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Sample records for directs zebrafish period2

  1. Light directs zebrafish period2 expression via conserved D and E boxes.

    PubMed

    Vatine, Gad; Vallone, Daniela; Appelbaum, Lior; Mracek, Philipp; Ben-Moshe, Zohar; Lahiri, Kajori; Gothilf, Yoav; Foulkes, Nicholas S

    2009-10-01

    For most species, light represents the principal environmental signal for entraining the endogenous circadian clock. The zebrafish is a fascinating vertebrate model for studying this process since unlike mammals, direct exposure of most of its tissues to light leads to local clock entrainment. Importantly, light induces the expression of a set of genes including certain clock genes in most zebrafish cell types in vivo and in vitro. However, the mechanism linking light to gene expression remains poorly understood. To elucidate this key mechanism, here we focus on how light regulates transcription of the zebrafish period2 (per2) gene. Using transgenic fish and stably transfected cell line-based assays, we define a Light Responsive Module (LRM) within the per2 promoter. The LRM lies proximal to the transcription start site and is both necessary and sufficient for light-driven gene expression and also for a light-dependent circadian clock regulation. Curiously, the LRM sequence is strongly conserved in other vertebrate per2 genes, even in species lacking directly light-sensitive peripheral clocks. Furthermore, we reveal that the human LRM can substitute for the zebrafish LRM to confer light-regulated transcription in zebrafish cells. The LRM contains E- and D-box elements that are critical for its function. While the E-box directs circadian clock regulation by mediating BMAL/CLOCK activity, the D-box confers light-driven expression. The zebrafish homolog of the thyrotroph embryonic factor binds efficiently to the LRM D-box and transactivates expression. We demonstrate that tef mRNA levels are light inducible and that knock-down of tef expression attenuates light-driven transcription from the per2 promoter in vivo. Together, our results support a model where a light-dependent crosstalk between E- and D-box binding factors is a central determinant of per2 expression. These findings extend the general understanding of the mechanism whereby the clock is entrained by light

  2. The Zebrafish Period2 Protein Positively Regulates the Circadian Clock through Mediation of Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR)-related Orphan Receptor α (Rorα)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyong; Zhong, Zhaomin; Zhong, Yingbin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Han

    2015-01-01

    We report the characterization of a null mutant for zebrafish circadian clock gene period2 (per2) generated by transcription activator-like effector nuclease and a positive role of PER2 in vertebrate circadian regulation. Locomotor experiments showed that per2 mutant zebrafish display reduced activities under light-dark and 2-h phase delay under constant darkness, and quantitative real time PCR analyses showed up-regulation of cry1aa, cry1ba, cry1bb, and aanat2 but down-regulation of per1b, per3, and bmal1b in per2 mutant zebrafish, suggesting that Per2 is essential for the zebrafish circadian clock. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that Per2 represses aanat2 expression through E-box and enhances bmal1b expression through the Ror/Rev-erb response element, implicating that Per2 plays dual roles in the zebrafish circadian clock. Cell transfection and co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Per2 enhances bmal1b expression through binding to orphan nuclear receptor Rorα. The enhancing effect of mouse PER2 on Bmal1 transcription is also mediated by RORα even though it binds to REV-ERBα. Moreover, zebrafish Per2 also appears to have tissue-specific regulatory roles in numerous peripheral organs. These findings help define the essential functions of Per2 in the zebrafish circadian clock and in particular provide strong evidence for a positive role of PER2 in the vertebrate circadian system. PMID:25544291

  3. Direct Visualization of DNA Replication Dynamics in Zebrafish Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuriya, Kenji; Higashiyama, Eriko; Avşar-Ban, Eriko; Tamaru, Yutaka; Ogata, Shin; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2015-12-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of DNA replication in the S-phase nucleus has been extensively studied in mammalian cells because it is tightly coupled with the regulation of other nuclear processes such as transcription. However, little is known about the replication dynamics in nonmammalian cells. Here, we analyzed the DNA replication processes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) cells through the direct visualization of replicating DNA in the nucleus and on DNA fiber molecules isolated from the nucleus. We found that zebrafish chromosomal DNA at the nuclear interior was replicated first, followed by replication of DNA at the nuclear periphery, which is reminiscent of the spatiotemporal regulation of mammalian DNA replication. However, the relative duration of interior DNA replication in zebrafish cells was longer compared to mammalian cells, possibly reflecting zebrafish-specific genomic organization. The rate of replication fork progression and ori-to-ori distance measured by the DNA combing technique were ∼ 1.4 kb/min and 100 kb, respectively, which are comparable to those in mammalian cells. To our knowledge, this is a first report that measures replication dynamics in zebrafish cells.

  4. ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database: updates and new directions

    PubMed Central

    Ruzicka, Leyla; Bradford, Yvonne M.; Frazer, Ken; Howe, Douglas G.; Paddock, Holly; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri E.; Eagle, Anne E.; Fashena, David; Kalita, Patrick; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A. T.; Pich, Christian; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Westerfield, Monte

    2015-01-01

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for genetic and genomic data from zebrafish (Danio rerio) research. ZFIN staff curate detailed information about genes, mutants, genotypes, reporter lines, sequences, constructs, antibodies, knockdown reagents, expression patterns, phenotypes, gene product function, and orthology from publications. Researchers can submit mutant, transgenic, expression, and phenotype data directly to ZFIN and use the ZFIN Community Wiki to share antibody and protocol information. Data can be accessed through topic-specific searches, a new site-wide search, and the data-mining resource ZebrafishMine (http://zebrafishmine.org). Data download and web service options are also available. ZFIN collaborates with major bioinformatics organizations to verify and integrate genomic sequence data, provide nomenclature support, establish reciprocal links and participate in the development of standardized structured vocabularies (ontologies) used for data annotation and searching. ZFIN-curated gene, function, expression, and phenotype data are available for comparative exploration at several multi-species resources. The use of zebrafish as a model for human disease is increasing. ZFIN is supporting this growing area with three major projects: adding easy access to computed orthology data from gene pages, curating details of the gene expression pattern changes in mutant fish, and curating zebrafish models of human diseases. PMID:26097180

  5. ZFIN, The zebrafish model organism database: Updates and new directions.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Leyla; Bradford, Yvonne M; Frazer, Ken; Howe, Douglas G; Paddock, Holly; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri E; Eagle, Anne E; Fashena, David; Kalita, Patrick; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A T; Pich, Christian; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Westerfield, Monte

    2015-08-01

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for genetic and genomic data from zebrafish (Danio rerio) research. ZFIN staff curate detailed information about genes, mutants, genotypes, reporter lines, sequences, constructs, antibodies, knockdown reagents, expression patterns, phenotypes, gene product function, and orthology from publications. Researchers can submit mutant, transgenic, expression, and phenotype data directly to ZFIN and use the ZFIN Community Wiki to share antibody and protocol information. Data can be accessed through topic-specific searches, a new site-wide search, and the data-mining resource ZebrafishMine (http://zebrafishmine.org). Data download and web service options are also available. ZFIN collaborates with major bioinformatics organizations to verify and integrate genomic sequence data, provide nomenclature support, establish reciprocal links, and participate in the development of standardized structured vocabularies (ontologies) used for data annotation and searching. ZFIN-curated gene, function, expression, and phenotype data are available for comparative exploration at several multi-species resources. The use of zebrafish as a model for human disease is increasing. ZFIN is supporting this growing area with three major projects: adding easy access to computed orthology data from gene pages, curating details of the gene expression pattern changes in mutant fish, and curating zebrafish models of human diseases. PMID:26097180

  6. ZFIN, The zebrafish model organism database: Updates and new directions.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Leyla; Bradford, Yvonne M; Frazer, Ken; Howe, Douglas G; Paddock, Holly; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri E; Eagle, Anne E; Fashena, David; Kalita, Patrick; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A T; Pich, Christian; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Westerfield, Monte

    2015-08-01

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for genetic and genomic data from zebrafish (Danio rerio) research. ZFIN staff curate detailed information about genes, mutants, genotypes, reporter lines, sequences, constructs, antibodies, knockdown reagents, expression patterns, phenotypes, gene product function, and orthology from publications. Researchers can submit mutant, transgenic, expression, and phenotype data directly to ZFIN and use the ZFIN Community Wiki to share antibody and protocol information. Data can be accessed through topic-specific searches, a new site-wide search, and the data-mining resource ZebrafishMine (http://zebrafishmine.org). Data download and web service options are also available. ZFIN collaborates with major bioinformatics organizations to verify and integrate genomic sequence data, provide nomenclature support, establish reciprocal links, and participate in the development of standardized structured vocabularies (ontologies) used for data annotation and searching. ZFIN-curated gene, function, expression, and phenotype data are available for comparative exploration at several multi-species resources. The use of zebrafish as a model for human disease is increasing. ZFIN is supporting this growing area with three major projects: adding easy access to computed orthology data from gene pages, curating details of the gene expression pattern changes in mutant fish, and curating zebrafish models of human diseases.

  7. Chemokine guided angiogenesis directs coronary vasculature formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Michael R.M.; Bussmann, Jeroen; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Long; Osorio, Arthela; Burns, C. Geoffrey; Burns, Caroline E.; Sucov, Henry M.; Siekmann, Arndt F.; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Interruption of coronary blood supply severely impairs heart function with often-fatal consequences for heart disease patients. However the formation and maturation of these coronary vessels is not fully understood. Here we provide a detailed analysis of coronary vessel development in zebrafish. We observe that coronary vessels form in zebrafish by angiogenic sprouting of arterial cells derived from the endocardium at the atrioventricular canal. Endothelial cells express the CXC-motif chemokine receptor Cxcr4a and migrate to vascularize the ventricle under the guidance of the myocardium-expressed ligand Cxcl12b. cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to form a vascular network, whereas ectopic expression of Cxcl12b ligand induces coronary vessel formation. Importantly, cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to undergo heart regeneration following injury. Our results suggest that chemokine-signaling has an essential role in coronary vessel formation by directing migration of endocardium-derived endothelial cells. Poorly developed vasculature in cxcr4a mutants likely underlies decreased regenerative potential in adults. PMID:26017769

  8. Chemokine-guided angiogenesis directs coronary vasculature formation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Michael R M; Bussmann, Jeroen; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Long; Osorio, Arthela; Burns, C Geoffrey; Burns, Caroline E; Sucov, Henry M; Siekmann, Arndt F; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-05-26

    Interruption of the coronary blood supply severely impairs heart function with often fatal consequences for patients. However, the formation and maturation of these coronary vessels is not fully understood. Here we provide a detailed analysis of coronary vessel development in zebrafish. We observe that coronary vessels form in zebrafish by angiogenic sprouting of arterial cells derived from the endocardium at the atrioventricular canal. Endothelial cells express the CXC-motif chemokine receptor Cxcr4a and migrate to vascularize the ventricle under the guidance of the myocardium-expressed ligand Cxcl12b. cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to form a vascular network, whereas ectopic expression of Cxcl12b ligand induces coronary vessel formation. Importantly, cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to undergo heart regeneration following injury. Our results suggest that chemokine signaling has an essential role in coronary vessel formation by directing migration of endocardium-derived endothelial cells. Poorly developed vasculature in cxcr4a mutants likely underlies decreased regenerative potential in adults.

  9. Directional and color preference in adult zebrafish: Implications in behavioral and learning assays in neurotoxicology studies.

    PubMed

    Bault, Zachary A; Peterson, Samuel M; Freeman, Jennifer L

    2015-12-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a useful vertebrate model organism for neurological studies. While a number of behavior and learning assays are recently reported in the literature for zebrafish, many of these assays are still being refined. The initial purpose of this study was to apply a published T-maze assay for adult zebrafish that measures how quickly an organism can discriminate between different color stimuli after receiving reinforcement to measure learning in a study investigating the later life impacts of developmental Pb exposure. The original results were inconclusive as the control group showed a directional and color preference. To assess directional preference further, a three-chambered testing apparatus was constructed and rotated in several directions. The directional preference observed in males was alleviated by rotating the arms pointing west and east. In addition, color preference was investigated using all combinations of five different colors (orange, yellow, green, blue and purple). With directional preference alleviated results showed that both male and female zebrafish preferred colors of shorter wavelengths. An additional experiment tested changes in color preference due to developmental exposure to Pb in adult male zebrafish. Results revealed that Pb-exposed males gained and lost certain color preferences compared to control males and the preference for short wavelengths was decreased. Overall, these results show that consideration and pretesting should be completed before applying behavioral and learning assays involving adult zebrafish to avoid innate preferences and confounding changes in neurotoxicology studies and that developmental Pb exposure alters color preferences in adult male zebrafish.

  10. Directed Differentiation of Zebrafish Pluripotent Embryonic Cells to Functional Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yao; Gao, Maomao; Gao, Luna; Zhao, Yu; Hong, Qiang; Li, Zhigang; Yao, Jing; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2016-09-13

    A cardiomyocyte differentiation in vitro system from zebrafish embryos remains to be established. Here, we have determined pluripotency window of zebrafish embryos by analyzing their gene-expression patterns of pluripotency factors together with markers of three germ layers, and have found that zebrafish undergoes a very narrow period of pluripotency maintenance from zygotic genome activation to a brief moment after oblong stage. Based on the pluripotency and a combination of appropriate conditions, we established a rapid and efficient method for cardiomyocyte generation in vitro from primary embryonic cells. The induced cardiomyocytes differentiated into functional and specific cardiomyocyte subtypes. Notably, these in vitro generated cardiomyocytes exhibited typical contractile kinetics and electrophysiological features. The system provides a new paradigm of cardiomyocyte differentiation from primary embryonic cells in zebrafish. The technology provides a new platform for the study of heart development and regeneration, in addition to drug discovery, disease modeling, and assessment of cardiotoxic agents. PMID:27569061

  11. Toxicity induced by Basic Violet 14, Direct Red 28 and Acid Red 26 in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bing; Liu, Hong-Cui; Ou, Wen-Bin; Eilers, Grant; Zhou, Sheng-Mei; Meng, Fan-Guo; Li, Chun-Qi; Li, Yong-Quan

    2015-12-01

    Basic Violet 14, Direct Red 28 and Acid Red 26 are classified as carcinogenic dyes in the European textile ecology standard, despite insufficient toxicity data. In this study, the toxicity of these dyes was assessed in a zebrafish model, and the underlying toxic mechanisms were investigated. Basic Violet 14 and Direct Red 28 showed acute toxicity with a LC50 value at 60.63 and 476.84 µg ml(-1) , respectively, whereas the LC50 of Acid Red 26 was between 2500 and 2800 µg ml(-1) . Treatment with Basic Violet 14, Direct Red 28 and Acid Red 26 resulted in common developmental abnormalities including delayed yolk sac absorption and swimming bladder deflation. Hepatotoxicity was observed in zebrafish treated with Basic Violet 14, and cardiovascular toxicity was found in zebrafish treated with Acid Red 26 at concentrations higher than 2500 µg ml(-1) . Basic Violet 14 also caused significant up-regulation of GCLC gene expression in a dose-dependent manner whereas Acid Red 26 induced significant up-regulation of NKX2.5 and down-regulation of GATA4 at a high concentration in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that Basic Violet 14, Direct Red 28 and Acid Red 26 induce developmental and organ-specific toxicity, and oxidative stress may play a role in the hepatotoxicity of Basic Violet 14, the suppressed GATA4 expression may have a relation to the cardiovascular toxicity of Acid Red 26.

  12. Lineage relationship of direct-developing melanocytes and melanocyte stem cells in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tryon, Robert C; Higdon, Charles W; Johnson, Stephen L

    2011-01-01

    Previous research in zebrafish has demonstrated that embryonic and larval regeneration melanocytes are derived from separate lineages. The embryonic melanocytes that establish the larval pigment pattern do not require regulative melanocyte stem cell (MSC) precursors, and are termed direct-developing melanocytes. In contrast, the larval regeneration melanocytes that restore the pigment pattern after ablation develop from MSC precursors. Here, we explore whether embryonic melanocytes and MSCs share bipotent progenitors. Furthermore, we explore when fate segregation of embryonic melanocytes and MSCs occurs in zebrafish development. In order to achieve this, we develop and apply a novel lineage tracing method. We first demonstrate that Tol2-mediated genomic integration of reporter constructs from plasmids injected at the 1-2 cell stage occurs most frequently after the midblastula transition but prior to shield stage, between 3 and 6 hours post-fertilization. This previously uncharacterized timing of Tol2-mediated genomic integration establishes Tol2-mediated transposition as a means for conducting lineage tracing in zebrafish. Combining the Tol2-mediated lineage tracing strategy with a melanocyte regeneration assay previously developed in our lab, we find that embryonic melanocytes and larval regeneration melanocytes are derived from progenitors that contribute to both lineages. We estimate 50-60 such bipotent melanogenic progenitors to be present in the shield-stage embryo. Furthermore, our examination of direct-developing and MSC-restricted lineages suggests that these are segregated from bipotent precursors after the shield stage, but prior to the end of convergence and extension. Following this early fate segregation, we estimate approximately 100 embryonic melanocyte and 90 MSC-restricted lineages are generated to establish or regenerate the zebrafish larval pigment pattern, respectively. Thus, the dual strategies of direct-development and MSC-derived development

  13. Strong Static Magnetic Fields Elicit Swimming Behaviors Consistent with Direct Vestibular Stimulation in Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Tan, Grace X-J; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Zee, David S.; Carey, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) offer advantages as model animals for studies of inner ear development, genetics and ototoxicity. However, traditional assessment of vestibular function in this species using the vestibulo-ocular reflex requires agar-immobilization of individual fish and specialized video, which are difficult and labor-intensive. We report that using a static magnetic field to directly stimulate the zebrafish labyrinth results in an efficient, quantitative behavioral assay in free-swimming fish. We recently observed that humans have sustained nystagmus in high strength magnetic fields, and we attributed this observation to magnetohydrodynamic forces acting on the labyrinths. Here, fish were individually introduced into the center of a vertical 11.7T magnetic field bore for 2-minute intervals, and their movements were tracked. To assess for heading preference relative to a magnetic field, fish were also placed in a horizontally oriented 4.7T magnet in infrared (IR) light. A sub-population was tested again in the magnet after gentamicin bath to ablate lateral line hair cell function. Free-swimming adult zebrafish exhibited markedly altered swimming behavior while in strong static magnetic fields, independent of vision or lateral line function. Two-thirds of fish showed increased swimming velocity or consistent looping/rolling behavior throughout exposure to a strong, vertically oriented magnetic field. Fish also demonstrated altered swimming behavior in a strong horizontally oriented field, demonstrating in most cases preferred swimming direction with respect to the field. These findings could be adapted for ‘high-throughput’ investigations of the effects of environmental manipulations as well as for changes that occur during development on vestibular function in zebrafish. PMID:24647586

  14. Distinct phases of Wnt/β-catenin signaling direct cardiomyocyte formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Dohn, Tracy E.; Waxman, Joshua S.

    2011-01-01

    Normal heart formation requires reiterative phases of canonical Wnt/β-catenin (Wnt) signaling. Understanding the mechanisms by which Wnt signaling directs cardiomyocyte (CM) formation in vivo is critical to being able to precisely direct differentiated CMs from stem cells in vitro. Here, we investigate the roles of Wnt signaling in zebrafish CM formation using heat-shock inducible transgenes that increase and decrease Wnt signaling. We find that there are three phases during which CM formation is sensitive to modulation of Wnt signaling through the first 24 hours of development. In addition to the previously recognized roles for Wnt signaling during mesoderm specification and in the pre-cardiac mesoderm, we find a previously unrecognized role during CM differentiation where Wnt signaling is necessary and sufficient to promote the differentiation of additional atrial cells. We also extend the previous studies of the roles of Wnt signaling during mesoderm specification and in pre-cardiac mesoderm. Importantly, in pre-cardiac mesoderm we define a new mechanism where Wnt signaling is sufficient to prevent CM differentiation, in contrast to a proposed role in inhibiting cardiac progenitor (CP) specification. The inability of the CPs to differentiate appears to lead to cell death through a p53/Caspase-3 independent mechanism. Together with a report for an even later role for Wnt signaling in restricting proliferation of differentiated ventricular CMs, our results indicate that during the first 3 days of development in zebrafish there are four distinct phases during which CMs are sensitive to Wnt signaling. PMID:22094017

  15. Direction selectivity in the larval zebrafish tectum is mediated by asymmetric inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Grama, Abhinav; Engert, Florian

    2012-01-01

    The extraction of the direction of motion is an important computation performed by many sensory systems and in particular, the mechanism by which direction-selective retinal ganglion cells (DS-RGCs) in the retina acquire their selective properties, has been studied extensively. However, whether DS-RGCs simply relay this information to downstream areas or whether additional and potentially de novo processing occurs in these recipient structures is a matter of great interest. Neurons in the larval zebrafish tectum, the largest retino-recipent area in this animal, show direction-selective (DS) responses to moving visual stimuli but how these properties are acquired is still unknown. In order to study this, we first used two-photon calcium imaging to classify the population responses of tectal cells to bars moving at different speeds and in different directions. Subsequently, we performed in vivo whole cell electrophysiology on these DS tectal neurons and we found that their inhibitory inputs were strongly biased toward the null direction of motion, whereas the excitatory inputs showed little selectivity. In addition, we found that excitatory currents evoked by a stimulus moving in the preferred direction occurred before the inhibitory currents whereas a stimulus moving in the null direction evoked currents in the reverse temporal order. The membrane potential modulations resulting from these currents were enhanced by the spike generation mechanism to generate amplified direction selectivity in the spike output. Thus, our results implicate a local inhibitory circuit in generating direction selectivity in tectal neurons. PMID:22969706

  16. Effect-directed analysis of Elizabeth River porewater: developmental toxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingliang; Getzinger, Gordon J; Cooper, Ellen M; Clark, Bryan W; Garner, Lindsey V T; Di Giulio, Richard T; Ferguson, P Lee; Stapleton, Heather M

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, effect-directed analysis was used to identify teratogenic compounds in porewater collected from a Superfund site along the Elizabeth River estuary (VA, USA). Zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to the porewater displayed acute developmental toxicity and cardiac teratogenesis, presumably because of elevated sediment levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from historical creosote use. Pretreatment of porewater with several physical and chemical particle removal methods revealed that colloid-bound chemicals constituted the bulk of the observed toxicity. Size-exclusive chromatography and normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography were used to fractionate Elizabeth River porewater. Acute toxicity of porewater extracts and extract fractions was assessed as the pericardial area in embryonic zebrafish. The most toxic fraction contained several known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists (e.g., 1,2-benzofluorene and 1,2-benzanthracene) and cytochrome P450 A1 (CPY1A) inhibitors (e.g., dibenzothiophene and fluoranthene). The second most toxic fraction contained known AhR agonists (e.g., benzo[a]pyrene and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene). Addition of a CYP1A inhibitor, fluoranthene, increased toxicity in all active porewater fractions, suggesting synergism between several contaminants present in porewaters. The results indicate that the observed acute toxicity associated with Elizabeth River porewater results from high concentrations of AhR agonistic PAHs and mixture effects related to interactions between compounds co-occurring at the Elizabeth River site. However, even after extensive fractionation and chemical characterization, it remains plausible that some active compounds in Elizabeth River porewater remain unidentified.

  17. EFFECT-DIRECTED ANALYSIS OF ELIZABETH RIVER POREWATER: DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY IN ZEBRAFISH (DANIO RERIO)

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mingliang; Getzinger, Gordon J.; Cooper, Ellen M.; Clark, Bryan W.; Garner, Lindsey V.T.; Di Giulio, Richard T.; Ferguson, P. Lee; Stapleton, Heather M.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, effect-directed analysis was used to identify teratogenic compounds in porewater collected from a Superfund site along the Elizabeth River estuary (VA, USA). Zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to the porewater displayed acute developmental toxicity and cardiac teratogenesis, presumably because of elevated sediment levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from historical creosote use. Pretreatment of porewater with several physical and chemical particle removal methods revealed that colloid-bound chemicals constituted the bulk of the observed toxicity. Size-exclusive chromatography and normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography were used to fractionate Elizabeth River porewater. Acute toxicity of porewater extracts and extract fractions was assessed as the pericardial area in embryonic zebrafish. The most toxic fraction contained several known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists (e.g., 1,2-benzofluorene and 1,2-benzanthracene) and cytochrome P450 A1 (CPY1A) inhibitors (e.g., dibenzothiophene and fluoranthene). The second most toxic fraction contained known AhR agonists (e.g., benzo[a]pyrene and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene). Addition of a CYP1A inhibitor, fluoranthene, increased toxicity in all active porewater fractions, suggesting synergism between several contaminants present in porewaters. The results indicate that the observed acute toxicity associated with Elizabeth River porewater results from high concentrations of AhR agonistic PAHs and mixture effects related to interactions between compounds co-occurring at the Elizabeth River site. However, even after extensive fractionation and chemical characterization, it remains plausible that some active compounds in Elizabeth River porewater remain unidentified. PMID:25196082

  18. Tbx16 and Msgn1 are required to establish directional cell migration of zebrafish mesodermal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Manning, Alyssa J; Kimelman, David

    2015-10-15

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an essential process that occurs repeatedly during embryogenesis whereby stably adherent cells convert to an actively migrating state. While much is known about the factors and events that initiate the EMT, the steps that cells undergo to become directionally migratory are far less well understood. Zebrafish embryos lacking the transcription factors Tbx16/Spadetail and Mesogenin1 (Msgn1) are a valuable system for investigating the EMT. Mesodermal cells in these embryos are unable to perform the EMT necessary to leave the most posterior end of the body (the tailbud) and join the pre-somitic mesoderm, a process that is conserved in all vertebrates. It has previously been very difficult to study this EMT in vertebrates because of the multiple cell types in the tailbud and the morphogenetic changes the whole embryo undergoes. Here, we describe a novel tissue explant system for imaging the mesodermal cell EMT in vivo that allows us to investigate the requirements for cells to acquire migratory properties during the EMT with high spatio-temporal resolution. This method revealed that, despite the inability of tbx16;msgn1-deficient cells to leave the tailbud, actin-based protrusions form surprisingly normally in these cells and they become highly motile. However, tbx16;msgn1-deficient cells have specific cell-autonomous defects in the persistence and anterior direction of migration because the lamellipodia they form are not productive in driving anteriorward migration. Additionally, we show that mesoderm morphogenesis and differentiation are separable and that there is a migratory cue that directs mesodermal cell migration that is independent of Tbx16 and Msgn1. This work defines changes that cells undergo as they complete the EMT and provides new insight into the mechanisms required in vivo for cells to become mesenchymal.

  19. Pou5f1/Oct4 Promotes Cell Survival via Direct Activation of mych Expression during Zebrafish Gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Wendik, Björn; Polok, Bożena K.; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Onichtchouk, Daria; Driever, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Myc proteins control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis, and play important roles in cancer as well in establishment of pluripotency. Here we investigated the control of myc gene expression by the Pou5f1/Oct4 pluripotency factor in the early zebrafish embryo. We analyzed the expression of all known zebrafish Myc family members, myca, mycb, mych, mycl1a, mycl1b, and mycn, by whole mount in situ hybridization during blastula and gastrula stages in wildtype and maternal plus zygotic pou5f1 mutant (MZspg) embryos, as well as by quantitative PCR and in time series microarray data. We found that the broad blastula and gastrula stage mych expression, as well as late gastrula stage mycl1b expression, both depend on Pou5f1 activity. We analyzed ChIP-Seq data and found that both Pou5f1 and Sox2 bind to mych and mycl1b control regions. The regulation of mych by Pou5f1 appears to be direct transcriptional activation, as overexpression of a Pou5f1 activator fusion protein in MZspg embryos induced strong mych expression even when translation of zygotically expressed mRNAs was suppressed. We further showed that MZspg embryos develop enhanced apoptosis already during early gastrula stages, when apoptosis was not be detected in wildtype embryos. However, Mych knockdown alone did not induce early apoptosis, suggesting potentially redundant action of several early expressed myc genes, or combination of several pathways affected in MZspg. Experimental mych overexpression in MZspg embryos did significantly, but not completely suppress the apoptosis phenotype. Similarly, p53 knockdown only partially suppressed apoptosis in MZspg gastrula embryos. However, combined knockdown of p53 and overexpression of Mych completely rescued the MZspg apoptosis phenotype. These results reveal that Mych has anti-apoptotic activity in the early zebrafish embryo, and that p53-dependent and Myc pathways are likely to act in parallel to control apoptosis at these stages. PMID:24643012

  20. Pou5f1/Oct4 promotes cell survival via direct activation of mych expression during zebrafish gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Kotkamp, Kay; Kur, Esther; Wendik, Björn; Polok, Bożena K; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Onichtchouk, Daria; Driever, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Myc proteins control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis, and play important roles in cancer as well in establishment of pluripotency. Here we investigated the control of myc gene expression by the Pou5f1/Oct4 pluripotency factor in the early zebrafish embryo. We analyzed the expression of all known zebrafish Myc family members, myca, mycb, mych, mycl1a, mycl1b, and mycn, by whole mount in situ hybridization during blastula and gastrula stages in wildtype and maternal plus zygotic pou5f1 mutant (MZspg) embryos, as well as by quantitative PCR and in time series microarray data. We found that the broad blastula and gastrula stage mych expression, as well as late gastrula stage mycl1b expression, both depend on Pou5f1 activity. We analyzed ChIP-Seq data and found that both Pou5f1 and Sox2 bind to mych and mycl1b control regions. The regulation of mych by Pou5f1 appears to be direct transcriptional activation, as overexpression of a Pou5f1 activator fusion protein in MZspg embryos induced strong mych expression even when translation of zygotically expressed mRNAs was suppressed. We further showed that MZspg embryos develop enhanced apoptosis already during early gastrula stages, when apoptosis was not be detected in wildtype embryos. However, Mych knockdown alone did not induce early apoptosis, suggesting potentially redundant action of several early expressed myc genes, or combination of several pathways affected in MZspg. Experimental mych overexpression in MZspg embryos did significantly, but not completely suppress the apoptosis phenotype. Similarly, p53 knockdown only partially suppressed apoptosis in MZspg gastrula embryos. However, combined knockdown of p53 and overexpression of Mych completely rescued the MZspg apoptosis phenotype. These results reveal that Mych has anti-apoptotic activity in the early zebrafish embryo, and that p53-dependent and Myc pathways are likely to act in parallel to control apoptosis at these stages.

  1. Poised regeneration of zebrafish melanocytes involves direct differentiation and concurrent replenishment of tissue-resident progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, Sharanya; Kasheta, Melissa; Ceol, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Efficient regeneration following injury is critical for maintaining tissue function and enabling organismal survival. Cells reconstituting damaged tissue are often generated from resident stem or progenitor cells or from cells that have dedifferentiated and become proliferative. While lineage-tracing studies have defined cellular sources of regeneration in many tissues, the process by which these cells execute the regenerative process is largely obscure. Here, we have identified tissue-resident progenitor cells that mediate regeneration of zebrafish stripe melanocytes and defined how these cells reconstitute pigmentation. Nearly all regeneration melanocytes arise through direct differentiation of progenitor cells. Wnt signaling is activated prior to differentiation, and inhibition of Wnt signaling impairs regeneration. Additional progenitors divide symmetrically to sustain the pool of progenitor cells. Combining direct differentiation with symmetric progenitor divisions may serve as a means to rapidly repair injured tissue while preserving the capacity to regenerate. PMID:26073020

  2. Poised Regeneration of Zebrafish Melanocytes Involves Direct Differentiation and Concurrent Replenishment of Tissue-Resident Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Sharanya; Kasheta, Melissa; Ceol, Craig J

    2015-06-22

    Efficient regeneration following injury is critical for maintaining tissue function and enabling organismal survival. Cells reconstituting damaged tissue are often generated from resident stem or progenitor cells or from cells that have dedifferentiated and become proliferative. While lineage-tracing studies have defined cellular sources of regeneration in many tissues, the process by which these cells execute the regenerative process is largely obscure. Here, we have identified tissue-resident progenitor cells that mediate regeneration of zebrafish stripe melanocytes and defined how these cells reconstitute pigmentation. Nearly all regeneration melanocytes arise through direct differentiation of progenitor cells. Wnt signaling is activated prior to differentiation, and inhibition of Wnt signaling impairs regeneration. Additional progenitors divide symmetrically to sustain the pool of progenitor cells. Combining direct differentiation with symmetric progenitor divisions may serve as a means to rapidly repair injured tissue while preserving the capacity to regenerate.

  3. Lymphatics, Cancer and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Astin, Jonathan W; Crosier, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Many solid tumors are known to metastasize through the lymphatic vasculature. This process is facilitated by the generation of new lymphatic vessels (tumor lymphangiogenesis) and also by the remodelling of existing lymphatics. Together these processes enable the spread of tumor cells to distant sites. Currently our understanding of tumor lymphangiogenesis has been informed from mouse tumor models and from studies of developmental lymphangiogenesis. Since the discovery of bona fide lymphatic vessels in zebrafish in 2006, zebrafish have become a well-established model of developmental lymphangiogenesis. The attributes that make zebrafish such an important model of blood vessel development-the ability to live image developing vessels, genetic tractability and the conserved nature of development-also make fish an attractive model of lymphatic vessel development. In particular, zebrafish have made important contributions to our understanding of the processes of lymphatic vessel sprouting from veins and the mechanisms by which lymphatic precursors remodel into mature vessels. To date, zebrafish have not been used to directly model tumor lymphangiogenesis. In this chapter we will summarise the contributions zebrafish have made to our understanding of lymphangiogenesis and investigate the possibilities of combining zebrafish transgenic cancer lines or tumor transplantation models with existing lymphatic reporter lines, which could provide valuable insights into the process of tumor-induced lymphangiogenesis. In addition the utility of using the zebrafish lymphatic model as a platform to screen and develop novel anti-lymphatic therapeutics will also be discussed.

  4. Lymphatics, Cancer and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Astin, Jonathan W; Crosier, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Many solid tumors are known to metastasize through the lymphatic vasculature. This process is facilitated by the generation of new lymphatic vessels (tumor lymphangiogenesis) and also by the remodelling of existing lymphatics. Together these processes enable the spread of tumor cells to distant sites. Currently our understanding of tumor lymphangiogenesis has been informed from mouse tumor models and from studies of developmental lymphangiogenesis. Since the discovery of bona fide lymphatic vessels in zebrafish in 2006, zebrafish have become a well-established model of developmental lymphangiogenesis. The attributes that make zebrafish such an important model of blood vessel development-the ability to live image developing vessels, genetic tractability and the conserved nature of development-also make fish an attractive model of lymphatic vessel development. In particular, zebrafish have made important contributions to our understanding of the processes of lymphatic vessel sprouting from veins and the mechanisms by which lymphatic precursors remodel into mature vessels. To date, zebrafish have not been used to directly model tumor lymphangiogenesis. In this chapter we will summarise the contributions zebrafish have made to our understanding of lymphangiogenesis and investigate the possibilities of combining zebrafish transgenic cancer lines or tumor transplantation models with existing lymphatic reporter lines, which could provide valuable insights into the process of tumor-induced lymphangiogenesis. In addition the utility of using the zebrafish lymphatic model as a platform to screen and develop novel anti-lymphatic therapeutics will also be discussed. PMID:27165355

  5. Homology Directed Knockin of Point Mutations in the Zebrafish tardbp and fus Genes in ALS Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    PubMed Central

    You, Zhipeng; Lissouba, Alexandra; Chen, Brian Edwin; Drapeau, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The methodology for site-directed editing of single nucleotides in the vertebrate genome is of considerable interest for research in biology and medicine. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 type II (Cas9) system has emerged as a simple and inexpensive tool for editing genomic loci of interest in a variety of animal models. In zebrafish, error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) has been used as a simple method to disrupt gene function. We sought to develop a method to easily create site-specific SNPs in the zebrafish genome. Here, we report simple methodologies for using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homology directed repair using single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide donor templates (ssODN) for site-directed single nucleotide editing, for the first time in two disease-related genes, tardbp and fus. PMID:26930076

  6. Cartilage development requires the function of Estrogen-related receptor alpha that directly regulates sox9 expression in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Il; No Lee, Joon; Bhandari, Sushil; Nam, In-Koo; Yoo, Kyeong-Won; Kim, Se-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; So, Hong-Seob; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil

    2015-12-10

    Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRa) regulates a number of cellular processes including development of bone and muscles. However, direct evidence regarding its involvement in cartilage development remains elusive. In this report, we establish an in vivo role of Esrra in cartilage development during embryogenesis in zebrafish. Gene expression analysis indicates that esrra is expressed in developing pharyngeal arches where genes necessary for cartilage development are also expressed. Loss of function analysis shows that knockdown of esrra impairs expression of genes including sox9, col2a1, sox5, sox6, runx2 and col10a1 thus induces abnormally formed cartilage in pharyngeal arches. Importantly, we identify putative ESRRa binding elements in upstream regions of sox9 to which ESRRa can directly bind, indicating that Esrra may directly regulate sox9 expression. Accordingly, ectopic expression of sox9 rescues defective formation of cartilage induced by the knockdown of esrra. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that ESRRa is essential for cartilage development by regulating sox9 expression during vertebrate development.

  7. Cartilage development requires the function of Estrogen-related receptor alpha that directly regulates sox9 expression in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Il; No Lee, Joon; Bhandari, Sushil; Nam, In-Koo; Yoo, Kyeong-Won; Kim, Se-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; So, Hong-Seob; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRa) regulates a number of cellular processes including development of bone and muscles. However, direct evidence regarding its involvement in cartilage development remains elusive. In this report, we establish an in vivo role of Esrra in cartilage development during embryogenesis in zebrafish. Gene expression analysis indicates that esrra is expressed in developing pharyngeal arches where genes necessary for cartilage development are also expressed. Loss of function analysis shows that knockdown of esrra impairs expression of genes including sox9, col2a1, sox5, sox6, runx2 and col10a1 thus induces abnormally formed cartilage in pharyngeal arches. Importantly, we identify putative ESRRa binding elements in upstream regions of sox9 to which ESRRa can directly bind, indicating that Esrra may directly regulate sox9 expression. Accordingly, ectopic expression of sox9 rescues defective formation of cartilage induced by the knockdown of esrra. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that ESRRa is essential for cartilage development by regulating sox9 expression during vertebrate development. PMID:26657540

  8. Rx3 and Shh direct anisotropic growth and specification in the zebrafish tuberal/anterior hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Muthu, Victor; Eachus, Helen; Ellis, Pam; Brown, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    In the developing brain, growth and differentiation are intimately linked. Here, we show that in the zebrafish embryo, the homeodomain transcription factor Rx3 coordinates these processes to build the tuberal/anterior hypothalamus. Analysis of rx3 chk mutant/rx3 morphant fish and EdU pulse-chase studies reveal that rx3 is required to select tuberal/anterior hypothalamic progenitors and to orchestrate their anisotropic growth. In the absence of Rx3 function, progenitors accumulate in the third ventricular wall, die or are inappropriately specified, the shh+ anterior recess does not form, and its resident pomc+, ff1b+ and otpb+ Th1+ cells fail to differentiate. Manipulation of Shh signalling shows that Shh coordinates progenitor cell selection and behaviour by acting as an on-off switch for rx3. Together, our studies show that Shh and Rx3 govern formation of a distinct progenitor domain that elaborates patterning through its anisotropic growth and differentiation. PMID:27317806

  9. Proteomics of early zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Link, Vinzenz; Shevchenko, Andrej; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2006-01-01

    Background Zebrafish (D. rerio) has become a powerful and widely used model system for the analysis of vertebrate embryogenesis and organ development. While genetic methods are readily available in zebrafish, protocols for two dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and proteomics have yet to be developed. Results As a prerequisite to carry out proteomic experiments with early zebrafish embryos, we developed a method to efficiently remove the yolk from large batches of embryos. This method enabled high resolution 2D gel electrophoresis and improved Western blotting considerably. Here, we provide detailed protocols for proteomics in zebrafish from sample preparation to mass spectrometry (MS), including a comparison of databases for MS identification of zebrafish proteins. Conclusion The provided protocols for proteomic analysis of early embryos enable research to be taken in novel directions in embryogenesis. PMID:16412219

  10. IL-1β and reactive oxygen species differentially regulate neutrophil directional migration and Basal random motility in a zebrafish injury-induced inflammation model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bo; Han, Peidong; Pan, Lifeng; Lu, Wei; Xiong, Jingwei; Zhang, Mingjie; Zhang, Wenqing; Li, Li; Wen, Zilong

    2014-06-15

    During inflammation, the proper inflammatory infiltration of neutrophils is crucial for the host to fight against infections and remove damaged cells and detrimental substances. IL-1β and NADPH oxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated to play important roles in this process. However, the cellular and molecular basis underlying the actions of IL-1β and ROS and their relationship during inflammatory response remains undefined. In this study, we use the zebrafish model to investigate these issues. We find that, similar to that of NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS signaling, the Il-1β-Myd88 pathway is required for the recruitment of neutrophils, but not macrophages, to the injury-induced inflammatory site, whereas it is dispensable for bacterial-induced inflammation. Interestingly, the Il-1β-Myd88 pathway is independent of NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS signaling and critical for the directional migration, but not the basal random movement, of neutrophils. In contrast, the NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS signaling is required for both basal random movement and directional migration of neutrophils. We further document that ectopic expression of Il-1β in zebrafish induces an inflammatory disorder, which can be suppressed by anti-inflammatory treatment. Our findings reveal that the Il-1β-Myd88 axis and NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS signaling are two independent pathways that differentially regulate neutrophil migration during sterile inflammation. In addition, Il-1β overexpressing Tg(hsp70:(m)il-1β_eGFP;lyz:DsRed2)hkz10t;nz50 transgenic zebrafish provides a useful animal model for the study of chronic inflammatory disorder and for anti-inflammatory drug discovery. PMID:24835391

  11. Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 6 (Prmt6) Is Essential for Early Zebrafish Development through the Direct Suppression of gadd45αa Stress Sensor Gene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin-Xi; Zhang, Yun-Bin; Ni, Pei-Li; Wu, Zhi-Li; Yan, Yuan-Chang; Li, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Histone lysine methylation is important in early zebrafish development; however, the role of histone arginine methylation in this process remains unclear. H3R2me2a, generated by protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (Prmt6), is a repressive mark. To explore the role of Prmt6 and H3R2me2a during zebrafish embryogenesis, we identified the maternal characteristic of prmt6 and designed two prmt6-specific morpholino-oligos (MOs) to study its importance in early development, application of which led to early epiboly defects and significantly reduced the level of H3R2me2a marks. prmt6 mRNA could rescue the epiboly defects and the H3R2me2a reduction in the prmt6 morphants. Functionally, microarray data demonstrated that growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible, α, a (gadd45αa) was a significantly up-regulated gene in MO-treated embryos, the activity of which was linked to the activation of the p38/JNK pathway and apoptosis. Importantly, gadd45αa MO and p38/JNK inhibitors could partially rescue the defect of prmt6 morphants, the downstream targets of Prmt6, and the apoptosis ratios of the prmt6 morphants. Moreover, the results of ChIP quantitative real time PCR and luciferase reporter assay indicated that gadd45αa is a repressive target of Prmt6. Taken together, these results suggest that maternal Prmt6 is essential to early zebrafish development by directly repressing gadd45αa.

  12. Studying Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatases in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hale, Alexander James; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a large family of signal transduction regulators that have an essential role in normal development and physiology. Aberrant activation or inactivation of PTPs is at the basis of many human diseases. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is being used extensively to model major aspects of development and disease as well as the mechanism of regeneration of limbs and vital organs, and most classical PTPs have been identified in zebrafish. Zebrafish is an excellent model system for biomedical research because the genome is sequenced, zebrafish produce a large number of offspring, the eggs develop outside the mother and are transparent, facilitating intravital imaging, and transgenesis and (site-directed) mutagenesis are feasible. Together, these traits make zebrafish amenable for the analysis of gene and protein function. In this chapter we cover three manipulations of zebrafish embryos that we have used to study the effects of PTPs in development, regeneration, and biochemistry. Microinjection at the one-cell stage is at the basis of many zebrafish experiments and is described first. This is followed by a description for measuring regeneration of the embryonic caudal fin, a powerful and robust physiological assay. Finally, the considerable but manageable troubleshooting of several complications associated with preparing zebrafish embryos for immunoblotting is explained. Overall, this chapter provides detailed protocols for manipulating zebrafish embryo samples with a compilation of tips collected through extensive experience from the zebrafish research community. PMID:27514815

  13. Zebrafish Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Michael; Chen, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    In vivo models of Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) have proven instrumental in understanding the development and progression of this devastating pediatric sarcoma. Both vertebrate and invertebrate model systems have been developed to study the tumor biology of both embryonal (ERMS) and alveolar (ARMS) RMS subtypes. Zebrafish RMS models have been particularly amenable for high-throughput studies to identify drug targetable pathways because of their short tumor latency, ease of ex vivo manipulation and conserved tumor biology. The transgenic KRASG12D-induced ERMS model allows for molecular and cellular characterization of distinct tumor cell subpopulations including the tumor propagating cells. Comparative genomic approaches have also been utilized in zebrafish ERMS to identify conserved candidate driver genes. Recent advances in zebrafish genome engineering have further enabled the ability to probe the functional significance of potential driver genes. Using the unique strengths of the zebrafish model organisms with the wealth of cellular and molecular tools currently available, zebrafish RMS models provide a powerful in vivo system for which to study RMS tumorigenesis. PMID:27165362

  14. Zebrafish Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Charles K

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma skin cancer is a potentially deadly disease in humans and has remained extremely difficult to treat once it has metastasized. In just the last 10 years, a number of models of melanoma have been developed in the zebrafish that are biologically faithful to the human disease and have already yielded important insights into the fundamental biology of melanoma and offered new potential avenues for treatment. With the diversity and breadth of the molecular genetic tools available in the zebrafish, these melanoma models will continue to be refined and expanded upon to keep pace with the rapidly evolving field of melanoma biology. PMID:27165365

  15. The circadian clock regulates autophagy directly through the nuclear hormone receptor Nr1d1/Rev-erbα and indirectly via Cebpb/(C/ebpβ) in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guodong; Zhang, Fanmiao; Ye, Qiang; Wang, Han

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a highly conserved intracellular degradation system, and recently was shown to display circadian rhythms in mice. The mechanisms underlying circadian regulation of autophagy, however, are still unclear. Here, we observed that numbers of autophagosomes and autolysosomes exhibit daily rhythms in the zebrafish liver, and cebpb/(c/ebpβ) and various autophagy genes are rhythmically expressed in zebrafish larvae but significantly upregulated in per1b and TALEN-generated nr1d1/rev-erbα mutant fish, indicating that both Per1b and Nr1d1 play critical roles in autophagy rhythms. Luciferase reporter and ChIP assays show that the circadian clock directly regulates autophagy genes through Nr1d1, and also regulates transcription of cebpb through Per1b. We also found that fasting leads to altered expression of both circadian clock genes and autophagy genes in zebrafish adult peripheral organs. Further, transcriptome analysis reveals multiple functions of Nr1d1 in zebrafish. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for how the circadian clock regulates autophagy, imply that nutritional signaling affects both circadian regulation and autophagy activities in peripheral organs, and shed light on how circadian gene mutations act through autophagy to contribute to common metabolic diseases such as obesity. PMID:27171500

  16. Turnover of the actomyosin complex in zebrafish embryos directs geometric remodelling and the recruitment of lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Asmita; Kumar Sinha, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs), reservoirs of cholesterols and fats, are organelles that hydrolyse lipids in the cell. In zebrafish embryos, the actomyosin complex and filamentous microtubules control the periodic regulation of the LD geometry. Contrary to the existing hypothesis that LD transport involves the kinesin-microtubule system, we find that their recruitment to the blastodisc depends on the actomyosin turnover and is independent of the microtubules. For the first time we report the existence of two distinct states of LDs, an inactive and an active state, that occur periodically, coupled weakly to the cleavage cycles. LDs are bigger, more circular and more stable in the inactive state in which the geometry of the LDs is maintained by actomyosin as well as microtubules. The active state has smaller and irregularly shaped LDs that show shape fluctuations that are linked to actin depolymerization. Because most functions of LDs employ surface interactions, our findings on the LD geometry and its regulation bring new insights to the mechanisms associated with specific functions of LDs, such as their storage capacity for fats or proteins, lipolysis etc. PMID:26355567

  17. Effect-directed analysis for estrogenic compounds in a fluvial sediment sample using transgenic cyp19a1b-GFP zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Fetter, Eva; Krauss, Martin; Brion, François; Kah, Olivier; Scholz, Stefan; Brack, Werner

    2014-09-01

    Xenoestrogens may persist in the environment by binding to sediments or suspended particulate matter serving as long-term reservoir and source of exposure, particularly for organisms living in or in contact with sediments. In this study, we present for the first time an effect-directed analysis (EDA) for identifying estrogenic compounds in a sediment sample using embryos of a transgenic reporter fish strain. In the tg(cyp19a1b-GFP) transgenic zebrafish strain, the expression of GFP (green fluorescent protein) in the brain is driven by an oestrogen responsive element in the promoter of the cyp19a1b (aromatase) gene. The selected sediment sample of the Czech river Bilina had already been analysed in a previous EDA using the yeast oestrogen screening assay and had revealed fractions containing estrogenic compounds. When normal phase HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography) fractionation was used for the separation of the sediment sample, the biotest with transgenic fish embryos revealed two estrogenic fractions. Chemical analysis of candidate compounds in these sediment fractions suggested alkylphenols and estrone as candidate compounds responsible for the observed estrogenic effect. Alkylphenol concentrations could partially explain the estrogenicity of the fractions. However, xenoestrogens below the analytical detection limit or non-targeted estrogenic compounds have probably also contributed to the sample's estrogenic potency. The results indicated the suitability of the tg(cyp19a1b-GFP) fish embryo for an integrated chemical-biological analysis of estrogenic effects.

  18. Zebrafish in hematology: sushi or science?

    PubMed Central

    Carradice, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    After a decade of the “modern era” of zebrafish hematology research, what have been their major contributions to hematology and what challenges does the model face? This review argues that, in hematology, zebrafish have demonstrated their suitability, are proving their utility, have supplied timely and novel discoveries, and are poised for further significant contributions. It presents an overview of the anatomy, physiology, and genetics of zebrafish hematopoiesis underpinning their use in hematology research. Whereas reverse genetic techniques enable functional studies of particular genes of interest, forward genetics remains zebrafish's particular strength. Mutants with diverse and interesting hematopoietic defects are emerging from multiple genetic screens. Some mutants model hereditary blood diseases, occasionally leading to disease genes first; others provide insights into developmental hematology. Models of malignant hematologic disorders provide tools for drug-target and pharmaceutics discovery. Numerous transgenic zebrafish with fluorescently marked blood cells enable live-cell imaging of inflammatory responses and host-pathogen interactions previously inaccessible to direct observation in vivo, revealing unexpected aspects of leukocyte behavior. Zebrafish disease models almost uniquely provide a basis for efficient whole animal chemical library screens for new therapeutics. Despite some limitations and challenges, their successes and discovery potential mean that zebrafish are here to stay in hematology research. PMID:18182572

  19. Analysis of circadian rhythms in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Jun; Kaneko, Maki; Cardone, Luca; Cahill, Gregory; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    The zebrafish probably constitutes the best animal system to study the complexity of the circadian clock machinery and the influence that light has on it. The possibilities of producing transgenic fishes, to establish light-responsive cultured cells, and to directly explore light phototransduction on single clock cells are all remarkable features of this circadian system. This article describes some of the most useful methodologies to analyze the behavioral, cellular, and molecular aspects of the zebrafish circadian clock system. PMID:15817288

  20. A Zebrafish Thrombosis Model for Assessing Antithrombotic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Hong-Cui; Guo, Sheng-Ya; Xia, Bo; Song, Ru-Shun; Lao, Qiao-Cong; Xuan, Yao-Xian; Li, Chun-Qi

    2016-08-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death and the development of effective and safe therapeutic agents for thrombotic diseases has been proven challenging. In this study, taking advantage of the transparency of larval zebrafish, we developed a larval zebrafish thrombosis model for drug screening and efficacy assessment. Zebrafish at 2 dpf (days post fertilization) were treated with phenylhydrazine (PHZ) and a testing drug for 24 h. Tested drugs were administered into the zebrafish either by direct soaking or circulation microinjection. Antithrombotic efficacy was quantitatively evaluated based on our previously patented technology characterized as an image analysis of the heart red blood cells stained with O-dianisidine staining. Zebrafish at 2 dpf treated with PHZ at a concentration of 1.5 μM for a time period of 24 h were determined as the optimum conditions for the zebrafish thrombosis model development. Induced thrombosis in zebrafish was visually confirmed under a dissecting stereomicroscope and quantified by the image assay. All 6 human antithrombotic drugs (aspirin, clopidogrel, diltiazem hydrochloride injection, xuanshuantong injection, salvianolate injection, and astragalus injection) showed significant preventive and therapeutic effects on zebrafish thrombosis (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, & p < 0.001) in this zebrafish thrombosis model. The larval zebrafish thrombosis model developed and validated in this study could be used for in vivo thrombosis studies and for rapid screening and efficacy assessment of antithrombotic drugs. PMID:27333081

  1. Visually driven chaining of elementary swim patterns into a goal-directed motor sequence: a virtual reality study of zebrafish prey capture.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Chintan A; Bollmann, Johann H

    2013-01-01

    Prey capture behavior critically depends on rapid processing of sensory input in order to track, approach, and catch the target. When using vision, the nervous system faces the problem of extracting relevant information from a continuous stream of input in order to detect and categorize visible objects as potential prey and to select appropriate motor patterns for approach. For prey capture, many vertebrates exhibit intermittent locomotion, in which discrete motor patterns are chained into a sequence, interrupted by short periods of rest. Here, using high-speed recordings of full-length prey capture sequences performed by freely swimming zebrafish larvae in the presence of a single paramecium, we provide a detailed kinematic analysis of first and subsequent swim bouts during prey capture. Using Fourier analysis, we show that individual swim bouts represent an elementary motor pattern. Changes in orientation are directed toward the target on a graded scale and are implemented by an asymmetric tail bend component superimposed on this basic motor pattern. To further investigate the role of visual feedback on the efficiency and speed of this complex behavior, we developed a closed-loop virtual reality setup in which minimally restrained larvae recapitulated interconnected swim patterns closely resembling those observed during prey capture in freely moving fish. Systematic variation of stimulus properties showed that prey capture is initiated within a narrow range of stimulus size and velocity. Furthermore, variations in the delay and location of swim triggered visual feedback showed that the reaction time of secondary and later swims is shorter for stimuli that appear within a narrow spatio-temporal window following a swim. This suggests that the larva may generate an expectation of stimulus position, which enables accelerated motor sequencing if the expectation is met by appropriate visual feedback. PMID:23675322

  2. Visually driven chaining of elementary swim patterns into a goal-directed motor sequence: a virtual reality study of zebrafish prey capture.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Chintan A; Bollmann, Johann H

    2013-01-01

    Prey capture behavior critically depends on rapid processing of sensory input in order to track, approach, and catch the target. When using vision, the nervous system faces the problem of extracting relevant information from a continuous stream of input in order to detect and categorize visible objects as potential prey and to select appropriate motor patterns for approach. For prey capture, many vertebrates exhibit intermittent locomotion, in which discrete motor patterns are chained into a sequence, interrupted by short periods of rest. Here, using high-speed recordings of full-length prey capture sequences performed by freely swimming zebrafish larvae in the presence of a single paramecium, we provide a detailed kinematic analysis of first and subsequent swim bouts during prey capture. Using Fourier analysis, we show that individual swim bouts represent an elementary motor pattern. Changes in orientation are directed toward the target on a graded scale and are implemented by an asymmetric tail bend component superimposed on this basic motor pattern. To further investigate the role of visual feedback on the efficiency and speed of this complex behavior, we developed a closed-loop virtual reality setup in which minimally restrained larvae recapitulated interconnected swim patterns closely resembling those observed during prey capture in freely moving fish. Systematic variation of stimulus properties showed that prey capture is initiated within a narrow range of stimulus size and velocity. Furthermore, variations in the delay and location of swim triggered visual feedback showed that the reaction time of secondary and later swims is shorter for stimuli that appear within a narrow spatio-temporal window following a swim. This suggests that the larva may generate an expectation of stimulus position, which enables accelerated motor sequencing if the expectation is met by appropriate visual feedback.

  3. Chemokine-Dependent pH Elevation at the Cell Front Sustains Polarity in Directionally Migrating Zebrafish Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Tarbashevich, Katsiaryna; Reichman-Fried, Michal; Grimaldi, Cecilia; Raz, Erez

    2015-04-20

    Directional cell migration requires cell polarization with respect to the distribution of the guidance cue. Cell polarization often includes asymmetric distribution of response components as well as elements of the motility machinery. Importantly, the function and regulation of most of these molecules are known to be pH dependent. Intracellular pH gradients were shown to occur in certain cells migrating in vitro, but the functional relevance of such gradients for cell migration and for the response to directional cues, particularly in the intact organism, is currently unknown. In this study, we find that primordial germ cells migrating in the context of the developing embryo respond to the graded distribution of the chemokine Cxcl12 by establishing elevated intracellular pH at the cell front. We provide insight into the mechanisms by which a polar pH distribution contributes to efficient cell migration. Specifically, we show that Carbonic Anhydrase 15b, an enzyme controlling the pH in many cell types, including metastatic cancer cells, is expressed in migrating germ cells and is crucial for establishing and maintaining an asymmetric pH distribution within them. Reducing the level of the protein and thereby erasing the pH elevation at the cell front resulted in abnormal cell migration and impaired arrival at the target. The basis for the disrupted migration is found in the stringent requirement for pH conditions in the cell for regulating contractility, for the polarization of Rac1 activity, and hence for the formation of actin-rich structures at the leading edge of the migrating cells.

  4. Zebrafish: from hematology to hydrology.

    PubMed

    Jagadeeswaran, P; Kulkarni, V; Carrillo, M; Kim, S

    2007-07-01

    Hemostasis is a defense mechanism that protects an organism from bleeding. Abnormal hemostasis results in bleeding disorders and thrombosis. Several factors are known to control hemostasis in mammals. Despite this progress, more factors remain to be identified. Classical genetic approaches have resolved physiological pathways. However, classical genetics could not be applied completely to hemostasis pathways a decade ago. We introduced zebrafish as a model system to study hemostasis and thrombosis using classical genetic methods. First, we established that zebrafish hemostasis is essentially similar to mammalian hemostasis. Secondly, we developed screening tools for isolating hemostatic mutants. These tools enabled us to identify hemostatic mutants, as well as providing a means to study hemostasis by knockdown methods. Continued characterization of the physiology of thrombus formation led to the novel finding of thrombocyte clustering. Recently, we have discovered that fish secrete proteases, which participate in hemostasis and may have direct relevance in humans. Future work to identify most of the players in thrombus formation is underway.

  5. Molecular psychiatry of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Ullmann, Jeremy F.P.; Norton, William H.J.; Brennan, Caroline H.; Parker, Matthew O.; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their well-characterized neural development and high genetic homology to mammals, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a powerful model organism in the field of biological psychiatry. Here, we discuss the molecular psychiatry of zebrafish, and its implications for translational neuroscience research and modeling CNS disorders. In particular, we outline recent genetic and technological developments allowing for in-vivo examinations, high-throughput screening and whole-brain analyses in larval and adult zebrafish. We also summarize the application of these molecular techniques to the understanding of neuropsychiatric disease, outlining the potential of zebrafish for modeling complex brain disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), aggression, post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Critically evaluating the advantages and limitations of larval and adult fish tests, we suggest that zebrafish models become a rapidly emerging new field in modern biological psychiatry research. PMID:25349164

  6. Detection of autofluorescent Mycobacterium chelonae in living zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Whipps, Christopher M; Moss, Larry G; Sisk, Dana M; Murray, Katrina N; Tobin, David M; Moss, Jennifer B

    2014-02-01

    Mycobacterium chelonae is widespread in aquatic environments and can cause mycobacteriosis with low virulence in zebrafish. The risk of infection in zebrafish is exacerbated in closed-recirculating aquatic systems where rapidly growing mycobacteria can live on biofilms, as well as in zebrafish tissues. We have discovered a method of identifying and visualizing M. chelonae infections in living zebrafish using endogenous autofluorescence. Infected larvae are easily identified and can be excluded from experimental results. Because infection may reduce fertility in zebrafish, the visualization of active infection in contaminated eggs of transparent casper females simplifies screening. Transparent fish are also particularly useful as sentinels that can be examined periodically for the presence of autofluorescence, which can then be tested directly for M. chelonae.

  7. Zebrafish models for assessing developmental and reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    He, Jian-Hui; Gao, Ji-Min; Huang, Chang-Jiang; Li, Chun-Qi

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish is increasingly used as a vertebrate animal model for in vivo drug discovery and for assessing chemical toxicity and safety. Numerous studies have confirmed that zebrafish and mammals are similar in their physiology, development, metabolism and pathways, and that zebrafish responses to toxic substances are highly predictive of mammalian responses. Developmental and reproductive toxicity assessments are an important part of new drug safety profiling. A significant number of drug candidates have failed in preclinical tests due to their adverse effect on development and reproductivity. Compared to conventional mammal testing, zebrafish testing for assessing developmental and reproductive toxicity offers several compelling experimental advantages, including transparency of embryo and larva, higher throughput, shorter test period, lower cost, smaller amount of compound required, easier manipulation and direct compound delivery. Toxicity and safety assessments using zebrafish have also been accepted by the FDA and EMEA for investigative new drug (IND) approval.

  8. Laser capture microdissection of gonads from juvenile zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Investigating gonadal gene expression is important in attempting to elucidate the molecular mechanism of sex determination and differentiation in the model species zebrafish. However, the small size of juvenile zebrafish and correspondingly their gonads complicates this type of investigation. Furthermore, the lack of a genetic sex marker in juvenile zebrafish prevents pooling gonads from several individuals. The aim of this study was to establish a method to isolate the gonads from individual juvenile zebrafish allowing future investigations of gonadal gene expression during sex determination and differentiation. Methods The laser capture microdissection technique enables isolation of specific cells and tissues and thereby removes the noise of gene expression from other cells or tissues in the gene expression profile. A protocol developed for laser microdissection of human gonocytes was adjusted and optimised to isolate juvenile zebrafish gonads. Results The juvenile zebrafish gonad is not morphologically distinguishable when using dehydrated cryosections on membrane slides and a specific staining method is necessary to identify the gonads. The protocol setup in this study allows staining, identification, isolation and subsequent RNA purification and amplification of gonads from individual juvenile zebrafish thereby enabling gonadal gene expression profiling. Conclusion The study presents a protocol for isolation of individual juvenile zebrafish gonads, which will enable future investigations of gonadal gene expression during the critical period of sex differentiation. Furthermore, the presented staining method is applicable to other species as it is directed towards alkaline phosphatase that is expressed in gonocytes and embryonic stem cells, which is conserved among vertebrate species. PMID:19747405

  9. Conservation and early expression of zebrafish tyrosine kinases support the utility of zebrafish as a model for tyrosine kinase biology.

    PubMed

    Challa, Anil Kumar; Chatti, Kiranam

    2013-09-01

    Tyrosine kinases have significant roles in cell growth, apoptosis, development, and disease. To explore the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model for tyrosine kinase signaling and to better understand their roles, we have identified all of the tyrosine kinases encoded in the zebrafish genome and quantified RNA expression of selected tyrosine kinases during early development. Using profile hidden Markov model analysis, we identified 122 zebrafish tyrosine kinase genes and proposed unambiguous gene names where needed. We found them to be organized into 39 nonreceptor and 83 receptor type, and 30 families consistent with human tyrosine kinase family assignments. We found five human tyrosine kinase genes (epha1, bmx, fgr, srm, and insrr) with no identifiable zebrafish ortholog, and one zebrafish gene (yrk) with no identifiable human ortholog. We also found that receptor tyrosine kinase genes were duplicated more often than nonreceptor tyrosine kinase genes in zebrafish. We profiled expression levels of 30 tyrosine kinases representing all families using direct digital detection at different stages during the first 24 hours of development. The profiling experiments clearly indicate regulated expression of tyrosine kinases in the zebrafish, suggesting their role during early embryonic development. In summary, our study has resulted in the first comprehensive description of the zebrafish tyrosine kinome. PMID:23234507

  10. Conservation and early expression of zebrafish tyrosine kinases support the utility of zebrafish as a model for tyrosine kinase biology.

    PubMed

    Challa, Anil Kumar; Chatti, Kiranam

    2013-09-01

    Tyrosine kinases have significant roles in cell growth, apoptosis, development, and disease. To explore the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model for tyrosine kinase signaling and to better understand their roles, we have identified all of the tyrosine kinases encoded in the zebrafish genome and quantified RNA expression of selected tyrosine kinases during early development. Using profile hidden Markov model analysis, we identified 122 zebrafish tyrosine kinase genes and proposed unambiguous gene names where needed. We found them to be organized into 39 nonreceptor and 83 receptor type, and 30 families consistent with human tyrosine kinase family assignments. We found five human tyrosine kinase genes (epha1, bmx, fgr, srm, and insrr) with no identifiable zebrafish ortholog, and one zebrafish gene (yrk) with no identifiable human ortholog. We also found that receptor tyrosine kinase genes were duplicated more often than nonreceptor tyrosine kinase genes in zebrafish. We profiled expression levels of 30 tyrosine kinases representing all families using direct digital detection at different stages during the first 24 hours of development. The profiling experiments clearly indicate regulated expression of tyrosine kinases in the zebrafish, suggesting their role during early embryonic development. In summary, our study has resulted in the first comprehensive description of the zebrafish tyrosine kinome.

  11. A gene mapping bottleneck in the translational route from zebrafish to human

    PubMed Central

    de Klein, Niek; Ibberson, Mark; Crespo, Isaac; Rodius, Sophie; Azuaje, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Among a diversity of animal models of disease, the zebrafish is a promising model organism for enabling novel translational biomedical research. To fully achieve the latter, a key requirement is to match molecular readouts measured in zebrafish with information relevant to health and disease in humans. A fundamental step in this direction is to accurately map gene sequences from zebrafish to humans. Despite significant progress in genome annotation, this remains an intricate and time-consuming challenge. Here we discuss major obstacles that we had to overcome to systematically map genes from zebrafish to human. We identified important disparities, as well as partial agreements, between five public zebrafish-to-human homology resources. There is still a need for standardized, comprehensive genomic mappings between zebrafish and humans. Without this, efforts to use zebrafish as a powerful translational research tool will be stalled. PMID:25628646

  12. Zebrafish: A tool for chemical screens.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Michael

    2010-09-01

    The zebrafish has proven to be an invaluable vertebrate animal model for developmental biology. Recent technological advances have added an arsenal of tools to expand its use into the realm of drug discovery. This includes methodology to generate transgenic reporter lines that allow for the direct visualization of fluorescent markers in live embryos. With the addition of automated imaging and analysis of embryos treated with small molecules, these innovations have expanded its utility into high throughput chemical screens. This review will highlight some of these advances that have propelled zebrafish as a tool for drug discovery.

  13. Myelopoiesis and Myeloid Leukaemogenesis in the Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, A. Michael; Berman, Jason N.; Payne, Elspeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past ten years, studies using the zebrafish model have contributed to our understanding of vertebrate haematopoiesis, myelopoiesis, and myeloid leukaemogenesis. Novel insights into the conservation of haematopoietic lineages and improvements in our capacity to identify, isolate, and culture such haematopoietic cells continue to enhance our ability to use this simple organism to address disease biology. Coupled with the strengths of the zebrafish embryo to dissect developmental myelopoiesis and the continually expanding repertoire of models of myeloid malignancies, this versatile organism has established its niche as a valuable tool to address key questions in the field of myelopoiesis and myeloid leukaemogenesis. In this paper, we address the recent advances and future directions in the field of myelopoiesis and leukaemogenesis using the zebrafish system. PMID:22851971

  14. Axonal regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Becker, Thomas; Becker, Catherina G

    2014-08-01

    In contrast to mammals, fish and amphibia functionally regenerate axons in the central nervous system (CNS). The strengths of the zebrafish model, that is, transgenics and mutant availability, ease of gene expression analysis and manipulation and optical transparency of larvae lend themselves to the analysis of successful axonal regeneration. Analyses in larval and adult zebrafish suggest a high intrinsic capacity for axon regrowth, yet signaling pathways employed in axonal growth and pathfinding are similar to those in mammals. However, the lesioned CNS environment in zebrafish shows remarkably little scarring or expression of inhibitory molecules and regenerating axons use molecular cues in the environment to successfully navigate to their targets. Future zebrafish research, including screening techniques, will complete our picture of the mechanisms behind successful CNS axon regeneration in this vertebrate model organism.

  15. Complement system in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shicui; Cui, Pengfei

    2014-09-01

    Zebrafish is recently emerging as a model species for the study of immunology and human diseases. Complement system is the humoral backbone of the innate immune defense, and our knowledge as such in zebrafish has dramatically increased in the recent years. This review summarizes the current research progress of zebrafish complement system. The global searching for complement components in genome database, together with published data, has unveiled the existence of all the orthologues of mammalian complement components identified thus far, including the complement regulatory proteins and complement receptors, in zebrafish. Interestingly, zebrafish complement components also display some distinctive features, such as prominent levels of extrahepatic expression and isotypic diversity of the complement components. Future studies should focus on the following issues that would be of special importance for understanding the physiological role of complement components in zebrafish: conclusive identification of complement genes, especially those with isotypic diversity; analysis and elucidation of function and mechanism of complement components; modulation of innate and adaptive immune response by complement system; and unconventional roles of complement-triggered pathways.

  16. Irf6 directly regulates Klf17 in zebrafish periderm and Klf4 in murine oral epithelium, and dominant-negative KLF4 variants are present in patients with cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Jia, Zhonglin; Smith, Tiffany; Eshete, Mekonen; Butali, Azeez; Dunnwald, Martine; Murray, Jeffrey; Cornell, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-syndromic (NS) cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a common disorder with a strong genetic underpinning. Genome-wide association studies have detected common variants associated with this disorder, but a large portion of the genetic risk for NSCL/P is conferred by unidentified rare sequence variants. Mutations in IRF6 (Interferon Regulatory Factor 6) and GRHL3 (Grainyhead-like 3) cause Van der Woude syndrome, which includes CL/P. Both genes encode members of a regulatory network governing periderm differentiation in model organisms. Here, we report that Krüppel-like factor 17 (Klf17), like Grhl3, acts downstream of Irf6 in this network in zebrafish periderm. Although Klf17 expression is absent from mammalian oral epithelium, a close homologue, Klf4, is expressed in this tissue and is required for the differentiation of epidermis. Chromosome configuration capture and reporter assays indicated that IRF6 directly regulates an oral-epithelium enhancer of KLF4. To test whether rare missense variants of KLF4 contribute risk for NSCL/P, we sequenced KLF4 in approximately 1000 NSCL/P cases and 300 controls. By one statistical test, missense variants of KLF4 as a group were enriched in cases versus controls. Moreover, two patient-derived KLF4 variants disrupted periderm differentiation upon forced expression in zebrafish embryos, suggesting that they have dominant-negative effect. These results indicate that rare NSCL/P risk variants can be found in members of the gene regulatory network governing periderm differentiation. PMID:26692521

  17. Measuring zebrafish turning rate.

    PubMed

    Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; di Bernardo, Mario; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a popular animal model in preclinical research, and zebrafish turning rate has been proposed for the analysis of activity in several domains. The turning rate is often estimated from the trajectory of the fish centroid that is output by commercial or custom-made target tracking software run on overhead videos of fish swimming. However, the accuracy of such indirect methods with respect to the turning rate associated with changes in heading during zebrafish locomotion is largely untested. Here, we compare two indirect methods for the turning rate estimation using the centroid velocity or position data, with full shape tracking for three different video sampling rates. We use tracking data from the overhead video recorded at 60, 30, and 15 frames per second of zebrafish swimming in a shallow water tank. Statistical comparisons of absolute turning rate across methods and sampling rates indicate that, while indirect methods are indistinguishable from full shape tracking, the video sampling rate significantly influences the turning rate measurement. The results of this study can aid in the selection of the video capture frame rate, an experimental design parameter in zebrafish behavioral experiments where activity is an important measure.

