Science.gov

Sample records for disability instrument llfdi

  1. Utility of the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument as an Outcome Measure in Patients Participating in Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the concurrent validity of the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and to evaluate the accuracy of information obtained through self-report questionnaire versus interview formats. Methods: The study included 29 patients older than 60 years attending an outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program. Participants completed the LLFDI, three additional self-report criterion measures, and six performance-based tests; they completed the LLFDI a second time via interview. We used descriptive statistics, correlations, and t-tests to analyze the data. Results: All LLFDI components were correlated (rs=0.36–0.83) with the self-report criterion measures. The Function Component of the LLFDI was moderately correlated with the 6-Minute Walk Test (r=0.62), timed up-and-go (r=−0.58), walking speed (r=−0.57), and timed sit-to-stand (r=−0.56) scores. The LLFDI demonstrated a ceiling effect (10%) only in the Disability Limitation component. All LLFDI component scores obtained via self-report questionnaire were correlated with scores obtained via interview; except in a single subcategory, there was no difference between LLFDI scores obtained through self-report questionnaire and those obtained through interview. Conclusions: Results indicate that the LLFDI has appropriate validity for older patients (>60 years) with CHD and can be completed independently by patients rather than administered by clinicians. PMID:23277685

  2. Psychometric properties of the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Marla K; Schmidt, Catherine T; Pedersen, Mette M; Bean, Jonathan F; Jette, Alan M

    2014-01-29

    The choice of measure for use as a primary outcome in geriatric research is contingent upon the construct of interest and evidence for its psychometric properties. The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) has been widely used to assess functional limitations and disability in studies with older adults. The primary aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the current available evidence for the psychometric properties of the LLFDI. Published studies of any design reporting results based on administration of the original version of the LLFDI in community-dwelling older adults were identified after searches of 9 electronic databases. Data related to construct validity (convergent/divergent and known-groups validity), test-retest reliability and sensitivity to change were extracted. Effect sizes were calculated for within-group changes and summarized graphically. Seventy-one studies including 17,301 older adults met inclusion criteria. Data supporting the convergent/divergent and known-groups validity for both the Function and Disability components were extracted from 30 and 18 studies, respectively. High test-retest reliability was found for the Function component, while results for the Disability component were more variable. Sensitivity to change of the LLFDI was confirmed based on findings from 25 studies. The basic lower extremity subscale and overall summary score of the Function component and limitation dimension of the Disability component were associated with the strongest relative effect sizes. There is extensive evidence to support the construct validity and sensitivity to change of the LLFDI among various clinical populations of community-dwelling older adults. Further work is needed on predictive validity and values for clinically important change. Findings from this review can be used to guide the selection of the most appropriate LLFDI subscale for use an outcome measure in geriatric research and practice.

  3. Psychometric properties of the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The choice of measure for use as a primary outcome in geriatric research is contingent upon the construct of interest and evidence for its psychometric properties. The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) has been widely used to assess functional limitations and disability in studies with older adults. The primary aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the current available evidence for the psychometric properties of the LLFDI. Methods Published studies of any design reporting results based on administration of the original version of the LLFDI in community-dwelling older adults were identified after searches of 9 electronic databases. Data related to construct validity (convergent/divergent and known-groups validity), test-retest reliability and sensitivity to change were extracted. Effect sizes were calculated for within-group changes and summarized graphically. Results Seventy-one studies including 17,301 older adults met inclusion criteria. Data supporting the convergent/divergent and known-groups validity for both the Function and Disability components were extracted from 30 and 18 studies, respectively. High test-retest reliability was found for the Function component, while results for the Disability component were more variable. Sensitivity to change of the LLFDI was confirmed based on findings from 25 studies. The basic lower extremity subscale and overall summary score of the Function component and limitation dimension of the Disability component were associated with the strongest relative effect sizes. Conclusions There is extensive evidence to support the construct validity and sensitivity to change of the LLFDI among various clinical populations of community-dwelling older adults. Further work is needed on predictive validity and values for clinically important change. Findings from this review can be used to guide the selection of the most appropriate LLFDI subscale for use an outcome measure in geriatric research and

