Science.gov

Sample records for directed gene introduction

  1. Direct Introduction of Genes into Rats and Expression of the Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenisty, Nissim; Reshef, Lea

    1986-12-01

    A method of introducing actively expressed genes into intact mammals is described. DNA precipitated with calcium phosphate has been injected intraperitoneally into newborn rats. The injected genes have been taken up and expressed by the animal tissues. To examine the generality of the method we have injected newborn rats with the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase prokaryotic gene fused with various viral and cellular gene promoters and the gene for hepatitis B surface antigen, and we observed appearance of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity and hepatitis B surface antigen in liver and spleen. In addition, administration of genes coding for hormones (insulin or growth hormone) resulted in their expression.

  2. Plant introductions, hybridization and gene flow.

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Richard J; James, Juliet K; Milne, Richard I; Gillies, Amanda C M

    2003-01-01

    Many regional floras contain a high proportion of recently introduced plant species. Occasionally, hybridization between an introduced species and another species (introduced or native) can result in interspecific gene flow. This may occur even in instances where the F(1) hybrid shows very high sterility, but occasionally produces a few viable gametes. We provide examples of gene flow occurring between some rhododendrons recently introduced to the British flora, and between an introduced and native Senecio species. Neutral molecular markers have normally been employed to obtain evidence of interspecific gene flow, but the challenge now is to isolate and characterize functional introgressed genes and to determine how they affect the fitness of introgressants and whether they improve adaptation to novel habitats allowing introgressants to expand the range of a species. We outline a candidate gene approach for isolating and characterizing an allele of the RAY gene in Senecio vulgaris, which is believed to have introgressed from S. squalidus, and which causes the production of ray florets in flower heads. We discuss the effects of this introgressed allele on individual fitness, including those that originate directly from the production of ray florets plus those that may arise from pleiotropy and/or linkage. PMID:12831478

  3. Introduction to the Gene Expression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Segundo-Val, Ignacio San; Sanz-Lozano, Catalina S

    2016-01-01

    In 1941, Beadle and Tatum published experiments that would explain the basis of the central dogma of molecular biology, whereby the DNA through an intermediate molecule, called RNA, results proteins that perform the functions in cells. Currently, biomedical research attempts to explain the mechanisms by which develops a particular disease, for this reason, gene expression studies have proven to be a great resource. Strictly, the term "gene expression" comprises from the gene activation until the mature protein is located in its corresponding compartment to perform its function and contribute to the expression of the phenotype of cell.The expression studies are directed to detect and quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of a specific gene. The development of the RNA-based gene expression studies began with the Northern Blot by Alwine et al. in 1977. In 1969, Gall and Pardue and John et al. independently developed the in situ hybridization, but this technique was not employed to detect mRNA until 1986 by Coghlan. Today, many of the techniques for quantification of RNA are deprecated because other new techniques provide more information. Currently the most widely used techniques are qPCR, expression microarrays, and RNAseq for the transcriptome analysis. In this chapter, these techniques will be reviewed. PMID:27300529

  4. [A brief introduction to the methods for novel gene cloning].

    PubMed

    Sun, C X; Yu, A C

    2000-01-01

    There are a lot of methods for novel gene cloning, but how to clone candidate gene(s) quickly and correctly? This is a brief introduction to methods of novel gene cloning, these methods includes: differential display reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction(DD RT-PCR), suppression subtractive hybridization(SSH), RNA arbitrarily primed PCR(RAP-PCR), representational difference analysis(RDA), yeast two-hybrid system, cDNA capturation, et al. We not only introduced these methods, but also discussed the advantages and disadvantages of them. However, no single method is omnipotent, one should pick up the method most suitable for a special purpose. PMID:12532765

  5. Approaches to modeling gene regulatory networks: a gentle introduction.

    PubMed

    Schlitt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is split into two main sections; first, I will present an introduction to gene networks. Second, I will discuss various approaches to gene network modeling which will include some examples for using different data sources. Computational modeling has been used for many different biological systems and many approaches have been developed addressing the different needs posed by the different application fields. The modeling approaches presented here are not limited to gene regulatory networks and occasionally I will present other examples. The material covered here is an update based on several previous publications by Thomas Schlitt and Alvis Brazma (FEBS Lett 579(8),1859-1866, 2005; Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 361(1467), 483-494, 2006; BMC Bioinformatics 8(suppl 6), S9, 2007) that formed the foundation for a lecture on gene regulatory networks at the In Silico Systems Biology workshop series at the European Bioinformatics Institute in Hinxton. PMID:23715978

  6. Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to a special issue of the journal General and Comparative Endocrinology dedicated to Insect Endocrinology. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequences ...

  7. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graauw, T.

    2010-04-01

    By far the most dramatic event that happened in Chile since the last newsletter was of course the big earthquake on 27th February. This affected everybody's lives in one way or another but we feel extremely lucky that none of the ALMA staff were injured. While the property damage in the Santiago area is limited, further south the disruption was much more severe and several families of our staff suffered significant material damage and were deprived for some time from food and water. In response to this critical situation, we arranged three emergency shipments of supplies, and ALMA staff volunteers transported these to Regions VII and VIII, the regions most affected by the catastrophe. Also, we set up a relief fund to collect and channel donations from employees. The ALMA site is far enough from the epicenter that there was no direct effect but it was necessary to put the activities there into a standby mode so that the staff members who needed to, could return home to be with their families. Operations resumed on the 8th of March. However, there have been plenty of positive things happening within the Project as well. January saw the formal start of Commissioning and Science Verification (CSV). This is the process which is intended to take the whole instrument from the stage where it is a collection of very complex parts which have been integrated together and make it into an instrument capable of producing images and making measurements with the exquisite sensitivity and precision which is the goal of the project. The work started with the three antennas in the "Phase I" locations somewhat to the west of the site. At the end of March the antennas were moved to a new location at the center of the site, using the antenna stations that will eventually form the Atacama Compact Array. This enables us to put the antennas close together, which is essential for some of the critical tests of the antenna performance and the stability of the system. You can find more details

  8. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.; Gunsing, F.; Pronyaev, V. G.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Volume 24 `Neutron Resonance Parameters' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides the introduction into the topic and an explanation of the symbols and notation used.

  9. Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The introduction to the second edition of the Compendium of Apple and Pear Diseases contains a general description of genus and species of commercial importance, some general information about growth and fruiting habits as well as recent production statistics. A general description of major scion c...

  10. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, Luigi

    This chapter introduces the context, objectives and structure of the book. This book aims both to contribute to disseminate the knowledge about the scientific research conducted in space and to promote new exploitation of existing data in this field. While space experiments are characterised by a long time for preparation, high costs and few opportunities, significant scientific value is expected from the resulting data for almost scientific disciplines. In this context, ISS is a unique experimental environment for research. As part of its Seventh Framework Programme, the European Commission intends to support further exploitation and valorisation of space experimental data. This book was realised as part of the ULISSE project, co-funded by the European Union. The book intends to provide an introduction to space research with a focus on the experiments performed on the ISS and related disciplines. The book also intends to be a useful guide, not only for scientists but also for teachers, students and newcomers to space research activities.

  11. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingshirn, C.

    The purpose of this introduction is - after a few general words on ZnO - to inform the reader about the history of ZnO research, the contents of this book and the intentions of the authors. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a IIb-VI compound semiconductor. This group comprises the binary compounds of Zn, Cd and Hg with O, S, Se, Te and their ternary and quaternary alloys. The band gaps of these compounds cover the whole band gap range from E g ≈ 3. 94 eV for hexagonal ZnS down to semimetals (i.e., E g = 0 eV) for most of the mercury compounds. ZnO itself is also a wide gap semiconductor with E g ≈ 3. 436 eV at T = 0 K and (3. 37 ± 0. 01) eV at room temperature. For more details on the band structure, see Chaps. 4 and 6 or for a recent collection of data on ZnO, for example, [Rössler et al. (eds) Landolt-Börnstein, New Series, Group III, Vols. 17 B, 22, and 41B, 1999]. Like most of the compounds of groups IV, III-V, IIb-VI and Ib-VII, ZnO shows a tetrahedral coordination. In contrast to several other IIb-VI compounds, which occur both in the hexagonal wurtzite and the cubic zinc blende type structure such as ZnS, which gave the name to these two modifications, ZnO occurs almost exclusively in the wurtzite type structure. It has a relatively strong ionic binding (see Chap. 2). The exciton binding energy in ZnO is 60 meV [Thomas, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 15:86, 1960], the largest among the IIb-VI compounds, but by far not the largest for all semiconductors since, for example, CuCl and CuO have exciton binding energies around 190 and 150 meV, respectively. See, for example, [Rössler et al. (eds) Landolt-Börnstein, New Series, Group III, Vols. 17B, 22, and 41B, 1999; Thomas, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 15:86, 1960; Klingshirn and Haug, Phy. Rep. 70:315, 1981; Hönerlage et al., Phys. Rep. 124:161, 1985] and references therein. More details on excitons will be given in Chap. 6. ZnO has a density of about 5. 6 g / cm3 corresponding to 4. 2 × 1022 ZnO molecules per cm3 [Hallwig and

  12. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, Cees; Develder, Chris; Jukan, Admela; Mambretti, Joe

    This topic is devoted to communication issues in scalable compute and storage systems, such as parallel computers, networks of workstations, and clusters. All aspects of communication in modern systems were solicited, including advances in the design, implementation, and evaluation of interconnection networks, network interfaces, system and storage area networks, on-chip interconnects, communication protocols, routing and communication algorithms, and communication aspects of parallel and distributed algorithms. In total 15 papers were submitted to this topic of which we selected the 7 strongest papers. We grouped the papers in two sessions of 3 papers each and one paper was selected for the best paper session. We noted a number of papers dealing with changing topologies, stability and forwarding convergence in source routing based cluster interconnect network architectures. We grouped these for the first session. The authors of the paper titled: “Implementing a Change Assimilation Mechanism for Source Routing Interconnects” propose a mechanism that can obtain the new topology, and compute and distribute a new set of fabric paths to the source routed network end points to minimize the impact on the forwarding service. The article entitled “Dependability Analysis of a Fault-tolerant Network Reconfiguration Strateg” reports on a case study analyzing the effects of network size, mean time to node failure, mean time to node repair, mean time to network repair and coverage of the failure when using a 2D mesh network with a fault-tolerant mechanism (similar to the one used in the BlueGene/L system), that is able to remove rows and/or columns in the presence of failures. The last paper in this session: “RecTOR: A New and Efficient Method for Dynamic Network Reconfiguration” presents a new dynamic reconfiguration method, that ensures deadlock-freedom during the reconfiguration without causing performance degradation such as increased latency or decreased

  13. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, Cees; Develder, Chris; Jukan, Admela; Mambretti, Joe

    This topic is devoted to communication issues in scalable compute and storage systems, such as parallel computers, networks of workstations, and clusters. All aspects of communication in modern systems were solicited, including advances in the design, implementation, and evaluation of interconnection networks, network interfaces, system and storage area networks, on-chip interconnects, communication protocols, routing and communication algorithms, and communication aspects of parallel and distributed algorithms. In total 15 papers were submitted to this topic of which we selected the 7 strongest papers. We grouped the papers in two sessions of 3 papers each and one paper was selected for the best paper session. We noted a number of papers dealing with changing topologies, stability and forwarding convergence in source routing based cluster interconnect network architectures. We grouped these for the first session. The authors of the paper titled: “Implementing a Change Assimilation Mechanism for Source Routing Interconnects” propose a mechanism that can obtain the new topology, and compute and distribute a new set of fabric paths to the source routed network end points to minimize the impact on the forwarding service. The article entitled “Dependability Analysis of a Fault-tolerant Network Reconfiguration Strateg” reports on a case study analyzing the effects of network size, mean time to node failure, mean time to node repair, mean time to network repair and coverage of the failure when using a 2D mesh network with a fault-tolerant mechanism (similar to the one used in the BlueGene/L system), that is able to remove rows and/or columns in the presence of failures. The last paper in this session: “RecTOR: A New and Efficient Method for Dynamic Network Reconfiguration” presents a new dynamic reconfiguration method, that ensures deadlock-freedom during the reconfiguration without causing performance degradation such as increased latency or decreased

  14. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koper, Rob

    In 2003 we started a new research programme at the Centre for Learning Sciences and Technologies (CELSTEC) that was aiming to help people to further develop their professional competences by using the innovative powers of new media, mobile devices, and modern Internet services. The idea behind the programme was to contribute to one of the bigger challenges in our society: how to deal with the growing complexity, the growing quantity and the permanent changes in knowledge and technologies. For companies this question relates to the core of their business: how to become innovative and stay competitive. For the employees, the ‘professionals’, this question relates directly to their jobs: how to become and stay employable. In this book we will concentrate on the last group, the professionals and their question how to stay employable, how to keep up-to-date and how to develop professional competence during their careers. The professionals represent the human capital, the knowledge, the innovative power in our economy.

  15. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.

    In the history of modern physics and engineering, the electron quantum mechanical effect and its utilization in electronics have attracted much attention. With increase in demand for ultrahigh sensitivity of signal sensing, ultrahigh speed of data processing, ultralow power dissipation of computer components and so on, quantum effect electronics has become more and more promising. Since the middle of the twentieth century most of vacuum electronics have been replaced by the solid state electronics, where the electron dynamics are well described by the band-diagram description. Solid state electronics itself and band-diagram description were originally in the category of quantum mechanics. However, the treatment of carriers based on the band-diagram inside semiconductors used the classical model where the electron wave concept has been missing. One should perceive it to be also true even for semiconductor superlattices. In the late twentieth century, along with the extremely miniaturized scale of semiconductor devices, mesoscopic physics and mesoscopic electronics have boomed. In this research area, one attempts to manipulate directly the coherent electron wave instead of the electron particle. In ordinary semiconductors, however, only the nanoscale dimension allowed us to handle electron wave interference, interaction and so on to some extent. Besides, success was obtained only at cryogenic temperatures. Collisions between electrons or between electron and lattice (or impurity) was recognized again as a forcible enemy of electron wave engineering. It was a time when both researchers and engineers in the field were urged forward to search for better physical and engineering stages where no electron collisions take place thereby maintaining electron wave coherency over very long distances in the appropriate temperature range.

  16. Mechanism of introduction of exogenous genes into cultured cells using DEAE-dextran-MMA graft copolymer as non-viral gene carrier.

    PubMed

    Eshita, Yuki; Higashihara, Junko; Onishi, Masayasu; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yoshida, Jun; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kubota, Naoji; Onishi, Yasuhiko

    2009-07-23

    Comparative investigations were carried out regarding the efficiency of introduction of exogenous genes into cultured cells using a cationic polysaccharide DEAE-dextran-MMA (methyl methacrylate ester) graft copolymer (2-diethylaminoethyl-dextran-methyl methacrylate graft copolymer; DDMC) as a nonviral carrier for gene introduction. The results confirmed that the gene introduction efficiency was improved with DDMC relative to DEAE-dextran. Comparative investigations were carried out using various concentrations of DDMC and DNA in the introduction of DNA encoding luciferase (pGL3 control vector; Promega) into COS-7 cells derived from African green monkey kidney cells. The complex formation reaction is thought to be directly proportional to the transformation rate, but the complex formation reaction between DDMC and DNA is significantly influenced by hydrophobic bonding strength along with hydrogen bonding strength and Coulomb forces due to the hydrophobicity of the grafted MMA sections. It is thought that the reaction is a Michaelis-Menten type complex formation reaction described by the following equation: Complex amount = K1 (DNA concentration)(DDMC concentration). In support of this equation, it was confirmed that the amount of formed complex was proportional to the RLU value.

  17. Energy, genes and evolution: introduction to an evolutionary synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lane, Nick; Martin, William F; Raven, John A; Allen, John F

    2013-07-19

    Life is the harnessing of chemical energy in such a way that the energy-harnessing device makes a copy of itself. No energy, no evolution. The 'modern synthesis' of the past century explained evolution in terms of genes, but this is only part of the story. While the mechanisms of natural selection are correct, and increasingly well understood, they do little to explain the actual trajectories taken by life on Earth. From a cosmic perspective-what is the probability of life elsewhere in the Universe, and what are its probable traits?-a gene-based view of evolution says almost nothing. Irresistible geological and environmental changes affected eukaryotes and prokaryotes in very different ways, ones that do not relate to specific genes or niches. Questions such as the early emergence of life, the morphological and genomic constraints on prokaryotes, the singular origin of eukaryotes, and the unique and perplexing traits shared by all eukaryotes but not found in any prokaryote, are instead illuminated by bioenergetics. If nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution, nothing in evolution makes sense except in the light of energetics. This Special Issue of Philosophical Transactions examines the interplay between energy transduction and genome function in the major transitions of evolution, with implications ranging from planetary habitability to human health. We hope that these papers will contribute to a new evolutionary synthesis of energetics and genetics.

  18. Early introduction of direct oral anticoagulants in cardioembolic stroke patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Cappellari, Manuel; Carletti, Monica; Danese, Alessandra; Bovi, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are superior to warfarin in reduction of the intracranial bleeding risk. The aim of the present study was to assess whether early DOAC introduction (1-3 days after onset) in stroke patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (nVAF) may be safe and effective, compared with DOAC introduction after 4-7 days. We conducted a prospective analysis based on data collected from 147 consecutive nVAF patients who started DOAC within 7 days after stroke onset. In all patients, we performed pre-DOAC CT scan 24-36 h after onset and follow-up CT scan at 7 days after DOAC introduction. Outcome measures were post-DOAC intracranial bleeding (new any intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in patients with pre-DOAC infarct without hemorrhagic transformation (HT) or expansion of ICH in patients with pre-DOAC infarct with asymptomatic HT) and post-DOAC recurrent ischemic stroke (any new ischemic infarct) on follow-up CT scan. 97 patients started DOAC after 1-3 days and 50 patients started DOAC after 4-7 days. On pre-DOAC CT scan, 132 patients had an infarct without HT and 15 an infarct with asymptomatic HT. On follow-up CT scan, new any ICH was noted in seven patients (asymptomatic in 6) and asymptomatic expansion of ICH in one patient. We found no association between early DOAC introduction and intracranial bleeding. Large infarct remained the only independent predictor of post-DOAC intracranial bleeding. No patients suffered recurrent ischemic stroke after DOAC introduction. Early DOAC introduction might be safe in carefully selected patients with nVAF who experience small- and medium-sized cardioembolic ischemic strokes. Further investigation will be needed. PMID:27329483

  19. Introduction to direct variational and moment methods and an application to the Child-Langmuir law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D.; Desaix, M.

    2015-11-01

    A short introduction is given of direct variational methods and its relation to Galerkin and moment methods, all flexible and powerful approaches for finding approximate solutions of difficult physical equations. A pedagogical application of moment methods is given to the physically and technically important Child-Langmuir law in electron physics. The analysis is shown to provide simple, yet accurate, approximate solutions of the two-dimensional problem (a problem which does not allow an exact analytical solution) and illustrates the usefulness and the power of moment methods.

  20. Electrothermal vaporization for sample introduction into a three-electrode direct current argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, W.G.; Matusiewicz, H.; Barnes, R.M.

    1986-05-01

    The direct current plasma (DCP) configuration developed by Elliott has been shown to be an excellent source for analytical atomic emission spectrometry. The application of DCP excitation for atomic emission (AES) measurements of trace metals has, during the past 10 years, enhanced the versatility of AES as an analytical technique. In normal use, sample is pumped continuously into a ceramic cross-flow nebulizer, and the resulting aerosol is transported to the excitation region of the plasma. This approach is satisfactory for routine analyses, but under special circumstances benefits may be obtained from the use of electrothermal vaporization (ETV) sample introduction. In this study the adaptation of the commercial electrothermal vaporization system is explored for sample introduction into the three-electrode DCP. The ETV technique reduces the sample volume required for analysis and is especially convenient for volumes in the 5-20 ..mu..L range. Recent studies of aerosol approaching the plasma indicate that elimination of the solvent by ETV may permit more efficient introduction of the sample directly into the excitation region of the DCP than with conventional nebulization. Three elements chosen for this feasibility investigation (aluminum, copper, and manganese) cover a range of vaporization and excitation conditions and illustrate problems expected in analytical applications. For each element the effects of carrier gas flow rate and observation region were investigated using 1 ..mu..g/mL solutions. The conditions providing the best signal-to-background ratio were employed to measure the calibration function and estimate the detection limit. 8 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  1. Strategies used for genetically modifying bacterial genome: ite-directed mutagenesis, gene inactivation, and gene over-expression*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian-zhong; Zhang, Wei-guo

    2016-01-01

    With the availability of the whole genome sequence of Escherichia coli or Corynebacterium glutamicum, strategies for directed DNA manipulation have developed rapidly. DNA manipulation plays an important role in understanding the function of genes and in constructing novel engineering bacteria according to requirement. DNA manipulation involves modifying the autologous genes and expressing the heterogenous genes. Two alternative approaches, using electroporation linear DNA or recombinant suicide plasmid, allow a wide variety of DNA manipulation. However, the over-expression of the desired gene is generally executed via plasmid-mediation. The current review summarizes the common strategies used for genetically modifying E. coli and C. glutamicum genomes, and discusses the technical problem of multi-layered DNA manipulation. Strategies for gene over-expression via integrating into genome are proposed. This review is intended to be an accessible introduction to DNA manipulation within the bacterial genome for novices and a source of the latest experimental information for experienced investigators. PMID:26834010

  2. The Comparative Utility of Viromer RED and Lipofectamine for Transient Gene Introduction into Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sudheendra; Morales, Alejo A.; Pearse, Damien D.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of genes into glial cells for mechanistic studies of cell function and as a therapeutic for gene delivery is an expanding field. Though viral vector based systems do exhibit good delivery efficiency and long-term production of the transgene, the need for transient gene expression, broad and rapid gene setup methodologies, and safety concerns regarding in vivo application still incentivize research into the use of nonviral gene delivery methods. In the current study, aviral gene delivery vectors based upon cationic lipid (Lipofectamine 3000) lipoplex or polyethylenimine (Viromer RED) polyplex technologies were examined in cell lines and primary glial cells for their transfection efficiencies, gene expression levels, and toxicity. The transfection efficiencies of polyplex and lipoplex agents were found to be comparable in a limited, yet similar, transfection setting, with or without serum across a number of cell types. However, differential effects on cell-specific transgene expression and reduced viability with cargo loaded polyplex were observed. Overall, our data suggests that polyplex technology could perform comparably to the market dominant lipoplex technology in transfecting various cells lines including glial cells but also stress a need for further refinement of polyplex reagents to minimize their effects on cell viability. PMID:26539498

  3. Introduction of Foreign Genes into Tissues of Living Mice by DNA-Coated Microprojectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders Williams, R.; Johnston, Stephen A.; Riedy, Mark; Devit, Michael J.; McElligott, Sandra G.; Sanford, John C.

    1991-04-01

    Foreign genes were expressed in liver and skin cells of live mice by using a new apparatus to accelerate DNA-coated microprojectiles into tissues. After introduction of a plasmid in which the firefly luciferase gene was controlled by the human β-actin promoter, luciferase activity was detectable for up to 14 days in mouse tissues (skin and liver). In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that microprojectiles penetrated through multiple cell layers without evidence of tissue injury and that 10-20% of the cells in the bombarded area expressed the foreign gene. An advantage of the new design is that internal organs, such as liver, can be transfected without subjecting the tissue to a vacuum. This procedure potentially is applicable to a wide variety of tissues and cell types for studies of transcriptional control elements and for expression of foreign proteins in intact animals.

  4. Introduction of foreign genes into tissues of living mice by DNA-coated microprojectiles.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R S; Johnston, S A; Riedy, M; DeVit, M J; McElligott, S G; Sanford, J C

    1991-01-01

    Foreign genes were expressed in liver and skin cells of live mice by using a new apparatus to accelerate DNA-coated microprojectiles into tissues. After introduction of a plasmid in which the firefly luciferase gene was controlled by the human beta-actin promoter, luciferase activity was detectable for up to 14 days in mouse tissues (skin and liver). In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that microprojectiles penetrated through multiple cell layers without evidence of tissue injury and that 10-20% of the cells in the bombarded area expressed the foreign gene. An advantage of the new design is that internal organs, such as liver, can be transfected without subjecting the tissue to a vacuum. This procedure potentially is applicable to a wide variety of tissues and cell types for studies of transcriptional control elements and for expression of foreign proteins in intact animals. Images PMID:2011582

  5. Three-electrode direct current argon plasma: studies in discrete sample introduction, mathematical correction of drifted plasma data, and organic solvent introduction effects in the plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Boyko, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis investigates three areas of research with the three-electrode direct-current argon plasma(DCP). The first area examines discrete sample introduction into the DCP. Discrete sampling, well known for its sample conservation advantage, has been used with flame atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopies but no work has been published on using this sampling mode with the DCP. Discrete sample introduction is compared here to the standard continuous sampling mode. An unique sample drop generator is described and characterized. Results are given for a variety of system effects and used to explain the effect of sample drop size on emission intensity. The second area of research involves the use of mathematical correction techniques for removing the effect of plasma emission drift from analytical data. The introduction of hydrophobic samples into the DCP is the last area examined in this thesis. Organic matrices are routinely run on the DCP but they can be prone to little understood matrix interferences effects. A modified sample introduction chimney was designed that largely eliminated the carbon buildup encountered with the standard chimney permitting extensive studies using organic solvent with the plasma. It was found that the analytical emission zone of the plasma appears to be spatially tied to the plasma core.

  6. Size Dependence of the Bandgap of Plasma Synthesized Silicon Nanoparticles Through Direct Introduction of Sulfur Hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Theingi, S.; Guan, T. Y.; Kendrick, C.; Klafehn, G.; Gorman, B. P.; Taylor, P. C.; Lusk, M. T.; Stradins, Pauls; Collins, R. T.

    2015-10-19

    Developing silicon nanoparticle (SiNP) synthesis techniques that allow for straightforward control of nanoparticle size and associated optical properties is critical to potential applications of these materials. In addition, it is, in general, hard to probe the absorption threshold in these materials due to silicon's low absorption coefficient. In this study, size is controlled through direct introduction of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) into the dilute silane precursor of plasma synthesized SiNPs. Size reduction by nearly a factor of two with high crystallinity independent of size is demonstrated. Optical absorption spectra of the SiNPs in the vicinity of the bandgap are measured using photothermal deflection spectroscopy. Bandgap as a function of size is extracted taking into account the polydispersity of the samples. A systematic blue shift inabsorption edge due to quantum confinement in the SiNPs is observed with increasing flow of SF6. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra show a similar blue shift with size. However, a ~300 meV difference in energy between emission and absorption for all sizes suggests that PL emission involves a defect related process. While PL may allow size-induced shifts in the bandgap of SiNPs to be monitored, it cannot be relied on to give an accurate value for the bandgap as a function of size.

  7. Size dependence of the bandgap of plasma synthesized silicon nanoparticles through direct introduction of sulfur hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Theingi, S.; Guan, T. Y.; Klafehn, G.; Taylor, P. C.; Lusk, M. T.; Collins, R. T.; Kendrick, C.; Gorman, B. P.; Stradins, P.

    2015-10-19

    Developing silicon nanoparticle (SiNP) synthesis techniques that allow for straightforward control of nanoparticle size and associated optical properties is critical to potential applications of these materials. In addition, it is, in general, hard to probe the absorption threshold in these materials due to silicon's low absorption coefficient. In this study, size is controlled through direct introduction of sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) into the dilute silane precursor of plasma synthesized SiNPs. Size reduction by nearly a factor of two with high crystallinity independent of size is demonstrated. The optical absorption spectra of the SiNPs in the vicinity of the bandgap are measured using photothermal deflection spectroscopy. Bandgap as a function of size is extracted taking into account the polydispersity of the samples. A systematic blue shift in absorption edge due to quantum confinement in the SiNPs is observed with increasing flow of SF{sub 6}. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra show a similar blue shift with size. However, a ∼300 meV difference in energy between emission and absorption for all sizes suggests that PL emission involves a defect related process. This shows that, while PL may allow size-induced shifts in the bandgap of SiNPs to be monitored, it cannot be relied on to give an accurate value for the bandgap as a function of size.

  8. Photodynamically induced cell cycle and gene expression changes: precursors of apoptosis introduction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krammer, Barbara E.; Verwanger, Thomas; Schnitzhofer, Gerlinde

    1997-12-01

    Photodynamic tumor therapy is able to induce apoptosis with many photosensitizers. Apoptosis is based on changes in gene expression and correlated to cell cycle activities. In this study, therefore, quantitative determination of the expression of the (proto)oncoges c-myc and bcl-2 in normal and transformed fibroblasts following PDT with ALA and low dose irradiation was connected with cell cycle analysis in order to investigate, if a risk for occurrence of secondary tumors by irreversibly increased oncogene expression can be found, if phases of the cell cycle show selective sensitivity to the therapy, and if changes in one of the two or both parameters may either precede or prepare an introduction of apoptosis. The results show (1) no mutagenic risk by timely limited overexpression of c-myc and bcl-2, (2) no selective cell cycle sensitivity to the therapy; but, in contrary, sustained increase of the proliferative activity of the transformed cells by the interaction of bcl-2 and c-myc, indicating a risk of promotion of tumor regrowth in sublethally damaged areas, (3) the introduction of apoptotic processes by low dose PDT in the cytoplasm/mitochondria and less in the nucleus. Transformed cells show higher constitutive gene expression and proliferative activities than normal cells.

  9. Identification of direction in gene networks from expression and methylation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Reverse-engineering gene regulatory networks from expression data is difficult, especially without temporal measurements or interventional experiments. In particular, the causal direction of an edge is generally not statistically identifiable, i.e., cannot be inferred as a statistical parameter, even from an unlimited amount of non-time series observational mRNA expression data. Some additional evidence is required and high-throughput methylation data can viewed as a natural multifactorial gene perturbation experiment. Results We introduce IDEM (Identifying Direction from Expression and Methylation), a method for identifying the causal direction of edges by combining DNA methylation and mRNA transcription data. We describe the circumstances under which edge directions become identifiable and experiments with both real and synthetic data demonstrate that the accuracy of IDEM for inferring both edge placement and edge direction in gene regulatory networks is significantly improved relative to other methods. Conclusion Reverse-engineering directed gene regulatory networks from static observational data becomes feasible by exploiting the context provided by high-throughput DNA methylation data. An implementation of the algorithm described is available at http://code.google.com/p/idem/. PMID:24182195

  10. Introduction of yeast artificial chromosomes containing mutant human amyloid precursor protein genes into transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Call, L.M.; Lamb, B.T.; Boese, K.F.

    1994-09-01

    Several hypothetical mechanisms have been proposed for the generation and deposition of the amyloid beta (A{beta}) peptide in Alzheimer`s disease (AD). These include overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene, as suggested by Down Syndrome (DS, trisomy 21), and mutation of APP, as suggested by mutations associated with the presence of disease/amyloid deposition in some cases of familial AD (FAD). Although numerous in vitro studies have lead to certain insights into the molecular basis for amyloid deposition, the mechanisms(s) of amyloidogenesis in vivo remains poorly defined. To examine the effect of FAD mutations on amyloidogenesis in an animal model, we have focused on producing APP YAC transgenic mice containing the human APP gene with FAD mutations. These APP YAC transgenics are being produced by introduction of a 650 kb APP YAC through lipid-mediated transfection of ES cells. This strategy has two principal advantages: the APP genomic sequences contain transcriptional regulatory elements required for proper spatial and temporal expression and contain appropriate splice donor and acceptor sites needed to generate the entire spectrum of alternatively spliced APP transcripts. As a first step, we cloned the genomic regions surrounding APP exons 16 and 17 from an APP YAC sublibrary. Both the Swedish and the 717 mutations were then introduced into exons 16 and 17, respectively, by PCR mutagenesis, and subsequently transferred into the 650 kb APP YAC by a two step gene replacement in yeast. The mutant YACs have been introduced into ES cells, and we have determined that these cells are expressing human mutant APP mRNA and protein. These cells are being used to generate transgenic mice. This paradigm should provide the appropriate test of whether a mutant APP gene is capable of producing AD-like pathology in a mouse model.

  11. Simulation of gene evolution under directional mutational pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Kowalczuk, Maria; Mackiewicz, Dorota; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Polak, Natalia; Smolarczyk, Kamila; Banaszak, Joanna; R. Dudek, Mirosław; Cebrat, Stanisław

    2004-05-01

    The two main mechanisms generating the genetic diversity, mutation and recombination, have random character but they are biased which has an effect on the generation of asymmetry in the bacterial chromosome structure and in the protein coding sequences. Thus, like in a case of two chiral molecules-the two possible orientations of a gene in relation to the topology of a chromosome are not equivalent. Assuming that the sequence of a gene may oscillate only between certain limits of its structural composition means that the gene could be forced out of these limits by the directional mutation pressure, in the course of evolution. The probability of the event depends on the time the gene stays under the same mutation pressure. Inversion of the gene changes the directional mutational pressure to the reciprocal one and hence it changes the distance of the gene to its lower and upper bound of the structural tolerance. Using Monte Carlo methods we were able to simulate the evolution of genes under experimentally found mutational pressure, assuming simple mechanisms of selection. We found that the mutation and recombination should work in accordance to lower their negative effects on the function of the products of coding sequences.

  12. Future directions in alcoholism research. Genomics and gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Brooks, P J; Lipsky, R H

    2000-01-01

    Alcohol affects the process by which genes direct the synthesis of proteins (i.e., expression). Therefore, patterns of gene expression in the presence of alcohol can help scientists identify the specific molecular sites of alcohol's actions within the brain. New technologies can detect and quantify changes in the expression of thousands of genes simultaneously by scanning microscopic gene arrays applied to glass or silicon chips an inch or so square. However, genes whose activity is altered in the presence of alcohol may either be contributing to alcoholism development or may be reacting to alcohol's presence. This question can be researched by observing the effects of manipulating the level of specific gene products. One way to accomplish this end is by means of viruses that have been engineered to express a specific gene in infected cells. This technique has been applied successfully in studying addictive behaviors. It is suggested that patterns of gene expression may become a diagnostic tool, with different disease states being characterized by distinct expression profiles.

  13. Short torch design for direct liquid sample introduction using conventional and micro-nebulizers for plasma spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Montaser, Akbar; Westphal, Craig S.; Kahen, Kaveh; Rutkowski, William F.

    2008-01-08

    An apparatus and method for providing direct liquid sample introduction using a nebulizer are provided. The apparatus and method include a short torch having an inner tube and an outer tube, and an elongated adapter having a cavity for receiving the nebulizer and positioning a nozzle tip of the nebulizer a predetermined distance from a tip of the outer tube of the short torch. The predetermined distance is preferably about 2-5 mm.

  14. GeneGenie: optimized oligomer design for directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Swainston, Neil; Currin, Andrew; Day, Philip J; Kell, Douglas B

    2014-07-01

    GeneGenie, a new online tool available at http://www.gene-genie.org, is introduced to support the design and self-assembly of synthetic genes and constructs. GeneGenie allows for the design of oligonucleotide cohorts encoding the gene sequence optimized for expression in any suitable host through an intuitive, easy-to-use web interface. The tool ensures consistent oligomer overlapping melting temperatures, minimizes the likelihood of misannealing, optimizes codon usage for expression in a selected host, allows for specification of forward and reverse cloning sequences (for downstream ligation) and also provides support for mutagenesis or directed evolution studies. Directed evolution studies are enabled through the construction of variant libraries via the optional specification of 'variant codons', containing mixtures of bases, at any position. For example, specifying the variant codon TNT (where N is any nucleotide) will generate an equimolar mixture of the codons TAT, TCT, TGT and TTT at that position, encoding a mixture of the amino acids Tyr, Ser, Cys and Phe. This facility is demonstrated through the use of GeneGenie to develop and synthesize a library of enhanced green fluorescent protein variants.

  15. Site-Specific Gene Expression in Vivo by Direct Gene Transfer into the Arterial Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Plautz, Gregory; Nabel, Gary J.

    1990-09-01

    A recombinant β-galactosidase gene has been expressed in a specific arterial segment in vivo by direct infection with a murine amphotropic retroviral vector or by DNA transfection with the use of liposomes. Several cell types in the vessel wall were transduced, including endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. After retroviral infection, a recombinant reporter gene was expressed for at least 5 months, and no helper virus was detected. Recombinant gene expression achieved by direct retroviral infection or liposome-mediated DNA transfection was limited to the site of infection and was absent from liver, lung, kidney, and spleen. These results demonstrate that site-specific gene expression can be achieved by direct gene transfer in vivo and could be applied to the treatment of such human diseases as atherosclerosis or cancer.

  16. Excision of plastid marker genes using directly repeated DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Mudd, Elisabeth A; Madesis, Panagiotis; Avila, Elena Martin; Day, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Excision of marker genes using DNA direct repeats makes use of the predominant homologous recombination pathways present in the plastids of algae and plants. The method is simple, efficient, and widely applicable to plants and microalgae. Marker excision frequency is dependent on the length and number of directly repeated sequences. When two repeats are used a repeat size of greater than 600 bp promotes efficient excision of the marker gene. A wide variety of sequences can be used to make the direct repeats. Only a single round of transformation is required, and there is no requirement to introduce site-specific recombinases by retransformation or sexual crosses. Selection is used to maintain the marker and ensure homoplasmy of transgenic plastid genomes. Release of selection allows the accumulation of marker-free plastid genomes generated by marker excision, which is spontaneous, random, and a unidirectional process. Positive selection is provided by linking marker excision to restoration of the coding region of an herbicide resistance gene from two overlapping but incomplete coding regions. Cytoplasmic sorting allows the segregation of cells with marker-free transgenic plastids. The marker-free shoots resulting from direct repeat-mediated excision of marker genes have been isolated by vegetative propagation of shoots in the T0 generation. Alternatively, accumulation of marker-free plastid genomes during growth, development and flowering of T0 plants allows the collection of seeds that give rise to a high proportion of marker-free T1 seedlings. The simplicity and convenience of direct repeat excision facilitates its widespread use to isolate marker-free crops. PMID:24599849

  17. [Immunoglobulin genes encoding antibodies directed to oncodevelopmental carbohydrate antigens].

    PubMed

    Zenita, K; Yago, K; Fujimoto, E; Kannagi, R

    1990-07-01

    We investigated the immunoglobulin genes which encode the variable region of the monoclonal antibodies directed to the onco-developmental carbohydrate antigens such SSEA-1, fucosyl SSEA-1, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4. The VH region of these antibodies was preferentially encoded by the gene members of the X24, VH7183 and Q52 families, the families which are known to be located at the 3'-end region of the murine germ line VH gene. This result is interesting particularly when considering that the members of the 3'-end VH families are known to be preferentially expressed in embryonic B lymphocytes by an intrinsic genetic program. The comparative study of the nucleic acid sequences of mRNAs encoding these antibodies and the sequences of the corresponding germ line VH genes disclosed that the sequences encoding the antibodies contain no mutation from the germ line VH genes, or contain only a few somatic mutations, which are thought to be insignificant for the reactivity of the antibodies to the nominal antigens. These results imply that some of the embryonic B lymphocytes that express the unmutated germ line VH genes of the 3'-end families can be reactive with embryonic carbohydrate antigens, albeit rearranged with appropriate D-JH gene segments, and coupled with proper light chains. The VH region of the syngenic monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies directed to these anti-carbohydrate antibodies were also encoded preferentially by the members of the 3'-end VH families. We propose here that a part of the virgin embryonic B lymphocytes, which express the antibody encoded by the gene members of the 3'-end VH families at the cell surface, will be stimulated by the embryonic carbohydrate antigens which are abundantly present in the internal milieu of the embryo. The clonally expanded B lymphocytes, in turn, will facilitate the proliferation of other populations of embryonic B lymphocytes expressing the corresponding anti-idiotypic antibodies, which are also encoded by the gene members

  18. ARID3B Directly Regulates Ovarian Cancer Promoting Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bobbs, Alexander; Gellerman, Katrina; Hallas, William Morgan; Joseph, Stancy; Yang, Chao; Kurkewich, Jeffrey; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein AT-Rich Interactive Domain 3B (ARID3B) is elevated in ovarian cancer and increases tumor growth in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer. However, relatively little is known about ARID3B's function. In this study we perform the first genome wide screen for ARID3B direct target genes and ARID3B regulated pathways. We identified and confirmed numerous ARID3B target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. Using motif-finding algorithms, we characterized a binding site for ARID3B, which is similar to the previously known site for the ARID3B paralogue ARID3A. Functionality of this predicted site was demonstrated by ChIP analysis. We next demonstrated that ARID3B induces expression of its targets in ovarian cancer cell lines. We validated that ARID3B binds to an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) enhancer and increases mRNA expression. ARID3B also binds to the promoter of Wnt5A and its receptor FZD5. FZD5 is highly expressed in ovarian cancer cell lines, and is upregulated by exogenous ARID3B. Both ARID3B and FZD5 expression increase adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) components including collagen IV, fibronectin and vitronectin. ARID3B-increased adhesion to collagens II and IV require FZD5. This study directly demonstrates that ARID3B binds target genes in a sequence-specific manner, resulting in increased gene expression. Furthermore, our data indicate that ARID3B regulation of direct target genes in the Wnt pathway promotes adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26121572

  19. Efficient gene replacement and direct hyphal transformation in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Levy, M; Erental, A; Yarden, O

    2008-09-01

    Homologous recombination is required for gene-targeted procedures such as gene disruption and gene replacement. Ku80 is part of the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair mechanism in many organisms. We identified and disrupted the Ku80 homologue in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and generated heterokaryon mutants enriched with Ku80-deficient nuclei (ssku80). Sclerotial formation and pathogenicity of ssku80 mutants were normal on tomato fruits. The frequencies of homologous recombination in these strains were much higher than those of the wild type when transformed with a cna1 (encoding calcineurin) replacement construct. We coupled the increase in homologous recombination with a direct BIM-LAB-mediated transformation procedure, which utilizes compressed air to assist the transforming DNA in penetrating fungal hyphae of S. sclerotiorum. We found this method to be efficient and reproducible, and it did not alter the fitness of the mutants. We also demonstrated the first case of direct transformation of sclerotia. Nourseothricin was introduced as a selectable marker in S. sclerotiorum. The tools and procedures described will improve our ability to study gene function in S. sclerotiorum and are most likely to be adaptable for use in other plant pathogens. PMID:19019000

  20. A C++ Infrastructure for Automatic Introduction and Translation of OpenMP Directives

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D J; Scordan, M; Yi, Q; de Supinski, B R

    2003-07-28

    In this paper we describe a C++ infrastructure for source-to-source translation. We demonstrate the translation of a serial program with high-level abstractions to a lower-level parallel program in two separate phases. In the first phase OpenMP directives are introduced, driven by the semantics of high-level abstractions. Then the OpenMP directives are translated to a C++ program that explicitly creates and manages parallelism according to the specified directives. Both phases are implemented using the same mechanisms in our infrastructure.

  1. Genomewide Identification of Genes Under Directional Selection: Gene Transcription QST Scan in Diverging Atlantic Salmon Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Roberge, C.; Guderley, H.; Bernatchez, L.

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary genomics has benefited from methods that allow identifying evolutionarily important genomic regions on a genomewide scale, including genome scans and QTL mapping. Recently, genomewide scanning by means of microarrays has permitted assessing gene transcription differences among species or populations. However, the identification of differentially transcribed genes does not in itself suffice to measure the role of selection in driving evolutionary changes in gene transcription. Here, we propose and apply a “transcriptome scan” approach to investigating the role of selection in shaping differential profiles of gene transcription among populations. We compared the genomewide transcription levels between two Atlantic salmon subpopulations that have been diverging for only six generations. Following assessment of normality and unimodality on a gene-per-gene basis, the additive genetic basis of gene transcription was estimated using the animal model. Gene transcription h2 estimates were significant for 1044 (16%) of all detected cDNA clones. In an approach analogous to that of genome scans, we used the distribution of the QST values estimated from intra- and intersubpopulation additive genetic components of the transcription profiles to identify 16 outlier genes (average QST estimate = 0.11) whose transcription levels are likely to have evolved under the influence of directional selection within six generations only. Overall, this study contributes both empirically and methodologically to the quantitative genetic exploration of gene transcription data. PMID:17720934

  2. INTRODUCTING A THERMAL DISSIPATION PROBE SYSTEM FOR MEASURING BI-DIRECTIONAL ROOT WATER FLUX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interest in measuring the direction and magnitude of root sapflow has accelerated in the past few years because of interest in the redistribution of water in the soil by roots. Plant roots have been shown to redistribute water between areas of soil with differing water conte...

  3. Condensed Phase Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometry with Direct Electron Ionization: On-line Measurement of PAHs in Complex Aqueous Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Termopoli, Veronica; Famiglini, Giorgio; Palma, Pierangela; Cappiello, Achille; Vandergrift, Gregory W.; Krogh, Erik T.; Gill, Chris G.

    2016-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are USEPA regulated priority pollutants. Their low aqueous solubility requires very sensitive analytical methods for their detection, typically involving preconcentration steps. Presented is the first demonstrated `proof of concept' use of condensed phase membrane introduction mass spectrometry (CP-MIMS) coupled with direct liquid electron ionization (DEI) for the direct, on-line measurement of PAHs in aqueous samples. DEI is very well suited for the ionization of PAHs and other nonpolar compounds, and is not significantly influenced by the co-elution of matrix components. Linear calibration data for low ppb levels of aqueous naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene is demonstrated, with measured detection limits of 4 ppb. Analytical response times (t10%-90% signal rise) ranged from 2.8 min for naphthalene to 4.7 min for pyrene. Both intra- and interday reproducibility has been assessed (<3% and 5% RSD, respectively). Direct measurements of ppb level PAHs spiked in a variety of real, complex environmental sample matrices is examined, including natural waters, sea waters, and a hydrocarbon extraction production waste water sample. For these spiked, complex samples, direct PAH measurement by CP-MIMS-DEI yielded minimal signal suppression from sample matrix effects (81%-104%). We demonstrate the use of this analytical approach to directly monitor real-time changes in aqueous PAH concentrations with potential applications for continuous on-line monitoring strategies and binding/adsorption studies in heterogeneous samples.

  4. Site-directed introduction of disulfide groups on antibodies for highly sensitive immunosensors.

    PubMed

    Acero Sánchez, Josep Ll; Fragoso, Alex; Joda, Hamdi; Suárez, Guillaume; McNeil, Calum J; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2016-07-01

    The interface between the sample and the transducer surface is critical to the performance of a biosensor. In this work, we compared different strategies for covalent self-assembly of antibodies onto bare gold substrates by introducing disulfide groups into the immunoglobulin structure, which acted as anchor molecules able to chemisorb spontaneously onto clean gold surfaces. The disulfide moieties were chemically introduced to the antibody via the primary amines, carboxylic acids, and carbohydrates present in its structure. The site-directed modification via the carbohydrate chains exhibited the best performance in terms of analyte response using a model system for the detection of the stroke marker neuron-specific enolase. SPR measurements clearly showed the potential for creating biologically active densely packed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in a one-step protocol compared to both mixed SAMs of alkanethiol compounds and commercial immobilization layers. The ability of the carbohydrate strategy to construct an electrochemical immunosensor was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) transduction. Graphical Abstract Left: Functionalization strategies of bare gold substrates via direct bio-SAM using disulfide-containing antibody chemically modified via their primary amines (A), carbohydrates (B) and carboxylic acids (C). Right: Dependence of the peak height with NSE concentration at NSE21-CHO modified electrochemical immunosensor. Inset: Logarithmic calibration plot. PMID:27220524

  5. Towards liver-directed gene therapy: retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grossman, M; Raper, S E; Wilson, J M

    1991-11-01

    Liver-directed gene therapy is being considered in the treatment of inherited metabolic diseases. One approach we are considering is the transplantation of autologous hepatocytes that have been genetically modified with recombinant retroviruses ex vivo. We describe, in this report, techniques for isolating human hepatocytes and efficiently transducing recombinant genes into primary cultures. Hepatocytes were isolated from tissue of four different donors, plated in primary culture, and exposed to recombinant retroviruses expressing either the LacZ reporter gene or the cDNA for rabbit LDL receptor. The efficiency of gene transfer under optimal conditions, as determined by Southern blot analysis, varied from a maximum of one proviral copy per cell to a minimum of 0.1 proviral copy per cell. Cytochemical assays were used to detect expression of the recombinant derived proteins, E. coli beta-galactosidase and rabbit LDL receptor. Hepatocytes transduced with the LDL receptor gene expressed levels of receptor protein that exceeded the normal endogenous levels. The ability to isolate and genetically modify human hepatocytes, as described in this report, is an important step towards the development of liver-directed gene therapies in humans. PMID:1767337

  6. Analysis of irradiated cooked ham by direct introduction into the programmable temperature vaporizer of a multidimensional gas chromatography system.

    PubMed

    Barba, Carmen; Santa-María, Guillermo; Calvo, Marta M

    2013-08-15

    A simple method involving direct introduction (DI) of cooked ham into a programmable temperature vaporizer and subsequent thermal desorption for multidimensional chromatographic analysis as a tool for studying changes of volatile compounds during food irradiation has been proposed. Analysis of non-irradiated samples showed four peaks in the precolumn, which were identified on the main column as peak 1, ethyl acetate; peak 2, a mixture of octanol and ethyl propanoate; peak 3, (R,R)-2,3-butanediol, and peak 4, nonanoic acid. (R,R) and (S,S)-2,3-butanediol were detected in samples irradiated at 8 kGy, which may indicate that irradiation induces isomerisation. When a single cut was transferred from the precolumn to the main column, 1-tetradecene, n-pentadecane, 8-heptadecene and 1-hexadecene were detected in irradiated samples. This simple and easy method allows detection of radiolytic markers and isomerisation of 2,3-butanediol during irradiation of food.

  7. Pitx2, an Atrial Fibrillation Predisposition Gene, Directly Regulates Ion Transport and Intercalated Disc Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ye; Zhang, Min; Li, Lele; Bai, Yan; Zhou, Yuefang; Moon, Anne M.; Kaminski, Henry J.; Martin, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pitx2 is the homeobox gene located in proximity to the human 4q25 familial atrial fibrillation locus. When deleted in the mouse germline, Pitx2 haploinsufficiency predisposes to pacing induced atrial fibrillation indicating that reduced Pitx2 promotes an arrhythmogenic substrate. Previous work focused on Pitx2 developmental functions that predispose to atrial fibrillation. Although Pitx2 is expressed in postnatal left atrium, it is unknown whether Pitx2 has distinct postnatal and developmental functions. Methods and Results To investigate Pitx2 postnatal function, we conditionally inactivated Pitx2 in the postnatal atrium while leaving its developmental function intact. Unstressed adult Pitx2 homozygous mutant mice display variable R-R interval with diminished P-wave amplitude characteristic of sinus node dysfunction, an atrial fibrillation risk factor in human patients. An integrated genomics approach in the adult heart revealed Pitx2 target genes encoding cell junction proteins, ion channels, and critical transcriptional regulators. Importantly, many Pitx2 target genes have been implicated in human atrial fibrillation by genome wide association studies. Immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy studies in adult Pitx2 mutant mice revealed structural remodeling of the intercalated disc characteristic of human atrial fibrillation patients. Conclusions Our findings, revealing that Pitx2 has genetically separable postnatal and developmental functions, unveil direct Pitx2 target genes that include channel and calcium handling genes as well as genes that stabilize the intercalated disc in postnatal atrium. PMID:24395921

  8. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Noel J; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-02-01

    Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus' Rapid Trait Development System (RTDS(™) ) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non-transgenic breeding alternative for trait improvement in agriculture to address this urgent need. This review explores the application of ODM as a precision genome editing technology, with emphasis on using oligonucleotides to make targeted edits in plasmid, episomal and chromosomal DNA of bacterial, fungal, mammalian and plant systems. The process of employing ODM by way of RTDS technology has been improved in many ways by utilizing a fluorescence conversion system wherein a blue fluorescent protein (BFP) can be changed to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) by editing a single nucleotide of the BFP gene (CAC→TAC; H66 to Y66). For example, dependent on oligonucleotide length, applying oligonucleotide-mediated technology to target the BFP transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts resulted in up to 0.05% precisely edited GFP loci. Here, the development of traits in commercially relevant plant varieties to improve crop performance by genome editing technologies such as ODM, and by extension RTDS, is reviewed.

  9. Gene rescue in plants by direct gene transfer of total genomic DNA into protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Gallois, P; Lindsey, K; Malone, R; Kreis, M; Jones, M G

    1992-01-01

    To study the possibility of gene rescue in plants by direct gene transfer we chose the Arabidopsis mutant GH50 as a source of donor DNA. GH50 is tolerant of chlorsulfuron, a herbicide of the sulfonylurea class. Tobacco protoplasts were cotransfected with genomic DNA and the plasmid pHP23 which confers kanamycin resistance. A high frequency of cointegration of the plasmid and the genomic DNA was expected, which would allow the tagging of the plant selectable trait with the plasmid DNA. After transfection by electroporation the protoplasts were cultivated on regeneration medium supplemented with either chlorsulfuron or kanamycin as a selective agent. Selection on kanamycin yielded resistant calluses at an absolute transformation frequency (ATF) of 0.8 x 10(-3). Selection on chlorsulfuron yielded resistant calluses at an ATF of 4.7 x 10(-6). When a selection on chlorsulfuron was subsequently applied to the kanamycin resistant calluses, 8% of them showed resistance to this herbicide. Southern analysis carried out on the herbicide resistant transformants detected the presence of the herbicide resistance gene of Arabidopsis into the genome of the transformed tobacco. Segregation analysis showed the presence of the resistance gene and the marker gene in the progeny of the five analysed transformants. 3 transformants showed evidence of genetic linkage between the two genes. In addition we show that using the same technique a kanamycin resistance gene from a transgenic tobacco could be transferred into sugar beet protoplasts at a frequency of 0.17% of the transformants. Images PMID:1508682

  10. Introduction of human gamma 1 immunoglobulin genes into fertilized mouse eggs.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, K; Kikutani, H; Takahashi, N; Taga, T; Akira, S; Kawai, K; Fukuchi, K; Kumahara, Y; Honjo, T; Kishimoto, T

    1984-08-01

    A rearranged human gamma 1 immunoglobulin gene was introduced into fertilized mouse eggs. The phage Ch4A-VCE-gamma 1 was constructed by ligating an EcoRI and BglII fragment of pBR322-CESSV(CE-1) containing the VDJ region with an EcoRI and BamHI fragment of Ch4A-HIg gamma 1-10 containing the gamma 1 constant region. About 200 copies of Ch4A-VCE-gamma 1 genes were introduced into fertilized mouse eggs. Of 489 eggs injected with these genes, 319 survived and were transferred to oviducts of foster mothers. Thirtyeight mice were born and were screened for the presence of human gamma 1 immunoglobulin genes by Southern blot hybridization. Five of these 38 mice had integrated human gamma 1 immunoglobulin genes. None of the human gamma 1 copies in each mouse had undergone deletions or rearrangements as judged by the Southern blotting patterns for several restriction enzymes. Human gamma 1 gene was present in several different tissues. All the mice tested so far transmit the human gamma 1 gene to a fraction of their offspring in an autosomal dominant manner. Spleen cells from transgenic mice were analyzed for immunoglobulin production by reverse plaque assay or immunofluorescence staining of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin, but synthesis and secretion of human gamma 1 chains could not be detected. No human gamma 1 immunoglobulin mRNA was detected in the liver and spleen of a transgenic mouse. The presence of the human gamma 1 immunoglobulin gene appeared to have no effect on the expression of endogenous mouse immunoglobulin genes.

  11. System and method for introduction and stabilization of genes in Thermus sp.

    DOEpatents

    Kayser, Kevin J.; Park, Ho-Shin; Kilbane, II, John J.

    2005-03-01

    A method for introducing and stabilizing heterologous and recombinant genes in a thermophilic host in which a characteristic gene defining a detectable host characteristic is inactivated or deleted from the thermophilic host, resulting in a modified thermophilic host expressing an absence of the detectable host characteristic. A DNA fragment of interest is inserted into the modified thermophilic host together with an intact characteristic gene, whereby the detectable host characteristic is restored to the thermophilic host, thereby enabling detection and confirmation of successful transformation using plasmid vectors and integration of the DNA fragment into the chromosome of the thermophilic host.

  12. Investigations on the direct introduction of cigarette smoke for trace elements analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Michael J.; Naworal, John D.; Walker, Kathleen; Connell, Chris T.

    2003-11-01

    Direct introduction of mainstream cigarette smoke into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been investigated with respect to its feasibility for on-line analysis of trace elements. An automated apparatus was designed and built interfacing a smoking machine with an ICP-MS for smoke generation, collection, injection and analysis. Major and minor elements present in the particulate phase and the gas phase of mainstream cigarette smoke of 2R4F reference cigarettes have been qualitatively identified by examination of their full mass spectra. This method provides a rapid-screening analysis of the transfer of trace elements into mainstream smoke during cigarette combustion. A full suite of elements present in the whole cigarette smoke has been identified, including As, B, Ba, Br, Cd, Cl, Cs, Cu, Hg, I, K, Li, Mn, Na, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sn, Tl and Zn. Of these elements, the major portions of B, Ba, Cs, Cu, K, Li, Mn, Na, Pb, Rb, Sn, Tl and Zn are present in the particulate phase, whereas the major portion of Hg is present in the gas phase. As, Br, Cd, Cl, I and Sb exist in a distribution between the gas phase and the particulate phase. Depending on the element, the precision of measurement ranges from 5 to 25% in terms of relative standard deviation of peak height and peak area, based on the fourth puff of 2R4F mainstream cigarette smoke analyzed in five smoking replicates.

  13. Direct sample introduction gas chromatography and mass spectrometry for the determination of phthalate esters in cleaning products.

    PubMed

    Cacho, J I; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2015-02-01

    A method using direct sample introduction (DSI) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is developed for the determination of six phthalate esters (dimethyl, diethyl, dibutyl, butylbenzyl, diethylhexyl and dioctyl phthalate) in cleaning products. The different variables involved in the DSI step, including venting time and temperature, vaporisation time and temperature, injector heating temperature and gas flow rate and pressure, were evaluated and optimised using Taguchi orthogonal arrays. The proposed method, using calibration against methanolic standards, showed good linearity in the 0.05-15 μg g(-1) range and good repeatability, with RSD values ranging from 3.5% to 5.7%. Quantification limits between 0.010 and 0.041 μg g(-1), depending on the compound, were attained, while recovery assays provided values from 83% to 115%. Twenty-seven cleaning products were analysed using the DSI-GC-MS method, being four phthalates (dimethyl, diethyl, dibutyl and diethylhexyl phthalate) found in fourteen of them at concentration levels in the 0.1-21 μg g(-1) range. Compared with the most common GC injection technique, which uses the split/splitless injector, the proposed DSI procedure provided larger peak areas and lower detection limits, as result of the greater injected volume and reduction in noise.

  14. Direct Imaging of Gene-Carrier Complexes in Animal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Alison J.; Slack, Nelle L.; Ahmad, Ayesha; Matsumoto, Brian; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    1998-03-01

    Cationic lipids are promising gene carriers for DNA transfection. Establishing the correlations between structures of cationic lipid/DNA complexes (CL-DNA) and pathways of transfection will greatly aid us in achieving the optimal CL-DNA transfections. Our first step is to determine the uptake mechanism of DNA by studying the interactions and structures of DNA and cationic lipids. X-ray diffraction shows that the CL-DNA undergoes structural phase transitions from lamellar( J. Raedler, I. Koltover, T. Salditt, C. R. Safinya, Science 275, 810 (1997).) to inverted hexagonal self-assemblies as we change the lipid composition. X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy techniques are used to directly image the progress of the CL-DNA in mouse L-cells and unravel the complex structure in-situ. Fluorescence and confocal optical microscopy techniques allow us to monitor the interactions between the complexes and different organelles in the cell cytoplasm. Current results indicate that once inside cells, complexes containing DOPE follow a different pathway from those containing DOPC. This research is funded by NSF-DMR-9624091, PRF-31352-AC7, and Los Alamos-STB/UC:96-108.

  15. A synthetic translation-terminator gene. A tool for dissecting the translation direction of a gene.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, I N; Horikoshi, K; Nagase, Y; Soma, M; Nobuhara, M; Yasuda, S; Hirota, Y

    1989-01-01

    A 41-nucleotide-long duplex DNA, which contains the translation termination codon TAA in six reading frames and lactose operator sequence of Escherichia coli, has been synthesized. This fragment may be useful not only for producing a truncated protein encoded in a plasmid, but also for the identification of the precise coding region and translation direction of a bacterial gene in the cloned chromosomal segment. The synthetic fragment was inserted into beta-lactamase structural gene in pBR322 in order to test the in vivo activity. The plasmid produced mutant beta-lactamase reduced in size, as expected from the insertion site, and rendered the host bacterium constitutive for beta-galactosidase. Thus, termination codons and lactose operator in synthetic nucleotide appear to be functional in vivo. PMID:2656460

  16. Gene Expression Analysis in the Age of Mass Sequencing: An Introduction.

    PubMed

    Pilarsky, Christian; Nanduri, Lahiri Kanth; Roy, Janine

    2016-01-01

    During the last years the technology used for gene expression analysis has changed dramatically. The old mainstay, DNA microarray, has served its due course and will soon be replaced by next-generation sequencing (NGS), the Swiss army knife of modern high-throughput nucleic acid-based analysis. Therefore preparation technologies have to adapt to suit the emerging NGS technology platform. Moreover, interpretation of the results is still time consuming and employs the use of high-end computers usually not found in molecular biology laboratories. Alternatively, cloud computing might solve this problem. Nevertheless, these new challenges have to be embraced for gene expression analysis in general. PMID:26667455

  17. Introduction to the special issue, pathways between genes, brain, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Kremen, William S; Jacobson, Kristen C

    2010-03-01

    In the past 10 years or so, with the sequencing of the human genome and rapid advances in the development of high throughput techniques, the field of behavior genetics has increasingly moved toward the detection of actual genes and environmental factors. However, the field is still in the relatively early stages of understanding some of the basic facts about the complex genetic underpinnings of brain structure and function and their relationship to behavior. The 15 articles in this special issue were selected to represent the diversity of methodologies applied to the complexity of pathways linking genes, brain, and behavior. While providing strong evidence for the role of genes in individual differences in brain structure and function, these papers also demonstrate that environmental experiences alter neurobiological pathways, and that genetic factors may further moderate the impact of environmental experience. Most importantly, the breadth of studies proves that in order to be able to trace the pathways between genes, brain, and behavior, we need experts in genetics, neuroscience, psychology, and psychiatry. PMID:20155393

  18. Direct protein interaction underlies gene-for-gene specificity and coevolution of the flax resistance genes and flax rust avirulence genes.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Peter N; Lawrence, Gregory J; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Teh, Trazel; Wang, Ching-I A; Ayliffe, Michael A; Kobe, Bostjan; Ellis, Jeffrey G

    2006-06-01

    Plant resistance proteins (R proteins) recognize corresponding pathogen avirulence (Avr) proteins either indirectly through detection of changes in their host protein targets or through direct R-Avr protein interaction. Although indirect recognition imposes selection against Avr effector function, pathogen effector molecules recognized through direct interaction may overcome resistance through sequence diversification rather than loss of function. Here we show that the flax rust fungus AvrL567 genes, whose products are recognized by the L5, L6, and L7 R proteins of flax, are highly diverse, with 12 sequence variants identified from six rust strains. Seven AvrL567 variants derived from Avr alleles induce necrotic responses when expressed in flax plants containing corresponding resistance genes (R genes), whereas five variants from avr alleles do not. Differences in recognition specificity between AvrL567 variants and evidence for diversifying selection acting on these genes suggest they have been involved in a gene-specific arms race with the corresponding flax R genes. Yeast two-hybrid assays indicate that recognition is based on direct R-Avr protein interaction and recapitulate the interaction specificity observed in planta. Biochemical analysis of Escherichia coli-produced AvrL567 proteins shows that variants that escape recognition nevertheless maintain a conserved structure and stability, suggesting that the amino acid sequence differences directly affect the R-Avr protein interaction. We suggest that direct recognition associated with high genetic diversity at corresponding R and Avr gene loci represents an alternative outcome of plant-pathogen coevolution to indirect recognition associated with simple balanced polymorphisms for functional and nonfunctional R and Avr genes.

  19. Antipsychotic pathway genes with expression altered in opposite direction by antipsychotics and amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ko, Françoise; Tallerico, Teresa; Seeman, Philip

    2006-08-01

    To develop a new strategy for identifying possible psychotic- or antipsychotic-related pathway genes, rats were treated with clinical doses of haloperidol and clozapine for 4 days, and the altered expression of genes was compared with the genes altered in expression after amphetamine sensitization. The objective was to identify genes with expression altered in the same direction by haloperidol and clozapine but in the opposite direction in the amphetamine-sensitized rat striatum. These criteria were met by 21 genes, consisting of 15 genes upregulated by amphetamine, and 6 genes downregulated by amphetamine. Of the 21 genes, 15 are not presently identified, and only 3 genes (cathepsin K, GRK6, and a gene with accession number AI177589) are located in chromosome regions known to be associated with schizophrenia.

  20. Cardiac gene therapy: Recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Mason, Daniel; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Krishnan, Harini Venkata; Sant, Shilpa

    2015-10-10

    Gene therapy has the potential to serve as an adaptable platform technology for treating various diseases. Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality in the developed world and genetic modification is steadily becoming a more plausible method to repair and regenerate heart tissue. Recently, new gene targets to treat cardiovascular disease have been identified and developed into therapies that have shown promise in animal models. Some of these therapies have advanced to clinical testing. Despite these recent successes, several barriers must be overcome for gene therapy to become a widely used treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we evaluate specific genetic targets that can be exploited to treat cardiovascular diseases, list the important delivery barriers for the gene carriers, assess the most promising methods of delivering the genetic information, and discuss the current status of clinical trials involving gene therapies targeted to the heart.

  1. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  2. Loss of sense transgene-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing by sequential introduction of the same transgene sequences in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Sayaka; Takahashi, Kouta; Abiko, Tomomi; Kodama, Hiroaki

    2010-04-01

    RNA silencing is an epigenetic inhibition of gene expression and is guided by small interfering RNAs. Sense transgene-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing (S-PTGS) occurs in a portion of a transgenic plant population. When a sense transgene encoding a tobacco endoplasmic reticulum omega-3 fatty acid desaturase (NtFAD3) was introduced into tobacco plants, an S-PTGS line, S44, was obtained. Introduction of another copy of the NtFAD3 transgene into S44 plants caused a phenotypic change from S-PTGS to overexpression. Because this change was associated with the methylation of the promoter sequences of the transgene, reduced transcriptional activity may abolish S-PTGS and residual transcription of the sense transgene may account for the overexpression. To clarify whether RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) can repress the transcriptional activity of the S44 transgene locus, we introduced several RdDM constructs targeting the transgene promoter. An RdDM construct harboring a 200-bp-long fragment of promoter sequences efficiently abrogated the generation of NtFAD3 small interfering RNAs in S44 plants. Transcription of the transgene was partially repressed, but the resulting NtFAD3 mRNAs successfully accumulated and an overexpressed phenotype was established. Our results indicate an example in which overexpression of the transgene is established by complex epigenetic interactions among the transgenic loci. PMID:20180844

  3. Direct transfer of IL-12 gene into growing Renca tumors.

    PubMed

    Budryk, M; Wilczyńska, U; Szary, J; Szala, S

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of transferring naked plasmid DNA containing a therapeutic gene (IL-12) into mice harboring growing Renca tumors. We found that naked DNA transferred into growing Renca and B16(F10) tumors gives higher expression level of reporter gene than complexes of DNA with DDAB/DOPE or DC-Chol/DOPE. Transfer of naked DNA carrying the IL-12 gene into growing Renca tumors causes a distinct therapeutic effect that depends on the time span between inoculation of mice with cancer cells and the beginning of the therapy. Therapy started on day 3 resulted in total cure (100%) of mice. PMID:11051203

  4. Glaucoma: genes, phenotypes, and new directions for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bao Jian; Wiggs, Janey L.

    2010-01-01

    Glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide, is characterized by progressive optic nerve damage, usually associated with intraocular pressure. Although the clinical progression of the disease is well defined, the molecular events responsible for glaucoma are currently poorly understood and current therapeutic strategies are not curative. This review summarizes the human genetics and genomic approaches that have shed light on the complex inheritance of glaucoma genes and the potential for gene-based and cellular therapies that this research makes possible. PMID:20811162

  5. Transcription mediated insulation and interference direct gene cluster expression switches.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tania; Fischl, Harry; Howe, Françoise S; Woloszczuk, Ronja; Serra Barros, Ana; Xu, Zhenyu; Brown, David; Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Halstead, James M; O'Connor, Leigh; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Steinmetz, Lars M; Mellor, Jane

    2014-11-19

    In yeast, many tandemly arranged genes show peak expression in different phases of the metabolic cycle (YMC) or in different carbon sources, indicative of regulation by a bi-modal switch, but it is not clear how these switches are controlled. Using native elongating transcript analysis (NET-seq), we show that transcription itself is a component of bi-modal switches, facilitating reciprocal expression in gene clusters. HMS2, encoding a growth-regulated transcription factor, switches between sense- or antisense-dominant states that also coordinate up- and down-regulation of transcription at neighbouring genes. Engineering HMS2 reveals alternative mono-, di- or tri-cistronic and antisense transcription units (TUs), using different promoter and terminator combinations, that underlie state-switching. Promoters or terminators are excluded from functional TUs by read-through transcriptional interference, while antisense TUs insulate downstream genes from interference. We propose that the balance of transcriptional insulation and interference at gene clusters facilitates gene expression switches during intracellular and extracellular environmental change.

