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Sample records for directed gene introduction

  1. Direct Introduction of Genes into Rats and Expression of the Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenisty, Nissim; Reshef, Lea

    1986-12-01

    A method of introducing actively expressed genes into intact mammals is described. DNA precipitated with calcium phosphate has been injected intraperitoneally into newborn rats. The injected genes have been taken up and expressed by the animal tissues. To examine the generality of the method we have injected newborn rats with the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase prokaryotic gene fused with various viral and cellular gene promoters and the gene for hepatitis B surface antigen, and we observed appearance of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity and hepatitis B surface antigen in liver and spleen. In addition, administration of genes coding for hormones (insulin or growth hormone) resulted in their expression.

  2. Introduction: Cancer Gene Networks.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Constructing, evaluating, and interpreting gene networks generally sits within the broader field of systems biology, which continues to emerge rapidly, particular with respect to its application to understanding the complexity of signaling in the context of cancer biology. For the purposes of this volume, we take a broad definition of systems biology. Considering an organism or disease within an organism as a system, systems biology is the study of the integrated and coordinated interactions of the network(s) of genes, their variants both natural and mutated (e.g., polymorphisms, rearrangements, alternate splicing, mutations), their proteins and isoforms, and the organic and inorganic molecules with which they interact, to execute the biochemical reactions (e.g., as enzymes, substrates, products) that reflect the function of that system. Central to systems biology, and perhaps the only approach that can effectively manage the complexity of such systems, is the building of quantitative multiscale predictive models. The predictions of the models can vary substantially depending on the nature of the model and its inputoutput relationships. For example, a model may predict the outcome of a specific molecular reaction(s), a cellular phenotype (e.g., alive, dead, growth arrest, proliferation, and motility), a change in the respective prevalence of cell or subpopulations, a patient or patient subgroup outcome(s). Such models necessarily require computers. Computational modeling can be thought of as using machine learning and related tools to integrate the very high dimensional data generated from modern, high throughput omics technologies including genomics (next generation sequencing), transcriptomics (gene expression microarrays; RNAseq), metabolomics and proteomics (ultra high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry), and "subomic" technologies to study the kinome, methylome, and others. Mathematical modeling can be thought of as the use of ordinary

  3. Direct introduction of gene constructs into the pronucleus-like structure of cloned embryos: a new strategy for the generation of genetically modified pigs.

    PubMed

    Kurome, Mayuko; Leuchs, Simon; Kessler, Barbara; Kemter, Elisabeth; Jemiller, Eva-Maria; Foerster, Beatrix; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wolf, Eckhard

    2017-04-01

    Due to a rising demand of porcine models with complex genetic modifications for biomedical research, the approaches for their generation need to be adapted. In this study we describe the direct introduction of a gene construct into the pronucleus (PN)-like structure of cloned embryos as a novel strategy for the generation of genetically modified pigs, termed "nuclear injection". To evaluate the reliability of this new strategy, the developmental ability of embryos in vitro and in vivo as well as the integration and expression efficiency of a transgene carrying green fluorescence protein (GFP) were examined. Eighty percent of the cloned pig embryos (633/787) exhibited a PN-like structure, which met the prerequisite to technically perform the new method. GFP fluorescence was observed in about half of the total blastocysts (21/40, 52.5%), which was comparable to classical zygote PN injection (28/41, 68.3%). In total, 478 cloned embryos injected with the GFP construct were transferred into 4 recipients and from one recipient 4 fetuses (day 68) were collected. In one of the fetuses which showed normal development, the integration of the transgene was confirmed by PCR in different tissues and organs from all three primary germ layers and placenta. The integration pattern of the transgene was mosaic (48 out of 84 single-cell colonies established from a kidney were positive for GFP DNA by PCR). Direct GFP fluorescence was observed macro- and microscopically in the fetus. Our novel strategy could be useful particularly for the generation of pigs with complex genetic modifications.

  4. An introduction to genes, genomes and disease.

    PubMed

    Hall, Peter A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Tomlinson, Ian Pm; Poulsom, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The human and other genome projects and subsequent resequencing programmes have provided new perspectives on the nature of the gene and how genes function. Understanding the complexity of the eukaryotic nucleus and the diversity of genetic regulatory mechanisms, including the role of non-coding RNAs, translational control mechanisms and the extraordinary prevalence of splicing, will be central to understanding how genes function, as will the recognition of gene dosage issues. This introduction to the 2010 Annual Review Issue, Genes, Genomes and Disease, provides overviews of these areas and then considers their relevance to a range of human diseases, including cardiovascular and renal disease, neural tube defects and cancer. The p53 gene is considered as an example of a massively regulated gene and the genetic perturbations in cancer are considered in a historical perspective. High-throughput genomic and transcriptomic methods have led to a paradigm shift in the way cancers are perceived and have changed the way translational research is performed. The progress in our understanding of chromosomal rearrangements in cancer, once believed to be incredibly rare events in epithelial malignancies, is discussed. The identification of low-penetrance cancer susceptibility genes through genome-wide association studies and their implications are reviewed. The contribution and limitations of expression profiling are discussed. In the last series of reviews, future challenges are addressed: the promise of synthetic lethality strategies in cancer therapy, a case for 'systems' approaches to genetic networks and the potential of single molecule genetic technologies. Finally, the question 'Does massively parallel DNA resequencing signify the end of histopathology as we know it?' is posed. Readers should find that the 2010 Annual Review Issue is an invaluable resource on contemporary genetics and its applications to understanding disease.

  5. Introduction of genes into living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, E.; Nagai, A.; Tomimasu, T.; Kina, T.; Fujimoto, S.; Katsura, Y.

    1998-02-01

    One of our main subjects is an application of the FEL to gene therapy of genetic diseases, immunodeficiency syndromes and cancer. In this study, using the FEL, we tried to establish a model system for introducing genes into the stem cells from which all blood cells are derived. Our aim is to specifically mark the stem cells with monoclonal antibodies which are conjugated with efficient FEL absorbers. Cells are then irradiated with FEL at a wavelength corresponding to the absorption energy of the absorber. We speculate that the gap formation of cell membrane will occur, caused by the thermal shock due to the absorption of the FEL energy. As an animal model for gene therapy, we tried to transfer the RAG-2 genes into hematopoietic stem cells from RAG-2 deficient mice, which have severe immunodeficiency because of the lack of RAG-2 gene required for lymphocyte development. As the results by this construct, the infant lymphocytes (T and B cells) could be observed in the thymus of the RAG-2 deficient mice 2 weeks post-operative.

  6. Polyplex nanomicelle promotes hydrodynamic gene introduction to skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Itaka, Keiji; Osada, Kensuke; Morii, Katsue; Kim, Pilhan; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2010-04-02

    Skeletal muscle is an interesting target for gene therapy. To achieve effective gene introduction in skeletal muscle, a hydrodynamic approach by intravenous injection of plasmid DNA (pDNA) with transient isolation of the limb has attracted attention. In this study, we demonstrated that polyplex nanomicelle, composed of poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG)-block-polycation and pDNA, showed excellent capacity of gene introduction to skeletal muscle. The evaluation of luciferase expression in the muscle revealed that the nanomicelle provided higher and sustained profiles of transgene expression compared with naked pDNA. Real-time in vivo imaging using a video-rate confocal imaging system suggested that the nanomicelle showed tolerability in the intracellular environment, resulting in the slow but sustained transgene expression. The nanomicelle induced less TNFalpha induction in the muscle than naked pDNA, indicating the safety of nanomicelle-based gene delivery into the skeletal muscle. Moreover, the nanomicelle showed significant tumor growth suppression for almost a month by introducing a pDNA expressing a soluble form of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-1 (sFlt-1) to skeletal muscle to obtain anti-angiogenic effect on tumor growth. This feature of sustained effect gives an important advantage of gene therapy, especially on the points of cost effectiveness and high compliance. These results suggest that the hydrodynamic gene introduction to skeletal muscle using polyplex nanomicelle system possesses the potential for effective gene therapy.

  7. Guest Editors' Introduction: Research on Direct Instruction in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac Iver, Martha Abele; Kemper, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a special issue devoted to recent studies of the direct instruction reading program, providing a history of direct instruction, examining research on the effects and outcomes of direct instruction, and reviewing the studies contained in this special issue. (Contains references.) (SM)

  8. Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to a special issue of the journal General and Comparative Endocrinology dedicated to Insect Endocrinology. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequences ...

  9. Stem cell directed gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Engel, B C; Kohn, D B

    1999-05-01

    A potential therapeutic approach to HIV-1 infection is the genetic modification of cells of a patient to make them resistant to HIV-1. Hematopoietic stem cells are an attractive target for gene therapy of AIDS because of their ability to generate a broad repertoire of mature T lymphocytes, as well as the monocytic cells (macrophages, dendritic cells and microglia) which are also involved in HIV-1 pathogenesis. A number of synthetic "anti-HIV-1 genes" have been developed which inhibit HIV-1 replication. However, current methods for gene transfer into human hematopoietic stem cells, using retroviral vectors derived from the Moloney murine leukemia virus, have been minimally effective. Clinical trials performed to date in which hematopoietic cells from HIV-1-positive patients have been transduced with retroviral vectors and then reinfused have produced low to undetectable levels of gene-containing peripheral blood leukocytes. New vector delivery systems, such as lentiviral vectors, need to be developed to ensure efficient gene transfer and persistent transgene expression to provide life-long resistance to the cells targeted by HIV-1.

  10. Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The introduction to the second edition of the Compendium of Apple and Pear Diseases contains a general description of genus and species of commercial importance, some general information about growth and fruiting habits as well as recent production statistics. A general description of major scion c...

  11. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, Luigi

    This chapter introduces the context, objectives and structure of the book. This book aims both to contribute to disseminate the knowledge about the scientific research conducted in space and to promote new exploitation of existing data in this field. While space experiments are characterised by a long time for preparation, high costs and few opportunities, significant scientific value is expected from the resulting data for almost scientific disciplines. In this context, ISS is a unique experimental environment for research. As part of its Seventh Framework Programme, the European Commission intends to support further exploitation and valorisation of space experimental data. This book was realised as part of the ULISSE project, co-funded by the European Union. The book intends to provide an introduction to space research with a focus on the experiments performed on the ISS and related disciplines. The book also intends to be a useful guide, not only for scientists but also for teachers, students and newcomers to space research activities.

  12. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bub, J.

    The papers in this issue stem from a conference, 'New Directions in the Foundations of Physics: A Memorial Conference for Rob Clifton (1964-2002),' organized by members of the Foundations of Physics Group of the University of Maryland, Johns Hopkins University, and Georgetown University (Jossi Berkovitz, Jeffrey Bub, James Mattingly, and Rob Rynasiewicz), John Earman and John Norton of the University of Pittsburgh, and Jeremy Butterfield of Oxford University.

  13. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Ken; Briggs*, Richard J.

    The motivation for the initial development of linear induction accelerators starting in the early 1960s came mainly from applications requiring intense electron pulses with beam currents and a charge per pulse above the range accessible to RF accelerators, and with particle energies beyond the capabilities of single stage pulsed-power diodes. The linear induction accelerators developed to meet these needs utilize a series of induction cells containing magnetic cores (torroidal geometry) driven directly by pulse modulators (pulsed power sources). This multistage "one-to-one transformer" configuration with non-resonant, low impedance induction cells accelerates kilo-Ampere-scale electron beam current pulses in induction linacs.

  14. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Bowman, S

    1997-08-18

    Before the field of electro-optics can realize its potential in the applied world, practical sources and detectors are needed which cover the important spectral ranges. For applications involving either ambient thermal emissions or remote chemical analysis, high brightness sources are needed in the 2 - 15 micron range. Over the last five years, several very promising techniques have been developed for generating solid-state mid-IR sources. Important advances in nonlinear materials have dramatically improved the efficiency and reliability of the frequency down-conversion approach to mid-IR sources. Also parallel efforts to develop direct solid-state mid-IR laser have begun to bear fruit. Room temperature mid-IR lasers have been demonstrated using both cascaded quantum well materials and low phonon rare earth doped materials. While potentially simple and compact, the development of solid-state mid-IR lasers poses a number of difficult material problems. The papers in this issue of Optics Express were invited to present recent progress on materials intended for direct emission in the mid-IR.

  15. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, Cees; Develder, Chris; Jukan, Admela; Mambretti, Joe

    This topic is devoted to communication issues in scalable compute and storage systems, such as parallel computers, networks of workstations, and clusters. All aspects of communication in modern systems were solicited, including advances in the design, implementation, and evaluation of interconnection networks, network interfaces, system and storage area networks, on-chip interconnects, communication protocols, routing and communication algorithms, and communication aspects of parallel and distributed algorithms. In total 15 papers were submitted to this topic of which we selected the 7 strongest papers. We grouped the papers in two sessions of 3 papers each and one paper was selected for the best paper session. We noted a number of papers dealing with changing topologies, stability and forwarding convergence in source routing based cluster interconnect network architectures. We grouped these for the first session. The authors of the paper titled: “Implementing a Change Assimilation Mechanism for Source Routing Interconnects” propose a mechanism that can obtain the new topology, and compute and distribute a new set of fabric paths to the source routed network end points to minimize the impact on the forwarding service. The article entitled “Dependability Analysis of a Fault-tolerant Network Reconfiguration Strateg” reports on a case study analyzing the effects of network size, mean time to node failure, mean time to node repair, mean time to network repair and coverage of the failure when using a 2D mesh network with a fault-tolerant mechanism (similar to the one used in the BlueGene/L system), that is able to remove rows and/or columns in the presence of failures. The last paper in this session: “RecTOR: A New and Efficient Method for Dynamic Network Reconfiguration” presents a new dynamic reconfiguration method, that ensures deadlock-freedom during the reconfiguration without causing performance degradation such as increased latency or decreased

  16. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, E. G. D.

    deduced for irreversible processes (C. Jarzynski). The survey of non-equilibrium steady states in statistical mechanics of classical and quantum systems employs heat bath models and the random matrix theory input. The quantum heat bath analysis and derivation of fluctuation-dissipation theorems is performed by means of the influence functional technique adopted to solve quantum master equations (D. Kusnezov). Chapter II deals with an issue of relaxation and its dynamical theory in both classical and quantum contexts. Pollicott-Ruelle resonance background for the exponential decay scenario is discussed for irreversible processes of diffusion in the Lorentz gas and multibaker models (P. Gaspard). The Pollicott-Ruelle theory reappears as a major inspiration in the survey of the behaviour of ensembles of chaotic systems, with a focus on model systems for which no rigorous results concerning the exponential decay of correlations in time is available (S. Fishman). The observation, that non-equilibrium transport processes in simple classical chaotic systems can be described in terms of fractal structures developing in the system phase space, links their formation and properties with the entropy production in the course of diffusion processes displaying a low dimensional deterministic (chaotic) origin (J. R. Dorfman). Chapter III offers an introduction to the theory of dynamical semigroups. Asymptotic properties of Markov operators and Markov semigroups acting in the set of probability densities (statistical ensemble notion is implicit) are analyzed. Ergodicity, mixing, strong (complete) mixing and sweeping are discussed in the familiar setting of "noise, chaos and fractals" (R. Rudnicki). The next step comprises a passage to quantum dynamical semigroups and completely positive dynamical maps, with an ultimate goal to introduce a consistent framework for the analysis of irreversible phenomena in open quantum systems, where dissipation and decoherence are crucial concepts (R

  17. Early introduction of direct oral anticoagulants in cardioembolic stroke patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Cappellari, Manuel; Carletti, Monica; Danese, Alessandra; Bovi, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are superior to warfarin in reduction of the intracranial bleeding risk. The aim of the present study was to assess whether early DOAC introduction (1-3 days after onset) in stroke patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (nVAF) may be safe and effective, compared with DOAC introduction after 4-7 days. We conducted a prospective analysis based on data collected from 147 consecutive nVAF patients who started DOAC within 7 days after stroke onset. In all patients, we performed pre-DOAC CT scan 24-36 h after onset and follow-up CT scan at 7 days after DOAC introduction. Outcome measures were post-DOAC intracranial bleeding (new any intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in patients with pre-DOAC infarct without hemorrhagic transformation (HT) or expansion of ICH in patients with pre-DOAC infarct with asymptomatic HT) and post-DOAC recurrent ischemic stroke (any new ischemic infarct) on follow-up CT scan. 97 patients started DOAC after 1-3 days and 50 patients started DOAC after 4-7 days. On pre-DOAC CT scan, 132 patients had an infarct without HT and 15 an infarct with asymptomatic HT. On follow-up CT scan, new any ICH was noted in seven patients (asymptomatic in 6) and asymptomatic expansion of ICH in one patient. We found no association between early DOAC introduction and intracranial bleeding. Large infarct remained the only independent predictor of post-DOAC intracranial bleeding. No patients suffered recurrent ischemic stroke after DOAC introduction. Early DOAC introduction might be safe in carefully selected patients with nVAF who experience small- and medium-sized cardioembolic ischemic strokes. Further investigation will be needed.

  18. Energy, genes and evolution: introduction to an evolutionary synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Nick; Martin, William F.; Raven, John A.; Allen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Life is the harnessing of chemical energy in such a way that the energy-harnessing device makes a copy of itself. No energy, no evolution. The ‘modern synthesis’ of the past century explained evolution in terms of genes, but this is only part of the story. While the mechanisms of natural selection are correct, and increasingly well understood, they do little to explain the actual trajectories taken by life on Earth. From a cosmic perspective—what is the probability of life elsewhere in the Universe, and what are its probable traits?—a gene-based view of evolution says almost nothing. Irresistible geological and environmental changes affected eukaryotes and prokaryotes in very different ways, ones that do not relate to specific genes or niches. Questions such as the early emergence of life, the morphological and genomic constraints on prokaryotes, the singular origin of eukaryotes, and the unique and perplexing traits shared by all eukaryotes but not found in any prokaryote, are instead illuminated by bioenergetics. If nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution, nothing in evolution makes sense except in the light of energetics. This Special Issue of Philosophical Transactions examines the interplay between energy transduction and genome function in the major transitions of evolution, with implications ranging from planetary habitability to human health. We hope that these papers will contribute to a new evolutionary synthesis of energetics and genetics. PMID:23754807

  19. Mechanism of introduction of exogenous genes into cultured cells using DEAE-dextran-MMA graft copolymer as non-viral gene carrier.

    PubMed

    Eshita, Yuki; Higashihara, Junko; Onishi, Masayasu; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yoshida, Jun; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kubota, Naoji; Onishi, Yasuhiko

    2009-07-23

    Comparative investigations were carried out regarding the efficiency of introduction of exogenous genes into cultured cells using a cationic polysaccharide DEAE-dextran-MMA (methyl methacrylate ester) graft copolymer (2-diethylaminoethyl-dextran-methyl methacrylate graft copolymer; DDMC) as a nonviral carrier for gene introduction. The results confirmed that the gene introduction efficiency was improved with DDMC relative to DEAE-dextran. Comparative investigations were carried out using various concentrations of DDMC and DNA in the introduction of DNA encoding luciferase (pGL3 control vector; Promega) into COS-7 cells derived from African green monkey kidney cells. The complex formation reaction is thought to be directly proportional to the transformation rate, but the complex formation reaction between DDMC and DNA is significantly influenced by hydrophobic bonding strength along with hydrogen bonding strength and Coulomb forces due to the hydrophobicity of the grafted MMA sections. It is thought that the reaction is a Michaelis-Menten type complex formation reaction described by the following equation: Complex amount = K1 (DNA concentration)(DDMC concentration). In support of this equation, it was confirmed that the amount of formed complex was proportional to the RLU value.

  20. The urease gene cluster of Vibrio parahaemolyticus does not influence the expression of the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) gene or the TDH-related hemolysin gene.

    PubMed

    Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Okuda, Jun; Iida, Tetsuya; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate why the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) of Vibrio parahaemolyticus are produced at low levels from urease-positive strains, the effect of the functional urease gene cluster of V. parahaemolyticus on the expression of the tdh and trh genes was examined. Transcriptional lacZ fusions with the tdh1, tdh2, trh1 and trh2 genes representing variants of the tdh and trh genes were integrated into the chromosome of an Escherichia coli strain and a urease-negative V. parahaemolyticus strain. The plasmid-borne urease gene cluster introduced and expressed in these constructs did not affect expression of any of the fusion genes. The amount of TDH produced from a Kanagawa phenomenon-positive V. parahaemolyticus did not change by introduction of the urease gene cluster either. It was concluded therefore that the urease gene cluster is not involved in the regulation of tdh and trh expression.

  1. Enantiomeric analysis of limonene and carvone by direct introduction of aromatic plants into multidimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Barba, C; Toledano, R M; Santa-María, G; Herraiz, M; Martínez, R M

    2013-03-15

    Analysis of chiral compounds in complex mixtures is achieved by multidimensional gas chromatography using heptakis-(2,3,6-tri-O-methyl)-β-cyclodextrin stationary phase as the main column of the system to separate specific selected cuts containing components unresolved in the first dimension. The proposed procedure allows rapid analysis of both solid and liquid matrices by direct introduction, into the programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV) of a gas chromatograph, of either the plant material or the essential oil, respectively. A comparison between enantiomeric excesses data obtained, from plant leaves (or plant seeds) and the corresponding essential oils, by direct injection (i.e., without sample pretreatment or concentration step) into the multidimensional system is also included. Reported data demonstrate that no racemization occurs during analysis as identical enantiomeric excesses are obtained in both cases for specific chiral compounds.

  2. Pollen grains as a target for introduction of foreign genes into plants: an assessment.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Susan

    2011-03-01

    Introduction of foreign genes and development of transgenic plants have become an integral part of crop improvement programmes in the last decade. However, most of the present day plant transformation protocols require long periods for development of transgenic plants and need skilled personnel. Development of alternate, simple and rapid transformation protocols for development of transgenic plants can overcome the constraints of in vitro culture, regeneration and associated problems. Pollen grains, due to their abundance and ease with which they can be handled are ideal targets for introduction of foreign genes into the germ line. However, progress in introduction of transgenes into pollen grains and their subsequent use in fertilization leading to development of transgenic plants are limited. With the recent progress made in understanding of pollen development along with reports of successful pollen-mediated transformation in important crop plants, it should be possible to extend this simple method of transformation to other crop plants. The review deals with development of pollen grains as a target for introduction of genes with special emphasis on recent developments.

  3. Regulatory effects of introduction of an exogenous FGF2 gene on other growth factor genes in a healing tendon.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jin Bo; Chen, Chuan Hao; Zhou, You Lang; McKeever, Clarie; Liu, Paul Y

    2014-01-01

    In this study of a tendon injury model, we investigated how injection of a vector incorporating one growth factor gene changes expression levels of multiple growth factor genes in the healing process. The flexor tendon of chicken toes was completely cut and repaired surgically. The tendons in the experimental arm were injected with an adeno-associated virus-2 vector incorporating basic fibroblast growth-factor gene, whereas the tendons in the control arm were not injected or injected with sham vectors. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction, we found that, within the tendon healing period, a set of growth factor genes-transforming growth factor-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and connective tissue growth factor-were significantly up-regulated. Expression of the platelet-derived growth factor-B gene was not changed, and the insulin-like growth factor was down-regulated. A tendon marker gene, scleraxis, was significantly up-regulated in the period. Our study revealed an intriguing finding that introduction of one growth factor gene in the healing tendon modulated expression of multiple growth factor genes. We believe this study may have significant implications in determining the approach of gene therapy, and the findings substantiate that gene therapy using a single growth factor could affect multiple growth factors.

  4. Strategies used for genetically modifying bacterial genome: ite-directed mutagenesis, gene inactivation, and gene over-expression*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian-zhong; Zhang, Wei-guo

    2016-01-01

    With the availability of the whole genome sequence of Escherichia coli or Corynebacterium glutamicum, strategies for directed DNA manipulation have developed rapidly. DNA manipulation plays an important role in understanding the function of genes and in constructing novel engineering bacteria according to requirement. DNA manipulation involves modifying the autologous genes and expressing the heterogenous genes. Two alternative approaches, using electroporation linear DNA or recombinant suicide plasmid, allow a wide variety of DNA manipulation. However, the over-expression of the desired gene is generally executed via plasmid-mediation. The current review summarizes the common strategies used for genetically modifying E. coli and C. glutamicum genomes, and discusses the technical problem of multi-layered DNA manipulation. Strategies for gene over-expression via integrating into genome are proposed. This review is intended to be an accessible introduction to DNA manipulation within the bacterial genome for novices and a source of the latest experimental information for experienced investigators. PMID:26834010

  5. DNA damage response pathway and replication fork stress during oligonucleotide directed gene editing.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Melissa; Strouse, Bryan; Applegate, Mindy; Livingston, Paula; Kmiec, Eric B

    2012-04-03

    Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ODNs) can be used to direct the exchange of nucleotides in the genome of mammalian cells in a process known as gene editing. Once refined, gene editing should become a viable option for gene therapy and molecular medicine. Gene editing is regulated by a number of DNA recombination and repair pathways whose natural activities often lead to single- and double-stranded DNA breaks. It has been previously shown that introduction of a phosphorotioated ODN, designed to direct a gene-editing event, into cells results in the activation of γH2AX, a well-recognized protein biomarker for double-stranded DNA breakage. Using a single copy, integrated mutant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene as our target, we now demonstrate that several types of ODNs, capable of directing gene editing, also activate the DNA damage response and the post-translational modification of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a signature modification of replication stress. We find that the gene editing reaction itself leads to transient DNA breakage, perhaps through replication fork collapse. Unmodified specific ODNs elicit a lesser degree of replication stress than their chemically modified counterparts, but are also less active in gene editing. Modified phosphothioate oligonucleotides (PTOs) are detrimental irrespective of the DNA sequence. Such collateral damage may prove problematic for proliferation of human cells genetically modified by gene editing.

  6. Introduction and expression of genes for metabolic engineering applications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Nancy A; Srikrishnan, Sneha

    2012-03-01

    Metabolic pathway engineering in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to improved production of a wide range of compounds, ranging from ethanol (from biomass) to natural products such as sesquiterpenes. The introduction of multienzyme pathways requires precise control over the level and timing of expression of the associated genes. Gene number and promoter strength/regulation are two critical control points, and multiple studies have focused on modulating these in yeast. This MiniReview focuses on methods for introducing genes and controlling their copy number and on the many promoters (both constitutive and inducible) that have been successfully employed. The advantages and disadvantages of the methods will be presented, and applications to pathway engineering will be highlighted.

  7. Size Dependence of the Bandgap of Plasma Synthesized Silicon Nanoparticles Through Direct Introduction of Sulfur Hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Theingi, S.; Guan, T. Y.; Kendrick, C.; Klafehn, G.; Gorman, B. P.; Taylor, P. C.; Lusk, M. T.; Stradins, Pauls; Collins, R. T.

    2015-10-19

    Developing silicon nanoparticle (SiNP) synthesis techniques that allow for straightforward control of nanoparticle size and associated optical properties is critical to potential applications of these materials. In addition, it is, in general, hard to probe the absorption threshold in these materials due to silicon's low absorption coefficient. In this study, size is controlled through direct introduction of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) into the dilute silane precursor of plasma synthesized SiNPs. Size reduction by nearly a factor of two with high crystallinity independent of size is demonstrated. Optical absorption spectra of the SiNPs in the vicinity of the bandgap are measured using photothermal deflection spectroscopy. Bandgap as a function of size is extracted taking into account the polydispersity of the samples. A systematic blue shift inabsorption edge due to quantum confinement in the SiNPs is observed with increasing flow of SF6. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra show a similar blue shift with size. However, a ~300 meV difference in energy between emission and absorption for all sizes suggests that PL emission involves a defect related process. While PL may allow size-induced shifts in the bandgap of SiNPs to be monitored, it cannot be relied on to give an accurate value for the bandgap as a function of size.

  8. Size dependence of the bandgap of plasma synthesized silicon nanoparticles through direct introduction of sulfur hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Theingi, S.; Guan, T. Y.; Klafehn, G.; Taylor, P. C.; Lusk, M. T.; Collins, R. T.; Kendrick, C.; Gorman, B. P.; Stradins, P.

    2015-10-19

    Developing silicon nanoparticle (SiNP) synthesis techniques that allow for straightforward control of nanoparticle size and associated optical properties is critical to potential applications of these materials. In addition, it is, in general, hard to probe the absorption threshold in these materials due to silicon's low absorption coefficient. In this study, size is controlled through direct introduction of sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) into the dilute silane precursor of plasma synthesized SiNPs. Size reduction by nearly a factor of two with high crystallinity independent of size is demonstrated. The optical absorption spectra of the SiNPs in the vicinity of the bandgap are measured using photothermal deflection spectroscopy. Bandgap as a function of size is extracted taking into account the polydispersity of the samples. A systematic blue shift in absorption edge due to quantum confinement in the SiNPs is observed with increasing flow of SF{sub 6}. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra show a similar blue shift with size. However, a ∼300 meV difference in energy between emission and absorption for all sizes suggests that PL emission involves a defect related process. This shows that, while PL may allow size-induced shifts in the bandgap of SiNPs to be monitored, it cannot be relied on to give an accurate value for the bandgap as a function of size.

  9. Photodynamically induced cell cycle and gene expression changes: precursors of apoptosis introduction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krammer, Barbara E.; Verwanger, Thomas; Schnitzhofer, Gerlinde

    1997-12-01

    Photodynamic tumor therapy is able to induce apoptosis with many photosensitizers. Apoptosis is based on changes in gene expression and correlated to cell cycle activities. In this study, therefore, quantitative determination of the expression of the (proto)oncoges c-myc and bcl-2 in normal and transformed fibroblasts following PDT with ALA and low dose irradiation was connected with cell cycle analysis in order to investigate, if a risk for occurrence of secondary tumors by irreversibly increased oncogene expression can be found, if phases of the cell cycle show selective sensitivity to the therapy, and if changes in one of the two or both parameters may either precede or prepare an introduction of apoptosis. The results show (1) no mutagenic risk by timely limited overexpression of c-myc and bcl-2, (2) no selective cell cycle sensitivity to the therapy; but, in contrary, sustained increase of the proliferative activity of the transformed cells by the interaction of bcl-2 and c-myc, indicating a risk of promotion of tumor regrowth in sublethally damaged areas, (3) the introduction of apoptotic processes by low dose PDT in the cytoplasm/mitochondria and less in the nucleus. Transformed cells show higher constitutive gene expression and proliferative activities than normal cells.

  10. Direct protein introduction into plant cells using a multi-gas plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Kawano, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Okino, Akitoshi; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Protein introduction into cells is more difficult in plants than in mammalian cells, although it was reported that protein introduction was successful in shoot apical meristem and leaves only together with a cell-penetrating peptide. In this study, we tried to introduce superfolder green fluorescent protein (sGFP)-fused to adenylate cyclase as a reporter protein without a cell-penetrating peptide into the cells of tobacco leaves by treatment with atmospheric non-thermal plasmas. For this purpose, CO2 or N2 plasma was generated using a multi-gas plasma jet. Confocal microscopy indicated that sGFP signals were observed inside of leaf cells after treatment with CO2 or N2 plasma without substantial damage. In addition, the amount of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formed by the catalytic enzyme adenylate cyclase, which requires cellular calmodulin for its activity, was significantly increased in leaves treated with CO2 or N2 plasma, also indicating the introduction of sGFP-fused adenylate cyclase into the cells. These results suggested that treatment with CO2 or N2 plasma could be a useful technique for protein introduction into plant tissues.

  11. Direct protein introduction into plant cells using a multi-gas plasma jet

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Kawano, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Okino, Akitoshi; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Protein introduction into cells is more difficult in plants than in mammalian cells, although it was reported that protein introduction was successful in shoot apical meristem and leaves only together with a cell-penetrating peptide. In this study, we tried to introduce superfolder green fluorescent protein (sGFP)-fused to adenylate cyclase as a reporter protein without a cell-penetrating peptide into the cells of tobacco leaves by treatment with atmospheric non-thermal plasmas. For this purpose, CO2 or N2 plasma was generated using a multi-gas plasma jet. Confocal microscopy indicated that sGFP signals were observed inside of leaf cells after treatment with CO2 or N2 plasma without substantial damage. In addition, the amount of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formed by the catalytic enzyme adenylate cyclase, which requires cellular calmodulin for its activity, was significantly increased in leaves treated with CO2 or N2 plasma, also indicating the introduction of sGFP-fused adenylate cyclase into the cells. These results suggested that treatment with CO2 or N2 plasma could be a useful technique for protein introduction into plant tissues. PMID:28182666

  12. A copula method for modeling directional dependence of genes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Min; Jung, Yoon-Sung; Sungur, Engin A; Han, Kap-Hoon; Park, Changyi; Sohn, Insuk

    2008-01-01

    Background Genes interact with each other as basic building blocks of life, forming a complicated network. The relationship between groups of genes with different functions can be represented as gene networks. With the deposition of huge microarray data sets in public domains, study on gene networking is now possible. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the reconstruction of gene networks from gene expression data. Recent work includes linear models, Boolean network models, and Bayesian networks. Among them, Bayesian networks seem to be the most effective in constructing gene networks. A major problem with the Bayesian network approach is the excessive computational time. This problem is due to the interactive feature of the method that requires large search space. Since fitting a model by using the copulas does not require iterations, elicitation of the priors, and complicated calculations of posterior distributions, the need for reference to extensive search spaces can be eliminated leading to manageable computational affords. Bayesian network approach produces a discretely expression of conditional probabilities. Discreteness of the characteristics is not required in the copula approach which involves use of uniform representation of the continuous random variables. Our method is able to overcome the limitation of Bayesian network method for gene-gene interaction, i.e. information loss due to binary transformation. Results We analyzed the gene interactions for two gene data sets (one group is eight histone genes and the other group is 19 genes which include DNA polymerases, DNA helicase, type B cyclin genes, DNA primases, radiation sensitive genes, repaire related genes, replication protein A encoding gene, DNA replication initiation factor, securin gene, nucleosome assembly factor, and a subunit of the cohesin complex) by adopting a measure of directional dependence based on a copula function. We have compared our results with those from

  13. Short torch design for direct liquid sample introduction using conventional and micro-nebulizers for plasma spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Montaser, Akbar; Westphal, Craig S.; Kahen, Kaveh; Rutkowski, William F.

    2008-01-08

    An apparatus and method for providing direct liquid sample introduction using a nebulizer are provided. The apparatus and method include a short torch having an inner tube and an outer tube, and an elongated adapter having a cavity for receiving the nebulizer and positioning a nozzle tip of the nebulizer a predetermined distance from a tip of the outer tube of the short torch. The predetermined distance is preferably about 2-5 mm.

  14. Genetic diversity and population structure of Lantana camara in India indicates multiple introductions and gene flow.

    PubMed

    Ray, A; Quader, S

    2014-05-01

    Lantana camara is a highly invasive plant, which has spread over 60 countries and island groups of Asia, Africa and Australia. In India, it was introduced in the early nineteenth century, since when it has expanded and gradually established itself in almost every available ecosystem. We investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of this plant in India in order to understand its introduction, subsequent range expansion and gene flow. A total of 179 individuals were sequenced at three chloroplast loci and 218 individuals were genotyped for six nuclear microsatellites. Both chloroplasts (nine haplotypes) and microsatellites (83 alleles) showed high genetic diversity. Besides, each type of marker confirmed the presence of private polymorphism. We uncovered low to medium population structure in both markers, and found a faint signal of isolation by distance with microsatellites. Bayesian clustering analyses revealed multiple divergent genetic clusters. Taken together, these findings (i.e. high genetic diversity with private alleles and multiple genetic clusters) suggest that Lantana was introduced multiple times and gradually underwent spatial expansion with recurrent gene flow.

  15. Simulation of gene evolution under directional mutational pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Kowalczuk, Maria; Mackiewicz, Dorota; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Polak, Natalia; Smolarczyk, Kamila; Banaszak, Joanna; R. Dudek, Mirosław; Cebrat, Stanisław

    2004-05-01

    The two main mechanisms generating the genetic diversity, mutation and recombination, have random character but they are biased which has an effect on the generation of asymmetry in the bacterial chromosome structure and in the protein coding sequences. Thus, like in a case of two chiral molecules-the two possible orientations of a gene in relation to the topology of a chromosome are not equivalent. Assuming that the sequence of a gene may oscillate only between certain limits of its structural composition means that the gene could be forced out of these limits by the directional mutation pressure, in the course of evolution. The probability of the event depends on the time the gene stays under the same mutation pressure. Inversion of the gene changes the directional mutational pressure to the reciprocal one and hence it changes the distance of the gene to its lower and upper bound of the structural tolerance. Using Monte Carlo methods we were able to simulate the evolution of genes under experimentally found mutational pressure, assuming simple mechanisms of selection. We found that the mutation and recombination should work in accordance to lower their negative effects on the function of the products of coding sequences.

  16. GeneGenie: optimized oligomer design for directed evolution

    PubMed Central

    Swainston, Neil; Currin, Andrew; Day, Philip J.; Kell, Douglas B.

    2014-01-01

    GeneGenie, a new online tool available at http://www.gene-genie.org, is introduced to support the design and self-assembly of synthetic genes and constructs. GeneGenie allows for the design of oligonucleotide cohorts encoding the gene sequence optimized for expression in any suitable host through an intuitive, easy-to-use web interface. The tool ensures consistent oligomer overlapping melting temperatures, minimizes the likelihood of misannealing, optimizes codon usage for expression in a selected host, allows for specification of forward and reverse cloning sequences (for downstream ligation) and also provides support for mutagenesis or directed evolution studies. Directed evolution studies are enabled through the construction of variant libraries via the optional specification of ‘variant codons’, containing mixtures of bases, at any position. For example, specifying the variant codon TNT (where N is any nucleotide) will generate an equimolar mixture of the codons TAT, TCT, TGT and TTT at that position, encoding a mixture of the amino acids Tyr, Ser, Cys and Phe. This facility is demonstrated through the use of GeneGenie to develop and synthesize a library of enhanced green fluorescent protein variants. PMID:24782527

  17. Achieving HIV-1 Control through RNA-Directed Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, Vera; Mitchell, Jye; Cortez-Jugo, Christina; Cavalieri, Francesca; Symonds, Geoff; Caruso, Frank; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic; Ahlenstiel, Chantelle

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 infection has been transformed by combined anti-retroviral therapy (ART), changing a universally fatal infection into a controllable infection. However, major obstacles for an HIV-1 cure exist. The HIV latent reservoir, which exists in resting CD4+ T cells, is not impacted by ART, and can reactivate when ART is interrupted or ceased. Additionally, multi-drug resistance can arise. One alternate approach to conventional HIV-1 drug treatment that is being explored involves gene therapies utilizing RNA-directed gene regulation. Commonly known as RNA interference (RNAi), short interfering RNA (siRNA) induce gene silencing in conserved biological pathways, which require a high degree of sequence specificity. This review will provide an overview of the silencing pathways, the current RNAi technologies being developed for HIV-1 gene therapy, current clinical trials, and the challenges faced in progressing these treatments into clinical trials. PMID:27941595

  18. A C++ Infrastructure for Automatic Introduction and Translation of OpenMP Directives

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D J; Scordan, M; Yi, Q; de Supinski, B R

    2003-07-28

    In this paper we describe a C++ infrastructure for source-to-source translation. We demonstrate the translation of a serial program with high-level abstractions to a lower-level parallel program in two separate phases. In the first phase OpenMP directives are introduced, driven by the semantics of high-level abstractions. Then the OpenMP directives are translated to a C++ program that explicitly creates and manages parallelism according to the specified directives. Both phases are implemented using the same mechanisms in our infrastructure.

  19. Gene duplication models for directed networks with limits on growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enemark, Jakob; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-11-01

    Background: Duplication of genes is important for evolution of molecular networks. Many authors have therefore considered gene duplication as a driving force in shaping the topology of molecular networks. In particular it has been noted that growth via duplication would act as an implicit means of preferential attachment, and thereby provide the observed broad degree distributions of molecular networks. Results: We extend current models of gene duplication and rewiring by including directions and the fact that molecular networks are not a result of unidirectional growth. We introduce upstream sites and downstream shapes to quantify potential links during duplication and rewiring. We find that this in itself generates the observed scaling of transcription factors for genome sites in prokaryotes. The dynamical model can generate a scale-free degree distribution, p(k)\\propto 1/k^{\\gamma } , with exponent γ = 1 in the non-growing case, and with γ>1 when the network is growing. Conclusions: We find that duplication of genes followed by substantial recombination of upstream regions could generate features of genetic regulatory networks. Our steady state degree distribution is however too broad to be consistent with data, thereby suggesting that selective pruning acts as a main additional constraint on duplicated genes. Our analysis shows that gene duplication can only be a main cause for the observed broad degree distributions if there are also substantial recombinations between upstream regions of genes.

  20. Solving the Phase Problem in Crystal Structure Determination: A Simple Introduction to Direct Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenk, H.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a simple way to introduce Direct Methods program systems to solve phase problems in x-ray crystal structure determination. It is intended for the undergraduate chemistry student laboratory. (Author/SA)

  1. Direct analysis of candidate genes in impulsive behaviours.

    PubMed

    Goldman, D; Lappalainen, J; Ozaki, N

    1996-01-01

    Antisocial behaviour is both heterogeneous and the product of interacting genetic and environmental factors acting at different levels of causation. Heritability studies show that individual differences in predisposition to antisocial behaviour are transmitted vertically in families by genetic mechanisms. Owing to aetiological heterogeneity and complexity, study of a variety of other behavioural phenotypes may shed more light on the antecedents of antisocial behaviour than direct studies on antisocial behaviour. Identification of genetic vulnerability factors would clarify mechanisms of vulnerability and the role of the environment. Direct gene analysis and genetic linkage analysis have identified structural variants in genes involved in neurotransmitter function, and some progress has been made towards relating these genetic variants to antisocial personality and other behaviours. Thyroid hormone receptor variants can cause attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and a monoamine oxidase A variant leads to aggressive behaviour in one family. Direct gene analyses have revealed non-conservative amino acid substitutions and structural variants (generally rare) at DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 dopamine receptors and 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT7 serotonin receptors. The stage is set to identify the phenotypic significance of these as well as genetic variants at other loci which may be relevant as candidate genes for antisocial behaviour and related behavioural differences.

  2. [Construction of directional T vector for gene cloning and expression].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xing; Zhai, Chao; Chen, Liang; Yu, Xiaolan; Jiang, Sijing; Yan, Hong; Yang, Dengxiang; Ma, Lixin

    2013-04-01

    Traditional T vector cloning method requires onerous procedures for identifying recombinant, and directional cloning was impossible. In order to overcome these problems, we have devised a directional T vector pETG based on pET-23a(+). For gene cloning, 7 bp partial LacO sequence was introduced into DNA fragment to reconstitute a full length LacO with Bfu I digested T vector. After transformation, blue colonies were selected on LB plate supplemented with X-gal. Restriction enzyme digestion and PCR identification showed that all blue colonies contained the directionally inserted recombinants and the recombinant efficiency was nearly 100%. We have successfully cloned 103 genes from human liver cDNA; in the study complicated procedures for screening of recombinant were not required. Eight pETG clones were picked for protein expression, and all the clones successfully produced corresponding proteins. We demonstrated that the directional T vector was successfully constructed, and it was very suitable for gene cloning and expression.

  3. Enhanced auxeticity in Yukawa systems due to introduction of nanochannels in [001]-direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, Konstantin V.; Pigłowski, Paweł M.; Hyżorek, Krzysztof; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof W.

    2016-05-01

    A new approach to search for materials with auxetic properties by modifying structures of solids at molecular level has been proposed. The analysis of elastic properties of the face-centered cubic Yukawa crystals with very narrow nanochannels in the [001] crystallographic direction using Monte Carlo simulations in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble has been done. An influence of the size of nanochannels on the value of Poisson’s ratio in main crystallographic directions has been studied. It has been shown that the insertion of nanochannels in the system causes a decrease of the Poisson’s ratio in the direction [110][1\\bar{1}0] from -0.15(2) to -0.29(3). That means an amplification of auxetity in the studied system twice as compared to the system without nanochannels.

  4. Direct-to-consumer marketing of evidence-based psychological interventions: introduction.

    PubMed

    Santucci, Lauren C; McHugh, R Kathryn; Barlow, David H

    2012-06-01

    The dissemination and implementation of evidence-based psychological interventions (EBPIs) to service provision settings has been a major challenge. Most efforts to disseminate and implement EBPIs have focused on clinicians and clinical systems as the consumers of these treatments and thus have targeted efforts to these groups. An alternative, complementary approach to achieve more widespread utilization of EBPIs is to disseminate directly to patients themselves. The aim of this special section is to explore several direct-to-consumer (i.e., patient) dissemination and education efforts currently underway. This manuscript highlights the rationale for direct-to-patient dissemination strategies as well as the application of marketing science to dissemination efforts. Achieving greater access to EBPIs will require the use of multiple approaches to overcome the many and varied barriers to successful dissemination and implementation.

  5. INTRODUCTING A THERMAL DISSIPATION PROBE SYSTEM FOR MEASURING BI-DIRECTIONAL ROOT WATER FLUX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interest in measuring the direction and magnitude of root sapflow has accelerated in the past few years because of interest in the redistribution of water in the soil by roots. Plant roots have been shown to redistribute water between areas of soil with differing water conte...

  6. Direct liquid sample introduction for flow injection analysis and liquid chromatography with inductively coupled argon plasma spectrometric detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, K.E.; Rice, G.W.; Fassel, V.A.

    1984-02-01

    The coupling of flow injection analysis (FIA) or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) offers new and attractive approaches for the determination of elemental concentrations in a wide variety of sample matrices. One of the most attractive features that FIA offers is a rapid and precise means of automating sample introduction into an ICP for simultaneous, multielement analysis at the trace, minor, and major constituent level with minimal sample consumption. The utilization of the ICP as a detector for HPLC retains most of the advantages of FIA-ICP, while providing the analyst with a powerful and versatile means of compound separation. This added dimension becomes particularly important when metal speciation is of primary interest, rather than total metal content. To date, the coupling of FIA and HPLC to the ICP has only been accomplished using conventional cross-flow, concentric, or Babington-type pneumatic nebulizers. Limits of detection under these conditions have generally been observed to be poorer when compared to conventional continuous sample flow conditions. These limitations have been attributed to the large dead-volume and the sample losses associated with conventional nebulizers and band broadening of eluents from FIA transfer tubing or HPLC columns prior to entering the nebulizer unit. In an effort to resolve these difficulties, a microconcentric nebulizer has been developed which is inserted directly into the tip of a conventional sample introduction tube of an ICP torch. Preliminary data on the potential utility of direct liquid sample introduction into the ICP are presented. 12 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  7. Crystallization of a fragment of human fibronectin: introduction of methionine by site-directed mutagenesis to allow phasing via selenomethionine.

    PubMed

    Leahy, D J; Erickson, H P; Aukhil, I; Joshi, P; Hendrickson, W A

    1994-05-01

    Crystals of a fragment of human fibronectin encompassing the 7th through the RGD-containing 10th type III repeats (FN7-10) have been produced with protein expressed in E. coli. The crystals are monoclinic with one molecule in the asymmetric unit and diffract to beyond 2.0 A Bragg spacings. A mutant FN7-10 was produced in which three methionines, in addition to the single native methionine already present, have been introduced by site-directed mutagenesis. Diffraction-quality crystals of this mutant protein have been grown in which methionine was replaced with selenomethionine. The introduction of methionine by site-directed mutagenesis to allow phasing from selenomethionyl-substituted crystals is shown to be feasible by this example and is proposed as a general approach to solving the crystallographic phase problem. Strategies for selecting propitious sites for methionine mutations are discussed.

  8. ARID3B Directly Regulates Ovarian Cancer Promoting Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bobbs, Alexander; Gellerman, Katrina; Hallas, William Morgan; Joseph, Stancy; Yang, Chao; Kurkewich, Jeffrey; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein AT-Rich Interactive Domain 3B (ARID3B) is elevated in ovarian cancer and increases tumor growth in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer. However, relatively little is known about ARID3B's function. In this study we perform the first genome wide screen for ARID3B direct target genes and ARID3B regulated pathways. We identified and confirmed numerous ARID3B target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. Using motif-finding algorithms, we characterized a binding site for ARID3B, which is similar to the previously known site for the ARID3B paralogue ARID3A. Functionality of this predicted site was demonstrated by ChIP analysis. We next demonstrated that ARID3B induces expression of its targets in ovarian cancer cell lines. We validated that ARID3B binds to an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) enhancer and increases mRNA expression. ARID3B also binds to the promoter of Wnt5A and its receptor FZD5. FZD5 is highly expressed in ovarian cancer cell lines, and is upregulated by exogenous ARID3B. Both ARID3B and FZD5 expression increase adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) components including collagen IV, fibronectin and vitronectin. ARID3B-increased adhesion to collagens II and IV require FZD5. This study directly demonstrates that ARID3B binds target genes in a sequence-specific manner, resulting in increased gene expression. Furthermore, our data indicate that ARID3B regulation of direct target genes in the Wnt pathway promotes adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26121572

  9. Direct interplay between two candidate genes in FSHD muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Giulia; Huichalaf, Claudia H; Caccia, Roberta; Gabellini, Davide

    2015-03-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common neuromuscular disorders. The major form of the disease (FSHD1) is linked to decrease in copy number of a 3.3-kb tandem repeated macrosatellite (D4Z4), located on chromosome 4q35. D4Z4 deletion alters chromatin structure of the locus leading to aberrant expression of nearby 4q35 genes. Given the high variability in disease onset and progression, multiple factors could contribute to the pathogenesis of FSHD. Among the FSHD candidate genes are double homeobox 4 (DUX4), encoded by the most telomeric D4Z4 unit, and FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1). DUX4 is a sequence-specific transcription factor. Here, we located putative DUX4 binding sites in the human FRG1 genomic area and we show specific DUX4 association to these regions. We found also that ectopically expressed DUX4 up-regulates the endogenous human FRG1 gene in healthy muscle cells, while DUX4 knockdown leads to a decrease in FRG1 expression in FSHD muscle cells. Moreover, DUX4 binds directly and specifically to its binding site located in the human FRG1 gene and transactivates constructs containing FRG1 genomic regions. Intriguingly, the mouse Frg1 genomic area lacks DUX4 binding sites and DUX4 is unable to activate the endogenous mouse Frg1 gene providing a possible explanation for the lack of muscle phenotype in DUX4 transgenic mice. Altogether, our results demonstrate that FRG1 is a direct DUX4 transcriptional target uncovering a novel regulatory circuit contributing to FSHD.

  10. Direct interplay between two candidate genes in FSHD muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Giulia; Huichalaf, Claudia H.; Caccia, Roberta; Gabellini, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common neuromuscular disorders. The major form of the disease (FSHD1) is linked to decrease in copy number of a 3.3-kb tandem repeated macrosatellite (D4Z4), located on chromosome 4q35. D4Z4 deletion alters chromatin structure of the locus leading to aberrant expression of nearby 4q35 genes. Given the high variability in disease onset and progression, multiple factors could contribute to the pathogenesis of FSHD. Among the FSHD candidate genes are double homeobox 4 (DUX4), encoded by the most telomeric D4Z4 unit, and FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1). DUX4 is a sequence-specific transcription factor. Here, we located putative DUX4 binding sites in the human FRG1 genomic area and we show specific DUX4 association to these regions. We found also that ectopically expressed DUX4 up-regulates the endogenous human FRG1 gene in healthy muscle cells, while DUX4 knockdown leads to a decrease in FRG1 expression in FSHD muscle cells. Moreover, DUX4 binds directly and specifically to its binding site located in the human FRG1 gene and transactivates constructs containing FRG1 genomic regions. Intriguingly, the mouse Frg1 genomic area lacks DUX4 binding sites and DUX4 is unable to activate the endogenous mouse Frg1 gene providing a possible explanation for the lack of muscle phenotype in DUX4 transgenic mice. Altogether, our results demonstrate that FRG1 is a direct DUX4 transcriptional target uncovering a novel regulatory circuit contributing to FSHD. PMID:25326393

  11. Condensed Phase Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometry with Direct Electron Ionization: On-line Measurement of PAHs in Complex Aqueous Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Termopoli, Veronica; Famiglini, Giorgio; Palma, Pierangela; Cappiello, Achille; Vandergrift, Gregory W.; Krogh, Erik T.; Gill, Chris G.

    2016-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are USEPA regulated priority pollutants. Their low aqueous solubility requires very sensitive analytical methods for their detection, typically involving preconcentration steps. Presented is the first demonstrated `proof of concept' use of condensed phase membrane introduction mass spectrometry (CP-MIMS) coupled with direct liquid electron ionization (DEI) for the direct, on-line measurement of PAHs in aqueous samples. DEI is very well suited for the ionization of PAHs and other nonpolar compounds, and is not significantly influenced by the co-elution of matrix components. Linear calibration data for low ppb levels of aqueous naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene is demonstrated, with measured detection limits of 4 ppb. Analytical response times (t10%-90% signal rise) ranged from 2.8 min for naphthalene to 4.7 min for pyrene. Both intra- and interday reproducibility has been assessed (<3% and 5% RSD, respectively). Direct measurements of ppb level PAHs spiked in a variety of real, complex environmental sample matrices is examined, including natural waters, sea waters, and a hydrocarbon extraction production waste water sample. For these spiked, complex samples, direct PAH measurement by CP-MIMS-DEI yielded minimal signal suppression from sample matrix effects (81%-104%). We demonstrate the use of this analytical approach to directly monitor real-time changes in aqueous PAH concentrations with potential applications for continuous on-line monitoring strategies and binding/adsorption studies in heterogeneous samples.

  12. An introduction to thermodynamics of renewable cycles for direct solar energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhodolsky, A.T.

    1998-07-01

    Mechanical energy is known to be converted into thermal form (heat) without any restriction. Any opposite conversion of heat into mechanical energy owing to work produced in the heat engines has been restricted by principle of Carnot. This communication is to introduce into the elements of thermodynamics for direct energy conversion of light into mechanical energy. The aim is to explain: why without any machines, the efficiency of conversion is able to be by many orders of magnitude greater than the efficiency of direct mechanical action of light given in framework of equilibrium radiation thermodynamics. The development of such a concept is to find out an actual fundamental restriction for the maximum conversion available in several new solar renewable technologies for both direct generation of mechanical vibrations and for extraction of pure water from mixtures owing to self-organization of heat cycles. In order to involve solar light under non-equilibrium with respect to matter as a motive power within thermodynamics, the principle of Carnot for heat engines is assumed to be also valid for renewable processes (cycles). The absorbing part of condensed matter by optical pumping is considered as a heat source for production of entropy by heat-transfer into dark surrounding that plays role of heat sink. Principle of Carnot is used together with common accepted definition of non-equilibrium entropy in order to describe the excitement of heat source and its next relaxation. The new formulation of Carnot theorem and fundamental maximum of renewable conversion is derived. The simplest system of two equal bodies with difference temperatures is considered to show how to find the maximum energy available for renewable conversion. The major difference between equilibrium (reversible) thermodynamics and proposed renewable (non-equilibrium) approach is discussed on this example together with a typical mathematical paradox.

  13. AAV-Mediated Liver-Directed Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is directly or indirectly involved in many essential processes and is affected by numerous inherited diseases. Therefore, many inherited diseases could be effectively treated by targeting the liver using gene transfer approaches. The challenges associated with liver-directed gene therapy are efficient targeting of hepatocytes, stability of the vector genome, and persistent high level expression. Many of these obstacles can be overcome with adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer vectors. The first AAV gene transfer vector developed for in vivo use was based on the AAV2 serotype. AAV2 has a broad tropism and transduces many cell types, including hepatocytes, relatively efficiently in vivo. The capsid protein confers the serological profile and at least 12 primate AAV serotypes have already been characterized. Importantly, pseudotyping a recombinant AAV vector with different capsid proteins can dramatically alter the tropism. Both AAV8 and AAV9 have higher affinities for hepatocytes when compared to AAV2. In particular, AAV8 can transduce 3–4 fold more hepatocytes and deliver 3–4 fold more genomes per transduced cell when compared to AAV2. Depending on the dose, AAV8 can transduce up to 90–95% of hepatocytes in the mouse liver following intraportal vein injection. Interestingly, comparable levels of transduction can be achieved following intravenous injection. Direct intraparenchymal injection of an AAV vector also mediates relatively high level long term expression. Additional specificity can be conferred by using liver-specific promoters in conjunction with AAV8 capsid proteins. In addition to treating primary hepatocyte defects, immune reactions to transgene products can be minimized by circumventing the fixed tissue macrophages of the liver, Kupffer cells, and limiting expression to hepatocytes. The ability to target hepatocytes by virtue of the AAV serotype and the use of liver-specific promoters allows investigators to test novel therapeutic

  14. Introduction to the Special Series: Current Directions for Measuring Parenting Constructs to Inform Prevention Science.

    PubMed

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Shaffer, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Parenting behaviors are multifaceted and dynamic and therefore challenging to quantify. Measurement methods have critical implications for study results, particularly for prevention trials designed to modify parenting behaviors. Although multiple approaches can complement one another and contribute to a more complete understanding of prevention trials, the assumptions and implications of each approach are not always clearly addressed. Greater attention to the measurement of complex constructs such as parenting is needed to advance the field of prevention science. This series examines the challenges of measuring changes in parenting behaviors in the context of prevention trials. All manuscripts in the special series address measurement issues and make practical recommendations for prevention researchers. Manuscripts in this special series include (1) empirical studies that demonstrate novel measurement approaches, (2) re-analyses of prevention trial outcome data directly comparing and contrasting two or more methods, and (3) a statistical primer and practical guide to analyzing proportion data.

  15. Direct sample introduction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of haloanisole compounds in cork stoppers.

    PubMed

    Cacho, J I; Nicolás, J; Viñas, P; Campillo, N; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2016-12-02

    A solventless analytical method is proposed for analyzing the compounds responsible for cork taint in cork stoppers. Direct sample introduction (DSI) is evaluated as a sample introduction system for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) determination of four haloanisoles (HAs) in cork samples. Several parameters affecting the DSI step, including desorption temperature and time, gas flow rate and other focusing parameters, were optimized using univariate and multivariate approaches. The proposed method shows high sensitivity and minimises sample handling, with detection limits of 1.6-2.6ngg(-1), depending on the compound. The suitability of the optimized procedure as a screening method was evaluated by obtaining decision limits (CCα) and detection capabilities (CCβ) for each analyte, which were found to be in 6.9-11.8 and 8.7-14.8ngg(-1), respectively, depending on the compound. Twenty-four cork samples were analysed, and 2,4,6-trichloroanisole was found in four of them at levels between 12.6 and 53ngg(-1).

  16. Introduction of a CD40L genomic fragment via a human artificial chromosome vector permits cell-type-specific gene expression and induces immunoglobulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hidetoshi; Li, Yanze C; Nishikawa, Mitsuo; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Inoue, Toshiaki

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy using cDNA driven by an exogenous promoter is not suited for genetic disorders that require intrinsic expression of a transgene, such as hyperimmunoglobulin (Ig)M syndrome (HIGM), which is caused by mutations in the CD40L gene. The human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector has the potential to solve this problem, because it can be used to transfer large genomic fragments containing their own regulatory elements. In this study, we examined whether introduction of a genomic fragment of CD40L via the HAC vector permits intrinsic expression of the transgene and has an effect on immunoglobulin secretion. We constructed an HAC vector carrying the mouse CD40L genomic fragment (mCD40L-HAC) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and transferred the mCD40L-HAC vector into a human CD4-positive active T-cell line (Jurkat) and a human myeloid cell line (U937) via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT). The mCD40L-HAC vector permits mCD40L expression in human active T cells but not in human myeloid cells. The mCD40L-HAC also functions to stimulate mouse B cells derived from CD40L(-/-) mice, inducing secretion of IgG. This study may be an initial step toward the therapeutic application of HAC vectors for intrinsic expression of genes, a potential new direction for genome-based gene therapy.

  17. Evolution of viruses by acquisition of cellular RNA or DNA nucleotide sequences and genes: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Becker, Y

    2000-01-01

    The origins of virus evolution may be traced to Archeabacteria since Inouye and Inouye (6) discovered a retroelement with a gene for reverse transcriptase in the bacterial genome and in the satellite, multiple copy single stranded DNA (msDNA) in the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. It was possible (8) to define the evolution of retroelements in eukaryotic cells of plants, insects (gypsy retrovirus) and vertebrates. The replication of RNA viruses in eukaryotic cells allowed for the viral RNA genome to integrate a cellular ubiquitin mRNA, as reported for BVDV (24). Another example is the integration of 28S ribosomal RNA into the hemagglutinin gene of an influenza virus. This change in the hemagglutinin gene led to an increased pathogenicity of the influenza virus (25). In contrast to RNA viruses, DNA viruses had evolved by inserting cDNA molecules derived from mRNA transcripts of cellular genes or foreign viral RNA. It is of interest that the virus acquired cellular genes in the genomes of DNA viruses represent genes that code for proteins that inhibit cellular molecular processes related to HLA class I and II molecules. The other acquired genes are cellular genes that code for cytokines that are capable of inhibiting antigen presentation to T cells by antigen presenting cells (APC) by dendritic Langerhans cells. The acquisition of cellular genes by DNA viruses enhances their pathogenicity by inhibiting the hosts' defense systems.

  18. Pitx2, an Atrial Fibrillation Predisposition Gene, Directly Regulates Ion Transport and Intercalated Disc Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ye; Zhang, Min; Li, Lele; Bai, Yan; Zhou, Yuefang; Moon, Anne M.; Kaminski, Henry J.; Martin, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pitx2 is the homeobox gene located in proximity to the human 4q25 familial atrial fibrillation locus. When deleted in the mouse germline, Pitx2 haploinsufficiency predisposes to pacing induced atrial fibrillation indicating that reduced Pitx2 promotes an arrhythmogenic substrate. Previous work focused on Pitx2 developmental functions that predispose to atrial fibrillation. Although Pitx2 is expressed in postnatal left atrium, it is unknown whether Pitx2 has distinct postnatal and developmental functions. Methods and Results To investigate Pitx2 postnatal function, we conditionally inactivated Pitx2 in the postnatal atrium while leaving its developmental function intact. Unstressed adult Pitx2 homozygous mutant mice display variable R-R interval with diminished P-wave amplitude characteristic of sinus node dysfunction, an atrial fibrillation risk factor in human patients. An integrated genomics approach in the adult heart revealed Pitx2 target genes encoding cell junction proteins, ion channels, and critical transcriptional regulators. Importantly, many Pitx2 target genes have been implicated in human atrial fibrillation by genome wide association studies. Immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy studies in adult Pitx2 mutant mice revealed structural remodeling of the intercalated disc characteristic of human atrial fibrillation patients. Conclusions Our findings, revealing that Pitx2 has genetically separable postnatal and developmental functions, unveil direct Pitx2 target genes that include channel and calcium handling genes as well as genes that stabilize the intercalated disc in postnatal atrium. PMID:24395921

  19. Tissue-specific prediction of directly regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    McLeay, Robert C.; Leat, Chris J.; Bailey, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    Direct binding by a transcription factor (TF) to the proximal promoter of a gene is a strong evidence that the TF regulates the gene. Assaying the genome-wide binding of every TF in every cell type and condition is currently impractical. Histone modifications correlate with tissue/cell/condition-specific (‘tissue specific’) TF binding, so histone ChIP-seq data can be combined with traditional position weight matrix (PWM) methods to make tissue-specific predictions of TF–promoter interactions. Results: We use supervised learning to train a naïve Bayes predictor of TF–promoter binding. The predictor's features are the histone modification levels and a PWM-based score for the promoter. Training and testing uses sets of promoters labeled using TF ChIP-seq data, and we use cross-validation on 23 such datasets to measure the accuracy. A PWM+histone naïve Bayes predictor using a single histone modification (H3K4me3) is substantially more accurate than a PWM score or a conservation-based score (phylogenetic motif model). The naïve Bayes predictor is more accurate (on average) at all sensitivity levels, and makes only half as many false positive predictions at sensitivity levels from 10% to 80%. On average, it correctly predicts 80% of bound promoters at a false positive rate of 20%. Accuracy does not diminish when we test the predictor in a different cell type (and species) from training. Accuracy is barely diminished even when we train the predictor without using TF ChIP-seq data. Availability: Our tissue-specific predictor of promoters bound by a TF is called Dr Gene and is available at http://bioinformatics.org.au/drgene. Contact: t.bailey@imb.uq.edu.au Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21724591

  20. Direct gene disruption by TALENs in medaka embryos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiansu; Hong, Yunhan

    2014-06-10

    Targeted gene disruption (GD) is powerful for generating genetic alterations in animal genomes. Engineered endonucleases such as zinc finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) allow for GD directly in animal embryos to achieve germline transmission. Here we report procedures and parameters of TALEN-mediated GD in the fish medaka by using a germ cell-specific gene dnd as a model. Embryos at the 1-cell stage were microinjected with synthetic TALEN mRNAs and examined for the survival rate and GD efficiency. Medaka embryos can tolerate a high dosage of TALEN-mRNA injection and exhibit a steadily increasing GD efficiency with increasing mRNA dosages before peaking at 100 ng/μl. This dosage produced ~24% efficiency for somatic GD. Some of the animals from manipulated embryos developed into fertile female and male. Most importantly, four fish (3 males and 1 female) examined by progeny-test were able to produce GD-bearing male and female gametes for germline transmission to F1 generation at ~10% efficiency. Therefore, TALEN is proficient for somatic and germline GD in medaka embryos, and disruption of one dnd copy does not compromise somatic development and gamete production.

  1. Xwnt8 directly initiates expression of labial Hox genes.

    PubMed

    In der Rieden, Paul M J; Vilaspasa, Ferran Lloret; Durston, Antony J

    2010-01-01

    Hox transcription factors play an essential role in patterning the anteroposterior axis during embryogenesis and exhibit a complex array of spatial and temporal patterns of expression. Their earliest onset of expression in vertebrates is during gastrulation in a temporally collinear sequence in the presomitic/ventrolateral mesoderm, and it is not clear which upstream signal transduction events initiate this expression. Using Xenopus, we present evidence that Xwnt8 is necessary for initiation of this collinear sequence by activating Hox-1 expression in three Hox clusters: hoxd, hoxa, and hoxb. All three labial genes appear to be direct targets of canonical Wnt signaling through Tcf/Lef. In addition, Xwnt8 loss- and gain-of-function leads to indirect regulation of other Hox genes: Hoxb4, Hoxd4, Hoxa7, Hoxc6, and Hoxc8. These findings shed new light on the early role of Wnt8 as well as of a proposed WNT gradient in patterning the Xenopus central nervous system (Kiecker and Niehrs [2001] Development 128:4189-4201).

  2. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Noel J; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-02-01

    Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus' Rapid Trait Development System (RTDS(™) ) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non-transgenic breeding alternative for trait improvement in agriculture to address this urgent need. This review explores the application of ODM as a precision genome editing technology, with emphasis on using oligonucleotides to make targeted edits in plasmid, episomal and chromosomal DNA of bacterial, fungal, mammalian and plant systems. The process of employing ODM by way of RTDS technology has been improved in many ways by utilizing a fluorescence conversion system wherein a blue fluorescent protein (BFP) can be changed to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) by editing a single nucleotide of the BFP gene (CAC→TAC; H66 to Y66). For example, dependent on oligonucleotide length, applying oligonucleotide-mediated technology to target the BFP transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts resulted in up to 0.05% precisely edited GFP loci. Here, the development of traits in commercially relevant plant varieties to improve crop performance by genome editing technologies such as ODM, and by extension RTDS, is reviewed.

  3. Investigations on the direct introduction of cigarette smoke for trace elements analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Michael J.; Naworal, John D.; Walker, Kathleen; Connell, Chris T.

    2003-11-01

    Direct introduction of mainstream cigarette smoke into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been investigated with respect to its feasibility for on-line analysis of trace elements. An automated apparatus was designed and built interfacing a smoking machine with an ICP-MS for smoke generation, collection, injection and analysis. Major and minor elements present in the particulate phase and the gas phase of mainstream cigarette smoke of 2R4F reference cigarettes have been qualitatively identified by examination of their full mass spectra. This method provides a rapid-screening analysis of the transfer of trace elements into mainstream smoke during cigarette combustion. A full suite of elements present in the whole cigarette smoke has been identified, including As, B, Ba, Br, Cd, Cl, Cs, Cu, Hg, I, K, Li, Mn, Na, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sn, Tl and Zn. Of these elements, the major portions of B, Ba, Cs, Cu, K, Li, Mn, Na, Pb, Rb, Sn, Tl and Zn are present in the particulate phase, whereas the major portion of Hg is present in the gas phase. As, Br, Cd, Cl, I and Sb exist in a distribution between the gas phase and the particulate phase. Depending on the element, the precision of measurement ranges from 5 to 25% in terms of relative standard deviation of peak height and peak area, based on the fourth puff of 2R4F mainstream cigarette smoke analyzed in five smoking replicates.