  18. Tracking zebrafish larvae in group – Status and perspectives☆

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, Pierre R.; Mourrain, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Video processing is increasingly becoming a standard procedure in zebrafish behavior investigations as it enables higher research throughput and new or better measures. This trend, fostered by the ever increasing performance-to-price ratio of the required recording and processing equipment, should be expected to continue in the foreseeable future, with video-processing based methods permeating more and more experiments and, as a result, expanding the very role of behavioral studies in zebrafish research. To assess whether the routine video tracking of zebrafish larvae directly in the Petri dish is a capability that can be expected in the near future, the key processing concepts are discussed and illustrated on published zebrafish studies when available or other animals when not. PMID:23707495

  19. Chemical Screening in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Brady, Colleen A; Rennekamp, Andrew J; Peterson, Randall T

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic small molecule screens in zebrafish have gained popularity as an unbiased approach to probe biological processes. In this chapter we outline basic methods for performing chemical screens with larval zebrafish including breeding large numbers of embryos, plating larval fish into multi-well dishes, and adding small molecules to these wells. We also highlight important considerations when designing and interpreting the results of a phenotypic screen and possible follow-up approaches, including popular methods used to identify the mechanism of action of a chemical compound. PMID:27464797

  20. Transverse instability of line defects of period-2 spiral waves.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Sung; Woo, Sung-Jae; Lee, Kyoung J

    2004-08-27

    Spiral waves that arise in period-2 oscillatory media extended in space generically bear "line defects" along which the local kinetics exhibits a period-1 oscillation. Locally, these defect structures can be viewed as a front separating two period-2 oscillatory domains oscillating 2pi out of phase. Here we show that their shape can become sinusoidal with a transverse instability as in bistable fronts. This instability eventually leads to a line-defect filled spatiotemporal chaotic state having erratic proliferations, annihilations, and regenerations of line defects. The same sequence of phenomena is observed in a model reaction-diffusion system as well as in an experimental system.

  1. High magnetic field induced otolith fusion in the zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Pais-Roldán, Patricia; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Schulz, Hildegard; Yu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoreception in animals illustrates the interaction of biological systems with the geomagnetic field (geoMF). However, there are few studies that identified the impact of high magnetic field (MF) exposure from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners (>100,000 times of geoMF) on specific biological targets. Here, we investigated the effects of a 14 Tesla MRI scanner on zebrafish larvae. All zebrafish larvae aligned parallel to the B0 field, i.e. the static MF, in the MRI scanner. The two otoliths (ear stones) in the otic vesicles of zebrafish larvae older than 24 hours post fertilization (hpf) fused together after the high MF exposure as short as 2 hours, yielding a single-otolith phenotype with aberrant swimming behavior. The otolith fusion was blocked in zebrafish larvae under anesthesia or embedded in agarose. Hair cells may play an important role on the MF-induced otolith fusion. This work provided direct evidence to show that high MF interacts with the otic vesicle of zebrafish larvae and causes otolith fusion in an "all-or-none" manner. The MF-induced otolith fusion may facilitate the searching for MF sensors using genetically amenable vertebrate animal models, such as zebrafish. PMID:27063288

  2. High magnetic field induced otolith fusion in the zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Pais-Roldán, Patricia; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Schulz, Hildegard; Yu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoreception in animals illustrates the interaction of biological systems with the geomagnetic field (geoMF). However, there are few studies that identified the impact of high magnetic field (MF) exposure from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners (>100,000 times of geoMF) on specific biological targets. Here, we investigated the effects of a 14 Tesla MRI scanner on zebrafish larvae. All zebrafish larvae aligned parallel to the B0 field, i.e. the static MF, in the MRI scanner. The two otoliths (ear stones) in the otic vesicles of zebrafish larvae older than 24 hours post fertilization (hpf) fused together after the high MF exposure as short as 2 hours, yielding a single-otolith phenotype with aberrant swimming behavior. The otolith fusion was blocked in zebrafish larvae under anesthesia or embedded in agarose. Hair cells may play an important role on the MF-induced otolith fusion. This work provided direct evidence to show that high MF interacts with the otic vesicle of zebrafish larvae and causes otolith fusion in an “all-or-none” manner. The MF-induced otolith fusion may facilitate the searching for MF sensors using genetically amenable vertebrate animal models, such as zebrafish. PMID:27063288

  3. Zebrafish for modeling skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Cline, Abigail; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    The experimental advantages of zebrafish make this model system highly amenable to the field of dermatology. Zebrafish skin development is similar to humans and its genome is ~70% orthologous to the human genome. Its external developmental process allows for genetic manipulation and analysis of embryogenesis within a short time frame with all important internal organs and skin compartments formed within 6 days. Zebrafish models of cutaneous human diseases offer insight into pathogenesis and a unique platform for testing of potential therapies. This review details the specific advantages of zebrafish and highlights its use in dermatological research. PMID:27617951

  4. Social dominance modulates eavesdropping in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Abril-de-Abreu, Rodrigo; Cruz, Ana S; Oliveira, Rui F

    2015-08-01

    Group living animals may eavesdrop on signalling interactions between conspecifics and integrate it with their own past social experience in order to optimize the use of relevant information from others. However, little is known about this interplay between public (eavesdropped) and private social information. To investigate it, we first manipulated the dominance status of bystander zebrafish. Next, we either allowed or prevented bystanders from observing a fight. Finally, we assessed their behaviour towards the winners and losers of the interaction, using a custom-made video-tracking system and directional analysis. We found that only dominant bystanders who had seen the fight revealed a significant increase in directional focus (a measure of attention) towards the losers of the fights. Furthermore, our results indicate that information about the fighters' acquired status was collected from the signalling interaction itself and not from post-interaction status cues, which implies the existence of individual recognition in zebrafish. Thus, we show for the first time that zebrafish, a highly social model organism, eavesdrop on conspecific agonistic interactions and that this process is modulated by the eavesdroppers' dominance status. We suggest that this type of integration of public and private information may be ubiquitous in social learning processes. PMID:26361550

  5. Social dominance modulates eavesdropping in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Abril-de-Abreu, Rodrigo; Cruz, Ana S.; Oliveira, Rui F.

    2015-01-01

    Group living animals may eavesdrop on signalling interactions between conspecifics and integrate it with their own past social experience in order to optimize the use of relevant information from others. However, little is known about this interplay between public (eavesdropped) and private social information. To investigate it, we first manipulated the dominance status of bystander zebrafish. Next, we either allowed or prevented bystanders from observing a fight. Finally, we assessed their behaviour towards the winners and losers of the interaction, using a custom-made video-tracking system and directional analysis. We found that only dominant bystanders who had seen the fight revealed a significant increase in directional focus (a measure of attention) towards the losers of the fights. Furthermore, our results indicate that information about the fighters' acquired status was collected from the signalling interaction itself and not from post-interaction status cues, which implies the existence of individual recognition in zebrafish. Thus, we show for the first time that zebrafish, a highly social model organism, eavesdrop on conspecific agonistic interactions and that this process is modulated by the eavesdroppers' dominance status. We suggest that this type of integration of public and private information may be ubiquitous in social learning processes. PMID:26361550

  6. Zebrafish Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Angelica; Amatruda, James F

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are malignant cancers that arise from embryonic precursors known as Primordial Germ Cells. GCTs occur in neonates, children, adolescents and young adults and can occur in the testis, the ovary or extragonadal sites. Because GCTs arise from pluripotent cells, the tumors can exhibit a wide range of different histologies. Current cisplatin-based combination therapies cures most patients, however at the cost of significant toxicity to normal tissues. While GWAS studies and genomic analysis of human GCTs have uncovered somatic mutations and loci that might confer tumor susceptibility, little is still known about the exact mechanisms that drive tumor development, and animal models that faithfully recapitulate all the different GCT subtypes are lacking. Here, we summarize current understanding of germline development in humans and zebrafish, describe the biology of human germ cell tumors, and discuss progress and prospects for zebrafish GCT models that may contribute to better understanding of human GCTs. PMID:27165367

  7. Zebrafish and giant danio as models for muscle growth: determinate vs. indeterminate growth as determined by morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Biga, P R; Goetz, F W

    2006-11-01

    The zebrafish has become an important genetic model, but their small size makes them impractical for traditional physiological studies. In contrast, the closely related giant danio is larger and can be utilized for physiological studies that can also make use of the extensive zebrafish genomic resources. In addition, the giant danio and zebrafish appear to exhibit different growth types, indicating the potential for developing a comparative muscle growth model system. Therefore, the present study was conducted to compare and characterize the muscle growth pattern of zebrafish and giant danio. Morphometric analyses demonstrated that giant danio exhibit an increased growth rate compared with zebrafish, starting as early as 2 wk posthatch. Total myotome area, mean fiber area, and total fiber number all exhibited positive correlations with larvae length in giant danio but not in zebrafish. Morphometric analysis of giant danio and zebrafish larvae demonstrated faster, more efficient growth in giant danio larvae. Similar to larger teleosts, adult giant danio exhibited increased growth rates in response to growth hormone, suggesting that giant danio exhibit indeterminate growth. In contrast, adult zebrafish do not exhibit mosaic hyperplasia, nor do they respond to growth hormone, suggesting they exhibit determinate growth like mammals. These results demonstrate that giant danio and zebrafish can be utilized as a direct comparative model system for muscle growth studies, with zebrafish serving as a model organism for determinate growth and giant danio for indeterminate growth.

  8. Pharmacological Modulation of Hemodynamics in Adult Zebrafish In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brönnimann, Daniel; Dellenbach, Christian; Saveljic, Igor; Rieger, Michael; Rohr, Stephan; Filipovic, Nenad; Djonov, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemodynamic parameters in zebrafish receive increasing attention because of their important role in cardiovascular processes such as atherosclerosis, hematopoiesis, sprouting and intussusceptive angiogenesis. To study underlying mechanisms, the precise modulation of parameters like blood flow velocity or shear stress is centrally important. Questions related to blood flow have been addressed in the past in either embryonic or ex vivo-zebrafish models but little information is available for adult animals. Here we describe a pharmacological approach to modulate cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in adult zebrafish in vivo. Materials and Methods Adult zebrafish were paralyzed and orally perfused with salt water. The drugs isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside were directly applied with the perfusate, thus closely resembling the preferred method for drug delivery in zebrafish, namely within the water. Drug effects on the heart and on blood flow in the submental vein were studied using electrocardiograms, in vivo-microscopy and mathematical flow simulations. Results Under control conditions, heart rate, blood flow velocity and shear stress varied less than ± 5%. Maximal chronotropic effects of isoprenaline were achieved at a concentration of 50 μmol/L, where it increased the heart rate by 22.6 ± 1.3% (n = 4; p < 0.0001). Blood flow velocity and shear stress in the submental vein were not significantly increased. Sodium nitroprusside at 1 mmol/L did not alter the heart rate but increased blood flow velocity by 110.46 ± 19.64% (p = 0.01) and shear stress by 117.96 ± 23.65% (n = 9; p = 0.03). Discussion In this study, we demonstrate that cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in adult zebrafish can be efficiently modulated by isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside. Together with the suitability of the zebrafish for in vivo-microscopy and genetic modifications, the methodology described permits studying biological processes that are dependent on hemodynamic

  9. The progress and promise of zebrafish as a model to study mast cells.

    PubMed

    Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Berman, Jason N

    2014-09-01

    Immunological and hematological research using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has significantly advanced our understanding of blood lineage ontology, cellular functions and mechanisms, and provided opportunities for disease modeling. Mast cells are an immunological cell type involved in innate and adaptive immune systems, hypersensitivity reactions and cancer progression. The application of zebrafish to study mast cell biology exploits the developmental and imaging opportunities inherent in this model system to enable detailed genetic and molecular studies of this lineage outside of traditional mammalian models. In this review, we first place the importance of mast cell research in zebrafish into the context of comparative studies of mast cells in other fish species and highlight its advantages due to superior experimental tractability and direct visualization in transparent embryos. We discuss current and future tools for mast cell research in zebrafish and the notable results of using zebrafish for understanding mast cell fate determination and our development of a systemic mastocytosis model.

  10. Automatic zebrafish heartbeat detection and analysis for zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Pylatiuk, Christian; Sanchez, Daniela; Mikut, Ralf; Alshut, Rüdiger; Reischl, Markus; Hirth, Sofia; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Just, Steffen

    2014-08-01

    A fully automatic detection and analysis method of heartbeats in videos of nonfixed and nonanesthetized zebrafish embryos is presented. This method reduces the manual workload and time needed for preparation and imaging of the zebrafish embryos, as well as for evaluating heartbeat parameters such as frequency, beat-to-beat intervals, and arrhythmicity. The method is validated by a comparison of the results from automatic and manual detection of the heart rates of wild-type zebrafish embryos 36-120 h postfertilization and of embryonic hearts with bradycardia and pauses in the cardiac contraction.

  11. Ozone promotes regeneration by regulating the inflammatory response in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hao, Kenan; Li, Yanhao; Feng, Jianyu; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Yiyue; Ma, Ning; Zeng, Qingle; Pang, Huajin; Wang, Chunyan; Xiao, Lijun; He, Xiaofeng

    2015-09-01

    Ozone is thought to advance wound healing by inhibiting inflammation, but the mechanism of this phenomenon has not been determined. Although the zebrafish is often used in regeneration experiments, there has been no report of zebrafish treated with ozonated water. We successfully established a zebrafish model of ozonated water treatment and demonstrate that ozonated water stimulates the regeneration of the zebrafish caudal fin, its mechanism, and time dependence. The growth rate of the caudal fin and the number of neutrophils migrating to the caudal fin wound after resection were higher in the experimental (ozonated) group than in the control group, preliminarily confirming that ozone-promoted regeneration is related to the stimulation of an early inflammatory response by ozone. Ozone modulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in two ways by regulating interleukin 10 (IL-10) expression. Therefore, ozone promotes tissue regeneration by regulating the inflammatory pathways. This effect of ozone in an experimental zebrafish model is demonstrated for the first time, confirming its promotion of wound healing and the mechanism of its effect in tissue regeneration. These results will open up new directions for ozone and regeneration research.

  12. Textile dyes induce toxicity on zebrafish early life stages.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gisele Augusto Rodrigues; de Lapuente, Joaquín; Teixidó, Elisabet; Porredón, Constança; Borràs, Miquel; de Oliveira, Danielle Palma

    2016-02-01

    Textile manufacturing is one of the most polluting industrial sectors because of the release of potentially toxic compounds, such as synthetic dyes, into the environment. Depending on the class of the dyes, their loss in wastewaters can range from 2% to 50% of the original dye concentration. Consequently, uncontrolled use of such dyes can negatively affect human health and the ecological balance. The present study assessed the toxicity of the textile dyes Direct Black 38 (DB38), Reactive Blue 15 (RB15), Reactive Orange 16 (RO16), and Vat Green 3 (VG3) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos for 144 h postfertilization (hpf). At the tested conditions, none of the dyes caused significant mortality. The highest RO16 dose significantly delayed or inhibited the ability of zebrafish embryos to hatch from the chorion after 96 hpf. From 120 hpf to 144 hpf, all the dyes impaired the gas bladder inflation of zebrafish larvae, DB38 also induced curved tail, and VG3 led to yolk sac edema in zebrafish larvae. Based on these data, DB38, RB15, RO16, and VG3 can induce malformations during embryonic and larval development of zebrafish. Therefore, it is essential to remove these compounds from wastewater or reduce their concentrations to safe levels before discharging textile industry effluents into the aquatic environment.

  13. Tales of regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Poss, Kenneth D; Keating, Mark T; Nechiporuk, Alex

    2003-02-01

    Complex tissue regeneration involves exquisitely coordinated proliferation and patterning of adult cells after severe injury or amputation. Certain lower vertebrates such as urodele amphibians and teleost fish have a greater capacity for regeneration than mammals. However, little is known about molecular mechanisms of regeneration, and cellular mechanisms are incompletely defined. To address this deficiency, we and others have focused on the zebrafish model system. Several helpful tools and reagents are available for use with zebrafish, including the potential for genetic approaches to regeneration. Recent studies have shed light on the remarkable ability of zebrafish to regenerate fins. PMID:12557199

  14. The Zebrafish Annexin Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Steven A.; De Rose, Robert A.; Olson, Eric S.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2003-01-01

    The Annexins (ANXs) are a family of calcium- and phospholipid-binding proteins that have been implicated in many cellular processes, including channel formation, membrane fusion, vesicle transport, and regulation of phospholipase A2 activity. As a first step toward understanding in vivo function, we have cloned 11 zebrafish anx genes. Four genes (anx1a, anx2a, anx5,and anx11a) were identified by screening a zebrafish cDNA library with a Xenopus anx2 fragment. For these genes, full-length cDNA sequences were used to cluster 212 EST sequences generated by the Zebrafish Genome Resources Project. The EST analysis revealed seven additional anx genes that were subsequently cloned. The genetic map positions of all 11 genes were determined by using a zebrafish radiation hybrid panel. Sequence and syntenic relationships between zebrafish and human genes indicate that the 11 genes represent orthologs of human anx1,2,4,5,6,11,13,and suggest that several zebrafish anx genes resulted from duplications that arose after divergence of the zebrafish and mammalian genomes. Zebrafish anx genes are expressed in a wide range of tissues during embryonic and larval stages. Analysis of the expression patterns of duplicated genes revealed both redundancy and divergence, with the most similar genes having almost identical tissue-specific patterns of expression and with less similar duplicates showing no overlap. The differences in gene expression of recently duplicated anx genes could explain why highly related paralogs were maintained in the genome and did not rapidly become pseudogenes. PMID:12799347

  15. Thrombin Generation in Zebrafish Blood.

    PubMed

    Schurgers, Evelien; Moorlag, Martijn; Hemker, Coenraad; Lindhout, Theo; Kelchtermans, Hilde; de Laat, Bas

    2016-01-01

    To better understand hypercoagulability as an underlying cause for thrombosis, the leading cause of death in the Western world, new assays to study ex vivo coagulation are essential. The zebrafish is generally accepted as a good model for human hemostasis and thrombosis, as the hemostatic system proved to be similar to that in man. Their small size however, has been a hurdle for more widespread use in hemostasis related research. In this study we developed a method that enables the measurement of thrombin generation in a single drop of non-anticoagulated zebrafish blood. Pre-treatment of the fish with inhibitors of FXa and thrombin, resulted in a dose dependent diminishing of thrombin generation, demonstrating the validity of the assay. In order to establish the relationship between whole blood thrombin generation and fibrin formation, we visualized the resulting fibrin network by scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, in this study we developed a fast and reliable method to measure thrombin generation in whole blood collected from a single zebrafish. Given the similarities between coagulation pathways of zebrafish and mammals, zebrafish may be an ideal animal model to determine the effect of novel therapeutics on thrombin generation. Additionally, because of the ease with which gene functions can be silenced, zebrafish may serve as a model organism for mechanistical research in thrombosis and hemostasis. PMID:26872266

  16. Thrombin Generation in Zebrafish Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hemker, Coenraad; Lindhout, Theo; Kelchtermans, Hilde; de Laat, Bas

    2016-01-01

    To better understand hypercoagulability as an underlying cause for thrombosis, the leading cause of death in the Western world, new assays to study ex vivo coagulation are essential. The zebrafish is generally accepted as a good model for human hemostasis and thrombosis, as the hemostatic system proved to be similar to that in man. Their small size however, has been a hurdle for more widespread use in hemostasis related research. In this study we developed a method that enables the measurement of thrombin generation in a single drop of non-anticoagulated zebrafish blood. Pre-treatment of the fish with inhibitors of FXa and thrombin, resulted in a dose dependent diminishing of thrombin generation, demonstrating the validity of the assay. In order to establish the relationship between whole blood thrombin generation and fibrin formation, we visualized the resulting fibrin network by scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, in this study we developed a fast and reliable method to measure thrombin generation in whole blood collected from a single zebrafish. Given the similarities between coagulation pathways of zebrafish and mammals, zebrafish may be an ideal animal model to determine the effect of novel therapeutics on thrombin generation. Additionally, because of the ease with which gene functions can be silenced, zebrafish may serve as a model organism for mechanistical research in thrombosis and hemostasis. PMID:26872266

  17. Zebrafish: A marvel of high-throughput biology for 21st century toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Bugel, Sean M.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Planchart, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary conservation of genomic, biochemical and developmental features between zebrafish and humans is gradually coming into focus with the end result that the zebrafish embryo model has emerged as a powerful tool for uncovering the effects of environmental exposures on a multitude of biological processes with direct relevance to human health. In this review, we highlight advances in automation, high-throughput (HT) screening, and analysis that leverage the power of the zebrafish embryo model for unparalleled advances in our understanding of how chemicals in our environment affect our health and wellbeing. PMID:25678986

  18. Budget Period 2 Summary Report Part 2: Hywind Maine Project

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, Frederick; Platt, Andrew; Sirnivas, Senu

    2015-08-15

    This project was performed under the Work for Others—Funds in Agreement FIA-14-1793 between Statoil and the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, manager and operator of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). To support the development of a 6-MW spar-mounted offshore wind turbine, Statoil funded NREL to perform tasks in the following three categories: 1. Design and analysis 2. Wake modeling 3. Concept resource assessment. This study expands upon the work conducted in Budget Period 1 (BP1) to investigate the influence of the wake generated from an upstream turbine on a downstream turbine using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) high-fidelity modeling tool. Simulator fOr Wind Farms Application (SOWFA) [1] is an NREL high fidelity modeling tool that couples OpenFOAM [2] CFD and NREL’s Aero-Elastic code Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence (FAST)[3]. In BP1 the configuration was based on Hywind-3MW at 140 m water depth in the Gulf of Maine; however this study for Budget Period 2 (BP2) the configuration investigated is based on Hywind-6MW at 220 m water depth off the coast of Boston. The objectives were to perform two-turbines One-Way Coupling (OWC), three-turbines Two-Way Coupling (TWC), and to investigate wind power plant optimization.

  19. INDUCED AND SPONTANEOUS NEOPLASIA IN ZEBRAFISH.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address the potential of zebrafish as a cancer model, it is important to determine the susceptibility of zebrafish to tumors, and to compare zebrafish tumors with human tumors. To determine whether the commonly-used germ line mutagen, ethylnitrosourea (ENU) induces tumors, we ...

  20. Maintenance of Zebrafish Lines at the European Zebrafish Resource Center

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Nadine; Ferg, Marco; Maier, Jana Viktoria; Strähle, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have established a European Zebrafish Resource Center (EZRC) at the KIT. This center not only maintains and distributes a large number of existing mutant and transgenic zebrafish lines but also gives zebrafish researchers access to screening services and technologies such as imaging and high-throughput sequencing, provided by the Institute of Toxicology and Genetics (ITG). The EZRC maintains and distributes the stock collection of the Nüsslein-Volhard laboratory, comprising over 2000 publicly released mutations, as frozen sperm samples. Within the framework of the ZF-HEALTH EU project, the EZRC distributes over 10,000 knockout mutations from the Sanger Institute (United Kingdom), as well as over 100 mutant and transgenic lines from other sources. In this article, we detail the measures we have taken to ensure the health of our fish, including hygiene, quarantine, and veterinary inspections. PMID:27351617

  1. The Zebrafish Information Network (ZFIN): the zebrafish model organism database.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Judy; Clements, Dave; Conlin, Tom; Edwards, Pat; Frazer, Ken; Schaper, Kevin; Segerdell, Erik; Song, Peiran; Sprunger, Brock; Westerfield, Monte

    2003-01-01

    The Zebrafish Information Network (ZFIN) is a web based community resource that serves as a centralized location for the curation and integration of zebrafish genetic, genomic and developmental data. ZFIN is publicly accessible at http://zfin.org. ZFIN provides an integrated representation of mutants, genes, genetic markers, mapping panels, publications and community contact data. Recent enhancements to ZFIN include: (i) an anatomical dictionary that provides a controlled vocabulary of anatomical terms, grouped by developmental stages, that may be used to annotate and query gene expression data; (ii) gene expression data; (iii) expanded support for genome sequence; (iv) gene annotation using the standardized vocabulary of Gene Ontology (GO) terms that can be used to elucidate relationships between gene products in zebrafish and other organisms; and (v) collaborations with other databases (NCBI, Sanger Institute and SWISS-PROT) to provide standardization and interconnections based on shared curation.

  2. Human cardiotoxic drugs delivered by soaking and microinjection induce cardiovascular toxicity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun-Jing; Xu, Yi-Qiao; He, Jian-Hui; Yu, Hang-Ping; Huang, Chang-Jiang; Gao, Ji-Min; Dong, Qiao-Xiang; Xuan, Yao-Xian; Li, Chun-Qi

    2014-02-01

    Cardiovascular toxicity is a major challenge for the pharmaceutical industry and predictive screening models to identify and eliminate pharmaceuticals with the potential to cause cardiovascular toxicity in humans are urgently needed. In this study, taking advantage of the transparency of larval zebrafish, Danio rerio, we assessed cardiovascular toxicity of seven known human cardiotoxic drugs (aspirin, clomipramine hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, nimodipine, quinidine, terfenadine and verapamil hydrochloride) and two non-cardiovascular toxicity drugs (gentamicin sulphate and tetracycline hydrochloride) in zebrafish using six specific phenotypic endpoints: heart rate, heart rhythm, pericardial edema, circulation, hemorrhage and thrombosis. All the tested drugs were delivered into zebrafish by direct soaking and yolk sac microinjection, respectively, and cardiovascular toxicity was quantitatively or qualitatively assessed at 4 and 24 h post drug treatment. The results showed that aspirin accelerated the zebrafish heart rate (tachycardia), whereas clomipramine hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, nimodipine, quinidine, terfenadine and verapamil hydrochloride induced bradycardia. Quinidine and terfenadine also caused atrioventricular (AV) block. Nimodipine treatment resulted in atrial arrest with much slower but regular ventricular heart beating. All the tested human cardiotoxic drugs also induced pericardial edema and circulatory disturbance in zebrafish. There was no sign of cardiovascular toxicity in zebrafish treated with non-cardiotoxic drugs gentamicin sulphate and tetracycline hydrochloride. The overall prediction success rate for cardiotoxic drugs and non-cardiotoxic drugs in zebrafish were 100% (9/9) as compared with human results, suggesting that zebrafish is an excellent animal model for rapid in vivo cardiovascular toxicity screening. The procedures we developed in this report for assessing cardiovascular toxicity in zebrafish were suitable for drugs delivered

  3. The Zebrafish Neurophenome Database (ZND): a dynamic open-access resource for zebrafish neurophenotypic data.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan; Zapolsky, Ivan; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Pham, Mimi; Collins, Christopher; Roth, Andrew; Stewart, Adam Michael; St-Pierre, Paul; Hirons, Budd; Kalueff, Allan V

    2012-03-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are widely used in neuroscience research, where their utility as a model organism is rapidly expanding. Low cost, ease of experimental manipulations, and sufficient behavioral complexity make zebrafish a valuable tool for high-throughput studies in biomedicine. To complement the available repositories for zebrafish genetic information, there is a growing need for the collection of zebrafish neurobehavioral and neurological phenotypes. For this, we are establishing the Zebrafish Neurophenome Database (ZND; www.tulane.edu/∼znpindex/search ) as a new dynamic online open-access data repository for behavioral and related physiological data. ZND, currently focusing on adult zebrafish, combines zebrafish neurophenotypic data with a simple, easily searchable user interface, which allow scientists to view and compare results obtained by other laboratories using various treatments in different testing paradigms. As a developing community effort, ZND is expected to foster innovative research using zebrafish by federating the growing body of zebrafish neurophenotypic data.

  4. Zebrafish Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Chatla, Kamalakar; Gaunt, Patricia S.; Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Ford, Lorelei; Hanson, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent known toxins. The mouse LD50 assay is the gold standard for testing BoNT potency, but is not sensitive enough to detect the extremely low levels of neurotoxin that may be present in the serum of sensitive animal species that are showing the effects of BoNT toxicity, such as channel catfish affected by visceral toxicosis of catfish. Since zebrafish are an important animal model for diverse biomedical and basic research, they are readily available and have defined genetic lines that facilitate reproducibility. This makes them attractive for use as an alternative bioassay organism. The utility of zebrafish as a bioassay model organism for BoNT was investigated. The 96 h median immobilizing doses of BoNT/A, BoNT/C, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F for adult male Tübingen strain zebrafish (0.32 g mean weight) at 25 °C were 16.31, 124.6, 4.7, and 0.61 picograms (pg)/fish, respectively. These findings support the use of the zebrafish-based bioassays for evaluating the presence of BoNT/A, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F. Evaluating the basis of the relatively high resistance of zebrafish to BoNT/C and the extreme sensitivity to BoNT/F may reveal unique functional patterns to the action of these neurotoxins. PMID:27153088

  5. Zebrafish Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Chatla, Kamalakar; Gaunt, Patricia S; Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Ford, Lorelei; Hanson, Larry A

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent known toxins. The mouse LD50 assay is the gold standard for testing BoNT potency, but is not sensitive enough to detect the extremely low levels of neurotoxin that may be present in the serum of sensitive animal species that are showing the effects of BoNT toxicity, such as channel catfish affected by visceral toxicosis of catfish. Since zebrafish are an important animal model for diverse biomedical and basic research, they are readily available and have defined genetic lines that facilitate reproducibility. This makes them attractive for use as an alternative bioassay organism. The utility of zebrafish as a bioassay model organism for BoNT was investigated. The 96 h median immobilizing doses of BoNT/A, BoNT/C, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F for adult male Tübingen strain zebrafish (0.32 g mean weight) at 25 °C were 16.31, 124.6, 4.7, and 0.61 picograms (pg)/fish, respectively. These findings support the use of the zebrafish-based bioassays for evaluating the presence of BoNT/A, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F. Evaluating the basis of the relatively high resistance of zebrafish to BoNT/C and the extreme sensitivity to BoNT/F may reveal unique functional patterns to the action of these neurotoxins. PMID:27153088

  6. Mapping of zebrafish research: a global outlook.

    PubMed

    Kinth, Priyamvadah; Mahesh, Gopalakrishnan; Panwar, Yatish

    2013-12-01

    On the basis of analysis of 17,151 records on zebrafish identified from Zebrafish Information Network: the zebrafish model organism database and Web of Science, the research performance on this model organism has been evaluated. The earliest research work on zebrafish as reflected in the databases goes back to 1951. After a rather slow growth till the 1980s, research on zebrafish gained momentum in the 1990s. Analysis shows a rapid and consistent increase in the publication output with 226 publications in the year 1996, to 1929 publications in the year 2012. The prominent areas of zebrafish research, journals, and leading authors as reflected from the research output have been identified. USA is the most productive country with 8196 articles. The most frequently used keywords were also determined to gain insights about the research trends and some of the commonly used keywords other than zebrafish and Danio rerio are development, retina, and gene expression.

  7. Neurochemical measurements in the zebrafish brain

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lauren J.; McCutcheon, James E.; Young, Andrew M. J.; Norton, William H. J.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is an ideal model organism for behavioral genetics and neuroscience. The high conservation of genes and neurotransmitter pathways between zebrafish and other vertebrates permits the translation of research between species. Zebrafish behavior can be studied at both larval and adult stages and recent research has begun to establish zebrafish models for human disease. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique that permits the detection of neurotransmitter release and reuptake. In this study we have used in vitro FSCV to measure the release of analytes in the adult zebrafish telencephalon. We compare different stimulation methods and present a characterization of neurochemical changes in the wild-type zebrafish brain. This study represents the first FSCV recordings in zebrafish, thus paving the way for neurochemical analysis of the fish brain. PMID:26441575

  8. Coupled mutagenesis screens and genetic mapping in zebrafish.

    PubMed Central

    Rawls, John F; Frieda, Matthew R; McAdow, Anthony R; Gross, Jason P; Clayton, Chad M; Heyen, Candy K; Johnson, Stephen L

    2003-01-01

    Forward genetic analysis is one of the principal advantages of the zebrafish model system. However, managing zebrafish mutant lines derived from mutagenesis screens and mapping the corresponding mutations and integrating them into the larger collection of mutations remain arduous tasks. To simplify and focus these endeavors, we developed an approach that facilitates the rapid mapping of new zebrafish mutations as they are generated through mutagenesis screens. We selected a minimal panel of 149 simple sequence length polymorphism markers for a first-pass genome scan in crosses involving C32 and SJD inbred lines. We also conducted a small chemical mutagenesis screen that identified several new mutations affecting zebrafish embryonic melanocyte development. Using our first-pass marker panel in bulked-segregant analysis, we were able to identify the genetic map positions of these mutations as they were isolated in our screen. Rapid mapping of the mutations facilitated stock management, helped direct allelism tests, and should accelerate identification of the affected genes. These results demonstrate the efficacy of coupling mutagenesis screens with genetic mapping. PMID:12663538

  9. Mapping the development of cerebellar Purkinje cells in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hamling, Kyla R; Tobias, Zachary J C; Weissman, Tamily A

    2015-11-01

    The cells that comprise the cerebellum perform a complex integration of neural inputs to influence motor control and coordination. The functioning of this circuit depends upon Purkinje cells and other cerebellar neurons forming in the precise place and time during development. Zebrafish provide a useful platform for modeling disease and studying gene function, thus a quantitative metric of normal zebrafish cerebellar development is key for understanding how gene mutations affect the cerebellum. To begin to quantitatively measure cerebellar development in zebrafish, we have characterized the spatial and temporal patterning of Purkinje cells during the first 2 weeks of development. Differentiated Purkinje cells first emerged by 2.8 days post fertilization and were spatially patterned into separate dorsomedial and ventrolateral clusters that merged at around 4 days. Quantification of the Purkinje cell layer revealed that there was a logarithmic increase in both Purkinje cell number as well as overall volume during the first 2 weeks, while the entire region curved forward in an anterior, then ventral direction. Purkinje cell dendrites were positioned next to parallel fibers as early as 3.3 days, and Purkinje cell diameter decreased significantly from 3.3 to 14 days, possibly due to cytoplasmic reappropriation into maturing dendritic arbors. A nearest neighbor analysis showed that Purkinje cells moved slightly apart from each other from 3 to 14 days, perhaps spreading as the organized monolayer forms. This study establishes a quantitative spatiotemporal map of Purkinje cell development in zebrafish that provides an important metric for studies of cerebellar development and disease.

  10. Whole-body multispectral photoacoustic imaging of adult zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Na; Guo, Heng; Qi, Weizhi; Zhang, Zhiwei; Rong, Jian; Yuan, Zhen; Ge, Wei; Jiang, Huabei; Xi, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish, an ideal vertebrate for studying developmental biology and genetics, is increasingly being used to understand human diseases, due to its high similarity to the human genome and its optical transparency during embryonic stages. Once the zebrafish has fully developed, especially wild-type breeds, conventional optical imaging techniques have difficulty in imaging the internal organs and structures with sufficient resolution and penetration depth. Even with established mutant lines that remain transparent throughout their life cycle, it is still challenging for purely optical imaging modalities to visualize the organs of juvenile and adult zebrafish at a micro-scale spatial resolution. In this work, we developed a non-invasive three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging platform with an optimized illumination pattern and a cylindrical-scanning-based data collection system to image entire zebrafish with micro-scale resolutions of 80 μm and 600 μm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. In addition, we employed a multispectral strategy that utilized excitation wavelengths from 690 nm to 930 nm to statistically quantify the relative optical absorption spectrum of major organs. PMID:27699119

  11. See-Thru-Gonad zebrafish line: developmental and functional validation.

    PubMed

    Presslauer, Christopher; Bizuayehu, Teshome Tilahun; Razmi, Komeil; Fernandes, Jorge M O; Babiak, Igor

    2016-11-01

    Zebrafish are an important model species in developmental biology. However, their potential in reproductive biology research has yet to be realized. In this study, we established See-Thru-Gonad zebrafish, a transparent line with fluorescently labeled germ cells visible throughout the life cycle, validated its gonadal development features, and demonstrated its applicability by performing a targeted gene knockdown experiment using vivo-morpholinos (VMOs). To establish the line, we crossed the zf45Tg and mitfa(w2/w2); mpv17(b18/b18) zebrafish lines. We documented the in vivo visibility of the germline-specific fluorescent signal throughout development, from gametes through embryonic and juvenile stages up to sexual maturity, and validated gonadal development with histology. We performed targeted gene knockdown of the microRNA (miRNA) miR-92a-3p through injection of VMOs directly to maturing ovaries. After the treatment, zebrafish were bred naturally. Embryos from miR-92a-3p knockdown ovaries had a significant reduction in relative miR-92a-3p expression and a higher percentage of developmental arrest at the 1-cell stage as compared with 5-base mismatch-treated controls. The experiment demonstrates that See-Thru-Gonad line can be successfully used for vertical transmission of the effects of targeted gene knockdown in ovaries into their offspring. PMID:27655215

  12. Whole-body multispectral photoacoustic imaging of adult zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Na; Guo, Heng; Qi, Weizhi; Zhang, Zhiwei; Rong, Jian; Yuan, Zhen; Ge, Wei; Jiang, Huabei; Xi, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish, an ideal vertebrate for studying developmental biology and genetics, is increasingly being used to understand human diseases, due to its high similarity to the human genome and its optical transparency during embryonic stages. Once the zebrafish has fully developed, especially wild-type breeds, conventional optical imaging techniques have difficulty in imaging the internal organs and structures with sufficient resolution and penetration depth. Even with established mutant lines that remain transparent throughout their life cycle, it is still challenging for purely optical imaging modalities to visualize the organs of juvenile and adult zebrafish at a micro-scale spatial resolution. In this work, we developed a non-invasive three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging platform with an optimized illumination pattern and a cylindrical-scanning-based data collection system to image entire zebrafish with micro-scale resolutions of 80 μm and 600 μm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. In addition, we employed a multispectral strategy that utilized excitation wavelengths from 690 nm to 930 nm to statistically quantify the relative optical absorption spectrum of major organs.

  13. Quantifying Aggressive Behavior in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Aggression is a complex behavior that influences social relationships and can be seen as adaptive or maladaptive depending on the context and intensity of expression. A model organism suitable for genetic dissection of the underlying neural mechanisms of aggressive behavior is still needed. Zebrafish has already proven to be a powerful vertebrate model organism for the study of normal and pathological brain function. Despite the fact that zebrafish is a gregarious species that forms shoals, when allowed to interact in pairs, both males and females express aggressive behavior and establish dominance hierarchies. Here, we describe two protocols that can be used to quantify aggressive behavior in zebrafish, using two different paradigms: (1) staged fights between real opponents and (2) mirror-elicited fights. We also discuss the methodology for the behavior analysis, the expected results for both paradigms, and the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm in face of the specific goals of the study. PMID:27464816

  14. New frontiers for zebrafish management.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, C

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a preeminent model organism with a wide and expanding utility for numerous scientific disciplines. The same features that once endeared this small freshwater minnow to developmental biologists combined with its relatively high genetic similarity to mammals and the advent of new, more efficient methods for genome editing are now helping to spur expanded growth in its usage in various fields, including toxicology, drug discovery, transplant biology, disease modeling, and even aquaculture. Continued maturation and adoption of the zebrafish model system in these and other fields of science will require that methods and approaches for husbandry and management of these fish in controlled settings be refined and improved to the extent that, ultimately, zebrafish research becomes more reproducible, defined, cost-effective, and accessible to the masses. Knowledge and technology transfer from laboratory animal science and commercial aquaculture will be a necessary part of this development. PMID:27443941

  15. Genomic Approaches to Zebrafish Cancer.

    PubMed

    White, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as an important model for studying cancer biology. Identification of DNA, RNA and chromatin abnormalities can give profound insight into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and the there are many techniques for analyzing the genomes of these tumors. Here, I present an overview of the available technologies for analyzing tumor genomes in the zebrafish, including array based methods as well as next-generation sequencing technologies. I also discuss the ways in which zebrafish tumor genomes can be compared to human genomes using cross-species oncogenomics, which act to filter genomic noise and ultimately uncover central drivers of malignancy. Finally, I discuss downstream analytic tools, including network analysis, that can help to organize the alterations into coherent biological frameworks that can then be investigated further. PMID:27165352

  16. Early Depletion of Primordial Germ Cells in Zebrafish Promotes Testis Formation

    PubMed Central

    Tzung, Keh-Weei; Goto, Rie; Saju, Jolly M.; Sreenivasan, Rajini; Saito, Taiju; Arai, Katsutoshi; Yamaha, Etsuro; Hossain, Mohammad Sorowar; Calvert, Meredith E.K.; Orbán, László

    2014-01-01

    Summary As complete absence of germ cells leads to sterile males in zebrafish, we explored the relationship between primordial germ cell (PGC) number and sexual development. Our results revealed dimorphic proliferation of PGCs in the early zebrafish larvae, marking the beginning of sexual differentiation. We applied morpholino-based gene knockdown and cell transplantation strategies to demonstrate that a threshold number of PGCs is required for the stability of ovarian fate. Using histology and transcriptomic analyses, we determined that zebrafish gonads are in a meiotic ovarian stage at 14 days postfertilization and identified signaling pathways supporting meiotic oocyte differentiation and eventual female fate. The development of PGC-depleted gonads appears to be restrained and delayed, suggesting that PGC number may directly regulate the variability and length of gonadal transformation and testicular differentiation in zebrafish. We propose that gonadal transformation may function as a developmental buffering mechanism to ensure the reproductive outcome. PMID:25434820

  17. Effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Tiziana; Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a species of choice in neurobiological and behavioral studies of alcohol-related disorders. In these efforts, the activity of adult zebrafish is typically quantified using indirect activity measures that are either scored manually or identified automatically from the fish trajectory. The analysis of such activity measures has produced important insight into the effect of acute ethanol exposure on individual and social behavior of this vertebrate species. Here, we leverage a recently developed tracking algorithm that reconstructs fish body shape to investigate the effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion in terms of amplitude and frequency. Our results demonstrate a significant effect of ethanol on the tail-beat amplitude as well as the tail-beat frequency, both of which were found to robustly decrease for high ethanol concentrations. Such a direct measurement of zebrafish motor functions is in agreement with evidence based on indirect activity measures, offering a complementary perspective in behavioral screening.

  18. A student team in a University of Michigan biomedical engineering design course constructs a microfluidic bioreactor for studies of zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu-chi; Li, David; Al-Shoaibi, Ali; Bersano-Begey, Tom; Chen, Hao; Ali, Shahid; Flak, Betsy; Perrin, Catherine; Winslow, Max; Shah, Harsh; Ramamurthy, Poornapriya; Schmedlen, Rachael H; Takayama, Shuichi; Barald, Kate F

    2009-06-01

    The zebrafish is a valuable model for teaching developmental, molecular, and cell biology; aquatic sciences; comparative anatomy; physiology; and genetics. Here we demonstrate that zebrafish provide an excellent model system to teach engineering principles. A seven-member undergraduate team in a biomedical engineering class designed, built, and tested a zebrafish microfluidic bioreactor applying microfluidics, an emerging engineering technology, to study zebrafish development. During the semester, students learned engineering and biology experimental design, chip microfabrication, mathematical modeling, zebrafish husbandry, principles of developmental biology, fluid dynamics, microscopy, and basic molecular biology theory and techniques. The team worked to maximize each person's contribution and presented weekly written and oral reports. Two postdoctoral fellows, a graduate student, and three faculty instructors coordinated and directed the team in an optimal blending of engineering, molecular, and developmental biology skill sets. The students presented two posters, including one at the Zebrafish meetings in Madison, Wisconsin (June 2008).

  19. A Student Team in a University of Michigan Biomedical Engineering Design Course Constructs a Microfluidic Bioreactor for Studies of Zebrafish Development

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yu-chi; Li, David; Al-Shoaibi, Ali; Bersano-Begey, Tom; Chen, Hao; Ali, Shahid; Flak, Betsy; Perrin, Catherine; Winslow, Max; Shah, Harsh; Ramamurthy, Poornapriya; Schmedlen, Rachael H.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish is a valuable model for teaching developmental, molecular, and cell biology; aquatic sciences; comparative anatomy; physiology; and genetics. Here we demonstrate that zebrafish provide an excellent model system to teach engineering principles. A seven-member undergraduate team in a biomedical engineering class designed, built, and tested a zebrafish microfluidic bioreactor applying microfluidics, an emerging engineering technology, to study zebrafish development. During the semester, students learned engineering and biology experimental design, chip microfabrication, mathematical modeling, zebrafish husbandry, principles of developmental biology, fluid dynamics, microscopy, and basic molecular biology theory and techniques. The team worked to maximize each person's contribution and presented weekly written and oral reports. Two postdoctoral fellows, a graduate student, and three faculty instructors coordinated and directed the team in an optimal blending of engineering, molecular, and developmental biology skill sets. The students presented two posters, including one at the Zebrafish meetings in Madison, Wisconsin (June 2008). PMID:19292670

  20. Measuring thigmotaxis in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Schnörr, S J; Steenbergen, P J; Richardson, M K; Champagne, D L

    2012-03-17

    One of the most commonly used behavioral endpoints measured in preclinical studies using rodent models is thigmotaxis (or "wall-hugging"). Thigmotaxis is a well-validated index of anxiety in animals and humans. While assays measuring thigmotaxis in adult zebrafish have been developed, a thigmotaxis assay has not yet been validated in larval zebrafish. Here we present a novel assay for measurement of thigmotaxis in zebrafish larvae that is triggered by a sudden change in illumination (i.e. sudden light-to-darkness transition) and performed in a standard 24-well plate. We show that zebrafish larvae as young as 5 days post fertilization respond to this challenge by engaging in thigmotaxis. Thigmotaxis was significantly attenuated by anxiolytic (diazepam) and significantly enhanced by anxiogenic (caffeine) drugs, thus representing the first validated thigmotaxis assay for larval zebrafish. We also show that exposure to sudden darkness per se may represent an anxiogenic situation for larval zebrafish since less contrasting light-to-darkness transitions (achieved by lowering darkness degrees) significantly decreased thigmotaxis levels in a manner similar to what was achieved with diazepam. These findings suggest that stimuli such as exposure to sudden darkness could be used proficiently to trigger the expression of anxiety-like behaviors in laboratory settings. In sum, this is a versatile protocol allowing testing of both anxiolytic and anxiogenic drugs in a cost-effective manner (only 10 min). This assay is also amenable to medium to high-throughput capacity while constituting a valuable tool for stress and central nervous system research as well as for preclinical drug screening and discovery. PMID:22197677

  1. Parvalbumin isoforms in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Felix

    2005-09-01

    By using an analysis of existing genomic information it is concluded that in zebrafish nine genes encode parvalbumin (PV). These genes possess introns that differ in size and show nucleotide variability but they contain the same number of exons, and for each corresponding exon, the number of nucleotides therein are identical in all the paralogs. This rule also applies to the multiple PV genes of other species e.g. mammals. Each of these genes displays, however, characteristic 5' and 3' UTRs which appear highly conserved between closely related species (so that orthologs among these species can be readily identified) but which show larger numbers of mutations between species that are more distant in evolution. A tree is presented which suggests that the traditional classification of PVs as alpha or beta (based mainly on charge of the protein molecule) is not sustainable. Numbers 1-9 are assigned to the various isoforms to facilitate their identification in future studies. A bifurcation of isoforms into 1 and 4; 2 and 3; 6 and 7; 8 and 9 appears to have occurred simultaneously in more recent time, i.e. perhaps approximately 60 mys ago when primates and rodents branched. PMID:16172917

  2. Carbon Quantum Dots for Zebrafish Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Li, Yu-Hao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Xu, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Mi; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are becoming a desirable alternative to metal-based QDs and dye probes owing to their high biocompatibility, low toxicity, ease of preparation, and unique photophysical properties. Herein, we describe fluorescence bioimaging of zebrafish using C-QDs as probe in terms of the preparation of C-QDs, zebrafish husbandry, embryo harvesting, and introduction of C-QDs into embryos and larvae by soaking and microinjection. The multicolor of C-QDs was validated with their imaging for zebrafish embryo. The distribution of C-QDs in zebrafish embryos and larvae were successfully observed from their fluorescence emission. the bio-toxicity of C-QDs was tested with zebrafish as model and C-QDs do not interfere to the development of zebrafish embryo. All of the results confirmed the high biocompatibility and low toxicity of C-QDs as imaging probe. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion route (ADME) of C-QDs in zebrafish was revealed by their distribution. Our work provides the useful information for the researchers interested in studying with zebrafish as a model and the applications of C-QDs. The operations related zebrafish are suitable for the study of the toxicity, adverse effects, transport, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials as well as for drug screening with zebrafish as model. PMID:26135470

  3. Zebrafish sex: a complicated affair

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Woei Chang

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we provide a detailed overview of studies on the elusive sex determination (SD) and gonad differentiation mechanisms of zebrafish (Danio rerio). We show that the data obtained from most studies are compatible with polygenic sex determination (PSD), where the decision is made by the allelic combinations of several loci. These loci are typically dispersed throughout the genome, but in some teleost species a few of them might be located on a preferential pair of (sex) chromosomes. The PSD system has a much higher level of variation of SD genotypes both at the level of gametes and the sexual genotype of individuals, than that of the chromosomal sex determination systems. The early sexual development of zebrafish males is a complicated process, as they first develop a ‘juvenile ovary’, that later undergoes a transformation to give way to a testis. To date, three major developmental pathways were shown to be involved with gonad differentiation through the modulation of programmed cell death. In our opinion, there are more pathways participating in the regulation of zebrafish gonad differentiation/transformation. Introduction of additional powerful large-scale genomic approaches into the analysis of zebrafish reproduction will result in further deepening of our knowledge as well as identification of additional pathways and genes associated with these processes in the near future. PMID:24148942

  4. Microsporidiosis in Zebrafish Research Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Justin L.; Watral, Virginia; Kent, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudoloma neurophilia (Microsporidia) is the most common pathogen detected in zebrafish (Danio rerio) from research facilities. The parasite infects the central nervous system and muscle and may be associated with emaciation and skeletal deformities. However, many fish exhibit sub-clinical infections. Another microsporidium, Pleistophora hyphessobryconis, has recently been detected in a few zebrafish facilities. Here, we review the methods for diagnosis and detection, modes of transmission, and approaches used to control microsporidia in zebrafish, focusing on P. neurophilia. The parasite can be readily transmitted by feeding spores or infected tissues, and we show that cohabitation with infected fish is also an effective means of transmission. Spores are released from live fish in various manners, including through the urine, feces, and sex products during spawning. Indeed, P. neurophilia infects both the eggs and ovarian tissues, where we found concentrations ranging from 12,000 to 88,000 spores per ovary. Hence, various lines of evidence support the conclusion that maternal transmission is a route of infection: spores are numerous in ovaries and developing follicles in infected females, spores are present in spawned eggs and water from spawning tanks based on polymerase chain reaction tests, and larvae are very susceptible to the infection. Furthermore, egg surface disinfectants presently used in zebrafish laboratories are ineffective against microsporidian spores. At this time, the most effective method for prevention of these parasites is avoidance. PMID:23382342

  5. Multiplicity of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors and their connection to the circadian clock in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Pelster, Bernd; Egg, Margit

    2015-01-01

    modified life cycle of erythrocytes and an altered patterning of the vascular bed, leading to even higher mortality rates of chronodisrupted animals. Hif protein, in turn, is known to affect the circadian clock pathway in zebrafish. Previously, we demonstrated that Hif-1α directly binds to defined E-boxes of the period 1 gene, leading to a sustained dampening of its oscillation amplitude. Here we show that Hif-1α also binds to the promoter of the period 2 gene, indicating that multiple connections between the Hif signaling pathway and the circadian clock exist. The redundancy of the coupling between both pathways might be evidence for the coevolution of both circuits after the great oxygenation event about 2.5 billion years ago. Coupling the circadian clock and the hypoxic signaling pathway may have conferred selective advantages by facilitating a coordinated response of cells and organisms to alternating day-night cycles and concomitant variable food availabilities in the face of varying oxygen supply. PMID:25730270

  6. Functional development of the circadian clock in the zebrafish pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Ben-Moshe, Zohar; Foulkes, Nicholas S; Gothilf, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish constitutes a powerful model organism with unique advantages for investigating the vertebrate circadian timing system and its regulation by light. In particular, the remarkably early and rapid development of the zebrafish circadian system has facilitated exploring the factors that control the onset of circadian clock function during embryogenesis. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular basis underlying functional development of the central clock in the zebrafish pineal gland. Furthermore, we examine how the directly light-entrainable clocks in zebrafish cell lines have facilitated unravelling the general mechanisms underlying light-induced clock gene expression. Finally, we summarize how analysis of the light-induced transcriptome and miRNome of the zebrafish pineal gland has provided insight into the regulation of the circadian system by light, including the involvement of microRNAs in shaping the kinetics of light- and clock-regulated mRNA expression. The relative contributions of the pineal gland central clock and the distributed peripheral oscillators to the synchronization of circadian rhythms at the whole animal level are a crucial question that still remains to be elucidated in the zebrafish model.

  7. Zebrafish: a vertebrate tool for studying basal body biogenesis, structure, and function.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Ryan A; Osborn, Daniel P S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the role of basal bodies (BBs) during development and disease has been largely overshadowed by research into the function of the cilium. Although these two organelles are closely associated, they have specific roles to complete for successful cellular development. Appropriate development and function of the BB are fundamental for cilia function. Indeed, there are a growing number of human genetic diseases affecting ciliary development, known collectively as the ciliopathies. Accumulating evidence suggests that BBs establish cell polarity, direct ciliogenesis, and provide docking sites for proteins required within the ciliary axoneme. Major contributions to our knowledge of BB structure and function have been provided by studies in flagellated or ciliated unicellular eukaryotic organisms, specifically Tetrahymena and Chlamydomonas. Reproducing these and other findings in vertebrates has required animal in vivo models. Zebrafish have fast become one of the primary organisms of choice for modeling vertebrate functional genetics. Rapid ex-utero development, proficient egg laying, ease of genetic manipulation, and affordability make zebrafish an attractive vertebrate research tool. Furthermore, zebrafish share over 80 % of disease causing genes with humans. In this article, we discuss the merits of using zebrafish to study BB functional genetics, review current knowledge of zebrafish BB ultrastructure and mechanisms of function, and consider the outlook for future zebrafish-based BB studies. PMID:27168933

  8. Functional Development of the Circadian Clock in the Zebrafish Pineal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Moshe, Zohar; Foulkes, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish constitutes a powerful model organism with unique advantages for investigating the vertebrate circadian timing system and its regulation by light. In particular, the remarkably early and rapid development of the zebrafish circadian system has facilitated exploring the factors that control the onset of circadian clock function during embryogenesis. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular basis underlying functional development of the central clock in the zebrafish pineal gland. Furthermore, we examine how the directly light-entrainable clocks in zebrafish cell lines have facilitated unravelling the general mechanisms underlying light-induced clock gene expression. Finally, we summarize how analysis of the light-induced transcriptome and miRNome of the zebrafish pineal gland has provided insight into the regulation of the circadian system by light, including the involvement of microRNAs in shaping the kinetics of light- and clock-regulated mRNA expression. The relative contributions of the pineal gland central clock and the distributed peripheral oscillators to the synchronization of circadian rhythms at the whole animal level are a crucial question that still remains to be elucidated in the zebrafish model. PMID:24839600

  9. Zebrafish models of major depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Fonseka, Trehani M; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Foster, Jane A; Kennedy, Sidney H

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as a model species for translational research in various neuroscience areas, including depressive disorders. Because of their physiological (neuroanatomical, neuroendocrine, neurochemical) and genetic homology to mammals, robust phenotypes, and value in high-throughput genetic and chemical genetic screens, zebrafish are ideal for developing valid experimental models of major depression and discovering novel therapeutics. Behavioral testing approaches, such as approach-avoidance, cognitive, and social paradigms, are available in zebrafish and have utility in identifying depression-like indices in zebrafish in response to physiological, genetic, environmental, and/or psychopharmacological alterations. In addition, the high sensitivity of zebrafish to commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs supports the use of this model as an invaluable tool for pharmacological research and drug screening. This Review outlines the benefits of using the zebrafish model for depression studies and summarizes the current research in this field.

  10. Development of social behavior in young zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Dreosti, Elena; Lopes, Gonçalo; Kampff, Adam R.; Wilson, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Adult zebrafish are robustly social animals whereas larva is not. We designed an assay to determine at what stage of development zebrafish begin to interact with and prefer other fish. One week old zebrafish do not show significant social preference whereas most 3 weeks old zebrafish strongly prefer to remain in a compartment where they can view conspecifics. However, for some individuals, the presence of conspecifics drives avoidance instead of attraction. Social preference is dependent on vision and requires viewing fish of a similar age/size. In addition, over the same 1–3 weeks period larval zebrafish increasingly tend to coordinate their movements, a simple form of social interaction. Finally, social preference and coupled interactions are differentially modified by an NMDAR antagonist and acute exposure to ethanol, both of which are known to alter social behavior in adult zebrafish. PMID:26347614

  11. Hooked! Modeling human disease in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Santoriello, Cristina; Zon, Leonard I

    2012-07-01

    Zebrafish have been widely used as a model system for studying developmental processes, but in the last decade, they have also emerged as a valuable system for modeling human disease. The development and function of zebrafish organs are strikingly similar to those of humans, and the ease of creating mutant or transgenic fish has facilitated the generation of disease models. Here, we highlight the use of zebrafish for defining disease pathways and for discovering new therapies. PMID:22751109

  12. Zebrafish Social Behavior in the Wild.

    PubMed

    Suriyampola, Piyumika S; Shelton, Delia S; Shukla, Rohitashva; Roy, Tamal; Bhat, Anuradha; Martins, Emília P

    2016-02-01

    Wild zebrafish exhibit a wide range of behavior. We found abundant wild zebrafish in flowing rivers and still water, in large, tightly-knit groups of hundreds of individuals, as well as in small, loose shoals. In two still-water populations, zebrafish were quite small in body size, common, and in tight groups of up to 22 fish. As in earlier laboratory studies, these zebrafish exhibited very low levels of aggression. In slowly flowing water in central India, zebrafish were relatively rare and gathered in small shoals (4-12 fish), often with other small fish, such as Rasbora daniconius. These stream zebrafish were larger in body size (27 mm TL) and much more aggressive than those in still water. In a second river population with much faster flowing water, zebrafish were abundant and again relatively large (21 mm TL). These zebrafish occurred in very large (up to 300 individuals) and tightly-knit (nearest-neighbor distances up to 21 mm) groups that exhibited collective rheotaxis and almost no aggression. This remarkable variation in social behavior of wild zebrafish offers an opportunity for future studies of behavioral genetics, development, and neuroscience.

  13. Zebrafish respond to the geomagnetic field by bimodal and group-dependent orientation.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Akira; Furutani, Toshiki; Wada, Tatsunori; Koinuma, Masami; Kubo, Yoko; Okano, Keiko; Okano, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    A variety of animals use Earth's magnetic field as a reference for their orientation behaviour. Although distinctive magnetoreception mechanisms have been postulated for many migrating or homing animals, the molecular mechanisms are still undefined. In this study, we found that zebrafish, a model organism suitable for genetic manipulation, responded to a magnetic field as weak as the geomagnetic field. Without any training, zebrafish were individually released into a circular arena that was placed in an artificial geomagnetic field, and their preferred magnetic directions were recorded. Individuals from five out of the seven zebrafish groups studied, groups mostly comprised of the offspring of predetermined pairs, showed bidirectional orientation with group-specific preferences regardless of close kinships. The preferred directions did not seem to depend on gender, age or surrounding environmental factors, implying that directional preference was genetically defined. The present findings may facilitate future study on the molecular mechanisms underlying magnetoreception.

  14. Zebrafish Thsd7a is a neural protein required for angiogenic patterning during development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chieh-Huei; Chen, I-Hui; Kuo, Meng-Wei; Su, Pei-Tsu; Lai, Zih-Yin; Wang, Chian-Huei; Huang, Wei-Chang; Hoffman, Jana; Kuo, Calvin J; You, May-Su; Chuang, Yung-Jen

    2011-06-01

    Angiogenesis is a highly organized process under the control of guidance cues that direct endothelial cell (EC) migration. Recently, many molecules that were initially described as regulators of neural guidance were subsequently shown to also direct EC migration. Here, we report a novel protein, thrombospondin type I domain containing 7A (Thsd7a), that is a neural molecule required for directed EC migration during embryonic angiogenesis in zebrafish. Thsd7a is a vertebrate conserved protein. Zebrafish thsd7a transcript was detected along the ventral edge of the neural tube in the developing zebrafish embryos, correlating with the growth path of angiogenic intersegmental vessels (ISVs). Morpholino-knockdown of Thsd7a caused a lateral deviation of angiogenic ECs below the thsd7a-expressing sites, resulting in aberrant ISV patterning. Collectively, our study shows that zebrafish Thsd7a is a neural protein required for ISV angiogenesis, and suggests an important role of Thsd7a in the neurovascular interaction during zebrafish development.

  15. Germplasm cryobanking in zebrafish and other aquarium model species.

    PubMed

    Robles, Vanesa; Cabrita, Elsa; Herráez, M Paz

    2009-09-01

    During the last few years zebrafish and other aquarium fish have become more important model system species. In zebrafish valuable biotechnological lines are constantly emerging, and the creation of cryobanks of viable fish sperm, oocytes, and embryos from those lines is a constant and important demand. Cryopreservation is an essential tool for storing specific genetic material and would significantly help in the conservation of such lines, facilitating daily procedures in labs and companies working with this species. In this review, all advances achieved in this field are presented. Protocols for sperm cryopreservation are described, and the new directions of approaches in embryo and oocyte cryopreservation and also in blastomeres, and primordial germ cell cryopreservation are discussed.

  16. Endocrine pancreas development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Zahra; Lin, Shuo

    2011-10-15

    Type 1 diabetes results from the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. Current efforts to cure diabetes are aimed at replenishing damaged cells by generating a new supply of β cells in vitro. The most promising strategy for achieving this goal is to differentiate embryonic stem (ES) cells by sequentially exposing them to signaling molecules that they would normally encounter in vivo. This approach requires a thorough understanding of the temporal sequence of the signaling events underlying pancreatic β-cell induction during embryonic development. The zebrafish system has emerged as a powerful tool in the study of pancreas development. In this review, we provide a temporal summary of pancreas development in zebrafish with a special focus on the formation of pancreatic β cells.

  17. Inflammatory diseases modelling in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Morales Fénero, Camila Idelí; Colombo Flores, Alicia Angelina; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2016-01-01

    The ingest of diets with high content of fats and carbohydrates, low or no physical exercise and a stressful routine are part of the everyday lifestyle of most people in the western world. These conditions are triggers for different diseases with complex interactions between the host genetics, the metabolism, the immune system and the microbiota, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), obesity and diabetes. The incidence of these disorders is growing worldwide; therefore, new strategies for its study are needed. Nowadays, the majority of researches are in use of murine models for understand the genetics, physiopathology and interaction between cells and signaling pathways to find therapeutic solutions to these diseases. The zebrafish, a little tropical water fish, shares 70% of our genes and conserves anatomic and physiological characteristics, as well as metabolical pathways, with mammals, and is rising as a new complementary model for the study of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Its high fecundity, fast development, transparency, versatility and low cost of maintenance makes the zebrafish an interesting option for new researches. In this review, we offer a discussion of the existing genetic and induced zebrafish models of two important Western diseases that have a strong inflammatory component, the IBD and the obesity. PMID:26929916

  18. Zebrafish Discoveries in Cancer Epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Chernyavskaya, Yelena; Kent, Brandon; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2016-01-01

    The cancer epigenome is fundamentally different than that of normal cells. How these differences arise in and contribute to carcinogenesis is not known, and studies using model organisms such as zebrafish provide an opportunity to address these important questions. Modifications of histones and DNA comprise the complex epigenome, and these influence chromatin structure, genome stability and gene expression, all of which are fundamental to the cellular changes that cause cancer. The cancer genome atlas covers the wide spectrum of genetic changes associated with nearly every cancer type, however, this catalog is currently uni-dimensional. As the pattern of epigenetic marks and chromatin structure in cancer cells is described and overlaid on the mutational landscape, the map of the cancer genome becomes multi-dimensional and highly complex. Two major questions remain in the field: (1) how the epigenome becomes repatterned in cancer and (2) which of these changes are cancer-causing. Zebrafish provide a tractable in vivo system to monitor the epigenome during transformation and to identify epigenetic drivers of cancer. In this chapter, we review principles of cancer epigenetics and discuss recent work using zebrafish whereby epigenetic modifiers were established as cancer driver genes, thus providing novel insights into the mechanisms of epigenetic reprogramming in cancer.

  19. Development of the zebrafish mesonephros

    PubMed Central

    Diep, Cuong Q.; Peng, Zhenzhen; Ukah, Tobechukwu K.; Kelly, Paul M.; Daigle, Renee V.; Davidson, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate kidney plays an essential role in removing metabolic waste and balancing water and salt. This is carried out by nephrons, which comprise a blood filter attached to an epithelial tubule with proximal and distal segments. In zebrafish, two nephrons are first formed as part of the embryonic kidney (pronephros) and hundreds are formed later to make up the adult kidney (mesonephros). Previous studies have focused on the development of the pronephros while considerably less is known about how the mesonephros is formed. Here, we characterize mesonephros development in zebrafish and examine the nephrons that form during larval metamorphosis. These nephrons, arising from proliferating progenitor cells that express the renal transcription factor genes wt1b, pax2a, and lhx1a, form on top of the pronephric tubules and develop a segmentation pattern similar to pronephric nephrons. We find that the pronephros acts as a scaffold for the mesonephros, where new nephrons fuse with the distal segments of the pronephric tubules to form the final branching network that characterizes the adult zebrafish kidney. PMID:25677367

  20. Zebrafish Discoveries in Cancer Epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Chernyavskaya, Yelena; Kent, Brandon; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2016-01-01

    The cancer epigenome is fundamentally different than that of normal cells. How these differences arise in and contribute to carcinogenesis is not known, and studies using model organisms such as zebrafish provide an opportunity to address these important questions. Modifications of histones and DNA comprise the complex epigenome, and these influence chromatin structure, genome stability and gene expression, all of which are fundamental to the cellular changes that cause cancer. The cancer genome atlas covers the wide spectrum of genetic changes associated with nearly every cancer type, however, this catalog is currently uni-dimensional. As the pattern of epigenetic marks and chromatin structure in cancer cells is described and overlaid on the mutational landscape, the map of the cancer genome becomes multi-dimensional and highly complex. Two major questions remain in the field: (1) how the epigenome becomes repatterned in cancer and (2) which of these changes are cancer-causing. Zebrafish provide a tractable in vivo system to monitor the epigenome during transformation and to identify epigenetic drivers of cancer. In this chapter, we review principles of cancer epigenetics and discuss recent work using zebrafish whereby epigenetic modifiers were established as cancer driver genes, thus providing novel insights into the mechanisms of epigenetic reprogramming in cancer. PMID:27165354

  1. Stressing Zebrafish for Behavioral Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Karl J.; Boczek, Nicole J.; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The stress response is a normal reaction to a real or perceived threat. However, stress response systems that are overwhelmed or out of balance can increase both the incidence and severity of diseases including addiction and mood and anxiety disorders. Using an animal model with both genetic diversity and large family size can help discover the specific genetic and environmental contributions to these behavioral diseases. The stress response has been studied extensively in teleosts because of their importance in food production. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a major model organism with a strong record for use in developmental biology, genetic screening, and genomic studies. More recently, the stress response of larval and adult zebrafish has been documented. High-throughput automated tracking systems make possible behavioral readouts of the stress response in zebrafish. This non-invasive measure of the stress response can be combined with mutagenesis methods to dissect the genes involved in complex stress response behaviors in vertebrates. Understanding the genetic and epigenetic basis for the stress response in vertebrates will help to develop advanced screening and therapies for stress-aggravated diseases like addiction and mood and anxiety disorders. PMID:21615261

  2. Moonlight affects nocturnal Period2 transcript levels in the pineal gland of the reef fish Siganus guttatus.

    PubMed

    Sugama, Nozomi; Park, Ji-Gweon; Park, Yong-Ju; Takeuchi, Yuki; Kim, Se-Jae; Takemura, Akihiro

    2008-09-01

    The golden rabbitfish Siganus guttatus is a reef fish with a restricted lunar-synchronized spawning cycle. It is not known how the fish recognizes cues from the moon and exerts moon-related activities. In order to evaluate the perception and utilization of moonlight by the fish, the present study aimed to clone and characterize Period2 (Per2), a light-inducible clock gene in lower vertebrates, and to examine daily variations in rabbitfish Per2 (rfPer2) expression as well as the effect of light and moonlight on its expression in the pineal gland. The partially-cloned rfPer2 cDNA (2933 bp) was highly homologous (72%) to zebrafish Per2. The rfPer2 levels increased at ZT6 and decreased at ZT18 in the whole brain and several peripheral organs. The rfPer2 expression in the pineal gland exhibited a daily variation with an increase during daytime. Exposing the fish to light during nighttime resulted in a rapid increase of its expression in the pineal gland, while the level was decreased by intercepting light during daytime. Two hours after exposing the fish to moonlight at the full moon period, the rfPer2 expression was upregulated. These results suggest that rfPer2 is a light-inducible clock gene and that its expression is affected not only by daylight but also by moonlight. Since the rfPer2 expression level during the full moon period was higher than that during the new moon period, the monthly variation in the rfPer2 expression is likely to occur with the change in amplitude between the full and new moon periods.

  3. A Comparative Map of the Zebrafish Genome

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Ian G.; Kelly, Peter D.; Chu, Felicia; Ngo-Hazelett, Phuong; Yan, Yi-Lin; Huang, Hui; Postlethwait, John H.; Talbot, William S.