  6. Transcription mediated insulation and interference direct gene cluster expression switches

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tania; Brown, David; Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Halstead, James M; O'Connor, Leigh; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Steinmetz, Lars M; Mellor, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In yeast, many tandemly arranged genes show peak expression in different phases of the metabolic cycle (YMC) or in different carbon sources, indicative of regulation by a bi-modal switch, but it is not clear how these switches are controlled. Using native elongating transcript analysis (NET-seq), we show that transcription itself is a component of bi-modal switches, facilitating reciprocal expression in gene clusters. HMS2, encoding a growth-regulated transcription factor, switches between sense- or antisense-dominant states that also coordinate up- and down-regulation of transcription at neighbouring genes. Engineering HMS2 reveals alternative mono-, di- or tri-cistronic and antisense transcription units (TUs), using different promoter and terminator combinations, that underlie state-switching. Promoters or terminators are excluded from functional TUs by read-through transcriptional interference, while antisense TUs insulate downstream genes from interference. We propose that the balance of transcriptional insulation and interference at gene clusters facilitates gene expression switches during intracellular and extracellular environmental change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03635.001 PMID:25407679

  7. Gene introduction into the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana via peptide-based carriers

    PubMed Central

    Chuah, Jo-Ann; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Available methods in plant genetic transformation are nuclear and plastid transformations because similar procedures have not yet been established for the mitochondria. The double membrane and small size of the organelle, in addition to its large population in cells, are major obstacles in mitochondrial transfection. Here we report the intracellular delivery of exogenous DNA localized to the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana using a combination of mitochondria-targeting peptide and cell-penetrating peptide. Low concentrations of peptides were sufficient to deliver DNA into the mitochondria and expression of imported DNA reached detectable levels within a short incubation period (12 h). We found that electrostatic interaction with the cell membrane is not a critical factor for complex internalization, instead, improved intracellular penetration of mitochondria-targeted complexes significantly enhanced gene transfer efficiency. Our results delineate a simple and effective peptide-based method, as a starting point for the development of more sophisticated plant mitochondrial transfection strategies. PMID:25583214

  8. Gene introduction into the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana via peptide-based carriers.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Jo-Ann; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2015-01-13

    Available methods in plant genetic transformation are nuclear and plastid transformations because similar procedures have not yet been established for the mitochondria. The double membrane and small size of the organelle, in addition to its large population in cells, are major obstacles in mitochondrial transfection. Here we report the intracellular delivery of exogenous DNA localized to the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana using a combination of mitochondria-targeting peptide and cell-penetrating peptide. Low concentrations of peptides were sufficient to deliver DNA into the mitochondria and expression of imported DNA reached detectable levels within a short incubation period (12 h). We found that electrostatic interaction with the cell membrane is not a critical factor for complex internalization, instead, improved intracellular penetration of mitochondria-targeted complexes significantly enhanced gene transfer efficiency. Our results delineate a simple and effective peptide-based method, as a starting point for the development of more sophisticated plant mitochondrial transfection strategies.

  9. Gene introduction into the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana via peptide-based carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuah, Jo-Ann; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Available methods in plant genetic transformation are nuclear and plastid transformations because similar procedures have not yet been established for the mitochondria. The double membrane and small size of the organelle, in addition to its large population in cells, are major obstacles in mitochondrial transfection. Here we report the intracellular delivery of exogenous DNA localized to the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana using a combination of mitochondria-targeting peptide and cell-penetrating peptide. Low concentrations of peptides were sufficient to deliver DNA into the mitochondria and expression of imported DNA reached detectable levels within a short incubation period (12 h). We found that electrostatic interaction with the cell membrane is not a critical factor for complex internalization, instead, improved intracellular penetration of mitochondria-targeted complexes significantly enhanced gene transfer efficiency. Our results delineate a simple and effective peptide-based method, as a starting point for the development of more sophisticated plant mitochondrial transfection strategies.

  10. Electroporation-mediated gene transfer directly to the swine heart.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, B; Downey, H; Strange, R; Murray, L; Cinnamond, C; Lundberg, C; Israel, A; Chen, Y-J; Marshall, W; Heller, R

    2013-02-01

    In vivo gene transfer to the ischemic heart via electroporation holds promise as a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of heart disease. In the current study, we investigated the use of in vivo electroporation for gene transfer using three different penetrating electrodes and one non-penetrating electrode. The hearts of adult male swine were exposed through a sternotomy. Eight electric pulses synchronized to the rising phase of the R wave of the electrocardiogram were administered at varying pulse widths and field strengths following an injection of either a plasmid encoding luciferase or one encoding green fluorescent protein. Four sites on the anterior wall of the left ventricle were treated. Animals were killed 48 h after injection and electroporation and gene expression was determined. Results were compared with sites in the heart that received plasmid injection but no electric pulses or were not treated. Gene expression was higher in all electroporated sites when compared with injection only sites demonstrating the robustness of this approach. Our results provide evidence that in vivo electroporation can be a safe and effective non-viral method for delivering genes to the heart, in vivo.

  11. Silent assassin: oncogenic ras directs epigenetic inactivation of target genes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaodong

    2008-01-01

    Oncogenic transformation is associated with genetic changes and epigenetic alterations. A study now shows that oncogenic Ras uses a complex and elaborate epigenetic silencing program to specifically repress the expression of multiple unrelated cancer-suppressing genes through a common pathway. These results suggest that cancer-related epigenetic modifications may arise through a specific and instructive mechanism and that genetic changes and epigenetic alterations are intimately connected and contribute to tumorigenesis cooperatively. PMID:18385037

  12. Bidirectional Transcription Directs Both Transcriptional Gene Activation and Suppression in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kevin V.; Santoso, Sharon; Turner, Anne-Marie; Pastori, Chiara; Hawkins, Peter G.

    2008-01-01

    Small RNAs targeted to gene promoters in human cells have been shown to modulate both transcriptional gene suppression and activation. However, the mechanism involved in transcriptional activation has remained poorly defined, and an endogenous RNA trigger for transcriptional gene silencing has yet to be identified. Described here is an explanation for siRNA-directed transcriptional gene activation, as well as a role for non-coding antisense RNAs as effector molecules driving transcriptional gene silencing. Transcriptional activation of p21 gene expression was determined to be the result of Argonaute 2–dependent, post-transcriptional silencing of a p21-specific antisense transcript, which functions in Argonaute 1–mediated transcriptional control of p21 mRNA expression. The data presented here suggest that in human cells, bidirectional transcription is an endogenous gene regulatory mechanism whereby an antisense RNA directs epigenetic regulatory complexes to a sense promoter, resulting in RNA-directed epigenetic gene regulation. The observations presented here support the notion that epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes, such as p21, may be the result of an imbalance in bidirectional transcription levels. This imbalance allows the unchecked antisense RNA to direct silent state epigenetic marks to the sense promoter, resulting in stable transcriptional gene silencing. PMID:19008947

  13. The Himalayas as a Directional Barrier to Gene Flow

    PubMed Central

    Gayden, Tenzin; Cadenas, Alicia M.; Regueiro, Maria; Singh, Nanda B.; Zhivotovsky, Lev A.; Underhill, Peter A.; Cavalli-Sforza, Luigi L.; Herrera, Rene J.

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution Y-chromosome haplogroup analyses coupled with Y–short tandem repeat (STR) haplotypes were used to (1) investigate the genetic affinities of three populations from Nepal—including Newar, Tamang, and people from cosmopolitan Kathmandu (referred to as “Kathmandu” subsequently)—as well as a collection from Tibet and (2) evaluate whether the Himalayan mountain range represents a geographic barrier for gene flow between the Tibetan plateau and the South Asian subcontinent. The results suggest that the Tibetans and Nepalese are in part descendants of Tibeto-Burman–speaking groups originating from Northeast Asia. All four populations are represented predominantly by haplogroup O3a5-M134–derived chromosomes, whose Y-STR–based age (±SE) was estimated at 8.1±2.9 thousand years ago (KYA), more recent than its Southeast Asian counterpart. The most pronounced difference between the two regions is reflected in the opposing high-frequency distributions of haplogroups D in Tibet and R in Nepal. With the exception of Tamang, both Newar and Kathmandu exhibit considerable similarities to the Indian Y-haplogroup distribution, particularly in their haplogroup R and H composition. These results indicate gene flow from the Indian subcontinent and, in the case of haplogroup R, from Eurasia as well, a conclusion that is also supported by the admixture analysis. In contrast, whereas haplogroup D is completely absent in Nepal, it accounts for 50.6% of the Tibetan Y-chromosome gene pool. Coalescent analyses suggest that the expansion of haplogroup D derivatives—namely, D1-M15 and D3-P47 in Tibet—involved two different demographic events (5.1±1.8 and 11.3±3.7 KYA, respectively) that are more recent than those of D2-M55 representatives common in Japan. Low frequencies, relative to Nepal, of haplogroup J and R lineages in Tibet are also consistent with restricted gene flow from the subcontinent. Yet the presence of haplogroup O3a5-M134 representatives in

  14. Multiple introductions and gene flow in subtropical South American populations of the fireweed, Senecio madagascariensis(Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Mäder, Geraldo; Castro, Luana; Bonatto, Sandro Luis; de Freitas, Loreta Brandão

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Non-indigenous plants exhibit different attributes that make them aggressive competitors with indigenous plants and serious threats to biodiversity.Senecio madagascariensis (fireweed, Asteraceae), a native from southern Africa, is a strong competitor in agricultural activities and has toxic alkaloids that may result in high cattle mortality. In Brazil, this weed was collected for the first time in 1995 and has since spread quickly throughout the Pampas region. To better understand the invasion of the fireweed in South America, we used a genetic characterization with internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and microsatellite markers. Based on the ITS data, the southern Brazil populations of S. madagascariensis shared genetic homology with samples taken from the Hawaiian Islands and South Africa. Microsatellite analysis showed the genetic diversity split in two clusters, perhaps intimating the independent introduction of each species into South America. Although fireweed was introduced recently in southern Brazil, the considerable levels of genetic diversity, gene flow, and inbreeding may indicate success in the species establishment in this environment. PMID:27007907

  15. Genomewide identification of genes under directional selection: gene transcription Q(ST) scan in diverging Atlantic salmon subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Roberge, C; Guderley, H; Bernatchez, L

    2007-10-01

    Evolutionary genomics has benefited from methods that allow identifying evolutionarily important genomic regions on a genomewide scale, including genome scans and QTL mapping. Recently, genomewide scanning by means of microarrays has permitted assessing gene transcription differences among species or populations. However, the identification of differentially transcribed genes does not in itself suffice to measure the role of selection in driving evolutionary changes in gene transcription. Here, we propose and apply a "transcriptome scan" approach to investigating the role of selection in shaping differential profiles of gene transcription among populations. We compared the genomewide transcription levels between two Atlantic salmon subpopulations that have been diverging for only six generations. Following assessment of normality and unimodality on a gene-per-gene basis, the additive genetic basis of gene transcription was estimated using the animal model. Gene transcription h(2) estimates were significant for 1044 (16%) of all detected cDNA clones. In an approach analogous to that of genome scans, we used the distribution of the Q(ST) values estimated from intra- and intersubpopulation additive genetic components of the transcription profiles to identify 16 outlier genes (average Q(ST) estimate = 0.11) whose transcription levels are likely to have evolved under the influence of directional selection within six generations only. Overall, this study contributes both empirically and methodologically to the quantitative genetic exploration of gene transcription data. PMID:17720934

  16. High-quality gene assembly directly from unpurified mixtures of microarray-synthesized oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Borovkov, Alex Y.; Loskutov, Andrey V.; Robida, Mark D.; Day, Kristen M.; Cano, Jose A.; Le Olson, Tien; Patel, Hetal; Brown, Kevin; Hunter, Preston D.; Sykes, Kathryn F.

    2010-01-01

    To meet the growing demand for synthetic genes more robust, scalable and inexpensive gene assembly technologies must be developed. Here, we present a protocol for high-quality gene assembly directly from low-cost marginal-quality microarray-synthesized oligonucleotides. Significantly, we eliminated the time- and money-consuming oligonucleotide purification steps through the use of hybridization-based selection embedded in the assembly process. The protocol was tested on mixtures of up to 2000 oligonucleotides eluted directly from microarrays obtained from three different chip manufacturers. These mixtures containing <5% perfect oligos, and were used directly for assembly of 27 test genes of different sizes. Gene quality was assessed by sequencing, and their activity was tested in coupled in vitro transcription/translation reactions. Genes assembled from the microarray-eluted material using the new protocol matched the quality of the genes assembled from >95% pure column-synthesized oligonucleotides by the standard protocol. Both averaged only 2.7 errors/kb, and genes assembled from microarray-eluted material without clonal selection produced only 30% less protein than sequence-confirmed clones. This report represents the first demonstration of cost-efficient gene assembly from microarray-synthesized oligonucleotides. The overall cost of assembly by this method approaches 5¢ per base, making gene synthesis more affordable than traditional cloning. PMID:20693531

  17. Collagen protein abnormalities produced by site-directed mutagenesis of the pro alpha 1(I) gene.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Mascara, T; Cole, W G; Stacey, A; Jaenisch, R

    1989-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of collagen genes offers a powerful new approach for studying structure-function relationships. The construction of engineered mutant collagen genes coding for glycine substitutions and their expression giving rise to the osteogenesis imperfecta type II phenotype in cells and transgenic mice has recently been achieved. This paper further defines the molecular abnormalities of collagen and bone pathology resulting from the expression of the mutant genes.

  18. Evidence for Introduction Bottleneck and Extensive Inter-Gene Pool (Mesoamerica x Andes) Hybridization in the European Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Gioia, Tania; Logozzo, Giuseppina; Attene, Giovanna; Bellucci, Elisa; Benedettelli, Stefano; Negri, Valeria; Papa, Roberto; Spagnoletti Zeuli, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Common bean diversity within and between Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools was compared in 89 landraces from America and 256 landraces from Europe, to elucidate the effects of bottleneck of introduction and selection for adaptation during the expansion of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Europe. Thirteen highly polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers (nuSSRs) were used to complement chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSRs) and nuclear markers (phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1) data from previous studies. To verify the extent of the introduction bottleneck, inter-gene pool hybrids were distinguished from “pure” accessions. Hybrids were identified on the basis of recombination of gene pool specific cpSSR, phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1 markers with a Bayesian assignments based on nuSSRs, and with STRUCTURE admixture analysis. More hybrids were detected than previously, and their frequency was almost four times larger in Europe (40.2%) than in America (12.3%). The genetic bottleneck following the introduction into Europe was not evidenced in the analysis including all the accessions, but it was significant when estimated only with “pure” accessions, and five times larger for Mesoamerican than for Andean germplasm. The extensive inter-gene pool hybridization generated a large amount of genotypic diversity that mitigated the effects of the bottleneck that occurred when common bean was introduced in Europe. The implication for evolution and the advantages for common bean breeding are discussed. PMID:24098412

  19. Recombinant AAV-directed gene therapy for type I glycogen storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chou, JY; Mansfield, BC

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ia and Ib are disorders of impaired glucose homeostasis affecting the liver and kidney. GSD-Ib also affects neutrophils. Current dietary therapies cannot prevent long-term complications. In animal studies, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene therapy can correct or minimize multiple aspects of the disorders, offering hope for human gene therapy. Areas covered A summary of recent progress in rAAV-mediated gene therapy for GSD-I; strategies to improve rAAV-mediated gene delivery, transduction efficiency and immune avoidance; and vector refinements that improve expression. Expert opinion rAAV-mediated gene delivery to the liver can restore glucose homeostasis in preclinical models of GSD-I, but some long-term complications of the liver and kidney remain. Gene therapy for GSD-Ib is less advanced than for GSD-Ia and only transient correction of myeloid dysfunction has been achieved. A question remains whether a single rAAV vector can meet the expression efficiency and tropism required to treat all aspects of GSD-I, or if a multi-prong approach is needed. An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of rAAV vectors in the context of strategies to achieve efficient transduction of the liver, kidney, and hematopoietic stem cells is required for treating GSD-I. PMID:21504389

  20. Problem-Based Learning Revisited, Introduction of Active and Self-Directed Learning to Reduce Fatigue among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Moust, Jos H. C.; Meijer, Andre W. M.; Schroder-Back, Peter; Roebertsen, Herma

    2012-01-01

    Despite several years of successfully applying problem-based learning at Maastricht University, the Faculty of Medicine observed a slow erosion of problem-based practices and "PBL fatigue" among themselves and students. In response to this fatigue and new research into the development of the young adult brain, Active Self-Directed Learning was…

  1. Direct Detection and Quantification of Bacterial Genes Associated with Inflammation in DNA Isolated from Stool

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Moreno, Ramón; Robledo, Iraida E.; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel

    2014-01-01

    Although predominantly associated with health benefits, the gut microbiota has also been shown to harbor genes that promote inflammation. In this work, we report a method for the direct detection and quantification of these pro-inflammatory bacterial genes by PCR and qPCR in DNA extracted from human stool samples. PCR reactions were performed to detect (i) the pks island genes, (ii) tcpC, which is present in some strains of Escherichia coli and (iii) gelE presented in some strains of Enterococcus faecalis. Additionally, we screened for the presence of the following genes encoding cyclomodulins that disrupted mammalian cell division: (iv) cdt (which encodes the cytolethal distending toxin) and (v) cnf-1 (which encodes the cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1). Our results show that 20% of the samples (N = 41) tested positive for detectable amounts of pks island genes, whereas 10% of individuals were positive for tcpC or gelE and only one individual was found to harbor the cnf-1 gene. Of the 13 individuals that were positive for at least one of the pro-inflammatory genes, 5 were found to harbor more than one. A quantitative version of the assay, which used real-time PCR, revealed the pro-inflammatory genes to be in high copy numbers: up to 1.3 million copies per mg of feces for the pks island genes. Direct detection of specific genes in stool could prove useful toward screening for the presence of pro-inflammatory bacterial genes in individuals with inflammatory bowel diseases or colorectal cancer. PMID:25635239

  2. Directing Cardiomyogenic Differentiation and Transdifferentiation By Ectopic Gene Expression - Direct Transition Or Reprogramming Detour?

    PubMed

    Andrée, Birgit; Zweigerdt, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disorders and associated morbidities remain the leading cause of premature death worldwide. Since the regeneration of diseased hearts is very limited and the insufficient supply of donor organs persists, hopes rely on new therapies for heart repair. Reviving the proliferation of endogenous cardiomyocytes (CMs) or the administration of adult stem cells to the heart was of limited curative success to date. Thus, the administration of in vitro generated CMs is under investigation to replenish loss of functional heart muscle tissue. This requires a sustainable source of CMs. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) have raised hopes for developing autologous cell therapies. To serve for heart repair, efficient and safe iPSC differentiation protocols for CMs production are required. iPSC differentiation into CMs and even functional subtypes was indeed achieved in recent years, either by the ectopic expression of cardiac transcription factors or the supplementation of chemical pathway modulators. An alternative approach aims at the direct transdifferentiation of fibroblasts, which are present in the interstitial tissue of many organs, into functional lineage-specific cell types. As a result the formation of induced cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs) by the ectopic expression of specific transcription factors combinations has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. This is an important proof-of-concept that the intermediate state of iPSC induction is dispensable. However, most of the early experiments were conducted in mice and translation to more relevant large animal models and subsequently to the clinic are challenging. Progress, drawbacks, and perspectives in this field will be discussed. PMID:26725881

  3. An introduction to wideband, two-channel direction-finding systems. I - General system overview, radiator, and arithmetic subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosko, J. A.

    1984-02-01

    It is pointed out that two-channel monopulse direction-finding (DF) systems have been used for many years in such antiradiation homing (ARH) missiles as Shrike and Standard ARM. The present investigation is concerned with the fairly broad topic of two-channel monopulse DF techniques. The entire system is considered in a system overview, and the design of multifilament spirals, with emphasis on dual-mode four-arm spirals, is discussed. Attention is given to radiation impedances and reference surface rotation, the hyperbolic spiral antenna, polarization diversity multimode antennas, and arithmetic subsystems.

  4. Introduction of silent mutations into the NP gene of influenza A viruses as a possible strategy for the creation of a live attenuated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Anhlan, Darisuren; Hrincius, Eike-Roman; Scholtissek, Christoph; Ludwig, Stephan

    2012-06-22

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza A virus (IAV) is associated with many different functions including host range restriction. Multiple sequence alignment analyses of 748 NP gene sequences from GenBank revealed a highly conserved region of 60 nucleotides within the ORF at the 3'-ends of the cRNA, in some codons even silent mutations were not found. This suggests that the RNA structure integrity within this region is crucial for IAV replication. To explore the impact of these conserved nucleotides for viral replication we created mutant viruses with one or more silent mutations in the respective region of the NP gene of the IAV strain A/WSN/33 (H1N1) (WSN). Assessment of viral replication of these WSN mutant viruses showed significant growth disadvantages when compared to the corresponding parental strain. On the basis of these findings we tested whether the attenuation of IAV by introduction of silent mutations into the NP gene may serve as a strategy to create a live attenuated vaccine. Mice vaccinated with the attenuated WSN mutant survived a lethal challenge dose of wild type WSN virus or the mouse adapted pandemic H1N1v strain A/Hamburg/4/2009. Thus, introduction of silent mutations in the NP of IAV is a feasible approach for a novel vaccination strategy allowing attenuation of the master strain but leaves the antigenicity of the gene product unaltered. This principle is potentially applicable for all viruses with segmented genomes.

  5. Direct Gene Transfer into Human Cultured Cells Facilitated by Laser Micropuncture of the Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wen; Wilkinson, Joyce; Stanbridge, Eric J.; Berns, Michael W.

    1987-06-01

    The selective alteration of the cellular genome by laser microbeam irradiation has been extensively applied in cell biology. We report here the use of the third harmonic (355 nm) of an yttrium-aluminum garnet laser to facilitate the direct transfer of the neo gene into cultured human HT1080-6TG cells. The resultant transformants were selected in medium containing an aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. Integration of the neo gene into individual human chromosomes and expression of the gene were demonstrated by Southern blot analyses, microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, and chromosome analyses. The stability of the integrated neo gene in the transformants was shown by a comparative growth assay in selective and nonselective media. Transformation and incorporation of the neo gene into the host genome occurred at a frequency of 8 × 10-4-3 × 10-3. This method appears to be 100-fold more efficient than the standard calcium phosphate-mediated method of DNA transfer.

  6. Direct gene transfer into human cultured cells facilitated by laser micropuncture of the cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.; Wilkinson, J.; Stanbridge, E.J.; Berns, M.W.

    1987-06-01

    The selective alteration of the cellular genome by laser microbeam irradiation has been extensively applied in cell biology. We report here the use of the third harmonic (355 nm) of an yttrium-aluminum garnet laser to facilitate the direct transfer of the neo gene into cultured human HT1080-6TG cells. The resultant transformants were selected in media containing an aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. Integration of the neo gene into individual chromosomes and expression of the gene were demonstrated by Southern blot analyses, microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, and chromosome analyses. The stability of the integrated neo gene in the transformants was shown by a comparative growth assay in selective and nonselective media. Transformation and incorporation of the neo gene into the host genome occurred at a frequency of 8x10-4-3x10-3. This method appears to be 100-fold more efficient than the standard calcium phosphate-mediated method of DNA transfer.

  7. Organization of the qa Gene Cluster in NEUROSPORA CRASSA: Direction of Transcription of the qa-3 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Strøman, Per; Reinert, William; Case, Mary E.; Giles, Norman H.

    1979-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa, the enzyme quinate (shikimate) dehydrogenase catalyzes the first reaction in the inducible quinic acid catabolic pathway and is encoded in the qa-3 gene of the qa cluster. In this cluster, the order of genes has been established as qa-1 qa-3 qa-4 qa-2. Amino-terminal sequences have been determined for purified quinate dehydrogenase from wild type and from UV-induced revertants in two different qa-3 mutants. These two mutants (M16 and M45) map at opposite ends of the qa-3 locus. In addition, mapping data (Case et al. 1978) indicate that the end of the qa-3 gene specified by M45 is closer to the adjacent qa-1 gene than is the end specified by the M16 mutant site. In one of the revertants (R45 from qa-3 mutant M45), the aminoterminal sequence for the first ten amino acids is identical to that of wild type. The other revertant (R1 from qa-3 mutant M16) differs from wild type at the amino-terminal end by a single altered residue at position three in the sequence. The observed change involves the substitution of an isoleucine in M16-R1 for a proline in wild type. This substitution requires a two-nucleotide change in the corresponding wild-type codon.——The combined genetic and biochemical data indicate that the qa-3 mutants M16 and M45 carry amino acid substitutions near the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal ends of the quinate dehydrogenase enzyme, respectively. On this basis we conclude that transcription of the qa-3 gene proceeds from the end specified by the M16 mutant site in the direction of the qa-1 gene. It appears probable that transcription is initiated from a promoter site within the qa cluster, possibly immediately adjacent to the qa-3 gene. PMID:159203

  8. Suitable reference genes for the analysis of direct hyperplasia in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Soichi; Ohashi, Kazuo Utoh, Rie; Tatsumi, Kohei; Shima, Midori; Okano, Teruo

    2008-12-26

    The liver is capable of undergoing a proliferative growth, known as direct hyperplasia, in which the naive liver increases in size due to stimulation with primary mitogens. To produce accurate gene expression data, housekeeping genes (HKGs) that are stably expressed need to be determined. In the present study, liver regeneration was promoted via the direct hyperplasia mode by inducing mice with 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene. Gene expression levels of nine commonly used HKGs were analyzed in the liver of different timing during the regeneration. The stability of gene expression was assessed using two different analysis programs, geNorm and NormFinder. Using these analyses, we identified that PPIA and RPL4 showed the most stable expression regardless of the status of the liver regeneration. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the use of PPIA and RPL4 were the most optimal in providing reliable normalization of gene expression when assessing liver regeneration attributed to direct hyperplasia.

  9. Direct introduction of volatile carbon compounds into the spray chamber of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer: Sensitivity enhancement for selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovačevič, Miroslav; Goessler, Walter

    2005-10-01

    The effect of signal enhancement of elements with ionization potentials in the range from 9 to 11 eV by carbon-containing compounds is a well-known phenomenon in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). It has traditionally been exploited through the addition of organic solvents to the sample matrix or to the mobile phase to improve sensitivity. In the present work, aqueous solutions of volatile carbon compounds (acetone, methanol and acetic acid) were directly introduced into the thermostatted spray chamber rather than being added to the sample matrix. It is presumed that no aerosol is produced from these solutions and only vapors of organic compounds are swept into the plasma together with the sample aerosol. When a 0.40 mol l - 1 aqueous solution of acetone was introduced directly into the spray chamber, the signals for arsenic and selenium were enhanced by a factor of 4.2. The usefulness of this approach was demonstrated through the achievement of lower instrumental detection limits for selenium at m/z 82 (0.1 ng ml - 1 ) compared to the system without direct introduction of volatile carbon compounds (0.5 ng ml - 1 ). The method was successfully applied in the determination of traces of selenium in natural water, urine and bovine liver reference material.

  10. Direct cellobiose production from cellulose using sextuple beta-glucosidase gene deletion Neurospora crassa mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct cellobiose production from cellulose by a genetically modified fungus—Neurospora crassa, was explored in this study. A library of N. crassa sextuple beta-glucosidase (bgl) gene deletion strains was constructed. Various concentrations of cellobiose were detected in the culture broth of the N. ...

  11. Controlling false discoveries in multidimensional directional decisions, with applications to gene expression data on ordered categories.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenge; Sarkar, Sanat K; Peddada, Shyamal D

    2010-06-01

    Microarray gene expression studies over ordered categories are routinely conducted to gain insights into biological functions of genes and the underlying biological processes. Some common experiments are time-course/dose-response experiments where a tissue or cell line is exposed to different doses and/or durations of time to a chemical. A goal of such studies is to identify gene expression patterns/profiles over the ordered categories. This problem can be formulated as a multiple testing problem where for each gene the null hypothesis of no difference between the successive mean gene expressions is tested and further directional decisions are made if it is rejected. Much of the existing multiple testing procedures are devised for controlling the usual false discovery rate (FDR) rather than the mixed directional FDR (mdFDR), the expected proportion of Type I and directional errors among all rejections. Benjamini and Yekutieli (2005, Journal of the American Statistical Association 100, 71-93) proved that an augmentation of the usual Benjamini-Hochberg (BH) procedure can control the mdFDR while testing simple null hypotheses against two-sided alternatives in terms of one-dimensional parameters. In this article, we consider the problem of controlling the mdFDR involving multidimensional parameters. To deal with this problem, we develop a procedure extending that of Benjamini and Yekutieli based on the Bonferroni test for each gene. A proof is given for its mdFDR control when the underlying test statistics are independent across the genes. The results of a simulation study evaluating its performance under independence as well as under dependence of the underlying test statistics across the genes relative to other relevant procedures are reported. Finally, the proposed methodology is applied to a time-course microarray data obtained by Lobenhofer et al. (2002, Molecular Endocrinology 16, 1215-1229). We identified several important cell-cycle genes, such as DNA

  12. Direct phylogenetic evidence for lateral transfer of elongation factor-like gene

    PubMed Central

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Inagaki, Yuji; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2008-01-01

    Genes encoding elongation factor-like (EFL) proteins, which show high similarity to elongation factor-1α (EF-1α), have been found in phylogenetically distantly related eukaryotes. The sporadic distribution of “EFL-containing” lineages within “EF-1α-containing” lineages indirectly, but strongly, suggests lateral gene transfer as the principal driving force in EFL evolution. However, one of the most critical aspects in the above hypothesis, the donor lineages in any putative cases of lateral EFL gene transfer, remained unclear. In this study, we provide direct evidence for lateral transfer of an EFL gene through the analyses of 10 diatom EFL genes. All diatom EFL homologues tightly clustered in phylogenetic analyses, suggesting acquisition of the exogenous EFL gene early in diatom evolution. Our survey additionally identified Thalassiosira pseudonana as a eukaryote bearing EF-1α and EFL genes and secondary EFL gene loss in Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the complete genome of which encodes only the EF-1α gene. Most importantly, the EFL phylogeny recovered a robust grouping of homologues from diatoms, the cercozoan Bigelowiella natans, and the foraminifer Planoglabratella opecularis, with the diatoms nested within the Bigelowiella plus Planoglabratella (Rhizaria) grouping. The particular relationships recovered are further consistent with two characteristic sequence motifs. The best explanation of our data analyses is an EFL gene transfer from a foraminifer to a diatom, the first case in which the donor–recipient relationship was clarified. Finally, based on a reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR assay and the genome information of Thalassiosira and Phaeodactylum, we propose the loss of elongation factor function in Thalassiosira EF-1α. PMID:18458344

  13. Rapid direct identification of Cryptococcus neoformans from pigeon droppings by nested PCR using CNLAC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Chae, H S; Park, G N; Kim, S H; Jo, H J; Kim, J T; Jeoung, H Y; An, D J; Kim, N H; Shin, B W; Kang, Y I; Chang, K S

    2012-08-01

    Isolation and identification of Cryptococcus neoformans and pathogenic yeast-like fungi from pigeon droppings has been taken for a long time and requires various nutrients for its growth. In this study, we attempted to establish a rapid direct identification method of Cr. neoformans from pigeon dropping samples by nested-PCR using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) CAP64 and CNLAC1 genes, polysaccharide capsule gene and laccase-associated gene to produce melanin pigment, respectively, which are common genes of yeasts. The ITS and CAP64 genes were amplified in all pathogenic yeasts, but CNLAC1 was amplified only in Cr. neoformans. The ITS gene was useful for yeast genotyping depending on nucleotide sequence. Homology of CAP64 genes among the yeasts were very high. The specificity of PCR using CNLAC1 was demonstrated in Cr. neoformans environmental strains but not in other yeast-like fungi. The CNLAC1 gene was detected in 5 serotypes of Cr. neoformans. The nested-PCR amplified up to 10(-11) μg of the genomic DNA and showed high sensitivity. All pigeon droppings among 31 Cr. neoformans-positive samples were positive and all pigeon droppings among 348 Cr. neoformans-negative samples were negative by the direct nested-PCR. In addition, after primary enrichment of pigeon droppings in Sabouraud dextrose broth, all Cr. neoformans-negative samples were negative by the nested-PCR, which showed high specificity. The nested-PCR showed high sensitivity without culture of pigeon droppings. Nested-PCR using CNLAC1 provides a rapid and reliable molecular diagnostic method to overcome weak points such as long culture time of many conventional methods.

  14. Applying Robust Directional Similarity based Clustering approach RDSC to classification of gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Li, H X; Wang, Shitong; Xiu, Yu

    2006-06-01

    Despite the fact that the classification of gene expression data from a cDNA microarrays has been extensively studied, nowadays a robust clustering method, which can estimate an appropriate number of clusters and be insensitive to its initialization has not yet been developed. In this work, a novel Robust Clustering approach, RDSC, based on the new Directional Similarity measure is presented. This new approach RDSC, which integrates the Directional Similarity based Clustering Algorithm, DSC, with the Agglomerative Hierarchical Clustering Algorithm, AHC, exhibits its robustness to initialization and its capability to determine the appropriate number of clusters reasonably. RDSC has been successfully employed to both artificial and benchmarking gene expression datasets. Our experimental results demonstrate its distinctive superiority over the conventional method Kmeans and the two typical directional clustering algorithms SPKmeans and moVMF.

  15. Glucocorticoid ultradian rhythmicity directs cyclical gene pulsing of the clock gene period 1 in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Conway-Campbell, B L; Sarabdjitsingh, R A; McKenna, M A; Pooley, J R; Kershaw, Y M; Meijer, O C; De Kloet, E R; Lightman, S L

    2010-10-01

    In vivo glucocorticoid (GC) secretion exhibits a distinctive ultradian rhythmicity. The lipophilic hormone can rapidly diffuse into cells, although only the pulse peak is of sufficient amplitude to activate the low affinity glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Discrete pulses readily access brain regions such as the hippocampus where GR expression is enriched and known to regulate neuronal function, including memory and learning processes. In the present study, we have tested the hypothesis that GR brain targets are responsive to ultradian GC rhythmicity. We have used adrenalectomised rats replaced with pulses of corticosterone to determine the transcriptional effects of ultradian pulses in the hippocampus. Confocal microscopy confirmed that each GC pulse results in transient GR nuclear localisation in hippocampal CA1 neurones. Concomitant GR activation and DNA binding was demonstrated by synthetic glucocorticoid response element oligonucleotide binding, and verified for the Clock gene Period 1 promoter region by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Strikingly each GC pulse induced a 'burst' of transcription of Period 1 measured by heterogeneous nuclear RNA quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The net effect of pulsatile GC exposure on accumulation of the mature transcript was also assessed, revealing a plateau of mRNA levels throughout the time course of pulsatile exposure, indicating the pulse timing works optimally for steady state Per1 expression. The plateau dropped to baseline within 120 min of the final pulse, indicating a relatively short half-life for hippocampal Per1. The significance of this strict temporal control is that any perturbation to the pulse frequency or duration would have rapid quantitative effects on the levels of Per1. This in turn could affect hippocampal function, especially circadian related memory and learning processes.

  16. An inverted TATA box directs downstream transcription of the bone sialoprotein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J J; Kim, R H; Sodek, J

    1995-01-01

    The orientation of the TATA box is thought to direct downstream transcription of eukaryotic genes by RNA polymerase II. However, the putative TATA box in the promoter of the bone sialoprotein (BSP) gene, which codes for a tissue-specific and developmentally regulated bone matrix protein, is inverted (5'-TTTATA-3') relative to the consensus TATA box sequence (5'-TATAAA-3') and is overlapped by a vitamin D3-response element. Here we show that the inverted TATA sequence in the rat BSP gene binds to recombinant TATA-box-binding protein (TBP) with an affinity similar to that observed with the consensus TATA box, and site-directed point mutations in the inverted TATA sequence (mutating TTTATA into TCTCTA) abrogate both TBP binding and BSP promoter activity. However, when the inverted TATA sequence is changed to a canonical TATAAA, the TBP- and vitamin D3 receptor-binding properties together with the BSP promoter activity are retained. In addition, we found that the TBP is required to reconstitute in vitro transcription driven by the BSP promoter. These studies, which have revealed a naturally occurring inverted TATA box that can bind TBP and direct downstream transcription, demonstrate that the orientation of the TATA box does not determine the direction of transcription in higher eukaryotic genes. Consequently, the inverted TATA box that is conserved in the human, rat and mouse BSP gene promoters will provide an excellent in vivo model to investigate the polarity of the transcription factor IID-DNA complex and its relation to downstream transcription. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7646464

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of Japanese encephalitis virus: envelope gene based analysis reveals a fifth genotype, geographic clustering, and multiple introductions of the virus into the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Uchil, P D; Satchidanandam, V

    2001-09-01

    We report the analysis of the complete nucleotide sequence for the Indian isolate (P20778; Genbank Accession number AF080251) of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). The phylogenetic tree topology obtained using thirteen complete genome sequences of JEV was reproduced with the envelope, NS1, NS3, and NS5 genes and revealed extensive divergence between the two Indian strains included. A more exhaustive analysis of JEV evolution using 107 envelope sequences available for isolates from different geographic locations worldwide revealed five distinct genotypes of JEV, displaying a minimum nucleotide divergence of 7% with high bootstrap support values. The tree also revealed overall clustering of strains based on geographic location, as well as multiple introductions of JEV into the Indian subcontinent. Nonsynonymous nucleotide divergence rates of the envelope gene estimated that the ancestor common to all JEV genotypes arose within the last three hundred years.

  18. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-10-16

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins) system in vivo in wild-type mice. We used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) to the liver that directly target the tumour suppressor genes Pten (ref. 5) and p53 (also known as TP53 and Trp53) (ref. 6), alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumours that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumour tissue revealed insertion or deletion mutations of the tumour suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumours. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harbouring sgRNAs targeting the β-catenin gene and a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of β-catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics.

  19. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S.; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G.; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sharp, Phillip A.; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells1. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas system in vivo in wild-type mice. We have used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs)2–4 to the liver and directly target the tumor suppressor genes Pten5 and p536, alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology7, 8. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumors that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumor tissue revealed insertion or deletion (indel) mutations of the tumor suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumors. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harboring sgRNAs targeting the β-Catenin gene (Ctnnb1) and a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of β-Catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics. PMID:25119044

  20. The Regulation of rRNA Gene Transcription during Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong; Zhao, Rui; Giles, Keith E.

    2016-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that proper cellular control of pluripotency and differentiation is related to the regulation of rRNA synthesis. To further our understanding of the role that the regulation of rRNA synthesis has in pluripotency we monitored rRNA synthesis during the directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We discovered that the rRNA synthesis rate is reduced ~50% within 6 hours of ACTIVIN A treatment. This precedes reductions in expression of specific stem cell markers and increases in expression of specific germ layer markers. The reduction in rRNA synthesis is concomitant with dissociation of the Pol I transcription factor, UBTF, from the rRNA gene promoter and precedes any increase to heterochromatin throughout the rRNA gene. To directly investigate the role of rRNA synthesis in pluripotency, hESCs were treated with the Pol I inhibitor, CX-5461. The direct reduction of rRNA synthesis by CX-5461 induces the expression of markers for all three germ layers, reduces the expression of pluripotency markers, and is overall similar to the ACTIVIN A induced changes. This work indicates that the dissociation of UBTF from the rRNA gene, and corresponding reduction in transcription, represent early regulatory events during the directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27299313

  1. Pathogen corruption and site-directed recombination at a plant disease resistance gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Ervin D; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2008-12-01

    The Pc locus of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) determines dominant sensitivity to a host-selective toxin produced by the fungal pathogen Periconia circinata. The Pc region was cloned by a map-based approach and found to contain three tandemly repeated genes with the structures of nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) disease resistance genes. Thirteen independent Pc-to-pc mutations were analyzed, and each was found to remove all or part of the central gene of the threesome. Hence, this central gene is Pc. Most Pc-to-pc mutations were associated with unequal recombination. Eight recombination events were localized to different sites in a 560-bp region within the approximately 3.7-kb NBS-LRR genes. Because any unequal recombination located within the flanking NBS-LRR genes would have removed Pc, the clustering of cross-over events within a 560-bp segment indicates that a site-directed recombination process exists that specifically targets unequal events to generate LRR diversity in NBS-LRR loci.

  2. A direct molecular link between the autism candidate gene RORa and the schizophrenia candidate MIR137

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devanna, Paolo; Vernes, Sonja C.

    2014-02-01

    Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha gene (RORa) and the microRNA MIR137 have both recently been identified as novel candidate genes for neuropsychiatric disorders. RORa encodes a ligand-dependent orphan nuclear receptor that acts as a transcriptional regulator and miR-137 is a brain enriched small non-coding RNA that interacts with gene transcripts to control protein levels. Given the mounting evidence for RORa in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and MIR137 in schizophrenia and ASD, we investigated if there was a functional biological relationship between these two genes. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-137 targets the 3'UTR of RORa in a site specific manner. We also provide further support for MIR137 as an autism candidate by showing that a large number of previously implicated autism genes are also putatively targeted by miR-137. This work supports the role of MIR137 as an ASD candidate and demonstrates a direct biological link between these previously unrelated autism candidate genes.

  3. SpeedyGenes: an improved gene synthesis method for the efficient production of error-corrected, synthetic protein libraries for directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Currin, Andrew; Swainston, Neil; Day, Philip J; Kell, Douglas B

    2014-09-01

    The de novo synthesis of genes is becoming increasingly common in synthetic biology studies. However, the inherent error rate (introduced by errors incurred during oligonucleotide synthesis) limits its use in synthesising protein libraries to only short genes. Here we introduce SpeedyGenes, a PCR-based method for the synthesis of diverse protein libraries that includes an error-correction procedure, enabling the efficient synthesis of large genes for use directly in functional screening. First, we demonstrate an accurate gene synthesis method by synthesising and directly screening (without pre-selection) a 747 bp gene for green fluorescent protein (yielding 85% fluorescent colonies) and a larger 1518 bp gene (a monoamine oxidase, producing 76% colonies with full catalytic activity, a 4-fold improvement over previous methods). Secondly, we show that SpeedyGenes can accommodate multiple and combinatorial variant sequences while maintaining efficient enzymatic error correction, which is particularly crucial for larger genes. In its first application for directed evolution, we demonstrate the use of SpeedyGenes in the synthesis and screening of large libraries of MAO-N variants. Using this method, libraries are synthesised, transformed and screened within 3 days. Importantly, as each mutation we introduce is controlled by the oligonucleotide sequence, SpeedyGenes enables the synthesis of large, diverse, yet controlled variant sequences for the purposes of directed evolution.

  4. Stable transformation of moth bean Vigna aconitifolia via direct gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Köhler, F; Golz, C; Eapen, S; Kohn, H; Schieder, O

    1987-07-01

    Direct gene transfer proved to be an efficient transformation method for Vigna aconitifolia, a member of the legume family. Kanamycin resistant calli and plants were regenerated from heat shocked protoplasts treated with PEG and plasmid DNA containing the coding region for aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene (NPT II). The plant cultivar used was an important factor in attaining higher transformation frequencies. Transformation was confirmed by Southern blot analysis using a non-radioactive detection system. Attempts to transform mesophyll and suspension cultured cells by this method were unsuccessful. Protoplasts electroporated with the plasmid pCAP212, which codes for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, exhibited transient expression of this gene two days after treatment while electroporated cells did not show this enzyme activity. It is therefore assumed that the DNA uptake is prevented by the cell wall.

  5. Short, direct repeats at the breakpoints of deletions of the retinoblastoma gene

    SciTech Connect

    Canning, S.; Dryja, T.P. )

    1989-07-01

    The authors found deletions involving the retinoblastoma gene in 12 of 49 tumors from patients with retinoblastoma or osteosarcoma. After mapping the deletion breakpoints, they found that no two breakpoints coincided. Thus, the data do not support the conclusions of others regarding the existence of a hotspot for deletion breakpoints in this gene. In 4 of the tumors, they sequenced 200 base pairs surrounding each deletion breakpoint. Three deletions had termini within pairs of short, direct repeats ranging in size from 4 to 7 base pairs. These results indicate that the slipped mispairing mechanism may predominate in the generation of deletions at this locus. The review of deletion breakpoints at other genetic loci reveals that the nature of the sequences present at deletion breakpoints (short, direct repeats versus middle repetitive elements) varies according to the genetic locus under study.

  6. p53-directed translational control can shape and expand the universe of p53 target genes.

    PubMed

    Zaccara, S; Tebaldi, T; Pederiva, C; Ciribilli, Y; Bisio, A; Inga, A

    2014-10-01

    The increasing number of genome-wide transcriptome analyses focusing on p53-induced cellular responses in many cellular contexts keeps adding to the already numerous p53-regulated transcriptional networks. To investigate post-transcriptional controls as an additional dimension of p53-directed gene expression responses, we performed a translatome analysis through polysomal profiling on MCF7 cells upon 16 hours of doxorubicin or nutlin-3a treatment. The comparison between the transcriptome and the translatome revealed a considerable level of uncoupling, characterized by genes whose transcription variations did not correlate with translation variations. Interestingly, uncoupled genes were associated with apoptosis, DNA and RNA metabolism and cell cycle functions, suggesting that post-transcriptional control can modulate classical p53-regulated responses. Furthermore, even for well-established p53 targets that were differentially expressed both at the transcriptional and translational levels, quantitative differences between the transcriptome, subpolysomal and polysomal RNAs were evident. As we searched mechanisms underlying gene expression uncoupling, we identified the p53-dependent modulation of six RNA-binding proteins, where hnRNPD (AUF1) and CPEB4 are direct p53 transcriptional targets, whereas SRSF1, DDX17, YBX1 and TARDBP are indirect targets (genes modulated preferentially in the subpolysomal or polysomal mRNA level) modulated at the translational level in a p53-dependent manner. In particular, YBX1 translation appeared to be reduced by p53 via two different mechanisms, one related to mTOR inhibition and the other to miR-34a expression. Overall, we established p53 as a master regulator of translational control and identified new p53-regulated genes affecting translation that can contribute to p53-dependent cellular responses.

  7. Direct Repression of Evening Genes by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 in the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    Kamioka, Mari; Takao, Saori; Suzuki, Takamasa; Taki, Kyomi; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Nakamichi, Norihito

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is a biological timekeeping system that provides organisms with the ability to adapt to day-night cycles. Timing of the expression of four members of the Arabidopsis thaliana PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR(PRR) family is crucial for proper clock function, and transcriptional control of PRRs remains incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that direct regulation of PRR5 by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) determines the repression state of PRR5 in the morning. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses indicated that CCA1 associates with three separate regions upstream of PRR5 CCA1 and its homolog LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) suppressed PRR5 promoter activity in a transient assay. The regions bound by CCA1 in the PRR5 promoter gave rhythmic patterns with troughs in the morning, when CCA1 and LHY are at high levels. Furthermore,ChIP-seq revealed that CCA1 associates with at least 449 loci with 863 adjacent genes. Importantly, this gene set contains genes that are repressed but upregulated incca1 lhy double mutants in the morning. This study shows that direct binding by CCA1 in the morning provides strong repression of PRR5, and repression by CCA1 also temporally regulates an evening-expressed gene set that includes PRR5. PMID:26941090

  8. Forced expression of Hnf4a induces hepatic gene activation through directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yahoo, Neda; Pournasr, Behshad; Rostamzadeh, Jalal; Fathi, Fardin

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of unlimited self-renewal and have a diverse differentiation potential. These unique features make ES cells as an attractive source for developmental biology studies. Having the mature hepatocyte in the lab with functional activities is valuable in drug discovery studies. Overexpression of hepatocyte lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs) becomes a promising approach in pluripotent cell differentiation toward liver cells. Many studies generate transgenic ES cell lines to examine the effects of specific TFs overexpression in cell differentiation. In the present report, we have addressed whether a suspension or adherent model of differentiation is an appropriate way to study the role of Hnf4a overexpression. We generated ES cells that carried a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible Hnf4a using lentiviral vectors. The transduced cells were subjected to induced Hnf4a overexpression through both spontaneous and directed differentiation methods. Gene expression analysis showed substantially increased expression of hepatic gene markers, particularly Ttr and endogenous Hnf4a, in transduced cells differentiated by the directed approach. These results demonstrated that forced expression of TFs during directed differentiation would be an appropriate way to study relevant gene activation and the effects of overexpression in the context of hepatic differentiation. PMID:27233607

  9. XSmad2 directly activates the activin-inducible, dorsal mesoderm gene XFKH1 in Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, M; Hill, C S

    1997-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta family members play a central role in mesoderm induction during early embryogenesis in Xenopus. Although a number of target genes induced as an immediate-early response to activin-like members of the family have been described, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. Our systematic analysis of the activin induction of the target gene XFKH1 reveals two regions that mediate activin-responsive transcription: one, in the first intron, is targeted directly by the activin-signalling pathway; the other, in the 5' flanking sequences, responds to activin indirectly, possibly being required for maintenance of gene expression. We demonstrate that a 107 bp region of the XFKH1 first intron acts as an enhancer and confers activin inducibility onto a minimal uninducible promoter in the absence of new protein synthesis. It bears little sequence similarity to other activin responsive sequences. We further demonstrate that overexpression of a constitutively active derivative of Xenopus Smad2 (XSmad2), which has been implicated as a component of the activin signalling pathway, is sufficient for direct activation of transcription via this enhancer. Moreover, we show that XSmad2 acts indirectly on the proximal promoter element induced by activin via an indirect mechanism. These results establish the XFKH1 intron enhancer as a direct nuclear target of the activin signalling pathway in Xenopus embryos, and provide strong new evidence that XSmad2 is a transducer of activin signals. PMID:9405370

  10. Efficiency of gene silencing in Arabidopsis: direct inverted repeats vs. transitive RNAi vectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Filichkin, Sergei A; DiFazio, Steven P; Brunner, Amy M; Davis, John M; Yang, Zamin Koo; Kalluri, Udaya C; Arias, Renee S; Etherington, Elizabeth; Tuskan, Gerald A; Strauss, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of RNA interference (RNAi) in Arabidopsis using transitive and homologous inverted repeat (hIR) vectors. hIR constructs carry self-complementary intron-spliced fragments of the target gene whereas transitive vectors have the target sequence fragment adjacent to an intron-spliced, inverted repeat of heterologous origin. Both transitive and hIR constructs facilitated specific and heritable silencing in the three genes studied (AP1, ETTIN and TTG1). Both types of vectors produced a phenotypic series that phenocopied reduction of function mutants for the respective target gene. The hIR yielded up to fourfold higher proportions of events with strongly manifested reduction of function phenotypes compared to transitive RNAi. We further investigated the efficiency and potential off-target effects of AP1 silencing by both types of vectors using genome-scale microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR. The depletion of AP1 transcripts coincided with reduction of function phenotypic changes among both hIR and transitive lines and also showed similar expression patterns among differentially regulated genes. We did not detect significant silencing directed against homologous potential off-target genes when constructs were designed with minimal sequence similarity. Both hIR and transitive methods are useful tools in plant biotechnology and genomics. The choice of vector will depend on specific objectives such as cloning throughput, number of events and degree of suppression required.

  11. Transient expression of minimum linear gene cassettes in onion epidermal cells via direct transformation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yun-Qing; Yang, Jun; Xu, Feng-Ping; An, Li-Jia; Liu, Jian-Feng; Chen, Zhi-Wen

    2009-12-01

    A new method without any special devices for direct transformation of linear gene cassettes was developed. Its feasibility was verified through 5'-fluorescent dye (fluorescein isothiocyanate, FITC)-labeled fluorescent tracing and transient expression of a gus reporter gene. Minimal linear gene cassettes, containing necessary regulation elements and a gus reporter gene, was prepared by polymerase chain reaction and dissolved in transformation buffer solution to 100 ng/mL. The basic transformation solution used was Murashige and Skoog basal salt mixture (MS) liquid medium. Hypertonic pretreatment of explants and transformation cofactors, including Ca(2+), surfactant assistants, Agrobacterium LBA4404 cell culture on transformation efficiency were evaluated. Prior to the incubation of the explants and target linear cassette in each designed transformation solution for 3 h, the onion low epidermal explants were pre-cultured in darkness at 27 degrees C for 48 h and then transferred to MS solid media for 72 h. FITC-labeled linear DNA was used to trace the delivery of DNA entry into the cell and the nuclei. By GUS staining and flow-cytometry-mediated fluorescent detection, a significant increase of the ratios of fluorescent nuclei as well as expression of the gus reporter gene was observed by each designed transformation solution. This potent and feasible method showed prospective applications in plant transgenic research. PMID:19255730

  12. Transient expression of minimum linear gene cassettes in onion epidermal cells via direct transformation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yun-Qing; Yang, Jun; Xu, Feng-Ping; An, Li-Jia; Liu, Jian-Feng; Chen, Zhi-Wen

    2009-12-01

    A new method without any special devices for direct transformation of linear gene cassettes was developed. Its feasibility was verified through 5'-fluorescent dye (fluorescein isothiocyanate, FITC)-labeled fluorescent tracing and transient expression of a gus reporter gene. Minimal linear gene cassettes, containing necessary regulation elements and a gus reporter gene, was prepared by polymerase chain reaction and dissolved in transformation buffer solution to 100 ng/mL. The basic transformation solution used was Murashige and Skoog basal salt mixture (MS) liquid medium. Hypertonic pretreatment of explants and transformation cofactors, including Ca(2+), surfactant assistants, Agrobacterium LBA4404 cell culture on transformation efficiency were evaluated. Prior to the incubation of the explants and target linear cassette in each designed transformation solution for 3 h, the onion low epidermal explants were pre-cultured in darkness at 27 degrees C for 48 h and then transferred to MS solid media for 72 h. FITC-labeled linear DNA was used to trace the delivery of DNA entry into the cell and the nuclei. By GUS staining and flow-cytometry-mediated fluorescent detection, a significant increase of the ratios of fluorescent nuclei as well as expression of the gus reporter gene was observed by each designed transformation solution. This potent and feasible method showed prospective applications in plant transgenic research.

  13. Direct gene transfer into human cultured cells facilitated by laser micropuncture of the cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.; Wilkinson, J.; Stanbridge, E.J.; Berns, M.W.

    1987-06-01

    The selective alteration of the cellular genome by laser microbeam irradiation has been extensively applied in cell biology. The authors report here the use of the third harmonic (355 nm) of an yttrium-aluminum garnet laser to facilitate the direct transfer of the neo gene into cultured human HT1080-6TG cells. The resultant transformants were selected in medium containing an aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. Integration of the neo gene into individual human chromosomes and expression of the gene were demonstrated by Southern blot analyses, microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, and chromosome analyses. The stability of the integrated neo gene in the transformants was shown by a comparative growth assay in selective and nonselective media. Transformation and incorporation of the neo gene into the host genome occurred at a frequency of 8 x 10 /sup -4/-3 x 10/sup -3/. This method appears to be 100-fold more efficient than the standard calcium phosphate-mediated method of DNA transfer.

  14. Circadian clock gene LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL directly regulates the timing of floral scent emission in Petunia

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, Myles P.; Hewett Hazelton, Kristen D.; Hempton, Andrew K.; Shim, Jae Sung; Yamamoto, Breanne M.; Riffell, Jeffrey A.; Imaizumi, Takato

    2015-01-01

    Flowers present a complex display of signals to attract pollinators, including the emission of floral volatiles. Volatile emission is highly regulated, and many species restrict emissions to specific times of the day. This rhythmic emission of scent is regulated by the circadian clock; however, the mechanisms have remained unknown. In Petunia hybrida, volatile emissions are dominated by products of the floral volatile benzenoid/phenylpropanoid (FVBP) metabolic pathway. Here we demonstrate that the circadian clock gene P. hybrida LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY; PhLHY) regulates the daily expression patterns of the FVBP pathway genes and floral volatile production. PhLHY expression peaks in the morning, antiphasic to the expression of P. hybrida GIGANTEA (PhGI), the master scent regulator ODORANT1 (ODO1), and many other evening-expressed FVBP genes. Overexpression phenotypes of PhLHY in Arabidopsis caused an arrhythmic clock phenotype, which resembles those of LHY overexpressors. In Petunia, constitutive expression of PhLHY depressed the expression levels of PhGI, ODO1, evening-expressed FVBP pathway genes, and FVBP emission in flowers. Additionally, in the Petunia lines in which PhLHY expression was reduced, the timing of peak expression of PhGI, ODO1, and the FVBP pathway genes advanced to the morning. Moreover, PhLHY protein binds to cis-regulatory elements called evening elements that exist in promoters of ODO1 and other FVBP genes. Thus, our results imply that PhLHY directly sets the timing of floral volatile emission by restricting the expression of ODO1 and other FVBP genes to the evening in Petunia. PMID:26124104

  15. Simultaneous Determination of 17 Pesticide Residues in Rice by GC/MS using a Direct Sample Introduction Procedure and Spiked Calibration Curves.

    PubMed

    Amirahmadi, Maryam; Yazdanpanah, Hassan; Shoeibi, Shahram; Pirali-Hamedani, Morteza; Ostad Gholami, Mahsa; Mohseninia, Mohammad Farshid; Kobarfard, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    A reliable, rapid and accurate method based on spiked calibration curves and direct sample introduction was developed for determination of 17 pesticide residues in rice by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry single quadrupole selected ion monitoring GC/MS-SQ-SIM. Sample preparation is based on extraction with acetonitrile without clean up. The use of spiked calibration curves for constructing the calibration curve substantially reduced adverse matrix-related effects. The average recovery of pesticides at 6 concentration levels was in range of 97.5-102.1%. The method was proved to be repeatable with RSDr in range of 0.7%-19.8%for all of the concentration levels. The limits of detection and limit of quantifications for all the pesticides were < 10 ng/g and < 25 ng/g, respectively. The developed method was applied for simultaneous determination of the selected pesticides in 23 rice samples collected from Tehran retail market in March 2009. Although many studies have been conducted regarding the determination of pesticides by using GC-MS, this is the first attempt in Iran using GC-MS-SIM technique that successfully can determine 17 pesticides with difference in physicochemical properties in rice.

  16. A comparison of continuous pneumatic nebulization and flow injection-direction injection nebulization for sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crain, J.S.; Kiely, J.T.

    1997-08-01

    Samples containing Ni, Cd, Pb, and U were analyzed eighteen times over a two-month period using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Sample introduction was accomplished by either flow injection-direct injection nebulization (FI-DIN) or continuous pneumatic nebulization (CPN). Using comparable instrumental measurement procedures, FI-DIN analyses were 33% faster and generated 52% less waste than CPN analyses. Instrumental limits of detection obtained with FI-DIN and CPN were comparable but not equivalent (except in the case of Pb) because of nebulizer-related differences in sensitivity (i.e., signal per unit analyte concentration) and background. Substantial and statistically significant differences were found between FI-DIN and CPN Ni determinations, and in the case of laboratory waste samples, there were also small but statistically significant differences between Cd determinations. These small (2 to 3%) differences were not related to polyatomic ion interference (e.g., {sup 95}Mo{sup 16}O{sup +}), but in light of the time and waste savings to be realized, they should not preclude the use of FI-DIN in place of CPN for determination of Cd, Pb, U, and similar elements present at trace concentrations.

  17. Analysis of the volatile organic matter of engine piston deposits by direct sample introduction thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Diaby, M; Kinani, S; Genty, C; Bouchonnet, S; Sablier, M; Le Negrate, A; El Fassi, M

    2009-12-01

    This article establishes an alternative method for the characterization of volatiles organic matter (VOM) contained in deposits of the piston first ring grooves of diesel engines using a ChromatoProbe direct sample introduction (DSI) device coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The addition of an organic solvent during thermal desorption leads to an efficient extraction and a good chromatographic separation of extracted products. The method was optimized investigating the effects of several solvents, the volume added to the solid sample, and temperature programming of the ChromatoProbe DSI device. The best results for thermal desorption were found using toluene as an extraction solvent and heating the programmable temperature injector from room temperature to 300 degrees C with a temperature step of 105 degrees C. With the use of the optimized thermal desorption conditions, several components have been positively identified in the volatile fraction of the deposits: aromatics, antioxidants, and antioxidant degradation products. Moreover, this work highlighted the presence of diesel fuel in the VOM of the piston deposits and gave new facts on the absence of the role of diesel fuel in the deposit formation process. Most importantly, it opens the possibility of quickly performing the analysis of deposits with small amounts of samples while having a good separation of the volatiles. PMID:19894696

  18. INTRODUCTION OF THE VITELLOGENIN GENE IN EARLY LIFE STAGE FATHEAD MINNOWS AS AN EFFECTIVE EXPOSURE INDICATOR FOR ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vitellogenin (Vg) gene expression in adult male fathead minnows (FHM) has previously been used successfully to detect exposures to estrogenic compounds in aquatic systems; however, sample volume(s)required for >24h exposure durations and the logistics of sampling pose some limita...

  19. Congenital Nystagmus Gene FRMD7 Is Necessary for Establishing a Neuronal Circuit Asymmetry for Direction Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Keisuke; Fiscella, Michele; Drinnenberg, Antonia; Esposti, Federico; Trenholm, Stuart; Krol, Jacek; Franke, Felix; Scherf, Brigitte Gross; Kusnyerik, Akos; Müller, Jan; Szabo, Arnold; Jüttner, Josephine; Cordoba, Francisco; Reddy, Ashrithpal Police; Németh, János; Nagy, Zoltán Zsolt; Munier, Francis; Hierlemann, Andreas; Roska, Botond

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal circuit asymmetries are important components of brain circuits, but the molecular pathways leading to their establishment remain unknown. Here we found that the mutation of FRMD7, a gene that is defective in human congenital nystagmus, leads to the selective loss of the horizontal optokinetic reflex in mice, as it does in humans. This is accompanied by the selective loss of horizontal direction selectivity in retinal ganglion cells and the transition from asymmetric to symmetric inhibitory input to horizontal direction-selective ganglion cells. In wild-type retinas, we found FRMD7 specifically expressed in starburst amacrine cells, the interneuron type that provides asymmetric inhibition to direction-selective retinal ganglion cells. This work identifies FRMD7 as a key regulator in establishing a neuronal circuit asymmetry, and it suggests the involvement of a specific inhibitory neuron type in the pathophysiology of a neurological disease. PMID:26711119

  20. Congenital Nystagmus Gene FRMD7 Is Necessary for Establishing a Neuronal Circuit Asymmetry for Direction Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Yonehara, Keisuke; Fiscella, Michele; Drinnenberg, Antonia; Esposti, Federico; Trenholm, Stuart; Krol, Jacek; Franke, Felix; Scherf, Brigitte Gross; Kusnyerik, Akos; Müller, Jan; Szabo, Arnold; Jüttner, Josephine; Cordoba, Francisco; Reddy, Ashrithpal Police; Németh, János; Nagy, Zoltán Zsolt; Munier, Francis; Hierlemann, Andreas; Roska, Botond

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neuronal circuit asymmetries are important components of brain circuits, but the molecular pathways leading to their establishment remain unknown. Here we found that the mutation of FRMD7, a gene that is defective in human congenital nystagmus, leads to the selective loss of the horizontal optokinetic reflex in mice, as it does in humans. This is accompanied by the selective loss of horizontal direction selectivity in retinal ganglion cells and the transition from asymmetric to symmetric inhibitory input to horizontal direction-selective ganglion cells. In wild-type retinas, we found FRMD7 specifically expressed in starburst amacrine cells, the interneuron type that provides asymmetric inhibition to direction-selective retinal ganglion cells. This work identifies FRMD7 as a key regulator in establishing a neuronal circuit asymmetry, and it suggests the involvement of a specific inhibitory neuron type in the pathophysiology of a neurological disease. Video Abstract PMID:26711119

  1. A survey of disease connections for CD4+ T cell master genes and their directly linked genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentian; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Simpfendorfer, Kim R; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies and other genetic analyses have identified a large number of genes and variants implicating a variety of disease etiological mechanisms. It is imperative for the study of human diseases to put these genetic findings into a coherent functional context. Here we use system biology tools to examine disease connections of five master genes for CD4+ T cell subtypes (TBX21, GATA3, RORC, BCL6, and FOXP3). We compiled a list of genes functionally interacting (protein-protein interaction, or by acting in the same pathway) with the master genes, then we surveyed the disease connections, either by experimental evidence or by genetic association. Embryonic lethal genes (also known as essential genes) are over-represented in master genes and their interacting genes (55% versus 40% in other genes). Transcription factors are significantly enriched among genes interacting with the master genes (63% versus 10% in other genes). Predicted haploinsufficiency is a feature of most these genes. Disease-connected genes are enriched in this list of genes: 42% of these genes have a disease connection according to Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) (versus 23% in other genes), and 74% are associated with some diseases or phenotype in a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) (versus 43% in other genes). Seemingly, not all of the diseases connected to genes surveyed were immune related, which may indicate pleiotropic functions of the master regulator genes and associated genes.

  2. Characterization of a Vibrio alginolyticus strain, isolated from Alaskan oysters, carrying a hemolysin gene similar to the thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin gene (trh) of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    González-Escalona, Narjol; Blackstone, George M; DePaola, Angelo

    2006-12-01

    A Vibrio strain isolated from Alaskan oysters and classified by its biochemical characteristics as Vibrio alginolyticus possessed a thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin (trh) gene previously reported only in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. This trh-like gene was cloned and sequenced and was 98% identical to the trh2 gene of V. parahaemolyticus. This gene seems to be functional since it was transcriptionally active in early-stationary-phase growing cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of V. alginolyticus possessing a trh gene.

  3. Direct effect of acaricides on pathogen loads and gene expression levels in honey bees Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Boncristiani, Humberto; Underwood, Robyn; Schwarz, Ryan; Evans, Jay D; Pettis, Jeffery; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis

    2012-05-01

    The effect of using acaricides to control varroa mites has long been a concern to the beekeeping industry due to unintended negative impacts on honey bee health. Irregular ontogenesis, suppression of immune defenses, and impairment of normal behavior have been linked to pesticide use. External stressors, including parasites and the pathogens they vector, can confound studies on the effects of pesticides on the metabolism of honey bees. This is the case of Varroa destructor, a mite that negatively affects honey bee health on many levels, from direct parasitism, which diminishes honey bee productivity, to vectoring and/or activating other pathogens, including many viruses. Here we present a gene expression profile comprising genes acting on diverse metabolic levels (detoxification, immunity, and development) in a honey bee population that lacks the influence of varroa mites. We present data for hives treated with five different acaricides; Apiguard (thymol), Apistan (tau-fluvalinate), Checkmite (coumaphos), Miteaway (formic acid) and ApiVar (amitraz). The results indicate that thymol, coumaphos and formic acid are able to alter some metabolic responses. These include detoxification gene expression pathways, components of the immune system responsible for cellular response and the c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, and developmental genes. These could potentially interfere with the health of individual honey bees and entire colonies.

  4. Recursive directional ligation by plasmid reconstruction allows rapid and seamless cloning of oligomeric genes.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Jonathan R; Mackay, J Andrew; Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2010-04-12

    This paper reports a new strategy, recursive directional ligation by plasmid reconstruction (PRe-RDL), to rapidly clone highly repetitive polypeptides of any sequence and specified length over a large range of molecular weights. In a single cycle of PRe-RDL, two halves of a parent plasmid, each containing a copy of an oligomer, are ligated together, thereby dimerizing the oligomer and reconstituting a functional plasmid. This process is carried out recursively to assemble an oligomeric gene with the desired number of repeats. PRe-RDL has several unique features that stem from the use of type IIs restriction endonucleases: first, PRe-RDL is a seamless cloning method that leaves no extraneous nucleotides at the ligation junction. Because it uses type IIs endonucleases to ligate the two halves of the plasmid, PRe-RDL also addresses the major limitation of RDL in that it abolishes any restriction on the gene sequence that can be oligomerized. The reconstitution of a functional plasmid only upon successful ligation in PRe-RDL also addresses two other limitations of RDL: the significant background from self-ligation of the vector observed in RDL, and the decreased efficiency of ligation due to nonproductive circularization of the insert. PRe-RDL can also be used to assemble genes that encode different sequences in a predetermined order to encode block copolymers or append leader and trailer peptide sequences to the oligomerized gene. PMID:20184309

  5. Direct linking of metabolism and gene expression in the proline utilization A protein from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuzhen; Zhu, Weidong; Bellur, Padmanetra S.; Rewinkel, Dustin; Becker, Donald F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The control of gene expression by enzymes provides a direct pathway for cells to respond to fluctuations in metabolites and nutrients. One example is the proline utilization A (PutA) protein from Escherichia coli. PutA is a membrane-associated enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of L-proline to glutamate using a flavin containing proline dehydrogenase domain and a NAD+ dependent Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase domain. In some Gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli, PutA is also endowed with a ribbon-helix-helix DNA-binding domain and acts as a transcriptional repressor of the proline utilization genes. PutA switches between transcriptional repressor and enzymatic functions in response to proline availability. Molecular insights into the redox based mechanism of PutA functional switching from recent studies are reviewed. In addition, new results from cell-based transcription assays are presented which correlate PutA membrane localization with put gene expression levels. General membrane localization of PutA, however, is not sufficient to activate the put genes. PMID:18324349

  6. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as a direct downstream target gene of Hoxc8

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Hyehyun; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Bok, Jinwoong; Chung, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2010-02-19

    Hoxc8 is a member of Hox family transcription factors that play crucial roles in spatiotemporal body patterning during embryogenesis. Hox proteins contain a conserved 61 amino acid homeodomain, which is responsible for recognition and binding of the proteins onto Hox-specific DNA binding motifs and regulates expression of their target genes. Previously, using proteome analysis, we identified Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as one of the putative target genes of Hoxc8. Here, we asked whether Hoxc8 regulates Pcna expression by directly binding to the regulatory sequence of Pcna. In mouse embryos at embryonic day 11.5, the expression pattern of Pcna was similar to that of Hoxc8 along the anteroposterior body axis. Moreover, Pcna transcript levels as well as cell proliferation rate were increased by overexpression of Hoxc8 in C3H10T1/2 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Characterization of 2.3 kb genomic sequence upstream of Pcna coding region revealed that the upstream sequence contains several Hox core binding sequences and one Hox-Pbx binding sequence. Direct binding of Hoxc8 proteins to the Pcna regulatory sequence was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, our data suggest that Pcna is a direct downstream target of Hoxc8.

  7. Gene dosage and stochastic effects determine the severity and direction of uniparental ribosomal RNA gene silencing (nucleolar dominance) in Arabidopsis allopolyploids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z J; Comai, L; Pikaard, C S

    1998-12-01

    Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon in which one parental set of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes is silenced in an interspecific hybrid. In natural Arabidopsis suecica, an allotetraploid (amphidiploid) hybrid of Arabidopsis thaliana and Cardaminopsis arenosa, the A. thaliana rRNA genes are repressed. Interestingly, A. thaliana rRNA gene silencing is variable in synthetic Arabidopsis suecica F1 hybrids. Two generations are needed for A. thaliana rRNA genes to be silenced in all lines, revealing a species-biased direction but stochastic onset to nucleolar dominance. Backcrossing synthetic A. suecica to tetraploid A. thaliana yielded progeny with active A. thaliana rRNA genes and, in some cases, silenced C. arenosa rRNA genes, showing that the direction of dominance can be switched. The hypothesis that naturally dominant rRNA genes have a superior binding affinity for a limiting transcription factor is inconsistent with dominance switching. Inactivation of a species-specific transcription factor is argued against by showing that A. thaliana and C. arenosa rRNA genes can be expressed transiently in the other species. Transfected A. thaliana genes are also active in A. suecica protoplasts in which chromosomal A. thaliana genes are repressed. Collectively, these data suggest that nucleolar dominance is a chromosomal phenomenon that results in coordinate or cooperative silencing of rRNA genes.