  4. Use of the late-life function and disability instrument to assess disability in major depression.

    PubMed

    Karp, Jordan F; Skidmore, Elizabeth; Lotz, Meredith; Lenze, Eric; Dew, Mary Amanda; Reynolds, Charles F

    2009-09-01

    To determine whether there was greater disability in subjects with depression than in those without, the correlation between disability and depression severity and quality of life, and whether improvement in disability after antidepressant pharmacotherapy was greater in those who responded to antidepressant treatment. Disability in subjects with and without depression from two different studies was compared for 22 weeks. Correlations were performed for the subjects with depression between disability and depression, anxiety, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and medical comorbidity. T-tests were used to compare disability between subjects who did and did not respond to antidepressant treatment and change in disability after pharmacotherapy. Late-life depression research clinic. The 313 subjects were recruited from primary care and the community and were aged 60 and older; 244 subjects were participants in a depression treatment protocol, and 69 subjects without depression participated in a separate longitudinal observational study of the mental and cognitive health of depression-free older adults. The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument (LL-FDI), a measure of instrumental activity of daily living, personal role, and social role functioning. Subjects with depression scored lower than controls for domains measuring limitation (can do) and frequency (does do) of activities. Both disability domains correlated with depression severity, anxiety, HRQOL, and cognition. Disability improved with antidepressant treatment; for partial responders who continued to receive higher-dose antidepressant treatment out to 22 weeks, there was continued improvement, although not to the level of comparison subjects without depression. The LL-FDI appears to discriminate subjects with depression from those without, correlates with depression severity, and demonstrates sensitivity to antidepressant treatment response. We recommend further investigation of the LL-FDI and similar

  5. Longitudinal Invariance and Construct Validity of the Abbreviated Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Amanda N.; Mullen, Sean P.; White, Siobhan M.; Wojcicki, Thomas R.; Mailey, Emily L.; Gothe, Neha; Olson, Erin A.; Fanning, Jason; Kramer, Arthur F.; McAuley, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Objective To cross-validate the psychometric properties of the abbreviated Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument (LL-FDI), a measure of perceived functional limitations and disability. Design Baseline and 12-month follow-up assessments conducted across the course of a 12-month exercise program. Setting University research community. Participants Older healthy adults (N=179; mean ± SD age, 66.43±5.67y) at baseline; 145 were retained at follow-up. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures LL-FDI and functional performance measures. Results Factor analyses confirmed the factor structure of the abbreviated LL-FDI, and all subscales met minimal criteria for temporal invariance. Significant correlations also were found between functional limitations subscales and an array of physical function performance measures, supporting the scale’s construct validity. Conclusions The abbreviated LL-FDI with some modifications appears to be temporally invariant in community-dwelling older adults. Additionally, moderate relationships between functional limitations and functional performance provide further support for these being conceptually distinct constructs. PMID:21458777

  6. Adaptive Instruments for Students with Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2012-01-01

    The main adaptations that will be made for music students with physical disabilities are those that make the classroom accessible and those that make classroom instruments accessible. There are a number of principles to guide one when selecting instruments for students with physical disabilities. These principles can assist one in determining the…

  7. How Should Disability Be Measured in Older Adults? An Analysis from the Boston Rehabilitative Impairment Study of the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Marla K.; Bean, Jonathan F.; Ward, Rachel E.; Kurlinski, Laura A.; Latham, Nancy K.; Jette, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) assesses two key dimensions of disability: frequency of and limitations in performance of major life tasks. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the predictive validity and responsiveness of the LLFDI frequency and limitation dimensions. Design Secondary analysis of 2-year follow-up data from the Boston Rehabilitative Impairment Study of the Elderly (RISE). Setting Primary care. Participants Community-dwelling older adults (age ≥ 65 years) (n=430) at risk for mobility decline. Measurements The LLFDI frequency and limitation dimensions, self-rated health, hospitalizations and emergency room (ER) visits over 2 years. Responsiveness measures included effect size (ES) estimates and minimal detectable change (MDC) scores. Results The LLFDI frequency dimension predicted low self-rated health (OR =0.51, P <.001), hospitalizations (OR =0.68, P <.001), and ER visits (OR =0.73, P =0.003) over 2 years while the limitation dimension did not. The absolute ES was 0.63 for the frequency dimension and 0.81 for the limitation dimension. The proportion of subjects with a decline ≥ the MDC was 10.6% for the frequency dimension and 14.2% for the limitation dimension. For patients who improved ≥ the MDC, the proportion was 1.7% for the frequency dimension and 15.3% for the limitation dimension. Conclusion Frequency of participation in major life roles was a better predictor of adverse outcomes than perceived limitations; however, limitations appeared to be more responsive to meaningful change. These results can be used to guide the selection of the most appropriate metric for measuring disability in geriatric research. PMID:26032351