    2000-01-01

    Zebrafish mutations define the functions of hundreds of essential genes in the vertebrate genome. To accelerate the molecular analysis of zebrafish mutations and to facilitate comparisons among the genomes of zebrafish and other vertebrates, we used a homozygous diploid meiotic mapping panel to localize polymorphisms in 691 previously unmapped genes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Together with earlier efforts, this work raises the total number of markers scored in the mapping panel to 2119, including 1503 genes and ESTs and 616 previously characterized simple-sequence length polymorphisms. Sequence analysis of zebrafish genes mapped in this study and in prior work identified putative human orthologs for 804 zebrafish genes and ESTs. Map comparisons revealed 139 new conserved syntenies, in which two or more genes are on the same chromosome in zebrafish and human. Although some conserved syntenies are quite large, there were changes in gene order within conserved groups, apparently reflecting the relatively frequent occurrence of inversions and other intrachromosomal rearrangements since the divergence of teleost and tetrapod ancestors. Comparative mapping also shows that there is not a one-to-one correspondence between zebrafish and human chromosomes. Mapping of duplicate gene pairs identified segments of 20 linkage groups that may have arisen during a genome duplication that occurred early in the evolution of teleosts after the divergence of teleost and mammalian ancestors. This comparative map will accelerate the molecular analysis of zebrafish mutations and enhance the understanding of the evolution of the vertebrate genome. PMID:11116086

  4. In Vivo Imaging of Cancer in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ignatius, Myron S; Hayes, Madeline; Langenau, David M

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish cancer models have greatly advanced our understanding of malignancy in humans. This is made possible due to the unique advantages of the zebrafish model including ex vivo development and large clutch sizes, which enable large-scale genetic and chemical screens. Transparency of the embryo and the creation of adult zebrafish devoid of pigmentation (casper) have permitted unprecedented ability to dynamically visualize cancer progression in live animals. When coupled with fluorescent reporters and transgenic approaches that drive oncogenesis, it is now possible to label entire or subpopulations of cancer cells and follow cancer growth in near real-time. Here, we will highlight aspects of in vivo imaging using the zebrafish and how it has enhanced our understanding of the fundamental aspects of tumor initiation, self-renewal, neovascularization, tumor cell heterogeneity, invasion and metastasis. Importantly, we will highlight the contribution of cancer imaging in zebrafish for drug discovery. PMID:27165356

  5. Approaches to Inactivate Genes in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Parant, John M; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of tumor initiation and tumor progression are essential components toward understanding cancer and designing/validating future therapies. Zebrafish is a powerful model for studying tumorigenesis and has been successfully exploited in drug discovery. According to the zebrafish reference genome, 82 % of disease-associated genes in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database have clear zebrafish orthologues. Using a variety of large-scale random mutagenesis methods developed to date, zebrafish can provide a unique opportunity to identify gene mutations that may be associated with cancer predisposition. On the other hand, newer technologies enabling targeted mutagenesis can facilitate reverse cancer genetic studies and open the door for complex genetic analysis of tumorigenesis. In this chapter, we will describe the various technologies for conducting genome editing in zebrafish with special emphasis on the approaches to inactivate genes. PMID:27165349

  6. Zebrafish: modeling for herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Thessicar Evadney; Jones, Kevin S; Dale, Rodney M; Shukla, Deepak; Tiwari, Vaibhav

    2014-02-01

    For many years, zebrafish have been the prototypical model for studies in developmental biology. In recent years, zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model system to study infectious diseases, including viral infections. Experiments conducted with herpes simplex virus type-1 in adult zebrafish or in embryo models are encouraging as they establish proof of concept with viral-host tropism and possible screening of antiviral compounds. In addition, the presence of human homologs of viral entry receptors in zebrafish such as 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate, nectins, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 14-like receptor bring strong rationale for virologists to test their in vivo significance in viral entry in a zebrafish model and compare the structure-function basis of virus zebrafish receptor interaction for viral entry. On the other end, a zebrafish model is already being used for studying inflammation and angiogenesis, with or without genetic manipulations, and therefore can be exploited to study viral infection-associated pathologies. The major advantage with zebrafish is low cost, easy breeding and maintenance, rapid lifecycle, and a transparent nature, which allows visualizing dissemination of fluorescently labeled virus infection in real time either at a localized region or the whole body. Further, the availability of multiple transgenic lines that express fluorescently tagged immune cells for in vivo imaging of virus infected animals is extremely attractive. In addition, a fully developed immune system and potential for receptor-specific knockouts further advocate the use of zebrafish as a new tool to study viral infections. In this review, we focus on expanding the potential of zebrafish model system in understanding human infectious diseases and future benefits.

  7. Zebrafish: A complete animal model to enumerate the nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Sharma, Garima; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Presently, nanotechnology is a multi-trillion dollar business sector that covers a wide range of industries, such as medicine, electronics and chemistry. In the current era, the commercial transition of nanotechnology from research level to industrial level is stimulating the world's total economic growth. However, commercialization of nanoparticles might offer possible risks once they are liberated in the environment. In recent years, the use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an established animal model system for nanoparticle toxicity assay is growing exponentially. In the current in-depth review, we discuss the recent research approaches employing adult zebrafish and their embryos for nanoparticle toxicity assessment. Different types of parameters are being discussed here which are used to evaluate nanoparticle toxicity such as hatching achievement rate, developmental malformation of organs, damage in gill and skin, abnormal behavior (movement impairment), immunotoxicity, genotoxicity or gene expression, neurotoxicity, endocrine system disruption, reproduction toxicity and finally mortality. Furthermore, we have also highlighted the toxic effect of different nanoparticles such as silver nanoparticle, gold nanoparticle, and metal oxide nanoparticles (TiO2, Al2O3, CuO, NiO and ZnO). At the end, future directions of zebrafish model and relevant assays to study nanoparticle toxicity have also been argued. PMID:27544212

  8. Gal4/UAS transgenic tools and their application to zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Marnie E; Rhee, Jerry; Goll, Mary G; Akitake, Courtney M; Parsons, Michael; Leach, Steven D

    2008-01-01

    The ability to regulate gene expression in a cell-specific and temporally restricted manner provides a powerful means to test gene function, bypass the action of lethal genes, label subsets of cells for developmental studies, monitor subcellular structures, and target tissues for selective ablation or physiological analyses. The galactose-inducible system of yeast, mediated by the transcriptional activator Gal4 and its consensus UAS binding site, has proven to be a highly successful and versatile system for controlling transcriptional activation in Drosophila. It has also been used effectively, albeit in a more limited manner, in the mouse. While zebrafish has lagged behind other model systems in the widespread application of Gal4 transgenic approaches to modulate gene activity during development, recent technological advances are permitting rapid progress. Here we review Gal4-regulated genetic tools and discuss how they have been used in zebrafish as well as their potential drawbacks. We describe some exciting new directions, in large part afforded by the Tol2 transposition system, that are generating valuable new Gal4/UAS reagents for zebrafish research.

  9. VEGF-B-Neuropilin-1 signaling is spatiotemporally indispensable for vascular and neuronal development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Lasse D.; Nakamura, Masaki; Bräutigam, Lars; Li, Xuri; Liu, Yizhi; Samani, Nilesh J.; Cao, Yihai

    2015-01-01

    Physiological functions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-B remain an enigma, and deletion of the Vegfb gene in mice lacks an overt phenotype. Here we show that knockdown of Vegfba, but not Vegfbb, in zebrafish embryos by specific morpholinos produced a lethal phenotype owing to vascular and neuronal defects in the brain. Vegfba morpholinos also markedly prevented development of hyaloid vasculatures in the retina, but had little effects on peripheral vascular development. Consistent with phenotypic defects, Vegfba, but not Vegfaa, mRNA was primarily expressed in the brain of developing zebrafish embryos. Interestingly, in situ detection of Neuropilin1 (Nrp1) mRNA showed an overlapping expression pattern with Vegfba, and knockdown of Nrp1 produced a nearly identically lethal phenotype as Vegfba knockdown. Furthermore, zebrafish VEGF-Ba protein directly bound to NRP1. Importantly, gain-of-function by exogenous delivery of mRNAs coding for NRP1-binding ligands VEGF-B or VEGF-A to the zebrafish embryos rescued the lethal phenotype by normalizing vascular development. Similarly, exposure of zebrafish embryos to hypoxia also rescued the Vegfba morpholino-induced vascular defects in the brain by increasing VEGF-A expression. Independent evidence of VEGF-A gain-of-function was provided by using a functionally defective Vhl-mutant zebrafish strain, which again rescued the Vegfba morpholino-induced vascular defects. These findings show that VEGF-B is spatiotemporally required for vascular development in zebrafish embryos and that NRP1, but not VEGFR1, mediates the essential signaling. PMID:26483474

  10. Developmental effects of simulated microgravity on zebrafish, (Danio rerio)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyek, Matthew; Edsall, Sara; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara; Smith, Frank; Croll, Roger

    Zebrafish are widely used model vertebrates in research and recently this species has been used to study the effects of microgravity on fundamental biological processes. In this study we used a NASA-designed rotating wall vessel (RWV) to investigate the effects of simulated microgravity (SMG) on zebrafish development up to 14 days post fertilization (dpf). At developmental stages beyond the 3-4 somite stage we found SMG-exposed embryos reached key developmental stag-ing points more rapidly than fish raised within a non-rotating vessel. By the 21 somite stage, both groups were again synchronized in their developmental staging. However, SMG-exposed embryos eventually exhibited a delay in hatching time compared to controls. Otolith and to-tal body size were observed to be greater in larvae raised in SMG. In addition, pigmentation patterns in SMG exposed fish differed, with larger and differentially aggregated melanocytes . Heart development was slowed in SMG exposed fish, but no change in nervous system de-velopment was detected. Ongoing research will focus on differences in heart and respiration rates. Finally, by developing a method to extend the duration of SMG exposure, we found the swimming behaviour of SMG-exposed animals was altered with time in the RWV. Initially SMG-exposed animals swam in the direction of RWV rotation (5-9dpf) but older (9+dpf) fish swam against rotation and demonstrated righting behaviour with each rotation. These results suggest that vestibular reflexes may develop normally and be maintained in animals exposed to SMG. Together, our data provide insights into how zebrafish may develop when flown in space, permitting better formulation of experiments to test mechanisms by which microgravity may affect ontogeny of this model organism. Keywords: microgravity, zebrafish, growth, development

  11. Distribution of cannabinoid receptor 1 in the CNS of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lam, C S; Rastegar, S; Strähle, U

    2006-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cb1) mediates the psychoactive effect of marijuana. In mammals, there is abundant evidence advocating the importance of cannabinoid signaling; activation of Cb1 exerts diverse functions, chiefly by its ability to modulate neurotransmission. Thus, much attention has been devoted to understand its role in health and disease and to evaluate its therapeutic potential. Here, we have cloned zebrafish cb1 and investigated its expression in developing and adult zebrafish brain. Sequence analysis showed that there is a high degree of conservation, especially in residues demonstrated to be critical for function in mammals. In situ hybridization revealed that zebrafish cb1 appears first in the preoptic area at 24 hours post-fertilization. Subsequently, transcripts are detected in the dorsal telencephalon, hypothalamus, pretectum and torus longitudinalis. A similar pattern of expression is recapitulated in the adult brain. While cb1 is intensively stained in the medial zone of the dorsal telencephalon, expression elsewhere is weak by comparison. In particular, localization of cb1 in the telencephalic periventricular matrix is suggestive of the involvement of Cb1 in neurogenesis, bearing strong resemblance in terms of expression and function to the proliferative mammalian hippocampal formation. In addition, a gradient-like expression of cb1 is detected in the torus longitudinalis, a teleost specific neural tissue. In relation to dopaminergic neurons in the diencephalic posterior tuberculum (considered to be the teleostean homologue of the mammalian midbrain dopaminergic system), both cb1 and tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing cells occupy non-overlapping domains. However there is evidence that they are co-localized in the caudal zone of the hypothalamus, implying a direct modulation of dopamine release in this particular region. Collectively, our data indicate the propensity of zebrafish cb1 to participate in multiple neurological processes.

  12. Development and Fibronectin Signaling Requirements of the Zebrafish Interrenal Vessel

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chih-Hao; Chou, Chih-Wei; Takada, Shinji; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Background The early morphogenetic steps of zebrafish interrenal tissue, the teleostean counterpart of the mammalian adrenal gland, are modulated by the peri-interrenal angioblasts and blood vessels. While an organized distribution of intra-adrenal vessels and extracellular matrix is essential for the fetal adrenal cortex remodeling, whether and how an intra-interrenal buildup of vasculature and extracellular matrix forms and functions during interrenal organogenesis in teleosts remains unclear. Methodology and Principal Findings We characterized the process of interrenal gland vascularization by identifying the interrenal vessel (IRV); which develops from the axial artery through angiogenesis and is associated with highly enriched Fibronectin (Fn) accumulation at its microenvironment. The loss of Fn1 by either antisense morpholino (MO) knockdown or genetic mutation inhibited endothelial invasion and migration of the steroidogenic tissue. The accumulation of peri-IRV Fn requires Integrin α5 (Itga5), with its knockdown leading to interrenal and IRV morphologies phenocopying those in the fn1 morphant and mutant. fn1b, another known fn gene in zebrafish, is however not involved in the IRV formation. The distribution pattern of peri-IRV Fn could be modulated by the blood flow, while a lack of which altered angiogenic direction of the IRV as well as its ability to integrate with the steroidogenic tissue. The administration of Fn antagonist through microangiography exerted reducing effects on both interrenal vessel angiogenesis and steroidogenic cell migration. Conclusions and Significance This work is the first to identify the zebrafish IRV and to characterize how its integration into the developing interrenal gland requires the Fn-enriched microenvironment, which leads to the possibility of using the IRV formation as a platform for exploring organ-specific angiogenesis. In the context of other developmental endocrinology studies, our results indicate a highly dynamic

  13. Disruption of Epithalamic Left–Right Asymmetry Increases Anxiety in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Facchin, Lucilla; Duboué, Erik R.

    2015-01-01

    Differences between the left and right sides of the brain are found throughout the animal kingdom, but the consequences of altered neural asymmetry are not well understood. In the zebrafish epithalamus, the parapineal is located on the left side of the brain where it influences development of the adjacent dorsal habenular (dHb) nucleus, causing the left and right dHb to differ in their organization, gene expression, and connectivity. Left–right (L-R) reversal of parapineal position and dHb asymmetry occurs spontaneously in a small percentage of the population, whereas the dHb develop symmetrically following experimental ablation of the parapineal. The habenular region was previously implicated in modulating fear in both mice and zebrafish, but the relevance of its L-R asymmetry is unclear. We now demonstrate that disrupting directionality of the zebrafish epithalamus causes reduced exploratory behavior and increased cortisol levels, indicative of enhanced anxiety. Accordingly, exposure to buspirone, an anxiolytic agent, significantly suppresses atypical behavior. Axonal projections from the parapineal to the dHb are more variable when it is located on the right side of the brain, revealing that L-R reversals do not necessarily represent a neuroanatomical mirror image. The results highlight the importance of directional asymmetry of the epithalamus in the regulation of stress responses in zebrafish. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The asymmetric epithalamus of zebrafish has emerged as a valuable model to explore the formation and function of left–right differences in the brain. To probe the relationship between brain laterality and behavior, we examined the effects of left–right reversal of epithalamic asymmetry or symmetric development on behavior. In both cases, zebrafish showed increased measures of fear/anxiety, including reduced exploratory behavior and delayed exit from a confined space. Adults with reversed L-R asymmetry also have elevated cortisol levels

  14. Streptococcus-Zebrafish Model of Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Melody N.; Pfeifer, John D.; Caparon, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Due to its small size, rapid generation time, powerful genetic systems, and genomic resources, the zebrafish has emerged as an important model of vertebrate development and human disease. Its well-developed adaptive and innate cellular immune systems make the zebrafish an ideal model for the study of infectious diseases. With a natural and important pathogen of fish, Streptococcus iniae, we have established a streptococcus- zebrafish model of bacterial pathogenesis. Following injection into the dorsal muscle, zebrafish developed a lethal infection, with a 50% lethal dose of 103 CFU, and died within 2 to 3 days. The pathogenesis of infection resembled that of S. iniae in farmed fish populations and that of several important human streptococcal diseases and was characterized by an initial focal necrotic lesion that rapidly progressed to invasion of the pathogen into all major organ systems, including the brain. Zebrafish were also susceptible to infection by the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. However, disease was characterized by a marked absence of inflammation, large numbers of extracellular streptococci in the dorsal muscle, and extensive myonecrosis that occurred far in advance of any systemic invasion. The genetic systems available for streptococci, including a novel method of mutagenesis which targets genes whose products are exported, were used to identify several mutants attenuated for virulence in zebrafish. This combination of a genetically amenable pathogen with a well-defined vertebrate host makes the streptococcus-zebrafish model of bacterial pathogenesis a powerful model for analysis of infectious disease. PMID:12065534

  15. Ethylnitrosourea induces neoplasia in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Beckwith, L G; Moore, J L; Tsao-Wu, G S; Harshbarger, J C; Cheng, K C

    2000-03-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been successfully used to discover hundreds of genes involved in development and organogenesis. To address the potential of zebrafish as a cancer model, it is important to determine the susceptibility of zebrafish to tumors. Germ line mutations are most commonly induced for zebrafish mutant screens by exposing adult male zebrafish to the alkylating agent, ethylnitrosourea (ENU). To determine whether ENU induces tumors, we compared the incidence of tumors in ENU-treated fish with untreated controls. Interestingly, 18 of 18 (100%) fish mutagenized with either 2.5 or 3.0 mM ENU developed epidermal papillomas, which numbered 1 to 22 per fish, within 1 year of treatment. The induced epidermal lesions included epidermal hyperplasia, flat papillomas (0.2 to 1.2 mm), and pedunculated papillomas (1.2 to 8 mm in greatest dimension), but no skin cancers. Angiogenesis was evident in papillomas larger than approximately 1 mm. All but two papillomas contained the three cell types (keratinocytes, club, and mucous cells) of normal zebrafish epidermis; histologic variants lacked either club cells or mucous cells. Two cavernous hemangiomas and a single malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor were also found in the treated fish. None of five untreated controls developed tumors. These studies establish the feasibility of the zebrafish as an experimental model for the study of skin tumors. PMID:10744073

  16. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  17. Nonhatching Decapsulated Artemia Cysts As a Replacement to Artemia Nauplii in Juvenile and Adult Zebrafish Culture.

    PubMed

    Tye, Marc; Rider, Dana; Duffy, Elizabeth A; Seubert, Adam; Lothert, Brogen; Schimmenti, Lisa A

    2015-12-01

    Feeding Artemia nauplii as the main nutrition source for zebrafish is a common practice for many research facilities. Culturing live feed can be time-consuming and requires additional equipment to be purchased, maintained, and cleaned. Nonhatching decapsulated Artemia cysts (decaps) are a commercially available product that can be fed directly to fish. Several other ornamental fish species have been successfully cultured using decaps. Replacing Artemia nauplii with decaps could reduce the overall time and costs associated with the operation of a zebrafish facility. The objective of this study was to determine if decaps could be a suitable replacement to Artemia nauplii in juvenile and adult zebrafish culture. Wild-type zebrafish were fed one of three dietary treatments: decaps only, nauplii only, or a standard consisting of nauplii plus a commercially prepared pellet food. Survival, growth (length and weight), and embryo production were analyzed between the treatments. Fish receiving the decap diet demonstrated a significantly higher growth and embryo production when compared to the fish receiving the nauplii-only diet. When comparing the decap fish to the standard fish, no significant difference was found in mean survival, mean weight at 90 days postfertilization, or mean embryo production. It was determined that nonhatching decapsulated Artemia cysts can be used as a suitable replacement to Artemia nauplii in juvenile and adult zebrafish culture.

  18. Colonizing the embryonic zebrafish gut with anaerobic bacteria derived from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Toh, Michael C; Goodyear, Mara; Daigneault, Michelle; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Van Raay, Terence J

    2013-06-01

    The zebrafish has become increasingly popular for microbiological research. It has been used as an infection model for a variety of pathogens, and is also emerging as a tool for studying interactions between a host and its resident microbial communities. The mouse microbiota has been transplanted into the zebrafish gut, but to our knowledge, there has been no attempt to introduce a bacterial community derived from the human gut. We explored two methods for colonizing the developing gut of 5-day-old germ-free zebrafish larvae with a defined anaerobic microbial community derived from a single human fecal sample. Both environmental exposure (static immersion) and direct microinjection into the gut resulted in the establishment of two species-Lactobacillus paracasei and Eubacterium limosum-from a community of 30 strains consisting of 22 anaerobic species. Of particular interest is E. limosum, which, as a strict anaerobe, represents a group of bacteria which until now have not been shown to colonize the developing zebrafish gut. Our success here indicates that further investigation of zebrafish as a tool for studying human gut microbial communities is warranted.

  19. Generation of Parabiotic Zebrafish Embryos by Surgical Fusion of Developing Blastulae

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Elliott J.; Cillis, Jennifer L.; Curley, Caitlyn R.; Patch, Taylor C.; Li, Brian; Blaser, Bradley W.; Riquelme, Raquel; Zon, Leonard I.; Shah, Dhvanit I.

    2016-01-01

    Surgical parabiosis of two animals of different genetic backgrounds creates a unique scenario to study cell-intrinsic versus cell-extrinsic roles for candidate genes of interest, migratory behaviors of cells, and secreted signals in distinct genetic settings. Because parabiotic animals share a common circulation, any blood or blood-borne factor from one animal will be exchanged with its partner and vice versa. Thus, cells and molecular factors derived from one genetic background can be studied in the context of a second genetic background. Parabiosis of adult mice has been used extensively to research aging, cancer, diabetes, obesity, and brain development. More recently, parabiosis of zebrafish embryos has been used to study the developmental biology of hematopoiesis. In contrast to mice, the transparent nature of zebrafish embryos permits the direct visualization of cells in the parabiotic context, making it a uniquely powerful method for investigating fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms. The utility of this technique, however, is limited by a steep learning curve for generating the parabiotic zebrafish embryos. This protocol provides a step-by-step method on how to surgically fuse the blastulae of two zebrafish embryos of different genetic backgrounds to investigate the role of candidate genes of interest. In addition, the parabiotic zebrafish embryos are tolerant to heat shock, making temporal control of gene expression possible. This method does not require a sophisticated set-up and has broad applications for studying cell migration, fate specification, and differentiation in vivo during embryonic development. PMID:27341538

  20. Association of Early Atherosclerosis with Vascular Wall Shear Stress in Hypercholesterolemic Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Joon; Choi, Woorak; Seo, Eunseok; Yeom, Eunseop

    2015-01-01

    Although atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease, the role of hemodynamic information has become more important. Low and oscillating wall shear stress (WSS) that changes its direction is associated with the early stage of atherosclerosis. Several in vitro and in vivo models were proposed to reveal the relation between the WSS and the early atherosclerosis. However, these models possess technical limitations in mimicking real physiological conditions and monitoring the developmental course of the early atherosclerosis. In this study, a hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish model is proposed as a novel experimental model to resolve these limitations. Zebrafish larvae are optically transparent, which enables temporal observation of pathological variations under in vivo condition. WSS in blood vessels of 15 days post-fertilisation zebrafish was measured using a micro particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique, and spatial distribution of lipid deposition inside the model was quantitatively investigated after feeding high cholesterol diet for 10 days. Lipids were mainly deposited in blood vessel of low WSS. The oscillating WSS was not induced by the blood flows in zebrafish models. The present hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish would be used as a potentially useful model for in vivo study about the effects of low WSS in the early atherosclerosis. PMID:26561854

  1. Nonhatching Decapsulated Artemia Cysts As a Replacement to Artemia Nauplii in Juvenile and Adult Zebrafish Culture.

    PubMed

    Tye, Marc; Rider, Dana; Duffy, Elizabeth A; Seubert, Adam; Lothert, Brogen; Schimmenti, Lisa A

    2015-12-01

    Feeding Artemia nauplii as the main nutrition source for zebrafish is a common practice for many research facilities. Culturing live feed can be time-consuming and requires additional equipment to be purchased, maintained, and cleaned. Nonhatching decapsulated Artemia cysts (decaps) are a commercially available product that can be fed directly to fish. Several other ornamental fish species have been successfully cultured using decaps. Replacing Artemia nauplii with decaps could reduce the overall time and costs associated with the operation of a zebrafish facility. The objective of this study was to determine if decaps could be a suitable replacement to Artemia nauplii in juvenile and adult zebrafish culture. Wild-type zebrafish were fed one of three dietary treatments: decaps only, nauplii only, or a standard consisting of nauplii plus a commercially prepared pellet food. Survival, growth (length and weight), and embryo production were analyzed between the treatments. Fish receiving the decap diet demonstrated a significantly higher growth and embryo production when compared to the fish receiving the nauplii-only diet. When comparing the decap fish to the standard fish, no significant difference was found in mean survival, mean weight at 90 days postfertilization, or mean embryo production. It was determined that nonhatching decapsulated Artemia cysts can be used as a suitable replacement to Artemia nauplii in juvenile and adult zebrafish culture. PMID:25495227

  2. Zebrafish resources on the internet.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen A

    2012-01-01

    The use of the zebrafish, Danio (Brachydanio) rerio in research laboratories, teaching curricula, and home aquariums has exploded over the past two decades. They have been used to study embryology, developmental and reproductive biology, behavior, neurobiology, immunology, toxicology, oncology, teratology, stem cell and regenerative biology, and a wide range of human diseases and disorders. This has been paralleled by a corresponding increase in the amount of information and literature about this species on the Internet. This overview of Internet resources is intended to aid both beginning and experienced individuals in the search for such information. PMID:23382352

  3. The Syntenic Relationship of the Zebrafish and Human Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Barbazuk, W. Bradley; Korf, Ian; Kadavi, Candy; Heyen, Joshua; Tate, Stephanie; Wun, Edmund; Bedell, Joseph A.; McPherson, John D.; Johnson, Stephen L.

    2000-01-01

    The zebrafish is an important vertebrate model for the mutational analysis of genes effecting developmental processes. Understanding the relationship between zebrafish genes and mutations with those of humans will require understanding the syntenic correspondence between the zebrafish and human genomes. High throughput gene and EST mapping projects in zebrafish are now facilitating this goal. Map positions for 523 zebrafish genes and ESTs with predicted human orthologs reveal extensive contiguous blocks of synteny between the zebrafish and human genomes. Eighty percent of genes and ESTs analyzed belong to conserved synteny groups (two or more genes linked in both zebrafish and human) and 56% of all genes analyzed fall in 118 homology segments (uninterrupted segments containing two or more contiguous genes or ESTs with conserved map order between the zebrafish and human genomes). This work now provides a syntenic relationship to the human genome for the majority of the zebrafish genome. PMID:10984453

  4. Probiotic modulation of the microbiota-gut-brain axis and behaviour in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Luca; Aceto, Serena; Agnisola, Claudio; De Paolo, Sofia; Dipineto, Ludovico; Stilling, Roman M; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F; Menna, Lucia F; Fioretti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in the bi-directional gut-brain axis, a communication that integrates the gut and central nervous system (CNS) activities. Animal studies reveal that gut bacteria influence behaviour, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels and serotonin metabolism. In the present study, we report for the first time an analysis of the microbiota-gut-brain axis in zebrafish (Danio rerio). After 28 days of dietary administration with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501, we found differences in shoaling behaviour, brain expression levels of bdnf and of genes involved in serotonin signalling/metabolism between control and treated zebrafish group. In addition, in microbiota we found a significant increase of Firmicutes and a trending reduction of Proteobacteria. This study demonstrates that selected microbes can be used to modulate endogenous neuroactive molecules in zebrafish. PMID:27416816

  5. Probiotic modulation of the microbiota-gut-brain axis and behaviour in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Luca; Aceto, Serena; Agnisola, Claudio; De Paolo, Sofia; Dipineto, Ludovico; Stilling, Roman M.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.; Menna, Lucia F.; Fioretti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in the bi-directional gut–brain axis, a communication that integrates the gut and central nervous system (CNS) activities. Animal studies reveal that gut bacteria influence behaviour, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels and serotonin metabolism. In the present study, we report for the first time an analysis of the microbiota–gut–brain axis in zebrafish (Danio rerio). After 28 days of dietary administration with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501, we found differences in shoaling behaviour, brain expression levels of bdnf and of genes involved in serotonin signalling/metabolism between control and treated zebrafish group. In addition, in microbiota we found a significant increase of Firmicutes and a trending reduction of Proteobacteria. This study demonstrates that selected microbes can be used to modulate endogenous neuroactive molecules in zebrafish. PMID:27416816

  6. Roles of noncanonical Wnt/PCP pathway genes in neuronal migration and neurulation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hironori; Okamoto, Hitoshi

    2009-03-01

    Noncanonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathways regulate oriented cell movement during development in both Drosophila and vertebrates. Recent studies have revealed similarities and differences between these pathways in the tissues on which they act. In zebrafish, PCP pathway genes regulate the directional migration of a specific population of motor neurons in the hindbrain, as well as morphogenesis of the neuroepithelium. In the present review, neuronal and neuroepithelial defects in zebrafish PCP pathway mutants are compared, and the possible cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these phenotypes are discussed. Future analyses of zebrafish PCP mutants will reveal the general mechanisms underlying the development of the neuroepithelium and provide novel insights into both conserved and diverse functions of PCP pathway genes in vertebrate development.

  7. Probiotic modulation of the microbiota-gut-brain axis and behaviour in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Luca; Aceto, Serena; Agnisola, Claudio; De Paolo, Sofia; Dipineto, Ludovico; Stilling, Roman M; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F; Menna, Lucia F; Fioretti, Alessandro

    2016-07-15

    The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in the bi-directional gut-brain axis, a communication that integrates the gut and central nervous system (CNS) activities. Animal studies reveal that gut bacteria influence behaviour, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels and serotonin metabolism. In the present study, we report for the first time an analysis of the microbiota-gut-brain axis in zebrafish (Danio rerio). After 28 days of dietary administration with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501, we found differences in shoaling behaviour, brain expression levels of bdnf and of genes involved in serotonin signalling/metabolism between control and treated zebrafish group. In addition, in microbiota we found a significant increase of Firmicutes and a trending reduction of Proteobacteria. This study demonstrates that selected microbes can be used to modulate endogenous neuroactive molecules in zebrafish.

  8. Identifying proteins in zebrafish embryos using spectral libraries generated from dissected adult organs and tissues.

    PubMed

    van der Plas-Duivesteijn, Suzanne J; Mohammed, Yassene; Dalebout, Hans; Meijer, Annemarie; Botermans, Anouk; Hoogendijk, Jordy L; Henneman, Alex A; Deelder, André M; Spaink, Herman P; Palmblad, Magnus

    2014-03-01

    Spectral libraries provide a sensitive and accurate method for identifying peptides from tandem mass spectra, complementary to searching genome-derived databases or sequencing de novo. Their application requires comprehensive libraries including peptides from low-abundant proteins. Here we describe a method for constructing such libraries using biological differentiation to "fractionate" the proteome by harvesting adult organs and tissues and build comprehensive libraries for identifying proteins in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos and larvae (an important and widely used model system). Hierarchical clustering using direct comparison of spectra was used to prioritize organ selection. The resulting and publicly available library covers 14,164 proteins, significantly improved the number of peptide-spectrum matches in zebrafish developmental stages, and can be used on data from different instruments and laboratories. The library contains information on tissue and organ expression of these proteins and is also applicable for adult experiments. The approach itself is not limited to zebrafish but would work for any model system.

  9. Waterborne Risperidone Decreases Stress Response in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kalichak, Fabiana; Rosa, João Gabriel Santos; de Oliveira, Tiago Acosta; Koakoski, Gessi; Gusso, Darlan; de Abreu, Murilo Sander; Giacomini, Ana Cristina Varrone; Barcellos, Heloísa Helena de Alcântara

    2015-01-01

    The presence of drugs and their metabolites in surface waters and municipal effluents has been reported in several studies, but its impacts on aquatic organisms are not yet well understood. This study investigated the effects of acute exposure to the antipsychotic risperidone on the stress and behavioral responses in zebrafish. It became clear that intermediate concentration of risperidone inhibited the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal axis and displayed anxiolytic-like effects in zebrafish. The data presented here suggest that the presence of this antipsychotic in aquatic environments can alter neuroendocrine and behavior profiles in zebrafish. PMID:26473477

  10. Benzo[a]pyrene decreases global and gene specific DNA methylation during zebrafish development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA methylation is important for gene regulation and is vulnerable to early-life exposure to environmental contaminants. We found that direct waterborne benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) exposure at 24 'g/L from 2.5 to 96 hours post fertilization (hpf) to zebrafish embryos significantly decreased global cytosine...

  11. “Casting” light on the role of glycosylation during embryonic development: Insights from zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan-Steet, Heather R.

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) remains a versatile model organism for the investigation of early development and organogenesis, and has emerged as a valuable platform for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation [1–6]. Harnessing the genetic power and experimental accessibility of this system, three decades of research have identified key genes and pathways that control the development of multiple organ systems and tissues, including the heart, kidney, and craniofacial cartilage, as well as the hematopoietic, vascular, and central and peripheral nervous systems [7–31]. In addition to their application in large mutagenic screens, zebrafish has been used to model a variety of diseases such as diabetes, polycystic kidney disease, muscular dystrophy and cancer [32–36]. As this work continues to intersect with cellular pathways and processes such as lipid metabolism, glycosylation and vesicle trafficking, investigators are often faced with the challenge of determining the degree to which these pathways are functionally conserved in zebrafish. While they share a high degree of genetic homology with mouse and human, the manner in which cellular pathways are regulated in zebrafish during early development, and the differences in the organ physiology, warrant consideration before functional studies can be effectively interpreted and compared with other vertebrate systems. This point is particularly relevant for glycosylation since an understanding of the glycan diversity and the mechanisms that control glycan biosynthesis during zebrafish embryogenesis (as in many organisms) is still developing. Nonetheless, a growing number of studies in zebrafish have begun to cast light on the functional roles of specific classes of glycans during organ and tissue development. While many of the initial efforts involved characterizing identified mutants in a number of glycosylation pathways, the use of reverse genetic approaches to directly model glycosylation-related disorders is now

  12. Ganzfeld ERG in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Seeliger, Mathias W; Rilk, Albrecht; Neuhauss, Stephan C F

    2002-01-01

    In developmental biology, zebrafish are widely used to study the impact of mutations. The fast pace of development allows for a definitive morphological evaluation of the phenotype usually 5 days post fertilization (dpf). At that age, a functional analysis is already feasible using electroretinographic (ERG) methods. Corneal Ganzfeld ERGs were recorded with a glass microelectrode in anaesthetized, dark-adapted larvae aged 5 dpf, using a platinum wire beneath a moist paper towel as reference. ERG protocols included flash, flicker, and ON/OFF stimuli, both under scotopic and photopic conditions. Repetitive, isoluminant stimuli were used to assess the dynamic effect of pharmacological agents on the ERG. Single flash, flicker, and ON/OFF responses had adequately matured at this point to be informative. Typical signs of the cone dominance were the small scotopic a-wave and the large OFF responses. The analysis of consecutive single traces was possible because of the lack of EKG, breathing, and blink artefacts. After application of APB, which selectively blocks the ON channel via the mGluR6 receptor, the successive loss of the b-wave could be observed, which was quite different from the deterioration of the ERG after a circulatory arrest. The above techniques allowed to reliably obtain Ganzfeld ERGs in larvae aged 5 dpf. This underlines the important role of the zebrafish as a model for the functional analysis of mutations disrupting the visual system. PMID:11949809

  13. Neocuproine ablates melanocytes in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Pol, Thomas; Johnson, Stephen L

    2008-12-01

    The simplest regeneration experiments involve the ablation of a single cell type. While methods exist to ablate the melanocytes of the larval zebrafish,(1,2) no convenient method exists to ablate melanocytes in adult zebrafish. Here, we show that the copper chelator neocuproine (NCP) causes fragmentation and disappearance of melanin in adult zebrafish melanocytes. Adult melanocytes expressing eGFP under the control of a melanocyte-specific promoter also lose eGFP fluorescence in the presence of NCP. We conclude that NCP causes melanocyte death. This death is independent of p53 and melanin, but can be suppressed by the addition of exogenous copper. NCP is ineffective at ablating larval melanocytes. This now provides a tool for addressing questions about stem cells and the maintenance of the adult pigment pattern in zebrafish.

  14. The MHC class I genes of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Dirscherl, Hayley; McConnell, Sean C; Yoder, Jeffrey A; de Jong, Jill L O

    2014-09-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a central role in the immune response and in the recognition of non-self. Found in all jawed vertebrate species, including zebrafish and other teleosts, MHC genes are considered the most polymorphic of all genes. In this review we focus on the multi-faceted diversity of zebrafish MHC class I genes, which are classified into three sequence lineages: U, Z, and L. We examine the polygenic, polymorphic, and haplotypic diversity of the zebrafish MHC class I genes, discussing known and postulated functional differences between the different class I lineages. In addition, we provide the first comprehensive nomenclature for the L lineage genes in zebrafish, encompassing at least 15 genes, and characterize their sequence properties. Finally, we discuss how recent findings have shed new light on the remarkably diverse MHC loci of this species.

  15. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick Ii, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-10-22

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning.

  16. Microbead Implantation in the Zebrafish Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Gary F.; Morales, Elvin E.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as a valuable genetic model system for the study of developmental biology and disease. Zebrafish share a high degree of genomic conservation, as well as similarities in cellular, molecular, and physiological processes, with other vertebrates including humans. During early ontogeny, zebrafish embryos are optically transparent, allowing researchers to visualize the dynamics of organogenesis using a simple stereomicroscope. Microbead implantation is a method that enables tissue manipulation through the alteration of factors in local environments. This allows researchers to assay the effects of any number of signaling molecules of interest, such as secreted peptides, at specific spatial and temporal points within the developing embryo. Here, we detail a protocol for how to manipulate and implant beads during early zebrafish development. PMID:26274386

  17. Microbead Implantation in the Zebrafish Embryo.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Gary F; Morales, Elvin E; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as a valuable genetic model system for the study of developmental biology and disease. Zebrafish share a high degree of genomic conservation, as well as similarities in cellular, molecular, and physiological processes, with other vertebrates including humans. During early ontogeny, zebrafish embryos are optically transparent, allowing researchers to visualize the dynamics of organogenesis using a simple stereomicroscope. Microbead implantation is a method that enables tissue manipulation through the alteration of factors in local environments. This allows researchers to assay the effects of any number of signaling molecules of interest, such as secreted peptides, at specific spatial and temporal points within the developing embryo. Here, we detail a protocol for how to manipulate and implant beads during early zebrafish development. PMID:26274386

  18. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick Ii, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning. PMID:26489395

  19. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J.; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick II, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B. Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning. PMID:26489395

  20. Microbead Implantation in the Zebrafish Embryo.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Gary F; Morales, Elvin E; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2015-07-30

    The zebrafish has emerged as a valuable genetic model system for the study of developmental biology and disease. Zebrafish share a high degree of genomic conservation, as well as similarities in cellular, molecular, and physiological processes, with other vertebrates including humans. During early ontogeny, zebrafish embryos are optically transparent, allowing researchers to visualize the dynamics of organogenesis using a simple stereomicroscope. Microbead implantation is a method that enables tissue manipulation through the alteration of factors in local environments. This allows researchers to assay the effects of any number of signaling molecules of interest, such as secreted peptides, at specific spatial and temporal points within the developing embryo. Here, we detail a protocol for how to manipulate and implant beads during early zebrafish development.

  1. Influence of magnetic field on zebrafish activity and orientation in a plus maze.

    PubMed

    Osipova, Elena A; Pavlova, Vera V; Nepomnyashchikh, Valentin A; Krylov, Viacheslav V

    2016-01-01

    We describe an impact of the geomagnetic field (GMF) and its modification on zebrafish's orientation and locomotor activity in a plus maze with four arms oriented to the north, east, south and west. Zebrafish's directional preferences were bimodal in GMF: they visited two arms oriented in opposed directions (east-west) most frequently. This bimodal preference remained stable for same individuals across experiments divided by several days. When the horizontal GMF component was turned 90° clockwise, the preference accordingly shifted by 90° to arms oriented to the north and south. Other modifications of GMF (reversal of both vertical and horizontal GMF components; reversal of vertical component only; and reversal of horizontal component only) did not exert any discernible effect on the orientation of zebrafish. The 90° turn of horizontal component also resulted in a significant increase of fish's locomotor activity in comparison with the natural GMF. This increase became even more pronounced when the horizontal component was repeatedly turned by 90° and back with 1min interval between turns. Our results show that GMF and its variations should be taken into account when interpreting zebrafish's directional preferences and locomotor activity in mazes and other experimental devices. PMID:26589739

  2. What is the Thalamus in Zebrafish?

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Current research on the thalamus and related structures in the zebrafish diencephalon identifies an increasing number of both neurological structures and ontogenetic processes as evolutionary conserved between teleosts and mammals. The patterning processes, for example, which during the embryonic development of zebrafish form the thalamus proper appear largely conserved. Yet also striking differences between zebrafish and other vertebrates have been observed, particularly when we look at mature and histologically differentiated brains. A case in point is the migrated preglomerular complex of zebrafish which evolved only within the lineage of ray-finned fish and has no counterpart in mammals or tetrapod vertebrates. Based on its function as a sensory relay station with projections to pallial zones, the preglomerular complex has been compared to specific thalamic nuclei in mammals. However, no thalamic projections to the zebrafish dorsal pallium, which corresponds topologically to the mammalian isocortex, have been identified. Merely one teleostean thalamic nucleus proper, the auditory nucleus, projects to a part of the dorsal telencephalon, the pallial amygdala. Studies on patterning mechanisms identify a rostral and caudal domain in the embryonic thalamus proper. In both, teleosts and mammals, the rostral domain gives rise to GABAergic neurons, whereas glutamatergic neurons originate in the caudal domain of the zebrafish thalamus. The distribution of GABAergic derivatives in the adult zebrafish brain, furthermore, revealed previously overlooked thalamic nuclei and redefined already established ones. These findings require some reconsideration regarding the topological origin of these adult structures. In what follows, I discuss how evolutionary conserved and newly acquired features of the developing and adult zebrafish thalamus can be compared to the mammalian situation. PMID:22586363

  3. Macrophages modulate adult zebrafish tail fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Timothy A; Strand, Nicholas S; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Tsung-Yang, Chao; Rabinowitz, Jeremy S; Moon, Randall T

    2014-07-01

    Neutrophils and macrophages, as key mediators of inflammation, have defined functionally important roles in mammalian tissue repair. Although recent evidence suggests that similar cells exist in zebrafish and also migrate to sites of injury in larvae, whether these cells are functionally important for wound healing or regeneration in adult zebrafish is unknown. To begin to address these questions, we first tracked neutrophils (lyzC(+), mpo(+)) and macrophages (mpeg1(+)) in adult zebrafish following amputation of the tail fin, and detailed a migratory timecourse that revealed conserved elements of the inflammatory cell response with mammals. Next, we used transgenic zebrafish in which we could selectively ablate macrophages, which allowed us to investigate whether macrophages were required for tail fin regeneration. We identified stage-dependent functional roles of macrophages in mediating fin tissue outgrowth and bony ray patterning, in part through modulating levels of blastema proliferation. Moreover, we also sought to detail molecular regulators of inflammation in adult zebrafish and identified Wnt/β-catenin as a signaling pathway that regulates the injury microenvironment, inflammatory cell migration and macrophage phenotype. These results provide a cellular and molecular link between components of the inflammation response and regeneration in adult zebrafish. PMID:24961798

  4. Adult zebrafish model for pneumococcal pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Saralahti, Anni; Piippo, Hannaleena; Parikka, Mataleena; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Rämet, Mika; Rounioja, Samuli

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a leading cause of community acquired pneumonia, septicemia, and meningitis. Due to incomplete understanding of the host and bacterial factors contributing to these diseases optimal treatment and prevention methods are lacking. In the present study we examined whether the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) can be used to investigate the pathophysiology of pneumococcal diseases. Here we show that both intraperitoneal and intramuscular injections of the pneumococcal strain TIGR4 cause a fulminant, dose-dependent infection in adult zebrafish, while isogenic mutant bacteria lacking the polysaccharide capsule, autolysin, or pneumolysin are attenuated in the model. Infection through the intraperitoneal route is characterized by rapid expansion of pneumococci in the bloodstream, followed by penetration of the blood-brain barrier and progression to meningitis. Using Rag1 mutant zebrafish, which are devoid of somatic recombination and thus lack adaptive immune responses, we show that clearance of pneumococci in adult zebrafish depends mainly on innate immune responses. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that the adult zebrafish can be used as a model for a pneumococcal infection, and that it can be used to study both host and bacterial factors involved in the pathogenesis. However, our results do not support the use of the zebrafish in studies on the role of adaptive immunity in pneumococcal disease or in the development of new pneumococcal vaccines.

  5. Generation and analysis of zebrafish melanoma models.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowska, S; van Rooijen, E; Ceol, C; Patton, E E; White, R M

    2016-01-01

    The rapid emergence of the zebrafish as a cancer model has been aided by advances in genetic, chemical, and imaging technologies. Melanoma in particular highlights both the power and challenges associated with cancer modeling in zebrafish. This chapter focuses on the lessons that have emerged from the melanoma models as paradigmatic of what will apply to nearly all cancer models in the zebrafish system. We specifically focus on methodologies related to germline and mosaic transgenic melanoma generation, and how these can be used to deeply interrogate additional cooperating oncogenes or tumor suppressors. These transgenic tumors can in turn be used to generate zebrafish-specific, stable melanoma cell lines which can be fluorescently labeled, modified by cDNA/CRISPR techniques, and used for detailed in vivo imaging of cancer progression in real time. These zebrafish melanoma models are beginning to elucidate both cell intrinsic and microenvironmental factors in melanoma that have broader implications for human disease. We envision that nearly all of the techniques described here can be applied to other zebrafish cancer models, and likely expanded beyond what we describe here. PMID:27312504

  6. Allograft Cancer Cell Transplantation in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Moore, John C; Langenau, David M

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic cell transplantation is the transfer of cells from one individual into another of the same species and has become an indispensable technique for studying development, immunology, regeneration and cancer biology. In experimental settings, tumor cell engraftment into immunologically competent recipients has greatly increased our understanding of the mechanisms that drive self-renewal, progression and metastasis in vivo. Zebrafish have quickly emerged as a powerful genetic model of cancer that has benefited greatly from allogeneic transplantation. Efficient engraftment can be achieved by transplanting cells into either early larval stage zebrafish that have not yet developed a functional acquired immune system or adult zebrafish following radiation or chemical ablation of the immune system. Alternatively, transplantation can be completed in adult fish using either clonal syngeneic strains or newly-generated immune compromised zebrafish models that have mutations in genes required for proper immune cell function. Here, we discuss the current state of cell transplantation as it pertains to zebrafish cancer and the available models used for dissecting important processes underlying cancer. We will also use the zebrafish model to highlight the power of cell transplantation, including its capacity to dynamically assess functional heterogeneity within individual cancer cells, visualize cancer progression and evolution, assess tumor-propagating potential and self-renewal, image cancer cell invasion and dissemination and identify novel therapies for treating cancer. PMID:27165358

  7. Egr1 regulates lithium-induced transcription of the Period 2 (PER2) gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hyun; Yu, Hyun Sook; Park, Hong Guen; Ahn, Yong Min; Kim, Yong Sik; Lee, Young Han; Ha, Kyooseob; Shin, Soon Young

    2013-12-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the circadian molecular system is involved in the pathogenic and therapeutic mechanisms underlying bipolar disorders. Lithium, a representative mood stabilizer, has been reported to induce the Period 2 (PER2) gene; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms require further study. We found that lithium upregulated PER2 expression at the transcriptional level in neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Promoter reporter analyses using serial deletions of the PER2 promoter revealed that two early growth response 1 (Egr1)-binding sites (EBS) between positions -180 and -100 are required for maximal activation of the PER2 promoter by lithium. Ectopic expression of Egr1 enhanced lithium-induced PER2 promoter activity, while a point mutation in EBS abolished it. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated that Egr1 bound directly to the PER2 promoter. Stimulation of the extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2/Elk1 pathway by lithium was functionally linked to PER2 expression through Egr1 induction, and lithium-induced PER2 expression was strongly attenuated by depletion of Egr1 by siRNA. Lithium also upregulated the expression of Per2 and Egr1 in mouse frontal cortex. Induction of Per2 by lithium was attenuated in Egr1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, lithium stimulates PER2 transcription through the ERK/Elk1/Egr1 pathway in neuronal cells, indicating a connection between the ERK-Egr1 pathway and a circadian gene system in the mechanism of action of lithium.

  8. Neutron induced bystander effect among zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Uchihori, Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Konishi, T.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper reported the first-ever observation of neutron induced bystander effect (NIBE) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos as the in vivo model. The neutron exposure in the present work was provided by the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. Two different strategies were employed to induce NIBE, namely, through directly partnering and through medium transfer. Both results agreed with a neutron-dose window (20-50 mGy) which could induce NIBE. The lower dose limit corresponded to the threshold amount of neutron-induced damages to trigger significant bystander signals, while the upper limit corresponded to the onset of gamma-ray hormesis which could mitigate the neutron-induced damages and thereby suppress the bystander signals. Failures to observe NIBE in previous studies were due to using neutron doses outside the dose-window. Strategies to enhance the chance of observing NIBE included (1) use of a mono-energetic high-energy (e.g., between 100 keV and 2 MeV) neutron source, and (2) use of a neutron source with a small gamma-ray contamination. It appeared that the NASBEE facility used in the present study fulfilled both conditions, and was thus ideal for triggering NIBE.

  9. Active microrheology of fluids inside developing zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, Mike; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-03-01

    Biological fluids are a source of diverse and interesting behavior for the soft matter physicist. Since their mechanical properties must be tuned to fulfill functional roles important to the development and health of living things, they often display complex behavior on length and time scales spanning many orders of magnitude. For microbes colonizing an animal host, for example, the mechanical properties of the host environment are of great importance, affecting mobility and hence the ability to establish a stable population. Indeed, some species possess the ability to affect the fluidity of their environment, both directly by chemically modifying it, and indirectly by influencing the host cells' secretion of mucus. Driving magnetically doped micron-scale probes which have been orally micro-gavaged into the intestinal bulb of a larval zebrafish allows the rheology of the mucosal layer within the fish to be measured over three decades of frequency, complementing ecological data on microbial colonization with physical information about the gut environment. Here, we describe the technique, provide the first measurement of mucosal viscosity in a developing animal, and explore the technique's applicability to other small-volume or spatially inhomogeneous fluid samples.

  10. Can Zebrafish be used to Identify Developmentally Neurotoxic Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Can Zebrafish be Used to Identify Developmentally Neurotoxic Chemicals? The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is evaluating methods to screen and prioritize large numbers of chemicals for developmental neurotoxicity. We are exploring behavioral methods using zebrafish by desig...

  11. Mixtures, Metabolites, and Mechanisms: Understanding Toxicology Using Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gamse, Joshua T; Gorelick, Daniel A

    2016-10-01

    For more than 60 years, zebrafish have been used in toxicological studies. Due to their transparency, genetic tractability, and compatibility with high-throughput screens, zebrafish embryos are uniquely suited to study the effects of pharmaceuticals and environmental insults on embryonic development, organ formation and function, and reproductive success. This special issue of Zebrafish highlights the ways zebrafish are used to investigate the toxic effects of endocrine disruptors, pesticides, and heavy metals. PMID:27618129

  12. Reverse genetics tools in zebrafish: a forward dive into endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Yuya; Neuhauss, Stephan C F

    2013-07-01

    The zebrafish is a powerful genetic model organism. In recent years, zebrafish has been increasingly used to model human diseases. Due to a number of recent technological advancements, the genetic tool box is now also stocked with sophisticated transgenic and reverse genetic tools. Here, we focus on both commonly used and recently established reverse genetic and transgenic tools available in zebrafish. These new developments make the zebrafish an even more attractive animal model in comparative endocrinology.

  13. Neuroblastoma and Its Zebrafish Model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shizhen; Thomas Look, A

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, an important developmental tumor arising in the peripheral sympathetic nervous system (PSNS), accounts for approximately 10 % of all cancer-related deaths in children. Recent genomic analyses have identified a spectrum of genetic alterations in this tumor. Amplification of the MYCN oncogene is found in 20 % of cases and is often accompanied by mutational activation of the ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) gene, suggesting their cooperation in tumor initiation and spread. Understanding how complex genetic changes function together in oncogenesis has been a continuing and daunting task in cancer research. This challenge was addressed in neuroblastoma by generating a transgenic zebrafish model that overexpresses human MYCN and activated ALK in the PSNS, leading to tumors that closely resemble human neuroblastoma and new opportunities to probe the mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of this tumor. For example, coexpression of activated ALK with MYCN in this model triples the penetrance of neuroblastoma and markedly accelerates tumor onset, demonstrating the interaction of these modified genes in tumor development. Further, MYCN overexpression induces adrenal sympathetic neuroblast hyperplasia, blocks chromaffin cell differentiation, and ultimately triggers a developmentally-timed apoptotic response in the hyperplastic sympathoadrenal cells. In the context of MYCN overexpression, activated ALK provides prosurvival signals that block this apoptotic response, allowing continued expansion and oncogenic transformation of hyperplastic neuroblasts, thus promoting progression to neuroblastoma. This application of the zebrafish model illustrates its value in rational assessment of the multigenic changes that define neuroblastoma pathogenesis and points the way to future studies to identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27165366

  14. Disruption of Epithalamic Left-Right Asymmetry Increases Anxiety in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Facchin, Lucilla; Duboué, Erik R; Halpern, Marnie E

    2015-12-01

    Differences between the left and right sides of the brain are found throughout the animal kingdom, but the consequences of altered neural asymmetry are not well understood. In the zebrafish epithalamus, the parapineal is located on the left side of the brain where it influences development of the adjacent dorsal habenular (dHb) nucleus, causing the left and right dHb to differ in their organization, gene expression, and connectivity. Left-right (L-R) reversal of parapineal position and dHb asymmetry occurs spontaneously in a small percentage of the population, whereas the dHb develop symmetrically following experimental ablation of the parapineal. The habenular region was previously implicated in modulating fear in both mice and zebrafish, but the relevance of its L-R asymmetry is unclear. We now demonstrate that disrupting directionality of the zebrafish epithalamus causes reduced exploratory behavior and increased cortisol levels, indicative of enhanced anxiety. Accordingly, exposure to buspirone, an anxiolytic agent, significantly suppresses atypical behavior. Axonal projections from the parapineal to the dHb are more variable when it is located on the right side of the brain, revealing that L-R reversals do not necessarily represent a neuroanatomical mirror image. The results highlight the importance of directional asymmetry of the epithalamus in the regulation of stress responses in zebrafish.

  15. Viral Diseases in Zebrafish: What Is Known and Unknown

    PubMed Central

    Crim, Marcus J.; Riley, Lela K.

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring viral infections have the potential to introduce confounding variability that leads to invalid and misinterpreted data. Whereas the viral diseases of research rodents are well characterized and closely monitored, no naturally occurring viral infections have been characterized for the laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio), an increasingly important biomedical research model. Despite the ignorance about naturally occurring zebrafish viruses, zebrafish models are rapidly expanding in areas of biomedical research where the confounding effects of unknown infectious agents present a serious concern. In addition, many zebrafish research colonies remain linked to the ornamental (pet) zebrafish trade, which can contribute to the introduction of new pathogens into research colonies, whereas mice used for research are purpose bred, with no introduction of new mice from the pet industry. Identification, characterization, and monitoring of naturally occurring viruses in zebrafish are crucial to the improvement of zebrafish health, the reduction of unwanted variability, and the continued development of the zebrafish as a model organism. This article addresses the importance of identifying and characterizing the viral diseases of zebrafish as the scope of zebrafish models expands into new research areas and also briefly addresses zebrafish susceptibility to experimental viral infection and the utility of the zebrafish as an infection and immunology model. PMID:23382345

  16. Swimming Against the Current: Zebrafish Help Address Educational Challenges.

    PubMed

    Pickart, Michael A; Liang, Jennifer; Hutson, Lara; Pierret, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Zebrafish can be important tools for learning and authentic student research. The broad zebrafish community is rich with examples to improve education for learners of all ages and geographical locales. This special collection of articles is presented with the hope of encouraging readers to reflect on the educational outcomes reported here and to consider new ways zebrafish may engage others to learn and grow.

  17. Modeling Leukemogenesis in the Zebrafish Using Genetic and Xenograft Models.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Vinothkumar; Dellaire, Graham; Berman, Jason N

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish is a widely accepted model to study leukemia. The major advantage of studying leukemogenesis in zebrafish is attributed to its short life cycle and superior imaging capacity. This chapter highlights using transgenic- and xenograft-based models in zebrafish to study a specific leukemogenic mutation and analyze therapeutic responses in vivo. PMID:27464808

  18. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    PubMed

    Khodiyar, Varsha K; Howe, Doug; Talmud, Philippa J; Breckenridge, Ross; Lovering, Ruth C

    2013-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer's vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer's vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of 'heart jogging' and the direction of 'heart looping'.  'Heart jogging' is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward 'jog'. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish 'heart jogging orthologs' are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach.

  19. Chemokine-guided cell migration and motility in zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Jeroen; Raz, Erez

    2015-05-12

    Chemokines are vertebrate-specific, structurally related proteins that function primarily in controlling cell movements by activating specific 7-transmembrane receptors. Chemokines play critical roles in a large number of biological processes and are also involved in a range of pathological conditions. For these reasons, chemokines are at the focus of studies in developmental biology and of clinically oriented research aimed at controlling cancer, inflammation, and immunological diseases. The small size of the zebrafish embryos, their rapid external development, and optical properties as well as the large number of eggs and the fast expansion in genetic tools available make this model an extremely useful one for studying the function of chemokines and chemokine receptors in an in vivo setting. Here, we review the findings relevant to the role that chemokines play in the context of directed single-cell migration, primarily in neutrophils and germ cells, and compare it to the collective cell migration of the zebrafish lateral line. We present the current knowledge concerning the formation of the chemokine gradient, its interpretation within the cell, and the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to chemokine signals during directed migration.

  20. Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy to Image Zebrafish Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Tomancak, Pavel; Preibisch, Stephan; Norden, Caren

    2016-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is gaining more and more popularity as a method to image embryonic development. The main advantages of LSFM compared to confocal systems are its low phototoxicity, gentle mounting strategies, fast acquisition with high signal to noise ratio and the possibility of imaging samples from various angles (views) for long periods of time. Imaging from multiple views unleashes the full potential of LSFM, but at the same time it can create terabyte-sized datasets. Processing such datasets is the biggest challenge of using LSFM. In this protocol we outline some solutions to this problem. Until recently, LSFM was mostly performed in laboratories that had the expertise to build and operate their own light sheet microscopes. However, in the last three years several commercial implementations of LSFM became available, which are multipurpose and easy to use for any developmental biologist. This article is primarily directed to those researchers, who are not LSFM technology developers, but want to employ LSFM as a tool to answer specific developmental biology questions. Here, we use imaging of zebrafish eye development as an example to introduce the reader to LSFM technology and we demonstrate applications of LSFM across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This article describes a complete experimental protocol starting with the mounting of zebrafish embryos for LSFM. We then outline the options for imaging using the commercially available light sheet microscope. Importantly, we also explain a pipeline for subsequent registration and fusion of multiview datasets using an open source solution implemented as a Fiji plugin. While this protocol focuses on imaging the developing zebrafish eye and processing data from a particular imaging setup, most of the insights and troubleshooting suggestions presented here are of general use and the protocol can be adapted to a variety of light sheet microscopy experiments. PMID:27167079

  1. Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy to Image Zebrafish Eye Development.

    PubMed

    Icha, Jaroslav; Schmied, Christopher; Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Tomancak, Pavel; Preibisch, Stephan; Norden, Caren

    2016-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is gaining more and more popularity as a method to image embryonic development. The main advantages of LSFM compared to confocal systems are its low phototoxicity, gentle mounting strategies, fast acquisition with high signal to noise ratio and the possibility of imaging samples from various angles (views) for long periods of time. Imaging from multiple views unleashes the full potential of LSFM, but at the same time it can create terabyte-sized datasets. Processing such datasets is the biggest challenge of using LSFM. In this protocol we outline some solutions to this problem. Until recently, LSFM was mostly performed in laboratories that had the expertise to build and operate their own light sheet microscopes. However, in the last three years several commercial implementations of LSFM became available, which are multipurpose and easy to use for any developmental biologist. This article is primarily directed to those researchers, who are not LSFM technology developers, but want to employ LSFM as a tool to answer specific developmental biology questions. Here, we use imaging of zebrafish eye development as an example to introduce the reader to LSFM technology and we demonstrate applications of LSFM across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This article describes a complete experimental protocol starting with the mounting of zebrafish embryos for LSFM. We then outline the options for imaging using the commercially available light sheet microscope. Importantly, we also explain a pipeline for subsequent registration and fusion of multiview datasets using an open source solution implemented as a Fiji plugin. While this protocol focuses on imaging the developing zebrafish eye and processing data from a particular imaging setup, most of the insights and troubleshooting suggestions presented here are of general use and the protocol can be adapted to a variety of light sheet microscopy experiments. PMID:27167079

  2. Zebrafish as an emerging model for studying complex brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kalueff, Allan V.; Stewart, Adam Michael; Gerlai, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is rapidly becoming a popular model organism in pharmacogenetics and neuropharmacology. Both larval and adult zebrafish are currently used to increase our understanding of brain function, dysfunction, and their genetic and pharmacological modulation. Here we review the developing utility of zebrafish in the analysis of complex brain disorders (including, for example, depression, autism, psychoses, drug abuse and cognitive disorders), also covering zebrafish applications towards the goal of modeling major human neuropsychiatric and drug-induced syndromes. We argue that zebrafish models of complex brain disorders and drug-induced conditions have become a rapidly emerging critical field in translational neuropharmacology research. PMID:24412421

  3. Zebrafish models of dyslipidemia: Relevance to atherosclerosis and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Longhou; Liu, Chao; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in zebrafish and in humans are remarkably similar. Zebrafish express all major nuclear receptors, lipid transporters, apolipoproteins and enzymes involved in lipoprotein metabolism. Unlike mice, zebrafish express cetp and the Cetp activity is detected in zebrafish plasma. Feeding zebrafish a high cholesterol diet, without any genetic intervention, results in significant hypercholesterolemia and robust lipoprotein oxidation, making zebrafish an attractive animal model to study mechanisms relevant to early development of human atherosclerosis. These studies are facilitated by the optical transparency of zebrafish larvae and the availability of transgenic zebrafish expressing fluorescent proteins in endothelial cells and macrophages. Thus, vascular processes can be monitored in live animals. In this review article we discuss recent advances in using dyslipidemic zebrafish in atherosclerosis-related studies. We also summarize recent work connecting lipid metabolism with regulation of angiogenesis, the work that considerably benefited from using the zebrafish model. These studies uncovered the role of aibp, abca1, abcg1, mtp, apoB and apoC2 in regulation of angiogenesis in zebrafish and paved the way for future studies in mammals, which may suggest new therapeutic approaches to modulation of excessive or diminished angiogenesis contributing to the pathogenesis of human disease. PMID:24095954

  4. Development of high-content assays for kidney progenitor cell expansion in transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sanker, Subramaniam; Cirio, Maria Cecilia; Vollmer, Laura L; Goldberg, Natasha D; McDermott, Lee A; Hukriede, Neil A; Vogt, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    Reactivation of genes normally expressed during organogenesis is a characteristic of kidney regeneration. Enhancing this reactivation could potentially be a therapeutic target to augment kidney regeneration. The inductive events that drive kidney organogenesis in zebrafish are similar to the initial steps in mammalian kidney organogenesis. Therefore, quantifying embryonic signals that drive zebrafish kidney development is an attractive strategy for the discovery of potential novel therapeutic modalities that accelerate kidney regeneration. The Lim1 homeobox protein, Lhx1, is a marker of kidney development that is also expressed in the regenerating kidneys after injury. Using a fluorescent Lhx1a-EGFP transgene whose phenotype faithfully recapitulates that of the endogenous protein, we developed a high-content assay for Lhx1a-EGFP expression in transgenic zebrafish embryos employing an artificial intelligence-based image analysis method termed cognition network technology (CNT). Implementation of the CNT assay on high-content readers enabled automated real-time in vivo time-course, dose-response, and variability studies in the developing embryo. The Lhx1a assay was complemented with a kidney-specific secondary CNT assay that enables direct measurements of the embryonic renal tubule cell population. The integration of fluorescent transgenic zebrafish embryos with automated imaging and artificial intelligence-based image analysis provides an in vivo analysis system for structure-activity relationship studies and de novo discovery of novel agents that augment innate regenerative processes.

  5. Transgenic zebrafish for ratiometric imaging of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ response in teleost embryo.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideaki; Sassa, Takayuki; Higashijima, Shin-Ichi; Okamoto, Hitoshi; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2013-09-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ imaging has widely been used to visualize intracellular signals, but the application in an intact animal is still limited due to difficulty of the indicator loading. In addition, the motion of the living animal produces artifacts. To investigate Ca2+ signaling at early embryonic stage, we established transgenic zebrafish line expressing a genetically encoded Ca2+ indicator, cameleon YC2.60, driven by a constitutively active promoter, hspa8. Although the embryo dynamically changes its morphology, the motion artifact could be canceled out by taking the advantage of YC2.60 as a ratiometric indicator. The transgenic zebrafish was used to visualize the propagation of cytosolic Ca2+ during the early embryonic stage upon fertilization and along cleavage furrow, and the rise in Ca2+ in the myocytes contracting spontaneously in the embryo. We also established a transgenic zebrafish line expressing YC2.60 targeted to the mitochondria. The rise in mitochondrial Ca2+ was rather sustained (≈2 min), which is consistent with the requirement of ATP refilling since the mitochondrial Ca2+ upregulates rate-limiting enzymes of Krebs cycle. This is in contrast with the transient rise in the cytosol Ca2+ that directly evokes the muscle contraction. These transgenic zebrafish lines are expected to serve as useful tools further Ca2+ imaging in vivo.

  6. Effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Tiziana; Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a species of choice in neurobiological and behavioral studies of alcohol-related disorders. In these efforts, the activity of adult zebrafish is typically quantified using indirect activity measures that are either scored manually or identified automatically from the fish trajectory. The analysis of such activity measures has produced important insight into the effect of acute ethanol exposure on individual and social behavior of this vertebrate species. Here, we leverage a recently developed tracking algorithm that reconstructs fish body shape to investigate the effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion in terms of amplitude and frequency. Our results demonstrate a significant effect of ethanol on the tail-beat amplitude as well as the tail-beat frequency, both of which were found to robustly decrease for high ethanol concentrations. Such a direct measurement of zebrafish motor functions is in agreement with evidence based on indirect activity measures, offering a complementary perspective in behavioral screening. PMID:26314628

  7. Fishing for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Zebrafish as a Model for Ethanol Teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lovely, Charles Ben; Fernandes, Yohaan; Eberhart, Johann K

    2016-10-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) describes a wide array of ethanol-induced developmental defects, including craniofacial dysmorphology and cognitive impairments. It affects ∼1 in 100 children born in the United States each year. Due to the pleiotropic effects of ethanol, animal models have proven critical in characterizing the mechanisms of ethanol teratogenesis. In this review, we focus on the utility of zebrafish in characterizing ethanol-induced developmental defects. A growing number of laboratories have focused on using zebrafish to examine ethanol-induced defects in craniofacial, cardiac, ocular, and neural development, as well as cognitive and behavioral impairments. Growing evidence supports that genetic predisposition plays a role in these ethanol-induced defects, yet little is understood about these gene-ethanol interactions. With a high degree of genetic amenability, zebrafish is at the forefront of identifying and characterizing the gene-ethanol interactions that underlie FASD. Because of the conservation of gene function between zebrafish and humans, these studies will directly translate to studies of candidate genes in human populations and allow for better diagnosis and treatment of FASD. PMID:27186793

  8. Efficient homologous recombination-mediated genome engineering in zebrafish using TALE nucleases.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jimann; Chen, Jiakun; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2014-10-01

    Custom-designed nucleases afford a powerful reverse genetic tool for direct gene disruption and genome modification in vivo. Among various applications of the nucleases, homologous recombination (HR)-mediated genome editing is particularly useful for inserting heterologous DNA fragments, such as GFP, into a specific genomic locus in a sequence-specific fashion. However, precise HR-mediated genome editing is still technically challenging in zebrafish. Here, we establish a GFP reporter system for measuring the frequency of HR events in live zebrafish embryos. By co-injecting a TALE nuclease and GFP reporter targeting constructs with homology arms of different size, we defined the length of homology arms that increases the recombination efficiency. In addition, we found that the configuration of the targeting construct can be a crucial parameter in determining the efficiency of HR-mediated genome engineering. Implementing these modifications improved the efficiency of zebrafish knock-in generation, with over 10% of the injected F0 animals transmitting gene-targeting events through their germline. We generated two HR-mediated insertion alleles of sox2 and gfap loci that express either superfolder GFP (sfGFP) or tandem dimeric Tomato (tdTomato) in a spatiotemporal pattern that mirrors the endogenous loci. This efficient strategy provides new opportunities not only to monitor expression of endogenous genes and proteins and follow specific cell types in vivo, but it also paves the way for other sophisticated genetic manipulations of the zebrafish genome.