  8. Generation of insect-resistant and glyphosate-tolerant rice by introduction of a T-DNA containing two Bt insecticidal genes and an EPSPS gene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi-chao; Liu, Ming-hong; Zhang, Xian-wen; Lin, Chao-yang; Zhang, Qing; Shen, Zhi-cheng

    2015-10-01

    Insect resistance and glyphosate tolerance have been two of the most important traits in the genetic improvement of various crops. In this study, two Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal genes, Cry1Ac and Cry1Ig, and a modified glyphosate-tolerant 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene (G10) were combined into a single transferred DNA (T-DNA) fragment and introduced into rice by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. A transgenic line with single-copy T-DNA insertion named GAI-14 was found to be highly resistant to striped stem borer and rice leaf roller, and tolerant to glyphosate. Analysis of T-DNA border sequence suggested that the transgenes were inserted at the chromosome 3 and appeared to have not interrupted any known or putative genes. A field trial observed no significant difference in the basic agronomic traits between GAI-14 and the recipient rice. PMID:26465130

  9. Generation of insect-resistant and glyphosate-tolerant rice by introduction of a T-DNA containing two Bt insecticidal genes and an EPSPS gene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi-chao; Liu, Ming-hong; Zhang, Xian-wen; Lin, Chao-yang; Zhang, Qing; Shen, Zhi-cheng

    2015-10-01

    Insect resistance and glyphosate tolerance have been two of the most important traits in the genetic improvement of various crops. In this study, two Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal genes, Cry1Ac and Cry1Ig, and a modified glyphosate-tolerant 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene (G10) were combined into a single transferred DNA (T-DNA) fragment and introduced into rice by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. A transgenic line with single-copy T-DNA insertion named GAI-14 was found to be highly resistant to striped stem borer and rice leaf roller, and tolerant to glyphosate. Analysis of T-DNA border sequence suggested that the transgenes were inserted at the chromosome 3 and appeared to have not interrupted any known or putative genes. A field trial observed no significant difference in the basic agronomic traits between GAI-14 and the recipient rice.

  10. Generation of insect-resistant and glyphosate-tolerant rice by introduction of a T-DNA containing two Bt insecticidal genes and an EPSPS gene*

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, Qi-chao; LIU, Ming-hong; ZHANG, Xian-wen; LIN, Chao-yang; ZHANG, Qing; SHEN, Zhi-cheng

    2015-01-01

    Insect resistance and glyphosate tolerance have been two of the most important traits in the genetic improvement of various crops. In this study, two Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal genes, Cry1Ac and Cry1Ig, and a modified glyphosate-tolerant 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene (G10) were combined into a single transferred DNA (T-DNA) fragment and introduced into rice by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. A transgenic line with single-copy T-DNA insertion named GAI-14 was found to be highly resistant to striped stem borer and rice leaf roller, and tolerant to glyphosate. Analysis of T-DNA border sequence suggested that the transgenes were inserted at the chromosome 3 and appeared to have not interrupted any known or putative genes. A field trial observed no significant difference in the basic agronomic traits between GAI-14 and the recipient rice. PMID:26465130

  11. 5-Lipoxygenase is a direct p53 target gene in humans.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Bianca; Ahmad, Khalil; Roos, Jessica; Lehmann, Christoph; Chiba, Tomohiro; Ulrich-Rückert, Sandra; Smeenk, Leonie; van Heeringen, Simon; Maier, Thorsten J; Groner, Bernd; Steinhilber, Dieter

    2015-08-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a critical role in cancer, and more than 50% of human tumors contain mutations or deletions of the TP53 gene. p53 can transactivate or repress target genes in response to diverse stress signals, such as transient growth arrest, DNA repair, cellular differentiation, senescence and apoptosis. Through an unbiased genome-wide ChIP-seq analysis, we have found that 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5, 5-LO) which is a key enzyme of leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis, is a direct target gene of p53 and its expression is induced by genotoxic stress via actinomycin D (Act.D) or etoposide (Eto) treatment. 5-LO and LTs play a role in immunological diseases as well as in tumorigenesis and tumor growth. p53 binds to a specific binding site consisting of a complete p53 consensus-binding motif in ALOX5 intron G which is located about 64kbp downstream of the transcriptional start site. We confirmed the strong binding of p53 to the 5-LO target site in ChIP-qPCR experiments. Expression analyses by qRT-PCR and immunoblot further revealed that genotoxic stress induces the ALOX5 mRNA and protein expression in a p53-dependent manner. Knockdown of p53 in U2OS cells leads to a downregulation of 5-LO mRNA and protein expression. In addition, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation assays indicate the direct binding of 5-LO to p53 protein. Furthermore, we found that 5-LO can inhibit the transcriptional activity of p53 suggesting that 5-LO acts in a negative feedback loop to limit induction of p53 target genes.

  12. Partial rescue of a lethal phenotype of fragile bones in transgenic mice with a chimeric antisense gene directed against a mutated collagen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Khillan, J S; Li, S W; Prockop, D J

    1994-01-01

    Previously, transgenic mice were prepared that developed a lethal phenotype of fragile bones because they expressed an internally deleted mini-gene for the pro alpha 1(I) chain of human type I procollagen. The shortened pro alpha 1(I) chains synthesized from the human transgene bound to and produced degradation of normal pro alpha 1(I) chains synthesized from the normal mouse alleles. Here we assembled an antisense gene that was similar to the internally deleted COL1A1 minigene but the 3' half of the gene was inverted so as to code for an antisense RNA. Transgenic mice expressing the antisense gene had a normal phenotype, apparently because the antisense gene contained human sequences instead of mouse sequences. Two lines of mice expressing the antisense gene were bred to two lines of transgenic mice expressing the mini-gene. In mice that inherited both genes, the incidence of the lethal fragile bone phenotype was reduced from 92% to 27%. The effects of the antisense gene were directly demonstrated by an increase in the ratio of normal mouse pro alpha 1(I) chains to human mini-pro alpha 1(I) chains in tissues from mice that inherited both genes and had a normal phenotype. The results raise the possibility that chimeric gene constructs that contain intron sequences and in which only the second half of a gene is inverted may be particularly effective as antisense genes. Images PMID:8022775

  13. A Cell-Penetrating Peptide with a Guanidinylethyl Amine Structure Directed to Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Makoto; Kato, Takuma; Furukawa, Kaori; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    A peptide composed of lysine with a guanidinylethyl (GEt) amine structure in the side chain [Lys(GEt)] was developed as a cell-penetrating peptide directed to plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery. The GEt amine adopted a diprotonated form at neutral pH, which may have led to the more efficient cellular uptake of a Lys(GEt)-peptide than an arginine-peptide at a low concentration. Lys(GEt)-peptide/pDNA complexes showed the highest transfection efficiency due to efficient endosomal escape without any cytotoxicity. Lys(GEt)-peptide may be a promising candidate as a gene delivery carrier.

  14. Direct lineage reprogramming via pioneer factors; a detour through developmental gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Morris, Samantha A

    2016-08-01

    Although many approaches have been employed to generate defined fate in vitro, the resultant cells often appear developmentally immature or incompletely specified, limiting their utility. Growing evidence suggests that current methods of direct lineage conversion may rely on the transition through a developmental intermediate. Here, I hypothesize that complete conversion between cell fates is more probable and feasible via reversion to a developmentally immature state. I posit that this is due to the role of pioneer transcription factors in engaging silent, unmarked chromatin and activating hierarchical gene regulatory networks responsible for embryonic patterning. Understanding these developmental contexts will be essential for the precise engineering of cell identity. PMID:27486230

  15. A potential target gene for the host-directed therapy of mycobacterial infection in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhang; Chen, Ran; Zhang, Pei; Lu, Shan; Chen, Xing; Yao, Yake; Jin, Xiaozheng; Sun, Yilan; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), one of the major bacterial pathogens for lethal infectious diseases, is capable of surviving within the phagosomes of host alveolar macrophages; therefore, host genetic variations may alter the susceptibility to MTB. In this study, to identify host genes exploited by MTB during infection, genes were non-selectively inactivated using lentivirus-based antisense RNA methods in Raw264.7 macrophages, and the cells that survived virulent MTB infection were then screened. Following DNA sequencing of the surviving cell clones, 26 host genes affecting susceptibility to MTB were identified and their pathways were analyzed by bioinformatics analysis. In total, 9 of these genes were confirmed as positive regulators of collagen α-5(IV) chain (Col4a5) expression, a gene encoding a type IV collagen subunit present on the cell surface. The knockdown of Col4a5 consistently suppressed intracellular mycobacterial viability, promoting the survival of Raw264.7 macrophages following mycobacterial infection. Furthermore, Col4a5 deficiency lowered the pH levels of intracellular vesicles, including endosomes, lysosomes and phagosomes in the Raw264.7 cells. Finally, the knockdown of Col4a5 post-translationally increased microsomal vacuolar-type H+-ATPase activity in macrophages, leading to the acidification of intracellular vesicles. Our findings reveal a novel role for Col4a5 in the regulation of macrophage responses to mycobacterial infection and identify Col4a5 as a potential target for the host-directed anti-mycobacterial therapy. PMID:27432120

  16. Regulatory region in choline acetyltransferase gene directs developmental and tissue-specific expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lönnerberg, P; Lendahl, U; Funakoshi, H; Arhlund-Richter, L; Persson, H; Ibáñez, C F

    1995-01-01

    Acetylcholine, one of the main neurotransmitters in the nervous system, is synthesized by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT; acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6). The molecular mechanisms controlling the establishment, maintenance, and plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in vivo are largely unknown. A previous report showed that a 3800-bp, but not a 1450-bp, 5' flanking segment from the rat ChAT gene promoter directed cell type-specific expression of a reporter gene in cholinergic cells in vitro. Now we have characterized a distal regulatory region of the ChAT gene that confers cholinergic specificity on a heterologous downstream promoter in a cholinergic cell line and in transgenic mice. A 2342-bp segment from the 5' flanking region of the ChAT gene behaved as an enhancer in cholinergic cells but as a repressor in noncholinergic cells in an orientation-independent manner. Combined with a heterologous basal promoter, this fragment targeted transgene expression to several cholinergic regions of the central nervous system of transgenic mice, including basal forebrain, cortex, pons, and spinal cord. In eight independent transgenic lines, the pattern of transgene expression paralleled qualitatively and quantitatively that displayed by endogenous ChAT mRNA in various regions of the rat central nervous system. In the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord, 85-90% of the transgene expression was targeted to the ventral part of the cord, where cholinergic alpha-motor neurons are located. Transgene expression in the spinal cord was developmentally regulated and responded to nerve injury in a similar way as the endogenous ChAT gene, indicating that the 2342-bp regulatory sequence contains elements controlling the plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in developing and injured neurons. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7732028

  17. A potential target gene for the host-directed therapy of mycobacterial infection in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhang; Chen, Ran; Zhang, Pei; Lu, Shan; Chen, Xing; Yao, Yake; Jin, Xiaozheng; Sun, Yilan; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), one of the major bacterial pathogens for lethal infectious diseases, is capable of surviving within the phagosomes of host alveolar macrophages; therefore, host genetic variations may alter the susceptibility to MTB. In this study, to identify host genes exploited by MTB during infection, genes were non-selectively inactivated using lentivirus-based antisense RNA methods in RAW264.7 macrophages, and the cells that survived virulent MTB infection were then screened. Following DNA sequencing of the surviving cell clones, 26 host genes affecting susceptibility to MTB were identified and their pathways were analyzed by bioinformatics analysis. In total, 9 of these genes were confirmed as positive regulators of collagen α-5(IV) chain (Col4a5) expression, a gene encoding a type IV collagen subunit present on the cell surface. The knockdown of Col4a5 consistently suppressed intracellular mycobacterial viability, promoting the survival of RAW264.7 macrophages following mycobacterial infection. Furthermore, Col4a5 deficiency lowered the pH levels of intracellular vesicles, including endosomes, lysosomes and phagosomes in the RAW264.7 cells. Finally, the knockdown of Col4a5 post-translationally increased microsomal vacuolar-type H+-ATPase activity in macrophages, leading to the acidification of intracellular vesicles. Our findings reveal a novel role for Col4a5 in the regulation of macrophage responses to mycobacterial infection and identify Col4a5 as a potential target for the host-directed anti-mycobacterial therapy. PMID:27432120

  18. In vivo introduction of unpreferred synonymous codons into the Drosophila Adh gene results in reduced levels of ADH protein.

    PubMed Central

    Carlini, David B; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of codon bias, the unequal usage of synonymous codons, is thought to be due to natural selection for the use of preferred codons that match the most abundant species of isoaccepting tRNA, resulting in increased translational efficiency and accuracy. We examined this hypothesis by introducing 1, 6, and 10 unpreferred codons into the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh). We observed a significant decrease in ADH protein production with number of unpreferred codons, confirming the importance of natural selection as a mechanism leading to codon bias. We then used this empirical relationship to estimate the selection coefficient (s) against unpreferred synonymous mutations and found the value (s >or= 10(-5)) to be approximately one order of magnitude greater than previous estimates from population genetics theory. The observed differences in protein production appear to be too large to be consistent with current estimates of the strength of selection on synonymous sites in D. melanogaster. PMID:12586711

  19. Controllability analysis of the directed human protein interaction network identifies disease genes and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Gibson, Travis E.; Lee, Ho-Joon; Yilmazel, Bahar; Roesel, Charles; Hu, Yanhui; Kwon, Young; Sharma, Amitabh; Liu, Yang-Yu; Perrimon, Norbert; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    The protein–protein interaction (PPI) network is crucial for cellular information processing and decision-making. With suitable inputs, PPI networks drive the cells to diverse functional outcomes such as cell proliferation or cell death. Here, we characterize the structural controllability of a large directed human PPI network comprising 6,339 proteins and 34,813 interactions. This network allows us to classify proteins as “indispensable,” “neutral,” or “dispensable,” which correlates to increasing, no effect, or decreasing the number of driver nodes in the network upon removal of that protein. We find that 21% of the proteins in the PPI network are indispensable. Interestingly, these indispensable proteins are the primary targets of disease-causing mutations, human viruses, and drugs, suggesting that altering a network’s control property is critical for the transition between healthy and disease states. Furthermore, analyzing copy number alterations data from 1,547 cancer patients reveals that 56 genes that are frequently amplified or deleted in nine different cancers are indispensable. Among the 56 genes, 46 of them have not been previously associated with cancer. This suggests that controllability analysis is very useful in identifying novel disease genes and potential drug targets. PMID:27091990

  20. Recent progress in gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy: an emerging cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Both, Gerald W

    2009-08-01

    The principle of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) has existed for many years but, while simple in concept, the effective practical application of this therapy has proven to be challenging. Improvements in the efficacy of GDEPT have been achieved principally through the choice and development of more effective vectors, by optimizing and controlling gene expression and by increasing the activity of the delivered enzyme through mutation. While innovation continues in this field, the pioneering GDEPT systems designed to treat glioma and prostate cancer have completed or are now entering late-stage clinical trials, respectively. As the pace of innovation in GDEPT technology far exceeds its clinical application, these initial products are anticipated to be replaced by next-generation biologicals. This review highlights recent progress in the strategies and development of GDEPT and summarizes the status of current clinical trials. With the first GDEPT product for treatment of resected gliomas poised to gain marketing approval, a new era in cancer gene medicine is emerging. PMID:19649987

  1. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  2. Evaluation of GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay for direct diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Husseiny Sh.; Bayoumi, Faten S.; Ali, Ahmed M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the performance of GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay for direct diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted between October 2013 and February 2016 at Abbassaia Chest Hospital and Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo, Egypt. Inclusion criteria were adults between 18 and 60 years with suspected PTB and classified into 5 clinical categories based on their clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings: confirmed TB, probable TB, possible TB, unlikely TB, and not TB. Two sputum samples from each participant were analyzed by GX and the results were compared by conventional culture. Results: In total, 218 participants were enrolled: 71 had confirmed TB; 112, highly probable TB; 20, probable TB; 10, unlikely TB; and 5, no TB. The sensitivity and specificity of the GX assay were 93% and 98.3% respectively. GeneXpert was positive in 93% of confirmed TB and 2.2% of probable TB cases. Conclusions: GeneXpert is a rapid and promising technique with good sensitivity (93%) and specificity (98.3%), but it cannot be used as a standalone PTB diagnostic tool. There is a need for more GX evaluation studies in countries with low TB incidence. PMID:27652357

  3. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  4. Directed natural product biosynthesis gene cluster capture and expression in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongxin; Li, Zhongrui; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Weipeng; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto; Moore, Bradley S; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-03-24

    Bacilli are ubiquitous low G+C environmental Gram-positive bacteria that produce a wide assortment of specialized small molecules. Although their natural product biosynthetic potential is high, robust molecular tools to support the heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in Bacillus hosts are rare. Herein we adapt transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast to design a single genomic capture and expression vector for antibiotic production in Bacillus subtilis. After validating this direct cloning "plug-and-play" approach with surfactin, we genetically interrogated amicoumacin biosynthetic gene cluster from the marine isolate Bacillus subtilis 1779. Its heterologous expression allowed us to explore an unusual maturation process involving the N-acyl-asparagine pro-drug intermediates preamicoumacins, which are hydrolyzed by the asparagine-specific peptidase into the active component amicoumacin A. This work represents the first direct cloning based heterologous expression of natural products in the model organism B. subtilis and paves the way to the development of future genome mining efforts in this genus.

  5. Directed natural product biosynthesis gene cluster capture and expression in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxin; Li, Zhongrui; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Weipeng; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto; Moore, Bradley S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-03-01

    Bacilli are ubiquitous low G+C environmental Gram-positive bacteria that produce a wide assortment of specialized small molecules. Although their natural product biosynthetic potential is high, robust molecular tools to support the heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in Bacillus hosts are rare. Herein we adapt transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast to design a single genomic capture and expression vector for antibiotic production in Bacillus subtilis. After validating this direct cloning ``plug-and-play'' approach with surfactin, we genetically interrogated amicoumacin biosynthetic gene cluster from the marine isolate Bacillus subtilis 1779. Its heterologous expression allowed us to explore an unusual maturation process involving the N-acyl-asparagine pro-drug intermediates preamicoumacins, which are hydrolyzed by the asparagine-specific peptidase into the active component amicoumacin A. This work represents the first direct cloning based heterologous expression of natural products in the model organism B. subtilis and paves the way to the development of future genome mining efforts in this genus.

  6. Nitroreductase gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy: insights and advances toward clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elsie M; Little, Rory F; Mowday, Alexandra M; Rich, Michelle H; Chan-Hyams, Jasmine V E; Copp, Janine N; Smaill, Jeff B; Patterson, Adam V; Ackerley, David F

    2015-10-15

    This review examines the vast catalytic and therapeutic potential offered by type I (i.e. oxygen-insensitive) nitroreductase enzymes in partnership with nitroaromatic prodrugs, with particular focus on gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT; a form of cancer gene therapy). Important first indications of this potential were demonstrated over 20 years ago, for the enzyme-prodrug pairing of Escherichia coli NfsB and CB1954 [5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide]. However, it has become apparent that both the enzyme and the prodrug in this prototypical pairing have limitations that have impeded their clinical progression. Recently, substantial advances have been made in the biodiscovery and engineering of superior nitroreductase variants, in particular development of elegant high-throughput screening capabilities to enable optimization of desirable activities via directed evolution. These advances in enzymology have been paralleled by advances in medicinal chemistry, leading to the development of second- and third-generation nitroaromatic prodrugs that offer substantial advantages over CB1954 for nitroreductase GDEPT, including greater dose-potency and enhanced ability of the activated metabolite(s) to exhibit a local bystander effect. In addition to forging substantial progress towards future clinical trials, this research is supporting other fields, most notably the development and improvement of targeted cellular ablation capabilities in small animal models, such as zebrafish, to enable cell-specific physiology or regeneration studies.

  7. Directed natural product biosynthesis gene cluster capture and expression in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongxin; Li, Zhongrui; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Weipeng; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto; Moore, Bradley S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Bacilli are ubiquitous low G+C environmental Gram-positive bacteria that produce a wide assortment of specialized small molecules. Although their natural product biosynthetic potential is high, robust molecular tools to support the heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in Bacillus hosts are rare. Herein we adapt transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast to design a single genomic capture and expression vector for antibiotic production in Bacillus subtilis. After validating this direct cloning “plug-and-play” approach with surfactin, we genetically interrogated amicoumacin biosynthetic gene cluster from the marine isolate Bacillus subtilis 1779. Its heterologous expression allowed us to explore an unusual maturation process involving the N-acyl-asparagine pro-drug intermediates preamicoumacins, which are hydrolyzed by the asparagine-specific peptidase into the active component amicoumacin A. This work represents the first direct cloning based heterologous expression of natural products in the model organism B. subtilis and paves the way to the development of future genome mining efforts in this genus. PMID:25807046

  8. Estrogen receptor dependent gene expression by osteoblasts - direct, indirect, circumspect, and speculative effects.

    PubMed

    Centrella, Michael; McCarthy, Thomas L

    2012-02-01

    Hormone activated estrogen receptors (ERs) have long been appreciated as potent mediators of gene expression in female reproductive tissues. These highly targeted responses likely evolved from more elemental roles in lower organisms, in agreement with their widespread effects in the cardiovascular, immunological, central nervous, and skeletal tissue systems. Still, despite intense investigation, the multiple and often perplexing roles of ERs retain significant attention. In the skeleton, this in part derives from apparently opposing effects by ER agonists on bone growth versus bone remodeling, and in younger versus older individuals. The complexity associated with ER activation can also derive from their interactions with other hormone and growth factor systems, and their direct and indirect effects on gene expression. We propose that part of this complexity results from essential interactions between ERs and other transcription factors, each with their own biochemical and molecular intricacies. Solving some of the many questions that persist may help to achieve better, or better directed, use of agents that can drive ER activation in focused and possibly tissue restricted ways.

  9. Introduction to Biophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Paras N.

    2003-04-01

    Paras Prasad's text provides a basic knowledge of a broad range of topics so that individuals in all disciplines can rapidly acquire the minimal necessary background for research and development in biophotonics. Introduction to Biophotonics serves as both a textbook for education and training as well as a reference book that aids research and development of those areas integrating light, photonics, and biological systems. Each chapter contains a topic introduction, a review of key data, and description of future directions for technical innovation. Introduction to Biophotonics covers the basic principles of Optics Optical spectroscopy Microscopy Each section also includes illustrated examples and review questions to test and advance the reader's knowledge. Sections on biosensors and chemosensors, important tools for combating biological and chemical terrorism, will be of particular interest to professionals in toxicology and other environmental disciplines. Introduction to Biophotonics proves a valuable reference for graduate students and researchers in engineering, chemistry, and the life sciences.

  10. The Cryptococcus neoformans Rim101 Transcription Factor Directly Regulates Genes Required for Adaptation to the Host

    PubMed Central

    O'Meara, Teresa R.; Xu, Wenjie; Selvig, Kyla M.; O'Meara, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    The Rim101 protein is a conserved pH-responsive transcription factor that mediates important interactions between several fungal pathogens and the infected host. In the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, the Rim101 protein retains conserved functions to allow the microorganism to respond to changes in pH and other host stresses. This coordinated cellular response enables this fungus to effectively evade the host immune response. Preliminary studies suggest that this conserved transcription factor is uniquely regulated in C. neoformans both by the canonical pH-sensing pathway and by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Here we present comparative transcriptional data that demonstrate a strong concordance between the downstream effectors of PKA and Rim101. To define Rim101-dependent gene expression during a murine lung infection, we used nanoString profiling of lung tissue infected with a wild-type or rim101Δ mutant strain. In this setting, we demonstrated that Rim101 controls the expression of multiple cell wall-biosynthetic genes, likely explaining the enhanced immunogenicity of the rim101Δ mutant. Despite its divergent upstream regulation, the C. neoformans Rim101 protein recognizes a conserved DNA binding motif. Using these data, we identified direct targets of this transcription factor, including genes involved in cell wall regulation. Therefore, the Rim101 protein directly controls cell wall changes required for the adaptation of C. neoformans to its host environment. Moreover, we propose that integration of the cAMP/PKA and pH-sensing pathways allows C. neoformans to respond to a broad range of host-specific signals. PMID:24324006

  11. Enhancing Heat Tolerance of the Little Dogwood Cornus canadensis L. f. with Introduction of a Superoxide Reductase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xing-Min; Liu, Xiang; Ji, Mikyoung; Hoffmann, William A.; Grunden, Amy; Xiang, Qiu-Yun J.

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be accelerated under various biotic and abiotic stresses causing lipid peroxidation, protein degradation, enzyme inactivation, and DNA damage. Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a novel antioxidant enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus and is employed by this anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon for efficient detoxification of ROS. In this study, SOR was introduced into a flowering plant Cornus canadensis to enhance its heat tolerance and reduce heat induced damage. A fusion construct of the SOR gene and Green Fluorescent Protein gene (GFP) was introduced into C. canadensis using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Heat tolerance of the GFP-SOR expressing transgenic plants was investigated by observing morphological symptoms of heat injury and by examining changes in photosynthesis, malondialdehyde (MDA), and proline levels in the plants. Our results indicate that the expression of the P. furiosus SOR gene in the transgenic plants alleviated lipid peroxidation of cell membranes and photoinhibition of PS II, and decreased the accumulation of proline at 40°C. After a series of exposures to increasing temperatures, the SOR transgenic plants remained healthy and green whereas most of the non-transgenic plants dried up and were unable to recover. While it had previously been reported that expression of SOR in Arabidopsis enhanced heat tolerance, this is the first report of the successful demonstration of improved heat tolerance in a non-model plant resulting from the introduction of P. furiosus SOR. The study demonstrates the potential of SOR for crop improvement and that inherent limitations of plant heat tolerance can be ameliorated with P. furiosus SOR. PMID:26858741

  12. Double replacement: strategy for efficient introduction of subtle mutations into the murine Col1a-1 gene by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Liu, X; Jaenisch, R

    1994-01-01

    A subtle mutation that rendered type I collagen resistant to mammalian collagenase has been introduced into the murine Col1a-1 (recently redesignated Cola-1) gene by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Initially, a "hit and run" procedure was used. Since two steps were required for introducing each mutation and more than one mutation was to be introduced in the same genomic region independently, we have developed a streamlined procedure that involves two sequential replacement-type homologous recombination events. In the first step, an internal deletion was introduced into the Col1a-1 locus along with the positive and negative selectable markers, neo and tk, to mark the region of interest. G418-resistant homologous recombinants were isolated and used in the second step in which the deleted Col1a-1 allele was replaced with a construct containing the desired mutation. Homologous recombinants containing the mutation were identified among the Tk- ES clones after selection with FIAU [1-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-iodouracil (called fialuridine)]. Approximately 10% of such clones contained the desired mutation. The double replacement procedure greatly reduces the time and amount of work required to introduce mutations independently into the same or closely linked regions. Once the homologous recombinants derived from the first step are established, the introduction of other mutations into the deleted region becomes a one-step procedure. For X number of introduced mutations, 2X selections are required with the "hit and run" approach, but only X + 1 are required with the double-replacement method. This innovative procedure could be very useful in studies of gene structure and function as well as gene expression and regulation. Images PMID:8146196

  13. Enhancing Heat Tolerance of the Little Dogwood Cornus canadensis L. f. with Introduction of a Superoxide Reductase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xing-Min; Liu, Xiang; Ji, Mikyoung; Hoffmann, William A; Grunden, Amy; Xiang, Qiu-Yun J

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be accelerated under various biotic and abiotic stresses causing lipid peroxidation, protein degradation, enzyme inactivation, and DNA damage. Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a novel antioxidant enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus and is employed by this anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon for efficient detoxification of ROS. In this study, SOR was introduced into a flowering plant Cornus canadensis to enhance its heat tolerance and reduce heat induced damage. A fusion construct of the SOR gene and Green Fluorescent Protein gene (GFP) was introduced into C. canadensis using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Heat tolerance of the GFP-SOR expressing transgenic plants was investigated by observing morphological symptoms of heat injury and by examining changes in photosynthesis, malondialdehyde (MDA), and proline levels in the plants. Our results indicate that the expression of the P. furiosus SOR gene in the transgenic plants alleviated lipid peroxidation of cell membranes and photoinhibition of PS II, and decreased the accumulation of proline at 40°C. After a series of exposures to increasing temperatures, the SOR transgenic plants remained healthy and green whereas most of the non-transgenic plants dried up and were unable to recover. While it had previously been reported that expression of SOR in Arabidopsis enhanced heat tolerance, this is the first report of the successful demonstration of improved heat tolerance in a non-model plant resulting from the introduction of P. furiosus SOR. The study demonstrates the potential of SOR for crop improvement and that inherent limitations of plant heat tolerance can be ameliorated with P. furiosus SOR.

  14. Muscle-targeted hydrodynamic gene introduction of insulin-like growth factor-1 using polyplex nanomicelle to treat peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Kazuya; Itaka, Keiji; Baba, Miyuki; Uchida, Satoshi; Ishii, Takehiko; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-06-10

    The recovery of neurologic function after peripheral nerve injury often remains incomplete because of the prolonged reinnervation process, which leads to skeletal muscle atrophy and articular contracture from disuse over time. To rescue the skeletal muscle and promote functional recovery, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), a potent myogenic factor, was introduced into the muscle by hydrodynamic injection of IGF-1-expressing plasmid DNA using a biocompatible nonviral gene carrier, a polyplex nanomicelle. In a mouse model of sciatic nerve injury, the introduction of IGF-1 into the skeletal muscle of the paralyzed limb effectively alleviated a decrease in muscle weight compared with that in untreated control mice. Histologic analysis of the muscle revealed the IGF-1-expressing plasmid DNA (pDNA) to have a myogenic effect, inducing muscle hypertrophy with the upregulation of the myogenic regulatory factors, myogenin and MyoD. The evaluation of motor function by walking track analysis revealed that the group that received the hydrodynamic injection of IGF-1-expressing pDNA using the polyplex nanomicelle had significantly early recovery of motor function compared with groups receiving negative control pDNA and untreated controls. Early recovery of sensation in the distal area of sciatic nerve injury was also induced by the introduction of IGF-1-expressing pDNA, presumably because of the effect of secreted IGF-1 protein in the vicinity of the injured sciatic nerve exerting a synergistic effect with muscle hypertrophy, inducing a more favorable prognosis. This approach of introducing IGF-1 into skeletal muscle is promising for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury by promoting early motor function recovery. PMID:24657809

  15. A unique nuclear receptor direct repeat 17 (DR17) is present within the upstream region of Schistosoma mansoni female-specific p14 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fantappie, Marcelo Rosado Furtado, Daniel Rodrigues; Rumjanek, Franklin David; LoVerde, Philip T.

    2008-07-11

    The eggs produced by sexually mature female Schistosma mansoni are responsible for the pathogenesis of the disease. The eggshell precursor gene p14 is expressed only in the vitelline cells of sexually mature female worms in response to a yet unidentified male stimulus. Herein, we report the identification of a novel nuclear receptor response element in the upstream region of the p14 gene. This element contains the canonical hexameric DNA core motif, 5'-PuGGTCA, composed of an atypically spaced direct repeat (DR17). Schistosome nuclear receptors SmRXR1 and SmNR1 specifically bound to the p14-DR17 element as a heterodimer. SmRXR1, but not SmNR1, bound to the motif as a monomer. Introduction of mutations in the TCA core sequence completely abolished the binding by SmRXR1/SmNR1 heterodimer. This finding supports our hypothesis that the expression of Schistosoma mansonip14 gene is regulated through the nuclear receptor signaling pathway.

  16. The doublesex proteins of Drosophila melanogaster bind directly to a sex-specific yolk protein gene enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Burtis, K C; Coschigano, K T; Baker, B S; Wensink, P C

    1991-01-01

    The doublesex (dsx) gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes both male-specific and female-specific polypeptides, whose synthesis is regulated by alternative sex-specific splicing of the primary dsx transcript. The alternative splicing of the dsx mRNA is the last known step in a cascade of regulatory gene interactions that involves both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Genetic studies have shown that the products of the dsx locus are required for correct somatic sexual differentiation of both sexes, and have suggested that each dsx product functions by repressing expression of terminal differentiation genes specific to the opposite sex. However, these studies have not shown whether the dsx gene products function directly to regulate the expression of target genes, or indirectly through another regulatory gene. We report here that the male- and female-specific DSX proteins, expressed in E.coli, bind directly and specifically in vitro to three DNA sequences located in an enhancer region that regulates female-specific expression of two target genes, the yolk protein genes 1 and 2. This result suggests strongly that dsx is a final regulatory gene in the hierarchy of regulatory genes controlling somatic sexual differentiation. Images PMID:1907913

  17. Novel applications of motif-directed profiling to identify disease resistance genes in plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular profiling of gene families is a versatile tool to study diversity between individual genomes in sexual crosses and germplasm. Nucleotide binding site (NBS) profiling, in particular, targets conserved nucleotide binding site-encoding sequences of resistance gene analogs (RGAs), and is widely used to identify molecular markers for disease resistance (R) genes. Results In this study, we used NBS profiling to identify genome-wide locations of RGA clusters in the genome of potato clone RH. Positions of RGAs in the potato RH and DM genomes that were generated using profiling and genome sequencing, respectively, were compared. Largely overlapping results, but also interesting discrepancies, were found. Due to the clustering of RGAs, several parts of the genome are overexposed while others remain underexposed using NBS profiling. It is shown how the profiling of other gene families, i.e. protein kinases and different protein domain-coding sequences (i.e., TIR), can be used to achieve a better marker distribution. The power of profiling techniques is further illustrated using RGA cluster-directed profiling in a population of Solanum berthaultii. Multiple different paralogous RGAs within the Rpi-ber cluster could be genetically distinguished. Finally, an adaptation of the profiling protocol was made that allowed the parallel sequencing of profiling fragments using next generation sequencing. The types of RGAs that were tagged in this next-generation profiling approach largely overlapped with classical gel-based profiling. As a potential application of next-generation profiling, we showed how the R gene family associated with late blight resistance in the SH*RH population could be identified using a bulked segregant approach. Conclusions In this study, we provide a comprehensive overview of previously described and novel profiling primers and their genomic targets in potato through genetic mapping and comparative genomics. Furthermore, it is shown how

  18. Quality control of astrocyte-directed Cre transgenic mice: the benefits of a direct link between loss of gene expression and reporter activation.

    PubMed

    Requardt, Robert Pascal; Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Dublin, Pavel; Wallraff-Beck, Anke; Mikeska, Thomas; Degen, Joachim; Waha, Andreas; Steinhäuser, Christian; Willecke, Klaus; Theis, Martin

    2009-04-15

    Cre recombinase activity for cell-type restricted deletion of floxed target genes (i.e., flanked by Cre recognition loxP-sites) is often measured by separate matings with recombination-activated reporter gene mice. Using a floxed Gja1 (Cx43) allele, we demonstrate the benefits of a direct link between reporter gene expression and target gene deletion to overcome critical limitations of the Cre/loxP system. The widely used human glial fibrillary acidic protein (hGFAP)-Cre transgene exhibits variable recombination activity and requires postexperimental validation. Such quality control is essential to correlate the extent of Cre-mediated Gja1 ablation with phenotypical alterations and to maintain the activity status of hGFAP-Cre in transgenic mouse colonies. We present several strategies to control for the fidelity of hGFAP-Cre mediated recombination. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Characterisation of a DNA sequence element that directs Dictyostelium stalk cell-specific gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, A; Zhukovskaya, N; Kawata, T; Bozzaro, S; Williams, J

    2000-12-01

    The ecmB gene of Dictyostelium is expressed at culmination both in the prestalk cells that enter the stalk tube and in ancillary stalk cell structures such as the basal disc. Stalk tube-specific expression is regulated by sequence elements within the cap-site proximal part of the promoter, the stalk tube (ST) promoter region. Dd-STATa, a member of the STAT transcription factor family, binds to elements present in the ST promoter-region and represses transcription prior to entry into the stalk tube. We have characterised an activatory DNA sequence element, that lies distal to the repressor elements and that is both necessary and sufficient for expression within the stalk tube. We have mapped this activator to a 28 nucleotide region (the 28-mer) within which we have identified a GA-containing sequence element that is required for efficient gene transcription. The Dd-STATa protein binds to the 28-mer in an in vitro binding assay, and binding is dependent upon the GA-containing sequence. However, the ecmB gene is expressed in a Dd-STATa null mutant, therefore Dd-STATa cannot be responsible for activating the 28-mer in vivo. Instead, we identified a distinct 28-mer binding activity in nuclear extracts from the Dd-STATa null mutant, the activity of this GA binding activity being largely masked in wild type extracts by the high affinity binding of the Dd-STATa protein. We suggest, that in addition to the long range repression exerted by binding to the two known repressor sites, Dd-STATa inhibits transcription by direct competition with this putative activator for binding to the GA sequence.

  20. Phenotype Sequencing: Identifying the Genes That Cause a Phenotype Directly from Pooled Sequencing of Independent Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Marc A.; Chen, Zugen; Toy, Traci; Machado, Iara M. P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Liao, James C.; Lee, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Random mutagenesis and phenotype screening provide a powerful method for dissecting microbial functions, but their results can be laborious to analyze experimentally. Each mutant strain may contain 50–100 random mutations, necessitating extensive functional experiments to determine which one causes the selected phenotype. To solve this problem, we propose a “Phenotype Sequencing” approach in which genes causing the phenotype can be identified directly from sequencing of multiple independent mutants. We developed a new computational analysis method showing that 1. causal genes can be identified with high probability from even a modest number of mutant genomes; 2. costs can be cut many-fold compared with a conventional genome sequencing approach via an optimized strategy of library-pooling (multiple strains per library) and tag-pooling (multiple tagged libraries per sequencing lane). We have performed extensive validation experiments on a set of E. coli mutants with increased isobutanol biofuel tolerance. We generated a range of sequencing experiments varying from 3 to 32 mutant strains, with pooling on 1 to 3 sequencing lanes. Our statistical analysis of these data (4099 mutations from 32 mutant genomes) successfully identified 3 genes (acrB, marC, acrA) that have been independently validated as causing this experimental phenotype. It must be emphasized that our approach reduces mutant sequencing costs enormously. Whereas a conventional genome sequencing experiment would have cost $7,200 in reagents alone, our Phenotype Sequencing design yielded the same information value for only $1200. In fact, our smallest experiments reliably identified acrB and marC at a cost of only $110–$340. PMID:21364744

  1. Oxytocin Receptor Gene Polymorphisms Are Associated with Human Directed Social Behavior in Dogs (Canis familiaris)

    PubMed Central

    Lakatos, Gabriella; Pergel, Enikő; Turcsán, Borbála; Pluijmakers, Jolanda; Vas, Judit; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Brúder, Ildikó; Földi, Levente; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Miklósi, Ádám; Rónai, Zsolt; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2014-01-01

    The oxytocin system has a crucial role in human sociality; several results prove that polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene are related to complex social behaviors in humans. Dogs' parallel evolution with humans and their adaptation to the human environment has made them a useful species to model human social interactions. Previous research indicates that dogs are eligible models for behavioral genetic research, as well. Based on these previous findings, our research investigated associations between human directed social behaviors and two newly described (−212AG, 19131AG) and one known (rs8679684) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the regulatory regions (5′ and 3′ UTR) of the oxytocin receptor gene in German Shepherd (N = 104) and Border Collie (N = 103) dogs. Dogs' behavior traits have been estimated in a newly developed test series consisting of five episodes: Greeting by a stranger, Separation from the owner, Problem solving, Threatening approach, Hiding of the owner. Buccal samples were collected and DNA was isolated using standard protocols. SNPs in the 3′ and 5′ UTR regions were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction based techniques followed by subsequent electrophoresis analysis. The gene–behavior association analysis suggests that oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms have an impact in both breeds on (i) proximity seeking towards an unfamiliar person, as well as their owner, and on (ii) how friendly dogs behave towards strangers, although the mediating molecular regulatory mechanisms are yet unknown. Based on these results, we conclude that similarly to humans, the social behavior of dogs towards humans is influenced by the oxytocin system. PMID:24454713

  2. Challenges to develop nitrogen-fixing cereals by direct nif-gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Curatti, Leonardo; Rubio, Luis M

    2014-08-01

    Some regions of the developing world suffer low cereal production yields due to low fertilizer inputs, among other factors. Biological N2 fixation, catalyzed by the prokaryotic enzyme nitrogenase, is an alternative to the use of synthetic N fertilizers. The molybdenum nitrogenase is an O2-labile metalloenzyme composed of the NifDK and NifH proteins, which biosyntheses require a number of nif gene products. A challenging strategy to increase cereal crop productivity in a scenario of low N fertilization is the direct transfer of nif genes into cereals. The sensitivity of nitrogenase to O2 and the apparent complexity of nitrogenase biosynthesis are the main barriers identified so far. Expression of active NifH requires the products of nifM, nifH, and possibly nifU and nifS, whereas active NifDK requires the products of nifH, nifD, nifK, nifB, nifE, nifN, and possibly nifU, nifS, nifQ, nifV, nafY, nifW and nifZ. Plastids and mitochondria are potential subcellular locations for nitrogenase. Both could provide the ATP and electrons required for nitrogenase to function but they differ in their internal O2 levels and their ability to incorporate ammonium into amino acids. PMID:25017168

  3. Tight junction CLDN2 gene is a direct target of the vitamin D receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-guo; Wu, Shaoping; Lu, Rong; Zhou, David; Zhou, Jingsong; Carmeliet, Geert; Petrof, Elaine; Claud, Erika C; Sun, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The breakdown of the intestinal barrier is a common manifestation of many diseases. Recent evidence suggests that vitamin D and its receptor VDR may regulate intestinal barrier function. Claudin-2 is a tight junction protein that mediates paracellular water transport in intestinal epithelia, rendering them "leaky". Using whole body VDR(-/-) mice, intestinal epithelial VDR conditional knockout (VDR(ΔIEC)) mice, and cultured human intestinal epithelial cells, we demonstrate here that the CLDN2 gene is a direct target of the transcription factor VDR. The Caudal-Related Homeobox (Cdx) protein family is a group of the transcription factor proteins which bind to DNA to regulate the expression of genes. Our data showed that VDR-enhances Claudin-2 promoter activity in a Cdx1 binding site-dependent manner. We further identify a functional vitamin D response element (VDRE) 5΄-AGATAACAAAGGTCA-3΄ in the Cdx1 site of the Claudin-2 promoter. It is a VDRE required for the regulation of Claudin-2 by vitamin D. Absence of VDR decreased Claudin-2 expression by abolishing VDR/promoter binding. In vivo, VDR deletion in intestinal epithelial cells led to significant decreased Claudin-2 in VDR(-/-) and VDR(ΔIEC) mice. The current study reveals an important and novel mechanism for VDR by regulation of epithelial barriers. PMID:26212084

  4. Effect of various irradiation treatments of plant protoplasts on the transformation rates after direct gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Köhler, F; Benediktsson, I; Cardon, G; Andreo, C S; Schieder, O

    1990-05-01

    In P. hybrida and B. nigra an enhancement of transformation rates (direct gene transfer) of about six to seven-fold was obtained after irradiation of protoplasts with 12.5 Gy (X-ray). The effect of protoplast irradiation was similar in experiments where protoplasts were irradiated 1h before transformation (X-ray/DNA) or 1h after completion of the transformation procedure (DNA/X-ray). Increased X-ray doses up to 62.5 Gy resulted in further enhancement of percentages of transformed colonies, indicating a correlation between relative transformation frequencies (RTF) and the doses applied. Estimation of degradation rates of plasmid sequences in plant protoplasts yielded a reduction of plasmid concentration to 50% 8-12 h after transformation. In 1-day-old protoplasts, the level of plasmid fragments dropped to 0%-10% compared to 1h after transformation. The results demonstrate that the integration rates of plasmid sequences into the plant genome may in part be governed by DNA repair mechanisms. This could be an explanation for the observed genotypic dependence of transformation rates in different plant species and plant genotypes. Gene copy number reconstructions revealed enhanced integration rates of plasmid sequences in transformed colonies derived from irradiated protoplasts.

  5. Challenges to develop nitrogen-fixing cereals by direct nif-gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Curatti, Leonardo; Rubio, Luis M

    2014-08-01

    Some regions of the developing world suffer low cereal production yields due to low fertilizer inputs, among other factors. Biological N2 fixation, catalyzed by the prokaryotic enzyme nitrogenase, is an alternative to the use of synthetic N fertilizers. The molybdenum nitrogenase is an O2-labile metalloenzyme composed of the NifDK and NifH proteins, which biosyntheses require a number of nif gene products. A challenging strategy to increase cereal crop productivity in a scenario of low N fertilization is the direct transfer of nif genes into cereals. The sensitivity of nitrogenase to O2 and the apparent complexity of nitrogenase biosynthesis are the main barriers identified so far. Expression of active NifH requires the products of nifM, nifH, and possibly nifU and nifS, whereas active NifDK requires the products of nifH, nifD, nifK, nifB, nifE, nifN, and possibly nifU, nifS, nifQ, nifV, nafY, nifW and nifZ. Plastids and mitochondria are potential subcellular locations for nitrogenase. Both could provide the ATP and electrons required for nitrogenase to function but they differ in their internal O2 levels and their ability to incorporate ammonium into amino acids.

  6. SpeedyGenes: Exploiting an Improved Gene Synthesis Method for the Efficient Production of Synthetic Protein Libraries for Directed Evolution.

    PubMed

    Currin, Andrew; Swainston, Neil; Day, Philip J; Kell, Douglas B

    2017-01-01

    Gene synthesis is a fundamental technology underpinning much research in the life sciences. In particular, synthetic biology and biotechnology utilize gene synthesis to assemble any desired DNA sequence, which can then be incorporated into novel parts and pathways. Here, we describe SpeedyGenes, a gene synthesis method that can assemble DNA sequences with greater fidelity (fewer errors) than existing methods, but that can also be used to encode extensive, statistically designed sequence variation at any position in the sequence to create diverse (but accurate) variant libraries. We summarize the integrated use of GeneGenie to design DNA and oligonucleotide sequences, followed by the procedure for assembling these accurately and efficiently using SpeedyGenes.

  7. SpeedyGenes: Exploiting an Improved Gene Synthesis Method for the Efficient Production of Synthetic Protein Libraries for Directed Evolution.

    PubMed

    Currin, Andrew; Swainston, Neil; Day, Philip J; Kell, Douglas B

    2017-01-01

    Gene synthesis is a fundamental technology underpinning much research in the life sciences. In particular, synthetic biology and biotechnology utilize gene synthesis to assemble any desired DNA sequence, which can then be incorporated into novel parts and pathways. Here, we describe SpeedyGenes, a gene synthesis method that can assemble DNA sequences with greater fidelity (fewer errors) than existing methods, but that can also be used to encode extensive, statistically designed sequence variation at any position in the sequence to create diverse (but accurate) variant libraries. We summarize the integrated use of GeneGenie to design DNA and oligonucleotide sequences, followed by the procedure for assembling these accurately and efficiently using SpeedyGenes. PMID:27671932

  8. Metabolic engineering of the Chl d-dominated cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina: production of a novel Chl species by the introduction of the chlorophyllide a oxygenase gene.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Tohru; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Akimoto, Seiji; Tomo, Tatsuya; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Mimuro, Mamoru

    2012-03-01

    In oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, the properties of photosynthetic reaction systems primarily depend on the Chl species used. Acquisition of new Chl species with unique optical properties may have enabled photosynthetic organisms to adapt to various light environments. The artificial production of a new Chl species in an existing photosynthetic organism by metabolic engineering provides a model system to investigate how an organism responds to a newly acquired pigment. In the current study, we established a transformation system for a Chl d-dominated cyanobacterium, Acaryochloris marina, for the first time. The expression vector (constructed from a broad-host-range plasmid) was introduced into A. marina by conjugal gene transfer. The introduction of a gene for chlorophyllide a oxygenase, which is responsible for Chl b biosynthesis, into A. marina resulted in a transformant that synthesized a novel Chl species instead of Chl b. The content of the novel Chl in the transformant was approximately 10% of the total Chl, but the level of Chl a, another Chl in A. marina, did not change. The chemical structure of the novel Chl was determined to be [7-formyl]-Chl d(P) by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. [7-Formyl]-Chl d(P) is hypothesized to be produced by the combined action of chlorophyllide a oxygenase and enzyme(s) involved in Chl d biosynthesis. These results demonstrate the flexibility of the Chl biosynthetic pathway for the production of novel Chl species, indicating that a new organism with a novel Chl might be discovered in the future. PMID:22302713

  9. Direct evaluation of the effect of gene dosage on secretion of protein from yeast Pichia pastoris by expressing EGFP.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hailong; Qin, Yufeng; Huang, Yuankai; Chen, Yaosheng; Cong, Peiqing; He, Zuyong

    2014-02-28

    Increasing the gene copy number has been commonly used to enhance the protein expression level in the yeast Pichia pastoris. However, this method has been shown to be effective up to a certain gene copy number, and a further increase of gene dosage can result in a decrease of expression level. Evidences indicate the gene dosage effect is product-dependent, which needs to be determined when expressing a new protein. Here, we describe a direct detection of the gene dosage effect on protein secretion through expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene under the direction of the α-factor preprosequence in a panel of yeast clones carrying increasing copies of the EGFP gene (from one to six copies). Directly examined under fluorescence microscopy, we found relatively lower levels of EGFP were secreted into the culture medium at one copy and two copies, substantial improvement of secretion appeared at three copies, plateau happened at four and five copies, and an apparent decrease of secretion happened at six copies. The secretion of EGFP being limiting at four and five copies was due to abundant intracellular accumulation of proteins, observed from the fluorescence image of yeast and confirmed by western blotting, which significantly activated the unfolded protein response indicated by the up-regulation of the BiP (the KAR2 gene product) and the protein disulfide isomerase. This study implies that tagging a reporter like GFP to a specific protein would facilitate a direct and rapid determination of the optimal gene copy number for high-yield expression. PMID:24225373

  10. GLABRA2 Directly Suppresses Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Genes with Diverse Functions in Root Hair Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Yohei; Kato, Mariko; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Aoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana GLABRA2 (GL2) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in the cell differentiation of various epidermal tissues. During root hair pattern formation, GL2 suppresses root hair development in non-hair cells, acting as a node between the gene regulatory networks for cell fate determination and cell differentiation. Despite the importance of GL2 function, its molecular basis remains obscure because the GL2 target genes leading to the network for cell differentiation are unknown. We identified five basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor genes (ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6 [RHD6], RHD6-LIKE1 [RSL1], RSL2, Lj-RHL1-LIKE1 [LRL1], and LRL2) as GL2 direct targets using transcriptional and posttranslational induction systems. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed GL2 binding to upstream regions of these genes in planta. Reporter gene analyses showed that these genes are expressed in various stages of root hair development and are suppressed by GL2 in non-hair cells. GL2 promoter-driven GFP fusions of LRL1 and LRL2, but not those of the other bHLH proteins, conferred root hair development on non-hair cells. These results indicate that GL2 directly suppresses bHLH genes with diverse functions in root hair development. PMID:26486447

  11. Gene-environment interaction: Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The execution and completion of the Human Genome Project was surrounded by great expectations and many overstated promises, and for the first time in history, the information revolution has made of the general public a first row spectator of the scientific advances in real time. Therefore, the publi...

  12. Direct modulation of simian virus 40 late gene expression by thyroid hormone and its receptor.

    PubMed

    Zuo, F; Kraus, R J; Gulick, T; Moore, D D; Mertz, J E

    1997-01-01

    Transcription of the late genes of simian virus 40 (SV40) is repressed during the early phase of the lytic cycle of infection of primate cells by the binding of cellular factors, called IBP-s, to the SV40 late promoter; repression is relieved after the onset of viral DNA replication by titration of these repressors (S. R. Wiley, R. J. Kraus, F. R. Zuo, E. E. Murray, K. Loritz, and J. E. Mertz, Genes Dev. 7:2206-2219, 1993). Recently, we showed that IBP-s consists of several members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily (F. Zuo and J. E. Mertz, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92:8586-8590, 1995). Here, we show that the thyroid hormone receptor TRalpha1, in combination with retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha), is specifically bound at the transcriptional initiation site of the major late promoter of SV40. This binding repressed transcription from the SV40 late promoter by preventing the formation of pre-initiation complexes. Addition of the thyroid hormone 3,5,3'-L-triiodothyronine (T3) resulted in reversal of this repression in cotransfected CV-1 cells. Interestingly, repression did not occur when this thyroid response element (TRE) was translocated to 50 bp upstream of the major late initiation site. Binding of TRalpha1/RXRalpha heterodimers to this TRE induced bending of the promoter DNA. We conclude that hormones and their receptors can directly affect the expression of SV40, probably by affecting protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions involved in the formation of functional preinitiation complexes.

  13. The NGATHA Genes Direct Style Development in the Arabidopsis Gynoecium[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Trigueros, Marina; Navarrete-Gómez, Marisa; Sato, Shusei; Christensen, Sioux K.; Pelaz, Soraya; Weigel, Detlef; Yanofsky, Martin F.; Ferrándiz, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    The gynoecium is the most complex floral organ, designed to protect the ovules and ensure their fertilization. Correct patterning and tissue specification in the developing gynoecium involves the concerted action of a host of genetic factors. In addition, apical-basal patterning into different domains, stigma and style, ovary and gynophore, appears to depend on the establishment and maintenance of asymmetric auxin distribution, with an auxin maximum at the apex. Here, we show that a small subfamily of the B3 transcription factor superfamily, the NGATHA (NGA) genes, act redundantly to specify style development in a dosage-dependent manner. Characterization of the NGA gene family is based on an analysis of the activation-tagged mutant named tower-of-pisa1 (top1), which was found to overexpress NGA3. Quadruple nga mutants completely lack style and stigma development. This mutant phenotype is likely caused by a failure to activate two auxin biosynthetic enzymes, YUCCA2 and YUCCA4, in the apical gynoecium domain. The NGA mutant phenotypes are similar to those caused by multiple combinations of mutations in STYLISH1 (STY1) and additional members of its family. NGA3/TOP1 and STY1 share almost identical patterns of expression, but they do not appear to regulate each other at the transcriptional level. Strong synergistic phenotypes are observed when nga3/top1 and sty1 mutants are combined. Furthermore, constitutive expression of both NGA3/TOP1 and STY1 induces the conversion of the ovary into style tissue. Taken together, these data suggest that the NGA and STY factors act cooperatively to promote style specification, in part by directing YUCCA-mediated auxin synthesis in the apical gynoecium domain. PMID:19435937

  14. Notch stimulates growth by direct regulation of genes involved in the control of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle

    PubMed Central

    Slaninova, Vera; Krafcikova, Michaela; Perez-Gomez, Raquel; Steffal, Pavel; Trantirek, Lukas; Bray, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Glycolytic shift is a characteristic feature of rapidly proliferating cells, such as cells during development and during immune response or cancer cells, as well as of stem cells. It results in increased glycolysis uncoupled from mitochondrial respiration, also known as the Warburg effect. Notch signalling is active in contexts where cells undergo glycolytic shift. We decided to test whether metabolic genes are direct transcriptional targets of Notch signalling and whether upregulation of metabolic genes can help Notch to induce tissue growth under physiological conditions and in conditions of Notch-induced hyperplasia. We show that genes mediating cellular metabolic changes towards the Warburg effect are direct transcriptional targets of Notch signalling. They include genes encoding proteins involved in glucose uptake, glycolysis, lactate to pyruvate conversion and repression of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The direct transcriptional upregulation of metabolic genes is PI3K/Akt independent and occurs not only in cells with overactivated Notch but also in cells with endogenous levels of Notch signalling and in vivo. Even a short pulse of Notch activity is able to elicit long-lasting metabolic changes resembling the Warburg effect. Loss of Notch signalling in Drosophila wing discs as well as in human microvascular cells leads to downregulation of glycolytic genes. Notch-driven tissue overgrowth can be rescued by downregulation of genes for glucose metabolism. Notch activity is able to support growth of wing during nutrient-deprivation conditions, independent of the growth of the rest of the body. Notch is active in situations that involve metabolic reprogramming, and the direct regulation of metabolic genes may be a common mechanism that helps Notch to exert its effects in target tissues. PMID:26887408

  15. Introduction: "Fiscal Neutrality" After Rodriquez

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coons, John E.

    1974-01-01

    An informal introduction to a collection of articles on future directions for public school finance reform which assesses the impact of the Serrano and Rodriquez decision and explores possible future trends in this area. (EH)

  16. Evaluation of OPEN Zinc Finger Nucleases for Direct Gene Targeting of the ROSA26 Locus in Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Mario; Maeder, Morgan L.; Rector, Kyle; Ruiz, Joseph; Becher, Burkhard; Bürki, Kurt; Khayter, Cyd; Aguzzi, Adriano; Joung, J. Keith

    2012-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) enable precise genome modification in a variety of organisms and cell types. Commercial ZFNs were reported to enhance gene targeting directly in mouse zygotes, whereas similar approaches using publicly available resources have not yet been described. Here we report precise targeted mutagenesis of the mouse genome using Oligomerized Pool Engineering (OPEN) ZFNs. OPEN ZFN can be constructed using publicly available resources and therefore provide an attractive alternative for academic researchers. Two ZFN pairs specific to the mouse genomic locus gt(ROSA26)Sor were generated by OPEN selections and used for gene disruption and homology-mediated gene replacement in single cell mouse embryos. One specific ZFN pair facilitated non-homologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated gene disruption when expressed in mouse zygotes. We also observed a single homologous recombination (HR)-driven gene replacement event when this ZFN pair was co-injected with a targeting vector. Our experiments demonstrate the feasibility of achieving both gene ablation through NHEJ and gene replacement by HR by using the OPEN ZFN technology directly in mouse zygotes. PMID:22970113

  17. Deployment of a retinal determination gene network drives directed cell migration in the sea urchin embryo

    PubMed Central

    Martik, Megan L; McClay, David R

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) provide a systems-level orchestration of an organism's genome encoded anatomy. As biological networks are revealed, they continue to answer many questions including knowledge of how GRNs control morphogenetic movements and how GRNs evolve. The migration of the small micromeres to the coelomic pouches in the sea urchin embryo provides an exceptional model for understanding the genomic regulatory control of morphogenesis. An assay using the robust homing potential of these cells reveals a ‘coherent feed-forward’ transcriptional subcircuit composed of Pax6, Six3, Six1/2, Eya, and Dach1 that is responsible for the directed homing mechanism of these multipotent progenitors. The linkages of that circuit are strikingly similar to a circuit involved in retinal specification in Drosophila suggesting that systems-level tasks can be highly conserved even though the tasks drive unrelated processes in different animals. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08827.001 PMID:26402456

  18. Matching genetics with oceanography: directional gene flow in a Mediterranean fish species.

    PubMed

    Schunter, C; Carreras-Carbonell, J; Macpherson, E; Tintoré, J; Vidal-Vijande, E; Pascual, A; Guidetti, P; Pascual, M

    2011-12-01

    Genetic connectivity and geographic fragmentation are two opposing mechanisms determining the population structure of species. While the first homogenizes the genetic background across populations the second one allows their differentiation. Therefore, knowledge of processes affecting dispersal of marine organisms is crucial to understand their genetic distribution patterns and for the effective management of their populations. In this study, we use genetic analyses of eleven microsatellites in combination with oceanographic satellite and dispersal simulation data to determine distribution patterns for Serranus cabrilla, a ubiquitous demersal broadcast spawner, in the Mediterranean Sea. Pairwise population F(ST) values ranged between -0.003 and 0.135. Two genetically distinct clusters were identified, with a clear division located between the oceanographic discontinuities at the Ibiza Channel (IC) and the Almeria-Oran Front (AOF), revealing an admixed population in between. The Balearic Front (BF) also appeared to dictate population structure. Directional gene flow on the Spanish coast was observed as S. cabrilla dispersed from west to east over the AOF, from north to south on the IC and from south of the IC towards the Balearic Islands. Correlations between genetic and oceanographic data were highly significant. Seasonal changes in current patterns and the relationship between ocean circulation patterns and spawning season may also play an important role in population structure around oceanographic fronts.

  19. Direct Gene Transfer into Plant Mature Seeds via Electroporation After Vacuum Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagio, Takashi

    A number of direct gene transfer methods have been used successfully in plant genetic engineering, providing powerful tools to investigate fundamental and applied problems in plant biology (Chowrira et al., 1996; D'halluin et al., 1992; Morandini and Salamini, 2003; Rakoczy-Trojanowska, 2002; Songstad et al., 1995). In cereals, several methods have been found to be suitable for obtaining transgenic plant; these include bombardment of scutellum (Hagio et al., 1995) and inflorescence cultures (He et al., 2001), and silicon carbide fiber-mediated DNA delivery (Asano et al., 1991) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation (Potrykus, 1990). Electroporation of cereal protoplasts also has proved successful but it involves prolonged cell treatments and generally is limited by the difficulties of regeneration from cereal protoplast cultures (Fromm et al., 1987). Many laboratories worldwide are now using Agrobacterium as a vehicle for routine production of transgenic crop plants. The primary application of the particle system (Klein et al., 1987) has been for transformation of species recalcitrant to conventional Agrobacterium (Binns, 1990) or protoplast methods. But these conventional methods can be applied to the species and varieties that are amenable to tissue culture (Machii et al., 1998). Mature seeds are readily available and free from the seasonal limits that immature embryo, inflorescence, and anther have. This method enables us to produce transgenic plants without time-consuming tissue culture process.

  20. RNAi-directed post transcriptional gene silencing of an Arabidopsis Myb transgene in tobacco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The AtMyb90 gene encodes the 'production of anthocyanin pigment 2' (PAP2) transcription factor of Arabidopsis thaliana and is able to induce a visible hyper-pigmented phenotype when expressed in tobacco. Based upon this phenotype, we have used the AtMyb90 gene as a reporter gene to examine RNAi-dire...

  1. Transient expression of a foreign gene by direct incorporation of DNA into intact plant tissue through vacuum infiltration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Zhao, Xia; Kawabata, Saneyuki; Li, Yuhua

    2009-11-01

    We previously established a method to induce transient expression of foreign genes in intact plant tissue to detect the subcellular localization of proteins. Here, we have inserted a putative bZIP protein HY5 gene (SeqID: EU386772), isolated from the seedlings of turnips Brassica rapa L. subsp. rapa 'Tsuda,' and a receptor-like kinase gene AtRLK (SeqID: AY531551.1), isolated from Arabidopsis, into the plasmid pA7-GFP. We accomplished the direct incorporation of DNA into onion epidermal tissue by vacuum infiltration. By detecting GFP, which was fused with AtRLK or putative BrHY5, we determined that BrHY5 is located in the nucleus and AtRLK is located in the plasma membrane. This approach can be thus used to study the transient expression of foreign genes in intact tissue.

  2. A constitutive promoter directs expression of the nerve growth factor receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, A.; Patil, N.; Chao, M.

    1988-08-01

    Expression of nerve growth factor receptor is normally restricted to cells derived from the neural crest in a developmentally regulated manner. The authors analyzed promoter sequences for the human nerve growth factor receptor gene and found that the receptor promoter resembles others which are associated with constitutively expressed genes that have housekeeping and growth-related functions. Unlike these other genes, the initiation of transcription occurred at one major site rather than at multiple sites. The constitutive nature of the nerve growth factor receptor promoter may account for the ability of this gene to be transcribed in a diverse number of heterologous cells after gene transfer. The intron-exon structure of the receptor gene indicated that structural features are precisely divided into discrete domains.

  3. An introduction to My Environmental Education Evaluation Resource Assistant (MEERA), a web-based resource for self-directed learning about environmental education program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zint, Michaela

    2010-05-01

    My Environmental Education Evaluation Resource Assistant or "MEERA" is a web-site designed to support environmental educators' program evaluation activities. MEERA has several characteristics that set it apart from other self-directed learning evaluation resources. Readers are encouraged to explore the site and to reflect on the role that self-directed learning resources can play in program evaluation and how those resources could be better designed.

  4. Introduction of the anti-apoptotic baculovirus p35 gene in passion fruit induces herbicide tolerance, reduced bacterial lesions, but does not inhibits passion fruit woodiness disease progress induced by cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV).

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Daniele Scandiucci; Coelho, Marly C Felipe; Souza, Manoel T; Marques, Abi; Ribeiro, E Bergmann Morais

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of anti-apoptotic genes into plants leads to resistance to environmental stress and broad-spectrum disease resistance. The anti-apoptotic gene (p35) from a baculovirus was introduced into the genome of passion fruit plants by biobalistics. Eleven regenerated plants showed the presence of the p35 gene by PCR and/or dot blot hybridization. Transcriptional analysis of regenerated plants showed the presence of specific p35 transcripts in 9 of them. Regenerated plants containing the p35 gene were inoculated with the cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), the bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv passiflorae, and the herbicide, glufosinate, (Syngenta). None of the plants showed resistance to CABMV. Regenerated plants (p35+) showed less than half of local lesions showed by non-transgenic plants when inoculated with X. axonopodis and some p35+ plants showed increased tolerance to the glufosinate herbicide when compared to non-transgenic plants. PMID:17016672

  5. Cloning and expression of a conjugated bile acid hydrolase gene from Lactobacillus plantarum by using a direct plate assay.

    PubMed

    Christiaens, H; Leer, R J; Pouwels, P H; Verstraete, W

    1992-12-01

    The conjugated bile acid hydrolase gene from the silage isolate Lactobacillus plantarum 80 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli MC1061. For the screening of this hydrolase gene within the gene bank, a direct plate assay developed by Dashkevicz and Feighner (M. P. Dashkevicz and S. D. Feighner, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 53:331-336, 1989) was adapted to the growth requirements of E. coli. Because of hydrolysis and medium acidification, hydrolase-active colonies were surrounded with big halos of precipitated, free bile acids. This phenomenon was also obtained when the gene was cloned into a multicopy shuttle vector and subsequently reintroduced into the parental Lactobacillus strain. The cbh gene and surrounding regions were characterized by nucleotide sequence analysis. The deduced amino acid sequence was shown to have 52% similarity with a penicillin V amidase from Bacillus sphaericus. Preliminary characterization of the gene product showed that it is a cholylglycine hydrolase (EC 3.5.1.24) with only slight activity against taurine conjugates. The optimum pH was between 4.7 and 5.5. Optimum temperature ranged from 30 to 45 degrees C. Southern blot analysis indicated that the cloned gene has similarity with genomic DNA of bile acid hydrolase-active Lactobacillus spp. of intestinal origin.

  6. Direct evidence for redundant segmental replacement between multiple 18S rRNA genes in a single Prototheca strain.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Ryohei; Huss, Volker A R; Urano, Naoto; Watabe, Shugo

    2007-11-01

    Informational genes such as those encoding rRNAs are related to transcription and translation, and are thus considered to be rarely subject to lateral gene transfer (LGT) between different organisms, compared to operational genes having metabolic functions. However, several lines of evidence have suggested or confirmed the occurrence of LGT of DNA segments encoding evolutionarily variable regions of rRNA genes between different organisms. In the present paper, we show, for the first time to our knowledge, that variable regions of the 18S rRNA gene are segmentally replaced by multiple copies of different sequences in a single strain of the green microalga Prototheca wickerhamii, resulting in at least 17 genotypes, nine of which were actually transcribed. Recombination between different 18S rRNA genes occurred in seven out of eight variable regions (V1-V5 and V7-V9) of eukaryotic small subunit (SSU) rRNAs. While no recombination was observed in V1, one to three different recombination loci were demonstrated for the other regions. Such segmental replacement was also implicated for helix H37, which is defined as V6 of prokaryotic SSU rRNAs. Our observations provide direct evidence for redundant recombination of an informational gene, which encodes a component of mature ribosomes, in a single strain of one organism.

  7. The hemagglutinin gene A (hagA) of Porphyromonas gingivalis 381 contains four large, contiguous, direct repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Han, N; Whitlock, J; Progulske-Fox, A

    1996-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative anaerobic bacterial species strongly associated with adult periodontitis. One of its distinguishing characteristics and putative virulence properties is the ability to agglutinate erythrocytes. We have previously reported the cloning of multiple hemagglutinin genes from P. gingivalis 381. Subsequent sequencing of clone ST 2 revealed that the cloned fragment contained only an internal portion of the gene which lacked both start and stop codons. We here report the cloning and sequencing of the entire gene, designated hagA, as well as its relationship to other genes of this species. By use of inverse PCR technology and the construction of several additional genomic libraries, the complete open reading frame of hagA was found to be 7,887 bp in length, encoding a protein of 2,628 amino acids with a molecular mass of 283.3 kDa, which is among the largest genes ever cloned from a prokaryote to date. Within its open reading frame, four large, contiguous, direct repeats (varying from 1,318 to 1,368 bp) were identified. The repeat unit (HArep), which is assumed to contain the hemagglutinin domain, is also present in other recently reported protease and hemagglutinin genes in P. gingivalis. Thus, we propose that hagA and the other genes which share the HArep sequence form a multigene family with hagA as a central member. PMID:8926061

  8. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Vectors in Liver-directed Gene Delivery of LDLR and VLDLR for Gene Therapy of Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Tytteli A K; Kurkipuro, Jere; Heikura, Tommi; Vuorio, Taina; Hytönen, Elisa; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-03-01

    Plasmid-based Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon vectors were developed and used to deliver genes for low-density lipoprotein and very-low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR and VLDLR, respectively) or lacZ reporter into liver of an LDLR-deficient mouse model of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). SB transposase, SB100x, was used to integrate the therapeutic transposons into mice livers for evaluating the feasibility of the vectors in reducing high blood cholesterol and the progression of atherosclerosis. Hydrodynamic gene delivery of transposon-VLDLR into the livers of the mice resulted in initial 17-19% reductions in plasma cholesterol, and at the later time points, in a significant stabilization of the cholesterol level for the 6.5-month duration of the study compared to the control mice. Transposon-LDLR-treated animals also demonstrated a trend of stabilization in the cholesterol levels in the long term. Vector-treated mice had slightly less lipid accumulation in the liver and reduced aortic atherosclerosis. Clinical chemistry and histological analyses revealed normal liver function and morphology comparable to that of the controls during the follow-up with no safety issues regarding the vector type, transgenes, or the gene transfer method. The study demonstrates the safety and potential benefits of the SB transposon vectors in the treatment of FH.