  8. Measurement of Environmental Constructs in Disability Assessment Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guscia, Roma; Ekberg, Stuart; Harries, Julia; Kirby, Neil

    2006-01-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) assumes a biopsychosocial basis for disability and provides a framework for understanding how environmental factors contribute to the experience of disability. To determine the utility of prevalent disability assessment instruments, the authors examined the extent to…

  9. Kids with disabilities inspire a musical instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, Dan; Pfeifer, Kent

    2013-11-21

    The Midiwing is a musical instrument that unites music and computer technology for those who lack the experience, physical ability, or maturity to play music with traditional instruments. To create the instrument, Dan Daily, Director of Musicode Innovations, reworked and recoded Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) technology and introduced ergonomic design. He applied to the New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) Program to receive help when he discovered the microcontroller he used was being phased out. Daily and Kent Pfeifer, an engineer at Sandia National Laboratories and musician himself, partnered to create a new state-of-the-art design.

  10. Kids with disabilities inspire a musical instrument

    ScienceCinema

    Daily, Dan; Pfeifer, Kent

    2016-07-12

    The Midiwing is a musical instrument that unites music and computer technology for those who lack the experience, physical ability, or maturity to play music with traditional instruments. To create the instrument, Dan Daily, Director of Musicode Innovations, reworked and recoded Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) technology and introduced ergonomic design. He applied to the New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) Program to receive help when he discovered the microcontroller he used was being phased out. Daily and Kent Pfeifer, an engineer at Sandia National Laboratories and musician himself, partnered to create a new state-of-the-art design.

  11. Higher Education and Students with Orthopedic Disabilities: A Survey Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Delar K.

    A survey instrument is presented that was used in a national survey of 160 colleges and universities to explore facilities and services to students with orthopedic disabilities. The survey contains 33 items that focus on the following areas: structural accessibility, academic accessibility, dorm-living, and recreational opportunities. The total…

  12. Disability attitudes in health care: a new scale instrument.

    PubMed

    Chadd, Edmund H; Pangilinan, Percival H

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop and validate an instrument measuring attitudes toward providing health care to patients with disability, to compare the attitudes of preclinical and clinical medical students, and to examine whether sex, a background in disability, or career interest in physical medicine and rehabilitation affect medical student attitudes toward working with patients with disability. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in an academic medical center with participants that included preclinical (n = 63) and clinical medical (n = 58) students, physical medicine and rehabilitation residents (n = 18), and internal medicine residents (n = 10). A 17-item Disability Attitudes in Health Care scale was developed based on existing, validated geriatrics attitudes scales. Attitudes Toward Disabled Persons Form O scale was used for correlation testing. Background demographic data collected from medical student respondents included sex, previous personal or work experience with disability, and career interest in physical medicine and rehabilitation. The new scale demonstrated high reliability (Cronbach α = 0.74) and criterion validity (correlation coefficient = 0.54 with the Attitude Towards Disabled Persons scale). Attitudes were no different between preclinical and clinical medical students. Male medical students had more negative attitudes than female students did (P = 0.03). Students with a higher level of career interest in physical medicine and rehabilitation scored higher than less interested students did (P = 0.015). The new Disability Attitudes in Health Care scale developed in this study shows good internal consistency and criterion validity. Attitudes toward caring for patients with disability seem to be unrelated to the standard medical education curriculum or previous experience with disability. Specific educational experiences may be designed to engender more positive attitudes toward providing health care to this patient population.

  13. Development of an Instrument to Measure Medical Students' Attitudes toward People with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symons, Andrew B.; Fish, Reva; McGuigan, Denise; Fox, Jeffery; Akl, Elie A.