  4. Direct sample introduction gas chromatography and mass spectrometry for the determination of phthalate esters in cleaning products.

    PubMed

    Cacho, J I; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2015-02-06

    A method using direct sample introduction (DSI) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is developed for the determination of six phthalate esters (dimethyl, diethyl, dibutyl, butylbenzyl, diethylhexyl and dioctyl phthalate) in cleaning products. The different variables involved in the DSI step, including venting time and temperature, vaporisation time and temperature, injector heating temperature and gas flow rate and pressure, were evaluated and optimised using Taguchi orthogonal arrays. The proposed method, using calibration against methanolic standards, showed good linearity in the 0.05-15 μg g(-1) range and good repeatability, with RSD values ranging from 3.5% to 5.7%. Quantification limits between 0.010 and 0.041 μg g(-1), depending on the compound, were attained, while recovery assays provided values from 83% to 115%. Twenty-seven cleaning products were analysed using the DSI-GC-MS method, being four phthalates (dimethyl, diethyl, dibutyl and diethylhexyl phthalate) found in fourteen of them at concentration levels in the 0.1-21 μg g(-1) range. Compared with the most common GC injection technique, which uses the split/splitless injector, the proposed DSI procedure provided larger peak areas and lower detection limits, as result of the greater injected volume and reduction in noise.

  5. System and method for introduction and stabilization of genes in Thermus sp.

    DOEpatents

    Kayser, Kevin J.; Park, Ho-Shin; Kilbane, II, John J.

    2005-03-01

    A method for introducing and stabilizing heterologous and recombinant genes in a thermophilic host in which a characteristic gene defining a detectable host characteristic is inactivated or deleted from the thermophilic host, resulting in a modified thermophilic host expressing an absence of the detectable host characteristic. A DNA fragment of interest is inserted into the modified thermophilic host together with an intact characteristic gene, whereby the detectable host characteristic is restored to the thermophilic host, thereby enabling detection and confirmation of successful transformation using plasmid vectors and integration of the DNA fragment into the chromosome of the thermophilic host.

  6. Argonaute 2 Binds Directly to tRNA Genes and Promotes Gene Repression in cis

    PubMed Central

    Woolnough, Jessica L.; Atwood, Blake L.

    2015-01-01

    To further our understanding of the RNAi machinery within the human nucleus, we analyzed the chromatin and RNA binding of Argonaute 2 (AGO2) within human cancer cell lines. Our data indicated that AGO2 binds directly to nascent tRNA and 5S rRNA, and to the genomic loci from which these RNAs are transcribed, in a small RNA- and DICER-independent manner. AGO2 chromatin binding was not observed at non-TFIIIC-dependent RNA polymerase III (Pol III) genes or at extra-TFIIIC (ETC) sites, indicating that the interaction is specific for TFIIIC-dependent Pol III genes. A genome-wide analysis indicated that loss of AGO2 caused a global increase in mRNA expression level among genes that flank AGO2-bound tRNA genes. This effect was shown to be distinct from that of the disruption of DICER, DROSHA, or CTCF. We propose that AGO2 binding to tRNA genes has a novel and important regulatory role in human cells. PMID:25918241

  7. Life cycle replacement by gene introduction under an allee effect in periodical cicadas.

    PubMed

    Nariai, Yukiko; Hayashi, Saki; Morita, Satoru; Umemura, Yoshitaka; Tainaka, Kei-ichi; Sota, Teiji; Cooley, John R; Yoshimura, Jin

    2011-04-06

    Periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) in the USA are divided into three species groups (-decim, -cassini, -decula) of similar but distinct morphology and behavior. Each group contains at least one species with a 17-year life cycle and one with a 13-year cycle; each species is most closely related to one with the other cycle. One explanation for the apparent polyphyly of 13- and 17-year life cycles is that populations switch between the two cycles. Using a numerical model, we test the general feasibility of life cycle switching by the introduction of alleles for one cycle into populations of the other cycle. Our results suggest that fitness reductions at low population densities of mating individuals (the Allee effect) could play a role in life cycle switching. In our model, if the 13-year cycle is genetically dominant, a 17-year cycle population will switch to a 13-year cycle given the introduction of a few 13-year cycle alleles under a moderate Allee effect. We also show that under a weak Allee effect, different year-classes ("broods") with 17-year life cycles can be generated. Remarkably, the outcomes of our models depend only on the dominance relationships of the cycle alleles, irrespective of any fitness advantages.

  8. Life Cycle Replacement by Gene Introduction under an Allee Effect in Periodical Cicadas

    PubMed Central

    Nariai, Yukiko; Hayashi, Saki; Morita, Satoru; Umemura, Yoshitaka; Tainaka, Kei-ichi; Sota, Teiji; Cooley, John R.; Yoshimura, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) in the USA are divided into three species groups (-decim, -cassini, -decula) of similar but distinct morphology and behavior. Each group contains at least one species with a 17-year life cycle and one with a 13-year cycle; each species is most closely related to one with the other cycle. One explanation for the apparent polyphyly of 13- and 17-year life cycles is that populations switch between the two cycles. Using a numerical model, we test the general feasibility of life cycle switching by the introduction of alleles for one cycle into populations of the other cycle. Our results suggest that fitness reductions at low population densities of mating individuals (the Allee effect) could play a role in life cycle switching. In our model, if the 13-year cycle is genetically dominant, a 17-year cycle population will switch to a 13-year cycle given the introduction of a few 13-year cycle alleles under a moderate Allee effect. We also show that under a weak Allee effect, different year-classes (“broods”) with 17-year life cycles can be generated. Remarkably, the outcomes of our models depend only on the dominance relationships of the cycle alleles, irrespective of any fitness advantages. PMID:21494682

  9. Isotope dilution ICP-MS with laser-assisted sample introduction for direct determination of sulfur in petroleum products.

    PubMed

    Boulyga, Sergei F; Heilmann, Jens; Heumann, Klaus G

    2005-08-01

    Inductively coupled plasma isotope dilution mass spectrometry (ICP-IDMS) with direct laser-assisted introduction of isotope-diluted samples into the plasma, using a laser ablation system with high ablation rates, was developed for accurate sulfur determinations in different petroleum products such as 'sulfur-free' premium gasoline, diesel fuel, and heating oil. Two certified gas oil reference materials were analyzed for method validation. Two different 34S-enriched spike compounds, namely, elementary sulfur dissolved in xylene and dibenzothiophene in hexane, were synthesized and tested for their usefulness in this isotope dilution technique. The isotope-diluted sample was adsorbed on a filter-paper-like material, which was fixed in a special holder for irradiation by the laser beam. Under these conditions no time-dependent spike/analyte fractionation was only observed for the dibenzothiophene spike during the laser ablation process, which means that the measured 34S/32S isotope ratio of the isotope-diluted sample remained constant-a necessary precondition for accurate results with the isotope dilution technique. A comparison of LA-ICP-IDMS results with the certified values of the gas oil reference materials and with results obtained from ICP-IDMS analyses with wet sample digestion demonstrated the accuracy of the new LA-ICP-IDMS method in the concentration range of 9.2 microg g(-1) ('sulfur-free' premium gasoline) to 10.4 mg g(-1) (gas oil reference material BCR 107). The detection limit for sulfur by LA-ICP-IDMS is 0.04 microg g(-1) and the analysis time is only about 10 min, which therefore also qualifies this method for accurate determinations of low sulfur contents in petroleum products on a routine level.

  10. Introduction to the special issue, pathways between genes, brain, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Kremen, William S; Jacobson, Kristen C

    2010-03-01

    In the past 10 years or so, with the sequencing of the human genome and rapid advances in the development of high throughput techniques, the field of behavior genetics has increasingly moved toward the detection of actual genes and environmental factors. However, the field is still in the relatively early stages of understanding some of the basic facts about the complex genetic underpinnings of brain structure and function and their relationship to behavior. The 15 articles in this special issue were selected to represent the diversity of methodologies applied to the complexity of pathways linking genes, brain, and behavior. While providing strong evidence for the role of genes in individual differences in brain structure and function, these papers also demonstrate that environmental experiences alter neurobiological pathways, and that genetic factors may further moderate the impact of environmental experience. Most importantly, the breadth of studies proves that in order to be able to trace the pathways between genes, brain, and behavior, we need experts in genetics, neuroscience, psychology, and psychiatry.

  11. Candidate Genes for Cannabis Use Disorders: Findings, Challenges and Directions

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Arpana; Lynskey, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Aim Twin studies have shown that cannabis use disorders (abuse/dependence) are highly heritable. This review aims to: (i) review existing linkage studies of cannabis use disorders and (ii) review gene association studies, to identify potential candidate genes, including those that have been tested for composite substance use disorders, and (iii) to highlight challenges in the genomic study of cannabis use disorders. Methods Peer-reviewed linkage and candidate gene association studies are reviewed. Results Four linkage studies are reviewed: results from these have homed in on regions on chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 9, 14, 17 and 18, which harbor candidates of predicted biological relevance, such as monoglyceride lipase (MGL) on chromosome 3, but also novel genes, including ELTD1 (EGF, latrophilin and seven transmembrane domain containing 1) on chromosome 1. Gene association studies are presented for (a) genes posited to have specific influences on cannabis use disorders: CNR1, CB2, FAAH, MGL, TRPV1 and GPR55 and (b) genes from various neurotransmitter systems that are likely to exert a non-specific influence on risk of cannabis use disorders e.g. GABRA2, DRD2 and OPRM1. Conclusions There are challenges associated with (i) understanding biological complexity underlying cannabis use disorders (including the need to study gene-gene and gene-environment interactions), (ii) using diagnostic versus quantitative phenotypes, (iii) delineating which stage of cannabis involvement (e.g. use vs. misuse) genes influence and (iv) problems of sample ascertainment. PMID:19335651

  12. Iron-biofortification in rice by the introduction of three barley genes participated in mugineic acid biosynthesis with soybean ferritin gene.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Michiko; Aung, May S; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Mori, Satoshi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a serious problem around the world, especially in developing countries. The production of iron-biofortified rice will help ameliorate this problem. Previously, expression of the iron storage protein, ferritin, in rice using an endosperm-specific promoter resulted in a two-fold increase in iron concentration in the resultant transgenic seeds. However, further over expression of ferritin did not produce an additional increase in the seed iron concentration, and symptoms of iron deficiency were noted in the leaves of the transgenic plants. In the present study, we aimed to further increase the iron concentration in rice seeds without increasing the sensitivity to iron deficiency by enhancing the uptake and transport of iron via a ferric iron chelator, mugineic acid. To this end, we introduced the soybean ferritin gene (SoyferH2) driven by two endosperm-specific promoters, along with the barley nicotianamine synthase gene (HvNAS1), two nicotianamine aminotransferase genes (HvNAAT-A and -B), and a mugineic acid synthase gene (IDS3) to enhance mugineic acid production in rice plants. A marker-free vector was utilized as a means of increasing public acceptance. Representative lines were selected from 102 transformants based on the iron concentration in polished seeds and ferritin accumulation in the seeds. These lines were grown in both commercially supplied soil (iron-sufficient conditions) and calcareous soil (iron-deficient conditions). Lines expressing both ferritin and mugineic acid biosynthetic genes showed signs of iron-deficiency tolerance in calcareous soil. The iron concentration in polished T3 seeds was increased by 4 and 2.5 times, as compared to that in non-transgenic lines grown in normal and calcareous soil, respectively. These results indicate that the concomitant introduction of the ferritin gene and mugineic acid biosynthetic genes effectively increased the seed iron level without causing iron sensitivity under iron-limited conditions.

  13. Generation of Constructs for DNA-Directed RNA Interference of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    20(Xi-237 Executive summary Introduction: Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) is one of a number of different alphaviruses , which can cause...required for replication . It is hypothesized that targeting essential virus genes, either individually or simultaneously, will lead to knockdown or...silencing of the genes, and subsequent inhibition of virus replication . This paper describes the PCR-based approach used to generate DNA cassettes that

  14. Quantitative real-time monitoring of multi-elements in airborne particulates by direct introduction into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshinari; Sato, Hikaru; Hiyoshi, Katsuhiro; Furuta, Naoki

    2012-10-01

    A new calibration system for real-time determination of trace elements in airborne particulates was developed. Airborne particulates were directly introduced into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, and the concentrations of 15 trace elements were determined by means of an external calibration method. External standard solutions were nebulized by an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) coupled with a desolvation system, and the resulting aerosol was introduced into the plasma. The efficiency of sample introduction via the USN was calculated by two methods: (1) the introduction of a Cr standard solution via the USN was compared with introduction of a Cr(CO)6 standard gas via a standard gas generator and (2) the aerosol generated by the USN was trapped on filters and then analyzed. The Cr introduction efficiencies obtained by the two methods were the same, and the introduction efficiencies of the other elements were equal to the introduction efficiency of Cr. Our results indicated that our calibration method for introduction efficiency worked well for the 15 elements (Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Sn, Sb, Ba, Tl and Pb). The real-time data and the filter-collection data agreed well for elements with low-melting oxides (V, Co, As, Mo, Sb, Tl, and Pb). In contrast, the real-time data were smaller than the filter-collection data for elements with high-melting oxides (Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sn, and Ba). This result implies that the oxides of these 8 elements were not completely fused, vaporized, atomized, and ionized in the initial radiation zone of the inductively coupled plasma. However, quantitative real-time monitoring can be realized after correction for the element recoveries which can be calculated from the ratio of real-time data/filter-collection data.

  15. Introduction of the Escherichia coli gdhA gene into Rhizobium phaseoli: effect on nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, A; Becerril, B; Mora, J

    1988-01-01

    Rhizobium phaseoli lacks glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and assimilates ammonium by the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase pathway. A strain of R. phaseoli harboring the Escherichia coli GDH structural gene (gdhA) was constructed. GDH activity was expressed in R. phaseoli in the free-living state and in symbiosis. Nodules with bacteroids that expressed GDH activity had severe impairment of nitrogen fixation. Also, R. phaseoli cells that lost GDH activity and assimilated ammonium by the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase pathway preferentially nodulated Phaseolus vulgaris. PMID:2892830

  16. Cardiac gene therapy: Recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Mason, Daniel; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Krishnan, Harini Venkata; Sant, Shilpa

    2015-10-10

    Gene therapy has the potential to serve as an adaptable platform technology for treating various diseases. Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality in the developed world and genetic modification is steadily becoming a more plausible method to repair and regenerate heart tissue. Recently, new gene targets to treat cardiovascular disease have been identified and developed into therapies that have shown promise in animal models. Some of these therapies have advanced to clinical testing. Despite these recent successes, several barriers must be overcome for gene therapy to become a widely used treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we evaluate specific genetic targets that can be exploited to treat cardiovascular diseases, list the important delivery barriers for the gene carriers, assess the most promising methods of delivering the genetic information, and discuss the current status of clinical trials involving gene therapies targeted to the heart.

  17. Gene introduction into the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana via peptide-based carriers.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Jo-Ann; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2015-01-13

    Available methods in plant genetic transformation are nuclear and plastid transformations because similar procedures have not yet been established for the mitochondria. The double membrane and small size of the organelle, in addition to its large population in cells, are major obstacles in mitochondrial transfection. Here we report the intracellular delivery of exogenous DNA localized to the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana using a combination of mitochondria-targeting peptide and cell-penetrating peptide. Low concentrations of peptides were sufficient to deliver DNA into the mitochondria and expression of imported DNA reached detectable levels within a short incubation period (12 h). We found that electrostatic interaction with the cell membrane is not a critical factor for complex internalization, instead, improved intracellular penetration of mitochondria-targeted complexes significantly enhanced gene transfer efficiency. Our results delineate a simple and effective peptide-based method, as a starting point for the development of more sophisticated plant mitochondrial transfection strategies.

  18. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  19. Informative Gene Selection and Direct Classification of Tumor Based on Chi-Square Test of Pairwise Gene Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyan; Li, Lanzhi; Luo, Chao; Sun, Congwei; Chen, Yuan; Dai, Zhijun; Yuan, Zheming

    2014-01-01

    In efforts to discover disease mechanisms and improve clinical diagnosis of tumors, it is useful to mine profiles for informative genes with definite biological meanings and to build robust classifiers with high precision. In this study, we developed a new method for tumor-gene selection, the Chi-square test-based integrated rank gene and direct classifier (χ2-IRG-DC). First, we obtained the weighted integrated rank of gene importance from chi-square tests of single and pairwise gene interactions. Then, we sequentially introduced the ranked genes and removed redundant genes by using leave-one-out cross-validation of the chi-square test-based Direct Classifier (χ2-DC) within the training set to obtain informative genes. Finally, we determined the accuracy of independent test data by utilizing the genes obtained above with χ2-DC. Furthermore, we analyzed the robustness of χ2-IRG-DC by comparing the generalization performance of different models, the efficiency of different feature-selection methods, and the accuracy of different classifiers. An independent test of ten multiclass tumor gene-expression datasets showed that χ2-IRG-DC could efficiently control overfitting and had higher generalization performance. The informative genes selected by χ2-IRG-DC could dramatically improve the independent test precision of other classifiers; meanwhile, the informative genes selected by other feature selection methods also had good performance in χ2-DC. PMID:25140319

  20. Glaucoma: genes, phenotypes, and new directions for therapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Bao Jian; Wiggs, Janey L

    2010-09-01

    Glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide, is characterized by progressive optic nerve damage, usually associated with intraocular pressure. Although the clinical progression of the disease is well defined, the molecular events responsible for glaucoma are currently poorly understood and current therapeutic strategies are not curative. This review summarizes the human genetics and genomic approaches that have shed light on the complex inheritance of glaucoma genes and the potential for gene-based and cellular therapies that this research makes possible.

  1. Transcription mediated insulation and interference direct gene cluster expression switches

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tania; Brown, David; Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Halstead, James M; O'Connor, Leigh; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Steinmetz, Lars M; Mellor, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In yeast, many tandemly arranged genes show peak expression in different phases of the metabolic cycle (YMC) or in different carbon sources, indicative of regulation by a bi-modal switch, but it is not clear how these switches are controlled. Using native elongating transcript analysis (NET-seq), we show that transcription itself is a component of bi-modal switches, facilitating reciprocal expression in gene clusters. HMS2, encoding a growth-regulated transcription factor, switches between sense- or antisense-dominant states that also coordinate up- and down-regulation of transcription at neighbouring genes. Engineering HMS2 reveals alternative mono-, di- or tri-cistronic and antisense transcription units (TUs), using different promoter and terminator combinations, that underlie state-switching. Promoters or terminators are excluded from functional TUs by read-through transcriptional interference, while antisense TUs insulate downstream genes from interference. We propose that the balance of transcriptional insulation and interference at gene clusters facilitates gene expression switches during intracellular and extracellular environmental change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03635.001 PMID:25407679

  2. Unambiguous demonstration of triple-helix-directed gene modification.

    PubMed

    Barre, F X; Ait-Si-Ali, S; Giovannangeli, C; Luis, R; Robin, P; Pritchard, L L; Helene, C; Harel-Bellan, A

    2000-03-28

    Triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs), which can potentially modify target genes irreversibly, represent promising tools for antiviral therapies. However, their effectiveness on endogenous genes has yet to be unambiguously demonstrated. To monitor endogenous gene modification by TFOs in a yeast model, we inactivated an auxotrophic marker gene by inserting target sequences of interest into its coding region. The genetically engineered yeast cells then were treated with psoralen-linked TFOs followed by UV irradiation, thus generating highly mutagenic covalent crosslinks at the target site whose repair could restore gene function; the number of revertants and spectrum of mutations generated were quantified. Results showed that a phosphoramidate TFO indeed reaches its target sequence, forms crosslinks, and generates mutations at the expected site via a triplex-mediated mechanism: (i) under identical conditions, no mutations were generated by the same TFO at two other loci in the target strain, nor in an isogenic control strain carrying a modified target sequence incapable of supporting triple-helix formation; (ii) for a given target sequence, whether the triplex was formed in vivo on an endogenous gene or in vitro on an exogenous plasmid, the nature of the mutations generated was identical, and consistent with the repair of a psoralen crosslink at the target site. Although the mutation efficiency was probably too low for therapeutic applications, our results confirm the validity of the triple-helix approach and provide a means of evaluating the effectiveness of new chemically modified TFOs and analogs.

  3. Multiple introductions and gene flow in subtropical South American populations of the fireweed, Senecio madagascariensis(Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Mäder, Geraldo; Castro, Luana; Bonatto, Sandro Luis; de Freitas, Loreta Brandão

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Non-indigenous plants exhibit different attributes that make them aggressive competitors with indigenous plants and serious threats to biodiversity.Senecio madagascariensis (fireweed, Asteraceae), a native from southern Africa, is a strong competitor in agricultural activities and has toxic alkaloids that may result in high cattle mortality. In Brazil, this weed was collected for the first time in 1995 and has since spread quickly throughout the Pampas region. To better understand the invasion of the fireweed in South America, we used a genetic characterization with internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and microsatellite markers. Based on the ITS data, the southern Brazil populations of S. madagascariensis shared genetic homology with samples taken from the Hawaiian Islands and South Africa. Microsatellite analysis showed the genetic diversity split in two clusters, perhaps intimating the independent introduction of each species into South America. Although fireweed was introduced recently in southern Brazil, the considerable levels of genetic diversity, gene flow, and inbreeding may indicate success in the species establishment in this environment. PMID:27007907

  4. Gene Knockdown of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus E2 Glycoprotein Using DNA-Directed RNA Interference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    e _s~u~m mary - Introduction: Alphaviruses are a large family of RNA viruses that can cause acute infection resulting in arthritis and encephalitis...One of the important alphaviruses is the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. This virus has been linked to a number of outbreaks in both North and... replication of VEE virus in vitro. Bhogal, H.S., McLaws, L.J., and Jager, S.J. 2006. Gene Knockdown of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus E2

  5. Drop-on-demand sample introduction system coupled with the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow for direct molecular analysis of complex liquid microvolume samples.

    PubMed

    Schaper, J Niklas; Pfeuffer, Kevin P; Shelley, Jacob T; Bings, Nicolas H; Hieftje, Gary M

    2012-11-06

    One of the fastest developing fields in analytical spectrochemistry in recent years is ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS). This burgeoning interest has been due to the demonstrated advantages of the method: simple mass spectra, little or no sample preparation, and applicability to samples in the solid, liquid, or gaseous state. One such ADI-MS source, the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA), is capable of direct analysis of solids just by aiming the source at the solid surface and sampling the produced ions into a mass spectrometer. However, direct introduction of significant volumes of liquid samples into this source has not been possible, as solvent loads can quench the afterglow and, thus, the formation of reagent ions. As a result, the analysis of liquid samples is preferably carried out by analyzing dried residues or by desorbing small amounts of liquid samples directly from the liquid surface. In the former case, reproducibility of sample introduction is crucial if quantitative results are desired. In the present study, introduction of liquid samples as very small droplets helps overcome the issues of sample positioning and reduced levels of solvent intake. A recently developed "drop-on-demand" (DOD) aerosol generator is capable of reproducibly producing very small volumes of liquid (∼17 pL). In this paper, the coupling of FAPA-MS and DOD is reported and applications are suggested. Analytes representing different classes of substances were tested and limits of detections were determined. Matrix tolerance was investigated for drugs of abuse and their metabolites by analyzing raw urine samples and quantification without the use of internal standards. Limits of detection below 2 μg/mL, without sample pretreatment, were obtained.

  6. Clinical potential of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy to improve radiation therapy in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Vajda, Alice; Marignol, Laure; Foley, Ruth; Lynch, Thomas H; Lawler, Mark; Hollywood, Donal

    2011-12-01

    Despite the advances in prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment, current therapies are not curative in a significant proportion of patients. Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT), when combined with radiation therapy, could improve the outcome of treatment for prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in the western world. GDEPT involves the introduction of a therapeutic transgene, which can be targeted to the tumour cells. A prodrug is administered systemically and is converted to its toxic form only in those cells containing the transgene, resulting in cell kill. This review will discuss the clinical trials which have investigated the potential of GDEPT at various stages of prostate cancer progression. The advantages of using GDEPT in combination with radiotherapy will be examined, as well as some of the recent advances which enhance the potential utility of GDEPT.

  7. Evidence for introduction bottleneck and extensive inter-gene pool (Mesoamerica x Andes) hybridization in the European common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Tania; Logozzo, Giuseppina; Attene, Giovanna; Bellucci, Elisa; Benedettelli, Stefano; Negri, Valeria; Papa, Roberto; Spagnoletti Zeuli, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Common bean diversity within and between Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools was compared in 89 landraces from America and 256 landraces from Europe, to elucidate the effects of bottleneck of introduction and selection for adaptation during the expansion of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Europe. Thirteen highly polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers (nuSSRs) were used to complement chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSRs) and nuclear markers (phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1) data from previous studies. To verify the extent of the introduction bottleneck, inter-gene pool hybrids were distinguished from "pure" accessions. Hybrids were identified on the basis of recombination of gene pool specific cpSSR, phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1 markers with a Bayesian assignments based on nuSSRs, and with STRUCTURE admixture analysis. More hybrids were detected than previously, and their frequency was almost four times larger in Europe (40.2%) than in America (12.3%). The genetic bottleneck following the introduction into Europe was not evidenced in the analysis including all the accessions, but it was significant when estimated only with "pure" accessions, and five times larger for Mesoamerican than for Andean germplasm. The extensive inter-gene pool hybridization generated a large amount of genotypic diversity that mitigated the effects of the bottleneck that occurred when common bean was introduced in Europe. The implication for evolution and the advantages for common bean breeding are discussed.

  8. Molecular Cloning of the Human Genes(s) Directing the Synthesis of Nervous System Cholinesterases.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    AD-8163 229 MOLECULAR CLONING OF THE HUMAN GENES (S) DIRECTING THE 1/1 SYNTHESIS OF NERYOU.. (U) NEIZMANN INST OF SCIENCE REHOVOT (ISRAEL) DEPT OF...whether these forms are produced from discrete genes or by post-transcrip- tional and post-translational processing. In addition, the amino acid...brain cholinseee (aRE.) is =*rxm yet, Which leaves open several questions Of cosdeal 1. Are the various Ch foru produiced from discrete genes , or is

  9. Gene network coherence based on prior knowledge using direct and indirect relationships.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vela, Francisco; Lagares, José Antonio; Díaz-Díaz, Norberto

    2015-06-01

    Gene networks (GNs) have become one of the most important approaches for modeling biological processes. They are very useful to understand the different complex biological processes that may occur in living organisms. Currently, one of the biggest challenge in any study related with GN is to assure the quality of these GNs. In this sense, recent works use artificial data sets or a direct comparison with prior biological knowledge. However, these approaches are not entirely accurate as they only take into account direct gene-gene interactions for validation, leaving aside the weak (indirect) relationships. We propose a new measure, named gene network coherence (GNC), to rate the coherence of an input network according to different biological databases. In this sense, the measure considers not only the direct gene-gene relationships but also the indirect ones to perform a complete and fairer evaluation of the input network. Hence, our approach is able to use the whole information stored in the networks. A GNC JAVA-based implementation is available at: http://fgomezvela.github.io/GNC/. The results achieved in this work show that GNC outperforms the classical approaches for assessing GNs by means of three different experiments using different biological databases and input networks. According to the results, we can conclude that the proposed measure, which considers the inherent information stored in the direct and indirect gene-gene relationships, offers a new robust solution to the problem of GNs biological validation.

  10. Directional gene flow and ecological separation in Yersinia enterocolitica

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Sandra; Corander, Jukka; de Been, Mark; Harris, Simon; Cheng, Lu; Hall, Miquette; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a common cause of food-borne gastroenteritis worldwide. Recent work defining the phylogeny of the genus Yersinia subdivided Y. enterocolitica into six distinct phylogroups. Here, we provide detailed analyses of the evolutionary processes leading to the emergence of these phylogroups. The dominant phylogroups isolated from human infections, PG3–5, show very little diversity at the sequence level, but do present marked patterns of gain and loss of functions, including those involved in pathogenicity and metabolism, including the acquisition of phylogroup-specific O-antigen loci. We tracked gene flow across the species in the core and accessory genome, and show that the non-pathogenic PG1 strains act as a reservoir for diversity, frequently acting as donors in recombination events. Analysis of the core and accessory genome also suggested that the different Y. enterocolitica phylogroups may be ecologically separated, in contrast to the long-held belief of common shared ecological niches across the Y. enterocolitica species. PMID:28348815

  11. Two Fis Regulators Directly Repress the Expression of Numerous Effector-Encoding Genes in Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Zusman, Tal; Speiser, Yariv

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular human pathogen that utilizes the Icm/Dot type IVB secretion system to translocate a large repertoire of effectors into host cells. For most of these effectors, there is no information regarding their regulation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the three L. pneumophila Fis homologs in the regulation of effector-encoding genes. Deletion mutants constructed in the genes encoding the three Fis regulators revealed that Fis1 (lpg0542 gene) and Fis3 (lpg1743) but not Fis2 (lpg1370) are partially required for intracellular growth of L. pneumophila in Acanthamoeba castellanii. To identify pathogenesis-related genes directly regulated by Fis, we established a novel in vivo system which resulted in the discovery of numerous effector-encoding genes directly regulated by Fis. Further examination of these genes revealed that Fis1 and Fis3 repress the level of expression of effector-encoding genes during exponential phase. Three groups of effector-encoding genes were identified: (i) effectors regulated mainly by Fis1, (ii) effectors regulated mainly by Fis3, and (iii) effectors regulated by both Fis1 and Fis3. Examination of the upstream regulatory region of all of these effector-encoding genes revealed multiple putative Fis regulatory elements, and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that a few of these sites constitute part of a repressor binding element. Furthermore, gel mobility shift assays demonstrated the direct relation between the Fis1 and Fis3 regulators and these regulatory elements. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that two of the three L. pneumophila Fis regulators directly repress the expression of Icm/Dot effector-encoding genes. PMID:25225276

  12. Direct Cytosolic Delivery of CRISPR/Cas9-Ribonucleoprotein for Efficient Gene Editing.

    PubMed

    Mout, Rubul; Ray, Moumita; Yesilbag Tonga, Gulen; Lee, Yi-Wei; Tay, Tristan; Sasaki, Kanae; Rotello, Vincent M

    2017-03-28

    Genome editing through the delivery of CRISPR/Cas9-ribonucleoprotein (Cas9-RNP) reduces unwanted gene targeting and avoids integrational mutagenesis that can occur through gene delivery strategies. Direct and efficient delivery of Cas9-RNP into the cytosol followed by translocation to the nucleus remains a challenge. Here, we report a remarkably highly efficient (∼90%) direct cytoplasmic/nuclear delivery of Cas9 protein complexed with a guide RNA (sgRNA) through the coengineering of Cas9 protein and carrier nanoparticles. This construct provides effective (∼30%) gene editing efficiency and opens up opportunities in studying genome dynamics.

  13. Image-Guided Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Yokoo, Takeshi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ogawa, Kohei; Shinagawa, Yoko; Inoue, Ryosuke; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Hydrodynamics-based delivery has been used as an experimental tool to express transgene in small animals. This in vivo gene transfer method is useful for functional analysis of genetic elements, therapeutic effect of oligonucleotides, and cancer cells to establish the metastatic cancer animal model for experimental research. Recent progress in the development of image-guided procedure for hydrodynamics-based gene delivery in large animals directly supports the clinical applicability of this technique. This review summarizes the current status and recent progress in the development of hydrodynamics-based gene delivery and discusses the future directions for its clinical application. PMID:26308044

  14. The MYB98 subcircuit of the synergid gene regulatory network includes genes directly and indirectly regulated by MYB98.

    PubMed

    Punwani, Jayson A; Rabiger, David S; Lloyd, Alan; Drews, Gary N

    2008-08-01

    The female gametophyte contains two synergid cells that play a role in many steps of the angiosperm reproductive process, including pollen tube guidance. At their micropylar poles, the synergid cells have a thickened and elaborated cell wall: the filiform apparatus that is thought to play a role in the secretion of the pollen tube attractant(s). MYB98 regulates an important subcircuit of the synergid gene regulatory network (GRN) that functions to activate the expression of genes required for pollen tube guidance and filiform apparatus formation. The MYB98 subcircuit comprises at least 83 downstream genes, including 48 genes within four gene families (CRP810, CRP3700, CRP3730 and CRP3740) that encode Cys-rich proteins. We show that the 11 CRP3700 genes, which include DD11 and DD18, are regulated by a common cis-element, GTAACNT, and that a multimer of this sequence confers MYB98-dependent synergid expression. The GTAACNT element contains the MYB98-binding site identified in vitro, suggesting that the 11 CRP3700 genes are direct targets of MYB98. We also show that five of the CRP810 genes, which include DD2, lack a functional GTAACNT element, suggesting that they are not directly regulated by MYB98. In addition, we show that the five CRP810 genes are regulated by the cis-element AACGT, and that a multimer of this sequence confers synergid expression. Together, these results suggest that the MYB98 branch of the synergid GRN is multi-tiered and, therefore, contains at least one additional downstream transcription factor.

  15. Direct and reverse pollen-mediated gene flow between GM rice and red rice weed

    PubMed Central

    Serrat, X.; Esteban, R.; Peñas, G.; Català, M. M.; Melé, E.; Messeguer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Potential risks of genetically modified (GM) crops must be identified before their commercialization, as happens with all new technologies. One of the major concerns is the proper risk assessment of adventitious presence of transgenic material in rice fields due to cross-pollination. Several studies have been conducted in order to quantify pollen-mediated gene flow from transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) to both conventional rice and red rice weed (O. sativa f. spontanea) under field conditions. Some of these studies reported GM pollen-donor rice transferring GM traits to red rice. However, gene flow also occurs in the opposite direction, in a phenomenon that we have called reverse gene flow, resulting in transgenic seeds that have incorporated the traits of wild red rice. We quantified reverse gene flow using material from two field trials. A molecular analysis based on amplified fragment length polymorphisms was carried out, being complemented with a phenotypic identification of red rice traits. In both field trials, the reverse gene flow detected was greater than the direct gene flow. The rate of direct gene flow varied according to the relative proportions of the donor (GM rice) and receptor (red rice) plants and was influenced by wind direction. The ecological impact of reverse gene flow is limited in comparison with that of direct gene flow because non-shattered and non-dormant seeds would be obtained in the first generation. Hybrid seed would remain in the spike and therefore most of it would be removed during harvesting. Nevertheless, this phenomenon must be considered in fields used for elite seed production and in developing countries where farmers often keep some seed for planting the following year. In these cases, there is a higher risk of GM red rice weed infestation increasing from year to year and therefore a proper monitoring plan needs to be established.

  16. Recombinant AAV-directed gene therapy for type I glycogen storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chou, JY; Mansfield, BC

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ia and Ib are disorders of impaired glucose homeostasis affecting the liver and kidney. GSD-Ib also affects neutrophils. Current dietary therapies cannot prevent long-term complications. In animal studies, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene therapy can correct or minimize multiple aspects of the disorders, offering hope for human gene therapy. Areas covered A summary of recent progress in rAAV-mediated gene therapy for GSD-I; strategies to improve rAAV-mediated gene delivery, transduction efficiency and immune avoidance; and vector refinements that improve expression. Expert opinion rAAV-mediated gene delivery to the liver can restore glucose homeostasis in preclinical models of GSD-I, but some long-term complications of the liver and kidney remain. Gene therapy for GSD-Ib is less advanced than for GSD-Ia and only transient correction of myeloid dysfunction has been achieved. A question remains whether a single rAAV vector can meet the expression efficiency and tropism required to treat all aspects of GSD-I, or if a multi-prong approach is needed. An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of rAAV vectors in the context of strategies to achieve efficient transduction of the liver, kidney, and hematopoietic stem cells is required for treating GSD-I. PMID:21504389

  17. Directing Cardiomyogenic Differentiation and Transdifferentiation By Ectopic Gene Expression - Direct Transition Or Reprogramming Detour?

    PubMed

    Andrée, Birgit; Zweigerdt, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disorders and associated morbidities remain the leading cause of premature death worldwide. Since the regeneration of diseased hearts is very limited and the insufficient supply of donor organs persists, hopes rely on new therapies for heart repair. Reviving the proliferation of endogenous cardiomyocytes (CMs) or the administration of adult stem cells to the heart was of limited curative success to date. Thus, the administration of in vitro generated CMs is under investigation to replenish loss of functional heart muscle tissue. This requires a sustainable source of CMs. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) have raised hopes for developing autologous cell therapies. To serve for heart repair, efficient and safe iPSC differentiation protocols for CMs production are required. iPSC differentiation into CMs and even functional subtypes was indeed achieved in recent years, either by the ectopic expression of cardiac transcription factors or the supplementation of chemical pathway modulators. An alternative approach aims at the direct transdifferentiation of fibroblasts, which are present in the interstitial tissue of many organs, into functional lineage-specific cell types. As a result the formation of induced cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs) by the ectopic expression of specific transcription factors combinations has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. This is an important proof-of-concept that the intermediate state of iPSC induction is dispensable. However, most of the early experiments were conducted in mice and translation to more relevant large animal models and subsequently to the clinic are challenging. Progress, drawbacks, and perspectives in this field will be discussed.

  18. Differential introduction of DNA damage and repair in mammalian genes transcribed by RNA polymerase I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, J.H.; Wauthier, E.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The authors have developed a general quantitative method for comparing the levels of drug-induced DNA crosslinking in specific mammalian genes. They observed a dramatic difference between the efficiency of the removal of both psoralen monoadducts and interstrand crosslinks from the rRNA genes and the efficiency of their removal from the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene in cultured human and hamster cells. While 90% of the interstrand crosslinks were removed from the human DHFR gene in 48 h, less than 25% repair occurred in the rRNA genes. Similarly, in Chinese hamster ovary cells, 85% repair of interstrand crosslinks within 8 h in the DHFR gene versus only 20% repair in the rRNA genes. The preferential repair of the DHFR gene relative to that of the rRNA genes was also observed for psoralen monoadducts in cells from both mammalian species. In human-mouse hybrid cells, the active mouse rRNA genes were five times more susceptible to psoralen modification than are the silent rRNA human genes, but adduct removal was similarly inefficient for both classes. They conclude that the repair of chemical damage such as psoralen photadducts in an expressed mammalian gene may depend upon the class of transcription to which it belongs.

  19. Direct Gene Transfer into Human Cultured Cells Facilitated by Laser Micropuncture of the Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wen; Wilkinson, Joyce; Stanbridge, Eric J.; Berns, Michael W.

    1987-06-01

    The selective alteration of the cellular genome by laser microbeam irradiation has been extensively applied in cell biology. We report here the use of the third harmonic (355 nm) of an yttrium-aluminum garnet laser to facilitate the direct transfer of the neo gene into cultured human HT1080-6TG cells. The resultant transformants were selected in medium containing an aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. Integration of the neo gene into individual human chromosomes and expression of the gene were demonstrated by Southern blot analyses, microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, and chromosome analyses. The stability of the integrated neo gene in the transformants was shown by a comparative growth assay in selective and nonselective media. Transformation and incorporation of the neo gene into the host genome occurred at a frequency of 8 × 10-4-3 × 10-3. This method appears to be 100-fold more efficient than the standard calcium phosphate-mediated method of DNA transfer.

  20. Farnesoid X receptor directly regulates xenobiotic detoxification genes in the long-lived Little mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanjun; Jin, Jingling; Iakova, Polina; Hernandez, Julio Cesar; Jawanmardi, Nicole; Sullivan, Emily; Guo, Grace L; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Darlington, Gretchen J

    2013-09-01

    Activation of xenobiotic metabolism pathways has been linked to lifespan extension in different models of aging. However, the mechanisms underlying activation of xenobiotic genes remain largely unknown. Here we showed that although farnesoid X receptor (FXR, Nr1h4) mRNA levels do not change significantly, FXR protein levels are elevated in the livers of the long-lived Little mice, leading to increased DNA binding activity of FXR. Hepatic FXR expression is sex-dependent in wild-type mice but not in Little mice, implying that up-regulation of FXR might be dependent on the reduction of growth hormone in Little mice. Growth hormone treatment decreased hepatic expression of FXR and xenobiotic genes Abcb1a, Fmo3 and Gsta2 in both wild-type and Little mice, suggesting an association between FXR and xenobiotic gene expression. We found that Abcb1a is transactivated by FXR via direct binding of FXR/retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer to a response element at the proximal promoter. FXR also positively controls Fmo3 and Gsta2 expression through direct interaction with the response elements in these genes. Our study demonstrates that xenobiotic genes are direct transcriptional targets of FXR and suggests that FXR signaling may play a critical role in the lifespan extension observed in Little mice.

  1. Suitable reference genes for the analysis of direct hyperplasia in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Soichi; Ohashi, Kazuo Utoh, Rie; Tatsumi, Kohei; Shima, Midori; Okano, Teruo

    2008-12-26

    The liver is capable of undergoing a proliferative growth, known as direct hyperplasia, in which the naive liver increases in size due to stimulation with primary mitogens. To produce accurate gene expression data, housekeeping genes (HKGs) that are stably expressed need to be determined. In the present study, liver regeneration was promoted via the direct hyperplasia mode by inducing mice with 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene. Gene expression levels of nine commonly used HKGs were analyzed in the liver of different timing during the regeneration. The stability of gene expression was assessed using two different analysis programs, geNorm and NormFinder. Using these analyses, we identified that PPIA and RPL4 showed the most stable expression regardless of the status of the liver regeneration. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the use of PPIA and RPL4 were the most optimal in providing reliable normalization of gene expression when assessing liver regeneration attributed to direct hyperplasia.

  2. Direct cellobiose production from cellulose using sextuple beta-glucosidase gene deletion Neurospora crassa mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct cellobiose production from cellulose by a genetically modified fungus—Neurospora crassa, was explored in this study. A library of N. crassa sextuple beta-glucosidase (bgl) gene deletion strains was constructed. Various concentrations of cellobiose were detected in the culture broth of the N. ...

  3. The role of direct oligonucleotide repeats in gonococcal pilin gene variation.

    PubMed

    Hill, S A; Morrison, S G; Swanson, J

    1990-08-01

    Previous studies indicate that gonococcal pilin phase and antigenic variation occur by intragenomic pilin gene recombination, the outcome of which resembles that of gene conversion. During such transitions, the expressed complete pilin gene (pilE) acquires a novel sequence corresponding to that of a silent pilin gene (pilS). In the present study, we find that internal deletions of pilE can produce pilus-/pilus+ phase transitions: direct oligonucleotide repeats in the pilin-encoding portion of pilE bracket the deleted segments. A novel, orthodox pilE is formed upon repair of the internal deletions, with pilS sequence probably acting as a template for repair. Such deletion/repair of pilE is suggested as a principal mechanism underlying gonococcal pilus variation.

  4. Direct phylogenetic evidence for lateral transfer of elongation factor-like gene.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Inagaki, Yuji; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2008-05-13

    Genes encoding elongation factor-like (EFL) proteins, which show high similarity to elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha), have been found in phylogenetically distantly related eukaryotes. The sporadic distribution of "EFL-containing" lineages within "EF-1alpha-containing" lineages indirectly, but strongly, suggests lateral gene transfer as the principal driving force in EFL evolution. However, one of the most critical aspects in the above hypothesis, the donor lineages in any putative cases of lateral EFL gene transfer, remained unclear. In this study, we provide direct evidence for lateral transfer of an EFL gene through the analyses of 10 diatom EFL genes. All diatom EFL homologues tightly clustered in phylogenetic analyses, suggesting acquisition of the exogenous EFL gene early in diatom evolution. Our survey additionally identified Thalassiosira pseudonana as a eukaryote bearing EF-1alpha and EFL genes and secondary EFL gene loss in Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the complete genome of which encodes only the EF-1alpha gene. Most importantly, the EFL phylogeny recovered a robust grouping of homologues from diatoms, the cercozoan Bigelowiella natans, and the foraminifer Planoglabratella opecularis, with the diatoms nested within the Bigelowiella plus Planoglabratella (Rhizaria) grouping. The particular relationships recovered are further consistent with two characteristic sequence motifs. The best explanation of our data analyses is an EFL gene transfer from a foraminifer to a diatom, the first case in which the donor-recipient relationship was clarified. Finally, based on a reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR assay and the genome information of Thalassiosira and Phaeodactylum, we propose the loss of elongation factor function in Thalassiosira EF-1alpha.

  5. Direct phylogenetic evidence for lateral transfer of elongation factor-like gene

    PubMed Central

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Inagaki, Yuji; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2008-01-01

    Genes encoding elongation factor-like (EFL) proteins, which show high similarity to elongation factor-1α (EF-1α), have been found in phylogenetically distantly related eukaryotes. The sporadic distribution of “EFL-containing” lineages within “EF-1α-containing” lineages indirectly, but strongly, suggests lateral gene transfer as the principal driving force in EFL evolution. However, one of the most critical aspects in the above hypothesis, the donor lineages in any putative cases of lateral EFL gene transfer, remained unclear. In this study, we provide direct evidence for lateral transfer of an EFL gene through the analyses of 10 diatom EFL genes. All diatom EFL homologues tightly clustered in phylogenetic analyses, suggesting acquisition of the exogenous EFL gene early in diatom evolution. Our survey additionally identified Thalassiosira pseudonana as a eukaryote bearing EF-1α and EFL genes and secondary EFL gene loss in Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the complete genome of which encodes only the EF-1α gene. Most importantly, the EFL phylogeny recovered a robust grouping of homologues from diatoms, the cercozoan Bigelowiella natans, and the foraminifer Planoglabratella opecularis, with the diatoms nested within the Bigelowiella plus Planoglabratella (Rhizaria) grouping. The particular relationships recovered are further consistent with two characteristic sequence motifs. The best explanation of our data analyses is an EFL gene transfer from a foraminifer to a diatom, the first case in which the donor–recipient relationship was clarified. Finally, based on a reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR assay and the genome information of Thalassiosira and Phaeodactylum, we propose the loss of elongation factor function in Thalassiosira EF-1α. PMID:18458344

  6. Rapid direct identification of Cryptococcus neoformans from pigeon droppings by nested PCR using CNLAC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Chae, H S; Park, G N; Kim, S H; Jo, H J; Kim, J T; Jeoung, H Y; An, D J; Kim, N H; Shin, B W; Kang, Y I; Chang, K S

    2012-08-01

    Isolation and identification of Cryptococcus neoformans and pathogenic yeast-like fungi from pigeon droppings has been taken for a long time and requires various nutrients for its growth. In this study, we attempted to establish a rapid direct identification method of Cr. neoformans from pigeon dropping samples by nested-PCR using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) CAP64 and CNLAC1 genes, polysaccharide capsule gene and laccase-associated gene to produce melanin pigment, respectively, which are common genes of yeasts. The ITS and CAP64 genes were amplified in all pathogenic yeasts, but CNLAC1 was amplified only in Cr. neoformans. The ITS gene was useful for yeast genotyping depending on nucleotide sequence. Homology of CAP64 genes among the yeasts were very high. The specificity of PCR using CNLAC1 was demonstrated in Cr. neoformans environmental strains but not in other yeast-like fungi. The CNLAC1 gene was detected in 5 serotypes of Cr. neoformans. The nested-PCR amplified up to 10(-11) μg of the genomic DNA and showed high sensitivity. All pigeon droppings among 31 Cr. neoformans-positive samples were positive and all pigeon droppings among 348 Cr. neoformans-negative samples were negative by the direct nested-PCR. In addition, after primary enrichment of pigeon droppings in Sabouraud dextrose broth, all Cr. neoformans-negative samples were negative by the nested-PCR, which showed high specificity. The nested-PCR showed high sensitivity without culture of pigeon droppings. Nested-PCR using CNLAC1 provides a rapid and reliable molecular diagnostic method to overcome weak points such as long culture time of many conventional methods.

  7. Introduction, stable integration, and controlled expression of a chimeric adenovirus gene whose product is toxic to the recipient human cell.

    PubMed Central

    Klessig, D F; Brough, D E; Cleghon, V

    1984-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein (DBP) encoded by human adenoviruses is a multifunctional polypeptide which plays a central role in regulating the expression of the viral genes. To gain a better understanding of the relationships between the various functions provided by DBP, an extensive collection of DBP mutants is essential. To this end we have constructed several permissive human cell lines which contain and express the DBP gene at high levels to allow propagation of otherwise lethal, nonrecoverable mutants of DBP. Because DBP is toxic to human cells, cell lines were constructed by using a vector in which the DBP gene is under the control of the dexamethasone-inducible promoter of the mouse mammary tumor virus. The low basal levels of DBP synthesis in the absence of dexamethasone allows isolation and propagation of these cells. Addition of dexamethasone enhances DBP production 50- to 200-fold, and within 8 h its synthesis from the single integrated copy of the chimeric gene is 5 to 15% of that observed during peak DBP synthesis in infected human cells in which hundreds of copies of the DBP gene serve as templates. At the nonpermissive temperature, adenovirus mutants with ts lesions in the DBP gene replicate their DNAs, express their late genes, and form infectious viral particles in these DBP+ cell lines but not in the parental HeLa cells. Images PMID:6542172

  8. Introduction of bacteriophage Mu into bacteria of various genera and intergeneric gene transfer by RP4::Mu.

    PubMed

    Murooka, Y; Takizawa, N; Harada, T

    1981-01-01

    The host range of coliphage Mu was greatly expanded to various genera of gram-negative bacteria by using the hybrid plasmic RP4::Mu cts, which is temperature sensitive and which confers resistance to ampicillin, kanamycin, and tetracycline. These drug resistance genes were transferred from Escherichia coli to members of the general Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Citrobacter, Salmonella, Proteus, Erwinia, Serratia, Alcaligenes, Agrobacterium, Rhizobium, Pseudomonas, Acetobacter, and Bacillus. Mu phage was produced by thermal induction from the lysogens of all these drug-resistant bacteria except Bacillus. Mu phage and RP4 or the RP4::Mu plasmid were used to create intergeneric recombinant strains by transfer of some genes, including the arylsulfatase gene, between Klebsiella aerogenes and E. coli. Thus, genetic analysis and intergeneric gene transfer are possible in these RP4::Mu-sensitive bacteria.

  9. The cerebellin 4 precursor gene is a direct target of SRY and SOX9 in mice.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Stephen T; Hiramatsu, Ryuji; Maddugoda, Madhavi P; Bernard, Pascal; Chaboissier, Marie-Christine; Sinclair, Andrew; Schedl, Andreas; Harley, Vincent; Kanai, Yoshiakira; Koopman, Peter; Wilhelm, Dagmar

    2009-06-01

    In most mammals, the expression of SRY (sex-determining region on the Y chromosome) initiates the development of testes, and thus determines the sex of the individual. However, despite the pivotal role of SRY, its mechanism of action remains elusive. One important missing piece of the puzzle is the identification of genes regulated by SRY. In this study we used chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify direct SRY target genes. Anti-mouse SRY antibody precipitated a region 7.5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start site of cerebellin 4 precursor (Cbln4), which encodes a secreted protein. Cbln4 is expressed in Sertoli cells in the developing gonad, with a profile mimicking that of the testis-determining gene SRY-box containing gene 9 (Sox9). In transgenic XY mouse embryos with reduced Sox9 expression, Cbln4 expression also was reduced, whereas overexpression of Sox9 in XX mice caused an upregulation of Cbln4 expression. Finally, ectopic upregulation of SRY in vivo resulted in ectopic expression of Cbln4. Our findings suggest that both SRY and SOX9 contribute to the male-specific upregulation of Cbln4 in the developing testis, and they identified a direct in vivo target gene of SRY.

  10. The Regulation of rRNA Gene Transcription during Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong; Zhao, Rui; Giles, Keith E.

    2016-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that proper cellular control of pluripotency and differentiation is related to the regulation of rRNA synthesis. To further our understanding of the role that the regulation of rRNA synthesis has in pluripotency we monitored rRNA synthesis during the directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We discovered that the rRNA synthesis rate is reduced ~50% within 6 hours of ACTIVIN A treatment. This precedes reductions in expression of specific stem cell markers and increases in expression of specific germ layer markers. The reduction in rRNA synthesis is concomitant with dissociation of the Pol I transcription factor, UBTF, from the rRNA gene promoter and precedes any increase to heterochromatin throughout the rRNA gene. To directly investigate the role of rRNA synthesis in pluripotency, hESCs were treated with the Pol I inhibitor, CX-5461. The direct reduction of rRNA synthesis by CX-5461 induces the expression of markers for all three germ layers, reduces the expression of pluripotency markers, and is overall similar to the ACTIVIN A induced changes. This work indicates that the dissociation of UBTF from the rRNA gene, and corresponding reduction in transcription, represent early regulatory events during the directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27299313

  11. Systematic Evaluation of AAV Vectors for Liver directed Gene Transfer in Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Wang, Huan; Bell, Peter; McCarter, Robert J; He, Jianping; Calcedo, Roberto; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Morizono, Hiroki; Batshaw, Mark L; Wilson, James M

    2009-01-01

    Vectors based on adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are being evaluated for use in liver-directed gene therapy. Candidates have been preselected on the basis of capsid structure that plays an important role in determining performance profiles. We describe a comprehensive and statistically powered set of mouse studies designed to compare the performance of vectors based on seven novel AAV capsids. The key criteria used to select candidates for successful gene therapy are high level and stable transgene expression in the absence of toxicity. Based on these criteria, the best performing vectors, AAV8, AAVhu.37, and AAVrh.8, will be further evaluated in nonhuman primates (NHPs). PMID:19861950

  12. Analysis of the volatile organic matter of engine piston deposits by direct sample introduction thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Diaby, M; Kinani, S; Genty, C; Bouchonnet, S; Sablier, M; Le Negrate, A; El Fassi, M

    2009-12-01

    This article establishes an alternative method for the characterization of volatiles organic matter (VOM) contained in deposits of the piston first ring grooves of diesel engines using a ChromatoProbe direct sample introduction (DSI) device coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The addition of an organic solvent during thermal desorption leads to an efficient extraction and a good chromatographic separation of extracted products. The method was optimized investigating the effects of several solvents, the volume added to the solid sample, and temperature programming of the ChromatoProbe DSI device. The best results for thermal desorption were found using toluene as an extraction solvent and heating the programmable temperature injector from room temperature to 300 degrees C with a temperature step of 105 degrees C. With the use of the optimized thermal desorption conditions, several components have been positively identified in the volatile fraction of the deposits: aromatics, antioxidants, and antioxidant degradation products. Moreover, this work highlighted the presence of diesel fuel in the VOM of the piston deposits and gave new facts on the absence of the role of diesel fuel in the deposit formation process. Most importantly, it opens the possibility of quickly performing the analysis of deposits with small amounts of samples while having a good separation of the volatiles.

  13. A comparison of continuous pneumatic nebulization and flow injection-direct injection nebulization for sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crain, J.S.; Kiely, J.T.

    1995-08-01

    Dilute nitric acid blanks and solutions containing Ni, Cd, Pb, and U (including two laboratory waste samples) were analyzed eighteen times over a two-month period using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Two different sample introduction techniques were employed: flow injection-direct injection nebulization (FI-DIN) and continuous pneumatic nebulization (CPN). Using comparable instrumental measurement procedures, FI-DIN analyses were 33% faster and generated 52% less waste than CPN analyses. Instrumental limits of detection obtained with FI-DIN and CPN were comparable but not equivalent (except in the case of Pb) because of nebulizer-related differences in sensitivity (i.e., signal per unit analyte concentration) and background. Substantial and statistically significant differences were found between FI-DIN and CPN Ni determinations, and in the case of the laboratory waste samples, there were also small but statistically significant differences between Cd determinations. These small (2 to 3%) differences were not related to polyatomic ion interference (e.g., {sup 95}Mo{sup 16}O{sup +}), but in light of the time savings and waste reduction to be realized, they should not preclude the use of FI-DIN in place of CPN for determination of Cd, Pb, U and chemically.

  14. A comparison of continuous pneumatic nebulization and flow injection-direction injection nebulization for sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crain, J.S.; Kiely, J.T.

    1997-08-01

    Samples containing Ni, Cd, Pb, and U were analyzed eighteen times over a two-month period using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Sample introduction was accomplished by either flow injection-direct injection nebulization (FI-DIN) or continuous pneumatic nebulization (CPN). Using comparable instrumental measurement procedures, FI-DIN analyses were 33% faster and generated 52% less waste than CPN analyses. Instrumental limits of detection obtained with FI-DIN and CPN were comparable but not equivalent (except in the case of Pb) because of nebulizer-related differences in sensitivity (i.e., signal per unit analyte concentration) and background. Substantial and statistically significant differences were found between FI-DIN and CPN Ni determinations, and in the case of laboratory waste samples, there were also small but statistically significant differences between Cd determinations. These small (2 to 3%) differences were not related to polyatomic ion interference (e.g., {sup 95}Mo{sup 16}O{sup +}), but in light of the time and waste savings to be realized, they should not preclude the use of FI-DIN in place of CPN for determination of Cd, Pb, U, and similar elements present at trace concentrations.

  15. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-10-16

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins) system in vivo in wild-type mice. We used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) to the liver that directly target the tumour suppressor genes Pten (ref. 5) and p53 (also known as TP53 and Trp53) (ref. 6), alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumours that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumour tissue revealed insertion or deletion mutations of the tumour suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumours. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harbouring sgRNAs targeting the β-catenin gene and a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of β-catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics.

  16. A Direct Role for Cohesin in Gene Regulation and Ecdysone Response in Drosophila Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, Andrea; van Bemmel, Joke G.; Oliveira, Raquel A.; Itoh, Takehiko; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; van Steensel, Bas; Nasmyth, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Developmental abnormalities observed in Cornelia de Lange syndrome have been genetically linked to mutations in the cohesin machinery. These and other recent experimental findings have led to the suggestion that cohesin, in addition to its canonical function of mediating sister chromatid cohesion, might also be involved in regulating gene expression. Results We report that cleavage of cohesin’s kleisin subunit in postmitotic Drosophila salivary glands induces major changes in the transcript levels of many genes. Kinetic analyses of changes in transcript levels upon cohesin cleavage reveal that a subset of genes responds to cohesin cleavage within a few hours. In addition, cohesin binds to most of these loci, suggesting that cohesin is directly regulating their expression. Among these genes are several that are regulated by the steroid hormone ecdysone. Cytological visualization of transcription at selected ecdysone-responsive genes reveals that puffing at Eip74EF ceases within an hour or two of cohesin cleavage, long before any decline in ecdysone receptor could be detected at this locus. Conclusion We conclude that cohesin regulates expression of a distinct set of genes, including those mediating the ecdysone response. PMID:20933422

  17. Target gene specificity of USF-1 is directed via p38-mediated phosphorylation-dependent acetylation.

    PubMed

    Corre, Sébastien; Primot, Aline; Baron, Yorann; Le Seyec, Jacques; Goding, Colin; Galibert, Marie-Dominique

    2009-07-10

    How transcription factors interpret the output from signal transduction pathways to drive distinct programs of gene expression is a key issue that underpins development and disease. The ubiquitously expressed basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper upstream stimulating factor-1 binds E-box regulatory elements (CANNTG) to regulate a wide number of gene networks. In particular, USF-1 is a key component of the tanning process. Following UV irradiation, USF-1 is phosphorylated by the p38 stress-activated kinase on threonine 153 and directly up-regulates expression of the POMC, MC1R, TYR, TYRP-1 and DCT genes. However, how phosphorylation on Thr-153 might affect the activity of USF-1 is unclear. Here we show that, in response to DNA damage, oxidative stress and cellular infection USF-1 is acetylated in a phospho-Thr-153-dependent fashion. Phospho-acetylated USF-1 is nuclear and interacts with DNA but displays altered gene regulatory properties. Phospho-acetylated USF-1 is thus proposed to be associated with loss of transcriptional activation properties toward several target genes implicated in pigmentation process and cell cycle regulation. The identification of this critical stress-dependent USF-1 modification gives new insights into understanding USF-1 gene expression modulation associated with cancer development.

  18. A direct molecular link between the autism candidate gene RORa and the schizophrenia candidate MIR137

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devanna, Paolo; Vernes, Sonja C.

    2014-02-01

    Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha gene (RORa) and the microRNA MIR137 have both recently been identified as novel candidate genes for neuropsychiatric disorders. RORa encodes a ligand-dependent orphan nuclear receptor that acts as a transcriptional regulator and miR-137 is a brain enriched small non-coding RNA that interacts with gene transcripts to control protein levels. Given the mounting evidence for RORa in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and MIR137 in schizophrenia and ASD, we investigated if there was a functional biological relationship between these two genes. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-137 targets the 3'UTR of RORa in a site specific manner. We also provide further support for MIR137 as an autism candidate by showing that a large number of previously implicated autism genes are also putatively targeted by miR-137. This work supports the role of MIR137 as an ASD candidate and demonstrates a direct biological link between these previously unrelated autism candidate genes.

  19. Direct and long-term detection of gene doping in conventional blood samples.

    PubMed

    Beiter, T; Zimmermann, M; Fragasso, A; Hudemann, J; Niess, A M; Bitzer, M; Lauer, U M; Simon, P

    2011-03-01

    The misuse of somatic gene therapy for the purpose of enhancing athletic performance is perceived as a coming threat to the world of sports and categorized as 'gene doping'. This article describes a direct detection approach for gene doping that gives a clear yes-or-no answer based on the presence or absence of transgenic DNA in peripheral blood samples. By exploiting a priming strategy to specifically amplify intronless DNA sequences, we developed PCR protocols allowing the detection of very small amounts of transgenic DNA in genomic DNA samples to screen for six prime candidate genes. Our detection strategy was verified in a mouse model, giving positive signals from minute amounts (20 μl) of blood samples for up to 56 days following intramuscular adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer, one of the most likely candidate vector systems to be misused for gene doping. To make our detection strategy amenable for routine testing, we implemented a robust sample preparation and processing protocol that allows cost-efficient analysis of small human blood volumes (200 μl) with high specificity and reproducibility. The practicability and reliability of our detection strategy was validated by a screening approach including 327 blood samples taken from professional and recreational athletes under field conditions.

  20. Automated DNA mutation detection using universal conditions direct sequencing: application to ten muscular dystrophy genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the most common and efficient methods for detecting mutations in genes is PCR amplification followed by direct sequencing. Until recently, the process of designing PCR assays has been to focus on individual assay parameters rather than concentrating on matching conditions for a set of assays. Primers for each individual assay were selected based on location and sequence concerns. The two primer sequences were then iteratively adjusted to make the individual assays work properly. This generally resulted in groups of assays with different annealing temperatures that required the use of multiple thermal cyclers or multiple passes in a single thermal cycler making diagnostic testing time-consuming, laborious and expensive. These factors have severely hampered diagnostic testing services, leaving many families without an answer for the exact cause of a familial genetic disease. A search of GeneTests for sequencing analysis of the entire coding sequence for genes that are known to cause muscular dystrophies returns only a small list of laboratories that perform comprehensive gene panels. The hypothesis for the study was that a complete set of universal assays can be designed to amplify and sequence any gene or family of genes using computer aided design tools. If true, this would allow automation and optimization of the mutation detection process resulting in reduced cost and increased throughput. Results An automated process has been developed for the detection of deletions, duplications/insertions and point mutations in any gene or family of genes and has been applied to ten genes known to bear mutations that cause muscular dystrophy: DMD; CAV3; CAPN3; FKRP; TRIM32; LMNA; SGCA; SGCB; SGCG; SGCD. Using this process, mutations have been found in five DMD patients and four LGMD patients (one in the FKRP gene, one in the CAV3 gene, and two likely causative heterozygous pairs of variations in the CAPN3 gene of two other patients). Methods and assay

  1. The promoter of the CD11b gene directs myeloid-specific and developmentally regulated expression.

    PubMed Central

    Shelley, C S; Arnaout, M A

    1991-01-01

    Human CD11b/CD18 (complement receptor type 3) is a member of the beta 2 integrin subfamily which also includes the heterodimers CD11a/CD18 and CD11c/CD18. The CD11 molecules and the common CD18 are the products of different genes that exhibit distinct though overlapping patterns of tissue- and developmental-specific expression. Whereas expression of CD11b and CD11c is almost exclusively restricted to cells of the myeloid lineage, that of CD11a and CD18 is panleukocytic. To begin to understand the mechanisms by which expression of these gene products is restricted to leukocytes and leukocyte subpopulations and to elucidate the mechanisms by which their expression is coordinated, we have cloned and characterized the promoter region of the CD11b gene. A single transcription initiation site has been identified and the region extending 242 base pairs upstream and 71 base pairs downstream of this site has been shown to be sufficient to direct tissue-, cell-, and development-specific expression in vitro, which mimics that of the CD11b gene in vivo. Within this region there are potential binding sites for transcription factors known to be involved in hematopoietic-specific and phorbol ester-inducible gene expression. Further analysis of this region of the CD11b gene and comparison with the promoters of the CD11a, CD11c, and CD18 genes should lead to significant insights into the molecular mechanisms by which these genes are regulated during hematopoietic development and upon activation. Images PMID:1683702

  2. Directed evolution combined with synthetic biology strategies expedite semi-rational engineering of genes and genomes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhen; Zhang, Junli; Jin, Peng; Yang, Sen

    2015-01-01

    Owing to our limited understanding of the relationship between sequence and function and the interaction between intracellular pathways and regulatory systems, the rational design of enzyme-coding genes and de novo assembly of a brand-new artificial genome for a desired functionality or phenotype are difficult to achieve. As an alternative approach, directed evolution has been widely used to engineer genomes and enzyme-coding genes. In particular, significant developments toward DNA synthesis, DNA assembly (in vitro or in vivo), recombination-mediated genetic engineering, and high-throughput screening techniques in the field of synthetic biology have been matured and widely adopted, enabling rapid semi-rational genome engineering to generate variants with desired properties. In this commentary, these novel tools and their corresponding applications in the directed evolution of genomes and enzymes are discussed. Moreover, the strategies for genome engineering and rapid in vitro enzyme evolution are also proposed.

  3. INTRODUCTION OF THE VITELLOGENIN GENE IN EARLY LIFE STAGE FATHEAD MINNOWS AS AN EFFECTIVE EXPOSURE INDICATOR FOR ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vitellogenin (Vg) gene expression in adult male fathead minnows (FHM) has previously been used successfully to detect exposures to estrogenic compounds in aquatic systems; however, sample volume(s)required for >24h exposure durations and the logistics of sampling pose some limita...

  4. Introduction of apple ANR genes into tobacco inhibits expression of both CHI and DFR genes in flowers, leading to loss of anthocyanin.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuepeng; Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena; Korban, Schuyler S

    2012-04-01

    Three genes encoding anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) in apple (Malus×domestica Borkh.), designated MdANR1, MdANR2a, and MdANR2b, have been cloned and characterized. MdANR1 shows 91% identity in coding DNA sequences with MdANR2a and MdANR2b, while MdANR2a and MdANR2b are allelic and share 99% nucleotide sequence identity in the coding region. MdANR1 and MdANR2 genes are located on linkage groups 10 and 5, respectively. Expression levels of both MdANR1 and MdANR2 genes are generally higher in yellow-skinned cv. Golden Delicious than in red-skinned cv. Red Delicious. Transcript accumulation of MdANR1 and MdANR2 genes in fruits gradually decreased throughout fruit development. Ectopic expression of apple MdANR genes in tobacco positively and negatively regulates the biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) and anthocyanin, respectively, resulting in white, pale pink-coloured, and white/red variegated flowers. The accumulation of anthocyanin is significantly reduced in all tobacco transgenic flowers, while catechin and epicatechin contents in transgenic flowers are significantly higher than those in flowers of wild-type plants. The inhibition of anthocyanin synthesis in tobacco transgenic flowers overexpressing MdANR genes is probably attributed to down-regulation of CHALCONE ISOMERASE (CHI) and DIHYDROFLAVONOL-4-REDUCTASE (DFR) genes involved in the anthocyanin pathway. Interestingly, several transgenic lines show no detectable transcripts of the gene encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) in flowers, but accumulate higher levels of catechin in flowers of transgenic plants than those of wild-type plants. This finding suggests that the ANR gene may be capable of generating catechin via an alternative route, although this mechanism is yet to be further elucidated.