  9. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Vectors in Liver-directed Gene Delivery of LDLR and VLDLR for Gene Therapy of Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Tytteli A K; Kurkipuro, Jere; Heikura, Tommi; Vuorio, Taina; Hytönen, Elisa; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-03-01

    Plasmid-based Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon vectors were developed and used to deliver genes for low-density lipoprotein and very-low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR and VLDLR, respectively) or lacZ reporter into liver of an LDLR-deficient mouse model of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). SB transposase, SB100x, was used to integrate the therapeutic transposons into mice livers for evaluating the feasibility of the vectors in reducing high blood cholesterol and the progression of atherosclerosis. Hydrodynamic gene delivery of transposon-VLDLR into the livers of the mice resulted in initial 17-19% reductions in plasma cholesterol, and at the later time points, in a significant stabilization of the cholesterol level for the 6.5-month duration of the study compared to the control mice. Transposon-LDLR-treated animals also demonstrated a trend of stabilization in the cholesterol levels in the long term. Vector-treated mice had slightly less lipid accumulation in the liver and reduced aortic atherosclerosis. Clinical chemistry and histological analyses revealed normal liver function and morphology comparable to that of the controls during the follow-up with no safety issues regarding the vector type, transgenes, or the gene transfer method. The study demonstrates the safety and potential benefits of the SB transposon vectors in the treatment of FH. PMID:26670130

  10. Identification of Genes Directly Involved in Shell Formation and Their Functions in Pearl Oyster, Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Hu, Yilin; Pan, Cong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2011-01-01

    Mollusk shell formation is a fascinating aspect of biomineralization research. Shell matrix proteins play crucial roles in the control of calcium carbonate crystallization during shell formation in the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. Characterization of biomineralization-related genes during larval development could enhance our understanding of shell formation. Genes involved in shell biomineralization were isolated by constructing three suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries that represented genes expressed at key points during larval shell formation. A total of 2,923 ESTs from these libraries were sequenced and gave 990 unigenes. Unigenes coding for secreted proteins and proteins with tandem-arranged repeat units were screened in the three SSH libraries. A set of sequences coding for genes involved in shell formation was obtained. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization assays were carried out on five genes to investigate their spatial expression in several tissues, especially the mantle tissue. They all showed a different expression pattern from known biomineralization-related genes. Inhibition of the five genes by RNA interference resulted in different defects of the nacreous layer, indicating that they all were involved in aragonite crystallization. Intriguingly, one gene (UD_Cluster94.seq.Singlet1) was restricted to the ‘aragonitic line’. The current data has yielded for the first time, to our knowledge, a suite of biomineralization-related genes active during the developmental stages of P.fucata, five of which were responsible for nacreous layer formation. This provides a useful starting point for isolating new genes involved in shell formation. The effects of genes on the formation of the ‘aragonitic line’, and other areas of the nacreous layer, suggests a different control mechanism for aragonite crystallization initiation from that of mature aragonite growth. PMID:21747964

  11. Gene-Environment Interactions in Genome-Wide Association Studies: Current Approaches and New Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winham, Stacey J.; Biernacka, Joanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Complex psychiatric traits have long been thought to be the result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and gene-environment interactions are thought to play a crucial role in behavioral phenotypes and the susceptibility and progression of psychiatric disorders. Candidate gene studies to investigate hypothesized…

  12. Involvement of condensin-directed gene associations in the organization and regulation of chromosome territories during the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Osamu; Corcoran, Christopher J.; Noma, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomes are not randomly disposed in the nucleus but instead occupy discrete sub-nuclear domains, referred to as chromosome territories. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the formation of chromosome territories and how they are regulated during the cell cycle remain largely unknown. Here, we have developed two different chromosome-painting approaches to address how chromosome territories are organized in the fission yeast model organism. We show that condensin frequently associates RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes (tRNA and 5S rRNA) that are present on the same chromosomes, and that the disruption of these associations by condensin mutations significantly compromises the chromosome territory arrangement. We also find that condensin-dependent intra-chromosomal gene associations and chromosome territories are co-regulated during the cell cycle. For example, condensin-directed gene associations occur to the least degree during S phase, with the chromosomal overlap becoming largest. In clear contrast, condensin-directed gene associations become tighter in other cell-cycle phases, especially during mitosis, with the overlap between the different chromosomes being smaller. This study suggests that condensin-driven intra-chromosomal gene associations contribute to the organization and regulation of chromosome territories during the cell cycle. PMID:26704981

  13. An Introduction to "My Environmental Education Evaluation Resource Assistant" (MEERA), a Web-Based Resource for Self-Directed Learning about Environmental Education Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zint, Michaela

    2010-01-01

    My Environmental Education Evaluation Resource Assistant or "MEERA" is a web-site designed to support environmental educators' program evaluation activities. MEERA has several characteristics that set it apart from other self-directed learning evaluation resources. Readers are encouraged to explore the site and to reflect on the role that…

  14. Rapid detection of translation-terminating mutations at the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene by direct protein truncation test

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Luut, R.; Khan, P.M.; Van Leeuwen, C.; Tops, C.; Roest, P.; Den Dunnen, J. )

    1994-03-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is usually associated with protein truncating mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. The APC mutations are known to play a major role in colorectal carcinogensis. For the identification of protein truncating mutations of the APC gene, the authors developed a rapid, sensitive, and direct screening procedure. The technique is based on the in vitro transcription and translation of the genomic PCR products and is called the protein truncation test. Samples of DNA from individual FAP patients, members of a FAP family, colorectal tumors, and colorectal tumor-derived cell lines were used to show the effectiveness of this method. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Identification of Agrobacterium tumefaciens genes that direct the complete catabolism of octopine.

    PubMed

    Cho, K; Fuqua, C; Martin, B S; Winans, S C

    1996-04-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens R10 was mutagenized by using the promoter probe transposon Tn5-gusA7, and a library of approximately 5,000 transcriptional fusions was screened for octopine-inducible patterns of gene expression. Twenty-one mutants carrying strongly inducible gusA fusions, 20 of which showed defects in the catabolism of octopine or its metabolites, were obtained. One group of mutants could not use octopine as a carbon source, while a second group of mutants could not utilize arginine or ornithine and a third group could not utilize octopine, arginine, ornithine, or proline as a carbon source. Utilization of these compounds as nitrogen sources showed similar but not identical patterns. Fifteen fusions were subcloned together with adjacent DNA. Sequence analysis and further genetic analysis indicated that insertions of the first group are localized in the occ region of the Ti plasmid. Insertions of the second group were localized to a gene encoding ornithine cyclodeaminase. This gene is very similar to, but distinct from, a homolog located on the Ti plasmid. This gene is located immediately downstream from a gene encoding an arginase. Genetic experiments indicated that this arginase gene is essential for octopine and arginine catabolism. Insertions of the third group was localized to a gene whose product is required for degradation of proline. We therefore have identified all steps required for the catabolism of octopine to glutamate. PMID:8606160

  16. Degeneration of olfactory receptor gene repertories in primates: no direct link to full trichromatic vision.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Atsushi; Go, Yasuhiro; Niimura, Yoshihito

    2010-05-01

    Odor molecules in the environment are detected by olfactory receptors (ORs), being encoded by a large multigene family in mammalian genomes. It is generally thought that primates are vision oriented and dependent weakly on olfaction. Previous studies suggested that Old World monkeys (OWMs) and hominoids lost many functional OR genes after the divergence from New World monkeys (NWMs) due to the acquisition of well-developed trichromatic vision. To examine this hypothesis, here we analyzed OR gene repertoires of five primate species including NWMs, OWMs, and hominoids for which high-coverage genome sequences are available, together with two prosimians and tree shrews with low-coverage genomes. The results showed no significant differences in the number of functional OR genes between NWMs (marmosets) and OWMs/hominoids. Two independent analyses, identification of orthologous genes among the five primates and estimation of the numbers of ancestral genes by the reconciled tree method, did not support a sudden loss of OR genes at the branch of the OWMs/hominoids ancestor but suggested a gradual loss in every lineage. Moreover, we found that humans retain larger numbers of ancestral OR genes that were in the common ancestor of NWMs/OWMs/hominoids than orangutans and macaques and that the OR gene repertoire in humans is more similar to that of marmosets than those of orangutans and macaques. These results suggest that the degeneration of OR genes in primates cannot simply be explained by the acquisition of trichromatic vision, and our sense of smell may not be inferior to other primate species. PMID:20061342

  17. Gene-Environment Interactions in Genome-Wide Association Studies: Current Approaches and New Directions

    PubMed Central

    Winham, Stacey J; Biernacka, Joanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Complex psychiatric traits have long been thought to be the result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and gene-environment interactions are thought to play a crucial role in behavioral phenotypes and the susceptibility and progression of psychiatric disorders. Candidate gene studies to investigate hypothesized gene-environment interactions are now fairly common in human genetic research, and with the shift towards genome-wide association studies, genome-wide gene-environment interaction studies are beginning to emerge. Methods We summarize the basic ideas behind gene-environment interaction, and provide an overview of possible study designs and traditional analysis methods in the context of genome-wide analysis. We then discuss novel approaches beyond the traditional strategy of analyzing the interaction between the environmental factor and each polymorphism individually. Results Two-step filtering approaches that reduce the number of polymorphisms tested for interactions can substantially increase the power of genome-wide gene-environment studies. New analytical methods including data-mining approaches, and gene-level and pathway-level analyses, also have the capacity to improve our understanding of how complex genetic and environmental factors interact to influence psychological and psychiatric traits. Such methods, however, have not yet been utilized much in behavioral and mental health research. Conclusions Although methods to investigate gene-environment interactions are available, there is a need for further development and extension of these methods to identify gene-environment interactions in the context of genome-wide association studies. These novel approaches need to be applied in studies of psychology and psychiatry. PMID:23808649

  18. Gene fusions for the directed modification of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway in Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga, Enrique A; Papp, Tamás; Alvarez, María Isabel; Eslava, Arturo P

    2012-01-01

    Several fungal species, particularly some included in the Mucorales, have been used to develop fermentation processes for the production of β-carotene. Oxygenated derivatives of β-carotene are more valuable products, and the preference by the market of carotenoids from biological sources has increased the research in different carotenoid-producing organisms. We currently use Mucor circinelloides as a model organism to develop strains able to produce new, more valuable, and with an increased content of carotenoids. In this chapter we describe part of our efforts to construct active gene fusions which could advance in the diversification of carotenoid production by this fungus. The main carotenoid accumulated by M. circinelloides is β-carotene, although it has some hydroxylase activity and produces low amounts of zeaxanthin. Two enzymatic activities are required for the production of astaxanthin from β-carotene: a hydroxylase and a ketolase. We used the ctrW gene of Paracoccus sp. N81106, encoding a bacterial β-carotene ketolase, to construct gene fusions with two fungal genes essential for the modification of the pathway in M. circinelloides. First we fused it to the carRP gene of M. circinelloides, which is responsible for the phytoene synthase and lycopene cyclase activities in this fungus. The expected activity of this fusion gene would be the accumulation by M. circinelloides of canthaxanthin and probably some astaxanthin. A second construction was the fusion of the crtW gene of Paracoccus sp. to the crtS gene of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous, responsible for the synthesis of astaxanthin from β-carotene in this fungus, but which was shown to have only hydroxylase activity in M. circinelloides. The expected result in M. circinelloides transformants was the accumulation of astaxanthin. Here we describe a detailed and empirically tested protocol for the construction of these gene fusions. PMID:22711120

  19. Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-04-20

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  20. Direct transcriptional control of the plasminogen activator gene of Yersinia pestis by the cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Jong; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L; Goh, Ee-Been; Igo, Michele M; Young, Glenn M

    2007-12-01

    Horizontal gene transfer events followed by proper regulatory integration of a gene drive rapid evolution of bacterial pathogens. A key event in the evolution of the highly virulent plague bacterium Yersinia pestis was the acquisition of plasmid pPCP1, which carries the plasminogen activator gene, pla. This promoted the bubonic form of the disease by increasing bacterial dissemination from flea bite sites and incidentally enhanced replication in respiratory airways during pneumonic infection. We determined that expression of pla is controlled by the global regulator cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (Crp). This transcription factor is well conserved among distantly related bacteria, where it acts as a soluble receptor for the ubiquitous signaling molecule cAMP and controls a global network of metabolic and stress-protective genes. Crp has a similar physiological role in Y. pestis since loss of its function resulted in an inability to metabolize a variety of nonglucose substrates. Activation of pla expression requires a transcription activation element of the pla promoter that serves as a Crp binding site. Crp interaction with this site was demonstrated to occur only in the presence of cAMP. Alteration of the Crp binding site nucleotide sequence prevented in vitro formation of Crp-DNA complexes and inhibited in vivo expression of pla. The placement of pla under direct regulatory control of Crp highlights how highly adapted pathogens integrate laterally acquired genes to coordinate virulence factor expression with global gene networks to maintain homeostasis through the infectious life cycle.

  1. Epstein–Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B.; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G.; Sinclair, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  2. Toward Improved Solar Irradiance Forecasts: Introduction of Post-Processing to Correct the Direct Normal Irradiance from the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Ki; Clarkson, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    Solar electricity production is highly dependent on atmospheric conditions. This study focuses on comparing model forecasts with observations for the period of May-December, 2011. The Weather Research and Forecasting model was run for two nested domains centered on Arizona in order to better capture the complex terrain driven dynamics of the region. The modeling performance from the simulation with the Global Forecast System model output as initial and boundary condition was better, with respect to both direct normal irradiance and global horizontal irradiance, than that with the North American Mesoscale model output. The observed aerosol optical depth is correlated with the water vapor, soil moisture and wind-blown dust and therefore, the aerosol optical depth is parameterized by the modeling outputs for these variables. The aerosol correction factor reduces the relative root mean square error from 12 to 6 %. In cases where dust was transported at high altitude, our algorithm did not correct the bias of direct normal irradiance.

  3. Introduction of a modular automated voltage-clamp platform and its correlation with manual human Ether-à-go-go related gene voltage-clamp data.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Olaf; Himmel, Herbert; Rascher-Eggstein, Gesa; Knott, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    In investigating ion channel pharmacology, the manual patch clamp is still considered the gold standard for data quality, notwithstanding the major drawbacks of low throughput and the need for skilled operators. The automated patch clamp platform CytoPatch™ Instrument overcomes these restrictions. Its modular fully automated design makes it possible to obtain scalable throughput without the need for well-trained operators. Its chip design and perfusion system reproduces the manual patch technique, thus ensuring optimal data quality. Further, the use of stably transfected frozen cells, usable immediately after thawing, eliminates the cell quality impairment and low success rates associated with a running cell culture and renders screening costs accurately calculable. To demonstrate the applicability of this platform, 18 blinded compounds were assessed for their impact on the cardiac human Ether-à-go-go related gene K(+) channel. The IC(50) values obtained by the CytoPatch Instrument using the frozen human embryonic kidney 293 cells showed a high correlation (R(2)=0.928) with those obtained from manual patch clamp recordings with human embryonic kidney 293 cells from a running cell culture. Moreover, this correlation extended to sticky compounds such as terfenadine or astemizole. In conclusion, the CytoPatch Instrument operated with frozen cells ready to use directly after thawing provides the same high data quality known from the manual voltage clamp and has the added benefit of enhanced throughput for use in ion channel screening and safety assessment. PMID:21675869

  4. Directed gene copy number amplification in Pichia pastoris by vector integration into the ribosomal DNA locus.

    PubMed

    Marx, Hans; Mecklenbräuker, Astrid; Gasser, Brigitte; Sauer, Michael; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2009-12-01

    The yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used host organism for heterologous protein production. One of the basic steps for strain improvement is to ensure a sufficient level of transcription of the heterologous gene, based on promoter strength and gene copy number. To date, high-copy-number integrants of P. pastoris are achievable only by screening of random events or by cloning of gene concatemers. Methods for rapid and reliable multicopy integration of the expression cassette are therefore desirable. Here we present such a method based on vector integration into the rDNA locus and post-transformational vector amplification by repeated selection on increased antibiotic concentrations. Data are presented for two exemplary products: human serum albumin, which is secreted into the supernatant, and human superoxide dismutase, which is accumulated in the cytoplasm of the cells. The striking picture evolving is that intracellular protein production is tightly correlated with gene copy number, while use of the secretory pathway introduces a high clonal variability and the correlation with gene copy number is valid only for low gene copy numbers. PMID:19799640

  5. Directed mutagenesis in Candida albicans: one-step gene disruption to isolate ura3 mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.; Miller, S.M.; Kurtz, M.B.; Kirsch, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A method for introducing specific mutations into the diploid Candida albicans by one-step gene disruption and subsequent UV-induced recombination was developed. The cloned C. albicans URA3 gene was disrupted with the C. albicans ADE2 gene, and the linearized DNA was used for transformation of two ade2 mutants, SGY-129 and A81-Pu. Both an insertional inactivation of the URA3 gene and a disruption which results in a 4.0-kilobase deletion were made. Southern hybridization analyses demonstrated that the URA3 gene was disrupted on one of the chromosomal homologs in 15 of the 18 transformants analyzed. These analyses also revealed restriction site dimorphism of EcoRI at the URA3 locus which provides a unique marker to distinguish between chromosomal homologs. This enabled us to show that either homolog could be disrupted and that disrupted transformants of SGY-129 contained more than two copies of the URA3 locus. The A81-Pu transformants heterozygous for the ura3 mutations were rendered homozygous and Ura- by UV-induced recombination. The homozygosity of a deletion mutant and an insertion mutant was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Both mutants were transformed to Ura+ with plasmids containing the URA3 gene and in addition, were resistant to 5-fluoro-orotic acid, a characteristic of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura3 mutants as well as of orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase mutants of other organisms.

  6. Polypurine hairpins directed against the template strand of DNA knock down the expression of mammalian genes.

    PubMed

    de Almagro, M Cristina; Coma, Silvia; Noé, Véronique; Ciudad, Carlos J

    2009-04-24

    We analyzed whether polypurine hairpins (PPRHs) had the ability to knock down gene expression. These hairpins are formed by two antiparallel purine domains linked by a loop that allows the formation of Hoogsteen bonds between both domains and Watson-Crick bonds with the target polypyrimidine sequence, forming triplex structures. To set up the experimental conditions, the human dhfr gene was used as a model. The PPRHs were designed toward the template strand of DNA. The transfection of the human breast cancer cell line SKBR3 with these template hairpins against the dhfr gene produced higher than 90% of cell mortality. Template PPRHs produced a decrease in DHFR mRNA, protein, and its corresponding enzymatic activity. In addition, the activity of DHFR PPRHs was tested against breast cancer cells resistant to methotrexate, observing high cell mortality. Given the difficulty in finding long polypyrimidine stretches, we studied how to compensate for the presence of purine interruptions in the polypyrimidine target sequence. The stability of PPRH was measured, resulting in a surprisingly long half-life of about 5 days. Finally, to test the generality of usage, template PPRHs were employed against two important genes involved in cell proliferation, telomerase and survivin, producing 80 and 95% of cell death, respectively. Taken together our results show the ability of antiparallel purine hairpins to bind the template strand of double strand DNA and to decrease gene transcription. Thus, PPRHs can be considered as a new type of molecules to modulate gene expression.

  7. Vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein inhibits host cell-directed transcription of target genes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Black, B L; Lyles, D S

    1992-01-01

    Infection by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) results in a rapid inhibition of host cell transcription and translation. To determine whether the viral matrix (M) protein was involved in this inhibition of host cell gene expression, an M protein expression vector was cotransfected with a target gene vector, encoding the target gene, encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Expression of M protein caused a decrease in CAT activity in a gene dosage-dependent manner, and inhibition was apparent by 12 h posttransfection. The inhibitory effect of M protein was quite potent. The level of M protein required for a 10-fold inhibition of CAT activity was less than 1% of the level of M protein produced during the sixth hour of VSV infection. Northern (RNA) analysis of cotransfected cells showed that expression of M protein caused a reduction in the steady-state level of the vector-encoded mRNAs. Expression of both CAT and M mRNAs was reduced in cells cotransfected with a plasmid encoding M protein, indicating that expression of small amounts of M protein from plasmid DNA inhibits further expression of both M and CAT mRNAs. Nuclear runoff transcription analysis demonstrated that expression of M protein inhibited transcription of the target genes. This is the first report of a viral gene product which is capable of inhibiting transcription in vivo in the absence of any other viral component. Images PMID:1318397

  8. Glial fibrillary acidic protein promoters direct adenovirus early 1A gene and human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoters direct sodium iodide symporter expression for malignant glioma radioiodine therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Tan, Jian; Wang, Peng; Li, Ning; Li, Chengxia

    2015-01-01

    Malignant glioma can be treated with radioiodine following transfection with human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene. Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS is engineered with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoters to express early region 1A (E1A) and hNIS genes, which may be useful in targeted gene therapy. The Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS was constructed and purified using the E1A and hNIS genes regulated by the hTERT and GFAP promoters, respectively. Glioma cells were infected by Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS. Selective replication ability of Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS was then evaluated by plaque forming assay, transgene expression by Western blot, (125)I-iodide uptake and efflux, clonogenicity following (131)I-iodide treatment in the tumor cells, and radioiodine therapy using nude mouse model. The Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS could selectively replicate; the hNIS gene was successfully expressed under the GFAP promoter. Western blot analyses using E1A- and hNIS-specific antibodies revealed two bands of approximately 40 and 70 kDa. In addition, the cells showed about 93.4 and 107.1 times higher (125)I uptake in U251 and U87 cells than in the control cells, respectively. Clonogenic assay indicated that >90% of cells transfected with Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS were killed. The Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS-transfected and 2 mCi (131)I-injected U87 xenograft nude mice survived the longest among the three groups. Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS has a good ability of selective replication and strong antitumor selectivity. An effective therapy of (131)I was achieved activity in malignant glioma cells after induction of tumor-specific iodide uptake activity by GFAP promoter-directed hNIS gene expression in vitro and in vivo.

  9. The synthetic gestagen levonorgestrel directly affects gene expression in thyroid and pituitary glands of Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Claudia; Opitz, Robert; Trubiroha, Achim; Lutz, Ilka; Zikova, Andrea; Kloas, Werner

    2016-08-01

    The synthetic gestagen levonorgestrel (LNG) was previously shown to perturb thyroid hormone-dependent metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis. However, so far the mechanisms underlying the anti-metamorphic effects of LNG remained unknown. Therefore, a series of in vivo and ex vivo experiments was performed to identify potential target sites of LNG action along the pituitary-thyroid axis of X. laevis tadpoles. Prometamorphic tadpoles were treated in vivo with LNG (0.01-10nM) for 72h and brain-pituitary and thyroid tissue was analyzed for marker gene expression. While no treatment-related changes were observed in brain-pituitary tissue, LNG treatment readily affected thyroidal gene expression in tadpoles including decreased slc5a5 and iyd mRNA expression and a strong induction of dio2 and dio3 expression. When using an ex vivo organ explant culture approach, direct effects of LNG on both pituitary and thyroid gland gene expression were detecTable Specifically, treatment of pituitary explants with 10nM LNG strongly stimulated dio2 expression and concurrently suppressed tshb expression. In thyroid glands, ex vivo LNG treatment induced dio2 and dio3 mRNA expression in a thyrotropin-independent manner. When thyroid explants were cultured in thyrotropin-containing media, LNG caused similar gene expression changes as seen after 72h in vivo treatment including a very strong repression of thyrotropin-induced slc5a5 expression. Concerning the anti-thyroidal activity of LNG as seen under in vivo conditions, our ex vivo data provide clear evidence that LNG directly affects expression of genes important for thyroidal iodide handling as well as genes involved in negative feedback regulation of pituitary tshb expression. PMID:27262936

  10. Direct Repression of Evening Genes by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 in the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kamioka, Mari; Takao, Saori; Suzuki, Takamasa; Taki, Kyomi; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Nakamichi, Norihito

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a biological timekeeping system that provides organisms with the ability to adapt to day-night cycles. Timing of the expression of four members of the Arabidopsis thaliana PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR) family is crucial for proper clock function, and transcriptional control of PRRs remains incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that direct regulation of PRR5 by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) determines the repression state of PRR5 in the morning. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses indicated that CCA1 associates with three separate regions upstream of PRR5. CCA1 and its homolog LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) suppressed PRR5 promoter activity in a transient assay. The regions bound by CCA1 in the PRR5 promoter gave rhythmic patterns with troughs in the morning, when CCA1 and LHY are at high levels. Furthermore, ChIP-seq revealed that CCA1 associates with at least 449 loci with 863 adjacent genes. Importantly, this gene set contains genes that are repressed but upregulated in cca1 lhy double mutants in the morning. This study shows that direct binding by CCA1 in the morning provides strong repression of PRR5, and repression by CCA1 also temporally regulates an evening-expressed gene set that includes PRR5. PMID:26941090

  11. Variation in key genes of serotonin and norepinephrine function predicts gamma-band activity during goal-directed attention.

    PubMed

    Enge, Sören; Fleischhauer, Monika; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Reif, Andreas; Strobel, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Recent evidence shows that genetic variations in key regulators of serotonergic (5-HT) signaling explain variance in executive tasks, which suggests modulatory actions of 5-HT on goal-directed selective attention as one possible underlying mechanism. To investigate this link, 130 volunteers were genotyped for the 5-HT transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and for a variation (TPH2-703 G/T) of the TPH2 gene coding for the rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT synthesis in the brain. Additionally, a functional polymorphism of the norepinephrine transporter gene (NET -3081 A/T) was considered, which was recently found to predict attention and working memory processes in interaction with serotonergic genes. The flanker-based Attention Network Test was used to assess goal-directed attention and the efficiency of attentional networks. Event-related gamma-band activity served to indicate selective attention at the intermediate phenotype level. The main findings were that 5-HTTLPR s allele and TPH2 G-allele homozygotes showed increased induced gamma-band activity during target processing when combined with the NET A/A genotype compared with other genotype combinations, and that gamma activity mediates the genotype-specific effects on task performance. The results further support a modulatory role of 5-HT and NE function in the top-down attentional selection of motivationally relevant over competing or irrelevant sensory input.

  12. The thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin (trh) gene of Vibrio parahaemolyticus: Sequence variation and implications for detection and function.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, William B; Turner, Jeffrey W

    2016-07-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of bacterial food-related illness associated with the consumption of undercooked seafood. Only a small subset of strains is pathogenic. Most clinical strains encode for the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and/or the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH). In this work, we amplify and sequence the trh gene from over 80 trh+strains of this bacterium and identify thirteen genetically distinct alleles, most of which have not been deposited in GenBank previously. Sequence data was used to design new primers for more reliable detection of trh by endpoint PCR. We also designed a new quantitative PCR assay to target a more conserved gene that is genetically-linked to trh. This gene, ureR, encodes the transcriptional regulator for the urease gene cluster immediately upstream of trh. We propose that this ureR assay can be a useful screening tool as a surrogate for direct detection of trh that circumvents challenges associated with trh sequence variation.

  13. Editorial introduction.

    PubMed

    Gelso, Charles J

    2007-09-01

    Introduces the special section in the current issue of Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training. This section contains a reprint of Carl R. Rogers' (1957) seminal paper on the necessary and sufficient conditions for constructive personality change, as well as 11 reaction papers from some of the best psychotherapy theoreticians and researchers of our time. The reaction papers address the impact of Rogers' paper on the field of psychotherapy in general and therapy of the commenter's persuasion in particular, limitations of Rogers' viewpoints, the most important and enduring aspects of Rogers' theoretical statement, and how Rogers' ideas may exhibit themselves directly and indirectly in the current psychotherapy scene. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Editorial introduction.

    PubMed

    Gelso, Charles J

    2007-09-01

    Introduces the special section in the current issue of Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training. This section contains a reprint of Carl R. Rogers' (1957) seminal paper on the necessary and sufficient conditions for constructive personality change, as well as 11 reaction papers from some of the best psychotherapy theoreticians and researchers of our time. The reaction papers address the impact of Rogers' paper on the field of psychotherapy in general and therapy of the commenter's persuasion in particular, limitations of Rogers' viewpoints, the most important and enduring aspects of Rogers' theoretical statement, and how Rogers' ideas may exhibit themselves directly and indirectly in the current psychotherapy scene. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22122244

  15. Twist1 Directly Regulates Genes That Promote Cell Proliferation and Migration in Developing Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mary P.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2011-01-01

    Twist1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is expressed in mesenchymal precursor populations during embryogenesis and in metastatic cancer cells. In the developing heart, Twist1 is highly expressed in endocardial cushion (ECC) valve mesenchymal cells and is down regulated during valve differentiation and remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that Twist1 promotes cell proliferation, migration, and expression of primitive extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in ECC mesenchymal cells. Furthermore, Twist1 expression is induced in human pediatric and adult diseased heart valves. However, the Twist1 downstream target genes that mediate increased cell proliferation and migration during early heart valve development remain largely unknown. Candidate gene and global gene profiling approaches were used to identify transcriptional targets of Twist1 during heart valve development. Candidate target genes were analyzed for evolutionarily conserved regions (ECRs) containing E-box consensus sequences that are potential Twist1 binding sites. ECRs containing conserved E-box sequences were identified for Twist1 responsive genes Tbx20, Cdh11, Sema3C, Rab39b, and Gadd45a. Twist1 binding to these sequences in vivo was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, and binding was detected in ECCs but not late stage remodeling valves. In addition identified Twist1 target genes are highly expressed in ECCs and have reduced expression during heart valve remodeling in vivo, which is consistent with the expression pattern of Twist1. Together these analyses identify multiple new genes involved in cell proliferation and migration that are differentially expressed in the developing heart valves, are responsive to Twist1 transcriptional function, and contain Twist1-responsive regulatory sequences. PMID:22242143

  16. Characterization and Expression Analysis of Genes Directing Galactomannan Synthesis in Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Pré, Martial; Caillet, Victoria; Sobilo, Julien; McCarthy, James

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Galactomannans act as storage reserves for the seeds in some plants, such as guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) and coffee (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora). In coffee, the galactomannans can represent up to 25 % of the mass of the mature green coffee grain, and they exert a significant influence on the production of different types of coffee products. The objective of the current work was to isolate and characterize cDNA encoding proteins responsible for galactomannan synthesis in coffee and to study the expression of the corresponding transcripts in the developing coffee grain from C. arabica and C. canephora, which potentially exhibit slight galactomannan variations. Comparative gene expression analysis was also carried out for several other tissues of C. arabica and C. canephora. Methods cDNA banks, RACE-PCR and genome walking were used to generate full-length cDNA for two putative coffee mannan synthases (ManS) and two galactomannan galactosyl transferases (GMGT). Gene-specific probe-primer sets were then generated and used to carry out comparative expression analysis of the corresponding genes in different coffee tissues using quantitative RT-PCR Key Results Two of the putative galactomannan biosynthetic genes, ManS1 and GMGT1, were demonstrated to have very high expression in the developing coffee grain of both Coffea species during endosperm development, consistent with our proposal that these two genes are responsible for the production of the majority of the galactomannans found in the grain. In contrast, the expression data presented indicates that the ManS2 gene product is probably involved in the synthesis of the galactomannans found in green tissue. Conclusions The identification of genes implicated in galactomannan synthesis in coffee are presented. The data obtained will enable more detailed studies on the biosynthesis of this important component of coffee grain and contribute to a better understanding of some functional

  17. Computed Tomography-Guided Access to the Cisterna Chyli: Introduction of a Technique for Direct Lymphangiography to Evaluate and Treat Chylothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Schoellnast, Helmut; Maybody, Majid; Getrajdman, George I.; Bains, Manjit S.; Finley, David J.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2011-02-15

    The purpose of this report is to introduce a technique of direct lymphangiography to enable chylothorax treatment. Using a hybrid computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy imaging system, a 21-gauge needle was placed under CT guidance into the cisterna chyli to allow contrast lymphangiography and CT lymphangiography in two patients with presumed postoperative chylothorax. Water-soluble contrast media injection demonstrated the thoracic duct anatomy in both patients. Further successful needle disruption of the cisterna chyli was performed in one patient to interrupt lymph flow and stop the chylous leak, with subsequent resolution of the chylothorax.

  18. Cytoplasmic-genetic male sterility gene provides direct evidence for some hybrid rice recently evolving into weedy rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxu; Lu, Zuomei; Dai, Weimin; Song, Xiaoling; Peng, Yufa; Valverde, Bernal E; Qiang, Sheng

    2015-05-27

    Weedy rice infests paddy fields worldwide at an alarmingly increasing rate. There is substantial evidence indicating that many weedy rice forms originated from or are closely related to cultivated rice. There is suspicion that the outbreak of weedy rice in China may be related to widely grown hybrid rice due to its heterosis and the diversity of its progeny, but this notion remains unsupported by direct evidence. We screened weedy rice accessions by both genetic and molecular marker tests for the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) genes (Wild abortive, WA, and Boro type, BT) most widely used in the production of indica and japonica three-line hybrid rice as a diagnostic trait of direct parenthood. Sixteen weedy rice accessions of the 358 tested (4.5%) contained the CMS-WA gene; none contained the CMS-BT gene. These 16 accessions represent weedy rices recently evolved from maternal hybrid rice derivatives, given the primarily maternal inheritance of this trait. Our results provide key direct evidence that hybrid rice can be involved in the evolution of some weedy rice accessions, but is not a primary factor in the recent outbreak of weedy rice in China.

  19. Comparing direct vs. indirect estimates of gene flow within a population of a scattered tree species.

    PubMed

    Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie; Klein, Etienne K

    2008-06-01

    The comparison between historical estimates of gene flow, using variance in allelic frequencies, and contemporary estimates of gene flow, using parentage assignment, is expected to provide insights into ecological and evolutionary processes at work within and among populations. Genetic variation at six microsatellite loci was used to quantify genetic structure in the insect-pollinated, animal-dispersed, low-density tree Sorbus torminalis L. Crantz, and to derive historical estimates of gene flow. The neighbourhood size and root-mean-squared dispersal distance inferred from seedling genotypes (N(b) = 70 individuals, sigma(e) = 417 m) were similar to those inferred from adult genotypes (N(b) = 114 individuals, sigma(e) = 472 m). We also used parentage analyses and a neighbourhood model approach after an evaluation of the statistical properties of this method on simulated data. From our data, we estimated even contributions of seed- and pollen-mediated dispersal to the genetic composition of established seedlings, with both fat-tailed pollen and seed dispersal kernels, and slightly higher mean distance of pollen dispersal (248 m) as compared to seed dispersal (135 m). The resulting contemporary estimate of gene dispersal distance (sigma(c) = 211 m) was approximately twofold smaller than the historical estimates. Besides different assumptions and statistical nuances of both approaches, this discrepancy is likely to reflect a recent restriction in the scale of gene flow which requires manager's attention in a context of increasing forest fragmentation.

  20. Isolation of virulence genes directing surface glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol synthesis by functional complementation of Leishmania.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, K A; Garraway, L A; Descoteaux, A; Turco, S J; Beverley, S M

    1993-01-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites of the genus Leishmania cause a spectrum of widespread tropical diseases. In the vertebrate host they reside within the macrophage phagolysosome; however, the mechanisms employed in this remarkable survival strategy are not well understood. Recent advances in the molecular genetics of these parasites prompted us to develop methods of functional genetic complementation in Leishmania and apply them to the isolation of genes involved in the biosynthesis of the virulence determinant lipophosphoglycan, an abundant glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored polysaccharide. LPG1, the gene product identified by complementation of the R2D2 mutant, appears to be a glycosyltransferase responsible for the addition of galactofuranosyl residues to the nascent lipophosphoglycan chain. As galactofuranose is not found in mammalian cells, inhibition of the addition of this sugar could be exploited for chemotherapy. Overall, the success of the functional complementation approach opens the way to the identification of a variety of genes involved in pathogenesis and parasitism. Images Fig. 5 PMID:8378337

  1. Identification of Genes Expressed in Premalignant Breast Disease by Microscopy-Directed Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Roy A.; Page, David L.; Holt, Jeffrey T.

    1994-09-01

    Histopathologic study of human breast biopsy samples has identified specific lesions which are associated with a high risk of development of invasive breast cancer. Presumably, these lesions (collectively termed premalignant breast disease) represent the earliest recognizable morphologic expression of fundamental molecular events that lead to the development of invasive breast cancer. To study molecular events underlying premalignant breast disease, we have developed a method for isolating RNA from histologically identified lesions from frozen human breast tissue. This method specifically obtains mRNA from breast epithelial cells and has identified three genes which are differentially expressed in premalignant breast epithelial lesions. One gene identified by this method is overexpressed in four of five noncomedo ductal carcinoma in situ lesions and appears to be the human homologue of the gene encoding the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an enzyme involved in DNA synthesis.

  2. Histidine-rich stabilized polyplexes for cMet-directed tumor-targeted gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, Petra; Lächelt, Ulrich; Herrmann, Annika; Mickler, Frauke Martina; Döblinger, Markus; He, Dongsheng; Krhač Levačić, Ana; Morys, Stephan; Bräuchle, Christoph; Wagner, Ernst

    2015-03-01

    Overexpression of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor/c-Met proto oncogene on the surface of a variety of tumor cells gives an opportunity to specifically target cancerous tissues. Herein, we report the first use of c-Met as receptor for non-viral tumor-targeted gene delivery. Sequence-defined oligomers comprising the c-Met binding peptide ligand cMBP2 for targeting, a monodisperse polyethylene glycol (PEG) for polyplex surface shielding, and various cationic (oligoethanamino) amide cores containing terminal cysteines for redox-sensitive polyplex stabilization, were assembled by solid-phase supported syntheses. The resulting oligomers exhibited a greatly enhanced cellular uptake and gene transfer over non-targeted control sequences, confirming the efficacy and target-specificity of the formed polyplexes. Implementation of endosomal escape-promoting histidines in the cationic core was required for gene expression without additional endosomolytic agent. The histidine-enriched polyplexes demonstrated stability in serum as well as receptor-specific gene transfer in vivo upon intratumoral injection. The co-formulation with an analogous PEG-free cationic oligomer led to a further compaction of pDNA polyplexes with an obvious change of shape as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. Such compaction was critically required for efficient intravenous gene delivery which resulted in greatly enhanced, cMBP2 ligand-dependent gene expression in the distant tumor.Overexpression of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor/c-Met proto oncogene on the surface of a variety of tumor cells gives an opportunity to specifically target cancerous tissues. Herein, we report the first use of c-Met as receptor for non-viral tumor-targeted gene delivery. Sequence-defined oligomers comprising the c-Met binding peptide ligand cMBP2 for targeting, a monodisperse polyethylene glycol (PEG) for polyplex surface shielding, and various cationic (oligoethanamino) amide cores containing

  3. Different regulatory sequences control creatine kinase-M gene expression in directly injected skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, C K; Gualberto, A; Patel, C V; Walsh, K

    1993-01-01

    Regulatory sequences of the M isozyme of the creatine kinase (MCK) gene have been extensively mapped in skeletal muscle, but little is known about the sequences that control cardiac-specific expression. The promoter and enhancer sequences required for MCK gene expression were assayed by the direct injection of plasmid DNA constructs into adult rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. A 700-nucleotide fragment containing the enhancer and promoter of the rabbit MCK gene activated the expression of a downstream reporter gene in both muscle tissues. Deletion of the enhancer significantly decreased expression in skeletal muscle but had no detectable effect on expression in cardiac muscle. Further deletions revealed a CArG sequence motif at position -179 within the promoter that was essential for cardiac-specific expression. The CArG element of the MCK promoter bound to the recombinant serum response factor and YY1, transcription factors which control expression from structurally similar elements in the skeletal actin and c-fos promoters. MCK-CArG-binding activities that were similar or identical to serum response factor and YY1 were also detected in extracts from adult cardiac muscle. These data suggest that the MCK gene is controlled by different regulatory programs in adult cardiac and skeletal muscle. Images PMID:8423791

  4. Direct ethanol production from cellulosic materials by Zymobacter palmae carrying Cellulomonas endoglucanase and Ruminococcus β-glucosidase genes.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Motoki; Okamoto, Kenji; Yanase, Hideshi

    2013-06-01

    In order to reduce the cost of bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass, we conferred the ability to ferment cellulosic materials directly on Zymobacter palmae by co-expressing foreign endoglucanase and β-glucosidase genes. Z. palmae is a novel ethanol-fermenting bacterium capable of utilizing a broad range of sugar substrates, but not cellulose. Therefore, the six genes encoding the cellulolytic enzymes (CenA, CenB, CenD, CbhA, CbhB, and Cex) from Cellulomonas fimi were introduced and expressed in Z. palmae. Of these cellulolytic enzyme genes cloned, CenA degraded carboxymethylcellulose and phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose (PASC) efficiently. The extracellular CenA catalyzed the hydrolysis of barley β-glucan and PASC to liberate soluble cello-oligosaccharides, indicating that CenA is the most suitable enzyme for cellulose degradation among those cellulolytic enzymes expressed in Z. palmae. Furthermore, the cenA gene and β-glucosidase gene (bgl) from Ruminococcus albus were co-expressed in Z. palmae. Of the total endoglucanase and β-glucosidase activities, 57.1 and 18.1 % were localized in the culture medium of the strain. The genetically engineered strain completely saccharified and fermented 20 g/l barley β-glucan to ethanol within 84 h, producing 79.5 % of the theoretical yield. Thus, the production and secretion of CenA and BGL enabled Z. palmae to efficiently ferment a water-soluble cellulosic polysaccharide to ethanol.

  5. The GLABRA2 homeodomain protein directly regulates CESA5 and XTH17 gene expression in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Tominaga-Wada, Rumi; Iwata, Mineko; Sugiyama, Junji; Kotake, Toshihisa; Ishida, Tetsuya; Yokoyama, Ryusuke; Nishitani, Kazuhiko; Okada, Kiyotaka; Wada, Takuji

    2009-11-01

    Arabidopsis root hair formation is determined by the patterning genes CAPRICE (CPC), GLABRA3 (GL3), WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABRA2 (GL2), but little is known about the later changes in cell wall material during root hair formation. A combined Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy-principal components analysis (FTIR-PCA) method was used to detect subtle differences in the cell wall material between wild-type and root hair mutants in Arabidopsis. Among several root hair mutants, only the gl2 mutation affected root cell wall polysaccharides. Five of the 10 genes encoding cellulose synthase (CESA1-10) and 4 of 33 xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XTH1-33) genes in Arabidopsis are expressed in the root, but only CESA5 and XTH17 were affected by the gl2 mutation. The L1-box sequence located in the promoter region of these genes was recognized by the GL2 protein. These results indicate that GL2 directly regulates cell wall-related gene expression during root development.

  6. Nr2e3-directed transcriptional regulation of genes involved in photoreceptor development and cell-type specific phototransduction.

    PubMed

    Haider, Neena B; Mollema, Nissa; Gaule, Meghan; Yuan, Yang; Sachs, Andrew J; Nystuen, Arne M; Naggert, Jürgen K; Nishina, Patsy M

    2009-09-01

    The retinal transcription factor Nr2e3 plays a key role in photoreceptor development and function. In this study we examine gene expression in the retina of Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) mutants with respect to wild-type control mice, to identify genes that are misregulated and hence potentially function in the Nr2e3 transcriptional network. Quantitative candidate gene real time PCR and subtractive hybridization approaches were used to identify transcripts that were misregulated in Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were then used to determine which of the misregulated transcripts were direct targets of NR2E3. We identified 24 potential targets of NR2E3. In the developing retina, NR2E3 targets transcription factors such as Ror1, Rorg, and the nuclear hormone receptors Nr1d1 and Nr2c1. In the mature retina NR2E3 targets several genes including the rod specific gene Gnb1 and cone specific genes blue opsin, and two of the cone transducin subunits, Gnat2 and Gnb3. In addition, we identified 5 novel transcripts that are targeted by NR2E3. While mislocalization of proteins between rods and cones was not observed, we did observe diminished concentration of GNB1 protein in adult Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) retinas. These studies identified novel transcriptional pathways that are potentially targeted by Nr2e3 in the retina and specifically demonstrate a novel role for NR2E3 in regulating genes involved in phototransduction. PMID:19379737

  7. Gene-environment interactions and obesity: recent developments and future directions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, a major public health concern, is a multifactorial disease caused by both environmental and genetic factors. Although recent genome-wide association studies have identified many loci related to obesity or body mass index, the identified variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of obesity. Better understanding of the interplay between genetic and environmental factors is the basis for developing effective personalized obesity prevention and management strategies. This article reviews recent advances in identifying gene-environment interactions related to obesity and describes epidemiological designs and newly developed statistical approaches to characterizing and discovering gene-environment interactions on obesity risk. PMID:25951849

  8. Earth System Monitoring, Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, John

    This section provides sensing and data collection methodologies, as well as an understanding of Earth's climate parameters and natural and man-made phenomena, to support a scientific assessment of the Earth system as a whole, and its response to natural and human-induced changes. The coverage ranges from climate change factors and extreme weather and fires to oil spill tracking and volcanic eruptions. This serves as a basis to enable improved prediction and response to climate change, weather, and natural hazards as well as dissemination of the data and conclusions. The data collection systems include satellite remote sensing, aerial surveys, and land- and ocean-based monitoring stations. Our objective in this treatise is to provide a significant portion of the scientific and engineering basis of Earth system monitoring and to provide this in 17 detailed articles or chapters written at a level for use by university students through practicing professionals. The reader is also directed to the closely related sections on Ecological Systems, Introduction and also Climate Change Modeling Methodology, Introduction as well as Climate Change Remediation, Introduction to. For ease of use by students, each article begins with a glossary of terms, while at an average length of 25 print pages each, sufficient detail is presented for use by professionals in government, universities, and industries. The chapters are individually summarized below.

  9. In vivo alteration of the keratin 17 gene in hair follicles by oligonucleotide-directed gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Fan, W; Yoon, K

    2003-12-01

    Using intradermal injection of a chimeric RNA-DNA oligonucleotide (RDO) or a single-stranded oligonucleotide (ssODN) into murine skin, we attempted to make a dominant mutation (R94p) in the conserve alpha-helical domain of keratin 17 (K17), the same mutation found in pachyononychia congenichia type 2 (PC-2) patients with phenotypes ranging from twisted hair and multiple pilosebaceous cysts. Both K17A-RDO and -ssODN contained a single base mismatch (CGC to CCC) to alter the normal K17 sequence to cause an amino acid substitution (R94P). The complexes consisting of oligonucleotides and cationic liposomes were injected to C57B1/6 murine skin at 2 and 5 day after birth. Histological examination of skin biopsies at postnatal day 8 from several mice showed consistent twisted hair shafts or broken hair follicles at the sebaceous gland level and occasional rupture of the hair bulb or epidermal cyst-like changes. In the injected area, the number of full anagen hair follicles decrease by 50%. Injection of the control oligonucleotide, identical to K17A-RDO but containing no mismatch to the normal sequence, did not result in any detectable abnormality. The frequency of gene alteration was lower than 3%, according to the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the genomic DNA isolated by dissection of hair follicles from slides. Although intradermal injection of K17A-RDO or K17-ssODN caused a dominant mutation in K17 affecting hair growth and morphology, these phenotypic changes were transient either due to the compensation of K17 by other keratins or the replacement of the mutated cells by normal surrounding cells during hair growth.

  10. The Arabidopsis SKU5 gene encodes an extracellular glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein involved in directional root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedbrook, John C.; Carroll, Kathleen L.; Hung, Kai F.; Masson, Patrick H.; Somerville, Chris R.

    2002-01-01

    To investigate how roots respond to directional cues, we characterized a T-DNA-tagged Arabidopsis mutant named sku5 in which the roots skewed and looped away from the normal downward direction of growth on inclined agar surfaces. sku5 roots and etiolated hypocotyls were slightly shorter than normal and exhibited a counterclockwise (left-handed) axial rotation bias. The surface-dependent skewing phenotype disappeared when the roots penetrated the agar surface, but the axial rotation defect persisted, revealing that these two directional growth processes are separable. The SKU5 gene belongs to a 19-member gene family designated SKS (SKU5 Similar) that is related structurally to the multiple-copper oxidases ascorbate oxidase and laccase. However, the SKS proteins lack several of the conserved copper binding motifs characteristic of copper oxidases, and no enzymatic function could be assigned to the SKU5 protein. Analysis of plants expressing SKU5 reporter constructs and protein gel blot analysis showed that SKU5 was expressed most strongly in expanding tissues. SKU5 was glycosylated and modified by glycosyl phosphatidylinositol and localized to both the plasma membrane and the cell wall. Our observations suggest that SKU5 affects two directional growth processes, possibly by participating in cell wall expansion.

  11. EHMT2 directs DNA methylation for efficient gene silencing in mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Auclair, Ghislain; Borgel, Julie; Sanz, Lionel A.; Vallet, Judith; Guibert, Sylvain; Dumas, Michael; Cavelier, Patricia; Girardot, Michael; Forné, Thierry; Feil, Robert; Weber, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which histone modifying enzymes contribute to DNA methylation in mammals remains unclear. Previous studies suggested a link between the lysine methyltransferase EHMT2 (also known as G9A and KMT1C) and DNA methylation in the mouse. Here, we used a model of knockout mice to explore the role of EHMT2 in DNA methylation during mouse embryogenesis. The Ehmt2 gene is expressed in epiblast cells but is dispensable for global DNA methylation in embryogenesis. In contrast, EHMT2 regulates DNA methylation at specific sequences that include CpG-rich promoters of germline-specific genes. These loci are bound by EHMT2 in embryonic cells, are marked by H3K9 dimethylation, and have strongly reduced DNA methylation in Ehmt2−/− embryos. EHMT2 also plays a role in the maintenance of germline-derived DNA methylation at one imprinted locus, the Slc38a4 gene. Finally, we show that DNA methylation is instrumental for EHMT2-mediated gene silencing in embryogenesis. Our findings identify EHMT2 as a critical factor that facilitates repressive DNA methylation at specific genomic loci during mammalian development. PMID:26576615

  12. Gene--Environment Interplay and Delinquent Involvement: Evidence of Direct, Indirect, and Interactive Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Kevin M.; DeLisi, Matt; Wright, John Paul; Vaughn, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral genetic research has revealed that biogenic factors play a role in the development of antisocial behaviors. Much of this research has also explicated the way in which the environment and genes may combine to create different phenotypes. The authors draw heavily from this literature and use data from the National Longitudinal Study of…

  13. A micro-fluidic sub-microliter sample introduction system for direct analysis of Chinese rice wine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using external aqueous calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Heyong; Liu, Jinhua; Xu, Zigang; Yin, Xuefeng

    2012-07-01

    A microfluidic sub-microliter sample introducing system was developed for direct analysis of Chinese rice wine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It consisted of a microfluidic chip integrating variable-volume sampling channels (0.1-0.8 μL), an eight-way multi-functional valve used in flow injection analysis (FIA), a syringe pump and a peristaltic pump of the Ar ICP-MS instrument. Three solutions, i.e., 15, 40 and 100 g L- 1 glucose in 20% ethanol were used to simulate Chinese rice wine of the dry type, the semidry type and the semisweet type, each. The effects of their volume introduced into ICP-MS on the plasma stability and ICP-MS intensities were studied. The experimental results showed that neither alteration of plasma stability nor carbon deposition was observed when the sampling volume of 20% ethanol containing 100 g L- 1 glucose was downscaled to 0.8 μL. Further reducing the sampling volume to 0.4 μL, no significant difference between the intensities of multi-element standard prepared in three simulated Chinese rice wine matrices and those in aqueous solution was observed. It indicated no negative effect of Chinese rice wine matrix on the ICP-MS intensities. A sampling volume of 0.4 μL was considered to be a good compromise between sensitivity and matrix effect. The flow rate of the carrier was chosen as 20 μL min- 1 for obtaining peaks with the highest peak height within the shortest time. Based on these observations, a microflow injection (μFI) method for the direct determination of cadmium and lead in Chinese rice wine by ICP-MS using an external aqueous calibration was developed. The sample throughput was 45 h- 1 with the detection limit of 19.8 and 10.4 ng L- 1 for Cd and Pb, respectively. The contents of Cd and Pb in 10 Chinese rice wine samples were measured. The results agreed well with those determined by ICP-MS with the conventional sampling system after microwave assisted digestion. The recoveries of three Chinese

  14. Silencing of host genes directed by virus-derived short interfering RNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xunyang; Li, Wan-Xiang; Lu, Rui

    2012-11-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) processed from viral replication intermediates by RNase III-like enzyme Dicer guide sequence-specific antiviral silencing in fungi, plants, and invertebrates. In plants, virus-derived siRNAs (viRNAs) can target and silence cellular transcripts and, in some cases, are responsible for the induction of plant diseases. Currently it remains unclear whether viRNAs are also capable of modulating the expression of cellular genes in the animal kingdom, although animal virus-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) are known to guide efficient silencing of host genes, thereby facilitating virus replication. In this report, we showed that viRNAs derived from a modified nodavirus triggered potent silencing of homologous cellular transcripts produced by the endogenous gene or transgene in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. Like that found in plants, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in C. elegans also involves RRF-1, a worm RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) that is known to produce single-stranded secondary siRNAs in a Dicer-independent manner. We further demonstrated that VIGS in C. elegans is inheritable, suggesting that VIGS has the potential to generate profound epigenetic consequences in future generations. Altogether, these findings, for the first time, confirmed that viRNAs have the potential to modulate host gene expression in the animal kingdom. Most importantly, the success in uncoupling the trigger and the target of the antiviral silencing would allow for the exploration of novel features of virus-host interactions mediated by viRNAs in the animal kingdom. PMID:22896621

  15. Interactions with RNA direct the Polycomb group protein SCML2 to chromatin where it represses target genes

    PubMed Central

    Bonasio, Roberto; Lecona, Emilio; Narendra, Varun; Voigt, Philipp; Parisi, Fabio; Kluger, Yuval; Reinberg, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) is essential for the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. SCML2 is a mammalian homolog of Drosophila SCM, a Polycomb-group protein that associates with PRC1. In this study, we show that SCML2A, an SCML2 isoform tightly associated to chromatin, contributes to PRC1 localization and also directly enforces repression of certain Polycomb target genes. SCML2A binds to PRC1 via its SPM domain and interacts with ncRNAs through a novel RNA-binding region (RBR). Targeting of SCML2A to chromatin involves the coordinated action of the MBT domains, RNA binding, and interaction with PRC1 through the SPM domain. Deletion of the RBR reduces the occupancy of SCML2A at target genes and overexpression of a mutant SCML2A lacking the RBR causes defects in PRC1 recruitment. These observations point to a role for ncRNAs in regulating SCML2 function and suggest that SCML2 participates in the epigenetic control of transcription directly and in cooperation with PRC1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02637.001 PMID:24986859

  16. Genes implicated in stem cell identity and temporal programme are directly targeted by Notch in neuroblast tumours

    PubMed Central

    Zacharioudaki, Evanthia; Housden, Benjamin E.; Garinis, George; Stojnic, Robert; Delidakis, Christos; Bray, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Notch signalling is involved in a multitude of developmental decisions and its aberrant activation is linked to many diseases, including cancers. One example is the neural stem cell tumours that arise from constitutive Notch activity in Drosophila neuroblasts. To investigate how hyperactivation of Notch in larval neuroblasts leads to tumours, we combined results from profiling the upregulated mRNAs and mapping the regions bound by the core Notch pathway transcription factor Su(H). This identified 246 putative direct Notch targets. These genes were highly enriched for transcription factors and overlapped significantly with a previously identified regulatory programme dependent on the proneural transcription factor Asense. Included were genes associated with the neuroblast maintenance and self-renewal programme that we validated as Notch regulated in vivo. Another group were the so-called temporal transcription factors, which have been implicated in neuroblast maturation. Normally expressed in specific time windows, several temporal transcription factors were ectopically expressed in the stem cell tumours, suggesting that Notch had reprogrammed their normal temporal regulation. Indeed, the Notch-induced hyperplasia was reduced by mutations affecting two of the temporal factors, which, conversely, were sufficient to induce mild hyperplasia on their own. Altogether, the results suggest that Notch induces neuroblast tumours by directly promoting the expression of genes that contribute to stem cell identity and by reprogramming the expression of factors that could regulate maturity. PMID:26657768

  17. Efficient dual sgRNA-directed large gene deletion in rabbit with CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuning; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Yong; Chen, Mao; Deng, Jichao; Lv, Qingyan; Sui, Tingting; Li, Zhanjun; Lai, Liangxue

    2016-08-01

    The CRISPR RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease gene-targeting system has been extensively used to edit the genome of several organisms. However, most mutations reported to date have been are indels, resulting in multiple mutations and numerous alleles in targeted genes. In the present study, a large deletion of 105 kb in the TYR (tyrosinase) gene was generated in rabbit via a dual sgRNA-directed CRISPR/Cas9 system. The typical symptoms of albinism accompanied significantly decreased expression of TYR in the TYR knockout rabbits. Furthermore, the same genotype and albinism phenotype were found in the F1 generation, suggesting that large-fragment deletions can be efficiently transmitted to the germline and stably inherited in offspring. Taken together, our data demonstrate that mono and biallelic large deletions can be achieved using the dual sgRNA-directed CRISPR/Cas9 system. This system produces no mosaic mutations or off-target effects, making it an efficient tool for large-fragment deletions in rabbit and other organisms. PMID:26817461

  18. Phylogenetic conservation of immunoglobulin heavy chains: direct comparison of hamster and mouse Cmu genes.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, K L; Duncan, W R; Tucker, P W

    1985-01-01

    We have analyzed the JH-Cmu locus of the Syrian hamster by DNA cloning and sequencing. The single Cmu gene is highly homologous to that of the mouse. The hamster equivalents of the JH and switch (S) recombination regions are arranged as in the mouse, but surprisingly are not highly conserved. Also unlike its close murine relative, the Smu regions among inbred hamster strains are not polymorphic. The complete nucleotide sequence of hamster and mouse Cmu genes have been compared to partial Cmu sequences of other species. Conservation within a portion of the 3' untranslated region may signify functional requirements for 3' end processing. Mutational frequencies within exons and introns of hamster and mouse do not support the theory that the rate of DNA transitions to transversions decreases with evolutionary distance. Images PMID:2994005

  19. Graded Smad2/3 Activation Is Converted Directly into Levels of Target Gene Expression in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mavrakis, Konstantinos J.; Goggolidou, Paraskevi; Norris, Dominic P.; Episkopou, Vasso

    2009-01-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor (TGF) β signalling family includes morphogens, such as Nodal and Activin, with important functions in vertebrate development. The concentration of the morphogen is critical for fate decisions in the responding cells. Smad2 and Smad3 are effectors of the Nodal/Activin branch of TGFβ signalling: they are activated by receptors, enter the nucleus and directly transcribe target genes. However, there have been no studies correlating levels of Smad2/3 activation with expression patterns of endogenous target genes in a developmental context over time. We used mouse Embryonic Stem (ES) cells to create a system whereby levels of activated Smad2/3 can be manipulated by an inducible constitutively active receptor (Alk4*) and an inhibitor (SB-431542) that blocks specifically Smad2/3 activation. The transcriptional responses were analysed by microarrays at different time points during activation and repression. We identified several genes that follow faithfully and reproducibly the Smad2/3 activation profile. Twenty-seven of these were novel and expressed in the early embryo downstream of Smad2/3 signalling. As they responded to Smad2/3 activation in the absence of protein synthesis, they were considered direct. These immediate responsive genes included negative intracellular feedback factors, like SnoN and I-Smad7, which inhibit the transcriptional activity of Smad2/3. However, their activation did not lead to subsequent repression of target genes over time, suggesting that this type of feedback is inefficient in ES cells or it is counteracted by mechanisms such as ubiquitin-mediated degradation by Arkadia. Here we present an ES cell system along with a database containing the expression profile of thousands of genes downstream of Smad2/3 activation patterns, in the presence or absence of protein synthesis. Furthermore, we identify primary target genes that follow proportionately and with high sensitivity changes in Smad2/3 levels over 15–30

  20. Workshop introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Streeper, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has three subprograms that directly reduce the nuclear/radiological threat; Convert (Highly Enriched Uranium), Protect (Facilities), and Remove (Materials). The primary mission of the Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP) falls under the 'Remove' subset. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a venue for joint-technical collaboration between the OSRP and the Nuclear Radiation Safety Service (NRSS). Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace initiative and the Soviet equivalent both promoted the spread of the paradoxical (peaceful and harmful) properties of the atom. The focus of nonproliferation efforts has been rightly dedicated to fissile materials and the threat they pose. Continued emphasis on radioactive materials must also be encouraged. An unquantifiable threat still exists in the prolific quantity of sealed radioactive sources (sources) spread worldwide. It does not appear that the momentum of the evolution in the numerous beneficial applications of radioactive sources will subside in the near future. Numerous expert studies have demonstrated the potentially devastating economic and psychological impacts of terrorist use of a radiological dispersal or emitting device. The development of such a weapon, from the acquisition of the material to the technical knowledge needed to develop and use it, is straightforward. There are many documented accounts worldwide of accidental and purposeful diversions of radioactive materials from regulatory control. The burden of securing sealed sources often falls upon the source owner, who may not have a disposal pathway once the source reaches the end of its useful life. This disposal problem is exacerbated by some source owners not having the resources to safely and compliantly store them. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) data suggests that, in the US alone, there are tens of thousands of high-activity (IAEA

  1. Direct evidence of recombination in the recA gene of Aeromonas bestiarum.

    PubMed

    Sanglas, Ariadna; Albarral, Vicenta; Farfán, Maribel; Lorén, J Gaspar; Fusté, M Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Two hundred and twenty-one strains representative of all Aeromonas species were characterized using the recA gene sequence, assessing its potential as a molecular marker for the genus Aeromonas. The inter-species distance values obtained demonstrated that recA has a high discriminatory power. Phylogenetic analysis, based on full-length gene nucleotide sequences, revealed a robust topology with clearly separated clusters for each species. The maximum likelihood tree showed the Aeromonas bestiarum strains in a well-defined cluster, containing a subset of four strains of different geographical origins in a deep internal branch. Data analysis provided strong evidence of recombination at the end of the recA sequences in these four strains. Intergenomic recombination corresponding to partial regions of the two adjacent genes recA and recX (248 bp) was identified between A. bestiarum (major parent) and Aeromonas eucrenophila (minor parent). The low number of recombinant strains detected (1.8%) suggests that horizontal flow between recA sequences is relatively uncommon in this genus. Moreover, only a few nucleotide differences were detected among these fragments, indicating that recombination has occurred recently. Finally, we also determined if the recombinant fragment could have influenced the structure and basic functions of the RecA protein, comparing models reconstructed from the translated amino acid sequences of our A. bestiarum strains with known Escherichia coli RecA structures.

  2. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum genes involved in erythrocyte invasion varies among isolates cultured directly from patients.

    PubMed

    Nery, Susana; Deans, Anne-Marie; Mosobo, Moses; Marsh, Kevin; Rowe, J Alexandra; Conway, David J

    2006-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum merozoites invade erythrocytes using a range of alternative ligands that includes erythrocyte binding antigenic proteins (EBAs) and reticulocyte binding protein homologues (Rh). Variation in the expression of some of these genes among culture-adapted parasite lines correlates with the use of different erythrocyte receptors. Here, expression profiles of four Rh genes and eba175 are analysed in a sample of 42 isolates cultured from malaria patients in Kenya. The profiles cluster into distinct groups, largely because of very strong negative correlations between the levels of expression of particular gene pairs (Rh1 versus Rh2b, eba175 versus Rh2b, and eba175 versus Rh4), previously associated with alternative invasion pathways in culture-adapted parasite lines. High levels of eba175 are seen in isolates in expression profile group I, and may be associated with sialic acid-dependent invasion. Groups II and III are, respectively, characterized by high levels of Rh2b and Rh4, and are more likely to be associated with sialic acid-independent invasion.

  3. Linkage approach and direct COL4A5 gene mutation screening in Alport syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, A.E.; Rossetti, S.; Biasi, O.

    1994-09-01

    Alport Syndrome (AS) is transmitted as an X-linked dominant trait in the majority of families, the defective gene being COL4A5 at Xq22. In the remaining cases AS appears to be autosomally inherited. Recently, mutations in COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes at 2q35-q37 were identified in families with autosomal recessive AS. Mutation detection screening is being performed by non-radioactive single stand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), heteroduplex analysis, and automated DNA sequencing in over 170 AS patients enrolled in the ongoing Italian Multicenter Study on AS. So far twenty-five different mutations have been found, including missense, splicing, and frameshifts. Moreover, by using six tightly linked COL4A5 informative makers, we have also typed two larger AS families, and have shown compatible sex-linked transmission in one other, suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. In this latter three-generation COL4A5-unlinked family we are now looking for linkage and for mutations in the candidate COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes on chromosome 2q.

  4. Identification of genes directly regulated by the oncogene ZNF217using ChIP-chip assays.

    SciTech Connect

    Krig, S.R.; Jin, V.X.; Bieda, M.C.; O'geen, H.; Yaswen, P.; Green, R.; Farnham, P.J.

    2007-01-26

    It has been proposed that ZNF217, which is amplified at 20q13 in various tumors, plays a key role during neoplastic transformation. ZNF217 has been purified in complexes that contain repressor proteins such as CtBP2, suggesting that it acts as a transcriptional repressor. However, the function of ZNF217 has not been well characterized due to a lack of known target genes. Using a global chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip approach, we identified thousands of ZNF217 binding sites in three tumor cell lines (MCF7, SW480, and Ntera2). Further analysis of ZNF217 in Ntera2 cells showed that many promoters are bound by ZNF217 and CtBP2 and that a subset of these promoters are activated upon removal of ZNF217. Thus, our in vivo studies corroborate the in vitro biochemical analyses of ZNF217-containing complexes and support the hypothesis that ZNF217 functions as a transcriptional repressor. Gene ontology analysis showed that ZNF217 targets in Ntera2 cells are involved in organ development, suggesting that one function of ZNF217 may be to repress differentiation. Accordingly we show that differentiation of Ntera2 cells with retinoic acid led to down-regulation of ZNF217. Our identification of thousands of ZNF217 target genes will enable further studies of the consequences of aberrant expression of ZNF217 during neoplastic transformation.

  5. Site-directed gene mutation at mixed sequence targets by psoralen-conjugated pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Nielsen, Peter E.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding molecules such as triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide a means for inducing site-specific mutagenesis and recombination at chromosomal sites in mammalian cells. However, the utility of TFOs is limited by the requirement for homopurine stretches in the target duplex DNA. Here, we report the use of pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids (pcPNAs) for intracellular gene targeting at mixed sequence sites. Due to steric hindrance, pcPNAs are unable to form pcPNA–pcPNA duplexes but can bind to complementary DNA sequences by Watson–Crick pairing via double duplex-invasion complex formation. We show that psoralen-conjugated pcPNAs can deliver site-specific photoadducts and mediate targeted gene modification within both episomal and chromosomal DNA in mammalian cells without detectable off-target effects. Most of the induced psoralen-pcPNA mutations were single-base substitutions and deletions at the predicted pcPNA-binding sites. The pcPNA-directed mutagenesis was found to be dependent on PNA concentration and UVA dose and required matched pairs of pcPNAs. Neither of the individual pcPNAs alone had any effect nor did complementary PNA pairs of the same sequence. These results identify pcPNAs as new tools for site-specific gene modification in mammalian cells without purine sequence restriction, thereby providing a general strategy for designing gene targeting molecules. PMID:17977869

  6. The Level of AdpA Directly Affects Expression of Developmental Genes in Streptomyces coelicolor ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wolański, Marcin; Donczew, Rafał; Kois-Ostrowska, Agnieszka; Masiewicz, Paweł; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2011-01-01

    AdpA is a key regulator of morphological differentiation in Streptomyces. In contrast to Streptomyces griseus, relatively little is known about AdpA protein functions in Streptomyces coelicolor. Here, we report for the first time the translation accumulation profile of the S. coelicolor adpA (adpASc) gene; the level of S. coelicolor AdpA (AdpASc) increased, reaching a maximum in the early stage of aerial mycelium formation (after 36 h), and remained relatively stable for the next several hours (48 to 60 h), and then the signal intensity decreased considerably. AdpASc specifically binds the adpASc promoter region in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that its expression is autoregulated; surprisingly, in contrast to S. griseus, the protein presumably acts as a transcriptional activator. We also demonstrate a direct influence of AdpASc on the expression of several genes whose products play key roles in the differentiation of S. coelicolor: STI, a protease inhibitor; RamR, an atypical response regulator that itself activates expression of the genes for a small modified peptide that is required for aerial growth; and ClpP1, an ATP-dependent protease. The diverse influence of AdpASc protein on the expression of the analyzed genes presumably results mainly from different affinities of AdpASc protein to individual promoters. PMID:21926228

  7. Direct capture and heterologous expression of Salinispora natural product genes for the biosynthesis of enterocin.

    PubMed

    Bonet, Bailey; Teufel, Robin; Crüsemann, Max; Ziemert, Nadine; Moore, Bradley S

    2015-03-27

    Heterologous expression of secondary metabolic pathways is a promising approach for the discovery and characterization of bioactive natural products. Herein we report the first heterologous expression of a natural product from the model marine actinomycete genus Salinispora. Using the recently developed method of yeast-mediated transformation-associated recombination for natural product gene clusters, we captured a type II polyketide synthase pathway from Salinispora pacifica with high homology to the enterocin pathway from Streptomyces maritimus and successfully produced enterocin in two different Streptomyces host strains. This result paves the way for the systematic interrogation of Salinispora's promising secondary metabolome.

  8. Cassette vectors directing expression of T cell receptor genes in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Kouskoff, V; Signorelli, K; Benoist, C; Mathis, D

    1995-03-27

    We describe a pair of cassette vectors that can be used to express rearranged T cell receptor genes in transgenic mice. Short DNA fragments containing rearranged V alpha and V beta segments are readily amplified from T cells and introduced between artificial cloning sites. Transgene-derived mRNAs are transcribed under the control of the natural TCR alpha and -beta promoter/enhancer elements. Using this vector, we have obtained transgenic mouse lines which display transgene-encoded TCR alpha and beta chains on a majority of T cells. PMID:7714342

  9. Evaluating the roles of directed breeding and gene flow in animal domestication

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Fiona B.; Dobney, Keith; Denham, Tim; Capriles, José M.