  9. In vivo dynamics of skeletal muscle Dystrophin in zebrafish embryos revealed by improved FRAP analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bajanca, Fernanda; Gonzalez-Perez, Vinicio; Gillespie, Sean J; Beley, Cyriaque; Garcia, Luis; Theveneau, Eric; Sear, Richard P; Hughes, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophin forms an essential link between sarcolemma and cytoskeleton, perturbation of which causes muscular dystrophy. We analysed Dystrophin binding dynamics in vivo for the first time. Within maturing fibres of host zebrafish embryos, our analysis reveals a pool of diffusible Dystrophin and complexes bound at the fibre membrane. Combining modelling, an improved FRAP methodology and direct semi-quantitative analysis of bleaching suggests the existence of two membrane-bound Dystrophin populations with widely differing bound lifetimes: a stable, tightly bound pool, and a dynamic bound pool with high turnover rate that exchanges with the cytoplasmic pool. The three populations were found consistently in human and zebrafish Dystrophins overexpressed in wild-type or dmdta222a/ta222a zebrafish embryos, which lack Dystrophin, and in Gt(dmd-Citrine)ct90a that express endogenously-driven tagged zebrafish Dystrophin. These results lead to a new model for Dystrophin membrane association in developing muscle, and highlight our methodology as a valuable strategy for in vivo analysis of complex protein dynamics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06541.001 PMID:26459831

  10. Zebrafish mRNA sequencing deciphers novelties in transcriptome dynamics during maternal to zygotic transition

    PubMed Central

    Aanes, Håvard; Winata, Cecilia L.; Lin, Chi Ho; Chen, Jieqi P.; Srinivasan, Kandhadayar G.; Lee, Serene G.P.; Lim, Adrian Y.M.; Hajan, Hajira Shreen; Collas, Philippe; Bourque, Guillaume; Gong, Zhiyuan; Korzh, Vladimir; Aleström, Peter; Mathavan, Sinnakaruppan

    2011-01-01

    Maternally deposited mRNAs direct early development before the initiation of zygotic transcription during mid-blastula transition (MBT). To study mechanisms regulating this developmental event in zebrafish, we applied mRNA deep sequencing technology and generated comprehensive information and valuable resources on transcriptome dynamics during early embryonic (egg to early gastrulation) stages. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis documented at least 8000 maternal genes and identified the earliest cohort of zygotic transcripts. We determined expression levels of maternal and zygotic transcripts with the highest resolution possible using mRNA-seq and clustered them based on their expression pattern. We unravel delayed polyadenylation in a large cohort of maternal transcripts prior to the MBT for the first time in zebrafish. Blocking polyadenylation of these transcripts confirms their role in regulating development from the MBT onward. Our study also identified a large number of novel transcribed regions in annotated and unannotated regions of the genome, which will facilitate reannotation of the zebrafish genome. We also identified splice variants with an estimated frequency of 50%–60%. Taken together, our data constitute a useful genomic information and valuable transcriptome resource for gene discovery and for understanding the mechanisms of early embryogenesis in zebrafish. PMID:21555364

  11. Immunohistochemical Characterization of Intestinal Neoplasia in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Indicates Epithelial Origin

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Colleen E.; Kent, Michael L.; Peterson, Tracy S.; Wang, Rong; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Löhr, Christiane V.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous neoplasia of the intestinal tract in sentinel and moribund zebrafish (Danio rerio) is common in some zebrafish facilities. We previously classified these tumors as adenocarcinoma, small-cell carcinoma, or carcinoma otherwise unspecified based on histomorphologic characteristics. Based on histological presentation, the primary differential diagnosis for the intestinal carcinomas was tumor of neuroendocrine cells (e.g., carcinoids). To further characterize the phenotype of the neoplastic cells, select tissue sections were stained with a panel of antibodies directed toward human epithelial (Cytokeratin Wide Spectrum Screening [WSS], AE1/AE3) or neuroendocrine (S100, chromogranin A) markers. We also investigated antibody specificity by Western blot analysis, using a human cell line and zebrafish tissues. Nine of the intestinal neoplasms (64%) stained for AE1/AE3, seven (50%) also stained for WSS. None of the intestinal neoplastic cells were stained for chromogranin A or S100. Endocrine cells of the pituitary gland and neurons and axons of peripheral nerves and ganglia stained for Chromogranin A, whereas perineural and periaxonal cells of peripheral intestinal ganglia, and glial and ependymal cells of the brain stained for S100. Immunohistochemistry for cytokeratins confirmed the majority of intestinal neoplasms in this cohort of zebrafish as carcinomas. PMID:26503773

  12. Chemical Genetic Screening in the Zebrafish Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Charles K.; White, Richard M.; Zon, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    Chemical genetic screening can be described as a discovery approach in which chemicals are assayed for their effects on a defined biological system. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is a well-characterized and genetically tractable vertebrate model organism that produces large numbers of rapidly developing embryos that develop externally. These characteristics allow for flexible, rapid, and scalable chemical screen design using the zebrafish. We describe a protocol for screening compounds from a chemical library for effects on early zebrafish development using an automated in situ based read-out. Because screens are performed in the context of a complete, developing organism, this approach allows for a more comprehensive analysis of the range of a chemical’s effects than that provided by, for example, a cell culture-based or in vitro biochemical assay. Using a twenty-four hour chemical treatment, one can complete a round of screening in six days. PMID:19745824

  13. The Toolbox for Conditional Zebrafish Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, Marie; Mione, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe the conditional zebrafish cancer toolbox, which allows for fine control of the expression of oncogenes or downregulation of tumor suppressors at the spatial and temporal level. Methods such as the Gal4/UAS or the Cre/lox systems paved the way to the development of elegant tumor models, which are now being used to study cancer cell biology, clonal evolution, identification of cancer stem cells and anti-cancer drug screening. Combination of these tools, as well as novel developments such as the promising genome editing system through CRISPR/Cas9 and clever application of light reactive proteins will enable the development of even more sophisticated zebrafish cancer models. Here, we introduce this growing toolbox of conditional transgenic approaches, discuss its current application in zebrafish cancer models and provide an outlook on future perspectives. PMID:27165348

  14. 15 years of zebrafish chemical screening

    PubMed Central

    Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Peterson, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    In 2000, the first chemical screen using living zebrafish in a multi-well plate was reported. Since then, more than 60 additional screens have been published describing whole-organism drug and pathway discovery projects in zebrafish. To investigate the scope of the work reported in the last 14 years and to identify trends in the field, we analyzed the discovery strategies of 64 primary research articles from the literature. We found that zebrafish screens have expanded beyond the use of developmental phenotypes to include behavioral, cardiac, metabolic, proliferative and regenerative endpoints. Additionally, many creative strategies have been used to uncover the mechanisms of action of new small molecules including chemical phenocopy, genetic phenocopy, mutant rescue, and spatial localization strategies. PMID:25461724

  15. Fast gene transfer into the adult zebrafish brain by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and electroporation: methods and optogenetic applications

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ming; De Koninck, Paul; Neve, Rachael L.; Friedrich, Rainer W.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish has various advantages as a model organism to analyze the structure and function of neural circuits but efficient viruses or other tools for fast gene transfer are lacking. We show that transgenes can be introduced directly into the adult zebrafish brain by herpes simplex type I viruses (HSV-1) or electroporation. We developed a new procedure to target electroporation to defined brain areas and identified promoters that produced strong long-term expression. The fast workflow of electroporation was exploited to express multiple channelrhodopsin-2 variants and genetically encoded calcium indicators in telencephalic neurons for measurements of neuronal activity and synaptic connectivity. The results demonstrate that HSV-1 and targeted electroporation are efficient tools for gene delivery into the zebrafish brain, similar to adeno-associated viruses and lentiviruses in other species. These methods fill an important gap in the spectrum of molecular tools for zebrafish and are likely to have a wide range of applications. PMID:24834028

  16. Characterization of zebrafish dysferlin by morpholino knockdown

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Genri; Serafini, Peter R.; Myers, Jennifer A.; Alexander, Matthew S.; Kunkel, Louis M.

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} cDNAs of zebrafish dysferlin were cloned (6.3 kb). {yields} The dysferlin expression was detected in skeletal muscle, heart and eye. {yields} Injection of antisense morpholinos to dysferlin caused marked muscle disorganization. {yields} Zebrafish dysferlin expression may be involved in stabilizing muscle structures. -- Abstract: Mutations in the gene encoding dysferlin cause two distinct muscular dystrophy phenotypes: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD-2B) and Miyoshi myopathy (MM). Dysferlin is a large transmembrane protein involved in myoblast fusion and membrane resealing. Zebrafish represent an ideal animal model to use for studying muscle disease including abnormalities of dysferlin. cDNAs of zebrafish dysferlin were cloned (6.3 kb) and the predicted amino acid sequences, showed 68% similarity to predicted amino acid sequences of mammalian dysferlin. The expression of dysferlin was mainly in skeletal muscle, heart and eye, and the expression could be detected as early as 11 h post fertilization (hpf). Three different antisense oligonucleotide morpholinos were targeted to inhibit translation of this dysferlin mRNA and the morpholino-injected fish showed marked muscle disorganization which could be detected by birefringence assay. Western blot analysis using dysferlin antibodies showed that the expression of dysferlin was reduced in each of the three morphants. Dysferlin expression was shown to be reduced at the myosepta of zebrafish muscle using immunohistochemistry, although the expression of other muscle membrane components, dystrophin, laminin, {beta}-dystroglycan were detected normally. Our data suggest that zebrafish dysferlin expression is involved in stabilizing muscle structures and its downregulation causes muscle disorganization.

  17. Culturable Gut Microbiota Diversity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Sørby, Jan Roger Torp; Aleström, Peter; Sørum, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an increasingly used laboratory animal model in basic biology and biomedicine, novel drug development, and toxicology. The wide use has increased the demand for optimized husbandry protocols to ensure animal health care and welfare. The knowledge about the correlation between culturable zebrafish intestinal microbiota and health in relation to environmental factors and management procedures is very limited. A semi-quantitative level of growth of individual types of bacteria was determined and associated with sampling points. A total of 72 TAB line zebrafish from four laboratories (Labs A–D) in the Zebrafish Network Norway were used. Diagnostic was based on traditional bacterial culture methods and biochemical characterization using commercial kits, followed by 16S rDNA gene sequencing from pure subcultures. Also selected Gram-negative isolates were analyzed for antibiotic susceptibility to 8 different antibiotics. A total of 13 morphologically different bacterial species were the most prevalent: Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas sobria, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Photobacterium damselae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas luteola, Comamonas testosteroni, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Staphylococcus cohnii, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus capitis, and Staphylococcus warneri. Only Lab B had significantly higher levels of total bacterial growth (OR=2.03), whereas numbers from Lab C (OR=1.01) and Lab D (OR=1.12) were found to be similar to the baseline Lab A. Sexually immature individuals had a significantly higher level of harvested total bacterial growth than mature fish (OR=0.82), no statistically significant differences were found between male and female fish (OR=1.01), and the posterior intestinal segment demonstrated a higher degree of culturable bacteria than the anterior segment (OR=4.1). Multiple antibiotic (>3) resistance was observed in 17% of the strains. We propose that a rapid

  18. Glyphosate induces neurotoxicity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Roy, Nicole M; Carneiro, Bruno; Ochs, Jeremy

    2016-03-01

    Glyphosate based herbicides (GBH) like Roundup(®) are used extensively in agriculture as well as in urban and rural settings as a broad spectrum herbicide. Its mechanism of action was thought to be specific only to plants and thus considered safe and non-toxic. However, mounting evidence suggests that GBHs may not be as safe as once thought as initial studies in frogs suggest that GBHs may be teratogenic. Here we utilize the zebrafish vertebrate model system to study early effects of glyphosate exposure using technical grade glyphosate and the Roundup(®) Classic formulation. We find morphological abnormalities including cephalic and eye reductions and a loss of delineated brain ventricles. Concomitant with structural changes in the developing brain, using in situ hybridization analysis, we detect decreases in genes expressed in the eye, fore and midbrain regions of the brain including pax2, pax6, otx2 and ephA4. However, we do not detect changes in hindbrain expression domains of ephA4 nor exclusive hindbrain markers krox-20 and hoxb1a. Additionally, using a Retinoic Acid (RA) mediated reporter transgenic, we detect no alterations in the RA expression domains in the hindbrain and spinal cord, but do detect a loss of expression in the retina. We conclude that glyphosate and the Roundup(®) formulation is developmentally toxic to the forebrain and midbrain but does not affect the hindbrain after 24 h exposure.

  19. Glyphosate induces neurotoxicity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Roy, Nicole M; Carneiro, Bruno; Ochs, Jeremy

    2016-03-01

    Glyphosate based herbicides (GBH) like Roundup(®) are used extensively in agriculture as well as in urban and rural settings as a broad spectrum herbicide. Its mechanism of action was thought to be specific only to plants and thus considered safe and non-toxic. However, mounting evidence suggests that GBHs may not be as safe as once thought as initial studies in frogs suggest that GBHs may be teratogenic. Here we utilize the zebrafish vertebrate model system to study early effects of glyphosate exposure using technical grade glyphosate and the Roundup(®) Classic formulation. We find morphological abnormalities including cephalic and eye reductions and a loss of delineated brain ventricles. Concomitant with structural changes in the developing brain, using in situ hybridization analysis, we detect decreases in genes expressed in the eye, fore and midbrain regions of the brain including pax2, pax6, otx2 and ephA4. However, we do not detect changes in hindbrain expression domains of ephA4 nor exclusive hindbrain markers krox-20 and hoxb1a. Additionally, using a Retinoic Acid (RA) mediated reporter transgenic, we detect no alterations in the RA expression domains in the hindbrain and spinal cord, but do detect a loss of expression in the retina. We conclude that glyphosate and the Roundup(®) formulation is developmentally toxic to the forebrain and midbrain but does not affect the hindbrain after 24 h exposure. PMID:26773362

  20. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes. PMID:9007229

  1. Dynamics of zebrafish fin regeneration using a pulsed SILAC approach.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Hendrik; Hölper, Soraya; Housley, Michael P; Islam, Shariful; Piller, Tanja; Konzer, Anne; Stainier, Didier Y R; Braun, Thomas; Krüger, Marcus

    2015-02-01

    The zebrafish owns remarkable regenerative capacities allowing regeneration of several tissues, including the heart, liver, and brain. To identify protein dynamics during fin regeneration we used a pulsed SILAC approach that enabled us to detect the incorporation of (13) C6 -lysine (Lys6) into newly synthesized proteins. Samples were taken at four different time points from noninjured and regrowing fins and incorporation rates were monitored using a combination of single-shot 4-h gradients and high-resolution tandem MS. We identified more than 5000 labeled proteins during the first 3 weeks of fin regeneration and were able to monitor proteins that are responsible for initializing and restoring the shape of these appendages. The comparison of Lys6 incorporation rates between noninjured and regrowing fins enabled us to identify proteins that are directly involved in regeneration. For example, we observed increased incorporation rates of two actinodin family members at the actinotrichia, which is a hairlike fiber structure at the tip of regrowing fins. Moreover, we used quantitative real-time RNA measurements of several candidate genes, including osteoglycin, si:ch211-288h17.3, and prostaglandin reductase 1 to correlate the mRNA expression to Lys6 incorporation data. This novel pulsed SILAC methodology in fish can be used as a versatile tool to monitor newly synthesized proteins and will help to characterize protein dynamics during regenerative processes in zebrafish beyond fin regeneration.

  2. Cell morphodynamics visualization from images of zebrafish embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Campana, Matteo; Sarti, Alessandro

    2010-07-01

    Laser scanning microscopy provides high-resolution nondestructive in vivo imaging to capture specific structures that have been fluorescently labeled, such as cellular nuclei and membranes, throughout early zebrafish embryogenesis. An increasingly challenging problem biologists must face is how to effectively explore, follow, and study the thousands of cells contained in the resulting time-varying volume data that are large in space, time, and variable domain. Visual data explorations, such as direct volume rendering, have been successfully used for the analysis of volumetric data. However, visualizing large-scale time-varying fields remains a challenging problem. In this paper we present a novel Focus+Context animated volume rendering. The technique is based on the distance map of objects of interest and on a scene graph architecture. We demonstrate that distance map driven volume rendering, implemented in modern graphics hardware, is suited to generate run time and interactive representations such as ghosted rendering and cut-away rendering. The experimental results on zebrafish embryogenesis data demonstrate that the technique is suited to uncover and to analyze biological events, such as organogenesis, contained in time-varying volumetric dataset.

  3. Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Biechl, Daniela; Tietje, Kristin; Gerlach, Gabriele; Wullimann, Mario F

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal. PMID:27087508

  4. Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Biechl, Daniela; Tietje, Kristin; Gerlach, Gabriele; Wullimann, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal. PMID:27087508

  5. Sparc Protein Is Required for Normal Growth of Zebrafish Otoliths

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young-Jin; Stevenson, Amy K.; Yau, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Otoliths and the homologous otoconia in the inner ear are essential for balance. Their morphogenesis is less understood than that of other biominerals, such as bone, and only a small number of their constituent proteins have been characterized. As a novel approach to identify unknown otolith proteins, we employed shotgun proteomics to analyze crude extracts from trout and catfish otoliths. We found three proteins that had not been associated previously with otolith or otoconia formation: ‘Secreted acidic cysteine rich glycoprotein’ (Sparc), an important bone protein that binds collagen and Ca2+; precerebellin-like protein, which contains a C1q domain and may associate with the collagenous otolin-1 during its assembly into a framework; and neuroserpin, a serine protease inhibitor that may regulate local protease activity during framework assembly. We then used the zebrafish to investigate whether Sparc plays a role in otolith morphogenesis. Immunodetection demonstrated that Sparc is a true constituent of otoliths. Knockdown of Sparc expression in morphant zebrafish resulted in four principal types of defective otoliths: smaller, extra and ectopic, missing and fused, or completely absent. Smaller size was the predominant phenotype and independent of the severity of otic-vesicle defects. These results suggested that Sparc is directly required for normal otolith growth. PMID:18784957

  6. Dynamic focusing in the zebrafish beating heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Delgado, L.; Peralta, M.; Mercader, N.; Ripoll, J.

    2016-03-01

    Of the large amount of the animal models available for cardiac research, the zebrafish is extremely valuable due to its transparency during early stages of development. In this work a dual illumination laser sheet microscope with simultaneous dual camera imaging is used to image the beating heart at 200 fps, dynamically and selectively focusing inside the beating heart through the use of a tunable lens. This dual color dynamic focusing enables imaging with cellular resolution at unprecedented high frame rates, allowing 3D imaging of the whole beating heart of embryonic zebrafish.

  7. Zebrafish invade Valparaiso: third meeting and symposium of the Latin American zebrafish network.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Kathleen E

    2014-12-01

    Zebrafish are an excellent model system for research and teaching. Because of their relatively low maintenance costs, beautiful and bountiful embryos, and tool box of molecular genetic technique, zebrafish are ideal for countries with smaller research budgets and less well-developed science infrastructure. For these reasons, zebrafish are growing in popularity as a model system for research in Latin America. In response to this growing need, we held the Third Latin American Zebrafish Network (LAZEN) Course and Symposium in Valparaiso, Chile, in April 4-13, 2014. The course covered a wide variety of topics from fish husbandry to outreach and ended with a symposium hosting excellent scientists from Latin America and beyond.

  8. High-Content and Semi-Automated Quantification of Responses to Estrogenic Chemicals Using a Novel Translucent Transgenic Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Green, Jon M; Metz, Jeremy; Lee, Okhyun; Trznadel, Maciej; Takesono, Aya; Brown, A Ross; Owen, Stewart F; Kudoh, Tetsuhiro; Tyler, Charles R

    2016-06-21

    Rapid embryogenesis, together with genetic similarities with mammals, and the desire to reduce mammalian testing, are major incentives for using the zebrafish model in chemical screening and testing. Transgenic zebrafish, engineered for identifying target gene expression through expression of fluorophores, have considerable potential for both high-content and high-throughput testing of chemicals for endocrine activity. Here we generated an estrogen responsive transgenic zebrafish model in a pigment-free "Casper" phenotype, facilitating identification of target tissues and quantification of these responses in whole intact fish. Using the ERE-GFP-Casper model we show chemical type and concentration dependence for green fluorescent protein (GFP) induction and both spatial and temporal responses for different environmental estrogens tested. We also developed a semiautomated (ArrayScan) imaging and image analysis system that we applied to quantify whole body fluorescence responses for a range of different estrogenic chemicals in the new transgenic zebrafish model. The zebrafish model developed provides a sensitive and highly integrative system for identifying estrogenic chemicals, their target tissues and effect concentrations for exposures in real time and across different life stages. It thus has application for chemical screening to better direct health effects analysis of environmental estrogens and for investigating the functional roles of estrogens in vertebrates.

  9. Hooking the big one: the potential of zebrafish xenotransplantation to reform cancer drug screening in the genomic era

    PubMed Central

    Veinotte, Chansey J.; Dellaire, Graham; Berman, Jason N.

    2014-01-01

    The current preclinical pipeline for drug discovery can be cumbersome and costly, which limits the number of compounds that can effectively be transitioned to use as therapies. Chemical screens in zebrafish have uncovered new uses for existing drugs and identified promising new compounds from large libraries. Xenotransplantation of human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos builds on this work and enables direct evaluation of patient-derived tumor specimens in vivo in a rapid and cost-effective manner. The short time frame needed for xenotransplantation studies means that the zebrafish can serve as an early preclinical drug screening tool and can also help personalize cancer therapy by providing real-time data on the response of the human cells to treatment. In this Review, we summarize the use of zebrafish embryos in drug screening and highlight the potential for xenotransplantation approaches to be adopted as a preclinical tool to identify and prioritize therapies for further clinical evaluation. We also discuss some of the limitations of using zebrafish xenografts and the benefits of using them in concert with murine xenografts in drug optimization. PMID:24973744

  10. High-Content and Semi-Automated Quantification of Responses to Estrogenic Chemicals Using a Novel Translucent Transgenic Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Green, Jon M; Metz, Jeremy; Lee, Okhyun; Trznadel, Maciej; Takesono, Aya; Brown, A Ross; Owen, Stewart F; Kudoh, Tetsuhiro; Tyler, Charles R

    2016-06-21

    Rapid embryogenesis, together with genetic similarities with mammals, and the desire to reduce mammalian testing, are major incentives for using the zebrafish model in chemical screening and testing. Transgenic zebrafish, engineered for identifying target gene expression through expression of fluorophores, have considerable potential for both high-content and high-throughput testing of chemicals for endocrine activity. Here we generated an estrogen responsive transgenic zebrafish model in a pigment-free "Casper" phenotype, facilitating identification of target tissues and quantification of these responses in whole intact fish. Using the ERE-GFP-Casper model we show chemical type and concentration dependence for green fluorescent protein (GFP) induction and both spatial and temporal responses for different environmental estrogens tested. We also developed a semiautomated (ArrayScan) imaging and image analysis system that we applied to quantify whole body fluorescence responses for a range of different estrogenic chemicals in the new transgenic zebrafish model. The zebrafish model developed provides a sensitive and highly integrative system for identifying estrogenic chemicals, their target tissues and effect concentrations for exposures in real time and across different life stages. It thus has application for chemical screening to better direct health effects analysis of environmental estrogens and for investigating the functional roles of estrogens in vertebrates. PMID:27227508

  11. Dietary β-glucan enhances the contents of complement component 3 and factor B in eggs of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chengyan; Wang, Peng; Li, Mengyang; Liu, Shousheng; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-12-01

    β-glucan has been shown to increase non-specific immunity and resistance against infections or pathogenic bacteria in several fish species, but no information is available regarding its trans-generational effects to date. Here we clearly demonstrated that β-glucan enhanced the contents of immune-relevant molecules C3 and Bf in eggs of zebrafish, and the embryos derived from β-1,3 glucan-treated zebrafish were more resistant to bacterial challenge than control embryos. Moreover, the transferred C3 and Bf were directly associated with the antimicrobial defense of early embryos. In addition, feeding female zebrafish with β-glucan had little detrimental effects on the number of spawned eggs and their embryonic development. Collectively, these data show for the first time that β-glucan can be safely used to promote the non-specific immunity in offspring of fishes. PMID:27375187

  12. Transplantation of GFP-expressing Blastomeres for Live Imaging of Retinal and Brain Development in Chimeric Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jian; Wei, Xiangyun

    2010-01-01

    Cells change extensively in their locations and property during embryogenesis. These changes are regulated by the interactions between the cells and their environment. Chimeric embryos, which are composed of cells of different genetic background, are great tools to study the cell-cell interactions mediated by genes of interest. The embryonic transparency of zebrafish at early developmental stages permits direct visualization of the morphogenesis of tissues and organs at the cellular level. Here, we demonstrate a protocol to generate chimeric retinas and brains in zebrafish embryos and to perform live imaging of the donor cells. The protocol covers the preparation of transplantation needles, the transplantation of GFP-expressing donor blastomeres to GFP-negative hosts, and the examination of donor cell behavior under live confocal microscopy. With slight modifications, this protocol can also be used to study the embryonic development of other tissues and organs in zebrafish. The advantages of using GFP to label donor cells are also discussed. PMID:20689504

  13. Zebrafish Trap230/Med12 is required as a coactivator for Sox9-dependent neural crest, cartilage and ear development.

    PubMed

    Rau, Marlene J; Fischer, Sabine; Neumann, Carl J

    2006-08-01

    The vertebrate Sox9 transcription factor directs the development of neural crest, otic placodes, cartilage and bone. In zebrafish, there are two Sox9 orthologs, Sox9a and Sox9b, which together perform the functions of the single-copy tetrapod Sox9. In a large-scale genetic screen, we have identified a novel zebrafish mutant that strongly resembles the Sox9a/Sox9b double mutant phenotype. We show that this mutation disrupts the zebrafish Trap230/Med12 ortholog, a member of the Mediator complex. Mediator is a coactivator complex transducing the interaction of DNA-binding transcription factors with RNA polymerase II, and our results reveal a critical function of the Trap230 subunit as a coactivator for Sox9.

  14. Expression Pattern and Biochemical Properties of Zebrafish N-Acetylglutamate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Caldovic, Ljubica; Haskins, Nantaporn; Mumo, Amy; Majumdar, Himani; Pinter, Mary; Tuchman, Mendel; Krufka, Alison

    2014-01-01

    The urea cycle converts ammonia, a waste product of protein catabolism, into urea. Because fish dispose ammonia directly into water, the role of the urea cycle in fish remains unknown. Six enzymes, N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), carbamylphosphate synthetase III, ornithine transcarbamylase, argininosuccinate synthase, argininosuccinate lyase and arginase 1, and two membrane transporters, ornithine transporter and aralar, comprise the urea cycle. The genes for all six enzymes and both transporters are present in the zebrafish genome. NAGS (EC 2.3.1.1) catalyzes the formation of N-acetylglutamate from glutamate and acetyl coenzyme A and in zebrafish is partially inhibited by L-arginine. NAGS and other urea cycle genes are highly expressed during the first four days of zebrafish development. Sequence alignment of NAGS proteins from six fish species revealed three regions of sequence conservation: the mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) at the N-terminus, followed by the variable and conserved segments. Removal of the MTS yields mature zebrafish NAGS (zfNAGS-M) while removal of the variable segment from zfNAGS-M results in conserved NAGS (zfNAGS-C). Both zfNAGS-M and zfNAGS-C are tetramers in the absence of L-arginine; addition of L-arginine decreased partition coefficients of both proteins. The zfNAGS-C unfolds over a broader temperature range and has higher specific activity than zfNAGS-M. In the presence of L-arginine the apparent Vmax of zfNAGS-M and zfNAGS-C decreased, their Kmapp for acetyl coenzyme A increased while the Kmapp for glutamate remained unchanged. The expression pattern of NAGS and other urea cycle genes in developing zebrafish suggests that they may have a role in citrulline and/or arginine biosynthesis during the first day of development and in ammonia detoxification thereafter. Biophysical and biochemical properties of zebrafish NAGS suggest that the variable segment may stabilize a tetrameric state of zfNAGS-M and that under physiological

  15. Developmental expression and organisation of fibrinogen genes in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fish, Richard J; Vorjohann, Silja; Béna, Frédérique; Fort, Alexandre; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite

    2012-01-01

    The zebrafish is a model organism for studying vertebrate development and many human diseases. Orthologues of the majority of human coagulation factors are present in zebrafish, including fibrinogen. As a first step towards using zebrafish to model human fibrinogen disorders, we cloned the zebrafish fibrinogen cDNAs and made in situ hybridisations and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCR) to detect zebrafish fibrinogen mRNAs. Prior to liver development or blood flow we detected zebrafish fibrinogen expression in the embryonic yolk syncytial layer and then in the early cells of the developing liver. While human fibrinogen is encoded by a three-gene, 50 kilobase (kb) cluster on chromosome 4 ( FGB-FGA-FGG ), recent genome assemblies showed that the zebrafish fgg gene appears distanced from fga and fgb , which we confirmed by in situ hybridisation. The zebrafish fibrinogen Bβ and γ protein chains are conserved at over 50% of amino acid positions, compared to the human polypeptides. The zebrafish Aα chain is less conserved and its C-terminal region is nearly 200 amino acids shorter than human Aα. We generated transgenic zebrafish which express a green fluorescent protein reporter gene under the control of a 1.6 kb regulatory region from zebrafish fgg . Transgenic embryos showed strong fluorescence in the developing liver, mimicking endogenous fibrinogen expression. This regulatory sequence can now be used for overexpression of transgenes in zebrafish hepatocytes. Our study is a proof-of-concept step towards using zebrafish to model human disease linked to fibrinogen gene mutations.

  16. Developmental exposure to acetaminophen does not induce hyperactivity in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Isabel; Knaup, Sabine; Romanos, Marcel; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Drepper, Carsten; Lillesaar, Christina

    2016-08-01

    First line pain relief medication during pregnancy relies nearly entirely on the over-the-counter analgesic acetaminophen, which is generally considered safe to use during gestation. However, recent epidemiological studies suggest a risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-like symptoms in children if mothers use acetaminophen during pregnancy. Currently, there are no experimental proofs that prenatal acetaminophen exposure causes developmental brain alterations of progeny. Exposure to high acetaminophen concentrations causes liver toxicity, which is well investigated in different model organisms. However, sub-liver-toxic concentrations have not been experimentally investigated with respect to ADHD endophenotypes such as hyperactivity. We used zebrafish to investigate the potential impact of acetaminophen exposure on locomotor activity levels, and compared it to the established zebrafish Latrophilin 3 (Lphn3) ADHD-model. We determined the sub-liver-toxic concentration of acetaminophen in zebrafish larvae and treated wild-type and lphn3.1 knockdown larvae with increasing concentrations of acetaminophen. We were able to confirm that lphn3.1 knockdown alone causes hyperactivity, strengthening the implication of Lphn3 dysfunction as an ADHD risk factor. Neither acute nor chronic exposure to acetaminophen at sub-liver-toxic concentrations in wild-type or lphn3.1 knock-downs increases locomotor activity levels. Together our findings show that embryonic to larval exposure to acetaminophen does not cause hyperactivity in zebrafish larvae. Furthermore, there are no additive and/or synergistic effects of acetaminophen exposure in a susceptible background induced by knock-down of lphn3.1. Our experimental study suggests that there is, at least in zebrafish larvae, no direct link between embryonic acetaminophen exposure and hyperactivity. Further work is necessary to clarify this issue in humans. PMID:27116683

  17. Illuminating Phagocyte Biology: The View from Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cong; Niethammer, Philipp

    2016-07-25

    Many phagocyte behaviors, including vascular rolling and adhesion, migration, and oxidative bursting, are better measured in seconds or minutes than hours or days. Zebrafish is ideally suited for imaging such rapid biology within the intact animal. We discuss how this model has revealed unique insights into various aspects of phagocyte physiology. PMID:27459065

  18. Teaching Stress Physiology Using Zebrafish ("Danio Rerio")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Michael; Dhawale, Shree; Mustafa, Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    A straightforward and inexpensive laboratory experiment is presented that investigates the physiological stress response of zebrafish after a 5 degree C increase in water temperature. This experiment is designed for an undergraduate physiology lab and allows students to learn the scientific method and relevant laboratory techniques without causing…

  19. Detecting Developmental Neurotoxicants Using Zebrafish Embryos

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of EPA’s program on the screening and prioritization of chemicals for developmental neurotoxicity, a rapid, cost-effective in vivo vertebrate screen is being developed using an alternative species approach. Zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small freshwater fish with external f...

  20. Regeneration of Zebrafish CNS: Adult Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sukla; Hui, Subhra Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration in the animal kingdom is one of the most fascinating problems that have allowed scientists to address many issues of fundamental importance in basic biology. However, we came to know that the regenerative capability may vary across different species. Among vertebrates, fish and amphibians are capable of regenerating a variety of complex organs through epimorphosis. Zebrafish is an excellent animal model, which can repair several organs like damaged retina, severed spinal cord, injured brain and heart, and amputated fins. The focus of the present paper is on spinal cord regeneration in adult zebrafish. We intend to discuss our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) that allows formation of proliferating progenitors and controls neurogenesis, which involve changes in epigenetic and transcription programs. Unlike mammals, zebrafish retains radial glia, a nonneuronal cell type in their adult central nervous system. Injury induced proliferation involves radial glia which proliferate, transcribe embryonic genes, and can give rise to new neurons. Recent technological development of exquisite molecular tools in zebrafish, such as cell ablation, lineage analysis, and novel and substantial microarray, together with advancement in stem cell biology, allowed us to investigate how progenitor cells contribute to the generation of appropriate structures and various underlying mechanisms like reprogramming. PMID:27382491

  1. Nicotine response genetics in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Andrew M.; Balciunas, Darius; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Clark, Karl J.; Bedell, Victoria M.; Westcot, Stephanie E.; Myers, Shelly R.; Moulder, Gary L.; Thomas, Mark J.; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco use is predicted to result in over 1 billion deaths worldwide by the end of the 21st century. How genetic variation contributes to the observed differential predisposition in the human population to drug dependence is unknown. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an emerging vertebrate model system for understanding the genetics of behavior. We developed a nicotine behavioral assay in zebrafish and applied it in a forward genetic screen using gene-breaking transposon mutagenesis. We used this method to molecularly characterize bdav/cct8 and hbog/gabbr1.2 as mutations with altered nicotine response. Each have a single human ortholog, identifying two points for potential scientific, diagnostic, and drug development for nicotine biology and cessation therapeutics. We show this insertional method generates mutant alleles that are reversible through Cre-mediated recombination, representing a conditional mutation system for the zebrafish. The combination of this reporter-tagged insertional mutagen approach and zebrafish provides a powerful platform for a rich array of questions amenable to genetic-based scientific inquiry, including the basis of behavior, epigenetics, plasticity, stress, memory, and learning. PMID:19858493

  2. Behavorial assessments of larval zebrafish neurotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fishes have long been a popular organism in ecotoxicology research, and are increasingly used in human health research as an alternative animal model for chemical screening. Our laboratory incorporates a zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo/larval assay to screen chemicals for developm...

  3. Thyroid development in zebrafish lacking Taz.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Andrea; Porreca, Immacolata; Caputi, Luigi; De Felice, Elena; Schulte-Merker, Stephan; Zannini, Mariastella; Sordino, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Taz is a signal-responsive transcriptional coregulator implicated in several biological functions, from chondrogenesis to regulation of organ size. Less well studied, however, is its role in thyroid formation. Here, we explored the in vivo effects on thyroid development of morpholino (MO)-mediated knockdown of wwtr1, the gene encoding zebrafish Taz. The wwtr1 gene is expressed in the thyroid primordium and pharyngeal tissue of developing zebrafish. Compared to mammalian cells, in which Taz promotes expression of thyroid transcription factors and thyroid differentiation genes, wwtr1 MO injection in zebrafish had little or no effect on the expression of thyroid transcription factors, and differentially altered the expression of thyroid differentiation genes. Analysis of wwtr1 morphants at later stages of development revealed that the number and the lumen of thyroid follicles, and the number of thyroid follicle cells, were significantly smaller. In addition, Taz-depleted larvae displayed patterning defects in ventral cranial vessels that correlate with lateral displacement of thyroid follicles. These findings indicate that the zebrafish Taz protein is needed for the normal differentiation of the thyroid and are the first to suggest that Taz confers growth advantage to the endocrine gland.

  4. Cadmium potentiates toxicity of cypermethrin in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Ye, Xiaoqing; He, Buyuan; Liu, Jing

    2016-02-01

    Co-occurrence of pesticides such as synthetic pyrethroids and metals in aquatic ecosystems raises concerns over their combined ecological effects. Cypermethrin, 1 of the top 5 synthetic pyrethroids in use, has been extensively detected in surface water. Cadmium (Cd) has been recognized as 1 of the most toxic metals and is a common contaminant in the aquatic system. However, little information is available regarding their joint toxicity. In the present study, combined toxicity of cypermethrin and Cd and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Zebrafish embryos and adults were exposed to the individual contaminant or binary mixtures. Co-exposure to cypermethrin and Cd produced synergistic effects on the occurrence of crooked body, pericardial edema, and noninflation of swim bladder. The addition of Cd significantly potentiated cypermethrin-induced spasms and caused more oxidative stress in zebrafish larvae. Cypermethrin-mediated induction of transcription levels and catalytic activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme were significantly down-regulated by Cd in both zebrafish larvae and adults. Chemical analytical data showed that in vitro elimination of cypermethrin by CYP1A1 was inhibited by Cd. The addition of Cd caused an elevation of in vivo cypermethrin residue levels in the mixture-exposed adult zebrafish. These results suggest that the enhanced toxicity of cypermethrin in the presence of Cd results from the inhibitory effects of Cd on CYP-mediated biotransformation of this pesticide. The authors' findings provide a deeper understanding of the mechanistic basis accounting for the joint toxicity of cypermethrin and Cd.

  5. An outbreak of Plesimonus Shigelloides in Zebrafish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plesiomonas shigelloides is a flagellated, gram-negative rod that is an emergent pathogen associated with human gastroenteritis. Recently, we experienced a disease outbreak in zebrafish that were obtained from a commercial source. Fourteen days after being held at 27°C in our flow-through quarantine...

  6. Neuroendocrine control of ionic balance in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Kumai, Yusuke; Perry, Steve F

    2016-08-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an emerging model for integrative physiological research. In this mini-review, we discuss recent advances in the neuroendocrine control of ionic balance in this species, and identify current knowledge gaps and issues that would benefit from further investigation. Zebrafish inhabit a hypo-ionic environment and therefore are challenged by a continual loss of ions to the water. To maintain ionic homeostasis, they must actively take up ions from the water and reduce passive ion loss. The adult gill or the skin of larvae are the primary sites of ionic regulation. Current models for the uptake of major ions in zebrafish incorporate at least three types of ion transporting cells (also called ionocytes); H(+)-ATPase-rich cells for Na(+) uptake, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-rich cells for Ca(2+) uptake, and Na(+)/Cl(-)-cotransporter expressing cells for both Na(+) and Cl(-) uptake. The precise molecular mechanisms regulating the paracellular loss of ions remain largely unknown. However, epithelial tight junction proteins, including claudins, are thought to play a critical role in reducing ion losses to the surrounding water. Using the zebrafish model, several key neuroendocrine factors were identified as regulators of epithelial ion movement, including the catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline), cortisol, the renin-angiotensin system, parathyroid hormone and prolactin. Increasing evidence also suggests that gasotransmitters, such as H2S, are involved in regulating ion uptake.

  7. Zebrafish embryo model of Bartonella henselae infection.

    PubMed

    Lima, Amorce; Cha, Byeong J; Amin, Jahanshah; Smith, Lisa K; Anderson, Burt

    2014-10-01

    Bartonella henselae (Bh) is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that has been associated with a variety of human diseases, including bacillary angiomatosis that is characterized by vasoproliferative tumor-like lesions on the skin of some immunosuppressed individuals. The study of Bh pathogenesis has been limited to in vitro cell culture systems due to the lack of an animal model. Therefore, we wanted to investigate whether the zebrafish embryo could be used to model human infection with Bh. Our data showed that Tg(fli1:egfp)(y1) zebrafish embryos supported a sustained Bh infection for 7 days with >10-fold bacterial replication when inoculated in the yolk sac. We showed that Bh recruited phagocytes to the site of infection in the Tg(mpx:GFP)uwm1 embryos. Infected embryos showed evidence of a Bh-induced angiogenic phenotype and an increase in the expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory factors and pro-angiogenic markers. However, infection of zebrafish embryos with a deletion mutant in the major adhesin (BadA) resulted in little or no bacterial replication and a diminished host response, providing the first evidence that BadA is critical for in vivo infection. Thus, the zebrafish embryo provides the first practical model of Bh infection that will facilitate efforts to identify virulence factors and define molecular mechanisms of Bh pathogenesis.

  8. Zebrafish Embryo Model of Bartonella henselae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Amorce; Cha, Byeong J.; Amin, Jahanshah; Smith, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bartonella henselae (Bh) is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that has been associated with a variety of human diseases, including bacillary angiomatosis that is characterized by vasoproliferative tumor-like lesions on the skin of some immunosuppressed individuals. The study of Bh pathogenesis has been limited to in vitro cell culture systems due to the lack of an animal model. Therefore, we wanted to investigate whether the zebrafish embryo could be used to model human infection with Bh. Our data showed that Tg(fli1:egfp)y1 zebrafish embryos supported a sustained Bh infection for 7 days with >10-fold bacterial replication when inoculated in the yolk sac. We showed that Bh recruited phagocytes to the site of infection in the Tg(mpx:GFP)uwm1 embryos. Infected embryos showed evidence of a Bh-induced angiogenic phenotype and an increase in the expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory factors and pro-angiogenic markers. However, infection of zebrafish embryos with a deletion mutant in the major adhesin (BadA) resulted in little or no bacterial replication and a diminished host response, providing the first evidence that BadA is critical for in vivo infection. Thus, the zebrafish embryo provides the first practical model of Bh infection that will facilitate efforts to identify virulence factors and define molecular mechanisms of Bh pathogenesis. PMID:25026365

  9. Regeneration of Zebrafish CNS: Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sukla; Hui, Subhra Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration in the animal kingdom is one of the most fascinating problems that have allowed scientists to address many issues of fundamental importance in basic biology. However, we came to know that the regenerative capability may vary across different species. Among vertebrates, fish and amphibians are capable of regenerating a variety of complex organs through epimorphosis. Zebrafish is an excellent animal model, which can repair several organs like damaged retina, severed spinal cord, injured brain and heart, and amputated fins. The focus of the present paper is on spinal cord regeneration in adult zebrafish. We intend to discuss our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) that allows formation of proliferating progenitors and controls neurogenesis, which involve changes in epigenetic and transcription programs. Unlike mammals, zebrafish retains radial glia, a nonneuronal cell type in their adult central nervous system. Injury induced proliferation involves radial glia which proliferate, transcribe embryonic genes, and can give rise to new neurons. Recent technological development of exquisite molecular tools in zebrafish, such as cell ablation, lineage analysis, and novel and substantial microarray, together with advancement in stem cell biology, allowed us to investigate how progenitor cells contribute to the generation of appropriate structures and various underlying mechanisms like reprogramming. PMID:27382491

  10. Regeneration of Zebrafish CNS: Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sukla; Hui, Subhra Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration in the animal kingdom is one of the most fascinating problems that have allowed scientists to address many issues of fundamental importance in basic biology. However, we came to know that the regenerative capability may vary across different species. Among vertebrates, fish and amphibians are capable of regenerating a variety of complex organs through epimorphosis. Zebrafish is an excellent animal model, which can repair several organs like damaged retina, severed spinal cord, injured brain and heart, and amputated fins. The focus of the present paper is on spinal cord regeneration in adult zebrafish. We intend to discuss our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) that allows formation of proliferating progenitors and controls neurogenesis, which involve changes in epigenetic and transcription programs. Unlike mammals, zebrafish retains radial glia, a nonneuronal cell type in their adult central nervous system. Injury induced proliferation involves radial glia which proliferate, transcribe embryonic genes, and can give rise to new neurons. Recent technological development of exquisite molecular tools in zebrafish, such as cell ablation, lineage analysis, and novel and substantial microarray, together with advancement in stem cell biology, allowed us to investigate how progenitor cells contribute to the generation of appropriate structures and various underlying mechanisms like reprogramming.

  11. Protocadherin-17 Function in Zebrafish Retinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Londraville, Richard; Brickner, Sarah; El-Shaar, Lana; Fankhauser, Kelsee; Dearth, Cassandra; Fulton, Leah; Sochacka, Alicja; Bhattarai, Sunil; Marrs, James A.; Liu, Qin

    2012-01-01

    Cadherin cell adhesion molecules play crucial roles in vertebrate development including the development of the retina. Most studies have focused on examining functions of classic cadherins (e.g. N-cadherin) in retinal development. There is little information on the function of protocadherins in the development of the vertebrate visual system. We previously showed that protocadherin-17 mRNA was expressed in developing zebrafish retina during critical stages of the retinal development. To gain insight into protocadherin-17 function in the formation of the retina, we analyzed eye development and differentiation of retinal cells in zebrafish embryos injected with protocadherin-17 specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs). Protocadherin-17 knockdown embryos (pcdh17 morphants) had significantly reduced eyes due mainly to decreased cell proliferation. Differentiation of several retinal cell types (e.g. retinal ganglion cells) was also disrupted in the pcdh17 morphants. Phenotypic rescue was achieved by injection of protocadherin-17 mRNA. Injection of a vivo-protocadherin-17 MO into one eye of embryonic zebrafish resulted in similar eye defects. Our results suggest that protocadherin-17 plays an important role in the normal formation of the zebrafish retina. PMID:22927092

  12. Reactive gliosis in the adult zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jennifer L; Ranski, Alexandra H; Morgan, Gregory W; Thummel, Ryan

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to mammals, zebrafish posses the remarkable ability to regenerate retinal neurons. Damage to the zebrafish retina induces Müller glia to act as stem cells, generating retinal progenitors for regeneration. In contrast, injury in the mammalian retina results in Müller glial reactive gliosis, a characteristic gliotic response that is normally detrimental to vision. Understanding the signaling pathways that determine how Müller glia respond to injury is a critical step toward promoting regeneration in the mammalian retina. Here we report that zebrafish Müller glia exhibit signs of reactive gliosis even under normal regenerative conditions and that cell cycle inhibition increases this response. Persistently reactive Müller glia increase their neuroprotective functions, temporarily saving photoreceptors from a cytotoxic light lesion. However, the absence of a sustained proliferation response results in a significant inhibition of retinal regeneration. Interestingly, when cell cycle inhibition is released, a partial recovery of regeneration is observed. Together, these data demonstrate that zebrafish Müller glia possess both gliotic and regenerative potential. PMID:26492821

  13. A zebrafish model of inflammatory lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Kazuhide S.; Misa, June Pauline; Oehlers, Stefan H.; Hall, Christopher J.; Ellett, Felix; Alasmari, Sultan; Lieschke, Graham J.; Crosier, Kathryn E.; Crosier, Philip S.; Astin, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a disabling chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. IBD patients have increased intestinal lymphatic vessel density and recent studies have shown that this may contribute to the resolution of IBD. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in IBD-associated lymphangiogenesis are still unclear. In this study, we established a novel inflammatory lymphangiogenesis model in zebrafish larvae involving colitogenic challenge stimulated by exposure to 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) or dextran sodium sulphate (DSS). Treatment with either TNBS or DSS resulted in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (Vegfr)-dependent lymphangiogenesis in the zebrafish intestine. Reduction of intestinal inflammation by the administration of the IBD therapeutic, 5-aminosalicylic acid, reduced intestinal lymphatic expansion. Zebrafish macrophages express vascular growth factors vegfaa, vegfc and vegfd and chemical ablation of these cells inhibits intestinal lymphatic expansion, suggesting that the recruitment of macrophages to the intestine upon colitogenic challenge is required for intestinal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. Importantly, this study highlights the potential of zebrafish as an inflammatory lymphangiogenesis model that can be used to investigate the role and mechanism of lymphangiogenesis in inflammatory diseases such as IBD. PMID:26369931

  14. Sleep and its regulation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, Irina V

    2011-01-01

    The function of sleep remains a central enigma of modern biology, in spite of the obvious importance of sleep for normal physiology and cognition. The zebrafish has emerged as a promising new model for studying sleep, its changes with age, and the impact of sleep alterations on cognitive function. Recent studies of this diurnal vertebrate have provided new insights into the dual role of the pineal hormone melatonin and its receptors, regulating sleep in diurnal vertebrates through both homeostatic and circadian mechanisms. Research in zebrafish has also revealed interactions between melatonin and the hypocretin/orexin system, another important sleep-wake modulator. Future investigations should benefit from the conservation in zebrafish of mechanisms that regulate normal sleep, our extensive knowledge of their molecular biology, the availability of multiple transgenic and mutant phenotypes, and the feasibility of applying sensitive in vivo imaging techniques to record sleep-related neuronal activity in these optically transparent subjects. The established sensitivity of zebrafish to many pharmacological hypnotics should also contribute to the development of new, safe and effective sleep medications.

  15. Nanomaterial Toxicity Screening in Developing Zebrafish Embryos

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess nanomaterial vertebrate toxicity, a high-content screening assay was created using developing zebrafish, Danio rerio. This included a diverse group of nanomaterials (n=42 total) ranging from metallic (Ag, Au) and metal oxide (CeO2, CuO, TiO2, ZnO) nanoparticles, to non...

  16. Human melanoma cells transplanted into zebrafish proliferate, migrate, produce melanin, form masses and stimulate angiogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Haldi, Maryann; Ton, Christopher; Seng, Wen Lin; McGrath, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    In this research, we optimized parameters for xenotransplanting WM-266-4, a metastatic melanoma cell line, including zebrafish site and stage for transplantation, number of cells, injection method, and zebrafish incubation temperature. Melanoma cells proliferated, migrated and formed masses in vivo. We transplanted two additional cancer cell lines, SW620, a colorectal cancer cell line, and FG CAS/Crk, a pancreatic cancer cell line and these human cancers also formed masses in zebrafish. We also transplanted CCD-1092Sk, a human fibroblast cell line established from normal foreskin and this cell line migrated, but did not proliferate or form masses. We quantified the number of proliferating melanoma and normal skin fibroblasts by dissociating xenotransplant zebrafish, dispensing an aliquot of CM-DiI labeled human cells from each zebrafish onto a hemocytometer slide and then visually counting the number of fluorescently labeled cancer cells. Since zebrafish are transparent until approximately 30 dpf, the interaction of labeled melanoma cells and zebrafish endothelial cells (EC) can be visualized by whole-mount immunochemical staining. After staining with Phy-V, a mouse anti-zebrafish monoclonal antibody (mAb) that specifically labels activated EC and angioblasts, using immunohistology and 2-photon microscopy, we observed activated zebrafish EC embedded in human melanoma cell masses. The zebrafish model offers a rapid efficient approach for assessing human cancer cells at various stages of tumorigenesis. PMID:17051341

  17. Defects of the Glycinergic Synapse in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Kazutoyo; Hirata, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Glycine mediates fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. Physiological importance of the glycinergic synapse is well established in the brainstem and the spinal cord. In humans, the loss of glycinergic function in the spinal cord and brainstem leads to hyperekplexia, which is characterized by an excess startle reflex to sudden acoustic or tactile stimulation. In addition, glycinergic synapses in this region are also involved in the regulation of respiration and locomotion, and in the nociceptive processing. The importance of the glycinergic synapse is conserved across vertebrate species. A teleost fish, the zebrafish, offers several advantages as a vertebrate model for research of glycinergic synapse. Mutagenesis screens in zebrafish have isolated two motor defective mutants that have pathogenic mutations in glycinergic synaptic transmission: bandoneon (beo) and shocked (sho). Beo mutants have a loss-of-function mutation of glycine receptor (GlyR) β-subunit b, alternatively, sho mutant is a glycinergic transporter 1 (GlyT1) defective mutant. These mutants are useful animal models for understanding of glycinergic synaptic transmission and for identification of novel therapeutic agents for human diseases arising from defect in glycinergic transmission, such as hyperekplexia or glycine encephalopathy. Recent advances in techniques for genome editing and for imaging and manipulating of a molecule or a physiological process make zebrafish more attractive model. In this review, we describe the glycinergic defective zebrafish mutants and the technical advances in both forward and reverse genetic approaches as well as in vivo visualization and manipulation approaches for the study of the glycinergic synapse in zebrafish. PMID:27445686

  18. Defects of the Glycinergic Synapse in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Kazutoyo; Hirata, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Glycine mediates fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. Physiological importance of the glycinergic synapse is well established in the brainstem and the spinal cord. In humans, the loss of glycinergic function in the spinal cord and brainstem leads to hyperekplexia, which is characterized by an excess startle reflex to sudden acoustic or tactile stimulation. In addition, glycinergic synapses in this region are also involved in the regulation of respiration and locomotion, and in the nociceptive processing. The importance of the glycinergic synapse is conserved across vertebrate species. A teleost fish, the zebrafish, offers several advantages as a vertebrate model for research of glycinergic synapse. Mutagenesis screens in zebrafish have isolated two motor defective mutants that have pathogenic mutations in glycinergic synaptic transmission: bandoneon (beo) and shocked (sho). Beo mutants have a loss-of-function mutation of glycine receptor (GlyR) β-subunit b, alternatively, sho mutant is a glycinergic transporter 1 (GlyT1) defective mutant. These mutants are useful animal models for understanding of glycinergic synaptic transmission and for identification of novel therapeutic agents for human diseases arising from defect in glycinergic transmission, such as hyperekplexia or glycine encephalopathy. Recent advances in techniques for genome editing and for imaging and manipulating of a molecule or a physiological process make zebrafish more attractive model. In this review, we describe the glycinergic defective zebrafish mutants and the technical advances in both forward and reverse genetic approaches as well as in vivo visualization and manipulation approaches for the study of the glycinergic synapse in zebrafish. PMID:27445686

  19. Dithiocarbamates are teratogenic to developing zebrafish through inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Boxtel, Antonius L. van; Kamstra, Jorke H.; Fluitsma, Donna M.; Legler, Juliette

    2010-04-15

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) are a class of compounds that are extensively used in agriculture as pesticides. As such, humans and wildlife are undoubtedly exposed to these chemicals. Although DTCs are thought to be relatively safe due to their short half lives, it is well established that they are teratogenic to vertebrates, especially to fish. In zebrafish, these teratogenic effects are characterized by distorted notochord development and shortened anterior to posterior axis. DTCs are known copper (Cu) chelators but this does not fully explain the observed teratogenic effects. We show here that DTCs cause malformations in zebrafish that highly resemble teratogenic effects observed by direct inhibition of a group of cuproenzymes termed lysyl oxidases (LOX). Additionally, we demonstrate that partial knockdown of three LOX genes, lox, loxl1 and loxl5b, sensitizes the developing embryo to DTC exposure. Finally, we show that DTCs directly inhibit zebrafish LOX activity in an ex vivo amine oxidase assay. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence that DTC induced teratogenic effects are, at least in part, caused by direct inhibition of LOX activity.

  20. Biosecurity and Health Monitoring at the Zebrafish International Resource Center.

    PubMed

    Murray, Katrina N; Varga, Zoltán M; Kent, Michael L

    2016-07-01

    The Zebrafish International Resource Center (ZIRC) is a repository and distribution center for mutant, transgenic, and wild-type zebrafish. In recent years annual imports of new zebrafish lines to ZIRC have increased tremendously. In addition, after 15 years of research, we have identified some of the most virulent pathogens affecting zebrafish that should be avoided in large production facilities, such as ZIRC. Therefore, while importing a high volume of new lines we prioritize safeguarding the health of our in-house fish colony. Here, we describe the biosecurity and health-monitoring program implemented at ZIRC. This strategy was designed to prevent introduction of new zebrafish pathogens, minimize pathogens already present in the facility, and ensure a healthy zebrafish colony for in-house uses and shipment to customers.

  1. Behavioral analysis of zebrafish larvae swimming in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ruopei; Girdhar, Kiran; Chemla, Yann; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Behavioral biologists have a strong interest in studying the behavior of larval zebrafish because the limited number of locomotor neurons in larval zebrafish couples with the rich repertoire of movements as a vertebrate animal. Current research uses a priori-selected parameters to describe their movements. Most research also only considers the 2D movements of zebrafish, leaving out the vertical component of their locomotion. Our lab has developed a method to reduce the dimensionality of the locomotion of zebrafish and determine the behavioral space of 2D swimming. We are extending this work to capture 3D locomotion of zebrafish larvae. Here we present our preliminary analysis of the 3D locomotion of zebrafish.

  2. Swimming Against the Current: Zebrafish Help Address Educational Challenges.

    PubMed

    Pickart, Michael A; Liang, Jennifer; Hutson, Lara; Pierret, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Zebrafish can be important tools for learning and authentic student research. The broad zebrafish community is rich with examples to improve education for learners of all ages and geographical locales. This special collection of articles is presented with the hope of encouraging readers to reflect on the educational outcomes reported here and to consider new ways zebrafish may engage others to learn and grow. PMID:27333079

  3. Optical micromanipulation of nanoparticles and cells inside living zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Patrick Lie; Fenaroli, Federico; Evensen, Lasse; Griffiths, Gareth; Koster, Gerbrand

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of biological processes is often based on physical interactions between cells and their microenvironment. To unravel how and where interactions occur, micromanipulation methods can be used that offer high-precision control over the duration, position and magnitude of interactions. However, lacking an in vivo system, micromanipulation has generally been done with cells in vitro, which may not reflect the complex in vivo situation inside multicellular organisms. Here using optical tweezers we demonstrate micromanipulation throughout the transparent zebrafish embryo. We show that different cells, as well as injected nanoparticles and bacteria can be trapped and that adhesion properties and membrane deformation of endothelium and macrophages can be analysed. This non-invasive micromanipulation inside a whole-organism gives direct insights into cell interactions that are not accessible using existing approaches. Potential applications include screening of nanoparticle-cell interactions for cancer therapy or tissue invasion studies in cancer and infection biology. PMID:26996121

  4. Optical micromanipulation of nanoparticles and cells inside living zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Patrick Lie; Fenaroli, Federico; Evensen, Lasse; Griffiths, Gareth; Koster, Gerbrand

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of biological processes is often based on physical interactions between cells and their microenvironment. To unravel how and where interactions occur, micromanipulation methods can be used that offer high-precision control over the duration, position and magnitude of interactions. However, lacking an in vivo system, micromanipulation has generally been done with cells in vitro, which may not reflect the complex in vivo situation inside multicellular organisms. Here using optical tweezers we demonstrate micromanipulation throughout the transparent zebrafish embryo. We show that different cells, as well as injected nanoparticles and bacteria can be trapped and that adhesion properties and membrane deformation of endothelium and macrophages can be analysed. This non-invasive micromanipulation inside a whole-organism gives direct insights into cell interactions that are not accessible using existing approaches. Potential applications include screening of nanoparticle-cell interactions for cancer therapy or tissue invasion studies in cancer and infection biology. PMID:26996121

  5. A dedicated visual pathway for prey detection in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Semmelhack, Julia L; Donovan, Joseph C; Thiele, Tod R; Kuehn, Enrico; Laurell, Eva; Baier, Herwig

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish larvae show characteristic prey capture behavior in response to small moving objects. The neural mechanism used to recognize objects as prey remains largely unknown. We devised a machine learning behavior classification system to quantify hunting kinematics in semi-restrained animals exposed to a range of virtual stimuli. Two-photon calcium imaging revealed a small visual area, AF7, that was activated specifically by the optimal prey stimulus. This pretectal region is innervated by two types of retinal ganglion cells, which also send collaterals to the optic tectum. Laser ablation of AF7 markedly reduced prey capture behavior. We identified neurons with arbors in AF7 and found that they projected to multiple sensory and premotor areas: the optic tectum, the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (nMLF) and the hindbrain. These findings indicate that computations in the retina give rise to a visual stream which transforms sensory information into a directed prey capture response. PMID:25490154

  6. Optical micromanipulation of nanoparticles and cells inside living zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Patrick Lie; Fenaroli, Federico; Evensen, Lasse; Griffiths, Gareth; Koster, Gerbrand

    2016-03-01

    Regulation of biological processes is often based on physical interactions between cells and their microenvironment. To unravel how and where interactions occur, micromanipulation methods can be used that offer high-precision control over the duration, position and magnitude of interactions. However, lacking an in vivo system, micromanipulation has generally been done with cells in vitro, which may not reflect the complex in vivo situation inside multicellular organisms. Here using optical tweezers we demonstrate micromanipulation throughout the transparent zebrafish embryo. We show that different cells, as well as injected nanoparticles and bacteria can be trapped and that adhesion properties and membrane deformation of endothelium and macrophages can be analysed. This non-invasive micromanipulation inside a whole-organism gives direct insights into cell interactions that are not accessible using existing approaches. Potential applications include screening of nanoparticle-cell interactions for cancer therapy or tissue invasion studies in cancer and infection biology.

  7. Hearing Assessment in Zebrafish During the First Week Postfertilization.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qi; DeSmidt, Alexandra A; Tekin, Mustafa; Liu, Xuezhong; Lu, Zhongmin

    2016-04-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a valuable vertebrate model for human hearing disorders because of many advantages in genetics, embryology, and in vivo visualization. In this study, we investigated auditory function of zebrafish during the first week postfertilization using microphonic potential recording. Extracellular microphonic potentials were recorded from hair cells in the inner ear of wild-type AB and transgenic Et(krt4:GFP)(sqet4) zebrafish at 3, 5, and 7 days postfertilization in response to 20, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400-Hz acoustic stimulation. We found that microphonic threshold significantly decreased with age in zebrafish. However, there was no significant difference of microphonic responses between wild-type and transgenic zebrafish, indicating that the transgenic zebrafish have normal hearing like wild-type zebrafish. In addition, we observed that microphonic threshold did not change with the recording electrode location. Furthermore, microphonic threshold increased significantly at all tested stimulus frequencies after displacement of the saccular otolith but only increased at low frequencies after displacement of the utricular otolith, showing that the saccule rather than the utricle plays the major role in larval zebrafish hearing. These results enhance our knowledge of early development of auditory function in zebrafish and the factors affecting hearing assessment with microphonic potential recording.

  8. Deriving cell lines from zebrafish embryos and tumors.

    PubMed

    Choorapoikayil, Suma; Overvoorde, John; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2013-09-01

    Over the last two decades the zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model organism in science. The experimental accessibility, the broad range of zebrafish mutants, and the highly conserved genetic and biochemical pathways between zebrafish and mammals lifted zebrafish to become one of the most attractive vertebrate models to study gene function and to model human diseases. Zebrafish cell lines are highly attractive to investigate cell biology and zebrafish cell lines complement the experimental tools that are available already. We established a straightforward method to culture cells from a single zebrafish embryo or a single tumor. Here we describe the generation of fibroblast-like cell lines from wild-type and ptenb(-/-) embryos and an endothelial-like cell line from a tumor of an adult ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) zebrafish. This protocol can easily be adapted to establish stable cell lines from any mutant or transgenic zebrafish line and the average time to obtain a pro-stable cell line is 3-5 months.

  9. Biologically inspired robots elicit a robust fear response in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Bartolini, Tiziana; Panitz, Sarah G.; Butail, Sachit; Macrı, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish to three fear-evoking stimuli. In a binary choice test, zebrafish are exposed to a live allopatric predator, a biologically-inspired robot, and a computer-animated image of the live predator. A target tracking algorithm is developed to score zebrafish behavior. Unlike computer-animated images, the robotic and live predator elicit a robust avoidance response. Importantly, the robotic stimulus elicits more consistent inter-individual responses than the live predator. Results from this effort are expected to aid in hypothesis-driven studies on zebrafish fear response, by offering a valuable approach to maximize data-throughput and minimize animal subjects.

  10. Endocrine-active compound evaluation: qualitative and quantitative histomorphological assessment of zebrafish gonads after bisphenol-A exposure.

    PubMed

    Molina, Ana M; Lora, Antonio J; Blanco, Alfonso; Monterde, José G; Ayala, Nahum; Moyano, Rosario

    2013-02-01

    There is great social concern about the risk involved from exposure to BPA as an endocrine disrupter in humans, as well as the possible repercussion of this chemical on the environment. In this study, the short-term effects of BPA at a gonadal level were assessed by means of different biomarkers in a model animal organism in vogue, the zebrafish (Danio rerio). For this purpose, 60 female zebrafish aged 16 weeks were used. These were exposed for 14 days in aquariums (following OECD Directive no.204) to BPA concentrations of 1, 10, 100 and 1000 μg/L, in addition to a control batch. After the exposure period, the zebrafish were sacrificed and samples taken for a histopathological study by light and electron microscopy and morphometric analysis. During the fourteen days of exposure, water samples were taken from the aquariums to analyze the BPA levels. The BPA concentration in the fish and the water was determined by LC-MS/MS. The gonads of the zebrafish exposed to the BPA had a normal external appearance and there were no variations in their size or body weight. An accumulation of BPA was produced in the zebrafish tissues, and this increased as the BPA concentration to which the fish were exposed did. In the histopathological and morphometric studies, multiple alterations were observed in the zebrafish ovaries, particularly highlighting the vacuolization of the follicular cytoplasm, a great degeneration of all the cell components, and an important increase in the percentage of atretic follicles as from concentrations of 100 and 1000 μg/L of BPA, verified by morphometry. These data indicate that morphological endpoints are sufficiently sensitive to individuate early effects of environmental concentration of BPA on gonads after two weeks of exposure. PMID:23219663

  11. DeltaA mRNA and protein distribution in the zebrafish nervous system.

    PubMed

    Tallafuss, Alexandra; Trepman, Alissa; Eisen, Judith S

    2009-12-01

    Physical interaction between the transmembrane proteins Delta and Notch allows only a subset of neural precursors to become neurons, as well as regulating other aspects of neural development. To examine the localization of Delta protein during neural development, we generated an antibody specific to zebrafish Delta A (Dla). Here, we describe for the first time the subcellular localization of Dla protein in distinct puncta at cell cortex and/or membrane, supporting the function of Dla in direct cell-cell communication. In situ RNA hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed dynamic, coordinated expression patterns of dla mRNA and Dla protein in the developing and adult zebrafish nervous system. Dla expression is mostly excluded from differentiated neurons and is maintained in putative precursor cells at least until larval stages. In the adult brain, dla mRNA and Dla protein are expressed in proliferative zones normally associated with stem cells. PMID:19924821

  12. Quantitative differences in tissue surface tension influence zebrafish germ layer positioning

    PubMed Central

    Schötz, Eva-Maria; Burdine, Rebecca D.; Jülicher, Frank; Steinberg, Malcolm S.; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Foty, Ramsey A.

    2008-01-01

    This study provides direct functional evidence that differential adhesion, measurable as quantitative differences in tissue surface tension, influences spatial positioning between zebrafish germ layer tissues. We show that embryonic ectodermal and mesendodermal tissues generated by mRNA-overexpression behave on long-time scales like immiscible fluids. When mixed in hanging drop culture, their cells segregate into discrete phases with ectoderm adopting an internal position relative to the mesendoderm. The position adopted directly correlates with differences in tissue surface tension. We also show that germ layer tissues from untreated embryos, when extirpated and placed in culture, adopt a configuration similar to those of their mRNA-overexpressing counterparts. Down-regulating E-cadherin expression in the ectoderm leads to reduced surface tension and results in phase reversal with E-cadherin-depleted ectoderm cells now adopting an external position relative to the mesendoderm. These results show that in vitro cell sorting of zebrafish mesendoderm and ectoderm tissues is specified by tissue interfacial tensions. We perform a mathematical analysis indicating that tissue interfacial tension between actively motile cells contributes to the spatial organization and dynamics of these zebrafish germ layers in vivo. PMID:19404452

  13. Characterisation of the promoter region of the zebrafish six7 gene.

    PubMed

    Drivenes, O; Seo, H C; Fjose, A

    2000-04-25

    The Drosophila homeobox gene sine oculis and its murine homologue Six3 have both been shown to have regulatory functions in eye and brain development. In zebrafish, three Six3-related genes with conserved expression during early eye and head formation have been identified. One of these, six7, is first expressed at the gastrula stage in the involuting axial mesoderm, and later in the overlying neuroectoderm from which the forebrain and optic primordium develop. To elucidate the mechanisms regulating six7 expression, we isolated a 2.7-kb fragment of the 5'-flanking region. Three sequentially deleted fragments of this upstream region were used to produce GFP reporter constructs for analysis of tissue-specific expression in zebrafish embryos. The results show that a 625-bp upstream fragment is sufficient to direct strong expression of the reporter during gastrulation and early neurulation. The proximal part of the promoter contains binding sites for various constitutive transcription factors and an additional upstream element that was shown to be critical in directing expression to the anterior region of the zebrafish brain.

  14. Efficacy of UV-C photolysis of bisphenol A on transcriptome alterations of genes in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Asma; Hashmi, Imran; Zare, Ava; Mehrabani-Zeinabad, Mitra; Achari, Gopal; Habibi, Hamid R

    2016-09-18

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of UV-C direct photolysis of bisphenol A (BPA) as a remediation method of BPA contamination. We used zebrafish embryos as a model organism to test the toxicity and residual biological activity by measuring cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A), aromatase B (Aro B) and heat shock proteins (HSP-70) transcript levels. The mRNA levels of CYP1A gene increased about two fold while exposure of zebrafish embryos at 72 hpf resulted in significant induction (P = 0.048) of Aro B at 100 µg/L of BPA. Exposure of zebrafish embryos at 72 hpf to increasing concentrations of BPA resulted in significant induction (P = 0.0031) of HSP-70 transcript level. UV treatment of BPA resulted in a significant reduction in toxicity by reducing mortality of zebrafish embryos. The results suggest that UV-C direct photolysis may be an effective method for remediation of BPA contamination. Further studies will be necessary for better understanding of the identity and relative activity of the UV degradation by-products. PMID:27314163

  15. Period2 downregulation inhibits glioma cell apoptosis by activating the MDM2-TP53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hechun, Xia; Jun, Wang; Lijian, Zhang; Dede, Ma; Wenbin, Liu; Lei, Yin

    2016-01-01

    The Period2 (Per2) gene is an essential component of the mammalian circadian clock and is strongly linked to glioma occurrence and its response to radiotherapy. Here, we examined the role of Per2 in the response to X-ray-induced DNA damage in U343 glioma cells and in a mouse cancer model. Following low dose X-ray irradiation, we observed that lowering Per2 expression using RNAi reduces DNA damage and cell death in U343 cells and glioma tissue. Additionally, Per2 was associated with increased TP53 activity and was involved in the DNA damage during TP53-mediated apoptosis. These findings suggest that Per2, a core circadian gene, is not only a tumor suppressor gene but can also be regarded as an upstream regulator of TP53. It thus appears that Per2 is an important inhibitor of tumor growth that acts by increasing TP53 expression, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis. PMID:27036047

  16. Mutation screening of the human period 2 gene in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Shiino, Yayoi; Nakajima, Satoru; Ozeki, Yuji; Isono, Takahiro; Yamada, Naoto

    2003-02-20

    We tested whether the human period 2 gene (hper2), one of the essential components of the circadian oscillator, might have influence on bipolar disorder. We screened 88 bipolar disorder patients and 127 controls, all of Japanese origin. Screening in the casein kinase I epsilon (CKIepsilon) binding region of hper2, which was previously reported in familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome patients, with polymerase chain reaction amplification revealed four polymorphisms. One of the four polymorphisms had an amino acid substitution of a serine at 662 with a glycine (S662G). The frequencies of the S662G allele and genotypes on patients with bipolar disorder were very low and had no difference from those in controls. Polymorphism on the CKIepsilon binding region of hper2 gene which was previously reported, is unlikely to play an important role in the development of bipolar disorder. PMID:12565145

  17. Daily restricted feeding rescues a rhythm of period2 expression in the arrhythmic suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lamont, E W; Diaz, L Renteria; Barry-Shaw, J; Stewart, J; Amir, S

    2005-01-01

    Second only to light, daily restricted feeding schedules can entrain circadian rhythms in mammals [Neurosci Biobehav Rev 4 (1980) 119; J Biol Rhythms 17 (2002) 284]. Contrary to light, however, such feeding schedules have been found not to affect the master circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) [Genes Dev 14 (2000) 2950; Eur J Neurosci 13 (2001) 1190]. Here, we show that in rats that are arrhythmic as a consequence of prolonged housing in constant light, a daily restricted feeding schedule not only restores behavioral rhythmicity, as previously shown [Physiol Behav 53 (1993) 509], but in addition, induces a rhythm of the clock protein, Period2 in the SCN. These findings challenge the idea that the SCN is invulnerable to feeding schedules and call for a reevaluation of the role of the SCN clock in the circadian effects of such schedules.