  5. Transient expression of minimum linear gene cassettes in onion epidermal cells via direct transformation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yun-Qing; Yang, Jun; Xu, Feng-Ping; An, Li-Jia; Liu, Jian-Feng; Chen, Zhi-Wen

    2009-12-01

    A new method without any special devices for direct transformation of linear gene cassettes was developed. Its feasibility was verified through 5'-fluorescent dye (fluorescein isothiocyanate, FITC)-labeled fluorescent tracing and transient expression of a gus reporter gene. Minimal linear gene cassettes, containing necessary regulation elements and a gus reporter gene, was prepared by polymerase chain reaction and dissolved in transformation buffer solution to 100 ng/mL. The basic transformation solution used was Murashige and Skoog basal salt mixture (MS) liquid medium. Hypertonic pretreatment of explants and transformation cofactors, including Ca(2+), surfactant assistants, Agrobacterium LBA4404 cell culture on transformation efficiency were evaluated. Prior to the incubation of the explants and target linear cassette in each designed transformation solution for 3 h, the onion low epidermal explants were pre-cultured in darkness at 27 degrees C for 48 h and then transferred to MS solid media for 72 h. FITC-labeled linear DNA was used to trace the delivery of DNA entry into the cell and the nuclei. By GUS staining and flow-cytometry-mediated fluorescent detection, a significant increase of the ratios of fluorescent nuclei as well as expression of the gus reporter gene was observed by each designed transformation solution. This potent and feasible method showed prospective applications in plant transgenic research.

  6. Efficiency of gene silencing in Arabidopsis: direct inverted repeats vs. transitive RNAi vectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Filichkin, Sergei A; DiFazio, Steven P; Brunner, Amy M; Davis, John M; Yang, Zamin Koo; Kalluri, Udaya C; Arias, Renee S; Etherington, Elizabeth; Tuskan, Gerald A; Strauss, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of RNA interference (RNAi) in Arabidopsis using transitive and homologous inverted repeat (hIR) vectors. hIR constructs carry self-complementary intron-spliced fragments of the target gene whereas transitive vectors have the target sequence fragment adjacent to an intron-spliced, inverted repeat of heterologous origin. Both transitive and hIR constructs facilitated specific and heritable silencing in the three genes studied (AP1, ETTIN and TTG1). Both types of vectors produced a phenotypic series that phenocopied reduction of function mutants for the respective target gene. The hIR yielded up to fourfold higher proportions of events with strongly manifested reduction of function phenotypes compared to transitive RNAi. We further investigated the efficiency and potential off-target effects of AP1 silencing by both types of vectors using genome-scale microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR. The depletion of AP1 transcripts coincided with reduction of function phenotypic changes among both hIR and transitive lines and also showed similar expression patterns among differentially regulated genes. We did not detect significant silencing directed against homologous potential off-target genes when constructs were designed with minimal sequence similarity. Both hIR and transitive methods are useful tools in plant biotechnology and genomics. The choice of vector will depend on specific objectives such as cloning throughput, number of events and degree of suppression required.

  7. Evaluation of automated direct sample introduction with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the screening analysis of dioxins in fish oil.

    PubMed

    Hoh, Eunha; Lehotay, Steven J; Mastovska, Katerina; Huwe, Janice K

    2008-08-01

    An automated direct sample introduction technique coupled to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (DSI-GC x GC/TOF-MS) was applied for the development of a relatively fast and easy analytical screening method for 17 polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and 4 non-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in fish oil. Comparison of instrumental performance between DSI-GC x GC/TOF-MS and the traditional gas chromatographic high resolution mass spectrometric (GC-HRMS) method showed good agreement of results for standard solutions analyzed in blind fashion. Relatively high tolerance of the DSI technique for lipids in the final extracts enabled a streamlined sample preparation procedure that only required gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) cleanup with graphitized carbon black. The sample size for the method was 2g of cod liver oil, which achieved limits of quantitation (LOQs) of 0.019-7.8 pg/g toxic equivalent quotients for the individual PCDD/Fs. Lower detection limits can be achieved by using larger sample size and scaling up the sample preparation procedure, but this adds to the labor, time, solvent consumption, and expense of the approach. However, the streamlined method yielded 0.94 pg/g and 2.3 pg/g LOQs for 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro dibenzofuran (TCDF) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachloro biphenyl (CB126), which were sufficiently low for regulatory monitoring of 2g samples. Therefore, instead of congener specific analysis, this streamlined analytical screening method for TCDF and CB126 has the potential to monitor fish oil contaminated with dioxin and dioxin-like PCBs at or above current food safety limits. Acceptable recoveries for nearly all analytes at three different spiking levels in fish oil samples were achieved with good repeatability.

  8. The core planar cell polarity gene, Vangl2, directs adult corneal epithelial cell alignment and migration

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Amy S.; Panzica, D. Alessio; Walczysko, Petr; Holt, Amy B.; Henderson, Deborah J.; West, John D.; Rajnicek, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that the core planar cell polarity (PCP) genes direct the aligned cell migration in the adult corneal epithelium, a stratified squamous epithelium on the outer surface of the vertebrate eye. Expression of multiple core PCP genes was demonstrated in the adult corneal epithelium. PCP components were manipulated genetically and pharmacologically in human and mouse corneal epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of VANGL2 reduced the directional component of migration of human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells without affecting speed. It was shown that signalling through PCP mediators, dishevelled, dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis and Rho-associated protein kinase directs the alignment of HCE cells by affecting cytoskeletal reorganization. Cells in which VANGL2 was disrupted tended to misalign on grooved surfaces and migrate across, rather than parallel to the grooves. Adult corneal epithelial cells in which Vangl2 had been conditionally deleted showed a reduced rate of wound-healing migration. Conditional deletion of Vangl2 in the mouse corneal epithelium ablated the normal highly stereotyped patterns of centripetal cell migration in vivo from the periphery (limbus) to the centre of the cornea. Corneal opacity owing to chronic wounding is a major cause of degenerative blindness across the world, and this study shows that Vangl2 activity is required for directional corneal epithelial migration. PMID:27853583

  9. Congenital Nystagmus Gene FRMD7 Is Necessary for Establishing a Neuronal Circuit Asymmetry for Direction Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Yonehara, Keisuke; Fiscella, Michele; Drinnenberg, Antonia; Esposti, Federico; Trenholm, Stuart; Krol, Jacek; Franke, Felix; Scherf, Brigitte Gross; Kusnyerik, Akos; Müller, Jan; Szabo, Arnold; Jüttner, Josephine; Cordoba, Francisco; Reddy, Ashrithpal Police; Németh, János; Nagy, Zoltán Zsolt; Munier, Francis; Hierlemann, Andreas; Roska, Botond

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neuronal circuit asymmetries are important components of brain circuits, but the molecular pathways leading to their establishment remain unknown. Here we found that the mutation of FRMD7, a gene that is defective in human congenital nystagmus, leads to the selective loss of the horizontal optokinetic reflex in mice, as it does in humans. This is accompanied by the selective loss of horizontal direction selectivity in retinal ganglion cells and the transition from asymmetric to symmetric inhibitory input to horizontal direction-selective ganglion cells. In wild-type retinas, we found FRMD7 specifically expressed in starburst amacrine cells, the interneuron type that provides asymmetric inhibition to direction-selective retinal ganglion cells. This work identifies FRMD7 as a key regulator in establishing a neuronal circuit asymmetry, and it suggests the involvement of a specific inhibitory neuron type in the pathophysiology of a neurological disease. Video Abstract PMID:26711119

  10. A survey of disease connections for CD4+ T cell master genes and their directly linked genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentian; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Simpfendorfer, Kim R; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies and other genetic analyses have identified a large number of genes and variants implicating a variety of disease etiological mechanisms. It is imperative for the study of human diseases to put these genetic findings into a coherent functional context. Here we use system biology tools to examine disease connections of five master genes for CD4+ T cell subtypes (TBX21, GATA3, RORC, BCL6, and FOXP3). We compiled a list of genes functionally interacting (protein-protein interaction, or by acting in the same pathway) with the master genes, then we surveyed the disease connections, either by experimental evidence or by genetic association. Embryonic lethal genes (also known as essential genes) are over-represented in master genes and their interacting genes (55% versus 40% in other genes). Transcription factors are significantly enriched among genes interacting with the master genes (63% versus 10% in other genes). Predicted haploinsufficiency is a feature of most these genes. Disease-connected genes are enriched in this list of genes: 42% of these genes have a disease connection according to Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) (versus 23% in other genes), and 74% are associated with some diseases or phenotype in a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) (versus 43% in other genes). Seemingly, not all of the diseases connected to genes surveyed were immune related, which may indicate pleiotropic functions of the master regulator genes and associated genes.

  11. Generation of insect-resistant and glyphosate-tolerant rice by introduction of a T-DNA containing two Bt insecticidal genes and an EPSPS gene*

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, Qi-chao; LIU, Ming-hong; ZHANG, Xian-wen; LIN, Chao-yang; ZHANG, Qing; SHEN, Zhi-cheng

    2015-01-01

    Insect resistance and glyphosate tolerance have been two of the most important traits in the genetic improvement of various crops. In this study, two Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal genes, Cry1Ac and Cry1Ig, and a modified glyphosate-tolerant 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene (G10) were combined into a single transferred DNA (T-DNA) fragment and introduced into rice by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. A transgenic line with single-copy T-DNA insertion named GAI-14 was found to be highly resistant to striped stem borer and rice leaf roller, and tolerant to glyphosate. Analysis of T-DNA border sequence suggested that the transgenes were inserted at the chromosome 3 and appeared to have not interrupted any known or putative genes. A field trial observed no significant difference in the basic agronomic traits between GAI-14 and the recipient rice. PMID:26465130

  12. Histone ADP-Ribosylation Facilitates Gene Transcription by Directly Remodeling Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Zamudio, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes imposes obstacles on gene transcription, and histone-modifying and nucleosome-remodeling complexes work in concert to alleviate these obstacles so as to facilitate transcription. Emerging evidence shows that chromatin-associated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and its enzymatic activity facilitate inflammatory gene transcription and modulate the inflammatory response in animal models. However, the molecular mechanisms by which PARP-1 enzymatic activity facilitates transcription are not well understood. Here we show that through an intracellular signaling pathway, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation induces PARP-1 enzymatic activity and the ADP-ribosylation of histones at transcriptionally active and accessible chromatin regions in macrophages. In vitro DNase I footprinting and restriction endonuclease accessibility assays reveal that histone ADP-ribosylation directly destabilizes histone-DNA interactions in the nucleosome and increases the site accessibility of the nucleosomal DNA to nucleases. Consistent with this, LPS stimulation-induced ADP-ribosylation at the nucleosome-occupied promoters of il-1β, mip-2, and csf2 facilitates NF-κB recruitment and the transcription of these genes in macrophages. Therefore, our data suggest that PARP-1 enzymatic activity facilitates gene transcription through increasing promoter accessibility by histone ADP-ribosylation. PMID:22547677

  13. Recursive directional ligation by plasmid reconstruction allows rapid and seamless cloning of oligomeric genes.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Jonathan R; Mackay, J Andrew; Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2010-04-12

    This paper reports a new strategy, recursive directional ligation by plasmid reconstruction (PRe-RDL), to rapidly clone highly repetitive polypeptides of any sequence and specified length over a large range of molecular weights. In a single cycle of PRe-RDL, two halves of a parent plasmid, each containing a copy of an oligomer, are ligated together, thereby dimerizing the oligomer and reconstituting a functional plasmid. This process is carried out recursively to assemble an oligomeric gene with the desired number of repeats. PRe-RDL has several unique features that stem from the use of type IIs restriction endonucleases: first, PRe-RDL is a seamless cloning method that leaves no extraneous nucleotides at the ligation junction. Because it uses type IIs endonucleases to ligate the two halves of the plasmid, PRe-RDL also addresses the major limitation of RDL in that it abolishes any restriction on the gene sequence that can be oligomerized. The reconstitution of a functional plasmid only upon successful ligation in PRe-RDL also addresses two other limitations of RDL: the significant background from self-ligation of the vector observed in RDL, and the decreased efficiency of ligation due to nonproductive circularization of the insert. PRe-RDL can also be used to assemble genes that encode different sequences in a predetermined order to encode block copolymers or append leader and trailer peptide sequences to the oligomerized gene.

  14. Site-directed gene replacement of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Elisa E; Nepomuceno, Roberto S L; Faria, Juarez B; Ferreira, Luís C S; Ferreira, Rita C C

    2006-04-01

    In this work we defined experimental conditions for site-directed gene replacement of the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac), an economically relevant pathogen of citrus plants. The procedure involved, first, optimizing the electrotransformation conditions of the Xac 306 strain and, second, constructing non-replicative suicide vectors carrying knockout copies of the target gene. Using specific experimental conditions, transformation efficiencies of Xac were at least 100 fold higher than those achieved with electroporation protocols previously designed for X. campestris transformation. Successful gene replacement events were achieved with a suicide vector derived from R6K plasmid (pWR-SS) but not with those with ColE1 replication origin. We have chosen the oppA as a target gene, encoding the binding component (OppA) of the major oligopeptide uptake system found in the genome of the Xac 306 strain, although not in X. campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). Defining the experimental conditions, which allow for the specific mutagenesis of the Xac 306 strain, represents a step in the understanding of both genetics and physiology of this economically important bacterial species.

  15. Direct effect of acaricides on pathogen loads and gene expression levels in honey bees Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Boncristiani, Humberto; Underwood, Robyn; Schwarz, Ryan; Evans, Jay D; Pettis, Jeffery; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis

    2012-05-01

    The effect of using acaricides to control varroa mites has long been a concern to the beekeeping industry due to unintended negative impacts on honey bee health. Irregular ontogenesis, suppression of immune defenses, and impairment of normal behavior have been linked to pesticide use. External stressors, including parasites and the pathogens they vector, can confound studies on the effects of pesticides on the metabolism of honey bees. This is the case of Varroa destructor, a mite that negatively affects honey bee health on many levels, from direct parasitism, which diminishes honey bee productivity, to vectoring and/or activating other pathogens, including many viruses. Here we present a gene expression profile comprising genes acting on diverse metabolic levels (detoxification, immunity, and development) in a honey bee population that lacks the influence of varroa mites. We present data for hives treated with five different acaricides; Apiguard (thymol), Apistan (tau-fluvalinate), Checkmite (coumaphos), Miteaway (formic acid) and ApiVar (amitraz). The results indicate that thymol, coumaphos and formic acid are able to alter some metabolic responses. These include detoxification gene expression pathways, components of the immune system responsible for cellular response and the c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, and developmental genes. These could potentially interfere with the health of individual honey bees and entire colonies.

  16. Directed partial correlation: inferring large-scale gene regulatory network through induced topology disruptions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yinyin; Li, Chang-Tsun; Windram, Oliver

    2011-04-06

    Inferring regulatory relationships among many genes based on their temporal variation in transcript abundance has been a popular research topic. Due to the nature of microarray experiments, classical tools for time series analysis lose power since the number of variables far exceeds the number of the samples. In this paper, we describe some of the existing multivariate inference techniques that are applicable to hundreds of variables and show the potential challenges for small-sample, large-scale data. We propose a directed partial correlation (DPC) method as an efficient and effective solution to regulatory network inference using these data. Specifically for genomic data, the proposed method is designed to deal with large-scale datasets. It combines the efficiency of partial correlation for setting up network topology by testing conditional independence, and the concept of Granger causality to assess topology change with induced interruptions. The idea is that when a transcription factor is induced artificially within a gene network, the disruption of the network by the induction signifies a genes role in transcriptional regulation. The benchmarking results using GeneNetWeaver, the simulator for the DREAM challenges, provide strong evidence of the outstanding performance of the proposed DPC method. When applied to real biological data, the inferred starch metabolism network in Arabidopsis reveals many biologically meaningful network modules worthy of further investigation. These results collectively suggest DPC is a versatile tool for genomics research. The R package DPC is available for download (http://code.google.com/p/dpcnet/).

  17. Oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with human directed social behavior in dogs (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Kis, Anna; Bence, Melinda; Lakatos, Gabriella; Pergel, Enikő; Turcsán, Borbála; Pluijmakers, Jolanda; Vas, Judit; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Brúder, Ildikó; Földi, Levente; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Miklósi, Adám; Rónai, Zsolt; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2014-01-01

    The oxytocin system has a crucial role in human sociality; several results prove that polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene are related to complex social behaviors in humans. Dogs' parallel evolution with humans and their adaptation to the human environment has made them a useful species to model human social interactions. Previous research indicates that dogs are eligible models for behavioral genetic research, as well. Based on these previous findings, our research investigated associations between human directed social behaviors and two newly described (-212AG, 19131AG) and one known (rs8679684) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the regulatory regions (5' and 3' UTR) of the oxytocin receptor gene in German Shepherd (N = 104) and Border Collie (N = 103) dogs. Dogs' behavior traits have been estimated in a newly developed test series consisting of five episodes: Greeting by a stranger, Separation from the owner, Problem solving, Threatening approach, Hiding of the owner. Buccal samples were collected and DNA was isolated using standard protocols. SNPs in the 3' and 5' UTR regions were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction based techniques followed by subsequent electrophoresis analysis. The gene-behavior association analysis suggests that oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms have an impact in both breeds on (i) proximity seeking towards an unfamiliar person, as well as their owner, and on (ii) how friendly dogs behave towards strangers, although the mediating molecular regulatory mechanisms are yet unknown. Based on these results, we conclude that similarly to humans, the social behavior of dogs towards humans is influenced by the oxytocin system.

  18. TRF2 associates with DREF and directs promoter-selective gene expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hochheimer, Andreas; Zhou, Sharleen; Zheng, Shuang; Holmes, Michael C; Tjian, Robert

    2002-11-28

    Drosophila TATA-box-binding protein (TBP)-related factor 2 (TRF2) is a member of a family of TBP-related factors present in metazoan organisms. Recent evidence suggests that TRF2s are required for proper embryonic development and differentiation. However, true target promoters and the mechanisms by which TRF2 operates to control transcription remain elusive. Here we report the antibody affinity purification of a Drosophila TRF2-containing complex that contains components of the nucleosome remodelling factor (NURF) chromatin remodelling complex as well as the DNA replication-related element (DRE)-binding factor DREF. This latter finding led us to potential target genes containing TRF2-responsive promoters. We have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays to show that the DREF-containing TRF2 complex directs core promoter recognition of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene. We also identified additional TRF2-responsive target genes involved in DNA replication and cell proliferation. These data suggest that TRF2 functions as a core promoter-selectivity factor responsible for coordinating transcription of a subset of genes in Drosophila.

  19. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as a direct downstream target gene of Hoxc8

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Hyehyun; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Bok, Jinwoong; Chung, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2010-02-19

    Hoxc8 is a member of Hox family transcription factors that play crucial roles in spatiotemporal body patterning during embryogenesis. Hox proteins contain a conserved 61 amino acid homeodomain, which is responsible for recognition and binding of the proteins onto Hox-specific DNA binding motifs and regulates expression of their target genes. Previously, using proteome analysis, we identified Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as one of the putative target genes of Hoxc8. Here, we asked whether Hoxc8 regulates Pcna expression by directly binding to the regulatory sequence of Pcna. In mouse embryos at embryonic day 11.5, the expression pattern of Pcna was similar to that of Hoxc8 along the anteroposterior body axis. Moreover, Pcna transcript levels as well as cell proliferation rate were increased by overexpression of Hoxc8 in C3H10T1/2 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Characterization of 2.3 kb genomic sequence upstream of Pcna coding region revealed that the upstream sequence contains several Hox core binding sequences and one Hox-Pbx binding sequence. Direct binding of Hoxc8 proteins to the Pcna regulatory sequence was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, our data suggest that Pcna is a direct downstream target of Hoxc8.

  20. Capabilities of direct sample introduction--comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography--time-of-flight mass spectrometry to analyze organic chemicals of interest in fish oils.

    PubMed

    Hoh, Eunha; Lehotay, Steven J; Mastovska, Katerina; Ngo, Helen L; Vetter, Walter; Pangallo, Kristin C; Reddy, Christopher M

    2009-05-01

    Most analytical methods for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) focus on individual groups of targeted analytes. Therefore, analysis of multiple classes of POPs typically entails several sample preparations, fractionations, and injections, whereas other chemicals of possible interest are neglected or lost. To analyze a wider scope of organic contaminants in fish oil, we developed an approach to combine the analysis of targeted and untargeted chemicals using an automated direct sample introduction (DSI) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC x GC/ ToF-MS). DSI-GC x GC/ToF-MS is a powerful tool that attains high quality separations to achieve high selectivity while still providing a wide analytical scope with minimal sample preparation, especially in conjunction with DSr's high tolerance to dirty extracts. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) was used for initial separation of lipids from POPs and other GC-amenable organic compounds from dietary cod liver oil. For comparison purposes, additional cleanup of the GPC extracts was done by silica adsorption and acidification, which helped provide clues in the identification of untargeted compounds, but in routine analysis, only GPC is needed for this analytical approach. The approach allowed simultaneous identification of known-POPs in the fish liver oils, and further permitted presumptive identifications of multiple groups of halogenated natural products (HNPs) and other organic chemicals of interest through comparisons of the mass spectra from analyses with those from mass spectral libraries and/or reports in the literature (approximately 60 PCB congeners and 76 compounds in total). Subsequent confirmations were made by reanalysis and comparison of chromatographic retention times and mass spectra with contemporaneously analyzed reference standards. Otherwise, ion fragmentation patterns of unknown compounds were assessed for tentative identifications. Some of the

  1. TGFβ Inducible Early Gene-1 Directly Binds to, and Represses, the OPG Promoter in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, M.; Hawse, J. R.; Bruinsma, E. S.; Grygo, S. B.; Cicek, M.; Oursler, M. J.; Spelsberg, T. C.

    2010-01-01

    TGFβ Inducible Early Gene-1 (TIEG) is a member of the Krüppel-like family of transcription factors (KLF10) that plays an important role in TGFβ mediated Smad signaling. In order to better understand the role of TIEG in bone, we generated TIEG knockout (KO) mice. Calvarial osteoblasts (OBs) isolated from these mice exhibit a reduced ability to support osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Gene expression studies revealed decreased receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) and increased osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression in TIEG KO OBs, suggesting a potential role for TIEG in regulating the expression of these genes. Since OPG and RANKL are two important regulators of osteoclast (OC) differentiation, we sought to determine if TIEG directly regulates their expression. Luciferase constructs, containing fragments of either the mouse OPG promoter (−1486 to +133 bp) or the RANKL promoter (−2000 to +1 bp) were each cloned into the pGL3 basic reporter vector and transiently transfected into TIEG KO calvarial OBs with and without a TIEG expression vector. No significant changes in the activity of the RANKL promoter were detected in the presence of TIEG. However, OPG promoter activity was inhibited in the presence of TIEG protein suggesting that TIEG directly represses the expression of OPG in OBs. In order to determine the region of this promoter through which TIEG acts, sequential 5′-deletion constructs were generated. Transient transfection of these constructs revealed that the TIEG regulatory element(s) reside within a 200 bp region of the OPG promoter. Transient ChIP analyses, using a TIEG-specific antibody, revealed that TIEG binds to this region of the OPG promoter. Since we have previously shown that TIEG regulates target gene expression through Sp-1 sites, we examined this region of the OPG promoter for potential TIEG binding elements and identified four potential Sp-1 binding sites. Site directed mutagenesis was used to determine if TIEG utilizes these Sp-1 elements

  2. A Cell-Penetrating Peptide with a Guanidinylethyl Amine Structure Directed to Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Makoto; Kato, Takuma; Furukawa, Kaori; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    A peptide composed of lysine with a guanidinylethyl (GEt) amine structure in the side chain [Lys(GEt)] was developed as a cell-penetrating peptide directed to plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery. The GEt amine adopted a diprotonated form at neutral pH, which may have led to the more efficient cellular uptake of a Lys(GEt)-peptide than an arginine-peptide at a low concentration. Lys(GEt)-peptide/pDNA complexes showed the highest transfection efficiency due to efficient endosomal escape without any cytotoxicity. Lys(GEt)-peptide may be a promising candidate as a gene delivery carrier. PMID:26814673

  3. Regulatory region in choline acetyltransferase gene directs developmental and tissue-specific expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lönnerberg, P; Lendahl, U; Funakoshi, H; Arhlund-Richter, L; Persson, H; Ibáñez, C F

    1995-01-01

    Acetylcholine, one of the main neurotransmitters in the nervous system, is synthesized by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT; acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6). The molecular mechanisms controlling the establishment, maintenance, and plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in vivo are largely unknown. A previous report showed that a 3800-bp, but not a 1450-bp, 5' flanking segment from the rat ChAT gene promoter directed cell type-specific expression of a reporter gene in cholinergic cells in vitro. Now we have characterized a distal regulatory region of the ChAT gene that confers cholinergic specificity on a heterologous downstream promoter in a cholinergic cell line and in transgenic mice. A 2342-bp segment from the 5' flanking region of the ChAT gene behaved as an enhancer in cholinergic cells but as a repressor in noncholinergic cells in an orientation-independent manner. Combined with a heterologous basal promoter, this fragment targeted transgene expression to several cholinergic regions of the central nervous system of transgenic mice, including basal forebrain, cortex, pons, and spinal cord. In eight independent transgenic lines, the pattern of transgene expression paralleled qualitatively and quantitatively that displayed by endogenous ChAT mRNA in various regions of the rat central nervous system. In the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord, 85-90% of the transgene expression was targeted to the ventral part of the cord, where cholinergic alpha-motor neurons are located. Transgene expression in the spinal cord was developmentally regulated and responded to nerve injury in a similar way as the endogenous ChAT gene, indicating that the 2342-bp regulatory sequence contains elements controlling the plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in developing and injured neurons. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7732028

  4. Alterations in the RB1 gene in Pakistani patients with retinoblastoma using direct sequencing analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wasim, Muhammad; Afzal, Sibtain; Shahzad, Muhammad Saqib; Ramzan, Shaiqa; Awan, Ali Raza; Anjum, Aftab Ahmed; Ramzan, Khushnooda

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Retinoblastoma (RB) is a rare intraocular malignant tumor of the developing retina with an estimated incidence of 1:20,000 live births in children under the age of 5 years. In addition to the abnormal whitish appearance of the pupil or leukocoria, strabismus has also been reported as a clinical symptom of the disease. RB1 is the first cloned tumor suppressor gene, and mutational inactivation of this gene is responsible for the development of RB during early childhood. The purpose of this study was to identify mutational alterations in the RB1 gene in Pakistani patients with RB. Methods During this study, 70 clinically evaluated patients with RB were recruited from different regions of Pakistan. The cases included 23 sporadic bilateral (32.9%), 34 sporadic unilateral (48.6%), nine familial bilateral (12.8%), and four familial unilateral (5.7%) cases. Constitutional causative mutations in the RB1 gene were screened via direct sequencing of all RB1 exons and their flanking regions. Results In this report, genetic testing resulted in the identification of 18 mutations in 25 patients with RB including six novel RB1 mutations. Of the total mutations identified, 13 (72.22%) were found to be null mutations caused by nine nonsense, three deletions, and one insertion. Two (11.11%) missense, two (11.11%) splice site mutations, and one (5.55%) base substitution in the promoter region were also found. Moreover, ten intronic variants were identified, one of which is novel. Conclusions Molecular screening and identification of these mutations in Pakistani patients with RB provide the mutational variants of the RB1 gene in the Pakistani population. The detection of oncogenic mutations in patients with RB and genetically predisposed individuals is a major step in clinical management, prognosis, follow-up care, accurate genetic counseling, and presymptomatic diagnosis of RB. PMID:26396485

  5. Enhancing Heat Tolerance of the Little Dogwood Cornus canadensis L. f. with Introduction of a Superoxide Reductase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xing-Min; Liu, Xiang; Ji, Mikyoung; Hoffmann, William A.; Grunden, Amy; Xiang, Qiu-Yun J.

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be accelerated under various biotic and abiotic stresses causing lipid peroxidation, protein degradation, enzyme inactivation, and DNA damage. Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a novel antioxidant enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus and is employed by this anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon for efficient detoxification of ROS. In this study, SOR was introduced into a flowering plant Cornus canadensis to enhance its heat tolerance and reduce heat induced damage. A fusion construct of the SOR gene and Green Fluorescent Protein gene (GFP) was introduced into C. canadensis using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Heat tolerance of the GFP-SOR expressing transgenic plants was investigated by observing morphological symptoms of heat injury and by examining changes in photosynthesis, malondialdehyde (MDA), and proline levels in the plants. Our results indicate that the expression of the P. furiosus SOR gene in the transgenic plants alleviated lipid peroxidation of cell membranes and photoinhibition of PS II, and decreased the accumulation of proline at 40°C. After a series of exposures to increasing temperatures, the SOR transgenic plants remained healthy and green whereas most of the non-transgenic plants dried up and were unable to recover. While it had previously been reported that expression of SOR in Arabidopsis enhanced heat tolerance, this is the first report of the successful demonstration of improved heat tolerance in a non-model plant resulting from the introduction of P. furiosus SOR. The study demonstrates the potential of SOR for crop improvement and that inherent limitations of plant heat tolerance can be ameliorated with P. furiosus SOR. PMID:26858741

  6. Directed natural product biosynthesis gene cluster capture and expression in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxin; Li, Zhongrui; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Weipeng; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto; Moore, Bradley S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-03-01

    Bacilli are ubiquitous low G+C environmental Gram-positive bacteria that produce a wide assortment of specialized small molecules. Although their natural product biosynthetic potential is high, robust molecular tools to support the heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in Bacillus hosts are rare. Herein we adapt transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast to design a single genomic capture and expression vector for antibiotic production in Bacillus subtilis. After validating this direct cloning ``plug-and-play'' approach with surfactin, we genetically interrogated amicoumacin biosynthetic gene cluster from the marine isolate Bacillus subtilis 1779. Its heterologous expression allowed us to explore an unusual maturation process involving the N-acyl-asparagine pro-drug intermediates preamicoumacins, which are hydrolyzed by the asparagine-specific peptidase into the active component amicoumacin A. This work represents the first direct cloning based heterologous expression of natural products in the model organism B. subtilis and paves the way to the development of future genome mining efforts in this genus.

  7. Controllability analysis of the directed human protein interaction network identifies disease genes and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Gibson, Travis E.; Lee, Ho-Joon; Yilmazel, Bahar; Roesel, Charles; Hu, Yanhui; Kwon, Young; Sharma, Amitabh; Liu, Yang-Yu; Perrimon, Norbert; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    The protein–protein interaction (PPI) network is crucial for cellular information processing and decision-making. With suitable inputs, PPI networks drive the cells to diverse functional outcomes such as cell proliferation or cell death. Here, we characterize the structural controllability of a large directed human PPI network comprising 6,339 proteins and 34,813 interactions. This network allows us to classify proteins as “indispensable,” “neutral,” or “dispensable,” which correlates to increasing, no effect, or decreasing the number of driver nodes in the network upon removal of that protein. We find that 21% of the proteins in the PPI network are indispensable. Interestingly, these indispensable proteins are the primary targets of disease-causing mutations, human viruses, and drugs, suggesting that altering a network’s control property is critical for the transition between healthy and disease states. Furthermore, analyzing copy number alterations data from 1,547 cancer patients reveals that 56 genes that are frequently amplified or deleted in nine different cancers are indispensable. Among the 56 genes, 46 of them have not been previously associated with cancer. This suggests that controllability analysis is very useful in identifying novel disease genes and potential drug targets. PMID:27091990

  8. Towards liver-directed gene therapy for Crigler-Najjar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Paula S Montenegro; Bosma, Piter J

    2009-04-01

    Crigler-Najjar (CN) syndrome is a recessive inherited disorder caused by deficiency of uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1. This hepatic enzyme catalyzes the glucuronidation of bilirubin, an essential step in excretion into bile of this neurotoxic compound. As a result, CN patients suffer from severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia and are at risk of bilirubin encephalopathy. Over the last decades ex vivo and in vivo gene therapy using viral and non-viral vectors has been used to correct hyperbilirubinemia in the relevant animal model for CN syndrome, the Gunn rat. Several of these approaches did result in long-term correction of serum bilirubin levels in this animal model. However, none have been translated into a clinical trial. In this review we will recapitulate the strategies used and discuss their suitability for clinical application in the near future. We will also address specific safety measures in the gene therapy protocol needed to prevent adverse effects such as bilirubin toxicity. Since CN seems an ideal model for other monogenetic inherited metabolic liver disorders, development of liver-directed gene-therapy has relevance beyond this rare disease.

  9. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of primary hyperoxaluria type 1

    PubMed Central

    Castello, Raffaele; Borzone, Roberta; D’Aria, Stefania; Annunziata, Patrizia; Piccolo, Pasquale; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an inborn error of liver metabolism due to deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) which catalyzes conversion of glyoxylate into glycine. AGT deficiency results in overproduction of oxalate which ultimately leads to end-stage renal disease and death. Organ transplantation as either preemptive liver transplantation or combined liver/kidney transplantation is the only available therapy to prevent disease progression. Gene therapy is an attractive option to provide an alternative treatment for PH1. Towards this goal, we investigated helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of PH1. Compared to saline controls, AGT-deficient mice injected with an HDAd encoding the AGT under the control of a liver-specific promoter showed a significant reduction of hyperoxaluria and less increase of urinary oxalate following challenge with Ethylene Glycol (EG), a precursor of glyoxylate. These studies may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd for PH1 gene therapy. PMID:26609667

  10. The RPG gene of Medicago truncatula controls Rhizobium-directed polar growth during infection.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Godfroy, Olivier; de Billy, Françoise; Saurat, Olivier; Jauneau, Alain; Gough, Clare

    2008-07-15

    Rhizobia can infect roots of host legume plants and induce new organs called nodules, in which they fix atmospheric nitrogen. Infection generally starts with root hair curling, then proceeds inside newly formed, intracellular tubular structures called infection threads. A successful symbiotic interaction relies on infection threads advancing rapidly at their tips by polar growth through successive cell layers of the root toward developing nodule primordia. To identify a plant component that controls this tip growth process, we characterized a symbiotic mutant of Medicago truncatula, called rpg for rhizobium-directed polar growth. In this mutant, nitrogen-fixing nodules were rarely formed due to abnormally thick and slowly progressing infection threads. Root hair curling was also abnormal, indicating that the RPG gene fulfils an essential function in the process whereby rhizobia manage to dominate the process of induced tip growth for root hair infection. Map-based cloning of RPG revealed a member of a previously unknown plant-specific gene family encoding putative long coiled-coil proteins we have called RRPs (RPG-related proteins) and characterized by an "RRP domain" specific to this family. RPG expression was strongly associated with rhizobial infection, and the RPG protein showed a nuclear localization, indicating that this symbiotic gene constitutes an important component of symbiotic signaling.

  11. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of primary hyperoxaluria type 1.

    PubMed

    Castello, R; Borzone, R; D'Aria, S; Annunziata, P; Piccolo, P; Brunetti-Pierri, N

    2016-02-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an inborn error of liver metabolism due to deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), which catalyzes conversion of glyoxylate into glycine. AGT deficiency results in overproduction of oxalate that ultimately leads to end-stage renal disease and death. Organ transplantation as either preemptive liver transplantation or combined liver/kidney transplantation is the only available therapy to prevent disease progression. Gene therapy is an attractive option to provide an alternative treatment for PH1. Toward this goal, we investigated helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of PH1. Compared with saline controls, AGT-deficient mice injected with an HDAd encoding the AGT under the control of a liver-specific promoter showed a significant reduction of hyperoxaluria and less increase of urinary oxalate following challenge with ethylene glycol, a precursor of glyoxylate. These studies may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd for PH1 gene therapy.

  12. CaSPIAN: A Causal Compressive Sensing Algorithm for Discovering Directed Interactions in Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Emad, Amin; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel algorithm for inference of causal gene interactions, termed CaSPIAN (Causal Subspace Pursuit for Inference and Analysis of Networks), which is based on coupling compressive sensing and Granger causality techniques. The core of the approach is to discover sparse linear dependencies between shifted time series of gene expressions using a sequential list-version of the subspace pursuit reconstruction algorithm and to estimate the direction of gene interactions via Granger-type elimination. The method is conceptually simple and computationally efficient, and it allows for dealing with noisy measurements. Its performance as a stand-alone platform without biological side-information was tested on simulated networks, on the synthetic IRMA network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and on data pertaining to the human HeLa cell network and the SOS network in E. coli. The results produced by CaSPIAN are compared to the results of several related algorithms, demonstrating significant improvements in inference accuracy of documented interactions. These findings highlight the importance of Granger causality techniques for reducing the number of false-positives, as well as the influence of noise and sampling period on the accuracy of the estimates. In addition, the performance of the method was tested in conjunction with biological side information of the form of sparse “scaffold networks”, to which new edges were added using available RNA-seq or microarray data. These biological priors aid in increasing the sensitivity and precision of the algorithm in the small sample regime. PMID:24622336

  13. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  14. The cancer gene WWOX behaves as an inhibitor of SMAD3 transcriptional activity via direct binding

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The WW domain containing protein WWOX has been postulated to behave as a tumor suppressor in breast and other cancers. Expression of this protein is lost in over 70% of ER negative tumors. This prompted us to investigate the phenotypic and gene expression effects of loss of WWOX expression in breast cells. Methods Gene expression microarrays and standard in vitro assays were performed on stably silenced WWOX (shRNA) normal breast cells. Bioinformatic analyses were used to identify gene networks and transcriptional regulators affected by WWOX silencing. Co-immunoprecipitations and GST-pulldowns were used to demonstrate a direct interaction between WWOX and SMAD3. Reporter assays, ChIP, confocal microscopy and in silico analyses were employed to determine the effect of WWOX silencing on TGFβ-signaling. Results WWOX silencing affected cell proliferation, motility, attachment and deregulated expression of genes involved in cell cycle, motility and DNA damage. Interestingly, we detected an enrichment of targets activated by the SMAD3 transcription factor, including significant upregulation of ANGPTL4, FST, PTHLH and SERPINE1 transcripts. Importantly, we demonstrate that the WWOX protein physically interacts with SMAD3 via WW domain 1. Furthermore, WWOX expression dramatically decreases SMAD3 occupancy at the ANGPTL4 and SERPINE1 promoters and significantly quenches activation of a TGFβ responsive reporter. Additionally, WWOX expression leads to redistribution of SMAD3 from the nuclear to the cytoplasmic compartment. Since the TGFβ target ANGPTL4 plays a key role in lung metastasis development, we performed a meta-analysis of ANGPTL4 expression relative to WWOX in microarray datasets from breast carcinomas. We observed a significant inverse correlation between WWOX and ANGPTL4. Furthermore, the WWOX lo /ANGPTL4 hi cluster of breast tumors is enriched in triple-negative and basal-like sub-types. Tumors with this gene expression signature could represent

  15. Muscle-targeted hydrodynamic gene introduction of insulin-like growth factor-1 using polyplex nanomicelle to treat peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Kazuya; Itaka, Keiji; Baba, Miyuki; Uchida, Satoshi; Ishii, Takehiko; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-06-10

    The recovery of neurologic function after peripheral nerve injury often remains incomplete because of the prolonged reinnervation process, which leads to skeletal muscle atrophy and articular contracture from disuse over time. To rescue the skeletal muscle and promote functional recovery, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), a potent myogenic factor, was introduced into the muscle by hydrodynamic injection of IGF-1-expressing plasmid DNA using a biocompatible nonviral gene carrier, a polyplex nanomicelle. In a mouse model of sciatic nerve injury, the introduction of IGF-1 into the skeletal muscle of the paralyzed limb effectively alleviated a decrease in muscle weight compared with that in untreated control mice. Histologic analysis of the muscle revealed the IGF-1-expressing plasmid DNA (pDNA) to have a myogenic effect, inducing muscle hypertrophy with the upregulation of the myogenic regulatory factors, myogenin and MyoD. The evaluation of motor function by walking track analysis revealed that the group that received the hydrodynamic injection of IGF-1-expressing pDNA using the polyplex nanomicelle had significantly early recovery of motor function compared with groups receiving negative control pDNA and untreated controls. Early recovery of sensation in the distal area of sciatic nerve injury was also induced by the introduction of IGF-1-expressing pDNA, presumably because of the effect of secreted IGF-1 protein in the vicinity of the injured sciatic nerve exerting a synergistic effect with muscle hypertrophy, inducing a more favorable prognosis. This approach of introducing IGF-1 into skeletal muscle is promising for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury by promoting early motor function recovery.

  16. Rapid Delivery of Foreign Genes into Plants by Direct Rub-Inoculation with Intact Plasmid DNA of a Tomato Bushy Stunt Virus Gene Vector

    PubMed Central

    Scholthof, Herman B.

    1999-01-01

    Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) cDNA, positioned between a modified cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the hepatitis delta virus antigenomic ribozyme with a downstream nopaline synthase gene polyadenylation signal, established infections upon rub-inoculation of plants with intact plasmids. Application of this methodology produced a TBSV DNA-based gene vector which yielded readily detectable levels of localized foreign gene expression in inoculated leaves. This is the first demonstration of an infectious DNA from a member of the Tombusviridae which permits rapid TBSV-mediated foreign-gene expression upon direct rub-inoculation of miniprep DNA onto a variety of plant species. PMID:10438874

  17. A unique nuclear receptor direct repeat 17 (DR17) is present within the upstream region of Schistosoma mansoni female-specific p14 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fantappie, Marcelo Rosado Furtado, Daniel Rodrigues; Rumjanek, Franklin David; LoVerde, Philip T.

    2008-07-11

    The eggs produced by sexually mature female Schistosma mansoni are responsible for the pathogenesis of the disease. The eggshell precursor gene p14 is expressed only in the vitelline cells of sexually mature female worms in response to a yet unidentified male stimulus. Herein, we report the identification of a novel nuclear receptor response element in the upstream region of the p14 gene. This element contains the canonical hexameric DNA core motif, 5'-PuGGTCA, composed of an atypically spaced direct repeat (DR17). Schistosome nuclear receptors SmRXR1 and SmNR1 specifically bound to the p14-DR17 element as a heterodimer. SmRXR1, but not SmNR1, bound to the motif as a monomer. Introduction of mutations in the TCA core sequence completely abolished the binding by SmRXR1/SmNR1 heterodimer. This finding supports our hypothesis that the expression of Schistosoma mansonip14 gene is regulated through the nuclear receptor signaling pathway.

  18. Effects of FVIII immunity on hepatocyte and hematopoietic stem cell-directed gene therapy of murine hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Allison M; Brown, Harrison C; Paik, Na Yoon; Knight, Kristopher A; Wright, J Fraser; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses to coagulation factors VIII (FVIII) and IX (FIX) represent primary obstacles to hemophilia treatment. Previously, we showed that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) retroviral gene therapy induces immune nonresponsiveness to FVIII in both naive and preimmunized murine hemophilia A settings. Liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV)-FIX vector gene transfer achieved similar results in preclinical hemophilia B models. However, as clinical immune responses to FVIII and FIX differ, we investigated the ability of liver-directed AAV-FVIII gene therapy to affect FVIII immunity in hemophilia A mice. Both FVIII naive and preimmunized mice were administered recombinant AAV8 encoding a liver-directed bioengineered FVIII expression cassette. Naive animals receiving high or mid-doses subsequently achieved near normal FVIII activity levels. However, challenge with adjuvant-free recombinant FVIII induced loss of FVIII activity and anti-FVIII antibodies in mid-dose, but not high-dose AAV or HSC lentiviral (LV) vector gene therapy cohorts. Furthermore, unlike what was shown previously for FIX gene transfer, AAV-FVIII administration to hemophilia A inhibitor mice conferred no effect on anti-FVIII antibody or inhibitory titers. These data suggest that functional differences exist in the immune modulation achieved to FVIII or FIX in hemophilia mice by gene therapy approaches incorporating liver-directed AAV vectors or HSC-directed LV.

  19. Effects of terminal nonhomology and homeology on double-strand-break-induced gene conversion tract directionality.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, H H; Sweetser, D B; Nickoloff, J A

    1996-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) greatly enhance gene conversion in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In prior plasmid x chromosome crosses, conversion tracts were often short ( < 53 bp) and usually extended in only one direction from a DSB in an HO recognition sequence inserted into ura3. To allow fine-structure analysis of short and unidirectional tracts, phenotypically silent markers were introduced at 3- and 6-bp intervals flanking the HO site. These markers, which created a 70-bp homeologous region (71% homology), greatly increased the proportion of bidirectional tracts. Among products with short or unidirectional tracts, 85% were highly directional, converting markers on only one side (the nearest marker being 6 bp from the HO site). A DSB in an HO site insertion creates terminal nonhomologies. The high degree of directionality is a likely consequence of the precise cleavage at homology/nonhomology borders in hybrid DNA by Rad1/10 endonuclease. In contrast, terminal homeology alone yielded mostly unidirectional tracts. Thus, nonhomology flanked by homeology yields primarily bidirectional tracts, but terminal homeology or nonhomology alone yields primarily unidirectional tracts. These results are inconsistent with uni- and bidirectional tracts arising from one- and two-ended invasion mechanisms, respectively, as reduced homology would be expected to favor one-ended events. Tract spectra with terminal homeology alone with similar in RAD1 and rad1 cells, indicating that the high proportion of bidirectional tracts seen with homeology flanking nonhomology is not a consequence of Rad1/10 cleavage at homology/homeology boundaries. Instead, tract directionality appears to reflect the influence of the degree of broken-end homology on mismatch repair. PMID:8649406

  20. Gene regulatory networks in differentiation and direct reprogramming of hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Claude; Tys, Janne; Lemaigre, Frédéric P

    2016-12-12

    Liver development proceeds by sequential steps during which gene regulatory networks (GRNs) determine differentiation and maturation of hepatic cells. Characterizing the architecture and dynamics of these networks is essential for understanding how cell fate decisions are made during development, and for recapitulating these processes during in vitro production of liver cells for toxicology studies, disease modelling and regenerative therapy. Here we review the GRNs that control key steps of liver development and lead to differentiation of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes in mammals. We focus on GRNs determining cell fate decisions and analyse subcircuitry motifs that may confer specific dynamic properties to the networks. Finally, we put our analysis in the perspective of recent attempts to directly reprogram cells to hepatocytes by forced expression of transcription factors.

  1. Direct gene transfer in the Gottingen minipig CNS using stereotaxic lentiviral microinjections.

    PubMed

    Norgaard Glud, Andreas; Hedegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Mette Slot; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Bendixen, Christian; Jensen, Poul Henning; Larsen, Knud; Bjarkam, Carsten Reidies

    2010-01-01

    We aim to induce direct viral mediated gene transfer in the substantia nigra (SN) of the Gottingen minipig using MRI guided stereotaxic injections of lentiviral vectors encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Nine female Gottingen minipigs were injected unilaterally into the SN with 6 per 2.5 microliters lentivirus capable of transducing cells and mediating expression of recombinant EGFP. The animals were euthanized after four (n=3) or twenty weeks (n=6). Fresh brain tissue from three animals was used for PCR. The remaining six brains were cryo- or paraffin-sectioned for fluorescence, Nissl-, and immunohistochemical EGFP visualization. EGFP was seen in nigral neurons, axons, glial cells, endothelial cells, and in nigral fibers targeting the striatum. PCR-based detection confirmed the presence of the transgene in SN, whereas all other examined brain areas were negative, indicating that the immunohistochemically detected EGFP in the striatum derived from transfected nigral cells.

  2. Oxytocin Receptor Gene Polymorphisms Are Associated with Human Directed Social Behavior in Dogs (Canis familiaris)

    PubMed Central

    Lakatos, Gabriella; Pergel, Enikő; Turcsán, Borbála; Pluijmakers, Jolanda; Vas, Judit; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Brúder, Ildikó; Földi, Levente; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Miklósi, Ádám; Rónai, Zsolt; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2014-01-01

    The oxytocin system has a crucial role in human sociality; several results prove that polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene are related to complex social behaviors in humans. Dogs' parallel evolution with humans and their adaptation to the human environment has made them a useful species to model human social interactions. Previous research indicates that dogs are eligible models for behavioral genetic research, as well. Based on these previous findings, our research investigated associations between human directed social behaviors and two newly described (−212AG, 19131AG) and one known (rs8679684) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the regulatory regions (5′ and 3′ UTR) of the oxytocin receptor gene in German Shepherd (N = 104) and Border Collie (N = 103) dogs. Dogs' behavior traits have been estimated in a newly developed test series consisting of five episodes: Greeting by a stranger, Separation from the owner, Problem solving, Threatening approach, Hiding of the owner. Buccal samples were collected and DNA was isolated using standard protocols. SNPs in the 3′ and 5′ UTR regions were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction based techniques followed by subsequent electrophoresis analysis. The gene–behavior association analysis suggests that oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms have an impact in both breeds on (i) proximity seeking towards an unfamiliar person, as well as their owner, and on (ii) how friendly dogs behave towards strangers, although the mediating molecular regulatory mechanisms are yet unknown. Based on these results, we conclude that similarly to humans, the social behavior of dogs towards humans is influenced by the oxytocin system. PMID:24454713

  3. Phenotype Sequencing: Identifying the Genes That Cause a Phenotype Directly from Pooled Sequencing of Independent Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Marc A.; Chen, Zugen; Toy, Traci; Machado, Iara M. P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Liao, James C.; Lee, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Random mutagenesis and phenotype screening provide a powerful method for dissecting microbial functions, but their results can be laborious to analyze experimentally. Each mutant strain may contain 50–100 random mutations, necessitating extensive functional experiments to determine which one causes the selected phenotype. To solve this problem, we propose a “Phenotype Sequencing” approach in which genes causing the phenotype can be identified directly from sequencing of multiple independent mutants. We developed a new computational analysis method showing that 1. causal genes can be identified with high probability from even a modest number of mutant genomes; 2. costs can be cut many-fold compared with a conventional genome sequencing approach via an optimized strategy of library-pooling (multiple strains per library) and tag-pooling (multiple tagged libraries per sequencing lane). We have performed extensive validation experiments on a set of E. coli mutants with increased isobutanol biofuel tolerance. We generated a range of sequencing experiments varying from 3 to 32 mutant strains, with pooling on 1 to 3 sequencing lanes. Our statistical analysis of these data (4099 mutations from 32 mutant genomes) successfully identified 3 genes (acrB, marC, acrA) that have been independently validated as causing this experimental phenotype. It must be emphasized that our approach reduces mutant sequencing costs enormously. Whereas a conventional genome sequencing experiment would have cost $7,200 in reagents alone, our Phenotype Sequencing design yielded the same information value for only $1200. In fact, our smallest experiments reliably identified acrB and marC at a cost of only $110–$340. PMID:21364744

  4. Challenges to develop nitrogen-fixing cereals by direct nif-gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Curatti, Leonardo; Rubio, Luis M

    2014-08-01

    Some regions of the developing world suffer low cereal production yields due to low fertilizer inputs, among other factors. Biological N2 fixation, catalyzed by the prokaryotic enzyme nitrogenase, is an alternative to the use of synthetic N fertilizers. The molybdenum nitrogenase is an O2-labile metalloenzyme composed of the NifDK and NifH proteins, which biosyntheses require a number of nif gene products. A challenging strategy to increase cereal crop productivity in a scenario of low N fertilization is the direct transfer of nif genes into cereals. The sensitivity of nitrogenase to O2 and the apparent complexity of nitrogenase biosynthesis are the main barriers identified so far. Expression of active NifH requires the products of nifM, nifH, and possibly nifU and nifS, whereas active NifDK requires the products of nifH, nifD, nifK, nifB, nifE, nifN, and possibly nifU, nifS, nifQ, nifV, nafY, nifW and nifZ. Plastids and mitochondria are potential subcellular locations for nitrogenase. Both could provide the ATP and electrons required for nitrogenase to function but they differ in their internal O2 levels and their ability to incorporate ammonium into amino acids.

  5. Neurogenin 3-directed cre deletion of Tsc1 gene causes pancreatic acinar carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Han, Lingling; Li, Yin; Zhao, Jing; He, Ping; Zhang, Weizhen

    2014-11-01

    The role of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancers remains largely unknown. The present study shows that neurogenin 3 directed Cre deletion of Tsc1 gene induces the development of pancreatic acinar carcinoma. By cross-breeding the Neurog3-cre mice with Tsc1 (loxp/loxp) mice, we generated the Neurog3-Tsc1-/- transgenic mice in which Tsc1 gene is deleted and mTOR signaling activated in the pancreatic progenitor cells. All Neurog3-Tsc1-/- mice developed notable adenocarcinoma-like lesions in pancreas starting from the age of 100 days old. The tumor lesions are composed of cells with morphological and molecular resemblance to acinar cells. Metastasis of neoplasm to liver and lung was detected in 5% of animals. Inhibition of mTOR signaling by rapamycin significantly attenuated the growth of the neoplasm. Relapse of the neoplasm occurred within 14 days upon cessation of rapamycin treatment. Our studies indicate that activation of mTOR signaling in the pancreatic progenitor cells may trigger the development of acinar carcinoma. Thus, mTOR may serve as a potential target for treatment of pancreatic acinar carcinoma.

  6. An optimised direct lysis method for gene expression studies on low cell numbers.

    PubMed

    Le, Anh Viet-Phuong; Huang, Dexing; Blick, Tony; Thompson, Erik W; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2015-08-05

    There is increasing interest in gene expression analysis of either single cells or limited numbers of cells. One such application is the analysis of harvested circulating tumour cells (CTCs), which are often present in very low numbers. A highly efficient protocol for RNA extraction, which involves a minimal number of steps to avoid RNA loss, is essential for low input cell numbers. We compared several lysis solutions that enable reverse transcription (RT) to be performed directly on the cell lysate, offering a simple rapid approach to minimise RNA loss for RT. The lysis solutions were assessed by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in low cell numbers isolated from four breast cancer cell lines. We found that a lysis solution containing both the non-ionic detergent (IGEPAL CA-630, chemically equivalent to Nonidet P-40 or NP-40) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) gave the best RT-qPCR yield. This direct lysis to reverse transcription protocol outperformed a column-based extraction method using a commercial kit. This study demonstrates a simple, reliable, time- and cost-effective method that can be widely used in any situation where RNA needs to be prepared from low to very low cell numbers.

  7. Direct and indirect effects of growth hormone receptor ablation on liver expression of xenobiotic metabolizing genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinna; Bartke, Andrzej; Berryman, Darlene E; Funk, Kevin; Kopchick, John J; List, Edward O; Sun, Liou; Miller, Richard A

    2013-10-15

    Detoxification of ingested xenobiotic chemicals, and of potentially toxic endogenous metabolites, is carried out largely through a series of enzymes synthesized in the liver, sometimes called "xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes" (XME). Expression of these XME is sexually dimorphic in rodents and humans, with many of the XME expressed at higher levels in females. This expression pattern is thought to be regulated, in part, by the sex differences in circadian growth hormone (GH) pulsatility. We have evaluated mRNA, in the liver, for 52 XME genes in male and female mice of four mutant stocks, with diminished levels of GH receptor (GHR) either globally (GKO), or in liver (LKO), fat (FKO), or muscle (MKO) tissue specifically. The data show complex, sex-specific changes. For some XME, the expression pattern is consistent with direct control of hepatic mRNA by GHR in the liver. In contrast, other XME show evidence for indirect pathways in which hepatic XME expression is altered by GH signals in fat or skeletal muscle. The effects of GHR-null mutations on glucose control, responses to dietary interventions, steroid metabolism, detoxification pathways, and lifespan may depend on a mixture of direct hepatic effects and cross talk between different GH-responsive tissues.

  8. Cystic fibrosis gene modifier SLC26A9 modulates airway response to CFTR-directed therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Strug, Lisa J; Gonska, Tanja; He, Gengming; Keenan, Katherine; Ip, Wan; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Lin, Fan; Panjwani, Naim; Gong, Jiafen; Li, Weili; Soave, David; Xiao, Bowei; Tullis, Elizabeth; Rabin, Harvey; Parkins, Michael D; Price, April; Zuberbuhler, Peter C; Corvol, Harriet; Ratjen, Felix; Sun, Lei; Bear, Christine E; Rommens, Johanna M

    2016-08-29

    Cystic fibrosis is realizing the promise of personalized medicine. Recent advances in drug development that target the causal CFTR directly result in lung function improvement, but variability in response is demanding better prediction of outcomes to improve management decisions. The genetic modifier SLC26A9 contributes to disease severity in the CF pancreas and intestine at birth and here we assess its relationship with disease severity and therapeutic response in the airways. SLC26A9 association with lung disease was assessed in individuals from the Canadian and French CF Gene Modifier consortia with CFTR-gating mutations and in those homozygous for the common Phe508del mutation. Variability in response to a CFTR-directed therapy attributed to SLC26A9 genotype was assessed in Canadian patients with gating mutations. A primary airway model system determined if SLC26A9 shows modification of Phe508del CFTR function upon treatment with a CFTR corrector.In those with gating mutations that retain cell surface-localized CFTR we show that SLC26A9 modifies lung function while this is not the case in individuals homozygous for Phe508del where cell surface expression is lacking. Treatment response to ivacaftor, which aims to improve CFTR-channel opening probability in patients with gating mutations, shows substantial variability in response, 28% of which can be explained by rs7512462 in SLC26A9 (P = 0.0006). When homozygous Phe508del primary bronchial cells are treated to restore surface CFTR, SLC26A9 likewise modifies treatment response (P = 0.02). Our findings indicate that SLC26A9 airway modification requires CFTR at the cell surface, and that a common variant in SLC26A9 may predict response to CFTR-directed therapeutics.

  9. GLABRA2 Directly Suppresses Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Genes with Diverse Functions in Root Hair Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Yohei; Kato, Mariko; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Aoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana GLABRA2 (GL2) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in the cell differentiation of various epidermal tissues. During root hair pattern formation, GL2 suppresses root hair development in non-hair cells, acting as a node between the gene regulatory networks for cell fate determination and cell differentiation. Despite the importance of GL2 function, its molecular basis remains obscure because the GL2 target genes leading to the network for cell differentiation are unknown. We identified five basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor genes (ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6 [RHD6], RHD6-LIKE1 [RSL1], RSL2, Lj-RHL1-LIKE1 [LRL1], and LRL2) as GL2 direct targets using transcriptional and posttranslational induction systems. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed GL2 binding to upstream regions of these genes in planta. Reporter gene analyses showed that these genes are expressed in various stages of root hair development and are suppressed by GL2 in non-hair cells. GL2 promoter-driven GFP fusions of LRL1 and LRL2, but not those of the other bHLH proteins, conferred root hair development on non-hair cells. These results indicate that GL2 directly suppresses bHLH genes with diverse functions in root hair development. PMID:26486447

  10. Direct modulation of simian virus 40 late gene expression by thyroid hormone and its receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, F; Kraus, R J; Gulick, T; Moore, D D; Mertz, J E

    1997-01-01

    Transcription of the late genes of simian virus 40 (SV40) is repressed during the early phase of the lytic cycle of infection of primate cells by the binding of cellular factors, called IBP-s, to the SV40 late promoter; repression is relieved after the onset of viral DNA replication by titration of these repressors (S. R. Wiley, R. J. Kraus, F. R. Zuo, E. E. Murray, K. Loritz, and J. E. Mertz, Genes Dev. 7:2206-2219, 1993). Recently, we showed that IBP-s consists of several members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily (F. Zuo and J. E. Mertz, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92:8586-8590, 1995). Here, we show that the thyroid hormone receptor TRalpha1, in combination with retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha), is specifically bound at the transcriptional initiation site of the major late promoter of SV40. This binding repressed transcription from the SV40 late promoter by preventing the formation of pre-initiation complexes. Addition of the thyroid hormone 3,5,3'-L-triiodothyronine (T3) resulted in reversal of this repression in cotransfected CV-1 cells. Interestingly, repression did not occur when this thyroid response element (TRE) was translocated to 50 bp upstream of the major late initiation site. Binding of TRalpha1/RXRalpha heterodimers to this TRE induced bending of the promoter DNA. We conclude that hormones and their receptors can directly affect the expression of SV40, probably by affecting protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions involved in the formation of functional preinitiation complexes. PMID:8985367

  11. The NGATHA Genes Direct Style Development in the Arabidopsis Gynoecium[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Trigueros, Marina; Navarrete-Gómez, Marisa; Sato, Shusei; Christensen, Sioux K.; Pelaz, Soraya; Weigel, Detlef; Yanofsky, Martin F.; Ferrándiz, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    The gynoecium is the most complex floral organ, designed to protect the ovules and ensure their fertilization. Correct patterning and tissue specification in the developing gynoecium involves the concerted action of a host of genetic factors. In addition, apical-basal patterning into different domains, stigma and style, ovary and gynophore, appears to depend on the establishment and maintenance of asymmetric auxin distribution, with an auxin maximum at the apex. Here, we show that a small subfamily of the B3 transcription factor superfamily, the NGATHA (NGA) genes, act redundantly to specify style development in a dosage-dependent manner. Characterization of the NGA gene family is based on an analysis of the activation-tagged mutant named tower-of-pisa1 (top1), which was found to overexpress NGA3. Quadruple nga mutants completely lack style and stigma development. This mutant phenotype is likely caused by a failure to activate two auxin biosynthetic enzymes, YUCCA2 and YUCCA4, in the apical gynoecium domain. The NGA mutant phenotypes are similar to those caused by multiple combinations of mutations in STYLISH1 (STY1) and additional members of its family. NGA3/TOP1 and STY1 share almost identical patterns of expression, but they do not appear to regulate each other at the transcriptional level. Strong synergistic phenotypes are observed when nga3/top1 and sty1 mutants are combined. Furthermore, constitutive expression of both NGA3/TOP1 and STY1 induces the conversion of the ovary into style tissue. Taken together, these data suggest that the NGA and STY factors act cooperatively to promote style specification, in part by directing YUCCA-mediated auxin synthesis in the apical gynoecium domain. PMID:19435937

  12. Notch stimulates growth by direct regulation of genes involved in the control of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Slaninova, Vera; Krafcikova, Michaela; Perez-Gomez, Raquel; Steffal, Pavel; Trantirek, Lukas; Bray, Sarah J; Krejci, Alena

    2016-02-01

    Glycolytic shift is a characteristic feature of rapidly proliferating cells, such as cells during development and during immune response or cancer cells, as well as of stem cells. It results in increased glycolysis uncoupled from mitochondrial respiration, also known as the Warburg effect. Notch signalling is active in contexts where cells undergo glycolytic shift. We decided to test whether metabolic genes are direct transcriptional targets of Notch signalling and whether upregulation of metabolic genes can help Notch to induce tissue growth under physiological conditions and in conditions of Notch-induced hyperplasia. We show that genes mediating cellular metabolic changes towards the Warburg effect are direct transcriptional targets of Notch signalling. They include genes encoding proteins involved in glucose uptake, glycolysis, lactate to pyruvate conversion and repression of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The direct transcriptional upregulation of metabolic genes is PI3K/Akt independent and occurs not only in cells with overactivated Notch but also in cells with endogenous levels of Notch signalling and in vivo. Even a short pulse of Notch activity is able to elicit long-lasting metabolic changes resembling the Warburg effect. Loss of Notch signalling in Drosophila wing discs as well as in human microvascular cells leads to downregulation of glycolytic genes. Notch-driven tissue overgrowth can be rescued by downregulation of genes for glucose metabolism. Notch activity is able to support growth of wing during nutrient-deprivation conditions, independent of the growth of the rest of the body. Notch is active in situations that involve metabolic reprogramming, and the direct regulation of metabolic genes may be a common mechanism that helps Notch to exert its effects in target tissues.

  13. Gene Expression of Human Lung Cancer Cell Line CL1–5 in Response to a Direct Current Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Wen; Chen, Huai-Yi; Yen, Meng-Hua; Chen, Jeremy J. W.; Young, Tai-Horng; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2011-01-01

    Background Electrotaxis is the movement of adherent living cells in response to a direct current (dc) electric field (EF) of physiological strength. Highly metastatic human lung cancer cells, CL1–5, exhibit directional migration and orientation under dcEFs. To understand the transcriptional response of CL1–5 cells to a dcEF, microarray analysis was performed in this study. Methodology/Principal Findings A large electric-field chip (LEFC) was designed, fabricated, and used in this study. CL1–5 cells were treated with the EF strength of 0mV/mm (the control group) and 300mV/mm (the EF-treated group) for two hours. Signaling pathways involving the genes that expressed differently between the two groups were revealed. It was shown that the EF-regulated genes highly correlated to adherens junction, telomerase RNA component gene regulation, and tight junction. Some up-regulated genes such as ACVR1B and CTTN, and some down-regulated genes such as PTEN, are known to be positively and negatively correlated to cell migration, respectively. The protein-protein interactions of adherens junction-associated EF-regulated genes suggested that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors and ephrin receptors may participate in sensing extracellular electrical stimuli. We further observed a high percentage of significantly regulated genes which encode cell membrane proteins, suggesting that dcEF may directly influence the activity of cell membrane proteins in signal transduction. Conclusions/Significance In this study, some of the EF-regulated genes have been reported to be essential whereas others are novel for electrotaxis. Our result confirms that the regulation of gene expression is involved in the mechanism of electrotactic response. PMID:21998723

  14. Regulation of Gene Editing Activity Directed by Single-Stranded Oligonucleotides and CRISPR/Cas9 Systems.

    PubMed

    Bialk, Pawel; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Strouse, Bryan; Kmiec, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. While the regulation of this gene editing reaction has been partially elucidated, the low frequency with which repair occurs has hampered development toward clinical application. In this work a CRISPR/Cas9 complex is employed to induce double strand DNA breakage at specific sites surrounding the nucleotide designated for exchange. The result is a significant elevation in ssODN-directed gene repair, validated by a phenotypic readout. By analysing reaction parameters, we have uncovered restrictions on gene editing activity involving CRISPR/Cas9 complexes. First, ssODNs that hybridize to the non-transcribed strand direct a higher level of gene repair than those that hybridize to the transcribed strand. Second, cleavage must be proximal to the targeted mutant base to enable higher levels of gene editing. Third, DNA cleavage enables a higher level of gene editing activity as compared to single-stranded DNA nicks, created by modified Cas9 (Nickases). Fourth, we calculated the hybridization potential and free energy levels of ssODNs that are complementary to the guide RNA sequences of CRISPRs used in this study. We find a correlation between free energy potential and the capacity of single-stranded oligonucleotides to inhibit specific DNA cleavage activity, thereby indirectly reducing gene editing activity. Our data provide novel information that might be taken into consideration in the design and usage of CRISPR/Cas9 systems with ssODNs for gene editing.

  15. [Ras gene analysis in mammary tumors of dogs by means of PCR-SSCP and direct genomic analysis].

    PubMed

    Castagnaro, M

    1995-01-01

    The oncogenic capacities of RAS family genes (Ha-ras, Ki-ras, and N-ras) are usually activated by point mutations in the conserved regions (codons 12, 13, and 61), resulting in single amino acid substitution in the specific proteins (p21). In order to verify the involvement of RAS genes in dog mammary tumors we analyzed the genomic DNA from 20 mammary tumors of dog by means of the Polymerase Chain Reaction-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) method and the direct genomic sequencing. The absence of point mutations in the "hot spots" of RAS genes suggests a lack or a low frequency of such a pattern of RAS genes activation in dog mammary tumors. The results are also in agreement to what reported in human mammary tumors. However, the presence of genetic alterations in other functional areas of the RAS genes or other mechanisms of activations cannot be ruled out.

  16. Direct Gene Transfer into Plant Mature Seeds via Electroporation After Vacuum Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagio, Takashi

    A number of direct gene transfer methods have been used successfully in plant genetic engineering, providing powerful tools to investigate fundamental and applied problems in plant biology (Chowrira et al., 1996; D'halluin et al., 1992; Morandini and Salamini, 2003; Rakoczy-Trojanowska, 2002; Songstad et al., 1995). In cereals, several methods have been found to be suitable for obtaining transgenic plant; these include bombardment of scutellum (Hagio et al., 1995) and inflorescence cultures (He et al., 2001), and silicon carbide fiber-mediated DNA delivery (Asano et al., 1991) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation (Potrykus, 1990). Electroporation of cereal protoplasts also has proved successful but it involves prolonged cell treatments and generally is limited by the difficulties of regeneration from cereal protoplast cultures (Fromm et al., 1987). Many laboratories worldwide are now using Agrobacterium as a vehicle for routine production of transgenic crop plants. The primary application of the particle system (Klein et al., 1987) has been for transformation of species recalcitrant to conventional Agrobacterium (Binns, 1990) or protoplast methods. But these conventional methods can be applied to the species and varieties that are amenable to tissue culture (Machii et al., 1998). Mature seeds are readily available and free from the seasonal limits that immature embryo, inflorescence, and anther have. This method enables us to produce transgenic plants without time-consuming tissue culture process.