    2012-01-01

    As curricula to improve medical students' attitudes toward people with disabilities are developed, instruments are needed to guide the process and evaluate effectiveness. The authors developed an instrument to measure medical students' attitudes toward people with disabilities. A pilot instrument with 30 items in four sections was administered to…

  14. Instruments for the detection of depressive symptoms in people with intellectual disabilities: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Perez-Achiaga, N; Nelson, S; Hassiotis, A

    2009-03-01

    Affective disorders, particularly depression, are common in adults with intellectual disabilities. However the detection of these disorders is hindered by the varied presentation of depressive symptoms across the range of intellectual disability. We undertook a systematic review of the available English-language diagnostic instruments for depressive disorders for adults with all levels of intellectual disability. We appraised the studies based on the instruments' psychometric properties, sensitivity and specificity. We included 21 of 28 identified studies which contained original data on validity and reliability; the ;gold standard' ranged from clinical opinion to other established instruments, some of which had limited validation in people with intellectual disability. In view of the benefits of psychological treatments for common mental disorders, it is important to develop instruments to be used in monitoring cognitive as well as behavioural outcomes for people with intellectual disability and depressive disorders.

  15. Characteristics of Instruments Screening for Depression in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermans, Heidi; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain information on feasibility, reliability and validity of available instruments screening for depression applied in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Therefore, literature was systematically reviewed. For self-report, the Glasgow Depression scale for people with a Learning Disability appears most…

  16. Instruments Assessing Anxiety in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermans, Heidi; van der Pas, Femke H.; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In the last decades several instruments measuring anxiety in adults with intellectual disabilities have been developed. Aim: To give an overview of the characteristics and psychometric properties of self-report and informant-report instruments measuring anxiety in this group. Method: Systematic review of the literature. Results:…

  17. Instruments Assessing Anxiety in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermans, Heidi; van der Pas, Femke H.; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In the last decades several instruments measuring anxiety in adults with intellectual disabilities have been developed. Aim: To give an overview of the characteristics and psychometric properties of self-report and informant-report instruments measuring anxiety in this group. Method: Systematic review of the literature. Results:…

  18. Disability in instrumental activities of daily living among older adults: gender differences

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Tiago da Silva; Corona, Ligiana Pires; Nunes, Daniella Pires; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira; Duarte, Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze gender differences in the incidence and determinants of disability regarding instrumental activities of daily living among older adults. METHODS The data were extracted from the Saúde, Bem-Estar e Envelhecimento (SABE – Health, Wellbeing and Ageing) study. In 2000, 1,034 older adults without difficulty in regarding instrumental activities of daily living were selected. The following characteristics were evaluated at the baseline: sociodemographic and behavioral variables, health status, falls, fractures, hospitalizations, depressive symptoms, cognition, strength, mobility, balance and perception of vision and hearing. Instrumental activities of daily living such as shopping and managing own money and medication, using transportation and using the telephone were reassessed in 2006, with incident cases of disability considered as the outcome. RESULTS The incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living was 44.7/1,000 person/years for women and 25.2/1,000 person/years for men. The incidence rate ratio between women and men was 1.77 (95%CI 1.75;1.80). After controlling for socioeconomic status and clinical conditions, the incidence rate ratio was 1.81 (95%CI 1.77;1.84), demonstrating that women with chronic disease and greater social vulnerability have a greater incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living. The following were determinants of the incidence of disability: age ≥ 80 and worse perception of hearing in both genders; stroke in men; and being aged 70 to 79 in women. Better cognitive performance was a protective factor in both genders and better balance was a protective factor in women. CONCLUSIONS The higher incidence density of disability in older women remained even after controlling for adverse social and clinical conditions. In addition to age, poorer cognitive performance and conditions that adversely affect communication disable both genders. Acute events, such as a stroke