    2014-01-01

    For the last 150 y scholars have focused upon the roles of intentional breeding and genetic isolation as fundamental to understanding the process of animal domestication. This analysis of ethnoarchaeological, archaeological, and genetic data suggests that long-term gene flow between wild and domestic stocks was much more common than previously assumed, and that selective breeding of females was largely absent during the early phases of animal domestication. These findings challenge assumptions about severe genetic bottlenecks during domestication, expectations regarding monophyletic origins, and interpretations of multiple domestications. The findings also raise new questions regarding ways in which behavioral and phenotypic domestication traits were developed and maintained. PMID:24753599

  10. Direct Capture and Heterologous Expression of Salinispora Natural Product Genes for the Biosynthesis of Enterocin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Heterologous expression of secondary metabolic pathways is a promising approach for the discovery and characterization of bioactive natural products. Herein we report the first heterologous expression of a natural product from the model marine actinomycete genus Salinispora. Using the recently developed method of yeast-mediated transformation-associated recombination for natural product gene clusters, we captured a type II polyketide synthase pathway from Salinispora pacifica with high homology to the enterocin pathway from Streptomyces maritimus and successfully produced enterocin in two different Streptomyces host strains. This result paves the way for the systematic interrogation of Salinispora’s promising secondary metabolome. PMID:25382643

  11. A MADS-box gene NtSVP regulates pedicel elongation by directly suppressing a KNAT1-like KNOX gene NtBPL in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Chen, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zenglin; Liu, Danmei; Song, Gaoyuan; Kong, Xingchen; Geng, Shuaifeng; Yang, Jiayue; Wang, Bingnan; Wu, Liang; Li, Aili; Mao, Long

    2015-10-01

    Optimal inflorescence architecture is important for plant reproductive success by affecting the ultimate number of flowers that set fruits and for plant competitiveness when interacting with biotic or abiotic conditions. The pedicel is one of the key contributors to inflorescence architecture diversity. To date, knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of pedicel development is derived from Arabidopsis. Not much is known regarding other plants. Here, an SVP family MADS-box gene, NtSVP, in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) that is required for pedicel elongation was identified. It is shown that knockdown of NtSVP by RNA interference (RNAi) caused elongated pedicels, while overexpression resulted in compact inflorescences with much shortened pedicels. Moreover, an Arabidopsis BREVIPEDECELLUS/KNAT1 homologue NtBP-Like (NtBPL) was significantly up-regulated in NtSVP-RNAi plants. Disruption of NtBPL decreased pedicel lengths and shortened cortex cells. Consistent with the presence of a CArG-box at the NtBPL promoter, the direct binding of NtSVP to the NtBPL promoter was demonstrated by yeast one-hybrid assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and dual-luciferase assay, in which NtSVP may act as a repressor of NtBPL. Microarray analysis showed that down-regulation of NtBPL resulted in differential expression of genes associated with a number of hormone biogenesis and signalling genes such as those for auxin and gibberellin. These findings together suggest the function of a MADS-box transcription factor in plant pedicel development, probably via negative regulation of a BP-like class I KNOX gene. The present work thus postulates the conservation and divergence of the molecular regulatory pathways underlying the development of plant inflorescence architecture. PMID:26175352

  12. Targeted insertions of two exogenous collagen genes into both alleles of their endogenous loci in cultured human cells: the insertions are directed by relatively short fragments containing the promoters and the 5' ends of the genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, A; Smelt, S; Mewar, R; Fertala, A; Sieron, A L; Overhauser, J; Prockop, D J

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that type II procollagen is synthesized by HT-1080 cells that are stably transfected with constructs of the human COL2A1 gene that contain the promoter and 5' end of either the COL2A1 gene or the human COL1A1 gene. Since the host HT-1080 cells were from a human tumor line that synthesizes type IV collagen but not type II or type I procollagen, the results suggested that the constructs were integrated near active enhancers or promoters. Here, however, we demonstrate that a 33-kb construct of the COL2A1 gene containing a 5' fragment from the same gene was inserted into both alleles of the endogenous COL2A1 gene on chromosome 12, apparently by homologous recombination by a nonconservative pathway. In contrast, a similar construct of the COL2A1 gene in which the 5' end was replaced with a 1.9-kb fragment from the 5' end of the COL1A1 gene was inserted into both alleles of the locus for the COL1A1 gene on chromosome 17. Therefore, targeted insertion of the gene construct was not directed by the degree of sequence homology. Instead, it was directed by the relatively short 5' fragment from the COL1A1 gene that contained the promoter and the initially transcribed sequences of the gene. After insertion, both gene constructs were expressed from previously inactive loci. Images PMID:8041796

  13. Direct Detection of Soil mRNAs using Targeted Microarrays for Genes Associated with Lignin Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Smith, Jeff L.; Waters, Katrina M.; Bolton, Harvey

    2010-07-04

    Microarrays have become established tools for describing microbial systems, however the assessment of expression profiles for environmental microbial communities still presents unique challenges. Notably, the concentration of particular transcripts are likely very dilute relative to the pool of total RNA, and PCR-based amplification strategies are vulnerable to amplification biases and the appropriate primer selection. Thus, we apply a signal amplification approach, rather than template amplification, to analyze the expression of genes encoding selected lignin-degrading enzymes in soil. Controls in the form of known amplicons and cDNA from Phanerochaete chrysosporium were included and mixed with the soil cDNA both before and after the signal amplification in order to assess the dynamic range of the microarray. We demonstrate that restored prairie soil expresses a diverse range of genes encoding lignin-degrading enzymes following incubation with lignin substrate, while farmed agricultural soil does not. The mixed additions of control cDNA with soil cDNA does interfere with detection of the low abundance transcripts, nevertheless this microarray approach consistently reports the higher-abundance transcripts which present more robust signals.

  14. Directed evolution induces tributyrin hydrolysis in a virulence factor of Xylella fastidiosa using a duplicated gene as a template.

    PubMed

    Gouran, Hossein; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Rao, Basuthkar J; Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Dandekar, Abhaya

    2014-01-01

    Duplication of genes is one of the preferred ways for natural selection to add advantageous functionality to the genome without having to reinvent the wheel with respect to catalytic efficiency and protein stability. The duplicated secretory virulence factors of Xylella fastidiosa (LesA, LesB and LesC), implicated in Pierce's disease of grape and citrus variegated chlorosis of citrus species, epitomizes the positive selection pressures exerted on advantageous genes in such pathogens. A deeper insight into the evolution of these lipases/esterases is essential to develop resistance mechanisms in transgenic plants. Directed evolution, an attempt to accelerate the evolutionary steps in the laboratory, is inherently simple when targeted for loss of function. A bigger challenge is to specify mutations that endow a new function, such as a lost functionality in a duplicated gene. Previously, we have proposed a method for enumerating candidates for mutations intended to transfer the functionality of one protein into another related protein based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the active site residues (DECAAF). In the current work, we present in vivo validation of DECAAF by inducing tributyrin hydrolysis in LesB based on the active site similarity to LesA. The structures of these proteins have been modeled using RaptorX based on the closely related LipA protein from Xanthomonas oryzae. These mutations replicate the spatial and electrostatic conformation of LesA in the modeled structure of the mutant LesB as well, providing in silico validation before proceeding to the laborious in vivo work. Such focused mutations allows one to dissect the relevance of the duplicated genes in finer detail as compared to gene knockouts, since they do not interfere with other moonlighting functions, protein expression levels or protein-protein interaction. PMID:25717364

  15. Direct and indirect effects of H-NS and Fis on global gene expression control in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kahramanoglou, Christina; Seshasayee, Aswin S. N.; Prieto, Ana I.; Ibberson, David; Schmidt, Sabine; Zimmermann, Jurgen; Benes, Vladimir; Fraser, Gillian M.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) are global regulators of gene expression in Escherichia coli, which affect DNA conformation by bending, wrapping and bridging the DNA. Two of these—H-NS and Fis—bind to specific DNA sequences and structures. Because of their importance to global gene expression, the binding of these NAPs to the DNA was previously investigated on a genome-wide scale using ChIP-chip. However, variation in their binding profiles across the growth phase and the genome-scale nature of their impact on gene expression remain poorly understood. Here, we present a genome-scale investigation of H-NS and Fis binding to the E. coli chromosome using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq). By performing our experiments under multiple time-points during growth in rich media, we show that the binding regions of the two proteins are mutually exclusive under our experimental conditions. H-NS binds to significantly longer tracts of DNA than Fis, consistent with the linear spread of H-NS binding from high- to surrounding lower-affinity sites; the length of binding regions is associated with the degree of transcriptional repression imposed by H-NS. For Fis, a majority of binding events do not lead to differential expression of the proximal gene; however, it has a significant indirect effect on gene expression partly through its effects on the expression of other transcription factors. We propose that direct transcriptional regulation by Fis is associated with the interaction of tandem arrays of Fis molecules to the DNA and possible DNA bending, particularly at operon-upstream regions. Our study serves as a proof-of-principle for the use of ChIP-seq for global DNA-binding proteins in bacteria, which should become significantly more economical and feasible with the development of multiplexing techniques. PMID:21097887

  16. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist delivered directly and by gene therapy inhibits matrix degradation in the intact degenerate human intervertebral disc: an in situ zymographic and gene therapy study

    PubMed Central

    Le Maitre, Christine L; Hoyland, Judith A; Freemont, Anthony J

    2007-01-01

    Data implicate IL-1 in the altered matrix biology that characterizes human intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. In the current study we investigated the enzymic mechanism by which IL-1 induces matrix degradation in degeneration of the human IVD, and whether the IL-1 inhibitor IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) will inhibit degradation. A combination of in situ zymography (ISZ) and immunohistochemistry was used to examine the effects of IL-1 and IL-1Ra on matrix degradation and metal-dependent protease (MDP) expression in explants of non-degenerate and degenerate human IVDs. ISZ employed three substrates (gelatin, collagen, casein) and different challenges (IL-1β, IL-1Ra and enzyme inhibitors). Immunohistochemistry was undertaken for MDPs. In addition, IL-1Ra was introduced into degenerate IVD explants using genetically engineered constructs. The novel findings from this study are: IL-1Ra delivered directly onto explants of degenerate IVDs eliminates matrix degradation as assessed by multi-substrate ISZ; there is a direct relationship between matrix degradation assessed by ISZ and MDP expression defined by immunohistochemistry; single injections of IVD cells engineered to over-express IL-1Ra significantly inhibit MDP expression for two weeks. Our findings show that IL-1 is a key cytokine driving matrix degradation in the degenerate IVD. Furthermore, IL-1Ra delivered directly or by gene therapy inhibits IVD matrix degradation. IL-1Ra could be used therapeutically to inhibit degeneration of the IVD. PMID:17760968

  17. Ultrasound directs a transposase system for durable hepatic gene delivery in mice

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cynthia D; Urschitz, Johann; Khemmani, Mark; Owens, Jesse B; Moisyadi, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the delivery of transposase-based vectors by Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction (UTMD) in mice. DNA vectors were attached to cationic lipid microbubbles (1-3 μm in diameter), injected intravenously, and delivered to the liver by destruction of the carrier bubbles with ultrasound in burst mode at a 1.0 MHz, 20 μs pulse duration, 10 Hz pulse repetition frequency, and acoustic peak negative pressure of ~1.3 MPa. We evaluated the expression and genomic integration of conventional (pcDNA3) and piggyBac transposase-based (pmGENIE) reporter vectors. In vivo, we observed UTMD-mediated liver-specific expression of pmGENIE for an average of 24 days, compared to 4 days with pcDNA3. Reporter expression was predominately located in proximity to blood vessels initially, while expression after three days was more evenly distributed through the parenchyma of the liver. We confirmed random genomic integration for pmGENIE in vitro, however, integration events for pmGENIE in vivo were targeted to specific areas of chromosome 14. Our results suggest that a combination of UTMD with nonviral DNA transposase vectors can mediate weeks of hepatic-specific gene transfer in vivo, and analyses performed by non-restrictive linear amplification-mediated (nrLAM) PCR, cloning, and sequencing identify an unexpected tropism for integration within a specific sequence on chromosome 14 in mice. UTMD delivery of transgenes may be useful for the treatment of hepatic gene deficiency disorders. PMID:24035623

  18. Muscle segment homeobox genes direct embryonic diapause by limiting inflammation in the uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Jeeyeon; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Bartos, Amanda; Li, Yingju; Baker, Erin Shammel; Tilton, Susan C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Jegga, Anil; Murata, Shigeo; Hirota, Yasushi; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2015-06-11

    Embryonic diapause (delayed implantation) is a reproductive strategy widespread in the animal kingdom. Under this condition, embryos at the blastocyst stage become dormant simultaneously with uterine quiescence until environmental or physiological conditions are favorable for the survival of the mother and newborn. Under favorable conditions, activation of the blastocyst and uterus ensues with implantation and progression of pregnancy. Although endocrine factors are known to participate in this process, the underlying molecular mechanism coordinating this phenomenon is not clearly understood. We recently found that uterine muscle segment homeobox (Msx) transcription factors are critical for the initiation and maintenance of delayed implantation in mice. To better understand why Msx genes are critical for delayed implantation, we compared uterine proteomics profiles between littermate floxed (Msx1/Msx2f/f) mice and mice with uterine deletion of Msx genes (Msx1/Msx2d/d) under delayed conditions. In Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri, pathways including protein translation, ubiquitin-proteasome system, inflammation, chaperone-mediated protein folding, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were enriched, and computational modeling showed intersection of these pathways on inflammatory responses. Indeed, increases in the ubiquitin-proteasome system and inflammation conformed to proteotoxic and ER stress in Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri under delayed conditions. Interestingly, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor bortezomib further exacerbated ER stress in Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri with aggravated inflammatory response, deteriorating rate of blastocyst recovery and failure to sustain delayed implantation. This study highlights a previously unrecognized role for Msx in preventing proteotoxic stress and inflammatory responses to coordinate embryo dormancy and uterine quiescence during embryonic diapause.

  19. Chromatinized Protein Kinase C-θ Directly Regulates Inducible Genes in Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition and Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Anjum; Wu, Fan; Hardy, Kristine; Li, Jasmine; Tu, Wen Juan; McCuaig, Robert; Harris, Janelle; Khanna, Kum Kum; Attema, Joanne; Gregory, Philip A.; Goodall, Gregory J.; Harrington, Kirsti; Dahlstrom, Jane E.; Boulding, Tara; Madden, Rebecca; Tan, Abel; Milburn, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is activated during cancer invasion and metastasis, enriches for cancer stem cells (CSCs), and contributes to therapeutic resistance and disease recurrence. Signal transduction kinases play a pivotal role as chromatin-anchored proteins in eukaryotes. Here we report for the first time that protein kinase C-theta (PKC-θ) promotes EMT by acting as a critical chromatin-anchored switch for inducible genes via transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the key inflammatory regulatory protein NF-κB. Chromatinized PKC-θ exists as an active transcription complex and is required to establish a permissive chromatin state at signature EMT genes. Genome-wide analysis identifies a unique cohort of inducible PKC-θ-sensitive genes that are directly tethered to PKC-θ in the mesenchymal state. Collectively, we show that cross talk between signaling kinases and chromatin is critical for eliciting inducible transcriptional programs that drive mesenchymal differentiation and CSC formation, providing novel mechanisms to target using epigenetic therapy in breast cancer. PMID:24891615

  20. Directed tagging of the Arabidopsis FATTY ACID ELONGATION1 (FAE1) gene with the maize transposon activator.

    PubMed Central

    James, D W; Lim, E; Keller, J; Plooy, I; Ralston, E; Dooner, H K

    1995-01-01

    The FATTY ACID ELONGATION1 (FAE1) gene of Arabidopsis is required for the synthesis of very long chain fatty acids in the seed. The product of the FAE1 gene is presumed to be a condensing enzyme that extends the chain length of fatty acids from C18 to C20 and C22. We report here the cloning of FAE1 by directed transposon tagging with the maize element Activator (Ac). An unstable fae1 mutant was isolated in a line carrying Ac linked to the FAE1 locus on chromosome 4. Cosegregation and reversion analyses established that the new mutant was tagged by Ac. A DNA fragment flanking Ac was cloned by inverse polymerase chain reaction and used to isolate FAE1 genomic clones and a cDNA clone from a library made from immature siliques. The predicted amino acid sequence of the FAE1 protein shares homology with those of other condensing enzymes (chalcone synthase, stilbene synthases, and beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III), supporting the notion that FAE1 is the structural gene for a synthase or condensing enzyme. FAE1 is expressed in developing seed, but not in leaves, as expected from the effect of the fae1 mutation on the fatty acid compositions of those tissues. PMID:7734965

  1. AP-2γ promotes proliferation in breast tumour cells by direct repression of the CDKN1A gene

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher M J; Scibetta, Angelo G; Friedrich, J Karsten; Canosa, Monica; Berlato, Chiara; Moss, Charlotte H; Hurst, Helen C

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the activator protein (AP)-2γ transcription factor in breast tumours has been identified as an independent predictor of poor outcome and failure of hormone therapy. To understand further the function of AP-2γ in breast carcinoma, we have used an RNA interference and gene expression profiling strategy with the MCF-7 cell line as a model. Gene expression changes between control and silenced cells implicate AP-2γ in the control of cell cycle progression and developmental signalling. A function for AP-2γ in cell cycle control was verified using flow cytometry: AP-2γ silencing led to a partial G1/S arrest and induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21cip/CDKN1A. Reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a direct, functional interaction by AP-2γ at the CDKN1A proximal promoter. AP-2γ silencing coincided with acquisition of an active chromatin conformation at the CDKN1A locus and increased gene expression. These data provide a mechanism whereby AP-2γ overexpression can promote breast epithelial proliferation and, coupled with previously published data, suggest how loss of oestrogen regulation of AP-2γ may contribute to the failure of hormone therapy in patients. PMID:19798054

  2. Directing 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pintoff, Ernest

    Providing an introduction to anyone considering directing as a field of study or career, this book takes a broad look at the process of directing and encourages students and professionals alike to look outside of the movie industry for inspiration. Chapters in the book discuss selecting and acquiring material; budgeting and financing; casting and…

  3. Potential Direct Regulators of the Drosophila yellow Gene Identified by Yeast One-Hybrid and RNAi Screens

    PubMed Central

    Kalay, Gizem; Lusk, Richard; Dome, Mackenzie; Hens, Korneel; Deplancke, Bart; Wittkopp, Patricia J.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression controls development, and changes in this regulation often contribute to phenotypic evolution. Drosophila pigmentation is a model system for studying evolutionary changes in gene regulation, with differences in expression of pigmentation genes such as yellow that correlate with divergent pigment patterns among species shown to be caused by changes in cis- and trans-regulation. Currently, much more is known about the cis-regulatory component of divergent yellow expression than the trans-regulatory component, in part because very few trans-acting regulators of yellow expression have been identified. This study aims to improve our understanding of the trans-acting control of yellow expression by combining yeast-one-hybrid and RNAi screens for transcription factors binding to yellow cis-regulatory sequences and affecting abdominal pigmentation in adults, respectively. Of the 670 transcription factors included in the yeast-one-hybrid screen, 45 showed evidence of binding to one or more sequence fragments tested from the 5′ intergenic and intronic yellow sequences from D. melanogaster, D. pseudoobscura, and D. willistoni, suggesting that they might be direct regulators of yellow expression. Of the 670 transcription factors included in the yeast-one-hybrid screen, plus another TF previously shown to be genetically upstream of yellow, 125 were also tested using RNAi, and 32 showed altered abdominal pigmentation. Nine transcription factors were identified in both screens, including four nuclear receptors related to ecdysone signaling (Hr78, Hr38, Hr46, and Eip78C). This finding suggests that yellow expression might be directly controlled by nuclear receptors influenced by ecdysone during early pupal development when adult pigmentation is forming. PMID:27527791

  4. Introduction of a novel 18S rDNA gene arrangement along with distinct ITS region in the saline water microalga Dunaliella

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of 18S rDNA gene sequences is a very promising method for identification and classification of living organisms. Molecular identification and discrimination of different Dunaliella species were carried out based on the size of 18S rDNA gene and, number and position of introns in the gene. Three types of 18S rDNA structure have already been reported: the gene with a size of ~1770 bp lacking any intron, with a size of ~2170 bp consisting one intron near 5' terminus, and with a size of ~2570 bp harbouring two introns near 5' and 3' termini. Hereby, we report a new 18S rDNA gene arrangement in terms of intron localization and nucleotide sequence in a Dunaliella isolated from Iranian salt lakes (ABRIINW-M1/2). PCR amplification with genus-specific primers resulted in production of a ~2170 bp DNA band, which is similar to that of D. salina 18S rDNA gene containing only one intron near 5' terminus. Whilst, sequence composition of the gene revealed the lack of any intron near 5' terminus in our isolate. Furthermore, another alteration was observed due to the presence of a 440 bp DNA fragment near 3' terminus. Accordingly, 18S rDNA gene of the isolate is clearly different from those of D. salina and any other Dunaliella species reported so far. Moreover, analysis of ITS region sequence showed the diversity of this region compared to the previously reported species. 18S rDNA and ITS sequences of our isolate were submitted with accesion numbers of EU678868 and EU927373 in NCBI database, respectively. The optimum growth rate of this isolate occured at the salinity level of 1 M NaCl. The maximum carotenoid content under stress condition of intense light (400 μmol photon m-2 s-1), high salinity (4 M NaCl) and deficiency of nitrate and phosphate nutritions reached to 240 ng/cell after 15 days. PMID:20377865

  5. Introduction of UAG, UAA, and UGA nonsense mutations at a specific site in the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene: use in measurement of amber, ochre, and opal suppression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Capone, J P; Sedivy, J M; Sharp, P A; RajBhandary, U L

    1986-01-01

    We have used oligonucleotide-directed site-specific mutagenesis to convert serine codon 27 of the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene to UAG, UAA, and UGA nonsense codons. The mutant cat genes, under transcriptional control of the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat, were then introduced into mammalian cells by DNA transfection along with UAG, UAA, and UGA suppressor tRNA genes derived from a human serine tRNA. Assay for CAT enzymatic activity in extracts from such cells allowed us to detect and quantitate nonsense suppression in monkey CV-1 cells and mouse NIH3T3 cells. Using such an assay, we provide the first direct evidence that an opal suppressor tRNA gene is functional in mammalian cells. The pattern of suppression of the three cat nonsense mutations in bacteria suggests that the serine at position 27 of CAT can be replaced by a wide variety of amino acids without loss of enzymatic activity. Thus, these mutant cat genes should be generally useful for the quantitation of suppressor activity of suppressor tRNA genes introduced into cells and possibly for the detection of naturally occurring nonsense suppressors. Images PMID:3023959

  6. Directed neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells and their gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesong; Gu, Qi; Wang, Xiang; Ma, Qingwen; Tang, Huixiang; Yan, Xiaoshuang; Guo, Xinbing; Yan, Hao; Hao, Jie; Zeng, Fanyi

    2013-07-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) may be useful as a therapeutic source of cells for the production of healthy tissue; however, they are associated with certain challenges including immunorejection as well as ethical issues. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising substitute since a patient's own adult cells would serve as tissue precursors. Ethical concerns prevent a full evaluation of the developmental potency of human ESCs and iPSCs, therefore, mouse iPSC models are required for protocol development and safety assessments. We used a modified culturing protocol to differentiate pluripotent cells from a mouse iPS cell line and two mouse ES cell lines into neurons. Our results indicated that all three pluripotent stem cell lines underwent nearly the same differentiation process when induced to form neurons in vitro. Genomic expression microarray profiling and single-cell RT-qPCR were used to analyze the neural lineage differentiation process, and more than one thousand differentially expressed genes involved in multiple molecular processes relevant to neural development were identified.

  7. Current Challenges and Future Directions in Recombinant AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Takashi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2013-01-01

    Various characteristics of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors with long-term safe expression have made it an exciting transduction tool for clinical gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although host immune reactions against the vector as well as transgene products were detected in some instances of the clinical studies, there have been promising observations. Methods of producing AAV vectors for considerable in vivo experimentation and clinical investigations have been developed and a number of studies with AAV vector-mediated muscle transduction were attempted. Notably, an intravenous limb perfusion transduction technique enables extensive transgene expression in the skeletal muscles without noticeable adverse events. Furthermore, cardiac transduction by the rAAV9-microdystrophin would be promising to prevent development of cardiac dysfunction. Recent achievements in transduction technology suggest that long-term transgene expression with therapeutic benefits in DMD treatment would be achieved by the rAAV-mediated transduction strategy with an adequate regimen to regulate host immune response. PMID:24276316

  8. The effect of the introduction of exogenous strain Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans A01 on functional gene expression, structure and function of indigenous consortium during pyrite bioleaching.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Yin, Huaqun; Zeng, Weimin; Liang, Yili; Liu, Yao; Baba, Ngom; Qiu, Guanzhou; Shen, Li; Fu, Xian; Liu, Xueduan

    2011-09-01

    Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans A01 was added to a consortium of bioleaching bacteria including Acidithiobacilluscaldus, Leptospirillumferriphilum, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, Acidiphilium spp., and Ferroplasma thermophilum cultured in modified 9 K medium containing 0.5% (w/v) pyrite, and 10.7% increase of bioleaching rate was observed. Changes in community structure and gene expression were monitored with real-time PCR and functional gene arrays (FGAs). Real-time PCR showed that addition of At. thiooxidans caused increased numbers of all consortium members except At. caldus, and At. caldus, L. ferriphilum, and F. thermophilum remained dominant in this community. FGAs results showed that after addition of At. thiooxidans, most genes involved in iron, sulfur, carbon, and nitrogen metabolisms, metal resistance, electron transport, and extracellular polymeric substances of L. ferriphilum, F. thermophilum, and Acidiphilium spp., were up-regulated while most of these genes were down-regulated at 70-78 h in At. caldus and up-regulated in At. ferrooxidans, then down-regulated at 82-86 h.

  9. The Drosophila planar polarity gene multiple wing hairs directly regulates the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuheng; Schafer, Dorothy A; Adler, Paul N

    2015-07-15

    The evolutionarily conserved frizzled/starry night (fz/stan) pathway regulates planar cell polarity (PCP) in vertebrates and invertebrates. This pathway has been extensively studied in the Drosophila wing, where it is manifested by an array of distally pointing cuticular hairs. Using in vivo imaging we found that, early in hair growth, cells have multiple actin bundles and hairs that subsequently fuse into a single growing hair. The downstream PCP gene multiple wing hairs (mwh) plays a key role in this process and acts to antagonize the actin cytoskeleton. In mwh mutants hair initiation is not limited to a small region at the distal edge of pupal wing cells as in wild type, resulting in multiple hairs with aberrant polarity. Extra actin bundles/hairs are formed and do not completely fuse, in contrast to wild type. As development proceeded additional hairs continued to form, further increasing hair number. We identified a fragment of Mwh with in vivo rescue activity and that bound and bundled F-actin filaments and inhibited actin polymerization in in vitro actin assays. The loss of these activities can explain the mwh mutant phenotype. Our data suggest a model whereby, prior to hair initiation, proximally localized Mwh inhibits actin polymerization resulting in polarized activation of the cytoskeleton and hair formation on the distal side of wing cells. During hair growth Mwh is found in growing hairs, where we suggest it functions to promote the fusion of actin bundles and inhibit the formation of additional actin bundles that could lead to extra hairs.

  10. Establishing a novel single-copy primer-internal intron-spanning PCR (spiPCR) procedure for the direct detection of gene doping.

    PubMed

    Beiter, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martina; Fragasso, Annunziata; Armeanu, Sorin; Lauer, Ulrich M; Bitzer, Michael; Su, Hua; Young, William L; Niess, Andreas M; Simon, Perikles

    2008-01-01

    So far, the abuse of gene transfer technology in sport, so-called gene doping, is undetectable. However, recent studies in somatic gene therapy indicate that long-term presence of transgenic DNA (tDNA) following various gene transfer protocols can be found in DNA isolated from whole blood using conventional PCR protocols. Application of these protocols for the direct detection of gene doping would require almost complete knowledge about the sequence of the genetic information that has been transferred. Here, we develop and describe the novel single-copy primer-internal intron-spanning PCR (spiPCR) procedure that overcomes this difficulty. Apart from the interesting perspectives that this spiPCR procedure offers in the fight against gene doping, this technology could also be of interest in biodistribution and biosafety studies for gene therapeutic applications. PMID:19203085

  11. Establishing a novel single-copy primer-internal intron-spanning PCR (spiPCR) procedure for the direct detection of gene doping.

    PubMed

    Beiter, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martina; Fragasso, Annunziata; Armeanu, Sorin; Lauer, Ulrich M; Bitzer, Michael; Su, Hua; Young, William L; Niess, Andreas M; Simon, Perikles

    2008-01-01

    So far, the abuse of gene transfer technology in sport, so-called gene doping, is undetectable. However, recent studies in somatic gene therapy indicate that long-term presence of transgenic DNA (tDNA) following various gene transfer protocols can be found in DNA isolated from whole blood using conventional PCR protocols. Application of these protocols for the direct detection of gene doping would require almost complete knowledge about the sequence of the genetic information that has been transferred. Here, we develop and describe the novel single-copy primer-internal intron-spanning PCR (spiPCR) procedure that overcomes this difficulty. Apart from the interesting perspectives that this spiPCR procedure offers in the fight against gene doping, this technology could also be of interest in biodistribution and biosafety studies for gene therapeutic applications.

  12. Enrichment of provitamin A content in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by introduction of the bacterial carotenoid biosynthetic genes CrtB and CrtI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Zeng, Jian; Li, Yin; Hu, Wei; Chen, Ling; Miao, Yingjie; Deng, Pengyi; Yuan, Cuihong; Ma, Cheng; Chen, Xi; Zang, Mingli; Wang, Qiong; Li, Kexiu; Chang, Junli; Wang, Yuesheng; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2014-06-01

    Carotenoid content is a primary determinant of wheat nutritional value and affects its end-use quality. Wheat grains contain very low carotenoid levels and trace amounts of provitamin A content. In order to enrich the carotenoid content in wheat grains, the bacterial phytoene synthase gene (CrtB) and carotene desaturase gene (CrtI) were transformed into the common wheat cultivar Bobwhite. Expression of CrtB or CrtI alone slightly increased the carotenoid content in the grains of transgenic wheat, while co-expression of both genes resulted in a darker red/yellow grain phenotype, accompanied by a total carotenoid content increase of approximately 8-fold achieving 4.76 μg g(-1) of seed dry weight, a β-carotene increase of 65-fold to 3.21 μg g(-1) of seed dry weight, and a provitamin A content (sum of α-carotene, β-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin) increase of 76-fold to 3.82 μg g(-1) of seed dry weight. The high provitamin A content in the transgenic wheat was stably inherited over four generations. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that enhancement of provitamin A content in transgenic wheat was also a result of the highly coordinated regulation of endogenous carotenoid biosynthetic genes, suggesting a metabolic feedback regulation in the wheat carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. These transgenic wheat lines are not only valuable for breeding wheat varieties with nutritional benefits for human health but also for understanding the mechanism regulating carotenoid biosynthesis in wheat endosperm.

  13. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Eucalyptus globulus using explants with shoot apex with introduction of bacterial choline oxidase gene to enhance salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Etsuko; Nanto, Kazuya; Oishi, Masatoshi; Ebinuma, Hiroyasu; Morishita, Yoshihiko; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Shimada, Teruhisa

    2012-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus is one of the most economically important plantation hardwoods for paper making. However, its low transformation frequency has prevented genetic engineering of this species with useful genes. We found the hypocotyl section with a shoot apex has the highest regeneration ability among another hypocotyl sections, and have developed an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method using these materials. We then introduced a salt tolerance gene, namely a bacterial choline oxidase gene (codA) with a GUS reporter gene, into E. globulus. The highest frequency of transgenic shoot regeneration from hypocotyls with shoot apex was 7.4% and the average frequency in four experiments was 4.0%, 12-fold higher than that from hypocotyls without shoot apex. Using about 10,000 explants, over 250 regenerated buds were confirmed as transformants by GUS analysis. Southern blot analysis of 100 elongated shoots confirmed successful generation of stable transformants. Accumulation of glycinebetaine was investigated in 44 selected transgenic lines, which showed 1- to 12-fold higher glycinebetaine levels than non-transgenic controls. Rooting of 16 transgenic lines was successful using a photoautotrophic method under enrichment with 1,000 ppm CO(2). The transgenic whole plantlets were transplanted into potting soil and grown normally in a growth room. They showed salt tolerance to 300 mM NaCl. The points of our system are using explants with shoot apex as materials, inhibiting the elongation of the apex on the selection medium, and regenerating transgenic buds from the side opposite to the apex. This approach may also solve transformation problems in other important plants.

  14. Efficient gene targeting by homology-directed repair in rat zygotes using TALE nucleases.

    PubMed

    Remy, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Menoret, Séverine; Usal, Claire; De Cian, Anne; Thepenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Baron, Daniel; Charpentier, Marine; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Buelow, Roland; Cost, Gregory J; Giovannangeli, Carine; Fraichard, Alexandre; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    The generation of genetically modified animals is important for both research and commercial purposes. The rat is an important model organism that until recently lacked efficient genetic engineering tools. Sequence-specific nucleases, such as ZFNs, TALE nucleases, and CRISPR/Cas9 have allowed the creation of rat knockout models. Genetic engineering by homology-directed repair (HDR) is utilized to create animals expressing transgenes in a controlled way and to introduce precise genetic modifications. We applied TALE nucleases and donor DNA microinjection into zygotes to generate HDR-modified rats with large new sequences introduced into three different loci with high efficiency (0.62%-5.13% of microinjected zygotes). Two of these loci (Rosa26 and Hprt1) are known to allow robust and reproducible transgene expression and were targeted for integration of a GFP expression cassette driven by the CAG promoter. GFP-expressing embryos and four Rosa26 GFP rat lines analyzed showed strong and widespread GFP expression in most cells of all analyzed tissues. The third targeted locus was Ighm, where we performed successful exon exchange of rat exon 2 for the human one. At all three loci we observed HDR only when using linear and not circular donor DNA. Mild hypothermic (30°C) culture of zygotes after microinjection increased HDR efficiency for some loci. Our study demonstrates that TALE nuclease and donor DNA microinjection into rat zygotes results in efficient and reproducible targeted donor integration by HDR. This allowed creation of genetically modified rats in a work-, cost-, and time-effective manner.

  15. Introduction of Pea DNA Helicase 45 Into Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. Hybrid) Enhances Cell Membrane Thermostability And Upregulation Of Stress-responsive Genes Leads To Abiotic Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Sruthy Maria; Ashwin Narayan, J; Syamaladevi, Divya P; Appunu, C; Chakravarthi, M; Ravichandran, V; Tuteja, Narendra; Subramonian, N

    2015-05-01

    DNA helicases are motor proteins that play an essential role in nucleic acid metabolism, by providing a duplex-unwinding function. To improve the drought and salinity tolerance of sugarcane, a DEAD-box helicase gene isolated from pea with a constitutive promoter, Port Ubi 2.3 was transformed into the commercial sugarcane variety Co 86032 through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and the transgenics were screened for tolerance to soil moisture stress and salinity. The transgene integration was confirmed through polymerase chain reaction, and the V 0 transgenic events showed significantly higher cell membrane thermostability under normal irrigated conditions. The V 1 transgenic events were screened for tolerance to soil moisture stress and exhibited significantly higher cell membrane thermostability, transgene expression, relative water content, gas exchange parameters, chlorophyll content, and photosynthetic efficiency under soil moisture stress compared to wild-type (WT). The overexpression of PDH45 transgenic sugarcane also led to the upregulation of DREB2-induced downstream stress-related genes. The transgenic events demonstrated higher germination ability and better chlorophyll retention than WT under salinity stress. Our results suggest the possibility for development of increased abiotic stress tolerant sugarcane cultivars through overexpression of PDH45 gene. Perhaps this is the first report, which provides evidence for increased drought and salinity tolerance in sugarcane through overexpression of PDH45.

  16. Direct genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii from amniotic fluids based on B1 gene polymorphism using minisequencing analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Because some Toxoplasma gondii genotypes may be more virulent in pregnant women, discriminating between them appears valuable. Currently, the main genotyping method is based on single copy microsatellite markers, which limit direct genotyping from amniotic fluids (AFs) to samples with a high parasitic load. We investigated whether the multicopy gene B1 could type the parasite with a higher sensitivity. To estimate the amplifiable DNA present in AFs, we first compared three different PCR assays used for Toxoplasma infection diagnosis: the P30-PCR, targeting the single copy gene P30; the B1-PCR, targeting the repeated B1 gene; and RE-PCR, targeting the repeated element. Results Of the 1792 AFs analyzed between 2008 and 2011, 73 were RE-PCR positive. Of those, 49 (67.1%) were P30-PCR and B1-PCR positive, and 14 (19.2%) additional AFs were B1-PCR positive only. All 63 BI-positive AFs (France n = 49; overseas n = 14) could be genotyped based on an analysis of eight nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within the B1 gene. Following high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, minisequencing was carried out for each of the eight SNPs. DNA from six reference strains was included in the study, and AFs were assigned to one of the three major lineages (Types I, II, and III). In total, 26 genotypes were observed, and the hierarchical clustering distinguished two clades in lineages II (IIa, n = 30 and IIb, n = 4) and III (IIIa n = 23 and IIIb n = 6). There was an overrepresentation of overseas isolates in Clade IIb (4/4, 100%) and Clade IIIa (8/22; 36.4%) (p <0.0001), whereas medical interruption and fetal death were overrepresented in Clade IIb (2/4, 50%) and Clade IIIa (4/23, 17.4%) (p = 0.049). Conclusions Although the current genotyping system cannot pretend to replace multilocus typing, we clearly show that targeting the multicopy B1 gene yields a genotyping capacity of AFs around 20% better than when single copy targets are used. The

  17. Improved production of homo-D-lactic acid via xylose fermentation by introduction of xylose assimilation genes and redirection of the phosphoketolase pathway to the pentose phosphate pathway in L-Lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Yoshida, Shogo; Yamada, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-12-01

    The production of optically pure d-lactic acid via xylose fermentation was achieved by using a Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 strain whose l-lactate dehydrogenase gene was deficient and whose phosphoketolase genes were replaced with a heterologous transketolase gene. After 60 h of fermentation, 41.2 g/liter of d-lactic acid was produced from 50 g/liter of xylose.

  18. Parole terms for a killer: directing caspase3/CAD induced DNA strand breaks to coordinate changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Brian D; Megeney, Lynn A

    2010-08-01

    In a series of discoveries over the preceding decade, a number of laboratories have unequivocally established that apoptotic proteins and pathways are well conserved cell fate determinants, which act independent of a cell death response. Within this context, the role for apoptotic proteins in the induction of cell differentiation has been widely documented. Despite these discoveries, little information has been forthcoming regarding a conserved mechanism by which apoptotic proteins achieve this non-death outcome. In the following discussion, we will explore the premise that the penultimate step in apoptosis, genome wide DNA damage/strand breaks act as a conserved genomic reprogramming event necessary for cell differentiation (Larsen et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2010; 107:4230-5). Moreover, we hypothesis that directed DNA damage, as mediated by known apoptotic proteins, may participate in numerous forms of regulated gene expression.

  19. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP encoded by the mammalian rapgef3 gene: Structure, function and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Upasana; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-10-10

    Mammalian exchange protein directly activated by cAMP isoform 1 (EPAC1), encoded by the RAPGEF3 gene, is one of the two-membered family of cAMP sensors that mediate the intracellular functions of cAMP by acting as guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Ras-like Rap small GTPases. Extensive studies have revealed that EPAC1-mediated cAMP signaling is highly coordinated spatiotemporally through the formation of dynamic signalosomes by interacting with a diverse array of cellular partners. Recent functional analyses of genetically engineered mouse models further suggest that EPAC1 functions as an important stress response switch and is involved in pathophysiological conditions of cardiac stresses, chronic pain, cancer and infectious diseases. These findings, coupled with the development of EPAC specific small molecule modulators, validate EPAC1 as a promising target for therapeutic interventions.

  20. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP encoded by the mammalian rapgef3 gene: Structure, function and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Upasana; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian exchange protein directly activated by cAMP isoform 1 (EPAC1), encoded by the RAPGEF3 gene, is one of the two-membered family of cAMP sensors that mediate the intracellular functions of cAMP by acting as guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Ras-like Rap small GTPases. Extensive studies have revealed that EPAC1-mediated cAMP signaling is highly coordinated spatiotemporally through the formation of dynamic signalosomes by interacting with a diverse array of cellular partners. Recent functional analyses of genetically engineered mouse models further suggest that EPAC1 functions as an important stress response switch and is involved in pathophysiological conditions of cardiac stresses, chronic pain, cancer and infectious diseases. These findings, coupled with the development of EPAC specific small molecule modulators, validate EPAC1 as a promising target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26119090

  1. Direct detection and differentiation of pathogenic Leptospira species using a multi-gene targeted real time PCR approach.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Sofia; Costa, Pedro; Rocha, Teresa; Amaro, Ana; Vieira, Maria Luísa; Ahmed, Ahmed; Thompson, Gertrude; Hartskeerl, Rudy A; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a growing public and veterinary health concern caused by pathogenic species of Leptospira. Rapid and reliable laboratory tests for the direct detection of leptospiral infections in animals are in high demand not only to improve diagnosis but also for understanding the epidemiology of the disease. In this work we describe a novel and simple TaqMan-based multi-gene targeted real-time PCR approach able to detect and differentiate Leptospira interrogans, L. kirschneri, L. borgpeteresenii and L. noguchii, which constitute the veterinary most relevant pathogenic species of Leptospira. The method uses sets of species-specific probes, and respective flanking primers, designed from ompL1 and secY gene sequences. To monitor the presence of inhibitors, a duplex amplification assay targeting both the mammal β-actin and the leptospiral lipL32 genes was implemented. The analytical sensitivity of all primer and probe sets was estimated to be <10 genome equivalents (GE) in the reaction mixture. Application of the amplification reactions on genomic DNA from a variety of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leptospira strains and other non-related bacteria revealed a 100% analytical specificity. Additionally, pathogenic leptospires were successfully detected in five out of 29 tissue samples from animals (Mus spp., Rattus spp., Dolichotis patagonum and Sus domesticus). Two samples were infected with L. borgpetersenii, two with L. interrogans and one with L. kirschneri. The possibility to detect and identify these pathogenic agents to the species level in domestic and wildlife animals reinforces the diagnostic information and will enhance our understanding of the epidemiology of leptopirosis. PMID:25398140

  2. Nicotiana tabacum EIL2 directly regulates expression of at least one tobacco gene induced by sulphur starvation.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, Anna; Lewandowska, Małgorzata; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2010-03-01

    Sulphur deficiency severely affects plant growth and their agricultural productivity leading to diverse changes in development and metabolisms. Molecular mechanisms regulating gene expression under low sulphur conditions remain largely unknown. AtSLIM1, a member of the EIN3-like (EIL) family was reported to be a central transcriptional regulator of the plant sulphur response, however, no direct interaction of this protein with any sulphur-responsive promoters was demonstrated. The focus of this study was on the analysis of a promoter region of UP9C, a tobacco gene strongly induced by sulphur limitation. Cloning and subsequent examination of this promoter resulted in the identification of a 20-nt sequence (UPE-box), also present in the promoters of several Arabidopsis genes, including three out of four homologues of UP9C. The UPE-box, consisting of two parallel tebs sequences (TEIL binding site), proved to be necessary to bind the transcription factors belonging to the EIL family and of a 5-nt conserved sequence at the 3'-end. The yeast one-hybrid analysis resulted in the identification of one transcription factor (NtEIL2) capable of binding to the UPE-box. The interactions of NtEIL2, and its homologue from Arabidopsis, AtSLIM1, with DNA were affected by mutations within the UPE-box. Transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana have further shown that both factors, NtEIL2 and AtSLIM1, activate the UP9C promoter. Interestingly, activation by NtEIL2, but not by AtSLIM1, was dependent on the sulphur-deficiency of the plants.

  3. Site-directed mutations reveal long-range compensatory interactions in the Adh gene of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Parsch, John; Tanda, Soichi; Stephan, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    Long-range interactions between the 5′ and 3′ ends of mRNA molecules have been suggested to play a role in the initiation of translation and the regulation of gene expression. To identify such interactions and to study their molecular evolution, we used phylogenetic analysis to generate a model of mRNA higher-order structure in the Adh transcript of Drosophila melanogaster. This model predicts long-range, tertiary contacts between a region of the protein-encoding sequence just downstream of the start codon and a conserved sequence in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR). To further examine the proposed structure, site-directed mutations were generated in vitro in a cloned D. melanogaster Adh gene, and the mutant constructs were introduced into the Drosophila germ line through P-element mediated transformation. Transformants were spectrophotometrically assayed for alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Our results indicate that transformants containing a silent mutation near the start of the protein-encoding sequence show an ≈15% reduction in alcohol dehydrogenase activity relative to wild-type transformants. This activity can be restored to wild-type levels by a second, compensatory mutation in the 3′ UTR. These observations are consistent with a higher-order structure model that includes long-range interactions between the 5′ and 3′ ends of the Adh mRNA. However, our results do not fit the classical compensatory substitution model because the second mutation by itself (in the 3′ UTR) did not show a measurable reduction in gene expression. PMID:9023359

  4. Direct Detection and Differentiation of Pathogenic Leptospira Species Using a Multi-Gene Targeted Real Time PCR Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ana Sofia; Costa, Pedro; Rocha, Teresa; Amaro, Ana; Vieira, Maria Luísa; Ahmed, Ahmed; Thompson, Gertrude; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a growing public and veterinary health concern caused by pathogenic species of Leptospira. Rapid and reliable laboratory tests for the direct detection of leptospiral infections in animals are in high demand not only to improve diagnosis but also for understanding the epidemiology of the disease. In this work we describe a novel and simple TaqMan-based multi-gene targeted real-time PCR approach able to detect and differentiate Leptospira interrogans, L. kirschneri, L. borgpeteresenii and L. noguchii, which constitute the veterinary most relevant pathogenic species of Leptospira. The method uses sets of species-specific probes, and respective flanking primers, designed from ompL1 and secY gene sequences. To monitor the presence of inhibitors, a duplex amplification assay targeting both the mammal β-actin and the leptospiral lipL32 genes was implemented. The analytical sensitivity of all primer and probe sets was estimated to be <10 genome equivalents (GE) in the reaction mixture. Application of the amplification reactions on genomic DNA from a variety of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leptospira strains and other non-related bacteria revealed a 100% analytical specificity. Additionally, pathogenic leptospires were successfully detected in five out of 29 tissue samples from animals (Mus spp., Rattus spp., Dolichotis patagonum and Sus domesticus). Two samples were infected with L. borgpetersenii, two with L. interrogans and one with L. kirschneri. The possibility to detect and identify these pathogenic agents to the species level in domestic and wildlife animals reinforces the diagnostic information and will enhance our understanding of the epidemiology of leptopirosis. PMID:25398140

  5. Production of herbicide-resistant transgenic Panax ginseng through the introduction of the phosphinothricin acetyl transferase gene and successful soil transfer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y E; Jeong, J H; In, J K; Yang, D C

    2003-02-01

    Herbicide-resistant transgenic Panax ginseng plants were produced by introducing the phosphinothricin acetyl transferase (PAT) gene that confers resistance to the herbicide Basta (bialaphos) through Agrobacterium tumefaciens co-cultivation. Embryogenic callus gathered from cotyledon explants of P. ginseng were pre-treated with 0.5 M sucrose or 0.05 M MgSO(4 )before Agrobacterium infection. This pre-treatment process markedly enhanced the transient expression of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene. Embryogenic callus was initially cultured on MS medium supplemented with 400 mg/l cefotaxime for 3 weeks and subsequently subcultured five times to a medium containing 25 mg/l kanamycin and 300 mg/l cefotaxime. Somatic embryos formed on the surfaces of kanamycin-resistant callus. Upon development into the cotyledonary stage, these somatic embryos were transferred to a medium containing 50 mg/l kanamycin and 5 mg/l gibberellic acid to induce germination and strong selection. Integration of the transgene into the plants was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and Southern analyses. Transfer of the transgenic ginseng plantlets to soil was successfully accomplished via acclimatization in autoclaved perlite. Not all of the plantlets survived in soil that had not been autoclaved because of fungal infection, particularly in the region between the roots and leaves. Transgenic plants growing in soil were observed to be strongly resistant to Basta application. PMID:12789431

  6. Rapid and efficient introduction of a foreign gene into bacterial artificial chromosome-cloned varicella vaccine by Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition

    SciTech Connect

    Somboonthum, Pranee; Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Shigefumi; Matsuura, Masaaki; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Michiaki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2010-06-20

    Using a rapid and reliable system based on Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition, we have successfully constructed a recombinant Oka varicella vaccine (vOka) expressing the mumps virus (MuV) fusion protein (F). The backbone of the vector was our previously reported vOka-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) genome. We inserted the transposon Tn7 attachment sequence, LacZ{alpha}-mini-attTn7, into the region between ORF12 and ORF13 to generate a vOka-BAC-Tn genome. The MuV-F expressing cassette was transposed into the vOka-BAC genome at the mini-attTn7 transposition site. MuV-F protein was expressed in recombinant virus, rvOka-F infected cells. In addition, the MuV-F protein was cleaved in the rvOka-F infected cells as in MuV-infected cells. The growth of rvOka-F was similar to that of the original recombinant vOka without the F gene. Thus, we show that Tn7-mediated transposition is an efficient method for introducing a foreign gene expression cassette into the vOka-BAC genome as a live virus vector.

  7. Introduction of a citrus blight-associated gene into Carrizo citrange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbc. x Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.] by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Kayim, M; Ceccardi, T L; Berretta, M J G; Barthe, G A; Derrick, K S

    2004-11-01

    The protein p12 accumulates in leaves of trees with citrus blight (CB), a serious decline of unknown cause. The function of p12 is not known, but sequence analysis indicates it may be related to expansins. In studies to determine the function of p12, sense and antisense constructs were used to make transgenic Carrizo citrange using an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system. Homogeneous beta-glucuronidase+ (GUS+) sense and antisense transgenic shoots were regenerated using kanamycin as a selective agent. Twenty-five sense and 45 antisense transgenic shoots were in vivo grafted onto Carrizo citrange for further analyses. In addition, 20 sense and 18 antisense shoots were rooted. The homogeneous GUS+ plants contained either the p12 sense or antisense gene (without the intron associated with the gene in untransformed citrus) as shown by PCR and Southern blotting. Northern blots showed the expected RNA in the sense and antisense plants. A protein of identical size and immunoreactivity was observed in seven of nine sense plants but not in nine antisense or non-transgenic plants. At the current stage of growth, there are no visual phenotypic differences between the transgenic and non-transgenic plants. Selected plants will be budded with sweet orange for field evaluation for resistance or susceptibility to CB and general rootstock performance.

  8. Production of human growth hormone in transgenic rice seeds: co-introduction of RNA interference cassette for suppressing the gene expression of endogenous storage proteins.

    PubMed

    Shigemitsu, Takanari; Ozaki, Shinji; Saito, Yuhi; Kuroda, Masaharu; Morita, Shigeto; Satoh, Shigeru; Masumura, Takehiro

    2012-03-01

    Rice seeds are potentially useful hosts for the production of pharmaceutical proteins. However, low yields of recombinant proteins have been observed in many cases because recombinant proteins compete with endogenous storage proteins. Therefore, we attempt to suppress endogenous seed storage proteins by RNA interference (RNAi) to develop rice seeds as a more efficient protein expression system. In this study, human growth hormone (hGH) was expressed in transgenic rice seeds using an endosperm-specific promoter from a 10 kDa rice prolamin gene. In addition, an RNAi cassette for reduction of endogenous storage protein expressions was inserted into the hGH expression construct. Using this system, the expression levels of 13 kDa prolamin and glutelin were effectively suppressed and hGH polypeptides accumulated to 470 μg/g dry weight at the maximum level in transgenic rice seeds. These results suggest that the suppression of endogenous protein gene expression by RNAi could be of great utility for increasing transgene products.

  9. Multiple introductions of a reassortant H5N1 avian influenza virus of clade 2.3.2.1c with PB2 gene of H9N2 subtype into Indian poultry.

    PubMed

    Tosh, Chakradhar; Nagarajan, Shanmugasundaram; Kumar, Manoj; Murugkar, Harshad V; Venkatesh, Govindarajulu; Shukla, Shweta; Mishra, Amit; Mishra, Pranav; Agarwal, Sonam; Singh, Bharati; Dubey, Prashant; Tripathi, Sushil; Kulkarni, Diwakar D

    2016-09-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses are a threat to poultry in Asia, Europe, Africa and North America. Here, we report isolation and characterization of H5N1 viruses isolated from ducks and turkeys in Kerala, Chandigarh and Uttar Pradesh, India between November 2014 and March 2015. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of haemagglutinin gene identified that the virus belonged to a new clade 2.3.2.1c which has not been detected earlier in Indian poultry. The virus possessed molecular signature for high pathogenicity to chickens, which was corroborated by intravenous pathogenicity index of 2.96. The virus was a reassortant which derives its PB2 gene from H9N2 virus isolated in China during 2007-2013. However, the neuraminidase and internal genes are of H5N1 subtype. Phylogenetic and network analysis revealed that after detection in China in 2013/2014, the virus moved to Europe, West Africa and other Asian countries including India. The analyses further indicated multiple introductions of H5N1 virus in Indian poultry and internal spread in Kerala. One of the outbreaks in ducks in Kerala is linked to the H5N1 virus isolated from wild birds in Dubai suggesting movement of virus probably through migration of wild birds. However, the outbreaks in ducks in Chandigarh and Uttar Pradesh were from an unknown source in Asia which also contributed gene pools to the outbreaks in Europe and West Africa. The widespread incidence of the novel H5N1 HPAI is similar to the spread of clade 2.2 ("Qinghai-like") virus in 2005, and should be monitored to avoid threat to animal and public health. PMID:27174088

  10. Introduction to metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mody, Vicky V; Siwale, Rodney; Singh, Ajay; Mody, Hardik R

    2010-10-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have fascinated scientist for over a century and are now heavily utilized in biomedical sciences and engineering. They are a focus of interest because of their huge potential in nanotechnology. Today these materials can be synthesized and modified with various chemical functional groups which allow them to be conjugated with antibodies, ligands, and drugs of interest and thus opening a wide range of potential applications in biotechnology, magnetic separation, and preconcentration of target analytes, targeted drug delivery, and vehicles for gene and drug delivery and more importantly diagnostic imaging. Moreover, various imaging modalities have been developed over the period of time such as MRI, CT, PET, ultrasound, SERS, and optical imaging as an aid to image various disease states. These imaging modalities differ in both techniques and instrumentation and more importantly require a contrast agent with unique physiochemical properties. This led to the invention of various nanoparticulated contrast agent such as magnetic nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4)), gold, and silver nanoparticles for their application in these imaging modalities. In addition, to use various imaging techniques in tandem newer multifunctional nanoshells and nanocages have been developed. Thus in this review article, we aim to provide an introduction to magnetic nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4)), gold nanoparticles, nanoshells and nanocages, and silver nanoparticles followed by their synthesis, physiochemical properties, and citing some recent applications in the diagnostic imaging and therapy of cancer. PMID:21180459

  11. Introduction to metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Vicky V.; Siwale, Rodney; Singh, Ajay; Mody, Hardik R.

    2010-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have fascinated scientist for over a century and are now heavily utilized in biomedical sciences and engineering. They are a focus of interest because of their huge potential in nanotechnology. Today these materials can be synthesized and modified with various chemical functional groups which allow them to be conjugated with antibodies, ligands, and drugs of interest and thus opening a wide range of potential applications in biotechnology, magnetic separation, and preconcentration of target analytes, targeted drug delivery, and vehicles for gene and drug delivery and more importantly diagnostic imaging. Moreover, various imaging modalities have been developed over the period of time such as MRI, CT, PET, ultrasound, SERS, and optical imaging as an aid to image various disease states. These imaging modalities differ in both techniques and instrumentation and more importantly require a contrast agent with unique physiochemical properties. This led to the invention of various nanoparticulated contrast agent such as magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4), gold, and silver nanoparticles for their application in these imaging modalities. In addition, to use various imaging techniques in tandem newer multifunctional nanoshells and nanocages have been developed. Thus in this review article, we aim to provide an introduction to magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4), gold nanoparticles, nanoshells and nanocages, and silver nanoparticles followed by their synthesis, physiochemical properties, and citing some recent applications in the diagnostic imaging and therapy of cancer. PMID:21180459

  12. Subtropical atlantic climate studies: introduction.

    PubMed

    Molinari, R L; Maul, G A; Chew, F; Wilson, W D; Busheell, M; Mayer, D; Leaman, K; Schott, F; Lee, T; Zantopp, R; Larsen, J C; Sanford, T B

    1985-01-18

    This report is an introduction to the accompanying collection of reports that present the results of a 2-year period of intensive monitoring of the Florida Current. Both direct observing systems (ship-deployed current profilers and moored current meters) and indirect observing systems (coastal tide gauge stations, bottom pressure gauge arrays, a submarine cable, acoustic arrays, and radar installations) were used to measure temperature and volume transport. PMID:17742098

  13. Introduction to deployable recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.

    1985-08-01

    This report provides an introduction to deployable recovery systems for persons with little or no background in parachutes but who are knowledgeable in aerodynamics. A historical review of parachute development is given along with a description of the basic components of most deployable recovery systems. Descriptions are given of the function of each component and of problems that occur if a component fails to perform adequately. Models are presented for deployable recovery systems. Possible directions for future work are suggested in the summary.

  14. Direct determination of lead isotopes (206Pb, 207Pb, 208Pb) in arctic ice samples at picogram per gram levels using inductively coupled plasma-sector field MS coupled with a high-efficiency sample introduction system.

    PubMed

    Krachler, Michael; Zheng, James; Fisher, David; Shotyk, William

    2004-09-15

    Adopting strict cleanroom procedures, ice samples from the Canadian High Arctic have been analyzed for Pb concentrations and Pb isotopes (206Pb, 207Pb, 208Pb) using ICP-SMS. The detection limit for Pb (0.06 pg g(-1)) was approximately 2 orders of magnitude lower than the lowest concentration of Pb in the ice samples (range, 4.3-1660 pg g(-1); median, 45 pg g(-1)). Acidification of ice samples with high-purity HNO3 for stabilization purposes contributed only 0.004 pg of Pb g(-1), which is an insignificant source of Pb. Using a new sample introduction system consisting of a heated (140 degrees C) minicyclonic spray chamber and a Peltier cooled condenser (2 degrees C) and by replacing the conventional sample cone with a high-performance cone, signal intensities for Pb were increased by approximately 1 order of magnitude. Thus, it was possible not only to measure Pb isotope ratios directly using ICP-SMS but also to achieve reasonable precision (approximately 0.2%) at low picogram per gram concentrations of total Pb. This precision is comparable to that achievable by thermal ionization mass spectrometry at such low Pb concentrations, but the ICP-SMS requires much less sample volume (approximately 2 mL), needs no sample pretreatment, and therefore is considerably faster and less expensive than the conventional approach. Even though absolute Pb concentrations in two ice samples dating from 1974 and 1852 were very similar (9 and 6 pg g(-1)) their fundamentally different isotopic signature (206Pb/207Pb: 1.169 +/- 0.002 vs 1.147 +/- 0.003) clearly indicates different sources of Pb. The analytical procedures described here, therefore, offer great promise for fingerprinting the predominant sources of atmospheric Pb in polar snow and ice.

  15. Three members of the human pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase gene family are direct targets of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta.

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Tatjana; Saramäki, Anna; Malinen, Marjo; Rieck, Markus; Väisänen, Sami; Huotari, Anne; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Müller, Rolf; Carlberg, Carsten

    2007-09-14

    The nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are known for their critical role in the metabolic syndrome. Here, we show that they are direct regulators of the family of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) genes, whose products act as metabolic homeostats in sensing hunger and satiety levels in key metabolic tissues by modulating the activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Mis-regulation of this tightly controlled network may lead to hyperglycemia. In human embryonal kidney cells we found the mRNA expression of PDK2, PDK3 and PDK4 to be under direct primary control of PPAR ligands, and in normal mouse kidney tissue Pdk2 and Pdk4 are PPAR targets. Both, treatment of HEK cells with PPARbeta/delta-specific siRNA and the genetic disruption of the Pparbeta/delta gene in mouse fibroblasts resulted in reduced expression of Pdk genes and abolition of induction by PPARbeta/delta ligands. These findings suggest that PPARbeta/delta is a key regulator of PDK genes, in particular the PDK4/Pdk4 gene. In silico analysis of the human PDK genes revealed two candidate PPAR response elements in the PDK2 gene, five in the PDK3 gene and two in the PDK4 gene, but none in the PDK1 gene. For seven of these sites we could demonstrate both PPARbeta/delta ligand responsiveness in context of their chromatin region and simultaneous association of PPARbeta/delta with its functional partner proteins, such as retinoidXreceptor, co-activator and mediator proteins and phosphorylated RNA polymerase II. In conclusion, PDK2, PDK3 and PDK4 are primary PPARbeta/delta target genes in humans underlining the importance of the receptor in the control of metabolism. PMID:17669420

  16. Increase in nervonic acid content in transformed yeast and transgenic plants by introduction of a Lunaria annua L. 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS) gene.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yiming; Mietkiewska, Elzbieta; Francis, Tammy; Katavic, Vesna; Brost, Jennifer M; Giblin, Michael; Barton, Dennis L; Taylor, David C

    2009-03-01

    Nervonic acid is a Very Long-Chain Monounsaturated Fatty Acid (VLCMFA), 24:1 Delta15 (cis-tetracos-15-enoic acid) found in the seed oils of Lunaria annua, borage, hemp, Acer (Purpleblow maple) and Tropaeolum speciosum (Flame flower). However, of these, only the "money plant" (Lunaria annua L.) has been studied and grown sparingly for future development as a niche crop and the outlook has been disappointing. Therefore, our goal was to isolate and characterize strategic new genes for high nervonic acid production in Brassica oilseed crops. To this end, we have isolated a VLCMFA-utilizing 3-Keto-Acyl-CoA Synthase (KCS; fatty acid elongase; EC 2.3.1.86) gene from Lunaria annua and functionally expressed it in yeast, with the recombinant KCS protein able to catalyze the synthesis of several VLCMFAs, including nervonic acid. Seed-specific expression of the Lunaria KCS in Arabidopsis resulted in a 30-fold increase in nervonic acid proportions in seed oils, compared to the very low quantities found in the wild-type. Similar transgenic experiments using B. carinata as the host resulted in a 7-10 fold increase in seed oil nervonic acid proportions. KCS enzyme activity assays indicated that upon using (14)C-22:1-CoA as substrate, the KCS activity from developing seeds of transgenic B. carinata was 20-30-fold higher than the low erucoyl-elongation activity exhibited by wild type control plants. There was a very good correlation between the Lun KCS transcript intensity and the resultant 22:1-CoA KCS activity in developing seed. The highest nervonic acid level in transgenic B. carinata expressing the Lunaria KCS reached 30%, compared to 2.8% in wild type plant. In addition, the erucic acid proportions in these transgenic lines were considerably lower than that found in native Lunaria oil. These results show the functional utility of the Lunaria KCS in engineering new sources of high nervonate/reduced erucic oils in the Brassicaceae. PMID:19082744

  17. A negatively acting DNA sequence element mediates phytochrome-directed repression of phyA gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, W B; Deng, X W; Quail, P H

    1991-01-01

    Phytochrome represses transcription of its own phyA genes within 5 min of light-triggered conversion to its active Pfr form. We have utilized microprojectile mediated gene transfer into etiolated rice seedlings to delineate sequence elements in the oat phyA3 promoter responsible for this regulation. Linker-scan mutagenesis of this promoter has identified two positive elements which together are necessary for maximal transcription in the absence of Pfr. These elements are designated PE1, centered at position -357 bp, and PE3, centered at position -96 bp. Sequence mutagenesis immediately downstream of PE3 results in maximal transcription in the presence of high Pfr levels, indicating that Pfr represses phyA3 transcription through a negatively acting sequence element. This element, designated RE1, with the sequence CATGGGCGCGG, encompasses a motif that is highly conserved in all monocot phyA promoters thus far characterized. DNase I protection analysis indicates that oat nuclear extracts contain multiple factors that bind to an array of sequence motifs, including PE1 and part of PE3, within 400 bp upstream of the oat phyA3 transcription start site. This DNA-binding pattern is not altered by Pfr. Weak binding to part of the RE1 motif is evident but also with no difference between high and low Pfr levels. We conclude that the signal transduction chain that mediates Pfr-directed repression of phyA3 transcription terminates with a negatively acting transcription factor that binds to the sequence element RE1. Images PMID:1915276

  18. Human Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein MRPL12 Interacts Directly with Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase to Modulate Mitochondrial Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhibo; Cotney, Justin; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2008-01-01

    The core human mitochondrial transcription machinery comprises a single subunit bacteriophage-related RNA polymerase, POLRMT, the high mobility group box DNA-binding protein h-mtTFA/TFAM, and two transcriptional co-activator proteins, h-mtTFB1 and h-mtTFB2 that also have rRNA methyltransferase activity. Recapitulation of specific initiation of transcription in vitro can be achieved by a complex of POLRMT, h-mtTFA, and either h-mtTFB1 or h-mtTFB2. However, the nature of mitochondrial transcription complexes in vivo and the potential involvement of additional proteins in the transcription process in human mitochondria have not been extensively investigated. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription and translation are physically coupled via the formation of a multiprotein complex nucleated by the binding of Nam1p to the amino-terminal domain of mtRNA polymerase (Rpo41p). This model system paradigm led us to search for proteins that interact with POLRMT to regulate mitochondrial gene expression in humans. Using an affinity capture strategy to identify POLRMT-binding proteins, we identified mitochondrial ribosomal protein L7/L12 (MRPL12) as a protein in HeLa mitochondrial extracts that interacts specifically with POLRMT in vitro. Purified recombinant MRPL12 binds to POLRMT and stimulates mitochondrial transcription activity in vitro, demonstrating that this interaction is both direct and functional. Finally, from HeLa cells that overexpress FLAG epitope-tagged MRPL12, increased steady-state levels of mtDNA-encoded transcripts are observed and MRPL12-POLRMT complexes can be co-immunoprecipitated, providing strong evidence that this interaction enhances mitochondrial transcription or RNA stability in vivo. We speculate that the MRPL12 interaction with POLRMT is likely part of a novel regulatory mechanism that coordinates mitochondrial transcription with translation and/or ribosome biogenesis during human mitochondrial gene expression. PMID:17337445

  19. Silk-Elastinlike Hydrogel Improves the Safety of Adenovirus-Mediated Gene-Directed Enzyme-Prodrug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Joshua A.; Price, Robert A.; Greish, Khaled; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant Silk-Elastinlike Protein polymers (SELPs) are well-known for their highly tunable properties on both the molecular and macroscopic hydrogel level. One specific structure of these polymers, SELP-815K, has been investigated as an injectable controlled delivery system for the treatment of head and neck cancer via a gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) approach. Due to its pore size and gelation properties in vivo, SELP restricts the distribution and controls the release of therapeutic viruses for up to one month. It has been shown that SELP-mediated delivery significantly improves therapeutic outcome of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV) system in xenograft models of human head and neck cancer. However little is known about potential benefits of this approach with regard to toxicity in the presence of a fully intact immune system. The studies presented here were designed to assess the change in toxicity of the SELP mediated viral delivery compared to free viral injection in a non-tumor bearing immune competent mouse model. Toxicity was assessed at 1, 2, 4, and 12 weeks via body weight monitoring, complete blood count (CBC), and blood chemistry. It was found that in the acute and subacute phases (weeks 1-4) there is significant toxicity in groups combining the virus and the prodrug, and matrix-mediated gene delivery with SELP demonstrates a reduction in toxicity from the 2 week time point through the 4 week time point. At the end of the subchronic phase (12 weeks), signs of toxicity had subsided in both groups. Based on these results, recombinant SELPs offer a significant reduction in toxicity of virus-mediated GDEPT treatment compared to free virus injection in the acute and subacute phases. PMID:20586469

  20. Gene array analysis of neural crest cells identifies transcription factors necessary for direct conversion of embryonic fibroblasts into neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Natsuki; Nishioka, Masahiro; Nakatake, Yuhki; Yulan, Piao; Mochizuki, Hiromi; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Ko, Minoru S. H.; Goshima, Naoki; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neural crest cells (NC cells) are multipotent cells that emerge from the edge of the neural folds and migrate throughout the developing embryo. Although the gene regulatory network for generation of NC cells has been elucidated in detail, it has not been revealed which of the factors in the network are pivotal to directing NC identity. In this study we analyzed the gene expression profile of a pure NC subpopulation isolated from Sox10-IRES-Venus mice and investigated whether these genes played a key role in the direct conversion of Sox10-IRES-Venus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into NC cells. The comparative molecular profiles of NC cells and neural tube cells in 9.5-day embryos revealed genes including transcription factors selectively expressed in developing trunk NC cells. Among 25 NC cell-specific transcription factor genes tested, SOX10 and SOX9 were capable of converting MEFs into SOX10-positive (SOX10+) cells. The SOX10+ cells were then shown to differentiate into neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts. These SOX10+ cells also showed limited self-renewal ability, suggesting that SOX10 and SOX9 directly converted MEFs into NC cells. Conversely, the remaining transcription factors, including well-known NC cell specifiers, were unable to convert MEFs into SOX10+ NC cells. These results suggest that SOX10 and SOX9 are the key factors necessary for the direct conversion of MEFs into NC cells. PMID:26873953

  1. Structure and evolution of CyI cytoplasmic actin-encoding genes in the indirect- and direct-developing sea urchins Heliocidaris tuberculata and Heliocidaris erythrogramma.

    PubMed

    Hahn, J H; Kissinger, J C; Raff, R A

    1995-02-14

    The CyI cytoplasmic actin-encoding genes of Heliocidaris erythrogramma (He), a direct-developing sea urchin, and H. tuberculata, an indirect developer, were isolated and compared to the homologous CyI gene of another indirect developer, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Comparisons show that despite the differences in development, the actin gene structures and sequences are highly similar. The coding and 3' untranslated regions are conserved. The 5' He regulatory region has an inserted repeat element, but is otherwise similar to its homologues in the arrangement of presumptive transcription control elements.