  17. Molecularly imprinted protein recognition cavities bearing exchangeable binding sites for postimprinting site-directed introduction of reporter molecules for readout of binding events.

    PubMed

    Sunayama, Hirobumi; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-11-26

    Protein-imprinted cavities bearing exchangeable domains to be used for postimprinting fluorophore introduction to transform binding events into fluorescence changes were constructed in molecularly imprinted polymer (MIPs) matrixes prepared on glass substrates. Copolymerization was performed with acrylamide, N,N'-methylenebisaclylamide, and a newly designed functional group-exchangeable monomer, ({[2-(2-methacrylamido)ethyldithio]ethylcarbamoyl}methoxy)acetic acid (MDTA), in the presence of a model basic protein, lysozyme (Lyso); MDTA can interact with Lyso and assemble close to Lyso in the resulting polymer. After removal of Lyso, followed by a disulfide reduction to cleave the (ethylcarbamoylmethoxy)acetic acid moiety from the MDTA residues, the exposed thiol groups within the imprinted cavities were modified by aminoethylpyridyldisulfide to be transformed into aminoethyl groups that function as active sites for amine-reactive fluorophores. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was then coupled with the aminoethyl groups, yielding site specifically FITC-modified signaling imprinted cavities for Lyso binding. Because the in-cavity fluorescent labeling was achieved via a disulfide linkage, it was easy to remove, exchange, and/or replace amine-reactive fluorophores. This facilitated the screening of fluorophores to select the highest readout for binding events, replace fluorophores when photobleaching occurred, and introduce other functions. The proposed molecular imprinting process, combined with postimprinting modifications, is expected to provide an affordable route to develop multifunctional MIPs for specific detection of protein binding events.

  18. An Introduction to "My Environmental Education Evaluation Resource Assistant" (MEERA), a Web-Based Resource for Self-Directed Learning about Environmental Education Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zint, Michaela

    2010-01-01

    My Environmental Education Evaluation Resource Assistant or "MEERA" is a web-site designed to support environmental educators' program evaluation activities. MEERA has several characteristics that set it apart from other self-directed learning evaluation resources. Readers are encouraged to explore the site and to reflect on the role that…

  19. Predominant role for directly transfected dendritic cells in antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells after gene gun immunization.

    PubMed

    Porgador, A; Irvine, K R; Iwasaki, A; Barber, B H; Restifo, N P; Germain, R N

    1998-09-21

    Cutaneous gene (DNA) bombardment results in substantial expression of the encoded antigen in the epidermal layer as well as detectable expression in dendritic cells (DC) in draining lymph nodes (LNs). Under these conditions, two possible modes of DC antigen presentation to naive CD8+ T cells might exist: (a) presentation directly by gene-transfected DC trafficking to local lymph nodes, and (b) cross-presentation by untransfected DC of antigen released from or associated with transfected epidermal cells. The relative contributions of these distinct modes of antigen presentation to priming for cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses have not been clearly established. Here we show that LN cells directly expressing the DNA-encoded antigen are rare; 24 h after five abdominal skin bombardments, the number of these cells does not exceed 50-100 cells in an individual draining LN. However, over this same time period, the total number of CD11c+ DC increases more than twofold, by an average of 20,000-30,000 DC per major draining node. This augmentation is due to gold bombardment and is independent of the presence of plasmid DNA. Most antigen-bearing cells in the LNs draining the site of DNA delivery appear to be DC and can be depleted by antibodies to an intact surface protein encoded by cotransfected DNA. This finding of predominant antigen presentation by directly transfected cells is also consistent with data from studies on cotransfection with antigen and CD86-encoding DNA, showing that priming of anti-mutant influenza nucleoprotein CTLs with a single immunization is dependent upon coexpression of the DNAs encoding nucleoprotein and B7.2 in the same cells. These observations provide insight into the relative roles of direct gene expression and cross-presentation in CD8+ T cell priming using gene gun immunization, and indicate that augmentation of direct DC gene expression may enhance such priming.

  20. Identification of direct serum-response factor gene targets during Me2SO-induced P19 cardiac cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu Xing; Garcia-Gras, Eduardo; Wycuff, Diane R; Marriot, Suzanne J; Kadeer, Nijiati; Yu, Wei; Olson, Eric N; Garry, Daniel J; Parmacek, Michael S; Schwartz, Robert J

    2005-05-13

    Serum-response factor (SRF) is an obligatory transcription factor, required for the formation of vertebrate mesoderm leading to the origin of the cardiovascular system. Protein A-TEV-tagged chromatin immunoprecipitation technology was used to collect direct SRF-bound gene targets from pluripotent P19 cells, induced by Me2SO treatment into an enriched cardiac cell population. From 242 sequenced DNA fragments, we identified 188 genomic DNA fragments as potential direct SRF targets that contain CArG boxes and CArG-like boxes. Of the 92 contiguous genes that were identified, a subgroup of 43 SRF targets was then further validated by co-transfection assays with SRF. Expression patterns of representative candidate genes were compared with the LacZ reporter expression activity of the endogenous SRF gene. According to the Unigene data base, 84% of the SRF target candidates were expressed, at least, in the heart. In SRF null embryonic stem cells, 81% of these SRF target candidates were greatly affected by the absence of SRF. Among these SRF-regulated genes, Raf1, Map4k4, and Bicc1 have essential roles in mesoderm formation. The 12 regulated SRF target genes, Mapk10 (JNK3), Txnl2, Azi2, Tera, Sema3a, Lrp4, Actc1, Myl3, Hspg2, Pgm2, Hif3a, and Asb5, have been implicated in cardiovascular formation, and the Ski and Hes6 genes have roles in muscle differentiation. SRF target genes related to cell mitosis and cycle, E2f5, Npm1, Cenpb, Rbbp6, and Scyl1, expressed in the heart tissue were differentially regulated in SRF null ES cells.

  1. Editorial introduction.

    PubMed

    Gelso, Charles J

    2007-09-01

    Introduces the special section in the current issue of Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training. This section contains a reprint of Carl R. Rogers' (1957) seminal paper on the necessary and sufficient conditions for constructive personality change, as well as 11 reaction papers from some of the best psychotherapy theoreticians and researchers of our time. The reaction papers address the impact of Rogers' paper on the field of psychotherapy in general and therapy of the commenter's persuasion in particular, limitations of Rogers' viewpoints, the most important and enduring aspects of Rogers' theoretical statement, and how Rogers' ideas may exhibit themselves directly and indirectly in the current psychotherapy scene. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Next-Generation Sequencing of Plasmodium vivax Patient Samples Shows Evidence of Direct Evolution in Drug-Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Erika L.; Wang, Tina; Akbari, Ali; Corey, Victoria C.; Gunawan, Felicia; Bright, A. Taylor; Abraham, Matthew; Sanchez, Juan F.; Santolalla, Meddly L.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Rosales, Luis A.; Lescano, Andrés G.; Bafna, Vineet; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of drug resistance in Plasmodium vivax, the parasite that causes the most widespread form of human malaria, is complicated by the lack of a suitable long-term cell culture system for this parasite. In contrast to P. falciparum, which can be more readily manipulated in the laboratory, insights about parasite biology need to be inferred from human studies. Here we analyze the genomes of parasites within 10 human P. vivax infections from the Peruvian Amazon. Using next-generation sequencing we show that some P. vivax infections analyzed from the region are likely polyclonal. Despite their polyclonality we observe limited parasite genetic diversity by showing that three or fewer haplotypes comprise 94% of the examined genomes, suggesting the recent introduction of parasites into this geographic region. In contrast we find more than three haplotypes in putative drug-resistance genes, including the gene encoding dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase and the P. vivax multidrug resistance associated transporter, suggesting that resistance mutations have arisen independently. Additionally, several drug-resistance genes are located in genomic regions with evidence of increased copy number. Our data suggest that whole genome sequencing of malaria parasites from patients may provide more insight about the evolution of drug resistance than genetic linkage or association studies, especially in geographical regions with limited parasite genetic diversity. PMID:26719854

  3. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Vectors in Liver-directed Gene Delivery of LDLR and VLDLR for Gene Therapy of Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Turunen, Tytteli A K; Kurkipuro, Jere; Heikura, Tommi; Vuorio, Taina; Hytönen, Elisa; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid-based Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon vectors were developed and used to deliver genes for low-density lipoprotein and very-low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR and VLDLR, respectively) or lacZ reporter into liver of an LDLR-deficient mouse model of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). SB transposase, SB100x, was used to integrate the therapeutic transposons into mice livers for evaluating the feasibility of the vectors in reducing high blood cholesterol and the progression of atherosclerosis. Hydrodynamic gene delivery of transposon-VLDLR into the livers of the mice resulted in initial 17–19% reductions in plasma cholesterol, and at the later time points, in a significant stabilization of the cholesterol level for the 6.5-month duration of the study compared to the control mice. Transposon-LDLR-treated animals also demonstrated a trend of stabilization in the cholesterol levels in the long term. Vector-treated mice had slightly less lipid accumulation in the liver and reduced aortic atherosclerosis. Clinical chemistry and histological analyses revealed normal liver function and morphology comparable to that of the controls during the follow-up with no safety issues regarding the vector type, transgenes, or the gene transfer method. The study demonstrates the safety and potential benefits of the SB transposon vectors in the treatment of FH. PMID:26670130

  4. Computed Tomography-Guided Access to the Cisterna Chyli: Introduction of a Technique for Direct Lymphangiography to Evaluate and Treat Chylothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Schoellnast, Helmut; Maybody, Majid; Getrajdman, George I.; Bains, Manjit S.; Finley, David J.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2011-02-15

    The purpose of this report is to introduce a technique of direct lymphangiography to enable chylothorax treatment. Using a hybrid computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy imaging system, a 21-gauge needle was placed under CT guidance into the cisterna chyli to allow contrast lymphangiography and CT lymphangiography in two patients with presumed postoperative chylothorax. Water-soluble contrast media injection demonstrated the thoracic duct anatomy in both patients. Further successful needle disruption of the cisterna chyli was performed in one patient to interrupt lymph flow and stop the chylous leak, with subsequent resolution of the chylothorax.

  5. Gene-Environment Interactions in Genome-Wide Association Studies: Current Approaches and New Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winham, Stacey J.; Biernacka, Joanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Complex psychiatric traits have long been thought to be the result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and gene-environment interactions are thought to play a crucial role in behavioral phenotypes and the susceptibility and progression of psychiatric disorders. Candidate gene studies to investigate hypothesized…

  6. Photoperiod and E-genes Directly Influence the Duration of Soybean Reproductive Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duration of the reproductive phase (DRP) is critical for soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] yield. Manipulation of this phase may benefit breeding for higher yield. The soybean E-gene series control time to flowering and maturity through a photoperiod-mediated response. It is possible that E-genes and...

  7. Involvement of condensin-directed gene associations in the organization and regulation of chromosome territories during the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Osamu; Corcoran, Christopher J.; Noma, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomes are not randomly disposed in the nucleus but instead occupy discrete sub-nuclear domains, referred to as chromosome territories. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the formation of chromosome territories and how they are regulated during the cell cycle remain largely unknown. Here, we have developed two different chromosome-painting approaches to address how chromosome territories are organized in the fission yeast model organism. We show that condensin frequently associates RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes (tRNA and 5S rRNA) that are present on the same chromosomes, and that the disruption of these associations by condensin mutations significantly compromises the chromosome territory arrangement. We also find that condensin-dependent intra-chromosomal gene associations and chromosome territories are co-regulated during the cell cycle. For example, condensin-directed gene associations occur to the least degree during S phase, with the chromosomal overlap becoming largest. In clear contrast, condensin-directed gene associations become tighter in other cell-cycle phases, especially during mitosis, with the overlap between the different chromosomes being smaller. This study suggests that condensin-driven intra-chromosomal gene associations contribute to the organization and regulation of chromosome territories during the cell cycle. PMID:26704981

  8. Carboxypeptidase-G2-based gene-directed enzyme-prodrug therapy: a new weapon in the GDEPT armoury.

    PubMed

    Hedley, Douglas; Ogilvie, Lesley; Springer, Caroline

    2007-11-01

    Gene-directed enzyme-prodrug therapy (GDEPT) aims to improve the therapeutic ratio (benefit versus toxic side-effects) of cancer chemotherapy. A gene encoding a 'suicide' enzyme is introduced into the tumour to convert a subsequently administered non-toxic prodrug into an active drug selectively in the tumour, but not in normal tissues. Significant effects can now be achieved in vitro and in targeted experimental models, and GDEPT therapies are entering the clinic. Our group has developed a GDEPT system that uses the bacterial enzyme carboxypeptidase G2 to convert nitrogen mustard prodrugs into potent DNA crosslinking agents, and a clinical trial of this system is pending.

  9. Earth System Monitoring, Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, John

    This section provides sensing and data collection methodologies, as well as an understanding of Earth's climate parameters and natural and man-made phenomena, to support a scientific assessment of the Earth system as a whole, and its response to natural and human-induced changes. The coverage ranges from climate change factors and extreme weather and fires to oil spill tracking and volcanic eruptions. This serves as a basis to enable improved prediction and response to climate change, weather, and natural hazards as well as dissemination of the data and conclusions. The data collection systems include satellite remote sensing, aerial surveys, and land- and ocean-based monitoring stations. Our objective in this treatise is to provide a significant portion of the scientific and engineering basis of Earth system monitoring and to provide this in 17 detailed articles or chapters written at a level for use by university students through practicing professionals. The reader is also directed to the closely related sections on Ecological Systems, Introduction and also Climate Change Modeling Methodology, Introduction as well as Climate Change Remediation, Introduction to. For ease of use by students, each article begins with a glossary of terms, while at an average length of 25 print pages each, sufficient detail is presented for use by professionals in government, universities, and industries. The chapters are individually summarized below.

  10. Analysis of gene expression profiles of Lactobacillus paracasei induced by direct contact with Saccharomyces cerevisiae through recognition of yeast mannan

    PubMed Central

    YAMASAKI-YASHIKI, Shino; SAWADA, Hiroshi; KINO-OKA, Masahiro; KATAKURA, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Co-culture of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeast induces specific responses that are not observed in pure culture. Gene expression profiles of Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334 co-cultured with Saccharomyces cerevisiae IFO 0216 were analyzed by DNA microarray, and the responses induced by direct contact with the yeast cells were investigated. Coating the LAB cells with recombinant DnaK, which acts as an adhesive protein between LAB and yeast cells, enhanced the ratio of adhesion of the LAB cells to the yeast cells. The signals induced by direct contact were clarified by removal of the LAB cells unbound to the yeast cells. The genes induced by direct contact with heat-inactivated yeast cells were very similar to both those induced by the intact yeast cells and those induced by a soluble mannan. The top 20 genes upregulated by direct contact with the heat-inactivated yeast cells mainly encoded proteins related to exopolysaccharide synthesis, modification of surface proteins, and transport systems. In the case of the most upregulated gene, LSEI_0669, encoding a protein that has a region homologous to polyprenyl glycosylphosphotransferase, the expression level was upregulated 7.6-, 11.0-, and 8.8-fold by the heat-inactivated yeast cells, the intact yeast cells, and the soluble mannan, respectively, whereas it was only upregulated 1.8-fold when the non-adherent LAB cells were not removed before RNA extraction. Our results indicated that the LAB responded to direct contact with the yeast cells through recognition of mannan on the surface of the yeast. PMID:28243547

  11. A stop-signal task for sheep: introduction and validation of a direct measure for the stop-signal reaction time.

    PubMed

    Knolle, Franziska; McBride, Sebastian D; Stewart, James E; Goncalves, Rita P; Morton, A Jennifer

    2017-04-07

    Huntington's disease (HD) patients show reduced flexibility in inhibiting an already-started response. This can be quantified by the stop-signal task. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a sheep version of the stop-signal task that would be suitable for monitoring the progression of cognitive decline in a transgenic sheep model of HD. Using a semi-automated operant system, sheep were trained to perform in a two-choice discrimination task. In 22% of the trials, a stop-signal was presented. Upon the stop-signal presentation, the sheep had to inhibit their already-started response. The stopping behaviour was captured using an accelerometer mounted on the back of the sheep. This set-up provided a direct read-out of the individual stop-signal reaction time (SSRT). We also estimated the SSRT using the conventional approach of subtracting the stop-signal delay (i.e., time after which the stop-signal is presented) from the ranked reaction time during a trial without a stop-signal. We found that all sheep could inhibit an already-started response in 91% of the stop-trials. The directly measured SSRT (0.974 ± 0.04 s) was not significantly different from the estimated SSRT (0.938 ± 0.04 s). The sheep version of the stop-signal task adds to the repertoire of tests suitable for investigating both cognitive dysfunction and efficacy of therapeutic agents in sheep models of neurodegenerative disease such as HD, as well as neurological conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

  12. Development of a Site-Directed Integration Plasmid for Heterologous Gene Expression in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    Indikova, Ivana; Szostak, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering the molecular basis of the interactions between the parasite Mycoplasma gallisepticum and its avian hosts suffers from the lack of genetic tools available for the pathogen. In the absence of well established methods for targeted disruption of relevant M. gallisepticum genes, we started to develop suicide vectors and equipped them with a short fragment of M. gallisepticum origin or replication (oriCMG). We failed to create a disruption vector, although by adding a further short fragment of the M. gallisepticum tufB upstream region we created a “Trojan horse” plasmid. This is fully integrated into the genomic DNA of M. gallisepticum, always at the same site, oriCMG, and is able to carry and express any gene of interest in the genetic background of M. gallisepticum. Successful expression of a heterologous gene was shown with the lacZ gene of E. coli. When used for gene complementation or expression of hybrid genes in M. gallisepticum, a site-specific combined integration/expression vector constitutes an improvement on randomly integrating transposons, which might have unexpected effects on the expression of chromosomal genes. PMID:24278444

  13. Gene-Environment Interactions in Genome-Wide Association Studies: Current Approaches and New Directions

    PubMed Central

    Winham, Stacey J; Biernacka, Joanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Complex psychiatric traits have long been thought to be the result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and gene-environment interactions are thought to play a crucial role in behavioral phenotypes and the susceptibility and progression of psychiatric disorders. Candidate gene studies to investigate hypothesized gene-environment interactions are now fairly common in human genetic research, and with the shift towards genome-wide association studies, genome-wide gene-environment interaction studies are beginning to emerge. Methods We summarize the basic ideas behind gene-environment interaction, and provide an overview of possible study designs and traditional analysis methods in the context of genome-wide analysis. We then discuss novel approaches beyond the traditional strategy of analyzing the interaction between the environmental factor and each polymorphism individually. Results Two-step filtering approaches that reduce the number of polymorphisms tested for interactions can substantially increase the power of genome-wide gene-environment studies. New analytical methods including data-mining approaches, and gene-level and pathway-level analyses, also have the capacity to improve our understanding of how complex genetic and environmental factors interact to influence psychological and psychiatric traits. Such methods, however, have not yet been utilized much in behavioral and mental health research. Conclusions Although methods to investigate gene-environment interactions are available, there is a need for further development and extension of these methods to identify gene-environment interactions in the context of genome-wide association studies. These novel approaches need to be applied in studies of psychology and psychiatry. PMID:23808649

  14. The present state and future direction of integrated gene function analysis.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    The determination of the function of the protein products of genes has been a major focus of molecular biology since the founding of the discipline. The development of knock-in, knock-down, and transgenic methodologies has greatly speeded laboratory discoveries, while the development of high-throughput measurement technologies for many molecular species has led to the emergence of computational methods capable of predicting functional relationships between genes. In the future, we should see the emergence of quantitative models based on integrated data and laboratory methods that elucidate context-specific functions and identify how gene function depends on changing partners and contexts.

  15. Epstein–Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B.; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G.; Sinclair, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  16. Molecular analysis of Wilson patients: direct sequencing and MLPA analysis in the ATP7B gene and Atox1 and COMMD1 gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Bost, Muriel; Piguet-Lacroix, Guénaelle; Parant, François; Wilson, C M R

    2012-06-01

    ATP7B mutations result in Cu storage in the liver and brain in Wilson disease (WD). Atox1 and COMMD1 were found to interact with ATP7B and involved in copper transport in the hepatocyte. To understand the molecular etiology of WD, we analyzed ATP7B, Atox1 and COMMD1 genes. Direct sequencing of (i) ATP7B gene was performed in 112 WD patients to identify the spectrum of disease-causing mutations in the French population, (ii) Atox1 gene was performed to study the known polymorphism 5'UTR-99T>C in 78 WD patients with two ATP7B mutations and (iii) COMMD1 gene was performed to detect the nucleotide change c.492GAT>GAC. MLPA (Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification) analysis was performed in WD patients presenting only one ATP7B mutation. Among our 112 WD unrelated patients, 83 different ATP7B gene mutations were identified, 27 of which were novel. Two ATP7B mutations were identified in 98 WD cases, and one mutation was identified in 14 cases. In two of these 14 WD patients, we identified the deletion of exon 4 of the ATP7B gene by MLPA technique. In 78 selected patients of the cohort with two mutations in ATP7B, we have examined genotype-phenotype correlation between the detected changes in Atox1 and COMMD1 genes, and the presentation of the WD patients. Based on the data of this study, no major role can be attributed to Atox1 and COMMD in the pathophysiology or clinical variation of WD.

  17. A micro-fluidic sub-microliter sample introduction system for direct analysis of Chinese rice wine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using external aqueous calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Heyong; Liu, Jinhua; Xu, Zigang; Yin, Xuefeng

    2012-07-01

    A microfluidic sub-microliter sample introducing system was developed for direct analysis of Chinese rice wine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It consisted of a microfluidic chip integrating variable-volume sampling channels (0.1-0.8 μL), an eight-way multi-functional valve used in flow injection analysis (FIA), a syringe pump and a peristaltic pump of the Ar ICP-MS instrument. Three solutions, i.e., 15, 40 and 100 g L- 1 glucose in 20% ethanol were used to simulate Chinese rice wine of the dry type, the semidry type and the semisweet type, each. The effects of their volume introduced into ICP-MS on the plasma stability and ICP-MS intensities were studied. The experimental results showed that neither alteration of plasma stability nor carbon deposition was observed when the sampling volume of 20% ethanol containing 100 g L- 1 glucose was downscaled to 0.8 μL. Further reducing the sampling volume to 0.4 μL, no significant difference between the intensities of multi-element standard prepared in three simulated Chinese rice wine matrices and those in aqueous solution was observed. It indicated no negative effect of Chinese rice wine matrix on the ICP-MS intensities. A sampling volume of 0.4 μL was considered to be a good compromise between sensitivity and matrix effect. The flow rate of the carrier was chosen as 20 μL min- 1 for obtaining peaks with the highest peak height within the shortest time. Based on these observations, a microflow injection (μFI) method for the direct determination of cadmium and lead in Chinese rice wine by ICP-MS using an external aqueous calibration was developed. The sample throughput was 45 h- 1 with the detection limit of 19.8 and 10.4 ng L- 1 for Cd and Pb, respectively. The contents of Cd and Pb in 10 Chinese rice wine samples were measured. The results agreed well with those determined by ICP-MS with the conventional sampling system after microwave assisted digestion. The recoveries of three Chinese

  18. Workshop introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Streeper, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has three subprograms that directly reduce the nuclear/radiological threat; Convert (Highly Enriched Uranium), Protect (Facilities), and Remove (Materials). The primary mission of the Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP) falls under the 'Remove' subset. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a venue for joint-technical collaboration between the OSRP and the Nuclear Radiation Safety Service (NRSS). Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace initiative and the Soviet equivalent both promoted the spread of the paradoxical (peaceful and harmful) properties of the atom. The focus of nonproliferation efforts has been rightly dedicated to fissile materials and the threat they pose. Continued emphasis on radioactive materials must also be encouraged. An unquantifiable threat still exists in the prolific quantity of sealed radioactive sources (sources) spread worldwide. It does not appear that the momentum of the evolution in the numerous beneficial applications of radioactive sources will subside in the near future. Numerous expert studies have demonstrated the potentially devastating economic and psychological impacts of terrorist use of a radiological dispersal or emitting device. The development of such a weapon, from the acquisition of the material to the technical knowledge needed to develop and use it, is straightforward. There are many documented accounts worldwide of accidental and purposeful diversions of radioactive materials from regulatory control. The burden of securing sealed sources often falls upon the source owner, who may not have a disposal pathway once the source reaches the end of its useful life. This disposal problem is exacerbated by some source owners not having the resources to safely and compliantly store them. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) data suggests that, in the US alone, there are tens of thousands of high-activity (IAEA

  19. Direct determination of arsenic and antimony in naphtha by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with microemulsion sample introduction and iridium permanent modifier.

    PubMed

    Cassella, Ricardo J; Barbosa, Bruno Alberto R S; Santelli, Ricardo E; Rangel, Alessandra T

    2004-05-01

    This paper reports the determination of arsenic and antimony in naphtha by employing electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) as the analytical technique. In order to promote the direct determination of the analytes in the very volatile naphtha, the formation of a microemulsion with different surfactants (Triton X-100 and Brij-35) and different chemical modification strategies were tested. The results indicated that Triton X-100 is the best emulsification agent for naphtha in both As and Sb determination when it is employed at a concentration of 1% w/v in the microemulsion. Under these conditions, the microemulsion was stabile for at least 2 h. By using Brij-35 it was possible to achieve good stability only in the first 15 min. Among all chemical modification approaches investigated (Ir permanent modifier, W-Ir permanent modifier, and Pd modifier), the Ir permanent modifier provided better sensitivity for both analytes and allowed a higher pyrolysis temperature, which decreased the background signals at lower levels. Under the best conditions established in this work, an RSD of 4.6% (20 microg L(-1)) and a detection limit of 2.7 microg L(-1) were observed for arsenic. For antimony, an RSD of 4.0% (20 microg L(-1)) and a detection limit of 2.5 microg L(-1) were obtained. The accuracy of the procedure was assessed by analyzing spiked samples of naphtha from different origins.

  20. Directed mutagenesis in Candida albicans: one-step gene disruption to isolate ura3 mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.; Miller, S.M.; Kurtz, M.B.; Kirsch, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A method for introducing specific mutations into the diploid Candida albicans by one-step gene disruption and subsequent UV-induced recombination was developed. The cloned C. albicans URA3 gene was disrupted with the C. albicans ADE2 gene, and the linearized DNA was used for transformation of two ade2 mutants, SGY-129 and A81-Pu. Both an insertional inactivation of the URA3 gene and a disruption which results in a 4.0-kilobase deletion were made. Southern hybridization analyses demonstrated that the URA3 gene was disrupted on one of the chromosomal homologs in 15 of the 18 transformants analyzed. These analyses also revealed restriction site dimorphism of EcoRI at the URA3 locus which provides a unique marker to distinguish between chromosomal homologs. This enabled us to show that either homolog could be disrupted and that disrupted transformants of SGY-129 contained more than two copies of the URA3 locus. The A81-Pu transformants heterozygous for the ura3 mutations were rendered homozygous and Ura- by UV-induced recombination. The homozygosity of a deletion mutant and an insertion mutant was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Both mutants were transformed to Ura+ with plasmids containing the URA3 gene and in addition, were resistant to 5-fluoro-orotic acid, a characteristic of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura3 mutants as well as of orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase mutants of other organisms.

  1. Transposon-directed base-exchange mutagenesis (TDEM): a novel method for multiple-nucleotide substitutions within a target gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Cheol; Lee, Hui Sun; Yoon, Sukjoon; Morrison, Sherie L

    2009-06-01

    In this report we describe transposon-directed base-exchange mutagenesis (TDEM), an efficient and controllable method for introducing a mutation into a gene. Each round of TDEM can remove up to 11 base pairs from a randomly selected site within the target gene and replace them with any length of DNA of predetermined sequence. Therefore, the number of bases to be deleted and inserted can be independently regulated providing greater versatility than existing methods of transposon-based mutagenesis. Subsequently, multiple rounds of mutagenesis will provide a diverse mutant library that contains multiple mutations throughout the gene. Additionally, we developed a simple frame-checking procedure that eliminates nonfunctional mutants containing frameshifts or stop codons. As a proof of principle, we used TDEM to generate mutant lacZalpha lacking alpha-complementation activity and recovered active revertants using a second round of TDEM. Furthermore, a single round of TDEM yielded unique, inactive mutants of ccdB.

  2. Modulation of Estrogen Response Element-Driven Gene Expressions and Cellular Proliferation with Polar Directions by Designer Transcription Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Muyan, Mesut; Güpür, Gizem; Yaşar, Pelin; Ayaz, Gamze; User, Sırma Damla; Kazan, Hasan Hüseyin; Huang, Yanfang

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα), as a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates 17β-estradiol (E2) effects. ERα is a modular protein containing a DNA binding domain (DBD) and transcription activation domains (AD) located at the amino- and carboxyl-termini. The interaction of the E2-activated ERα dimer with estrogen response elements (EREs) of genes constitutes the initial step in the ERE-dependent signaling pathway necessary for alterations of cellular features. We previously constructed monomeric transcription activators, or monotransactivators, assembled from an engineered ERE-binding module (EBM) using the ERα-DBD and constitutively active ADs from other transcription factors. Monotransactivators modulated cell proliferation by activating and repressing ERE-driven gene expressions that simulate responses observed with E2-ERα. We reasoned here that integration of potent heterologous repression domains (RDs) into EBM could generate monotransrepressors that alter ERE-bearing gene expressions and cellular proliferation in directions opposite to those observed with E2-ERα or monotransactivators. Consistent with this, monotransrepressors suppressed reporter gene expressions that emulate the ERE-dependent signaling pathway. Moreover, a model monotransrepressor regulated DNA synthesis, cell cycle progression and proliferation of recombinant adenovirus infected ER-negative cells through decreasing as well as increasing gene expressions with polar directions compared with E2-ERα or monotransactivator. Our results indicate that an ‘activator’ or a ‘repressor’ possesses both transcription activating/enhancing and repressing/decreasing abilities within a chromatin context. Offering a protein engineering platform to alter signal pathway-specific gene expressions and cell growth, our approach could also be used for the development of tools for epigenetic modifications and for clinical interventions wherein multigenic de-regulations are an issue. PMID:26295471

  3. The synthetic gestagen levonorgestrel directly affects gene expression in thyroid and pituitary glands of Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Claudia; Opitz, Robert; Trubiroha, Achim; Lutz, Ilka; Zikova, Andrea; Kloas, Werner

    2016-08-01

    The synthetic gestagen levonorgestrel (LNG) was previously shown to perturb thyroid hormone-dependent metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis. However, so far the mechanisms underlying the anti-metamorphic effects of LNG remained unknown. Therefore, a series of in vivo and ex vivo experiments was performed to identify potential target sites of LNG action along the pituitary-thyroid axis of X. laevis tadpoles. Prometamorphic tadpoles were treated in vivo with LNG (0.01-10nM) for 72h and brain-pituitary and thyroid tissue was analyzed for marker gene expression. While no treatment-related changes were observed in brain-pituitary tissue, LNG treatment readily affected thyroidal gene expression in tadpoles including decreased slc5a5 and iyd mRNA expression and a strong induction of dio2 and dio3 expression. When using an ex vivo organ explant culture approach, direct effects of LNG on both pituitary and thyroid gland gene expression were detecTable Specifically, treatment of pituitary explants with 10nM LNG strongly stimulated dio2 expression and concurrently suppressed tshb expression. In thyroid glands, ex vivo LNG treatment induced dio2 and dio3 mRNA expression in a thyrotropin-independent manner. When thyroid explants were cultured in thyrotropin-containing media, LNG caused similar gene expression changes as seen after 72h in vivo treatment including a very strong repression of thyrotropin-induced slc5a5 expression. Concerning the anti-thyroidal activity of LNG as seen under in vivo conditions, our ex vivo data provide clear evidence that LNG directly affects expression of genes important for thyroidal iodide handling as well as genes involved in negative feedback regulation of pituitary tshb expression.

  4. Antibody-directed double suicide gene therapy targeting of MUC1- positive leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao-Ya; Wang, Wen-Qian; Zhao, Yu; Li, Xu-Dong; Fang, Zhi-Gang; Lin, Dong-Jun; Xiao, Ruo-Zhi; Huang, Ren-Wei; Pan, Guang-Jin; Liu, Jia-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Our aim was to specifically transfer the cytosine deaminase (CD) and thymidine kinase (TK) genes into mucin 1 (MUC1)-positive leukemia cells by anti-MUC1 antibody directed infection of replication-defective lentivirus and to evaluate the targeted cytotoxicity of double suicide genes to leukemia. The target gene vector (containing CD and TK) and envelope (containing GFP and anti-MUC1) and packaging plasmids were cotransfected into 293T cells to produce the recombinant lentivirus. Suicide genes in virus-infected leukemia cells (U937, Jurkat, and K562) were detected by western blot. The cytotoxicity and bystander effect in vitro and the therapeutic effect in vivo were detected after treatment with the prodrugs. The results revealed that combined treatment with prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and ganciclovir (GCV) inhibited leukemia cell growth and caused significant bystander effect than treatment with either prodrug alone. TK/GCV treatment alone induced degeneration and cell death while the effect of CD/5-FC alone mainly caused vacuolar degeneration and necrosis. The addictive effects of combinatorial use of GCV and 5-FC mainly induced swelling of the mitochondria followed by necrosis of the leukemia cells. In vivo experiments revealed that both single and combinatorial prodrug treatments could prolong the survival time of leukemic mice. In summary, anti-MUC1 antibody directed lentiviral vector successfully transduced dual suicide genes and exerted targeted cytotoxicity against MUC1 positive leukemia cells. This targeted lentiviral dual suicide gene delivering system provides a promising approach for clinical treatment of leukemia in future.

  5. Preexisting Immunity and Low Expression in Primates Highlight Translational Challenges for Liver-directed AAV8-mediated Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hurlbut, Gregory D; Ziegler, Robin J; Nietupski, Jennifer B; Foley, Joseph W; Woodworth, Lisa A; Meyers, Elizabeth; Bercury, Scott D; Pande, Nilesh N; Souza, David W; Bree, Mark P; Lukason, Michael J; Marshall, John; Cheng, Seng H; Scheule, Ronald K

    2010-01-01

    Liver-directed gene therapy with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors effectively treats mouse models of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). We asked whether these results were likely to translate to patients. To understand to what extent preexisting anti-AAV8 antibodies could impede AAV8-mediated liver transduction in primates, commonly preexposed to AAV, we quantified the effects of preexisting antibodies on liver transduction and subsequent transgene expression in mouse and nonhuman primate (NHP) models. Using the highest viral dose previously reported in a clinical trial, passive transfer of NHP sera containing relatively low anti-AAV8 titers into mice blocked liver transduction, which could be partially overcome by increasing vector dose tenfold. Based on this and a survey of anti-AAV8 titers in 112 humans, we predict that high-dose systemic gene therapy would successfully transduce liver in >50% of human patients. However, although high-dose AAV8 administration to mice and monkeys with equivalent anti-AAV8 titers led to comparable liver vector copy numbers, the resulting transgene expression in primates was ~1.5-logs lower than mice. This suggests vector fate differs in these species and that strategies focused solely on overcoming preexisting vector-specific antibodies may be insufficient to achieve clinically meaningful expression levels of LSD genes using a liver-directed gene therapy approach in patients. PMID:20736932

  6. c-Myc directly regulates the transcription of the NBS1 gene involved in DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yu-Chi; Teng, Shu-Chun; Su, Yi-Ning; Hsieh, Fon-Jou; Wu, Kou-Juey

    2003-05-23

    The c-myc proto-oncogene encodes a ubiquitous transcription factor involved in the control of cell growth and implicated in inducing tumorigenesis. Understanding the function of c-Myc and its role in cancer depends upon the identification of c-Myc target genes. Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a chromosomal-instability syndrome associated with cancer predisposition, radiosensitivity, and chromosomal instability. The NBS gene product, NBS1 (p95 or nibrin), is a part of the hMre11 complex, a central player associated with double-strand break (DSB) repair. NBS1 contains domains characteristic for proteins involved in DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Here we show that c-Myc directly activates NBS1. c-Myc-mediated induction of NBS1 gene transcription occurs in different tissues, is independent of cell proliferation, and is mediated by a c-Myc binding site in the intron 1 region of NBS1 gene. Overexpression of NBS1 in Rat1a cells increased cell proliferation. These results indicate that NBS1 is a direct transcriptional target of c-Myc and links the function of c-Myc to the regulation of DNA DSB repair pathway operating during DNA replication.

  7. The Vestigial and Scalloped proteins act together to directly regulate wing-specific gene expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Halder, G; Polaczyk, P; Kraus, M E; Hudson, A; Kim, J; Laughon, A; Carroll, S

    1998-12-15

    A small number of major regulatory (selector) genes have been identified in animals that control the development of particular organs or complex structures. In Drosophila, the vestigial gene is required for wing formation and is able to induce wing-like outgrowths on other structures. However, the molecular function of the nuclear Vestigial protein, which bears no informative similarities to other proteins, was unknown. Here, we show that Vestigial requires the function of the Scalloped protein, a member of the TEA family of transcriptional regulators, to directly activate the expression of genes involved in wing morphogenesis. Genetic and molecular analyses reveal that Vestigial regulates wing identity by forming a complex with the Scalloped protein that binds sequence specifically to essential sites in wing-specific enhancers. These enhancers also require the direct inputs of signaling pathways, and the response of an enhancer can be switched to another pathway through changes in signal-transducer binding sites. Combinatorial regulation by selector proteins and signal transducers is likely to be a general feature of the tissue-specific control of gene expression during organogenesis.

  8. The faah gene is the first direct target of estrogen in the testis: role of histone demethylase LSD1.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Paola; Pucci, Mariangela; Di Siena, Sara; Di Giacomo, Daniele; Pirazzi, Valentina; Geremia, Raffaele; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2012-12-01

    Estrogen (E(2)) regulates spermatogenesis, yet its direct target genes have not been identified in the testis. Here, we cloned the proximal 5' flanking region of the mouse fatty acid amide hydrolase (faah) gene upstream of the luciferase reporter gene, and demonstrated its promoter activity and E(2) inducibility in primary mouse Sertoli cells. Specific mutations in the E(2) response elements (ERE) of the faah gene showed that two proximal ERE sequences (ERE2/3) are essential for E(2)-induced transcription, and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that E(2) induced estrogen receptor β binding at ERE2/3 sites in the faah promoter in vivo. Moreover, the histone demethylase LSD1 was found to be associated with ERE2/3 sites and to play a role in mediating E(2) induction of FAAH expression. E(2) induced epigenetic modifications at the faah proximal promoter compatible with transcriptional activation by remarkably decreasing methylation of both DNA at CpG site and histone H3 at lysine 9. Finally, FAAH silencing abolished E(2) protection against apoptosis induced by the FAAH substrate anandamide. Taken together, our results identify FAAH as the first direct target of E(2).

  9. Variation in key genes of serotonin and norepinephrine function predicts gamma-band activity during goal-directed attention.

    PubMed

    Enge, Sören; Fleischhauer, Monika; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Reif, Andreas; Strobel, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Recent evidence shows that genetic variations in key regulators of serotonergic (5-HT) signaling explain variance in executive tasks, which suggests modulatory actions of 5-HT on goal-directed selective attention as one possible underlying mechanism. To investigate this link, 130 volunteers were genotyped for the 5-HT transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and for a variation (TPH2-703 G/T) of the TPH2 gene coding for the rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT synthesis in the brain. Additionally, a functional polymorphism of the norepinephrine transporter gene (NET -3081 A/T) was considered, which was recently found to predict attention and working memory processes in interaction with serotonergic genes. The flanker-based Attention Network Test was used to assess goal-directed attention and the efficiency of attentional networks. Event-related gamma-band activity served to indicate selective attention at the intermediate phenotype level. The main findings were that 5-HTTLPR s allele and TPH2 G-allele homozygotes showed increased induced gamma-band activity during target processing when combined with the NET A/A genotype compared with other genotype combinations, and that gamma activity mediates the genotype-specific effects on task performance. The results further support a modulatory role of 5-HT and NE function in the top-down attentional selection of motivationally relevant over competing or irrelevant sensory input.

  10. Characterization and Expression Analysis of Genes Directing Galactomannan Synthesis in Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Pré, Martial; Caillet, Victoria; Sobilo, Julien; McCarthy, James

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Galactomannans act as storage reserves for the seeds in some plants, such as guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) and coffee (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora). In coffee, the galactomannans can represent up to 25 % of the mass of the mature green coffee grain, and they exert a significant influence on the production of different types of coffee products. The objective of the current work was to isolate and characterize cDNA encoding proteins responsible for galactomannan synthesis in coffee and to study the expression of the corresponding transcripts in the developing coffee grain from C. arabica and C. canephora, which potentially exhibit slight galactomannan variations. Comparative gene expression analysis was also carried out for several other tissues of C. arabica and C. canephora. Methods cDNA banks, RACE-PCR and genome walking were used to generate full-length cDNA for two putative coffee mannan synthases (ManS) and two galactomannan galactosyl transferases (GMGT). Gene-specific probe-primer sets were then generated and used to carry out comparative expression analysis of the corresponding genes in different coffee tissues using quantitative RT-PCR Key Results Two of the putative galactomannan biosynthetic genes, ManS1 and GMGT1, were demonstrated to have very high expression in the developing coffee grain of both Coffea species during endosperm development, consistent with our proposal that these two genes are responsible for the production of the majority of the galactomannans found in the grain. In contrast, the expression data presented indicates that the ManS2 gene product is probably involved in the synthesis of the galactomannans found in green tissue. Conclusions The identification of genes implicated in galactomannan synthesis in coffee are presented. The data obtained will enable more detailed studies on the biosynthesis of this important component of coffee grain and contribute to a better understanding of some functional

  11. Gene Editing With CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-Directed Nuclease.

    PubMed

    Doetschman, Thomas; Georgieva, Teodora

    2017-03-03

    Genetic engineering of model organisms and cultured cells has for decades provided important insights into the mechanisms underlying cardiovascular development and disease. In the past few years the development of several nuclease systems has broadened the range of model/cell systems that can be engineered. Of these, the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system has become the favorite for its ease of application. Here we will review this RNA-guided nuclease system for gene editing with respect to its usefulness for cardiovascular studies and with an eye toward potential therapy. Studies on its off-target activity, along with approaches to minimize this activity will be given. The advantages of gene editing versus gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, including the breadth of species and cell types to which it is applicable, will be discussed. We will also cover its use in iPSC for research and possible therapeutic purposes; and we will review its use in muscular dystrophy studies where considerable progress has been made toward dystrophin correction in mice. The CRISPR/Ca9s system is also being used for high-throughput screening of genes, gene regulatory regions, and long noncoding RNAs. In addition, the CRISPR system is being used for nongene-editing purposes such as activation and inhibition of gene expression, as well as for fluorescence tagging of chromosomal regions and individual mRNAs to track their cellular location. Finally, an approach to circumvent the inability of post-mitotic cells to support homologous recombination-based gene editing will be presented. In conclusion, applications of the CRISPR/Cas system are expanding at a breath-taking pace and are revolutionizing approaches to gain a better understanding of human diseases.

  12. Cytoplasmic-genetic male sterility gene provides direct evidence for some hybrid rice recently evolving into weedy rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingxu; Lu, Zuomei; Dai, Weimin; Song, Xiaoling; Peng, Yufa; Valverde, Bernal E.; Qiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Weedy rice infests paddy fields worldwide at an alarmingly increasing rate. There is substantial evidence indicating that many weedy rice forms originated from or are closely related to cultivated rice. There is suspicion that the outbreak of weedy rice in China may be related to widely grown hybrid rice due to its heterosis and the diversity of its progeny, but this notion remains unsupported by direct evidence. We screened weedy rice accessions by both genetic and molecular marker tests for the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) genes (Wild abortive, WA, and Boro type, BT) most widely used in the production of indica and japonica three-line hybrid rice as a diagnostic trait of direct parenthood. Sixteen weedy rice accessions of the 358 tested (4.5%) contained the CMS-WA gene; none contained the CMS-BT gene. These 16 accessions represent weedy rices recently evolved from maternal hybrid rice derivatives, given the primarily maternal inheritance of this trait. Our results provide key direct evidence that hybrid rice can be involved in the evolution of some weedy rice accessions, but is not a primary factor in the recent outbreak of weedy rice in China. PMID:26012494

  13. Cytoplasmic-genetic male sterility gene provides direct evidence for some hybrid rice recently evolving into weedy rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxu; Lu, Zuomei; Dai, Weimin; Song, Xiaoling; Peng, Yufa; Valverde, Bernal E; Qiang, Sheng

    2015-05-27

    Weedy rice infests paddy fields worldwide at an alarmingly increasing rate. There is substantial evidence indicating that many weedy rice forms originated from or are closely related to cultivated rice. There is suspicion that the outbreak of weedy rice in China may be related to widely grown hybrid rice due to its heterosis and the diversity of its progeny, but this notion remains unsupported by direct evidence. We screened weedy rice accessions by both genetic and molecular marker tests for the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) genes (Wild abortive, WA, and Boro type, BT) most widely used in the production of indica and japonica three-line hybrid rice as a diagnostic trait of direct parenthood. Sixteen weedy rice accessions of the 358 tested (4.5%) contained the CMS-WA gene; none contained the CMS-BT gene. These 16 accessions represent weedy rices recently evolved from maternal hybrid rice derivatives, given the primarily maternal inheritance of this trait. Our results provide key direct evidence that hybrid rice can be involved in the evolution of some weedy rice accessions, but is not a primary factor in the recent outbreak of weedy rice in China.

  14. [Levels of thermostable direct hemolysin production by Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains carrying both tdh and trh genes].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, N; Hashimoto, S; Ishibashi, M; Kim, Y B; Okuda, J; Nishibuchi, M

    1997-12-01

    One hundred and twenty-five strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus carrying both the tdh and trh genes were selected from the strains isolated from the travelers with diarrhea by an hybridization test using polynucleotide probes. The levels of TDH produced by these strains and the association between the TDH levels and related characteristics in these strains were analyzed. The TDH level varied greatly from strain to strain, but none of the levels was as high as that of the typical Kanagawa phenomenon-positive strains. The strains were classified into "TDH producer" (18 strains), "Low-level TDH producer" (85 strains), and "No TDH producer" (22 strains) based on the results of a modified Elek test and the hemolysis assay on Wagatsuma agar. The highest TDH level achieved by the "TDH producer" was twofold lower than that of the Kanagawa phenomenon-positive strains as assayed by the RPLA method. All strains possessed the toxR gene. The trh1 and trh2 genes were detected in, respectively, 105 and 20 strains, and no correlation existed between the type of the trh gene and the levels of TDH produced. Considerable restriction fragment length polymorphism was observed with the tdh gene-bearing HindIII DNA fragment in different strains, but it was not related with the TDH level.

  15. Dual sgRNA-directed gene knockout using CRISPR/Cas9 technology in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangyang; Xu, Fei; Zhu, Chengming; Ji, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Xufei; Feng, Xuezhu; Guang, Shouhong

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease gene-targeting system has been successfully used for genome editing in a variety of organisms. Here, we report the use of dual sgRNA-guided Cas9 nuclease to generate knockout mutants of protein coding genes, noncoding genes, and repetitive sequences in C. elegans. Co-injection of C. elegans with dual sgRNAs results in the removal of the interval between two sgRNAs and the loss-of-function phenotype of targeted genes. We sought to determine how large an interval can be eliminated and found that at least a 24 kb chromosome segment can be deleted using this dual sgRNA/Cas9 strategy. The deletion of large chromosome segments facilitates mutant screening by PCR and agarose electrophoresis. Thus, the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in combination with dual sgRNAs provides a powerful platform with which to easily generate gene knockout mutants in C. elegans. Our data also suggest that encoding multiple sgRNA sequences into a single CRISPR array to simultaneously edit several sites within the genome may cause the off-target deletion of chromosome sequences. PMID:25531445

  16. Identification of Genes Expressed in Premalignant Breast Disease by Microscopy-Directed Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Roy A.; Page, David L.; Holt, Jeffrey T.

    1994-09-01

    Histopathologic study of human breast biopsy samples has identified specific lesions which are associated with a high risk of development of invasive breast cancer. Presumably, these lesions (collectively termed premalignant breast disease) represent the earliest recognizable morphologic expression of fundamental molecular events that lead to the development of invasive breast cancer. To study molecular events underlying premalignant breast disease, we have developed a method for isolating RNA from histologically identified lesions from frozen human breast tissue. This method specifically obtains mRNA from breast epithelial cells and has identified three genes which are differentially expressed in premalignant breast epithelial lesions. One gene identified by this method is overexpressed in four of five noncomedo ductal carcinoma in situ lesions and appears to be the human homologue of the gene encoding the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an enzyme involved in DNA synthesis.

  17. Revealing constitutively expressed resistance genes in Agrostis species using PCR-based motif-directed RNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Budak, Hikmet; Su, Senem; Ergen, Neslihan

    2006-12-01

    Agrostis species are mainly used in athletic fields and golf courses. Their integrity is maintained by fungicides, which makes the development of disease-resistance varieties a high priority. However, there is a lack of knowledge about resistance (R) genes and their use for genetic improvement in Agrostis species. The objective of this study was to identify and clone constitutively expressed cDNAs encoding R gene-like (RGL) sequences from three Agrostis species (colonial bentgrass (A. capillaris L.), creeping bentgrass (A. stolonifera L.) and velvet bentgrass (A. canina L.)) by PCR-based motif-directed RNA fingerprinting towards relatively conserved nucleotide binding site (NBS) domains. Sixty-one constitutively expressed cDNA sequences were identified and characterized. Sequence analysis of ESTs and probable translation products revealed that RGLs are highly conserved among these three Agrostis species. Fifteen of them were shown to share conserved motifs found in other plant disease resistance genes such as MLA13, Xa1, YR6, YR23 and RPP5. The molecular evolutionary forces, analysed using the Ka/Ks ratio, reflected purifying selection both on NBS and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) intervening regions of discovered RGL sequences in these species. This study presents, for the first time, isolation and characterization of constitutively expressed RGL sequences from Agrostis species revealing the presence of TNL (TIR-NBS-LRR) type R genes in monocot plants. The characterized RGLs will further enhance knowledge on the molecular evolution of the R gene family in grasses.

  18. Identification of ςB-Dependent Genes in Bacillus subtilis Using a Promoter Consensus-Directed Search and Oligonucleotide Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Petersohn, Anja; Bernhardt, Jörg; Gerth, Ulf; Höper, Dirk; Koburger, Torsten; Völker, Uwe; Hecker, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A consensus-directed search for ςB promoters was used to locate potential candidates for new ςB-dependent genes in Bacillus subtilis. Screening of those candidates by oligonucleotide hybridizations with total RNA from exponentially growing or ethanol-stressed cells of the wild type as well as a sigB mutant revealed 22 genes that required ςB for induction by ethanol. Although almost 50% of the proteins encoded by the newly discovered ςB-dependent stress genes seem to be membrane localized, biochemical functions have so far not been defined for any of the gene products. Allocation of the genes to the ςB-dependent stress regulon may indicate a potential function in the establishment of a multiple stress resistance. AldY and YhdF show similarities to NAD(P)-dependent dehydrogenases and YdbP to thioredoxins, supporting our suggestion that ςB-dependent proteins may be involved in the maintenance of the intracellular redox balance after stress. PMID:10482513

  19. Direct Evidence for Pitavastatin Induced Chromatin Structure Change in the KLF4 Gene in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanki, Yasuharu; Kohro, Takahide; Li, Guoliang; Ohta, Yoshihiro; Kimura, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Mika; Taguchi, Akashi; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Iwanari, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Shogo; Aruga, Hirofumi; Dong, Shoulian; Stevens, Junko F.; Poh, Huay Mei; Yamamoto, Kazuki; Kawamura, Takeshi; Mimura, Imari; Suehiro, Jun-ichi; Sugiyama, Akira; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Shibata, Haruki; Yoshinaka, Yasunobu; Doi, Takeshi; Asanuma, Akimune; Tanabe, Sohei; Tanaka, Toshiya; Minami, Takashi; Hamakubo, Takao; Sakai, Juro; Nozaki, Naohito; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Nangaku, Masaomi; Ruan, Xiaoan; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Ruan, Yijun; Ihara, Sigeo; Endo, Akira; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Wada, Youichiro

    2014-01-01

    Statins exert atheroprotective effects through the induction of specific transcriptional factors in multiple organs. In endothelial cells, statin-dependent atheroprotective gene up-regulation is mediated by Kruppel-like factor (KLF) family transcription factors. To dissect the mechanism of gene regulation, we sought to determine molecular targets by performing microarray analyses of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with pitavastatin, and KLF4 was determined to be the most highly induced gene. In addition, it was revealed that the atheroprotective genes induced with pitavastatin, such as nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) and thrombomodulin (THBD), were suppressed by KLF4 knockdown. Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) family activation is reported to be involved in pitavastatin-dependent KLF4 induction. We focused on MEF2C among the MEF2 family members and identified a novel functional MEF2C binding site 148 kb upstream of the KLF4 gene by chromatin immunoprecipitation along with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) followed by luciferase assay. By applying whole genome and quantitative chromatin conformation analysis {chromatin interaction analysis with paired end tag sequencing (ChIA-PET), and real time chromosome conformation capture (3C) assay}, we observed that the MEF2C-bound enhancer and transcription start site (TSS) of KLF4 came into closer spatial proximity by pitavastatin treatment. 3D-Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging supported the conformational change in individual cells. Taken together, dynamic chromatin conformation change was shown to mediate pitavastatin-responsive gene induction in endothelial cells. PMID:24797675

  20. Gene-environment interactions and obesity: recent developments and future directions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, a major public health concern, is a multifactorial disease caused by both environmental and genetic factors. Although recent genome-wide association studies have identified many loci related to obesity or body mass index, the identified variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of obesity. Better understanding of the interplay between genetic and environmental factors is the basis for developing effective personalized obesity prevention and management strategies. This article reviews recent advances in identifying gene-environment interactions related to obesity and describes epidemiological designs and newly developed statistical approaches to characterizing and discovering gene-environment interactions on obesity risk. PMID:25951849

  1. The Arabidopsis SKU5 gene encodes an extracellular glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein involved in directional root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedbrook, John C.; Carroll, Kathleen L.; Hung, Kai F.; Masson, Patrick H.; Somerville, Chris R.

    2002-01-01

    To investigate how roots respond to directional cues, we characterized a T-DNA-tagged Arabidopsis mutant named sku5 in which the roots skewed and looped away from the normal downward direction of growth on inclined agar surfaces. sku5 roots and etiolated hypocotyls were slightly shorter than normal and exhibited a counterclockwise (left-handed) axial rotation bias. The surface-dependent skewing phenotype disappeared when the roots penetrated the agar surface, but the axial rotation defect persisted, revealing that these two directional growth processes are separable. The SKU5 gene belongs to a 19-member gene family designated SKS (SKU5 Similar) that is related structurally to the multiple-copper oxidases ascorbate oxidase and laccase. However, the SKS proteins lack several of the conserved copper binding motifs characteristic of copper oxidases, and no enzymatic function could be assigned to the SKU5 protein. Analysis of plants expressing SKU5 reporter constructs and protein gel blot analysis showed that SKU5 was expressed most strongly in expanding tissues. SKU5 was glycosylated and modified by glycosyl phosphatidylinositol and localized to both the plasma membrane and the cell wall. Our observations suggest that SKU5 affects two directional growth processes, possibly by participating in cell wall expansion.

  2. In vivo alteration of the keratin 17 gene in hair follicles by oligonucleotide-directed gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Fan, W; Yoon, K

    2003-12-01

    Using intradermal injection of a chimeric RNA-DNA oligonucleotide (RDO) or a single-stranded oligonucleotide (ssODN) into murine skin, we attempted to make a dominant mutation (R94p) in the conserve alpha-helical domain of keratin 17 (K17), the same mutation found in pachyononychia congenichia type 2 (PC-2) patients with phenotypes ranging from twisted hair and multiple pilosebaceous cysts. Both K17A-RDO and -ssODN contained a single base mismatch (CGC to CCC) to alter the normal K17 sequence to cause an amino acid substitution (R94P). The complexes consisting of oligonucleotides and cationic liposomes were injected to C57B1/6 murine skin at 2 and 5 day after birth. Histological examination of skin biopsies at postnatal day 8 from several mice showed consistent twisted hair shafts or broken hair follicles at the sebaceous gland level and occasional rupture of the hair bulb or epidermal cyst-like changes. In the injected area, the number of full anagen hair follicles decrease by 50%. Injection of the control oligonucleotide, identical to K17A-RDO but containing no mismatch to the normal sequence, did not result in any detectable abnormality. The frequency of gene alteration was lower than 3%, according to the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the genomic DNA isolated by dissection of hair follicles from slides. Although intradermal injection of K17A-RDO or K17-ssODN caused a dominant mutation in K17 affecting hair growth and morphology, these phenotypic changes were transient either due to the compensation of K17 by other keratins or the replacement of the mutated cells by normal surrounding cells during hair growth.

  3. Targeted Myostatin Gene Editing in Multiple Mammalian Species Directed by a Single Pair of TALE Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Zhao, Piming; Mariano, Andrew; Han, Renzhi

    2013-07-30

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. Strategies to block myostatin signaling pathway have been extensively pursued to increase muscle mass in various disease settings including muscular dystrophy. Here, we report a new class of reagents based on transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to disrupt myostatin expression at the genome level. We designed a pair of MSTN TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the myostatin gene. We demonstrate that codelivery of these MSTN TALENs induce highly specific and efficient gene disruption in a variety of human, cattle, and mouse cells. Based upon sequence analysis, this pair of TALENs is expected to be functional in many other mammalian species. Moreover, we demonstrate that these MSTN TALENs can facilitate targeted integration of a mCherry expression cassette or a larger muscular dystrophy gene (dysferlin) expression cassette into the MSTN locus in mouse or human cells. Therefore, targeted editing of the myostatin gene using our highly specific and efficient TALEN pair would facilitate cell engineering, allowing potential use in translational research for cell-based therapy.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e112; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.39; published online 30 July 2013.

  4. Gene--Environment Interplay and Delinquent Involvement: Evidence of Direct, Indirect, and Interactive Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Kevin M.; DeLisi, Matt; Wright, John Paul; Vaughn, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral genetic research has revealed that biogenic factors play a role in the development of antisocial behaviors. Much of this research has also explicated the way in which the environment and genes may combine to create different phenotypes. The authors draw heavily from this literature and use data from the National Longitudinal Study of…

  5. The thermostable direct hemolysin gene (tdh) of Vibrio hollisae is dissimilar in prevalence to and phylogenetically distant from the tdh genes of other vibrios: implications in the horizontal transfer of the tdh gene.

    PubMed

    Nishibuchi, M; Janda, J M; Ezaki, T

    1996-01-01

    Vibrio hollisae strains isolated recently from patients in various locations were examined for the presence of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene (tdh) using nucleic acid hybridization and polymerase chain reaction assays. The results were consistent with the previous finding that all strains of V. hollisae carry the tdh gene. In contrast, the tdh gene has been detected in a minority of strains for other Vibrio species (V. parahaemolyticus, V. cholerae non-O1, and V. mimicus). Detailed phylogenetic analysis showed that the tdh genes of the non-V. hollisae species were very closely related to each other and that the tdh gene of V. hollisae was distantly related to the tdh genes of the non-V. hollisae species. These results and the proposed insertion sequence-mediated tdh transfer mechanism suggest that the tdh gene may have been maintained stably in V. hollisae and that the tdh genes of the non-V. hollisae species may have been involved in recent horizontal transfer.

  6. Genes implicated in stem cell identity and temporal programme are directly targeted by Notch in neuroblast tumours.

    PubMed

    Zacharioudaki, Evanthia; Housden, Benjamin E; Garinis, George; Stojnic, Robert; Delidakis, Christos; Bray, Sarah J

    2016-01-15

    Notch signalling is involved in a multitude of developmental decisions and its aberrant activation is linked to many diseases, including cancers. One example is the neural stem cell tumours that arise from constitutive Notch activity in Drosophila neuroblasts. To investigate how hyperactivation of Notch in larval neuroblasts leads to tumours, we combined results from profiling the upregulated mRNAs and mapping the regions bound by the core Notch pathway transcription factor Su(H). This identified 246 putative direct Notch targets. These genes were highly enriched for transcription factors and overlapped significantly with a previously identified regulatory programme dependent on the proneural transcription factor Asense. Included were genes associated with the neuroblast maintenance and self-renewal programme that we validated as Notch regulated in vivo. Another group were the so-called temporal transcription factors, which have been implicated in neuroblast maturation. Normally expressed in specific time windows, several temporal transcription factors were ectopically expressed in the stem cell tumours, suggesting that Notch had reprogrammed their normal temporal regulation. Indeed, the Notch-induced hyperplasia was reduced by mutations affecting two of the temporal factors, which, conversely, were sufficient to induce mild hyperplasia on their own. Altogether, the results suggest that Notch induces neuroblast tumours by directly promoting the expression of genes that contribute to stem cell identity and by reprogramming the expression of factors that could regulate maturity.

  7. Genes implicated in stem cell identity and temporal programme are directly targeted by Notch in neuroblast tumours

    PubMed Central

    Zacharioudaki, Evanthia; Housden, Benjamin E.; Garinis, George; Stojnic, Robert; Delidakis, Christos; Bray, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Notch signalling is involved in a multitude of developmental decisions and its aberrant activation is linked to many diseases, including cancers. One example is the neural stem cell tumours that arise from constitutive Notch activity in Drosophila neuroblasts. To investigate how hyperactivation of Notch in larval neuroblasts leads to tumours, we combined results from profiling the upregulated mRNAs and mapping the regions bound by the core Notch pathway transcription factor Su(H). This identified 246 putative direct Notch targets. These genes were highly enriched for transcription factors and overlapped significantly with a previously identified regulatory programme dependent on the proneural transcription factor Asense. Included were genes associated with the neuroblast maintenance and self-renewal programme that we validated as Notch regulated in vivo. Another group were the so-called temporal transcription factors, which have been implicated in neuroblast maturation. Normally expressed in specific time windows, several temporal transcription factors were ectopically expressed in the stem cell tumours, suggesting that Notch had reprogrammed their normal temporal regulation. Indeed, the Notch-induced hyperplasia was reduced by mutations affecting two of the temporal factors, which, conversely, were sufficient to induce mild hyperplasia on their own. Altogether, the results suggest that Notch induces neuroblast tumours by directly promoting the expression of genes that contribute to stem cell identity and by reprogramming the expression of factors that could regulate maturity. PMID:26657768

  8. Tobamovirus-resistant tobacco generated by RNA interference directed against host genes.

    PubMed

    Asano, Momoko; Satoh, Rena; Mochizuki, Atsuko; Tsuda, Shinya; Yamanaka, Takuya; Nishiguchi, Masamichi; Hirai, Katsuyuki; Meshi, Tetsuo; Naito, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2005-08-15

    Two homologous Nicotiana tabacum genes NtTOM1 and NtTOM3 have been identified. These genes encode polypeptides with amino acid sequence similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana TOM1 and TOM3, which function in parallel to support tobamovirus multiplication. Simultaneous RNA interference against NtTOM1 and NtTOM3 in N. tabacum resulted in nearly complete inhibition of the multiplication of Tomato mosaic virus and other tobamoviruses, but did not affect plant growth or the ability of Cucumber mosaic virus to multiply. As TOM1 and TOM3 homologues are present in a variety of plant species, their inhibition via RNA interference should constitute a useful method for generating tobamovirus-resistant plants.

  9. Phylogenetic conservation of immunoglobulin heavy chains: direct comparison of hamster and mouse Cmu genes.

    PubMed

    McGuire, K L; Duncan, W R; Tucker, P W

    1985-08-12

    We have analyzed the JH-Cmu locus of the Syrian hamster by DNA cloning and sequencing. The single Cmu gene is highly homologous to that of the mouse. The hamster equivalents of the JH and switch (S) recombination regions are arranged as in the mouse, but surprisingly are not highly conserved. Also unlike its close murine relative, the Smu regions among inbred hamster strains are not polymorphic. The complete nucleotide sequence of hamster and mouse Cmu genes have been compared to partial Cmu sequences of other species. Conservation within a portion of the 3' untranslated region may signify functional requirements for 3' end processing. Mutational frequencies within exons and introns of hamster and mouse do not support the theory that the rate of DNA transitions to transversions decreases with evolutionary distance.

  10. Detection of a functional insertion sequence responsible for deletion of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene (tdh) in Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Bhoopong, Phuangthip; Vuddhakul, Varaporn; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2008-09-15

    The thermostable direct hemolysin coded by the tdh gene is a marker of virulent strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The tdh genes are flanked by insertion sequences collectively named as ISVs or their remnants; but the ISVs so far examined have accumulated mutations in the transposase genes and underwent structural arrangements and their transposition activity could not be expected; the tdh gene was thus considered to have been acquired by V. parahaemolyticus through horizontal transfer in the past during evolution. We recently isolated from the same patient tdh+ strains and a tdh(-) strain (PCR examination) that were otherwise indistinguishable. The purpose of this study was to examine the hypothesis that the tdh(-) strain was derived from the tdh+ strain by a deletion of the tdh gene mediated by a functional ISV. Southern blot hybridization showed tdh+ sequences in the tdh(-) strain (PSU-1466). Nucleotide sequence analysis of the tdh and its flanking sequences revealed the tdh gene was split into two parts and they were located 3182-bp apart in PSU-1466. The two tdh sequences were flanked by one of the ISVs, named as ISVpa3, in PSU-1466. This genetic structure could be explained by an ISVpa3-mediated partial tdh deletion from a tdh+ strain followed by transposition of the duplicated ISVpa3 and the deleted tdh sequence into a neighboring location. The ISVpa3 of PSU-1466 coded for a full-length transposase and a DDE motif. We were able to demonstrate transposition activity of the ISVpa3 cloned from PSU-1466 using the replicon fusion assay with the conjugal transfer of a cointegrate from Escherichia coli to V. parahaemolyticus. Our data support ISVpa3-mediated partial tdh deletion resulted in the emergence of the tdh(-) strain.

  11. Linkage approach and direct COL4A5 gene mutation screening in Alport syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, A.E.; Rossetti, S.; Biasi, O.

    1994-09-01

    Alport Syndrome (AS) is transmitted as an X-linked dominant trait in the majority of families, the defective gene being COL4A5 at Xq22. In the remaining cases AS appears to be autosomally inherited. Recently, mutations in COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes at 2q35-q37 were identified in families with autosomal recessive AS. Mutation detection screening is being performed by non-radioactive single stand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), heteroduplex analysis, and automated DNA sequencing in over 170 AS patients enrolled in the ongoing Italian Multicenter Study on AS. So far twenty-five different mutations have been found, including missense, splicing, and frameshifts. Moreover, by using six tightly linked COL4A5 informative makers, we have also typed two larger AS families, and have shown compatible sex-linked transmission in one other, suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. In this latter three-generation COL4A5-unlinked family we are now looking for linkage and for mutations in the candidate COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes on chromosome 2q.

  12. Sizes, locations, and directions of transcription of two genes on a cloned maize chloroplast DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Link, Gerhard; Bogorad, Lawrence

    1980-01-01

    mRNA for the large subunit (LS) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase [3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxylase (dimerizing), EC 4.1.1.39] of Zea mays is complementary to an uninterrupted 1600-base-pair-long chloroplast DNA sequence that has been mapped precisely within the 4350-base-pair-long chloroplast DNA fragment Bam 9 to which it had been traced earlier [Bedbrook, J. R., Coen, D. M., Beaton, A. R., Bogorad, L. & Rich, A. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 905-910]. An additional 1400-base-pair-long uninterrupted region that is colinear with a chloroplast RNA has been detected on Bam 9. The transcript from this region is part of a 2200-nucleotide-long RNA. The remainder of the DNA sequence for the 2200-base-pair RNA maps outside Bam 9. The 1600-base-pair LS gene and the gene for the 2200-nucleotide transcript are close to one another. They are separated by an untranscribed intercistronic “gap” about 330 base pairs long. These two closely packed genes are inverted on the chromosome—i.e., their 3′ termini are at opposite ends of the untranscribed gap and they map on opposite strands. Images PMID:16592800

  13. Urea hydrolysis and suppressed production of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) by Vibrio parahaemolyticus associated with presence of TDH-related hemolysin genes.