  18. Dynamics of DNA hydroxymethylation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, Jorke H; Løken, Marianne; Aleström, Peter; Legler, Juliette

    2015-06-01

    During embryonic development in mammals, most of the methylated cytosines in the paternal genome are converted to 5-hydroxymethyldeoxycytidine (hmC), as part of DNA methylation reprogramming. Recent data also suggest tissue-specific functional roles of hmC, perhaps as an epigenetic mark. However, limited data are available on the levels and tissue distribution in zebrafish. In this study, we used high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to quantify hmC and 5-methyldeoxycytidine (mC) in zebrafish during development and in different tissues of the adult fish. Low levels of mC were found at 0.5 hours postfertilization (hpf) (1-2 cell stage) (1.9%), and increased to 8.4% by 96 hpf, with similar levels observed in different adult tissues. No hmC was detected up to 12 hpf, but levels increased during development from 24 up to 96 hpf (0.23%). In tissues, the highest levels of hmC were found in the brain (0.49%), intermediate levels in muscle (0.13%), liver (0.08%), and intestine (0.06%) and low levels in testis (0.01%), with an inverse correlation between hmC and mC. Our results indicate similar tissue distribution and levels of hmC between zebrafish and mammals, but distinct differences during embryonic development. Although more research is needed, these results support the use of zebrafish as an alternative model in the elucidation of tissue-specific functions of hmC.

  19. Standardized Welfare Terms for the Zebrafish Community

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Natasha A.; Blackledge, Samuel; Clark, Bradley; Keeble, Rosemary; Kovacs, Ceri; Murray, Katrina N.; Price, Michael; Thompson, Peter; Bussell, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Managing the welfare of laboratory animals is critical to animal health, vital in the understanding of phenotypes created by treatment or genetic alteration and ensures compliance of regulations. Part of an animal welfare assessment is the requirement to record observations, ensuring all those responsible for the animals are aware of their health status and can act accordingly. Although the use of zebrafish in research continues to increase, guidelines for conducting welfare assessments and the reporting of observations are considered unclear compared to mammalian species. To support the movement of zebrafish between facilities, significant improvement would be achieved through the use of standardized terms to ensure clarity and consistency between facilities. Improving the clarity of terminology around welfare not only addresses our ethical obligation but also supports the research goals and provides a searchable description of the phenotypes. A Collaboration between the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and Cambridge University (Department of Medicine-Laboratory of Molecular Biology) has led to the creation of the zebrafish welfare terms from which standardization of terminology can be achieved. PMID:27096380

  20. Streptococcus agalactiae infection in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Brandon J; Hancock, Bryan M; Del Cid, Natasha; Bermudez, Andres; Traver, David; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is an encapsulated, Gram-positive bacterium that is a leading cause of neonatal pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis, and an emerging aquaculture pathogen. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a genetically tractable model vertebrate that has been used to analyze the pathogenesis of both aquatic and human bacterial pathogens. We have developed a larval zebrafish model of GBS infection to study bacterial and host factors that contribute to disease progression. GBS infection resulted in dose dependent larval death, and GBS serotype III, ST-17 strain was observed as the most virulent. Virulence was dependent on the presence of the GBS capsule, surface anchored lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and toxin production, as infection with GBS mutants lacking these factors resulted in little to no mortality. Additionally, interleukin-1β (il1b) and CXCL-8 (cxcl8a) were significantly induced following GBS infection compared to controls. We also visualized GBS outside the brain vasculature, suggesting GBS penetration into the brain during the course of infection. Our data demonstrate that zebrafish larvae are a valuable model organism to study GBS pathogenesis. PMID:25617657

  1. The zebrafish infraorbital bones: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Carolyn; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara Anne

    2014-02-01

    The infraorbital (IO) bone series, a component of the circumorbital series, makes up five of the eight dermal bones found in the orbital region of the zebrafish skull. Ossifying in a set sequence, the IOs are closely associated with the cranial lateral line system as they house neuromast sensory receptors in bony canals. We conducted a detailed analysis of the condensation to mineralization phases of development of these bones. Our analyses involved both bone and osteoblast staining of zebrafish at 20 different time points. IO bone condensations are shaped as templates for the final bone shape, and they mineralize at one or more centers of ossification. Initially, mineralization is closely associated with the lateral line canals and/or foramen, and the onset of mineralization is temporally variable. Canal wall mineralization is a process that continues into adulthood and completely mineralized canal roofs were not found. Our comprehensive growth series detailing the ossification of each IO bone provides important insight into the growth and development of this series of neural crest-derived flat bones in the zebrafish craniofacial skeleton.

  2. CERKL Knockdown Causes Retinal Degeneration in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Marina; Burguera, Demian; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser

    2013-01-01

    The human CERKL gene is responsible for common and severe forms of retinal dystrophies. Despite intense in vitro studies at the molecular and cellular level and in vivo analyses of the retina of murine knockout models, CERKL function remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to approach the developmental and functional features of cerkl in Danio rerio within an Evo-Devo framework. We show that gene expression increases from early developmental stages until the formation of the retina in the optic cup. Unlike the high mRNA-CERKL isoform multiplicity shown in mammals, the moderate transcriptional complexity in fish facilitates phenotypic studies derived from gene silencing. Moreover, of relevance to pathogenicity, teleost CERKL shares the two main human protein isoforms. Morpholino injection has been used to generate a cerkl knockdown zebrafish model. The morphant phenotype results in abnormal eye development with lamination defects, failure to develop photoreceptor outer segments, increased apoptosis of retinal cells and small eyes. Our data support that zebrafish Cerkl does not interfere with proliferation and neural differentiation during early developmental stages but is relevant for survival and protection of the retinal tissue. Overall, we propose that this zebrafish model is a powerful tool to unveil CERKL contribution to human retinal degeneration. PMID:23671706

  3. Cell migration during heart regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Naoyuki; Brush, Michael; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2016-07-01

    Zebrafish possess the remarkable ability to regenerate injured hearts as adults, which contrasts the very limited ability in mammals. Although very limited, mammalian hearts do in fact have measurable levels of cardiomyocyte regeneration. Therefore, elucidating mechanisms of zebrafish heart regeneration would provide information of naturally occurring regeneration to potentially apply to mammalian studies, in addition to addressing this biologically interesting phenomenon in itself. Studies over the past 13 years have identified processes and mechanisms of heart regeneration in zebrafish. After heart injury, pre-existing cardiomyocytes dedifferentiate, enter the cell cycle, and repair the injured myocardium. This process requires interaction with epicardial cells, endocardial cells, and vascular endothelial cells. Epicardial cells envelope the heart, while endocardial cells make up the inner lining of the heart. They provide paracrine signals to cardiomyocytes to regenerate the injured myocardium, which is vascularized during heart regeneration. In addition, accumulating results suggest that local migration of these major cardiac cell types have roles in heart regeneration. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of various heart injury methods used in the research community and regeneration of the major cardiac cell types. Then, we discuss local migration of these cardiac cell types and immune cells during heart regeneration. Developmental Dynamics 245:774-787, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27085002

  4. In vivo imaging of zebrafish embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Philipp J.

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish Danio rerio has emerged as a powerful vertebrate model system that lends itself particularly well to quantitative investigations with live imaging approaches, owing to its exceptionally high optical clarity in embryonic and larval stages. Recent advances in light microscopy technology enable comprehensive analyses of cellular dynamics during zebrafish embryonic development, systematic mapping of gene expression dynamics, quantitative reconstruction of mutant phenotypes and the system-level biophysical study of morphogenesis. Despite these technical breakthroughs, it remains challenging to design and implement experiments for in vivo long-term imaging at high spatio-temporal resolution. This article discusses the fundamental challenges in zebrafish long-term live imaging, provides experimental protocols and highlights key prop1erties and capabilities of advanced fluorescence microscopes. The article focuses in particular on experimental assays based on light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy, an emerging imaging technology that achieves exceptionally high imaging speeds and excellent signal-to-noise ratios, while minimizing light-induced damage to the specimen. This unique combination of capabilities makes light sheet microscopy an indispensable tool for the in vivo long-term imaging of large developing organisms. PMID:23523701

  5. Standardized Welfare Terms for the Zebrafish Community.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Nicola; Karp, Natasha A; Blackledge, Samuel; Clark, Bradley; Keeble, Rosemary; Kovacs, Ceri; Murray, Katrina N; Price, Michael; Thompson, Peter; Bussell, James

    2016-07-01

    Managing the welfare of laboratory animals is critical to animal health, vital in the understanding of phenotypes created by treatment or genetic alteration and ensures compliance of regulations. Part of an animal welfare assessment is the requirement to record observations, ensuring all those responsible for the animals are aware of their health status and can act accordingly. Although the use of zebrafish in research continues to increase, guidelines for conducting welfare assessments and the reporting of observations are considered unclear compared to mammalian species. To support the movement of zebrafish between facilities, significant improvement would be achieved through the use of standardized terms to ensure clarity and consistency between facilities. Improving the clarity of terminology around welfare not only addresses our ethical obligation but also supports the research goals and provides a searchable description of the phenotypes. A Collaboration between the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and Cambridge University (Department of Medicine-Laboratory of Molecular Biology) has led to the creation of the zebrafish welfare terms from which standardization of terminology can be achieved.

  6. Phenylthiourea disrupts thyroid function in developing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Elsalini, Osama A; Rohr, Klaus B

    2003-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T4) can be detected in thyroid follicles in wild-type zebrafish larvae from 3 days of development, when the thyroid has differentiated. In contrast, embryos or larvae treated with goitrogens (substances such as methimazole, potassium percholorate, and 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil) are devoid of thyroid hormone immunoreactivity. Phenythiourea (PTurea; also commonly known as PTU) is widely used in zebrafish research to suppress pigmentation in developing embryos/fry. PTurea contains a thiocarbamide group that is responsible for goitrogenic activity in methimazole and 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil. In the present study, we show that commonly used doses of 0.003% PTurea abolish T4 immunoreactivity of the thyroid follicles of zebrafish larvae. As development of the thyroid gland is not affected, these data suggest that PTurea blocks thyroid hormone production. Like other goitrogens, PTurea causes delayed hatching, retardation and malformation of embryos or larvae with increasing doses. At doses of 0.003% PTurea, however, toxic side effects seem to be at a minimum, and the maternal contribution of the hormone might compensate for compromised thyroid function during the first days of development.

  7. Developmental lead exposure causes startle response deficits in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Rice, Clinton; Ghorai, Jugal K; Zalewski, Kathryn; Weber, Daniel N

    2011-10-01

    Lead (Pb(2+)) exposure continues to be an important concern for fish populations. Research is required to assess the long-term behavioral effects of low-level concentrations of Pb(2+) and the physiological mechanisms that control those behaviors. Newly fertilized zebrafish embryos (<2h post fertilization; hpf) were exposed to one of three concentrations of lead (as PbCl(2)): 0, 10, or 30 nM until 24 hpf. (1) Response to a mechanosensory stimulus: Individual larvae (168 hpf) were tested for response to a directional, mechanical stimulus. The tap frequency was adjusted to either 1 or 4 taps/s. Startle response was recorded at 1000 fps. Larvae responded in a concentration-dependent pattern for latency to reaction, maximum turn velocity, time to reach V(max) and escape time. With increasing exposure concentrations, a larger number of larvae failed to respond to even the initial tap and, for those that did respond, ceased responding earlier than control larvae. These differences were more pronounced at a frequency of 4 taps/s. (2) Response to a visual stimulus: Fish, exposed as embryos (2-24 hpf) to Pb(2+) (0-10 μM) were tested as adults under low light conditions (≈ 60 μW/m(2)) for visual responses to a rotating black bar. Visual responses were significantly degraded at Pb(2+) concentrations of 30 nM. These data suggest that zebrafish are viable models for short- and long-term sensorimotor deficits induced by acute, low-level developmental Pb(2+) exposures.

  8. Survival Study of Zebrafish Embryos Under Gamma Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena, Pamela; Allende, Miguel; Morales, José Roberto

    2010-08-01

    Zebrafish embryos have interesting biological properties for the study of human diseases. The present work uses zebrafish embryos in a particular development state, to study biological effects due to gamma radiation, arising from a calibrated 60Co source. Initially, the lethal dose for fish embryos was determined and subsequent irradiations were performed at sub-lethal doses, in order to study more subtle effects.

  9. DRUG EFFECTS ON THE LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY OF LARVAL ZEBRAFISH.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA’s prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae and the effects of prototype drugs. Zebrafish larvae (6-7 days post-fertilization) were indiv...

  10. A bioenergetic model for zebrafish Danio rerio (Hamilton)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, C.J.; Sharma, Bibek; Pope, K.L.; Patino, R.

    2008-01-01

    A bioenergetics model was developed from observed consumption, respiration and growth rates for zebrafish Danio rerio across a range (18-32?? C) of water temperatures, and evaluated with a 50 day laboratory trial at 28?? C. No significant bias in variable estimates was found during the validation trial; namely, predicted zebrafish mass generally agreed with observed mass. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  11. Reverse Genetics in Zebrafish: Mutants, Morphants, and Moving Forward.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathan D

    2016-02-01

    Gene editing in zebrafish has begun to reveal discordance between mutant phenotypes and those associated with knockdown via morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs). These studies suggest that MOs should not be used as a standalone tool and underscore the need for guidelines that require defined mutants to assess gene function in zebrafish.

  12. Pleistophora hyphessobryconis (Microsporidia) infecting zebrafish Danio rerio in research facilities.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Justin L; Lawrence, Christian; Nichols, Donald K; Brubaker, Jeffrey F; Peterson, Tracy S; Murray, Katrina N; Kent, Michael L

    2010-07-26

    Zebrafish Danio rerio are important models for biomedical research, and thus, there is an increased concern about diseases afflicting them. Here we describe infections by Pleistophora hyphessobryconis (Microsporidia) in zebrafish from 3 laboratories. As reported in other aquarium fishes, affected zebrafish exhibited massive infections in the skeletal muscle, with no involvement of smooth or cardiac muscle. In addition, numerous spores within macrophages were observed in the visceral organs, including the ovaries. Transmission studies and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence comparisons confirmed that the parasite from zebrafish was P. hyphessobryconis as described from neon tetra Paracheirodon innesi. Ten 15 d old zebrafish were exposed to P. hyphessobryconis collected from 1 infected neon tetra, and 7 of 10 fish became infected. Comparison of P. hyphessobryconis small subunit rRNA gene sequence from neon tetra with that obtained from zebrafish was nearly identical, with < 1% difference. Given the severity of infections, P. hyphessobryconis should be added to the list of pathogens that should be avoided in zebrafish research facilities, and it would be prudent to avoid mixing zebrafish used in research with other aquarium fishes. PMID:20853741

  13. Identifying Structural Alerts Based on Zebrafish Developmental Morphological Toxicity (TDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zebrafish constitute a powerful alternative animal model for chemical hazard evaluation. To provide an in vivo complement to high-throughput screening data from the ToxCast program, zebrafish developmental toxicity screens were conducted on the ToxCast Phase I (Padilla et al., 20...

  14. Characterization of behavioral and endocrine effects of LSD on zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Leah; Utterback, Eli; Stewart, Adam; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Chung, Kyung Min; Suciu, Christopher; Wong, Keith; Elegante, Marco; Elkhayat, Salem; Tan, Julia; Gilder, Thomas; Wu, Nadine; Dileo, John; Cachat, Jonathan; Kalueff, Allan V

    2010-12-25

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a potent hallucinogenic drug that strongly affects animal and human behavior. Although adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) are emerging as a promising neurobehavioral model, the effects of LSD on zebrafish have not been investigated previously. Several behavioral paradigms (the novel tank, observation cylinder, light-dark box, open field, T-maze, social preference and shoaling tests), as well as modern video-tracking tools and whole-body cortisol assay were used to characterize the effects of acute LSD in zebrafish. While lower doses (5-100 microg/L) did not affect zebrafish behavior, 250 microg/L LSD increased top dwelling and reduced freezing in the novel tank and observation cylinder tests, also affecting spatiotemporal patterns of activity (as assessed by 3D reconstruction of zebrafish traces and ethograms). LSD evoked mild thigmotaxis in the open field test, increased light behavior in the light-dark test, reduced the number of arm entries and freezing in the T-maze and social preference test, without affecting social preference. In contrast, LSD affected zebrafish shoaling (increasing the inter-fish distance in a group), and elevated whole-body cortisol levels. Overall, our findings show sensitivity of zebrafish to LSD action, and support the use of zebrafish models to study hallucinogenic drugs of abuse.

  15. Early doors (Edo) mutant mouse reveals the importance of period 2 (PER2) PAS domain structure for circadian pacemaking

    PubMed Central

    Militi, Stefania; Maywood, Elizabeth S.; Sandate, Colby R.; Chesham, Johanna E.; Parsons, Michael J.; Vibert, Jennifer L.; Joynson, Greg M.; Partch, Carrie L.; Hastings, Michael H.; Nolan, Patrick M.

    2016-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) defines 24 h of time via a transcriptional/posttranslational feedback loop in which transactivation of Per (period) and Cry (cryptochrome) genes by BMAL1–CLOCK complexes is suppressed by PER–CRY complexes. The molecular/structural basis of how circadian protein complexes function is poorly understood. We describe a novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutation, early doors (Edo), in the PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domain dimerization region of period 2 (PER2) (I324N) that accelerates the circadian clock of Per2Edo/Edo mice by 1.5 h. Structural and biophysical analyses revealed that Edo alters the packing of the highly conserved interdomain linker of the PER2 PAS core such that, although PER2Edo complexes with clock proteins, its vulnerability to degradation mediated by casein kinase 1ε (CSNK1E) is increased. The functional relevance of this mutation is revealed by the ultrashort (<19 h) but robust circadian rhythms in Per2Edo/Edo; Csnk1eTau/Tau mice and the SCN. These periods are unprecedented in mice. Thus, Per2Edo reveals a direct causal link between the molecular structure of the PER2 PAS core and the pace of SCN circadian timekeeping. PMID:26903623

  16. BAC transgenic zebrafish for transcriptional promoter and enhancer studies.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Petra; Winata, Cecilia L; Lufkin, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of BAC recombineering techniques, transcriptional promoter and enhancer isolation studies have become much more feasible in zebrafish than in mouse given the easy access to large numbers of fertilized zebrafish eggs and offspring in general, the easy to follow ex-utero development of zebrafish, an overall less skill demand and a more cost-effective technique. Here we provide guidelines for the generation of BAC recombineering-based transgenic zebrafish for DNA transcriptional promoter and enhancer identification studies as well as protocols for their analysis, which have been successfully applied in our laboratories many times. BAC recombineering in zebrafish allows for economical functional genomics studies, for example by integrating developmental biology with comparative genomics approaches to validate potential enhancer elements of vertebrate transcription factors.

  17. The Zebrafish as a Tool to Cancer Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Huiting, LN; Laroche, FJF; Feng, H

    2015-01-01

    The ability of zebrafish to faithfully recapitulate a variety of human cancers provides a unique in vivo system for drug identification and validation. Zebrafish models of human cancer generated through methodologies such as transgenesis, gene inactivation, transplantation, and carcinogenic induction have proven similar to their human counterparts both molecularly and pathologically. Suppression of cancer-relevant phenotypes provides opportunities to both identify and evaluate efficacious compounds using embryonic and adult zebrafish. After relevant compounds are selected, preclinical evaluation in mammalian models can occur, delivering lead compounds to human trials swiftly and rapidly. The advantages of in vivo imaging, large progeny, and rapid development that the zebrafish provides make it an attractive model to promote novel cancer drug discovery and reduce the hurdles and cost of clinical trials. This review explores the current methodologies to model human cancers in zebrafish, and how these cancer models have aided in formation of novel therapeutic hypotheses. PMID:26835511

  18. Zebrafish models for translational neuroscience research: from tank to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Braubach, Oliver; Spitsbergen, Jan; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is emerging as a new important species for studying mechanisms of brain function and dysfunction. Focusing on selected central nervous system (CNS) disorders (brain cancer, epilepsy, and anxiety) and using them as examples, we discuss the value of zebrafish models in translational neuroscience. We further evaluate the contribution of zebrafish to neuroimaging, circuit level, and drug discovery research. Outlining the role of zebrafish in modeling a wide range of human brain disorders, we also summarize recent applications and existing challenges in this field. Finally, we emphasize the potential of zebrafish models in behavioral phenomics and high-throughput genetic/small molecule screening, which is critical for CNS drug discovery and identifying novel candidate genes. PMID:24726051

  19. Examination of a Palatogenic Gene Program in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Mary E.; Sheehan-Rooney, Kelly; Dixon, Michael J.; Eberhart, Johann K.

    2011-01-01

    Human palatal clefting is debilitating and difficult to rectify surgically. Animal models enhance our understanding of palatogenesis and are essential in strategies designed to ameliorate palatal malformations in humans. Recent studies have shown that the zebrafish palate, or anterior neurocranium, is under similar genetic control to the amniote palatal skeleton. We extensively analyzed palatogenesis in zebrafish to determine the similarity of gene expression and function across vertebrates. By 36 hpf palatogenic cranial neural crest cells reside in homologous regions of the developing face compared to amniote species. Transcription factors and signaling molecules regulating mouse palatogenesis are expressed in similar domains during palatogenesis in zebrafish. Functional investigation of a subset of these genes, fgf10a, tgfb2, pax9 and smad5 revealed their necessity in zebrafish palatogenesis. Collectively, these results suggest that the gene regulatory networks regulating palatogenesis may be conserved across vertebrate species, demonstrating the utility of zebrafish as a model for palatogenesis. PMID:22016187

  20. Acute caffeine administration affects zebrafish response to a robotic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Mwaffo, Violet; Li, Jasmine; Macrì, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Zebrafish has been recently proposed as a valid animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms regulating emotional behavior and evaluate the modulatory effects exerted by psychoactive compounds. In this study, we propose a novel methodological framework based on robotics and information theory to investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish exposed to acute caffeine treatment. In a binary preference test, we studied the response of caffeine-treated zebrafish to a replica of a shoal of conspecifics moving in the tank. A purely data-driven information theoretic approach was used to infer the influence of the replica on zebrafish behavior as a function of caffeine concentration. Our results demonstrate that acute caffeine administration modulates both the average speed and the interaction with the replica. Specifically, zebrafish exposed to elevated doses of caffeine show reduced locomotion and increased sensitivity to the motion of the replica. The methodology developed in this study may complement traditional experimental paradigms developed in the field of behavioral pharmacology.

  1. Studying the immune response to human viral infections using zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Goody, Michelle F; Sullivan, Con; Kim, Carol H

    2014-09-01

    Humans and viruses have a long co-evolutionary history. Viral illnesses have and will continue to shape human history: from smallpox, to influenza, to HIV, and beyond. Animal models of human viral illnesses are needed in order to generate safe and effective antiviral medicines, adjuvant therapies, and vaccines. These animal models must support the replication of human viruses, recapitulate aspects of human viral illnesses, and respond with conserved immune signaling cascades. The zebrafish is perhaps the simplest, most commonly used laboratory model organism in which innate and/or adaptive immunity can be studied. Herein, we will discuss the current zebrafish models of human viral illnesses and the insights they have provided. We will highlight advantages of early life stage zebrafish and the importance of innate immunity in human viral illnesses. We will also discuss viral characteristics to consider before infecting zebrafish with human viruses as well as predict other human viruses that may be able to infect zebrafish.

  2. Studying the immune response to human viral infections using zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Goody, Michelle F.; Sullivan, Con; Kim, Carol H.

    2014-01-01

    Humans and viruses have a long co-evolutionary history. Viral illnesses have and will continue to shape human history: from smallpox, to influenza, to HIV, and beyond. Animal models of human viral illnesses are needed in order to generate safe and effective antiviral medicines, adjuvant therapies, and vaccines. These animal models must support the replication of human viruses, recapitulate aspects of human viral illnesses, and respond with conserved immune signaling cascades. The zebrafish is perhaps the simplest, most commonly used laboratory model organism in which innate and/or adaptive immunity can be studied. Herein, we will discuss the current zebrafish models of human viral illnesses and the insights they have provided. We will highlight advantages of early life stage zebrafish and the importance of innate immunity in human viral illnesses. We will also discuss viral characteristics to consider before infecting zebrafish with human viruses as well as predict other human viruses that may be able to infect zebrafish. PMID:24718256

  3. Neutrophils in host defense: new insights from zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Harvie, Elizabeth A.; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are highly motile phagocytic cells that play a critical role in the immune response to infection. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are increasingly used to study neutrophil function and host-pathogen interactions. The generation of transgenic zebrafish lines with fluorescently labeled leukocytes has made it possible to visualize the neutrophil response to infection in real time by use of optically transparent zebrafish larvae. In addition, the genetic tractability of zebrafish has allowed for the generation of models of inherited neutrophil disorders. In this review, we discuss several zebrafish models of infectious disease, both in the context of immunocompetent, as well as neutrophil-deficient hosts and how these models have shed light on neutrophil behavior during infection. PMID:25717145

  4. Recent advances in the study of zebrafish extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Jason R

    2015-05-01

    The zebrafish extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic and pleomorphic structure consisting of numerous proteins that together regulate a variety of cellular and morphogenetic events beginning as early as gastrulation. The zebrafish genome encodes a similar complement of ECM proteins as found in other vertebrate organisms including glycoproteins, fibrous proteins, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and interacting or modifying proteins such as integrins and matrix metalloproteinases. As a genetic model system combined with its amenability to high-resolution microscopic imaging, the zebrafish allows interrogation of ECM protein structure and function in both the embryo and adult. Accumulating data have identified important roles for zebrafish ECM proteins in processes as diverse as cell polarity, migration, tissue mechanics, organ laterality, muscle contraction, and regeneration. In this review, I highlight recently published data on these topics that demonstrate how the ECM proteins fibronectin, laminin, and collagen contribute to zebrafish development and adult homeostasis.

  5. Zebrafish Models of Human Liver Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The liver performs a large number of essential synthetic and regulatory functions that are acquired during fetal development and persist throughout life. Their disruption underlies a diverse group of heritable and acquired diseases that affect both pediatric and adult patients. Although experimental analyses used to study liver development and disease are typically performed in cell culture models or rodents, the zebrafish is increasingly used to complement discoveries made in these systems. Forward and reverse genetic analyses over the past two decades have shown that the molecular program for liver development is largely conserved between zebrafish and mammals, and that the zebrafish can be used to model heritable human liver disorders. Recent work has demonstrated that zebrafish can also be used to study the mechanistic basis of acquired liver diseases. Here, we provide a comprehensive summary of how the zebrafish has contributed to our understanding of human liver development and disease. PMID:23897685

  6. Investigation of septin biology in vivo using zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Willis, A; Mazon-Moya, M; Mostowy, S

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important animal model to study cell biology in vivo. Benefits of the zebrafish include a fully annotated reference genome, an easily manipulable genome (for example, by morpholino oligonucleotide or CRISPR-Cas9), and transparent embryos for noninvasive, real-time microscopy using fluorescent transgenic lines. Zebrafish have orthologues of most human septins, and studies using larvae were used to investigate the role of septins in vertebrate development. The zebrafish larva is also an established model to study the cell biology of infection and has recently been used to visualize septin assembly during bacterial infection in vivo. Here, we describe protocols for the study of septins in zebrafish, with emphasis on techniques used to investigate the role of septins in host defense against bacterial infection. PMID:27473912

  7. Using the zebrafish model for Alzheimer’s disease research

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Morgan; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Lardelli, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rodent models have been extensively used to investigate the cause and mechanisms behind Alzheimer’s disease. Despite many years of intensive research using these models we still lack a detailed understanding of the molecular events that lead to neurodegeneration. Although zebrafish lack the complexity of advanced cognitive behaviors evident in rodent models they have proven to be a very informative model for the study of human diseases. In this review we give an overview of how the zebrafish has been used to study Alzheimer’s disease. Zebrafish possess genes orthologous to those mutated in familial Alzheimer’s disease and research using zebrafish has revealed unique characteristics of these genes that have been difficult to observe in rodent models. The zebrafish is becoming an increasingly popular model for the investigation of Alzheimer’s disease and will complement studies using other models to help complete our understanding of this disease. PMID:25071820

  8. Development of sensory systems in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorman, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    Zebrafish possess all of the classic sensory modalities: taste, tactile, smell, balance, vision, and hearing. For each sensory system, this article provides a brief overview of the system in the adult zebrafish followed by a more detailed overview of the development of the system. By far the majority of studies performed in each of the sensory systems of the zebrafish have involved some aspect of molecular biology or genetics. Although molecular biology and genetics are not major foci of the paper, brief discussions of some of the mutant strains of zebrafish that have developmental defects in each specific sensory system are included. The development of the sensory systems is only a small sampling of the work being done using zebrafish and provides a mere glimpse of the potential of this model for the study of vertebrate development, physiology, and human disease.

  9. UNUSUAL FINDINGS IN ZEBRAFISH, DANIO RERIO, FROM TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES AND THE ZEBRAFISH INTERNATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER DIAGNOSTIC SERVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of interesting and unusual lesions have been diagnosed in zebrafish that have been evaluated from toxicological studies or submitted as cases to the Diagnostic Service at Oregon State University. Lesions were observed in various wild-type and mutant lines of zebrafish an...

  10. Characterization of snakehead rhabdovirus infection in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Phelan, Peter E; Pressley, Meagan E; Witten, P Eckhard; Mellon, Mark T; Blake, Sharon; Kim, Carol H

    2005-02-01

    The zebrafish, Danio rerio, has become recognized as a valuable model for the study of development, genetics, and toxicology. Recently, the zebrafish has been recognized as a useful model for infectious disease and immunity. In this study, the pathogenesis and antiviral immune response of zebrafish to experimental snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV) infection was characterized. Zebrafish 24 h postfertilization to 30 days postfertilization were susceptible to infection by immersion in 10(6) 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of SHRV/ml, and adult zebrafish were susceptible to infection by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 10(5) TCID50 of SHRV/ml. Mortalities exceeded 40% in infected fish, and clinical presentation of infection included petechial hemorrhaging, redness of the abdomen, and erratic swim behavior. Virus reisolation and reverse transcription-PCR analysis of the viral nucleocapsid gene confirmed the presence of SHRV. Histological sections of moribund embryonic and juvenile fish revealed necrosis of the pharyngeal epithelium and liver, in addition to congestion of the swim bladder by cell debris. Histopathology in adult fish injected i.p. was confined to the site of injection. The antiviral response in zebrafish was monitored by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of zebrafish interferon (IFN) and Mx expression. IFN and Mx levels were elevated in zebrafish exposed to SHRV, although expression and intensity differed with age and route of infection. This study is the first to examine the pathogenesis of SHRV infection in zebrafish. Furthermore, this study is the first to describe experimental infection of zebrafish embryos with a viral pathogen, which will be important for future experiments involving targeted gene disruption and forward genetic screens.

  11. Establishment of Gal4 transgenic zebrafish lines for analysis of development of cerebellar neural circuitry.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Miki; Matsuda, Koji; Yamaguchi, Shingo; Asakawa, Kazuhide; Miyasaka, Nobuhiko; Lal, Pradeep; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Koga, Akihiko; Kawakami, Koichi; Shimizu, Takashi; Hibi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in some forms of motor coordination and motor learning. Here we isolated transgenic (Tg) zebrafish lines that express a modified version of Gal4-VP16 (GFF) in the cerebellar neural circuits: granule, Purkinje, or eurydendroid cells, Bergmann glia, or the neurons in the inferior olive nuclei (IO) which send climbing fibers to Purkinje cells, with the transposon Tol2 system. By combining GFF lines with Tg lines carrying a reporter gene located downstream of Gal4 binding sequences (upstream activating sequence: UAS), we investigated the anatomy and developmental processes of the cerebellar neural circuitry. Combining an IO-specific Gal4 line with a UAS reporter line expressing the photoconvertible fluorescent protein Kaede demonstrated the contralateral projections of climbing fibers. Combining a granule cell-specific Gal4 line with a UAS reporter line expressing wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) confirmed direct and/or indirect connections of granule cells with Purkinje cells, eurydendroid cells, and IO neurons in zebrafish. Time-lapse analysis of a granule cell-specific Gal4 line revealed initial random movements and ventral migration of granule cell nuclei. Transgenesis of a reporter gene with another transposon Tol1 system visualized neuronal structure at a single cell resolution. Our findings indicate the usefulness of these zebrafish Gal4 Tg lines for studying the development and function of cerebellar neural circuits.

  12. Model-free information-theoretic approach to infer leadership in pairs of zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butail, Sachit; Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Collective behavior affords several advantages to fish in avoiding predators, foraging, mating, and swimming. Although fish schools have been traditionally considered egalitarian superorganisms, a number of empirical observations suggest the emergence of leadership in gregarious groups. Detecting and classifying leader-follower relationships is central to elucidate the behavioral and physiological causes of leadership and understand its consequences. Here, we demonstrate an information-theoretic approach to infer leadership from positional data of fish swimming. In this framework, we measure social interactions between fish pairs through the mathematical construct of transfer entropy, which quantifies the predictive power of a time series to anticipate another, possibly coupled, time series. We focus on the zebrafish model organism, which is rapidly emerging as a species of choice in preclinical research for its genetic similarity to humans and reduced neurobiological complexity with respect to mammals. To overcome experimental confounds and generate test data sets on which we can thoroughly assess our approach, we adapt and calibrate a data-driven stochastic model of zebrafish motion for the simulation of a coupled dynamical system of zebrafish pairs. In this synthetic data set, the extent and direction of the coupling between the fish are systematically varied across a wide parameter range to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of transfer entropy in inferring leadership. Our approach is expected to aid in the analysis of collective behavior, providing a data-driven perspective to understand social interactions.

  13. Model-free information-theoretic approach to infer leadership in pairs of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Butail, Sachit; Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Collective behavior affords several advantages to fish in avoiding predators, foraging, mating, and swimming. Although fish schools have been traditionally considered egalitarian superorganisms, a number of empirical observations suggest the emergence of leadership in gregarious groups. Detecting and classifying leader-follower relationships is central to elucidate the behavioral and physiological causes of leadership and understand its consequences. Here, we demonstrate an information-theoretic approach to infer leadership from positional data of fish swimming. In this framework, we measure social interactions between fish pairs through the mathematical construct of transfer entropy, which quantifies the predictive power of a time series to anticipate another, possibly coupled, time series. We focus on the zebrafish model organism, which is rapidly emerging as a species of choice in preclinical research for its genetic similarity to humans and reduced neurobiological complexity with respect to mammals. To overcome experimental confounds and generate test data sets on which we can thoroughly assess our approach, we adapt and calibrate a data-driven stochastic model of zebrafish motion for the simulation of a coupled dynamical system of zebrafish pairs. In this synthetic data set, the extent and direction of the coupling between the fish are systematically varied across a wide parameter range to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of transfer entropy in inferring leadership. Our approach is expected to aid in the analysis of collective behavior, providing a data-driven perspective to understand social interactions. PMID:27176333

  14. Retinoic acid negatively regulates dact3b expression in the hindbrain of zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Amrita; Waxman, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays important roles in normal development as well as pathophysiological conditions. The Dapper antagonist of β-catenin (Dact) proteins are modulators of both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling via direct interactions with Dishevelled (Dvl) and Van Gogh like-2 (Vangl2). Here, we report the dynamic expression patterns of two zebrafish dact3 paralogs during early embryonic development. Our whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) analysis indicates that specific dact3a expression starts by the tailbud stage in adaxial cells. Later, it is expressed in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm, somites, migrating cranial neural crest, and hindbrain neurons. By comparison, dact3b expression initiates on the dorsal side at the dome stage and soon after is expressed in the dorsal forerunner cells (DFCs) during gastrulation. At later stages, dact3b expression becomes restricted to the branchial neurons of the hindbrain and to the 2nd pharyngeal arch. To investigate how zebrafish dact3 gene expression is regulated, we manipulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling during development and found it negatively regulates dact3b in the hindbrain. Our study is the first to document the expression of the paralogous zebrafish dact3 genes during early development and demonstrate dact3b can be regulated by RA signaling. Therefore, our study opens up new avenues to study Dact3 function in the development of multiple tissues and suggests a previously unappreciated cross regulation of Wnt signaling by RA signaling in the developing vertebrate hindbrain. PMID:25266145

  15. Zebrafish Cx35: cloning and characterization of a gap junction gene highly expressed in the retina.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Elizabeth; White, Thomas W; Ugonabo, Chioma; Olson, Carl; Nagy, James I; Valdimarsson, Gunnar

    2003-09-15

    The vertebrate connexin gene family encodes protein subunits of gap junction channels, which provide a route for direct intercellular communication. Consequently, gap junctions play a vital role in many developmental and homeostatic processes. Aberrant functioning of gap junctions is implicated in many human diseases. Zebrafish are an ideal vertebrate model to study development of the visual system as they produce transparent embryos that develop rapidly, thereby facilitating morphological and behavioral testing. In this study, zebrafish connexin35 has been cloned from a P1 artificial chromosome (PAC) library. Sequence analysis shows a high degree of similarity to the Cx35/36 orthologous group, which are expressed primarily in nervous tissue, including the retina. The gene encodes a 304-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of approximately 35 kDa. Injection of zebrafish Cx35 RNA into paired Xenopus oocytes elicited intercellular electrical coupling with weak voltage sensitivity. In development, Cx35 is first detectable by Northern analysis and RT-PCR, at 2 days post-fertilization (2 dpf), and in the adult it is expressed in the brain and retina. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the Cx35 protein is expressed in two sublaminae of the inner plexiform layer of the adult retina. A similar pattern was seen in the 4 and 5 dpf retina, but no labeling was detected in the retina of earlier embryos.

  16. Uncoupling nicotine mediated motoneuron axonal pathfinding errors and muscle degeneration in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, Lillian; Tanguay, Robert L.; Svoboda, Kurt R.

    2009-05-15

    Zebrafish embryos offer a unique opportunity to investigate the mechanisms by which nicotine exposure impacts early vertebrate development. Embryos exposed to nicotine become functionally paralyzed by 42 hpf suggesting that the neuromuscular system is compromised in exposed embryos. We previously demonstrated that secondary spinal motoneurons in nicotine-exposed embryos were delayed in development and that their axons made pathfinding errors (Svoboda, K.R., Vijayaraghaven, S., Tanguay, R.L., 2002. Nicotinic receptors mediate changes in spinal motoneuron development and axonal pathfinding in embryonic zebrafish exposed to nicotine. J. Neurosci. 22, 10731-10741). In that study, we did not consider the potential role that altered skeletal muscle development caused by nicotine exposure could play in contributing to the errors in spinal motoneuron axon pathfinding. In this study, we show that an alteration in skeletal muscle development occurs in tandem with alterations in spinal motoneuron development upon exposure to nicotine. The alteration in the muscle involves the binding of nicotine to the muscle-specific AChRs. The nicotine-induced alteration in muscle development does not occur in the zebrafish mutant (sofa potato, [sop]), which lacks muscle-specific AChRs. Even though muscle development is unaffected by nicotine exposure in sop mutants, motoneuron axonal pathfinding errors still occur in these mutants, indicating a direct effect of nicotine exposure on nervous system development.

  17. Zebrafish eleutheroembryos provide a suitable vertebrate model for screening chemicals that impair thyroid hormone synthesis.

    PubMed

    Thienpont, Benedicte; Tingaud-Sequeira, Angèle; Prats, Eva; Barata, Carlos; Babin, Patrick J; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2011-09-01

    Thyroxine-immunofluorescence quantitative disruption test (TIQDT) was designed to provide a simple, rapid, alternative bioassay for assessing the potential of chemical pollutants and drugs to disrupt thyroid gland function. This study demonstrated that zebrafish eleutheroembryos provided a suitable vertebrate model, not only for screening the potential thyroid disrupting effect of molecules, but also for estimating the potential hazards associated with exposure to chemicals directly impairing thyroxine (T4) synthesis. Amitrole, potassium perchlorate, potassium thiocyanate, methimazole (MMI), phloroglucinol, 6-propyl-2-thiouracil, ethylenethiourea, benzophenone-2, resorcinol, pyrazole, sulfamethoxazole, sodium bromide, mancozeb, and genistein were classified as thyroid gland function disruptors. Concordance between TIQDT on zebrafish and mammalian published data was very high and the physiological relevance of T4-intrafollicular content was clearly higher than regulation at the transcriptional level of tg or slc5a5. Moreover, concentration-response analysis provided information about the thyroid disrupting potency and hazard of selected positive compounds. Finally, the effect of perchlorate, but not MMI, was completely rescued by low-micromolar amounts of iodide. TIQDT performed on zebrafish eleutheroembryos is an alternative whole-organism screening assay that provides relevant information for environmental and human risk assessments. PMID:21800831

  18. [Lumen morphogenesis and molecular mechanisms in tubular organs during zebrafish embryonic development].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chun; Hu, Huo-Zhen; Mo, Xian-Ming

    2013-04-01

    A network tubular system is an important structure in the body and organ of metazoa. The lumen of tube is fundamental units in the structure, which serve to transport material, divide the organ into different functional compartments and separate the organ from the environment. The defects of lumen formation will lead to abnormalities of the organ morphogenesis and disorder of the function. Zebrafish (Danio rerio)is an important model for development research. Meanwhile easy observation of tubular organ, the relevant mutants, and transgene linages make zebrafish to become an excellent model to study the formation of lumen in the tubular organs, including the blood vessels, neural tube, gut, exocrine pancreas, and pronephric duct, which undergo the typical morphogenesis of lumen that is involved in the organs' development. The process of lumen formation is mainly consisted of induction of extracellular signals, polarization of epithelial cell, directional transportation in the polar cells, the aggregation and transportation of fluid in the lumen, and the reconstruction of cytoskeleton in polar cells and controlled by the precise and complicated molecular networks during embryonic development. This review will summarize our current knowledge on lumen morphogenesis in four kinds of typical tubular organs during zebrafish embryonic development and the related molecular mechanisms as well as to supply helpful reference to the future studies.

  19. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Effect on Behavior of Zebrafish During Chronic Ethanol Exposure.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ana Claudia Reis; Rico, Eduardo Pacheco; de Oliveira, Diogo Losch; Rosemberg, Denis Broock; Guizzo, Ranieli; Meurer, Fábio; da Silveira, Themis Reverbel

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely consumed drug, which acts on the central nervous system to induce behavioral alterations ranging from disinhibition to sedation. Recent studies have produced accumulating evidence for the therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria in behavior. We aimed to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on the behavior of adult zebrafish chronically exposed to ethanol. Adult wild-type zebrafish were randomly divided into four groups, each containing 15 fish. The following groups were formed: Control (C), received unsupplemented feed during the trial period; Probiotic (P), fed with feed supplemented with LGG; Ethanol (E), received unsupplemented feed and 0.5% of ethanol directly added to the tank water; and Probiotic+Ethanol (P+E), group under ethanol exposure (0.5%) and fed with LGG supplemented feed. After 2 weeks of exposure, the novel tank test was used to evaluate fish behavior, which was analyzed using computer-aided video tracking. LGG alone did not alter swimming behavior of the fish. Ethanol exposure led to robust behavioral effects in the form of reduced anxiety levels, as indicated by increased vertical exploration and more time spent in the upper region of the novel tank. The group exposed to ethanol and treated with LGG behaved similarly to animals exposed to ethanol alone. Taken together, these results show that zebrafish behavior was not altered by LGG per se, as seen in murine models. This was the first study to investigate the effects of a probiotic diet on behavior after a chronic ethanol exposure.

  20. RNA polymerase III component Rpc9 regulates hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell maintenance in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yonglong; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zilong; Liu, Feng

    2016-06-15

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are capable of self-renewal and replenishing all lineages of blood cells throughout life and are thus crucial for tissue homeostasis. However, the mechanism regulating HSPC development is still incompletely understood. Here, we isolate a zebrafish mutant with defective T lymphopoiesis and positional cloning identifies that Rpc9, a component of DNA-directed RNA polymerase III (Pol III) complex, is responsible for the mutant phenotype. Further analysis shows that rpc9 deficiency leads to the impairment of HSPCs and their derivatives in zebrafish embryos. Excessive apoptosis is observed in the caudal hematopoietic tissue (CHT; the equivalent of fetal liver in mammals) of rpc9(-/-) embryos and the hematopoietic defects in these embryos can be fully rescued by suppression of p53 Thus, our work illustrates that Rpc9, a component of Pol III, plays an important tissue-specific role in HSPC maintenance during zebrafish embryogenesis and might be conserved across vertebrates, including mammals. PMID:27151951

  1. Using Zebrafish as a Model System for Studying the Transgenerational Effects of Dioxin

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Tracie R.; Peterson, Richard E.; Heideman, Warren

    2014-01-01

    2,3,7,8 Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been associated with many disease states in humans. A rising concern is that exposure early in life can lead to adult toxicity and toxicity in subsequent generations. Juvenile zebrafish exposed to TCDD (50 pg/ml in water; 1 h exposure) at 3 and 7 weeks post fertilization showed toxicity only later in adulthood. We have maintained the offspring of these exposed F0 fish to determine whether we could find adverse affects in the next two generations of F1 and F2 offspring. TCDD exposure produced a significantly higher female:male ratio in all three generations. Scoliosis-like axial skeleton abnormalities, not normally observed in controls, were present in the F1 and F2 generations descended from the treated F0 founders. Egg release and fertilization success were reduced in the TCDD lineage F1 and F2 generations. This reduction in fertility in the TCDD lineage F2 generation could be attributed to alterations in the F2 males. Using zebrafish as a model allowed the simultaneous maintenance of different generations with relatively small space and costs. The zebrafish showed clear signs of transgenerational responses persisting into generations never directly exposed to TCDD. PMID:24470537

  2. Target of rapamycin (TOR)-based therapy for cardiomyopathy: evidence from zebrafish and human studies.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Sudhir; Xu, Xiaolei

    2012-02-01

    Rapamycin is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for the prevention of immunorejection following organ transplantation. Pharmacological studies suggest a potential new application of rapamycin in attenuating cardiomyopathy, but the potential for this application is not yet supported by genetic studies of genes in target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling in rodents. Recently, supporting genetic evidence was presented in zebrafish using two adult cardiomyopathy models. By characterizing a heterozygous zebrafish target of rapamycin (ztor) mutant, the therapeutic effect of long-term TOR signaling inhibition was demonstrated. Dose- and stage-dependent functions of TOR signaling provide an explanation for the seemingly contradictory results obtained in genetic studies of TOR components in rodents. The results from the zebrafish studies, together with the supporting preliminary clinical studies, suggested that TOR signaling inhibition should be further pursued as a novel therapeutic strategy for cardiomyopathy. Future directions for developing TOR-based therapy include assessing the long-term benefits of rapamycin as a candidate drug for heart failure patients, defining the dynamic activity of TOR, exploring the impacts of TOR signaling manipulation in different models of cardiomyopathies, and elucidating the downstream signaling branches that confer the therapeutic effects of TOR signaling inhibition.

  3. OCCURRENCE OF A MYXOZOAN PARASITE MYXIDIUM STREISINGERI N. SP. IN LABORATORY ZEBRAFISH DANIO RERIO

    PubMed Central

    Whipps, Christopher M.; Murray, Katrina N.; Kent, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Over several years of screening diagnostic cases, the Zebrafish International Resource Center Health Services have encountered a myxozoan parasite of the ducts associated with the kidney in zebrafish Danio rerio from and average of 21% of facilities submitting specimens over 5 yr. The parasite is coelozoic and is associated with no appreciable histological changes. Plasmodia bear ovoid spores with 3 sutural ridges. Spores are consistent with the genus Myxidium, but are distinct from any known species, and are thus described as Myxidium streisingeri n. sp. Phylogenetically, this parasite is a member of the polyphyletic urinary bladder clade, which is consistent with the site of infection. The common occurrence of a myxozoan in this closed husbandry system is unexpected because these parasites are known to have complex life cycles, alternating between a vertebrate and invertebrate host. It may be that biofilters provide habitat for suitable invertebrate hosts or perhaps M. streisingeri n. sp. can be transmitted directly. Future control of this parasite in zebrafish research laboratories depends on a better understanding of this life cycle. PMID:25277837

  4. Reversible loss of reproductive fitness in zebrafish on chronic alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Dewari, Pooran Singh; Ajani, Funmilola; Kushawah, Gopal; Kumar, Damera Santhosh; Mishra, Rakesh K

    2016-02-01

    Alcoholism is one of the most prevalent diseases in society and causes significant health and social problems. Alcohol consumption by pregnant women is reported to cause adverse effects on the physical and psychological growth of the fetus. However, the direct effect of chronic alcohol consumption on reproductive fitness has not been tested. In recent years, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as a versatile model system to study the effects of alcohol on behavior and embryonic development. We utilized the zebrafish model system to address the effect of chronic alcohol exposure (0.5% alcohol in the holding tank for 9 weeks) on reproductive capacity. We found a dramatic decrease in fecundity, measured by counting the number of eggs laid, when at least one of the parents is subject to chronic alcohol exposure. Interestingly, a 9-week alcohol withdrawal program completely restored the reproductive capacity of the treated subjects. In agreement with observations on fecundity, the chronic alcohol exposure leads to increased anxiety, as measured by the novel-tank diving assay. Conversely, the withdrawal program diminished heightened anxiety in alcohol-exposed subjects. Our results highlight the adverse effects of chronic alcohol exposure on the reproductive capacity of both males and females, and underscore the utility of the zebrafish model system to understand the biology of chronic alcoholism. PMID:26781213

  5. PZR Coordinates Shp2 Noonan and LEOPARD Syndrome Signaling in Zebrafish and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Paardekooper Overman, Jeroen; Yi, Jae-Sung; Bonetti, Monica; Soulsby, Matthew; Preisinger, Christian; Stokes, Matthew P.; Hui, Li; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Overvoorde, John; Giansanti, Piero; Heck, Albert J. R.; Kontaridis, Maria I.; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by activating mutations in the PTPN11 gene encoding Shp2, which manifests in congenital heart disease, short stature, and facial dysmorphia. The complexity of Shp2 signaling is exemplified by the observation that LEOPARD syndrome (LS) patients possess inactivating PTPN11 mutations yet exhibit similar symptoms to NS. Here, we identify “protein zero-related” (PZR), a transmembrane glycoprotein that interfaces with the extracellular matrix to promote cell migration, as a major hyper-tyrosyl-phosphorylated protein in mouse and zebrafish models of NS and LS. PZR hyper-tyrosyl phosphorylation is facilitated in a phosphatase-independent manner by enhanced Src recruitment to NS and LS Shp2. In zebrafish, PZR overexpression recapitulated NS and LS phenotypes. PZR was required for zebrafish gastrulation in a manner dependent upon PZR tyrosyl phosphorylation. Hence, we identify PZR as an NS and LS target. Enhanced PZR-mediated membrane recruitment of Shp2 serves as a common mechanism to direct overlapping pathophysiological characteristics of these PTPN11 mutations. PMID:24865967

  6. Circadian clock regulation of the cell cycle in the zebrafish intestine.

    PubMed

    Peyric, Elodie; Moore, Helen A; Whitmore, David

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock controls cell proliferation in a number of healthy tissues where cell renewal and regeneration are critical for normal physiological function. The intestine is an organ that typically undergoes regular cycles of cell division, differentiation and apoptosis as part of its role in digestion and nutrient absorption. The aim of this study was to explore circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation and cell cycle gene expression in the zebrafish intestine. Here we show that the zebrafish gut contains a directly light-entrainable circadian pacemaker, which regulates the daily timing of mitosis. Furthermore, this intestinal clock controls the expression of key cell cycle regulators, such as cdc2, wee1, p21, PCNA and cdk2, but only weakly influences cyclin B1, cyclin B2 and cyclin E1 expression. Interestingly, food deprivation has little impact on circadian clock function in the gut, but dramatically reduces cell proliferation, as well as cell cycle gene expression in this tissue. Timed feeding under constant dark conditions is able to drive rhythmic expression not only of circadian clock genes, but also of several cell cycle genes, suggesting that food can entrain the clock, as well as the cell cycle in the intestine. Rather surprisingly, we found that timed feeding is critical for high amplitude rhythms in cell cycle gene expression, even when zebrafish are maintained on a light-dark cycle. Together these results suggest that the intestinal clock integrates multiple rhythmic cues, including light and food, to function optimally.

  7. Zebrafish bcl2l is a survival factor in thyroid development.

    PubMed

    Porreca, Immacolata; De Felice, Elena; Fagman, Henrik; Di Lauro, Roberto; Sordino, Paolo

    2012-06-15

    Regulated cell death, defined in morphological terms as apoptosis, is crucial for organ morphogenesis. While differentiation of the thyroid gland has been extensively studied, nothing is yet known about the survival mechanisms involved in the development of this endocrine gland. Using the zebrafish model system, we aim to understand whether genes belonging to the Bcl-2 family that control apoptosis are implicated in regulation of cell survival during thyroid development. Evidence of strong Bcl-2 gene expression in mouse thyroid precursors prompted us to investigate the functions played by its zebrafish homologs during thyroid development. We show that the bcl2-like (bcl2l) gene is expressed in the zebrafish thyroid primordium. Morpholino-mediated knockdown and mutant analyses revealed that bcl2l is crucial for thyroid cell survival and that this function is tightly modulated by the transcription factors pax2a, nk2.1a and hhex. Also, the bcl2l gene appears to control a caspase-3-dependent apoptotic mechanism during thyroid development. Thyroid precursor cells require an actively maintained survival mechanism to properly proceed through development. The bcl2l gene operates in the inhibition of cell death under direct regulation of a thyroid specific set of transcription factors. This is the first demonstration of an active mechanism to ensure survival of the thyroid primordium during morphogenesis.

  8. Clinically approved iron chelators influence zebrafish mortality, hatching morphology and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jasmine L; Hatef, Azadeh; Imran ul-Haq, Muhammad; Nair, Neelima; Unniappan, Suraj; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2014-01-01

    Iron chelation therapy using iron (III) specific chelators such as desferrioxamine (DFO, Desferal), deferasirox (Exjade or ICL-670), and deferiprone (Ferriprox or L1) are the current standard of care for the treatment of iron overload. Although each chelator is capable of promoting some degree of iron excretion, these chelators are also associated with a wide range of well documented toxicities. However, there is currently very limited data available on their effects in developing embryos. In this study, we took advantage of the rapid development and transparency of the zebrafish embryo, Danio rerio to assess and compare the toxicity of iron chelators. All three iron chelators described above were delivered to zebrafish embryos by direct soaking and their effects on mortality, hatching and developmental morphology were monitored for 96 hpf. To determine whether toxicity was specific to embryos, we examined the effects of chelator exposure via intra peritoneal injection on the cardiac function and gene expression in adult zebrafish. Chelators varied significantly in their effects on embryo mortality, hatching and morphology. While none of the embryos or adults exposed to DFO were negatively affected, ICL -treated embryos and adults differed significantly from controls, and L1 exerted toxic effects in embryos alone. ICL-670 significantly increased the mortality of embryos treated with doses of 0.25 mM or higher and also affected embryo morphology, causing curvature of larvae treated with concentrations above 0.5 mM. ICL-670 exposure (10 µL of 0.1 mM injection) also significantly increased the heart rate and cardiac output of adult zebrafish. While L1 exposure did not cause toxicity in adults, it did cause morphological defects in embryos at 0.5 mM. This study provides first evidence on iron chelator toxicity in early development and will help to guide our approach on better understanding the mechanism of iron chelator toxicity.

  9. Md1 and Rp105 regulate innate immunity and viral resistance in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Candel, Sergio; Sepulcre, María P; Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Tyrkalska, Sylwia D; de Oliveira, Sofía; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano

    2015-06-01

    TLR4 was the first TLR family member identified in mammals and is responsible for the activation of the immune response by bacterial LPS. Later, MD1 and RP105 were shown to form complexes that directly interact with the MD2-TLR4 complex, acting as physiological negative regulators of LPS signaling. Despite the general conservation of various TLR families from fish to mammals, several differences can be appreciated, such as the high tolerance of fish to LPS, the absence of the crucial accessory molecules Md2 and Cd14 for Tlr4 signaling in fish, the absence of Tlr4 in some fish species, and the confirmation that LPS does not signal through Tlr4 in zebrafish. The present study has identified the Rp105 and Md1 homologs in zebrafish, confirming (i) Rp105 and Tlr4 evolved from a common ancestor before the divergence between fish and tetrapods and (ii) the presence of Md1 in teleost fish and the lack of Md2, suggesting that the divergence of these accessory molecules occurred in the tetrapod lineage. Biochemical and functional studies indicate that Md1 binds both Rp105 and Tlr4 in zebrafish. Genetic inhibition of zebrafish Md1 and Rp105 reveals that Md1 or Rp105 deficiency impairs the expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory and antiviral molecules, leading to increased susceptibility to viral infection. These results shed light on the evolutionary history of Md1 and Rp105 and uncover a previously unappreciated function of these molecules in the regulation of innate immunity.

  10. Clinically Approved Iron Chelators Influence Zebrafish Mortality, Hatching Morphology and Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Jasmine L.; Hatef, Azadeh; Imran ul-haq, Muhammad; Nair, Neelima; Unniappan, Suraj; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N.

    2014-01-01

    Iron chelation therapy using iron (III) specific chelators such as desferrioxamine (DFO, Desferal), deferasirox (Exjade or ICL-670), and deferiprone (Ferriprox or L1) are the current standard of care for the treatment of iron overload. Although each chelator is capable of promoting some degree of iron excretion, these chelators are also associated with a wide range of well documented toxicities. However, there is currently very limited data available on their effects in developing embryos. In this study, we took advantage of the rapid development and transparency of the zebrafish embryo, Danio rerio to assess and compare the toxicity of iron chelators. All three iron chelators described above were delivered to zebrafish embryos by direct soaking and their effects on mortality, hatching and developmental morphology were monitored for 96 hpf. To determine whether toxicity was specific to embryos, we examined the effects of chelator exposure via intra peritoneal injection on the cardiac function and gene expression in adult zebrafish. Chelators varied significantly in their effects on embryo mortality, hatching and morphology. While none of the embryos or adults exposed to DFO were negatively affected, ICL -treated embryos and adults differed significantly from controls, and L1 exerted toxic effects in embryos alone. ICL-670 significantly increased the mortality of embryos treated with doses of 0.25 mM or higher and also affected embryo morphology, causing curvature of larvae treated with concentrations above 0.5 mM. ICL-670 exposure (10 µL of 0.1 mM injection) also significantly increased the heart rate and cardiac output of adult zebrafish. While L1 exposure did not cause toxicity in adults, it did cause morphological defects in embryos at 0.5 mM. This study provides first evidence on iron chelator toxicity in early development and will help to guide our approach on better understanding the mechanism of iron chelator toxicity. PMID:25329065

  11. Immobilization of zebrafish larvae on a chip-based device for environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, Jin; Hall, Chris J.; Crosier, Kathryn E.; Crosier, Philip S.; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2013-12-01

    Small vertebrate model organisms have recently gained popularity as attractive experimental models that enhance our understanding of human tissue and organ development. Laser microsurgery on zebrafish larvae combined with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging can in particular provide accelerated insights into the tissue regeneration phenomena. Conventional SEM exposes, however, specimens to high vacuum environments, and often requires laborintensive and time-consuming pretreatments and manual positioning. Moreover, there are virtually no technologies available that can quickly immobilize the zebrafish larvae for high definition SEM imaging. This work describes the proof-of-concept design and validation of a microfluidic chip-based system for immobilizing zebrafish larvae and it's interfacing with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) imaging. The Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) device was fabricated using a high-speed infrared laser micromachining and consists of a reservoir with multiple semispherical microwells, which hold the yolk of zebrafish larvae, and drain channels that allow removing excess of medium during SEM imaging. Paper filter is used to actuate the chip and immobilization of the larvae by gentle suction that occurs during water drainage. The trapping region allows multiple specimens to be positioned on the chip. The device is then inserted directly inside the ESEM and imaged in a near 100% humidity atmosphere. This facilitates ESEM imaging of untreated biological samples.

  12. Representational difference analysis, high-resolution physical mapping, and transcript identification of the zebrafish genomic region for a motor behavior.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomomi; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2003-08-01

    Zebrafish is one of the best model organisms for investigating gene functions in vertebrates. By 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen mutagenesis, we isolated a zebrafish mutant, vibrato, with defects in the spontaneous contraction and touch response. Whole genome subtraction between the wild-type and the mutant genomes by representational difference analysis yielded polymorphic markers tightly linked to the vibrato locus. Using these markers, we constructed a high-resolution physical map and localized the vibrato locus within a genomic region of 720 kb. Direct cDNA selection with the contig led to the identification of a novel gene, solo, encoding a protein with SEC14 and spectrin repeat domains. These domains of Solo shared significant amino acid sequence identities with those of mammalian Trio and Karilin. In addition, we found the zebrafish orthologs for mammalian TTN, COL5A2, and CED-6 in the vibrato region. Mapping of these genes localized human chromosomal regions possibly involved in motor disorders. Our results suggest that representational difference analysis provides an efficient way to isolate mutated genomic regions in zebrafish. PMID:12837271

  13. Repression of Hedgehog signalling is required for the acquisition of dorsolateral cell fates in the zebrafish otic vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Katherine L.; van Eeden, Fredericus J. M.; Whitfield, Tanya T.

    2010-01-01

    In zebrafish, Hedgehog (Hh) signalling from ventral midline structures is necessary and sufficient to specify posterior otic identity. Loss of Hh signalling gives rise to mirror symmetric ears with double anterior character, whereas severe upregulation of Hh signalling leads to double posterior ears. By contrast, in mouse and chick, Hh is predominantly required for dorsoventral otic patterning. Whereas a loss of Hh function in zebrafish does not affect dorsoventral and mediolateral otic patterning, we now show that a gain of Hh signalling activity causes ventromedial otic territories to expand at the expense of dorsolateral domains. In a panel of lines carrying mutations in Hh inhibitor genes, Hh pathway activity is increased throughout the embryo, and dorsolateral otic structures are lost or reduced. Even a modest increase in Hh signalling has consequences for patterning the ear. In ptc1–/– and ptc2–/– mutant embryos, in which Hh signalling is maximal throughout the embryo, the inner ear is severely ventralised and medialised, in addition to displaying the previously reported double posterior character. Transplantation experiments suggest that the effects of the loss of Hh pathway inhibition on the ear are mediated directly. These new data suggest that Hh signalling must be kept tightly repressed for the correct acquisition of dorsolateral cell fates in the zebrafish otic vesicle, revealing distinct similarities between the roles of Hh signalling in zebrafish and amniote inner ear patterning. PMID:20223756

  14. Glucocorticoid-mediated Period2 induction delays the phase of circadian rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Solmi; Park, Noheon; Cho, Sehyung; Kim, Kyungjin

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) signaling synchronizes the circadian rhythm of individual peripheral cells and induces the expression of circadian genes, including Period1 (Per1) and Period2 (Per2). However, no GC response element (GRE) has been reported in the Per2 promoter region. Here we report the molecular mechanisms of Per2 induction by GC signaling and its relevance to the regulation of circadian timing. We found that GC prominently induced Per2 expression and delayed the circadian phase. The overlapping GRE and E-box (GE2) region in the proximal Per2 promoter was responsible for GC-mediated Per2 induction. The GRE in the Per2 promoter was unique in that brain and muscle ARNT-like protein-1 (BMAL1) was essential for GC-induced Per2 expression, whereas other GRE-containing promoters, such as Per1 and mouse mammary tumor virus, responded to dexamethasone in the absence of BMAL1. This specialized regulatory mechanism was mediated by BMAL1-dependent binding of the GC receptor to GRE in Per2 promoter. When Per2 induction was abrogated by the mutation of the GRE or E-box, the circadian oscillation phase failed to be delayed compared with that of the wild-type. Therefore, the current study demonstrates that the rapid Per2 induction mediated by GC is crucial for delaying the circadian rhythm. PMID:23620290

  15. Zebrafish: an animal model for research in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Nowik, N; Podlasz, P; Jakimiuk, A; Kasica, N; Sienkiewicz, W; Kaleczyc, J

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become known as an excellent model organism for studies of vertebrate biology, vertebrate genetics, embryonal development, diseases and drug screening. Nevertheless, there is still lack of detailed reports about usage of the zebrafish as a model in veterinary medicine. Comparing to other vertebrates, they can lay hundreds of eggs at weekly intervals, externally fertilized zebrafish embryos are accessible to observation and manipulation at all stages of their development, which makes possible to simplify the research techniques such as fate mapping, fluorescent tracer time-lapse lineage analysis and single cell transplantation. Although zebrafish are only 2.5 cm long, they are easy to maintain. Intraperitoneal and intracerebroventricular injections, blood sampling and measurement of food intake are possible to be carry out in adult zebrafish. Danio rerio is a useful animal model for neurobiology, developmental biology, drug research, virology, microbiology and genetics. A lot of diseases, for which the zebrafish is a perfect model organism, affect aquatic animals. For a part of them, like those caused by Mycobacterium marinum or Pseudoloma neutrophila, Danio rerio is a natural host, but the zebrafish is also susceptible to the most of fish diseases including Itch, Spring viraemia of carp and Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis. The zebrafish is commonly used in research of bacterial virulence. The zebrafish embryo allows for rapid, non-invasive and real time analysis of bacterial infections in a vertebrate host. Plenty of common pathogens can be examined using zebrafish model: Streptococcus iniae, Vibrio anguillarum or Listeria monocytogenes. The steps are taken to use the zebrafish also in fungal research, especially that dealing with Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Although, the zebrafish is used commonly as an animal model to study diseases caused by external agents, it is also useful in studies of metabolic

  16. Zebrafish: an animal model for research in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Nowik, N; Podlasz, P; Jakimiuk, A; Kasica, N; Sienkiewicz, W; Kaleczyc, J

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become known as an excellent model organism for studies of vertebrate biology, vertebrate genetics, embryonal development, diseases and drug screening. Nevertheless, there is still lack of detailed reports about usage of the zebrafish as a model in veterinary medicine. Comparing to other vertebrates, they can lay hundreds of eggs at weekly intervals, externally fertilized zebrafish embryos are accessible to observation and manipulation at all stages of their development, which makes possible to simplify the research techniques such as fate mapping, fluorescent tracer time-lapse lineage analysis and single cell transplantation. Although zebrafish are only 2.5 cm long, they are easy to maintain. Intraperitoneal and intracerebroventricular injections, blood sampling and measurement of food intake are possible to be carry out in adult zebrafish. Danio rerio is a useful animal model for neurobiology, developmental biology, drug research, virology, microbiology and genetics. A lot of diseases, for which the zebrafish is a perfect model organism, affect aquatic animals. For a part of them, like those caused by Mycobacterium marinum or Pseudoloma neutrophila, Danio rerio is a natural host, but the zebrafish is also susceptible to the most of fish diseases including Itch, Spring viraemia of carp and Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis. The zebrafish is commonly used in research of bacterial virulence. The zebrafish embryo allows for rapid, non-invasive and real time analysis of bacterial infections in a vertebrate host. Plenty of common pathogens can be examined using zebrafish model: Streptococcus iniae, Vibrio anguillarum or Listeria monocytogenes. The steps are taken to use the zebrafish also in fungal research, especially that dealing with Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Although, the zebrafish is used commonly as an animal model to study diseases caused by external agents, it is also useful in studies of metabolic

  17. PERIOD2 is a circadian negative regulator of PAI-1 gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Miyazaki, Koyomi; Uchida, Daisuke; Ohkura, Naoki; Wakabayashi, Miyuki; Doi, Ryosuke; Matsuda, Juzo; Ishida, Norio

    2009-04-01

    An increased level of obesity-induced plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To determine whether the circadian clock component PERIOD2 (PER2) is involved in the regulation of PAI-1 gene expression, we performed transient transfection assays in vitro, and generated transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing PER2. We then compared PAI-1 expression in Tg and wild-type (WT) mice with or without obesity induced by a high-fat/high-sucrose diet. PER2 suppressed CLOCK:BMAL1- and CLOCK:BMAL2-dependent transactivation of the PAI-1 promoter in vitro. Furthermore, nuclear translocation is dispensable for PER2 to suppress CLOCK:BMAL1-dependent transactivation of the PAI-1 promoter, because functional loss of the nuclear localization domain did not affect either the interaction with BMAL1 or the suppressive role of PER2. The diurnal expression of clock and clock-controlled genes was disrupted in a gene-specific manner, whereas that of PAI-1 mRNA was significantly damped in the hearts of PER2 Tg mice fed with a normal diet. Obesity-induced plasma PAI-1 increase was significantly suppressed in Tg mice in accordance with cardiac PAI-1 mRNA levels, whereas body weight gain and changes in metabolic parameters were identical between WT and Tg mice. Endogenous PAI-1 gene expression induced by transforming growth factor-beta1 was significantly attenuated in embryonic fibroblasts derived from Tg mice compared with those from WT mice. Our results demonstrated that PER2 represses PAI-1 gene transcription in a BMAL1/2-dependent manner. The present findings also suggest that PER2 attenuates obesity-induced hypofibrinolysis by downregulating PAI-1 expression independently of metabolic disorders.