  2. Minimal evidence for a direct involvement of Twisted Gastrulation Homolog 1 (TWSG1) gene in human holoprosencephaly

    PubMed Central

    Kauvar, Emily F.; Hu, Ping; Pineda-Alvarez, Daniel E.; Solomon, Benjamin D.; Dutra, Amalia; Pak, Evgenia; Blessing, Brooke; Proud, Virginia; Shanske, Alan L.; Stevens, Cathy A.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Roessler, Erich; Muenke, Maximilian

    2011-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common disorder of human forebrain and facial development. Presently understood etiologies include both genetic and environmental factors, acting either alone, or more likely, in combination. The majority of patients without overt chromosomal abnormalities or recognizable associated syndromes have unidentified etiologies. A potential candidate gene, Twisted Gastrulation Homolog 1 (TWSG1), was previously suggested as a contributor to the complex genetics of human HPE based on (1) cytogenetic studies of patients with 18p deletions, (2) animal studies of TWSG1 deficient mice, and (3) the relationship of TWSG1 to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, which modulates the primary pathway implicated in HPE, Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling. Here we present the first analysis of a large cohort of patients with HPE for coding sequence variations in TWSG1. We also performed fine mapping of 18p for a subset of patients with partial 18p deletions. Surprisingly, minimal evidence for alterations of TWSG1 was found, suggesting that sequence alterations of TWSG1 are neither a common direct cause nor a frequent modifying factor for human HPE pathologies. PMID:21227728

  3. Evidence for Direct Control of Virulence and Defense Gene Circuits by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Regulator, MvfR

    PubMed Central

    Maura, Damien; Hazan, Ronen; Kitao, Tomoe; Ballok, Alicia E.; Rahme, Laurence G.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa defies eradication by antibiotics and is responsible for acute and chronic human infections due to a wide variety of virulence factors. Currently, it is believed that MvfR (PqsR) controls the expression of many of these factors indirectly via the pqs and phnAB operons. Here we provide strong evidence that MvfR may also bind and directly regulate the expression of additional 35 loci across the P. aeruginosa genome, including major regulators and virulence factors, such as the quorum sensing (QS) regulators lasR and rhlR, and genes involved in protein secretion, translation, and response to oxidative stress. We show that these anti-oxidant systems, AhpC-F, AhpB-TrxB2 and Dps, are critical for P. aeruginosa survival to reactive oxygen species and antibiotic tolerance. Considering that MvfR regulated compounds generate reactive oxygen species, this indicates a tightly regulated QS self-defense anti-poisoning system. These findings also challenge the current hierarchical regulation model of P. aeruginosa QS systems by revealing new interconnections between them that suggest a circular model. Moreover, they uncover a novel role for MvfR in self-defense that favors antibiotic tolerance and cell survival, further demonstrating MvfR as a highly desirable anti-virulence target. PMID:27678057

  4. Construction of a directed hammerhead ribozyme library: towards the identification of optimal target sites for antisense-mediated gene inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, M L; Ruffner, D E

    1998-01-01

    Antisense-mediated gene inhibition uses short complementary DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to block expression of any mRNA of interest. A key parameter in the success or failure of an antisense therapy is the identification of a suitable target site on the chosen mRNA. Ultimately, the accessibility of the target to the antisense agent determines target suitability. Since accessibility is a function of many complex factors, it is currently beyond our ability to predict. Consequently, identification of the most effective target(s) requires examination of every site. Towards this goal, we describe a method to construct directed ribozyme libraries against any chosen mRNA. The library contains nearly equal amounts of ribozymes targeting every site on the chosen transcript and the library only contains ribozymes capable of binding to that transcript. Expression of the ribozyme library in cultured cells should allow identification of optimal target sites under natural conditions, subject to the complexities of a fully functional cell. Optimal target sites identified in this manner should be the most effective sites for therapeutic intervention. PMID:9801305

  5. Facile Construction of Random Gene Mutagenesis Library for Directed Evolution Without the Use of Restriction Enzyme in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Eung; Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; You, Chun; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-09-01

    A foolproof protocol was developed for the construction of mutant DNA library for directed protein evolution. First, a library of linear mutant gene was generated by error-prone PCR or molecular shuffling, and a linear vector backbone was prepared by high-fidelity PCR. Second, the amplified insert and vector fragments were assembled by overlap-extension PCR with a pair of 5'-phosphorylated primers. Third, full-length linear plasmids with phosphorylated 5'-ends were self-ligated with T4 ligase, yielding circular plasmids encoding mutant variants suitable for high-efficiency transformation. Self-made competent Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) showed a transformation efficiency of 2.4 × 10(5) cfu/µg of the self-ligated circular plasmid. Using this method, three mutants of mCherry fluorescent protein were found to alter their colors and fluorescent intensities under visible and UV lights, respectively. Also, one mutant of 6-phosphorogluconate dehydrogenase from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica was found to show the 3.5-fold improved catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) on NAD(+) as compared to the wild-type. This protocol is DNA-sequence independent, and does not require restriction enzymes, special E. coli host, or labor-intensive optimization. In addition, this protocol can be used for subcloning the relatively long DNA sequences into any position of plasmids. PMID:27367290

  6. A xylanase gene directly cloned from the genomic DNA of alkaline wastewater sludge showing application potential in the paper industry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyu; Luo, Huiying; Meng, Kun; Shi, Pengjun; Wang, Guozeng; Yang, Peilong; Yuan, Tiezheng; Yao, Bin

    2011-09-01

    A xylanase gene, aws-2x, was directly cloned from the genomic DNA of the alkaline wastewater sludge using degenerated PCR and modified TAIL-PCR. The deduced amino acid sequence of AWS-2x shared the highest identity (60%) with the xylanase from Chryseobacterium gleum belonging to the glycosyl hydrolase GH family 10. Recombinant AWS-2x was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. The enzyme showed maximal activity at pH 7.5 and 55 °C, maintained more than 50% of maximal activity when assayed at pH 9.0, and was stable over a wide pH range from 4.0 to 11.0. The specific activity of AWS-2x towards hardwood xylan (beechwood and birchwood xylan) was significantly higher than that to cereal xylan (oat spelt xylan and wheat arabinoxylan). These properties make AWS-2x a potential candidate for application in the pulp and paper industry.

  7. Assessing causal relationships in genomics: From Bradford-Hill criteria to complex gene-environment interactions and directed acyclic graphs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Observational studies of human health and disease (basic, clinical and epidemiological) are vulnerable to methodological problems -such as selection bias and confounding- that make causal inferences problematic. Gene-disease associations are no exception, as they are commonly investigated using observational designs. A rich body of knowledge exists in medicine and epidemiology on the assessment of causal relationships involving personal and environmental causes of disease; it includes seminal causal criteria developed by Austin Bradford Hill and more recently applied directed acyclic graphs (DAGs). However, such knowledge has seldom been applied to assess causal relationships in clinical genetics and genomics, even in studies aimed at making inferences relevant for human health. Conversely, incorporating genetic causal knowledge into clinical and epidemiological causal reasoning is still a largely unexplored area. As the contribution of genetics to the understanding of disease aetiology becomes more important, causal assessment of genetic and genomic evidence becomes fundamental. The method we develop in this paper provides a simple and rigorous first step towards this goal. The present paper is an example of integrative research, i.e., research that integrates knowledge, data, methods, techniques, and reasoning from multiple disciplines, approaches and levels of analysis to generate knowledge that no discipline alone may achieve. PMID:21658235

  8. Quantitative morphological comparison of axon-targeting strategies for gene therapies directed to the nigro-striatal projection.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, S; Kareva, T; Kholodilov, N; Burke, R E

    2014-02-01

    Cellular targeting of mRNAs and proteins to axons is essential for axon growth during development and is likely to be important for adult maintenance as well. Given the importance and potency of these axon-targeting motifs to the biology of axons, it seems possible that they can be used in the design of transgenes that are intended to enhance axon growth or maintenance, so as to improve potency and minimize off-target effects. To investigate this possibility, it is first essential to assess known motifs for their efficacy. We have therefore evaluated four axon-targeting motifs, using adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene delivery in the nigro-striatal dopaminergic system, a projection that is predominantly affected in Parkinson's disease. We have tested two mRNA axonal zipcodes, the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of β-actin and 3' UTR of tau, and two axonal-targeting protein motifs, the palmitoylation signal sequence in GAP-43 and the last 15 amino acids in the amyloid precursor protein, to direct the expression of the fluorescent protein Tomato in axons. These sequences, fused to Tomato, were able to target its expression to dopaminergic axons. Based on quantification of Tomato-positive axons, and the density of striatal innervation, we conclude that the C-terminal of the amyloid precursor protein is the most effective axon-targeting motif. PMID:24305419

  9. CNS-directed gene therapy for the treatment of neurologic and somatic mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Motas, Sandra; Haurigot, Virginia; Garcia, Miguel; Marcó, Sara; Ribera, Albert; Roca, Carles; Sánchez, Víctor; Molas, Maria; Bertolin, Joan; Maggioni, Luca; León, Xavier; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by severe neurologic and somatic disease caused by deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), an enzyme that catabolizes the glycosaminoglycans heparan and dermatan sulphate. Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) currently constitutes the only approved therapeutic option for MPSII. However, the inability of recombinant IDS to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits ERT efficacy in treating neurological symptoms. Here, we report a gene therapy approach for MPSII through direct delivery of vectors to the CNS. Through a minimally invasive procedure, we administered adeno-associated virus vectors encoding IDS (AAV9-Ids) to the cerebrospinal fluid of MPSII mice with already established disease. Treated mice showed a significant increase in IDS activity throughout the encephalon, with full resolution of lysosomal storage lesions, reversal of lysosomal dysfunction, normalization of brain transcriptomic signature, and disappearance of neuroinflammation. Moreover, our vector also transduced the liver, providing a peripheral source of therapeutic protein that corrected storage pathology in visceral organs, with evidence of cross-correction of nontransduced organs by circulating enzyme. Importantly, AAV9-Ids-treated MPSII mice showed normalization of behavioral deficits and considerably prolonged survival. These results provide a strong proof of concept for the clinical translation of our approach for the treatment of Hunter syndrome patients with cognitive impairment. PMID:27699273

  10. CNS-directed gene therapy for the treatment of neurologic and somatic mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Motas, Sandra; Haurigot, Virginia; Garcia, Miguel; Marcó, Sara; Ribera, Albert; Roca, Carles; Sánchez, Víctor; Molas, Maria; Bertolin, Joan; Maggioni, Luca; León, Xavier; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by severe neurologic and somatic disease caused by deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), an enzyme that catabolizes the glycosaminoglycans heparan and dermatan sulphate. Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) currently constitutes the only approved therapeutic option for MPSII. However, the inability of recombinant IDS to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits ERT efficacy in treating neurological symptoms. Here, we report a gene therapy approach for MPSII through direct delivery of vectors to the CNS. Through a minimally invasive procedure, we administered adeno-associated virus vectors encoding IDS (AAV9-Ids) to the cerebrospinal fluid of MPSII mice with already established disease. Treated mice showed a significant increase in IDS activity throughout the encephalon, with full resolution of lysosomal storage lesions, reversal of lysosomal dysfunction, normalization of brain transcriptomic signature, and disappearance of neuroinflammation. Moreover, our vector also transduced the liver, providing a peripheral source of therapeutic protein that corrected storage pathology in visceral organs, with evidence of cross-correction of nontransduced organs by circulating enzyme. Importantly, AAV9-Ids-treated MPSII mice showed normalization of behavioral deficits and considerably prolonged survival. These results provide a strong proof of concept for the clinical translation of our approach for the treatment of Hunter syndrome patients with cognitive impairment.

  11. Directional dispersal between mid-ocean ridges: deep-ocean circulation and gene flow in Ridgeia piscesae.

    PubMed

    Young, C R; Fujio, S; Vrijenhoek, R C

    2008-04-01

    This study examined relationships between bathymetrically induced deep-ocean currents and the dispersal of the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae along the northeast Pacific ridge system. A robust diagnostic model of deep-ocean circulation in this region predicted strong southeasterly currents following contours of the Blanco Transform Fault, a 450-km lateral offset that separates the Gorda and Juan de Fuca ridge systems. Such currents should facilitate the southward dispersal of R. piscesae larvae. Immigration rates for populations north and south of the Blanco Transform Fault were estimated from molecular population genetic data. Mitochondrial DNA evidence revealed population subdivision across the Blanco Transform Fault, and a strong directional bias in gene flow that was consistent with predictions of the circulation model. The distribution of mitochondrial diversity between the northern and southern populations of R. piscesae suggests that the Gorda Ridge tubeworms have maintained larger effective population sizes than the northern populations, a pattern that also exists in co-occurring limpets. Together, these data suggest that the northern vent fields may experience a higher frequency of habitat turnover and consequently more rapid losses of genetic diversity.

  12. Introduction of chromosome segment carrying the seed storage protein genes from chromosome 1V of Dasypyrum villosum showed positive effect on bread-making quality of common wheat.

    PubMed

    Ruiqi, Zhang; Mingyi, Zhang; Xiue, Wang; Peidu, Chen

    2014-03-01

    Development of wheat- D. villosum 1V#4 translocation lines; physically mapping the Glu - V1 and Gli - V1 / Glu - V3 loci; and assess the effects of the introduced Glu - V1 and Gli - V1 / Glu - V3 on wheat bread-making quality. Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci, located in the chromosome 1V of Dasypyrum villosum, were proved to have positive effects on grain quality. However, there are very few reports about the transfer of the D. villosum-derived seed storage protein genes into wheat background by chromosome manipulation. In the present study, a total of six CS-1V#4 introgression lines with different alien-fragment sizes were developed through ionizing radiation of the mature female gametes of CS--D. villosum 1V#4 disomic addition line and confirmed by cytogenetic analysis. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), chromosome C-banding, twelve 1V#4-specific EST-STS markers and seed storage protein analysis enabled the cytological physical mapping of Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci to the region of FL 0.50-1.00 of 1V#4S of D. villosum. The Glu-V1 allele of D. villosum was Glu-V1a and its coded protein was V71 subunit. Quality analysis indicated that Glu-V1a together with Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci showed a positive effect on protein content, Zeleny sedimentation value and the rheological characteristics of wheat flour dough. In addition, the positive effect could be maintained when specific Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci were transferred to the wheat genetic background as in the case of T1V#4S-6BS · 6BL, T1V#4S · 1BL and T1V#4S · 1DS translocation lines. These results showed that the chromosome segment carrying the Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci in 1V#4S of D. villosum had positive effect on bread-making quality, and the T1V#4S-6BS · 6BL and T1V#4S · 1BL translocation lines could be useful germplasms for bread wheat improvement. The developed 1V#4S-specific molecular markers could be used to rapidly identify and trace the alien chromatin of 1V#4S in wheat background.

  13. Introduction of chromosome segment carrying the seed storage protein genes from chromosome 1V of Dasypyrum villosum showed positive effect on bread-making quality of common wheat.

    PubMed

    Ruiqi, Zhang; Mingyi, Zhang; Xiue, Wang; Peidu, Chen

    2014-03-01

    Development of wheat- D. villosum 1V#4 translocation lines; physically mapping the Glu - V1 and Gli - V1 / Glu - V3 loci; and assess the effects of the introduced Glu - V1 and Gli - V1 / Glu - V3 on wheat bread-making quality. Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci, located in the chromosome 1V of Dasypyrum villosum, were proved to have positive effects on grain quality. However, there are very few reports about the transfer of the D. villosum-derived seed storage protein genes into wheat background by chromosome manipulation. In the present study, a total of six CS-1V#4 introgression lines with different alien-fragment sizes were developed through ionizing radiation of the mature female gametes of CS--D. villosum 1V#4 disomic addition line and confirmed by cytogenetic analysis. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), chromosome C-banding, twelve 1V#4-specific EST-STS markers and seed storage protein analysis enabled the cytological physical mapping of Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci to the region of FL 0.50-1.00 of 1V#4S of D. villosum. The Glu-V1 allele of D. villosum was Glu-V1a and its coded protein was V71 subunit. Quality analysis indicated that Glu-V1a together with Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci showed a positive effect on protein content, Zeleny sedimentation value and the rheological characteristics of wheat flour dough. In addition, the positive effect could be maintained when specific Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci were transferred to the wheat genetic background as in the case of T1V#4S-6BS · 6BL, T1V#4S · 1BL and T1V#4S · 1DS translocation lines. These results showed that the chromosome segment carrying the Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci in 1V#4S of D. villosum had positive effect on bread-making quality, and the T1V#4S-6BS · 6BL and T1V#4S · 1BL translocation lines could be useful germplasms for bread wheat improvement. The developed 1V#4S-specific molecular markers could be used to rapidly identify and trace the alien chromatin of 1V#4S in wheat background. PMID:24408374

  14. Pack-Mutator-like transposable elements (Pack-MULEs) induce directional modification of genes through biased insertion and DNA acquisition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ning; Ferguson, Ann A; Slotkin, R Keith; Lisch, Damon

    2011-01-25

    In monocots, many genes demonstrate a significant negative GC gradient, meaning that the GC content declines along the orientation of transcription. Such a gradient is not observed in the genes of the dicot plant Arabidopsis. In addition, a lack of homology is often observed when comparing the 5' end of the coding region of orthologous genes in rice and Arabidopsis. The reasons for these differences have been enigmatic. The presence of GC-rich sequences at the 5' end of genes may influence the conformation of chromatin, the expression level of genes, as well as the recombination rate. Here we show that Pack-Mutator-like transposable elements (Pack-MULEs) that carry gene fragments specifically acquire GC-rich fragments and preferentially insert into the 5' end of genes. The resulting Pack-MULEs form independent, GC-rich transcripts with a negative GC gradient. Alternatively, the Pack-MULEs evolve into additional exons at the 5' end of existing genes, thus altering the GC content in those regions. We demonstrate that Pack-MULEs modify the 5' end of genes and are at least partially responsible for the negative GC gradient of genes in grasses. Such a unique and global impact on gene composition and gene structure has not been observed for any other transposable elements.

  15. Direct Activation of Amidohydrolase Domain-Containing 1 Gene by Thyroid Hormone Implicates a Role in the Formation of Adult Intestinal Stem Cells During Xenopus Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Morihiro; Miller, Thomas C; Fu, Liezhen; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2015-09-01

    The T3-dependent anuran metamorphosis resembles postembryonic development in mammals, the period around birth when plasma T3 levels peak. In particular, the remodeling of the intestine during metamorphosis mimics neonatal intestinal maturation in mammals when the adult intestinal epithelial self-renewing system is established. We have been using intestinal metamorphosis to investigate how the organ-specific adult stem cells are formed during vertebrate development. Early studies in Xenopus laevis have shown that this process involves complete degeneration of the larval epithelium and de novo formation of adult stem cells. A tissue-specific microarray analysis of intestinal gene expression during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis has identified a number of candidate stem cell genes. Here we have carried out detailed analyses of one such gene, amidohydrolase domain containing 1 (AMDHD1) gene, which encodes an enzyme in the histidine catabolic pathway. We show that AMDHD1 is exclusively expressed in the proliferating adult epithelial stem cells during metamorphosis with little expression in other intestinal tissues. We further provide evidence that T3 activates AMDHD1 gene expression directly at the transcription level through T3 receptor binding to the AMDHD1 gene in the intestine. In addition, we have reported earlier that histidine ammonia-lyase gene, another gene in histidine catabolic pathway, is similarly regulated by T3 in the intestine. These results together suggest that histidine catabolism plays a critical role in the formation and/or proliferation of adult intestinal stem cells during metamorphosis.

  16. Search Engine for Antimicrobial Resistance: A Cloud Compatible Pipeline and Web Interface for Rapidly Detecting Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Directly from Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Will; Baker, Kate S.; Verner-Jeffreys, David; Baker-Austin, Craig; Ryan, Jim J.; Maskell, Duncan; Pearce, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial resistance remains a growing and significant concern in human and veterinary medicine. Current laboratory methods for the detection and surveillance of antimicrobial resistant bacteria are limited in their effectiveness and scope. With the rapidly developing field of whole genome sequencing beginning to be utilised in clinical practice, the ability to interrogate sequencing data quickly and easily for the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes will become increasingly important and useful for informing clinical decisions. Additionally, use of such tools will provide insight into the dynamics of antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic samples such as those used in environmental monitoring. Results Here we present the Search Engine for Antimicrobial Resistance (SEAR), a pipeline and web interface for detection of horizontally acquired antimicrobial resistance genes in raw sequencing data. The pipeline provides gene information, abundance estimation and the reconstructed sequence of antimicrobial resistance genes; it also provides web links to additional information on each gene. The pipeline utilises clustering and read mapping to annotate full-length genes relative to a user-defined database. It also uses local alignment of annotated genes to a range of online databases to provide additional information. We demonstrate SEAR’s application in the detection and abundance estimation of antimicrobial resistance genes in two novel environmental metagenomes, 32 human faecal microbiome datasets and 126 clinical isolates of Shigella sonnei. Conclusions We have developed a pipeline that contributes to the improved capacity for antimicrobial resistance detection afforded by next generation sequencing technologies, allowing for rapid detection of antimicrobial resistance genes directly from sequencing data. SEAR uses raw sequencing data via an intuitive interface so can be run rapidly without requiring advanced bioinformatic skills or

  17. Thyroid hormones directly activate the expression of the human and mouse uncoupling protein-3 genes through a thyroid response element in the proximal promoter region

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The transcription of the human UCP3 (uncoupling protein-3) gene in skeletal muscle is tightly regulated by metabolic signals related to fatty acid availability. However, changes in thyroid status also modulate UCP3 gene expression, albeit by unknown mechanisms. We created transgenic mice bearing the entire human UCP3 gene to investigate the effect of thyroid hormones on human UCP3 gene expression. Treatment of human UCP3 transgenic mice with thyroid hormones induced the expression of the human gene in skeletal muscle. In addition, transient transfection experiments demonstrate that thyroid hormones activate the transcription of the human UCP3 gene promoter when MyoD and the TR (thyroid hormone receptor) were co-transfected. The action of thyroid hormones on UCP3 gene transcription is mediated by the binding of the TR to a proximal region in the UCP3 gene promoter that contains a direct repeat structure. An intact DNA sequence of this site is required for thyroid hormone responsiveness and TR binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the TR binds this element in vivo. The murine Ucp3 gene promoter was also dependent on MyoD and responsive to thyroid hormone in transient transfection assays. However, it was much less sensitive to thyroid hormone than the human UCP3 promoter. In summary, UCP3 gene transcription is activated by thyroid hormone treatment in vivo, and this activation is mediated by a TRE (thyroid hormone response element) in the proximal promoter region. Such regulation suggests a link between UCP3 gene expression and the effects of thyroid hormone on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. PMID:15496137

  18. Direct hippocampal injection of pseudo lentivirus-delivered nerve growth factor gene rescues the damaged cognitive function after traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong; Wan, Jie-qing; Gao, Guo-yi; Pan, Yao-hua; Ding, Sheng-hao; Fan, Yi-ling; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) treatment is a long-term process and requires repeated medicine administration, which, however, can cause high expense, infection, and hemorrhage to patients. To investigate how a long-term expression of nerve growth factor (Ngf) gene affects the injured hippocampus function post-TBI, in this study, a pseudo lentivirus carrying the β-Ngf fusion gene, with green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene, was constructed to show the gene expression and its ability of protecting cells from oxidative damage in vitro. Then, the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene was directly injected into the injured brain to evaluate its influence on the injured hippocampus function post-TBI in vivo. We found that the expression of the pseudo lentivirus-delivered β-Ngf fusion gene lasted more than four-week after the cell transduction and the encoded β-NGF fusion protein could induce the neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation. Moreover, the hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene sped the injured cognitive function recovery of the rat subjected to TBI. Together, our findings indicate that the long-term expression of the β-Ngf fusion gene, delivered by the pseudo lentivirus, can promote the neurite outgrowth of the neuron-like cells and protect the cells from the oxidative damage in vitro, and that the direct and single dose hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene is able to rescue the hippocampus function after the TBI in the rat.

  19. Direct hippocampal injection of pseudo lentivirus-delivered nerve growth factor gene rescues the damaged cognitive function after traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong; Wan, Jie-qing; Gao, Guo-yi; Pan, Yao-hua; Ding, Sheng-hao; Fan, Yi-ling; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) treatment is a long-term process and requires repeated medicine administration, which, however, can cause high expense, infection, and hemorrhage to patients. To investigate how a long-term expression of nerve growth factor (Ngf) gene affects the injured hippocampus function post-TBI, in this study, a pseudo lentivirus carrying the β-Ngf fusion gene, with green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene, was constructed to show the gene expression and its ability of protecting cells from oxidative damage in vitro. Then, the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene was directly injected into the injured brain to evaluate its influence on the injured hippocampus function post-TBI in vivo. We found that the expression of the pseudo lentivirus-delivered β-Ngf fusion gene lasted more than four-week after the cell transduction and the encoded β-NGF fusion protein could induce the neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation. Moreover, the hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene sped the injured cognitive function recovery of the rat subjected to TBI. Together, our findings indicate that the long-term expression of the β-Ngf fusion gene, delivered by the pseudo lentivirus, can promote the neurite outgrowth of the neuron-like cells and protect the cells from the oxidative damage in vitro, and that the direct and single dose hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene is able to rescue the hippocampus function after the TBI in the rat. PMID:26285082

  20. The Yeast Hrs1 Gene Encodes a Polyglutamine-Rich Nuclear Protein Required for Spontaneous and Hpr1-Induced Deletions between Direct Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Rosa, H.; Clever, B.; Heyer, W. D.; Aguilera, A.

    1996-01-01

    The hrs1-1 mutation was isolated as an extragenic suppressor of the hyperrecombination phenotype of hpr1Δ cells. We have cloned, sequenced and deleted from the genome the HRS1 gene. The DNA sequence of the HRS1 gene reveals that it is identical to PGD1, a gene with no reported function, and that the Hrs1p protein contains polyglutamine stretches typically found in transcription factors. We have purified a His(6) tagged version of Hrs1p protein from E. coli and have obtained specific anti-Hrs1p polyclonal antibodies. We show that Hrs1p is a 49-kD nuclear protein, as determined by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blot analysis. The hrs1Δ null mutation reduces the frequency of deletions in wild-type and hpr1Δ backgrounds sevenfold below wild-type and rad52 levels. Furthermore, hrs1Δ cells show reduced induction of the GAL1,10 promoter relative to wild-type cells. Our results suggest that Hrs1p is required for the formation of deletions between direct repeats and that it may function in gene expression. This suggests a connection between gene expression and direct repeat recombination. In this context, we discuss the possible roles of Hrs1p and Hpr1p in initiation of direct-repeat recombination. PMID:8849881

  1. WNT/β-catenin signaling promotes VSMCs to osteogenic transdifferentiation and calcification through directly modulating Runx2 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ting; Sun, Danqin; Duan, Ying; Wen, Ping; Dai, Chunsun; Yang, Junwei; He, Weichun

    2016-07-15

    Arterial medial calcification (AMC) is prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and contributes to elevated risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to osteogenic transdifferentiation (VOT) in a high-phosphate environment is involved in the pathogenesis of AMC in CKD. WNT/β-catenin signaling is indicated to play a crucial role in osteogenesis via promoting Runx2 expression in osteoprogenitor cells, however, its role in Runx2 regulation and VOT remains incompletely clarified. In this study, Runx2 was induced and β-catenin was activated by high-phosphate in VSMCs. Two forms of active β-catenin, dephosphorylated on Ser37/Thr41 and phosphorylated on Ser675 sites, were upregulated by high-phosphate. Activation of β-catenin, through ectopic expression of stabilized β-catenin, inhibition of GSK-3β, or WNT-3A protein, induced Runx2 expression, whereas blockade of WNT/β-catenin signaling with Porcupine (PORCN) inhibitor or Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) protein inhibited Runx2 induction by high-phosphate. WNT-3A promoted osteocalcin expression and calcium deposition in VSMCs, whereas DKK1 ameliorated calcification of VSMCs induced by high-phosphate. Two functional T cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor binding sites were identified in the promoter region of Runx2 gene in VSMCs, which interacted with TCF upon β-catenin activation. Site-directed mutation of each of them attenuated Runx2 response to β-catenin, and deletion or destruction of both of them completely abolished this responsiveness. In the aortic tunica media of rats with chronic renal failure, followed by AMC, Runx2 and β-catenin was induced, and the Runx2 mRNA level was positively associated with the abundance of phosphorylated β-catenin (Ser675). Collectively, our study suggested that high-phosphate may activate WNT/β-catenin signaling through different pathways, and the activated WNT/β-catenin signaling, through direct downstream target Runx2

  2. The transcription factor Spi-B regulates human plasmacytoid dendritic cell survival through direct induction of the antiapoptotic gene BCL2-A1.

    PubMed

    Karrich, Julien J; Balzarolo, Melania; Schmidlin, Heike; Libouban, Marion; Nagasawa, Maho; Gentek, Rebecca; Kamihira, Shimeru; Maeda, Takahiro; Amsen, Derk; Wolkers, Monika C; Blom, Bianca

    2012-05-31

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) selectively express Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7 and TLR-9, which allow them to rapidly secrete massive amounts of type I interferons after sensing nucleic acids derived from viruses or bacteria. It is not completely understood how development and function of pDCs are controlled at the transcriptional level. One of the main factors driving pDC development is the ETS factor Spi-B, but little is known about its target genes. Here we demonstrate that Spi-B is crucial for the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells into pDCs by controlling survival of pDCs and its progenitors. In search for Spi-B target genes, we identified the antiapoptotic gene Bcl2-A1 as a specific and direct target gene, thereby consolidating the critical role of Spi-B in cell survival.

  3. Genome engineering and direct cloning of antibiotic gene clusters via phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Du, Deyao; Wang, Lu; Tian, Yuqing; Liu, Hao; Tan, Huarong; Niu, Guoqing

    2015-03-04

    Several strategies have been used to clone large DNA fragments directly from bacterial genome. Most of these approaches are based on different site-specific recombination systems consisting of a specialized recombinase and its target sites. In this study, a novel strategy based on phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination was developed, and used for simultaneous Streptomyces genome engineering and cloning of antibiotic gene clusters. This method has been proved successful for the cloning of actinorhodin gene cluster from Streptomyces coelicolor M145, napsamycin gene cluster and daptomycin gene cluster from Streptomyces roseosporus NRRL 15998 at a frequency higher than 80%. Furthermore, the system could be used to increase the titer of antibiotics as we demonstrated with actinorhodin and daptomycin, and it will be broadly applicable in many Streptomyces.

  4. Genome engineering and direct cloning of antibiotic gene clusters via phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Du, Deyao; Wang, Lu; Tian, Yuqing; Liu, Hao; Tan, Huarong; Niu, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Several strategies have been used to clone large DNA fragments directly from bacterial genome. Most of these approaches are based on different site-specific recombination systems consisting of a specialized recombinase and its target sites. In this study, a novel strategy based on phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination was developed, and used for simultaneous Streptomyces genome engineering and cloning of antibiotic gene clusters. This method has been proved successful for the cloning of actinorhodin gene cluster from Streptomyces coelicolor M145, napsamycin gene cluster and daptomycin gene cluster from Streptomyces roseosporus NRRL 15998 at a frequency higher than 80%. Furthermore, the system could be used to increase the titer of antibiotics as we demonstrated with actinorhodin and daptomycin, and it will be broadly applicable in many Streptomyces. PMID:25737113

  5. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng . E-mail: Dongfeng_pan@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10{sup 9} PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases.

  6. As a novel p53 direct target, bidirectional gene HspB2/αB-crystallin regulates the ROS level and Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Yan, Bin; Lai, Weiwei; Chen, Ling; Xiao, Desheng; Xi, Sichuan; Jiang, Yiqun; Dong, Xin; An, Jing; Chen, Xiang; Cao, Ya; Tao, Yongguang

    2014-07-01

    Many mammalian genes are composed of bidirectional gene pairs with the two genes separated by less than 1.0kb. The transcriptional regulation and function of these bidirectional genes remain largely unclear. Here, we report that bidirectional gene pair HspB2/αB-crystallin, both of which are members of the small heat shock protein gene family, is a novel direct target gene of p53. Two potential binding sites of p53 are present in the intergenic region of HspB2/αB-crystallin. p53 up-regulated the bidirectional promoter activities of HspB2/αB-crystallin. Actinomycin D (ActD), an activator of p53, induces the promoter and protein activities of HspB2/αB-crystallin. p53 binds to two p53 binding sites in the intergenic region of HspB2/αB-crystallin in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the products of bidirectional gene pair HspB2/αB-crystallin regulate glucose metabolism, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and the Warburg effect by affecting metabolic genes, including the synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 2 (SCO2), hexokinase II (HK2), and TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR). The ROS level and the Warburg effect are affected after the depletion of p53, HspB2 and αB-crystallin respectively. Finally, we show that both HspB2 and αB-crystallin are linked with human renal carcinogenesis. These findings provide novel insights into the role of p53 as a regulator of bidirectional gene pair HspB2/αB-crystallin-mediated ROS and the Warburg effect.

  7. Direct interplay among histones, histone chaperones, and a chromatin boundary protein in the control of histone gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zunder, Rachel M; Rine, Jasper

    2012-11-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the histone chaperone Rtt106 binds newly synthesized histone proteins and mediates their delivery into chromatin during transcription, replication, and silencing. Rtt106 is also recruited to histone gene regulatory regions by the HIR histone chaperone complex to ensure S-phase-specific expression. Here we showed that this Rtt106:HIR complex included Asf1 and histone proteins. Mutations in Rtt106 that reduced histone binding reduced Rtt106 enrichment at histone genes, leading to their increased transcription. Deletion of the chromatin boundary element Yta7 led to increased Rtt106:H3 binding, increased Rtt106 enrichment at histone gene regulatory regions, and decreased histone gene transcription at the HTA1-HTB1 locus. These results suggested a unique regulatory mechanism in which Rtt106 sensed the level of histone proteins to maintain the proper level of histone gene transcription. The role of these histone chaperones and Yta7 differed markedly among the histone gene loci, including the two H3-H4 histone gene pairs. Defects in silencing in rtt106 mutants could be partially accounted for by Rtt106-mediated changes in histone gene repression. These studies suggested that feedback mediated by histone chaperone complexes plays a pivotal role in regulating histone gene transcription.

  8. Specific PCR primers directed to identify cryI and cryIII genes within a Bacillus thuringiensis strain collection.

    PubMed Central

    Cerón, J; Ortíz, A; Quintero, R; Güereca, L; Bravo, A

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we describe a PCR strategy that can be used to rapidly identify Bacillus thuringiensis strains that harbor any of the known cryI or cryIII genes. Four general PCR primers which amplify DNA fragments from the known cryI or cryIII genes were selected from conserved regions. Once a strain was identified as an organism that contains a particular type of cry gene, it could be easily characterized by performing additional PCR with specific cryI and cryIII primers selected from variable regions. The method described in this paper can be used to identify the 10 different cryI genes and the five different cryIII genes. One feature of this screening method is that each cry gene is expected to produce a PCR product having a precise molecular weight. The genes which produce PCR products having different sizes probably represent strains that harbor a potentially novel cry gene. Finally, we present evidence that novel crystal genes can be identified by the method described in this paper. PMID:8526493

  9. Homology Directed Knockin of Point Mutations in the Zebrafish tardbp and fus Genes in ALS Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    PubMed Central

    You, Zhipeng; Lissouba, Alexandra; Chen, Brian Edwin; Drapeau, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The methodology for site-directed editing of single nucleotides in the vertebrate genome is of considerable interest for research in biology and medicine. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 type II (Cas9) system has emerged as a simple and inexpensive tool for editing genomic loci of interest in a variety of animal models. In zebrafish, error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) has been used as a simple method to disrupt gene function. We sought to develop a method to easily create site-specific SNPs in the zebrafish genome. Here, we report simple methodologies for using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homology directed repair using single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide donor templates (ssODN) for site-directed single nucleotide editing, for the first time in two disease-related genes, tardbp and fus. PMID:26930076

  10. Gene-specific amplicons from metagenomes as an alternative to directed evolution for enzyme screening: a case study using phenylacetaldehyde reductases.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Nobuya; Kazama, Miki; Takeuchi, Nami; Isotani, Kentaro; Kurokawa, Junji

    2016-06-01

    Screening gene-specific amplicons from metagenomes (S-GAM) is a highly promising technique for the isolation of genes encoding enzymes for biochemical and industrial applications. From metagenomes, we isolated phenylacetaldehyde reductase (par) genes, which code for an enzyme that catalyzes the production of various Prelog's chiral alcohols. Nearly full-length par genes were amplified by PCR from metagenomic DNA, the products of which were fused with engineered par sequences at both terminal regions of the expression vector to ensure proper expression and then used to construct Escherichia coli plasmid libraries. Sequence- and activity-based screening of these libraries identified different homologous par genes, Hpar-001 to -036, which shared more than 97% amino acid sequence identity with PAR. Comparative characterization of these active homologs revealed a wide variety of enzymatic properties including activity, substrate specificity, and thermal stability. Moreover, amino acid substitutions in these genes coincided with those of Sar268 and Har1 genes, which were independently engineered by error-prone PCR to exhibit increased activity in the presence of concentrated 2-propanol. The comparative data from both approaches suggest that sequence information from homologs isolated from metagenomes is quite useful for enzyme engineering. Furthermore, by examining the GAM-based sequence dataset derived from soil metagenomes, we easily found amino acid substitutions that increase the thermal stability of PAR/PAR homologs. Thus, GAM-based approaches can provide not only useful homologous enzymes but also an alternative to directed evolution methodologies. PMID:27419059

  11. Sequences contained within the promoter of the human thymidine kinase gene can direct cell-cycle regulation of heterologous fusion genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y K; Wells, S; Lau, Y F; Lee, A S

    1988-01-01

    Recent evidence on the transcriptional regulation of the human thymidine kinase (TK) gene raises the possibility that cell-cycle regulatory sequences may be localized within its promoter. A hybrid gene that combines the TK 5' flanking sequence and the coding region of the bacterial neomycin-resistance gene (neo) has been constructed. Upon transfection into a hamster fibroblast cell line K12, the hybrid gene exhibits cell-cycle-dependent expression. Deletion analysis reveals that the region important for cell-cycle regulation is within -441 to -63 nucleotides from the transcriptional initiation site. This region (-441 to -63) also confers cell-cycle regulation to the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) promoter, which is not expressed in a cell-cycle manner. We conclude that the -441 to -63 sequence within the human TK promoter is important for cell-cycle-dependent expression. Images PMID:3413063

  12. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  13. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XVI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the sixteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  14. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the fifteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  15. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  16. Introduction to stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scilla, Degl'Innocenti

    2016-04-01

    This contribution is meant as a first brief introduction to stellar physics. First I shortly describe the main physical processes active in stellar structures then I summarize the most important features during the stellar life-cycle.

  17. Introduction to artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Charniak, E.; McDermott, D.

    1985-01-01

    This book is an introduction on artificial intelligence. Topics include reasoning under uncertainty, robot plans, language understanding, and learning. The history of the field as well as intellectual ties to related disciplines are presented.

  18. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Stéphane G.; Banner, David; Chi, Le Thi Bao; Leon, Alberto J.; Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi; Huang, Stephen S.H.; Farooqui, Amber; and others

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus–epithelial cell interaction. - Highlights: • We investigated H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection in primary epithelial cells. • H1N1pdm directly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature, sH1N1 did not. • H1N1pdm viral RNA triggered a stronger response than sH1N1. • H1N1pdm induces greater response due to direct virus–cell interaction. • These results have potential to impact vaccine and therapeutic development.

  19. Changes in Primary and Secondary Metabolite Levels in Response to Gene Targeting-Mediated Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Anthranilate Synthase Gene in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Saika, Hiroaki; Oikawa, Akira; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Matsuda, Fumio; Saito, Kazuki; Toki, Seiichi

    2012-01-01

    Gene targeting (GT) via homologous recombination allows precise modification of a target gene of interest. In a previous study, we successfully used GT to produce rice plants accumulating high levels of free tryptophan (Trp) in mature seeds and young leaves via targeted modification of a gene encoding anthranilate synthase—a key enzyme of Trp biosynthesis. Here, we performed metabolome analysis in the leaves and mature seeds of GT plants. Of 72 metabolites detected in both organs, a total of 13, including Trp, involved in amino acid metabolism, accumulated to levels >1.5-fold higher than controls in both leaves and mature seeds of GT plants. Surprisingly, the contents of certain metabolites valuable for both humans and livestock, such as γ-aminobutyric acid and vitamin B, were significantly increased in mature seeds of GT plants. Moreover, untargeted analysis using LC-MS revealed that secondary metabolites, including an indole alkaloid, 2-[2-hydroxy-3-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy-1-(1H-indol-3-yl)propyl] tryptophan, also accumulate to higher levels in GT plants. Some of these metabolite changes in plants produced via GT are similar to those observed in plants over expressing mutated genes, thus demonstrating that in vivo protein engineering via GT can be an effective approach to metabolic engineering in crops. PMID:24957777

  20. Rapid changes in gene expression direct rapid shifts in intestinal form and function in the Burmese python after feeding

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Audra L.; Card, Daren C.; Ruggiero, Robert P.; Schield, Drew R.; Adams, Richard H.; Pollock, David D.; Secor, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Snakes provide a unique and valuable model system for studying the extremes of physiological remodeling because of the ability of some species to rapidly upregulate organ form and function upon feeding. The predominant model species used to study such extreme responses has been the Burmese python because of the extreme nature of postfeeding response in this species. We analyzed the Burmese python intestine across a time series, before, during, and after feeding to understand the patterns and timing of changes in gene expression and their relationship to changes in intestinal form and function upon feeding. Our results indicate that >2,000 genes show significant changes in expression in the small intestine following feeding, including genes involved in intestinal morphology and function (e.g., hydrolases, microvillus proteins, trafficking and transport proteins), as well as genes involved in cell division and apoptosis. Extensive changes in gene expression occur surprisingly rapidly, within the first 6 h of feeding, coincide with changes in intestinal morphology, and effectively return to prefeeding levels within 10 days. Collectively, our results provide an unprecedented portrait of parallel changes in gene expression and intestinal morphology and physiology on a scale that is extreme both in the magnitude of changes, as well as in the incredibly short time frame of these changes, with up- and downregulation of expression and function occurring in the span of 10 days. Our results also identify conserved vertebrate signaling pathways that modulate these responses, which may suggest pathways for therapeutic modulation of intestinal function in humans. PMID:25670730

  1. Rapid changes in gene expression direct rapid shifts in intestinal form and function in the Burmese python after feeding.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Audra L; Card, Daren C; Ruggiero, Robert P; Schield, Drew R; Adams, Richard H; Pollock, David D; Secor, Stephen M; Castoe, Todd A

    2015-05-01

    Snakes provide a unique and valuable model system for studying the extremes of physiological remodeling because of the ability of some species to rapidly upregulate organ form and function upon feeding. The predominant model species used to study such extreme responses has been the Burmese python because of the extreme nature of postfeeding response in this species. We analyzed the Burmese python intestine across a time series, before, during, and after feeding to understand the patterns and timing of changes in gene expression and their relationship to changes in intestinal form and function upon feeding. Our results indicate that >2,000 genes show significant changes in expression in the small intestine following feeding, including genes involved in intestinal morphology and function (e.g., hydrolases, microvillus proteins, trafficking and transport proteins), as well as genes involved in cell division and apoptosis. Extensive changes in gene expression occur surprisingly rapidly, within the first 6 h of feeding, coincide with changes in intestinal morphology, and effectively return to prefeeding levels within 10 days. Collectively, our results provide an unprecedented portrait of parallel changes in gene expression and intestinal morphology and physiology on a scale that is extreme both in the magnitude of changes, as well as in the incredibly short time frame of these changes, with up- and downregulation of expression and function occurring in the span of 10 days. Our results also identify conserved vertebrate signaling pathways that modulate these responses, which may suggest pathways for therapeutic modulation of intestinal function in humans.

  2. The Hos2 Histone Deacetylase Controls Ustilago maydis Virulence through Direct Regulation of Mating-Type Genes

    PubMed Central

    Elías-Villalobos, Alberto; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Moreno-Sánchez, Ismael; Helmlinger, Dominique; Ibeas, José I.

    2015-01-01

    Morphological changes are critical for host colonisation in plant pathogenic fungi. These changes occur at specific stages of their pathogenic cycle in response to environmental signals and are mediated by transcription factors, which act as master regulators. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play crucial roles in regulating gene expression, for example by locally modulating the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulators. It has been reported that HDACs play important roles in the virulence of plant fungi. However, the specific environment-sensing pathways that control fungal virulence via HDACs remain poorly characterised. Here we address this question using the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. We find that the HDAC Hos2 is required for the dimorphic switch and pathogenic development in U. maydis. The deletion of hos2 abolishes the cAMP-dependent expression of mating type genes. Moreover, ChIP experiments detect Hos2 binding to the gene bodies of mating-type genes, which increases in proportion to their expression level following cAMP addition. These observations suggest that Hos2 acts as a downstream component of the cAMP-PKA pathway to control the expression of mating-type genes. Interestingly, we found that Clr3, another HDAC present in U. maydis, also contributes to the cAMP-dependent regulation of mating-type gene expression, demonstrating that Hos2 is not the only HDAC involved in this control system. Overall, our results provide new insights into the role of HDACs in fungal phytopathogenesis. PMID:26317403

  3. The Hos2 Histone Deacetylase Controls Ustilago maydis Virulence through Direct Regulation of Mating-Type Genes.

    PubMed

    Elías-Villalobos, Alberto; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Moreno-Sánchez, Ismael; Helmlinger, Dominique; Ibeas, José I

    2015-08-01

    Morphological changes are critical for host colonisation in plant pathogenic fungi. These changes occur at specific stages of their pathogenic cycle in response to environmental signals and are mediated by transcription factors, which act as master regulators. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play crucial roles in regulating gene expression, for example by locally modulating the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulators. It has been reported that HDACs play important roles in the virulence of plant fungi. However, the specific environment-sensing pathways that control fungal virulence via HDACs remain poorly characterised. Here we address this question using the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. We find that the HDAC Hos2 is required for the dimorphic switch and pathogenic development in U. maydis. The deletion of hos2 abolishes the cAMP-dependent expression of mating type genes. Moreover, ChIP experiments detect Hos2 binding to the gene bodies of mating-type genes, which increases in proportion to their expression level following cAMP addition. These observations suggest that Hos2 acts as a downstream component of the cAMP-PKA pathway to control the expression of mating-type genes. Interestingly, we found that Clr3, another HDAC present in U. maydis, also contributes to the cAMP-dependent regulation of mating-type gene expression, demonstrating that Hos2 is not the only HDAC involved in this control system. Overall, our results provide new insights into the role of HDACs in fungal phytopathogenesis.

  4. Site-Directed Genome Knockout in Chicken Cell Line and Embryos Can Use CRISPR/Cas Gene Editing Technology.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Qisheng; Wang, Yinjie; Cheng, Shaoze; Lian, Chao; Tang, Beibei; Wang, Fei; Lu, Zhenyu; Ji, Yanqing; Zhao, Ruifeng; Zhang, Wenhui; Jin, Kai; Song, Jiuzhou; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun

    2016-01-01

    The present study established an efficient genome editing approach for the construction of stable transgenic cell lines of the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). Our objectives were to facilitate the breeding of high-yield, high-quality chicken strains, and to investigate gene function in chicken stem cells. Three guide RNA (gRNAs) were designed to knockout the C2EIP gene, and knockout efficiency was evaluated in DF-1 chicken fibroblasts and chicken ESCs using the luciferase single-strand annealing (SSA) recombination assay, T7 endonuclease I (T7EI) assay, and TA clone sequencing. In addition, the polyethylenimine-encapsulated Cas9/gRNA plasmid was injected into fresh fertilized eggs. At 4.5 d later, frozen sections of the embryos were prepared, and knockout efficiency was evaluated by the T7EI assay. SSA assay results showed that luciferase activity of the vector expressing gRNA-3 was double that of the control. Results of the T7EI assay and TA clone sequencing indicated that Cas9/gRNA vector-mediated gene knockdown efficiency was approximately 27% in both DF-1 cells and ESCs. The CRISPR/Cas9 vector was also expressed in chicken embryos, resulting in gene knockdown in three of the 20 embryos (gene knockdown efficiency 15%). Taken together, our results indicate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can mediate stable gene knockdown at the cell and embryo levels in domestic chickens. PMID:27172204

  5. Staph ID/R: a Rapid Method for Determining Staphylococcus Species Identity and Detecting the mecA Gene Directly from Positive Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Pasko, Chris; Dunn, John; Jaeckel, Heidi; Nieuwlandt, Dan; Weed, Diane; Woodruff, Evelyn; Zheng, Xiaotian

    2012-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis of staphylococcal bacteremia directs appropriate antimicrobial therapy, leading to improved patient outcome. We describe herein a rapid test (<75 min) that can identify the major pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus to the species level as well as the presence or absence of the methicillin resistance determinant gene, mecA. The test, Staph ID/R, combines a rapid isothermal nucleic acid amplification method, helicase-dependent amplification (HDA), with a chip-based array that produces unambiguous visible results. The analytic sensitivity was 1 CFU per reaction for the mecA gene and was 1 to 250 CFU per reaction depending on the staphylococcal species present in the positive blood culture. Staph ID/R has excellent specificity as well, with no cross-reactivity observed. We validated the performance of Staph ID/R by testing 104 frozen clinical positive blood cultures and comparing the results with rpoB gene or 16S rRNA gene sequencing for species identity determinations and mecA gene PCR to confirm mecA gene results. Staph ID/R agreed with mecA gene PCR for all samples and agreed with rpoB/16S rRNA gene sequencing in all cases except for one sample that contained a mixture of two staphylococcal species, one of which Staph ID/R correctly identified, for an overall agreement of 99.0% (P < 0.01). Staph ID/R could potentially be used to positively affect patient management for Staphylococcus-mediated bacteremia. PMID:22170912

  6. Altered expression of oligodendrocyte and neuronal marker genes predicts the clinical onset of autoimmune encephalomyelitis and indicates the effectiveness of multiple sclerosis-directed therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Evangelidou, Maria; Karamita, Maria; Vamvakas, Sotiris-Spyros; Szymkowski, David E; Probert, Lesley

    2014-05-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a valuable model for studying immunopathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) and for exploring the interface between autoimmune responses and CNS tissue that ultimately leads to lesion development. In this study, we measured gene expression in mouse spinal cord during myelin oligodendrocyte gp35-55 peptide-induced EAE, using quantitative RT-PCR, to identify gene markers that monitor individual hallmark pathological processes. We defined a small panel of genes whose longitudinal expression patterns provided insight into the timing, interrelationships, and mechanisms of individual disease processes and the efficacy of therapeutics for the treatment of MS. Earliest transcriptional changes were upregulation of Il17a and sharp downregulation of neuronal and oligodendrocyte marker genes preceding clinical disease onset, whereas neuroinflammatory markers progressively increased as symptoms and tissue lesions developed. EAE-induced gene-expression changes were not altered in mice deficient in IKKβ in cells of the myeloid lineage compared with controls, but the administration of a selective inhibitor of soluble TNF to mice from the day of immunization delayed changes in the expression of innate inflammation, myelin, and neuron markers from the presymptomatic phase. Proof of principle that the gene panel shows drug screening potential was obtained using a well-established MS therapeutic, glatiramer acetate. Prophylactic treatment of mice with glatiramer acetate normalized gene marker expression, and this correlated with the level of therapeutic success. These results show that neurons and oligodendrocytes are highly sensitive to CNS-directed autoimmunity before the development of clinical symptoms and immunopathology and reveal a role for soluble TNF in mediating the earliest changes in gene expression.

  7. Direct and indirect estimates of gene flow among wild and managed populations of Polaskia chichipe, an endemic columnar cactus in Central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Otero-Arnaiz, Adriana; Casas, Alejandro; Hamrick, James L

    2005-12-01

    Microsatellite markers were used to obtain direct and indirect estimates of gene flow in populations of Polaskia chichipe under different management regimes, in order to understand the genetic consequences of gene flow in the evolutionary process of domestication. P. chichipe is a columnar cactus endemic to the Tehuacan Valley, Central Mexico, and has come under domestication for its edible fruit. Morphological, phenological, physiological, and reproductive differences, apparently attributable to artificial selection, exist between wild and managed populations, which grow sympatrically. However, strong gene flow may counteract the effects of this selection. In this study, we used paternity analysis to demonstrate that although most of the pollinations occur among individuals within the same population at distances < 40 m, pollen flow from other populations is considerable (27 +/- 5%). Heterogeneity in pollen clouds sampled by mother plants (FST = 0.12) indicated nonrandom mating, which is probably due to temporal heterogeneity in pollen movement. Spatial structure on local and regional scales is consistent with an isolation-by-distance model. The similarity of indirect, direct and demographic estimates of neighbourhood size (74-250 individuals) suggests that this genetic structure is representative of an equilibrium state. These results suggest that traditional management practices have conserved the genetic resources of this species in situ, but also that gene flow is counteracting the effect of domestication to some degree. We discuss our results in the general context of genetic exchange between cultivated and wild populations during the domestication process.

  8. Dissection of the regulatory mechanism of a heat-shock responsive promoter in Haloarchaea: a new paradigm for general transcription factor directed archaeal gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiuhe; Han, Jing; Zhou, Ligang; Coker, James A.; DasSarma, Priya; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Xiang, Hua

    2008-01-01

    Multiple general transcription factors (GTFs), TBP and TFB, are present in many haloarchaea, and are deemed to accomplish global gene regulation. However, details and the role of GTF-directed transcriptional regulation in stress response are still not clear. Here, we report a comprehensive investigation of the regulatory mechanism of a heat-induced gene (hsp5) from Halobacterium salinarum. We demonstrated by mutation analysis that the sequences 5′ and 3′ to the core elements (TATA box and BRE) of the hsp5 promoter (Phsp5) did not significantly affect the basal and heat-induced gene expression, as long as the transcription initiation site was not altered. Moreover, the BRE and TATA box of Phsp5 were sufficient to render a nonheat-responsive promoter heat-inducible, in both Haloferax volcanii and Halobacterium sp. NRC-1. DNA–protein interactions revealed that two heat-inducible GTFs, TFB2 from H. volcanii and TFBb from Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, could specifically bind to Phsp5 likely in a temperature-dependent manner. Taken together, the heat-responsiveness of Phsp5 was mainly ascribed to the core promoter elements that were efficiently recognized by specific heat-induced GTFs at elevated temperature, thus providing a new paradigm for GTF-directed gene regulation in the domain of Archaea. PMID:18390887

  9. Use of a non-radioactive hybridisation assay for direct detection of gram-negative bacteria carrying TEM beta-lactamase genes in infected urine.

    PubMed

    Carter, G I; Towner, K J; Pearson, N J; Slack, R C

    1989-02-01

    DNA in infected urines from 81 patients with urinary tract infection was hybridised directly with a non-radioactive DNA probe specific for bacterial genes coding for TEM-type beta-lactamase. The results were assessed by means of a computerised image analysis system and compared with those obtained following isolation of the infecting organism, conventional sensitivity testing and isoelectric focusing (IEF) procedures for the detection of TEM-type beta-lactamase. Of the 27 ampicillin-resistant gram-negative organisms isolated in pure culture from the urines, 14 were shown by both hybridisation and IEF to carry a gene for TEM beta-lactamase production. Only four discordant results were obtained: three "false positive" direct hybridisation results, one due to urine pigmentation, and one, possibly, to a TEM beta-lactamase gene which was not being expressed, and one "false negative" result due to insufficient cell numbers in the urine. The system is capable of screening large numbers of samples and is applicable to any gene for which a suitable DNA probe is available.

  10. The auxin response factor MONOPTEROS controls meristem function and organogenesis in both the shoot and root through the direct regulation of PIN genes.

    PubMed

    Krogan, Naden T; Marcos, Danielle; Weiner, Aaron I; Berleth, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The regulatory effect auxin has on its own transport is critical in numerous self-organizing plant patterning processes. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking auxin signal transduction and auxin transport is still fragmentary, and important regulatory genes remain to be identified. To track a key link between auxin signaling and auxin transport in development, we established an Arabidopsis thaliana genetic background in which fundamental patterning processes in both shoot and root were essentially abolished and the expression of PIN FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux facilitators was dramatically reduced. In this background, we demonstrate that activating a steroid-inducible variant of the auxin response factor (ARF) MONOPTEROS (MP) is sufficient to restore patterning and PIN gene expression. Further, we show that MP binds to distinct promoter elements of multiple genetically defined PIN genes. Our work identifies a direct regulatory link between central, well-characterized genes involved in auxin signal transduction and auxin transport. The steroid-inducible MP system directly demonstrates the importance of this molecular link in multiple patterning events in embryos, shoots and roots, and provides novel options for interrogating the properties of self-regulated auxin-based patterning in planta. PMID:27441727

  11. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Stéphane G; Banner, David; Chi, Le Thi Bao; Leόn, Alberto J; Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi; Huang, Stephen S H; Farooqui, Amber; Kelvin, David J; Kelvin, Alyson A

    2014-01-01

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus-epithelial cell interaction.

  12. Simple and rapid direct cloning and heterologous expression of natural product biosynthetic gene cluster in Bacillus subtilis via Red/ET recombineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingshu; Shen, Qiyao; Bian, Xiaoying; Chen, Hanna; Fu, Jun; Wang, Hailong; Lei, Ping; Guo, Zhaohui; Chen, Wu; Li, Dingjun; Zhang, Youming

    2016-01-01

    Heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways is an important way to research and discover microbial natural products. Bacillus subtilis is a suitable host for the heterologous production of natural products from bacilli and related Firmicutes. Existing technologies for heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in B. subtilis are complicated. Herein, we present a simple and rapid strategy for direct cloning based heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways in B. subtilis via Red/ET recombineering, using a 5.2 kb specific direct cloning vector carrying homologous sequences to the amyE gene in B. subtilis and CcdB counterselection marker. Using a two-step procedure, two large biosynthetic pathways for edeine (48.3 kb) and bacillomycin (37.2 kb) from Brevibacillus brevis X23 and B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42, respectively, were directly cloned and subsequently integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis within one week. The gene cluster for bacillomycin was successfully expressed in the heterologous host, although edeine production was not detectable. Compared with similar technologies, this method offers a simpler and more feasible system for the discovery of natural products from bacilli and related genera. PMID:27687863

  13. Direct repeat-mediated DNA deletion of the mating type MAT1-2 genes results in unidirectional mating type switching in Sclerotinia trifoliorum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liangsheng; Jardini, Teresa M.; Chen, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The necrotrophic fungal pathogen Sclerotinia trifoliorum exhibits ascospore dimorphism and unidirectional mating type switching - self-fertile strains derived from large ascospores produce both self-fertile (large-spores) and self-sterile (small-spores) offsprings in a 4:4 ratio. The present study, comparing DNA sequences at MAT locus of both self-fertile and self-sterile strains, found four mating type genes (MAT1-1-1, MAT1-1-5, MAT1-2-1 and MAT1-2-4) in the self-fertile strain. However, a 2891-bp region including the entire MAT1-2-1 and MAT1-2-4 genes had been completely deleted from the MAT locus in the self-sterile strain. Meanwhile, two copies of a 146-bp direct repeat motif flanking the deleted region were found in the self-fertile strain, but only one copy of this 146-bp motif (a part of the MAT1-1-1 gene) was present in the self-sterile strain. The two direct repeats were believed to be responsible for the deletion through homologous intra-molecular recombination in meiosis. Tetrad analyses showed that all small ascospore-derived strains lacked the missing DNA between the two direct repeats that was found in all large ascospore-derived strains. In addition, heterokaryons at the MAT locus were observed in field isolates as well as in laboratory derived isolates. PMID:27255676

  14. Curative ex vivo liver-directed gene therapy in a pig model of hereditary tyrosinemia type 1.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Raymond D; Mao, Shennen A; Glorioso, Jaime; Elgilani, Faysal; Amiot, Bruce; Chen, Harvey; Rinaldo, Piero; Marler, Ronald; Jiang, Huailei; DeGrado, Timothy R; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; O'Connor, Michael K; Freeman, Brittany L; Ibrahim, Samar H; Peng, Kah Whye; Harding, Cary O; Ho, Chak-Sum; Grompe, Markus; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Lillegard, Joseph B; Russell, Stephen J; Nyberg, Scott L

    2016-07-27

    We tested the hypothesis that ex vivo hepatocyte gene therapy can correct the metabolic disorder in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase-deficient (Fah(-/-)) pigs, a large animal model of hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1). Recipient Fah(-/-) pigs underwent partial liver resection and hepatocyte isolation by collagenase digestion. Hepatocytes were transduced with one or both of the lentiviral vectors expressing the therapeutic Fah and the reporter sodium-iodide symporter (Nis) genes under control of the thyroxine-binding globulin promoter. Pigs received autologous transplants of hepatocytes by portal vein infusion. After transplantation, the protective drug 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzyol)-1,3 cyclohexanedione (NTBC) was withheld from recipient pigs to provide a selective advantage for expansion of corrected FAH(+) cells. Proliferation of transplanted cells, assessed by both immunohistochemistry and noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging of NIS-labeled cells, demonstrated near-complete liver repopulation by gene-corrected cells. Tyrosine and succinylacetone levels improved to within normal range, demonstrating complete correction of tyrosine metabolism. In addition, repopulation of the Fah(-/-) liver with transplanted cells inhibited the onset of severe fibrosis, a characteristic of nontransplanted Fah(-/-) pigs. This study demonstrates correction of disease in a pig model of metabolic liver disease by ex vivo gene therapy. To date, ex vivo gene therapy has only been successful in small animal models. We conclude that further exploration of ex vivo hepatocyte genetic correction is warranted for clinical use.

  15. Curative ex vivo liver-directed gene therapy in a pig model of hereditary tyrosinemia type 1.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Raymond D; Mao, Shennen A; Glorioso, Jaime; Elgilani, Faysal; Amiot, Bruce; Chen, Harvey; Rinaldo, Piero; Marler, Ronald; Jiang, Huailei; DeGrado, Timothy R; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; O'Connor, Michael K; Freeman, Brittany L; Ibrahim, Samar H; Peng, Kah Whye; Harding, Cary O; Ho, Chak-Sum; Grompe, Markus; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Lillegard, Joseph B; Russell, Stephen J; Nyberg, Scott L

    2016-07-27

    We tested the hypothesis that ex vivo hepatocyte gene therapy can correct the metabolic disorder in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase-deficient (Fah(-/-)) pigs, a large animal model of hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1). Recipient Fah(-/-) pigs underwent partial liver resection and hepatocyte isolation by collagenase digestion. Hepatocytes were transduced with one or both of the lentiviral vectors expressing the therapeutic Fah and the reporter sodium-iodide symporter (Nis) genes under control of the thyroxine-binding globulin promoter. Pigs received autologous transplants of hepatocytes by portal vein infusion. After transplantation, the protective drug 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzyol)-1,3 cyclohexanedione (NTBC) was withheld from recipient pigs to provide a selective advantage for expansion of corrected FAH(+) cells. Proliferation of transplanted cells, assessed by both immunohistochemistry and noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging of NIS-labeled cells, demonstrated near-complete liver repopulation by gene-corrected cells. Tyrosine and succinylacetone levels improved to within normal range, demonstrating complete correction of tyrosine metabolism. In addition, repopulation of the Fah(-/-) liver with transplanted cells inhibited the onset of severe fibrosis, a characteristic of nontransplanted Fah(-/-) pigs. This study demonstrates correction of disease in a pig model of metabolic liver disease by ex vivo gene therapy. To date, ex vivo gene therapy has only been successful in small animal models. We conclude that further exploration of ex vivo hepatocyte genetic correction is warranted for clinical use. PMID:27464750

  16. Acute TNF-induced repression of cell identity genes is mediated by NFκB-directed redistribution of cofactors from super-enhancers.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Søren Fisker; Larsen, Bjørk Ditlev; Loft, Anne; Nielsen, Ronni; Madsen, Jesper Grud Skat; Mandrup, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in low-grade adipose tissue inflammation and development of insulin resistance during obesity. In this context, nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) is directly involved and required for the acute activation of the inflammatory gene program. Here, we show that the major transactivating subunit of NFκB, v-rel avian reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog A (RELA), is also required for acute TNF-induced suppression of adipocyte genes. Notably, this repression does not involve RELA binding to the associated enhancers but rather loss of cofactors and enhancer RNA (eRNA) selectively from high-occupancy sites within super-enhancers. Based on these data, we have developed models that, with high accuracy, predict which enhancers and genes are repressed by TNF in adipocytes. We show that these models are applicable to other cell types where TNF represses genes associated with super-enhancers in a highly cell-type-specific manner. Our results propose a novel paradigm for NFκB-mediated repression, whereby NFκB selectively redistributes cofactors from high-occupancy enhancers, thereby specifically repressing super-enhancer-associated cell identity genes.

  17. Acute TNF-induced repression of cell identity genes is mediated by NFκB-directed redistribution of cofactors from super-enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Søren Fisker; Larsen, Bjørk Ditlev; Loft, Anne; Nielsen, Ronni; Madsen, Jesper Grud Skat; Mandrup, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in low-grade adipose tissue inflammation and development of insulin resistance during obesity. In this context, nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) is directly involved and required for the acute activation of the inflammatory gene program. Here, we show that the major transactivating subunit of NFκB, v-rel avian reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog A (RELA), is also required for acute TNF-induced suppression of adipocyte genes. Notably, this repression does not involve RELA binding to the associated enhancers but rather loss of cofactors and enhancer RNA (eRNA) selectively from high-occupancy sites within super-enhancers. Based on these data, we have developed models that, with high accuracy, predict which enhancers and genes are repressed by TNF in adipocytes. We show that these models are applicable to other cell types where TNF represses genes associated with super-enhancers in a highly cell-type–specific manner. Our results propose a novel paradigm for NFκB-mediated repression, whereby NFκB selectively redistributes cofactors from high-occupancy enhancers, thereby specifically repressing super-enhancer-associated cell identity genes. PMID:26113076

  18. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Fusakio, Michael E.; Willy, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T.; Al Baghdadi, Rana J. T.; Adams, Christopher M.; Anthony, Tracy G.; Wek, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins—PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6—is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera. PMID:26960794

  19. A PPO Promoter from Betalain-Producing Red Swiss Chard, Directs Petiole- and Root-Preferential Expression of Foreign Gene in Anthocyanins-Producing Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhi-Hai; Han, Ya-Nan; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2015-01-01

    A 1670 bp 5′-flanking region of the polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene was isolated from red Swiss chard, a betalain-producing plant. This region, named promoter BvcPPOP, and its 5′-truncated versions were fused with the GUS gene and introduced into Arabidopsis, an anthocyanins-producing plant. GUS histochemical staining and quantitative analysis of transgenic plants at the vegetative and reproductive stages showed that BvcPPOP could direct GUS gene expression in vegetative organs with root- and petiole-preference, but not in reproductive organs including inflorescences shoot, inflorescences leaf, flower, pod and seed. This promoter was regulated by developmental stages in its driving strength, but not in expression pattern. It was also regulated by the abiotic stressors tested, positively by salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) but negatively by abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellin (GA), NaCl and OH−. Its four 5′-truncated versions varied in the driving strength, but not obviously in expression pattern, and even the shortest version (−225 to +22) retained the root- and petiole- preference. This promoter is, to our knowledge, the first PPO promoter cloned and functionally elucidated from the betalain-producing plant, and thus provides not only a useful tool for expressing gene(s) of agricultural interest in vegetative organs, but also a clue to clarify the function of metabolism-specific PPO in betalain biosynthesis. PMID:26569235

  20. A PPO Promoter from Betalain-Producing Red Swiss Chard, Directs Petiole- and Root-Preferential Expression of Foreign Gene in Anthocyanins-Producing Plants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Hai; Han, Ya-Nan; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2015-01-01

    A 1670 bp 5'-flanking region of the polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene was isolated from red Swiss chard, a betalain-producing plant. This region, named promoter BvcPPOP, and its 5'-truncated versions were fused with the GUS gene and introduced into Arabidopsis, an anthocyanins-producing plant. GUS histochemical staining and quantitative analysis of transgenic plants at the vegetative and reproductive stages showed that BvcPPOP could direct GUS gene expression in vegetative organs with root- and petiole-preference, but not in reproductive organs including inflorescences shoot, inflorescences leaf, flower, pod and seed. This promoter was regulated by developmental stages in its driving strength, but not in expression pattern. It was also regulated by the abiotic stressors tested, positively by salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) but negatively by abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellin (GA), NaCl and OH(-). Its four 5'-truncated versions varied in the driving strength, but not obviously in expression pattern, and even the shortest version (-225 to +22) retained the root- and petiole- preference. This promoter is, to our knowledge, the first PPO promoter cloned and functionally elucidated from the betalain-producing plant, and thus provides not only a useful tool for expressing gene(s) of agricultural interest in vegetative organs, but also a clue to clarify the function of metabolism-specific PPO in betalain biosynthesis. PMID:26569235

  1. Construction of an opal suppressor by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae tRNA(Trp) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Atkin, A L; Roy, K L; Bell, J B

    1990-01-01

    In vitro mutagenesis was used to create putative opal suppressor alleles of a tRNA(Trp) gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The construct with the requisite anticodon change did not result in an active suppressor, whereas when a second change was introduced into the portion of the gene encoding the intron, an active and specific opal suppressor was produced. We propose that the secondary structure of transcripts from the first mutant may prevent efficient pre-tRNA processing, whereas normal processing occurs with the double mutant. Images PMID:2370870

  2. Direct estimation of the recombination frequency between the RB1 gene and two closely linked microsatellites using sperm typing.

    PubMed

    Girardet, A; Lien, S; Leeflang, E P; Beaufrère, L; Tuffery, S; Munier, F; Arnheim, N; Claustres, M; Pellestor, F

    1999-01-01

    In this study, single sperm typing has been used for high-resolution recombination analysis between the retinoblastoma gene and two closely linked extragenic microsatellites (D13S284 and D13S1307). The analysis of 1198 single sperm from three donors allowed the determination of recombination fractions between RB1.20 and D13S284 and RB1.20 and D13S1307 of 0.022 and 0.033, respectively. These results show that RB1 gene and the two microsatellites are closely linked, which validates their potential use in indirect genetic diagnosis of retinoblastoma. PMID:10196709

  3. REST-Governed Gene Expression Profiling in a Neuronal Cell Model Reveals Novel Direct and Indirect Processes of Repression and Up-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manteiga, Jose M.; Bonfiglio, Silvia; Folladori, Lucrezia; Malosio, Maria L.; Lazarevic, Dejan; Stupka, Elia; Cittaro, Davide; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The role of REST changes in neurons, including the rapid decrease of its level during differentiation and its fluctuations during many mature functions and diseases, is well established. However, identification of many thousand possible REST-target genes, mostly based on indirect criteria, and demonstration of their operative dependence on the repressor have been established for only a relatively small fraction. In the present study, starting from our recently published work, we have expanded the identification of REST-dependent genes, investigated in two clones of the PC12 line, a recognized neuronal cell model, spontaneously expressing different levels of REST: very low as in neurons and much higher as in most non-neural cells. The molecular, structural and functional differences of the two PC12 clones were shown to depend largely on their different REST level and the ensuing variable expression of some dependent genes. Comprehensive RNA-Seq analyses of the 13,700 genes expressed, validated by parallel RT-PCR and western analyses of mRNAs and encoded proteins, identified in the high-REST clone two groups of almost 900 repressed and up-regulated genes. Repression is often due to direct binding of REST to target genes; up-regulation to indirect mechanism(s) mostly mediated by REST repression of repressive transcription factors. Most, but not all, genes governing neurosecretion, excitability, and receptor channel signaling were repressed in the high REST clone. The genes governing expression of non-channel receptors (G protein-coupled and others), although variably affected, were often up-regulated together with the genes of intracellular kinases, small G proteins, cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix proteins. Expression of REST-dependent genes governing functions other than those mentioned so far were also identified. The results obtained by the parallel investigation of the two PC12 clones revealed the complexity of the REST molecular and

  4. Introduction to International Trade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crummett, Dan M.; Crummett, Jerrie

    This set of student and teacher guides is intended for use in a course to prepare students for entry-level employment in such occupational areas in international trade as business/finance, communications, logistics, and marketing. The following topics are covered in the course's five instructional units: introduction to careers in international…

  5. Introduction to HACCP.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction to HACCP Deana R. Jones, Ph.D. Egg Safety and Quality Research Unit USDA-Agricultural Research Service Russell Research Center Athens, GA Deana.Jones@ars.usda.gov HACCP is an acronym for Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point and was initially developed by the Pillsbury Company a...