    PubMed

    Okitsu, T; Osawa, R; Pornruangwong, S; Yamai, S

    1997-05-01

    A total of 18 strains of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from patients of past food poisoning cases occurring in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, were assayed for presence of the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) gene and the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) genes (trh 1 and trh 2) with specific reference to their ability to hydrolyze urea and TDH production. A polymerase chain reaction assay revealed that all urea-hydrolyzing strains (9 strains) carried either trh 1 gene or trh 2 gene. The strains carrying the trh genes as well as the tdh gene produced TDH less by a factor of 4 to 16 than those carrying only the tdh gene, suggesting the expression of the tdh gene was suppressed by the presence of trh gene through a mechanism yet to be defined.

  14. Introduction of specific point mutations into RNA polymerase II by gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells: evidence for a DNA mismatch repair mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Steeg, C M; Ellis, J; Bernstein, A

    1990-01-01

    We have introduced two specific point mutations, located 20 base pairs apart, into the endogenous murine gene that encodes the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPII215). The first mutation conferred resistance to the mushroom toxin alpha-amanitin (amar), and the second mutation generated a restriction fragment length polymorphism without altering the protein sequence. Targeted amar clones were generated at a frequency of 1 in 30 totipotent embryonic stem cells that expressed stably integrated DNA vectors after electroporation. Thirty to 40% of these clones had acquired both mutations, whereas, surprisingly, the remaining clones had acquired the specific amar point mutation but lacked the restriction fragment length polymorphism. We suggest that the latter clones were generated by independent DNA mismatch repair rather than by double crossover or gene conversion. These results demonstrate that it is possible to introduce specific point mutations into an endogenous gene in embryonic stem cells. Thus it should be possible to introduce single base substitutions into other cellular genes, including nonselectable genes, by optimizing the efficiency of gene transfer and/or the sensitivity of screening for targeted clones. Images PMID:1972278

  15. Directing 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pintoff, Ernest

    Providing an introduction to anyone considering directing as a field of study or career, this book takes a broad look at the process of directing and encourages students and professionals alike to look outside of the movie industry for inspiration. Chapters in the book discuss selecting and acquiring material; budgeting and financing; casting and…

  16. Evaluating the roles of directed breeding and gene flow in animal domestication

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Fiona B.; Dobney, Keith; Denham, Tim; Capriles, José M.

    2014-01-01

    For the last 150 y scholars have focused upon the roles of intentional breeding and genetic isolation as fundamental to understanding the process of animal domestication. This analysis of ethnoarchaeological, archaeological, and genetic data suggests that long-term gene flow between wild and domestic stocks was much more common than previously assumed, and that selective breeding of females was largely absent during the early phases of animal domestication. These findings challenge assumptions about severe genetic bottlenecks during domestication, expectations regarding monophyletic origins, and interpretations of multiple domestications. The findings also raise new questions regarding ways in which behavioral and phenotypic domestication traits were developed and maintained. PMID:24753599

  17. ZmMYB31 directly represses maize lignin genes and redirects the phenylpropanoid metabolic flux.

    PubMed

    Fornalé, Silvia; Shi, Xinhui; Chai, Chenglin; Encina, Antonio; Irar, Sami; Capellades, Montserrat; Fuguet, Elisabet; Torres, Josep-Lluís; Rovira, Pere; Puigdomènech, Pere; Rigau, Joan; Grotewold, Erich; Gray, John; Caparrós-Ruiz, David

    2010-11-01

    Few regulators of phenylpropanoids have been identified in monocots having potential as biofuel crops. Here we demonstrate the role of the maize (Zea mays) R2R3-MYB factor ZmMYB31 in the control of the phenylpropanoid pathway. We determined its in vitro consensus DNA-binding sequence as ACC(T)/(A) ACC, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) established that it interacts with two lignin gene promoters in vivo. To explore the potential of ZmMYB31 as a regulator of phenylpropanoids in other plants, its role in the regulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway was further investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana. ZmMYB31 downregulates several genes involved in the synthesis of monolignols and transgenic plants are dwarf and show a significantly reduced lignin content with unaltered polymer composition. We demonstrate that these changes increase cell wall degradability of the transgenic plants. In addition, ZmMYB31 represses the synthesis of sinapoylmalate, resulting in plants that are more sensitive to UV irradiation, and induces several stress-related proteins. Our results suggest that, as an indirect effect of repression of lignin biosynthesis, transgenic plants redirect carbon flux towards the biosynthesis of anthocyanins. Thus, ZmMYB31 can be considered a good candidate for the manipulation of lignin biosynthesis in biotechnological applications.

  18. BMP restricts stemness of intestinal Lgr5+ stem cells by directly suppressing their signature genes

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhen; Li, Yehua; Zhao, Bing; Xu, Chi; Liu, Yuan; Li, Haonan; Zhang, Bingjie; Wang, Xinquan; Yang, Xiao; Xie, Wei; Li, Baojie; Han, Jing-Dong Jackie; Chen, Ye-Guang

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium possesses a remarkable self-renewal ability, which is mediated by actively proliferating Lgr5+ stem cells. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling represents one major counterforce that limits the hyperproliferation of intestinal epithelium, but the exact mechanism remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that epithelial BMP signalling plays an indispensable role in restricting Lgr5+ stem cell expansion to maintain intestinal homeostasis and prevent premalignant hyperproliferation on damage. Mechanistically, BMP inhibits stemness of Lgr5+ stem cells through Smad-mediated transcriptional repression of a large number of stem cell signature genes, including Lgr5, and this effect is independent of Wnt/β-catenin signalling. Smad1/Smad4 recruits histone deacetylase HDAC1 to the promoters to repress transcription, and knockout of Smad4 abolishes the negative effects of BMP on stem cells. Our findings therefore demonstrate that epithelial BMP constrains the Lgr5+ stem cell self-renewal via Smad-mediated repression of stem cell signature genes to ensure proper homeostatic renewal of intestinal epithelium. PMID:28059064

  19. Future directions in research with presymptomatic individuals carrying the gene for Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Smith, Eleanor; Bradshaw, John L; Chua, Phyllis; Lloyd, John; Churchyard, Andrew; Chiu, Edmond

    2003-01-30

    Presymptomatic individuals carrying the gene for Huntington's disease (HD) provide researchers with a unique opportunity of learning more about the neuropathophysiology, symptom onset, behavioural functioning, and mediating factors of this fatal disease. In this review, we attempt to demonstrate that research over the last 8 years, since the isolation of the gene, has remained at large controversial. Although we are aware of some of the factors that can influence age at onset and disease progression, we are still unable to determine exactly when an individual will develop HD symptoms, and how fast these symptoms will progress. In an era rapidly advancing with respect to therapeutic intervention that could forestall the onset and progression of HD, systematic research with improved inclusion criteria is paramount. A greater understanding of the time course of the disease would be beneficial not only in monitoring the effectiveness of future treatments, but also in determining the most appropriate time to administer them. Finally, we present various ethical considerations, as well as put forward various recommendations that could assist in better diagnosing preclinical deficits in presymptomatic individuals.

  20. Direct Detection of Soil mRNAs using Targeted Microarrays for Genes Associated with Lignin Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Smith, Jeff L.; Waters, Katrina M.; Bolton, Harvey

    2010-07-04

    Microarrays have become established tools for describing microbial systems, however the assessment of expression profiles for environmental microbial communities still presents unique challenges. Notably, the concentration of particular transcripts are likely very dilute relative to the pool of total RNA, and PCR-based amplification strategies are vulnerable to amplification biases and the appropriate primer selection. Thus, we apply a signal amplification approach, rather than template amplification, to analyze the expression of genes encoding selected lignin-degrading enzymes in soil. Controls in the form of known amplicons and cDNA from Phanerochaete chrysosporium were included and mixed with the soil cDNA both before and after the signal amplification in order to assess the dynamic range of the microarray. We demonstrate that restored prairie soil expresses a diverse range of genes encoding lignin-degrading enzymes following incubation with lignin substrate, while farmed agricultural soil does not. The mixed additions of control cDNA with soil cDNA does interfere with detection of the low abundance transcripts, nevertheless this microarray approach consistently reports the higher-abundance transcripts which present more robust signals.

  1. Rapidly evolving mitochondrial genome and directional selection in mitochondrial genes in the parasitic wasp nasonia (hymenoptera: pteromalidae).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Deodoro C S G; Raychoudhury, Rhitoban; Lavrov, Dennis V; Werren, John H

    2008-10-01

    We sequenced the nearly complete mtDNA of 3 species of parasitic wasps, Nasonia vitripennis (2 strains), Nasonia giraulti, and Nasonia longicornis, including all 13 protein-coding genes and the 2 rRNAs, and found unusual patterns of mitochondrial evolution. The Nasonia mtDNA has a unique gene order compared with other insect mtDNAs due to multiple rearrangements. The mtDNAs of these wasps also show nucleotide substitution rates over 30 times faster than nuclear protein-coding genes, indicating among the highest substitution rates found in animal mitochondria (normally <10 times faster). A McDonald and Kreitman test shows that the between-species frequency of fixed replacement sites relative to silent sites is significantly higher compared with within-species polymorphisms in 2 mitochondrial genes of Nasonia, atp6 and atp8, indicating directional selection. Consistent with this interpretation, the Ka/Ks (nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rates) ratios are higher between species than within species. In contrast, cox1 shows a signature of purifying selection for amino acid sequence conservation, although rates of amino acid substitutions are still higher than for comparable insects. The mitochondrial-encoded polypeptides atp6 and atp8 both occur in F0F1ATP synthase of the electron transport chain. Because malfunction in this fundamental protein severely affects fitness, we suggest that the accelerated accumulation of replacements is due to beneficial mutations necessary to compensate mild-deleterious mutations fixed by random genetic drift or Wolbachia sweeps in the fast evolving mitochondria of Nasonia. We further propose that relatively high rates of amino acid substitution in some mitochondrial genes can be driven by a "Compensation-Draft Feedback"; increased fixation of mildly deleterious mutations results in selection for compensatory mutations, which lead to fixation of additional deleterious mutations in nonrecombining mitochondrial genomes, thus

  2. Rapidly Evolving Mitochondrial Genome and Directional Selection in Mitochondrial Genes in the Parasitic Wasp Nasonia (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)

    PubMed Central

    Raychoudhury, Rhitoban; Lavrov, Dennis V.; Werren, John H.

    2008-01-01

    We sequenced the nearly complete mtDNA of 3 species of parasitic wasps, Nasonia vitripennis (2 strains), Nasonia giraulti, and Nasonia longicornis, including all 13 protein-coding genes and the 2 rRNAs, and found unusual patterns of mitochondrial evolution. The Nasonia mtDNA has a unique gene order compared with other insect mtDNAs due to multiple rearrangements. The mtDNAs of these wasps also show nucleotide substitution rates over 30 times faster than nuclear protein-coding genes, indicating among the highest substitution rates found in animal mitochondria (normally <10 times faster). A McDonald and Kreitman test shows that the between-species frequency of fixed replacement sites relative to silent sites is significantly higher compared with within-species polymorphisms in 2 mitochondrial genes of Nasonia, atp6 and atp8, indicating directional selection. Consistent with this interpretation, the Ka/Ks (nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rates) ratios are higher between species than within species. In contrast, cox1 shows a signature of purifying selection for amino acid sequence conservation, although rates of amino acid substitutions are still higher than for comparable insects. The mitochondrial-encoded polypeptides atp6 and atp8 both occur in F0F1ATP synthase of the electron transport chain. Because malfunction in this fundamental protein severely affects fitness, we suggest that the accelerated accumulation of replacements is due to beneficial mutations necessary to compensate mild-deleterious mutations fixed by random genetic drift or Wolbachia sweeps in the fast evolving mitochondria of Nasonia. We further propose that relatively high rates of amino acid substitution in some mitochondrial genes can be driven by a “Compensation-Draft Feedback”; increased fixation of mildly deleterious mutations results in selection for compensatory mutations, which lead to fixation of additional deleterious mutations in nonrecombining mitochondrial genomes, thus

  3. Directed evolution induces tributyrin hydrolysis in a virulence factor of Xylella fastidiosa using a duplicated gene as a template

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Basuthkar J.; Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Dandekar, Abhaya

    2014-01-01

    Duplication of genes is one of the preferred ways for natural selection to add advantageous functionality to the genome without having to reinvent the wheel with respect to catalytic efficiency and protein stability. The duplicated secretory virulence factors of Xylella fastidiosa (LesA, LesB and LesC), implicated in Pierce's disease of grape and citrus variegated chlorosis of citrus species, epitomizes the positive selection pressures exerted on advantageous genes in such pathogens. A deeper insight into the evolution of these lipases/esterases is essential to develop resistance mechanisms in transgenic plants. Directed evolution, an attempt to accelerate the evolutionary steps in the laboratory, is inherently simple when targeted for loss of function. A bigger challenge is to specify mutations that endow a new function, such as a lost functionality in a duplicated gene. Previously, we have proposed a method for enumerating candidates for mutations intended to transfer the functionality of one protein into another related protein based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the active site residues (DECAAF). In the current work, we present in vivo validation of DECAAF by inducing tributyrin hydrolysis in LesB based on the active site similarity to LesA. The structures of these proteins have been modeled using RaptorX based on the closely related LipA protein from Xanthomonas oryzae. These mutations replicate the spatial and electrostatic conformation of LesA in the modeled structure of the mutant LesB as well, providing in silico validation before proceeding to the laborious in vivo work. Such focused mutations allows one to dissect the relevance of the duplicated genes in finer detail as compared to gene knockouts, since they do not interfere with other moonlighting functions, protein expression levels or protein-protein interaction. PMID:25717364

  4. Introduction of a novel 18S rDNA gene arrangement along with distinct ITS region in the saline water microalga Dunaliella.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Mohammad A; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Gharajeh, Nahid Hosseinzadeh; Hejazi, Mohammad S

    2010-04-08

    Comparison of 18S rDNA gene sequences is a very promising method for identification and classification of living organisms. Molecular identification and discrimination of different Dunaliella species were carried out based on the size of 18S rDNA gene and, number and position of introns in the gene. Three types of 18S rDNA structure have already been reported: the gene with a size of ~1770 bp lacking any intron, with a size of ~2170 bp consisting one intron near 5' terminus, and with a size of ~2570 bp harbouring two introns near 5' and 3' termini. Hereby, we report a new 18S rDNA gene arrangement in terms of intron localization and nucleotide sequence in a Dunaliella isolated from Iranian salt lakes (ABRIINW-M1/2). PCR amplification with genus-specific primers resulted in production of a ~2170 bp DNA band, which is similar to that of D. salina 18S rDNA gene containing only one intron near 5' terminus. Whilst, sequence composition of the gene revealed the lack of any intron near 5' terminus in our isolate. Furthermore, another alteration was observed due to the presence of a 440 bp DNA fragment near 3' terminus. Accordingly, 18S rDNA gene of the isolate is clearly different from those of D. salina and any other Dunaliella species reported so far. Moreover, analysis of ITS region sequence showed the diversity of this region compared to the previously reported species. 18S rDNA and ITS sequences of our isolate were submitted with accesion numbers of EU678868 and EU927373 in NCBI database, respectively. The optimum growth rate of this isolate occured at the salinity level of 1 M NaCl. The maximum carotenoid content under stress condition of intense light (400 mumol photon m-2 s-1), high salinity (4 M NaCl) and deficiency of nitrate and phosphate nutritions reached to 240 ng/cell after 15 days.

  5. Modulation of enhancer looping and differential gene targeting by Epstein-Barr virus transcription factors directs cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Michael J; Wood, C David; Ojeniyi, Opeoluwa; Cooper, Tim J; Kanhere, Aditi; Arvey, Aaron; Webb, Helen M; Palermo, Richard D; Harth-Hertle, Marie L; Kempkes, Bettina; Jenner, Richard G; West, Michelle J

    2013-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) epigenetically reprogrammes B-lymphocytes to drive immortalization and facilitate viral persistence. Host-cell transcription is perturbed principally through the actions of EBV EBNA 2, 3A, 3B and 3C, with cellular genes deregulated by specific combinations of these EBNAs through unknown mechanisms. Comparing human genome binding by these viral transcription factors, we discovered that 25% of binding sites were shared by EBNA 2 and the EBNA 3s and were located predominantly in enhancers. Moreover, 80% of potential EBNA 3A, 3B or 3C target genes were also targeted by EBNA 2, implicating extensive interplay between EBNA 2 and 3 proteins in cellular reprogramming. Investigating shared enhancer sites neighbouring two new targets (WEE1 and CTBP2) we discovered that EBNA 3 proteins repress transcription by modulating enhancer-promoter loop formation to establish repressive chromatin hubs or prevent assembly of active hubs. Re-ChIP analysis revealed that EBNA 2 and 3 proteins do not bind simultaneously at shared sites but compete for binding thereby modulating enhancer-promoter interactions. At an EBNA 3-only intergenic enhancer site between ADAM28 and ADAMDEC1 EBNA 3C was also able to independently direct epigenetic repression of both genes through enhancer-promoter looping. Significantly, studying shared or unique EBNA 3 binding sites at WEE1, CTBP2, ITGAL (LFA-1 alpha chain), BCL2L11 (Bim) and the ADAMs, we also discovered that different sets of EBNA 3 proteins bind regulatory elements in a gene and cell-type specific manner. Binding profiles correlated with the effects of individual EBNA 3 proteins on the expression of these genes, providing a molecular basis for the targeting of different sets of cellular genes by the EBNA 3s. Our results therefore highlight the influence of the genomic and cellular context in determining the specificity of gene deregulation by EBV and provide a paradigm for host-cell reprogramming through modulation of

  6. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist delivered directly and by gene therapy inhibits matrix degradation in the intact degenerate human intervertebral disc: an in situ zymographic and gene therapy study

    PubMed Central

    Le Maitre, Christine L; Hoyland, Judith A; Freemont, Anthony J

    2007-01-01

    Data implicate IL-1 in the altered matrix biology that characterizes human intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. In the current study we investigated the enzymic mechanism by which IL-1 induces matrix degradation in degeneration of the human IVD, and whether the IL-1 inhibitor IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) will inhibit degradation. A combination of in situ zymography (ISZ) and immunohistochemistry was used to examine the effects of IL-1 and IL-1Ra on matrix degradation and metal-dependent protease (MDP) expression in explants of non-degenerate and degenerate human IVDs. ISZ employed three substrates (gelatin, collagen, casein) and different challenges (IL-1β, IL-1Ra and enzyme inhibitors). Immunohistochemistry was undertaken for MDPs. In addition, IL-1Ra was introduced into degenerate IVD explants using genetically engineered constructs. The novel findings from this study are: IL-1Ra delivered directly onto explants of degenerate IVDs eliminates matrix degradation as assessed by multi-substrate ISZ; there is a direct relationship between matrix degradation assessed by ISZ and MDP expression defined by immunohistochemistry; single injections of IVD cells engineered to over-express IL-1Ra significantly inhibit MDP expression for two weeks. Our findings show that IL-1 is a key cytokine driving matrix degradation in the degenerate IVD. Furthermore, IL-1Ra delivered directly or by gene therapy inhibits IVD matrix degradation. IL-1Ra could be used therapeutically to inhibit degeneration of the IVD. PMID:17760968

  7. Muscle segment homeobox genes direct embryonic diapause by limiting inflammation in the uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Jeeyeon; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Bartos, Amanda; Li, Yingju; Baker, Erin Shammel; Tilton, Susan C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Jegga, Anil; Murata, Shigeo; Hirota, Yasushi; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2015-06-11

    Embryonic diapause (delayed implantation) is a reproductive strategy widespread in the animal kingdom. Under this condition, embryos at the blastocyst stage become dormant simultaneously with uterine quiescence until environmental or physiological conditions are favorable for the survival of the mother and newborn. Under favorable conditions, activation of the blastocyst and uterus ensues with implantation and progression of pregnancy. Although endocrine factors are known to participate in this process, the underlying molecular mechanism coordinating this phenomenon is not clearly understood. We recently found that uterine muscle segment homeobox (Msx) transcription factors are critical for the initiation and maintenance of delayed implantation in mice. To better understand why Msx genes are critical for delayed implantation, we compared uterine proteomics profiles between littermate floxed (Msx1/Msx2f/f) mice and mice with uterine deletion of Msx genes (Msx1/Msx2d/d) under delayed conditions. In Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri, pathways including protein translation, ubiquitin-proteasome system, inflammation, chaperone-mediated protein folding, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were enriched, and computational modeling showed intersection of these pathways on inflammatory responses. Indeed, increases in the ubiquitin-proteasome system and inflammation conformed to proteotoxic and ER stress in Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri under delayed conditions. Interestingly, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor bortezomib further exacerbated ER stress in Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri with aggravated inflammatory response, deteriorating rate of blastocyst recovery and failure to sustain delayed implantation. This study highlights a previously unrecognized role for Msx in preventing proteotoxic stress and inflammatory responses to coordinate embryo dormancy and uterine quiescence during embryonic diapause.

  8. AAV-directed persistent expression of a gene encoding anti-nicotine antibody for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Martin J; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; De, Bishnu P; Pagovich, Odelya E; Young, Colin N; Qiu, Jian-ping; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Hackett, Neil R; Worgall, Stefan; Janda, Kim D; Davisson, Robin L; Crystal, Ronald G

    2012-06-27

    Current strategies to help tobacco smokers quit have limited success as a result of the addictive properties of the nicotine in cigarette smoke. We hypothesized that a single administration of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vector expressing high levels of an anti-nicotine antibody would persistently prevent nicotine from reaching its receptors in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we constructed an AAVrh.10 vector that expressed a full-length, high-affinity, anti-nicotine antibody derived from the Fab fragment of the anti-nicotine monoclonal antibody NIC9D9 (AAVantiNic). In mice treated with this vector, blood concentrations of the anti-nicotine antibody were dose-dependent, and the antibody showed high specificity and affinity for nicotine. The antibody shielded the brain from systemically administered nicotine, reducing brain nicotine concentrations to 15% of those in naïve mice. The amount of nicotine sequestered in the serum of vector-treated mice was more than seven times greater than that in untreated mice, with 83% of serum nicotine bound to immunoglobulin G. Treatment with the AAVantiNic vector blocked nicotine-mediated alterations in arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and locomotor activity. In summary, a single administration of a gene transfer vector expressing a high-affinity anti-nicotine monoclonal antibody elicited persistent (18 weeks), high titers of an anti-nicotine antibody that obviated the physiologic effects of nicotine. If this degree of efficacy translates to humans, AAVantiNic could be an effective preventative therapy for nicotine addiction.

  9. Ribosome Elongation Stall Directs Gene-specific Translation in the Integrated Stress Response*

    PubMed Central

    Young, Sara K.; Palam, Lakshmi Reddy; Wu, Cheng; Sachs, Matthew S.; Wek, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Upon exposure to environmental stress, phosphorylation of the α subunit of eIF2 (eIF2α-P) represses global protein synthesis, coincident with preferential translation of gene transcripts that mitigate stress damage or alternatively trigger apoptosis. Because there are multiple mammalian eIF2 kinases, each responding to different stress arrangements, this translational control scheme is referred to as the integrated stress response (ISR). Included among the preferentially translated mRNAs induced by eIF2α-P is that encoding the transcription factor CHOP (DDIT3/GADD153). Enhanced levels of CHOP promote cell death when ISR signaling is insufficient to restore cell homeostasis. Preferential translation of CHOP mRNA occurs by a mechanism involving ribosome bypass of an inhibitory upstream ORF (uORF) situated in the 5′-leader of the CHOP mRNA. In this study, we used biochemical and genetic approaches to define the inhibitory features of the CHOP uORF and the biological consequences of loss of the CHOP uORF on CHOP expression during stress. We discovered that specific sequences within the CHOP uORF serve to stall elongating ribosomes and prevent ribosome reinitiation at the downstream CHOP coding sequence. As a consequence, deletion of the CHOP uORF substantially increases the levels and modifies the pattern of induction of CHOP expression in the ISR. Enhanced CHOP expression leads to increased expression of key CHOP target genes, culminating in increased cell death in response to stress. PMID:26817837

  10. Dissection of tumour and host cells from target organs of metastasis for testing gene expression directly ex vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, M.; Hexel, K.; Bucur, M.; Schirrmacher, V.; Umansky, V.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a new methodology which allows the direct analysis ex vivo of tumour cells and host cells (lymphocytes, macrophages, endothelial cells) from a metastasised organ (liver or spleen) at any time point during the metastatic process and without any further in vitro culture. First, we used a tumour cell line transduced with the bacterial gene lacZ, which permits the detection of the procaryotic enzyme beta-galactosidase in eukaryotic cells at the single cell level thus allowing flow adhesion cell sorting (FACS) analysis of tumour cells from metastasised target organs. Second, we established a method for the separation and enrichment of tumour and host cells from target organs of metastasis with a high viability and reproducibility. As exemplified with the murine lymphoma ESb, this new methodology permits the study of molecules of importance for metastasis or anti-tumour immunity (adhesion, costimulatory and cytotoxic molecules, cytokines, etc.) at the RNA or protein level in tumour and host cells during the whole process of metastasis. This novel approach may open new possibilities of developing strategies for intervention in tumour progression, since it allows the determination of the optimal window in time for successful treatments. The possibility of direct analysis of tumour and host cell properties also provides a new method for the evaluation of the effects of immunisation with tumour vaccines or of gene therapy. Images Figure 3 PMID:8883407

  11. Genistein: A Novel Anthocyanin Synthesis Promoter that Directly Regulates Biosynthetic Genes in Red Cabbage in a Light-Dependent Way

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Qi, Yan; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Wang, Xiaoyun; Li, Hongfei; Shi, Yantong; Guo, Yang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Genistein (GNT), an isoflavone, is used in the clinical treatment of various health disorders. GNT is found in primary food source plants and some medical plants. However, studies on the functions of GNT in plants are rarely reported. In this study, we demonstrated that GNT plays an important role in promoting anthocyanin accumulation in red cabbage. GNT solutions (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mg/L) as foliar fertilizers were applied to red cabbage. Consequently, anthocyanin accumulation in red cabbage increased in a light-dependent manner. GNT solution at 30 mg/L exhibited the optimal effect on anthocyanin accumulation, which was twice that of the control. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that GNT application upregulated the expression of all structural genes, contributing to anthocyanin biosynthesis under light conditions. Under dark conditions, GNT exerted no significant promotive effect on anthocyanin accumulation; only early biosynthetic genes of anthocyanin biosynthesis responded to GNT. The promotive effect of GNT on anthocyanin biosynthesis is directly attributable to the regulation of structural gene expression. Transcription factors exhibited no response to GNT. The levels of anthocyanin in red cabbage positively correlated with the enzyme activities of antioxidant systems. This finding correlation suggested that the promotive effect of GNT on anthocyanin levels was correlated with improved antioxidant activity in the red cabbage. PMID:27990149

  12. Targeted DNA methylation by homology-directed repair in mammalian cells. Transcription reshapes methylation on the repaired gene.

    PubMed

    Morano, Annalisa; Angrisano, Tiziana; Russo, Giusi; Landi, Rosaria; Pezone, Antonio; Bartollino, Silvia; Zuchegna, Candida; Babbio, Federica; Bonapace, Ian Marc; Allen, Brittany; Muller, Mark T; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Gottesman, Max E; Porcellini, Antonio; Avvedimento, Enrico V

    2014-01-01

    We report that homology-directed repair of a DNA double-strand break within a single copy Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene in HeLa cells alters the methylation pattern at the site of recombination. DNA methyl transferase (DNMT)1, DNMT3a and two proteins that regulate methylation, Np95 and GADD45A, are recruited to the site of repair and are responsible for selective methylation of the promoter-distal segment of the repaired DNA. The initial methylation pattern of the locus is modified in a transcription-dependent fashion during the 15-20 days following repair, at which time no further changes in the methylation pattern occur. The variation in DNA modification generates stable clones with wide ranges of GFP expression. Collectively, our data indicate that somatic DNA methylation follows homologous repair and is subjected to remodeling by local transcription in a discrete time window during and after the damage. We propose that DNA methylation of repaired genes represents a DNA damage code and is source of variation of gene expression.

  13. Directed tagging of the Arabidopsis FATTY ACID ELONGATION1 (FAE1) gene with the maize transposon activator.

    PubMed Central

    James, D W; Lim, E; Keller, J; Plooy, I; Ralston, E; Dooner, H K

    1995-01-01

    The FATTY ACID ELONGATION1 (FAE1) gene of Arabidopsis is required for the synthesis of very long chain fatty acids in the seed. The product of the FAE1 gene is presumed to be a condensing enzyme that extends the chain length of fatty acids from C18 to C20 and C22. We report here the cloning of FAE1 by directed transposon tagging with the maize element Activator (Ac). An unstable fae1 mutant was isolated in a line carrying Ac linked to the FAE1 locus on chromosome 4. Cosegregation and reversion analyses established that the new mutant was tagged by Ac. A DNA fragment flanking Ac was cloned by inverse polymerase chain reaction and used to isolate FAE1 genomic clones and a cDNA clone from a library made from immature siliques. The predicted amino acid sequence of the FAE1 protein shares homology with those of other condensing enzymes (chalcone synthase, stilbene synthases, and beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III), supporting the notion that FAE1 is the structural gene for a synthase or condensing enzyme. FAE1 is expressed in developing seed, but not in leaves, as expected from the effect of the fae1 mutation on the fatty acid compositions of those tissues. PMID:7734965

  14. Chromatinized Protein Kinase C-θ Directly Regulates Inducible Genes in Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition and Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Anjum; Wu, Fan; Hardy, Kristine; Li, Jasmine; Tu, Wen Juan; McCuaig, Robert; Harris, Janelle; Khanna, Kum Kum; Attema, Joanne; Gregory, Philip A.; Goodall, Gregory J.; Harrington, Kirsti; Dahlstrom, Jane E.; Boulding, Tara; Madden, Rebecca; Tan, Abel; Milburn, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is activated during cancer invasion and metastasis, enriches for cancer stem cells (CSCs), and contributes to therapeutic resistance and disease recurrence. Signal transduction kinases play a pivotal role as chromatin-anchored proteins in eukaryotes. Here we report for the first time that protein kinase C-theta (PKC-θ) promotes EMT by acting as a critical chromatin-anchored switch for inducible genes via transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the key inflammatory regulatory protein NF-κB. Chromatinized PKC-θ exists as an active transcription complex and is required to establish a permissive chromatin state at signature EMT genes. Genome-wide analysis identifies a unique cohort of inducible PKC-θ-sensitive genes that are directly tethered to PKC-θ in the mesenchymal state. Collectively, we show that cross talk between signaling kinases and chromatin is critical for eliciting inducible transcriptional programs that drive mesenchymal differentiation and CSC formation, providing novel mechanisms to target using epigenetic therapy in breast cancer. PMID:24891615

  15. ARH directs megalin to the endocytic recycling compartment to regulate its proteolysis and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mehul; Baterina, Oscar Y; Taupin, Vanessa; Farquhar, Marilyn G

    2013-07-08

    Receptors internalized by endocytosis can return to the plasma membrane (PM) directly from early endosomes (EE; fast recycling) or they can traffic from EE to the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) and recycle from there (slow recycling). How receptors are sorted for trafficking along these two pathways remains unclear. Here we show that autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) is required for trafficking of megalin, a member of the LDL receptor family, from EE to the ERC by coupling it to dynein; in the absence of ARH, megalin returns directly to the PM from EE via the connecdenn2/Rab35 fast recycling pathway. Binding of ARH to the endocytic adaptor AP-2 prevents fast recycling of megalin. ARH-mediated trafficking of megalin to the ERC is necessary for γ-secretase mediated cleavage of megalin and release of a tail fragment that mediates transcriptional repression. These results identify a novel mechanism for sorting receptors for trafficking to the ERC and link ERC trafficking to regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) and expression of megalin.

  16. Fully Automatic In-Syringe Magnetic Stirring-Assisted Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Hyphenated to High-Temperature Torch Integrated Sample Introduction System-Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrometer with Direct Injection of the Organic Phase.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Raquel; Horstkotte, Burkhard; Fikarová, Kateřina; Sklenářová, Hana; Maestre, Salvador; Miró, Manuel; Todolí, Jose-Luis

    2017-03-21

    A proof of concept study involving the online coupling of automatic dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) with direct introduction and analysis of the organic extract is herein reported for the first time. The flow-based analyzer features a lab-in-syringe (LIS) setup with an integrated stirring system, a Meinhard nebulizer in combination with a heated single-pass spray chamber, and a rotary injection valve, used as an online interface between the microextraction system and the detection instrument. Air-segmented flow was used for delivery of a fraction of the nonwater miscible extraction phase, 12 μL of xylene, to the nebulizer. All sample preparative steps including magnetic stirring assisted DLLME were carried out inside the syringe void volume as a size-adaptable yet sealed mixing and extraction chamber. Determination of trace level concentrations of cadmium, copper, lead, and silver as model analytes has been demonstrated by microextraction as diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) complexes. The automatic LIS-DLLME method features quantitative metal extraction, even in troublesome sample matrixes, such as seawater, salt, and fruit juices, with relative recoveries within the range of 94-103%, 93-100%, and 92-99%, respectively. Furthermore, no statistically significant differences at the 0.05 significance level were found between concentration values experimentally obtained and the certified values of two serum standard reference materials.

  17. Potential Direct Regulators of the Drosophila yellow Gene Identified by Yeast One-Hybrid and RNAi Screens

    PubMed Central

    Kalay, Gizem; Lusk, Richard; Dome, Mackenzie; Hens, Korneel; Deplancke, Bart; Wittkopp, Patricia J.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression controls development, and changes in this regulation often contribute to phenotypic evolution. Drosophila pigmentation is a model system for studying evolutionary changes in gene regulation, with differences in expression of pigmentation genes such as yellow that correlate with divergent pigment patterns among species shown to be caused by changes in cis- and trans-regulation. Currently, much more is known about the cis-regulatory component of divergent yellow expression than the trans-regulatory component, in part because very few trans-acting regulators of yellow expression have been identified. This study aims to improve our understanding of the trans-acting control of yellow expression by combining yeast-one-hybrid and RNAi screens for transcription factors binding to yellow cis-regulatory sequences and affecting abdominal pigmentation in adults, respectively. Of the 670 transcription factors included in the yeast-one-hybrid screen, 45 showed evidence of binding to one or more sequence fragments tested from the 5′ intergenic and intronic yellow sequences from D. melanogaster, D. pseudoobscura, and D. willistoni, suggesting that they might be direct regulators of yellow expression. Of the 670 transcription factors included in the yeast-one-hybrid screen, plus another TF previously shown to be genetically upstream of yellow, 125 were also tested using RNAi, and 32 showed altered abdominal pigmentation. Nine transcription factors were identified in both screens, including four nuclear receptors related to ecdysone signaling (Hr78, Hr38, Hr46, and Eip78C). This finding suggests that yellow expression might be directly controlled by nuclear receptors influenced by ecdysone during early pupal development when adult pigmentation is forming. PMID:27527791

  18. RNA-directed gene editing specifically eradicates latent and prevents new HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenhui; Kaminski, Rafal; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yonggang; Cosentino, Laura; Li, Fang; Luo, Biao; Alvarez-Carbonell, David; Garcia-Mesa, Yoelvis; Karn, Jonathan; Mo, Xianming; Khalili, Kamel

    2014-08-05

    AIDS remains incurable due to the permanent integration of HIV-1 into the host genome, imparting risk of viral reactivation even after antiretroviral therapy. New strategies are needed to ablate the viral genome from latently infected cells, because current methods are too inefficient and prone to adverse off-target effects. To eliminate the integrated HIV-1 genome, we used the Cas9/guide RNA (gRNA) system, in single and multiplex configurations. We identified highly specific targets within the HIV-1 LTR U3 region that were efficiently edited by Cas9/gRNA, inactivating viral gene expression and replication in latently infected microglial, promonocytic, and T cells. Cas9/gRNAs caused neither genotoxicity nor off-target editing to the host cells, and completely excised a 9,709-bp fragment of integrated proviral DNA that spanned from its 5' to 3' LTRs. Furthermore, the presence of multiplex gRNAs within Cas9-expressing cells prevented HIV-1 infection. Our results suggest that Cas9/gRNA can be engineered to provide a specific, efficacious prophylactic and therapeutic approach against AIDS.

  19. SUMOylation of DRIL1 Directs Its Transcriptional Activity Towards Leukocyte Lineage-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    van Lohuizen, Maarten; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    DRIL1 is an ARID family transcription factor that can immortalize primary mouse fibroblasts, bypass RASV12-induced cellular senescence and collaborate with RASV12 or MYC in mediating oncogenic transformation. It also activates immunoglobulin heavy chain transcription and engages in heterodimer formation with E2F to stimulate E2F-dependent transcription. Little, however, is known about the regulation of DRIL1 activity. Recently, DRIL1 was found to interact with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9, but the functional relevance of this association has not been assessed. Here, we show that DRIL1 is sumoylated both in vitro and in vivo at lysine 398. Moreover, we provide evidence that PIASy functions as a specific SUMO E3-ligase for DRIL1 and promotes its sumoylation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, consistent with the subnuclear localization of PIASy in the Matrix-Associated Region (MAR), SUMO-modified DRIL1 species are found exclusively in the MAR fraction. This post-translational modification interferes neither with the subcellular localization nor the DNA-binding activity of the protein. In contrast, DRIL1 sumoylation impairs its interaction with E2F1 in vitro and modifies its transcriptional activity in vivo, driving transcription of subset of genes regulating leukocyte fate. Taken together, these results identify sumoylation as a novel post-translational modification of DRIL1 that represents an important mechanism for targeting and modulating DRIL1 transcriptional activity. PMID:19436740

  20. MicroRNA-34 directly targets pair-rule genes and cytoskeleton component in the honey bee

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Flávia C. P.; Pires, Camilla V.; Claudianos, Charles; Cristino, Alexandre S.; Simões, Zilá L. P.

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of developmental processes, such as cell fate determination and differentiation. Previous studies showed Dicer knockdown in honeybee embryos disrupt the processing of functional mature miRNAs and impairs embryo patterning. Here we investigated the expression profiles of miRNAs in honeybee embryogenesis and the role of the highly conserved miR-34-5p in the regulation of genes involved in insect segmentation. A total of 221 miRNAs were expressed in honey bee embryogenesis among which 97 mature miRNA sequences have not been observed before. Interestingly, we observed a switch in dominance between the 5-prime and 3-prime arm of some miRNAs in different embryonic stages; however, most miRNAs present one dominant arm across all stages of embryogenesis. Our genome-wide analysis of putative miRNA-target networks and functional pathways indicates miR-34-5p is one of the most conserved and connected miRNAs associated with the regulation of genes involved in embryonic patterning and development. In addition, we experimentally validated that miR-34-5p directly interacts to regulatory elements in the 3′-untranslated regions of pair-rule (even-skipped, hairy, fushi-tarazu transcription factor 1) and cytoskeleton (actin5C) genes. Our study suggests that miR-34-5p may regulate the expression of pair-rule and cytoskeleton genes during early development and control insect segmentation. PMID:28098233

  1. MicroRNA-34 directly targets pair-rule genes and cytoskeleton component in the honey bee.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Flávia C P; Pires, Camilla V; Claudianos, Charles; Cristino, Alexandre S; Simões, Zilá L P

    2017-01-18

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of developmental processes, such as cell fate determination and differentiation. Previous studies showed Dicer knockdown in honeybee embryos disrupt the processing of functional mature miRNAs and impairs embryo patterning. Here we investigated the expression profiles of miRNAs in honeybee embryogenesis and the role of the highly conserved miR-34-5p in the regulation of genes involved in insect segmentation. A total of 221 miRNAs were expressed in honey bee embryogenesis among which 97 mature miRNA sequences have not been observed before. Interestingly, we observed a switch in dominance between the 5-prime and 3-prime arm of some miRNAs in different embryonic stages; however, most miRNAs present one dominant arm across all stages of embryogenesis. Our genome-wide analysis of putative miRNA-target networks and functional pathways indicates miR-34-5p is one of the most conserved and connected miRNAs associated with the regulation of genes involved in embryonic patterning and development. In addition, we experimentally validated that miR-34-5p directly interacts to regulatory elements in the 3'-untranslated regions of pair-rule (even-skipped, hairy, fushi-tarazu transcription factor 1) and cytoskeleton (actin5C) genes. Our study suggests that miR-34-5p may regulate the expression of pair-rule and cytoskeleton genes during early development and control insect segmentation.

  2. Enrichment of provitamin A content in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by introduction of the bacterial carotenoid biosynthetic genes CrtB and CrtI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Zeng, Jian; Li, Yin; Hu, Wei; Chen, Ling; Miao, Yingjie; Deng, Pengyi; Yuan, Cuihong; Ma, Cheng; Chen, Xi; Zang, Mingli; Wang, Qiong; Li, Kexiu; Chang, Junli; Wang, Yuesheng; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2014-06-01

    Carotenoid content is a primary determinant of wheat nutritional value and affects its end-use quality. Wheat grains contain very low carotenoid levels and trace amounts of provitamin A content. In order to enrich the carotenoid content in wheat grains, the bacterial phytoene synthase gene (CrtB) and carotene desaturase gene (CrtI) were transformed into the common wheat cultivar Bobwhite. Expression of CrtB or CrtI alone slightly increased the carotenoid content in the grains of transgenic wheat, while co-expression of both genes resulted in a darker red/yellow grain phenotype, accompanied by a total carotenoid content increase of approximately 8-fold achieving 4.76 μg g(-1) of seed dry weight, a β-carotene increase of 65-fold to 3.21 μg g(-1) of seed dry weight, and a provitamin A content (sum of α-carotene, β-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin) increase of 76-fold to 3.82 μg g(-1) of seed dry weight. The high provitamin A content in the transgenic wheat was stably inherited over four generations. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that enhancement of provitamin A content in transgenic wheat was also a result of the highly coordinated regulation of endogenous carotenoid biosynthetic genes, suggesting a metabolic feedback regulation in the wheat carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. These transgenic wheat lines are not only valuable for breeding wheat varieties with nutritional benefits for human health but also for understanding the mechanism regulating carotenoid biosynthesis in wheat endosperm.

  3. Introduction of Pea DNA Helicase 45 Into Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. Hybrid) Enhances Cell Membrane Thermostability And Upregulation Of Stress-responsive Genes Leads To Abiotic Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Sruthy Maria; Ashwin Narayan, J; Syamaladevi, Divya P; Appunu, C; Chakravarthi, M; Ravichandran, V; Tuteja, Narendra; Subramonian, N

    2015-05-01

    DNA helicases are motor proteins that play an essential role in nucleic acid metabolism, by providing a duplex-unwinding function. To improve the drought and salinity tolerance of sugarcane, a DEAD-box helicase gene isolated from pea with a constitutive promoter, Port Ubi 2.3 was transformed into the commercial sugarcane variety Co 86032 through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and the transgenics were screened for tolerance to soil moisture stress and salinity. The transgene integration was confirmed through polymerase chain reaction, and the V 0 transgenic events showed significantly higher cell membrane thermostability under normal irrigated conditions. The V 1 transgenic events were screened for tolerance to soil moisture stress and exhibited significantly higher cell membrane thermostability, transgene expression, relative water content, gas exchange parameters, chlorophyll content, and photosynthetic efficiency under soil moisture stress compared to wild-type (WT). The overexpression of PDH45 transgenic sugarcane also led to the upregulation of DREB2-induced downstream stress-related genes. The transgenic events demonstrated higher germination ability and better chlorophyll retention than WT under salinity stress. Our results suggest the possibility for development of increased abiotic stress tolerant sugarcane cultivars through overexpression of PDH45 gene. Perhaps this is the first report, which provides evidence for increased drought and salinity tolerance in sugarcane through overexpression of PDH45.

  4. Improved production of homo-D-lactic acid via xylose fermentation by introduction of xylose assimilation genes and redirection of the phosphoketolase pathway to the pentose phosphate pathway in L-Lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Yoshida, Shogo; Yamada, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-12-01

    The production of optically pure d-lactic acid via xylose fermentation was achieved by using a Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 strain whose l-lactate dehydrogenase gene was deficient and whose phosphoketolase genes were replaced with a heterologous transketolase gene. After 60 h of fermentation, 41.2 g/liter of d-lactic acid was produced from 50 g/liter of xylose.

  5. Diagnosis of ABCB11 gene mutations in children with intrahepatic cholestasis using high resolution melting analysis and direct sequencing

    PubMed Central

    HU, GUORUI; HE, PING; LIU, ZHIFENG; CHEN, QIAN; ZHENG, BIXIA; ZHANG, QIHUA

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis represents a heterogeneous group of disorders that begin during childhood, most commonly manifesting as neonatal cholestasis, and lead to ongoing liver dysfunction in children and adults. For children, inherited pathogenic factors of cholestasis have gained increasing attention owing to the rapid development of molecular biology technology. However, these methods have their advantages and disadvantages in terms of simplicity, sensitivity, specificity, time required and expense. In the present study, an effective, sensitive and economical method is recommended, termed high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis and direct sequencing, based on general polymerase chain reaction, to detect mutations in disease-causing genes. As one type of inherited intrahepatic cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC2) is caused by pathogenic mutations in the ABCB11 gene, HRM was used to detect mutations in the ABCB11 gene in the present study, and the diagnosis for PFIC2 was made by comprehensive analysis of genetic findings and clinical features. Furthermore, the characteristics of mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ABCB11 gene were elucidated. A total of 14 types of mutations/polymorphisms were identified in 20 patients from mainland China, including six missense mutations (p.Y337H, p.Y472C, p.R696W, p.Q931P, p.D1131V and p.H1198R), one nonsense mutation (p.R928X) and seven SNPs (p.D36D/rs3815675, p.F90F/rs4148777, p.Y269Y/rs2287616, p.I416I/rs183390670, p.V444A/rs2287622, p.A865V/rs118109635 and p.A1028A/rs497692). Five mutations were novel. The majority of the mutations were different from those detected in other population groups. A total of 4/20 patients (1/5) were diagnosed to be PFIC2 by combining genetic findings with the clinical features. Polymorphisms V444A and A1028A, with an allele frequency of 74.5 and 67.2%, respectively, were highly prevalent in the mainland Chinese subjects. No differences

  6. Direct genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii from amniotic fluids based on B1 gene polymorphism using minisequencing analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Because some Toxoplasma gondii genotypes may be more virulent in pregnant women, discriminating between them appears valuable. Currently, the main genotyping method is based on single copy microsatellite markers, which limit direct genotyping from amniotic fluids (AFs) to samples with a high parasitic load. We investigated whether the multicopy gene B1 could type the parasite with a higher sensitivity. To estimate the amplifiable DNA present in AFs, we first compared three different PCR assays used for Toxoplasma infection diagnosis: the P30-PCR, targeting the single copy gene P30; the B1-PCR, targeting the repeated B1 gene; and RE-PCR, targeting the repeated element. Results Of the 1792 AFs analyzed between 2008 and 2011, 73 were RE-PCR positive. Of those, 49 (67.1%) were P30-PCR and B1-PCR positive, and 14 (19.2%) additional AFs were B1-PCR positive only. All 63 BI-positive AFs (France n = 49; overseas n = 14) could be genotyped based on an analysis of eight nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within the B1 gene. Following high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, minisequencing was carried out for each of the eight SNPs. DNA from six reference strains was included in the study, and AFs were assigned to one of the three major lineages (Types I, II, and III). In total, 26 genotypes were observed, and the hierarchical clustering distinguished two clades in lineages II (IIa, n = 30 and IIb, n = 4) and III (IIIa n = 23 and IIIb n = 6). There was an overrepresentation of overseas isolates in Clade IIb (4/4, 100%) and Clade IIIa (8/22; 36.4%) (p <0.0001), whereas medical interruption and fetal death were overrepresented in Clade IIb (2/4, 50%) and Clade IIIa (4/23, 17.4%) (p = 0.049). Conclusions Although the current genotyping system cannot pretend to replace multilocus typing, we clearly show that targeting the multicopy B1 gene yields a genotyping capacity of AFs around 20% better than when single copy targets are used. The

  7. Estrogen regulation of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene is mediated by ERE half sites without direct binding of estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, Urvashi; Ganjam, Goutham K; Vasudevan, Nandini; Kondaiah, Paturu

    2005-02-28

    Estrogen is an important steroid hormone that mediates most of its effects on regulation of gene expression by binding to intracellular receptors. The consensus estrogen response element (ERE) is a 13bp palindromic inverted repeat with a three nucleotide spacer. However, several reports suggest that many estrogen target genes are regulated by diverse elements, such as imperfect EREs and ERE half sites (ERE 1/2), which are either the proximal or the distal half of the palindrome. To gain more insight into ERE half site-mediated gene regulation, we used a region from the estrogen-regulated chicken riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) gene promoter that contains ERE half sites. Using moxestrol, an analogue of estrogen and transient transfection of deletion and mutation containing RCP promoter/reporter constructs in chicken hepatoma (LMH2A) cells, we identified an estrogen response unit (ERU) composed of two consensus ERE 1/2 sites and one non-consensus ERE 1/2 site. Mutation of any of these sites within this ERU abolishes moxestrol response. Further, the ERU is able to confer moxestrol responsiveness to a heterologous promoter. Interestingly, RCP promoter is regulated by moxestrol in estrogen responsive human MCF-7 cells, but not in other cell lines such as NIH3T3 and HepG2 despite estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-alpha) co transfection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) with promoter regions encompassing the half sites and nuclear extracts from LMH2A cells show the presence of a moxestrol-induced complex that is abolished by a polyclonal anti-ERalpha antibody. Surprisingly, estrogen receptor cannot bind to these promoter elements in isolation. Thus, there appears to be a definite requirement for some other factor(s) in addition to estrogen receptor, for the generation of a suitable response of this promoter to estrogen. Our studies therefore suggest a novel mechanism of gene regulation by estrogen, involving ERE half sites without direct binding of ER to the

  8. HTP-OligoDesigner: An Online Primer Design Tool for High-Throughput Gene Cloning and Site-Directed Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Camilo, Cesar M; Lima, Gustavo M A; Maluf, Fernando V; Guido, Rafael V C; Polikarpov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Following burgeoning genomic and transcriptomic sequencing data, biochemical and molecular biology groups worldwide are implementing high-throughput cloning and mutagenesis facilities in order to obtain a large number of soluble proteins for structural and functional characterization. Since manual primer design can be a time-consuming and error-generating step, particularly when working with hundreds of targets, the automation of primer design process becomes highly desirable. HTP-OligoDesigner was created to provide the scientific community with a simple and intuitive online primer design tool for both laboratory-scale and high-throughput projects of sequence-independent gene cloning and site-directed mutagenesis and a Tm calculator for quick queries.

  9. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP encoded by the mammalian rapgef3 gene: Structure, function and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Upasana; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-10-10

    Mammalian exchange protein directly activated by cAMP isoform 1 (EPAC1), encoded by the RAPGEF3 gene, is one of the two-membered family of cAMP sensors that mediate the intracellular functions of cAMP by acting as guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Ras-like Rap small GTPases. Extensive studies have revealed that EPAC1-mediated cAMP signaling is highly coordinated spatiotemporally through the formation of dynamic signalosomes by interacting with a diverse array of cellular partners. Recent functional analyses of genetically engineered mouse models further suggest that EPAC1 functions as an important stress response switch and is involved in pathophysiological conditions of cardiac stresses, chronic pain, cancer and infectious diseases. These findings, coupled with the development of EPAC specific small molecule modulators, validate EPAC1 as a promising target for therapeutic interventions.

  10. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP encoded by the mammalian rapgef3 gene: Structure, function and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Upasana; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian exchange protein directly activated by cAMP isoform 1 (EPAC1), encoded by the RAPGEF3 gene, is one of the two-membered family of cAMP sensors that mediate the intracellular functions of cAMP by acting as guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Ras-like Rap small GTPases. Extensive studies have revealed that EPAC1-mediated cAMP signaling is highly coordinated spatiotemporally through the formation of dynamic signalosomes by interacting with a diverse array of cellular partners. Recent functional analyses of genetically engineered mouse models further suggest that EPAC1 functions as an important stress response switch and is involved in pathophysiological conditions of cardiac stresses, chronic pain, cancer and infectious diseases. These findings, coupled with the development of EPAC specific small molecule modulators, validate EPAC1 as a promising target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26119090

  11. Parole terms for a killer: directing caspase3/CAD induced DNA strand breaks to coordinate changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Brian D; Megeney, Lynn A

    2010-08-01

    In a series of discoveries over the preceding decade, a number of laboratories have unequivocally established that apoptotic proteins and pathways are well conserved cell fate determinants, which act independent of a cell death response. Within this context, the role for apoptotic proteins in the induction of cell differentiation has been widely documented. Despite these discoveries, little information has been forthcoming regarding a conserved mechanism by which apoptotic proteins achieve this non-death outcome. In the following discussion, we will explore the premise that the penultimate step in apoptosis, genome wide DNA damage/strand breaks act as a conserved genomic reprogramming event necessary for cell differentiation (Larsen et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2010; 107:4230-5). Moreover, we hypothesis that directed DNA damage, as mediated by known apoptotic proteins, may participate in numerous forms of regulated gene expression.

  12. Rapid and efficient introduction of a foreign gene into bacterial artificial chromosome-cloned varicella vaccine by Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition

    SciTech Connect

    Somboonthum, Pranee; Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Shigefumi; Matsuura, Masaaki; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Michiaki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2010-06-20

    Using a rapid and reliable system based on Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition, we have successfully constructed a recombinant Oka varicella vaccine (vOka) expressing the mumps virus (MuV) fusion protein (F). The backbone of the vector was our previously reported vOka-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) genome. We inserted the transposon Tn7 attachment sequence, LacZ{alpha}-mini-attTn7, into the region between ORF12 and ORF13 to generate a vOka-BAC-Tn genome. The MuV-F expressing cassette was transposed into the vOka-BAC genome at the mini-attTn7 transposition site. MuV-F protein was expressed in recombinant virus, rvOka-F infected cells. In addition, the MuV-F protein was cleaved in the rvOka-F infected cells as in MuV-infected cells. The growth of rvOka-F was similar to that of the original recombinant vOka without the F gene. Thus, we show that Tn7-mediated transposition is an efficient method for introducing a foreign gene expression cassette into the vOka-BAC genome as a live virus vector.

  13. Targeting of HPV-16+ epithelial cancer cells by TCR gene engineered T cells directed against E6

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Lindsey M.; Kwong, Mei Li; Gros, Alena; Stevanović, Sanja; Tran, Eric; Kerkar, Sid; Raffeld, Mark; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hinrichs, Christian S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of HPV-associated epithelial cancers are in principle ideal immunotherapeutic targets, but evidence that T cells specific for these antigens can recognize and kill HPV+ tumor cells is limited. We sought to determine if TCR gene engineered T cells directed against an HPV oncoprotein can successfully target HPV+ tumor cells. Experimental design T cell responses against the HPV-16 oncoproteins were investigated in a patient with an ongoing 22-month disease-free interval after her second resection of distant metastatic anal cancer. T cells genetically engineered to express an oncoprotein-specific TCR from this patient’s tumor-infiltrating T cells were tested for specific reactivity against HPV+ epithelial tumor cells. Results We identified, from an excised metastatic anal cancer tumor, T cells that recognized an HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitope of HPV-16 E6. The frequency of the dominant T cell clonotype from these cells was approximately 400-fold greater in the patient’s tumor than in her peripheral blood. T cells genetically engineered to express the TCR from this clonotype displayed high avidity for an HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitope of HPV-16, and they showed specific recognition and killing of HPV-16+ cervical, and head and neck cancer cell lines. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that HPV-16+ tumors can be targeted by E6-specific TCR gene engineered T cells, and they provide the foundation for a novel cellular therapy directed against HPV-16+ malignancies including cervical, oropharyngeal, anal, vulvar, vaginal, and penile cancers. PMID:26429982

  14. Direct methylation of FXR by Set7/9, a lysine methyltransferase, regulates the expression of FXR target genes

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Ananthanarayanan, Meena

    2012-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a ligand (bile acid)-dependent nuclear receptor that regulates target genes involved in every aspect of bile acid homeostasis. Upon binding of ligand, FXR recruits an array of coactivators and associated proteins, some of which have intrinsic enzymatic activity that modify histones or even components of the transcriptional complex. In this study, we show chromatin occupancy by the Set7/9 methyltransferase at the FXR response element (FXRE) and direct methylation of FXR in vivo and in vitro at lysine 206. siRNA depletion of Set7/9 in the Huh-7 liver cell line decreased endogenous mRNAs of the FXR target genes, the short heterodimer partner (SHP) and bile salt export pump (BSEP). Mutation of the methylation site at K206 of FXR to an arginine prevented methylation by Set7/9. A pan-methyllysine antibody recognized the wild-type FXR but not the K206R mutant form. An electromobility shift assay showed that methylation by Set7/9 enhanced binding of FXR/retinoic X receptor-α to the FXRE. Interaction between hinge domain of FXR (containing K206) and Set7/9 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation, GST pull down, and mammalian two-hybrid experiments. Set7/9 overexpression in Huh-7 cells significantly enhanced transactivation of the SHP and BSEP promoters in a ligand-dependent fashion by wild-type FXR but not the K206R mutant FXR. A Set7/9 mutant deficient in methyltransferase activity was also not effective in increasing transactivation of the BSEP promoter. These studies demonstrate that posttranslational methylation of FXR by Set7/9 contributes to the transcriptional activation of FXR-target genes. PMID:22345554

  15. Org-1, the Drosophila ortholog of Tbx1, is a direct activator of known identity genes during muscle specification

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Christoph; Nagaso, Hideyuki; Jin, Hong; Frasch, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Members of the T-Box gene family of transcription factors are important players in regulatory circuits that generate myogenic and cardiogenic lineage diversities in vertebrates. We show that during somatic myogenesis in Drosophila, the single ortholog of vertebrate Tbx1, optomotor-blind-related-gene-1 (org-1), is expressed in a small subset of muscle progenitors, founder cells and adult muscle precursors, where it overlaps with the products of the muscle identity genes ladybird (lb) and slouch (slou). In addition, org-1 is expressed in the lineage of the heart-associated alary muscles. org-1 null mutant embryos lack Lb and Slou expression within the muscle lineages that normally co-express org-1. As a consequence, the respective muscle fibers and adult muscle precursors are either severely malformed or missing, as are the alary muscles. To address the mechanisms that mediate these regulatory interactions between Org-1, Lb and Slou, we characterized distinct enhancers associated with somatic muscle expression of lb and slou. We demonstrate that these lineage- and stage-specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) bind Org-1 in vivo, respond to org-1 genetically and require T-box domain binding sites for their activation. In summary, we propose that org-1 is a common and direct upstream regulator of slou and lb in the developmental pathway of these two neighboring muscle lineages. Cross-repression between slou and lb and combinatorial activation of lineage-specific targets by Org-1–Slou and Org-1–Lb, respectively, then leads to the distinction between the two lineages. These findings provide new insights into the regulatory circuits that control the proper pattering of the larval somatic musculature in Drosophila. PMID:22318630

  16. Nicotiana tabacum EIL2 directly regulates expression of at least one tobacco gene induced by sulphur starvation.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, Anna; Lewandowska, Małgorzata; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2010-03-01

    Sulphur deficiency severely affects plant growth and their agricultural productivity leading to diverse changes in development and metabolisms. Molecular mechanisms regulating gene expression under low sulphur conditions remain largely unknown. AtSLIM1, a member of the EIN3-like (EIL) family was reported to be a central transcriptional regulator of the plant sulphur response, however, no direct interaction of this protein with any sulphur-responsive promoters was demonstrated. The focus of this study was on the analysis of a promoter region of UP9C, a tobacco gene strongly induced by sulphur limitation. Cloning and subsequent examination of this promoter resulted in the identification of a 20-nt sequence (UPE-box), also present in the promoters of several Arabidopsis genes, including three out of four homologues of UP9C. The UPE-box, consisting of two parallel tebs sequences (TEIL binding site), proved to be necessary to bind the transcription factors belonging to the EIL family and of a 5-nt conserved sequence at the 3'-end. The yeast one-hybrid analysis resulted in the identification of one transcription factor (NtEIL2) capable of binding to the UPE-box. The interactions of NtEIL2, and its homologue from Arabidopsis, AtSLIM1, with DNA were affected by mutations within the UPE-box. Transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana have further shown that both factors, NtEIL2 and AtSLIM1, activate the UP9C promoter. Interestingly, activation by NtEIL2, but not by AtSLIM1, was dependent on the sulphur-deficiency of the plants.

  17. The Direct Effects of Atmospheric Change on Vegetation: From Gene Expression to Crop Production in the Field

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Stephen

    2005-08-31

    The CO2 and ozone (O3) concentrations of the troposphere are rising with direct impacts on plants. O3 currently costs crop production > 5bn Euro a year with parallel damage to natural ecosystems. In the short-term, elevated CO2 stimulates and elevated O3 depresses photosynthesis in highly predictable ways. Longer-term effects are less predictable, but new patterns are now emerging via meta-analysis of realistic field treatment in Free-Air Concentration Enrichment (FACE) facilities. The chain of effects from gene expression to acclimated phenotype that result from long-term growth in elevated CO2 or O3 will be reviewed. Significant season long increases in photosynthesis and production with CO2 are found, with some surprising changes in plant development that were not apparent or suspected in studies with field enclosures. Season-long exposures to the moderate increases in O3 observed in the field cause: more gene transcripts to be down-regulated than up-regulated; a chronic decrease in photosynthetic capacity, largely attributable to decreased activity of the primary carboxylation step; and accelerated senescence. The large FACE facilities, a biologists equivalent of the physicists accelerators, are providing new insights into plant responses to atmospheric change and will provide a basis for adapting crop plants to change.

  18. Rapid and specific detection of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene in Vibrio parahaemolyticus by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Jiro; Sugawara, Chiyo; Akahane, Kenji; Hashimoto, Keiji; Kojima, Tadashi; Ikedo, Masanari; Konuma, Hirotaka; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko

    2009-04-01

    Several investigators have reported that thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin are important virulence factors of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, but it has been difficult to detect these factors rapidly in seafood and other environmental samples. A novel nucleic acid amplification method, termed the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), which amplifies DNA with high specificity and rapidity under isothermal conditions, was applied. In this study, we designed tdh gene-specific LAMP primers for detection of TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus. The specificity of this assay was evaluated with 32 strains of TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus, one strain of TDH-producing Grimontia hollisae, 10 strains of TDH-nonproducing V. parahaemolyticus, and 94 strains of TDH-nonproducing bacteria, and the sensitivity was high enough to detect one cell per test. Moreover, to investigate the detection of TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus in oysters, the LAMP assay was performed with enrichment culture in alkaline peptone water of oyster samples inoculated with TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus and TDH-nonproducing V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus after enrichment in alkaline peptone water. These results suggest that the LAMP assay targeting tdh gene has high sensitivity and specificity and is useful to detect TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus in oyster after enrichment.

  19. Integration-defective lentiviral vector mediates efficient gene editing through homology-directed repair in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yebo; Wang, Yingjia; Chang, Tammy; Huang, He; Yee, Jiing-Kuan

    2016-11-28

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are used as platforms for disease study, drug screening and cell-based therapy. To facilitate these applications, it is frequently necessary to genetically manipulate the hESC genome. Gene editing with engineered nucleases enables site-specific genetic modification of the human genome through homology-directed repair (HDR). However, the frequency of HDR remains low in hESCs. We combined efficient expression of engineered nucleases and integration-defective lentiviral vector (IDLV) transduction for donor template delivery to mediate HDR in hESC line WA09. This strategy led to highly efficient HDR with more than 80% of the selected WA09 clones harboring the transgene inserted at the targeted genomic locus. However, certain portions of the HDR clones contained the concatemeric IDLV genomic structure at the target site, probably resulted from recombination of the IDLV genomic input before HDR with the target. We found that the integrase protein of IDLV mediated the highly efficient HDR through the recruitment of a cellular protein, LEDGF/p75. This study demonstrates that IDLV-mediated HDR is a powerful and broadly applicable technology to carry out site-specific gene modification in hESCs.

  20. Hmga2 is a direct target gene of RUNX1 and regulates expansion of myeloid progenitors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kentson; Muselman, Alexander; Du, Randal; Harada, Yuka; Scholl, Amanda G.; Yan, Ming; Matsuura, Shinobu; Weng, Stephanie; Harada, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    RUNX1 is a master transcription factor in hematopoiesis and mediates the specification and homeostasis of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Disruptions in RUNX1 are well known to lead to hematologic disease. In this study, we sought to identify and characterize RUNX1 target genes in HSPCs by performing RUNX1 chromatin immunoprecipitation with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) using a murine HSPC line and complementing this data with our previously described gene expression profiling of primary wild-type and RUNX1-deficient HSPCs (Lineage–/cKit+/Sca1+). From this analysis, we identified and confirmed that Hmga2, a known oncogene, as a direct target of RUNX1. Hmga2 was strongly upregulated in RUNX1-deficient HSPCs, and the promoter of Hmga2 was responsive in a cell-type dependent manner upon coexpression of RUNX1. Conditional Runx1 knockout mice exhibit expansion of their HSPCs and myeloid progenitors as hallmark phenotypes. To further validate and establish that Hmga2 plays a role in inducing HSPC expansion, we generated mouse models of HMGA2 and RUNX1 deficiency. Although mice lacking both factors continued to display higher frequencies of HSPCs, the expansion of myeloid progenitors was effectively rescued. The data presented here establish Hmga2 as a transcriptional target of RUNX1 and a critical regulator of myeloid progenitor expansion. PMID:25150295

  1. Analysis of the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) gene and the tdh-related hemolysin (trh) genes in urease-positive strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated on the West Coast of the United States.

    PubMed

    Okuda, J; Ishibashi, M; Abbott, S L; Janda, J M; Nishibuchi, M

    1997-08-01

    Urease-positive (Ure+) and urease-negative (Ure-) strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from patients on the West Coast of the United States between 1979 and 1995 were analyzed for the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) gene and the tdh-related hemolysin (trh) genes (trh1 and trh2). The DNA colony hybridization method with the polynucleotide probes was used to determine the distribution of the genes. Of 60 Ure+ strains, 59 strains (98%) had the trh (either trh1 or trh2) gene and 54 strains (90%) carried the tdh gene. The absence of the trh gene or a related sequence in an exceptional Ure+ strain was confirmed by Southern blot analyses. The stronger correlation with the trh gene than with the tdh gene was mostly attributable to strains possessing only the trh2 gene. Of 25 Ure- strains, 20 strains (80%) had the tdh gene but none had the trh gene. These results indicate a very strong correlation between the Ure+ phenotype and the trh gene and are consistent with those reported for strains isolated in Asia. The Ure+ strains carrying the trh genes were not restricted to a unique group of the strains. The O4:K12 strains carrying the trh1 gene have predominantly been isolated since 1979. However, strains of various non-O4:K12 serovars carrying either the trh1 or the trh2 gene became predominant after 1992. In addition, analysis by the arbitrarily primed PCR method revealed two subgroups within the selected Ure+ O4:K12 strains. Hybridization tests with oligonucleotide probes demonstrated that the trh1 sequences of the West Coast strains differ to some extent from those of Asian strains. Nevertheless, a PCR method previously established to detect both the trh1 and the trh2 genes in Asian strains could detect 98% of those genes in the West Coast strains.

  2. Multiple introductions of a reassortant H5N1 avian influenza virus of clade 2.3.2.1c with PB2 gene of H9N2 subtype into Indian poultry.