  18. The zebrafish world of colors and shapes: preference and discrimination.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jessica; Silveira, Mayara; Chacon, Diana; Luchiari, Ana

    2015-04-01

    Natural environment imposes many challenges to animals, which have to use cognitive abilities to cope with and exploit it to enhance their fitness. Since zebrafish is a well-established model for cognitive studies and high-throughput screening for drugs and diseases that affect cognition, we tested their ability for ambient color preference and 3D objects discrimination to establish a protocol for memory evaluation. For the color preference test, zebrafish were observed in a multiple-chamber tank with different environmental color options. Zebrafish showed preference for blue and green, and avoided yellow and red. For the 3D objects discrimination, zebrafish were allowed to explore two equal objects and then observed in a one-trial test in which a new color, size, or shape of the object was presented. Zebrafish showed discrimination for color, shape, and color+shape combined, but not size. These results imply that zebrafish seem to use some categorical system to discriminate items, and distracters affect their ability for discrimination. The type of variables available (color and shape) may favor zebrafish objects perception and facilitate discrimination processing. We suggest that this easy and simple memory test could serve as a useful screening tool for cognitive dysfunction and neurotoxicological studies. PMID:25674976

  19. Zebrafish: A Versatile Animal Model for Fertility Research

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Jing Ying; Kumari, Yatinesh; Shaikh, Mohd Farooq; Hue, Seow Mun

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of zebrafish in biomedical research is very common in the research world nowadays. Today, it has emerged as a favored vertebrate organism for the research in science of reproduction. There is a significant growth in amount numbers of scientific literature pertaining to research discoveries in reproductive sciences in zebrafish. It has implied the importance of zebrafish in this particular field of research. In essence, the current available literature has covered from the very specific brain region or neurons of zebrafish, which are responsible for reproductive regulation, until the gonadal level of the animal. The discoveries and findings have proven that this small animal is sharing a very close/similar reproductive system with mammals. More interestingly, the behavioral characteristics and along with the establishment of animal courtship behavior categorization in zebrafish have laid an even stronger foundation and firmer reason on the suitability of zebrafish utilization in research of reproductive sciences. In view of the immense importance of this small animal for the development of reproductive sciences, this review aimed at compiling and describing the proximate close similarity of reproductive regulation on zebrafish and human along with factors contributing to the infertility, showing its versatility and its potential usage for fertility research. PMID:27556045

  20. Zebrafish: A Versatile Animal Model for Fertility Research.

    PubMed

    Hoo, Jing Ying; Kumari, Yatinesh; Shaikh, Mohd Farooq; Hue, Seow Mun; Goh, Bey Hing

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of zebrafish in biomedical research is very common in the research world nowadays. Today, it has emerged as a favored vertebrate organism for the research in science of reproduction. There is a significant growth in amount numbers of scientific literature pertaining to research discoveries in reproductive sciences in zebrafish. It has implied the importance of zebrafish in this particular field of research. In essence, the current available literature has covered from the very specific brain region or neurons of zebrafish, which are responsible for reproductive regulation, until the gonadal level of the animal. The discoveries and findings have proven that this small animal is sharing a very close/similar reproductive system with mammals. More interestingly, the behavioral characteristics and along with the establishment of animal courtship behavior categorization in zebrafish have laid an even stronger foundation and firmer reason on the suitability of zebrafish utilization in research of reproductive sciences. In view of the immense importance of this small animal for the development of reproductive sciences, this review aimed at compiling and describing the proximate close similarity of reproductive regulation on zebrafish and human along with factors contributing to the infertility, showing its versatility and its potential usage for fertility research. PMID:27556045

  1. A sequence-based variation map of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Patowary, Ashok; Purkanti, Ramya; Singh, Meghna; Chauhan, Rajendra; Singh, Angom Ramcharan; Swarnkar, Mohit; Singh, Naresh; Pandey, Vikas; Torroja, Carlos; Clark, Matthew D; Kocher, Jean-Pierre; Clark, Karl J; Stemple, Derek L; Klee, Eric W; Ekker, Stephen C; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar

    2013-03-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a popular vertebrate model organism largely deployed using outbred laboratory animals. The nonisogenic nature of the zebrafish as a model system offers the opportunity to understand natural variations and their effect in modulating phenotype. In an effort to better characterize the range of natural variation in this model system and to complement the zebrafish reference genome project, the whole genome sequence of a wild zebrafish at 39-fold genome coverage was determined. Comparative analysis with the zebrafish reference genome revealed approximately 5.2 million single nucleotide variations and over 1.6 million insertion-deletion variations. This dataset thus represents a new catalog of genetic variations in the zebrafish genome. Further analysis revealed selective enrichment for variations in genes involved in immune function and response to the environment, suggesting genome-level adaptations to environmental niches. We also show that human disease gene orthologs in the sequenced wild zebrafish genome show a lower ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous single nucleotide variations.

  2. The zebrafish world of colors and shapes: preference and discrimination.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jessica; Silveira, Mayara; Chacon, Diana; Luchiari, Ana

    2015-04-01

    Natural environment imposes many challenges to animals, which have to use cognitive abilities to cope with and exploit it to enhance their fitness. Since zebrafish is a well-established model for cognitive studies and high-throughput screening for drugs and diseases that affect cognition, we tested their ability for ambient color preference and 3D objects discrimination to establish a protocol for memory evaluation. For the color preference test, zebrafish were observed in a multiple-chamber tank with different environmental color options. Zebrafish showed preference for blue and green, and avoided yellow and red. For the 3D objects discrimination, zebrafish were allowed to explore two equal objects and then observed in a one-trial test in which a new color, size, or shape of the object was presented. Zebrafish showed discrimination for color, shape, and color+shape combined, but not size. These results imply that zebrafish seem to use some categorical system to discriminate items, and distracters affect their ability for discrimination. The type of variables available (color and shape) may favor zebrafish objects perception and facilitate discrimination processing. We suggest that this easy and simple memory test could serve as a useful screening tool for cognitive dysfunction and neurotoxicological studies.

  3. Effectiveness of recommended euthanasia methods in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Strykowski, Jennifer L; Schech, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of zebrafish and its use as a model organism in biomedical research including genetics, development, and toxicology, has increased over the past 20 y and continues to grow. However, guidelines for euthanasia remain vague, and the responsibility of creating appropriate euthanasia protocols essentially falls on individual facilities. To reduce variation in experimental results among labs, a standard method of euthanasia for zebrafish would be useful. Although various euthanasia methods have been compared, few studies focus on the effectiveness of euthanasia methods for larval zebrafish. In this study, we exposed larval zebrafish to each of 3 euthanasia agents (MS222, eugenol, and hypothermic shock) and assessed the recovery rate. Hypothermic shock appeared to be the most effective method for euthanizing zebrafish at 14 d after fertilization; however, this method may not be considered an efficient method for large numbers of larval zebrafish. Exposure to chemicals, such as MS222 and eugenol, were ineffective methods for euthanasia at this stage of development. When these agents are used, secondary measures should be taken to ensure death. Choosing a euthanasia method that is effective, efficient, and humane can be challenging. Determining a method of euthanasia that is suitable for fish of all stages will bring the zebrafish community closer to meeting this challenge.

  4. Characterization of mesonephric development and regeneration using transgenic zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weibin; Boucher, Rudrick C.; Bollig, Frank; Englert, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    The zebrafish is a valuable vertebrate model for kidney research. The majority of previous studies focused on the zebrafish pronephros, which comprises only two nephrons and is structurally simpler than the mesonephros of adult fish and the metanephros of mammals. To evaluate the zebrafish system for more complex studies of kidney development and regeneration, we investigated the development and postinjury regeneration of the mesonephros in adult zebrafish. Utilizing two transgenic zebrafish lines (wt1b::GFP and pod::NTR-mCherry), we characterized the developmental stages of individual mesonephric nephrons and the temporal-spatial pattern of mesonephrogenesis. We found that mesonephrogenesis continues throughout the life of zebrafish, with a rapid growth phase during the juvenile period and a slower phase in adulthood such that the total nephron number of juvenile and adult fish linearly correlates with body mass. Following gentamicin-induced renal injury, the zebrafish mesonephros can undergo de novo regeneration of mesonephric nephrons, a process known as neonephrogenesis. We found that wt1b expression was induced in individually dispersed cells in the mesonephric interstitium as early as 48 h following injury. These wt1b-expressing cells formed aggregates by 72–96 h following injury which proceeded to form nephrons. This suggests that wt1b may serve as an early marker of fated renal progenitor cells. The synchronous nature of regenerative neonephrogenesis suggests that this process may be useful for studies of nephron development. PMID:20810610

  5. Retinal Proliferation Response in the Buphthalmic Zebrafish, bugeye

    PubMed Central

    Sherpa, Tshering; Hunter, Samuel S.; Frey, Ruth A.; Robison, Barrie D.; Stenkamp, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    The zebrafish retina regenerates in response to acute retinal lesions, replacing damaged neurons with new neurons. In this study we test the hypothesis that chronic stress to inner retinal neurons also triggers a retinal regeneration response in the bugeye zebrafish. Mutations in the lrp2 gene in zebrafish are associated with a progressive eye phenotype (bugeye) that models several risk factors for human glaucoma including buphthalmos (enlarged eyes), elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), and upregulation of genes related to retinal ganglion cell pathology. The retinas of adult bugeye zebrafish showed high rates of ongoing proliferation which resulted in the production of a small number of new retinal neurons, particularly photoreceptors. A marker of mechanical cell stress, Hsp27, was strongly expressed in inner retinal neurons and glia of bugeye retinas. The more enlarged eyes of individual bugeye zebrafish showed disrupted retinal lamination, and a persistent reduced density of neurons in the ganglion cell layer (GCL), although total numbers of GCL neurons were higher than in control eyes. Despite the presence of a proliferative response to damage, the adult bugeye zebrafish remained behaviorally blind. These findings suggest the existence of an unsuccessful regenerative response to a persistent pathological condition in the bugeye zebrafish. PMID:21723280

  6. Genetic determinants of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Yolanda; Cederlund, Maria L; Cottell, David C; Bill, Brent R; Ekker, Stephen C; Torres-Vazquez, Jesus; Weinstein, Brant M; Hyde, David R; Vihtelic, Thomas S; Kennedy, Breandan N

    2007-01-01

    Background The retinal vasculature is a capillary network of blood vessels that nourishes the inner retina of most mammals. Developmental abnormalities or microvascular complications in the retinal vasculature result in severe human eye diseases that lead to blindness. To exploit the advantages of zebrafish for genetic, developmental and pharmacological studies of retinal vasculature, we characterised the intraocular vasculature in zebrafish. Results We show a detailed morphological and developmental analysis of the retinal blood supply in zebrafish. Similar to the transient hyaloid vasculature in mammalian embryos, vessels are first found attached to the zebrafish lens at 2.5 days post fertilisation. These vessels progressively lose contact with the lens and by 30 days post fertilisation adhere to the inner limiting membrane of the juvenile retina. Ultrastructure analysis shows these vessels to exhibit distinctive hallmarks of mammalian retinal vasculature. For example, smooth muscle actin-expressing pericytes are ensheathed by the basal lamina of the blood vessel, and vesicle vacuolar organelles (VVO), subcellular mediators of vessel-retinal nourishment, are present. Finally, we identify 9 genes with cell membrane, extracellular matrix and unknown identity that are necessary for zebrafish hyaloid and retinal vasculature development. Conclusion Zebrafish have a retinal blood supply with a characteristic developmental and adult morphology. Abnormalities of these intraocular vessels are easily observed, enabling application of genetic and chemical approaches in zebrafish to identify molecular regulators of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in development and disease. PMID:17937808

  7. Designing and Testing of Self-Cleaning Recirculating Zebrafish Tanks.

    PubMed

    Nema, Shubham; Bhargava, Yogesh

    2016-08-01

    Maintenance of large number of zebrafish in captive conditions is a daunting task. This can be eased by the use of recirculating racks with self-cleaning zebrafish tanks. Commercially available systems are costly, and compatibility of intercompany products has never been investigated. Although various cost-effective designs and methods of construction of custom-made recirculating zebrafish racks are available in literature, the design of self-cleaning zebrafish tanks is still not available. In this study, we report the design and method of construction of the self-cleaning unit, which can be fitted in any zebrafish tank. We validated the design by investigating sediment cleaning process in rectangular and cylindrical tank geometries using time lapse imaging. Our results suggest that for both tank geometries, the tanks fitted with self-cleaning unit provided superior sediment cleaning than the tanks fitted with overflow-drain unit. Although the self-cleaning unit could clean the sediment completely from both geometries over prolonged period, the cleaning of sediments was faster in the cylindrical tank than the rectangular tank. In conclusion, cost and efforts of zebrafish maintenance could be significantly reduced through the installation of our self-cleaning unit in any custom-made zebrafish tank.

  8. Premature aging in telomerase-deficient zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Anchelin, Monique; Alcaraz-Pérez, Francisca; Martínez, Carlos M.; Bernabé-García, Manuel; Mulero, Victoriano; Cayuela, María L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The study of telomere biology is crucial to the understanding of aging and cancer. In the pursuit of greater knowledge in the field of human telomere biology, the mouse has been used extensively as a model. However, there are fundamental differences between mouse and human cells. Therefore, additional models are required. In light of this, we have characterized telomerase-deficient zebrafish (Danio rerio) as the second vertebrate model for human telomerase-driven diseases. We found that telomerase-deficient zebrafish show p53-dependent premature aging and reduced lifespan in the first generation, as occurs in humans but not in mice, probably reflecting the similar telomere length in fish and humans. Among these aging symptoms, spinal curvature, liver and retina degeneration, and infertility were the most remarkable. Although the second-generation embryos died in early developmental stages, restoration of telomerase activity rescued telomere length and survival, indicating that telomerase dosage is crucial. Importantly, this model also reproduces the disease anticipation observed in humans with dyskeratosis congenita (DC). Thus, telomerase haploinsufficiency leads to anticipation phenomenon in longevity, which is related to telomere shortening and, specifically, with the proportion of short telomeres. Furthermore, p53 was induced by telomere attrition, leading to growth arrest and apoptosis. Importantly, genetic inhibition of p53 rescued the adverse effects of telomere loss, indicating that the molecular mechanisms induced by telomere shortening are conserved from fish to mammals. The partial rescue of telomere length and longevity by restoration of telomerase activity, together with the feasibility of the zebrafish for high-throughput chemical screening, both point to the usefulness of this model for the discovery of new drugs able to reactivate telomerase in individuals with DC. PMID:23744274

  9. montalcino, a Zebrafish Model for Variegate Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Kimberly A.; Fraenkel, Paula G.; Langer, Nathaniel B.; Schmid, Bettina; Davidson, Alan J.; Weber, Gerhard; Chiang, Ken; Foott, Helen; Dwyer, Caitlin; Wingert, Rebecca A.; Zhou, Yi; Paw, Barry H.; Zon, Leonard I.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Inherited or acquired mutations in the heme biosynthetic pathway lead to a debilitating class of diseases collectively known as porphyrias, with symptoms that can include anemia, cutaneous photosensitivity, and neurovisceral dysfunction. In a genetic screen for hematopoietic mutants, we isolated a zebrafish mutant, montalcino (mno), which displays hypochromic anemia and porphyria. The objective of this study was to identify the defective gene and characterize the phenotype of the zebrafish mutant. Methods Genetic linkage analysis was utilized to identify the region harboring the mno mutation. Candidate gene analysis together with RT-PCR was utilized to identify the genetic mutation, which was confirmed via allele specific oligo hybridizations. Whole mount in situ hybridizations and 0-dianisidine staining were used to characterize the phenotype of the mno mutant. mRNA and morpholino microinjections were performed to phenocopy and/or rescue the mutant phenotype. Results Homozygous mno mutant embryos have a defect in the protoporphyrinogen oxidase (ppox) gene, which encodes the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of protoporphyrinogen. Homozygous mutant embryos are deficient in hemoglobin, and by 36 hpf are visibly anemic and porphyric. The hypochromic anemia of mno embryos was partially rescued by human ppox, providing evidence for the conservation of function between human and zebrafish ppox. Conclusion In humans, mutations in ppox result in variegate porphyria. At present, effective treatment for acute attacks requires the administration intravenous hemin and/or glucose. Thus, mno represents a powerful model for investigation, and a tool for future screens aimed at identifying chemical modifiers of variegate porphyria. PMID:18550261

  10. Learning and memory in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Gerlai, R

    2016-01-01

    Learning and memory are defining features of our own species inherently important to our daily lives and to who we are. Without our memories we cease to exist as a person. Without our ability to learn individuals and collectively our society would cease to function. Diseases of the mind still remain incurable. The interest in understanding of the mechanisms of learning and memory is thus well founded. Given the complexity of such mechanisms, concerted efforts have been made to study them under controlled laboratory conditions, ie, with laboratory model organisms. The zebrafish, although new in this field, is one such model organism. The rapidly developing forward- and reverse genetic methods designed for the zebrafish and the increasing use of pharmacological tools along with numerous neurobiology techniques make this species perhaps the best model for the analysis of the mechanisms of complex central nervous system characteristics. The fact that it is an evolutionarily ancient and simpler vertebrate, but at the same time it possesses numerous conserved features across multiple levels of biological organization makes this species an excellent tool for the analysis of the mechanisms of learning and memory. The bottleneck lies in our understanding of its cognitive and mnemonic features, the topic of this chapter. The current paper builds on a chapter published in the previous edition and continues to focus on associative learning, but now it extends the discussion to other forms of learning and to recent discoveries on memory-related features and findings obtained both in adults and larval zebrafish. PMID:27312505

  11. Novel biomarkers of perchlorate exposure in zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mukhi, S.; Carr, J.A.; Anderson, T.A.; Patino, R.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate inhibits iodide uptake by thyroid follicles and lowers thyroid hormone production. Although several effects of perchlorate on the thyroid system have been reported, the utility of these pathologies as markers of environmental perchlorate exposures has not been adequately assessed. The present study examined time-course and concentration-dependent effects of perchlorate on thyroid follicle hypertrophy, colloid depletion, and angiogenesis; alterations in whole-body thyroxine (T4) levels; and somatic growth and condition factor of subadult and adult zebrafish. Changes in the intensity of the colloidal T4 ring previously observed in zebrafish also were examined immunohistochemically. Three-month-old zebrafish were exposed to ammonium perchlorate at measured perchlorate concentrations of 0, 11, 90, 1,131, and 11,480 ppb for 12 weeks and allowed to recover in clean water for 12 weeks. At two weeks of exposure, the lowest-observed-effective concentrations (LOECs) of perchlorate that induced angiogenesis and depressed the intensity of colloidal T4 ring were 90 and 1,131 ppb, respectively; other parameters were not affected (whole-body T4 was not determined at this time). At 12 weeks of exposure, LOECs for colloid depletion, hypertrophy, angiogenesis, and colloidal T4 ring were 11,480, 1,131, 90, and 11 ppb, respectively. All changes were reversible, but residual effects on angiogenesis and colloidal T4 ring intensity were still present after 12 weeks of recovery (LOEC, 11,480 ppb). Whole-body T 4 concentration, body growth (length and weight), and condition factor were not affected by perchlorate. The sensitivity and longevity of changes in colloidal T4 ring intensity and angiogenesis suggest their usefulness as novel markers of perchlorate exposure. The 12-week LOEC for colloidal T4 ring is the lowest reported for any perchlorate biomarker in aquatic vertebrates. ?? 2005 SETAC.

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of Heart Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fei; Langenbacher, Adam D.; Chen, Jau-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac transcription factors orchestrate the complex cellular and molecular events required to produce a functioning heart. Misregulation of the cardiac transcription program leads to embryonic developmental defects and is associated with human congenital heart diseases. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the regulation of cardiac gene expression at an additional layer, involving the coordination of epigenetic and transcriptional regulators. In this review, we highlight and discuss discoveries made possible by the genetic and embryological tools available in the zebrafish model organism, with a focus on the novel functions of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins during cardiogenesis. PMID:27148546

  13. Visualizing voltage dynamics in zebrafish heart.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Hidekazu; Higashijima, Shin-ichi; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Okamura, Yasushi

    2010-06-15

    The zebrafish heart provides a useful vertebrate cardiovascular model with outstanding advantages, including genetic manipulatability, optical accessibility and rapid development. In addition, an emerging topic in cardiotoxicity assay and drug discovery is its use in phenotype-based chemical screening. Here, we report a technique that allows non-invasive voltage mapping in beating heart using a genetically encoded probe for transmembrane potential. Application of the anti-allergy compound astemizole resulted in aberrant propagation of excitation, which accounted for a lack of ventricular contraction. This optical method will provide new opportunities in broad areas of physiological, developmental and pharmacological cardiovascular research. PMID:20421282

  14. Zebrafish germ cells: motility and guided migration.

    PubMed

    Paksa, Azadeh; Raz, Erez

    2015-10-01

    In the course of embryonic development, the process of cell migration is critical for establishment of the embryonic body plan, for morphogenesis and for organ function. Investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying cell migration is thus crucial for understanding developmental processes and clinical conditions resulting from abnormal cell migration such as cancer metastasis. The long-range migration of primordial germ cells toward the region at which the gonad develops occurs in embryos of various species and thus constitutes a useful in vivo model for single-cell migration. Recent studies employing zebrafish embryos have greatly contributed to the understanding of the mechanisms facilitating the migration of these cells en route to their target.

  15. Zebrafish-based systems pharmacology of cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yasuhito; Nishimura, Yuhei; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Because of their small size, high fecundity, and commonality to human genetics and genomics, phenotype-based animal testing using zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as a powerful tool for identifying disease mechanisms, drug target molecules and small bioactive compounds over the last decade. Importantly, the immaturity of the zebrafish larvae immune system compared with that of mammals facilitates the implantation of human tumors representing aggressive cancer progression with metastasis. In the current chapter, we describe the methods for human cancer cell xenotransplantation into zebrafish, phenotypic image analysis, and transcriptome analysis using deep sequencing.

  16. Zebrafish biosensor for toxicant induced muscle hyperactivity

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Maryam; Takamiya, Masanari; Stegmaier, Johannes; Middel, Volker; Gradl, Marion; Klüver, Nils; Mikut, Ralf; Dickmeis, Thomas; Scholz, Stefan; Rastegar, Sepand; Yang, Lixin; Strähle, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Robust and sensitive detection systems are a crucial asset for risk management of chemicals, which are produced in increasing number and diversity. To establish an in vivo biosensor system with quantitative readout for potential toxicant effects on motor function, we generated a transgenic zebrafish line TgBAC(hspb11:GFP) which expresses a GFP reporter under the control of regulatory elements of the small heat shock protein hspb11. Spatiotemporal hspb11 transgene expression in the musculature and the notochord matched closely that of endogenous hspb11 expression. Exposure to substances that interfere with motor function induced a dose-dependent increase of GFP intensity beginning at sub-micromolar concentrations, while washout of the chemicals reduced the level of hspb11 transgene expression. Simultaneously, these toxicants induced muscle hyperactivity with increased calcium spike height and frequency. The hspb11 transgene up-regulation induced by either chemicals or heat shock was eliminated after co-application of the anaesthetic MS-222. TgBAC(hspb11:GFP) zebrafish embryos provide a quantitative measure of muscle hyperactivity and represent a robust whole organism system for detecting chemicals that affect motor function. PMID:27029555

  17. Toxicity of chlorine to zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Kent, Michael L; Buchner, Cari; Barton, Carrie; Tanguay, Robert L

    2014-01-16

    Surface disinfection of fertilized fish eggs is widely used in aquaculture to reduce extraovum pathogens that may be released from brood fish during spawning, and this is routinely used in zebrafish Danio rerio research laboratories. Most laboratories use approximately 25 to 50 ppm unbuffered chlorine solution for 5 to 10 min. Treatment of embryos with chlorine has significant germicidal effects for many Gram-negative bacteria, viruses, and trophozoite stages of protozoa, but is less effective against cyst or spore stages of protozoa and certain Mycobacterium spp. Therefore, we evaluated the toxicity of unbuffered and buffered chlorine solutions to embryos exposed at 6 or 24 h post-fertilization (hpf) to determine whether higher concentrations can be used for treating zebrafish embryos. Most of our experiments entailed using an outbred line (5D), with both mortality and malformations as endpoints. We found that 6 hpf embryos consistently were more resistant than 24 hpf embryos to the toxic effects of chlorine. Chlorine is more toxic and germicidal at lower pH, and chlorine causes elevated pH. Consistent with this, we found that unbuffered chlorine solutions (pH ca. 8-9) were less toxic at corresponding concentrations than solutions buffered to pH 7. Based on our findings here, we recommend treating 6 hpf embryos for 10 min and 24 hpf embryos for 5 min with unbuffered chlorine solution at 100 ppm.

  18. Afferent Connectivity of the Zebrafish Habenulae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Katherine J.; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Yáñez, Julián; Anadón, Ramón; Wilson, Stephen W.; Folgueira, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The habenulae are bilateral nuclei located in the dorsal diencephalon that are conserved across vertebrates. Here we describe the main afferents to the habenulae in larval and adult zebrafish. We observe afferents from the subpallium, nucleus rostrolateralis, posterior tuberculum, posterior hypothalamic lobe, median raphe; we also see asymmetric afferents from olfactory bulb to the right habenula, and from the parapineal to the left habenula. In addition, we find afferents from a ventrolateral telencephalic nucleus that neurochemical and hodological data identify as the ventral entopeduncular nucleus (vENT), confirming and extending observations of Amo et al. (2014). Fate map and marker studies suggest that vENT originates from the diencephalic prethalamic eminence and extends into the lateral telencephalon from 48 to 120 hour post-fertilization (hpf). No afferents to the habenula were observed from the dorsal entopeduncular nucleus (dENT). Consequently, we confirm that the vENT (and not the dENT) should be considered as the entopeduncular nucleus “proper” in zebrafish. Furthermore, comparison with data in other vertebrates suggests that the vENT is a conserved basal ganglia nucleus, being homologous to the entopeduncular nucleus of mammals (internal segment of the globus pallidus of primates) by both embryonic origin and projections, as previously suggested by Amo et al. (2014). PMID:27199671

  19. Chevron formation of the zebrafish muscle segments

    PubMed Central

    Rost, Fabian; Eugster, Christina; Schröter, Christian; Oates, Andrew C.; Brusch, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    The muscle segments of fish have a folded shape, termed a chevron, which is thought to be optimal for the undulating body movements of swimming. However, the mechanism shaping the chevron during embryogenesis is not understood. Here, we used time-lapse microscopy of developing zebrafish embryos spanning the entire somitogenesis period to quantify the dynamics of chevron shape development. By comparing such time courses with the start of movements in wildtype zebrafish and analysing immobile mutants, we show that the previously implicated body movements do not play a role in chevron formation. Further, the monotonic increase of chevron angle along the anteroposterior axis revealed by our data constrains or rules out possible contributions by previously proposed mechanisms. In particular, we found that muscle pioneers are not required for chevron formation. We put forward a tension-and-resistance mechanism involving interactions between intra-segmental tension and segment boundaries. To evaluate this mechanism, we derived and analysed a mechanical model of a chain of contractile and resisting elements. The predictions of this model were verified by comparison with experimental data. Altogether, our results support the notion that a simple physical mechanism suffices to self-organize the observed spatiotemporal pattern in chevron formation. PMID:25267843

  20. Elucidating cannabinoid biology in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Krug, Randall G; Clark, Karl J

    2015-10-10

    The number of annual cannabinoid users exceeds 100,000,000 globally and an estimated 9% of these individuals will suffer from dependency. Although exogenous cannabinoids, like those contained in marijuana, are known to exert their effects by disrupting the endocannabinoid system, a dearth of knowledge exists about the potential toxicological consequences on public health. Conversely, the endocannabinoid system represents a promising therapeutic target for a plethora of disorders because it functions to endogenously regulate a vast repertoire of physiological functions. Accordingly, the rapidly expanding field of cannabinoid biology has sought to leverage model organisms in order to provide both toxicological and therapeutic insights about altered endocannabinoid signaling. The primary goal of this manuscript is to review the existing field of cannabinoid research in the genetically tractable zebrafish model-focusing on the cannabinoid receptor genes, cnr1 and cnr2, and the genes that produce enzymes for synthesis and degradation of the cognate ligands anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol. Consideration is also given to research that has studied the effects of exposure to exogenous phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids that are known to interact with cannabinoid receptors. These results are considered in the context of either endocannabinoid gene expression or endocannabinoid gene function, and are integrated with findings from rodent studies. This provides the framework for a discussion of how zebrafish may be leveraged in the future to provide novel toxicological and therapeutic insights in the field of cannabinoid biology, which has become increasingly significant given recent trends in cannabis legislation.

  1. Targeted chromosomal deletions and inversions in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankit; Hall, Victoria L; Kok, Fatma O; Shin, Masahiro; McNulty, Joseph C; Lawson, Nathan D; Wolfe, Scot A

    2013-06-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) provide powerful platforms for genome editing in plants and animals. Typically, a single nuclease is sufficient to disrupt the function of protein-coding genes through the introduction of microdeletions or insertions that cause frameshifts within an early coding exon. However, interrogating the function of cis-regulatory modules or noncoding RNAs in many instances requires the excision of this element from the genome. In human cell lines and invertebrates, two nucleases targeting the same chromosome can promote the deletion of intervening genomic segments with modest efficiencies. We have examined the feasibility of using this approach to delete chromosomal segments within the zebrafish genome, which would facilitate the functional study of large noncoding sequences in a vertebrate model of development. Herein, we demonstrate that segmental deletions within the zebrafish genome can be generated at multiple loci and are efficiently transmitted through the germline. Using two nucleases, we have successfully generated deletions of up to 69 kb at rates sufficient for germline transmission (1%-15%) and have excised an entire lincRNA gene and enhancer element. Larger deletions (5.5 Mb) can be generated in somatic cells, but at lower frequency (0.7%). Segmental inversions have also been generated, but the efficiency of these events is lower than the corresponding deletions. The ability to efficiently delete genomic segments in a vertebrate developmental system will facilitate the study of functional noncoding elements on an organismic level.

  2. Elucidating Cannabinoid Biology in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Randall G.; Clark, Karl J.

    2015-01-01

    The number of annual cannabinoid users exceeds 100,000,000 globally and an estimated 9 % of these individuals will suffer from dependency. Although exogenous cannabinoids, like those contained in marijuana, are known to exert their effects by disrupting the endocannabinoid system, a dearth of knowledge exists about the potential toxicological consequences on public health. Conversely, the endocannabinoid system represents a promising therapeutic target for a plethora of disorders because it functions to endogenously regulate a vast repertoire of physiological functions. Accordingly, the rapidly expanding field of cannabinoid biology has sought to leverage model organisms in order to provide both toxicological and therapeutic insights about altered endocannabinoid signaling. The primary goal of this manuscript is to review the existing field of cannabinoid research in the genetically tractable zebrafish model—focusing on the cannabinoid receptor genes, cnr1 and cnr2, and the genes that produce enzymes for synthesis and degradation of the cognate ligands anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol. Consideration is also given to research that has studied the effects of exposure to exogenous phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids that are known to interact with cannabinoid receptors. These results are considered in the context of either endocannabinoid gene expression or endocannabinoid gene function, and are integrated with findings from rodent studies. This provides the framework for a discussion of how zebrafish may be leveraged in the future to provide novel toxicological and therapeutic insights in the field of cannabinoid biology, which has become increasingly significant given recent trends in cannabis legislation. PMID:26192460

  3. Identification of polarized macrophage subsets in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Laplace-Builhe, Béryl; Travnickova, Jana; Luz-Crawford, Patricia; Tejedor, Gautier; Phan, Quang Tien; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Kissa, Karima; Lutfalla, Georges

    2015-01-01

    While the mammalian macrophage phenotypes have been intensively studied in vitro, the dynamic of their phenotypic polarization has never been investigated in live vertebrates. We used the zebrafish as a live model to identify and trail macrophage subtypes. We generated a transgenic line whose macrophages expressing tumour necrosis factor alpha (tnfa), a key feature of classically activated (M1) macrophages, express fluorescent proteins Tg(mpeg1:mCherryF/tnfa:eGFP-F). Using 4D-confocal microscopy, we showed that both aseptic wounding and Escherichia coli inoculation triggered macrophage recruitment, some of which started to express tnfa. RT-qPCR on Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted tnfa+ and tnfa− macrophages showed that they, respectively, expressed M1 and alternatively activated (M2) mammalian markers. Fate tracing of tnfa+ macrophages during the time-course of inflammation demonstrated that pro-inflammatory macrophages converted into M2-like phenotype during the resolution step. Our results reveal the diversity and plasticity of zebrafish macrophage subsets and underline the similarities with mammalian macrophages proposing a new system to study macrophage functional dynamic. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07288.001 PMID:26154973

  4. Imaging axon pathfinding in zebrafish in vivo.

    PubMed

    Leung, Louis; Holt, Christine E

    2012-09-01

    Axon pathfinding in the developing animal involves a highly dynamic process in which the axonal growth cone makes continuous decisions as it navigates toward its target. Changes occurring in the growth cone with respect to retracting from or extending into complex new territories can occur in minutes. Thus, the advent of strategies to visualize axon path-finding in vivo in a live intact animal is crucial for a better understanding of how the growth cone makes such rapid decisions in response to multiple cues. Combining these strategies with loss-of-function and/or gain-of-function techniques, one can gain some insight as to which molecules are crucial to particular growth cone behaviors at specific choice points during navigation. The major advantage of using zebrafish lies in the accessibility of major axon tracts for live microscopy, as their embryonic development occurs ex utero. Furthermore, the robust embryos remain healthy during immobilization and allow for good imaging for long periods. This protocol describes the method for stabilizing and preparing live zebrafish embryos for imaging labeled axonal tracts at high spatial and temporal resolution for up to 72 h. It has been used for retinotectal axon pathfinding, but can be adapted to visualize other axon tracts of interest. PMID:22949713

  5. Multidimensional In Vivo Hazard Assessment Using Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    There are tens of thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment; the inherent safety of most of these chemicals is not known. Relevant biological platforms and new computational tools are needed to prioritize testing of chemicals with limited human health hazard information. We describe an experimental design for high-throughput characterization of multidimensional in vivo effects with the power to evaluate trends relating to commonly cited chemical predictors. We evaluated all 1060 unique U.S. EPA ToxCast phase 1 and 2 compounds using the embryonic zebrafish and found that 487 induced significant adverse biological responses. The utilization of 18 simultaneously measured endpoints means that the entire system serves as a robust biological sensor for chemical hazard. The experimental design enabled us to describe global patterns of variation across tested compounds, evaluate the concordance of the available in vitro and in vivo phase 1 data with this study, highlight specific mechanisms/value-added/novel biology related to notochord development, and demonstrate that the developmental zebrafish detects adverse responses that would be missed by less comprehensive testing strategies. PMID:24136191

  6. Bioelectric Signaling Regulates Size in Zebrafish Fins

    PubMed Central

    Perathoner, Simon; Daane, Jacob M.; Henrion, Ulrike; Seebohm, Guiscard; Higdon, Charles W.; Johnson, Stephen L.; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Harris, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    The scaling relationship between the size of an appendage or organ and that of the body as a whole is tightly regulated during animal development. If a structure grows at a different rate than the rest of the body, this process is termed allometric growth. The zebrafish another longfin (alf) mutant shows allometric growth resulting in proportionally enlarged fins and barbels. We took advantage of this mutant to study the regulation of size in vertebrates. Here, we show that alf mutants carry gain-of-function mutations in kcnk5b, a gene encoding a two-pore domain potassium (K+) channel. Electrophysiological analysis in Xenopus oocytes reveals that these mutations cause an increase in K+ conductance of the channel and lead to hyperpolarization of the cell. Further, somatic transgenesis experiments indicate that kcnk5b acts locally within the mesenchyme of fins and barbels to specify appendage size. Finally, we show that the channel requires the ability to conduct K+ ions to increase the size of these structures. Our results provide evidence for a role of bioelectric signaling through K+ channels in the regulation of allometric scaling and coordination of growth in the zebrafish. PMID:24453984

  7. Metabolic Profile Analysis of Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Gibert, Yann; McGee, Sean L.; Ward, Alister C.

    2013-01-01

    A growing goal in the field of metabolism is to determine the impact of genetics on different aspects of mitochondrial function. Understanding these relationships will help to understand the underlying etiology for a range of diseases linked with mitochondrial dysfunction, such as diabetes and obesity. Recent advances in instrumentation, has enabled the monitoring of distinct parameters of mitochondrial function in cell lines or tissue explants. Here we present a method for a rapid and sensitive analysis of mitochondrial function parameters in vivo during zebrafish embryonic development using the Seahorse bioscience XF 24 extracellular flux analyser. This protocol utilizes the Islet Capture microplates where a single embryo is placed in each well, allowing measurement of bioenergetics, including: (i) basal respiration; (ii) basal mitochondrial respiration (iii) mitochondrial respiration due to ATP turnover; (iv) mitochondrial uncoupled respiration or proton leak and (iv) maximum respiration. Using this approach embryonic zebrafish respiration parameters can be compared between wild type and genetically altered embryos (mutant, gene over-expression or gene knockdown) or those manipulated pharmacologically. It is anticipated that dissemination of this protocol will provide researchers with new tools to analyse the genetic basis of metabolic disorders in vivo in this relevant vertebrate animal model. PMID:23353983

  8. Microfluidic tools for developmental studies of small model organisms — nematodes, fruit flies, and zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyundoo

    2013-01-01

    Studying genetics of development with small model organisms such as zebrafish Danio Rerio, the fruit fly Drosophila Melanogaster, and the soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, provide unique opportunities for understanding related processes and diseases in human as well as potential drug screens. There have been sweeping developments of microfabrication and microfluidic technologies for manipulating and imaging small objects, which allow high-throughput quantitative biological studies. Here, we review recent progress on these microfluidic tools and project future directions in these fields. PMID:23161817

  9. Health monitoring and disease prevention at the Zebrafish International Resource Center.

    PubMed

    Varga, Z M; Murray, K N

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we review the components of the fish health program at the Zebrafish International Resource Center. We describe health-monitoring strategies to assess individual and colony health, practices to prevent the spread of pathogens within the fish colony, and a biosecurity program designed to prevent entry of new fish pathogens. While this program is designed for a facility on a recirculating water system with expectations of high volumes of import and export, many of the components can be directly applied or modified for application in facilities of different sizes and with other programmatic goals.

  10. Toxicity of cylindrospermopsin, and other apparent metabolites from Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and Aphanizomenon ovalisporum, to the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo

    PubMed Central

    Berry, John P.; Gibbs, Patrick D.L.; Schmale, Michael C.; Saker, Martin L.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce a diverse array of toxic or otherwise bioactive compounds that pose growing threats to human and environmental health. We utilized the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo, as a model of vertebrate development, to investigate the inhibition of development pathways (i.e. developmental toxicity) by the cyanobacterial toxin, cylindrospermopsin (CYN), as well as extracts from various isolates of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and Aphanizomenon ovalisporum. CYN was toxic only when injected directly into embryos, but not by direct immersion at doses up to 50 μg/ml. Despite the dose dependency of toxicity observed following injection of CYN, no consistent patterns of developmental defects were observed, suggesting that toxic effects of CYN may not target specific developmental pathways. In contrast, direct immersion of embryos in all of the extracts resulted in both increased mortality and reproducible, consistent, developmental dysfunctions. Interestingly, there was no correlation of developmental toxicity observed for these extracts with the presence of CYN or with previously reported toxicity for these strains. These results suggest that CYN is lethal to zebrafish embryos, but apparently inhibits no specific developmental pathways, whereas other apparent metabolites from C. raciborskii and A. ovalisporum seem to reproducibly inhibit development in the zebrafish model. Continued investigation of these apparent, unknown metabolites is needed. PMID:19087885

  11. Social learning of an associative foraging task in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zala, Sarah M.; Määttänen, Ilmari

    2013-05-01

    The zebrafish ( Danio rerio) is increasingly becoming an important model species for studies on the genetic and neural mechanisms controlling behaviour and cognition. Here, we utilized a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm to study social learning in zebrafish. We tested whether social interactions with conditioned demonstrators enhance the ability of focal naïve individuals to learn an associative foraging task. We found that the presence of conditioned demonstrators improved focal fish foraging behaviour through the process of social transmission, whereas the presence of inexperienced demonstrators interfered with the learning of the control focal fish. Our results indicate that zebrafish use social learning for finding food and that this CPP paradigm is an efficient assay to study social learning and memory in zebrafish.

  12. Think Small: Zebrafish as a Model System of Human Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, J. R.; Jobin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Although human pathologies have mostly been modeled using higher mammal systems such as mice, the lower vertebrate zebrafish has gained tremendous attention as a model system. The advantages of zebrafish over classical vertebrate models are multifactorial and include high genetic and organ system homology to humans, high fecundity, external fertilization, ease of genetic manipulation, and transparency through early adulthood that enables powerful imaging modalities. This paper focuses on four areas of human pathology that were developed and/or advanced significantly in zebrafish in the last decade. These areas are (1) wound healing/restitution, (2) gastrointestinal diseases, (3) microbe-host interactions, and (4) genetic diseases and drug screens. Important biological processes and pathologies explored include wound-healing responses, pancreatic cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and mycobacterium infection. The utility of zebrafish in screening for novel genes important in various pathologies such as polycystic kidney disease is also discussed. PMID:22701308

  13. Zebrafish as a Model for the Study of Solid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Genevieve C; Amatruda, James F

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish cancer models have provided critical insight into understanding the link between aberrant developmental pathways and tumorigenesis. The unique strengths of zebrafish as compared to other vertebrate model systems include the combination of fecundity, readily available and efficient transgenesis techniques, transparency that facilitates in vivo cell lineage tracing, and amenability for high-throughput applications. In addition to early embryo readouts, zebrafish can develop tumors at ages ranging from 2 weeks old to adulthood. Tumorigenesis is driven by genetically introducing oncogenes using selected promoter/tissue-specific expression, with either mosaic expression or with the generation of a stable transgenic line. Here, we detail a research pipeline to facilitate the study of human oncogenes in zebrafish systems. The goals of this approach are to identify conserved developmental pathways that may be critical for tumor development and to create platforms for testing novel therapies. PMID:27464805

  14. Functional inhibition of UQCRB suppresses angiogenesis in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin; Seok, Seung Hyeok; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Chen, James K.; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: ► This is the first functional characterization of UQCRB in vivo model. ► Angiogenesis is inhibited with UQCRB loss of function in zebrafish. ► UQCRB is introduced as a prognostic marker for mitochondria- and angiogenesis-related diseases. -- Abstract: As a subunit of mitochondrial complex III, UQCRB plays an important role in complex III stability, electron transport, and cellular oxygen sensing. Herein, we report UQCRB function regarding angiogenesis in vivo with the zebrafish (Danio rerio). UQCRB knockdown inhibited angiogenesis in zebrafish leading to the suppression of VEGF expression. Moreover, the UQCRB-targeting small molecule terpestacin also inhibited angiogenesis and VEGF levels in zebrafish, supporting the role of UQCRB in angiogenesis. Collectively, UQCRB loss of function by either genetic and pharmacological means inhibited angiogenesis, indicating that UQCRB plays a key role in this process and can be a prognostic marker of angiogenesis- and mitochondria-related diseases.

  15. Teratogenic potential of antiepileptic drugs in the zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hak; Kang, Jung Won; Lin, Tao; Lee, Jae Eun; Jin, Dong Il

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish model is an attractive candidate for screening of developmental toxicity during early drug development. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) arouse concern for the risk of teratogenicity, but the data are limited. In this study, we evaluated the teratogenic potential of seven AEDs (carbamazepine (CBZ), ethosuximide (ETX), valproic acid (VPN), lamotrigine (LMT), lacosamide (LCM), levetiracetam (LVT), and topiramate (TPM)) in the zebrafish model. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to AEDs from initiation of gastrula (5.25 hours post-fertilization (hpf)) to termination of hatching (72 hpf) which mimic the mammalian teratogenic experimental design. The lethality and teratogenic index (TI) of AEDs were determined and the TI values of each drug were compared with the US FDA human pregnancy categories. Zebrafish model was useful screening model for teratogenic potential of antiepilepsy drugs and was in concordance with in vivo mammalian data and human clinical data.

  16. Behavioral analysis of the escape response in larval zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ruopei; Girdhar, Kiran; Chemla, Yann; Gruebele, Martin

    The behavior of larval zebrafish is of great interest because the limited number of locomotor neurons in larval zebrafish couples with its rich repertoire of movements as a vertebrate animal. Current research uses a priori-selected parameters to describe their swimming behavior while our lab has built a parameter-free model based on singular value decomposition analysis to characterize it. Our previous work has analyzed the free swimming of larval zebrafish and presented a different picture from the current classification of larval zebrafish locomotion. Now we are extending this work to the studies of their escape response to acoustic stimulus. Analysis has shown intrinsic difference in the locomotion between escape response and free swimming.

  17. Zebrafish (Danio rerio): A Potential Model for Toxinological Studies.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Rafael Antonio; Sarmiento, Karen; Vásquez, Isabel Cristina

    2015-10-01

    Zebrafish are an emerging basic biomedical research model that has multiple advantages compared with other research models. Given that biotoxins, such as toxins, poisons, and venoms, represent health hazards to animals and humans, a low-cost biological model that is highly sensitive to biotoxins is useful to understand the damage caused by such agents and to develop biological tests to prevent and reduce the risk of poisoning in potential cases of bioterrorism or food contamination. In this article, a narrative review of the general aspects of zebrafish as a model in basic biomedical research and various studies in the field of toxinology that have used zebrafish as a biological model are presented. This information will provide useful material to beginner students and researchers who are interested in developing toxinological studies with the zebrafish model.

  18. Persistent impaired glucose metabolism in a zebrafish hyperglycemia model.

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Antonioli, Régis; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) affects over 10% of the world's population. Hyperglycemia is the main feature for the diagnosis of this disease. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an established model organism for the study of various metabolic diseases. In this paper, hyperglycemic zebrafish, when immersed in a 111 mM glucose solution for 14 days, developed increased glycation of proteins from the eyes, decreased mRNA levels of insulin receptors in the muscle, and a reversion of high blood glucose level after treatment with anti-diabetic drugs (glimepiride and metformin) even after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. Additionally, hyperglycemic zebrafish developed an impaired response to exogenous insulin, which was recovered after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. These data suggest that the exposure of adult zebrafish to high glucose concentration is able to induce persistent metabolic changes probably underlined by a hyperinsulinemic state and impaired peripheral glucose metabolism. PMID:24704522

  19. The behaviour and ecology of the zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Spence, Rowena; Gerlach, Gabriele; Lawrence, Christian; Smith, Carl

    2008-02-01

    The zebrafish Danio rerio, is an important model organism in developmental genetics, neurophysiology and biomedicine, but little is known about its natural ecology and behaviour. It is a small, shoaling cyprinid, native to the flood-plains of the Indian subcontinent, where it is found in shallow, slow-flowing waters. Zebrafish are group spawners and egg scatterers, although females are choosy with respect to sites for oviposition and males defend territories around such sites. Laboratory studies of zebrafish behaviour have encompassed shoaling, foraging, reproduction, sensory perception and learning. These studies are reviewed in relation to the suitability of the zebrafish as a model for studies on cognition and learning, development, behavioural and evolutionary ecology, and behavioural genetics.

  20. REVIEW: Zebrafish: A Renewed Model System For Functional Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiao-Yan

    2008-01-01

    In the post genome era, a major goal in molecular biology is to determine the function of the many thousands of genes present in the vertebrate genome. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) provides an almost ideal genetic model to identify the biological roles of these novel genes, in part because their embryos are transparent and develop rapidly. The zebrafish has many advantages over mouse for genome-wide mutagenesis studies, allowing for easier, cheaper and faster functional characterization of novel genes in the vertebrate genome. Many molecular research tools such as chemical mutagenesis, transgenesis, gene trapping, gene knockdown, TILLING, gene targeting, RNAi and chemical genetic screen are now available in zebrafish. Combining all the forward, reverse, and chemical genetic tools, it is expected that zebrafish will make invaluable contribution to vertebrate functional genomics in functional annotation of the genes, modeling human diseases and drug discoveries.

  1. Imaging blood vessels and lymphatic vessels in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jung, H M; Isogai, S; Kamei, M; Castranova, D; Gore, A V; Weinstein, B M

    2016-01-01

    Blood vessels supply tissues and organs with oxygen, nutrients, cellular, and humoral factors, while lymphatic vessels regulate tissue fluid homeostasis, immune trafficking, and dietary fat absorption. Understanding the mechanisms of vascular morphogenesis has become a subject of intense clinical interest because of the close association of both types of vessels with pathogenesis of a broad spectrum of human diseases. The zebrafish provides a powerful animal model to study vascular morphogenesis because of their small, accessible, and transparent embryos. These unique features of zebrafish embryos permit sophisticated high-resolution live imaging of even deeply localized vessels during embryonic development and even in adult tissues. In this chapter, we summarize various methods for blood and lymphatic vessel imaging in zebrafish, including nonvital resin injection-based or dye injection-based vessel visualization, and alkaline phosphatase staining. We also provide protocols for vital imaging of vessels using microangiography or transgenic fluorescent reporter zebrafish lines. PMID:27263409

  2. Phenotype Classification of Zebrafish Embryos by Supervised Learning

    PubMed Central

    Jeanray, Nathalie; Marée, Raphaël; Pruvot, Benoist; Stern, Olivier; Geurts, Pierre; Wehenkel, Louis; Muller, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish is increasingly used to assess biological properties of chemical substances and thus is becoming a specific tool for toxicological and pharmacological studies. The effects of chemical substances on embryo survival and development are generally evaluated manually through microscopic observation by an expert and documented by several typical photographs. Here, we present a methodology to automatically classify brightfield images of wildtype zebrafish embryos according to their defects by using an image analysis approach based on supervised machine learning. We show that, compared to manual classification, automatic classification results in 90 to 100% agreement with consensus voting of biological experts in nine out of eleven considered defects in 3 days old zebrafish larvae. Automation of the analysis and classification of zebrafish embryo pictures reduces the workload and time required for the biological expert and increases the reproducibility and objectivity of this classification. PMID:25574849

  3. Developmental Toxicity of Louisiana Crude Oiled Sediment to Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Embryonic exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and petroleum products cause a characteristic suite of developmental defects in a variety of fish species. We exposed zebrafish embryos to sediment mixed with laboratory weathered South Louisiana crude oil. Oiled sedi...

  4. The zebrafish as a model for complex tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gemberling, Matthew; Bailey, Travis J.; Hyde, David R.; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    For centuries, philosophers and scientists have been fascinated by the principles and implications of regeneration in lower vertebrate species. Two features have made zebrafish an informative model system for determining mechanisms of regenerative events. First, they are highly regenerative, able to regrow amputated fins, as well as a lesioned brain, retina, spinal cord, heart, and other tissues. Second, they are amenable to both forward and reverse genetic approaches, with a research toolset regularly updated by an expanding community of zebrafish researchers. Zebrafish studies have helped identify new mechanistic underpinnings of regeneration in multiple tissues, and in some cases have served as a guide for contemplating regenerative strategies in mammals. Here, we review the recent history of zebrafish as a genetic model system for understanding how and why tissue regeneration occurs. PMID:23927865

  5. Study of Host–Microbe Interactions in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Milligan-Myhre, Kathryn; Charette, Jeremy R.; Phennicie, Ryan T.; Stephens, W. Zac; Rawls, John F.; Guillemin, Karen; Kim, Carol H.

    2015-01-01

    All animals are ecosystems, home to diverse microbial populations. Animal-associated microbes play important roles in the normal development and physiology of their hosts, but can also be agents of infectious disease. Traditionally, mice have been used to study pathogenic and beneficial associations between microbes and vertebrate animals. The zebrafish is emerging as a valuable new model system for host-microbe interaction studies, affording researchers with the opportunity to survey large populations of hosts and to visualize microbe-host associations at a cellular level in living animals. This chapter provides detailed protocols for the analysis of zebrafish-associated microbial communities, the derivation and husbandry of germ-free zebrafish, and the modeling of infectious disease in different stages of zebrafish development via different routes of inoculation. These protocols offer a starting point for researchers to address a multitude of questions about animals’ coexistence with microorganisms. PMID:21951527

  6. pyewacket, a new zebrafish fin pigment pattern mutant.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, Eve M; Johnson, Stephen L

    2006-06-01

    Many mutants that disrupt zebrafish embryonic pigment pattern have been isolated, and subsequent cloning of the mutated genes causing these phenotypes has contributed to our understanding of pigment cell development. However, few mutants have been identified that specifically affect development of the adult pigment pattern. Through a mutant screen for adult pigment pattern phenotypes, we identified pyewacket (pye), a novel zebrafish mutant in which development of the adult caudal fin pigment pattern is aberrant. Specifically, pye mutants have fin melanocyte pigment pattern defects and fewer xanthophores than wild-type fins. We mapped pye to an interval where a single gene, the zebrafish ortholog of the human gene DHRSX, is present. pye will be an informative mutant for understanding how xanthophores and melanocytes interact to form the pigment pattern of the adult zebrafish fin.

  7. Inducible Podocyte Injury and Proteinuria in Transgenic Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2012-01-01

    Damage or loss of podocytes causes glomerulosclerosis in murine models, and mutations in podocyte-specific genes cause nephrotic syndrome in humans. Zebrafish provide a valuable model for kidney research, but disruption of pronephroi leads to death within a few days, thereby preventing the study of CKD. In this study, we generated an inducible model of podocyte injury in zebrafish (pod::NTR-mCherry) by expressing a bacterial nitroreductase, which converts metronidazole to a cytotoxin, specifically in podocytes under the control of the zebrafish nphs2/podocin promoter. Application of the prodrug metronidazole to the transgenic fish induces acute damage to the podocytes in pronephroi of larval zebrafish and the mesonephroi of adult zebrafish, resulting in foot-process effacement and podocyte loss. We also developed a functional assay of the glomerular filtration barrier by creating transgenic zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)–tagged vitamin D–binding protein (VDBP) as a tracer for proteinuria. In the VDBP-GFP and pod::NTR-mCherry double-transgenic fish, induction of podocyte damage led to whole-body edema, and the proximal tubules reabsorbed and accumulated VDBP-GFP that leaked through the glomeruli, mimicking the phenotype of human nephrotic syndrome. Moreover, expression of wt1b::GFP, a marker for the developing nephron, extended into the Bowman capsule in response to podocyte injury, suggesting that zebrafish have a podocyte-specific repair process known to occur in mammalian metanephros. These data support the use of these transgenic zebrafish as a model system for studies of glomerular pathogenesis and podocyte regeneration. PMID:22440901

  8. Of fish and men: using zebrafish to fight human diseases.

    PubMed

    Ablain, Julien; Zon, Leonard I

    2013-12-01

    Long restricted to the field of developmental biology, the use of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has extended to the study of human pathogenesis. Fostered by the rapid adaptation of new technologies, the design and analysis of fish models of human diseases have contributed important findings that are now making their way from aquariums to clinics. Here we outline the clinical relevance of the zebrafish as a model organism. PMID:24275383

  9. Quadruple zebrafish mutant reveals different roles of Mesp genes in somite segmentation between mouse and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Taijiro; Hoshijima, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Takada, Shinji

    2016-08-01

    The segmental pattern of somites is generated by sequential conversion of the temporal periodicity provided by the molecular clock. Whereas the basic structure of this clock is conserved among different species, diversity also exists, especially in terms of the molecular network. The temporal periodicity is subsequently converted into the spatial pattern of somites, and Mesp2 plays crucial roles in this conversion in the mouse. However, it remains unclear whether Mesp genes play similar roles in other vertebrates. In this study, we generated zebrafish mutants lacking all four zebrafish Mesp genes by using TALEN-mediated genome editing. Contrary to the situation in the mouse Mesp2 mutant, in the zebrafish Mesp quadruple mutant embryos the positions of somite boundaries were clearly determined and morphological boundaries were formed, although their formation was not completely normal. However, each somite was caudalized in a similar manner to the mouse Mesp2 mutant, and the superficial horizontal myoseptum and lateral line primordia were not properly formed in the quadruple mutants. These results clarify the conserved and species-specific roles of Mesp in the link between the molecular clock and somite morphogenesis. PMID:27385009

  10. Fundamental Approaches to the Study of Zebrafish Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Stephen A.; Powell, Mickie; D’Abramo, Louis R.

    2014-01-01

    The value of the zebrafish model has been well established. However, culture variability within and among laboratories remains a concern, particularly as it relates to nutrition. Investigators using rodent models addressed this concern several decades ago and have developed strict nutritional regimes to which their models adhere. These investigators decreased the variability associated with nutrition in most studies by developing standardized reference and open formulation diets. Zebrafish investigators have not embraced this approach. In this article, we address the problems associated with the lack of nutritional information and standardization in the zebrafish research community. Based on the knowledge gained from studies of other animals, including traditional research models, other fish species, domesticated and companion animals, and humans, we have proposed an approach that seeks to standardize nutrition research in zebrafish. We have identified a number of factors for consideration in zebrafish nutrition studies and have suggested a number of proposed outcomes. The long term-goal of nutrition research will be to identify the daily nutritional requirements of the zebrafish and to develop appropriate standardized reference and open formulation diets. PMID:23382346

  11. The emerging use of zebrafish to model metabolic disease

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Asha; Stemple, Derek L.; Barroso, Inês

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish research community is celebrating! The zebrafish genome has recently been sequenced, the Zebrafish Mutation Project (launched by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) has published the results of its first large-scale ethylnitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen, and a host of new techniques, such as the genome editing technologies TALEN and CRISPR-Cas, are enabling specific mutations to be created in model organisms and investigated in vivo. The zebrafish truly seems to be coming of age. These powerful resources invoke the question of whether zebrafish can be increasingly used to model human disease, particularly common, chronic diseases of metabolism such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In recent years, there has been considerable success, mainly from genomic approaches, in identifying genetic variants that are associated with these conditions in humans; however, mechanistic insights into the role of implicated disease loci are lacking. In this Review, we highlight some of the advantages and disadvantages of zebrafish to address the organism’s utility as a model system for human metabolic diseases. PMID:24046387

  12. Zebrafish Models of Human Leukemia: Technological Advances and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Nicholas R; Laroche, Fabrice J F; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Feng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Insights concerning leukemic pathophysiology have been acquired in various animal models and further efforts to understand the mechanisms underlying leukemic treatment resistance and disease relapse promise to improve therapeutic strategies. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a vertebrate organism with a conserved hematopoietic program and unique experimental strengths suiting it for the investigation of human leukemia. Recent technological advances in zebrafish research including efficient transgenesis, precise genome editing, and straightforward transplantation techniques have led to the generation of a number of leukemia models. The transparency of the zebrafish when coupled with improved lineage-tracing and imaging techniques has revealed exquisite details of leukemic initiation, progression, and regression. With these advantages, the zebrafish represents a unique experimental system for leukemic research and additionally, advances in zebrafish-based high-throughput drug screening promise to hasten the discovery of novel leukemia therapeutics. To date, investigators have accumulated knowledge of the genetic underpinnings critical to leukemic transformation and treatment resistance and without doubt, zebrafish are rapidly expanding our understanding of disease mechanisms and helping to shape therapeutic strategies for improved outcomes in leukemic patients.

  13. Normal anatomy and histology of the adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Menke, Aswin L; Spitsbergen, Jan M; Wolterbeek, Andre P M; Woutersen, Ruud A

    2011-08-01

    The zebrafish has been shown to be an excellent vertebrate model for studying the roles of specific genes and signaling pathways. The sequencing of its genome and the relative ease with which gene modifications can be performed have led to the creation of numerous human disease models that can be used for testing the potential and the toxicity of new pharmaceutical compounds. Many pharmaceutical companies already use the zebrafish for prescreening purposes. So far, the focus has been on ecotoxicity and the effects on embryonic development, but there is a trend to expand the use of the zebrafish with acute, subchronic, and chronic toxicity studies that are currently still carried out with the more conventional test animals such as rodents. However, before we can fully realize the potential of the zebrafish as an animal model for understanding human development, disease, and toxicology, we must first greatly advance our knowledge of normal zebrafish physiology, anatomy, and histology. To further this knowledge, we describe, in the present article, location and histology of the major zebrafish organ systems with a brief description of their function.

  14. Microarray Noninvasive Neuronal Seizure Recordings from Intact Larval Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Michaela; Dhamne, Sameer C; LaCoursiere, Christopher M; Tambunan, Dimira; Poduri, Annapurna; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish epilepsy models are emerging tools in experimental epilepsy. Zebrafish larvae, in particular, are advantageous because they can be easily genetically altered and used for developmental and drug studies since agents applied to the bath penetrate the organism easily. Methods for electrophysiological recordings in zebrafish are new and evolving. We present a novel multi-electrode array method to non-invasively record electrical activity from up to 61 locations of an intact larval zebrafish head. This method enables transcranial noninvasive recording of extracellular field potentials (which include multi-unit activity and EEG) to identify epileptic seizures. To record from the brains of zebrafish larvae, the dorsum of the head of an intact larva was secured onto a multi-electrode array. We recorded from individual electrodes for at least three hours and quantified neuronal firing frequency, spike patterns (continuous or bursting), and synchrony of neuronal firing. Following 15 mM potassium chloride- or pentylenetetrazole-infusion into the bath, spike and burst rate increased significantly. Additionally, synchrony of neuronal firing across channels, a hallmark of epileptic seizures, also increased. Notably, the fish survived the experiment. This non-invasive method complements present invasive zebrafish neurophysiological techniques: it affords the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution, a capacity to measure multiregional activity and neuronal synchrony in seizures, and fish survival for future experiments, such as studies of epileptogenesis and development. PMID:27281339

  15. Microarray Noninvasive Neuronal Seizure Recordings from Intact Larval Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michaela; Dhamne, Sameer C.; LaCoursiere, Christopher M.; Tambunan, Dimira; Poduri, Annapurna; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish epilepsy models are emerging tools in experimental epilepsy. Zebrafish larvae, in particular, are advantageous because they can be easily genetically altered and used for developmental and drug studies since agents applied to the bath penetrate the organism easily. Methods for electrophysiological recordings in zebrafish are new and evolving. We present a novel multi-electrode array method to non-invasively record electrical activity from up to 61 locations of an intact larval zebrafish head. This method enables transcranial noninvasive recording of extracellular field potentials (which include multi-unit activity and EEG) to identify epileptic seizures. To record from the brains of zebrafish larvae, the dorsum of the head of an intact larva was secured onto a multi-electrode array. We recorded from individual electrodes for at least three hours and quantified neuronal firing frequency, spike patterns (continuous or bursting), and synchrony of neuronal firing. Following 15 mM potassium chloride- or pentylenetetrazole-infusion into the bath, spike and burst rate increased significantly. Additionally, synchrony of neuronal firing across channels, a hallmark of epileptic seizures, also increased. Notably, the fish survived the experiment. This non-invasive method complements present invasive zebrafish neurophysiological techniques: it affords the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution, a capacity to measure multiregional activity and neuronal synchrony in seizures, and fish survival for future experiments, such as studies of epileptogenesis and development. PMID:27281339

  16. Zebrafish Models of Human Leukemia: Technological Advances and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Nicholas R.; Laroche, Fabrice J.F.; Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Insights concerning leukemic pathophysiology have been acquired in various animal models and further efforts to understand the mechanisms underlying leukemic treatment resistance and disease relapse promise to improve therapeutic strategies. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a vertebrate organism with a conserved hematopoietic program and unique experimental strengths suiting it for the investigation of human leukemia. Recent technological advances in zebrafish research including efficient transgenesis, precise genome editing, and straightforward transplantation techniques have led to the generation of a number of leukemia models. The transparency of the zebrafish when coupled with improved lineage-tracing and imaging techniques has revealed exquisite details of leukemic initiation, progression, and regression. With these advantages, the zebrafish represents a unique experimental system for leukemic research and additionally, advances in zebrafish-based high-throughput drug screening promise to hasten the discovery of novel leukemia therapeutics. To date, investigators have accumulated knowledge of the genetic underpinnings critical to leukemic transformation and treatment resistance and without doubt, zebrafish are rapidly expanding our understanding of disease mechanisms and helping to shape therapeutic strategies for improved outcomes in leukemic patients. PMID:27165361

  17. Zebrafish Models of Human Leukemia: Technological Advances and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Nicholas R; Laroche, Fabrice J F; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Feng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Insights concerning leukemic pathophysiology have been acquired in various animal models and further efforts to understand the mechanisms underlying leukemic treatment resistance and disease relapse promise to improve therapeutic strategies. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a vertebrate organism with a conserved hematopoietic program and unique experimental strengths suiting it for the investigation of human leukemia. Recent technological advances in zebrafish research including efficient transgenesis, precise genome editing, and straightforward transplantation techniques have led to the generation of a number of leukemia models. The transparency of the zebrafish when coupled with improved lineage-tracing and imaging techniques has revealed exquisite details of leukemic initiation, progression, and regression. With these advantages, the zebrafish represents a unique experimental system for leukemic research and additionally, advances in zebrafish-based high-throughput drug screening promise to hasten the discovery of novel leukemia therapeutics. To date, investigators have accumulated knowledge of the genetic underpinnings critical to leukemic transformation and treatment resistance and without doubt, zebrafish are rapidly expanding our understanding of disease mechanisms and helping to shape therapeutic strategies for improved outcomes in leukemic patients. PMID:27165361

  18. Turning Rate Dynamics of Zebrafish Exposed to Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is emerging as a species of choice in alcohol-related pharmacological studies. In these studies, zebrafish are often exposed to acute ethanol treatments and their activity scored during behavioral assays. Computational modeling of zebrafish behavior is expected to positively impact these efforts by offering a predictive toolbox to plan hypothesis-driven studies, reduce the number of subjects, perform pilot trials, and refine behavioral screening. In this work, we demonstrate the use of the recently proposed jump persistent turning walker to model the turning rate dynamics of zebrafish exposed to acute ethanol administration. This modeling framework is based on a stochastic mean reverting jump process to capture the sudden and large changes in orientation of swimming zebrafish. The model is calibrated on an available experimental dataset of 40 subjects, tested at different ethanol concentrations. We demonstrate that model parameters are modulated by ethanol administration, whereby both the relaxation rate and jump frequency of the turning rate dynamics are influenced by ethanol concentration. This effort offers a first evidence for the possibility of complementing zebrafish pharmacological research with computational modeling of animal behavior.

  19. Expression analysis of a tyrosinase promoter sequence in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Camp, Esther; Badhwar, Prerna; Mann, Graham J; Lardelli, Michael

    2003-04-01

    Sequence comparisons and functional analysis of the 5' upstream regions of tyrosinase genes have revealed the importance of cis-regulatory elements acting to control the spatiotemporal expression of tyrosinase in the melanocytes and retinal pigmented epithelium of developing embryos. To date there are no reports addressing the control of tyrosinase gene transcription in zebrafish, a vertebrate model organism of increasing importance. To exploit the tyrosinase gene as a marker in zebrafish we set out to clone its promoter and analyse its regulation during embryogenesis. Amplification of a zebrafish tyrosinase complementary DNA fragment by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction allowed us to isolate and sequence a 1041 nt genomic DNA fragment that includes a transcription initiation site and 73 nt of the open reading frame. Bioinformatic analysis of this genomic sequence revealed five E-box motifs, including one CATGTG type E-box present in a putative initiation region. These are conserved positive regulatory elements in vertebrate tyrosinase promoters. We show that a region of 814 nt upstream from the translation start site of the zebrafish tyrosinase gene can drive expression in retinal pigmented epithelium in transiently transgenic zebrafish embryos but that its activity is not restricted to melanin-producing cells. This region is unable to drive transcription in human melanoma cell lines. Ectopic expression from this zebrafish tyrosinase promoter fragment is probably due to the absence of positive and negative cis-regulatory elements, such as a tyrosinase distal element, which is known to function as a pigment cell-specific enhancer.

  20. Connexin43 regulates joint location in zebrafish fins.

    PubMed

    Sims, Kenneth; Eble, Diane M; Iovine, M Kathryn

    2009-03-15

    Joints are essential for skeletal form and function, yet their development remains poorly understood. In zebrafish fins, joints form between the bony fin ray segments providing essentially unlimited opportunities to evaluate joint morphogenesis. Mutations in cx43 cause the short segment phenotype of short fin (sof(b123)) mutants, suggesting that direct cell-cell communication may regulate joint location. Interestingly, increased cx43 expression in the another long fin (alf(dty86)) mutant appears to cause joint failure typical of that mutant. Indeed, knockdown of cx43 in alf(dty86) mutant fins rescues joint formation. Together, these data reveal a correlation between the level of Cx43 expression in the fin ray mesenchyme and the location of joints. Cx43 was also observed laterally in cells associated with developing joints. Confocal microscopy revealed that the Cx43 protein initially surrounds the membranes of ZNS5-positive joint cells, but at later stages becomes polarized toward the underlying Cx43-positive mesenchymal cells. One possibility is that communication between the Cx43-positive mesenchyme and the overlying ZNS5-positive cells regulates joint location, and upregulation of Cx43 in joint-forming cells contributes to joint morphogenesis. PMID:19150347

  1. Multifaceted toxicity assessment of catalyst composites in transgenic zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Jang, Gun Hyuk; Lee, Keon Yong; Choi, Jaewon; Kim, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2016-09-01

    Recent development in the field of nanomaterials has given rise into the inquiries regarding the toxicological characteristics of the nanomaterials. While many individual nanomaterials have been screened for their toxicological effects, composites that accompany nanomaterials are not common subjects to such screening through toxicological assessment. One of the widely used composites that accompany nanomaterials is catalyst composite used to reduce air pollution, which was selected as a target composite with nanomaterials for the multifaceted toxicological assessment. As existing studies did not possess any significant data regarding such catalyst composites, this study focuses on investigating toxicological characteristics of catalyst composites from various angles in both in-vitro and in-vivo settings. Initial toxicological assessment on catalyst composites was conducted using HUVECs for cell viability assays, and subsequent in-vivo assay regarding their direct influence on living organisms was done. The zebrafish embryo and its transgenic lines were used in the in-vivo assays to obtain multifaceted analytic results. Data obtained from the in-vivo assays include blood vessel formation, mutated heart morphology, and heart functionality change. Our multifaceted toxicological assessment pointed out that chemical composites augmented with nanomaterials can too have toxicological threat as much as individual nanomaterials do and alarms us with their danger. This manuscript provides a multifaceted assessment for composites augmented with nanomaterials, of which their toxicological threats have been overlooked. PMID:27364464

  2. Modeling mucosal candidiasis in larval zebrafish by swimbladder injection.

    PubMed

    Gratacap, Remi L; Bergeron, Audrey C; Wheeler, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Early defense against mucosal pathogens consists of both an epithelial barrier and innate immune cells. The immunocompetency of both, and their intercommunication, are paramount for the protection against infections. The interactions of epithelial and innate immune cells with a pathogen are best investigated in vivo, where complex behavior unfolds over time and space. However, existing models do not allow for easy spatio-temporal imaging of the battle with pathogens at the mucosal level. The model developed here creates a mucosal infection by direct injection of the fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, into the swimbladder of juvenile zebrafish. The resulting infection enables high-resolution imaging of epithelial and innate immune cell behavior throughout the development of mucosal disease. The versatility of this method allows for interrogation of the host to probe the detailed sequence of immune events leading to phagocyte recruitment and to examine the roles of particular cell types and molecular pathways in protection. In addition, the behavior of the pathogen as a function of immune attack can be imaged simultaneously by using fluorescent protein-expressing C. albicans. Increased spatial resolution of the host-pathogen interaction is also possible using the described rapid swimbladder dissection technique. The mucosal infection model described here is straightforward and highly reproducible, making it a valuable tool for the study of mucosal candidiasis. This system may also be broadly translatable to other mucosal pathogens such as mycobacterial, bacterial or viral microbes that normally infect through epithelial surfaces.