  19. Disability in instrumental activities of daily living among older adults: gender differences.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Tiago da Silva; Corona, Ligiana Pires; Nunes, Daniella Pires; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira; Duarte, Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze gender differences in the incidence and determinants of disability regarding instrumental activities of daily living among older adults. METHODS The data were extracted from the Saúde, Bem-Estar e Envelhecimento (SABE - Health, Wellbeing and Ageing) study. In 2000, 1,034 older adults without difficulty in regarding instrumental activities of daily living were selected. The following characteristics were evaluated at the baseline: sociodemographic and behavioral variables, health status, falls, fractures, hospitalizations, depressive symptoms, cognition, strength, mobility, balance and perception of vision and hearing. Instrumental activities of daily living such as shopping and managing own money and medication, using transportation and using the telephone were reassessed in 2006, with incident cases of disability considered as the outcome. RESULTS The incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living was 44.7/1,000 person/years for women and 25.2/1,000 person/years for men. The incidence rate ratio between women and men was 1.77 (95%CI 1.75;1.80). After controlling for socioeconomic status and clinical conditions, the incidence rate ratio was 1.81 (95%CI 1.77;1.84), demonstrating that women with chronic disease and greater social vulnerability have a greater incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living. The following were determinants of the incidence of disability: age ≥ 80 and worse perception of hearing in both genders; stroke in men; and being aged 70 to 79 in women. Better cognitive performance was a protective factor in both genders and better balance was a protective factor in women. CONCLUSIONS The higher incidence density of disability in older women remained even after controlling for adverse social and clinical conditions. In addition to age, poorer cognitive performance and conditions that adversely affect communication disable both genders. Acute events, such as a stroke

  20. Measuring activity and participation in children and adolescents with disabilities: a literature review of available instruments.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Rebecca L; Olds, Tim; Boshoff, Kobie; Lane, Alison E

    2013-08-01

    This article aims to (1) identify instruments available to measure activity and participation in children with disabilities; (2) describe the reliability and validity of these instruments; and (3) consider whether the available instruments capture the extent of involvement, as well as the difficulty and satisfaction/enjoyment associated with performance in all life areas. A literature review was completed by undertaking an electronic search to identify instruments that measure activity and participation in children with disabilities. A further electronic search was conducted to obtain an adequate description of the instruments, including psychometric properties. The search identified 20 instruments purporting to measure activity and participation, however, no single instrument measured extent of involvement, difficulty and satisfaction/enjoyment in all life areas. There were instances in which each of these aspects was captured, but not within the one instrument. Instruments assessed combinations of frequency, difficulty, assistance, environment and satisfaction across varying contexts, for example, school, domestic life, recreational tasks, leisure tasks or all life areas. Although a large number of instruments exist to measure varying aspects of activity and participation, there is currently no single instrument available to measure the extent of involvement, difficulty and satisfaction/enjoyment in all life areas. This finding indicates that there is the opportunity to develop a single instrument to measure activity and participation across all life areas. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  1. Adult Learning Disabilities Screening Using an Internet-Administered Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Sean; Mellard, Daryl

    2005-01-01

    Identifying individuals with specific learning disabilities (SLD) is a complex task, particularly for adult populations. Adult agencies such as vocational rehabilitative services or adult basic education often use different SLD definitions and criteria, are often understaffed, have limited resources, and have a shortage of staff trained on SLD…

  2. [Disabled person's satisfaction with health and social care--an internationally developed instrument].

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Lajos; Paulik, Edit

    2011-02-01

    Quality of health and social care is being assessed by largely different methods. Obtaining comparable and valuable data is difficult. Thus, internationally developed instruments have special value. A set of instruments has been developed simultaneously using World Health Organization's instrument development method. One of these is the instrument "Quality of Care and Support for People with Disabilities". Response scales contain five options for physically and three for intellectually disabled persons. Psychometric analysis of the Hungarian instrument version was based on interviews with 151 physically and 166 intellectually disabled persons. Answering rate was high, above 95% with the exception of one item. Internal consistency of the two instrument versions by Cronbach's alpha is 0.845 and 0.745 respectively. Lowest satisfaction was found in the domain "information" in both groups that correlates significantly with health conditions at p < 0.01 and p < 0.05 level respectively. The field trial confirms validity and reliability of the instrument. Its wider use may help the evaluation of satisfaction concerning different components of quality of care, consequently better tailoring of services to needs.