    PubMed

    Tosh, Chakradhar; Nagarajan, Shanmugasundaram; Kumar, Manoj; Murugkar, Harshad V; Venkatesh, Govindarajulu; Shukla, Shweta; Mishra, Amit; Mishra, Pranav; Agarwal, Sonam; Singh, Bharati; Dubey, Prashant; Tripathi, Sushil; Kulkarni, Diwakar D

    2016-09-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses are a threat to poultry in Asia, Europe, Africa and North America. Here, we report isolation and characterization of H5N1 viruses isolated from ducks and turkeys in Kerala, Chandigarh and Uttar Pradesh, India between November 2014 and March 2015. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of haemagglutinin gene identified that the virus belonged to a new clade 2.3.2.1c which has not been detected earlier in Indian poultry. The virus possessed molecular signature for high pathogenicity to chickens, which was corroborated by intravenous pathogenicity index of 2.96. The virus was a reassortant which derives its PB2 gene from H9N2 virus isolated in China during 2007-2013. However, the neuraminidase and internal genes are of H5N1 subtype. Phylogenetic and network analysis revealed that after detection in China in 2013/2014, the virus moved to Europe, West Africa and other Asian countries including India. The analyses further indicated multiple introductions of H5N1 virus in Indian poultry and internal spread in Kerala. One of the outbreaks in ducks in Kerala is linked to the H5N1 virus isolated from wild birds in Dubai suggesting movement of virus probably through migration of wild birds. However, the outbreaks in ducks in Chandigarh and Uttar Pradesh were from an unknown source in Asia which also contributed gene pools to the outbreaks in Europe and West Africa. The widespread incidence of the novel H5N1 HPAI is similar to the spread of clade 2.2 ("Qinghai-like") virus in 2005, and should be monitored to avoid threat to animal and public health.

  3. Volume 1 - Introduction

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    An introduction to the Emissions Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP) materials. Describes EIIP development, use of EIIP, inventory staff training, and planning, development, documentation, and reporting of inventories.

  4. Ezetimibe: A biomarker for efficacy of liver directed UGT1A1 gene therapy for inherited hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Miranda, Paula S; Sneitz, Nina; de Waart, D Rudi; Ten Bloemendaal, Lysbeth; Duijst, Suzanne; de Knegt, Robert J; Beuers, Ulrich; Finel, Moshe; Bosma, Piter J

    2012-08-01

    As recently demonstrated in patients with factor IX deficiency, adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated liver-directed therapy is a viable option for inherited metabolic liver disorders. Our aim is to treat Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I (CN I), an inherited severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia, as a rare recessive inherited disorder. Because the number of patients eligible for this approach is small, the efficacy can only be demonstrated by a beneficial effect on the pathophysiology in individual patients. Serum bilirubin levels in potential candidates have been monitored since birth, providing an indication of their pathophysiology. Adjuvant phototherapy to prevent brain damage reduces serum unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) levels in CN I patients to the level seen in the milder form of the disease, CN type II. This therapy increases the excretion of UCB, thereby complicating the use of UCB and conjugated bilirubin levels in serum as biomarkers for the gene therapy we try to develop. Therefore, a suitable biomarker that is not affected by phototherapy is currently needed. To this end, we have investigated whether estradiol, ethinylestradiol or ezetimibe could be used as markers for uridine 5'-di-phospho-glucuronosyltransferase isoform 1A1 (UGT1A1) activity restored by AAV gene therapy in Gunn rats, a relevant animal model for CN I. Of these compounds, ezetimibe appeared most suitable because its glucuronidation rate in untreated control Gunn rats is low. Subsequently, ezetimibe glucuronidation was studied in both untreated and AAV-treated Gunn rats and the results suggest that it may serve as a useful serum marker for restored hepatic UGT1A1 activity.

  5. Silk-Elastinlike Hydrogel Improves the Safety of Adenovirus-Mediated Gene-Directed Enzyme-Prodrug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Joshua A.; Price, Robert A.; Greish, Khaled; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant Silk-Elastinlike Protein polymers (SELPs) are well-known for their highly tunable properties on both the molecular and macroscopic hydrogel level. One specific structure of these polymers, SELP-815K, has been investigated as an injectable controlled delivery system for the treatment of head and neck cancer via a gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) approach. Due to its pore size and gelation properties in vivo, SELP restricts the distribution and controls the release of therapeutic viruses for up to one month. It has been shown that SELP-mediated delivery significantly improves therapeutic outcome of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV) system in xenograft models of human head and neck cancer. However little is known about potential benefits of this approach with regard to toxicity in the presence of a fully intact immune system. The studies presented here were designed to assess the change in toxicity of the SELP mediated viral delivery compared to free viral injection in a non-tumor bearing immune competent mouse model. Toxicity was assessed at 1, 2, 4, and 12 weeks via body weight monitoring, complete blood count (CBC), and blood chemistry. It was found that in the acute and subacute phases (weeks 1-4) there is significant toxicity in groups combining the virus and the prodrug, and matrix-mediated gene delivery with SELP demonstrates a reduction in toxicity from the 2 week time point through the 4 week time point. At the end of the subchronic phase (12 weeks), signs of toxicity had subsided in both groups. Based on these results, recombinant SELPs offer a significant reduction in toxicity of virus-mediated GDEPT treatment compared to free virus injection in the acute and subacute phases. PMID:20586469

  6. Combining localized PCR mutagenesis and natural transformation in direct genetic analysis of a transcriptional regulator gene, pobR.

    PubMed Central

    Kok, R G; D'Argenio, D A; Ornston, L N

    1997-01-01

    We present a procedure for efficient random mutagenesis of selected genes in a bacterial chromosome. The method combines PCR replication errors with the uptake of PCR-amplified DNA via natural transformation. Cloning of PCR fragments is not required, since mutations are transferred directly to the chromosome via homologous recombination. Random mutations were introduced into the Acinetobacter chromosomal pobR gene encoding the transcriptional activator of pobA, the structural gene for 4-hydroxybenzoate 3-hydroxylase. Mutant strains with strongly reduced PobR activity were selected by demanding the inability to convert 4-hydroxybenzoate to a toxic metabolite. Of spontaneous pobR mutants, 80% carry the insertion element IS1236, rendering them inappropriate for structure-function studies. Transformation with Taq-amplified pobR DNA increased the mutation frequency 240-fold and reduced the proportion of IS1236 inserts to undetectable levels. The relative fidelity of Pfu polymerase compared with Taq polymerase was illustrated by a reduced effect on the mutation frequency; a procedure for rapid assessment of relative polymerase fidelity in PCR follows from this observation. Over 150 independent mutations were localized by transformation with DNA fragments containing nested deletions of wild-type pobR. Sequence analysis of 89 of the mutant pobR alleles showed that the mutations were predominantly single-nucleotide substitutions broadly distributed within pobR. Promoter mutations were recovered, as were two mutations that are likely to block pobR translation. One-third of the recovered mutations conferred a leaky or temperature-sensitive phenotype, whereas the remaining null mutations completely blocked growth with 4-hydroxybenzoate. Strains containing two different nonsense mutations in pobR were transformed with PCR-amplified DNA to identify permissible codon substitutions. Independently, second-site suppressor mutations were recovered within pcaG, another member of the

  7. Gene array analysis of neural crest cells identifies transcription factors necessary for direct conversion of embryonic fibroblasts into neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Natsuki; Nishioka, Masahiro; Nakatake, Yuhki; Yulan, Piao; Mochizuki, Hiromi; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Ko, Minoru S. H.; Goshima, Naoki; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neural crest cells (NC cells) are multipotent cells that emerge from the edge of the neural folds and migrate throughout the developing embryo. Although the gene regulatory network for generation of NC cells has been elucidated in detail, it has not been revealed which of the factors in the network are pivotal to directing NC identity. In this study we analyzed the gene expression profile of a pure NC subpopulation isolated from Sox10-IRES-Venus mice and investigated whether these genes played a key role in the direct conversion of Sox10-IRES-Venus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into NC cells. The comparative molecular profiles of NC cells and neural tube cells in 9.5-day embryos revealed genes including transcription factors selectively expressed in developing trunk NC cells. Among 25 NC cell-specific transcription factor genes tested, SOX10 and SOX9 were capable of converting MEFs into SOX10-positive (SOX10+) cells. The SOX10+ cells were then shown to differentiate into neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts. These SOX10+ cells also showed limited self-renewal ability, suggesting that SOX10 and SOX9 directly converted MEFs into NC cells. Conversely, the remaining transcription factors, including well-known NC cell specifiers, were unable to convert MEFs into SOX10+ NC cells. These results suggest that SOX10 and SOX9 are the key factors necessary for the direct conversion of MEFs into NC cells. PMID:26873953

  8. Introduction to Pathogenic Protozoa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    1 1 Introduction Mary K. Klassen-Fischer and Ronald C. Neafie Introduction Protozoa Protozoa are single-celled eukaryotic animals first dis...phylogeny of protozoa , see Table 1.1. A recent trend is to replace the term “ protozoa ” with “protista.” For these topics we retain “pro- tozoa” and...JUN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Introduction to Pathogenic Protozoa 5a. CONTRACT

  9. Construction of a directed hammerhead ribozyme library: towards the identification of optimal target sites for antisense-mediated gene inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, M L; Ruffner, D E

    1998-01-01

    Antisense-mediated gene inhibition uses short complementary DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to block expression of any mRNA of interest. A key parameter in the success or failure of an antisense therapy is the identification of a suitable target site on the chosen mRNA. Ultimately, the accessibility of the target to the antisense agent determines target suitability. Since accessibility is a function of many complex factors, it is currently beyond our ability to predict. Consequently, identification of the most effective target(s) requires examination of every site. Towards this goal, we describe a method to construct directed ribozyme libraries against any chosen mRNA. The library contains nearly equal amounts of ribozymes targeting every site on the chosen transcript and the library only contains ribozymes capable of binding to that transcript. Expression of the ribozyme library in cultured cells should allow identification of optimal target sites under natural conditions, subject to the complexities of a fully functional cell. Optimal target sites identified in this manner should be the most effective sites for therapeutic intervention. PMID:9801305

  10. Site-directed mutagenesis of an acetylcholinesterase gene from the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti confers insecticide insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, A; Rocheleau, T; ffrench-Constant, R

    1997-11-01

    Insecticide resistance is a serious problem facing the effective control of insect vectors of disease. Insensitive acetylcholinesterase (AChE) confers resistance to organophosphorus (OP) and carbamate insecticides and is a widespread resistance mechanism in vector mosquitoes. Although the point mutations that underlie AChE insensitivity have been described from Drosophila, the Colorado potato beetle, and house flies, no resistance associated mutations have been documented from mosquitoes to date. We are therefore using a cloned acetylcholinesterase gene from the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti as a model in which to perform site directed mutagenesis in order to understand the effects of potential resistance associated mutations. The same resistance associated amino-acid replacements as found in other insects also confer OP and carbamate resistance to the mosquito enzyme. Here we describe the levels of resistance conferred by different combinations of these mutations and the effects of these mutations on the kinetics of the AChE enzyme. Over-expression of these constructs in baculovirus will facilitate purification of each of the mutant enzymes and a more detailed analysis of their associated inhibition kinetics.

  11. The BCL11A transcription factor directly activates RAG gene expression and V(D)J recombination.

    PubMed

    Lee, Baeck-seung; Dekker, Joseph D; Lee, Bum-kyu; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Sleckman, Barry P; Shaffer, Arthur L; Ippolito, Gregory C; Tucker, Philip W

    2013-05-01

    Recombination-activating gene 1 protein (RAG1) and RAG2 are critical enzymes for initiating variable-diversity-joining (VDJ) segment recombination, an essential process for antigen receptor expression and lymphocyte development. The transcription factor BCL11A is required for B cell development, but its molecular function(s) in B cell fate specification and commitment is unknown. We show here that the major B cell isoform, BCL11A-XL, binds the RAG1 promoter and Erag enhancer to activate RAG1 and RAG2 transcription in pre-B cells. We employed BCL11A overexpression with recombination substrates in a cultured pre-B cell line as well as Cre recombinase-mediated Bcl11a(lox/lox) deletion in explanted murine pre-B cells to demonstrate direct consequences of BCL11A/RAG modulation on V(D)J recombination. We conclude that BCL11A is a critical component of a transcriptional network that regulates B cell fate by controlling V(D)J recombination.

  12. A xylanase gene directly cloned from the genomic DNA of alkaline wastewater sludge showing application potential in the paper industry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyu; Luo, Huiying; Meng, Kun; Shi, Pengjun; Wang, Guozeng; Yang, Peilong; Yuan, Tiezheng; Yao, Bin

    2011-09-01

    A xylanase gene, aws-2x, was directly cloned from the genomic DNA of the alkaline wastewater sludge using degenerated PCR and modified TAIL-PCR. The deduced amino acid sequence of AWS-2x shared the highest identity (60%) with the xylanase from Chryseobacterium gleum belonging to the glycosyl hydrolase GH family 10. Recombinant AWS-2x was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. The enzyme showed maximal activity at pH 7.5 and 55 °C, maintained more than 50% of maximal activity when assayed at pH 9.0, and was stable over a wide pH range from 4.0 to 11.0. The specific activity of AWS-2x towards hardwood xylan (beechwood and birchwood xylan) was significantly higher than that to cereal xylan (oat spelt xylan and wheat arabinoxylan). These properties make AWS-2x a potential candidate for application in the pulp and paper industry.

  13. Directional dispersal between mid-ocean ridges: deep-ocean circulation and gene flow in Ridgeia piscesae.

    PubMed

    Young, C R; Fujio, S; Vrijenhoek, R C

    2008-04-01

    This study examined relationships between bathymetrically induced deep-ocean currents and the dispersal of the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae along the northeast Pacific ridge system. A robust diagnostic model of deep-ocean circulation in this region predicted strong southeasterly currents following contours of the Blanco Transform Fault, a 450-km lateral offset that separates the Gorda and Juan de Fuca ridge systems. Such currents should facilitate the southward dispersal of R. piscesae larvae. Immigration rates for populations north and south of the Blanco Transform Fault were estimated from molecular population genetic data. Mitochondrial DNA evidence revealed population subdivision across the Blanco Transform Fault, and a strong directional bias in gene flow that was consistent with predictions of the circulation model. The distribution of mitochondrial diversity between the northern and southern populations of R. piscesae suggests that the Gorda Ridge tubeworms have maintained larger effective population sizes than the northern populations, a pattern that also exists in co-occurring limpets. Together, these data suggest that the northern vent fields may experience a higher frequency of habitat turnover and consequently more rapid losses of genetic diversity.

  14. Evidence for Direct Control of Virulence and Defense Gene Circuits by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Regulator, MvfR

    PubMed Central

    Maura, Damien; Hazan, Ronen; Kitao, Tomoe; Ballok, Alicia E.; Rahme, Laurence G.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa defies eradication by antibiotics and is responsible for acute and chronic human infections due to a wide variety of virulence factors. Currently, it is believed that MvfR (PqsR) controls the expression of many of these factors indirectly via the pqs and phnAB operons. Here we provide strong evidence that MvfR may also bind and directly regulate the expression of additional 35 loci across the P. aeruginosa genome, including major regulators and virulence factors, such as the quorum sensing (QS) regulators lasR and rhlR, and genes involved in protein secretion, translation, and response to oxidative stress. We show that these anti-oxidant systems, AhpC-F, AhpB-TrxB2 and Dps, are critical for P. aeruginosa survival to reactive oxygen species and antibiotic tolerance. Considering that MvfR regulated compounds generate reactive oxygen species, this indicates a tightly regulated QS self-defense anti-poisoning system. These findings also challenge the current hierarchical regulation model of P. aeruginosa QS systems by revealing new interconnections between them that suggest a circular model. Moreover, they uncover a novel role for MvfR in self-defense that favors antibiotic tolerance and cell survival, further demonstrating MvfR as a highly desirable anti-virulence target. PMID:27678057

  15. Facile Construction of Random Gene Mutagenesis Library for Directed Evolution Without the Use of Restriction Enzyme in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Eung; Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; You, Chun; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-09-01

    A foolproof protocol was developed for the construction of mutant DNA library for directed protein evolution. First, a library of linear mutant gene was generated by error-prone PCR or molecular shuffling, and a linear vector backbone was prepared by high-fidelity PCR. Second, the amplified insert and vector fragments were assembled by overlap-extension PCR with a pair of 5'-phosphorylated primers. Third, full-length linear plasmids with phosphorylated 5'-ends were self-ligated with T4 ligase, yielding circular plasmids encoding mutant variants suitable for high-efficiency transformation. Self-made competent Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) showed a transformation efficiency of 2.4 × 10(5) cfu/µg of the self-ligated circular plasmid. Using this method, three mutants of mCherry fluorescent protein were found to alter their colors and fluorescent intensities under visible and UV lights, respectively. Also, one mutant of 6-phosphorogluconate dehydrogenase from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica was found to show the 3.5-fold improved catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) on NAD(+) as compared to the wild-type. This protocol is DNA-sequence independent, and does not require restriction enzymes, special E. coli host, or labor-intensive optimization. In addition, this protocol can be used for subcloning the relatively long DNA sequences into any position of plasmids.

  16. Enhancing Autophagy with Drugs or Lung-directed Gene Therapy Reverses the Pathological Effects of Respiratory Epithelial Cell Proteinopathy*

    PubMed Central

    Hidvegi, Tunda; Stolz, Donna B.; Alcorn, John F.; Yousem, Samuel A.; Wang, Jieru; Leme, Adriana S.; Houghton, A. McGarry; Hale, Pamela; Ewing, Michael; Cai, Houming; Garchar, Evelyn Akpadock; Pastore, Nunzia; Annunziata, Patrizia; Kaminski, Naftali; Pilewski, Joseph; Shapiro, Steven D.; Pak, Stephen C.; Silverman, Gary A.; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Perlmutter, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that autophagy mitigates the pathological effects of proteinopathies in the liver, heart, and skeletal muscle but this has not been investigated for proteinopathies that affect the lung. This may be due at least in part to the lack of an animal model robust enough for spontaneous pathological effects from proteinopathies even though several rare proteinopathies, surfactant protein A and C deficiencies, cause severe pulmonary fibrosis. In this report we show that the PiZ mouse, transgenic for the common misfolded variant α1-antitrypsin Z, is a model of respiratory epithelial cell proteinopathy with spontaneous pulmonary fibrosis. Intracellular accumulation of misfolded α1-antitrypsin Z in respiratory epithelial cells of the PiZ model resulted in activation of autophagy, leukocyte infiltration, and spontaneous pulmonary fibrosis severe enough to elicit functional restrictive deficits. Treatment with autophagy enhancer drugs or lung-directed gene transfer of TFEB, a master transcriptional activator of the autophagolysosomal system, reversed these proteotoxic consequences. We conclude that this mouse is an excellent model of respiratory epithelial proteinopathy with spontaneous pulmonary fibrosis and that autophagy is an important endogenous proteostasis mechanism and an attractive target for therapy. PMID:26494620

  17. CNS-directed gene therapy for the treatment of neurologic and somatic mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Motas, Sandra; Haurigot, Virginia; Garcia, Miguel; Marcó, Sara; Ribera, Albert; Roca, Carles; Sánchez, Víctor; Molas, Maria; Bertolin, Joan; Maggioni, Luca; León, Xavier; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by severe neurologic and somatic disease caused by deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), an enzyme that catabolizes the glycosaminoglycans heparan and dermatan sulphate. Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) currently constitutes the only approved therapeutic option for MPSII. However, the inability of recombinant IDS to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits ERT efficacy in treating neurological symptoms. Here, we report a gene therapy approach for MPSII through direct delivery of vectors to the CNS. Through a minimally invasive procedure, we administered adeno-associated virus vectors encoding IDS (AAV9-Ids) to the cerebrospinal fluid of MPSII mice with already established disease. Treated mice showed a significant increase in IDS activity throughout the encephalon, with full resolution of lysosomal storage lesions, reversal of lysosomal dysfunction, normalization of brain transcriptomic signature, and disappearance of neuroinflammation. Moreover, our vector also transduced the liver, providing a peripheral source of therapeutic protein that corrected storage pathology in visceral organs, with evidence of cross-correction of nontransduced organs by circulating enzyme. Importantly, AAV9-Ids-treated MPSII mice showed normalization of behavioral deficits and considerably prolonged survival. These results provide a strong proof of concept for the clinical translation of our approach for the treatment of Hunter syndrome patients with cognitive impairment. PMID:27699273

  18. Vibrio parahaemolyticus has a homolog of the Vibrio cholerae toxRS operon that mediates environmentally induced regulation of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Z; Kumagai, K; Baba, K; Mekalanos, J J; Nishibuchi, M

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to identify the regulatory gene controlling the expression of the tdh gene, encoding the thermostable direct hemolysin of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, we examined total DNA of AQ3815 (a Kanagawa phenomenon-positive strain) for sequences homologous to that of the toxR gene of Vibrio cholerae. The extracted DNA gave a weak hybridization signal under reduced-stringency conditions with a toxR-specific DNA probe. Cloning and sequence analysis of the probe-positive sequence revealed an operon (Vp-toxRS) which was highly similar to the toxRS operon of V. cholerae (Vc-toxRS) (52 and 62% similarities in the two genes, respectively). The deduced amino acid sequences of the Vp-toxRS gene products (Vp-ToxRS) contained regions similar to the proposed transmembrane and activity domains of the Vc-toxRS gene products (Vc-ToxRS). All clinical and environmental strains of V. parahaemolyticus examined possessed the Vp-toxRS genes. In the presence of Vp-ToxS, Vp-ToxR promoted expression of the tdh2 gene, one of two tdh genes (tdh1 and tdh2) carried by Kanagawa phenomenon-positive strains. The DNA sequence located 144 bp upstream of the tdh2 coding region was shown to be important for the Vp-ToxR-stimulated expression of the tdh2 gene in an Escherichia coli background. Comparative analysis of AQ3815 and its isogenic Vp-toxR null mutant gave the following results: (i) Vp-ToxR promoted, in an AQ3815 background, expression of the tdh gene to different degrees in various culture media, with KP broth (2% peptone, 0.5% NaCl, 0.03 M KH2PO4, pH 6.2) being most effective (12-fold); (ii) the promotion of tdh gene expression in KP broth was at the level of transcription; and (iii) Vp-ToxR was essential for demonstration of enterotoxic activity of AQ3815 in the rabbit ileal loop, a model previously used to demonstrate thermostable direct hemolysin-mediated enterotoxic activity of AQ3815. These results demonstrate that Vp-ToxR and Vc-ToxR share a strikingly similar function, i.e., direct

  19. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  20. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the fifteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  1. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  2. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XVI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the sixteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  3. Introduction to RTM Workstation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    Several successful experiments were run using different types of resins and fibers for both RTM and VARTM processes. 3. According to DSC measures...INTRODUCTION TO RTM WORKSTATION Jeffrey M. Lawrence Mathieu Devillard Peter Friede Dr. Suresh G. Advani Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Introduction To RTM Workstation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  4. Direct Activation of Amidohydrolase Domain-Containing 1 Gene by Thyroid Hormone Implicates a Role in the Formation of Adult Intestinal Stem Cells During Xenopus Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Morihiro; Miller, Thomas C; Fu, Liezhen; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2015-09-01

    The T3-dependent anuran metamorphosis resembles postembryonic development in mammals, the period around birth when plasma T3 levels peak. In particular, the remodeling of the intestine during metamorphosis mimics neonatal intestinal maturation in mammals when the adult intestinal epithelial self-renewing system is established. We have been using intestinal metamorphosis to investigate how the organ-specific adult stem cells are formed during vertebrate development. Early studies in Xenopus laevis have shown that this process involves complete degeneration of the larval epithelium and de novo formation of adult stem cells. A tissue-specific microarray analysis of intestinal gene expression during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis has identified a number of candidate stem cell genes. Here we have carried out detailed analyses of one such gene, amidohydrolase domain containing 1 (AMDHD1) gene, which encodes an enzyme in the histidine catabolic pathway. We show that AMDHD1 is exclusively expressed in the proliferating adult epithelial stem cells during metamorphosis with little expression in other intestinal tissues. We further provide evidence that T3 activates AMDHD1 gene expression directly at the transcription level through T3 receptor binding to the AMDHD1 gene in the intestine. In addition, we have reported earlier that histidine ammonia-lyase gene, another gene in histidine catabolic pathway, is similarly regulated by T3 in the intestine. These results together suggest that histidine catabolism plays a critical role in the formation and/or proliferation of adult intestinal stem cells during metamorphosis.

  5. Direct hippocampal injection of pseudo lentivirus-delivered nerve growth factor gene rescues the damaged cognitive function after traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong; Wan, Jie-qing; Gao, Guo-yi; Pan, Yao-hua; Ding, Sheng-hao; Fan, Yi-ling; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) treatment is a long-term process and requires repeated medicine administration, which, however, can cause high expense, infection, and hemorrhage to patients. To investigate how a long-term expression of nerve growth factor (Ngf) gene affects the injured hippocampus function post-TBI, in this study, a pseudo lentivirus carrying the β-Ngf fusion gene, with green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene, was constructed to show the gene expression and its ability of protecting cells from oxidative damage in vitro. Then, the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene was directly injected into the injured brain to evaluate its influence on the injured hippocampus function post-TBI in vivo. We found that the expression of the pseudo lentivirus-delivered β-Ngf fusion gene lasted more than four-week after the cell transduction and the encoded β-NGF fusion protein could induce the neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation. Moreover, the hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene sped the injured cognitive function recovery of the rat subjected to TBI. Together, our findings indicate that the long-term expression of the β-Ngf fusion gene, delivered by the pseudo lentivirus, can promote the neurite outgrowth of the neuron-like cells and protect the cells from the oxidative damage in vitro, and that the direct and single dose hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene is able to rescue the hippocampus function after the TBI in the rat.

  6. Isolation of precise plastid deletion mutants by homology-based excision: a resource for site-directed mutagenesis, multi-gene changes and high-throughput plastid transformation.

    PubMed

    Kode, Vasumathi; Mudd, Elisabeth A; Iamtham, Siriluck; Day, Anil

    2006-06-01

    We describe a simple and efficient homology-based excision method to delete plastid genes. The procedure allows one or more adjacent plastid genes to be deleted without the retention of a marker gene. We used aadA-based transformation to duplicate a 649 bp region of plastid DNA corresponding to the atpB promoter region. Efficient recombination between atpB repeats deletes the intervening foreign genes and 1,984 bp of plastid DNA (co-ordinates 57,424-59,317) containing the rbcL gene. Only five foreign bases are present in DeltarbcL plants illustrating the precision of homology-based excision. Sequence analysis of non-functional rbcL-related sequences in DeltarbcL plants indicated an extra-plastidic origin. Mutant DeltarbcL plants were heterotrophic, pale-green and contained round plastids with reduced amounts of thylakoids. Restoration of autotrophy and leaf pigmentation following aadA-based transformation with the wild-type rbcL gene ruled out mutations in other genes. Excision and re-use of aadA shows that, despite the multiplicity of plastid genomes, homology-based excision ensures complete removal of functional aadA genes. Rescue of the DeltarbcL mutation and autotrophic growth stabilizes transgenic plastids in heteroplasmic transformants following antibiotic withdrawal, enhancing the overall efficiency of plastid transformation. Unlike the available set of homoplasmic knockout mutants in 25 plastid genes, the rbcL deletion mutant isolated here is readily transformed with the efficient aadA marker gene. This improvement in deletion design facilitates advanced studies that require the isolation of double mutants in distant plastid genes and the replacement of the deleted locus with site-directed mutant alleles and is not easily achieved using other methods.

  7. Thyroid hormones directly activate the expression of the human and mouse uncoupling protein-3 genes through a thyroid response element in the proximal promoter region

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The transcription of the human UCP3 (uncoupling protein-3) gene in skeletal muscle is tightly regulated by metabolic signals related to fatty acid availability. However, changes in thyroid status also modulate UCP3 gene expression, albeit by unknown mechanisms. We created transgenic mice bearing the entire human UCP3 gene to investigate the effect of thyroid hormones on human UCP3 gene expression. Treatment of human UCP3 transgenic mice with thyroid hormones induced the expression of the human gene in skeletal muscle. In addition, transient transfection experiments demonstrate that thyroid hormones activate the transcription of the human UCP3 gene promoter when MyoD and the TR (thyroid hormone receptor) were co-transfected. The action of thyroid hormones on UCP3 gene transcription is mediated by the binding of the TR to a proximal region in the UCP3 gene promoter that contains a direct repeat structure. An intact DNA sequence of this site is required for thyroid hormone responsiveness and TR binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the TR binds this element in vivo. The murine Ucp3 gene promoter was also dependent on MyoD and responsive to thyroid hormone in transient transfection assays. However, it was much less sensitive to thyroid hormone than the human UCP3 promoter. In summary, UCP3 gene transcription is activated by thyroid hormone treatment in vivo, and this activation is mediated by a TRE (thyroid hormone response element) in the proximal promoter region. Such regulation suggests a link between UCP3 gene expression and the effects of thyroid hormone on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. PMID:15496137

  8. Arabidopsis VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN6 directly regulates the genes that govern programmed cell death and secondary wall formation during xylem differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Oda, Yoshihisa; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2010-10-01

    Xylem consists of three types of cells: tracheary elements (TEs), parenchyma cells, and fiber cells. TE differentiation includes two essential processes, programmed cell death (PCD) and secondary cell wall formation. These two processes are tightly coupled. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes. Here, we show that VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN6 (VND6), a master regulator of TEs, regulates some of the downstream genes involved in these processes in a coordinated manner. We first identified genes that are expressed downstream of VND6 but not downstream of SECONDARY WALL-ASSOCIATED NAC DOMAIN PROTEIN1 (SND1), a master regulator of xylem fiber cells, using transformed suspension culture cells in microarray experiments. We found that VND6 and SND1 governed distinct aspects of xylem formation, whereas they regulated a number of genes in common, specifically those related to secondary cell wall formation. Genes involved in TE-specific PCD were upregulated only by VND6. Moreover, we revealed that VND6 directly regulated genes that harbor a TE-specific cis-element, TERE, in their promoters. Thus, we found that VND6 is a direct regulator of genes related to PCD as well as to secondary wall formation.

  9. Identification of bacteria directly from positive blood culture samples by DNA pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Motoshima, Maiko; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Matsuda, Junichi; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Kohno, Shigeru; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2012-11-01

    Rapid identification of the causative bacteria of sepsis in patients can contribute to the selection of appropriate antibiotics and improvement of patients' prognosis. Genotypic identification is an emerging technology that may provide an alternative method to, or complement, established phenotypic identification procedures. We evaluated a rapid protocol for bacterial identification based on PCR and pyrosequencing of the V1 and V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene using DNA extracted directly from positive blood culture samples. One hundred and two positive blood culture bottles from 68 patients were randomly selected and the bacteria were identified by phenotyping and pyrosequencing. The results of pyrosequencing identification displayed 84.3 and 64.7 % concordance with the results of phenotypic identification at the genus and species levels, respectively. In the monomicrobial samples, the concordance between the results of pyrosequencing and phenotypic identification at the genus level was 87.0 %. Pyrosequencing identified one isolate in 60 % of polymicrobial samples, which were confirmed by culture analysis. Of the samples identified by pyrosequencing, 55.7 % showed consistent results in V1 and V3 targeted sequencing; other samples were identified based on the results of V1 (12.5 %) or V3 (31.8 %) sequencing alone. One isolate was erroneously identified by pyrosequencing due to high sequence similarity with another isolate. Pyrosequencing identified one isolate that was not detected by phenotypic identification. The process of pyrosequencing identification can be completed within ~4 h. The information provided by DNA-pyrosequencing for the identification of micro-organisms in positive blood culture bottles is accurate and could prove to be a rapid and useful tool in standard laboratory practice.

  10. Genome engineering and direct cloning of antibiotic gene clusters via phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Du, Deyao; Wang, Lu; Tian, Yuqing; Liu, Hao; Tan, Huarong; Niu, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Several strategies have been used to clone large DNA fragments directly from bacterial genome. Most of these approaches are based on different site-specific recombination systems consisting of a specialized recombinase and its target sites. In this study, a novel strategy based on phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination was developed, and used for simultaneous Streptomyces genome engineering and cloning of antibiotic gene clusters. This method has been proved successful for the cloning of actinorhodin gene cluster from Streptomyces coelicolor M145, napsamycin gene cluster and daptomycin gene cluster from Streptomyces roseosporus NRRL 15998 at a frequency higher than 80%. Furthermore, the system could be used to increase the titer of antibiotics as we demonstrated with actinorhodin and daptomycin, and it will be broadly applicable in many Streptomyces. PMID:25737113

  11. Genome engineering and direct cloning of antibiotic gene clusters via phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Du, Deyao; Wang, Lu; Tian, Yuqing; Liu, Hao; Tan, Huarong; Niu, Guoqing

    2015-03-04

    Several strategies have been used to clone large DNA fragments directly from bacterial genome. Most of these approaches are based on different site-specific recombination systems consisting of a specialized recombinase and its target sites. In this study, a novel strategy based on phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination was developed, and used for simultaneous Streptomyces genome engineering and cloning of antibiotic gene clusters. This method has been proved successful for the cloning of actinorhodin gene cluster from Streptomyces coelicolor M145, napsamycin gene cluster and daptomycin gene cluster from Streptomyces roseosporus NRRL 15998 at a frequency higher than 80%. Furthermore, the system could be used to increase the titer of antibiotics as we demonstrated with actinorhodin and daptomycin, and it will be broadly applicable in many Streptomyces.

  12. Identification of Notch target genes in uncommitted T-cell progenitors: No direct induction of a T-cell specific gene program.

    PubMed

    Weerkamp, F; Luis, T C; Naber, B A E; Koster, E E L; Jeannotte, L; van Dongen, J J M; Staal, F J T

    2006-11-01

    Deregulated Notch signaling occurs in the majority of human T-ALL. During normal lymphoid development, activation of the Notch signaling pathway poses a T-cell fate on hematopoietic progenitors. However, the transcriptional targets of the Notch pathway are largely unknown. We sought to identify Notch target genes by inducing Notch signaling in human hematopoietic progenitors using two different methods: an intracellular signal through transfection of activated Notch and a Notch-receptor dependent signal by interaction with its ligand Delta1. Gene expression profiles were generated and evaluated with respect to expression profiles of immature thymic subpopulations. We confirmed HES1, NOTCH1 and NRARP as Notch target genes, but other reported Notch targets, including the genes for Deltex1, pre-T-cell receptor alpha and E2A, were not found to be differentially expressed. Remarkably, no induction of T-cell receptor gene rearrangements or transcription of known T-cell specific genes was found after activation of the Notch pathway. A number of novel Notch target genes, including the transcription factor TCFL5 and the HOXA cluster, were identified and functionally tested. Apparently, Notch signaling is essential to open the T-cell pathway, but does not initiate the T-cell program itself.

  13. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng . E-mail: Dongfeng_pan@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10{sup 9} PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases.

  14. Direct interplay among histones, histone chaperones, and a chromatin boundary protein in the control of histone gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zunder, Rachel M; Rine, Jasper

    2012-11-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the histone chaperone Rtt106 binds newly synthesized histone proteins and mediates their delivery into chromatin during transcription, replication, and silencing. Rtt106 is also recruited to histone gene regulatory regions by the HIR histone chaperone complex to ensure S-phase-specific expression. Here we showed that this Rtt106:HIR complex included Asf1 and histone proteins. Mutations in Rtt106 that reduced histone binding reduced Rtt106 enrichment at histone genes, leading to their increased transcription. Deletion of the chromatin boundary element Yta7 led to increased Rtt106:H3 binding, increased Rtt106 enrichment at histone gene regulatory regions, and decreased histone gene transcription at the HTA1-HTB1 locus. These results suggested a unique regulatory mechanism in which Rtt106 sensed the level of histone proteins to maintain the proper level of histone gene transcription. The role of these histone chaperones and Yta7 differed markedly among the histone gene loci, including the two H3-H4 histone gene pairs. Defects in silencing in rtt106 mutants could be partially accounted for by Rtt106-mediated changes in histone gene repression. These studies suggested that feedback mediated by histone chaperone complexes plays a pivotal role in regulating histone gene transcription.

  15. The position of DNA cleavage by TALENs and cell synchronization influences the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Strouse, Bryan; Bialk, Pawel; Niamat, Rohina A; Kmiec, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    With recent technological advances that enable DNA cleavage at specific sites in the human genome, it may now be possible to reverse inborn errors, thereby correcting a mutation, at levels that could have an impact in a clinical setting. We have been developing gene editing, using single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs), as a tool to direct site specific single base changes. Successful application of this technique has been demonstrated in many systems ranging from bacteria to human (ES and somatic) cells. While the frequency of gene editing can vary widely, it is often at a level that does not enable clinical application. As such, a number of stimulatory factors such as double-stranded breaks are known to elevate the frequency significantly. The majority of these results have been discovered using a validated HCT116 mammalian cell model system where credible genetic and biochemical readouts are available. Here, we couple TAL-Effector Nucleases (TALENs) that execute specific ds DNA breaks with ssODNs, designed specifically to repair a missense mutation, in an integrated single copy eGFP gene. We find that proximal cleavage, relative to the mutant base, is key for enabling high frequencies of editing. A directionality of correction is also observed with TALEN activity upstream from the target base being more effective in promoting gene editing than activity downstream. We also find that cells progressing through S phase are more amenable to combinatorial gene editing activity. Thus, we identify novel aspects of gene editing that will help in the design of more effective protocols for genome modification and gene therapy in natural genes.

  16. Sequences contained within the promoter of the human thymidine kinase gene can direct cell-cycle regulation of heterologous fusion genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y K; Wells, S; Lau, Y F; Lee, A S

    1988-01-01

    Recent evidence on the transcriptional regulation of the human thymidine kinase (TK) gene raises the possibility that cell-cycle regulatory sequences may be localized within its promoter. A hybrid gene that combines the TK 5' flanking sequence and the coding region of the bacterial neomycin-resistance gene (neo) has been constructed. Upon transfection into a hamster fibroblast cell line K12, the hybrid gene exhibits cell-cycle-dependent expression. Deletion analysis reveals that the region important for cell-cycle regulation is within -441 to -63 nucleotides from the transcriptional initiation site. This region (-441 to -63) also confers cell-cycle regulation to the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) promoter, which is not expressed in a cell-cycle manner. We conclude that the -441 to -63 sequence within the human TK promoter is important for cell-cycle-dependent expression. Images PMID:3413063

  17. Sequences contained within the promoter of the human thymidine kinase gene can direct cell-cycle regulation of heterologous fusion genes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yongkyu; Wells, S.; Lau, Yunfai Chris; Lee, A.S. )

    1988-08-01

    Recent evidence on the transcriptional regulation of the human thymidine kinase (TK) gene raises the possibility that cell-cycle regulatory sequences may be localized within its promoter. A hybrid gene that combines the TK 5{prime} flanking sequence and the coding region of the bacterial neomycin-resistance gene (neo) has been constructed. Upon transfection into a hamster fibroblast cell line K12, the hybrid gene exhibits cell-cycle-dependent expression. Deletion analysis reveals that the region important for cell-cycle regulation is within {minus}441 to {minus}63 nucleotides from the transcriptional initiation site. This region ({minus}441 to {minus}63) also confers cell-cycle regulation to the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) promoter, which is not expressed in a cell-cycle manner. The authors conclude that the {minus}441 to {minus}63 sequence within the human TK promoter is important for cell-cycle-dependent expression.

  18. An alpha-helical cationic antimicrobial peptide selectively modulates macrophage responses to lipopolysaccharide and directly alters macrophage gene expression.

    PubMed

    Scott, M G; Rosenberger, C M; Gold, M R; Finlay, B B; Hancock, R E

    2000-09-15

    Certain cationic antimicrobial peptides block the binding of LPS to LPS-binding protein and reduce the ability of LPS to induce the production of inflammatory mediators by macrophages. To gain a more complete understanding of how LPS activates macrophages and how cationic peptides influence this process, we have used gene array technology to profile gene expression patterns in macrophages treated with LPS in the presence or the absence of the insect-derived cationic antimicrobial peptide CEMA (cecropin-melittin hybrid). We found that CEMA selectively blocked LPS-induced gene expression in the RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line. The ability of LPS to induce the expression of >40 genes was strongly inhibited by CEMA, while LPS-induced expression of another 16 genes was relatively unaffected. In addition, CEMA itself induced the expression of a distinct set of 35 genes, including genes involved in cell adhesion and apoptosis. Thus, CEMA, a synthetic alpha-helical peptide, selectively modulates the transcriptional response of macrophages to LPS and can alter gene expression in macrophages.

  19. Fall Protection Introduction, #33462

    SciTech Connect

    Chochoms, Michael

    2016-06-23

    The proper use of fall prevention and fall protection controls can reduce the risk of deaths and injuries caused by falls. This course, Fall Protection Introduction (#33462), is designed as an introduction to various types of recognized fall prevention and fall protection systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), including guardrail systems, safety net systems, fall restraint systems, and fall arrest systems. Special emphasis is given to the components, inspection, care, and storage of personal fall arrest systems (PFASs). This course also presents controls for falling object hazards and emergency planning considerations for persons who have fallen.

  20. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Stéphane G.; Banner, David; Chi, Le Thi Bao; Leon, Alberto J.; Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi; Huang, Stephen S.H.; Farooqui, Amber; and others

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus–epithelial cell interaction. - Highlights: • We investigated H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection in primary epithelial cells. • H1N1pdm directly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature, sH1N1 did not. • H1N1pdm viral RNA triggered a stronger response than sH1N1. • H1N1pdm induces greater response due to direct virus–cell interaction. • These results have potential to impact vaccine and therapeutic development.

  1. The promoter of a plant defensin gene directs specific expression in nematode-induced syncytia in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Shahid; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Szakasits, Dagmar; Kreil, David P; Bohlmann, Holger

    2011-10-01

    The beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii induces a feeding site, called syncytium, in roots of host plants. In Arabidopsis, one of the genes whose expression is strongly induced in these structures is Pdf2.1 which codes for an antimicrobial plant defensin. Arabidopsis has 13 plant defensin genes. Besides Pdf2.1, the Pdf2.2 and Pdf2.3 genes were strongly expressed in syncytia and therefore the expression of all three Pdf genes was studied in detail. The promoter of the Pdf2.1 gene turned out to be an interesting candidate to drive a syncytium-specific expression of foreign genes as RT-PCR showed that apart from the feeding site it was only expressed in siliques (seeds). The Pdf2.2 and Pdf2.3 genes were in addition expressed in seedlings, roots, leaves, stems, and flowers. These results were supported by the analysis of promoter::GUS lines. After infection with H. schachtii all GUS lines showed a strong staining in syncytia at 5 and 15 dpi. This expression pattern was confirmed by in situ RT-PCR.

  2. Re-expression of Selected Epigenetically Silenced Candidate Tumor Suppressor Genes in Cervical Cancer by TET2-directed Demethylation.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Christian; van der Wijst, Monique G P; Schokker, Matthijs; Blancafort, Pilar; Terpstra, Martijn M; Kok, Klaas; van der Zee, Ate G J; Schuuring, Ed; Wisman, G Bea A; Rots, Marianne G

    2016-03-01

    DNA hypermethylation is extensively explored as therapeutic target for gene expression modulation in cancer. Here, we re-activated hypermethylated candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) (C13ORF18, CCNA1, TFPI2, and Maspin) by TET2-induced demethylation in cervical cancer cell lines. To redirect TET2 to hypermethylated TSGs, we engineered zinc finger proteins (ZFPs), which were first fused to the transcriptional activator VP64 to validate effective gene re-expression and confirm TSG function. ChIP-Seq not only revealed enriched binding of ZFPs to their intended sequence, but also considerable off-target binding, especially at promoter regions. Nevertheless, results obtained by targeted re-expression using ZFP-VP64 constructs were in line with cDNA overexpression; both revealed strong growth inhibition for C13ORF18 and TFPI2, but not for CCNA1 and Maspin. To explore effectivity of locus-targeted demethylation, ZFP-TET2 fusions were constructed which efficiently demethylated genes with subsequent gene re-activation. Moreover, targeting TET2 to TFPI2 and C13ORF18, but not CCNA1, significantly decreased cell growth, viability, and colony formation in cervical cancer cells compared to a catalytically inactive mutant of TET2. These data underline that effective re-activation of hypermethylated genes can be achieved through targeted DNA demethylation by TET2, which can assist in realizing sustained re-expression of genes of interest.

  3. Introduction to Childhood Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehily, Mary Jane, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Educationalists and social scientists are increasingly interested in childhood as a distinct social category, and Childhood Studies is now a recognized area of research and analysis. This book brings together the key themes of Childhood Studies in a broad and accessible introduction for students and practitioners working in this field.…

  4. Why SRS Matters - Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Paul

    2015-01-21

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode provides an introduction to the SRS mission and operations.

  5. Introduction to Relational Programming.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    such as Russell’s "rami- tied type theory." In most other respects our notation follows that of Carnap 11] and Whitehead and Russell [8]. There is no... Carnap , R. Introduction to Symbolic Logic and its Applica- tions, Dover, 1958. [2] Childs, D.L. Feasibility of a set-theoretic data structure based on a

  6. Writing the introduction.

    PubMed

    Peh, W C; Ng, K H

    2008-10-01

    The introduction section of a scientific paper aims to introduce a specific topic and to stimulate the reader's interest. It provides background information about what has already been done by others, supported by a limited number of relevant references. The reader should be informed about the purpose of the paper, what it will address, and how it relates to previous work.

  7. An Introduction to Akan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Jack; Aidoo, Agnes Akosua

    This introduction to Akan is designed to provide the basic structures and vocabulary that a non-native speaker would need to use Akan. The text is based on the Asante dialect of Akan, and is divided into twenty units. Each unit consists of a conversation given in English and Asante, drills for the classroom or individual practice, grammar notes,…

  8. Why SRS Matters - Introduction

    ScienceCinema

    Hunt, Paul

    2016-08-26

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode provides an introduction to the SRS mission and operations.

  9. Introduction to International Trade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crummett, Dan M.; Crummett, Jerrie

    This set of student and teacher guides is intended for use in a course to prepare students for entry-level employment in such occupational areas in international trade as business/finance, communications, logistics, and marketing. The following topics are covered in the course's five instructional units: introduction to careers in international…

  10. Mauritian Creole: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Morris F.; And Others

    The format of this 23-unit course in Mauritian Creole is based on "microwave" cycles, each cycle beginning with the introduction of new material and ending with the use of that material in communication. A small amount of new material is introduced at a time (usually in a monolog, drill, or dialog) which, after a brief bit of practice is…

  11. Introduction to Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary

    There are numerous ways to structure the introduction to film course so as to meet the needs of the different types of students who typically enroll. Assuming there is no production component in the course, the teacher is left with two major approaches to choose from--historical and aesthetic. The units in the course will typically be built around…

  12. Introduction to Shakespeare: English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargraves, Richard

    The "Introduction to Shakespeare" course in the Quinmester Program involves the careful study of the tragedy "Romeo and Juliet" and the comedy "The Taming of the Shrew," emphasizing language, development of character and theme. The course also includes the study of biographical data relevant to the evolution of…

  13. An Introduction to Psycholinguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodai, Hojat

    2011-01-01

    This paper is written to have a preliminary introduction about psycholinguistics. Psycholinguistics or psychology of language is the study of the interrelation between linguistic factors and psychological aspects. The main subject of research in psycholinguistics is the study of cognitive processes that underlie the comprehension and production of…

  14. Introduction to HACCP.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction to HACCP Deana R. Jones, Ph.D. Egg Safety and Quality Research Unit USDA-Agricultural Research Service Russell Research Center Athens, GA Deana.Jones@ars.usda.gov HACCP is an acronym for Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point and was initially developed by the Pillsbury Company a...

  15. HSI2 Repressor Recruits MED13 and HDA6 to Down-Regulate Seed Maturation Gene Expression Directly During Arabidopsis Early Seedling Growth.

    PubMed

    Chhun, Tory; Chong, Suet Yen; Park, Bong Soo; Wong, Eriko Chi Cheng; Yin, Jun-Lin; Kim, Mijung; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2016-08-01

    Arabidopsis HSI2 (HIGH-LEVEL EXPRESSION OF SUGAR-INDUCIBLE GENE 2) which carries a EAR (ERF-associated amphiphilic repression) motif acts as a repressor of seed maturation genes and lipid biosynthesis, whereas MEDIATOR (MED) is a conserved multiprotein complex linking DNA-bound transcription factors to RNA polymerase II transcription machinery. How HSI2 executes its repressive function through MED is hitherto unknown. Here, we show that HSI2 and its homolog, HSI2-lik (HSL1), are able to form homo- and heterocomplexes. Both factors bind to the TRAP240 domain of MED13, a subunit of the MED CDK8 module. Mutant alleles of the med13 mutant show elevated seed maturation gene expression and increased lipid accumulation in cotyledons; in contrast, HSI2- or MED13-overexpressing plants display the opposite phenotypes. The overexpression phenotypes of HSI2 and MED13 are abolished in med13 and hsi2 hsl1, respectively, indicating that HSI2 and MED13 together are required for these functions. The HSI2 C-terminal region interacts with HDA6, whose overexpression also reduces seed maturation gene expression and lipid accumulation. Moreover, HSI2, MED13 and HDA6 bind to the proximal promoter and 5'-coding regions of seed maturation genes. Taken together, our results suggest that HSI2 recruits MED13 and HDA6 to suppress directly a subset of seed maturation genes post-germination.

  16. Combining qPCR and functional gene microarrays to directly link changes in the expression of the nirS gene to denitrification rates in aquatic sediment mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, J. L.; Babbin, A. R.; Ward, B. B.

    2010-12-01

    Molecular methods for the investigation of biogeochemical processes, including denitrification, are being developed at an astonishing rate, but it remains difficult to use the molecular information to understand the regulation and variation in biogeochemical transformation rates. By combining information on gene abundance and expression for nirS, a key gene in denitrification, with quantitative modeling of nitrogen fluxes, we can begin to understand the scales on which genetic signals vary in space and time, and how they relate to biogeochemical function. We used quantitative PCR, a functional gene microarray, and biogeochemical modeling to assess how denitrifier community composition (evaluated by DNA and cDNA of the nirS gene) changed over time in estuarine sediment mesocosms. Sediments and water were collected from coastal Massachusetts and maintained in replicated 20 L mesocosm experiments for 45 days. Sediments were collected for microbial analysis at weekly intervals throughout the experiment. Concentrations of all major nitrogen species were measured daily and used to derive rates of nitrification and denitrification from a Monte Carlo-based nonnegative least-squares analysis of finite difference equations. Denitrification rates peaked between day 18 and day 22, slightly after the peaks in nitrite concentration that were generated from oxidization of remineralized ammonium. In most mesocosms the peak in denitrification rates coincided with the peak in nirS gene abundance (DNA). Peaks in the expression of the nirS gene (cDNA), however, did not always correlate with peaks in the denitrification rates. The nirS microarray contained 39 archetype probes, three of which accounted for more than 60% of the DNA hybridization signal. Two of these clades also dominated the hybridization signal in cDNA, indicating that those organisms that are actively expressing nirS are not always the dominant members of the community. Fifteen of the 39 probes accounted for less than

  17. Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Genes URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  18. Rapid changes in gene expression direct rapid shifts in intestinal form and function in the Burmese python after feeding.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Audra L; Card, Daren C; Ruggiero, Robert P; Schield, Drew R; Adams, Richard H; Pollock, David D; Secor, Stephen M; Castoe, Todd A

    2015-05-01

    Snakes provide a unique and valuable model system for studying the extremes of physiological remodeling because of the ability of some species to rapidly upregulate organ form and function upon feeding. The predominant model species used to study such extreme responses has been the Burmese python because of the extreme nature of postfeeding response in this species. We analyzed the Burmese python intestine across a time series, before, during, and after feeding to understand the patterns and timing of changes in gene expression and their relationship to changes in intestinal form and function upon feeding. Our results indicate that >2,000 genes show significant changes in expression in the small intestine following feeding, including genes involved in intestinal morphology and function (e.g., hydrolases, microvillus proteins, trafficking and transport proteins), as well as genes involved in cell division and apoptosis. Extensive changes in gene expression occur surprisingly rapidly, within the first 6 h of feeding, coincide with changes in intestinal morphology, and effectively return to prefeeding levels within 10 days. Collectively, our results provide an unprecedented portrait of parallel changes in gene expression and intestinal morphology and physiology on a scale that is extreme both in the magnitude of changes, as well as in the incredibly short time frame of these changes, with up- and downregulation of expression and function occurring in the span of 10 days. Our results also identify conserved vertebrate signaling pathways that modulate these responses, which may suggest pathways for therapeutic modulation of intestinal function in humans.

  19. The Hos2 Histone Deacetylase Controls Ustilago maydis Virulence through Direct Regulation of Mating-Type Genes

    PubMed Central

    Elías-Villalobos, Alberto; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Moreno-Sánchez, Ismael; Helmlinger, Dominique; Ibeas, José I.

    2015-01-01

    Morphological changes are critical for host colonisation in plant pathogenic fungi. These changes occur at specific stages of their pathogenic cycle in response to environmental signals and are mediated by transcription factors, which act as master regulators. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play crucial roles in regulating gene expression, for example by locally modulating the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulators. It has been reported that HDACs play important roles in the virulence of plant fungi. However, the specific environment-sensing pathways that control fungal virulence via HDACs remain poorly characterised. Here we address this question using the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. We find that the HDAC Hos2 is required for the dimorphic switch and pathogenic development in U. maydis. The deletion of hos2 abolishes the cAMP-dependent expression of mating type genes. Moreover, ChIP experiments detect Hos2 binding to the gene bodies of mating-type genes, which increases in proportion to their expression level following cAMP addition. These observations suggest that Hos2 acts as a downstream component of the cAMP-PKA pathway to control the expression of mating-type genes. Interestingly, we found that Clr3, another HDAC present in U. maydis, also contributes to the cAMP-dependent regulation of mating-type gene expression, demonstrating that Hos2 is not the only HDAC involved in this control system. Overall, our results provide new insights into the role of HDACs in fungal phytopathogenesis. PMID:26317403

  20. Rapid changes in gene expression direct rapid shifts in intestinal form and function in the Burmese python after feeding

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Audra L.; Card, Daren C.; Ruggiero, Robert P.; Schield, Drew R.; Adams, Richard H.; Pollock, David D.; Secor, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Snakes provide a unique and valuable model system for studying the extremes of physiological remodeling because of the ability of some species to rapidly upregulate organ form and function upon feeding. The predominant model species used to study such extreme responses has been the Burmese python because of the extreme nature of postfeeding response in this species. We analyzed the Burmese python intestine across a time series, before, during, and after feeding to understand the patterns and timing of changes in gene expression and their relationship to changes in intestinal form and function upon feeding. Our results indicate that >2,000 genes show significant changes in expression in the small intestine following feeding, including genes involved in intestinal morphology and function (e.g., hydrolases, microvillus proteins, trafficking and transport proteins), as well as genes involved in cell division and apoptosis. Extensive changes in gene expression occur surprisingly rapidly, within the first 6 h of feeding, coincide with changes in intestinal morphology, and effectively return to prefeeding levels within 10 days. Collectively, our results provide an unprecedented portrait of parallel changes in gene expression and intestinal morphology and physiology on a scale that is extreme both in the magnitude of changes, as well as in the incredibly short time frame of these changes, with up- and downregulation of expression and function occurring in the span of 10 days. Our results also identify conserved vertebrate signaling pathways that modulate these responses, which may suggest pathways for therapeutic modulation of intestinal function in humans. PMID:25670730

  1. Staph ID/R: a rapid method for determining staphylococcus species identity and detecting the mecA gene directly from positive blood culture.

    PubMed

    Pasko, Chris; Hicke, Brian; Dunn, John; Jaeckel, Heidi; Nieuwlandt, Dan; Weed, Diane; Woodruff, Evelyn; Zheng, Xiaotian; Jenison, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Rapid diagnosis of staphylococcal bacteremia directs appropriate antimicrobial therapy, leading to improved patient outcome. We describe herein a rapid test (<75 min) that can identify the major pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus to the species level as well as the presence or absence of the methicillin resistance determinant gene, mecA. The test, Staph ID/R, combines a rapid isothermal nucleic acid amplification method, helicase-dependent amplification (HDA), with a chip-based array that produces unambiguous visible results. The analytic sensitivity was 1 CFU per reaction for the mecA gene and was 1 to 250 CFU per reaction depending on the staphylococcal species present in the positive blood culture. Staph ID/R has excellent specificity as well, with no cross-reactivity observed. We validated the performance of Staph ID/R by testing 104 frozen clinical positive blood cultures and comparing the results with rpoB gene or 16S rRNA gene sequencing for species identity determinations and mecA gene PCR to confirm mecA gene results. Staph ID/R agreed with mecA gene PCR for all samples and agreed with rpoB/16S rRNA gene sequencing in all cases except for one sample that contained a mixture of two staphylococcal species, one of which Staph ID/R correctly identified, for an overall agreement of 99.0% (P < 0.01). Staph ID/R could potentially be used to positively affect patient management for Staphylococcus-mediated bacteremia.

  2. Altered expression of oligodendrocyte and neuronal marker genes predicts the clinical onset of autoimmune encephalomyelitis and indicates the effectiveness of multiple sclerosis-directed therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Evangelidou, Maria; Karamita, Maria; Vamvakas, Sotiris-Spyros; Szymkowski, David E; Probert, Lesley

    2014-05-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a valuable model for studying immunopathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) and for exploring the interface between autoimmune responses and CNS tissue that ultimately leads to lesion development. In this study, we measured gene expression in mouse spinal cord during myelin oligodendrocyte gp35-55 peptide-induced EAE, using quantitative RT-PCR, to identify gene markers that monitor individual hallmark pathological processes. We defined a small panel of genes whose longitudinal expression patterns provided insight into the timing, interrelationships, and mechanisms of individual disease processes and the efficacy of therapeutics for the treatment of MS. Earliest transcriptional changes were upregulation of Il17a and sharp downregulation of neuronal and oligodendrocyte marker genes preceding clinical disease onset, whereas neuroinflammatory markers progressively increased as symptoms and tissue lesions developed. EAE-induced gene-expression changes were not altered in mice deficient in IKKβ in cells of the myeloid lineage compared with controls, but the administration of a selective inhibitor of soluble TNF to mice from the day of immunization delayed changes in the expression of innate inflammation, myelin, and neuron markers from the presymptomatic phase. Proof of principle that the gene panel shows drug screening potential was obtained using a well-established MS therapeutic, glatiramer acetate. Prophylactic treatment of mice with glatiramer acetate normalized gene marker expression, and this correlated with the level of therapeutic success. These results show that neurons and oligodendrocytes are highly sensitive to CNS-directed autoimmunity before the development of clinical symptoms and immunopathology and reveal a role for soluble TNF in mediating the earliest changes in gene expression.

  3. Occurrence of urease-positive Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Kanagawa, Japan, with specific reference to presence of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and the TDH-related-hemolysin genes.

    PubMed

    Osawa, R; Okitsu, T; Morozumi, H; Yamai, S

    1996-02-01

    A total of 132 strains of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from patients and from the suspected causal food items of past food poisoning cases occurring in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, were examined for the ability to hydrolyze urea, with specific reference to the presence of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene (tdh) and the gene for thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin (trh). Ten strains belonging to five different O-antigen serotypes were positive for urea hydrolysis (UH+), and four of these strains did not carry tdh. A total of 106 strains carried tdh, but less than 6% of them were UH+, whereas all trh-carrying strains were UH+. The evidence suggests that urea hydrolysis is not a reliable marker for identifying tdh-carrying V. parahaemolyticus strains in Japan (the Pacific Northeast) but may be a marker for trh-carrying strains.

  4. 5 CFR 2500.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION, EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT INFORMATION SECURITY REGULATION § 2500.1 Introduction. (a) References. (1) Executive Order 12065, “National Security Information”, dated June 28, 1978. (2) Information Security Oversight Office Directive No. 1, “National...

  5. Typewriting Syllabus. Part 1: Introduction. 1976 Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational and Career Curriculum Development.

    The document is the first of a two-part set. It is directed primarily to the typewriting teacher and provides an introduction to the course designed to assist the secondary school teacher and student in achieving a high level of performance. It briefly describes the nine modules of instruction which are presented in detail in the second volume of…

  6. 5 CFR 2500.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION, EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT INFORMATION SECURITY REGULATION § 2500.1 Introduction. (a) References. (1) Executive Order 12065, “National Security Information”, dated June 28, 1978. (2) Information Security Oversight Office Directive No. 1, “National...

  7. 5 CFR 2500.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION, EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT INFORMATION SECURITY REGULATION § 2500.1 Introduction. (a) References. (1) Executive Order 12065, “National Security Information”, dated June 28, 1978. (2) Information Security Oversight Office Directive No. 1, “National...

  8. 5 CFR 2500.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION, EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT INFORMATION SECURITY REGULATION § 2500.1 Introduction. (a) References. (1) Executive Order 12065, “National Security Information”, dated June 28, 1978. (2) Information Security Oversight Office Directive No. 1, “National...

  9. 5 CFR 2500.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION, EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT INFORMATION SECURITY REGULATION § 2500.1 Introduction. (a) References. (1) Executive Order 12065, “National Security Information”, dated June 28, 1978. (2) Information Security Oversight Office Directive No. 1, “National...

  10. Insertional Mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Gene Editing in Cells Targeted for Point Mutation Repair Directed by Short Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bialk, Pawel; Bloh, Kevin M.; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) have been used to direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. Here, we examine a method designed to increase the precision of RNA guided genome editing in human cells by utilizing a CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex to initiate DNA cleavage. The RNP is assembled in vitro and induces a double stranded break at a specific site surrounding the mutant base designated for correction by the ssODN. We use an integrated mutant eGFP gene, bearing a single base change rendering the expressed protein nonfunctional, as a single copy target in HCT 116 cells. We observe significant gene correction activity of the mutant base, promoted by the RNP and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide with validation through genotypic and phenotypic readout. We demonstrate that all individual components must be present to obtain successful gene editing. Importantly, we examine the genotype of individually sorted corrected and uncorrected clonally expanded cell populations for the mutagenic footprint left by the action of these gene editing tools. While the DNA sequence of the corrected population is exact with no adjacent sequence modification, the uncorrected population exhibits heterogeneous mutagenicity with a wide variety of deletions and insertions surrounding the target site. We designate this type of DNA aberration as on-site mutagenicity. Analyses of two clonal populations bearing specific DNA insertions surrounding the target site, indicate that point mutation repair has occurred at the level of the gene. The phenotype, however, is not rescued because a section of the single-stranded oligonucleotide has been inserted altering the reading frame and generating truncated proteins. These data illustrate the importance of analysing mutagenicity in uncorrected cells. Our results also form the basis of a simple model for point mutation repair directed by a short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and

  11. Insertional Mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Gene Editing in Cells Targeted for Point Mutation Repair Directed by Short Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Banas, Kelly; Bialk, Pawel; Bloh, Kevin M; Kmiec, Eric B

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) have been used to direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. Here, we examine a method designed to increase the precision of RNA guided genome editing in human cells by utilizing a CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex to initiate DNA cleavage. The RNP is assembled in vitro and induces a double stranded break at a specific site surrounding the mutant base designated for correction by the ssODN. We use an integrated mutant eGFP gene, bearing a single base change rendering the expressed protein nonfunctional, as a single copy target in HCT 116 cells. We observe significant gene correction activity of the mutant base, promoted by the RNP and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide with validation through genotypic and phenotypic readout. We demonstrate that all individual components must be present to obtain successful gene editing. Importantly, we examine the genotype of individually sorted corrected and uncorrected clonally expanded cell populations for the mutagenic footprint left by the action of these gene editing tools. While the DNA sequence of the corrected population is exact with no adjacent sequence modification, the uncorrected population exhibits heterogeneous mutagenicity with a wide variety of deletions and insertions surrounding the target site. We designate this type of DNA aberration as on-site mutagenicity. Analyses of two clonal populations bearing specific DNA insertions surrounding the target site, indicate that point mutation repair has occurred at the level of the gene. The phenotype, however, is not rescued because a section of the single-stranded oligonucleotide has been inserted altering the reading frame and generating truncated proteins. These data illustrate the importance of analysing mutagenicity in uncorrected cells. Our results also form the basis of a simple model for point mutation repair directed by a short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and

  12. The auxin response factor MONOPTEROS controls meristem function and organogenesis in both the shoot and root through the direct regulation of PIN genes.

    PubMed

    Krogan, Naden T; Marcos, Danielle; Weiner, Aaron I; Berleth, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The regulatory effect auxin has on its own transport is critical in numerous self-organizing plant patterning processes. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking auxin signal transduction and auxin transport is still fragmentary, and important regulatory genes remain to be identified. To track a key link between auxin signaling and auxin transport in development, we established an Arabidopsis thaliana genetic background in which fundamental patterning processes in both shoot and root were essentially abolished and the expression of PIN FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux facilitators was dramatically reduced. In this background, we demonstrate that activating a steroid-inducible variant of the auxin response factor (ARF) MONOPTEROS (MP) is sufficient to restore patterning and PIN gene expression. Further, we show that MP binds to distinct promoter elements of multiple genetically defined PIN genes. Our work identifies a direct regulatory link between central, well-characterized genes involved in auxin signal transduction and auxin transport. The steroid-inducible MP system directly demonstrates the importance of this molecular link in multiple patterning events in embryos, shoots and roots, and provides novel options for interrogating the properties of self-regulated auxin-based patterning in planta.

  13. Heterologous Protein Secretion Directed by a Repressible Acid Phosphatase System of Kluyveromyces lactis: Characterization of Upstream Region-Activating Sequences in the KIPHO5 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Fermiñán, Encarnación; Domínguez, Angel

    1998-01-01

    Transcription of the repressible acid phosphatase gene (KIPHO5) in Kluyveromyces lactis is strongly regulated in response to the level of inorganic phosphate (Pi) present in the growth medium. We have begun a study of the promoter region of this gene in order to identify sequences involved in the phosphate control of KIPHO5 expression and to design new expression-secretion systems in K. lactis. Deletion analysis and directed mutagenesis revealed two major identical upstream activating sequences (UAS) CACGTG at positions −430 (UAS1) and −192 (UAS2) relative to the ATG initiation codon. These sequences are identical to those described for Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the binding of Pho4p. Deletion or directed mutagenesis of either one or both UAS reduce KIPHO5 expression by the same amount (approximately 80%). When fused to the coding region of trout growth hormone cDNA (tGH-II), the promoter and signal peptide-encoding region of the phosphate-repressible KIPHO5 gene drives the expression of this gene and the secretion of the tGHII protein. Synthesis of tGHIIp in K. lactis transformants carrying this construct was found to be regulated by the Pi present in the medium; derepression of heterologous protein expression can therefore be achieved by lowering the Pi concentration. PMID:9647807

  14. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Stéphane G; Banner, David; Chi, Le Thi Bao; Leόn, Alberto J; Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi; Huang, Stephen S H; Farooqui, Amber; Kelvin, David J; Kelvin, Alyson A

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus-epithelial cell interaction.

  15. Direct and indirect estimates of gene flow among wild and managed populations of Polaskia chichipe, an endemic columnar cactus in Central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Otero-Arnaiz, Adriana; Casas, Alejandro; Hamrick, James L

    2005-12-01

    Microsatellite markers were used to obtain direct and indirect estimates of gene flow in populations of Polaskia chichipe under different management regimes, in order to understand the genetic consequences of gene flow in the evolutionary process of domestication. P. chichipe is a columnar cactus endemic to the Tehuacan Valley, Central Mexico, and has come under domestication for its edible fruit. Morphological, phenological, physiological, and reproductive differences, apparently attributable to artificial selection, exist between wild and managed populations, which grow sympatrically. However, strong gene flow may counteract the effects of this selection. In this study, we used paternity analysis to demonstrate that although most of the pollinations occur among individuals within the same population at distances < 40 m, pollen flow from other populations is considerable (27 +/- 5%). Heterogeneity in pollen clouds sampled by mother plants (FST = 0.12) indicated nonrandom mating, which is probably due to temporal heterogeneity in pollen movement. Spatial structure on local and regional scales is consistent with an isolation-by-distance model. The similarity of indirect, direct and demographic estimates of neighbourhood size (74-250 individuals) suggests that this genetic structure is representative of an equilibrium state. These results suggest that traditional management practices have conserved the genetic resources of this species in situ, but also that gene flow is counteracting the effect of domestication to some degree. We discuss our results in the general context of genetic exchange between cultivated and wild populations during the domestication process.

  16. Gene conversion and deletion frequencies during double-strand break repair in human cells are controlled by the distance between direct repeats.