  3. Modeling Mucosal Candidiasis in Larval Zebrafish by Swimbladder Injection

    PubMed Central

    Gratacap, Remi L.; Bergeron, Audrey C.; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Early defense against mucosal pathogens consists of both an epithelial barrier and innate immune cells. The immunocompetency of both, and their intercommunication, are paramount for the protection against infections. The interactions of epithelial and innate immune cells with a pathogen are best investigated in vivo, where complex behavior unfolds over time and space. However, existing models do not allow for easy spatio-temporal imaging of the battle with pathogens at the mucosal level. The model developed here creates a mucosal infection by direct injection of the fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, into the swimbladder of juvenile zebrafish. The resulting infection enables high-resolution imaging of epithelial and innate immune cell behavior throughout the development of mucosal disease. The versatility of this method allows for interrogation of the host to probe the detailed sequence of immune events leading to phagocyte recruitment and to examine the roles of particular cell types and molecular pathways in protection. In addition, the behavior of the pathogen as a function of immune attack can be imaged simultaneously by using fluorescent protein-expressing C. albicans. Increased spatial resolution of the host-pathogen interaction is also possible using the described rapid swimbladder dissection technique. The mucosal infection model described here is straightforward and highly reproducible, making it a valuable tool for the study of mucosal candidiasis. This system may also be broadly translatable to other mucosal pathogens such as mycobacterial, bacterial or viral microbes that normally infect through epithelial surfaces. PMID:25490695

  4. A dedicated visual pathway for prey detection in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Semmelhack, Julia L; Donovan, Joseph C; Thiele, Tod R; Kuehn, Enrico; Laurell, Eva; Baier, Herwig

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish larvae show characteristic prey capture behavior in response to small moving objects. The neural mechanism used to recognize objects as prey remains largely unknown. We devised a machine learning behavior classification system to quantify hunting kinematics in semi-restrained animals exposed to a range of virtual stimuli. Two-photon calcium imaging revealed a small visual area, AF7, that was activated specifically by the optimal prey stimulus. This pretectal region is innervated by two types of retinal ganglion cells, which also send collaterals to the optic tectum. Laser ablation of AF7 markedly reduced prey capture behavior. We identified neurons with arbors in AF7 and found that they projected to multiple sensory and premotor areas: the optic tectum, the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (nMLF) and the hindbrain. These findings indicate that computations in the retina give rise to a visual stream which transforms sensory information into a directed prey capture response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04878.001 PMID:25490154

  5. Triclosan (TCS) exposure impairs lipid metabolism in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jeff C H; Hsiao, C D; Kawakami, K; Tse, William K F

    2016-04-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an active antimicrobial ingredient used in many household products, such as skin creams and toothpaste. It is produced in high volumes, and humans are directly exposed to it and dispose it on a daily basis. TCS has been found to contaminate water worldwide. This study aimed to understand the potential developmental and metabolic abnormalities caused by TCS exposure by using zebrafish as the experimental model. Four developmental stages (70-85% epiboly, 10-12 somite, prim-5, and 5dpf) were selected to perform in situ hybridization staining to investigate the effects of TCS on dorsal ventral patterning, segmentation, brain development, and organ formation. Results showed, in terms of developmental toxicology, that neither phenotypic nor molecular changes were found after 5 days of 250μg/L TCS exposure. However, such dosage of TCS exposure resulted in lipid droplet accumulation in the yolk sac, which might due to the deregulated mRNA expression level of beta-oxidation transcripts. This study showed that 250μg/L TCS exposure does not affect normal embryogenesis or organogenesis; however, there are concerns regarding possible impairment of lipid metabolism.

  6. The dorsal raphe modulates sensory responsiveness during arousal in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yokogawa, Tohei; Hannan, Markus C.; Burgess, Harold A.

    2012-01-01

    During waking behavior animals adapt their state of arousal in response to environmental pressures. Sensory processing is regulated in aroused states and several lines of evidence imply that this is mediated at least partly by the serotonergic system. However there is little information directly showing that serotonergic function is required for state-dependent modulation of sensory processing. Here we find that zebrafish larvae can maintain a short-term state of arousal during which neurons in the dorsal raphe modulate sensory responsiveness to behaviorally relevant visual cues. Following a brief exposure to water flow, larvae show elevated activity and heightened sensitivity to perceived motion. Calcium imaging of neuronal activity after flow revealed increased activity in serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe. Genetic ablation of these neurons abolished the increase in visual sensitivity during arousal without affecting baseline visual function or locomotor activity. We traced projections from the dorsal raphe to a major visual area, the optic tectum. Laser ablation of the tectum demonstrated that this structure, like the dorsal raphe, is required for improved visual sensitivity during arousal. These findings reveal that serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe have a state-dependent role in matching sensory responsiveness to behavioral context. PMID:23100441

  7. Endosulfan I and endosulfan sulfate disrupts zebrafish embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Kerri A.; Curtis, Lawrence R.; Massey Simonich, Staci L.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Fish in agricultural and remote areas may be exposed to endosulfan and its degradation products as a result of direct runoff, atmospheric transport and deposition. The following study used the zebrafish developmental model to investigate the responses to endosulfan I and endosulfan sulfate, the major degradation product of endosulfan I and II. Embryos were dechorionated and waterborne exposed to the endosulfan I or endosulfan sulfate from 6 to 120 hours post fertilization (hpf). Endosulfan I exposure concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 10 μg/L and endosulfan sulfate from 1 to 100 μg/L. Water solutions were renewed every 24 hours and fish were scored for overt developmental and behavioral abnormalities. Chemical analysis was performed on water, whole embryo, and larvae samples to determine waterborne exposure concentrations and tissue concentrations throughout the 5-day period. The most sensitive toxicity endpoint for both endosulfan I and endosulfan sulfate was an abnormal response of the embryo/larvae to touch, suggesting that endosulfan I and sulfate are developmentally neurotoxic. The waterborne exposure EC50s for inhibition of touch response for endosulfan I and endosulfan sulfate were 2.2 μg/L and 23 μg/L, respectively. The endosulfans were highly concentrated by the organisms, and the inhibition of touch response tissue EC50, determined from the measured tissue concentrations, was 367 ng/g for endosulfan I and 4552 ng/g for endosulfan sulfate. PMID:19883949

  8. EP300 Protects from Light-Induced Retinopathy in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kawase, Reiko; Nishimura, Yuhei; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Okabe, Shiko; Kawaguchi, Koki; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Moriyuki, Kazumi; Yamane, Shinsaku; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of rhodopsin to bright white light can induce photoreceptor cell damage and degeneration. However, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying light-induced retinopathy remains elusive. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis of three rodent models of light-induced retinopathy, and we identified 37 genes that are dysregulated in all three models. Gene ontology analysis revealed that this gene set is significantly associated with a cytokine signaling axis composed of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 and 3 (STAT1/3), interleukin 6 signal transducer (IL6ST), and oncostatin M receptor (OSMR). Furthermore, the analysis suggested that the histone acetyltransferase EP300 may be a key upstream regulator of the STAT1/3–IL6ST/OSMR axis. To examine the role of EP300 directly, we developed a larval zebrafish model of light-induced retinopathy. Using this model, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of EP300 significantly increased retinal cell apoptosis, decreased photoreceptor cell outer segments, and increased proliferation of putative Müller cells upon exposure to intense light. These results suggest that EP300 may protect photoreceptor cells from light-induced damage and that activation of EP300 may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27242532

  9. Position- and quantity-dependent responses in zebrafish turning behavior

    PubMed Central

    Umeda, Keiko; Ishizuka, Toru; Yawo, Hiromu; Shoji, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Neural reflexes are stereotypical automatic responses often modulated by both intrinsic and environmental factors. We report herein that zebrafish larval C-shaped turning is modulated by the stimulated position of Rohon-Beard (RB) neurons. Targeted stimulation of more anterior RB neurons produces larger trunk flexion, which anticipates adult escape behavior by coordinated turning toward the appropriate direction. We also demonstrated that turning laterality varies with the numbers of stimulated neurons. Multi-cell stimulation of RB neurons elicits contralateral turning, as seen in the touch response to physical contact, while minimum input from single-cell stimulation induces ipsilateral turning, a phenomenon not previously reported. This ipsilateral response, but not the contralateral one, is impaired by transecting the ascending neural tract known as the dorsolateral fascicule (DLF), indicating that two, distinct neural circuits trigger these two responses. Our results suggest that RB neurons transmit the position and quantity of sensory information, which are then processed separately to modulate behavioral strength and to select turning laterality. PMID:27292818

  10. Multifaceted toxicity assessment of catalyst composites in transgenic zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Jang, Gun Hyuk; Lee, Keon Yong; Choi, Jaewon; Kim, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2016-09-01

    Recent development in the field of nanomaterials has given rise into the inquiries regarding the toxicological characteristics of the nanomaterials. While many individual nanomaterials have been screened for their toxicological effects, composites that accompany nanomaterials are not common subjects to such screening through toxicological assessment. One of the widely used composites that accompany nanomaterials is catalyst composite used to reduce air pollution, which was selected as a target composite with nanomaterials for the multifaceted toxicological assessment. As existing studies did not possess any significant data regarding such catalyst composites, this study focuses on investigating toxicological characteristics of catalyst composites from various angles in both in-vitro and in-vivo settings. Initial toxicological assessment on catalyst composites was conducted using HUVECs for cell viability assays, and subsequent in-vivo assay regarding their direct influence on living organisms was done. The zebrafish embryo and its transgenic lines were used in the in-vivo assays to obtain multifaceted analytic results. Data obtained from the in-vivo assays include blood vessel formation, mutated heart morphology, and heart functionality change. Our multifaceted toxicological assessment pointed out that chemical composites augmented with nanomaterials can too have toxicological threat as much as individual nanomaterials do and alarms us with their danger. This manuscript provides a multifaceted assessment for composites augmented with nanomaterials, of which their toxicological threats have been overlooked.

  11. Zebrafish Development: High-throughput Test Systems to Assess Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Because of its developmental concordance, ease of handling and rapid development, the small teleost, zebrafish (Danio rerio), is frequently promoted as a vertebrate model for medium-throughput developmental screens. This present chapter discusses zebrafish as an altern...

  12. Small zebrafish in a big chemical pond

    PubMed Central

    Helenius, I. Taneli; Yeh, J.-R. Joanna

    2012-01-01

    The number of possible small organic molecules of different structure is virtually limitless. One of the main goals of chemical biologists is to identify, from this “chemical space”, entities that affect biological processes or systems in a specific manner. This can lead to a better understanding of the regulation and components of various biological machineries, as well as provide insights into efficacious therapeutic targets and drug candidates. However, the challenges confronting chemical biologists are multiple. How do we efficiently identify compounds that possess desirable activities without unwanted off-target effects? Once a candidate compound has been found, how do we determine its mode of action? In this Prospects piece, we call attention to recent studies using embryonic and larval zebrafish to illustrate the breadth and depth of questions in chemical biology that may be addressed using this model, and hope that they can serve as catalysts for future investigational ideas. PMID:22396148

  13. Kaempferol Identified by Zebrafish Assay and Fine Fractionations Strategy from Dysosma versipellis Inhibits Angiogenesis through VEGF and FGF Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Fang; Han, Yuxiang; Gao, Hao; Xin, Shengchang; Chen, Shaodan; Wang, Nan; Qin, Wei; Zhong, Hanbing; Lin, Shuo; Yao, Xinsheng; Li, Song

    2015-01-01

    Natural products are a rich resource for the discovery of therapeutic substances. By directly using 504 fine fractions from isolated traditional Chinese medicine plants, we performed a transgenic zebrafish based screen for anti-angiogenesis substances. One fraction, DYVE-D3, was found to inhibit the growth of intersegmental vessels in the zebrafish vasculature. Bioassay-guided isolation of DYVE-D3 indicates that the flavonoid kaempferol was the active substance. Kaempferol also inhibited the proliferation and migration of HUVECs in vitro. Furthermore, we found that kaempferol suppressed angiogenesis through inhibiting VEGFR2 expression, which can be enhanced by FGF inhibition. In summary, this study shows that the construction of fine fraction libraries allows efficient identification of active substances from natural products. PMID:26446489

  14. Potential teratogenicity of methimazole: exposure of zebrafish embryos to methimazole causes similar developmental anomalies to human methimazole embryopathy.

    PubMed

    Komoike, Yuta; Matsuoka, Masato; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2013-06-01

    While methimazole (MMI) is widely used in the therapy for hyperthyroidism, several groups have reported that maternal exposure to MMI results in a variety of congenital anomalies, including choanal and esophageal atresia, iridic and retinal coloboma, and delayed neurodevelopment. Thus, adverse effects of maternal exposure to MMI on fetal development have long been suggested; however, direct evidence for the teratogenicity of MMI has not been presented. Therefore, we studied the effects of MMI on early development by using zebrafish as a model organism. The fertilized eggs of zebrafish were collected immediately after spawning and grown in egg culture water containing MMI at various concentrations. External observation of the embryos revealed that exposure to high concentrations of MMI resulted in loss of pigmentation, hypoplastic hindbrain, turbid tissue in the forebrain, swelling of the notochord, and curly trunk. Furthermore, these effects occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Precise observation of the serial cross-sections of MMI-exposed embryos elucidated delayed development and hypoplasia of the whole brain and spinal cord, narrowing of the pharynx and esophagus, severe disruption of the retina, and aberrant structure of the notochord. These neuronal, pharyngeal, esophageal, and retinal anomalous morphologies have a direct analogy to the congenital anomalies observed in children exposed to MMI in utero. Here, we show the teratogenic effects of MMI on the development of zebrafish and provide the first experimental evidence for the connection between exposure to MMI and human MMI embryopathy.

  15. Zebrafish learn to forage in the dark.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Andres; McHenry, Matthew J

    2016-02-01

    A large diversity of fishes struggle early in life to forage on zooplankton while under the threat of predation. Some species, such as zebrafish (Danio rerio), acquire an ability to forage in the dark during growth as larvae, but it is unclear how this is achieved. We investigated the functional basis of this foraging by video-recording larval and juvenile zebrafish as they preyed on zooplankton (Artemia sp.) under infrared illumination. We found that foraging improved with age, to the extent that 1-month-old juveniles exhibited a capture rate that was an order of magnitude greater than that of hatchlings. At all ages, the ability to forage in the dark was diminished when we used a chemical treatment to compromise the cranial superficial neuromasts, which facilitate flow sensing. However, a morphological analysis showed no developmental changes in these receptors that could enhance sensitivity. We tested whether the improvement in foraging with age could instead be a consequence of learning by raising fish that were naïve to the flow of prey. After 1 month of growth, both groups foraged with a capture rate that was significantly less than that of fish that had the opportunity to learn and indistinguishable from that of fish with no ability to sense flow. This suggests that larval fish learn to use water flow to forage in the dark. This ability could enhance resource acquisition under reduced competition and predation. Furthermore, our findings offer an example of learning in a model system that offers promise for understanding its neurophysiological basis. PMID:26889003

  16. Zebrafish learn to forage in the dark.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Andres; McHenry, Matthew J

    2016-02-01

    A large diversity of fishes struggle early in life to forage on zooplankton while under the threat of predation. Some species, such as zebrafish (Danio rerio), acquire an ability to forage in the dark during growth as larvae, but it is unclear how this is achieved. We investigated the functional basis of this foraging by video-recording larval and juvenile zebrafish as they preyed on zooplankton (Artemia sp.) under infrared illumination. We found that foraging improved with age, to the extent that 1-month-old juveniles exhibited a capture rate that was an order of magnitude greater than that of hatchlings. At all ages, the ability to forage in the dark was diminished when we used a chemical treatment to compromise the cranial superficial neuromasts, which facilitate flow sensing. However, a morphological analysis showed no developmental changes in these receptors that could enhance sensitivity. We tested whether the improvement in foraging with age could instead be a consequence of learning by raising fish that were naïve to the flow of prey. After 1 month of growth, both groups foraged with a capture rate that was significantly less than that of fish that had the opportunity to learn and indistinguishable from that of fish with no ability to sense flow. This suggests that larval fish learn to use water flow to forage in the dark. This ability could enhance resource acquisition under reduced competition and predation. Furthermore, our findings offer an example of learning in a model system that offers promise for understanding its neurophysiological basis.

  17. The social zebrafish: Behavioral responses to conspecific, heterospecific, and computer animated fish

    PubMed Central

    Saverino, Cristina; Gerlai, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Zebrafish has been in the forefront of developmental biology and genetics, but only recently has interest in their behavior increased. Zebrafish are small and prolific, which lends this species to high throughput screening applications. A typical feature of zebrafish is its propensity to aggregate in groups, a behavior known as shoaling. Thus zebrafish has been proposed as a possible model organism appropriate for the analysis of the genetics of vertebrate social behavior. However, shoaling behavior is not well characterized in zebrafish. Here, using a recently developed software application, we first investigate how zebrafish respond to conspecific and heterospecific fish species that differ in coloration and/or shoaling tendencies. We found that zebrafish shoaled with their own species but not with two heterospecific species, one of which was a shoaling the other a non-shoaling species. In addition, we have started the analysis of visual stimuli that zebrafish may utilize to determine whether to shoal with a fish or not. We systematically modified the color, the location, the pattern, and the body shape of computer animated zebrafish images and presented them to experimental zebrafish. The subjects responded differentially to some of these stimuli showing preference for yellow and avoidance of elongated zebrafish images. Our results suggest that computerized stimulus presentation and automated behavioral quantification of zebrafish responses are feasible, which in turn implies that high throughput forward genetic mutation or drug screening will be possible in the analysis of social behavior with this model organism. PMID:18423643

  18. [Effect of horizontal rotary culture on zebrafish vascular development].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ting; Xie, Xiang; Zhang, Jian-Qing; Bao, Jing; Tang, Chuan-Zheng; Lei, Dao-Xi; Qiu, Ju-Hui; Wang, Gui-Xue

    2013-04-01

    With the development of space life science, a study on the influence of microgravity on organism has been an increasingly concerned topic. Lots of studies indicate that microgravity plays an important role in the early development of embryos. The vascular system as the first-function system of embryos provides an interesting topic for many researchers. However, those studies were mostly carried out in vitro by rotary cell culture system (RCCS), while few experiments were done in vivo. Using zebrafish as a model, this research investigated the effects of horizontal rotary culture on the vascular development in vivo. Zebrafish embryos at 24 hpf (hour post-fertilization) were selected and divided into two groups. One group was cultured by the shaker, and the other was cultured normally as the control. After 12 h, all the embryos were collected and detected. The phenotype of zebrafish was observed by stereo microscope. Then, the expression of vascular specific expression factor, flk1, flt4, and ephrinB2 was compared by RT-PCR, qPCR, and in situ hybridization, respectively. Cell apoptosis and proliferation in situ were observed using TUNEL assay and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. The results demonstrated that horizontal rotary culture at 90 r/min decreased the hatching of embryos (10.3±0.41 vs. 0.0, P<0.05), accelerate the heart rate (223.5±2.32 vs. 185.0±3.23, P<0.05) and increased the content of melanin in zebrafish significantly. At the same time, we found some differences in the vascular system of zebrafish after horizontal rotary culture which caused a down regulation of flk1, flt4, and ephrinB2. On the other hand, horizontal rotary culture accelerated the apoptosis of cells in zebrafish, but showed no significance in proliferation. In conclusion, horizontal rotary culture has a significant influence on the vascular development in zebrafish. PMID:23659941

  19. Acute exposure to 2,4-dinitrophenol alters zebrafish swimming performance and whole body triglyceride levels.

    PubMed

    Marit, Jordan S; Weber, Lynn P

    2011-06-01

    While swimming endurance (critical swimming speed or U(crit)) and lipid stores have both been reported to acutely decrease after exposure to a variety of toxicants, the relationship between these endpoints has not been clearly established. In order to examine these relationships, adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) were aqueously exposed to solvent control (ethanol) or two nominal concentrations of 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a mitochondrial electron transport chain uncoupler, for a 24-h period. Following exposure, fish were placed in a swim tunnel in clean water for swimming testing or euthanized immediately without testing, followed by analysis of whole body triglyceride levels. U(crit) decreased in both the 6 mg/L and 12 mg/L DNP groups, with 12 mg/L approaching the LC₅₀. A decrease in tail beat frequency was observed without a significant change in tail beat amplitude. In contrast, triglyceride levels were elevated in a concentration-dependent manner in the DNP exposure groups, but only in fish subjected to swimming tests. This increase in triglyceride stores may be due to a direct interference of DNP on lipid catabolism as well as increased triglyceride production when zebrafish were subjected to the co-stressors of swimming and toxicant exposure. Future studies should be directed at determining how acute DNP exposure combines with swimming to cause alterations in triglyceride accumulation. PMID:21406246

  20. Cardiovascular system in larval zebrafish responds to developmental hypoxia in a family specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Francisco B-G; Hosey, Michelle; Bagatto, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Background Genetic and environmental variation are both known to influence development. Evolution of a developmental response that is optimized to the environment (adaptive plasticity) requires the existence of genetic variation for that developmental response. In complex traits composed of integrated sets of subsidiary traits, the adaptive process may be slowed by the existence of multiple possible integrated responses. This study tests for family (sibship) specific differences in plastic response to hypoxia in an integrated set of cardiovascular traits in zebrafish. Results Cardiac output, which is the integrated product of several subsidiary traits, varied highly significantly between families, and families differed significantly in the degree and direction of response to developmental oxygen level. The cardiac output response to oxygen environment was entirely family specific with no significant overall trend due to oxygen level. Constituent physiological variables that contribute to cardiac output all showed significant family specific response to hypoxia. Traits that were not directly related to cardiac output, such as arterial and venous diameter, and red blood cell velocities did not respond to hypoxia in a family specific manner. Conclusion Zebrafish families vary in their plastic response to hypoxia. Genetic variation in plastic response to hypoxia may therefore provide the basic ingredient for adaptation to a variable environment. Considerable variation in the degree of familial response to hypoxia exists between different cardiovascular traits that may contribute to cardiac output. It is possible that the integration of several subsidiary traits into cardiac output allows the maintenance of genetic variance in cardiac response. PMID:16539736

  1. Prolactin regulates transcription of the ion uptake Na+/Cl- cotransporter (ncc) gene in zebrafish gill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breves, Jason P.; Serizier, Sandy B.; Goffin, Vincent; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a well-known regulator of ion and water transport within osmoregulatory tissues across vertebrate species, yet how PRL acts on some of its target tissues remains poorly understood. Using zebrafish as a model, we show that ionocytes in the gill directly respond to systemic PRL to regulate mechanisms of ion uptake. Ion-poor conditions led to increases in the expression of PRL receptor (prlra), Na+/Cl− cotransporter (ncc; slc12a10.2), Na+/H+ exchanger (nhe3b; slc9a3.2), and epithelial Ca2+ channel (ecac; trpv6) transcripts within the gill. Intraperitoneal injection of ovine PRL (oPRL) increased ncc and prlra transcripts, but did not affect nhe3b or ecac. Consistent with direct PRL action in the gill, addition of oPRL to cultured gill filaments stimulated ncc in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect blocked by a pure human PRL receptor antagonist (Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL). These results suggest that PRL signaling through PRL receptors in the gill regulates the expression of ncc, thereby linking this pituitary hormone with an effector of Cl− uptake in zebrafish for the first time.

  2. Prolactin regulates transcription of the ion uptake Na+/Cl− cotransporter (ncc) gene in zebrafish gill

    PubMed Central

    Breves, Jason P.; Serizier, Sandy B.; Goffin, Vincent; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a well-known regulator of ion and water transport within osmoregulatory tissues across vertebrate species, yet how PRL acts on some of its target tissues remains poorly understood. Using zebrafish as a model, we show that ionocytes in the gill directly respond to systemic PRL to regulate mechanisms of ion uptake. Ion-poor conditions led to increases in the expression of PRL receptor (prlra), Na+/Cl− cotransporter (ncc; slc12a10.2), Na+/H+ exchanger (nhe3b; slc9a3.2), and epithelial Ca2+ channel (ecac; trpv6) transcripts within the gill. Intraperitoneal injection of ovine PRL (oPRL) increased ncc and prlra transcripts, but did not affect nhe3b or ecac. Consistent with direct PRL action in the gill, addition of oPRL to cultured gill filaments stimulated ncc in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect blocked by a pure human PRL receptor antagonist (Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL). These results suggest that PRL signaling through PRL receptors in the gill regulates the expression of ncc, thereby linking this pituitary hormone with an effector of Cl− uptake in zebrafish for the first time. PMID:23395804

  3. Visualizing and Quantifying Intracellular Behavior and Abundance of the Core Circadian Clock Protein PERIOD2.

    PubMed

    Smyllie, Nicola J; Pilorz, Violetta; Boyd, James; Meng, Qing-Jun; Saer, Ben; Chesham, Johanna E; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Krogager, Toke P; Spiller, David G; Boot-Handford, Raymond; White, Michael R H; Hastings, Michael H; Loudon, Andrew S I

    2016-07-25

    Transcriptional-translational feedback loops (TTFLs) are a conserved molecular motif of circadian clocks. The principal clock in mammals is the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. In SCN neurons, auto-regulatory feedback on core clock genes Period (Per) and Cryptochrome (Cry) following nuclear entry of their protein products is the basis of circadian oscillation [1, 2]. In Drosophila clock neurons, the movement of dPer into the nucleus is subject to a circadian gate that generates a delay in the TTFL, and this delay is thought to be critical for oscillation [3, 4]. Analysis of the Drosophila clock has strongly influenced models of the mammalian clock, and such models typically infer complex spatiotemporal, intracellular behaviors of mammalian clock proteins. There are, however, no direct measures of the intracellular behavior of endogenous circadian proteins to support this: dynamic analyses have been limited and often have no circadian dimension [5-7]. We therefore generated a knockin mouse expressing a fluorescent fusion of native PER2 protein (PER2::VENUS) for live imaging. PER2::VENUS recapitulates the circadian functions of wild-type PER2 and, importantly, the behavior of PER2::VENUS runs counter to the Drosophila model: it does not exhibit circadian gating of nuclear entry. Using fluorescent imaging of PER2::VENUS, we acquired the first measures of mobility, molecular concentration, and localization of an endogenous circadian protein in individual mammalian cells, and we showed how the mobility and nuclear translocation of PER2 are regulated by casein kinase. These results provide new qualitative and quantitative insights into the cellular mechanism of the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:27374340

  4. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Effect on Behavior of Zebrafish During Chronic Ethanol Exposure.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ana Claudia Reis; Rico, Eduardo Pacheco; de Oliveira, Diogo Losch; Rosemberg, Denis Broock; Guizzo, Ranieli; Meurer, Fábio; da Silveira, Themis Reverbel

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely consumed drug, which acts on the central nervous system to induce behavioral alterations ranging from disinhibition to sedation. Recent studies have produced accumulating evidence for the therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria in behavior. We aimed to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on the behavior of adult zebrafish chronically exposed to ethanol. Adult wild-type zebrafish were randomly divided into four groups, each containing 15 fish. The following groups were formed: Control (C), received unsupplemented feed during the trial period; Probiotic (P), fed with feed supplemented with LGG; Ethanol (E), received unsupplemented feed and 0.5% of ethanol directly added to the tank water; and Probiotic+Ethanol (P+E), group under ethanol exposure (0.5%) and fed with LGG supplemented feed. After 2 weeks of exposure, the novel tank test was used to evaluate fish behavior, which was analyzed using computer-aided video tracking. LGG alone did not alter swimming behavior of the fish. Ethanol exposure led to robust behavioral effects in the form of reduced anxiety levels, as indicated by increased vertical exploration and more time spent in the upper region of the novel tank. The group exposed to ethanol and treated with LGG behaved similarly to animals exposed to ethanol alone. Taken together, these results show that zebrafish behavior was not altered by LGG per se, as seen in murine models. This was the first study to investigate the effects of a probiotic diet on behavior after a chronic ethanol exposure. PMID:26862467

  5. Role of Adenosine Signaling on Pentylenetetrazole-Induced Seizures in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Siebel, Anna Maria; Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Schaefer, Isabel da Costa; Frantz, Juliana Zanetti; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adenosine is a well-known endogenous modulator of neuronal excitability with anticonvulsant properties. Thus, the modulation exerted by adenosine might be an effective tool to control seizures. In this study, we investigated the effects of drugs that are able to modulate adenosinergic signaling on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in adult zebrafish. The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. The adenosine A1 receptor agonist cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) increased the latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure stage. Both the adenosine A2A receptor agonist and antagonist, CGS 21680 and ZM 241385, respectively, did not promote changes in seizure parameters. Pretreatment with the ecto-5′nucleotidase inhibitor adenosine 5′-(α,β-methylene) diphosphate (AMPCP) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. However, when pretreated with the adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA), or with the nucleoside transporter (NT) inhibitors, dipyridamole and S-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI), animals showed longer latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure status. Finally, our molecular analysis of the c-fos gene expression corroborates these behavioral results. Our findings indicate that the activation of adenosine A1 receptors is an important mechanism to control the development of seizures in zebrafish. Furthermore, the actions of ecto-5′-nucleotidase, ADA, and NTs are directly involved in the control of extracellular adenosine levels and have an important role in the development of seizure episodes in zebrafish. PMID:25560904

  6. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Effect on Behavior of Zebrafish During Chronic Ethanol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Ana Claudia Reis; Rico, Eduardo Pacheco; de Oliveira, Diogo Losch; Rosemberg, Denis Broock; Guizzo, Ranieli; Meurer, Fábio; da Silveira, Themis Reverbel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ethanol is a widely consumed drug, which acts on the central nervous system to induce behavioral alterations ranging from disinhibition to sedation. Recent studies have produced accumulating evidence for the therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria in behavior. We aimed to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on the behavior of adult zebrafish chronically exposed to ethanol. Adult wild-type zebrafish were randomly divided into four groups, each containing 15 fish. The following groups were formed: Control (C), received unsupplemented feed during the trial period; Probiotic (P), fed with feed supplemented with LGG; Ethanol (E), received unsupplemented feed and 0.5% of ethanol directly added to the tank water; and Probiotic+Ethanol (P+E), group under ethanol exposure (0.5%) and fed with LGG supplemented feed. After 2 weeks of exposure, the novel tank test was used to evaluate fish behavior, which was analyzed using computer-aided video tracking. LGG alone did not alter swimming behavior of the fish. Ethanol exposure led to robust behavioral effects in the form of reduced anxiety levels, as indicated by increased vertical exploration and more time spent in the upper region of the novel tank. The group exposed to ethanol and treated with LGG behaved similarly to animals exposed to ethanol alone. Taken together, these results show that zebrafish behavior was not altered by LGG per se, as seen in murine models. This was the first study to investigate the effects of a probiotic diet on behavior after a chronic ethanol exposure. PMID:26862467

  7. Role of adenosine signaling on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siebel, Anna Maria; Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Kist, Luiza Wilges; da Costa Schaefer, Isabel; Frantz, Juliana Zanetti; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Da Silva, Rosane Souza; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-04-01

    Adenosine is a well-known endogenous modulator of neuronal excitability with anticonvulsant properties. Thus, the modulation exerted by adenosine might be an effective tool to control seizures. In this study, we investigated the effects of drugs that are able to modulate adenosinergic signaling on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in adult zebrafish. The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. The adenosine A1 receptor agonist cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) increased the latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure stage. Both the adenosine A2A receptor agonist and antagonist, CGS 21680 and ZM 241385, respectively, did not promote changes in seizure parameters. Pretreatment with the ecto-5'nucleotidase inhibitor adenosine 5'-(α,β-methylene) diphosphate (AMPCP) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. However, when pretreated with the adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA), or with the nucleoside transporter (NT) inhibitors, dipyridamole and S-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI), animals showed longer latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure status. Finally, our molecular analysis of the c-fos gene expression corroborates these behavioral results. Our findings indicate that the activation of adenosine A1 receptors is an important mechanism to control the development of seizures in zebrafish. Furthermore, the actions of ecto-5'-nucleotidase, ADA, and NTs are directly involved in the control of extracellular adenosine levels and have an important role in the development of seizure episodes in zebrafish.

  8. Stimulus dependence of the development of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Moorman, S J; Burress, C; Cordova, R; Slater, J

    1999-02-01

    It has been suggested that stimulus dependence is a general feature of all developing sensory systems. We tested this idea for the developing zebrafish vestibular system using a bioreactor the National Aeronautic and Space Agency designed to simulate microgravity for cells in culture on earth. We replaced the culture medium with aquarium water and maintained zebrafish eggs/hatchlings in the bioreactor for either 72 or 96 h postfertilization. These experimental animals displayed a swimming behavior that was indistinguishable from the control animals when illuminated from above. However, when illuminated from below, experimental animals swam not only dorsal surface up, but also lying on their side; they corkscrewed, swam vertical loops, and occasionally even swam upside down. When incubated in the bioreactor for 96 h, the saccular otolith was significantly smaller than normal, suggesting that otolith development was either delayed or slower than normal. When incubated in the bioreactor for 72 h, some animals were missing one or more otoliths. In contrast, control animals all had two otoliths on each side. This supports the idea that otolith development was delayed. Immediately upon removal from the bioreactor at 96 h, experimental animals showed some signs of compensatory eye rotation, but with a much less clear relationship between the orientation of the eye and the direction of gravity than the age-matched control animals. This difference was still obvious 1 day later. These results support the idea that development of the vestibular system in zebrafish is dependent on the presence of the normal stimulus the system is designed to detect.

  9. From Zebrafish to Mammal: Functional Evolution of Prestin, the Motor Protein of Cochlear Outer Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaodong; Pecka, Jason L.; Tang, Jie; Okoruwa, Oseremen E.; Zhang, Qian

    2011-01-01

    Prestin is the motor protein of cochlear outer hair cells. It belongs to a distinct anion transporter family called solute carrier protein 26A, or SLC26A. Members of this family serve two fundamentally distinct functions. Although most members transport different anion substrates across a variety of epithelia, prestin (SLC26A5) is unique, functioning as a voltage-dependent motor protein. Recent evidence suggests that prestin orthologs from zebrafish and chicken are electrogenic divalent/chloride anion exchangers/transporters with no motor function. These studies appear to suggest that prestin was evolved from an anion transporter. We examined the motor and transport functions of prestin and its orthologs from four different species in the vertebrate lineage, to gain insights of how these two physiological functions became distinct. Somatic motility, voltage-dependent nonlinear capacitance (NLC), and transporter function were measured in transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells using voltage-clamp and anion uptake techniques. Zebrafish and chicken prestins both exhibited weak NLC, with peaks significantly shifted in the depolarization (right) direction. This was contrasted by robust NLC with peaks left shifted in the platypus and gerbil. The platypus and gerbil prestins retained little transporter function compared with robust anion transport capacities in the zebrafish and chicken orthologs. Somatic motility was detected only in the platypus and gerbil prestins. There appears to be an inverse relationship between NLC and anion transport functions, whereas motor function appears to have emerged only in mammalian prestin. Our results suggest that motor function is an innovation of therian prestin and is concurrent with diminished transporter capabilities. PMID:21047933

  10. Venous-derived angioblasts generate organ-specific vessels during zebrafish embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Hen, Gideon; Nicenboim, Julian; Mayseless, Oded; Asaf, Lihee; Shin, Masahiro; Busolin, Giorgia; Hofi, Roy; Almog, Gabriella; Tiso, Natascia; Lawson, Nathan D.; Yaniv, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Formation and remodeling of vascular beds are complex processes orchestrated by multiple signaling pathways. Although it is well accepted that vessels of a particular organ display specific features that enable them to fulfill distinct functions, the embryonic origins of tissue-specific vessels and the molecular mechanisms regulating their formation are poorly understood. The subintestinal plexus of the zebrafish embryo comprises vessels that vascularize the gut, liver and pancreas and, as such, represents an ideal model in which to investigate the early steps of organ-specific vessel formation. Here, we show that both arterial and venous components of the subintestinal plexus originate from a pool of specialized angioblasts residing in the floor of the posterior cardinal vein (PCV). Using live imaging of zebrafish embryos, in combination with photoconvertable transgenic reporters, we demonstrate that these angioblasts undergo two phases of migration and differentiation. Initially, a subintestinal vein forms and expands ventrally through a Bone Morphogenetic Protein-dependent step of collective migration. Concomitantly, a Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-dependent shift in the directionality of migration, coupled to the upregulation of arterial markers, is observed, which culminates with the generation of the supraintestinal artery. Together, our results establish the zebrafish subintestinal plexus as an advantageous model for the study of organ-specific vessel development and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling its formation. More broadly, our findings suggest that PCV-specialized angioblasts contribute not only to the formation of the early trunk vasculature, but also to the establishment of late-forming, tissue-specific vascular beds. PMID:26525671

  11. Silver nanoparticles induce endoplasmatic reticulum stress response in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Verena; Capelle, Martinus; Fent, Karl

    2013-10-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) find increasing applications, and therefore humans and the environment are increasingly exposed to them. However, potential toxicological implications are not sufficiently known. Here we investigate effects of AgNPs (average size 120 nm) on zebrafish in vitro and in vivo, and compare them to human hepatoma cells (Huh7). AgNPs are incorporated in zebrafish liver cells (ZFL) and Huh7, and in zebrafish embryos. In ZFL cells AgNPs lead to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress response, and TNF-α. Transcriptional alterations also occur in pro-apoptotic genes p53 and Bax. The transcriptional profile differed in ZFL and Huh7 cells. In ZFL cells, the ER stress marker BiP is induced, concomitant with the ER stress marker ATF-6 and spliced XBP-1 after 6 h and 24 h exposure to 0.5 g/L and 0.05 g/L AgNPs, respectively. This indicates the induction of different pathways of the ER stress response. Moreover, AgNPs induce TNF-α. In zebrafish embryos exposed to 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 5 mg/L AgNPs hatching was affected and morphological defects occurred at high concentrations. ER stress related gene transcripts BiP and Synv are significantly up-regulated after 24 h at 0.1 and 5 mg/L AgNPs. Furthermore, transcriptional alterations occurred in the pro-apoptotic genes Noxa and p21. The ER stress response was strong in ZFL cells and occurred in zebrafish embryos as well. Our data demonstrate for the first time that AgNPs lead to induction of ER stress in zebrafish. The induction of ER stress can have several consequences including the activation of apoptotic and inflammatory pathways. - Highlights: • Effects of silver nanoparticles (120 nm AgNPs) are investigated in zebrafish. • AgNPs induce all ER stress reponses in vitro in zebrafish liver cells. • AgNPs induce weak ER stress in zebrafish embryos. • AgNPs induce oxidative stress and transcripts of pro-apoptosis genes.

  12. Structured illumination fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for velocimetry in Zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Paolo; Rossetti, Leone; Sironi, Laura; Freddi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Laura; Caccia, Michele; Bouzin, Margaux; Collini, Maddalena; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    The vascular system of Zebrafish embryos is studied by means of Fluorescence Correlation and Image Correlation Spectroscopy. The long term project addresses biologically relevant issues concerning vasculogenesis and cardiogenesis and in particular mechanical interaction between blood flow and endothelial cells. To this purpose we use Zebrafish as a model system since the transparency of its embryos facilitates morphological observation of internal organs in-vivo. The correlation analysis provides quantitative characterization of fluxes in blood vessels in vivo. We have pursued and compared two complementary routes. In a first one we developed a two-spots two-photon setup in which the spots are spaced at adjustable micron-size distances (1-40 μm) along a vessel and the endogenous (autofluorescence) or exogenous (dsRed transgenic erythrocytes) signal is captured with an EM-CCD and cross-correlated. In this way we are able to follow the morphology of the Zebrafish embryo, simultaneously measure the heart pulsation, the velocity of red cells and of small plasma proteins. These data are compared to those obtained by image correlations on Zebrafish vessels. The two methods allows to characterize the motion of plasma fluids and erythrocytes in healthy Zebrafish embryos to be compared in the future to pathogenic ones.

  13. Toxicity Evaluation of New Engineered Nanomaterials in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Brundo, Maria V.; Pecoraro, Roberta; Marino, Fabio; Salvaggio, Antonio; Tibullo, Daniele; Saccone, Salvatore; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Buccheri, Maria A.; Impellizzeri, Giuliana; Scuderi, Viviana; Zimbone, Massimo; Privitera, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the nanoparticles on the marine organisms, depends on their size, chemical composition, surface structure, solubility and shape. In order to take advantage from their activity, preserving the surrounding environment from a possible pollution, we are trying to trap the nanoparticles into new nanomaterials. The nanomaterials tested were synthesized proposing a ground-breaking approach by an upside-down vision of the Au/TiO2 nano-system to avoid the release of nanoparticles. The system was synthesized by wrapping Au nanoparticles with a thin layer of TiO2. The non-toxicity of the nano-system was established by testing the effect of the material on zebrafish larvae. Danio rerio o zebrafish was considered an excellent model for the environmental biomonitoring of aquatic environments and the Zebrafish Embryo Toxicity Test (ZFET) is considered an alternative method of animal test. For this reason zebrafish larvae were exposed to different concentrations of nanoparticles of TiO2 and Au and new nanomaterials. As biomarkers of exposure, we evaluated the expression of metallothioneins by immunohistochemistry analysis and western blotting analysis also. The results obtained by toxicity test showed that neither mortality as well as sublethal effects were induced by the different nanomaterials and nanoparticles tested. Only zebrafish larvae exposed to free Au nanoparticles showed a different response to anti-MT antibody. In fact, the immunolocalization analysis highlighted an increase of the metallothioneins synthesis. PMID:27148069

  14. Cloning and expression of new microRNAs from zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Steiner, Florian A.; Berezikov, Eugene; de Bruijn, Ewart; van de Belt, Jose; Verheul, Mark; Cuppen, Edwin; Plasterk, Ronald H.A.

    2006-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in development and regulate the expression of many animal genes by post-transcriptional gene silencing. Here we describe the cloning and expression of new miRNAs from zebrafish. By high-throughput sequencing of small-RNA cDNA libraries from 5-day-old zebrafish larvae and adult zebrafish brain we found 139 known miRNAs and 66 new miRNAs. For 65 known miRNAs and for 11 new miRNAs we also cloned the miRNA star sequence. We analyzed the temporal and spatial expression patterns for 35 new miRNAs and for 32 known miRNAs in the zebrafish by whole mount in situ hybridization and northern blotting. Overall, 23 of the 35 new miRNAs and 30 of the 32 known miRNAs could be detected. We found that most miRNAs were expressed during later stages of development. Some were expressed ubiquitously, but many of the miRNAs were expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Most newly discovered miRNAs have low expression levels and are less conserved in other vertebrate species. Our cloning and expression analysis indicates that most abundant and conserved miRNAs in zebrafish are now known. PMID:16698962

  15. A jump persistent turning walker to model zebrafish locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Mwaffo, Violet; Anderson, Ross P.; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish are gaining momentum as a laboratory animal species for the investigation of several functional and dysfunctional biological processes. Mathematical models of zebrafish behaviour are expected to considerably aid in the design of hypothesis-driven studies by enabling preliminary in silico tests that can be used to infer possible experimental outcomes without the use of zebrafish. This study is motivated by observations of sudden, drastic changes in zebrafish locomotion in the form of large deviations in turn rate. We demonstrate that such deviations can be captured through a stochastic mean reverting jump diffusion model, a process that is commonly used in financial engineering to describe large changes in the price of an asset. The jump process-based model is validated on trajectory data of adult subjects swimming in a shallow circular tank obtained from an overhead camera. Through statistical comparison of the empirical distribution of the turn rate against theoretical predictions, we demonstrate the feasibility of describing zebrafish as a jump persistent turning walker. The critical role of the jump term is assessed through comparison with a simplified mean reversion diffusion model, which does not allow for describing the heavy-tailed distributions observed in the fish turn rate. PMID:25392396

  16. Zebrafish: an important tool for liver disease research.

    PubMed

    Goessling, Wolfram; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2015-11-01

    As the incidence of hepatobiliary diseases increases, we must improve our understanding of the molecular, cellular, and physiological factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of liver disease. Animal models help us identify disease mechanisms that might be targeted therapeutically. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have traditionally been used to study embryonic development but are also important to the study of liver disease. Zebrafish embryos develop rapidly; all of their digestive organs are mature in larvae by 5 days of age. At this stage, they can develop hepatobiliary diseases caused by developmental defects or toxin- or ethanol-induced injury and manifest premalignant changes within weeks. Zebrafish are similar to humans in hepatic cellular composition, function, signaling, and response to injury as well as the cellular processes that mediate liver diseases. Genes are highly conserved between humans and zebrafish, making them a useful system to study the basic mechanisms of liver disease. We can perform genetic screens to identify novel genes involved in specific disease processes and chemical screens to identify pathways and compounds that act on specific processes. We review how studies of zebrafish have advanced our understanding of inherited and acquired liver diseases as well as liver cancer and regeneration.

  17. Zebrafish Craniofacial Development: A Window into Early Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Mork, Lindsey; Crump, Gage

    2016-01-01

    The formation of the face and skull involves a complex series of developmental events mediated by cells derived from the neural crest, endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Although vertebrates boast an enormous diversity of adult facial morphologies, the fundamental signaling pathways and cellular events that sculpt the nascent craniofacial skeleton in the embryo have proven to be highly conserved from fish to man. The zebrafish Danio rerio, a small freshwater cyprinid fish from eastern India, has served as a popular model of craniofacial development since the 1990s. Unique strengths of the zebrafish model include a simplified skeleton during larval stages, access to rapidly developing embryos for live imaging, and amenability to transgenesis and complex genetics. In this chapter, we describe the anatomy of the zebrafish craniofacial skeleton; its applications as models for the mammalian jaw, middle ear, palate, and cranial sutures; the superior imaging technology available in fish that has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of facial morphogenesis; the use of the zebrafish to decipher the genetic underpinnings of craniofacial biology; and finally a glimpse into the most promising future applications of zebrafish craniofacial research. PMID:26589928

  18. Atlas of Cellular Dynamics during Zebrafish Adult Kidney Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    McCampbell, Kristen K.; Springer, Kristin N.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is a useful animal model to study the signaling pathways that orchestrate kidney regeneration, as its renal nephrons are simple, yet they maintain the biological complexity inherent to that of higher vertebrate organisms including mammals. Recent studies have suggested that administration of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin in zebrafish mimics human acute kidney injury (AKI) through the induction of nephron damage, but the timing and details of critical phenotypic events associated with the regeneration process, particularly in existing nephrons, have not been characterized. Here, we mapped the temporal progression of cellular and molecular changes that occur during renal epithelial regeneration of the proximal tubule in the adult zebrafish using a platform of histological and expression analysis techniques. This work establishes the timing of renal cell death after gentamicin injury, identifies proliferative compartments within the kidney, and documents gene expression changes associated with the regenerative response of proliferating cells. These data provide an important descriptive atlas that documents the series of events that ensue after damage in the zebrafish kidney, thus availing a valuable resource for the scientific community that can facilitate the implementation of zebrafish research to delineate the mechanisms that control renal regeneration. PMID:26089919

  19. Comparative studies of Toll-like receptor signalling using zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Zakia; Wiegertjes, Geert F; Veneman, Wouter J; Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P

    2014-09-01

    Zebrafish model systems for infectious disease are increasingly used for the functional analysis of molecular pattern recognition processes. These studies benefit from the high conservation level of all innate immune factors in vertebrates. Zebrafish studies are strategically well positioned for this because of the ease of comparisons with studies in other fish species of which the immune system also has been intensively studied, but that are currently still less amendable to detailed genetic or microscopic studies. In this paper we focus on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling factors, which currently are the best characterized in mammalian systems. We review the knowledge on TLR signalling in the context of recent advances in zebrafish studies and discuss possibilities for future approaches that can complement studies in cell cultures and rodent models. A focus in these comparisons is the role of negative control mechanisms in immune responses that appear very important in a whole organism to keep adverse systemic responses in check. We also pay much attention to comparisons with studies in common carp that is highly related to zebrafish and that because of its large body mass can complement immune studies in zebrafish.

  20. Zebrafish Craniofacial Development: A Window into Early Patterning.

    PubMed

    Mork, Lindsey; Crump, Gage

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the face and skull involves a complex series of developmental events mediated by cells derived from the neural crest, endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Although vertebrates boast an enormous diversity of adult facial morphologies, the fundamental signaling pathways and cellular events that sculpt the nascent craniofacial skeleton in the embryo have proven to be highly conserved from fish to man. The zebrafish Danio rerio, a small freshwater cyprinid fish from eastern India, has served as a popular model of craniofacial development since the 1990s. Unique strengths of the zebrafish model include a simplified skeleton during larval stages, access to rapidly developing embryos for live imaging, and amenability to transgenesis and complex genetics. In this chapter, we describe the anatomy of the zebrafish craniofacial skeleton; its applications as models for the mammalian jaw, middle ear, palate, and cranial sutures; the superior imaging technology available in fish that has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of facial morphogenesis; the use of the zebrafish to decipher the genetic underpinnings of craniofacial biology; and finally a glimpse into the most promising future applications of zebrafish craniofacial research.

  1. Myomaker mediates fusion of fast myocytes in zebrafish embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Landemaine, Aurélie; Rescan, Pierre-Yves; Gabillard, Jean-Charles

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Myomaker is transiently expressed in fast myocytes during embryonic myogenesis. • Myomaker is essential for fast myocyte fusion in zebrafish. • The function of myomaker is conserved among Teleostomi. - Abstract: Myomaker (also called Tmem8c), a new membrane activator of myocyte fusion was recently discovered in mice. Using whole mount in situ hybridization on zebrafish embryos at different stages of embryonic development, we show that myomaker is transiently expressed in fast myocytes forming the bulk of zebrafish myotome. Zebrafish embryos injected with morpholino targeted against myomaker were alive after yolk resorption and appeared morphologically normal, but they were unable to swim, even under effect of a tactile stimulation. Confocal observations showed a marked phenotype characterized by the persistence of mononucleated muscle cells in the fast myotome at developmental stages where these cells normally fuse to form multinucleated myotubes. This indicates that myomaker is essential for myocyte fusion in zebrafish. Thus, there is an evolutionary conservation of myomaker expression and function among Teleostomi.

  2. Providing a food reward reduces inhibitory avoidance learning in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Remy; Zethof, Jan; Flik, Gert; van den Bos, Ruud

    2015-11-01

    As shown in male rats, prior history of subjects changes behavioural and stress-responses to challenges: a two-week history of exposure to rewards at fixed intervals led to slightly, but consistently, lower physiological stress-responses and anxiety-like behaviour. Here, we tested whether similar effects are present in zebrafish (Danio rerio). After two weeks of providing Artemia (brine shrimp; Artemia salina) as food reward or flake food (Tetramin) as control at fixed intervals, zebrafish were exposed to a fear-avoidance learning task using an inhibitory avoidance protocol. Half the number of fish received a 3V shock on day 1 and were tested and sacrificed on day 2; the other half received a second 3V shock on day 2 and were tested and sacrificed on day 3. The latter was done to assess whether effects are robust, as effects in rats have been shown to be modest. Zebrafish that were given Artemia showed less inhibitory avoidance after one shock, but not after two shocks, than zebrafish that were given flake-food. Reduced avoidance behaviour was associated with lower telencepahalic gene expression levels of cannabinoid receptor 1 (cnr1) and higher gene expression levels of corticotropin releasing factor (crf). These results suggest that providing rewards at fixed intervals alters fear avoidance behaviour, albeit modestly, in zebrafish. We discuss the data in the context of similar underlying brain structures in mammals and fish.

  3. Evaluation of MWNT toxic effects on daphnia and zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasagasti, Maider; Alvarez, Noelia; Vera, Carolina; Rainieri, Sandra

    2009-05-01

    Organisms of daphnia (Daphnia magna) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to a range of different concentrations of COOH-functionalized MWCNT suspended in an aqueous solution of Tween 20. Immobilization of daphnia and growth retardation, inhibition and malformation of zebrafish embryos were the endpoints tested after 24 and 48 hours. Immobilization of daphnia could be observed from 3 to 16 ppm and an increasing mortality of zebrafish embryo was detected at all the concentration tested. To identify more subtle toxic effects, we took advantage of the extensive information available on the zebrafish genome and monitored by RT-PCR the expression patterns of different zebrafish genes that could act as toxicity bio-markers. At some of the concentrations tested, changes in the expression profiles of the genes examined were detected. Our results suggest that MWCNT could potentially represent a risk to human health and environment, therefore a wider range of concentrations and further testing of this molecules should be carried out to define possible limitations in their use.

  4. An automated device for appetitive conditioning in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Manabe, Kazuchika; Dooling, R J; Takaku, Shinichi

    2013-12-01

    An automated device and a procedure for the operant conditioning individual zebrafish were developed. The key feature of this procedure was the construction of a simple, inexpensive feeder that can deliver extremely small amounts of food, thus preventing rapid satiation. This allows the experimenter to run multiple trails in a single test session and multiple sessions in one day. In addition, small response keys made from acryl rods and fiber sensors were developed that were sufficiently sensitive to detect fish contact. To illustrate the efficiency and utility of the device for traditional learning paradigms, we trained zebrafish in a fixed ratio schedule where subjects were reinforced with food after 10 responses. Zebrafish reliably responded on the response key for sessions that lasted as long 80-reinforcements. They also showed the traditional "break and run" response pattern that has been found in many species. These results show that this system will be valuable for behavioral studies with zebrafish, especially for experiments that need many repeated trials using food reinforcer in a session. The present system can be used for sensory and learning investigations, as well applications in behavioral pharmacology, behavioral genetics, and toxicology where the zebrafish is becoming the vertebrate model of choice.

  5. Cardiac neural crest contributes to cardiomyogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mariko; Yost, H Joseph

    2003-05-01

    In birds and mammals, cardiac neural crest is essential for heart development and contributes to conotruncal cushion formation and outflow tract septation. The zebrafish prototypical heart lacks outflow tract septation, raising the question of whether cardiac neural crest exists in zebrafish. Here, results from three distinct lineage-labeling approaches identify zebrafish cardiac neural crest cells and indicate that these cells have the ability to generate MF20-positive muscle cells in the myocardium of the major chambers during development. Fate-mapping demonstrates that cardiac neural crest cells originate both from neural tube regions analogous to those found in birds, as well as from a novel region rostral to the otic vesicle. In contrast to other vertebrates, cardiac neural crest invades the myocardium in all segments of the heart, including outflow tract, atrium, atrioventricular junction, and ventricle in zebrafish. Three distinct groups of premigratory neural crest along the rostrocaudal axis have different propensities to contribute to different segments in the heart and are correspondingly marked by unique combinations of gene expression patterns. Zebrafish will serve as a model for understanding interactions between cardiac neural crest and cardiovascular development.

  6. Providing a food reward reduces inhibitory avoidance learning in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Remy; Zethof, Jan; Flik, Gert; van den Bos, Ruud

    2015-11-01

    As shown in male rats, prior history of subjects changes behavioural and stress-responses to challenges: a two-week history of exposure to rewards at fixed intervals led to slightly, but consistently, lower physiological stress-responses and anxiety-like behaviour. Here, we tested whether similar effects are present in zebrafish (Danio rerio). After two weeks of providing Artemia (brine shrimp; Artemia salina) as food reward or flake food (Tetramin) as control at fixed intervals, zebrafish were exposed to a fear-avoidance learning task using an inhibitory avoidance protocol. Half the number of fish received a 3V shock on day 1 and were tested and sacrificed on day 2; the other half received a second 3V shock on day 2 and were tested and sacrificed on day 3. The latter was done to assess whether effects are robust, as effects in rats have been shown to be modest. Zebrafish that were given Artemia showed less inhibitory avoidance after one shock, but not after two shocks, than zebrafish that were given flake-food. Reduced avoidance behaviour was associated with lower telencepahalic gene expression levels of cannabinoid receptor 1 (cnr1) and higher gene expression levels of corticotropin releasing factor (crf). These results suggest that providing rewards at fixed intervals alters fear avoidance behaviour, albeit modestly, in zebrafish. We discuss the data in the context of similar underlying brain structures in mammals and fish. PMID:26342856

  7. Toxicity Evaluation of New Engineered Nanomaterials in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Brundo, Maria V; Pecoraro, Roberta; Marino, Fabio; Salvaggio, Antonio; Tibullo, Daniele; Saccone, Salvatore; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Buccheri, Maria A; Impellizzeri, Giuliana; Scuderi, Viviana; Zimbone, Massimo; Privitera, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the nanoparticles on the marine organisms, depends on their size, chemical composition, surface structure, solubility and shape. In order to take advantage from their activity, preserving the surrounding environment from a possible pollution, we are trying to trap the nanoparticles into new nanomaterials. The nanomaterials tested were synthesized proposing a ground-breaking approach by an upside-down vision of the Au/TiO2 nano-system to avoid the release of nanoparticles. The system was synthesized by wrapping Au nanoparticles with a thin layer of TiO2. The non-toxicity of the nano-system was established by testing the effect of the material on zebrafish larvae. Danio rerio o zebrafish was considered an excellent model for the environmental biomonitoring of aquatic environments and the Zebrafish Embryo Toxicity Test (ZFET) is considered an alternative method of animal test. For this reason zebrafish larvae were exposed to different concentrations of nanoparticles of TiO2 and Au and new nanomaterials. As biomarkers of exposure, we evaluated the expression of metallothioneins by immunohistochemistry analysis and western blotting analysis also. The results obtained by toxicity test showed that neither mortality as well as sublethal effects were induced by the different nanomaterials and nanoparticles tested. Only zebrafish larvae exposed to free Au nanoparticles showed a different response to anti-MT antibody. In fact, the immunolocalization analysis highlighted an increase of the metallothioneins synthesis. PMID:27148069

  8. Zebrafish: An Important Tool for Liver Disease Research

    PubMed Central

    Goessling, Wolfram; Sadler, Kirsten C.

    2016-01-01

    As the incidence of hepatobiliary diseases increases, we must improve our understanding of the molecular, cellular, and physiological factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of liver disease. Animal models help us identify disease mechanisms that might be targeted therapeutically. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have traditionally been used to study embryonic development but are also important to the study of liver disease. Zebrafish embryos develop rapidly; all of their digestive organs are mature in larvae by 5 days of age. At this stage, they can develop hepatobiliary diseases caused by developmental defects or toxin- or ethanol-induced injury and manifest premalignant changes within weeks. Zebrafish are similar to humans in hepatic cellular composition, function, signaling, and response to injury as well as the cellular processes that mediate liver diseases. Genes are highly conserved between humans and zebrafish, making them a useful system to study the basic mechanisms of liver disease. We can perform genetic screens to identify novel genes involved in specific disease processes and chemical screens to identify pathways and compounds that act on specific processes. We review how studies of zebrafish have advanced our understanding of inherited and acquired liver diseases as well as liver cancer and regeneration. PMID:26319012

  9. Construction and Application of a Zebrafish Array CGH Platform

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jennifer L.; Ceol, Craig; Feng, Hui; Langenau, David M.; Belair, Cassandra; Stern, Howard M.; Song, Anhua; Paw, Barry H.; Look, A. Thomas; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I.; Lee, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The zebrafish is emerging as a prominent model system for studying the genetics of human development and disease. Genetic alterations that underlie each mutant model can exist in the form of single base changes, balanced chromosomal rearrangements, or genetic imbalances. To detect genetic imbalances in an unbiased genome-wide fashion, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) can be used. We have developed a 5 Mb resolution array CGH platform specifically for the zebrafish. This platform contains 286 BAC clones, enriched for orthologous sequences of human oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Each BAC clone has been end-sequenced and cytogenetically assigned to a specific location within the zebrafish genome, allowing for ease of integration of array CGH data with the current version of the genome assembly. This platform has been applied to three zebrafish cancer models. Significant genomic imbalances were detected in each model, identifying different regions which may potentially play a role in tumorigenesis. Hence, this platform should be a useful resource for genetic dissection of additional zebrafish developmental and disease models as well as a benchmark for future array CGH platform development. PMID:18973135

  10. The Zebrafish Breathes New Life into the Study of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Myllymäki, Henna; Bäuerlein, Carina A.; Rämet, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global health emergency. Up to one-third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the pathogen continues to kill 1.5 million people annually. Currently, the means for preventing, diagnosing, and treating TB are unsatisfactory. One of the main reasons for the poor progress in TB research has been a lack of good animal models to study the latency, dormancy, and reactivation of the disease. Although sophisticated in vitro and in silico methods suitable for TB research are constantly being developed, they cannot reproduce the complete vertebrate immune system and its interplay with pathogens and vaccines. However, the zebrafish has recently emerged as a useful alternative to more traditional models, such as mice, rabbits, guinea pigs, and non-human primates, for studying the complex pathophysiology of a mycobacterial infection. The model is based on the similarity between Mycobacterium marinum – a natural fish pathogen – and M. tuberculosis. In both zebrafish larvae and adult fish, an infection with M. marinum leads to the formation of macrophage aggregates and granulomas, which resemble the M. tuberculosis infections in humans. In this review, we will summarize the current status of the zebrafish model in TB research and highlight the advantages of using zebrafish to dissect mycobacterial virulence strategies as well as the host immune responses elicited against them. In addition, we will discuss the possibilities of using the adult zebrafish model for studying latency, dormancy, and reactivation in a mycobacterial infection. PMID:27242801

  11. Finding clues to the riddle of sex determination in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nagabhushana, A; Mishra, Rakesh K

    2016-03-01

    How sex is determined has been one of the most intriguing puzzles in biology since antiquity. Although a fundamental process in most metazoans, there seems to be myriad of ways in which sex can be determined - from genetic to environmental sex determination. This variation is limited mainly to upstream triggers with the core of sex determination pathway being conserved. Zebrafish has gained prominence as a vertebrate model system to study development and disease. However, very little is known about its primary sex determination mechanism. Here we review our current understanding of the sex determination in zebrafish. Zebrafish lack identifiable heteromorphic sex chromosomes and sex is determined by multiple genes, with some influence from the environment. Recently, chromosome 4 has been identified as sex chromosome along with few sex-linked loci on chromosomes 5 and 16. The identities of candidate sex-linked genes, however, have remained elusive. Sex in zebrafish is also influenced by the number of meiotic oocytes in the juvenile ovary, which appear to instruct retention of the ovarian fate. The mechanism and identity of this instructive signal remain unknown. We hypothesize that sex in zebrafish is a culmination of combinatorial effects of the genome, germ cells and the environment with inputs from epigenetic factors translating the biological meaning of this interaction. PMID:26949096

  12. Zebrafish Database: Customizable, Free, and Open-Source Solution for Facility Management.

    PubMed

    Yakulov, Toma Antonov; Walz, Gerd

    2015-12-01

    Zebrafish Database is a web-based customizable database solution, which can be easily adapted to serve both single laboratories and facilities housing thousands of zebrafish lines. The database allows the users to keep track of details regarding the various genomic features, zebrafish lines, zebrafish batches, and their respective locations. Advanced search and reporting options are available. Unique features are the ability to upload files and images that are associated with the respective records and an integrated calendar component that supports multiple calendars and categories. Built on the basis of the Joomla content management system, the Zebrafish Database is easily extendable without the need for advanced programming skills.

  13. Strategies to Mitigate a Mycobacterium marinum Outbreak in a Zebrafish Research Facility

    PubMed Central

    Snell, Kathy; Mittge, Erika; Melancon, Ellie; Montgomery, Rebecca; McFadden, Marcie; Camoriano, Javier; Kent, Michael L.; Whipps, Christopher M.; Peirce, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In 2011, the zebrafish research facility at the University of Oregon experienced an outbreak of Mycobacterium marinum that affected both research fish and facility staff. A thorough review of risks to personnel, the zebrafish veterinary care program, and zebrafish husbandry procedures at the research facility followed. In the years since 2011, changes have been implemented throughout the research facility to protect the personnel, the fish colony, and ultimately the continued success of the zebrafish model research program. In this study, we present the history of the outbreak, the changes we implemented, and recommendations to mitigate pathogen outbreaks in zebrafish research facilities. PMID:27351618

  14. Nrz but not zBcl-xL antagonizes Bcl-wav pro-apoptotic activity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Prudent, Julien; Gillet, Germain; Popgeorgiev, Nikolay

    2014-01-01

    We recently identified a new highly divergent Bcl-2 related protein, named Bcl-wav, with phylogenetic pattern restricted to aquatic anamniotes. In zebrafish gastrula, bclwav gene silencing resulted in calcium-dependent cytoskeleton remodeling leading to convergence and extension movements defaults and abnormal orientation of the larva notochord. Beyond its function in cell migration, Bcl-wav was found to act as a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 member inducing Bax/Bak dependent cell death. Here we show that, in zebrafish, pro-apoptotic Bcl-wav activity is selectively counteracted by the anti-apoptotic Nrz protein but not by zBcl-xL. Indeed Nrz but not zBcl-xL was able to decrease Bcl-wav dependent embryo mortality. Furthermore Nrz was able to prevent apoptosis induced by Bcl-wav ectopic expression in the embryo's head and tail. Finally co-immunoprecipitation experiments in HeLa cells showed that Bcl-wav directly interacts with Nrz. Overall these results expand our current knowledge about Bcl-2 family proteins interactome during early zebrafish development.

  15. Zebrafish P54 RNA helicases are cytoplasmic granule residents that are required for development and stress resilience

    PubMed Central

    Zampedri, Cecilia; Tinoco-Cuellar, Maryana; Carrillo-Rosas, Samantha; Diaz-Tellez, Abigail; Ramos-Balderas, Jose Luis; Pelegri, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stress granules are cytoplasmic foci that directly respond to the protein synthesis status of the cell. Various environmental insults, such as oxidative stress or extreme heat, block protein synthesis; consequently, mRNA will stall in translation, and stress granules will immediately form and become enriched with mRNAs. P54 DEAD box RNA helicases are components of RNA granules such as P-bodies and stress granules. We studied the expression, in cytoplasmic foci, of both zebrafish P54 RNA helicases (P54a and P54b) during development and found that they are expressed in cytoplasmic granules under both normal conditions and stress conditions. In zebrafish embryos exposed to heat shock, some proportion of P54a and P54b helicases move to larger granules that exhibit the properties of genuine stress granules. Knockdown of P54a and/or P54b in zebrafish embryos produces developmental abnormalities restricted to the posterior trunk; further, these embryos do not form stress granules, and their survival upon exposure to heat-shock conditions is compromised. Our observations fit the model that cells lacking stress granules have no resilience or ability to recover once the stress has ended, indicating that stress granules play an essential role in the way organisms adapt to a changing environment. PMID:27489304

  16. Targeted Laser Ablation of the Zebrafish Larval Heart Induces Models of Heart Block, Valvular Regurgitation, and Outflow Tract Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, Gianfranco; Maqsood, Sana; Taylor, Jonathan; Mullins, John J.; Tucker, Carl S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian models of cardiac disease have provided unique and important insights into human disease but have become increasingly challenging to produce. The zebrafish could provide inexpensive high-throughput models of cardiac injury and repair. We used a highly targeted laser, synchronized to fire at specific phases of the cardiac cycle, to induce regional injury to the ventricle, atrioventricular (AV) cushion, and bulbus arteriosus (BA). We assessed the impact of laser injury on hearts of zebrafish early larvae at 72 h postfertilization, to different regions, recording the effects on ejection fraction (EF), heart rate (HR), and blood flow at 2 and 24 h postinjury (hpi). Laser injury to the apex, midzone, and outflow regions of the ventricle resulted in reductions of the ventricle EF at 2 hpi with full recovery of function by 24 hpi. Laser injury to the ventricle, close to the AV cushion, was more likely to cause bradycardia and atrial–ventricular dysfunction, suggestive of an electrical conduction block. At 2 hpi, direct injury to the AV cushion resulted in marked regurgitation of blood from the ventricle to the atrium. Laser injury to the BA caused temporary outflow tract obstruction with cessation of ventricle contraction and circulation. Despite such damage, 80% of embryos showed complete recovery of the HR and function within 24 h of laser injury. Precision laser injury to key structures in the zebrafish developing heart provides a range of potentially useful models of hemodynamic overload, injury, and repair. PMID:25272304

  17. Regular Care and Maintenance of a Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Laboratory: An Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Iverson, Mathew T.; Mondal, Alinda; Ong, Daniel; Rainey-Smith, Stephanie; Taddei, Kevin; Lardelli, Michael; Groth, David M.; Verdile, Giuseppe; Martins, Ralph N.

    2012-01-01

    This protocol describes regular care and maintenance of a zebrafish laboratory. Zebrafish are now gaining popularity in genetics, pharmacological and behavioural research. As a vertebrate, zebrafish share considerable genetic sequence similarity with humans and are being used as an animal model for various human disease conditions. The advantages of zebrafish in comparison to other common vertebrate models include high fecundity, low maintenance cost, transparent embryos, and rapid development. Due to the spur of interest in zebrafish research, the need to establish and maintain a productive zebrafish housing facility is also increasing. Although literature is available for the maintenance of a zebrafish laboratory, a concise video protocol is lacking. This video illustrates the protocol for regular housing, feeding, breeding and raising of zebrafish larvae. This process will help researchers to understand the natural behaviour and optimal conditions of zebrafish husbandry and hence troubleshoot experimental issues that originate from the fish husbandry conditions. This protocol will be of immense help to researchers planning to establish a zebrafish laboratory, and also to graduate students who are intending to use zebrafish as an animal model. PMID:23183629

  18. Developmental Toxicity of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles to Zebrafish (Danio rerio): A Transcriptomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Soo; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Yoon, Seokjoo; Kim, Woo-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are being utilized in an increasing number of fields and commercial applications. While their general toxicity and associated oxidative stress have been extensively studied, the toxicological pathways that they induce in developmental stages are still largely unknown. In this study, the developmental toxicity of ZnO NPs to embryonic/larval zebrafish was investigated. The transcriptional expression profiles induced by ZnO NPs were also investigated to ascertain novel genomic responses related to their specific toxicity pathway. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 mg/L ZnO NPs for 96 h post-fertilization. The toxicity of ZnO NPs, based on their Zn concentration, was quite similar to that in embryonic/larval zebrafish exposed to corresponding ZnSO4 concentrations. Pericardial edema and yolk-sac edema were the principal malformations induced by ZnO NPs. Gene-expression profiling using microarrays demonstrated 689 genes that were differentially regulated (fold change >1.5) following exposure to ZnO NPs (498 upregulated, 191 downregulated). Several genes that were differentially regulated following ZnO NP exposure shared similar biological pathways with those observed with ZnSO4 exposure, but six genes (aicda, cyb5d1, edar, intl2, ogfrl2 and tnfsf13b) associated with inflammation and the immune system responded specifically to ZnO NPs (either in the opposite direction or were unchanged in ZnSO4 exposure). Real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction confirmed that the responses of these genes to ZnO NPs were significantly different from their response to ZnSO4 exposure. ZnO NPs may affect genes related to inflammation and the immune system, resulting in yolk-sac edema and pericardia edema in embryonic/larval developmental stages. These results will assist in elucidating the mechanisms of toxicity of ZnO NPs during development of zebrafish. PMID:27504894

  19. Regulation of the activin-inhibin-follistatin system by bone morphogenetic proteins in the zebrafish ovary.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheuk Wun; Ge, Wei

    2013-09-01

    In the zebrafish, the dynamic expression of the activin-inhibin-follistatin system during folliculogenesis and its exclusive localization (except follistatin) in follicle cells suggests that the system plays important roles in follicle development and that its expression is subject to tight controls, probably by external factors including those derived from the oocyte. We have previously identified zebrafish bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) as oocyte factors that may act on follicle cells; however, the targets of BMPs in the follicle cells remain unknown. Considering their spatiotemporal expression in the follicle, we hypothesized that members of the activin-inhibin-follistatin system in follicle cells could be potential target genes of BMPs. In the present study, we developed a novel coculture system to co-incubate zebrafish bone morphogenetic protein 2b or 4 (zfBMP2b/4)-producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with zebrafish follicle cells. During incubation, the zfBMPs secreted from the CHO cells would act directly on the follicle cells in a paracrine manner. Our results showed that all activin beta subunits (inhbaa, inhbab, and inhbb) were down-regulated by both zfBMP2b and zfBMP4, while follistatin (fst, an activin-binding protein) and inhibin alpha (inha, an activin antagonist) were significantly up-regulated. The specificity of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) actions was confirmed by short interfering RNA knockdown of zfBMP4 expression in the CHO cells. The robust response of inha to zfBMPs, together with our previous observation that inha expression surged at the full-grown stage prior to oocyte maturation, led us to hypothesize that the full-grown oocyte may signal upper levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis its readiness to mature by releasing BMPs, which in turn stimulate inhibin production. As an ovarian hormone and activin antagonist, inhibin may suppress the action of activin in the pituitary to reduce follicle-stimulating hormone

  20. Simple microfluidic devices for in vivo imaging of C. elegans, Drosophila and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sudip; Ahlawat, Shikha; Koushika, Sandhya P

    2012-01-01

    compared to anesthetized animals (Figure 1J and 3C-F). Device dimensions were altered to allow time-lapse imaging of different stages of C. elegans, first instar Drosophila larvae and zebrafish larvae. Transport of vesicles marked with synaptotagmin tagged with GFP (syt.eGFP) in sensory neurons shows directed motion of synaptic vesicle markers expressed in cholinergic sensory neurons in intact first instar Drosophila larvae. A similar device has been used to carry out time-lapse imaging of heartbeat in -30 hr post fertilization (hpf) zebrafish larvae. These data show that the simple devices we have developed can be applied to a variety of model systems to study several cell biological and developmental phenomena in vivo. PMID:23051668

  1. Developmental Toxicity of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles to Zebrafish (Danio rerio): A Transcriptomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Soo; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Yoon, Seokjoo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are being utilized in an increasing number of fields and commercial applications. While their general toxicity and associated oxidative stress have been extensively studied, the toxicological pathways that they induce in developmental stages are still largely unknown. In this study, the developmental toxicity of ZnO NPs to embryonic/larval zebrafish was investigated. The transcriptional expression profiles induced by ZnO NPs were also investigated to ascertain novel genomic responses related to their specific toxicity pathway. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 mg/L ZnO NPs for 96 h post-fertilization. The toxicity of ZnO NPs, based on their Zn concentration, was quite similar to that in embryonic/larval zebrafish exposed to corresponding ZnSO4 concentrations. Pericardial edema and yolk-sac edema were the principal malformations induced by ZnO NPs. Gene-expression profiling using microarrays demonstrated 689 genes that were differentially regulated (fold change >1.5) following exposure to ZnO NPs (498 upregulated, 191 downregulated). Several genes that were differentially regulated following ZnO NP exposure shared similar biological pathways with those observed with ZnSO4 exposure, but six genes (aicda, cyb5d1, edar, intl2, ogfrl2 and tnfsf13b) associated with inflammation and the immune system responded specifically to ZnO NPs (either in the opposite direction or were unchanged in ZnSO4 exposure). Real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction confirmed that the responses of these genes to ZnO NPs were significantly different from their response to ZnSO4 exposure. ZnO NPs may affect genes related to inflammation and the immune system, resulting in yolk-sac edema and pericardia edema in embryonic/larval developmental stages. These results will assist in elucidating the mechanisms of toxicity of ZnO NPs during development of zebrafish. PMID:27504894

  2. Wnt/β-catenin signaling promotes regeneration after adult zebrafish spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Strand, Nicholas S; Hoi, Kimberly K; Phan, Tien M T; Ray, Catherine A; Berndt, Jason D; Moon, Randall T

    2016-09-01

    Unlike mammals, zebrafish can regenerate their injured spinal cord and regain control of caudal tissues. It was recently shown that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary for spinal cord regeneration in the larval zebrafish. However, the molecular mechanisms of regeneration may or may not be conserved between larval and adult zebrafish. To test this, we assessed the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling after spinal cord injury in the adult zebrafish. We show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is increased after spinal cord injury in the adult zebrafish. Moreover, overexpression of Dkk1b inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the regenerating spinal cord of adult zebrafish. Dkk1b overexpression also inhibited locomotor recovery, axon regeneration, and glial bridge formation in the injured spinal cord. Thus, our data illustrate a conserved role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling in adult and larval zebrafish spinal cord regeneration.