  3. Translation, cultural adaptation and validation for Brazilian Portuguese of the Cardiff Acne Disability Index instrument*

    PubMed Central

    Grando, Luciana Rosa; Horn, Roberta; Cunha, Vivian Trein; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Cardiff Acne Disability Index was originally developed in English for measuring quality of life of acne patients. Considering the psychosocial impact of this disease, it is important to have instruments culturally and linguistically validated for use in Brazilian adolescents. OBJECTIVE To translate the Cardiff Acne Disability Index into Brazilian Portuguese, culturally adapt it, and verify its reliability and validity in adolescent patients with acne. METHODS In the first step, the Cardiff Acne Disability Index was translated and validated linguistically to Brazilian Portuguese in accordance with international guidelines published. In the second step, the validation of the Cardiff Acne Disability Index into Brazilian Portuguese instrument was performed, when patients aged from 12 to 20 years with acne were selected. The participants were interviewed to collect demographic data, submitted to the classification of acne by the Global Acne Grading System and invited to respond the Cardiff Acne Disability Index into Brazilian Portuguese version and DLQI (>16 years) or CDLQI (≤16 years). The internal consistency of Cardiff Acne Disability Index into Brazilian Portuguese was assessed by Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and concurrent validity was measured by the Spearman correlation coefficient and Student ‘s t-test for paired samples. RESULTS The study included 100 adolescents. The Cardiff Acne Disability Index into Brazilian Portuguese version showed good reliability and internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.73). The concurrent validity of the scale was supported by a strong and significant correlation with CDLQI / DLQI instruments (rs=0.802;p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Cardiff Acne Disability Index into Brazilian Portuguese version is a reliable, valid and valuable tool to measure the impact of acne on quality of life in adolescent patients. PMID:27192517

  4. Translation, cultural adaptation and validation for Brazilian Portuguese of the Cardiff Acne Disability Index instrument.

    PubMed

    Grando, Luciana Rosa; Horn, Roberta; Cunha, Vivian Trein; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2016-04-01

    The Cardiff Acne Disability Index was originally developed in English for measuring quality of life of acne patients. Considering the psychosocial impact of this disease, it is important to have instruments culturally and linguistically validated for use in Brazilian adolescents. To translate the Cardiff Acne Disability Index into Brazilian Portuguese, culturally adapt it, and verify its reliability and validity in adolescent patients with acne. In the first step, the Cardiff Acne Disability Index was translated and validated linguistically to Brazilian Portuguese in accordance with international guidelines published. In the second step, the validation of the Cardiff Acne Disability Index into Brazilian Portuguese instrument was performed, when patients aged from 12 to 20 years with acne were selected. The participants were interviewed to collect demographic data, submitted to the classification of acne by the Global Acne Grading System and invited to respond the Cardiff Acne Disability Index into Brazilian Portuguese version and DLQI (>16 years) or CDLQI (≤16 years). The internal consistency of Cardiff Acne Disability Index into Brazilian Portuguese was assessed by Cronbach's alpha coefficient and concurrent validity was measured by the Spearman correlation coefficient and Student 's t-test for paired samples. The study included 100 adolescents. The Cardiff Acne Disability Index into Brazilian Portuguese version showed good reliability and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.73). The concurrent validity of the scale was supported by a strong and significant correlation with CDLQI / DLQI instruments (rs=0.802;p<0.001). Cardiff Acne Disability Index into Brazilian Portuguese version is a reliable, valid and valuable tool to measure the impact of acne on quality of life in adolescent patients.

  5. Instruments used to assess functional limitations in workers applying for disability benefit: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Spanjer, Jerry; Groothoff, Johan W; Brouwer, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    To systematically review the quality of the psychometric properties of instruments for assessing functional limitations in workers applying for disability benefit. Electronic searches of Medline, Embase, CINAHL and PsycINFO were performed to identify studies focusing on the psychometric properties of instruments used to assess functional limitations in workers' compensation claimants. Two independent reviewers applied the inclusion criteria to select relevant articles and then evaluated the psychometric qualities of the instruments found. Of the 712 articles that were identified, 10 studies met the inclusion criteria, reporting on four instruments: the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), the Isernhagen Work System (IWS) and the Multiperspective Multidimensional Pain Assessment Protocol (MMPAP). The questionnaires (RMDQ and PSFS) did not focus specifically on the work situation and measured three to eight functional limitations. The psychometric qualities of the IWS were poor to moderate. For the MMPAP, only predictive validity was measured. The instruments assessed a range varying between 3 and 34 physical functional limitations. No instruments were found for assessing mental limitations in workers' compensation claimants. Studies on four instruments specifically focusing on assessing physical functional limitations in workers applying for disability benefit were found. All four instruments have limitations regarding their psychometric qualities or contents. Since the RMDQ has the best demonstrated psychometric qualities and takes little time to complete it, we recommend the RMDQ for clinicians in rehabilitation. For the assessment of functional limitations in workers applying for disability benefit a combination of questionnaires, performance tests or interviews together with the judgment by physicians looks the most promising.