    PubMed

    Schildkraut, Ezra; Miller, Cheryl A; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2005-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs DNA double-strand breaks and maintains genome stability. HR between linked, direct repeats can occur by gene conversion without an associated crossover that maintains the gross repeat structure. Alternatively, direct repeat HR can occur by gene conversion with a crossover, or by single-strand annealing (SSA), both of which delete one repeat and the sequences between the repeats. Prior studies of different repeat structures in yeast and mammalian cells revealed disparate conversion:deletion ratios. Here, we show that a key factor controlling this ratio is the distance between the repeats, with conversion frequency increasing linearly with the distances from 850 to 3800 bp. Deletions are thought to arise primarily by SSA, which involves extensive end-processing to reveal complementary single-strands in each repeat. The results can be explained by a model in which strand-invasion leading to gene conversion competes more effectively with SSA as more extensive end-processing is required for SSA. We hypothesized that a transcription unit between repeats would inhibit end-processing and SSA, thereby increasing the fraction of conversions. However, conversion frequencies were identical for direct repeats separated by 3800 bp of transcriptionally silent or active DNA, indicating that end-processing and SSA are not affected by transcription.

  17. Simple and rapid direct cloning and heterologous expression of natural product biosynthetic gene cluster in Bacillus subtilis via Red/ET recombineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingshu; Shen, Qiyao; Bian, Xiaoying; Chen, Hanna; Fu, Jun; Wang, Hailong; Lei, Ping; Guo, Zhaohui; Chen, Wu; Li, Dingjun; Zhang, Youming

    2016-01-01

    Heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways is an important way to research and discover microbial natural products. Bacillus subtilis is a suitable host for the heterologous production of natural products from bacilli and related Firmicutes. Existing technologies for heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in B. subtilis are complicated. Herein, we present a simple and rapid strategy for direct cloning based heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways in B. subtilis via Red/ET recombineering, using a 5.2 kb specific direct cloning vector carrying homologous sequences to the amyE gene in B. subtilis and CcdB counterselection marker. Using a two-step procedure, two large biosynthetic pathways for edeine (48.3 kb) and bacillomycin (37.2 kb) from Brevibacillus brevis X23 and B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42, respectively, were directly cloned and subsequently integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis within one week. The gene cluster for bacillomycin was successfully expressed in the heterologous host, although edeine production was not detectable. Compared with similar technologies, this method offers a simpler and more feasible system for the discovery of natural products from bacilli and related genera. PMID:27687863

  18. Introduction to ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Sashida, Toshiiku; Kenjo, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    The ultrasonic motor, invented in 1980, utilizes the piezoelectric effect in the ultrasonic frequency range to provide the motive force. (In conventional electric motors the motive force is electromagnetic.) The result is a motor with unusually good low-speed high-torque and power-to-weight characteristics. It has already found applications in camera autofocus mechanisms, medical equipment subject to high magnetic fields, and motorized car accessories. Its applications will increase as designers become more familiar with its unique characteristics. This book is the result of a collaboration between the inventor and an expert in conventional electric motors: the result is an introduction to the general theory presented in a way that links it to conventional motor theory. It will be invaluable both to motor designers and to those who design with and use electric motors as an introduction to this important new invention.

  19. Introduction to Nanotechnology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    materials’ • 1959 Feynman Lecture “There is Plenty of Room at the Bottom” provided the vision of exciting new discoveries if one could fabricate...NATO LECTURES M. Meyyappan Introduction to Nanotechnology Abstract Nanotechnology deals with creation of materials, devices and systems in... lecture will first define nanotechnology, particularly describing what it is and what it is not, followed by detailed examples of change in various

  20. Introduction to Pump Rotordynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    RTO-EN-AVT-143 9 - 1 Introduction to Pump Rotordynamics Luis San Andrés Mast-Childs Tribology Professor Turbomachinery Laboratory Texas A... rotordynamics of turbomachinery, excessive vibration and instability. The acceptable performance of a turbomachine depends on the adequate design and operation...on rotordynamics . The basic equations for the modeling of linear rotor-bearing systems are given along with an example for the rotordynamics of a

  1. Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2010-07-12

    Extra dimensions provide a very useful tool in addressing a number of the fundamental problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides a very basic introduction to this very broad subject area as given at the VIII School of the Gravitational and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society in December 2009. Some prospects for extra dimensional searches at the 7 TeV LHC with {approx}1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are provided.

  2. Introduction to Modern Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    Preface; Table of physical quantities; Part I. Foundations: 1. Introduction; 2. Magnetohydrodynamics; 3. Conservation laws; Part II. Fundamental Processes: 4. Magnetohydrodynamic waves; 5. Dynamo; 6. Discontinuities and shocks; 7. Magnetic reconnection; Part III. Instabilities and Magnetic Confinement: 8. Static equilibrium; 9. Linear perturbation theory; 10. Study of MHD instabilities; Part IV. Turbulence: 11. Hydrodynamic turbulence; 12. MHD turbulence; 13. Advanced MHD turbulence; Appendix 1. Solutions to the exercises; Appendix 2. Formulary; References; Index.

  3. Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2010-04-29

    Extra dimensions provide a very useful tool in addressing a number of the fundamental problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides a very basic introduction to this very broad subject area as given at the VIII School of the Gravitational and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society in December 2009. Some prospects for extra dimensional searches at the 7 TeV LHC with {approx}1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are provided.

  4. Introduction to Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryden, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    Preface to second edition; Preface to first edition; 1. Introduction; 2. Fundamental observations; 3. Newton versus Einstein; 4. Cosmic dynamics; 5. Model universes; 6. Measuring cosmological parameters; 7. Dark matter; 8. The cosmic microwave background; 9. Nucleosynthesis and the early Universe; 10. Inflation and the very early Universe; 11. Structure formation: gravitational instability; 12. Structure formation: baryons and photons; Epilogue; Bibliography; Table of useful constants; Index.

  5. Direct regulatory interaction of the eyeless protein with an eye-specific enhancer in the sine oculis gene during eye induction in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Niimi, T; Seimiya, M; Kloter, U; Flister, S; Gehring, W J

    1999-05-01

    The Pax-6 gene encodes a transcription factor with two DNA-binding domains, a paired and a homeodomain, and is expressed during eye morphogenesis and development of the nervous system. Pax-6 homologs have been isolated from a wide variety of organisms ranging from flatworms to humans. Since loss-of-function mutants in insects and mammals lead to an eyeless phenotype and Pax-6 orthologs from distantly related species are capable of inducing ectopic eyes in Drosophila, we have proposed that Pax-6 is a universal master control gene for eye morphogenesis. To determine the extent of evolutionary conservation of the eye morphogenetic pathway, we have begun to identify subordinate target genes of Pax-6. Previously we have shown that expression of two genes, sine oculis (so) and eyes absent (eya), is induced by eyeless (ey), the Pax-6 homolog of Drosophila. Here we present evidence from ectopic expression studies in transgenic flies, from transcription activation studies in yeast, and from gel shift assays in vitro that the EY protein activates transcription of sine oculis by direct interaction with an eye-specific enhancer in the long intron of the so gene.

  6. A PPO Promoter from Betalain-Producing Red Swiss Chard, Directs Petiole- and Root-Preferential Expression of Foreign Gene in Anthocyanins-Producing Plants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Hai; Han, Ya-Nan; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2015-11-12

    A 1670 bp 5'-flanking region of the polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene was isolated from red Swiss chard, a betalain-producing plant. This region, named promoter BvcPPOP, and its 5'-truncated versions were fused with the GUS gene and introduced into Arabidopsis, an anthocyanins-producing plant. GUS histochemical staining and quantitative analysis of transgenic plants at the vegetative and reproductive stages showed that BvcPPOP could direct GUS gene expression in vegetative organs with root- and petiole-preference, but not in reproductive organs including inflorescences shoot, inflorescences leaf, flower, pod and seed. This promoter was regulated by developmental stages in its driving strength, but not in expression pattern. It was also regulated by the abiotic stressors tested, positively by salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) but negatively by abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellin (GA), NaCl and OH(-). Its four 5'-truncated versions varied in the driving strength, but not obviously in expression pattern, and even the shortest version (-225 to +22) retained the root- and petiole- preference. This promoter is, to our knowledge, the first PPO promoter cloned and functionally elucidated from the betalain-producing plant, and thus provides not only a useful tool for expressing gene(s) of agricultural interest in vegetative organs, but also a clue to clarify the function of metabolism-specific PPO in betalain biosynthesis.

  7. A PPO Promoter from Betalain-Producing Red Swiss Chard, Directs Petiole- and Root-Preferential Expression of Foreign Gene in Anthocyanins-Producing Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhi-Hai; Han, Ya-Nan; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2015-01-01

    A 1670 bp 5′-flanking region of the polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene was isolated from red Swiss chard, a betalain-producing plant. This region, named promoter BvcPPOP, and its 5′-truncated versions were fused with the GUS gene and introduced into Arabidopsis, an anthocyanins-producing plant. GUS histochemical staining and quantitative analysis of transgenic plants at the vegetative and reproductive stages showed that BvcPPOP could direct GUS gene expression in vegetative organs with root- and petiole-preference, but not in reproductive organs including inflorescences shoot, inflorescences leaf, flower, pod and seed. This promoter was regulated by developmental stages in its driving strength, but not in expression pattern. It was also regulated by the abiotic stressors tested, positively by salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) but negatively by abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellin (GA), NaCl and OH−. Its four 5′-truncated versions varied in the driving strength, but not obviously in expression pattern, and even the shortest version (−225 to +22) retained the root- and petiole- preference. This promoter is, to our knowledge, the first PPO promoter cloned and functionally elucidated from the betalain-producing plant, and thus provides not only a useful tool for expressing gene(s) of agricultural interest in vegetative organs, but also a clue to clarify the function of metabolism-specific PPO in betalain biosynthesis. PMID:26569235

  8. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver.

    PubMed

    Fusakio, Michael E; Willy, Jeffrey A; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T; Al Baghdadi, Rana J T; Adams, Christopher M; Anthony, Tracy G; Wek, Ronald C

    2016-05-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins-PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6-is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera.

  9. Camptothecin enhances the frequency of oligonucleotide-directed gene repair in mammalian cells by inducing DNA damage and activating homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Luciana; Kmiec, Eric B

    2004-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) is an anticancer drug that promotes DNA breakage at replication forks and the formation of lesions that activate the processes of homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining. We have taken advantage of the CPT-induced damage response by coupling it to gene repair directed by synthetic oligonucleotides, a process in which a mutant base pair is converted into a wild-type one. Here, we show that pretreating DLD-1 cells with CPT leads to a significant stimulation in the frequency of correction of an integrated mutant enhanced green fluorescent protein gene. The stimulation is dose-dependent and coincident with the formation of double-strand DNA breaks. Caffeine, but not vanillin, blocks the enhancement of gene repair suggesting that, in this system, HR is the pathway most responsible for elevating the frequency of correction. The involvement of HR is further proven by studies in which wortmannin was seen to inhibit gene repair at high concentrations but not at lower levels that are known to inhibit DNA-PK activity. Taken together, our results suggest that DNA damage induced by CPT activates a cellular response that stimulates gene repair in mammalian cells.

  10. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Fusakio, Michael E.; Willy, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T.; Al Baghdadi, Rana J. T.; Adams, Christopher M.; Anthony, Tracy G.; Wek, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins—PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6—is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera. PMID:26960794

  11. Direct estimation of the recombination frequency between the RB1 gene and two closely linked microsatellites using sperm typing.

    PubMed

    Girardet, A; Lien, S; Leeflang, E P; Beaufrère, L; Tuffery, S; Munier, F; Arnheim, N; Claustres, M; Pellestor, F

    1999-01-01

    In this study, single sperm typing has been used for high-resolution recombination analysis between the retinoblastoma gene and two closely linked extragenic microsatellites (D13S284 and D13S1307). The analysis of 1198 single sperm from three donors allowed the determination of recombination fractions between RB1.20 and D13S284 and RB1.20 and D13S1307 of 0.022 and 0.033, respectively. These results show that RB1 gene and the two microsatellites are closely linked, which validates their potential use in indirect genetic diagnosis of retinoblastoma.

  12. A novel bicistronic expression system composed of the intraflagellar transport protein gene ift25 and FMDV 2A sequence directs robust nuclear gene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bin; Hu, He-He; Li, Zhen-Fang; Cheng, Rong-Qiang; Meng, De-Mei; Wang, Junping; Fan, Zhen-Chuan

    2017-02-25

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii offers a great promise for large-scale production of multiple recombinant proteins of pharmaceutical and industrial interest. However, the nuclear-encoding transgenes usually are expressed at a low level, which severely hampers the use of this alga in molecular farming. In this study, the promoter of the endogenous intraflagellar transport 25 (IFT25) gene of C. reinhardtii was tested for its ability to drive the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP), which functions as a readout for target gene expression. IFT25 promoter (IFT25P) alone was not able to drive GFP expression to a detectable level. IFT25P, however, can drive robust IFT25-GFP fusion protein expression when the intron-containing IFT25 gene was inserted between IFT25P and GFP cDNA. When an extended version of foot-and-mouth virus 2A protease (2A(E)) sequence was further inserted between the intron-containing IFT25 gene and the GFP cDNA, discrete GFP protein was observed to release from the IFT25-2A(E)-GFP polyprotein via 2A self-cleaving with a cleavage efficacy of approximately 99%. The monomer GFP was accumulated to a level of as high as 0.68% of total soluble proteins. To test whether the newly developed bicistronic IFT25P-IFT25-2A(E) expression system can be used to overexpress heterologous proteins of different origins and sizes, we inserted codon-optimized cDNAs encoding a Trichoderma reesei xylanase1 (25 kDa) and a Lachnospiraceae bacterium ND2006 type V CRISPR-Cas protein LbCpf1 (147 kDa) to the vector and found that the production of xylanase1 and LbCpf1 was as high as 0.69 and 0.49% of total soluble protein. Our result showed that IFT25P-IFT25-2A(E) system is more efficient to drive nuclear gene expression in C. reinhardtii than other conventionally used promoters, thus representing a novel efficient recombinant protein expression tool and has the potential to be scaled for commercial production of nuclear-encoded recombinant proteins of different sizes and

  13. Schizophrenia susceptibility genes directly implicated in the life cycles of pathogens: cytomegalovirus, influenza, herpes simplex, rubella, and Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Carter, C J

    2009-11-01

    Many genes implicated in schizophrenia can be related to glutamatergic transmission and neuroplasticity, oligodendrocyte function, and other families clearly related to neurobiology and schizophrenia phenotypes. Others appear rather to be involved in the life cycles of the pathogens implicated in the disease. For example, aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA), PLA2, SIAT8B, GALNT7, or B3GAT1 metabolize chemical ligands to which the influenza virus, herpes simplex, cytomegalovirus (CMV), rubella, or Toxoplasma gondii bind. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGR/EGFR) is used by the CMV to gain entry to cells, and a CMV gene codes for an interleukin (IL-10) mimic that binds the host cognate receptor, IL10R. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR1) is used by herpes simplex. KPNA3 and RANBP5 control the nuclear import of the influenza virus. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) controls the microtubule network that is used by viruses as a route to the nucleus, while DTNBP1, MUTED, and BLOC1S3 regulate endosomal to lysosomal routing that is also important in viral traffic. Neuregulin 1 activates ERBB receptors releasing a factor, EBP1, known to inhibit the influenza virus transcriptase. Other viral or bacterial components bind to genes or proteins encoded by CALR, FEZ1, FYN, HSPA1B, IL2, HTR2A, KPNA3, MED12, MED15, MICB, NQO2, PAX6, PIK3C3, RANBP5, or TP53, while the cerebral infectivity of the herpes simplex virus is modified by Apolipoprotein E (APOE). Genes encoding for proteins related to the innate immune response, including cytokine related (CCR5, CSF2RA, CSF2RB, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL3, IL3RA, IL4, IL10, IL10RA, IL18RAP, lymphotoxin-alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF]), human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antigens (HLA-A10, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1), and genes involved in antigen processing (angiotensin-converting enzyme and tripeptidyl peptidase 2) are all concerned with defense against invading pathogens. Human microRNAs (Hsa-mir-198 and Hsa-mir-206) are predicted to bind

  14. REST-Governed Gene Expression Profiling in a Neuronal Cell Model Reveals Novel Direct and Indirect Processes of Repression and Up-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manteiga, Jose M.; Bonfiglio, Silvia; Folladori, Lucrezia; Malosio, Maria L.; Lazarevic, Dejan; Stupka, Elia; Cittaro, Davide; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The role of REST changes in neurons, including the rapid decrease of its level during differentiation and its fluctuations during many mature functions and diseases, is well established. However, identification of many thousand possible REST-target genes, mostly based on indirect criteria, and demonstration of their operative dependence on the repressor have been established for only a relatively small fraction. In the present study, starting from our recently published work, we have expanded the identification of REST-dependent genes, investigated in two clones of the PC12 line, a recognized neuronal cell model, spontaneously expressing different levels of REST: very low as in neurons and much higher as in most non-neural cells. The molecular, structural and functional differences of the two PC12 clones were shown to depend largely on their different REST level and the ensuing variable expression of some dependent genes. Comprehensive RNA-Seq analyses of the 13,700 genes expressed, validated by parallel RT-PCR and western analyses of mRNAs and encoded proteins, identified in the high-REST clone two groups of almost 900 repressed and up-regulated genes. Repression is often due to direct binding of REST to target genes; up-regulation to indirect mechanism(s) mostly mediated by REST repression of repressive transcription factors. Most, but not all, genes governing neurosecretion, excitability, and receptor channel signaling were repressed in the high REST clone. The genes governing expression of non-channel receptors (G protein-coupled and others), although variably affected, were often up-regulated together with the genes of intracellular kinases, small G proteins, cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix proteins. Expression of REST-dependent genes governing functions other than those mentioned so far were also identified. The results obtained by the parallel investigation of the two PC12 clones revealed the complexity of the REST molecular and

  15. REST-Governed Gene Expression Profiling in a Neuronal Cell Model Reveals Novel Direct and Indirect Processes of Repression and Up-Regulation.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manteiga, Jose M; Bonfiglio, Silvia; Folladori, Lucrezia; Malosio, Maria L; Lazarevic, Dejan; Stupka, Elia; Cittaro, Davide; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The role of REST changes in neurons, including the rapid decrease of its level during differentiation and its fluctuations during many mature functions and diseases, is well established. However, identification of many thousand possible REST-target genes, mostly based on indirect criteria, and demonstration of their operative dependence on the repressor have been established for only a relatively small fraction. In the present study, starting from our recently published work, we have expanded the identification of REST-dependent genes, investigated in two clones of the PC12 line, a recognized neuronal cell model, spontaneously expressing different levels of REST: very low as in neurons and much higher as in most non-neural cells. The molecular, structural and functional differences of the two PC12 clones were shown to depend largely on their different REST level and the ensuing variable expression of some dependent genes. Comprehensive RNA-Seq analyses of the 13,700 genes expressed, validated by parallel RT-PCR and western analyses of mRNAs and encoded proteins, identified in the high-REST clone two groups of almost 900 repressed and up-regulated genes. Repression is often due to direct binding of REST to target genes; up-regulation to indirect mechanism(s) mostly mediated by REST repression of repressive transcription factors. Most, but not all, genes governing neurosecretion, excitability, and receptor channel signaling were repressed in the high REST clone. The genes governing expression of non-channel receptors (G protein-coupled and others), although variably affected, were often up-regulated together with the genes of intracellular kinases, small G proteins, cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix proteins. Expression of REST-dependent genes governing functions other than those mentioned so far were also identified. The results obtained by the parallel investigation of the two PC12 clones revealed the complexity of the REST molecular and

  16. Gene Resistance to Transcriptional Reprogramming following Nuclear Transfer Is Directly Mediated by Multiple Chromatin-Repressive Pathways.

    PubMed

    Jullien, Jerome; Vodnala, Munender; Pasque, Vincent; Oikawa, Mami; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George; David, Sarah Anne; Brochard, Vincent; Wang, Stan; Bradshaw, Charles; Koseki, Haruhiko; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Beaujean, Nathalie; Gurdon, John

    2017-03-02

    Understanding the mechanism of resistance of genes to reactivation will help improve the success of nuclear reprogramming. Using mouse embryonic fibroblast nuclei with normal or reduced DNA methylation in combination with chromatin modifiers able to erase H3K9me3, H3K27me3, and H2AK119ub1 from transplanted nuclei, we reveal the basis for resistance of genes to transcriptional reprogramming by oocyte factors. A majority of genes is affected by more than one type of treatment, suggesting that resistance can require repression through multiple epigenetic mechanisms. We classify resistant genes according to their sensitivity to 11 chromatin modifier combinations, revealing the existence of synergistic as well as adverse effects of chromatin modifiers on removal of resistance. We further demonstrate that the chromatin modifier USP21 reduces resistance through its H2AK119 deubiquitylation activity. Finally, we provide evidence that H2A ubiquitylation also contributes to resistance to transcriptional reprogramming in mouse nuclear transfer embryos.

  17. HIV-1 Receptor Binding Site-Directed Antibodies Using a VH1-2 Gene Segment Orthologue Are Activated by Env Trimer Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Shridhar; Phad, Ganesh E.; Guenaga, Javier; Wilson, Richard; Soldemo, Martina; McKee, Krisha; Sundling, Christopher; Mascola, John; Li, Yuxing; Wyatt, Richard T.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) isolated from chronically HIV-1 infected individuals reveal important information regarding how antibodies target conserved determinants of the envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike such as the primary receptor CD4 binding site (CD4bs). Many CD4bs-directed bNAbs use the same heavy (H) chain variable (V) gene segment, VH1-2*02, suggesting that activation of B cells expressing this allele is linked to the generation of this type of Ab. Here, we identify the rhesus macaque VH1.23 gene segment to be the closest macaque orthologue to the human VH1-2 gene segment, with 92% homology to VH1-2*02. Of the three amino acids in the VH1-2*02 gene segment that define a motif for VRC01-like antibodies (W50, N58, flanking the HCDR2 region, and R71), the two identified macaque VH1.23 alleles described here encode two. We demonstrate that immunization with soluble Env trimers induced CD4bs-specific VH1.23-using Abs with restricted neutralization breadth. Through alanine scanning and structural studies of one such monoclonal Ab (MAb), GE356, we demonstrate that all three HCDRs are involved in neutralization. This contrasts to the highly potent CD4bs-directed VRC01 class of bNAb, which bind Env predominantly through the HCDR2. Also unlike VRC01, GE356 was minimally modified by somatic hypermutation, its light (L) chain CDRs were of average lengths and it displayed a binding footprint proximal to the trimer axis. These results illustrate that the Env trimer immunogen used here activates B cells encoding a VH1-2 gene segment orthologue, but that the resulting Abs interact distinctly differently with the HIV-1 Env spike compared to VRC01. PMID:25166308

  18. Hypoxia-response element (HRE)-directed transcriptional regulation of the rat lysyl oxidase gene in response to cobalt and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Yinzhi; Toselli, Paul; Li, Wande

    2013-04-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LO) catalyzes crosslink of collagen, elastin, and histone H1, stabilizing the extracellular matrix and cell nucleus. This enzyme displays dual functions for tumorigenesis, i.e., as a tumor suppressor inactivating the ras oncogene and as a tumor promoter enhancing malignant cell metastasis. To elucidate LO transcriptional regulation, we have cloned the 804 base pair region upstream of the translation start site (ATG) of the rat LO gene with the maximal promoter activity. Computer analysis indicated that at least four hypoxia-response element (HRE) consensuses (5'-ACGTG-3') exist in the cloned LO promoter. Treatment of rat lung fibroblasts (RFL6) with CoCl2 (Co, 10-100 μM), a chemical hypoxia reagent, enhanced LO mRNA expression and promoter activities. Overexpression of LO was associated with upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α at mRNA levels in cobalt (Co)-treated cells. Thus, LO is a hypoxia-responsive gene. Dominant negative-HIF-1α inhibited LO promoter activities stimulated by Co. Electrophoretic mobility shift, oligonucleotide competition, and in vitro translated HIF-1α binding assays indicated that only one HRE mapped at -387/-383 relative to ATG was functionally active among four consensuses. Site-directed mutation of this HRE significantly diminished the Co-induced and LO promoter-directed expression of the reporter gene. Cadmium (Cd), an inducer of reactive oxygen species, inhibited HIF-1α mRNA expression and HIF-1α binding to the LO gene in Co-treated cells as revealed by RT-PCR and ChIP assays, respectively. Thus, modulation of the HRE activity by Co and Cd plays a critical role in LO gene transactivation.

  19. Hypoxia-Response Element (HRE)–Directed Transcriptional Regulation of the Rat Lysyl Oxidase Gene in Response to Cobalt and Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wande

    2013-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LO) catalyzes crosslink of collagen, elastin, and histone H1, stabilizing the extracellular matrix and cell nucleus. This enzyme displays dual functions for tumorigenesis, i.e., as a tumor suppressor inactivating the ras oncogene and as a tumor promoter enhancing malignant cell metastasis. To elucidate LO transcriptional regulation, we have cloned the 804 base pair region upstream of the translation start site (ATG) of the rat LO gene with the maximal promoter activity. Computer analysis indicated that at least four hypoxia-response element (HRE) consensuses (5′-ACGTG-3′) exist in the cloned LO promoter. Treatment of rat lung fibroblasts (RFL6) with CoCl2 (Co, 10–100 μM), a chemical hypoxia reagent, enhanced LO mRNA expression and promoter activities. Overexpression of LO was associated with upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α at mRNA levels in cobalt (Co)–treated cells. Thus, LO is a hypoxia-responsive gene. Dominant negative-HIF-1α inhibited LO promoter activities stimulated by Co. Electrophoretic mobility shift, oligonucleotide competition, and in vitro translated HIF-1α binding assays indicated that only one HRE mapped at −387/−383 relative to ATG was functionally active among four consensuses. Site-directed mutation of this HRE significantly diminished the Co-induced and LO promoter-directed expression of the reporter gene. Cadmium (Cd), an inducer of reactive oxygen species, inhibited HIF-1α mRNA expression and HIF-1α binding to the LO gene in Co-treated cells as revealed by RT-PCR and ChIP assays, respectively. Thus, modulation of the HRE activity by Co and Cd plays a critical role in LO gene transactivation. PMID:23161664

  20. Direct Recruitment of ERK Cascade Components to Inducible Genes Is Regulated by Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K*

    PubMed Central

    Mikula, Michal; Bomsztyk, Karol

    2011-01-01

    Components of the ERK cascade are recruited to genes, but it remains unknown how they are regulated at these sites. The RNA-binding protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K interacts with kinases and is found along genes including the mitogen-inducible early response gene EGR-1. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitations to study co-recruitment of hnRNP K and ERK cascade activity along the EGR-1 gene. These measurements revealed that the spatiotemporal binding patterns of ERK cascade transducers (GRB2, SOS, B-Raf, MEK, and ERK) at the EGR-1 locus resemble both hnRNP K and RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Inhibition of EGR-1 transcription with either serum-responsive factor knockdown or 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole altered recruitment of all of the above ERK cascade components along this locus that mirrored the changes in Pol II and hnRNP K profiles. siRNA knockdown of hnRNP K decreased the levels of active MEK and ERK at the EGR-1, changes associated with decreased levels of elongating pre-mRNA and less efficient splicing. The hnRNP K dependence and pattern of ERK cascade activation at the c-MYC locus were different from at EGR-1. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitations revealed that hnRNP K was associated with the EGR-1 but not c-MYC mRNAs. These data suggest a model where Pol II transcription-driven recruitment of hnRNP K along the EGR-1 locus compartmentalizes activation of the ERK cascade at these genes, events that regulate synthesis of mature mRNA. PMID:21233203

  1. Molecular analysis of transgenic melon plants showing virus resistance conferred by direct repeat of movement gene of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Ali, Emran Md; Emran, Ali; Tabei, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Kappei; Yamaoka, Naoto; Nishiguchi, Masamichi

    2012-08-01

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) is a major limiting factor in the production of melon plants worldwide. For effective control of this virus using the transgenic approach, the direct repeat of the movement protein gene of CGMMV was used for transforming melon plants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. PCR and Southern blot analyses of T₃ confirmed that they carried the transgene. Northern blot analysis with total RNA showed that transgene transcript RNA as well as siRNA was observed in all plants tested. Separate leaves or individual plants were inoculated with CGMMV and subjected to ELISA and RNA blot analysis using the coat protein gene probe of the virus. Compared to nontransgenic control, these plants were shown to have high virus resistance. Furthermore, cytosine of the transgene DNA in the plants was methylated. Thus, these results reveal that the transgenic lines were highly resistant to the virus through RNA silencing. Key message High virus resistance was obtained in transgenic melon plants with direct repeat of movement protein gene of Cucumber green mottle mosaic tobamovirus through RNA silencing.

  2. The blue copper protein gene of Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 directs secretion of blue copper protein from Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K; Uozumi, T; Beppu, T

    1987-01-01

    The gene encoding a blue copper protein (a member of the pseudoazurins) of 123 amino acid residues, containing a single type I Cu2+ ion, was cloned from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6. The nucleotide sequence of the coding region, as well as the 5'- and 3'-flanking regions, was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence after Glu-24 coincided with the reported sequence of the blue protein, and its NH2-terminal sequence of 23 residues resembled a typical signal peptide. The cloned gene was expressed under the control of the tac promoter in Escherichia coli, and the correctly processed blue protein was secreted into the periplasm. The blue protein produced in E. coli possessed the activity to transfer electrons to the copper-containing nitrite reductase of A. faecalis S-6 in vitro. Images PMID:2824441

  3. The ASYMMETRIC LEAVES complex maintains repression of KNOX homeobox genes via direct recruitment of Polycomb-repressive complex2

    PubMed Central

    Lodha, Mukesh; Marco, Cristina F.; Timmermans, Marja C.P.

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb-repressive complexes (PRCs) ensure the correct spatiotemporal expression of numerous key developmental regulators. Despite their pivotal role, how PRCs are recruited to specific targets remains largely unsolved, particularly in plants. Here we show that the Arabidopsis ASYMMETRIC LEAVES complex physically interacts with PRC2 and recruits this complex to the homeobox genes BREVIPEDICELLUS and KNAT2 to stably silence these stem cell regulators in differentiating leaves. The recruitment mechanism resembles the Polycomb response element-based recruitment of PRC2 originally defined in flies and provides the first such example in plants. Combined with recent studies in mammals, our findings reveal a conserved paradigm to epigenetically regulate homeobox gene expression during development. PMID:23468429

  4. Sequences 5' of the basement membrane laminin beta 1 chain gene (LAMB1) direct the expression of beta-galactosidase during development of the mouse testis and ovary.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Gudas, L J

    1997-12-01

    The murine LAMB1 gene encoding laminin beta 1 is expressed in the developing male and female gonads and mesonephros. To identify the cis-acting elements regulating the expression of LAMB1, murine transgenic lines were generated by fusing regions of the LAMB1 gene to the Eschericia coli lacZ gene. The p3.9LAM beta gal construct contained approximately 4 kb of 5' flanking sequence and directed beta-galactosidase expression in many different organs including the kidney, mammary gland, and the male and female genital systems, the focus of this report. In male embryos, between gestational ages E 14.5 and birth beta-galactosidase was transiently expressed in the prospermatogonia cells of the testis and in the differentiating epithelial cells in the ductus deferens, ductus epididymis, and seminal vesicles. In female embryos, beta-galactosidase was not detected in the ovary until about 1 week after birth; at this time, beta-galactosidase was expressed by oocytes of primary and secondary follicles. In contrast, transgenic mice carrying the first 0.7 kb of LAMB1 fused to the lacZ gene expressed beta-galactosidase only in the prospermatogonia cells of the testis. Thus, the cis-acting element(s) necessary for the expression of the LAMB1 gene in prospermatogonia cells are located in the first 0.7 kb of LAMB1 5' flanking sequence; element(s) required for expression of the LAMB1 gene in oocytes and epithelial cells of the mesonephric ducts, mesonephric tubules, the ductus deferens, ductus epididymis, and seminal vesicles are located with 4 kb 5' of the transcription initiation site.

  5. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells.

  6. The Diversification of Plant NBS-LRR Defense Genes Directs the Evolution of MicroRNAs That Target Them

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Xia, Rui; Kuang, Hanhui; Meyers, Blake C.

    2016-01-01

    High expression of plant nucleotide binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) defense genes is often lethal to plant cells, a phenotype perhaps associated with fitness costs. Plants implement several mechanisms to control the transcript level of NBS-LRR defense genes. As negative transcriptional regulators, diverse miRNAs target NBS-LRRs in eudicots and gymnosperms. To understand the evolutionary benefits of this miRNA-NBS-LRR regulatory system, we investigated the NBS-LRRs of 70 land plants, coupling this analysis with extensive small RNA data. A tight association between the diversity of NBS-LRRs and miRNAs was found. The miRNAs typically target highly duplicated NBS-LRRs. In comparison, families of heterogeneous NBS-LRRs were rarely targeted by miRNAs in Poaceae and Brassicaceae genomes. We observed that duplicated NBS-LRRs from different gene families periodically gave birth to new miRNAs. Most of these newly emerged miRNAs target the same conserved, encoded protein motif of NBS-LRRs, consistent with a model of convergent evolution for these miRNAs. By assessing the interactions between miRNAs and NBS-LRRs, we found nucleotide diversity in the wobble position of the codons in the target site drives the diversification of miRNAs. Taken together, we propose a co-evolutionary model of plant NBS-LRRs and miRNAs hypothesizing how plants balance the benefits and costs of NBS-LRR defense genes. PMID:27512116

  7. Introduction to biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Nikhil; Jolly, Pawan; Formisano, Nello

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors are nowadays ubiquitous in biomedical diagnosis as well as a wide range of other areas such as point-of-care monitoring of treatment and disease progression, environmental monitoring, food control, drug discovery, forensics and biomedical research. A wide range of techniques can be used for the development of biosensors. Their coupling with high-affinity biomolecules allows the sensitive and selective detection of a range of analytes. We give a general introduction to biosensors and biosensing technologies, including a brief historical overview, introducing key developments in the field and illustrating the breadth of biomolecular sensing strategies and the expansion of nanotechnological approaches that are now available. PMID:27365030

  8. Introduction to Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. NCTS 21070-15. Course Description: This course will present operating principles of the heat pipe with emphases on the underlying physical processes and requirements of pressure and energy balance. Performance characterizations and design considerations of the heat pipe will be highlighted. Guidelines for thermal engineers in the selection of heat pipes as part of the spacecraft thermal control system, testing methodology, and analytical modeling will also be discussed.

  9. Introduction to Econophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantegna, Rosario N.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2007-08-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Efficient market hypothesis; 3. Random walk; 4. Lévy stochastic processes and limit theorems; 5. Scales in financial data; 6. Stationarity and time correlation; 7. Time correlation in financial time series; 8. Stochastic models of price dynamics; 9. Scaling and its breakdown; 10. ARCH and GARCH processes; 11. Financial markets and turbulence; 12. Correlation and anti-correlation between stocks; 13. Taxonomy of a stock portfolio; 14. Options in idealized markets; 15. Options in real markets; Appendix A: notation guide; Appendix B: martingales; References; Index.

  10. Introduction to human factors.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Eric

    2012-03-01

    This paper provides an introduction to "human factors engineering," an applied science that seeks to optimize usability and safety of systems. Human factors engineering pursues this goal by aligning system design with the perceptual, cognitive, and physical capabilities of users. Human factors issues loom large in the diabetes management domain because patients and health care professionals interact with a complex variety of systems, including medical device hardware and software, which are themselves embedded within larger systems of institutions, people, and processes. Usability considerations must be addressed in these systems and devices to ensure safe and effective diabetes management.

  11. Theoretical Optics: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, Hartmann

    2005-02-01

    Starting from basic electrodynamics, this volume provides a solid, yet concise introduction to theoretical optics, containing topics such as nonlinear optics, light-matter interaction, and modern topics in quantum optics, including entanglement, cryptography, and quantum computation. The author, with many years of experience in teaching and research, goes way beyond the scope of traditional lectures, enabling readers to keep up with the current state of knowledge. Both content and presentation make it essential reading for graduate and phD students as well as a valuable reference for researchers.

  12. An introduction to webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. D.

    2016-04-01

    Webs are sets of Feynman diagrams that contribute to the exponents of scattering amplitudes, in the kinematic limit in which emitted radiation is soft. As such, they have a number of phenomenological and formal applications, and offer tantalizing glimpses into the all-order structure of perturbative quantum field theory. This article is based on a series of lectures given to graduate students, and aims to provide a pedagogical introduction to webs. Topics covered include exponentiation in (non-)abelian gauge theories, the web mixing matrix formalism for non-abelian gauge theories, and recent progress on the calculation of web diagrams. Problems are included throughout the text, to aid understanding.

  13. Neurolaw: A brief introduction

    PubMed Central

    Petoft, Arian

    2015-01-01

    Neurolaw, as an interdisciplinary field which links the brain to law, facilitates the pathway to better understanding of human behavior in order to regulate it accurately through incorporating neuroscience achievements in legal studies. Since 1990’s, this emerging field, by study on human nervous system as a new dimension of legal phenomena, leads to a more precise explanation for human behavior to revise legal rules and decision-makings. This paper strives to bring about significantly a brief introduction to neurolaw so as to take effective steps toward exploring and expanding the scope of law and more thorough understanding of legal issues in the field at hand. PMID:25874060

  14. Introduction to Numerical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Schoonover, Joseph A.

    2016-06-14

    These are slides for a lecture for the Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship at the National Security Education Center. This gives an introduction to numerical methods. Repetitive algorithms are used to obtain approximate solutions to mathematical problems, using sorting, searching, root finding, optimization, interpolation, extrapolation, least squares regresion, Eigenvalue problems, ordinary differential equations, and partial differential equations. Many equations are shown. Discretizations allow us to approximate solutions to mathematical models of physical systems using a repetitive algorithm and introduce errors that can lead to numerical instabilities if we are not careful.

  15. Vibrio parahaemolyticus CalR down regulates the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) gene transcription and thereby inhibits hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiquan; Zhang, Ying; Gao, He; Zhang, Lingyu; Yin, Zhe; Huang, Xinxiang; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Huiying; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Li

    2017-03-04

    TDH, encoded by tdh gene, is a major virulent determinant of V. parahaemolyticus that controls various biological activities, such as hemolytic activity, cytotoxicity, and enterotoxicity. The hemolytic activity on Wagatsuma agar ascribed to TDH is called Kanagawa phenomenon (KP). All KP positive strains contain tdh1 and tdh2 genes, but tdh2 is predominantly responsible for KP. CalR is a regulatory protein that was originally identified as a repressor of swarming motility and T3SS1 gene expression in V. parahaemolyticus. In the present study, the regulation of tdh2 by CalR was investigated using a set of experiments including qRT-PCR, primer extension, LacZ fusion, hemolytic phenotype, EMSA, and DNase I footprinting assays. The results showed that His-CalR protected a single region from 224bp to 318bp upstream of tdh2 against DNase I digestion, and a transcriptional start site located at 42bp upstream of tdh2 was detected and its transcribed activity was inhibited by CalR. Moreover, the KP test results showed that the hemolytic activity of V. parahaemolyticus is also under negative control of CalR. The data demonstrated that CalR is a repressor of the tdh2 transcription and thereby inhibits the hemolytic activity of V. parahaemolyticus.

  16. Enhancer and promoter elements directing activation and glucocorticoid repression of the. cap alpha. /sub 1/-fetoprotein gene in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Guertin, M.; La Rue, H.; Bernier, D.; Wrange, O.; Chevrette, M.; Gingras, M.C.; Belanger, L.

    1988-04-01

    Mutations were introduced in 7 kilobases of 5'-flanking rat ..cap alpha../sub 1/-fetoprotein (AFP) genomic DNA, linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. AFP promoter activity and its repression by a glucocorticoid hormone were assessed by stable and transient expression assays. Stable transfection assays were more sensitive and accurate than transient expression assays in a Morris 7777 rat hepatoma recipient (Hepa7.6), selected for its strong AFP repression by dexamethasone. The segment of DNA encompassing a hepatocyte-constitutive chromatin DNase I-hypersensitive site at -3.7 kilobases and a liver developmental stage-specific site at -2.5 kilobases contains interacting enhancer elements sufficient for high AFP promoter activity in Hepa7.6 or HepG2 cells. Deletions and point mutations define an upstream promoter domain of AFP gene activation, operating with at least three distinct promoter-activating elements, PEI at -65 base pairs, PEII at -120 base pairs, and DE at -160 base pairs. PEI and PEII share homologies with albumin promoter sequences, PEII is a near-consensus nuclear factor I recognition sequence, and DE overlaps a glucocorticoid receptor recognition sequence. An element conferring glucocorticoid repression of AFP gene activity is located in the upstream AFP promoter domain. Receptor-binding assays indicate that this element is the glucocorticoid receptor recognition sequence which overlaps with promoter-activating element DE.

  17. Zbtb20 defines a hippocampal neuronal identity through direct repression of genes that control projection neuron development in the isocortex.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jakob V; Thomassen, Mads; Møllgård, Kjeld; Noraberg, Jens; Jensen, Niels A

    2014-05-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons are important for encoding and retrieval of spatial maps and episodic memories. While previous work has shown that Zbtb20 is a cell fate determinant for CA1 pyramidal neurons, the regulatory mechanisms governing this process are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that Zbtb20 binds to genes that control neuronal subtype specification in the developing isocortex, including Cux1, Cux2, Fezf2, Foxp2, Mef2c, Rorb, Satb2, Sox5, Tbr1, Tle4, and Zfpm2. We show that Zbtb20 represses these genes during ectopic CA1 pyramidal neuron development in transgenic mice. These data reveal a novel regulatory mechanism by which Zbtb20 suppresses the acquisition of an isocortical fate during archicortical neurogenesis to ensure commitment to a CA1 pyramidal neuron fate. We further show that the expression pattern of Zbtb20 is evolutionary conserved in the fetal human hippocampus, where it is complementary to the expression pattern of the Zbtb20 target gene Tbr1. Therefore, the disclosed Zbtb20-mediated transcriptional repressor mechanism may be involved in development of the human archicortex.

  18. Muscle-directed gene therapy for phenylketonuria (PKU): Development of transgenic mice with muscle-specific phenylalanine hydroxylase expression

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, C.O.; Messing, A.; Wolff, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an attractive target for gene therapy because of shortcomings in current therapy including lifelong commitment to a difficult and expensive diet, persistent mild cognitive deficits in some children despite adequate dietary therapy, and maternal PKU syndrome. Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is normally expressed only in liver, but we propose to treat PKU by introducing the gene for PAH into muscle. In order to evaluate both the safety and efficacy of this approach, we have a developed a trangenic mouse which expresses PAH in both cardiac and skeletal muscle. The transgene includes promoter and enhancer sequences from the mouse muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene fused to the mouse liver PAH cDNA. Mice which have inherited the transgene are healthy, active, and do not exhibit any signs of muscle weakness or wasting. Ectopic PAH expression in muscle is not detrimental to the health, neurologic function, or reproduction of the mice. Pah{sup enu2} hyperphenylalaninemic mice, a model of human PAH deficiency, bred to carry the transgene have substantial PAH expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle but none in liver. Muscle PAH expression alone does not complement the hyperphenylalaninemic phenotype of Pah{sup enu2} mice. However, administration of reduced tetrahydrobiopterin to transgenic Pah{sup enu2} mice is associated with a 25% mean decrease in serum phenylalanine levels. We predict that ectopic expression of PAH in muscle along with adequate muscle supplies of reduced biopterin cofactor will decrease hyperphenylalaninemia in PKU.

  19. Ha-ras oncogene expression directed by a milk protein gene promoter: tissue specificity, hormonal regulation, and tumor induction in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, A.C.; Schoenenberger, C.A.; Groner, B.; Henninghausen, L.; LeMeur, M.; Gelinger, P.

    1987-03-01

    The activated human Ha-ras oncogene was subjected to the control of the promoter region of the murine whey acidic protein (Wap) gene, which is expressed in mammary epithelial cells in response to lactogenic hormones. The Wap-ras gene was stably introduced into the mouse germ line of five transgenic mice (one male and four females). Wap-ras expression was observed in the mammary glands of lactating females in two lines derived from female founders. The tissue-directed and hormone-dependent Wap expression was conferred on the Ha-ras oncogene. The signals governing Wap expression are located within 2.5 kilobases of 5' flanking sequence. The other two lines derived from female founders did not express the chimeric gene. In the line derived from the male founder the Wap-ras gene is integrated into the Y chromosome. Expression was found in the salivary gland of male animals only. After a long latency, Wap-ras-expressing mice developed tumors. The tumors arose in tissues expressing Wap-ras - i.e., mammary or salivary glands. Compared to the corresponding nonmalignant tissues, Wap-ras expression was enhanced in the tumors.

  20. Phylogenetic and in silico functional analyses of thermostable-direct hemolysin and tdh-related encoding genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus and other Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Sushanta K; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

    2014-01-01

    Emergence and spread of pandemic strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus have drawn attention to make detailed study on their genomes. The pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus has been associated with thermostable-direct hemolysin (TDH) and/or TDH-related hemolysin (TRH). The present study evaluated characteristics of tdh and trh genes, considering the phylogenetic and in silico functional features of V. parahaemolyticus and other bacteria. Fifty-two tdh and trh genes submitted to the GenBank were analyzed for sequence similarity. The promoter sequences of these genes were also analyzed from transcription start point to -35 regions and correlated with amino acid substitution within the coding regions. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that tdh and trh are highly distinct and also differ within the V. parahaemolyticus strains that were isolated from different geographical regions. Promoter sequence analysis revealed nucleotide substitutions and deletions at -18 and -19 positions among the pandemic, prepandemic, and nonpandemic tdh sequences. Many amino acid substitutions were also found within the signal peptide and also in the matured protein region of several TDH proteins as compared to TDH-S protein of pandemic V. parahaemolyticus. Experimental evidences are needed to recognize the importance of substitutions and deletions in the tdh and trh genes.

  1. Rapid and efficient CRISPR/Cas9 gene inactivation in human neurons during human pluripotent stem cell differentiation and direct reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Alicia; Luoni, Mirko; Giannelli, Serena G.; Radice, Isabella; Iannielli, Angelo; Cancellieri, Cinzia; Di Berardino, Claudia; Regalia, Giulia; Lazzari, Giovanna; Menegon, Andrea; Taverna, Stefano; Broccoli, Vania

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a rapid and customizable tool for gene editing in mammalian cells. In particular, this approach has widely opened new opportunities for genetic studies in neurological disease. Human neurons can be differentiated in vitro from hPSC (human Pluripotent Stem Cells), hNPCs (human Neural Precursor Cells) or even directly reprogrammed from fibroblasts. Here, we described a new platform which enables, rapid and efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome targeting simultaneously with three different paradigms for in vitro generation of neurons. This system was employed to inactivate two genes associated with neurological disorder (TSC2 and KCNQ2) and achieved up to 85% efficiency of gene targeting in the differentiated cells. In particular, we devised a protocol that, combining the expression of the CRISPR components with neurogenic factors, generated functional human neurons highly enriched for the desired genome modification in only 5 weeks. This new approach is easy, fast and that does not require the generation of stable isogenic clones, practice that is time consuming and for some genes not feasible. PMID:27857203

  2. Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase α gene variations may be associated with the direct effects of some antipsychotics on triglyceride levels

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Francisco J.; Meary, Alexander; Arranz, Maria J.; Ruaño, Gualberto; Windemuth, Andreas; de Leon, Jose

    2009-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase α (ACACA) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs2229416) was significantly associated with hypertriglyceridemia, during exploration of antipsychotic direct effects on lipids. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene (rs1468271) and ACACB gene (rs2241220) SNPs were significantly associated with severe hypercholesterolemia. In the same sample (173 patients on olanzapine, quetiapine, chlorpromazine or mirtazapine [increasing the risk of hyperlipidemia] and 184 controls taking other antipsychotics), three (rs1266175, rs12453407 and rs9906543) of eight additional ACACA SNPs were significantly associated with hypertriglyceridemia in those taking drugs of interest, but not in controls. Five other ACACA SNPs, three additional NPY SNPs, or seven additional ACACB SNPs were not significant. PMID:19846279

  3. Position independent expression and developmental regulation is directed by the beta myosin heavy chain gene's 5' upstream region in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Knotts, S; Rindt, H; Robbins, J

    1995-08-25

    Transgenic mice generated with constructs containing 5.6 kb of the beta myosin heavy chain (MyHC) gene's 5' flanking region linked to the cat reporter gene express the transgene at high levels. In all 47 lines analyzed, tissue-specific accumulation of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was found at levels proportional to the number of integrated transgene copies. Deletion constructs containing only 0.6 kb of 5' upstream region showed position effects in transgenic mice and did not demonstrate copy number dependence although transgene expression remained muscle-specific. The 5.6 kb 5' upstream region conferred appropriate developmental control of the transgene to the cardiac compartment and directs copy number dependent and position independent expression. Lines generated with a construct in which three proximal cis-acting elements were mutated showed reduced levels of transgene expression, but all maintained their position independence and copy number dependence, suggesting the presence of distinct regulatory mechanisms.

  4. Position independent expression and developmental regulation is directed by the beta myosin heavy chain gene's 5' upstream region in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Knotts, S; Rindt, H; Robbins, J

    1995-01-01

    Transgenic mice generated with constructs containing 5.6 kb of the beta myosin heavy chain (MyHC) gene's 5' flanking region linked to the cat reporter gene express the transgene at high levels. In all 47 lines analyzed, tissue-specific accumulation of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was found at levels proportional to the number of integrated transgene copies. Deletion constructs containing only 0.6 kb of 5' upstream region showed position effects in transgenic mice and did not demonstrate copy number dependence although transgene expression remained muscle-specific. The 5.6 kb 5' upstream region conferred appropriate developmental control of the transgene to the cardiac compartment and directs copy number dependent and position independent expression. Lines generated with a construct in which three proximal cis-acting elements were mutated showed reduced levels of transgene expression, but all maintained their position independence and copy number dependence, suggesting the presence of distinct regulatory mechanisms. Images PMID:7667107

  5. First Case of Streptococcus oligofermentans Endocarditis Determined Based on sodA Gene Sequences after Amplification Directly from Valvular Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Matta; Gousseff, Marie; Monsel, Fabien; Poyart, Claire; Diebold, Benoît; Podglajen, Isabelle; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    We report the first case of infection due to Streptococcus oligofermentans, which is a recently described oral Streptococcus species. It was responsible for the endocarditis and left forearm abscess of a 43-year-old woman. Identification was made using molecular techniques performed directly from valvular and surgical samples. PMID:19116351

  6. Directed engineering of a high-expression chimeric transgene as a strategy for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Doering, Christopher B; Denning, Gabriela; Dooriss, Kerry; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Johnston, Jennifer M; Kerstann, Keith W; McCarty, David A; Spencer, H Trent

    2009-07-01

    Human coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is inefficiently biosynthesized in vitro and has proven difficult to express at therapeutic levels using available clinical gene-transfer technologies. Recently, we showed that a porcine and certain hybrid human/porcine fVIII transgenes demonstrate up to 100-fold greater expression than human fVIII. In this study, we extend these results to describe the use of a humanized, high-expression, hybrid human/porcine fVIII transgene that is 89% identical to human fVIII and was delivered by lentiviral vectors (LVs) to hematopoietic stem cells for gene therapy of hemophilia A. Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus-based vectors encoding the fVIII chimera efficiently transduced human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293T cells. Cells transduced with hybrid human/porcine fVIII encoding vectors expressed fVIII at levels 6- to 100-fold greater than cells transduced with vectors encoding human fVIII. Transplantation of transduced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells into hemophilia A mice resulted in long-term fVIII expression at therapeutic levels despite <5% genetically modified blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) -derived vector effectively transduced the human hematopoietic cell lines K562, EU1, U.937, and Jurkat as well as the nonhematopoietic cell lines, HEK-293T and HeLa. All cell lines expressed hybrid human/porcine fVIII, albeit at varying levels with the K562 cells expressing the highest level of the hematopoietic cell lines. From these studies, we conclude that humanized high-expression hybrid fVIII transgenes can be utilized in gene therapy applications for hemophilia A to significantly increase fVIII expression levels compared to what has been previously achieved.

  7. EIN3 and ORE1 Accelerate Degreening during Ethylene-Mediated Leaf Senescence by Directly Activating Chlorophyll Catabolic Genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kai; Li, Zhongpeng; Yang, Zhen; Chen, Junyi; Wu, Shouxin; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Shan; Gao, Jiong; Ren, Guodong; Kuai, Benke; Zhou, Xin

    2015-07-01

    Degreening, caused by chlorophyll degradation, is the most obvious symptom of senescing leaves. Chlorophyll degradation can be triggered by endogenous and environmental cues, and ethylene is one of the major inducers. ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) is a key transcription factor in the ethylene signaling pathway. It was previously reported that EIN3, miR164, and a NAC (NAM, ATAF, and CUC) transcription factor ORE1/NAC2 constitute a regulatory network mediating leaf senescence. However, how this network regulates chlorophyll degradation at molecular level is not yet elucidated. Here we report a feed-forward regulation of chlorophyll degradation that involves EIN3, ORE1, and chlorophyll catabolic genes (CCGs). Gene expression analysis showed that the induction of three major CCGs, NYE1, NYC1 and PAO, by ethylene was largely repressed in ein3 eil1 double mutant. Dual-luciferase assay revealed that EIN3 significantly enhanced the promoter activity of NYE1, NYC1 and PAO in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Furthermore, Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) indicated that EIN3 could directly bind to NYE1, NYC1 and PAO promoters. These results reveal that EIN3 functions as a positive regulator of CCG expression during ethylene-mediated chlorophyll degradation. Interestingly, ORE1, a senescence regulator which is a downstream target of EIN3, could also activate the expression of NYE1, NYC1 and PAO by directly binding to their promoters in EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. In addition, EIN3 and ORE1 promoted NYE1 and NYC1 transcriptions in an additive manner. These results suggest that ORE1 is also involved in the direct regulation of CCG transcription. Moreover, ORE1 activated the expression of ACS2, a major ethylene biosynthesis gene, and subsequently promoted ethylene production. Collectively, our work reveals that EIN3, ORE1 and CCGs constitute a coherent feed-forward loop involving in the robust regulation of ethylene-mediated chlorophyll degradation

  8. Promoters of AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 genes of Artemisia annua direct reporter gene expression in glandular and non-glandular trichomes

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Sunita; Longchar, Bendangchuchang; Singh, Alka; Gupta, Vikrant

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report cloning and analysis of promoters of GLABRA2 (AaGL2) homolog and a MIXTA-Like (AaMIXTA-Like1) gene from Artemisia annua. The upstream regulatory regions of AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 showed the presence of several crucial cis-acting elements. Arabidopsis and A. annua seedlings were transiently transfected with the promoter-GUS constructs using a robust agro-infiltration method. Both AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 promoters showed GUS expression preferentially in Arabidopsis single-celled trichomes and glandular as well as T-shaped trichomes of A. annua. Transgenic Arabidopsis harboring constructs in which AaGL2 or AaMIXTA-Like1 promoters would control GFP expression, showed fluorescence emanating specifically from trichome cells. Our study provides a fast and efficient method to study trichome-specific expression, and 2 promoters that have potential for targeted metabolic engineering in plants. PMID:26340695

  9. An LXR–NCOA5 gene regulatory complex directs inflammatory crosstalk-dependent repression of macrophage cholesterol efflux

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Mark A; Gold, Elizabeth S; Ramsey, Stephen A; Podolsky, Irina; Aderem, Alan; Ranish, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    LXR–cofactor complexes activate the gene expression program responsible for cholesterol efflux in macrophages. Inflammation antagonizes this program, resulting in foam cell formation and atherosclerosis; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this antagonism remain to be fully elucidated. We use promoter enrichment-quantitative mass spectrometry (PE-QMS) to characterize the composition of gene regulatory complexes assembled at the promoter of the lipid transporter Abca1 following downregulation of its expression. We identify a subset of proteins that show LXR ligand- and binding-dependent association with the Abca1 promoter and demonstrate they differentially control Abca1 expression. We determine that NCOA5 is linked to inflammatory Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and establish that NCOA5 functions as an LXR corepressor to attenuate Abca1 expression. Importantly, TLR3–LXR signal crosstalk promotes recruitment of NCOA5 to the Abca1 promoter together with loss of RNA polymerase II and reduced cholesterol efflux. Together, these data significantly expand our knowledge of regulatory inputs impinging on the Abca1 promoter and indicate a central role for NCOA5 in mediating crosstalk between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways that results in repression of macrophage cholesterol efflux. PMID:25755249

  10. A direct gene transfer strategy via brain internal capsule reverses the biochemical defect in Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Martino, S; Marconi, P; Tancini, B; Dolcetta, D; De Angelis, M G Cusella; Montanucci, P; Bregola, G; Sandhoff, K; Bordignon, C; Emiliani, C; Manservigi, R; Orlacchio, A

    2005-08-01

    Therapy for neurodegenerative lysosomal Tay-Sachs (TS) disease requires active hexosaminidase (Hex) A production in the central nervous system and an efficient therapeutic approach that can act faster than human disease progression. We combined the efficacy of a non-replicating Herpes simplex vector encoding for the Hex A alpha-subunit (HSV-T0alphaHex) and the anatomic structure of the brain internal capsule to distribute the missing enzyme optimally. With this gene transfer strategy, for the first time, we re-established the Hex A activity and totally removed the GM2 ganglioside storage in both injected and controlateral hemispheres, in the cerebellum and spinal cord of TS animal model in the span of one month's treatment. In our studies, no adverse effects were observed due to the viral vector, injection site or gene expression and on the basis of these results, we feel confident that the same approach could be applied to similar diseases involving an enzyme defect.

  11. MicroRNA-15a inhibits the growth and invasiveness of malignant melanoma and directly targets on CDCA4 gene.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Christopher; Sehlaoui, Ayoub; Xiao, Zhaoyang; Yang, Yixin

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs can affect behaviors of tumor cells by modulating the expression of the target genes that involve tumor growth, invasiveness, and death. The goal of this research is to examine the effects of miR-15a on the proliferation and invasiveness of malignant melanoma cells in vitro, as well as the therapeutic effect of miR-15a in a mouse melanoma model. miR-15a displayed inhibitory effects on proliferation and invasiveness of several malignant melanoma cell lines. miR-15a also caused cell cycle arrest at G1/G0 phase. miRNA 15a downregulated the expressions of CDCA4 and AKT-3 in melanoma cell lines. In vivo, experiment showed that miRNA 15a significantly retarded the growth of melanoma tumors in the mouse model. The luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR15a can suppress gene expression through the binding site in the 3 'UTR of CACD4, which is a bona fide target of miRNA 15a. In conclusion, miRNA 15a suppressed the growth and invasiveness of melanoma cells, suggesting that miRNA 15a may represent a viable microRNA-based therapy against melanoma.

  12. Direct quantification and distribution of tetracycline-resistant genes in meat samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Guarddon, Mónica; Miranda, Jose M; Vázquez, Beatriz I; Cepeda, Alberto; Franco, Carlos M

    2012-07-01

    The evolution of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria has become a threat to food safety and methods to control them are necessary. Counts of tetracycline-resistant (TR) bacteria by microbiological methods were compared with those obtained by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in 80 meat samples. TR Enterobacteriaceae counts were similar between the count plate method and qPCR (P= 0.24), whereas TR aerobic mesophilic bacteria counts were significantly higher by the microbiological method (P < 0.001). The distribution of tetA and tetB genes was investigated in different types of meat. tetA was detected in chicken meat (40%), turkey meat (100%), pork (20%), and beef (40%) samples, whereas tetB was detected in chicken meat (45%), turkey meat (70%), pork (30%), and beef (35%) samples. The presence of tetracycline residues was also investigated by a receptor assay. This study offers an alternative and rapid method for monitoring the presence of TR bacteria in meat and furthers the understanding of the distribution of tetA and tetB genes.

  13. An LXR-NCOA5 gene regulatory complex directs inflammatory crosstalk-dependent repression of macrophage cholesterol efflux.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Mark A; Gold, Elizabeth S; Ramsey, Stephen A; Podolsky, Irina; Aderem, Alan; Ranish, Jeffrey A

    2015-05-05

    LXR-cofactor complexes activate the gene expression program responsible for cholesterol efflux in macrophages. Inflammation antagonizes this program, resulting in foam cell formation and atherosclerosis; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this antagonism remain to be fully elucidated. We use promoter enrichment-quantitative mass spectrometry (PE-QMS) to characterize the composition of gene regulatory complexes assembled at the promoter of the lipid transporter Abca1 following downregulation of its expression. We identify a subset of proteins that show LXR ligand- and binding-dependent association with the Abca1 promoter and demonstrate they differentially control Abca1 expression. We determine that NCOA5 is linked to inflammatory Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and establish that NCOA5 functions as an LXR corepressor to attenuate Abca1 expression. Importantly, TLR3-LXR signal crosstalk promotes recruitment of NCOA5 to the Abca1 promoter together with loss of RNA polymerase II and reduced cholesterol efflux. Together, these data significantly expand our knowledge of regulatory inputs impinging on the Abca1 promoter and indicate a central role for NCOA5 in mediating crosstalk between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways that results in repression of macrophage cholesterol efflux.

  14. Direct transcriptional activation of BT genes by NLP transcription factors is a key component of the nitrate response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeo; Maekawa, Shugo; Konishi, Mineko; Yoshioka, Nozomi; Sasaki, Yuki; Maeda, Haruna; Ishida, Tetsuya; Kato, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Junji; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2017-01-29

    Nitrate modulates growth and development, functioning as a nutrient signal in plants. Although many changes in physiological processes in response to nitrate have been well characterized as nitrate responses, the molecular mechanisms underlying the nitrate response are not yet fully understood. Here, we show that NLP transcription factors, which are key regulators of the nitrate response, directly activate the nitrate-inducible expression of BT1 and BT2 encoding putative scaffold proteins with a plant-specific domain structure in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, the 35S promoter-driven expression of BT2 partially rescued growth inhibition caused by reductions in NLP activity in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, simultaneous disruption of BT1 and BT2 affected nitrate-dependent lateral root development. These results suggest that direct activation of BT1 and BT2 by NLP transcriptional activators is a key component of the molecular mechanism underlying the nitrate response in Arabidopsis.

  15. Pediatric obesity. An introduction.

    PubMed

    Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children's health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children's environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail.

  16. Morbillivirus Infections: An Introduction

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Rory D.; Duprex, W. Paul; de Swart, Rik L.

    2015-01-01

    Research on morbillivirus infections has led to exciting developments in recent years. Global measles vaccination coverage has increased, resulting in a significant reduction in measles mortality. In 2011 rinderpest virus was declared globally eradicated – only the second virus to be eradicated by targeted vaccination. Identification of new cellular receptors and implementation of recombinant viruses expressing fluorescent proteins in a range of model systems have provided fundamental new insights into the pathogenesis of morbilliviruses, and their interactions with the host immune system. Nevertheless, both new and well-studied morbilliviruses are associated with significant disease in wildlife and domestic animals. This illustrates the need for robust surveillance and a strategic focus on barriers that restrict cross-species transmission. Recent and ongoing measles outbreaks also demonstrate that maintenance of high vaccination coverage for these highly infectious agents is critical. This introduction briefly summarizes the most important current research topics in this field. PMID:25685949

  17. An introduction to phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Maffucci, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) are minor components of cellular membranes that play critical regulatory roles in several intracellular functions. This chapter describes the main enzymes regulating the turnover of each of the seven PIs in mammalian cells and introduces to some of their intracellular functions and to some evidences of their involvement in human diseases. Due to the complex interrelation between the distinct PIs and the plethora of functions that they can regulate inside a cell, this chapter is not meant to be a comprehensive coverage of all aspects of PI signalling but rather an introduction to this complex signalling field. For more details of their regulation/functions and extensive description of their intracellular roles, more detailed reviews are suggested on each single topic.

  18. Introduction to multivariate discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kégl, Balázs

    2013-07-01

    Multivariate discrimination or classification is one of the best-studied problem in machine learning, with a plethora of well-tested and well-performing algorithms. There are also several good general textbooks [1-9] on the subject written to an average engineering, computer science, or statistics graduate student; most of them are also accessible for an average physics student with some background on computer science and statistics. Hence, instead of writing a generic introduction, we concentrate here on relating the subject to a practitioner experimental physicist. After a short introduction on the basic setup (Section 1) we delve into the practical issues of complexity regularization, model selection, and hyperparameter optimization (Section 2), since it is this step that makes high-complexity non-parametric fitting so different from low-dimensional parametric fitting. To emphasize that this issue is not restricted to classification, we illustrate the concept on a low-dimensional but non-parametric regression example (Section 2.1). Section 3 describes the common algorithmic-statistical formal framework that unifies the main families of multivariate classification algorithms. We explain here the large-margin principle that partly explains why these algorithms work. Section 4 is devoted to the description of the three main (families of) classification algorithms, neural networks, the support vector machine, and AdaBoost. We do not go into the algorithmic details; the goal is to give an overview on the form of the functions these methods learn and on the objective functions they optimize. Besides their technical description, we also make an attempt to put these algorithm into a socio-historical context. We then briefly describe some rather heterogeneous applications to illustrate the pattern recognition pipeline and to show how widespread the use of these methods is (Section 5). We conclude the chapter with three essentially open research problems that are either

  19. Elevation of serum IgE level and peripheral eosinophil count during T lymphocyte-directed gene therapy for ADA deficiency: implication of Tc2-like cells after gene transduction procedure.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, N; Ariga, T; Ohtsu, M; Yamada, M; Tame, A; Furuta, H; Kobayashi, I; Okano, M; Yanagihara, Y; Sakiyama, Y

    1998-11-01

    We have successfully carried out T-cell-directed gene therapy for a boy with severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA SCID) and unexpectedly found an elevation of serum IgE level and peripheral eosinophil count during the course. More than 90% of transduced cells cultured for 7-11 days before infusion into the patient were positive for CD8 and expressed Th2-type cytokine genes such as IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13. Furthermore, CD4(+) T-depleted PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) from the patient synthesized IgE in vitro by stimulation with IL-4. Collectively, these results suggested that Tc2-like cells in the transduced cells have distinct immunological functions to help IgE synthesis and activate eosinophils.

  20. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, Geoff; de Meer, Jan B.

    1997-03-01

    service management' by Gregor v Bochmann and Abdelhakim Hafid offers lessons in QoS management learned during the implementation of a prototype News-on-Demand application. Some general principles are extracted from this experience. In particular, a novel QoS adaptation technique is highlighted: transparent automatic reconfiguration of the components involved in a communication (e.g. choice of an alternative network or server at run time). An algorithm which attempts to choose optimal configurations is discussed. `Quality of service management using generic modelling and monitoring techniques', by Leonard Franken and Boudewijn Haverkort investigates the use of Petri nets as the basis of generic QoS monitoring of distributed applications. A distributed application is exploded into finegrained component parts and interactions between these parts are instrumented. The paper offers a case study of the instrumentation of a videophone application using this technique. Simulation is used to evaluate the scheme. The final two papers in the special issue are more focused and pragmatic in nature. These papers explore QoS provision in particular environments (the World Wide Web and ATM networks respectively) through reported implementation experience. `QoS management in a World Wide Web environment which supports continuous media' by Michael Fry, Aruna Seneviratne, Andreas Vogel and Varuni Witana looks at the practical provision of end to end QoS management in the World Wide Web. The paper looks beyond currently available tools such as RealAudio and StreamWorks and presents a QoS managed RTP based solution featuring an adjunct QoS management protocol. This work offers QoS management functions (e.g. QoS negotiation, adaptation and control of QoS degradation paths) directly to the user via the usual Web GUI. `A QoS adaptive multimedia transport system: design, implementation and experiences' by Andrew Campbell and Geoff Coulson offers further practical experience of QoS management

  1. Association of Taf14 with acetylated histone H3 directs gene transcription and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Shanle, Erin K.; Andrews, Forest H.; Meriesh, Hashem; McDaniel, Stephen L.; Dronamraju, Raghuvar; DiFiore, Julia V.; Jha, Deepak; Wozniak, Glenn G.; Bridgers, Joseph B.; Kerschner, Jenny L.; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Martín, Glòria Mas; Morrison, Ashby J.; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.; Strahl, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    The YEATS domain, found in a number of chromatin-associated proteins, has recently been shown to have the capacity to bind histone lysine acetylation. Here, we show that the YEATS domain of Taf14, a member of key transcriptional and chromatin-modifying complexes in yeast, is a selective reader of histone H3 Lys9 acetylation (H3K9ac). Structural analysis reveals that acetylated Lys9 is sandwiched in an aromatic cage formed by F62 and W81. Disruption of this binding in cells impairs gene transcription and the DNA damage response. Our findings establish a highly conserved acetyllysine reader function for the YEATS domain protein family and highlight the significance of this interaction for Taf14. PMID:26341557

  2. Small nucleolar RNA host genes and long non-coding RNA responses in directly irradiated and bystander cells.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, M Ahmad

    2014-04-01

    The irradiated cells communicate with unirradiated cells and induce changes in them through a phenomenon known as the bystander effect. The nature of the bystander signal and how it impacts unirradiated cells remains to be discovered. Examination of molecular changes could lead to the identification of pathways underlying the bystander effect. Apart from microRNAs, little is known about the regulation of other non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) in irradiated or bystander cells. In this study we monitored the transcriptional changes of several small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) host genes and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) that are known to participate in a variety of cellular functions, in irradiated and bystander cells to gain insight into the molecular pathways affected in these cells. We used human lymphoblasts TK6 cells in a medium exchanged bystander effect model system to examine ncRNA expression alterations. The snoRNA host genes SNHG1 and SNHG4 were upregulated in irradiated TK6 cells but were repressed in bystander cells. The SNHG5 and SNHG11 were downregulated in irradiated and bystander cells and the expression levels of these ncRNA were significantly lower in bystander cells. The lncRNA MALAT1, MATR3, SRA1, and SOX2OT were induced in irradiated TK6 cells and their expression levels were repressed in bystander cells. The lncRNA RMST was induced in both irradiated and bystander cells. Taken together, these results indicate that expression levels of ncRNA are modulated in irradiated and bystander cells and these transcriptional changes could be associated with the bystander effect.