  6. Introduction to Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biernacka, Monika; Bajan, Katarzyna; Stachowski, Greg; Flin, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Between 15-25 August 2015, Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce was the host of a Cosmological School, titled "Introduction to Cosmology". The main purpose of the School was to give the participants, mostly young astronomers and physicists, a basic idea of what, today, are some of the main problems in astronomy.

  7. 4.1 Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.1 Introduction' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy' with the contents:

  8. An Introduction to Psycholinguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodai, Hojat

    2011-01-01

    This paper is written to have a preliminary introduction about psycholinguistics. Psycholinguistics or psychology of language is the study of the interrelation between linguistic factors and psychological aspects. The main subject of research in psycholinguistics is the study of cognitive processes that underlie the comprehension and production of…

  9. Introduction to Childhood Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehily, Mary Jane, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Educationalists and social scientists are increasingly interested in childhood as a distinct social category, and Childhood Studies is now a recognized area of research and analysis. This book brings together the key themes of Childhood Studies in a broad and accessible introduction for students and practitioners working in this field.…

  10. Why SRS Matters - Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Paul

    2015-01-21

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode provides an introduction to the SRS mission and operations.

  11. Introduction to chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, V.

    1996-01-08

    These lectures are an attempt to a pedagogical introduction into the elementary concepts of chiral symmetry in nuclear physics. Effective chiral models such as the linear and nonlinear sigma model will be discussed as well as the essential ideas of chiral perturbation theory. Some applications to the physics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions will be presented.

  12. Introduction to Film Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert E.

    This booklet is intended for teachers who are now teaching units in film production as part of a program in communication or who wish to begin work with filmmaking in such a program. The first section is intended to serve as a brief introduction to film theory, while a major portion of the rest of the booklet is devoted to film projects which may…

  13. Introduction and Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Corinne

    2001-01-01

    Provides an introduction to articles in this special "Perspectives" issue of "Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology." The articles, taken collectively, contain significant elements of a research agenda in image indexing and retrieval for the next decade. Articles focus on user, representation, and system issues.…

  14. Introduction to Shakespeare: English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargraves, Richard

    The "Introduction to Shakespeare" course in the Quinmester Program involves the careful study of the tragedy "Romeo and Juliet" and the comedy "The Taming of the Shrew," emphasizing language, development of character and theme. The course also includes the study of biographical data relevant to the evolution of Shakespeare's literary genius, and…

  15. Introduction to LHC physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polesello, Giacomo

    2006-11-01

    An elementary introduction to the basic features of experimentation at the LHC is given, with some emphasis on the detector requirements and on some basic experimental techniques. The experimental program is briefly introduced, and bibliographical indications are provided for a detailed study of the key physics topics.

  16. Direct and indirect effects of RNA interference against pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase genes in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Huang, ShuoHao; Yao, LiLi; Zhang, JianYun; Huang, LongQuan

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin B6 comprises six interconvertible pyridine compounds (vitamers), among which pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is a coenzyme involved in a high diversity of biochemical reactions. Humans and animals obtain B6 vitamers from diet, and synthesize pyridoxal 5'-phosphate by pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase. Currently, little is known on how pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis is regulated, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is supplied to meet their requirement in terms of cofactor. Bombyx mori is a large silk-secreting insect, in which protein metabolism is most active, and the vitamin B6 demand is high. In this study, we successfully down-regulated the gene expression of pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase by body cavity injection of synthesized double-stranded small interfering RNA to 5th instar larvae of Bombyx mori, and analyzed the gene transcription levels of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzymes, phosphoserine aminotransferase and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase. Results show that the gene expression of pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase has a greater impact on the gene transcription of enzymes using pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor in Bombyx mori. Our study suggests that pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis and dynamic balance may be regulated by genetic networks.

  17. Live, attenuated coronavirus vaccines through the directed deletion of group-specific genes provide protection against feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Haijema, Bert Jan; Volders, Haukeline; Rottier, Peter J M

    2004-04-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal immunity-mediated disease caused by mutants of a ubiquitous coronavirus. Since previous attempts to protect cats under laboratory and field conditions have been largely unsuccessful, we used our recently developed system of reverse genetics (B. J. Haijema, H. Volders, and P. J. M. Rottier, J. Virol. 77:4528-4538, 2003) for the development of a modified live FIP vaccine. With this objective, we deleted the group-specific gene cluster open reading frame 3abc or 7ab and obtained deletion mutant viruses that not only multiplied well in cell culture but also showed an attenuated phenotype in the cat. At doses at which the wild-type virus would be fatal, the mutants with gene deletions did not cause any clinical symptoms. They still induced an immune response, however, as judged from the high levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies. The FIP virus (FIPV) mutant lacking the 3abc cluster and, to a lesser extent, the mutant missing the 7ab cluster, protected cats against a lethal homologous challenge; no protection was obtained with the mutant devoid of both gene clusters. Our studies show that the deletion of group-specific genes from the coronavirus genome results in live attenuated candidate vaccines against FIPV. More generally, our approach may allow the development of vaccines against infections with other pathogenic coronaviruses, including that causing severe acute respiratory syndrome in humans.

  18. Direct and indirect effects of RNA interference against pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase genes in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Huang, ShuoHao; Yao, LiLi; Zhang, JianYun; Huang, LongQuan

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin B6 comprises six interconvertible pyridine compounds (vitamers), among which pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is a coenzyme involved in a high diversity of biochemical reactions. Humans and animals obtain B6 vitamers from diet, and synthesize pyridoxal 5'-phosphate by pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase. Currently, little is known on how pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis is regulated, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is supplied to meet their requirement in terms of cofactor. Bombyx mori is a large silk-secreting insect, in which protein metabolism is most active, and the vitamin B6 demand is high. In this study, we successfully down-regulated the gene expression of pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase by body cavity injection of synthesized double-stranded small interfering RNA to 5th instar larvae of Bombyx mori, and analyzed the gene transcription levels of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzymes, phosphoserine aminotransferase and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase. Results show that the gene expression of pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase has a greater impact on the gene transcription of enzymes using pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor in Bombyx mori. Our study suggests that pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis and dynamic balance may be regulated by genetic networks. PMID:27106120

  19. NODULE INCEPTION Directly Targets NF-Y Subunit Genes to Regulate Essential Processes of Root Nodule Development in Lotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Soyano, Takashi; Kouchi, Hiroshi; Hirota, Atsuko; Hayashi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The interactions of legumes with symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria cause the formation of specialized lateral root organs called root nodules. It has been postulated that this root nodule symbiosis system has recruited factors that act in early signaling pathways (common SYM genes) partly from the ancestral mycorrhizal symbiosis. However, the origins of factors needed for root nodule organogenesis are largely unknown. NODULE INCEPTION (NIN) is a nodulation-specific gene that encodes a putative transcription factor and acts downstream of the common SYM genes. Here, we identified two Nuclear Factor-Y (NF-Y) subunit genes, LjNF-YA1 and LjNF-YB1, as transcriptional targets of NIN in Lotus japonicus. These genes are expressed in root nodule primordia and their translational products interact in plant cells, indicating that they form an NF-Y complex in root nodule primordia. The knockdown of LjNF-YA1 inhibited root nodule organogenesis, as did the loss of function of NIN. Furthermore, we found that NIN overexpression induced root nodule primordium-like structures that originated from cortical cells in the absence of bacterial symbionts. Thus, NIN is a crucial factor responsible for initiating nodulation-specific symbiotic processes. In addition, ectopic expression of either NIN or the NF-Y subunit genes caused abnormal cell division during lateral root development. This indicated that the Lotus NF-Y subunits can function to stimulate cell division. Thus, transcriptional regulation by NIN, including the activation of the NF-Y subunit genes, induces cortical cell division, which is an initial step in root nodule organogenesis. Unlike the legume-specific NIN protein, NF-Y is a major CCAAT box binding protein complex that is widespread among eukaryotes. We propose that the evolution of root nodules in legume plants was associated with changes in the function of NIN. NIN has acquired functions that allow it to divert pathways involved in the regulation of cell division to

  20. Pax3 and Zic1 trigger the early neural crest gene regulatory network by the direct activation of multiple key neural crest specifiers.

    PubMed

    Plouhinec, Jean-Louis; Roche, Daniel D; Pegoraro, Caterina; Figueiredo, Ana Leonor; Maczkowiak, Frédérique; Brunet, Lisa J; Milet, Cécile; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Pollet, Nicolas; Harland, Richard M; Monsoro-Burq, Anne H

    2014-02-15

    Neural crest development is orchestrated by a complex and still poorly understood gene regulatory network. Premigratory neural crest is induced at the lateral border of the neural plate by the combined action of signaling molecules and transcription factors such as AP2, Gbx2, Pax3 and Zic1. Among them, Pax3 and Zic1 are both necessary and sufficient to trigger a complete neural crest developmental program. However, their gene targets in the neural crest regulatory network remain unknown. Here, through a transcriptome analysis of frog microdissected neural border, we identified an extended gene signature for the premigratory neural crest, and we defined novel potential members of the regulatory network. This signature includes 34 novel genes, as well as 44 known genes expressed at the neural border. Using another microarray analysis which combined Pax3 and Zic1 gain-of-function and protein translation blockade, we uncovered 25 Pax3 and Zic1 direct targets within this signature. We demonstrated that the neural border specifiers Pax3 and Zic1 are direct upstream regulators of neural crest specifiers Snail1/2, Foxd3, Twist1, and Tfap2b. In addition, they may modulate the transcriptional output of multiple signaling pathways involved in neural crest development (Wnt, Retinoic Acid) through the induction of key pathway regulators (Axin2 and Cyp26c1). We also found that Pax3 could maintain its own expression through a positive autoregulatory feedback loop. These hierarchical inductions, feedback loops, and pathway modulations provide novel tools to understand the neural crest induction network.

  1. Hypoxia-Response Element (HRE)–Directed Transcriptional Regulation of the Rat Lysyl Oxidase Gene in Response to Cobalt and Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wande

    2013-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LO) catalyzes crosslink of collagen, elastin, and histone H1, stabilizing the extracellular matrix and cell nucleus. This enzyme displays dual functions for tumorigenesis, i.e., as a tumor suppressor inactivating the ras oncogene and as a tumor promoter enhancing malignant cell metastasis. To elucidate LO transcriptional regulation, we have cloned the 804 base pair region upstream of the translation start site (ATG) of the rat LO gene with the maximal promoter activity. Computer analysis indicated that at least four hypoxia-response element (HRE) consensuses (5′-ACGTG-3′) exist in the cloned LO promoter. Treatment of rat lung fibroblasts (RFL6) with CoCl2 (Co, 10–100 μM), a chemical hypoxia reagent, enhanced LO mRNA expression and promoter activities. Overexpression of LO was associated with upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α at mRNA levels in cobalt (Co)–treated cells. Thus, LO is a hypoxia-responsive gene. Dominant negative-HIF-1α inhibited LO promoter activities stimulated by Co. Electrophoretic mobility shift, oligonucleotide competition, and in vitro translated HIF-1α binding assays indicated that only one HRE mapped at −387/−383 relative to ATG was functionally active among four consensuses. Site-directed mutation of this HRE significantly diminished the Co-induced and LO promoter-directed expression of the reporter gene. Cadmium (Cd), an inducer of reactive oxygen species, inhibited HIF-1α mRNA expression and HIF-1α binding to the LO gene in Co-treated cells as revealed by RT-PCR and ChIP assays, respectively. Thus, modulation of the HRE activity by Co and Cd plays a critical role in LO gene transactivation. PMID:23161664

  2. Directed chromosomal integration and expression of the reporter gene gusA3 in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Grace L; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2011-10-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a probiotic microbe that survives passage through the human gastrointestinal tract and interacts with the host epithelium and mucosal immune cells. The potential for L. acidophilus to express antigens at mucosal surfaces has been investigated with various antigens and plasmid expression vectors. Plasmid instability and antibiotic selection complicate the possibility of testing these constructs in human clinical trials. Integrating antigen encoding genes into the chromosome for expression is expected to eliminate selection requirements and provide genetic stability. In this work, a reporter gene encoding a β-glucuronidase (GusA3) was integrated into four intergenic chromosomal locations. The integrants were tested for genetic stability and GusA3 activity. Two locations were selected for insertion downstream of constitutively highly expressed genes, one downstream of slpA (LBA0169), encoding a highly expressed surface-layer protein, and one downstream of phosphopyruvate hydratase (LBA0889), a highly expressed gene with homologs in other lactic acid bacteria. An inducible location was selected downstream of lacZ (LBA1462), encoding a β-galactosidase. A fourth location was selected in a low-expression region. The expression of gusA3 was evaluated from each location by measuring GusA3 activity on 4-methyl-umbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide (MUG). GusA3 activity from both highly expressed loci was more than three logs higher than the gusA3-negative parent, L. acidophilus NCK1909. GusA3 activity from the lacZ locus was one log higher in cells grown in lactose than in glucose. The differences in expression levels between integration locations highlights the importance of rational targeting with gene cassettes intended for chromosomal expression.

  3. 5 CFR 2500.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION, EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT INFORMATION SECURITY REGULATION § 2500.1 Introduction. (a) References. (1) Executive Order 12065, “National Security Information”, dated June 28, 1978. (2) Information Security Oversight Office Directive No. 1, “National...

  4. 5 CFR 2500.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION, EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT INFORMATION SECURITY REGULATION § 2500.1 Introduction. (a) References. (1) Executive Order 12065, “National Security Information”, dated June 28, 1978. (2) Information Security Oversight Office Directive No. 1, “National...

  5. Molecular analysis of transgenic melon plants showing virus resistance conferred by direct repeat of movement gene of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Ali, Emran Md; Emran, Ali; Tabei, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Kappei; Yamaoka, Naoto; Nishiguchi, Masamichi

    2012-08-01

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) is a major limiting factor in the production of melon plants worldwide. For effective control of this virus using the transgenic approach, the direct repeat of the movement protein gene of CGMMV was used for transforming melon plants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. PCR and Southern blot analyses of T₃ confirmed that they carried the transgene. Northern blot analysis with total RNA showed that transgene transcript RNA as well as siRNA was observed in all plants tested. Separate leaves or individual plants were inoculated with CGMMV and subjected to ELISA and RNA blot analysis using the coat protein gene probe of the virus. Compared to nontransgenic control, these plants were shown to have high virus resistance. Furthermore, cytosine of the transgene DNA in the plants was methylated. Thus, these results reveal that the transgenic lines were highly resistant to the virus through RNA silencing. Key message High virus resistance was obtained in transgenic melon plants with direct repeat of movement protein gene of Cucumber green mottle mosaic tobamovirus through RNA silencing.

  6. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) utilization by Delftia acidovorans MC1 at alkaline pH and in the presence of dichlorprop is improved by introduction of the tfdK gene.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Doreen; Müller, Roland H

    2006-06-01

    Growth of Delftia acidovorans MC1 on 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and on racemic 2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propanoic acid ((RS)-2,4-DP) was studied in the perspective of an extension of the strain's degradation capacity at alkaline pH. At pH 6.8 the strain grew on 2,4-D at a maximum rate (mu max) of 0.158 h(-1). The half-maximum rate-associated substrate concentration (Ks) was 45 microM. At pH 8.5 mu max was only 0.05 h(-1) and the substrate affinity was mucher lower than at pH 6.8. The initial attack of 2,4-D was not the limiting step at pH 8.5 as was seen from high dioxygenase activity in cells grown at this pH. High stationary 2,4-D concentrations and the fact that mu max with dichlorprop was around 0.2 h(-1) at both pHs rather pointed at limited 2,4-D uptake at pH 8.5. Introduction of tfdK from D. acidovorans P4a by conjugation, coding for a 2,4-D-specific transporter resulted in improved growth on 2,4-D at pH 8.5 with mu max of 0.147 h(-1) and Ks of 267 microM. Experiments with labeled substrates showed significantly enhanced 2,4-D uptake by the transconjugant TK62. This is taken as an indication of expression of the tfdK gene and proper function of the transporter. The uncoupler carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) reduced the influx of 2,4-D. At a concentration of 195 microM 2,4-D, the effect amounted to 90% and 50%, respectively, with TK62 and MC1. Cloning of tfdK also improved the utilization of 2,4-D in the presence of (RS)-2,4-DP. Simultaneous and almost complete degradation of both compounds occurred in TK62 up to D = 0.23 h(-1) at pH 6.8 and up to D = 0.2 h(-1) at pH 8.5. In contrast, MC1 left 2,4-D largely unutilized even at low dilution rates when growing on herbicide mixtures at pH 8.5.

  7. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells.

  8. The Diversification of Plant NBS-LRR Defense Genes Directs the Evolution of MicroRNAs That Target Them

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Xia, Rui; Kuang, Hanhui; Meyers, Blake C.

    2016-01-01

    High expression of plant nucleotide binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) defense genes is often lethal to plant cells, a phenotype perhaps associated with fitness costs. Plants implement several mechanisms to control the transcript level of NBS-LRR defense genes. As negative transcriptional regulators, diverse miRNAs target NBS-LRRs in eudicots and gymnosperms. To understand the evolutionary benefits of this miRNA-NBS-LRR regulatory system, we investigated the NBS-LRRs of 70 land plants, coupling this analysis with extensive small RNA data. A tight association between the diversity of NBS-LRRs and miRNAs was found. The miRNAs typically target highly duplicated NBS-LRRs. In comparison, families of heterogeneous NBS-LRRs were rarely targeted by miRNAs in Poaceae and Brassicaceae genomes. We observed that duplicated NBS-LRRs from different gene families periodically gave birth to new miRNAs. Most of these newly emerged miRNAs target the same conserved, encoded protein motif of NBS-LRRs, consistent with a model of convergent evolution for these miRNAs. By assessing the interactions between miRNAs and NBS-LRRs, we found nucleotide diversity in the wobble position of the codons in the target site drives the diversification of miRNAs. Taken together, we propose a co-evolutionary model of plant NBS-LRRs and miRNAs hypothesizing how plants balance the benefits and costs of NBS-LRR defense genes. PMID:27512116

  9. Functional studies of the gene slr2049 from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and its site-directed mutation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingjun; Chen, Sili; Zhang, Lei

    2015-06-01

    Phycobiliprotein is a homologous family of light-harvesting chromoproteins existing in cyanobacteria, red algae and cryptophytes. Phycobiliprotein is made up of phycobilin and its corresponding apophycobiliprotein, and they are covalently linked by the thioether bond with the bilin lyase. Using the software BLAST, we have found gene slr2049 in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 homologous to the biliprotein lyase gene cpeS. This paper investigates the protein expressed by gene slr2049 to find the enzymatic activity characteristics. We cloned slr2049 and its related genes cpcB, ho1, and pcyA which are linked with the synthesis of phycocyanin. Special amino acid mutagenesis was performed on slr2049 to construct eight mutants slr2049 (H21S), slr2049 (L23S), slr2049 (A24S), slr2049 (F25S), slr2049 (W72L), slr2049 (G84S), slr2049 (R107S) and slr2049 (Y124S). These mutants were ligated with vectors pEDFDuet-1 and pET-23a to construct pCDF-cpcB-slr2049 wild-type, pCDF-cpcB-slr2049 mutants and pET-ho1-pcyA, for the purpose of protein expression and analysis. The results showed that the wild-type and mutants slr2049 (H21S), slr2049 (L23S), slr2049 (F25S), slr2049 (W72L), slr2049 (G84S), and slr2049 (Y124S) can catalyze CpcB to couple on PCB correctly and the products have unique spectral characteristics. However mutants slr2049 (A24S) and slr2049 (R107S) have no spectral characteristics. Thus, it is suggested that alanine at position 24 and arginine at position 107 are the active sites.

  10. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24500196

  11. Functional studies of the gene slr2049 from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and its site-directed mutation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingjun; Chen, Sili; Zhang, Lei

    2015-06-01

    Phycobiliprotein is a homologous family of light-harvesting chromoproteins existing in cyanobacteria, red algae and cryptophytes. Phycobiliprotein is made up of phycobilin and its corresponding apophycobiliprotein, and they are covalently linked by the thioether bond with the bilin lyase. Using the software BLAST, we have found gene slr2049 in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 homologous to the biliprotein lyase gene cpeS. This paper investigates the protein expressed by gene slr2049 to find the enzymatic activity characteristics. We cloned slr2049 and its related genes cpcB, ho1, and pcyA which are linked with the synthesis of phycocyanin. Special amino acid mutagenesis was performed on slr2049 to construct eight mutants slr2049 (H21S), slr2049 (L23S), slr2049 (A24S), slr2049 (F25S), slr2049 (W72L), slr2049 (G84S), slr2049 (R107S) and slr2049 (Y124S). These mutants were ligated with vectors pEDFDuet-1 and pET-23a to construct pCDF-cpcB-slr2049 wild-type, pCDF-cpcB-slr2049 mutants and pET-ho1-pcyA, for the purpose of protein expression and analysis. The results showed that the wild-type and mutants slr2049 (H21S), slr2049 (L23S), slr2049 (F25S), slr2049 (W72L), slr2049 (G84S), and slr2049 (Y124S) can catalyze CpcB to couple on PCB correctly and the products have unique spectral characteristics. However mutants slr2049 (A24S) and slr2049 (R107S) have no spectral characteristics. Thus, it is suggested that alanine at position 24 and arginine at position 107 are the active sites. PMID:25791490

  12. The Spn4 gene from Drosophila melanogaster is a multipurpose defence tool directed against proteases from three different peptidase families

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, Mareke; Lummer, Martina; Bentele, Caterina; Smolenaars, Marcel M. W.; Rodenburg, Kees W.; Ragg, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    By alternative use of four RSL (reactive site loop) coding exon cassettes, the serpin (serine protease inhibitor) gene Spn4 from Drosophila melanogaster was proposed to enable the synthesis of multiple protease inhibitor isoforms, one of which has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of human furin. Here, we have investigated the inhibitory spectrum of all Spn4 RSL variants. The analyses indicate that the Spn4 gene encodes inhibitors that may inhibit serine proteases of the subtilase family (S8), the chymotrypsin family (S1), and the papain-like cysteine protease family (C1), most of them at high rates. Thus a cohort of different protease inhibitors is generated simply by grafting enzyme-adapted RSL sequences on to a single serpin scaffold, even though the target proteases contain different types and/or a varying order of catalytic residues and are descendents of different phylogenetic lineages. Since all of the Spn4 RSL isoforms are produced as intracellular residents and additionally as variants destined for export or associated with the secretory pathway, the Spn4 gene represents a versatile defence tool kit that may provide multiple antiproteolytic functions. PMID:16989645

  13. Muscle-directed gene therapy for phenylketonuria (PKU): Development of transgenic mice with muscle-specific phenylalanine hydroxylase expression

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, C.O.; Messing, A.; Wolff, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an attractive target for gene therapy because of shortcomings in current therapy including lifelong commitment to a difficult and expensive diet, persistent mild cognitive deficits in some children despite adequate dietary therapy, and maternal PKU syndrome. Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is normally expressed only in liver, but we propose to treat PKU by introducing the gene for PAH into muscle. In order to evaluate both the safety and efficacy of this approach, we have a developed a trangenic mouse which expresses PAH in both cardiac and skeletal muscle. The transgene includes promoter and enhancer sequences from the mouse muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene fused to the mouse liver PAH cDNA. Mice which have inherited the transgene are healthy, active, and do not exhibit any signs of muscle weakness or wasting. Ectopic PAH expression in muscle is not detrimental to the health, neurologic function, or reproduction of the mice. Pah{sup enu2} hyperphenylalaninemic mice, a model of human PAH deficiency, bred to carry the transgene have substantial PAH expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle but none in liver. Muscle PAH expression alone does not complement the hyperphenylalaninemic phenotype of Pah{sup enu2} mice. However, administration of reduced tetrahydrobiopterin to transgenic Pah{sup enu2} mice is associated with a 25% mean decrease in serum phenylalanine levels. We predict that ectopic expression of PAH in muscle along with adequate muscle supplies of reduced biopterin cofactor will decrease hyperphenylalaninemia in PKU.

  14. PEGylated gene nanocarriers based on block catiomers bearing ethylenediamine repeating units directed to remarkable enhancement of photochemical transfection.

    PubMed

    Arnida; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kanayama, Naoki; Jang, Woo-Dong; Yamasaki, Yuichi; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2006-10-10

    The therapeutic usefulness of macromolecular drugs such as plasmid DNA is often limited by the inefficient transfer of macromolecules to the cytosol. Photochemical internalization (PCI) technology, in which the endosomal escape of DNA or its complex is assisted by co-incubated photosensitizers that photodamage endosome membrane, offers a solution for this problem. A series of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based block polycatiomers with increasing number of ethylenediamine repeating unit at side chain of polycatiomers were complexed with pDNA to form the PEGylated polyplexes as a biocompatible gene carrier. Dendrimeric phthalocyanine (DPc)-incorporated micelle was used to assist the gene transfer of these polyplexes in a light-inducible manner. As a result, the light-inducible transfection activity was significantly enhanced as the number of amino group at the side chain of PEG-b-polycatiomer increased. The polyplex from PEG-b-polycatiomer having the longest ethylenediamine structure achieved approximately 1000-fold enhancement of transfection upon photoirradiation. This result supports the underlying hypothesis that photochemical transfection and proton sponge effect of polycations can work synergistically to enhance the transfection efficiency. With careful balance between photochemical transfection enhancement and cytotoxicity, PEG-b-polycatiomers used in this study might be a potential candidate for in vivo PCI-mediated gene transfer.

  15. Direct gene transfer study and transgenic plant regeneration after electroporation into mesophyll protoplasts of Pelargonium x hortorum, 'Panaché Sud'.

    PubMed

    Hassanein, Anber; Hamama, Latifa; Loridon, Karine; Dorion, Noëlle

    2009-10-01

    Direct genetic transformation of mesophyll protoplasts was studied in Pelargonium x hortorum. Calcein and green-fluorescent protein (GFP) gene were used to set up the process. Electroporation (three electric pulses from a 33-microF capacitor in a 250-V cm(-1) electric field) was more efficient than PEG 6000 for membrane permeation, protoplast survival and cell division. Transient expression of GFP was detected in 33-36% of electroporated protoplasts after 2 days and further in colonies. A protoplast suspension conductivity of >1,500 microS cm(-1) allowed high colony formation and plant regeneration. Stable transformation was obtained using the plasmid FAJ3000 containing uidA and nptII genes. When selection (50 mg l(-1) kanamycin) was achieved 6 weeks after electroporation, regenerated shoots were able to grow and root on 100 mg l(-1) kanamycin. The maximum transformation efficiency was 4.5%, based on the number of colonies producing kanamycin-resistant rooted plants or 0.7% based on the number of cultured protoplasts. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis on in vitro micropropagated plants showed that 18 clones out of 20 contained the nptII gene, while the uidA gene was absent. These results were confirmed after PCR analyses of five glasshouse-acclimatized clones.

  16. Ha-ras oncogene expression directed by a milk protein gene promoter: tissue specificity, hormonal regulation, and tumor induction in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, A.C.; Schoenenberger, C.A.; Groner, B.; Henninghausen, L.; LeMeur, M.; Gelinger, P.

    1987-03-01

    The activated human Ha-ras oncogene was subjected to the control of the promoter region of the murine whey acidic protein (Wap) gene, which is expressed in mammary epithelial cells in response to lactogenic hormones. The Wap-ras gene was stably introduced into the mouse germ line of five transgenic mice (one male and four females). Wap-ras expression was observed in the mammary glands of lactating females in two lines derived from female founders. The tissue-directed and hormone-dependent Wap expression was conferred on the Ha-ras oncogene. The signals governing Wap expression are located within 2.5 kilobases of 5' flanking sequence. The other two lines derived from female founders did not express the chimeric gene. In the line derived from the male founder the Wap-ras gene is integrated into the Y chromosome. Expression was found in the salivary gland of male animals only. After a long latency, Wap-ras-expressing mice developed tumors. The tumors arose in tissues expressing Wap-ras - i.e., mammary or salivary glands. Compared to the corresponding nonmalignant tissues, Wap-ras expression was enhanced in the tumors.

  17. Meta-Analysis of Arabidopsis KANADI1 Direct Target Genes Identifies a Basic Growth-Promoting Module Acting Upstream of Hormonal Signaling Pathways1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yakun; Straub, Daniel; Eguen, Tenai; Brandt, Ronny; Stahl, Mark; Martínez-García, Jaime F.; Wenkel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    An intricate network of antagonistically acting transcription factors mediates the formation of a flat leaf lamina of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. In this context, members of the class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIPIII) transcription factor family specify the adaxial domain (future upper side) of the leaf, while antagonistically acting KANADI transcription factors determine the abaxial domain (future lower side). Here, we used a messenger RNA sequencing approach to identify genes regulated by KANADI1 (KAN1) and subsequently performed a meta-analysis combining our data sets with published genome-wide data sets. Our analysis revealed that KAN1 acts upstream of several genes encoding auxin biosynthetic enzymes. When exposed to shade, we found three YUCCA genes, YUC2, YUC5, and YUC8, to be transcriptionally up-regulated, which correlates with an increase in the levels of free auxin. When ectopically expressed, KAN1 is able to transcriptionally repress these three YUC genes and thereby block shade-induced auxin biosynthesis. Consequently, KAN1 is able to strongly suppress shade-avoidance responses. Taken together, we hypothesize that HD-ZIPIII/KAN form the basis of a basic growth-promoting module. Hypocotyl extension in the shade and outgrowth of new leaves both involve auxin synthesis and signaling, which are under the direct control of HD-ZIPIII/KAN. PMID:26246448

  18. Introduction to ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Sashida, Toshiiku; Kenjo, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    The ultrasonic motor, invented in 1980, utilizes the piezoelectric effect in the ultrasonic frequency range to provide the motive force. (In conventional electric motors the motive force is electromagnetic.) The result is a motor with unusually good low-speed high-torque and power-to-weight characteristics. It has already found applications in camera autofocus mechanisms, medical equipment subject to high magnetic fields, and motorized car accessories. Its applications will increase as designers become more familiar with its unique characteristics. This book is the result of a collaboration between the inventor and an expert in conventional electric motors: the result is an introduction to the general theory presented in a way that links it to conventional motor theory. It will be invaluable both to motor designers and to those who design with and use electric motors as an introduction to this important new invention.

  19. Expression profiling of Aldh1l1-precursors in the developing spinal cord reveals glial lineage-specific genes and direct Sox9-Nfe2l1 interactions.

    PubMed

    Molofsky, Anna V; Glasgow, Stacey M; Chaboub, Lesley S; Tsai, Hui-Hsin; Murnen, Alice T; Kelley, Kevin W; Fancy, Stephen P J; Yuen, Tracy J; Madireddy, Lohith; Baranzini, Sergio; Deneen, Benjamin; Rowitch, David H; Oldham, Michael C

    2013-09-01

    Developmental regulation of gliogenesis in the mammalian CNS is incompletely understood, in part due to a limited repertoire of lineage-specific genes. We used Aldh1l1-GFP as a marker for gliogenic radial glia and later-stage precursors of developing astrocytes and performed gene expression profiling of these cells. We then used this dataset to identify candidate transcription factors that may serve as glial markers or regulators of glial fate. Our analysis generated a database of developmental stage-related markers of Aldh1l1+ cells between murine embryonic day 13.5-18.5. Using these data we identify the bZIP transcription factor Nfe2l1 and demonstrate that it promotes glial fate under direct Sox9 regulatory control. Thus, this dataset represents a resource for identifying novel regulators of glial development.

  20. Critical Role of IRF-3 in the Direct Regulation of dsRNA-Induced Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene-I (RIG-I) Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hayakari, Ryo; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Xing, Fei; Yoshida, Hidemi; Hayakari, Makoto; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic viral sensor retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I), which is also known as an IFN-stimulated gene (ISG), senses viral RNA to activate antiviral signaling. It is therefore thought that RIG-I is regulated in a STAT1-dependent manner. Although RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling is indispensable for the induction of an appropriate adaptive immune response, the mechanism underlying the regulation of RIG-I expression remains elusive. Here, we examined the direct regulation of RIG-I expression by interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), which is an essential molecule for antiviral innate immunity. We initially found that RIG-I can be induced by dsRNA in both IFN-independent and IRF-3-dependent manners. A sequence analysis revealed that the RIG-I gene has putative IRF-3-binding sites in its promoter region. Using a combination of cellular, molecular biological, and mutational approaches, we first showed that IRF-3 can directly regulate the expression of RIG-I via a single IRF-element (IRF-E) site in the proximal promoter region of the RIG-I gene in response to dsRNA. IRF-3 is considered a master regulator in antiviral signaling for the generation of type I interferons (IFNs). Thus, our findings demonstrate that RIG-I expression induced by the IRF-3-mediated pathway may serve as a crucial antiviral factor for reinforcing a surveillance system against viral invasion through the regulation of the cytoplasmic viral sensor RIG-I. PMID:27662626

  1. Direct regulation of knot gene expression by Ultrabithorax and the evolution of cis-regulatory elements in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Bradley M; Carroll, Sean B

    2005-04-01

    The regulation of development by Hox proteins is important in the evolution of animal morphology, but how the regulatory sequences of Hox-regulated target genes function and evolve is unclear. To understand the regulatory organization and evolution of a Hox target gene, we have identified a wing-specific cis-regulatory element controlling the knot gene, which is expressed in the developing Drosophila wing but not the haltere. This regulatory element contains a single binding site that is crucial for activation by the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci), and a cluster of binding sites for repression by the Hox protein Ultrabithorax (UBX). The negative and positive control regions are physically separable, demonstrating that UBX does not repress by competing for occupancy of Ci-binding sites. Although knot expression is conserved among Drosophila species, this cluster of UBX binding sites is not. We isolated the knot wing cis-regulatory element from D. pseudoobscura, which contains a cluster of UBX-binding sites that is not homologous to the functionally defined D. melanogaster cluster. It is, however, homologous to a second D. melanogaster region containing a cluster of UBX sites that can also function as a repressor element. Thus, the knot regulatory region in D. melanogaster has two apparently functionally redundant blocks of sequences for repression by UBX, both of which are widely separated from activator sequences. This redundancy suggests that the complete evolutionary unit of regulatory control is larger than the minimal experimentally defined control element. The span of regulatory sequences upon which selection acts may, in general, be more expansive and less modular than functional studies of these elements have previously indicated.

  2. Radiofrequency hyperthermia-enhanced herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase/ganciclovir direct intratumoral gene therapy of esophageal squamous cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yaoping; Wang, Jianfeng; Bai, Zhibin; Li, Yonggang; Qiu, Longhua; Zhai, Bo; Zhang, Feng; Yang, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in surgical technique and treatment strategies for esophageal cancer (EC), to effectively manage the advanced (metastatic or disseminated) and recurrent EC still remain a great challenge. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using intra-esophagus radiofrequency hyperthermia to enhance local HSV-TK/ganciclovir-mediated suicide gene therapy of an innovative animal models with orthotopic esophageal squamous cancers. Human esophageal squamous cancer (ESCa) cells were labeled with lentivirus/luciferase. ESCa cells and nude rats with orthotopic ESCa were divided into in four groups (n = 6/group) and treated with: i) combination therapy of MR imaging-heating-guidewire-mediated radiofrequency hyperthermia ((RFH, 42°C) plus local HSV-TK/GCV; ii) HSV-TK/GCV alone; iii) RFH alone; and (iv) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Bioluminescence optical imaging and transcutaneous ultrasound imaging were used to follow up bioluminescence signal and size changes of tumors among different groups over two weeks, which were correlated with subsequent histology. We demonstrated that combination therapy of RFH with gene therapy resulted in the lowest cell proliferation (37.5±8.6%, P<0.0001), rendered the smallest relative tumor volume (0.90±0.15, P<0.01), and relative bioluminescence optical imaging photon signal intensity (0.81±0.17, P<0.01) of orthotopic esophageal cancers, compared with groups treated with gene therapy alone, RFH alone and PBS. Our study indicated that intra-esophageal radiofrequency hyperthermia could enhance the HSV-TK-mediated effect on esophageal squamous cancers. PMID:27725910

  3. EIN3 and ORE1 Accelerate Degreening during Ethylene-Mediated Leaf Senescence by Directly Activating Chlorophyll Catabolic Genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kai; Li, Zhongpeng; Yang, Zhen; Chen, Junyi; Wu, Shouxin; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Shan; Gao, Jiong; Ren, Guodong; Kuai, Benke; Zhou, Xin

    2015-07-01

    Degreening, caused by chlorophyll degradation, is the most obvious symptom of senescing leaves. Chlorophyll degradation can be triggered by endogenous and environmental cues, and ethylene is one of the major inducers. ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) is a key transcription factor in the ethylene signaling pathway. It was previously reported that EIN3, miR164, and a NAC (NAM, ATAF, and CUC) transcription factor ORE1/NAC2 constitute a regulatory network mediating leaf senescence. However, how this network regulates chlorophyll degradation at molecular level is not yet elucidated. Here we report a feed-forward regulation of chlorophyll degradation that involves EIN3, ORE1, and chlorophyll catabolic genes (CCGs). Gene expression analysis showed that the induction of three major CCGs, NYE1, NYC1 and PAO, by ethylene was largely repressed in ein3 eil1 double mutant. Dual-luciferase assay revealed that EIN3 significantly enhanced the promoter activity of NYE1, NYC1 and PAO in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Furthermore, Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) indicated that EIN3 could directly bind to NYE1, NYC1 and PAO promoters. These results reveal that EIN3 functions as a positive regulator of CCG expression during ethylene-mediated chlorophyll degradation. Interestingly, ORE1, a senescence regulator which is a downstream target of EIN3, could also activate the expression of NYE1, NYC1 and PAO by directly binding to their promoters in EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. In addition, EIN3 and ORE1 promoted NYE1 and NYC1 transcriptions in an additive manner. These results suggest that ORE1 is also involved in the direct regulation of CCG transcription. Moreover, ORE1 activated the expression of ACS2, a major ethylene biosynthesis gene, and subsequently promoted ethylene production. Collectively, our work reveals that EIN3, ORE1 and CCGs constitute a coherent feed-forward loop involving in the robust regulation of ethylene-mediated chlorophyll degradation

  4. The Conservation and Application of Three Hypothetical Protein Coding Gene for Direct Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Sputum Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lianhua; Gao, Shihui; Wang, Jie; Zheng, Ruijuan; Lu, Junmei; Hu, Zhongyi

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate and early diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is of major importance in the control of TB. One of the most important technical advances in diagnosis of tuberculosis is the development of nucleic acid amplification (NAA) tests. However, the choice of the target sequence remains controversial in NAA tests. Recently, interesting alternatives have been found in hypothetical protein coding sequences from mycobacterial genome. Methodology/Principal Findings To obtain rational biomarker for TB diagnosis, the conservation of three hypothetical genes was firstly evaluated in 714 mycobacterial strains. The results showed that SCAR1 (Sequenced Characterized Amplified Region) based on Rv0264c coding gene showed the highest conservation (99.8%) and SCAR2 based on Rv1508c gene showed the secondary high conservation (99.7%) in M. tuberculosis (MTB) strains. SCAR3 based on Rv2135c gene (3.2%) and IS6110 (8%) showed relatively high deletion rate in MTB strains. Secondly, three SCAR markers were evaluated in 307 clinical sputum from patients in whom TB was suspected or patients with diseases other than TB. The amplification of IS6110 and 16SrRNA sequences together with both clinical and bacteriological identification was as a protocol to evaluate the efficacy of SCAR markers. The sensitivities and specificities, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of all NAA tests were higher than those of bacteriological detection. In four NAA tests, IS6110 and SCAR3 showed the highest PPV (100%) and low NPV (70% and 68.8%, respectively), and SCAR1 and SCAR2 showed the relatively high PPV and NPV (97% and 82.6%, 95.6% and 88.8%, respectively). Conclusions/Significance Our result indicated that SCAR1 and SCAR2 with a high degree of sequence conservation represent efficient and promising alternatives as NAA test targets in identification of MTB. Moreover, the targets developed from this study may provide more alternative targets for the development of a

  5. The role of vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein in inhibition of host-directed gene expression is genetically separable from its function in virus assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Black, B L; Rhodes, R B; McKenzie, M; Lyles, D S

    1993-01-01

    Recently, the vesicular stomatitis virus matrix (M) protein has been shown to be capable of inhibition of host cell-directed transcription in the absence of other viral components (B. L. Black and D. S. Lyles, J. Virol. 66:4058-4064, 1992). M protein is a major structural protein that is known to play a critical role in virus assembly by binding the helical ribonucleoprotein core of the virus to the cytoplasmic surface of the cell plasma membrane during budding. In this study, two M protein mutants were tested to determine whether the inhibition of host transcription by M protein is an indirect effect of its function in virus assembly or whether it represents an independent function of M protein. The mutant M protein of the conditionally temperature-sensitive (ts) vesicular stomatitis virus mutant, tsO82, was found to be defective in its ability to inhibit host-directed gene expression, as shown by its inability to inhibit expression of a cotransfected target gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase. The ability of the tsO82 M protein to function in virus assembly was similar to that of wild-type M protein, as shown by its ability to complement the group III ts M protein mutant, tsO23. Another mutant, MN1, which lacks amino acids 4 to 21 of M protein demonstrated that the abilities of M protein to inhibit chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression and to localize to the nucleus were unaffected by deletion of this lysine-rich amino-terminal region but that the ability to function in virus assembly was ablated. Thus, the two M protein mutants examined in this study exhibited complementary phenotypes: tsO82 M protein functioned in virus assembly but was defective in inhibition of host-directed gene expression, while MN1 M protein functioned in inhibiting gene expression but was unable to function in virus assembly. These data demonstrate that the role of M protein in inhibition of host transcription can be separated genetically from its role in virus

  6. Promoters of AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 genes of Artemisia annua direct reporter gene expression in glandular and non-glandular trichomes.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Sunita; Longchar, Bendangchuchang; Singh, Alka; Gupta, Vikrant

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report cloning and analysis of promoters of GLABRA2 (AaGL2) homolog and a MIXTA-Like (AaMIXTA-Like1) gene from Artemisia annua. The upstream regulatory regions of AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 showed the presence of several crucial cis-acting elements. Arabidopsis and A. annua seedlings were transiently transfected with the promoter-GUS constructs using a robust agro-infiltration method. Both AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 promoters showed GUS expression preferentially in Arabidopsis single-celled trichomes and glandular as well as T-shaped trichomes of A. annua. Transgenic Arabidopsis harboring constructs in which AaGL2 or AaMIXTA-Like1 promoters would control GFP expression, showed fluorescence emanating specifically from trichome cells. Our study provides a fast and efficient method to study trichome-specific expression, and 2 promoters that have potential for targeted metabolic engineering in plants. PMID:26340695

  7. Direct sequence evaluation of the major outer membrane protein gene variant regions of Chlamydia trachomatis subtypes D', I', and L2'.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, D; Patton, M; Stephens, R S

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of variable segments (VS) 1, 2, and 4 for the major outer membrane protein gene (omp1) of Chlamydia trachomatis were determined for serologically defined subtypes D', I', and L2'. Asymmetric DNA amplification was used to produce single-stranded DNA for direct sequencing. Amino acid substitutions were detected in VS1, VS2, and VS4 for I', in VS2 for L2', and in VS4 for D'. DNA sequencing of omp1 variant regions may be an important method for evaluating the molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia spp. PMID:1706325

  8. Direct sequence evaluation of the major outer membrane protein gene variant regions of Chlamydia trachomatis subtypes D', I', and L2'.

    PubMed

    Dean, D; Patton, M; Stephens, R S

    1991-04-01

    The nucleotide sequences of variable segments (VS) 1, 2, and 4 for the major outer membrane protein gene (omp1) of Chlamydia trachomatis were determined for serologically defined subtypes D', I', and L2'. Asymmetric DNA amplification was used to produce single-stranded DNA for direct sequencing. Amino acid substitutions were detected in VS1, VS2, and VS4 for I', in VS2 for L2', and in VS4 for D'. DNA sequencing of omp1 variant regions may be an important method for evaluating the molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia spp.

  9. An LXR–NCOA5 gene regulatory complex directs inflammatory crosstalk-dependent repression of macrophage cholesterol efflux

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Mark A; Gold, Elizabeth S; Ramsey, Stephen A; Podolsky, Irina; Aderem, Alan; Ranish, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    LXR–cofactor complexes activate the gene expression program responsible for cholesterol efflux in macrophages. Inflammation antagonizes this program, resulting in foam cell formation and atherosclerosis; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this antagonism remain to be fully elucidated. We use promoter enrichment-quantitative mass spectrometry (PE-QMS) to characterize the composition of gene regulatory complexes assembled at the promoter of the lipid transporter Abca1 following downregulation of its expression. We identify a subset of proteins that show LXR ligand- and binding-dependent association with the Abca1 promoter and demonstrate they differentially control Abca1 expression. We determine that NCOA5 is linked to inflammatory Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and establish that NCOA5 functions as an LXR corepressor to attenuate Abca1 expression. Importantly, TLR3–LXR signal crosstalk promotes recruitment of NCOA5 to the Abca1 promoter together with loss of RNA polymerase II and reduced cholesterol efflux. Together, these data significantly expand our knowledge of regulatory inputs impinging on the Abca1 promoter and indicate a central role for NCOA5 in mediating crosstalk between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways that results in repression of macrophage cholesterol efflux. PMID:25755249

  10. Truncated cotton subtilase promoter directs guard cell-specific expression of foreign genes in tobacco and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Han, Ya-Nan; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2013-01-01

    A 993-bp regulatory region upstream of the translation start codon of subtilisin-like serine protease gene was isolated from Gossypium barbadense. This (T/A)AAAG-rich region, GbSLSP, and its 5'- and 3'-truncated versions were transferred into tobacco and Arabidopsis after fusing with GUS or GFP. Histochemical and quantitative GUS analysis and confocal GFP fluorescence scanning in the transgenic plants showed that the GbSLSP-driven GUS and GFP expressed preferentially in guard cells, whereas driven by GbSLSPF2 to GbSLSPF4, the 5'-truncated GbSLSP versions with progressively reduced Dof1 elements, both GUS and GFP expressed exclusively in guard cells, and the expression strength declined with (T/A)AAAG copy decrement. Deletion of 5'-untranslated region from GbSLSP markedly weakened the activity of GUS and GFP, while deletion from the strongest guard cell-specific promoter, GbSLSPF2, not only significantly decreased the expression strength, but also completely abolished the guard cell specificity. These results suggested both guard cell specificity and expression strength of the promoters be coordinately controlled by 5'-untranslated region and a cluster of at least 3 (T/A)AAAG elements within a region of about 100 bp relative to transcription start site. Our guard cell-specific promoters will enrich tools to manipulate gene expression in guard cells for scientific research and crop improvement.

  11. Construction of recombinant Marek's disease virus (rMDV) co-expressing AIV-H9N2-NA and NDV-F genes under control of MDV's own bi-directional promoter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenjie; Ma, Chengtai; Zhao, Peng; Duan, Luntao; Chen, Wenqing; Zhang, Fushou; Cui, Zhizhong

    2014-01-01

    To qualitatively analyze and evaluate a bi-directional promoter transcriptional function in both transient and transgenic systems, several different plasmids were constructed and recombinant MDV type 1 strain GX0101 was developed to co-express a Neuraminidase (NA) gene from Avian Influenza Virus H9N2 strain and a Fusion (F) gene from the Newcastle disease virus (NDV). The two foreign genes, NDV-F gene and AIV-NA gene, were inserted in the plasmid driven in each direction by the bi-directional promoter. To test whether the expression of pp38/pp24 heterodimers are the required activators for the expression of the foreign genes, the recombinant plasmid pPpp38-NA/1.8kb-F containing expression cassette for the two foreign genes was co-transfected with a pp38/pp24 expression plasmid, pBud-pp38-pp24, in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells. Alternatively, plasmid pPpp38-NA/1.8kb-F was transfected in GX0101-infected CEFs where the viral endogenous pp38/pp24 were expressed via virus infection. The expression of both foreign genes was activated by pp38/pp24 dimers either via virus infection, or co-expression. The CEFs transfected with pPpp38-NA/1.8kb-F alone had no expression. We chose to insert the expression cassette of Ppp38-NA/1.8kb-F in the non-essential region of GX0101ΔMeq US2 gene, and formed a new rMDV named MZC13NA/F through homologous recombination. Indirect fluorescence antibody (IFA) test, ELISA and Western blot analyses indicated that F and NA genes were expressed simultaneously under control of the bi-directional promoter, but in opposite directions. The data also indicated the activity of the promoter in the 1.8-kb mRNA transcript direction was higher than that in the direction for the pp38 gene. The expression of pp38/pp24 dimers either via co-tranfection of the pBud-pp38-pp24 plasmid, or by GX0101 virus infection were critical to activate the bi-directional promoter for expression of two foreign genes in both directions. Therefore, the confirmed function

  12. Directed self-assembly, genomic assembly complexity and the formation of biological structure, or, what are the genes for nacre?

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Julyan H E

    2016-03-13

    Biology uses dynamical mechanisms of self-organization and self-assembly of materials, but it also choreographs and directs these processes. The difference between abiotic self-assembly and a biological process is rather like the difference between setting up and running an experiment to make a material remotely compared with doing it in one's own laboratory: with a remote experiment-say on the International Space Station-everything must be set up beforehand to let the experiment run 'hands off', but in the laboratory one can intervene at any point in a 'hands-on' approach. It is clear that the latter process, of directed self-assembly, can allow much more complicated experiments and produce far more complex structures than self-assembly alone. This control over self-assembly in biology is exercised at certain key waypoints along a trajectory and the process may be quantified in terms of the genomic assembly complexity of a biomaterial.

  13. Directed self-assembly, genomic assembly complexity and the formation of biological structure, or, what are the genes for nacre?

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Julyan H E

    2016-03-13

    Biology uses dynamical mechanisms of self-organization and self-assembly of materials, but it also choreographs and directs these processes. The difference between abiotic self-assembly and a biological process is rather like the difference between setting up and running an experiment to make a material remotely compared with doing it in one's own laboratory: with a remote experiment-say on the International Space Station-everything must be set up beforehand to let the experiment run 'hands off', but in the laboratory one can intervene at any point in a 'hands-on' approach. It is clear that the latter process, of directed self-assembly, can allow much more complicated experiments and produce far more complex structures than self-assembly alone. This control over self-assembly in biology is exercised at certain key waypoints along a trajectory and the process may be quantified in terms of the genomic assembly complexity of a biomaterial. PMID:26857670

  14. Direct evidence for Mendelian inheritance of the variations in the ribosomal protein gene introns in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares).

    PubMed

    Chow, S; Scholey, V P; Nakazawa, A; Margulies, D; Wexler, J B; Olson, R J; Hazama, K

    2001-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism found in the S7 ribosomal protein gene introns of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) was compared between a single pair of parents and their offspring. The sizes of the first intron ( RP1) and second intron ( RP2) amplified by polymerase chain reaction were 810 bp and 1400 bp, respectively. The dam and sire had different restriction types from one another in HhaI and RsaI digestions for RP1 and in DdeI, HhaI, and ScrFI digestions for RP2. Putative genotypes in both introns of 64 larvae were found to be segregated in Mendelian proportions. Genotype distributions in a wild yellowfin tuna sample ( n = 34) were in Hardy-Weinberg proportions, and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.149 to 0.388. This study presents novel Mendelian markers, which are feasible for tuna population genetic study and pedigree analysis. PMID:14961386

  15. Targeted silencing of BjMYB28 transcription factor gene directs development of low glucosinolate lines in oilseed Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Rehna; Mukhopadhyay, Arundhati; Bisht, Naveen C

    2013-09-01

    Brassica juncea (Indian mustard), a globally important oilseed crop, contains relatively high amount of seed glucosinolates ranging from 80 to 120 μmol/g dry weight (DW). One of the major breeding objectives in oilseed Brassicas is to improve the seed-meal quality through the development of low-seed-glucosinolate lines (<30 μmol/g DW), as high amounts of certain seed glucosinolates are known to be anti-nutritional and reduce the meal palatability. Here, we report the development of transgenic B. juncea lines having seed glucosinolates as low as 11.26 μmol/g DW, through RNAi-based targeted suppression of BjMYB28, a R2R3-MYB transcription factor family gene involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis. Targeted silencing of BjMYB28 homologs provided significant reduction in the anti-nutritional aliphatic glucosinolates fractions, without altering the desirable nonaliphatic glucosinolate pool, both in leaves and seeds of transgenic plants. Molecular characterization of single-copy, low glucosinolate homozygous lines confirmed significant down-regulation of BjMYB28 homologs vis-à-vis enhanced accumulation of BjMYB28-specific siRNA pool. Consequently, these low glucosinolate lines also showed significant suppression of genes involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis. The low glucosinolate trait was stable in subsequent generations of the transgenic lines with no visible off-target effects on plant growth and development. Various seed quality parameters including fatty acid composition, oil content, protein content and seed weight of the low glucosinolate lines also remained unaltered, when tested under containment conditions in the field. Our results indicate that targeted silencing of a key glucosinolate transcriptional regulator MYB28 has huge potential for reducing the glucosinolates content and improving the seed-meal quality of oilseed Brassica crops. PMID:23721233

  16. Multiple promoters and targeted microRNAs direct the expressions of HMGB3 gene transcripts in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Li, Liming; Huang, Jinming; Ju, Zhihua; Li, Qiuling; Wang, Changfa; Qi, Chao; Zhang, Yan; Hou, Qinlei; Hang, Suqin; Zhong, Jifeng

    2013-06-01

    HMGB3 (high-mobility group box 3) is an X-linked member of a family of sequence-independent chromatin-binding proteins and functions as a universal sentinel for nucleic acid-mediated innate immune responses. The splice variant expression, promoter characterization and targeted microRNAs of the bovine HMGB3 gene were investigated to explore its expression pattern and possible regulatory mechanism. The results revealed that the expression of HMGB3 transcript variants 1 and 2 (HMGB3-TV1 and HMGB3-TV2) mRNA in the mastitis-infected mammary gland tissues was up-regulated by 8.46- and 5.31-fold respectively compared with that in healthy tissues (P < 0.05). HMGB3-TV1 was highly expressed in the mammary gland tissues, whereas HMGB3-TV2 was expressed primarily in liver. Functional analyses indicated that HMGB3 transcription is regulated by three distinct promoters - promoters 1, 2 and 3 (P1, P2 and P3) - resulting in two alternative transcripts with the same 3'-untranslated region. Promoter luciferase activity analysis suggested that the core sequences of P1 and P2 were mapped in the region of g.1535 to ~g.2076 and g.2074 to ~g.2491 respectively. The g.5880C>T SNP in P3 affected its base promoter activity, and different genotypes were associated with the bovine somatic count score. The expression of targets bovine miR-17-5p, miR-20b and miR-93 of the HMGB3 gene was down-regulated 1.56-, 1.72- and 2.94-fold respectively in mammary gland tissues as compared with that in healthy tissues (P < 0.05). The findings suggest that HMGB3 expression is under complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional control by alternate promoter usage, alternative splicing mechanism and microRNAs in dairy cattle. PMID:23206268

  17. Theoretical Optics: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, Hartmann

    2005-02-01

    Starting from basic electrodynamics, this volume provides a solid, yet concise introduction to theoretical optics, containing topics such as nonlinear optics, light-matter interaction, and modern topics in quantum optics, including entanglement, cryptography, and quantum computation. The author, with many years of experience in teaching and research, goes way beyond the scope of traditional lectures, enabling readers to keep up with the current state of knowledge. Both content and presentation make it essential reading for graduate and phD students as well as a valuable reference for researchers.

  18. Neurolaw: A brief introduction

    PubMed Central

    Petoft, Arian

    2015-01-01

    Neurolaw, as an interdisciplinary field which links the brain to law, facilitates the pathway to better understanding of human behavior in order to regulate it accurately through incorporating neuroscience achievements in legal studies. Since 1990’s, this emerging field, by study on human nervous system as a new dimension of legal phenomena, leads to a more precise explanation for human behavior to revise legal rules and decision-makings. This paper strives to bring about significantly a brief introduction to neurolaw so as to take effective steps toward exploring and expanding the scope of law and more thorough understanding of legal issues in the field at hand. PMID:25874060

  19. Introduction to biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Nikhil; Jolly, Pawan; Formisano, Nello

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors are nowadays ubiquitous in biomedical diagnosis as well as a wide range of other areas such as point-of-care monitoring of treatment and disease progression, environmental monitoring, food control, drug discovery, forensics and biomedical research. A wide range of techniques can be used for the development of biosensors. Their coupling with high-affinity biomolecules allows the sensitive and selective detection of a range of analytes. We give a general introduction to biosensors and biosensing technologies, including a brief historical overview, introducing key developments in the field and illustrating the breadth of biomolecular sensing strategies and the expansion of nanotechnological approaches that are now available. PMID:27365030

  20. Introduction to Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. NCTS 21070-15. Course Description: This course will present operating principles of the heat pipe with emphases on the underlying physical processes and requirements of pressure and energy balance. Performance characterizations and design considerations of the heat pipe will be highlighted. Guidelines for thermal engineers in the selection of heat pipes as part of the spacecraft thermal control system, testing methodology, and analytical modeling will also be discussed.

  1. Introduction to Econophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantegna, Rosario N.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1999-12-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Efficient market hypothesis; 3. Random walk; 4. Lévy stochastic processes and limit theorems; 5. Scales in financial data; 6. Stationarity and time correlation; 7. Time correlation in financial time series; 8. Stochastic models of price dynamics; 9. Scaling and its breakdown; 10. ARCH and GARCH processes; 11. Financial markets and turbulence; 12. Correlation and anti-correlation between stocks; 13. Taxonomy of a stock portfolio; 14. Options in idealized markets; 15. Options in real markets; Appendix A: notation guide; Appendix B: martingales; References; Index.

  2. Introduction to Econophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantegna, Rosario N.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2007-08-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Efficient market hypothesis; 3. Random walk; 4. Lévy stochastic processes and limit theorems; 5. Scales in financial data; 6. Stationarity and time correlation; 7. Time correlation in financial time series; 8. Stochastic models of price dynamics; 9. Scaling and its breakdown; 10. ARCH and GARCH processes; 11. Financial markets and turbulence; 12. Correlation and anti-correlation between stocks; 13. Taxonomy of a stock portfolio; 14. Options in idealized markets; 15. Options in real markets; Appendix A: notation guide; Appendix B: martingales; References; Index.

  3. An introduction to webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. D.

    2016-04-01

    Webs are sets of Feynman diagrams that contribute to the exponents of scattering amplitudes, in the kinematic limit in which emitted radiation is soft. As such, they have a number of phenomenological and formal applications, and offer tantalizing glimpses into the all-order structure of perturbative quantum field theory. This article is based on a series of lectures given to graduate students, and aims to provide a pedagogical introduction to webs. Topics covered include exponentiation in (non-)abelian gauge theories, the web mixing matrix formalism for non-abelian gauge theories, and recent progress on the calculation of web diagrams. Problems are included throughout the text, to aid understanding.

  4. Introduction to drilling research

    SciTech Connect

    Hamblin, J. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper is a brief introduction to research projects in the area of drilling technology. A technical panel, composed of representatives of geothermal operators, drilling contractors, and service companies, met in Albuquerque, and heard presentations on various drilling related projects which are ongoing or planned. These projects are fairly small scale, partially funded by DOE, administered through Sandia National Laboratory, and generally cooperative in nature between industry and the laboratory. The author briefly discusses the seven highest rated projects, both by the researchers and the conferees. They are: hard rock bits, slimhole drilling, memory logging tools, lost circulation, the Geothermal Drilling Organization, the Long Valley Exploratory Well, and acoustic telemetry.

  5. Introduction to biosensors.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Nikhil; Jolly, Pawan; Formisano, Nello; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-06-30

    Biosensors are nowadays ubiquitous in biomedical diagnosis as well as a wide range of other areas such as point-of-care monitoring of treatment and disease progression, environmental monitoring, food control, drug discovery, forensics and biomedical research. A wide range of techniques can be used for the development of biosensors. Their coupling with high-affinity biomolecules allows the sensitive and selective detection of a range of analytes. We give a general introduction to biosensors and biosensing technologies, including a brief historical overview, introducing key developments in the field and illustrating the breadth of biomolecular sensing strategies and the expansion of nanotechnological approaches that are now available. PMID:27365030

  6. Apoptosis-an introduction.

    PubMed

    Lawen, Alfons

    2003-09-01

    Apoptosis has become a major research area in the biomedical sciences. As there are more than 13,000 papers published annually on the topic, it is impossible to keep track on all developments in the area. The individual aspects of molecular control of apoptosis are well reviewed, but more general, introductory recent reviews into the field are lacking. This review aims to give a brief overview of the field, providing an introduction into the literature for students and newcomers; as it is written for the un-initiated, wherever possible, review articles will be cited rather than original papers.

  7. Direct conversion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts into functional keratinocytes through transient expression of pluripotency-related genes.

    PubMed

    Iacovides, Demetris; Rizki, Gizem; Lapathitis, Georgios; Strati, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    The insufficient ability of specialized cells such as neurons, cardiac myocytes, and epidermal cells to regenerate after tissue damage poses a great challenge to treat devastating injuries and ailments. Recent studies demonstrated that a diverse array of cell types can be directly derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), or somatic cells by combinations of specific factors. The use of iPSCs and direct somatic cell fate conversion, or transdifferentiation, holds great promise for regenerative medicine as these techniques may circumvent obstacles related to immunological rejection and ethical considerations. However, producing iPSC-derived keratinocytes requires a lengthy two-step process of initially generating iPSCs and subsequently differentiating into skin cells, thereby elevating the risk of cellular damage accumulation and tumor formation. In this study, we describe the reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts into functional keratinocytes via the transient expression of pluripotency factors coupled with directed differentiation. The isolation of an iPSC intermediate is dispensable when using this method. Cells derived with this approach, termed induced keratinocytes (iKCs), morphologically resemble primary keratinocytes. Furthermore they express keratinocyte-specific markers, downregulate mesenchymal markers as well as the pluripotency factors Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4, and they show important functional characteristics of primary keratinocytes. iKCs can be further differentiated by high calcium administration in vitro and are capable of regenerating a fully stratified epidermis in vivo. Efficient conversion of somatic cells into keratinocytes could have important implications for studying genetic skin diseases and designing regenerative therapies to ameliorate devastating skin conditions. PMID:27473056

  8. SOX4 is a direct target gene of FRA-2 and induces expression of HDAC8 in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Tomonori; Nakayama, Takashi; Arao, Tokuzo; Nishio, Kazuto; Yoshie, Osamu

    2013-05-01

    Previously, we have shown that an AP-1 family member, FRA-2, is constitutively expressed in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and, together with JUND, upregulates CCR4 and promotes ATL cell growth. Among the identified potential target genes of FRA-2/JUND was SOX4. Here, we examine the expression and function of SOX4 in ATL. SOX4 was indeed consistently expressed in primary ATL cells. FRA-2/JUND efficiently activated the SOX4 promoter via an AP-1 site. Knockdown of SOX4 expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) strongly suppressed cell growth of ATL cell lines. Microarray analyses revealed that SOX4 knockdown reduced the expression of genes such as germinal center kinase related (GCKR), NAK-associated protein 1 (NAP1), and histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8). We confirmed consistent expression of GCKR, NAP1, and HDAC8 in primary ATL cells. We also showed direct activation of the HDAC8 promoter by SOX4. Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of GCKR, NAP1, and HDAC8 each significantly suppressed cell growth of ATL cell lines. Taken together, we have revealed an important oncogenic cascade involving FRA-2/JUND and SOX4 in ATL, which leads to the expression of genes such as GCKR, NAP1, and HDAC8. PMID:23482931

  9. Evolutionary changes in sites and timing of actin gene expression in embryos of the direct- and indirect-developing sea urchins, Heliocidaris erythrogramma and H. tuberculata.

    PubMed

    Kissinger, J C; Raff, R A

    1998-04-01

    We describe an evolutionary comparison of expression of the actin gene families of two congeneric sea urchins. Heliocidaris tuberculata develops indirectly via a planktonic feeding pluteus that forms a juvenile rudiment after a long period of larval development. H. erythrogramma is a direct developer that initiates formation of a juvenile rudiment immediately following gastrulation. The developmental expression of each actin isoform of both species was determined by in situ hybridization. The observed expression patterns are compared with known expression patterns in a related indirect-developing sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Comparisons reveal unexpected patterns of conserved and divergent expression. Cytoplasmic actin, CyIII, is expressed in the aboral ectoderm cells of the indirect developers, but is an unexpressed pseudogene in H. erythrogramma, which lacks aboral ectoderm. This change is correlated with developmental mode. Two CyII actins are expressed in S. purpuratus, and one in H. erythrogramma, but no CyII is expressed in H. tuberculata despite its great developmental similarity to S. purpuratus. CyI expression differs slightly between Heliocidaris and Strongylocentrotus with more ectodermal expression in Heliocidaris. Evolutionary changes in actin gene expression reflect both evolution of developmental mode as well as a surprising flexibility in gene expression within a developmental mode.

  10. Identification of the Set of Genes, Including Nonannotated morA, under the Direct Control of ModE in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Tatsuaki; Katayama, Akira; Hiramatsu, Masakazu; Kiguchi, Yuya; Takeuchi, Masamitsu; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Ogasawara, Hiroshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    ModE is the molybdate-sensing transcription regulator that controls the expression of genes related to molybdate homeostasis in Escherichia coli. ModE is activated by binding molybdate and acts as both an activator and a repressor. By genomic systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) screening and promoter reporter assays, we have identified a total of nine operons, including the hitherto identified modA, moaA, dmsA, and napF operons, of which six were activated by ModE and three were repressed. In addition, two promoters were newly identified and direct transcription of novel genes, referred to as morA and morB, located on antisense strands of yghW and torY, respectively. The morA gene encodes a short peptide, MorA, with an unusual initiation codon. Surprisingly, overexpression of the morA 5′ untranslated region exhibited an inhibitory influence on colony formation of E. coli K-12. PMID:23913318

  11. Familial Dysautonomia (FD) Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived PNS Neurons Reveal that Synaptic Vesicular and Neuronal Transport Genes Are Directly or Indirectly Affected by IKBKAP Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Gal; Cheishvili, David; Even, Aviel; Birger, Anastasya; Turetsky, Tikva; Gil, Yaniv; Even-Ram, Sharona; Aizenman, Einat; Bashir, Nibal; Maayan, Channa; Razin, Aharon; Reubinoff, Benjamim E.; Weil, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD), affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Here we found new molecular insights for the IKAP role and the impact of the FD mutation in the human PNS lineage by using a novel and unique human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line homozygous to the FD mutation originated by pre implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) analysis. We found that IKBKAP downregulation during PNS differentiation affects normal migration in FD-hESC derived neural crest cells (NCC) while at later stages the PNS neurons show reduced intracellular colocalization between vesicular proteins and IKAP. Comparative wide transcriptome analysis of FD and WT hESC-derived neurons together with the analysis of human brains from FD and WT 12 weeks old embryos and experimental validation of the results confirmed that synaptic vesicular and neuronal transport genes are directly or indirectly affected by IKBKAP downregulation in FD neurons. Moreover we show that kinetin (a drug that corrects IKBKAP alternative splicing) promotes the recovery of IKAP expression and these IKAP functional associated genes identified in the study. Altogether, these results support the view that IKAP might be a vesicular like protein that might be involved in neuronal transport in hESC derived PNS neurons. This function seems to be mostly affected in FD-hESC derived PNS neurons probably reflecting some PNS neuronal dysfunction observed in FD. PMID:26437462

  12. Intraoperative multiplane transesophageal echocardiography for guiding direct myocardial gene transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor in patients with refractory angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Esakof, D D; Maysky, M; Losordo, D W; Vale, P R; Lathi, K; Pastore, J O; Symes, J F; Isner, J M

    1999-09-20

    Gene transfer for therapeutic angiogenesis represents a novel treatment for patients with chronic angina refractory to standard medical therapy and not amenable to conventional revascularization. We sought to assess the role of intraoperative multiplane transesophageal echocardiography (MPTEE) in guiding injection of naked DNA encoding vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into the left ventricular (LV) myocardium of patients with refractory angina. After exposing the LV myocardium via a limited lateral thoracotomy, each of 17 patients in this series received 4 separate injections of VEGF DNA into different myocardial sites. Initial injections in the first patient produced intracavitary microbubbles, indicating injection of DNA into the LV chamber. Subsequently, each injection was preceded by a test injection of agitated saline. The absence of microbubbles while visualizing the LV cavity during the test injection verified that the ensuing injection of DNA would not be inadvertently squandered in the LV chamber itself. Intracavitary LV microbubbles were observed by MPTEE in 13 of 64 (20.3%) saline test injections and in 8 of 16 (50.0%) patients in which saline test injection was used, leading to adjustments in needle position. MPTEE imaging detected a previously unknown large, apical left ventricular thrombus in one patient, thereby preventing inadvertent injection of VEGF DNA through the myocardium into the thrombus. Imaging during and after injection verified no deleterious impact on LV function. We conclude that MPTEE is a useful tool for ensuring that myocardial gene therapy performed by direct needle injection results in gene transfer to the LV myocardium.

  13. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Plays Protective Roles against High Fat Diet (HFD)-induced Hepatic Steatosis and the Subsequent Lipotoxicity via Direct Transcriptional Regulation of Socs3 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Wada, Taira; Sunaga, Hiroshi; Miyata, Kazuki; Shirasaki, Haruno; Uchiyama, Yuki; Shimba, Shigeki

    2016-03-25

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor regulating the expression of genes involved in xenobiotic response. Recent studies have suggested that AhR plays essential roles not only in xenobiotic detoxification but also energy metabolism. Thus, in this study, we studied the roles of AhR in lipid metabolism. Under high fat diet (HFD) challenge, liver-specific AhR knock-out (AhR LKO) mice exhibited severe steatosis, inflammation, and injury in the liver. Gene expression analysis and biochemical study revealed thatde novolipogenesis activity was significantly increased in AhR LKO mice. In contrast, induction of suppressor of cytokine signal 3 (Socs3) expression by HFD was attenuated in the livers of AhR LKO mice. Rescue of theSocs3gene in the liver of AhR LKO mice cancelled the HFD-induced hepatic lipotoxicities. Promoter analysis established Socs3 as novel transcriptional target of AhR. These results indicated that AhR plays a protective role against HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and the subsequent lipotoxicity effects, such as inflammation, and that the mechanism of protection involves the direct transcriptional regulation ofSocs3expression by AhR. PMID:26865635

  14. The metabolic regulator CodY links L. monocytogenes metabolism to virulence by directly activating the virulence regulatory gene, prfA

    PubMed Central

    Lobel, Lior; Sigal, Nadejda; Borovok, Ilya; Belitsky, Boris R.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.; Herskovits, Anat A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Metabolic adaptations are critical to the ability of bacterial pathogens to grow within host cells and are normally preceded by sensing of host-specific metabolic signals, which in turn can influence the pathogen's virulence state. Previously, we reported that the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes responds to low availability of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) within mammalian cells by up-regulating both BCAA biosynthesis and virulence genes. The induction of virulence genes required the BCAA-responsive transcription regulator, CodY, but the molecular mechanism governing this mode of regulation was unclear. In this report, we demonstrate that CodY directly binds the coding sequence of the L. monocytogenes master virulence activator gene, prfA, 15 nt downstream of its start codon, and that this binding results in up-regulation of prfA transcription specifically under low concentrations of BCAA. Mutating this site abolished CodY binding and reduced prfA transcription in macrophages, and attenuated bacterial virulence in mice. Notably, the mutated binding site did not alter prfA transcription or PrfA activity under other conditions that are known to activate PrfA, such as during growth in the presence of glucose-1-phosphate. This study highlights the tight crosstalk between L. monocytogenes metabolism and virulence' while revealing novel features of CodY-mediated regulation. PMID:25430920

  15. Speeding up directed evolution: Combining the advantages of solid-phase combinatorial gene synthesis with statistically guided reduction of screening effort.