  3. Influence of sediment composition on PAH toxicity using zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryo-larval assays.

    PubMed

    Perrichon, Prescilla; Le Bihanic, Florane; Bustamante, Paco; Le Menach, Karyn; Budzinski, Hélène; Cachot, Jérôme; Cousin, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Due to hydrophobic and persistent properties, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have a high capacity to accumulate in sediment. Sediment quality criteria, for the assessment of habitat quality and risk for aquatic life, include understanding the fate and effects of PAHs. In the context of European regulation (REACH and Water Framework Directive), the first objective was to assess the influence of sediment composition on the toxicity of two model PAHs, benzo[a]pyrene and fluoranthene using 10-day zebrafish embryo-larval assay. This procedure was undertaken with an artificial sediment in order to limit natural sediment variability. A suitable sediment composition might be then validated for zebrafish and proposed in a new OECD guideline for chemicals testing. Second, a comparative study of toxicity responses from this exposure protocol was then performed using another OECD species, the Japanese medaka. The potential toxicity of both PAHs was assessed through lethal (e.g., survival, hatching success) and sublethal endpoints (e.g., abnormalities, PMR, and EROD) measured at different developmental stages, adapted to the embryonic development time of both species. Regarding effects observed for both species, a suitable artificial sediment composition for PAH toxicity testing was set at 92.5 % dry weight (dw) silica of 0.2-0.5-mm grain size, 5 % dw kaolin clay without organic matter for zebrafish, and 2.5 % dw blond peat in more only for Japanese medaka. PAH bioavailability and toxicity were highly dependent on the fraction of organic matter in sediment and of the K ow coefficients of the tested compounds. The biological responses observed were also dependent of the species under consideration. Japanese medaka embryos appeared more robust than zebrafish embryos for understanding the toxicity of PAHs following a sediment contact test, due to the longer exposure duration and lower sensitivity of sediment physical properties.

  4. Specific Resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in Zebrafish Is Mediated by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Phennicie, Ryan T.; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Singer, John T.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Carol H.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease caused by recessive mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is associated with prevalent and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. Despite numerous studies that have sought to elucidate the role of CFTR in the innate immune response, the links between CFTR, innate immunity, and P. aeruginosa infection remain unclear. The present work highlights the zebrafish as a powerful model organism for human infectious disease, particularly infection by P. aeruginosa. Zebrafish embryos with reduced expression of the cftr gene (Cftr morphants) exhibited reduced respiratory burst response and directed neutrophil migration, supporting a connection between cftr and the innate immune response. Cftr morphants were infected with P. aeruginosa or other bacterial species that are commonly associated with infections in CF patients, including Burkholderia cenocepacia, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus. Intriguingly, the bacterial burden of P. aeruginosa was found to be significantly higher in zebrafish Cftr morphants than in controls, but this phenomenon was not observed with the other bacterial species. Bacterial burden in Cftr morphants infected with a P. aeruginosa ΔLasR mutant, a quorum sensing-deficient strain, was comparable to that in control fish, indicating that the regulation of virulence factors through LasR is required for enhancement of infection in the absence of Cftr. The zebrafish system provides a multitude of advantages for studying the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa and for understanding the role that innate immune cells, such as neutrophils, play in the host response to acute bacterial infections commonly associated with cystic fibrosis. PMID:20732993

  5. Using Mouse and Zebrafish Models to Understand the Etiology of Developmental Defects in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    KAWAUCHI, SHIMAKO; SANTOS, ROSAYSELA; MUTO, AKIHIKO; LOPEZ-BURKS, MARTHA E.; SCHILLING, THOMAS F.; LANDER, ARTHUR D.; CALOF, ANNE L.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem birth defects disorder that affects every tissue and organ system in the body. Understanding the factors that contribute to the origins, prevalence, and severity of these developmental defects provides the most direct approach for developing screens and potential treatments for individuals with CdLS. Since the majority of cases of CdLS are caused by haploinsufficiency for NIPBL (Nipped-B-like, which encodes a cohesin-associated protein), we have developed mouse and zebrafish models of CdLS by using molecular genetic tools to create Nipbl-deficient mice and zebrafish (Nipbl+/− mice, zebrafish nipbl morphants). Studies of these vertebrate animal models have yielded novel insights into the developmental etiology and genes/gene pathways that contribute to CdLS-associated birth defects, particularly defects of the gut, heart, craniofacial structures, nervous system, and limbs. Studies of these mouse and zebrafish CdLS models have helped clarify how deficiency for NIPBL, a protein that associates with cohesin and other transcriptional regulators in the nucleus, affects processes important to the emergence of the structural and physiological birth defects observed in CdLS: NIPBL exerts chromosome position-specific effects on gene expression; it influences long-range interactions between different regulatory elements of genes; and it regulates combinatorial and synergistic actions of genes in developing tissues. Our current understanding is that CdLS should be considered as not only a cohesinopathy, but also a “transcriptomopathy,” that is, a disease whose underlying etiology is the global dysregulation of gene expression throughout the organism. PMID:27120001

  6. Saccadic and Postsaccadic Disconjugacy in Zebrafish Larvae Suggests Independent Eye Movement Control

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Cheng; Bockisch, Christopher J.; Straumann, Dominik; Huang, Melody Ying-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous eye movements of zebrafish larvae in the dark consist of centrifugal saccades that move the eyes from a central to an eccentric position and postsaccadic centripetal drifts. In a previous study, we showed that the fitted single-exponential time constants of the postsaccadic drifts are longer in the temporal-to-nasal (T->N) direction than in the nasal-to-temporal (N->T) direction. In the present study, we further report that saccadic peak velocities are higher and saccadic amplitudes are larger in the N->T direction than in the T->N direction. We investigated the underlying mechanism of this ocular disconjugacy in the dark with a top-down approach. A mathematic ocular motor model, including an eye plant, a set of burst neurons and a velocity-to-position neural integrator (VPNI), was built to simulate the typical larval eye movements in the dark. The modeling parameters, such as VPNI time constants, neural impulse signals generated by the burst neurons and time constants of the eye plant, were iteratively adjusted to fit the average saccadic eye movement. These simulations suggest that four pools of burst neurons and four pools of VPNIs are needed to explain the disconjugate eye movements in our results. A premotor mechanism controls the synchronous timing of binocular saccades, but the pools of burst and integrator neurons in zebrafish larvae seem to be different (and maybe separate) for both eyes and horizontal directions, which leads to the observed ocular disconjugacies during saccades and postsaccadic drifts in the dark. PMID:27761109

  7. Zebrafish embryos as an alternative to animal experiments--a commentary on the definition of the onset of protected life stages in animal welfare regulations.

    PubMed

    Strähle, Uwe; Scholz, Stefan; Geisler, Robert; Greiner, Petra; Hollert, Henner; Rastegar, Sepand; Schumacher, Axel; Selderslaghs, Ingrid; Weiss, Carsten; Witters, Hilda; Braunbeck, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Worldwide, the zebrafish has become a popular model for biomedical research and (eco)toxicology. Particularly the use of embryos is receiving increasing attention, since they are considered as replacement method for animal experiments. Zebrafish embryos allow the analysis of multiple endpoints ranging from acute and developmental toxicity determination to complex functional genetic and physiological analysis. Particularly the more complex endpoints require the use of post-hatched eleutheroembryo stages. According to the new EU Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes, the earliest life-stages of animals are not defined as protected and, therefore, do not fall into the regulatory frameworks dealing with animal experimentation. Independent feeding is considered as the stage from which free-living larvae are subject to regulations for animal experimentation. However, despite this seemingly clear definition, large variations exist in the interpretation of this criterion by national and regional authorities. Since some assays require the use of post-hatched stages up to 120 h post fertilization, the literature and available data are reviewed in order to evaluate if this stage could still be considered as non-protected according to the regulatory criterion of independent feeding. Based on our analysis and by including criteria such as yolk consumption, feeding and swimming behavior, we conclude that zebrafish larvae can indeed be regarded as independently feeding from 120 h after fertilization. Experiments with zebrafish should thus be subject to regulations for animal experiments from 120 h after fertilization onwards.

  8. Acute exposure to waterborne psychoactive drugs attract zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Murilo S; Giacomini, Ana Cristina V; Gusso, Darlan; Rosa, João G S; Koakoski, Gessi; Kalichak, Fabiana; Idalêncio, Renan; Oliveira, Thiago A; Barcellos, Heloísa H A; Bonan, Carla D; Barcellos, Leonardo J G

    2016-01-01

    Psychotropic medications are widely used, and their prescription has increased worldwide, consequently increasing their presence in aquatic environments. Therefore, aquatic organisms can be exposed to psychotropic drugs that may be potentially dangerous, raising the question of whether these drugs are attractive or aversive to fish. To answer this question, adult zebrafish were tested in a chamber that allows the fish to escape or seek a lane of contaminated water. These attraction and aversion paradigms were evaluated by exposing the zebrafish to the presence of acute contamination with these compounds. The zebrafish were attracted by certain concentrations of diazepam, fluoxetine, risperidone and buspirone, which were most likely detected by olfaction, because this behavior was absent in anosmic fish. These findings suggest that despite their deleterious effects, certain psychoactive drugs attract fish.

  9. The Transcriptomics of Glucocorticoid Receptor Signaling in Developing Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Nesan, Dinushan; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2013-01-01

    Cortisol is the primary corticosteroid in teleosts that is released in response to stressor activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis. The target tissue action of this hormone is primarily mediated by the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a ligand-bound transcription factor. In developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, GR transcripts and cortisol are maternally deposited into the oocyte prior to fertilization and influence early embryogenesis. To better understand of the molecular mechanisms involved, we investigated changes in the developmental transcriptome prior to hatch, in response to morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown of GR using the Agilent zebrafish microarray platform. A total of 1313 and 836 mRNA transcripts were significantly changed at 24 and 36 hours post fertilization (hpf), respectively. Functional analysis revealed numerous developmental processes under GR regulation, including neurogenesis, eye development, skeletal and cardiac muscle formation. Together, this study underscores a critical role for glucocorticoid signaling in programming molecular events essential for zebrafish development. PMID:24348914

  10. Stable multilineage xenogeneic replacement of definitive hematopoiesis in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hess, Isabell; Boehm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bony fishes are the most numerous and phenotypically diverse group of vertebrates inhabiting our planet, making them an ideal target for identifying general principles of tissue development and function. However, lack of suitable experimental platforms prevents the exploitation of this rich source of natural phenotypic variation. Here, we use a zebrafish strain lacking definitive hematopoiesis for interspecific analysis of hematopoietic cell development. Without conditioning prior to transplantation, hematopoietic progenitor cells from goldfish stably engraft in adult zebrafish homozygous for the c-myb(I181N) mutation. However, in competitive repopulation experiments, zebrafish hematopoietic cells exhibit an advantage over their goldfish counterparts, possibly owing to subtle species-specific functional differences in hematopoietic microenvironments resulting from over 100 million years of independent evolution. Thus, our unique animal model provides an unprecedented opportunity to genetically and functionally disentangle universal and species-specific contributions of the microenvironment to hematopoietic progenitor cell maintenance and development. PMID:26777855

  11. Monitoring Wnt Signaling in Zebrafish Using Fluorescent Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Facchinello, Nicola; Schiavone, Marco; Vettori, Andrea; Argenton, Francesco; Tiso, Natascia

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we are presenting methods to monitor and quantify in vivo canonical Wnt signaling activities at single-cell resolution in zebrafish. Our technology is based on artificial enhancers, obtained by polymerization of TCF binding elements, cloned upstream to ubiquitous or tissue-specific promoters. The different promoter/enhancer combinations are used to drive fluorescent protein reporter constructs integrated in the zebrafish germline by microinjection of fertilized zebrafish eggs. Fish with a single integration site are selected by Mendelian analysis of fluorescent carriers, and heterozygous offspring are used to monitor and quantify canonical Wnt activities. Open source public domain software such as ImageJ/Fiji is used to calculate the integrated densities in the region of interest and compare the effect of experimental conditions on control and treated animals. PMID:27590154

  12. Recommendations for Health Monitoring and Reporting for Zebrafish Research Facilities.

    PubMed

    Collymore, Chereen; Crim, Marcus J; Lieggi, Christine

    2016-07-01

    The presence of subclinical infection or clinical disease in laboratory zebrafish may have a significant impact on research results, animal health and welfare, and transfer of animals between institutions. As use of zebrafish as a model of disease increases, a harmonized method for monitoring and reporting the health status of animals will facilitate the transfer of animals, allow institutions to exclude diseases that may negatively impact their research programs, and improve animal health and welfare. All zebrafish facilities should implement a health monitoring program. In this study, we review important aspects of a health monitoring program, including choice of agents, samples for testing, available testing methodologies, housing and husbandry, cost, test subjects, and a harmonized method for reporting results. Facilities may use these recommendations to implement their own health monitoring program.

  13. [Looking through zebrafish to study host-pathogen interactions].

    PubMed

    Bernut, Audrey; Lutfalla, Georges; Kremer, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish offers many advantages that motivated and validated its use to study the virulence of numerous human pathogens, including viruses, bacteria and fungi. Its immune system is homologous to the one of mammals. The optical transparency of zebrafish embryos allows non-invasive and real-time monitoring of the infection processes through the use of imaging techniques. The zebrafish is therefore a useful and powerful model to study host-pathogen interactions at a cellular level. It may be used to describe pathophysiological events and subversion mechanisms that are specific to each pathogen. In addition to increasing our understanding of the host immune defense, this model is of high potential for medical application, being particularly amenable to high-throughput screening for the discovery of new anti-infective molecules.

  14. Nephrotoxin Microinjection in Zebrafish to Model Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    McKee, Robert A; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys are susceptible to harm from exposure to chemicals they filter from the bloodstream. This can lead to organ injury associated with a rapid decline in renal function and development of the clinical syndrome known as acute kidney injury (AKI). Pharmacological agents used to treat medical circumstances ranging from bacterial infection to cancer, when administered individually or in combination with other drugs, can initiate AKI. Zebrafish are a useful animal model to study the chemical effects on renal function in vivo, as they form an embryonic kidney comprised of nephron functional units that are conserved with higher vertebrates, including humans. Further, zebrafish can be utilized to perform genetic and chemical screens, which provide opportunities to elucidate the cellular and molecular facets of AKI and develop therapeutic strategies such as the identification of nephroprotective molecules. Here, we demonstrate how microinjection into the zebrafish embryo can be utilized as a paradigm for nephrotoxin studies. PMID:27500823

  15. Aquatic blues: modeling depression and antidepressant action in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michael; Stewart, Adam Michael; Kalueff, Allan V

    2014-12-01

    Depression is a serious psychiatric condition affecting millions of patients worldwide. Unipolar depression is characterized by low mood, anhedonia, social withdrawal and other severely debilitating psychiatric symptoms. Bipolar disorder manifests in alternating depressed mood and 'hyperactive' manic/hypomanic states. Animal experimental models are an invaluable tool for research into the pathogenesis of bipolar/unipolar depression, and for the development of potential treatments. Due to their high throughput value, genetic tractability, low cost and quick reproductive cycle, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a promising new model species for studying brain disorders. Here, we discuss the developing utility of zebrafish for studying depression disorders, and outline future areas of research in this field. We argue that zebrafish represent a useful model organism for studying depression and its behavioral, genetic and physiological mechanisms, as well as for anti-depressant drug discovery.

  16. Exploring Hallucinogen Pharmacology and Psychedelic Medicine with Zebrafish Models.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan J; Kalueff, Allan V

    2016-10-01

    After decades of sociopolitical obstacles, the field of psychiatry is experiencing a revived interest in the use of hallucinogenic agents to treat brain disorders. Along with the use of ketamine for depression, recent pilot studies have highlighted the efficacy of classic serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide and psilocybin, in treating addiction, post-traumatic stress disorder, and anxiety. However, many basic pharmacological and toxicological questions remain unanswered with regard to these compounds. In this study, we discuss psychedelic medicine as well as the behavioral and toxicological effects of hallucinogenic drugs in zebrafish. We emphasize this aquatic organism as a model ideally suited to assess both the potential toxic and therapeutic effects of major known classes of hallucinogenic compounds. In addition, novel drugs with hallucinogenic properties can be efficiently screened using zebrafish models. Well-designed preclinical studies utilizing zebrafish can contribute to the reemerging treatment paradigm of psychedelic medicine, leading to new avenues of clinical exploration for psychiatric disorders. PMID:27002655

  17. Recommendations for Health Monitoring and Reporting for Zebrafish Research Facilities.

    PubMed

    Collymore, Chereen; Crim, Marcus J; Lieggi, Christine

    2016-07-01

    The presence of subclinical infection or clinical disease in laboratory zebrafish may have a significant impact on research results, animal health and welfare, and transfer of animals between institutions. As use of zebrafish as a model of disease increases, a harmonized method for monitoring and reporting the health status of animals will facilitate the transfer of animals, allow institutions to exclude diseases that may negatively impact their research programs, and improve animal health and welfare. All zebrafish facilities should implement a health monitoring program. In this study, we review important aspects of a health monitoring program, including choice of agents, samples for testing, available testing methodologies, housing and husbandry, cost, test subjects, and a harmonized method for reporting results. Facilities may use these recommendations to implement their own health monitoring program. PMID:26991393

  18. Studying Lipid Metabolism and Transport During Zebrafish Development.

    PubMed

    Zeituni, Erin M; Farber, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish model facilitates the study of lipid metabolism and transport during development. Here, we outline methods to introduce traceable fluorescent or radiolabeled fatty acids into zebrafish embryos and larvae at various developmental stages. Labeled fatty acids can be injected into the large yolk cell prior to the development of digestive organs when the larvae is entirely dependent on the yolk for its nutrition (lecithotrophic state). Once zebrafish are able to consume exogenous food, labeled fatty acids can be incorporated into their food. Our group and others have demonstrated that the transport and processing of these injected or ingested fatty acid analogs can be followed through microscopy and/or biochemical analysis. These techniques can be easily combined with targeted antisense approaches, transgenics, or drug treatments (see Note 1 ), allowing studies of lipid cell biology and metabolism that are exceedingly difficult or impossible in mammals. PMID:27464812

  19. Exploring Hallucinogen Pharmacology and Psychedelic Medicine with Zebrafish Models.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan J; Kalueff, Allan V

    2016-10-01

    After decades of sociopolitical obstacles, the field of psychiatry is experiencing a revived interest in the use of hallucinogenic agents to treat brain disorders. Along with the use of ketamine for depression, recent pilot studies have highlighted the efficacy of classic serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide and psilocybin, in treating addiction, post-traumatic stress disorder, and anxiety. However, many basic pharmacological and toxicological questions remain unanswered with regard to these compounds. In this study, we discuss psychedelic medicine as well as the behavioral and toxicological effects of hallucinogenic drugs in zebrafish. We emphasize this aquatic organism as a model ideally suited to assess both the potential toxic and therapeutic effects of major known classes of hallucinogenic compounds. In addition, novel drugs with hallucinogenic properties can be efficiently screened using zebrafish models. Well-designed preclinical studies utilizing zebrafish can contribute to the reemerging treatment paradigm of psychedelic medicine, leading to new avenues of clinical exploration for psychiatric disorders.

  20. Diet-induced obesity in zebrafish shares common pathophysiological pathways with mammalian obesity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Obesity is a multifactorial disorder influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Animal models of obesity are required to help us understand the signaling pathways underlying this condition. Zebrafish possess many structural and functional similarities with humans and have been used to model various human diseases, including a genetic model of obesity. The purpose of this study was to establish a zebrafish model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Results Zebrafish were assigned into two dietary groups. One group of zebrafish was overfed with Artemia (60 mg dry weight/day/fish), a living prey consisting of a relatively high amount of fat. The other group of zebrafish was fed with Artemia sufficient to meet their energy requirements (5 mg dry weight/day/fish). Zebrafish were fed under these dietary protocols for 8 weeks. The zebrafish overfed with Artemia exhibited increased body mass index, which was calculated by dividing the body weight by the square of the body length, hypertriglyceridemia and hepatosteatosis, unlike the control zebrafish. Calorie restriction for 2 weeks was applied to zebrafish after the 8-week overfeeding period. The increased body weight and plasma triglyceride level were improved by calorie restriction. We also performed comparative transcriptome analysis of visceral adipose tissue from DIO zebrafish, DIO rats, DIO mice and obese humans. This analysis revealed that obese zebrafish and mammals share common pathophysiological pathways related to the coagulation cascade and lipid metabolism. Furthermore, several regulators were identified in zebrafish and mammals, including APOH, IL-6 and IL-1β in the coagulation cascade, and SREBF1, PPARα/γ, NR1H3 and LEP in lipid metabolism. Conclusion We established a zebrafish model of DIO that shared common pathophysiological pathways with mammalian obesity. The DIO zebrafish can be used to identify putative pharmacological targets and to test novel drugs for the treatment of human obesity

  1. Orthotopic models of pediatric brain tumors in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Eden, C J; Ju, B; Murugesan, M; Phoenix, T N; Nimmervoll, B; Tong, Y; Ellison, D W; Finkelstein, D; Wright, K; Boulos, N; Dapper, J; Thiruvenkatam, R; Lessman, C A; Taylor, M R; Gilbertson, R J

    2015-03-26

    High-throughput screens (HTS) of compound toxicity against cancer cells can identify thousands of potential new drug-leads. But only limited numbers of these compounds can progress to expensive and labor-intensive efficacy studies in mice, creating a 'bottle neck' in the drug development pipeline. Approaches that triage drug-leads for further study are greatly needed. Here we provide an intermediary platform between HTS and mice by adapting mouse models of pediatric brain tumors to grow as orthotopic xenografts in the brains of zebrafish. Freshly isolated mouse ependymoma, glioma and choroid plexus carcinoma cells expressing red fluorescence protein were conditioned to grow at 34 °C. Conditioned tumor cells were then transplanted orthotopically into the brains of zebrafish acclimatized to ambient temperatures of 34 °C. Live in vivo fluorescence imaging identified robust, quantifiable and reproducible brain tumor growth as well as spinal metastasis in zebrafish. All tumor xenografts in zebrafish retained the histological characteristics of the corresponding parent mouse tumor and efficiently recruited fish endothelial cells to form a tumor vasculature. Finally, by treating zebrafish harboring ERBB2-driven gliomas with an appropriate cytotoxic chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil) or tyrosine kinase inhibitor (erlotinib), we show that these models can effectively assess drug efficacy. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that mouse brain tumors can grow orthotopically in fish and serve as a platform to study drug efficacy. As large cohorts of brain tumor-bearing zebrafish can be generated rapidly and inexpensively, these models may serve as a powerful tool to triage drug-leads from HTS for formal efficacy testing in mice. PMID:24747973

  2. The Effect of Zeaxanthin on the Visual Acuity of Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saidi, Eric A.; Davey, Pinakin Gunvant; Cameron, D. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Oral supplementation of carotenoids such as zeaxanthin or lutein which naturally occur in human retina have been shown to improve vision and prevent progression of damage to advanced AMD in some studies. The zebrafish eye shares many physiological similarities with the human eye and is increasingly being used as model for vision research. We hypothesized that injection of zeaxanthin into the zebrafish eye would improve the visual acuity of the zebrafish over time. Visual acuity, calculated in cycles per degree, was measured in adult zebrafish to establish a consistent baseline using the optokinetic response. Zeaxanthin dissolved into phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or PBS only was injected into the anterior chamber of the right and left eyes of the Zebrafish. Visual acuities were measured at 1 week and 3, 8 and 12 weeks post-injection to compare to baseline values. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare visual acuities between fish injected with PBS and zeaxanthin. A significant improvement in visual acuity, 14% better than before the injection (baseline levels), was observed one week after injection with zeaxanthin (p = 0.04). This improvement peaked at more than 30% for some fish a few weeks after the injection and improvement in vision persisted at 3 weeks after injection (p = 0.006). The enhanced visual function was not significantly better than baseline at 8 weeks (p = 0.19) and returned to baseline levels 12 weeks after the initial injection (p = 0.50). Zeaxanthin can improve visual acuity in zebrafish eyes. Further studies are required to develop a better understanding of the role zeaxanthin and other carotenoids play during normal visual function. PMID:26267864

  3. Defective Glycinergic Synaptic Transmission in Zebrafish Motility Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Hiromi; Carta, Eloisa; Yamanaka, Iori; Harvey, Robert J.; Kuwada, John Y.

    2009-01-01

    Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Recently, in vivo analysis of glycinergic synaptic transmission has been pursued in zebrafish using molecular genetics. An ENU mutagenesis screen identified two behavioral mutants that are defective in glycinergic synaptic transmission. Zebrafish bandoneon (beo) mutants have a defect in glrbb, one of the duplicated glycine receptor (GlyR) β subunit genes. These mutants exhibit a loss of glycinergic synaptic transmission due to a lack of synaptic aggregation of GlyRs. Due to the consequent loss of reciprocal inhibition of motor circuits between the two sides of the spinal cord, motor neurons activate simultaneously on both sides resulting in bilateral contraction of axial muscles of beo mutants, eliciting the so-called ‘accordion’ phenotype. Similar defects in GlyR subunit genes have been observed in several mammals and are the basis for human hyperekplexia/startle disease. By contrast, zebrafish shocked (sho) mutants have a defect in slc6a9, encoding GlyT1, a glycine transporter that is expressed by astroglial cells surrounding the glycinergic synapse in the hindbrain and spinal cord. GlyT1 mediates rapid uptake of glycine from the synaptic cleft, terminating synaptic transmission. In zebrafish sho mutants, there appears to be elevated extracellular glycine resulting in persistent inhibition of postsynaptic neurons and subsequent reduced motility, causing the ‘twitch-once’ phenotype. We review current knowledge regarding zebrafish ‘accordion’ and ‘twitch-once’ mutants, including beo and sho, and report the identification of a new α2 subunit that revises the phylogeny of zebrafish GlyRs. PMID:20161699

  4. Effects of perfluorinated compounds on development of zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin-Mei; Liu, Hong-Ling; Shi, Wei; Wei, Si; Giesy, John P; Yu, Hong-Xia

    2011-08-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been widely used in industrial and consumer products and frequently detected in many environmental media. Potential reproductive effects of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) have been reported in mice, rats and water birds. PFOS and PFOA were also confirmed developing toxicants towards zebrafish embryos; however, the reported effect concentrations were contradictory. Polyfluorinated alkylated phosphate ester surfactants (including FC807) are precursor of PFOS and PFOA; however, there is no published information about the effects of FC807 and PFNA on zebrafish embryos. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the effects of these four PFCs on zebrafish embryos. Normal fertilized zebrafish embryos were selected to be exposed to several concentrations of PFOA, PFNA, PFOS or FC807 in 24-well cell culture plates. A digital camera was used to image morphological anomalies of embryos with a stereomicroscope. Embryos were observed through matching up to 96-h post-fertilization (hpf) and rates of survival and abnormalities recorded. PFCs caused lethality in a concentration-dependent manner with potential toxicity in the order of PFOS > FC807 > PFNA > PFOA based on 72-h LC(50). Forty-eight-hour post-fertilization pericardial edema and 72- or 96-hpf spine crooked malformation were all observed. PFOA, PFNA, PFOS and FC807 all caused structural abnormalities using early stages of development of zebrafish. The PFCs all retarded the development of zebrafish embryos. The toxicity of the PFCs was related to the length of the PFC chain and functional groups. PMID:22828880

  5. Persistent behavioral impairment caused by embryonic methylphenidate exposure in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D; Sledge, Damiyon; Roach, Stephanie; Petro, Ann; Donerly, Susan; Linney, Elwood

    2011-01-01

    As more adults take the stimulant medication methylphenidate to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) residual type, the risk arises with regard to exposure during early development if people taking the medication become pregnant. We studied the neurobehavioral effects of methylphenidate in zebrafish. Zebrafish offer cellular reporter systems, continuous visual access and molecular interventions such as morpholinos to help determine critical mechanisms underlying neurobehavioral teratogenicity. Previously, we had seen that persisting neurobehavioral impairment in zebrafish with developmental chlorpyrifos exposure was associated with disturbed dopamine systems. Because methylphenidate is an indirect dopamine agonist, it was thought that it might also cause persistent behavioral impairment after developmental exposure. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to the ADHD stimulant medication methylphenidate 0-5 days post fertilization (12.5-50mg/l). They were tested for long-term behavioral effects as adults. Methylphenidate exposure (50mg/l) caused significant increases in dopamine, norepinepherine and serotonin on day 6 but not day 30 after fertilization. In the novel tank diving test of predatory avoidance developmental methylphenidate (50mg/l) caused a significant reduction in the normal diving response. In the three-chamber spatial learning task early developmental methylphenidate (50mg/l) caused a significant impairment in choice accuracy. These data show that early developmental exposure of zebrafish to methylphenidate causes a long-term impairment in neurobehavioral plasticity. The identification of these functional deficits in zebrafish enables further studies with this model to determine how molecular and cellular mechanisms are disturbed to arrive at this compromised state.

  6. Zebrafish vimentin: molecular characterization, assembly properties and developmental expression.

    PubMed

    Cerdà, J; Conrad, M; Markl, J; Brand, M; Herrmann, H

    1998-11-01

    To provide a basis for the investigation of the intermediate filament (IF) protein vimentin in one of the most promising experimental vertebrate systems, the zebrafish (Danio rerio), we have isolated a cDNA clone of high sequence identity to and with the characteristic features of human vimentin. Using this clone we produced recombinant zebrafish vimentin and studied its assembly behaviour. Unlike other vimentins, zebrafish vimentin formed unusually thick filaments when assembled at temperatures below 21 degrees C. At 37 degrees C few filaments were observed, which often also terminated in aggregated masses, indicating that its assembly was severely disturbed at this temperature. Between 21 and 34 degrees C apparently normal IFs were generated. By viscometry, the temperature optimum of assembly was determined to be around 28 degrees C. At this temperature, zebrafish vimentin partially rescued, in mixing experiments, the temperature-dependent assembly defect of trout vimentin. Therefore it is apparently able to "instruct" the misorganized trout vimentin such that it can enter normal IFs. This feature, that assembly is best at the normal body temperature of various species, puts more weight on the assumption that vimentin is vital for some aspects of generating functional adult tissues. Remarkably, like in most other vertebrates, zebrafish vimentin appears to be an abundant factor in the lens and the retina as well as transiently, during development, in various parts of the central and peripheral nervous system. Therefore, promising cell biological investigations may now be performed with cells involved in the generation of the vertebrate eye and brain, and, in particular, the retina. Moreover, the power of genetics of the zebrafish system may be employed to investigate functional properties of vimentin in vivo. PMID:9860133

  7. Sensitivity to dioxin decreases as zebrafish mature.

    PubMed

    Lanham, Kevin A; Peterson, Richard E; Heideman, Warren

    2012-06-01

    The embryos of teleost fish are exquisitely sensitive to the toxic effects of exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, several lines of evidence suggest that adults are less sensitive to TCDD. To better understand and characterize this difference between early life stage and adults, we exposed zebrafish (Danio rerio) to graded TCDD concentrations at different ages. The LD(50) for embryos exposed at 1 day post-fertilization (dpf) was more than an order of magnitude lower than it was for juveniles exposed at 30 dpf. The latency between exposure and response also increased with age. Embryo toxicity was characterized by marked cardiovascular collapse and heart malformation, whereas juveniles exposed at 30 dpf had no detectable cardiovascular toxicity. In juveniles, the effects of TCDD exposure included stunted growth, altered pigmentation, and skeletal malformations. Furthermore, the transcriptional profile produced in hearts exposed to TCDD as embryos had very little overlap with the transcriptional changes induced by TCDD at 30 dpf. The early cardiotoxic response was associated with fish exposed prior to metamorphosis from the larval to the adult body plan at approximately 14 dpf. Our results show conclusively that the developmental stage at the time of exposure controls the toxic response to TCDD.

  8. The art of fin regeneration in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferli, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish fin provides a valuable model to study the epimorphic type of regeneration, whereby the amputated part of the appendage is nearly perfectly replaced. To accomplish fin regeneration, two reciprocally interacting domains need to be established at the injury site, namely a wound epithelium and a blastema. The wound epithelium provides a supporting niche for the blastema, which contains mesenchyme‐derived progenitor cells for the regenerate. The fate of blastemal daughter cells depends on their relative position with respect to the fin margin. The apical compartment of the outgrowth maintains its undifferentiated character, whereas the proximal descendants of the blastema progressively switch from the proliferation program to the morphogenesis program. A delicate balance between self‐renewal and differentiation has to be continuously adjusted during the course of regeneration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of blastema formation, and discusses several studies related to the regulation of growth and morphogenesis during fin regeneration. A wide range of canonical signaling pathways has been implicated during the establishment and maintenance of the blastema. Epigenetic mechanisms play a crucial role in the regulation of cellular plasticity during the transition between differentiation states. Ion fluxes, gap‐junctional communication and protein phosphatase activity have been shown to coordinate proliferation and tissue patterning in the caudal fin. The identification of the downstream targets of the fin regeneration signals and the discovery of mechanisms integrating the variety of input pathways represent exciting future aims in this fascinating field of research. PMID:27499869

  9. fork head domain genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Odenthal, J; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1998-07-01

    Nine members of the fork head domain gene family (fkd1-fkd9) were isolated from early cDNA libraries in the zebrafish. They show unique expression patterns in whole-mount RNA in situ hybridization during the first 24 h of embryonic development. These fkd genes fall into three of ten classes, based on sequence similarities within the DNA-binding domain, whereas members for the other seven classes described in other vertebrates were not found. In addition to conserved residues at certain positions in the fork head domain, characteristic transcription activation domains as well as similarities in expression patterns were found for members of the different classes. Members of class I (fkd1/axial, fkd2/Zffkh1, fkd4 and fkd7) are differentially transcribed in unsegmented dorsal axial structures such as the floor plate, the notochord, the hypochord and, in addition, the endoderm. Transcripts of fkd3 and fkd5 (class II) are mainly detected in the cells of the ectoderm which form neural tissues, as is the case for genes of this class in other species. RNAs of the three members of class V (fkd6, fkd8 and fkd9) are expressed in the paraxial mesoderm and transiently in the neuroectoderm. fkd6 is strongly expressed in neural crest cells from early stages on, whereas fkd2 and fkd7 are transcribed in individual neural crest cells in the pharyngula period.

  10. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in zebrafish models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asharani, P. V.; Lian Wu, Yi; Gong, Zhiyuan; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2008-06-01

    This study was initiated to enhance our insight on the health and environmental impact of silver nanoparticles (Ag-np). Using starch and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as capping agents, silver nanoparticles were synthesized to study their deleterious effects and distribution pattern in zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio). Toxicological endpoints like mortality, hatching, pericardial edema and heart rate were recorded. A concentration-dependent increase in mortality and hatching delay was observed in Ag-np treated embryos. Additionally, nanoparticle treatments resulted in concentration-dependent toxicity, typified by phenotypes that had abnormal body axes, twisted notochord, slow blood flow, pericardial edema and cardiac arrhythmia. Ag+ ions and stabilizing agents showed no significant defects in developing embryos. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the embryos demonstrated that nanoparticles were distributed in the brain, heart, yolk and blood of embryos as evident from the electron-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS). Furthermore, the acridine orange staining showed an increased apoptosis in Ag-np treated embryos. These results suggest that silver nanoparticles induce a dose-dependent toxicity in embryos, which hinders normal development.

  11. Cadmium affects retinogenesis during zebrafish embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Hen Chow, Elly Suk; Yu Hui, Michelle Nga; Cheng, Chi Wa; Cheng, Shuk Han

    2009-02-15

    Ocular malformations are commonly observed in embryos of aquatic species after exposure to toxicants. Using zebrafish embryos as the model organism, we showed that cadmium exposure from sphere stage (4 hpf) to end of segmentation stage (24 hpf) induced microphthalmia in cadmium-treated embryos. Embryos with eye defects were then assessed for visual abilities. Cadmium-exposed embryos were behaviorally blind, showing hyperpigmentation and loss of camouflage response to light. We investigated the cellular basis of the formation of the small eyes phenotype and the induction of blindness by studying retina development and retinotectal projections. Retinal progenitors were found in cadmium-treated embryos albeit in smaller numbers. The number of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), the first class of retinal cells to differentiate during retinogenesis, was reduced, while photoreceptor cells, the last batch of retinal neurons to differentiate, were absent. Cadmium also affected the propagation of neurons in neurogenic waves. The neurons remained in the ventronasal area and failed to spread across the retina. Drastically reduced RGC axons and disrupted optic stalk showed that the optic nerves did not extend from the retina beyond the chiasm into the tectum. Our data suggested that impairment in neuronal differentiation of the retina, disruption in RGC axon formation and absence of cone photoreceptors were the causes of microphthalmia and visual impairment in cadmium-treated embryos.

  12. Defining Hepatic Dysfunction Parameters in Two Models of Fatty Liver Disease in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, Deanna L.; Yin, Chunyue; Yeh, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fatty liver disease in humans can progress from steatosis to hepatocellular injury, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. We developed a series of straightforward assays to determine whether zebrafish larvae with either tunicamycin- or ethanol-induced steatosis develop hepatic dysfunction. We found altered expression of genes involved in acute phase response and hepatic function, and impaired hepatocyte secretion and disruption of canaliculi in both models, but glycogen deficiency in hepatocytes and dilation of hepatic vasculature occurred only in ethanol-treated larvae. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) become activated during liver injury and HSC numbers increased in both models. Whether the excess lipids in hepatocytes are a direct cause of hepatocyte dysfunction in fatty liver disease has not been defined. We prevented ethanol-induced steatosis by blocking activation of the sterol response element binding proteins (Srebps) using gonzombtps1 mutants and scap morphants and found that hepatocyte dysfunction persisted even in the absence of lipid accumulation. This suggests that lipotoxicity is not the primary cause of hepatic injury in these models of fatty liver disease. This study provides a panel of parameters to assess liver disease that can be easily applied to zebrafish mutants, transgenics, and for drug screening in which liver function is an important consideration. PMID:23697887

  13. In Vivo Assessment of Drug Efficacy against Mycobacterium abscessus Using the Embryonic Zebrafish Test System

    PubMed Central

    Bernut, Audrey; Le Moigne, Vincent; Lesne, Tiffany; Lutfalla, Georges; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is responsible for a wide spectrum of clinical syndromes and is one of the most intrinsically drug-resistant mycobacterial species. Recent evaluation of the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of the few potentially active antibiotics against M. abscessus was essentially performed using immunocompromised mice. Herein, we assessed the feasibility and sensitivity of fluorescence imaging for monitoring the in vivo activity of drugs against acute M. abscessus infection using zebrafish embryos. A protocol was developed where clarithromycin and imipenem were directly added to water containing fluorescent M. abscessus-infected embryos in a 96-well plate format. The status of the infection with increasing drug concentrations was visualized on a spatiotemporal level. Drug efficacy was assessed quantitatively by measuring the index of protection, the bacterial burden (CFU), and the number of abscesses through fluorescence measurements. Both drugs were active in infected embryos and were capable of significantly increasing embryo survival in a dose-dependent manner. Protection from bacterial killing correlated with restricted mycobacterial growth in the drug-treated larvae and with reduced pathophysiological symptoms, such as the number of abscesses within the brain. In conclusion, we present here a new and efficient method for testing and compare the in vivo activity of two clinically relevant drugs based on a fluorescent reporter strain in zebrafish embryos. This approach could be used for rapid determination of the in vivo drug susceptibility profile of clinical isolates and to assess the preclinical efficacy of new compounds against M. abscessus. PMID:24798271

  14. Photocaged morpholino oligomers for the light-regulation of gene function in zebrafish and Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Deiters, Alexander; Garner, R Aaron; Lusic, Hrvoje; Govan, Jeane M; Dush, Mike; Nascone-Yoder, Nanette M; Yoder, Jeffrey A

    2010-11-10

    Morpholino oligonucleotides, or morpholinos, have emerged as powerful antisense reagents for evaluating gene function in both in vitro and in vivo contexts. However, the constitutive activity of these reagents limits their utility for applications that require spatiotemporal control, such as tissue-specific gene disruptions in embryos. Here we report a novel and efficient synthetic route for incorporating photocaged monomeric building blocks directly into morpholino oligomers and demonstrate the utility of these caged morpholinos in the light-activated control of gene function in both cell culture and living embryos. We demonstrate that a caged morpholino that targets enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) disrupts EGFP production only after exposure to UV light in both transfected cells and living zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Xenopus frog embryos. Finally, we show that a caged morpholino targeting chordin, a zebrafish gene that yields a distinct phenotype when functionally disrupted by conventional morpholinos, elicits a chordin phenotype in a UV-dependent manner. Our results suggest that photocaged morpholinos are readily synthesized and highly efficacious tools for light-activated spatiotemporal control of gene expression in multiple contexts. PMID:20961123

  15. Defining hepatic dysfunction parameters in two models of fatty liver disease in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Deanna L; Yin, Chunyue; Yeh, Karen; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2013-06-01

    Fatty liver disease in humans can progress from steatosis to hepatocellular injury, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. We developed a series of straightforward assays to determine whether zebrafish larvae with either tunicamycin- or ethanol-induced steatosis develop hepatic dysfunction. We found altered expression of genes involved in acute phase response and hepatic function, and impaired hepatocyte secretion and disruption of canaliculi in both models, but glycogen deficiency in hepatocytes and dilation of hepatic vasculature occurred only in ethanol-treated larvae. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) become activated during liver injury and HSC numbers increased in both models. Whether the excess lipids in hepatocytes are a direct cause of hepatocyte dysfunction in fatty liver disease has not been defined. We prevented ethanol-induced steatosis by blocking activation of the sterol response element binding proteins (Srebps) using gonzo(mbtps1) mutants and scap morphants and found that hepatocyte dysfunction persisted even in the absence of lipid accumulation. This suggests that lipotoxicity is not the primary cause of hepatic injury in these models of fatty liver disease. This study provides a panel of parameters to assess liver disease that can be easily applied to zebrafish mutants, transgenics, and for drug screening in which liver function is an important consideration. PMID:23697887

  16. Manipulation of BK channel expression is sufficient to alter auditory hair cell thresholds in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Rohmann, Kevin N.; Tripp, Joel A.; Genova, Rachel M.; Bass, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Non-mammalian vertebrates rely on electrical resonance for frequency tuning in auditory hair cells. A key component of the resonance exhibited by these cells is an outward calcium-activated potassium current that flows through large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels. Previous work in midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) has shown that BK expression correlates with seasonal changes in hearing sensitivity and that pharmacologically blocking these channels replicates the natural decreases in sensitivity during the winter non-reproductive season. To test the hypothesis that reducing BK channel function is sufficient to change auditory thresholds in fish, morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) were used in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) to alter expression of slo1a and slo1b, duplicate genes coding for the pore-forming α-subunits of BK channels. Following MO injection, microphonic potentials were recorded from the inner ear of larvae. Quantitative real-time PCR was then used to determine the MO effect on slo1a and slo1b expression in these same fish. Knockdown of either slo1a or slo1b resulted in disrupted gene expression and increased auditory thresholds across the same range of frequencies of natural auditory plasticity observed in midshipman. We conclude that interference with the normal expression of individual slo1 genes is sufficient to increase auditory thresholds in zebrafish larvae and that changes in BK channel expression are a direct mechanism for regulation of peripheral hearing sensitivity among fishes. PMID:24803460

  17. Subacute microcystin-LR exposure alters the metabolism of thyroid hormones in juvenile zebrafish (Danio Rerio).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zidong; Tang, Rong; Li, Dapeng; Hu, Qing; Wang, Ying

    2015-02-01

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) has been detected extensively in the aquatic environment and has the potential to disturb the thyroid endocrine system. However, limited information is available on the effects of subacute MC-LR exposure on fish thyroid hormone (TH) metabolism. In the present study, juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to MC-LR at environmentally relevant concentrations (0, 1, 5, and 25 μg/L) for 28 days. Whole-body TH content and thyroid follicle histology were used as direct endpoints to assess thyroid disruption. The activities of iodothyronine deiodinases (IDs) and the transcription of selected genes associated with TH synthesis were also investigated to study the underlying mechanisms of endocrine disruption. Exposure of zebrafish to MC-LR significantly increased whole-body thyroxine (T4) content but decreased whole-body triiodothyronine (T3) content. We also observed hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the thyroid follicle epithelial cells, as well as up-regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and transthyretin (TTR) genes. The decreases in ID1 and ID2 activities coupled with an increase in ID3 activity were observed in MC-LR treatment groups. These results demonstrate that exposure to MC-LR at environmental concentrations results in the disturbance of TH homeostasis by disrupting the synthesis and conversion of THs. PMID:25647779

  18. Sox10-dependent neural crest origin of olfactory microvillous neurons in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ankur; Peng, Brian N; Bronner, Marianne E

    2013-03-19

    The sense of smell in vertebrates is detected by specialized sensory neurons derived from the peripheral nervous system. Classically, it has been presumed that the olfactory placode forms all olfactory sensory neurons. In contrast, we show that the cranial neural crest is the primary source of microvillous sensory neurons within the olfactory epithelium of zebrafish embryos. Using photoconversion-based fate mapping and live cell tracking coupled with laser ablation, we followed neural crest precursors as they migrated from the neural tube to the nasal cavity. A subset that coexpressed Sox10 protein and a neurogenin1 reporter ingressed into the olfactory epithelium and differentiated into microvillous sensory neurons. Timed loss-of-function analysis revealed a critical role for Sox10 in microvillous neurogenesis. Taken together, these findings directly demonstrate a heretofore unknown contribution of the cranial neural crest to olfactory sensory neurons in zebrafish and provide important insights into the assembly of the nascent olfactory system. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00336.001.

  19. In-vivo cell tracking to quantify endothelial cell migration during zebrafish angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Prahlad G.; Rochon, Elizabeth R.; Roman, Beth L.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism of endothelial cell migration as individual cells or collectively while remaining an integral component of a functional blood vessel has not been well characterized. In this study, our overarching goal is to define an image processing workflow to facilitate quantification of how endothelial cells within the first aortic arch and are proximal to the zebrafish heart behave in response to the onset of flow (i.e. onset of heart beating). Endothelial cell imaging was conducted at this developmental time-point i.e. ~24-28 hours post fertilization (hpf) when flow first begins, using 3D+time two-photon confocal microscopy of a live, wild-type, transgenic, zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in endothelial cell nuclei. An image processing pipeline comprised of image signal enhancement, median filtering for speckle noise reduction, automated identification of the nuclei positions, extraction of the relative movement of nuclei between consecutive time instances, and finally tracking of nuclei, was designed for achieving the tracking of endothelial cell nuclei and the identification of their movement towards or away from the heart. Pilot results lead to a hypothesis that upon the onset of heart beat and blood flow, endothelial cells migrate collectively towards the heart (by 21.51+/-10.35 μm) in opposition to blood flow (i.e. subtending 142.170+/-21.170 with the flow direction).

  20. CHRONIC ZEBRAFISH PFOS EXPOSURE ALTERS SEX RATIO AND MATERNAL RELATED EFFECTS IN F1 OFFSPRING

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyong; Chen, Jiangfei; Lin, Kuanfei; Chen, Yuanhong; Hu, Wei; Tanguay, Robert L.; Huang, Changjiang; Dong, Qiaoxiang

    2012-01-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) is an organic contaminant ubiquitous in the environment, wildlife, and humans. Few studies have assessed its chronic toxicity on aquatic organisms. The present study defined the effects of long-term exposure to PFOS on zebrafish development and reproduction. Specifically, zebrafish at 8 h postfertilization (hpf) were exposed to PFOS at 0, 5, 50, and 250 μg/L for five months. Growth suppression was observed in the 250 μg/L PFOS-treated group. The sex ratio was altered, with a significant female dominance in the high-dose PFOS group. Male gonad development was also impaired in a dose-dependent manner by PFOS exposure. Although female fecundity was not impacted, the F1 embryos derived from high-dose exposed females paired with males without PFOS exposure developed severe deformity at early development stages and resulted in 100% larval mortality at 7 d postfertilization (dpf). Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid quantification in embryos indicated that decreased larval survival in F1 offspring was directly correlated to the PFOS body burden, and larval lethality was attributable to maternal transfer of PFOS to the eggs. Lower-dose parental PFOS exposure did not result in decreased F1 survival; however, the offspring displayed hyperactivity of basal swimming speed in a light-to-dark behavior assessment test. These findings demonstrate that chronic exposure to PFOS adversely impacts embryonic growth, reproduction, and subsequent offspring development. Environ. PMID:21671259

  1. Subacute microcystin-LR exposure alters the metabolism of thyroid hormones in juvenile zebrafish (Danio Rerio).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zidong; Tang, Rong; Li, Dapeng; Hu, Qing; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-30

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) has been detected extensively in the aquatic environment and has the potential to disturb the thyroid endocrine system. However, limited information is available on the effects of subacute MC-LR exposure on fish thyroid hormone (TH) metabolism. In the present study, juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to MC-LR at environmentally relevant concentrations (0, 1, 5, and 25 μg/L) for 28 days. Whole-body TH content and thyroid follicle histology were used as direct endpoints to assess thyroid disruption. The activities of iodothyronine deiodinases (IDs) and the transcription of selected genes associated with TH synthesis were also investigated to study the underlying mechanisms of endocrine disruption. Exposure of zebrafish to MC-LR significantly increased whole-body thyroxine (T4) content but decreased whole-body triiodothyronine (T3) content. We also observed hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the thyroid follicle epithelial cells, as well as up-regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and transthyretin (TTR) genes. The decreases in ID1 and ID2 activities coupled with an increase in ID3 activity were observed in MC-LR treatment groups. These results demonstrate that exposure to MC-LR at environmental concentrations results in the disturbance of TH homeostasis by disrupting the synthesis and conversion of THs.

  2. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Suppresses Gonadotropin-Stimulated Estradiol Release from Zebrafish Ovarian Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Alsop, Derek; Ings, Jennifer S.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2009-01-01

    While stress is known to impact reproductive performance, the pathways involved are not entirely understood. Corticosteroid effects on the functioning of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis are thought to be a key aspect of stress-mediated reproductive dysfunction. A vital component of the stress response is the pituitary secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which binds to the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) in the adrenal glands and activates cortisol biosynthesis. We recently reported MC2R mRNA abundance in fish gonads leading to the hypothesis that ACTH may be directly involved in gonadal steroid modulation. Using zebrafish (Danio rerio) ovarian follicles, we tested the hypothesis that acute ACTH stimulation modulates cortisol and estradiol (E2) secretion. ACTH neither affected cortisol nor unstimulated E2 release from ovarian follicles. However, ACTH suppressed human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated E2 secretion in a dose-related manner, with a maximum decrease of 62% observed at 1 I.U. ACTH mL−1. This effect of ACTH on E2 release was not observed in the presence of either 8-bromo-cAMP or forskolin, suggesting that the mechanism(s) involved in steroid attenuation was upstream of adenylyl cyclase activation. Overall, our results suggest that a stress-induced rise in plasma ACTH levels may initiate a rapid down-regulation of acute stimulated E2 biosynthesis in the zebrafish ovary, underscoring a novel physiological role for this pituitary peptide in modulating reproductive activity. PMID:19649243

  3. Distinct Functions of Different scl Isoforms in Zebrafish Definitive Hematopoietic Stem Cell Initiation and Maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yahui

    2011-07-01

    The establishment of entire blood system relies on the multi-potent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), thus identifying the molecular mechanism in HSC generation is of importance for not only complementing the fundamental knowledge in stem cell biology, but also providing insights to the regenerative therapies. Recent researches have documented the formation of nascent HSCs through a direct transition from ventral aortic endothelium, named as endothelial hematopoietic transition (EHT) process. However, the precise genetic program engaged in this process remains largely elusive. The transcription factor scl plays pivotal and conserved roles in embryonic and adult hematopoiesis from teleosts to mammals. Our lab have previously identified a new truncated scl isoform, scl-beta, which is indispensible for the specification of HSCs in the ventral wall of dorsal aorta (VDA), the zebrafish equivalent of mammalian fetal hematopoietic organ. Here we observe that, by combining time-lapse confocal imaging of transgenic zebrafish and genetic epistasis analysis, scl-beta is expressed in a subset of ventral aortic endothelial cells and critical for their forthcoming transformation to hemogenic endothelium; in contrast, runx1 is required downstream to govern the successful egress of the hemogenic endothelial cells to become naive HSCs. In addition, the traditional known full-length scl-alpha isoform is firstly evidenced to be required for the maintenance or survival of newly formed HSCs in VDA. Collectively our data has established the genetic hierarchy controlling discrete steps in the consecutive process of HSC formation from endothelial cells and further development in VDA.

  4. Analysis of the dynamic co-expression network of heart regeneration in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Rodius, Sophie; Androsova, Ganna; Götz, Lou; Liechti, Robin; Crespo, Isaac; Merz, Susanne; Nazarov, Petr V; de Klein, Niek; Jeanty, Céline; González-Rosa, Juan M; Muller, Arnaud; Bernardin, Francois; Niclou, Simone P; Vallar, Laurent; Mercader, Nadia; Ibberson, Mark; Xenarios, Ioannis; Azuaje, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish has the capacity to regenerate its heart after severe injury. While the function of a few genes during this process has been studied, we are far from fully understanding how genes interact to coordinate heart regeneration. To enable systematic insights into this phenomenon, we generated and integrated a dynamic co-expression network of heart regeneration in the zebrafish and linked systems-level properties to the underlying molecular events. Across multiple post-injury time points, the network displays topological attributes of biological relevance. We show that regeneration steps are mediated by modules of transcriptionally coordinated genes, and by genes acting as network hubs. We also established direct associations between hubs and validated drivers of heart regeneration with murine and human orthologs. The resulting models and interactive analysis tools are available at http://infused.vital-it.ch. Using a worked example, we demonstrate the usefulness of this unique open resource for hypothesis generation and in silico screening for genes involved in heart regeneration. PMID:27241320

  5. Analysis of the dynamic co-expression network of heart regeneration in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Rodius, Sophie; Androsova, Ganna; Götz, Lou; Liechti, Robin; Crespo, Isaac; Merz, Susanne; Nazarov, Petr V.; de Klein, Niek; Jeanty, Céline; González-Rosa, Juan M.; Muller, Arnaud; Bernardin, Francois; Niclou, Simone P.; Vallar, Laurent; Mercader, Nadia; Ibberson, Mark; Xenarios, Ioannis; Azuaje, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish has the capacity to regenerate its heart after severe injury. While the function of a few genes during this process has been studied, we are far from fully understanding how genes interact to coordinate heart regeneration. To enable systematic insights into this phenomenon, we generated and integrated a dynamic co-expression network of heart regeneration in the zebrafish and linked systems-level properties to the underlying molecular events. Across multiple post-injury time points, the network displays topological attributes of biological relevance. We show that regeneration steps are mediated by modules of transcriptionally coordinated genes, and by genes acting as network hubs. We also established direct associations between hubs and validated drivers of heart regeneration with murine and human orthologs. The resulting models and interactive analysis tools are available at http://infused.vital-it.ch. Using a worked example, we demonstrate the usefulness of this unique open resource for hypothesis generation and in silico screening for genes involved in heart regeneration. PMID:27241320

  6. Kctd10 regulates heart morphogenesis by repressing the transcriptional activity of Tbx5a in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Xiangjun; Zu, Yao; Li, Zengpeng; Li, Wenyuan; Ying, Lingxiao; Yang, Jing; Wang, Xin; He, Shuonan; Liu, Da; Zhu, Zuoyan; Chen, Jianming; Lin, Shuo; Zhang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    The T-box transcription factor Tbx5 (Tbx5a in zebrafish) plays a crucial role in the formation of cardiac chambers in a dose-dependent manner. Its deregulation leads to congenital heart disease. However, little is known regarding its regulation. Here we isolate a zebrafish mutant with heart malformations, called 34c. The affected gene is identified as kctd10, a member of the potassium channel tetramerization domain (KCTD)-containing family. In the mutant, the expressions of the atrioventricular canal marker genes, such as tbx2b, hyaluronan synthase 2 (has2), notch1b and bmp4, are changed. The knockdown of tbx5 rescues the ectopic expression of has2, and knockdown of either tbx5a or has2 alleviates the heart defects. We show that Kctd10 directly binds to Tbx5 to repress its transcriptional activity. Our results reveal a new essential factor for cardiac development and suggest that KCTD10 could be considered as a new causative gene of congenital heart disease.

  7. Subacute Microcystin-LR Exposure Alters the Metabolism of Thyroid Hormones in Juvenile Zebrafish (Danio Rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zidong; Tang, Rong; Li, Dapeng; Hu, Qing; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) has been detected extensively in the aquatic environment and has the potential to disturb the thyroid endocrine system. However, limited information is available on the effects of subacute MC-LR exposure on fish thyroid hormone (TH) metabolism. In the present study, juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to MC-LR at environmentally relevant concentrations (0, 1, 5, and 25 μg/L) for 28 days. Whole-body TH content and thyroid follicle histology were used as direct endpoints to assess thyroid disruption. The activities of iodothyronine deiodinases (IDs) and the transcription of selected genes associated with TH synthesis were also investigated to study the underlying mechanisms of endocrine disruption. Exposure of zebrafish to MC-LR significantly increased whole-body thyroxine (T4) content but decreased whole-body triiodothyronine (T3) content. We also observed hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the thyroid follicle epithelial cells, as well as up-regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and transthyretin (TTR) genes. The decreases in ID1 and ID2 activities coupled with an increase in ID3 activity were observed in MC-LR treatment groups. These results demonstrate that exposure to MC-LR at environmental concentrations results in the disturbance of TH homeostasis by disrupting the synthesis and conversion of THs. PMID:25647779

  8. Adult neural stem cell behavior underlying constitutive and restorative neurogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Joana S; Ninkovic, Jovica

    2016-01-01

    Adult Neural Stem Cells (aNSCs) generate new neurons that integrate into the pre-existing networks in specific locations of the Vertebrate brain. Moreover, aNSCs contribute with new neurons to brain regeneration in some non-mammalian Vertebrates. The similarities and the differences in the cellular and molecular processes governing neurogenesis in the intact and regenerating brain are still to be assessed. Toward this end, we recently established a protocol for non-invasive imaging of aNSC behavior in their niche in vivo in the adult intact and regenerating zebrafish telencephalon. We observed different modes of aNSC division in the intact brain and a novel mode of neurogenesis by direct conversion, which contributes to stem cell depletion with age. After injury, the generation of neurons is increased both by the activation of additional aNSCs and a shift in the division mode of aNSCs, thereby contributing to the successful neuronal regeneration. The cellular behavior we observed opens new questions regarding long-term aNSC maintenance in homeostasis and in regeneration. In this commentary we discuss our data and new questions arising in the context of aNSC behavior, not only in zebrafish but also in other species, including mammals. PMID:27606336

  9. N-cadherin is required for the polarized cell behaviors that drive neurulation in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hong, Elim; Brewster, Rachel

    2006-10-01

    Through the direct analysis of cell behaviors, we address the mechanisms underlying anterior neural tube morphogenesis in the zebrafish and the role of the cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin (N-cad) in this process. We demonstrate that although the mode of neurulation differs at the morphological level between amphibians and teleosts, the underlying cellular mechanisms are conserved. Contrary to previous reports, the zebrafish neural plate is a multi-layered structure, composed of deep and superficial cells that converge medially while undergoing radial intercalation, to form a single cell-layered neural tube. Time-lapse recording of individual cell behaviors reveals that cells are polarized along the mediolateral axis and exhibit protrusive activity. In N-cad mutants, both convergence and intercalation are blocked. Moreover, although N-cad-depleted cells are not defective in their ability to form protrusions, they are unable to maintain them stably. Taken together, these studies uncover key cellular mechanisms underlying neural tube morphogenesis in teleosts, and reveal a role for cadherins in promoting the polarized cell behaviors that underlie cellular rearrangements and shape the vertebrate embryo.

  10. Imaging tumour cell heterogeneity following cell transplantation into optically clear immune-deficient zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qin; Moore, John C.; Ignatius, Myron S.; Tenente, Inês M.; Hayes, Madeline N.; Garcia, Elaine G.; Torres Yordán, Nora; Bourque, Caitlin; He, Shuning; Blackburn, Jessica S.; Look, A. Thomas; Houvras, Yariv; Langenau, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancers contain a wide diversity of cell types that are defined by differentiation states, genetic mutations and altered epigenetic programmes that impart functional diversity to individual cells. Elevated tumour cell heterogeneity is linked with progression, therapy resistance and relapse. Yet, imaging of tumour cell heterogeneity and the hallmarks of cancer has been a technical and biological challenge. Here we develop optically clear immune-compromised rag2E450fs (casper) zebrafish for optimized cell transplantation and direct visualization of fluorescently labelled cancer cells at single-cell resolution. Tumour engraftment permits dynamic imaging of neovascularization, niche partitioning of tumour-propagating cells in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, emergence of clonal dominance in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and tumour evolution resulting in elevated growth and metastasis in BRAFV600E-driven melanoma. Cell transplantation approaches using optically clear immune-compromised zebrafish provide unique opportunities to uncover biology underlying cancer and to dynamically visualize cancer processes at single-cell resolution in vivo. PMID:26790525

  11. The zebrafish trilobite gene is essential for tangential migration of branchiomotor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Stephanie; Higashijima, Shin-ichi; Okamoto, Hitoshi; Chandrasekhar, Anand

    2009-01-01

    Newborn neurons migrate extensively in the radial and tangential directions to organize the developing vertebrate nervous system. We show here that mutations in zebrafish trilobite (tri) that affect gastrulation-associated cell movements also eliminate tangential migration of motor neurons in the hindbrain. In the wild-type hindbrain, facial (nVII) and glossopharyngeal (nIX) motor neurons are induced in rhombomeres 4 and 6, respectively, and migrate tangentially into r6 and r7 (nVII), and r7 (nIX). In all three tri alleles examined, although normal numbers of motor neurons are induced, nVII motor neurons are found exclusively in r4, and nIX-like motor neurons are found exclusively in r6. The migration of other neuronal and non-neuronal cell types is unaffected in tri mutants. Rhombomere formation and the development of other hindbrain neurons are also unaffected in tri mutants. Furthermore, tangential neuronal migration occurs normally in the gastrulation mutant knypek, indicating that the trilobite neuron phenotype does not arise non-specifically from aberrant gastrulation-associated movements. We conclude that trilobite function is specifically required for two types of cell migration that occur at different stages of zebrafish development. PMID:11820812

  12. Zebrafish Lbh-like Is Required for Otx2-mediated Photoreceptor Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Hua; Zhou, Li; Li, Zhi; Wang, Yang; Shi, Jian-Tao; Yang, Yan-Jing; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The homeobox transcription factor orthodenticle homolog 2 (otx2) is supposed as an organizer that orchestrates a transcription factor network during photoreceptor development. However, its regulation in the process remains unclear. In this study, we have identified a zebrafish limb bud and heart-like gene (lbh-like), which is expressed initially at 30 hours post fertilization (hpf) in the developing brain and eyes. Lbh-like knockdown by morpholinos specifically inhibits expression of multiple photoreceptor-specific genes, such as opsins, gnat1, gnat2 and irbp. Interestingly, otx2 expression in the morphants is not significantly reduced until 32 hpf when lbh-like begins to express, but its expression level in 72 hpf morphants is higher than that in wild type embryos. Co-injection of otx2 and its downstream target neuroD mRNAs can rescue the faults in eyes of Lbh-like morphants. Combined with the results of promoter-reporter assay, we suggest that lbh-like is a new regulator of photoreceptor differentiation directly through affecting otx2 expression in zebrafish. Furthermore, knockdown of lbh-like increases the activity of Notch pathway and perturbs the balance among proliferation, differentiation and survival of photoreceptor precursors. PMID:25999792

  13. Otolith tethering in the zebrafish otic vesicle requires Otogelin and α-Tectorin

    PubMed Central

    Stooke-Vaughan, Georgina A.; Obholzer, Nikolaus D.; Baxendale, Sarah; Megason, Sean G.; Whitfield, Tanya T.

    2015-01-01

    Otoliths are biomineralised structures important for balance and hearing in fish. Their counterparts in the mammalian inner ear, otoconia, have a primarily vestibular function. Otoliths and otoconia form over sensory maculae and are attached to the otolithic membrane, a gelatinous extracellular matrix that provides a physical coupling between the otolith and the underlying sensory epithelium. In this study, we have identified two proteins required for otolith tethering in the zebrafish ear, and propose that there are at least two stages to this process: seeding and maintenance. The initial seeding step, in which otolith precursor particles tether directly to the tips of hair cell kinocilia, fails to occur in the einstein (eis) mutant. The gene disrupted in eis is otogelin (otog); mutations in the human OTOG gene have recently been identified as causative for deafness and vestibular dysfunction (DFNB18B). At later larval stages, maintenance of otolith tethering to the saccular macula is dependent on tectorin alpha (tecta) function, which is disrupted in the rolling stones (rst) mutant. α-Tectorin (Tecta) is a major constituent of the tectorial membrane in the mammalian cochlea. Mutations in the human TECTA gene can cause either dominant (DFNA8/12) or recessive (DFNB21) forms of deafness. Our findings indicate that the composition of extracellular otic membranes is highly conserved between mammals and fish, reinforcing the view that the zebrafish is an excellent model system for the study of deafness and vestibular disease. PMID:25758224

  14. Generation and detection of plasmonic nanobubbles in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, E Y; Santiago, C; Wagner, D S; Hafner, J H; Lapotko, D O

    2010-01-01

    The zebrafish embryo has been evaluated as an in vivo model for plasmonic nanobubble (PNB) generation and detection at nanoscale. The embryo is easily observed and manipulated utilizing the same methodology as for application of PNBs in vitro. Injection and irradiation of gold nanoparticles with a short laser pulse resulted in generation of PNBs in zebrafish with similar parameters as for PNBs generated in water and cultured living cells. These PNBs do not result in systemic damage, thus we demonstrated an in vivo model for rapid and precise testing of plasmonic nanotechnologies. PMID:20453288

  15. Insights into kidney stem cell development and regeneration using zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Bridgette E; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-01-01

    Kidney disease is an escalating global health problem, for which the formulation of therapeutic approaches using stem cells has received increasing research attention. The complexity of kidney anatomy and function, which includes the diversity of renal cell types, poses formidable challenges in the identification of methods to generate replacement structures. Recent work using the zebrafish has revealed their high capacity to regenerate the integral working units of the kidney, known as nephrons, following acute injury. Here, we discuss these findings and explore the ways that zebrafish can be further utilized to gain a deeper molecular appreciation of renal stem cell biology, which may uncover important clues for regenerative medicine. PMID:26981168

  16. Systemic Fluorescence Imaging of Zebrafish Glycans with Bioorthogonal Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Paresh; Beahm, Brendan J.; Shieh, Peyton

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate glycans constitute a large, important, and dynamic set of post-translational modifications that are notoriously difficult to manipulate and image. Although the chemical reporter strategy has been used in conjunction with bioorthogonal chemistry to image the external glycosylation state of live zebrafish and detect tumor-associated glycans in mice, the ability to image glycans systemically within a live organism has remained elusive. Here, we report a method that combines the metabolic incorporation of a cyclooctyne-functionalized sialic acid derivative with a ligation reaction of a fluorogenic tetrazine, allowing for the imaging of sialylated glycoconjugates within live zebrafish embryos. PMID:26230529