  3. Early direct and transneuronal effects in mice with targeted expression of a toxin gene to D1 dopamine receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Padungchaichot, P; Wong, J Y; Natoli, A L; Massalas, J S; Finkelstein, D I; Lawrence, A L; Drago, J

    2000-01-01

    The neurochemical profile was examined at postnatal day 3-4 in mutant mice generated by in vivo Cre mediated activation of an attenuated diphtheria toxin gene inserted into the D1 dopamine receptor gene locus. An earlier study of this model had shown that D1 dopamine receptor, substance P and dynorphin were not expressed in the striatum. Quantitative in situ hybridization analysis showed an increase in D2 dopamine receptor and enkephalin messenger RNA expression. The nigrostriatal pathway in the mutant pups was intact with a normal number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area in addition to a normal pattern of striatal dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity. Quantitative analysis of striatal dopamine transporter density using [3H]mazindol showed a reduction of 26% suggesting a degree of transneuronal down-regulation. There was also a 49% reduction of striatal GABA receptor binding and a 36% reduction of striatal muscarinic receptor binding in mutant pups. The number of healthy striatal neuropeptide Y-containing interneurons was also substantially down-regulated in the mutant striatum. In contrast, there was an increase in the number of striatal cholinergic interneurons. Down-regulated cortical GABA receptor and muscarinic receptor binding was also observed in addition to subtle morphological changes in the neuropeptide Y-expressing population of cortical neurons. The changes reflect the early cascade of events which follows the ablation of D1 dopamine receptor-positive cells. Although extensive changes in a number of striatal and cortical neurons were demonstrated, only subtle transneuronal effects were seen in the nigrostriatal pathway.

  4. [Informed consent for clinical investigation in the critically ill patient. An introduction to the regulation 536/2014/EC on clinical investigation of medicinal products for human use, repealing Directive 2001/20/EC].

    PubMed

    Savonitto, Stefano; Coppola, Teresa; Braglia, Paola; Ciccone, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    The principle of patient information, awareness and documented consent for the participation in clinical trials is a cornerstone in the modern ethics of clinical research. However, this procedure is seldom applicable in the critically ill patient who becomes suddenly incapable of fully evaluating the risk vs benefit of the alternative therapeutic options. This issue becomes particularly problematic in those conditions where the benefit of any intervention is highly time-dependent, such as acute myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiac arrest, polytrauma and other similar conditions. The new directive 536/2014/EC defines the concept that in these cases the expert clinician and the Ethics Committees, based upon a rigorous study protocol, are in better conditions, as compared to patients' proxies and any legal representative, to take an appropriate decision. This decision should be later confirmed (deferred consent) by the patient, in case he returns competent, or by his proxies or legal tutor, in order to use experimental data. The new directive ends a long period of disparity among the Member States, some of which had taken unilateral decisions allowing the participation of incapable patients, whereas others, among which Italy, had a more conservative approach. Unfortunately, owing to technical and bureaucratic issues, the new regulation is unlikely to become active before the beginning of 2018.

  5. Introduction: Background on CROMERR

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This self-directed, online course is designed for states, tribes, and local governments that administer EPA-authorized programs under Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR) and accept or wish to accept electronic reports.

  6. Complete correction of hyperphenylalaninemia following liver-directed, recombinant AAV2/8 vector-mediated gene therapy in murine phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Harding, C O; Gillingham, M B; Hamman, K; Clark, H; Goebel-Daghighi, E; Bird, A; Koeberl, D D

    2006-03-01

    Novel recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors pseudotyped with serotype 8 capsid (rAAV2/8) have recently shown exciting promise as effective liver-directed gene transfer reagents. We have produced a novel liver-specific rAAV2/8 vector expressing the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pah) cDNA and have administered this vector to hyperphenylalaninemic PAH-deficient Pah(enu2) mice, a model of human phenylketonuria (PKU). Our hypothesis was that this vector would produce sufficient hepatocyte transduction frequency and PAH activity to correct blood phenylalanine levels in murine PKU. Portal vein injection of recombinant AAV2/8 vector into five adult Pah(enu2) mice yielded complete and stable (up to 17 weeks) correction of serum phenylalanine levels. Liver PAH activity was corrected to 11.5+/-2.4% of wild type liver activity and was associated with a significant increase in phenylalanine clearance following parenteral phenylalanine challenge. Although questions of long-term safety and stability of expression remain, recombinant AAV2/8-mediated, liver-directed gene therapy is a promising novel treatment approach for PKU and allied inborn errors of metabolism.

  7. Complete correction of hyperphenylalaninemia following liver-directed, recombinant AAV2/8 vector-mediated gene therapy in murine phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Harding, CO; Gillingham, MB; Hamman, K; Clark, H; Goebel-Daghighi, E; Bird, A; Koeberl, DD

    2009-01-01

    Novel recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors pseudo-typed with serotype 8 capsid (rAAV2/8) have recently shown exciting promise as effective liver-directed gene transfer reagents. We have produced a novel liver-specific rAAV2/8 vector expressing the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pah) cDNA and have administered this vector to hyperphenylalaninemic PAH-deficient Pahenu2 mice, a model of human phenylketonuria (PKU). Our hypothesis was that this vector would produce sufficient hepatocyte transduction frequency and PAH activity to correct blood phenylalanine levels in murine PKU. Portal vein injection of recombinant AAV2/8 vector into five adult Pahenu2 mice yielded complete and stable (up to 17 weeks) correction of serum phenylalanine levels. Liver PAH activity was corrected to 11.5±2.4% of wild type liver activity and was associated with a significant increase in phenylalanine clearance following parenteral phenylalanine challenge. Although questions of long-term safety and stability of expression remain, recombinant AAV2/8-mediated, liver-directed gene therapy is a promising novel treatment approach for PKU and allied inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:16319949

  8. Speeding up directed evolution: Combining the advantages of solid-phase combinatorial gene synthesis with statistically guided reduction of screening effort.

    PubMed

    Hoebenreich, Sabrina; Zilly, Felipe E; Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Zilly, Matías; Reetz, Manfred T

    2015-03-20

    Efficient and economic methods in directed evolution at the protein, metabolic, and genome level are needed for biocatalyst development and the success of synthetic biology. In contrast to random strategies, semirational approaches such as saturation mutagenesis explore the sequence space in a focused manner. Although several combinatorial libraries based on saturation mutagenesis have been reported using solid-phase gene synthesis, direct comparison with traditional PCR-based methods is currently lacking. In this work, we compare combinatorial protein libraries created in-house via PCR versus those generated by commercial solid-phase gene synthesis. Using descriptive statistics and probabilistic distributions on amino acid occurrence frequencies, the quality of the libraries was assessed and compared, revealing that the outsourced libraries are characterized by less bias and outliers than the PCR-based ones. Afterward, we screened all libraries following a traditional algorithm for almost complete library coverage and compared this approach with an emergent statistical concept suggesting screening a lower portion of the protein sequence space. Upon analyzing the biocatalytic landscapes and best hits of all combinatorial libraries, we show that the screening effort could have been reduced in all cases by more than 50%, while still finding at least one of the best mutants.

  9. Direct selection of conserved cDNAs from the DiGeorge critical region: isolation of a novel CDC45-like gene.

    PubMed

    McKie, J M; Wadey, R B; Sutherland, H F; Taylor, C L; Scambler, P J

    1998-08-01

    We have used a modified direct selection technique to detect transcripts that are both evolutionary conserved and developmentally expressed. The enrichment for homologous mouse cDNAs by use of human genomic DNA as template is shown to be an efficient and rapid approach for generating transcript maps. Deletions of human 22q11 are associated with several clinical syndromes, with overlapping phenotypes, for example, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) and DiGeorge syndrome (DGS). A large number of transcriptional units exist within the defined critical region, many of which have been identified previously by direct selection. However, no single obvious candidate gene for the VCFS/DGS phenotype has yet been found. Our technique has been applied to the DiGeorge critical region and has resulted in the isolation of a novel candidate gene, Cdc45l2, similar to yeast Cdc45p. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the EMBL data library under accession nos. AJ0223728 and AF0223729.

  10. Enhancement by lithium of cAMP-induced CRE/CREB-directed gene transcription conferred by TORC on the CREB basic leucine zipper domain

    PubMed Central

    Böer, Ulrike; Eglins, Julia; Krause, Doris; Schnell, Susanne; Schöfl, Christof; Knepel, Willhart

    2007-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the action of lithium salts in the treatment of bipolar disorder is not well understood. As their therapeutic action requires chronic treatment, adaptive neuronal processes are suggested to be involved. The molecular basis of this are changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors such as CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein). CREB contains a transactivation domain, in which Ser119 is phosphorylated upon activation, and a bZip (basic leucine zipper domain). The bZip is involved in CREB dimerization and DNA-binding, but also contributes to CREB transactivation by recruiting the coactivator TORC (transducer of regulated CREB). In the present study, the effect of lithium on CRE (cAMP response element)/CREB-directed gene transcription was investigated. Electrically excitable cells were transfected with CRE/CREB-driven luciferase reporter genes. LiCl (6 mM or higher) induced an up to 4.7-fold increase in 8-bromo-cAMP-stimulated CRE/CREB-directed transcription. This increase was not due to enhanced Ser119 phosphorylation or DNA-binding of CREB. Also, the known targets inositol monophosphatase and GSK3β (glycogen-synthase-kinase 3β) were not involved as specific GSK3β inhibitors and inositol replenishment did not mimic and abolish respectively the effect of lithium. However, lithium no longer enhanced CREB activity when the CREB-bZip was deleted or the TORC-binding site inside the CREB-bZip was specifically mutated (CREB-R300A). Otherwise, TORC overexpression conferred lithium responsiveness on CREB-bZip or the CRE-containing truncated rat somatostatin promoter. This indicates that lithium enhances cAMP-induced CRE/CREB-directed transcription, conferred by TORC on the CREB-bZip. We thus support the hypothesis that lithium salts modulate CRE/CREB-dependent gene transcription and suggest the CREB coactivator TORC as a new molecular target of lithium. PMID:17696880

  11. Familial Dysautonomia (FD) Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived PNS Neurons Reveal that Synaptic Vesicular and Neuronal Transport Genes Are Directly or Indirectly Affected by IKBKAP Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Gal; Cheishvili, David; Even, Aviel; Birger, Anastasya; Turetsky, Tikva; Gil, Yaniv; Even-Ram, Sharona; Aizenman, Einat; Bashir, Nibal; Maayan, Channa; Razin, Aharon; Reubinoff, Benjamim E.; Weil, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD), affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Here we found new molecular insights for the IKAP role and the impact of the FD mutation in the human PNS lineage by using a novel and unique human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line homozygous to the FD mutation originated by pre implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) analysis. We found that IKBKAP downregulation during PNS differentiation affects normal migration in FD-hESC derived neural crest cells (NCC) while at later stages the PNS neurons show reduced intracellular colocalization between vesicular proteins and IKAP. Comparative wide transcriptome analysis of FD and WT hESC-derived neurons together with the analysis of human brains from FD and WT 12 weeks old embryos and experimental validation of the results confirmed that synaptic vesicular and neuronal transport genes are directly or indirectly affected by IKBKAP downregulation in FD neurons. Moreover we show that kinetin (a drug that corrects IKBKAP alternative splicing) promotes the recovery of IKAP expression and these IKAP functional associated genes identified in the study. Altogether, these results support the view that IKAP might be a vesicular like protein that might be involved in neuronal transport in hESC derived PNS neurons. This function seems to be mostly affected in FD-hESC derived PNS neurons probably reflecting some PNS neuronal dysfunction observed in FD. PMID:26437462

  12. In vitro exposure to isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol by direct deposition and its effects on COX-2 and IL-8 gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arashiro, Maiko; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Sexton, Kenneth G.; Zhang, Zhenfa; Jaspers, Ilona; Fry, Rebecca C.; Vizuete, William G.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric oxidation of isoprene, the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted into Earth's atmosphere primarily from terrestrial vegetation, is now recognized as a major contributor to the global secondary organic aerosol (SOA) burden. Anthropogenic pollutants significantly enhance isoprene SOA formation through acid-catalyzed heterogeneous chemistry of epoxide products. Since isoprene SOA formation as a source of fine aerosol is a relatively recent discovery, research is lacking on evaluating its potential adverse effects on human health. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of isoprene-derived SOA on inflammation-associated gene expression in human lung cells using a direct deposition exposure method. We assessed altered expression of inflammation-related genes in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) exposed to isoprene-derived SOA generated in an outdoor chamber facility. Measurements of gene expression of known inflammatory biomarkers interleukin 8 (IL-8) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in exposed cells, together with complementary chemical measurements, showed that a dose of 0.067 µg cm-2 of SOA from isoprene photooxidation leads to statistically significant increases in IL-8 and COX-2 mRNA levels. Resuspension exposures using aerosol filter extracts corroborated these findings, supporting the conclusion that isoprene-derived SOA constituents induce the observed changes in mRNA levels. The present study is an attempt to examine the early biological responses of isoprene SOA exposure in human lung cells.

  13. The arcelin-5 Gene of Phaseolus vulgaris Directs High Seed-Specific Expression in Transgenic Phaseolus acutifolius and Arabidopsis Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Alain; Dillen, Willy; De Clercq, Janniek; Van Montagu, Marc; Angenon, Geert

    1999-01-01

    The regulatory sequences of many genes encoding seed storage proteins have been used to drive seed-specific expression of a variety of proteins in transgenic plants. Because the levels at which these transgene-derived proteins accumulate are generally quite low, we investigated the utility of the arcelin-5 regulatory sequences in obtaining high seed-specific expression in transgenic plants. Arcelin-5 is an abundant seed protein found in some wild common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes. Seeds of Arabidopsis and Tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray) plants transformed with arcelin-5 gene constructs synthesized arcelin-5 to levels of 15% and 25% of the total protein content, respectively. To our knowledge, such high expression levels directed by a transgene have not been reported before. The transgenic plants also showed low plant-to-plant variation in arcelin expression. Complex transgene integration patterns, which often result in gene silencing effects, were not associated with reduced arcelin-5 expression. High transgene expression was the result of high mRNA steady-state levels and was restricted to seeds. This indicates that all requirements for high seed-specific expression are cis elements present in the cloned genomic arcelin-5 sequence and trans-acting factors that are available in Arabidopsis and Phaseolus spp., and thus probably in most dicotyledonous plants. PMID:10444093

  14. Familial Dysautonomia (FD) Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived PNS Neurons Reveal that Synaptic Vesicular and Neuronal Transport Genes Are Directly or Indirectly Affected by IKBKAP Downregulation.

    PubMed

    Lefler, Sharon; Cohen, Malkiel A; Kantor, Gal; Cheishvili, David; Even, Aviel; Birger, Anastasya; Turetsky, Tikva; Gil, Yaniv; Even-Ram, Sharona; Aizenman, Einat; Bashir, Nibal; Maayan, Channa; Razin, Aharon; Reubinoff, Benjamim E; Weil, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD), affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Here we found new molecular insights for the IKAP role and the impact of the FD mutation in the human PNS lineage by using a novel and unique human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line homozygous to the FD mutation originated by pre implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) analysis. We found that IKBKAP downregulation during PNS differentiation affects normal migration in FD-hESC derived neural crest cells (NCC) while at later stages the PNS neurons show reduced intracellular colocalization between vesicular proteins and IKAP. Comparative wide transcriptome analysis of FD and WT hESC-derived neurons together with the analysis of human brains from FD and WT 12 weeks old embryos and experimental validation of the results confirmed that synaptic vesicular and neuronal transport genes are directly or indirectly affected by IKBKAP downregulation in FD neurons. Moreover we show that kinetin (a drug that corrects IKBKAP alternative splicing) promotes the recovery of IKAP expression and these IKAP functional associated genes identified in the study. Altogether, these results support the view that IKAP might be a vesicular like protein that might be involved in neuronal transport in hESC derived PNS neurons. This function seems to be mostly affected in FD-hESC derived PNS neurons probably reflecting some PNS neuronal dysfunction observed in FD.

  15. Facilitation of Direct Conditional Knockout of Essential Genes in Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 by Comparative Genetic Analysis and Manipulation of Genetic Competence▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Kerstin; Wollherr, Antje; Larsen, Michael; Rachinger, Michael; Liesegang, Heiko; Ehrenreich, Armin; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2010-01-01

    The genetic manageability of the biotechnologically important Bacillus licheniformis is hampered due to its poor transformability, whereas Bacillus subtilis efficiently takes up DNA during genetic competence, a quorum-sensing-dependent process. Since the sensor histidine kinase ComP, encoded by a gene of the quorum-sensing module comQXPA of B. licheniformis DSM13, was found to be inactive due to an insertion element within comP, the coding region was exchanged with a functional copy. Quorum sensing was restored, but the already-poor genetic competence dropped further. The inducible expression of the key regulator for the transcription of competence genes, ComK, in trans resulted in highly competent strains and facilitated the direct disruption of genes, as well as the conditional knockout of an essential operon. As ComK is inhibited at low cell densities by a proteolytic complex in which MecA binds ComK and such inhibition is antagonized by the interaction of MecA with ComS (the expression of the latter is controlled by cell density in B. subtilis), we performed an in silico analysis of MecA and the hitherto unidentified ComS, which revealed differences for competent and noncompetent strains, indicating that the reduced competence possibly is due to a nonfunctional coupling of the comQXPA-encoded quorum module and ComK. The obtained increased genetic tractability of this industrial workhorse should improve a wide array of scientific investigations. PMID:20543043

  16. mRIN for direct assessment of genome-wide and gene-specific mRNA integrity from large-scale RNA-sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Huijuan; Zhang, Xuegong; Zhang, Chaolin

    2015-01-01

    The volume of RNA-Seq data sets in public repositories has been expanding exponentially, providing unprecedented opportunities to study gene expression regulation. Because degraded RNA samples, such as those collected from post-mortem tissues, can result in distinct expression profiles with potential biases, a particularly important step in mining these data is quality control. Here we develop a method named mRIN to directly assess mRNA integrity from RNA-Seq data at the sample and individual gene level. We systematically analyse large-scale RNA-Seq data sets of the human brain transcriptome generated by different consortia. Our analysis demonstrates that 3′ bias resulting from partial RNA fragmentation in post-mortem tissues has a marked impact on global expression profiles, and that mRIN effectively identifies samples with different levels of mRNA degradation. Unexpectedly, this process has a reproducible and gene-specific component, and transcripts with different stabilities are associated with distinct functions and structural features reminiscent of mRNA decay in living cells. PMID:26234653

  17. Detection of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase and Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase Genes Directly from Blood Cultures by Use of a Nucleic Acid Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Sinyavskiy, Oleg; Riederer, Kathleen; Hujer, Andrea M.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The growing crisis of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria requires that current technologies permit the rapid detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (blaESBL) and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (blaKPC) genes. In the present study, we assessed the performance characteristics of a commercially available nucleic acid microarray system for the detection of blaESBL and blaKPC genes directly from positive blood cultures. Using blood cultures (BCs) that contained Gram-negative bacilli identified by Gram staining, we isolated bacterial DNA using spin columns (BC-C) and rapid water lysis (BC-W). Twenty ESBL/KPC-positive and 20 ESBL/KPC-negative blood culture samples, as well as 20 non-lactose-fermenting organisms, were tested. The 20 isolates that were ESBL positive by phenotypic testing were also evaluated on solid medium (SM), and the DNA was extracted by use of a spin column (SM-C). The resulting 140 DNA extractions were assessed for DNA quantity and quality using 260/280-nm absorbance ratios, and DNA microarray analysis was performed in a blinded fashion. Microarray and phenotypic results were concordant for 98.3% of BC-W, 90% of BC-C, and 95% of SM-C samples. Compared to phenotypic testing, the sensitivity and specificity for BC-C samples were 88.9% and 100%, respectively, and for BC-W samples, the sensitivity and specificity were 94.4% and 100%, respectively. BC-W samples yielded the highest concordance with phenotypic results. Nucleic acid microarrays offer promise in the identification of blaESBL and blaKPC genes directly from blood cultures, thereby reducing the time to identification of these important pathogens. PMID:22718942

  18. The Arabidopsis SWI2/SNF2 Chromatin Remodeler BRAHMA Regulates Polycomb Function during Vegetative Development and Directly Activates the Flowering Repressor Gene SVP

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenlong; Chen, Chen; Gao, Lei; Yang, Songguang; Nguyen, Vi; Shi, Xuejiang; Siminovitch, Katherine; Kohalmi, Susanne E.; Huang, Shangzhi; Wu, Keqiang; Chen, Xuemei; Cui, Yuhai

    2015-01-01

    The chromatin remodeler BRAHMA (BRM) is a Trithorax Group (TrxG) protein that antagonizes the functions of Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins in fly and mammals. Recent studies also implicate such a role for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BRM but the molecular mechanisms underlying the antagonism are unclear. To understand the interplay between BRM and PcG during plant development, we performed a genome-wide analysis of trimethylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in brm mutant seedlings by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Increased H3K27me3 deposition at several hundred genes was observed in brm mutants and this increase was partially supressed by removal of the H3K27 methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF) or SWINGER (SWN). ChIP experiments demonstrated that BRM directly binds to a subset of the genes and prevents the inappropriate association and/or activity of PcG proteins at these loci. Together, these results indicate a crucial role of BRM in restricting the inappropriate activity of PcG during plant development. The key flowering repressor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) is such a BRM target. In brm mutants, elevated PcG occupancy at SVP accompanies a dramatic increase in H3K27me3 levels at this locus and a concomitant reduction of SVP expression. Further, our gain- and loss-of-function genetic evidence establishes that BRM controls flowering time by directly activating SVP expression. This work reveals a genome-wide functional interplay between BRM and PcG and provides new insights into the impacts of these proteins in plant growth and development. PMID:25615622

  19. The Arabidopsis SWI2/SNF2 chromatin Remodeler BRAHMA regulates polycomb function during vegetative development and directly activates the flowering repressor gene SVP.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenlong; Chen, Chen; Gao, Lei; Yang, Songguang; Nguyen, Vi; Shi, Xuejiang; Siminovitch, Katherine; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Huang, Shangzhi; Wu, Keqiang; Chen, Xuemei; Cui, Yuhai

    2015-01-01

    The chromatin remodeler BRAHMA (BRM) is a Trithorax Group (TrxG) protein that antagonizes the functions of Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins in fly and mammals. Recent studies also implicate such a role for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BRM but the molecular mechanisms underlying the antagonism are unclear. To understand the interplay between BRM and PcG during plant development, we performed a genome-wide analysis of trimethylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in brm mutant seedlings by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Increased H3K27me3 deposition at several hundred genes was observed in brm mutants and this increase was partially supressed by removal of the H3K27 methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF) or SWINGER (SWN). ChIP experiments demonstrated that BRM directly binds to a subset of the genes and prevents the inappropriate association and/or activity of PcG proteins at these loci. Together, these results indicate a crucial role of BRM in restricting the inappropriate activity of PcG during plant development. The key flowering repressor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) is such a BRM target. In brm mutants, elevated PcG occupancy at SVP accompanies a dramatic increase in H3K27me3 levels at this locus and a concomitant reduction of SVP expression. Further, our gain- and loss-of-function genetic evidence establishes that BRM controls flowering time by directly activating SVP expression. This work reveals a genome-wide functional interplay between BRM and PcG and provides new insights into the impacts of these proteins in plant growth and development.

  20. Gene regulatory networks mediating canonical Wnt signal-directed control of pluripotency and differentiation in embryo stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Peterson, Kevin A; Liu, X Shirley; McMahon, Andrew P; Ohba, Shinsuke

    2013-12-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling supports the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) but also promotes differentiation of early mammalian cell lineages. To explain these paradoxical observations, we explored the gene regulatory networks at play. Canonical Wnt signaling is intertwined with the pluripotency network comprising Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2 in mouse ESCs. In defined media supporting the derivation and propagation of ESCs, Tcf3 and β-catenin interact with Oct4; Tcf3 binds to Sox motif within Oct-Sox composite motifs that are also bound by Oct4-Sox2 complexes. Furthermore, canonical Wnt signaling upregulates the activity of the Pou5f1 distal enhancer via the Sox motif in ESCs. When viewed in the context of published studies on Tcf3 and β-catenin mutants, our findings suggest Tcf3 counters pluripotency by competition with Sox2 at these sites, and Tcf3 inhibition is blocked by β-catenin entry into this complex. Wnt pathway stimulation also triggers β-catenin association at regulatory elements with classic Lef/Tcf motifs associated with differentiation programs. The failure to activate these targets in the presence of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor essential for ESC culture suggests MEK/ERK signaling and canonical Wnt signaling combine to promote ESC differentiation.

  1. Spi-1 and Fli-1 directly activate common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis in Friend erythroleukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Juban, Gaëtan; Giraud, Guillaume; Guyot, Boris; Belin, Stéphane; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Starck, Joëlle; Guillouf, Christel; Moreau-Gachelin, Françoise; Morlé, François

    2009-05-01

    Spi-1 and Fli-1 are ETS transcription factors recurrently deregulated in mouse erythroleukemia induced by Friend viruses. Since they share the same core DNA binding site, we investigated whether they may contribute to erythroleukemia by common mechanisms. Using inducible knockdown, we demonstrated that Fli-1 contributes to proliferation, survival, and differentiation arrest of erythroleukemic cells harboring an activated fli-1 locus. Similarly, we used inducible Fli-1 knockdown and either hexamethylenebisacetamide (HMBA)- or small interfering RNA-mediated Spi-1 knockdown to investigate their respective contributions in erythroleukemic cells harboring an activated spi-1 locus. In these cells, simple or double knockdown of both Spi-1 and Fli-1 additively contributed to induce proliferation arrest and differentiation. Transcriptome profiling revealed that virtually all transcripts affected by both Fli-1 knockdown and HMBA are affected in an additive manner. Among these additively downregulated transcripts, more than 20% encode proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis, and conserved ETS binding sites are present in their gene promoters. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrated the association of Spi-1 and Fli-1 on these promoters in Friend erythroleukemic cells. These data lead us to propose that the oncogenicity of Spi-1, Fli-1, and possibly other ETS transcription factors may involve their ability to stimulate ribosome biogenesis.

  2. Nrf2 Transcription Factor Can Directly Regulate mTOR: LINKING CYTOPROTECTIVE GENE EXPRESSION TO A MAJOR METABOLIC REGULATOR THAT GENERATES REDOX ACTIVITY.

    PubMed

    Bendavit, Gabriel; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Hilmi, Khalid; Shah, Sujay; Batist, Gerald

    2016-12-02

    Nrf2 is a master transcription factor that regulates a wide variety of cellular proteins by recognizing and binding to antioxidant response elements (AREs) in their gene promoter regions. In this study we show that increasing cellular Nrf2 results in transcriptional activation of the gene for mTOR, which is central to the PI3K signaling pathway. This is the case in cells with normal physiological PI3K. However, in cells with abnormally active PI3K increased cellular Nrf2 levels have no effect on mTOR. ChIP assays results show that increased Nrf2 binding is associated with decreased p65 binding and H3-K27me3 signal (marker of gene repression) as well as increased H3-K4me3 signal (marker of gene activation). However, in cells with PI3K activation, no effect of cellular Nrf2 increase on mTOR transcription was observed. In these cells, increasing Nrf2 levels increases Nrf2 promoter binding marginally, whereas p65 binding and H3-K27me3 mark were significantly increased, and H3-K4me3 signal is reduced. Together, these data show for the first time that Nrf2 directly regulates mTOR transcription when the PI3K pathway is intact, whereas this function is lost when PI3K is activated. We have identified a link between the Nrf2 system of sensing environmental stress and mTOR, which is a key cellular protein in metabolism. Studies in cells with activating mutations in the PI3K pathway suggest that Nrf2 transcriptional regulation of mTOR is related to promoter binding of p65 and of methylation of histone residues permissive of transcription.

  3. Mi-1.2, an R gene for aphid resistance in tomato, has direct negative effects on a zoophytophagous biocontrol agent, Orius insidiosus

    PubMed Central

    Pallipparambil, Godshen R.; Sayler, Ronald J.; Shapiro, Jeffrey P.; Thomas, Jean M. G.; Kring, Timothy J.; Goggin, Fiona L.

    2015-01-01

    Mi-1.2 is a single dominant gene in tomato that confers race-specific resistance against certain phloem-feeding herbivores including aphids, whiteflies, psyllids, and root-knot nematodes. Few prior studies have considered the potential non-target effects of race-specific resistance genes (R genes), and this paper evaluates the compatibility of Mi-mediated resistance in tomato with a beneficial zoophytophagous predator, Orius insidiosus (Say). In addition to preying on aphids and other pests, this piercing–sucking insect also feeds from the xylem, epidermis, and/or mesophyll, and oviposits within plant tissues. Comparison of O. insidiosus confined to isogenic tomato plants with and without Mi-1.2 revealed that immatures of O. insidiosus had lower survival on resistant plants even when the immatures were provisioned with prey that did not feed on the host plant. Molecular gut content analysis confirmed that adults and immatures of O. insidiosus feed on both resistant (Mi-1.2+) and susceptible (Mi-1.2–) genotypes, and bioassays suggest that resistance does not affect oviposition rates, plant sampling, or prey acceptance by O. insidiosus adults. These results demonstrate a direct negative impact of R-gene-mediated host plant resistance on a non-target beneficial species, and reveal that Mi-mediated resistance can impact organisms that do not feed on phloem sap. Through laser capture microdissection and RT-PCR, Mi-1.2 transcripts were detected in the epidermis and mesophyll as well as the phloem of tomato plants, consistent with our observations that Mi-mediated resistance is active outside the phloem. These results suggest that the mode of action and potential ecological impacts of Mi-mediated resistance are broader than previously assumed. PMID:25189594

  4. Krüppel Homolog 1 Inhibits Insect Metamorphosis via Direct Transcriptional Repression of Broad-Complex, a Pupal Specifier Gene.

    PubMed

    Kayukawa, Takumi; Nagamine, Keisuke; Ito, Yuka; Nishita, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Yukio; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2016-01-22

    The Broad-Complex gene (BR-C) encodes transcription factors that dictate larval-pupal metamorphosis in insects. The expression of BR-C is induced by molting hormone (20-hydroxyecdysone (20E)), and this induction is repressed by juvenile hormone (JH), which exists during the premature larval stage. Krüppel homolog 1 gene (Kr-h1) has been known as a JH-early inducible gene responsible for repression of metamorphosis; however, the functional relationship between Kr-h1 and repression of BR-C has remained unclear. To elucidate this relationship, we analyzed cis- and trans elements involved in the repression of BR-C using a Bombyx mori cell line. In the cells, as observed in larvae, JH induced the expression of Kr-h1 and concurrently suppressed 20E-induced expression of BR-C. Forced expression of Kr-h1 repressed the 20E-dependent activation of the BR-C promoter in the absence of JH, and Kr-h1 RNAi inhibited the JH-mediated repression, suggesting that Kr-h1 controlled the repression of BR-C. A survey of the upstream sequence of BR-C gene revealed a Kr-h1 binding site (KBS) in the BR-C promoter. When KBS was deleted from the promoter, the repression of BR-C was abolished. Electrophoresis mobility shift demonstrated that two Kr-h1 molecules bound to KBS in the BR-C promoter. Based on these results, we conclude that Kr-h1 protein molecules directly bind to the KBS sequence in the BR-C promoter and thereby repress 20E-dependent activation of the pupal specifier, BR-C. This study has revealed a considerable portion of the picture of JH signaling pathways from the reception of JH to the repression of metamorphosis.

  5. Lack of gene-language correlation due to reciprocal female but directional male admixture in Austronesians and non-Austronesians of East Timor.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Sibylle M; van Oven, Mannis; Souto, Luis; Morreira, Helena; Brauer, Silke; Bodner, Martin; Zimmermann, Bettina; Huber, Gabriela; Strobl, Christina; Röck, Alexander W; Côrte-Real, Francisco; Parson, Walther; Kayser, Manfred

    2017-02-01

    Nusa Tenggara, including East Timor, located at the crossroad between Island Southeast Asia, Near Oceania, and Australia, are characterized by a complex cultural structure harbouring speakers from two different major linguistic groups of different geographic origins (Austronesian (AN) and non-Austronesian (NAN)). This provides suitable possibilities to study gene-language relationship; however, previous studies from other parts of Nusa Tenggara reported conflicting evidence about gene-language correlation in this region. Aiming to investigate gene-language relationships including sex-mediated aspects in East Timor, we analysed the paternally inherited non-recombining part of the Y chromosome (NRY) and the maternally inherited mitochondrial (mt) DNA in a representative collection of AN- and NAN-speaking groups. Y-SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) data were newly generated for 273 samples and combined with previously established Y-STR (short tandem repeat) data of the same samples, and with previously established mtDNA data of 290 different samples with, however, very similar representation of geographic and linguistic coverage of the country. We found NRY and mtDNA haplogroups of previously described putative East/Southeast Asian (E/SEA) and Near Oceanian (NO) origins in both AN and NAN speakers of East Timor, albeit in different proportions, suggesting reciprocal genetic admixture between both linguistic groups for females, but directional admixture for males. Our data underline the dual genetic origin of East Timorese in E/SEA and NO, and highlight that substantial genetic admixture between the two major linguistic groups had occurred, more so via women than men. Our study therefore provides another example where languages and genes do not conform due to sex-biased genetic admixture across major linguistic groups.

  6. A Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA)-Based Real-Time PCR Assay for the Rapid Detection of Multiple Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance Genes Directly from Positive Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Shen, Dingxia; Zhou, Qiming; Li, Zexia; Fang, Xiangdong; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial strains resistant to various antibiotic drugs are frequently encountered in clinical infections, and the rapid identification of drug-resistant strains is highly essential for clinical treatment. We developed a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based quantitative real-time PCR (LNA-qPCR) method for the rapid detection of 13 antibiotic resistance genes and successfully used it to distinguish drug-resistant bacterial strains from positive blood culture samples. A sequence-specific primer-probe set was designed, and the specificity of the assays was assessed using 27 ATCC bacterial strains and 77 negative blood culture samples. No cross-reaction was identified among bacterial strains and in negative samples, indicating 100% specificity. The sensitivity of the assays was determined by spiking each bacterial strain into negative blood samples, and the detection limit was 1–10 colony forming units (CFU) per reaction. The LNA-qPCR assays were first applied to 72 clinical bacterial isolates for the identification of known drug resistance genes, and the results were verified by the direct sequencing of PCR products. Finally, the LNA-qPCR assays were used for the detection in 47 positive blood culture samples, 19 of which (40.4%) were positive for antibiotic resistance genes, showing 91.5% consistency with phenotypic susceptibility results. In conclusion, LNA-qPCR is a reliable method for the rapid detection of bacterial antibiotic resistance genes and can be used as a supplement to phenotypic susceptibility testing for the early detection of antimicrobial resistance to allow the selection of appropriate antimicrobial treatment and to prevent the spread of resistant isolates. PMID:25775001

  7. Mi-1.2, an R gene for aphid resistance in tomato, has direct negative effects on a zoophytophagous biocontrol agent, Orius insidiosus.

    PubMed

    Pallipparambil, Godshen R; Sayler, Ronald J; Shapiro, Jeffrey P; Thomas, Jean M G; Kring, Timothy J; Goggin, Fiona L

    2015-02-01

    Mi-1.2 is a single dominant gene in tomato that confers race-specific resistance against certain phloem-feeding herbivores including aphids, whiteflies, psyllids, and root-knot nematodes. Few prior studies have considered the potential non-target effects of race-specific resistance genes (R genes), and this paper evaluates the compatibility of Mi-mediated resistance in tomato with a beneficial zoophytophagous predator, Orius insidiosus (Say). In addition to preying on aphids and other pests, this piercing-sucking insect also feeds from the xylem, epidermis, and/or mesophyll, and oviposits within plant tissues. Comparison of O. insidiosus confined to isogenic tomato plants with and without Mi-1.2 revealed that immatures of O. insidiosus had lower survival on resistant plants even when the immatures were provisioned with prey that did not feed on the host plant. Molecular gut content analysis confirmed that adults and immatures of O. insidiosus feed on both resistant (Mi-1.2+) and susceptible (Mi-1.2-) genotypes, and bioassays suggest that resistance does not affect oviposition rates, plant sampling, or prey acceptance by O. insidiosus adults. These results demonstrate a direct negative impact of R-gene-mediated host plant resistance on a non-target beneficial species, and reveal that Mi-mediated resistance can impact organisms that do not feed on phloem sap. Through laser capture microdissection and RT-PCR, Mi-1.2 transcripts were detected in the epidermis and mesophyll as well as the phloem of tomato plants, consistent with our observations that Mi-mediated resistance is active outside the phloem. These results suggest that the mode of action and potential ecological impacts of Mi-mediated resistance are broader than previously assumed.

  8. A locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based real-time PCR assay for the rapid detection of multiple bacterial antibiotic resistance genes directly from positive blood culture.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Shen, Dingxia; Zhou, Qiming; Li, Zexia; Fang, Xiangdong; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial strains resistant to various antibiotic drugs are frequently encountered in clinical infections, and the rapid identification of drug-resistant strains is highly essential for clinical treatment. We developed a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based quantitative real-time PCR (LNA-qPCR) method for the rapid detection of 13 antibiotic resistance genes and successfully used it to distinguish drug-resistant bacterial strains from positive blood culture samples. A sequence-specific primer-probe set was designed, and the specificity of the assays was assessed using 27 ATCC bacterial strains and 77 negative blood culture samples. No cross-reaction was identified among bacterial strains and in negative samples, indicating 100% specificity. The sensitivity of the assays was determined by spiking each bacterial strain into negative blood samples, and the detection limit was 1-10 colony forming units (CFU) per reaction. The LNA-qPCR assays were first applied to 72 clinical bacterial isolates for the identification of known drug resistance genes, and the results were verified by the direct sequencing of PCR products. Finally, the LNA-qPCR assays were used for the detection in 47 positive blood culture samples, 19 of which (40.4%) were positive for antibiotic resistance genes, showing 91.5% consistency with phenotypic susceptibility results. In conclusion, LNA-qPCR is a reliable method for the rapid detection of bacterial antibiotic resistance genes and can be used as a supplement to phenotypic susceptibility testing for the early detection of antimicrobial resistance to allow the selection of appropriate antimicrobial treatment and to prevent the spread of resistant isolates.

  9. Women and AIDS: introduction.

    PubMed

    Krieger, N; Margo, G

    1991-01-01

    Around the world, more and more women--principally poor women of color--are being diagnosed with and are dying of AIDS, the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Yet, effective and appropriate prevention programs for women are sorely missing from the global program to control AIDS. To help us understand why this gap exists, and what we must do to close it, the three articles in this issue focus on women and AIDS. Examining the situation in such countries as Zimbabwe and South Africa, as well as in other economically underdeveloped and developed regions, the authors argue that women with the least control over their bodies and their lives are at greatest risk of acquiring AIDS. For example, the high rate of infection among women in Africa cannot be understood apart from the legacy of colonialism (including land expropriation and the forced introduction of a migrant labor system) and the insidious combination of traditional and European patriarchal values. Only by recognizing the socioeconomic and cultural determinants of both disease and sexual behavior, and only by incorporating these insights into our AIDS prevention programs, will we be able to curb the spread of this lethal disease.

  10. Introduction and Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Nancey

    This chapter provides an overview of some of the history of debates regarding free will, and concurs with several authors who claim that the philosophical discussions have reached a stalemate due to their focus on a metaphysical doctrine of universal determinism. The way ahead, therefore, requires two developments. One is to focus not on determinism but on reductionism; the other is to attend to specific scientific findings that appear to call free will into question. The chapter provides an introduction to the topics of reductionism, emergence, and downward causation, and then surveys the works of Daniel Wegner and Benjamin Libet, which have been taken to show the irrelevance of conscious will in human action. It summarizes the chapters comprising the rest of the volume, and then offers a reflection on the achievement of the work as a whole - in brief, a critique of free-will skeptics based on human capacities such as meta-cognition and long-term planning, which allow agents to exert downward control on neural processes and behavior. It ends by highlighting, in light of Alasdair MacIntyre's work on moral responsibility, an important additional factor involved in creating the possibility for freedom of choice, namely the possession of abstract symbolic language.

  11. Enhancing functional expression of codon-optimized heterologous enzymes in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) by selective introduction of synonymous rare codons.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chao; Wei, Ping; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2017-05-01

    Rare codon in a heterologous gene may cause premature termination of protein synthesis, misincorporation of amino acids, and/or slow translation of mRNA, decreasing the heterologous protein expression. However, its hypothetical function pertaining to functional protein folding has been barely reported. Here, we investigated the effects of selective introduction of synonymous rare codons (SRCs) to two codon-optimized (i.e., rare codon-free) genes sucrose phosphorylase (SP) gene from Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum and amidohydrolase gene from Streptomyces caatingaensis on their expression levels in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). We investigated the introduction of a single SRC to the coding regions of alpha-helix, beta-strand, or linker in the first half of rare codon-free sp and ah gene. The introduction of a single SRC in the beginning of the coding regions of beta-strand greatly enhanced their soluble expression levels as compared to the other regions. Also, we applied directed evolution to test multi-SRC-containing sp gene mutants for enhanced soluble SP expression levels. To easily identify the soluble SP expression level of colonies growing on Petri dishes, mCherry fluorescent protein was used as a SP-folding reporter when it was fused to the 3' end of the sp gene mutant libraries. After three rounds of screening, the best sp gene mutant containing nine SRCs exhibited an approximately six-fold enhancement in soluble protein expression level as compared to the wild-type and rare codon-free sp control. This study suggests that the selective introduction of SRCs can attenuate translation at specific points and such discontinuous attenuation can temporally separate the translation of segments of the peptide chains and actively coordinates their co-translational folding, resulting in enhanced functional protein expression. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1054-1064. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Controlling feeding behavior by chemical or gene-directed targeting in the brain: what's so spatial about our methods?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arshad M.

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial chemical injection (ICI) methods have been used to identify the locations in the brain where feeding behavior can be controlled acutely. Scientists conducting ICI studies often document their injection site locations, thereby leaving kernels of valuable location data for others to use to further characterize feeding control circuits. Unfortunately, this rich dataset has not yet been formally contextualized with other published neuroanatomical data. In particular, axonal tracing studies have delineated several neural circuits originating in the same areas where ICI injection feeding-control sites have been documented, but it remains unclear whether these circuits participate in feeding control. Comparing injection sites with other types of location data would require careful anatomical registration between the datasets. Here, a conceptual framework is presented for how such anatomical registration efforts can be performed. For example, by using a simple atlas alignment tool, a hypothalamic locus sensitive to the orexigenic effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) can be aligned accurately with the locations of neurons labeled by anterograde tracers or those known to express NPY receptors or feeding-related peptides. This approach can also be applied to those intracranial “gene-directed” injection (IGI) methods (e.g., site-specific recombinase methods, RNA expression or interference, optogenetics, and pharmacosynthetics) that involve viral injections to targeted neuronal populations. Spatial alignment efforts can be accelerated if location data from ICI/IGI methods are mapped to stereotaxic brain atlases to allow powerful neuroinformatics tools to overlay different types of data in the same reference space. Atlas-based mapping will be critical for community-based sharing of location data for feeding control circuits, and will accelerate our understanding of structure-function relationships in the brain for mammalian models of obesity and metabolic disorders

  13. The structural HCV genes delivered by MPG cell penetrating peptide are directed to enhance immune responses in mice model.

    PubMed

    Mehrlatifan, Saloume; Mirnurollahi, Seyyedeh Masumeh; Motevalli, Fatemeh; Rahimi, Pooneh; Soleymani, Sepehr; Bolhassani, Azam

    2016-10-01

    One of the significant problems in vaccination projects is the lack of an effective vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV). The goal of the current study is to evaluate and compare two DNA constructs encoding HCV core and coreE1E2 genes alone or complexed with MPG peptide as a delivery system for stimulation of antibody responses and IFN-γ secretion in Balb/c mice model. Indeed, MPG cell penetrating peptide was used to improve DNA immunization in mice. Our results demonstrated that MPG forms stable non-covalent nanoparticles with pcDNA-core and pcDNA-coreE1E2 at an N/P ratio of 10:1. The in vitro transfection efficiency of core or coreE1E2 DNA using MPG and TurboFect delivery systems was confirmed by western blot analysis. The results indicated the expression of the full-length core (∼21 kDa), and coreE1E2 (∼83 kDa) proteins using an anti-His monoclonal antibody. In addition, the expression of HCV core and coreE1E2 proteins was performed in bacteria and the purified recombinant proteins were injected to mice with Montanide 720 adjuvant. Our data showed that the immunized mice with HCV core and coreE1E2 proteins generated the mixture of sera IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes considerably higher than other groups. Furthermore, DNA constructs encoding core and coreE1E2 complexed with MPG could significantly induce IFN-γ secretion in lower concentrations than the naked core and coreE1E2 DNAs. Taken together, the DNA formulations as well as protein regimens used in this study triggered high-level IFN-γ production in mice, an important feature for the development of Th1 immune responses.

  14. Genes V.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, B.

    1994-12-31

    This fifth edition book encompasses a wide range of topics covering 1,272 pages. The book is arranged into nine parts with a total of 36 chapters. These nine parts include Introduction; DNA as a Store of Information; Translation; Constructing Cells; Control of Prokaryotypic Gene Expression; Perpetuation of DNA; Organization of the Eukaryotypic Genome; Eukaryotypic Transcription and RNA Processing; The Dynamic Genome; and Genes in Development.

  15. Introduction to Quantum Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1996-01-01

    An impact of ideas associated with the concept of a hypothetical quantum computer upon classical computing is analyzed. Two fundamental properties of quantum computing: direct simulations of probabilities, and influence between different branches of probabilistic scenarios, as well as their classical versions, are discussed.

  16. Introduction of a new issue paper from CAST - Implications of gene flow in the scale-up and commercial use of biotechnology-derived crops: Economic and Policy Considerations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews the concept of gene flow — the successful transfer of genetic information between different individuals, populations, and generations (to progeny) and across spatial dimensions. The paper also discusses the relatively limited situations in which gene flow is likely to cause ec...

  17. Amelogenesis imperfecta: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Gadhia, K; McDonald, S; Arkutu, N; Malik, K

    2012-04-27

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is an inherited disorder that is associated with mutations in five genes (AMEL; ENAM; MMP20; KLK4 and FAM83H) with a wide range of clinical presentations (phenotypes). It affects the structure and appearance of enamel of all teeth, both in the primary and secondary dentition. In this review paper, we look at the epidemiology, classification, aetiology, clinical description and diagnosis of AI. In the following three papers of this series, we aim to describe the role of paediatric dentists, orthodontists and restorative dentists in the clinical management of patients with AI.

  18. Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, William J.

    Coincidentally, as I sat down in late October 2003 to read and review the second edition of Wallace H. Campbell's text, Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields, we received warnings from the news media of a massive solar flare and its possible effect on power supply systems and satellite communications. News programs briefly explained the source of Sun-Earth interactions. If you are interested in learning more about the physics of the connection between sun spots and power supply systems and their impact on orbiting satellites, I urge you to become acquainted with Campbell's book. It presents an interesting and informative explanation of the geomagnetic field and its applications to a wide variety of topics, including oil exploration, climate change, and fraudulent claims of the utility of magnetic fields for alleviating human pain. Geomagnetism, the study of the nature and processes of the Earth's magnetic fields and its application to the investigation of the Earth, its processes, and history, is a mature science with a well-developed theoretical foundation and a vast array of observations. It is discussed in varied detail in Earth physics books and most entry-level geoscience texts. The latter treatments largely are driven by the need to discuss paleomagnetism as an essential tool in studying plate tectonics. A more thorough explanation of geomagnetism is needed by many interested scientists in related fields and by laypersons. This is the objective of Campbell's book. It is particularly germane in view of a broad range of geomagnetic topics that are at the forefront of today's science, including environmental magnetism, so-called ``jerks'' observed in the Earth's magnetic field, the perplexing magnetic field of Mars, improved satellite magnetic field observations, and the increasing availability of high-quality continental magnetic anomaly maps, to name only a few.

  19. Computer Assisted Introduction to Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha R.

    These six chapters provide an introduction to Newtonian mechanics, based on a coordinated use of text material, laboratory work, and the computer. The material is essentially self-contained so that it can serve as a short text on mechanics or as a text supplement in a regular physics course. Chapter 1 is a brief introduction to the computer…

  20. Connection with dynamics: General introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1993-01-01

    This is a brief nontechnical introduction to a few theoretical issues to the density-velocity relation. The aim of this introduction is not an exhaustive analysis of the current theoretical situation but rather setting a stage for the following talks. The selection of topics has been determined by the sequel program.

  1. Group 1 Allergen Genes in Two Species of House Dust Mites, Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus (Acari: Pyroglyphidae): Direct Sequencing, Characterization and Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Shafique, Rubaba Hamid; Klimov, Pavel B; Inam, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Farhana Riaz; OConnor, Barry M

    2014-01-01

    Group 1 allergens of Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 1) and D. pteronyssinus (Der p 1) dominate overall allergic responses in house dust mite allergy patients. The need for accurate identification and characterization of representative variants of group 1 allergens in any given geographic locality has been emphasized for development of appropriate allergen extracts. Regional amino acid sequence polymorphism has been described but the extent of this polymorphism is not well understood. Such data are completely absent for the USA and many other countries. Most previous studies used cDNA libraries generated by reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR) and/or primers amplifying shorter fragments of this gene. Using novel species-specific primers and direct PCR, we document group 1 allergen gene sequence polymorphism in populations of D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus from the USA and Pakistan. We report two novel introns (nt pos 87 and 291) in both species, and the absence of intron 3 in Der p 1. Thirteen silent and one novel non-synonymous mutation (Tryptophan W197 to Arginine R197) were detected in D. farinae. The potential medical significance of the latter mutation is discussed. Two haplotypes of the Der f 1 gene were identified, haplotype 1 (63%) was more frequent than haplotype 2 (18%). Polymorphism in Der f 1 displayed geographical localization, since both haplotypes were present in mite populations from Pakistan whereas haplotype 1 was observed only in the USA. In Der p 1, a silent mutation at nt (aa) position 1011(149) and four non-synonymous mutations at positions 589(50), 935(124), 971(136), 1268(215) were observed. These mutations were reported from many other geographic regions, suggesting that polymorphism in the Der p 1 gene is panmictic. The extent of polymorphism in both genes is substantially lower than that reported previously (0.10-0.16% vs 0.31-0.49%), indicating the need for careful evaluation of potential polymerase errors in studies utilizing RT-PCR.

  2. An introduction to recombination and linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mcpeek, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    With a garden as his laboratory, Mendel was able to discern basic probabilistic laws of heredity. Although it first appeared as a baffling exception to one of Mendel`s principles, the phenomenon of variable linkage between characters was soon recognized to be a powerful tool in the process of chromosome mapping and location of genes of interest. In this introduction, we first describe Mendel`s work and the subsequent discovery of linkage. Next we describe the apparent cause of variable linkage, namely recombination, and we introduce linkage analysis. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Direct and freely switchable detection of target genes engineered by reduced graphene oxide-poly(m-aminobenzenesulfonic acid) nanocomposite via synchronous pulse electrosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Guan, Qian; Guo, Xiuhong; Meng, Le; Du, Meng; Jiao, Kui

    2013-02-05

    A novel one-step electrochemical synthesis of the reduced graphene oxide and poly(m-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, ABSA) nanocomposite (PABSA-rGNO) via pulse potentiostatic method (PPM) for direct and freely switchable detection of target genes is presented. Unlike most electrochemical preparation of hybrids based on rGNO and polymer, electrochemical synthesis of PABSA (during the pulse electropolymerization period of PPM) and electrochemical reduction of rGNO (during the resting period of PPM), in this paper, were alternately performed. The total progress synchronously resulted in PABSA-rGNO nanocomposite. This nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The PABSA-rGNO nanocomposite integrated graphene (a single-atom thick, two-dimensional sheet of sp(2) bonded conjugated carbon) with PABSA (owning rich-conjugated structures, functional groups, and excellent electrochemical activity), which could serve as an ideal electrode material for biosensing and electrochemical cell, etc. As an example, the immobilization of the specific probe DNA was successfully conducted via the noncovalent method due to the π-π* interaction between conjugated nanocomposite and DNA bases. The hybridization between the probe DNA and target DNA induced the product dsDNA to be released from conjugated nanocomposite, accompanied with the self-signal regeneration of nanocomposite ("signal-on"). The self-signal changes served as a powerful tool for direct and freely switchable detection of different target genes, and the synergistic effect of PABSA-rGNO nanocomposite effectively improved the sensitivity for the target DNA detection.

  4. The influence of variation in the P2Y12 receptor gene on in vitro platelet inhibition with the direct P2Y12 antagonist cangrelor.

    PubMed

    Bouman, H J; van Werkum, J W; Rudez, G; Leebeek, F W G; Kruit, A; Hackeng, C M; Ten Berg, J M; de Maat, M P M; Ruven, H J T

    2010-02-01

    Novel P2Y12 inhibitors are in development to overcome the occurrence of atherothrombotic events associated with poor responsiveness to the widely used P2Y12 inhibitor clopidogrel. Cangrelor is an intravenously administered P2Y12 inhibitor that does not need metabolic conversion to an active metabolite for its antiplatelet action, and as a consequence exhibits a more potent and consistent antiplatelet profile as compared to clopidogrel. It was the objective of this study to determine the contribution of variation in the P2Y12 receptor gene to platelet aggregation after in vitro partial P2Y12 receptor blockade with the direct antagonist cangrelor. Optical aggregometry was performed at baseline and after in vitro addition of 0.05 and 0.25 microM cangrelor to the platelet-rich plasma of 254 healthy subjects. Five haplotype-tagging (ht)-SNPs covering the entire P2Y12 receptor gene were genotyped (rs6798347C>t, rs6787801T>c, rs9859552C>a, rs6801273A>g and rs2046934T>c [T744C]) and haplotypes were inferred. The minor c allele of SNP rs6787801 was associated with a 5% lower 20 microM ADP-induced peak platelet aggregation (0.05 microM cangrelor, p<0.05). Aa homozygotes for SNP rs9859552 showed 20% and 17% less inhibition of platelet aggregation with cangrelor when compared to CC homozygotes (0.05 and 0.25 microM cangrelor respectively; p<0.05). Results of the haplotype analyses were consistent with those of the single SNPs. Polymorphisms of the P2Y12 receptor gene contribute significantly to the interindividual variability in platelet inhibition after partial in vitro blockade with the P2Y12 antagonist cangrelor.

  5. DNA deamination enables direct PCR amplification of the cystatin B (CSTB) gene-associated dodecamer repeat expansion in myoclonus epilepsy type Unverricht-Lundborg.

    PubMed

    Weinhaeusel, Andreas; Morris, Michael A; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Haas, Oskar A

    2003-11-01

    The Unverricht-Lundborg type of progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is caused by the dysfunction of the cystatin B (CSTB) gene product. In the vast majority of affected cases, mRNA transcription is impaired by a biallelic expansion of a dodecamer repeat within the 5'-untranslated region of the respective gene. Since this minisatellite contains exclusively G and C nucleotides, direct PCR analysis of allele expansion is extremely difficult and error prone. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a PCR assay that is based on the deamination of the DNA prior to amplification. We have developed a method based on PCR after DNA deamination of the GC-rich repeat region, which improves the PCR condition to such an extent that we were not only able to reliably amplify expanded alleles of affected individuals (homozygotes and compound heterozygotes), but also the two alleles of full mutation carriers, whose analysis is particularly difficult because of PCR bias and heteroduplex formation between the two alleles. We used promoter- and repeat-specific primer combinations to investigate whether dodecamer repeat expansion concurs with de novo methylation of the CSTB gene promoter in a similar fashion to other repeat expansion syndromes. We confirmed previous evidence obtained by HpaII digestion and Southern blot analysis that both the promoter and the repeat regions are unmethylated, in both healthy and affected individuals. Thus, in contrast to certain trinucleotide repeat expansion-associated diseases, such as fragile X syndrome (FRAXA) and myotonic dystrophy, methylation analyses can not be utilized for indirect diagnostic testing.

  6. High-throughput analysis of promoter occupancy reveals direct neural targets of FOXP2, a gene mutated in speech and language disorders.

    PubMed

    Vernes, Sonja C; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Nicod, Jérôme; Groszer, Matthias; Taylor, Jennifer M; Davies, Kay E; Geschwind, Daniel H; Fisher, Simon E

    2007-12-01

    We previously discovered that mutations of the human FOXP2 gene cause a monogenic communication disorder, primarily characterized by difficulties in learning to make coordinated sequences of articulatory gestures that underlie speech. Affected people have deficits in expressive and receptive linguistic processing and display structural and/or functional abnormalities in cortical and subcortical brain regions. FOXP2 provides a unique window into neural processes involved in speech and language. In particular, its role as a transcription factor gene offers powerful functional genomic routes for dissecting critical neurogenetic mechanisms. Here, we employ chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with promoter microarrays (ChIP-chip) to successfully identify genomic sites that are directly bound by FOXP2 protein in native chromatin of human neuron-like cells. We focus on a subset of downstream targets identified by this approach, showing that altered FOXP2 levels yield significant changes in expression in our cell-based models and that FOXP2 binds in a specific manner to consensus sites within the relevant promoters. Moreover, we demonstrate significant quantitative differences in target expression in embryonic brains of mutant mice, mediated by specific in vivo Foxp2-chromatin interactions. This work represents the first identification and in vivo verification of neural targets regulated by FOXP2. Our data indicate that FOXP2 has dual functionality, acting to either repress or activate gene expression at occupied promoters. The identified targets suggest roles in modulating synaptic plasticity, neurodevelopment, neurotransmission, and axon guidance and represent novel entry points into in vivo pathways that may be disturbed in speech and language disorders.

  7. Isolation of SMA candidate genes from a YAC contig by direct selection of cDNA clones from normalized cDNA libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, B.M.; Bonaldo, M.F.; Vitale, E.

    1994-09-01

    A YAC contig has been constructed across the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) region of chromosome 5 (5q11-13). Further definition by pedigree analysis has yielded a minimal genetic region of 400 kb. For isolation of candidate genes in this region, the following cDNA selection method was hybridized to directionally cloned normalized (Cot 1 DNA-preannealed) cDNA libraries in the form of single-stranded circles. The libraries used were constructed from SMA infant brain and normal fetal liver+spleen. Hybridizing circles were eluted off the filter, partially converted into duplexes and electroporated into bacteria. The selected clones were then sequentially hybridized with a human Cot 1 DNA probe (BRL), and a probe made from the corresponding YAC DNA. Clones that hybridized only to the YAC DNA probe were verified to map to the critical region by genomic Southern analyses. Ten different cDNA clones have been isolated by this procedure so far. Three of them have been definitively mapped back to the region. Four of the ten clones are now completely sequenced. One clone shows sequence homology to a transcriptional initiation factor; another has homology to a prokaryotic attachment site sequence for the lipid moiety of membrane lipoproteins. Two clones show no homology to sequences represented in the public databases. We are continuing the full characterization of the cDNA clones as candidates for the SMA gene.

  8. An immunoaffinity purified Schizosaccharomyces pombe TBP-containing complex directs correct initiation of the S.pombe rRNA gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Guo, A; Pape, L

    1997-01-01

    The multi-protein complex SL1, containing TBP, which is essential for RNA polymerase I catalyzed transcription, has been analyzed in fission yeast. It was immunopurified based on association of component subunits with epitope-tagged TBP. To enable this analysis, a strain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe was created where the only functional TBP coding sequences were those of FLAG-TBP. RNA polymerase I transcription components were fractionated from this strain and the TBP-associated polypeptides were subsequently immunopurified together with the epitope- tagged TBP. An assessment of the activity of this candidate SL1 complex was undertaken cross-species. This fission yeast TBP-containing complex displays two activities in redirecting transcriptional initiation of an S. pombe rDNA gene promoter cross-species in Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription reactions: it both blocks an incorrect transcriptional start site at +7 and directs initiation at the correct site for S. pombe rRNA synthesis. This complex is essential for accurate initiation of the S.pombe rRNA gene: rRNA synthesis is reconstituted when this S.pombe TBP-containing complex is combined with a S.pombe fraction immunodepleted of TBP. PMID:9092673

  9. The nuclear-encoded sigma factor SIG4 directly activates transcription of chloroplast psbA and ycf17 genes in the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Gaku; Imamura, Sousuke; Era, Atsuko; Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Hanaoka, Mitsumasa; Tanaka, Kan

    2015-05-01

    The plant organelle chloroplast originated from the endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterial-like photosynthetic bacterium, and still retains its own genome derived from this ancestor. We have been focusing on a unicellular red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, as a model photosynthetic eukaryote. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional specificity of SIG4, which is one of four nuclear-encoded chloroplast RNA polymerase sigma factors in this alga. Accumulation of the SIG4 protein was observed in response to nitrogen depletion or high light conditions. By comparing the chloroplast transcriptomes under nitrogen depletion and SIG4-overexpressing conditions, we identified several candidate genes as SIG4 targets. Together with the results of chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, the promoters of the psbA (encoding the D1 protein of the photosystem II reaction center) and ycf17 (encoding a protein of the early light-inducible protein family) genes were shown to be direct activation targets. The phycobilisome (PBS) CpcB protein was decreased by SIG4 overexpression, which suggests the negative involvement of SIG4 in PBS accumulation.

  10. DNA microarray technology. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarray technology has revolutionized biological research by enabling genome-scale explorations. This chapter provides an overview of DNA microarray technology and its application to characterizing the physical genome, with a focus on cancer genomes. Specific areas discussed include investigations of DNA copy number alteration (and loss of heterozygosity), DNA methylation, DNA-protein (i.e., chromatin and transcription factor) interactions, DNA replication, and the integration of diverse genome-scale data types. Also provided is a perspective on recent advances and future directions in characterizing the physical genome.

  11. Introduction to radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.L.

    1998-12-31

    This lecture will present time-dependent radiation transport where the radiation is coupled to a static medium, i.e., the material is not in motion. In reality, radiation exerts a pressure on the materials it propagates through and will accelerate the material in the direction of the radiation flow. This fully coupled problem with radiation transport and materials in motion is referred to as radiation-hydrodynamics (or in a shorthand notation: rad-hydro) and is beyond the scope of this lecture.

  12. Introduction to Praxis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, J.R.; Evans, A. Jr.; Morgan, C.R.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1980-07-01

    Praxis is the practice of the programming art, science, and skill. It is a high-order language designed for the efficient programming of control and systems applications. It is a comprehensive, strongly typed, block-structured language in the tradition of Pascal, with much of the power of the Mesa and Ada languages. It supports the development of systems composed of separately compiled modules, user-defined data types, exception handling, detailed control mechanisms, and encapsulated data and routines. Direct access to machine facilities, efficient bit manipulation, and interlocked critical regions are provided within Praxis.

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) following exposure to whole cigarette smoke on a direct in vitro exposure system.

    PubMed

    Fukano, Yasuo; Yoshimura, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Takemi

    2006-07-01

    Many in vitro studies have employed cigarette smoke condensates or soluble smoke components to investigate the biological effects of cigarette smoke. However, neither of these methods evaluates the biological effects of fresh whole cigarette smoke. It is most desirable to conduct in vitro biological studies under conditions which accommodate the dynamic physicochemical character of fresh cigarette smoke. Previously we reported the development of a whole smoke exposure system to assess the biological effects of mainstream cigarette smoke. The exposure system design was based on a combination of the sedimentation procedure and the CULTEX cultivation technique, which includes a systemized air/liquid interface methodology and exposes the cells to fresh smoke at every puff. The aim of this study was to adopt the other biological endpoint to our whole smoke exposure system. We focused on heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA gene expression, an enzyme which has recently been shown to be highly responsible for oxidative stress. In the present study, a dose-response relationship between the HO-1 mRNA expression based on the reverse transcription real-time PCR method and total exposure to cigarette smoke was observed. When a Cambridge filter pad was placed between the cigarette and exposure module, to ensure the cells were only exposed to the gas/vapor phase, the latter, as well as the whole smoke, induced HO-1 mRNA dose dependently. For the next step, acetate plain and charcoal filters with the same pressure drop were prepared to assess the potential ability of charcoal filters with regard to the vapor phase performance. The results revealed reduced HO-1 mRNA gene expression when a charcoal filter was used. Direct whole smoke exposure is a significant approach and may reflect the conditions of exposure essentially resulting from direct contact between cells and a dynamic mixture of gaseous and particulate constituents. We were able to adopt a gene expression assay for oxidative

  14. The study of homology between tumor progression genes and members of retroviridae as a tool to predict target-directed therapy failure

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Janaina

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenes are the primary candidates for target-directed therapy, given that they are involved directly in the progression and resistance of tumors. However, the appearance of point mutations can hinder the treatment of patients with these new molecules, raising costs and the need to development new analogs that target the novel mutations. Based on an analysis of homologies, the present study discusses the possibility of predicting the failure of a protein as a pharmacological target, due to its similarities with retrovirus sequences, which have extremely high mutation rates. This analysis was based on the molecular evidence available in the literature, and widely-used and well-established PSI-BLAST, with two iterations and maximum of 500 aligned sequences. The possibility of predicting which newly-discovered genes involved in tumor progression would likely result in the failure of targeted therapy, using free, simple and automated bioinformatics tools, could provide substantial savings in the time and financial resources needed for long-term drug development. PMID:25983693

  15. Adenylyl cyclase A expression is tip-specific in Dictyostelium slugs and directs StatA nuclear translocation and CudA gene expression.

    PubMed

    Verkerke-van Wijk, I; Fukuzawa, M; Devreotes, P N; Schaap, P

    2001-06-01

    cAMP oscillations, generated by adenylyl cyclase A (ACA), coordinate cell aggregation in Dictyostelium and have also been implicated in organizer function during multicellular development. We used a gene fusion of the ACA promoter with a labile lacZ derivative to study the expression pattern of ACA. During aggregation, most cells expressed ACA, but thereafter expression was lost in all cells except those of the anterior tip. Before aggregation, ACA transcription was strongly upregulated by nanomolar cAMP pulses. Postaggregative transcription was sustained by nanomolar cAMP pulses, but downregulated by a continuous micromolar cAMP stimulus and by the stalk-cell-inducing factor DIF. Earlier work showed that the transcription factor StatA displays tip-specific nuclear translocation and directs tip-specific expression of the nuclear protein CudA, which is essential for culmination. Both StatA and CudA were present in nuclei throughout the entire slug in an aca null mutant that expresses ACA from the constitutive actin15 promoter. This suggests that the tip-specific expression of ACA directs tip-specific nuclear translocation of StatA and tip-specific expression of CudA.

  16. Direct Comparison of a Natural Loss-Of-Function Single Nucleotide Polymorphism with a Targeted Deletion in the Ncf1 Gene Reveals Different Phenotypes