    PubMed

    Hoebenreich, Sabrina; Zilly, Felipe E; Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Zilly, Matías; Reetz, Manfred T

    2015-03-20

    Efficient and economic methods in directed evolution at the protein, metabolic, and genome level are needed for biocatalyst development and the success of synthetic biology. In contrast to random strategies, semirational approaches such as saturation mutagenesis explore the sequence space in a focused manner. Although several combinatorial libraries based on saturation mutagenesis have been reported using solid-phase gene synthesis, direct comparison with traditional PCR-based methods is currently lacking. In this work, we compare combinatorial protein libraries created in-house via PCR versus those generated by commercial solid-phase gene synthesis. Using descriptive statistics and probabilistic distributions on amino acid occurrence frequencies, the quality of the libraries was assessed and compared, revealing that the outsourced libraries are characterized by less bias and outliers than the PCR-based ones. Afterward, we screened all libraries following a traditional algorithm for almost complete library coverage and compared this approach with an emergent statistical concept suggesting screening a lower portion of the protein sequence space. Upon analyzing the biocatalytic landscapes and best hits of all combinatorial libraries, we show that the screening effort could have been reduced in all cases by more than 50%, while still finding at least one of the best mutants. PMID:24921161

  16. EutR Is a Direct Regulator of Genes That Contribute to Metabolism and Virulence in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Luzader, Deborah H.; Clark, David E.; Gonyar, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanolamine (EA) metabolism is a trait associated with enteric pathogens, including enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). EHEC causes severe bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome. EHEC encodes the ethanolamine utilization (eut) operon that allows EHEC to metabolize EA and gain a competitive advantage when colonizing the gastrointestinal tract. The eut operon encodes the transcriptional regulator EutR. Genetic studies indicated that EutR expression is induced by EA and vitamin B12 and that EutR promotes expression of the eut operon; however, biochemical evidence for these interactions has been lacking. We performed EA-binding assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) to elucidate a mechanism for EutR gene regulation. These studies confirmed EutR interaction with EA, as well as direct binding to the eutS promoter. EutR also contributes to expression of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) in an EA-dependent manner. We performed EMSAs to examine EutR activation of the LEE. The results demonstrated that EutR directly binds the regulatory region of the ler promoter. These results present the first mechanistic description of EutR gene regulation and reveal a novel role for EutR in EHEC pathogenesis. PMID:23995630

  17. Enhancement by lithium of cAMP-induced CRE/CREB-directed gene transcription conferred by TORC on the CREB basic leucine zipper domain

    PubMed Central

    Böer, Ulrike; Eglins, Julia; Krause, Doris; Schnell, Susanne; Schöfl, Christof; Knepel, Willhart

    2007-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the action of lithium salts in the treatment of bipolar disorder is not well understood. As their therapeutic action requires chronic treatment, adaptive neuronal processes are suggested to be involved. The molecular basis of this are changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors such as CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein). CREB contains a transactivation domain, in which Ser119 is phosphorylated upon activation, and a bZip (basic leucine zipper domain). The bZip is involved in CREB dimerization and DNA-binding, but also contributes to CREB transactivation by recruiting the coactivator TORC (transducer of regulated CREB). In the present study, the effect of lithium on CRE (cAMP response element)/CREB-directed gene transcription was investigated. Electrically excitable cells were transfected with CRE/CREB-driven luciferase reporter genes. LiCl (6 mM or higher) induced an up to 4.7-fold increase in 8-bromo-cAMP-stimulated CRE/CREB-directed transcription. This increase was not due to enhanced Ser119 phosphorylation or DNA-binding of CREB. Also, the known targets inositol monophosphatase and GSK3β (glycogen-synthase-kinase 3β) were not involved as specific GSK3β inhibitors and inositol replenishment did not mimic and abolish respectively the effect of lithium. However, lithium no longer enhanced CREB activity when the CREB-bZip was deleted or the TORC-binding site inside the CREB-bZip was specifically mutated (CREB-R300A). Otherwise, TORC overexpression conferred lithium responsiveness on CREB-bZip or the CRE-containing truncated rat somatostatin promoter. This indicates that lithium enhances cAMP-induced CRE/CREB-directed transcription, conferred by TORC on the CREB-bZip. We thus support the hypothesis that lithium salts modulate CRE/CREB-dependent gene transcription and suggest the CREB coactivator TORC as a new molecular target of lithium. PMID:17696880

  18. The Arabidopsis SWI2/SNF2 chromatin Remodeler BRAHMA regulates polycomb function during vegetative development and directly activates the flowering repressor gene SVP.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenlong; Chen, Chen; Gao, Lei; Yang, Songguang; Nguyen, Vi; Shi, Xuejiang; Siminovitch, Katherine; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Huang, Shangzhi; Wu, Keqiang; Chen, Xuemei; Cui, Yuhai

    2015-01-01

    The chromatin remodeler BRAHMA (BRM) is a Trithorax Group (TrxG) protein that antagonizes the functions of Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins in fly and mammals. Recent studies also implicate such a role for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BRM but the molecular mechanisms underlying the antagonism are unclear. To understand the interplay between BRM and PcG during plant development, we performed a genome-wide analysis of trimethylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in brm mutant seedlings by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Increased H3K27me3 deposition at several hundred genes was observed in brm mutants and this increase was partially supressed by removal of the H3K27 methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF) or SWINGER (SWN). ChIP experiments demonstrated that BRM directly binds to a subset of the genes and prevents the inappropriate association and/or activity of PcG proteins at these loci. Together, these results indicate a crucial role of BRM in restricting the inappropriate activity of PcG during plant development. The key flowering repressor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) is such a BRM target. In brm mutants, elevated PcG occupancy at SVP accompanies a dramatic increase in H3K27me3 levels at this locus and a concomitant reduction of SVP expression. Further, our gain- and loss-of-function genetic evidence establishes that BRM controls flowering time by directly activating SVP expression. This work reveals a genome-wide functional interplay between BRM and PcG and provides new insights into the impacts of these proteins in plant growth and development.

  19. Development of an mlrA gene-directed TaqMan PCR assay for quantitative assessment of microcystin-degrading bacteria within water treatment plant sand filter biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hoefel, Daniel; Adriansen, Caroline M M; Bouyssou, Magali A C; Saint, Christopher P; Newcombe, Gayle; Ho, Lionel

    2009-08-01

    We report for the first time a quantitative mlrA gene-directed TaqMan PCR assay for the rapid detection of microcystin-degrading bacteria. This was applied, in combination with 16S ribosomal DNA-directed quantitative PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, to study virgin sand filter column biofilm development and to correlate mlrA gene abundance with microcystin removal efficiency.

  20. Spi-1 and Fli-1 directly activate common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis in Friend erythroleukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Juban, Gaëtan; Giraud, Guillaume; Guyot, Boris; Belin, Stéphane; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Starck, Joëlle; Guillouf, Christel; Moreau-Gachelin, Françoise; Morlé, François

    2009-05-01

    Spi-1 and Fli-1 are ETS transcription factors recurrently deregulated in mouse erythroleukemia induced by Friend viruses. Since they share the same core DNA binding site, we investigated whether they may contribute to erythroleukemia by common mechanisms. Using inducible knockdown, we demonstrated that Fli-1 contributes to proliferation, survival, and differentiation arrest of erythroleukemic cells harboring an activated fli-1 locus. Similarly, we used inducible Fli-1 knockdown and either hexamethylenebisacetamide (HMBA)- or small interfering RNA-mediated Spi-1 knockdown to investigate their respective contributions in erythroleukemic cells harboring an activated spi-1 locus. In these cells, simple or double knockdown of both Spi-1 and Fli-1 additively contributed to induce proliferation arrest and differentiation. Transcriptome profiling revealed that virtually all transcripts affected by both Fli-1 knockdown and HMBA are affected in an additive manner. Among these additively downregulated transcripts, more than 20% encode proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis, and conserved ETS binding sites are present in their gene promoters. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrated the association of Spi-1 and Fli-1 on these promoters in Friend erythroleukemic cells. These data lead us to propose that the oncogenicity of Spi-1, Fli-1, and possibly other ETS transcription factors may involve their ability to stimulate ribosome biogenesis.

  1. Memorable messages about genes and health: implications for direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic tests and therapies.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Roxanne; Volkman, Julie; Ghetian, Christie; Weiner, Judith; Raup-Krieger, Janice; Parrott, John

    2008-01-01

    The era of genomic health care introduces new realities into decision-making about the prevention and treatment of disease. Despite this reality, relatively little is known about lay audience recollection of images and messages about genes and health, or their perceptions about the role of genetics research for health, and what diseases are inherited. Participants (N=482) responded to three open-ended thought-listing tasks to consider these issues. Results revealed the significance of movies in framing memorable messages for participants, with print sources and television also represented. Both awareness and product commercials also comprised specific memories. Cloning was a frequently recalled message and often the first thought that came to participants' minds. While a broad range of conditions were associated with health risks inherited from one's family, cancer was most often identified. The messages recalled revealed a number of common features including their tendency to be emotion-laden. The theoretic and pragmatic implications of these results are considered. PMID:18935878

  2. Klf5 regulates muscle differentiation by directly targeting muscle-specific genes in cooperation with MyoD in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinichiro; Manabe, Ichiro; Suzuki, Yumi; Relaix, Frédéric; Oishi, Yumiko

    2016-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 5 (Klf5) is a zinc-finger transcription factor that controls various biological processes, including cell proliferation and differentiation. We show that Klf5 is also an essential mediator of skeletal muscle regeneration and myogenic differentiation. During muscle regeneration after injury (cardiotoxin injection), Klf5 was induced in the nuclei of differentiating myoblasts and newly formed myofibers expressing myogenin in vivo. Satellite cell-specific Klf5 deletion severely impaired muscle regeneration, and myotube formation was suppressed in Klf5-deleted cultured C2C12 myoblasts and satellite cells. Klf5 knockdown suppressed induction of muscle differentiation-related genes, including myogenin. Klf5 ChIP-seq revealed that Klf5 binding overlaps that of MyoD and Mef2, and Klf5 physically associates with both MyoD and Mef2. In addition, MyoD recruitment was greatly reduced in the absence of Klf5. These results indicate that Klf5 is an essential regulator of skeletal muscle differentiation, acting in concert with myogenic transcription factors such as MyoD and Mef2. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17462.001 PMID:27743478

  3. Krüppel Homolog 1 Inhibits Insect Metamorphosis via Direct Transcriptional Repression of Broad-Complex, a Pupal Specifier Gene.

    PubMed

    Kayukawa, Takumi; Nagamine, Keisuke; Ito, Yuka; Nishita, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Yukio; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2016-01-22

    The Broad-Complex gene (BR-C) encodes transcription factors that dictate larval-pupal metamorphosis in insects. The expression of BR-C is induced by molting hormone (20-hydroxyecdysone (20E)), and this induction is repressed by juvenile hormone (JH), which exists during the premature larval stage. Krüppel homolog 1 gene (Kr-h1) has been known as a JH-early inducible gene responsible for repression of metamorphosis; however, the functional relationship between Kr-h1 and repression of BR-C has remained unclear. To elucidate this relationship, we analyzed cis- and trans elements involved in the repression of BR-C using a Bombyx mori cell line. In the cells, as observed in larvae, JH induced the expression of Kr-h1 and concurrently suppressed 20E-induced expression of BR-C. Forced expression of Kr-h1 repressed the 20E-dependent activation of the BR-C promoter in the absence of JH, and Kr-h1 RNAi inhibited the JH-mediated repression, suggesting that Kr-h1 controlled the repression of BR-C. A survey of the upstream sequence of BR-C gene revealed a Kr-h1 binding site (KBS) in the BR-C promoter. When KBS was deleted from the promoter, the repression of BR-C was abolished. Electrophoresis mobility shift demonstrated that two Kr-h1 molecules bound to KBS in the BR-C promoter. Based on these results, we conclude that Kr-h1 protein molecules directly bind to the KBS sequence in the BR-C promoter and thereby repress 20E-dependent activation of the pupal specifier, BR-C. This study has revealed a considerable portion of the picture of JH signaling pathways from the reception of JH to the repression of metamorphosis.

  4. A locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based real-time PCR assay for the rapid detection of multiple bacterial antibiotic resistance genes directly from positive blood culture.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Shen, Dingxia; Zhou, Qiming; Li, Zexia; Fang, Xiangdong; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial strains resistant to various antibiotic drugs are frequently encountered in clinical infections, and the rapid identification of drug-resistant strains is highly essential for clinical treatment. We developed a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based quantitative real-time PCR (LNA-qPCR) method for the rapid detection of 13 antibiotic resistance genes and successfully used it to distinguish drug-resistant bacterial strains from positive blood culture samples. A sequence-specific primer-probe set was designed, and the specificity of the assays was assessed using 27 ATCC bacterial strains and 77 negative blood culture samples. No cross-reaction was identified among bacterial strains and in negative samples, indicating 100% specificity. The sensitivity of the assays was determined by spiking each bacterial strain into negative blood samples, and the detection limit was 1-10 colony forming units (CFU) per reaction. The LNA-qPCR assays were first applied to 72 clinical bacterial isolates for the identification of known drug resistance genes, and the results were verified by the direct sequencing of PCR products. Finally, the LNA-qPCR assays were used for the detection in 47 positive blood culture samples, 19 of which (40.4%) were positive for antibiotic resistance genes, showing 91.5% consistency with phenotypic susceptibility results. In conclusion, LNA-qPCR is a reliable method for the rapid detection of bacterial antibiotic resistance genes and can be used as a supplement to phenotypic susceptibility testing for the early detection of antimicrobial resistance to allow the selection of appropriate antimicrobial treatment and to prevent the spread of resistant isolates.

  5. Mi-1.2, an R gene for aphid resistance in tomato, has direct negative effects on a zoophytophagous biocontrol agent, Orius insidiosus

    PubMed Central

    Pallipparambil, Godshen R.; Sayler, Ronald J.; Shapiro, Jeffrey P.; Thomas, Jean M. G.; Kring, Timothy J.; Goggin, Fiona L.

    2015-01-01

    Mi-1.2 is a single dominant gene in tomato that confers race-specific resistance against certain phloem-feeding herbivores including aphids, whiteflies, psyllids, and root-knot nematodes. Few prior studies have considered the potential non-target effects of race-specific resistance genes (R genes), and this paper evaluates the compatibility of Mi-mediated resistance in tomato with a beneficial zoophytophagous predator, Orius insidiosus (Say). In addition to preying on aphids and other pests, this piercing–sucking insect also feeds from the xylem, epidermis, and/or mesophyll, and oviposits within plant tissues. Comparison of O. insidiosus confined to isogenic tomato plants with and without Mi-1.2 revealed that immatures of O. insidiosus had lower survival on resistant plants even when the immatures were provisioned with prey that did not feed on the host plant. Molecular gut content analysis confirmed that adults and immatures of O. insidiosus feed on both resistant (Mi-1.2+) and susceptible (Mi-1.2–) genotypes, and bioassays suggest that resistance does not affect oviposition rates, plant sampling, or prey acceptance by O. insidiosus adults. These results demonstrate a direct negative impact of R-gene-mediated host plant resistance on a non-target beneficial species, and reveal that Mi-mediated resistance can impact organisms that do not feed on phloem sap. Through laser capture microdissection and RT-PCR, Mi-1.2 transcripts were detected in the epidermis and mesophyll as well as the phloem of tomato plants, consistent with our observations that Mi-mediated resistance is active outside the phloem. These results suggest that the mode of action and potential ecological impacts of Mi-mediated resistance are broader than previously assumed. PMID:25189594

  6. AraC/XylS family members, HilD and HilC, directly activate virulence gene expression independently of HilA in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Samina; Schechter, Lisa M; Lostroh, C Phoebe; Lee, Catherine A

    2003-02-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is a Gram-negative enteric pathogen that can infect intestinal epithelial cells and induce inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. These processes are mediated by a type III secretion system (TTSS), which is encoded on Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1). Previous studies showed that four SPI1-encoded transcriptional regulators, HilD, HilC, HilA and InvF, act in an ordered fashion to co-ordinately activate expression of the SPI1 TTSS. HilD and HilC derepress hilA transcription. HilA activates invF as well as SPI1 genes that encode components of the TTS apparatus. InvF then activates genes that encode proteins secreted by the SPI1 TTS apparatus. In this scheme, HilD and HilC indirectly activate expression of the SPI1 TTS apparatus and its secreted substrates by affecting hilA expression. Here, we report that HilD and HilC can also activate expression of a subset of SPI1 genes independently of HilA. Our studies show that HilD and HilC activate transcription of invF from a promoter that is far upstream of its HilA-dependent promoter. This activation is most probably through direct binding of HilD and HilC to sequences upstream and downstream of this alternative HilA-independent promoter. We conclude that HilD and HilC have a second role in SPI1 gene regulation that is separate from their role in co-ordinating expression of the SPI1 TTSS through hilA.

  7. Controlling feeding behavior by chemical or gene-directed targeting in the brain: what's so spatial about our methods?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arshad M.

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial chemical injection (ICI) methods have been used to identify the locations in the brain where feeding behavior can be controlled acutely. Scientists conducting ICI studies often document their injection site locations, thereby leaving kernels of valuable location data for others to use to further characterize feeding control circuits. Unfortunately, this rich dataset has not yet been formally contextualized with other published neuroanatomical data. In particular, axonal tracing studies have delineated several neural circuits originating in the same areas where ICI injection feeding-control sites have been documented, but it remains unclear whether these circuits participate in feeding control. Comparing injection sites with other types of location data would require careful anatomical registration between the datasets. Here, a conceptual framework is presented for how such anatomical registration efforts can be performed. For example, by using a simple atlas alignment tool, a hypothalamic locus sensitive to the orexigenic effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) can be aligned accurately with the locations of neurons labeled by anterograde tracers or those known to express NPY receptors or feeding-related peptides. This approach can also be applied to those intracranial “gene-directed” injection (IGI) methods (e.g., site-specific recombinase methods, RNA expression or interference, optogenetics, and pharmacosynthetics) that involve viral injections to targeted neuronal populations. Spatial alignment efforts can be accelerated if location data from ICI/IGI methods are mapped to stereotaxic brain atlases to allow powerful neuroinformatics tools to overlay different types of data in the same reference space. Atlas-based mapping will be critical for community-based sharing of location data for feeding control circuits, and will accelerate our understanding of structure-function relationships in the brain for mammalian models of obesity and metabolic disorders

  8. PPARalpha and PPARgamma activators direct a distinct tissue-specific transcriptional response via a PPRE in the lipoprotein lipase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Schoonjans, K; Peinado-Onsurbe, J; Lefebvre, A M; Heyman, R A; Briggs, M; Deeb, S; Staels, B; Auwerx, J

    1996-01-01

    Increased activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) may explain the hypotriglyceridemic effects of fibrates, thiazolidinediones and fatty acids, which are known activators (and/or ligands) of the various peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Treatment with compounds which activate preferentially PPARalpha, such as fenofibrate, induced LPL expression exclusively in rat liver. In contrast, the antidiabetic thiazolidinedione BRL 49653, a high affinity ligand for PPARgamma, had no effect on liver, but induced LPL expression in rat adipose tissue. In the hepatocyte cell line AML-12, fenofibric acid, but not BRL 49653, induced LPL mRNA, whereas in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, the PPARgamma ligand induced LPL mRNA levels much quicker and to a higher extent than fenofibric acid. In both the in vivo and in vitro studies, inducibility by either PPARalpha or gamma activators, correlated with the tissue distribution of the respective PPARs: an adipocyte-restricted expression of PPARgamma, whereas PPARalpha was expressed predominantly in liver. A sequence element was identified in the human LPL promoter that mediates the functional responsiveness to fibrates and thiazolidinediones. Methylation interference and gel retardation assays demonstrated that a PPARalpha or gamma and the 9-cis retinoic acid receptor (RXR) heterodimers bind to this sequence -169 TGCCCTTTCCCCC -157. These data provide evidence that transcriptional activation of the LPL gene by fibrates and thiazolidinediones is mediated by PPAR-RXR heterodimers and contributes significantly to their hypotriglyceridemic effects in vivo. Whereas thiazolidinediones predominantly affect adipocyte LPL production through activation of PPARgamma, fibrates exert their effects mainly in the liver via activation of PPARalpha. Images PMID:8895578

  9. Pediatric obesity. An introduction.

    PubMed

    Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children's health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children's environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail.

  10. Morbillivirus Infections: An Introduction

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Rory D.; Duprex, W. Paul; de Swart, Rik L.

    2015-01-01

    Research on morbillivirus infections has led to exciting developments in recent years. Global measles vaccination coverage has increased, resulting in a significant reduction in measles mortality. In 2011 rinderpest virus was declared globally eradicated – only the second virus to be eradicated by targeted vaccination. Identification of new cellular receptors and implementation of recombinant viruses expressing fluorescent proteins in a range of model systems have provided fundamental new insights into the pathogenesis of morbilliviruses, and their interactions with the host immune system. Nevertheless, both new and well-studied morbilliviruses are associated with significant disease in wildlife and domestic animals. This illustrates the need for robust surveillance and a strategic focus on barriers that restrict cross-species transmission. Recent and ongoing measles outbreaks also demonstrate that maintenance of high vaccination coverage for these highly infectious agents is critical. This introduction briefly summarizes the most important current research topics in this field. PMID:25685949

  11. Introduction to lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1998-12-31

    The goal of the lectures on lattice QCD (LQCD) is to provide an overview of both the technical issues and the progress made so far in obtaining phenomenologically useful numbers. The lectures consist of three parts. The author`s charter is to provide an introduction to LQCD and outline the scope of LQCD calculations. In the second set of lectures, Guido Martinelli will discuss the progress they have made so far in obtaining results, and their impact on Standard Model phenomenology. Finally, Martin Luescher will discuss the topical subjects of chiral symmetry, improved formulation of lattice QCD, and the impact these improvements will have on the quality of results expected from the next generation of simulations.

  12. Introduction to multivariate discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kégl, Balázs

    2013-07-01

    Multivariate discrimination or classification is one of the best-studied problem in machine learning, with a plethora of well-tested and well-performing algorithms. There are also several good general textbooks [1-9] on the subject written to an average engineering, computer science, or statistics graduate student; most of them are also accessible for an average physics student with some background on computer science and statistics. Hence, instead of writing a generic introduction, we concentrate here on relating the subject to a practitioner experimental physicist. After a short introduction on the basic setup (Section 1) we delve into the practical issues of complexity regularization, model selection, and hyperparameter optimization (Section 2), since it is this step that makes high-complexity non-parametric fitting so different from low-dimensional parametric fitting. To emphasize that this issue is not restricted to classification, we illustrate the concept on a low-dimensional but non-parametric regression example (Section 2.1). Section 3 describes the common algorithmic-statistical formal framework that unifies the main families of multivariate classification algorithms. We explain here the large-margin principle that partly explains why these algorithms work. Section 4 is devoted to the description of the three main (families of) classification algorithms, neural networks, the support vector machine, and AdaBoost. We do not go into the algorithmic details; the goal is to give an overview on the form of the functions these methods learn and on the objective functions they optimize. Besides their technical description, we also make an attempt to put these algorithm into a socio-historical context. We then briefly describe some rather heterogeneous applications to illustrate the pattern recognition pipeline and to show how widespread the use of these methods is (Section 5). We conclude the chapter with three essentially open research problems that are either

  13. [Informed consent for clinical investigation in the critically ill patient. An introduction to the regulation 536/2014/EC on clinical investigation of medicinal products for human use, repealing Directive 2001/20/EC].

    PubMed

    Savonitto, Stefano; Coppola, Teresa; Braglia, Paola; Ciccone, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    The principle of patient information, awareness and documented consent for the participation in clinical trials is a cornerstone in the modern ethics of clinical research. However, this procedure is seldom applicable in the critically ill patient who becomes suddenly incapable of fully evaluating the risk vs benefit of the alternative therapeutic options. This issue becomes particularly problematic in those conditions where the benefit of any intervention is highly time-dependent, such as acute myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiac arrest, polytrauma and other similar conditions. The new directive 536/2014/EC defines the concept that in these cases the expert clinician and the Ethics Committees, based upon a rigorous study protocol, are in better conditions, as compared to patients' proxies and any legal representative, to take an appropriate decision. This decision should be later confirmed (deferred consent) by the patient, in case he returns competent, or by his proxies or legal tutor, in order to use experimental data. The new directive ends a long period of disparity among the Member States, some of which had taken unilateral decisions allowing the participation of incapable patients, whereas others, among which Italy, had a more conservative approach. Unfortunately, owing to technical and bureaucratic issues, the new regulation is unlikely to become active before the beginning of 2018. PMID:27310904

  14. Characterization of directly transformed weedy Brassica rapa and introgressed B. rapa with Bt cry1Ac and gfp genes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hong S; Halfhill, Matthew D; Good, Laura L; Raymer, Paul L; Neal Stewart, C

    2007-07-01

    Crop to weed transgene flow, which could result in more competitive weed populations, is an agricultural biosafety concern. Crop Brassica napus to weedy Brassica rapa hybridization has been extensively characterized to better understand the transgene flow and its consequences. In this study, weedy accessions of B. rapa were transformed with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cry1Ac- and green fluorescence protein (gfp)-coding transgenes using Agrobacterium to assess ecological performance of the wild biotype relative to introgressed hybrids in which the transgenic parent was the crop. Regenerated transgenic B. rapa events were characterized by progeny analysis, Bt protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Southern blot analysis, and GFP expression assay. GFP expression level and Bt protein concentration were significantly different between independent transgenic B. rapa events. Similar reproductive productivity was observed in comparison between transgenic B. rapa events and B. rapa x B. napus introgressed hybrids in greenhouse and field experiments. In the greenhouse, Bt transgenic plants experienced significantly less herbivory damage from the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella). No differences were found in the field experiment under ambient, low, herbivore pressure. Directly transformed transgenic B. rapa plants should be a helpful experimental control to better understand crop genetic load in introgressed transgenic weeds.

  15. Characterization of directly transformed weedy Brassica rapa and introgressed B. rapa with Bt cry1Ac and gfp genes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hong S; Halfhill, Matthew D; Good, Laura L; Raymer, Paul L; Neal Stewart, C

    2007-07-01

    Crop to weed transgene flow, which could result in more competitive weed populations, is an agricultural biosafety concern. Crop Brassica napus to weedy Brassica rapa hybridization has been extensively characterized to better understand the transgene flow and its consequences. In this study, weedy accessions of B. rapa were transformed with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cry1Ac- and green fluorescence protein (gfp)-coding transgenes using Agrobacterium to assess ecological performance of the wild biotype relative to introgressed hybrids in which the transgenic parent was the crop. Regenerated transgenic B. rapa events were characterized by progeny analysis, Bt protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Southern blot analysis, and GFP expression assay. GFP expression level and Bt protein concentration were significantly different between independent transgenic B. rapa events. Similar reproductive productivity was observed in comparison between transgenic B. rapa events and B. rapa x B. napus introgressed hybrids in greenhouse and field experiments. In the greenhouse, Bt transgenic plants experienced significantly less herbivory damage from the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella). No differences were found in the field experiment under ambient, low, herbivore pressure. Directly transformed transgenic B. rapa plants should be a helpful experimental control to better understand crop genetic load in introgressed transgenic weeds. PMID:17333014

  16. CTCF regulates the human p53 gene through direct interaction with its natural antisense transcript, Wrap53

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña-Meyer, Ricardo; González-Buendía, Edgar; Guerrero, Georgina; Narendra, Varun; Bonasio, Roberto; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Reinberg, Danny

    2014-01-01

    The multifunctional CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) protein exhibits a broad range of functions, including that of insulator and higher-order chromatin organizer. We found that CTCF comprises a previously unrecognized region that is necessary and sufficient to bind RNA (RNA-binding region [RBR]) and is distinct from its DNA-binding domain. Depletion of cellular CTCF led to a decrease in not only levels of p53 mRNA, as expected, but also those of Wrap53 RNA, an antisense transcript originated from the p53 locus. PAR-CLIP-seq (photoactivatable ribonucleoside-enhanced cross-linking and immunoprecipitation [PAR-CLIP] combined with deep sequencing) analyses indicate that CTCF binds a multitude of transcripts genome-wide as well as to Wrap53 RNA. Apart from its established role at the p53 promoter, CTCF regulates p53 expression through its physical interaction with Wrap53 RNA. Cells harboring a CTCF mutant in its RBR exhibit a defective p53 response to DNA damage. Moreover, the RBR facilitates CTCF multimerization in an RNA-dependent manner, which may bear directly on its role in establishing higher-order chromatin structures in vivo. PMID:24696455

  17. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, Geoff; de Meer, Jan B.

    1997-03-01

    service management' by Gregor v Bochmann and Abdelhakim Hafid offers lessons in QoS management learned during the implementation of a prototype News-on-Demand application. Some general principles are extracted from this experience. In particular, a novel QoS adaptation technique is highlighted: transparent automatic reconfiguration of the components involved in a communication (e.g. choice of an alternative network or server at run time). An algorithm which attempts to choose optimal configurations is discussed. `Quality of service management using generic modelling and monitoring techniques', by Leonard Franken and Boudewijn Haverkort investigates the use of Petri nets as the basis of generic QoS monitoring of distributed applications. A distributed application is exploded into finegrained component parts and interactions between these parts are instrumented. The paper offers a case study of the instrumentation of a videophone application using this technique. Simulation is used to evaluate the scheme. The final two papers in the special issue are more focused and pragmatic in nature. These papers explore QoS provision in particular environments (the World Wide Web and ATM networks respectively) through reported implementation experience. `QoS management in a World Wide Web environment which supports continuous media' by Michael Fry, Aruna Seneviratne, Andreas Vogel and Varuni Witana looks at the practical provision of end to end QoS management in the World Wide Web. The paper looks beyond currently available tools such as RealAudio and StreamWorks and presents a QoS managed RTP based solution featuring an adjunct QoS management protocol. This work offers QoS management functions (e.g. QoS negotiation, adaptation and control of QoS degradation paths) directly to the user via the usual Web GUI. `A QoS adaptive multimedia transport system: design, implementation and experiences' by Andrew Campbell and Geoff Coulson offers further practical experience of QoS management

  18. EIN3 and ORE1 Accelerate Degreening during Ethylene-Mediated Leaf Senescence by Directly Activating Chlorophyll Catabolic Genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Kai; Li, Zhongpeng; Yang, Zhen; Chen, Junyi; Wu, Shouxin; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Shan; Gao, Jiong; Ren, Guodong; Kuai, Benke; Zhou, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Degreening, caused by chlorophyll degradation, is the most obvious symptom of senescing leaves. Chlorophyll degradation can be triggered by endogenous and environmental cues, and ethylene is one of the major inducers. ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) is a key transcription factor in the ethylene signaling pathway. It was previously reported that EIN3, miR164, and a NAC (NAM, ATAF, and CUC) transcription factor ORE1/NAC2 constitute a regulatory network mediating leaf senescence. However, how this network regulates chlorophyll degradation at molecular level is not yet elucidated. Here we report a feed-forward regulation of chlorophyll degradation that involves EIN3, ORE1, and chlorophyll catabolic genes (CCGs). Gene expression analysis showed that the induction of three major CCGs, NYE1, NYC1 and PAO, by ethylene was largely repressed in ein3 eil1 double mutant. Dual-luciferase assay revealed that EIN3 significantly enhanced the promoter activity of NYE1, NYC1 and PAO in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Furthermore, Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) indicated that EIN3 could directly bind to NYE1, NYC1 and PAO promoters. These results reveal that EIN3 functions as a positive regulator of CCG expression during ethylene-mediated chlorophyll degradation. Interestingly, ORE1, a senescence regulator which is a downstream target of EIN3, could also activate the expression of NYE1, NYC1 and PAO by directly binding to their promoters in EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. In addition, EIN3 and ORE1 promoted NYE1 and NYC1 transcriptions in an additive manner. These results suggest that ORE1 is also involved in the direct regulation of CCG transcription. Moreover, ORE1 activated the expression of ACS2, a major ethylene biosynthesis gene, and subsequently promoted ethylene production. Collectively, our work reveals that EIN3, ORE1 and CCGs constitute a coherent feed-forward loop involving in the robust regulation of ethylene-mediated chlorophyll degradation

  19. Molecular Determinants for Targeting Heterochromatin Protein 1-Mediated Gene Silencing: Direct Chromoshadow Domain–KAP-1 Corepressor Interaction Is Essential

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Mark S.; Begg, Gillian E.; Speicher, David W.; Rauscher, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    The KRAB domain is a highly conserved transcription repression module commonly found in eukaryotic zinc finger proteins. KRAB-mediated repression requires binding to the KAP-1 corepressor, which in turn recruits members of the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) family. The HP1 proteins are nonhistone chromosomal proteins, although it is unclear how they are targeted to unique chromosomal domains or promoters. In this report, we have reconstituted and characterized the HP1–KAP-1 interaction using purified proteins and have compared KAP-1 to three other known HP1 binding proteins: SP100, lamin B receptor (LBR), and the p150 subunit from chromatin assembly factor (CAF-1 p150). We show that the chromoshadow domain (CSD) of HP1 is a potent repression domain that binds directly to all four previously described proteins. For KAP-1, we have mapped the CSD interaction region to a 15-amino-acid segment, termed the HP1BD, which is also present in CAF-1 p150 but not SP100 or LBR. The region of KAP-1 harboring the HP1BD binds as a monomer to a dimer of the CSD, as revealed by gel filtration, analytical ultracentrifugation, and optical biosensor analyses. The use of a spectrum of amino acid substitutions in the human HP1α CSD revealed a strong correlation between CSD-mediated repression and binding to KAP-1, CAF-1 p150, and SP100 but not LBR. Differences among the HP1 binding partners could also be discerned by fusion to a heterologous DNA binding domain and by the potential to act as dominant negative molecules. Together, these results strongly suggest that KAP-1 is a physiologically relevant target for HP1 function. PMID:10938122

  20. MiRNA-335 suppresses neuroblastoma cell invasiveness by direct targeting of multiple genes from the non-canonical TGF-β signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Jennifer; Fay, Joanna; Meehan, Maria; Bryan, Kenneth; Watters, Karen M; Murphy, Derek M; Stallings, Raymond L

    2012-05-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling regulates many diverse cellular activities through both canonical (SMAD-dependent) and non-canonical branches, which includes the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Rho-like guanosine triphosphatase and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/AKT pathways. Here, we demonstrate that miR-335 directly targets and downregulates genes in the TGF-β non-canonical pathways, including the Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein (ROCK1) and MAPK1, resulting in reduced phosphorylation of downstream pathway members. Specifically, inhibition of ROCK1 and MAPK1 reduces phosphorylation levels of the motor protein myosin light chain (MLC) leading to a significant inhibition of the invasive and migratory potential of neuroblastoma cells. Additionally, miR-335 targets the leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein 1 (LRG1) messenger RNA, which similarly results in a significant reduction in the phosphorylation status of MLC and a decrease in neuroblastoma cell migration and invasion. Thus, we link LRG1 to the migratory machinery of the cell, altering its activity presumably by exerting its effect within the non-canonical TGF-β pathway. Moreover, we demonstrate that the MYCN transcription factor, whose coding sequence is highly amplified in a particularly clinically aggressive neuroblastoma tumor subtype, directly binds to a region immediately upstream of the miR-335 transcriptional start site, resulting in transcriptional repression. We conclude that MYCN contributes to neuroblastoma cell migration and invasion, by directly downregulating miR-335, resulting in the upregulation of the TGF-β signaling pathway members ROCK1, MAPK1 and putative member LRG1, which positively promote this process. Our results provide novel insight into the direct regulation of TGF-β non-canonical signaling by miR-335, which in turn is downregulated by MYCN.

  1. [The direct gene test in familial medullary thyroid gland carcinoma and in MEN syndromes. Detection of mutations in the ret proto-oncogene saves screening studies].

    PubMed

    Stuhrmann, M

    1995-12-20

    Multiple endocrine neoplasias, type 2A and type 2B (MEN2A, MEN2B), and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) have an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The risk of passing on the disease is almost 50%. Early diagnosis and surgical intervention largely prevents aggressive metastasis of thyroid carcinoma, the main cause of death. The diagnostic possibilities have been much improved by the implementation of direct gene testing. Exclusion of the inheritance of a parental mutation in the RET proto-oncogene removes the potential risk of progeny contracting the disease, and obviates the need for the usual annual screening from age 5 years onward. In many of those cases in whom a mutation is detected, prophylactic surgical intervention should be considered.

  2. Administration of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors and sequential delivery of different vector serotype for long-term liver-directed gene transfer in baboons

    PubMed Central

    Morral, Núria; O’Neal, Wanda; Rice, Karen; Leland, Michele; Kaplan, Johanne; Piedra, Pedro A.; Zhou, Heshan; Parks, Robin J.; Velji, Rizwan; Aguilar-Córdova, Estuardo; Wadsworth, Samuel; Graham, Frank L.; Kochanek, Stefan; Carey, K. Dee; Beaudet, Arthur L.

    1999-01-01

    The efficiency of first-generation adenoviral vectors as gene delivery tools is often limited by the short duration of transgene expression, which can be related to immune responses and to toxic effects of viral proteins. In addition, readministration is usually ineffective unless the animals are immunocompromised or a different adenovirus serotype is used. Recently, adenoviral vectors devoid of all viral coding sequences (helper-dependent or gutless vectors) have been developed to avoid expression of viral proteins. In mice, liver-directed gene transfer with AdSTK109, a helper-dependent adenoviral (Ad) vector containing the human α1-antitrypsin (hAAT) gene, resulted in sustained expression for longer than 10 months with negligible toxicity to the liver. In the present report, we have examined the duration of expression of AdSTK109 in the liver of baboons and compared it to first-generation vectors expressing hAAT. Transgene expression was limited to approximately 3–5 months with the first-generation vectors. In contrast, administration of AdSTK109 resulted in transgene expression for longer than a year in two of three baboons. We have also investigated the feasibility of circumventing the humoral response to the virus by sequential administration of vectors of different serotypes. We found that the ineffectiveness of readministration due to the humoral response to an Ad5 first-generation vector was overcome by use of an Ad2-based vector expressing hAAT. These data suggest that long-term expression of transgenes should be possible by combining the reduced immunogenicity and toxicity of helper-dependent vectors with sequential delivery of vectors of different serotypes. PMID:10536005

  3. Direct exposure of mouse ovaries and oocytes to high doses of an adenovirus gene therapy vector fails to lead to germ cell transduction.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J W

    2001-04-01

    The risk of insertion of adenovirus gene therapy DNA into female germ cells during the course of somatic gene therapy was stringently tested in the mouse by injecting up to 10(10) infectious particles directly into the ovary and by incubating naked oocytes in a solution of 2 x 10(8) particles/ml for 1 h prior to in vitro fertilization (IVF). The vector used was a recombinant adenovirus carrying the bacterial lacZ gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter (Adbeta-gal). Ovaries were stained for LacZ activity, or immunochemically for LacZ, 5-7 days after injection. Although very large amounts of LacZ activity and protein were detected, all positive staining was in the thecal portion of the ovary, with no staining seen in oocytes. In another series of experiments, mice with injected ovaries were mated, and preimplantation embryos or fetuses were analyzed either for LacZ expression or by PCR for lacZ DNA. None of 202 preimplantation embryos stained positively for LacZ and none of 58 fetuses were positive for DNA by PCR analysis. Finally, more than 1400 eggs were fertilized after exposure to the vector prior to IVF and stained as morulae for LacZ activity. Fewer than 2% of the embryos stained positively for LacZ, and experiments indicated that the staining was due to incomplete washing of the eggs prior to IVF. These data provide strong evidence that adenoviruses cannot infect oocytes and that the risk of female germ-line transduction with such vectors is very low. PMID:11319918

  4. Response to copper stress in Streptomyces lividans extends beyond genes under direct control of a copper-sensitive operon repressor protein (CsoR).

    PubMed

    Dwarakanath, Srivatsa; Chaplin, Amanda K; Hough, Michael A; Rigali, Sébastien; Vijgenboom, Erik; Worrall, Jonathan A R

    2012-05-18

    A copper-sensitive operon repressor protein (CsoR) has been identified in Streptomyces lividans (CsoR(Sl)) and found to regulate copper homeostasis with attomolar affinity for Cu(I). Solution studies reveal apo- and Cu(I)-CsoR(Sl) to be a tetramer assembly, and a 1.7-Å resolution crystal structure of apo-CsoR(Sl) reveals that a significant conformational change is necessary to enable Cu(I) binding. In silico prediction of the CsoR regulon was confirmed in vitro (EMSA) and in vivo (RNA-seq), which highlighted that next to the csoR gene itself, the regulon consists of two Cu(I) efflux systems involving a CopZ-like copper metallochaperone protein and a CopA P(1)-type ATPase. Although deletion of csoR has only minor effects on S. lividans development when grown under high copper concentrations, mutations of the Cu(I) ligands decrease tolerance to copper as a result of the Cu(I)-CsoR mutants failing to disengage from the DNA targets, thus inhibiting the derepression of the regulon. RNA-seq experiments carried out on samples incubated with exogenous copper and a ΔcsoR strain showed that the set of genes responding to copper stress is much wider than anticipated and largely extends beyond genes targeted by CsoR. This suggests more control levels are operating and directing other regulons in copper homeostasis beside the CsoR regulon.

  5. DNA deamination enables direct PCR amplification of the cystatin B (CSTB) gene-associated dodecamer repeat expansion in myoclonus epilepsy type Unverricht-Lundborg.

    PubMed

    Weinhaeusel, Andreas; Morris, Michael A; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Haas, Oskar A

    2003-11-01

    The Unverricht-Lundborg type of progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is caused by the dysfunction of the cystatin B (CSTB) gene product. In the vast majority of affected cases, mRNA transcription is impaired by a biallelic expansion of a dodecamer repeat within the 5'-untranslated region of the respective gene. Since this minisatellite contains exclusively G and C nucleotides, direct PCR analysis of allele expansion is extremely difficult and error prone. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a PCR assay that is based on the deamination of the DNA prior to amplification. We have developed a method based on PCR after DNA deamination of the GC-rich repeat region, which improves the PCR condition to such an extent that we were not only able to reliably amplify expanded alleles of affected individuals (homozygotes and compound heterozygotes), but also the two alleles of full mutation carriers, whose analysis is particularly difficult because of PCR bias and heteroduplex formation between the two alleles. We used promoter- and repeat-specific primer combinations to investigate whether dodecamer repeat expansion concurs with de novo methylation of the CSTB gene promoter in a similar fashion to other repeat expansion syndromes. We confirmed previous evidence obtained by HpaII digestion and Southern blot analysis that both the promoter and the repeat regions are unmethylated, in both healthy and affected individuals. Thus, in contrast to certain trinucleotide repeat expansion-associated diseases, such as fragile X syndrome (FRAXA) and myotonic dystrophy, methylation analyses can not be utilized for indirect diagnostic testing.

  6. A novel cold-active xylanase gene from the environmental DNA of goat rumen contents: direct cloning, expression and enzyme characterization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guozeng; Luo, Huiying; Wang, Yaru; Huang, Huoqing; Shi, Pengjun; Yang, Peilong; Meng, Kun; Bai, Yingguo; Yao, Bin

    2011-02-01

    A xylanase-coding gene, xynGR40, was cloned directly from the environmental DNA of goat rumen contents and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The 1446-bp full-length gene encodes a 481-residue polypeptide (XynGR40) containing a catalytic domain belonging to glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family 10. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that XynGR40 was closely related with microbial xylanases of gastrointestinal source. Purified recombinant XynGR40 exhibited high activity at low temperatures, and remained active (∼10% of the activity) even at 0°C. The optimal temperature of XynGR40 was 30°C, much lower than other xylanases from rumen. Compared with mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts, XynGR40 had fewer hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, and lengthened loops in the catalytic domain. The enzyme also had relatively better stability at mesophilic temperatures and a higher catalytic efficiency than other known GH 10 cold active xylanases. These properties suggest that XynGR40 is a novel cold active xylanase and has great potential for basic research and industrial applications.

  7. Beta-carotene affects gene expression in lungs of male and female Bcmo1−/− mice in opposite directions

    PubMed Central

    van Helden, Yvonne G. J.; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; Swarts, Hans J. M.; Hollman, Peter C. H.; van Schooten, Frederik J.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms triggered by high dietary beta-carotene (BC) intake in lung are largely unknown. We performed microarray gene expression analysis on lung tissue of BC supplemented beta-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase 1 knockout (Bcmo1−/−) mice, which are—like humans—able to accumulate BC. Our main observation was that the genes were regulated in an opposite direction in male and female Bcmo1−/− mice by BC. The steroid biosynthetic pathway was overrepresented in BC-supplemented male Bcmo1−/− mice. Testosterone levels were higher after BC supplementation only in Bcmo1−/− mice, which had, unlike wild-type (Bcmo1+/+) mice, large variations. We hypothesize that BC possibly affects hormone synthesis or metabolism. Since sex hormones influence lung cancer risk, these data might contribute to an explanation for the previously found increased lung cancer risk after BC supplementation (ATBC and CARET studies). Moreover, effects of BC may depend on the presence of frequent human BCMO1 polymorphisms, since these effects were not found in wild-type mice. PMID:20820853

  8. The Wnt and Delta-Notch signalling pathways interact to direct pair-rule gene expression via caudal during segment addition in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum.

    PubMed

    Schönauer, Anna; Paese, Christian L B; Hilbrant, Maarten; Leite, Daniel J; Schwager, Evelyn E; Feitosa, Natália Martins; Eibner, Cornelius; Damen, Wim G M; McGregor, Alistair P

    2016-07-01

    In short-germ arthropods, posterior segments are added sequentially from a segment addition zone (SAZ) during embryogenesis. Studies in spiders such as Parasteatoda tepidariorum have provided insights into the gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying segment addition, and revealed that Wnt8 is required for dynamic Delta (Dl) expression associated with the formation of new segments. However, it remains unclear how these pathways interact during SAZ formation and segment addition. Here, we show that Delta-Notch signalling is required for Wnt8 expression in posterior SAZ cells, but represses the expression of this Wnt gene in anterior SAZ cells. We also found that these two signalling pathways are required for the expression of the spider orthologues of even-skipped (eve) and runt-1 (run-1), at least in part via caudal (cad). Moreover, it appears that dynamic expression of eve in this spider does not require a feedback loop with run-1, as is found in the pair-rule circuit of the beetle Tribolium Taken together, our results suggest that the development of posterior segments in Parasteatoda is directed by dynamic interactions between Wnt8 and Delta-Notch signalling that are read out by cad, which is necessary but probably not sufficient to regulate the expression of eve and run-1 Our study therefore provides new insights towards better understanding the evolution and developmental regulation of segmentation in other arthropods, including insects. PMID:27287802

  9. The Arabidopsis SKU6/SPIRAL1 Gene Encodes a Plus End–Localized Microtubule-Interacting Protein Involved in Directional Cell ExpansionW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sedbrook, John C.; Ehrhardt, David W.; Fisher, Sarah E.; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Somerville, Chris R.

    2004-01-01

    The sku6-1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibits altered patterns of root and organ growth. sku6 roots, etiolated hypocotyls, and leaf petioles exhibit right-handed axial twisting, and root growth on inclined agar media is strongly right skewed. The touch-dependent sku6 root skewing phenotype is suppressed by the antimicrotubule drugs propyzamide and oryzalin, and right skewing is exacerbated by cold treatment. Cloning revealed that sku6-1 is allelic to spiral1-1 (spr1-1). However, modifiers in the Columbia (Col) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotype backgrounds mask noncomplementation in sku6-1 (Col)/spr1-1 (Ler) F1 plants. The SPR1 gene encodes a plant-specific 12-kD protein that is ubiquitously expressed and belongs to a six-member gene family in Arabidopsis. An SPR1:green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion expressed in transgenic seedlings localized to microtubules within the cortical array, preprophase band, phragmoplast, and mitotic spindle. SPR1:GFP was concentrated at the growing ends of cortical microtubules and was dependent on polymer growth state; the microtubule-related fluorescence dissipated upon polymer shortening. The protein has a repeated motif at both ends, separated by a predicted rod-like domain, suggesting that it may act as an intermolecular linker. These observations suggest that SPR1 is involved in microtubule polymerization dynamics and/or guidance, which in turn influences touch-induced directional cell expansion and axial twisting. PMID:15155883

  10. Streptomyces coelicolor XdhR is a direct target of (p)ppGpp that controls expression of genes encoding xanthine dehydrogenase to promote purine salvage.

    PubMed

    Sivapragasam, Smitha; Grove, Anne

    2016-05-01

    The gene encoding Streptomyces coelicolor xanthine dehydrogenase regulator (XdhR) is divergently oriented from xdhABC, which encodes xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh). Xdh is required for purine salvage pathways. XdhR was previously shown to repress xdhABC expression. We show that XdhR binds the xdhABC-xdhR intergenic region with high affinity (Kd ∼ 0.5 nM). DNaseI footprinting reveals that this complex formation corresponds to XdhR binding the xdhR gene promoter at two adjacent sites; at higher protein concentrations, protection expands to a region that overlaps the transcriptional and translational start sites of xdhABC. While substrates for Xdh have little effect on DNA binding, GTP and ppGpp dissociate the DNA-XdhR complex. Progression of cells to stationary phase, a condition associated with increased (p)ppGpp production, leads to elevated xdhB expression; in contrast, inhibition of Xdh by allopurinol results in xdhB repression. We propose that XdhR is a direct target of (p)ppGpp, and that expression of xdhABC is upregulated during the stringent response to promote purine salvage pathways, maintain GTP homeostasis and ensure continued (p)ppGpp synthesis. During exponential phase growth, basal levels of xdhABC expression may be achieved by GTP serving as a lower-affinity XdhR ligand.

  11. The Wnt and Delta-Notch signalling pathways interact to direct pair-rule gene expression via caudal during segment addition in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum.

    PubMed

    Schönauer, Anna; Paese, Christian L B; Hilbrant, Maarten; Leite, Daniel J; Schwager, Evelyn E; Feitosa, Natália Martins; Eibner, Cornelius; Damen, Wim G M; McGregor, Alistair P

    2016-07-01

    In short-germ arthropods, posterior segments are added sequentially from a segment addition zone (SAZ) during embryogenesis. Studies in spiders such as Parasteatoda tepidariorum have provided insights into the gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying segment addition, and revealed that Wnt8 is required for dynamic Delta (Dl) expression associated with the formation of new segments. However, it remains unclear how these pathways interact during SAZ formation and segment addition. Here, we show that Delta-Notch signalling is required for Wnt8 expression in posterior SAZ cells, but represses the expression of this Wnt gene in anterior SAZ cells. We also found that these two signalling pathways are required for the expression of the spider orthologues of even-skipped (eve) and runt-1 (run-1), at least in part via caudal (cad). Moreover, it appears that dynamic expression of eve in this spider does not require a feedback loop with run-1, as is found in the pair-rule circuit of the beetle Tribolium Taken together, our results suggest that the development of posterior segments in Parasteatoda is directed by dynamic interactions between Wnt8 and Delta-Notch signalling that are read out by cad, which is necessary but probably not sufficient to regulate the expression of eve and run-1 Our study therefore provides new insights towards better understanding the evolution and developmental regulation of segmentation in other arthropods, including insects.

  12. Disruption of the Abdominal-B Promoter Tethering Element Results in a Loss of Long-Range Enhancer-Directed Hox Gene Expression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Margaret C. W.; Schiller, Benjamin J.; Akbari, Omar S.; Bae, Esther; Drewell, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    There are many examples within gene complexes of transcriptional enhancers interacting with only a subset of target promoters. A number of molecular mechanisms including promoter competition, insulators and chromatin looping are thought to play a role in regulating these interactions. At the Drosophila bithorax complex (BX-C), the IAB5 enhancer specifically drives gene expression only from the Abdominal-B (Abd-B) promoter, even though the enhancer and promoter are 55 kb apart and are separated by at least three insulators. In previous studies, we discovered that a 255 bp cis-regulatory module, the promoter tethering element (PTE), located 5′ of the Abd-B transcriptional start site is able to tether IAB5 to the Abd-B promoter in transgenic embryo assays. In this study we examine the functional role of the PTE at the endogenous BX-C using transposon-mediated mutagenesis. Disruption of the PTE by P element insertion results in a loss of enhancer-directed Abd-B expression during embryonic development and a homeotic transformation of abdominal segments. A partial deletion of the PTE and neighboring upstream genomic sequences by imprecise excision of the P element also results in a similar loss of Abd-B expression in embryos. These results demonstrate that the PTE is an essential component of the regulatory network at the BX-C and is required in vivo to mediate specific long-range enhancer-promoter interactions. PMID:21283702

  13. Introduction and Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Nancey

    This chapter provides an overview of some of the history of debates regarding free will, and concurs with several authors who claim that the philosophical discussions have reached a stalemate due to their focus on a metaphysical doctrine of universal determinism. The way ahead, therefore, requires two developments. One is to focus not on determinism but on reductionism; the other is to attend to specific scientific findings that appear to call free will into question. The chapter provides an introduction to the topics of reductionism, emergence, and downward causation, and then surveys the works of Daniel Wegner and Benjamin Libet, which have been taken to show the irrelevance of conscious will in human action. It summarizes the chapters comprising the rest of the volume, and then offers a reflection on the achievement of the work as a whole - in brief, a critique of free-will skeptics based on human capacities such as meta-cognition and long-term planning, which allow agents to exert downward control on neural processes and behavior. It ends by highlighting, in light of Alasdair MacIntyre's work on moral responsibility, an important additional factor involved in creating the possibility for freedom of choice, namely the possession of abstract symbolic language.

  14. Arctic freshwater synthesis: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prowse, T.; Bring, A.; Mârd, J.; Carmack, E.

    2015-11-01

    In response to a joint request from the World Climate Research Program's Climate and Cryosphere Project, the International Arctic Science Committee, and the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program, an updated scientific assessment has been conducted of the Arctic Freshwater System (AFS), entitled the Arctic Freshwater Synthesis (AFSΣ). The major reason for joint request was an increasing concern that changes to the AFS have produced, and could produce even greater, changes to biogeophysical and socioeconomic systems of special importance to northern residents and also produce extra-Arctic climatic effects that will have global consequences. Hence, the key objective of the AFSΣ was to produce an updated, comprehensive, and integrated review of the structure and function of the entire AFS. The AFSΣ was organized around six key thematic areas: atmosphere, oceans, terrestrial hydrology, terrestrial ecology, resources and modeling, and the review of each coauthored by an international group of scientists and published as separate manuscripts in this special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences. This AFSΣ—Introduction reviews the motivations for, and foci of, previous studies of the AFS, discusses criteria used to define the domain of the AFS, and details key characteristics of the definition adopted for the AFSΣ.

  15. Nonhemolytic Cell-Penetrating Peptides: Site Specific Introduction of Glutamine and Lysine Residues into the α-Helical Peptide Causes Deletion of Its Direct Membrane Disrupting Ability but Retention of Its Cell Penetrating Ability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seoyeon; Hyun, Soonsil; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Yan; Yu, Jaehoon

    2016-09-12

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) often have cationic and amphipathic characteristics that are commonly associated with α-helical peptides. These features give CPPs both membrane demolishing and penetrating abilities. To make CPPs safe for biomedical applications, their toxicities resulting from their membrane demolishing abilities must be removed while their cell penetrating abilities must be retained. In this study, we systematically constructed mutants of the amphipathic α-helical model peptide (LKKLLKLLKKLLKLAG, LK peptide). The hydrophobic amino acid leucine in the LK peptide was replaced with hydrophilic amino acids to reduce hemolytic or cell toxicity. Most of the mutants were found to have weakened membrane disrupting abilities, but their cell penetrating abilities were also weakened. However, the L8Q and L8K mutants were found to have low micromolar range cell penetrating ability and almost no membrane disrupting ability. These selected mutants utilize energy-dependent endocytosis mechanisms instead of an energy-independent direct cell penetrating mechanism to enter cells. In addition, the mutants can be used to deliver the anticancer drug methotrexate (MTX) to cells, thereby overcoming resistance to this drug. To determine if the effect of these mutations on the membrane disrupting and cell penetrating abilities is general, Q and K mutations of the natural amphipathic α-helical antimicrobial peptide (AMP), LL37, were introduced. Specific positional Q and K mutants of LL37 were found to have lower hemolytic toxicities and preserved the ability to penetrate eukaryotic cells such as MDA-MB-231 cells. Taken together, observations made in this work suggest that interrupting the global hydrophobicity of amphipathic α-helical CPPs and AMPs, by replacing hydrophobic residues with mildly hydrophilic amino acids such as Q and K, might be an ideal strategy for constructing peptides that have strong cell penetrating abilities and weak cell membrane disrupting

  16. Nonhemolytic Cell-Penetrating Peptides: Site Specific Introduction of Glutamine and Lysine Residues into the α-Helical Peptide Causes Deletion of Its Direct Membrane Disrupting Ability but Retention of Its Cell Penetrating Ability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seoyeon; Hyun, Soonsil; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Yan; Yu, Jaehoon

    2016-09-12

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) often have cationic and amphipathic characteristics that are commonly associated with α-helical peptides. These features give CPPs both membrane demolishing and penetrating abilities. To make CPPs safe for biomedical applications, their toxicities resulting from their membrane demolishing abilities must be removed while their cell penetrating abilities must be retained. In this study, we systematically constructed mutants of the amphipathic α-helical model peptide (LKKLLKLLKKLLKLAG, LK peptide). The hydrophobic amino acid leucine in the LK peptide was replaced with hydrophilic amino acids to reduce hemolytic or cell toxicity. Most of the mutants were found to have weakened membrane disrupting abilities, but their cell penetrating abilities were also weakened. However, the L8Q and L8K mutants were found to have low micromolar range cell penetrating ability and almost no membrane disrupting ability. These selected mutants utilize energy-dependent endocytosis mechanisms instead of an energy-independent direct cell penetrating mechanism to enter cells. In addition, the mutants can be used to deliver the anticancer drug methotrexate (MTX) to cells, thereby overcoming resistance to this drug. To determine if the effect of these mutations on the membrane disrupting and cell penetrating abilities is general, Q and K mutations of the natural amphipathic α-helical antimicrobial peptide (AMP), LL37, were introduced. Specific positional Q and K mutants of LL37 were found to have lower hemolytic toxicities and preserved the ability to penetrate eukaryotic cells such as MDA-MB-231 cells. Taken together, observations made in this work suggest that interrupting the global hydrophobicity of amphipathic α-helical CPPs and AMPs, by replacing hydrophobic residues with mildly hydrophilic amino acids such as Q and K, might be an ideal strategy for constructing peptides that have strong cell penetrating abilities and weak cell membrane disrupting

  17. The study of homology between tumor progression genes and members of retroviridae as a tool to predict target-directed therapy failure.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Janaina

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenes are the primary candidates for target-directed therapy, given that they are involved directly in the progression and resistance of tumors. However, the appearance of point mutations can hinder the treatment of patients with these new molecules, raising costs and the need to development new analogs that target the novel mutations. Based on an analysis of homologies, the present study discusses the possibility of predicting the failure of a protein as a pharmacological target, due to its similarities with retrovirus sequences, which have extremely high mutation rates. This analysis was based on the molecular evidence available in the literature, and widely-used and well-established PSI-BLAST, with two iterations and maximum of 500 aligned sequences. The possibility of predicting which newly-discovered genes involved in tumor progression would likely result in the failure of targeted therapy, using free, simple and automated bioinformatics tools, could provide substantial savings in the time and financial resources needed for long-term drug development.

  18. Mechanisms of evolutionary changes in timing, spatial expression, and mRNA processing in the msp130 gene in a direct-developing sea urchin, Heliocidaris erythrogramma.

    PubMed

    Klueg, K M; Harkey, M A; Raff, R A

    1997-02-01

    Developmental processes associated with skeletogenesis differ in the direct-developing sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma from that in Heliocidaris tuberculata and other indirect-developing species. In H. erythrogramma, the differences include ingression of a much higher number of mesenchyme cells, failure of the cells to form the typical ring pattern of cells prior to the onset of skeletogenesis, a significantly reduced larval skeleton, and a delay in timing of expression of the skeletogenic cell-restricted gene msp130. We report that the heterochronic change in msp130 expression is regulated at the level of transcription. By transient expression of reporter constructs containing msp130 promoter regions from direct- and indirect-developing species, we found that this evolutionary change in regulation is consistent with changes in the timing of action of trans-acting factors in skeletogenic mesenchyme cells. We further used these experiments to show that the H. erythrogramma promoter contains elements required for correct spatial expression in the primary mesenchyme cells of an indirect-developing host. We finally show that alternate processing of H. erythrogramma msp130 is thus far specific to this species and not an aspect of adult skeletogenesis.

  19. The study of homology between tumor progression genes and members of retroviridae as a tool to predict target-directed therapy failure

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Janaina

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenes are the primary candidates for target-directed therapy, given that they are involved directly in the progression and resistance of tumors. However, the appearance of point mutations can hinder the treatment of patients with these new molecules, raising costs and the need to development new analogs that target the novel mutations. Based on an analysis of homologies, the present study discusses the possibility of predicting the failure of a protein as a pharmacological target, due to its similarities with retrovirus sequences, which have extremely high mutation rates. This analysis was based on the molecular evidence available in the literature, and widely-used and well-established PSI-BLAST, with two iterations and maximum of 500 aligned sequences. The possibility of predicting which newly-discovered genes involved in tumor progression would likely result in the failure of targeted therapy, using free, simple and automated bioinformatics tools, could provide substantial savings in the time and financial resources needed for long-term drug development. PMID:25983693

  20. Adenylyl cyclase A expression is tip-specific in Dictyostelium slugs and directs StatA nuclear translocation and CudA gene expression.

    PubMed

    Verkerke-van Wijk, I; Fukuzawa, M; Devreotes, P N; Schaap, P

    2001-06-01

    cAMP oscillations, generated by adenylyl cyclase A (ACA), coordinate cell aggregation in Dictyostelium and have also been implicated in organizer function during multicellular development. We used a gene fusion of the ACA promoter with a labile lacZ derivative to study the expression pattern of ACA. During aggregation, most cells expressed ACA, but thereafter expression was lost in all cells except those of the anterior tip. Before aggregation, ACA transcription was strongly upregulated by nanomolar cAMP pulses. Postaggregative transcription was sustained by nanomolar cAMP pulses, but downregulated by a continuous micromolar cAMP stimulus and by the stalk-cell-inducing factor DIF. Earlier work showed that the transcription factor StatA displays tip-specific nuclear translocation and directs tip-specific expression of the nuclear protein CudA, which is essential for culmination. Both StatA and CudA were present in nuclei throughout the entire slug in an aca null mutant that expresses ACA from the constitutive actin15 promoter. This suggests that the tip-specific expression of ACA directs tip-specific nuclear translocation of StatA and tip-specific expression of CudA.

  1. RFQ's: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, J.W.

    1990-09-01

    This report discusses the follow topics on radio frequency quadrupole accelerators: RFQ characteristics; low velocity accelerators; alternating-gradient focusing; acceleration; RFQ accelerator; bunching; adiabatic capture; injectors; transverse input matching; rf structures; mechanical designs; structure stabilization; rf considerations; space-charge effects; beam dynamics codes; cavity design codes; some real machines; heavy ions; and future directions.

  2. Introduction to Quantum Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1996-01-01

    An impact of ideas associated with the concept of a hypothetical quantum computer upon classical computing is analyzed. Two fundamental properties of quantum computing: direct simulations of probabilities, and influence between different branches of probabilistic scenarios, as well as their classical versions, are discussed.

  3. An introduction to recombination and linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mcpeek, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    With a garden as his laboratory, Mendel was able to discern basic probabilistic laws of heredity. Although it first appeared as a baffling exception to one of Mendel`s principles, the phenomenon of variable linkage between characters was soon recognized to be a powerful tool in the process of chromosome mapping and location of genes of interest. In this introduction, we first describe Mendel`s work and the subsequent discovery of linkage. Next we describe the apparent cause of variable linkage, namely recombination, and we introduce linkage analysis. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, William J.

    Coincidentally, as I sat down in late October 2003 to read and review the second edition of Wallace H. Campbell's text, Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields, we received warnings from the news media of a massive solar flare and its possible effect on power supply systems and satellite communications. News programs briefly explained the source of Sun-Earth interactions. If you are interested in learning more about the physics of the connection between sun spots and power supply systems and their impact on orbiting satellites, I urge you to become acquainted with Campbell's book. It presents an interesting and informative explanation of the geomagnetic field and its applications to a wide variety of topics, including oil exploration, climate change, and fraudulent claims of the utility of magnetic fields for alleviating human pain. Geomagnetism, the study of the nature and processes of the Earth's magnetic fields and its application to the investigation of the Earth, its processes, and history, is a mature science with a well-developed theoretical foundation and a vast array of observations. It is discussed in varied detail in Earth physics books and most entry-level geoscience texts. The latter treatments largely are driven by the need to discuss paleomagnetism as an essential tool in studying plate tectonics. A more thorough explanation of geomagnetism is needed by many interested scientists in related fields and by laypersons. This is the objective of Campbell's book. It is particularly germane in view of a broad range of geomagnetic topics that are at the forefront of today's science, including environmental magnetism, so-called ``jerks'' observed in the Earth's magnetic field, the perplexing magnetic field of Mars, improved satellite magnetic field observations, and the increasing availability of high-quality continental magnetic anomaly maps, to name only a few.

  5. Campus Networking Strategies: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Michael M.

    1988-01-01

    This article is adapted from the introduction to EDUCOM's forthcoming book, Campus Networking Strategies, which includes 10 case study chapters detailing academic experiences with computer networking. Topics discussed in the introduction include network issues for management, networking economics, engineering and telecommunications issues, and…

  6. An Introduction to Business German.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambacher, Robert

    At Millersville University (Pennsylvania), business German is taught in the German section in a two-semester introduction at the sophomore level, a junior-level advanced course, and a senior-level translation course. These four courses are augmented by introductions to business and economics, both taught in English outside the German section.…

  7. Connection with dynamics: General introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1993-01-01

    This is a brief nontechnical introduction to a few theoretical issues to the density-velocity relation. The aim of this introduction is not an exhaustive analysis of the current theoretical situation but rather setting a stage for the following talks. The selection of topics has been determined by the sequel program.

  8. Computer Assisted Introduction to Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha R.

    These six chapters provide an introduction to Newtonian mechanics, based on a coordinated use of text material, laboratory work, and the computer. The material is essentially self-contained so that it can serve as a short text on mechanics or as a text supplement in a regular physics course. Chapter 1 is a brief introduction to the computer…

  9. Arabidopsis RNASE THREE LIKE2 Modulates the Expression of Protein-Coding Genes via 24-Nucleotide Small Interfering RNA-Directed DNA Methylation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hachet, Mélanie; Comella, Pascale; Zytnicki, Matthias; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    RNaseIII enzymes catalyze the cleavage of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and have diverse functions in RNA maturation. Arabidopsis thaliana RNASE THREE LIKE2 (RTL2), which carries one RNaseIII and two dsRNA binding (DRB) domains, is a unique Arabidopsis RNaseIII enzyme resembling the budding yeast small interfering RNA (siRNA)-producing Dcr1 enzyme. Here, we show that RTL2 modulates the production of a subset of small RNAs and that this activity depends on both its RNaseIII and DRB domains. However, the mode of action of RTL2 differs from that of Dcr1. Whereas Dcr1 directly cleaves dsRNAs into 23-nucleotide siRNAs, RTL2 likely cleaves dsRNAs into longer molecules, which are subsequently processed into small RNAs by the DICER-LIKE enzymes. Depending on the dsRNA considered, RTL2-mediated maturation either improves (RTL2-dependent loci) or reduces (RTL2-sensitive loci) the production of small RNAs. Because the vast majority of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to transposons and intergenic regions producing 24-nucleotide siRNAs that guide DNA methylation, RTL2 depletion modifies DNA methylation in these regions. Nevertheless, 13% of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to protein-coding genes. We show that changes in 24-nucleotide siRNA levels also affect DNA methylation levels at such loci and inversely correlate with mRNA steady state levels, thus implicating RTL2 in the regulation of protein-coding gene expression. PMID:26764378

  10. Regulation of Cell Proliferation in the Stomatal Lineage by the Arabidopsis MYB FOUR LIPS via Direct Targeting of Core Cell Cycle Genes[W

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zidian; Lee, EunKyoung; Lucas, Jessica R.; Morohashi, Kengo; Li, Dongmei; Murray, James A.H.; Sack, Fred D.; Grotewold, Erich

    2010-01-01

    Stomata, which are epidermal pores surrounded by two guard cells, develop from a specialized stem cell lineage and function in shoot gas exchange. The Arabidopsis thaliana FOUR LIPS (FLP) and MYB88 genes encode closely related and atypical two-MYB-repeat proteins, which when mutated result in excess divisions and abnormal groups of stomata in contact. Consistent with a role in transcription, we show here that FLP and MYB88 are nuclear proteins with DNA binding preferences distinct from other known MYBs. To identify possible FLP/MYB88 transcriptional targets, we used chromatin immunoprecitation (ChIP) followed by hybridization to Arabidopsis whole genome tiling arrays. These ChIP-chip data indicate that FLP/MYB88 target the upstream regions especially of cell cycle genes, including cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and components of the prereplication complex. In particular, we show that FLP represses the expression of the mitosis-inducing factor CDKB1;1, which, along with CDKB1;2, is specifically required both for the last division in the stomatal pathway and for cell overproliferation in flp mutants. We propose that FLP and MYB88 together integrate patterning with the control of cell cycle progression and terminal differentiation through multiple and