  6. INTERPRETING PHYSICAL AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SCORES FROM NEW WORK DISABILITY INSTRUMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Marfeo, Elizabeth E.; Ni, Pengsheng; Chan, Leighton; Rasch, Elizabeth K.; McDonough, Christine M.; Brandt, Diane E.; Bogusz, Kara; Jette, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a system to guide interpretation of scores generated from 2 new instruments measuring work-related physical and behavioral health functioning (Work Disability – Physical Function (WD-PF) and WD – Behavioral Function (WD-BH)). Design Cross-sectional, secondary data from 3 independent samples to develop and validate the functional levels for physical and behavioral health functioning. Subjects Physical group: 999 general adult subjects, 1,017 disability applicants and 497 work-disabled subjects. Behavioral health group: 1,000 general adult subjects, 1,015 disability applicants and 476 work-disabled subjects. Methods Three-phase analytic approach including item mapping, a modified-Delphi technique, and known-groups validation analysis were used to develop and validate cut-points for functional levels within each of the WD-PF and WD-BH instrument’s scales. Results Four and 5 functional levels were developed for each of the scales in the WD-PF and WD-BH instruments. Distribution of the comparative samples was in the expected direction: the general adult samples consistently demonstrated scores at higher functional levels compared with the claimant and work-disabled samples. Conclusion Using an item-response theory-based methodology paired with a qualitative process appears to be a feasible and valid approach for translating the WD-BH and WD-PF scores into meaningful levels useful for interpreting a person’s work-related physical and behavioral health functioning. PMID:25729901

  7. Lived Experiences of Secondary Instrumental Music Teachers Who Teach Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinciguerra, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Very little research is published on teaching music to students with learning disabilities. Nevertheless, federal law mandates that instruction of such students take place in all public schools. The purpose of this study was to investigate the lived experiences of four secondary instrumental music teachers who teach five students with learning…

  8. Lived Experiences of Secondary Instrumental Music Teachers Who Teach Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinciguerra, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Very little research is published on teaching music to students with learning disabilities. Nevertheless, federal law mandates that instruction of such students take place in all public schools. The purpose of this study was to investigate the lived experiences of four secondary instrumental music teachers who teach five students with learning…

  9. Creating a Computer Adaptive Test Version of the Late-Life Function & Disability Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Jette, Alan M.; Haley, Stephen M.; Ni, Pengsheng; Olarsch, Sippy; Moed, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Background This study applied Item Response Theory (IRT) and Computer Adaptive Test (CAT) methodologies to develop a prototype function and disability assessment instrument for use in aging research. Herein, we report on the development of the CAT version of the Late-Life Function & Disability instrument (Late-Life FDI) and evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods We employed confirmatory factor analysis, IRT methods, validation, and computer simulation analyses of data collected from 671 older adults residing in residential care facilities. We compared accuracy, precision, and sensitivity to change of scores from CAT versions of two Late-Life FDI scales with scores from the fixed-form instrument. Score estimates from the prototype CAT versus the original instrument were compared in a sample of 40 older adults. Results Distinct function and disability domains were identified within the Late-Life FDI item bank and used to construct two prototype CAT scales. Using retrospective data, scores from computer simulations of the prototype CAT scales were highly correlated with scores from the original instrument. The results of computer simulation, accuracy, precision, and sensitivity to change of the CATs closely approximated those of the fixed-form scales, especially for the 10- or 15-item CAT versions. In the prospective study each CAT was administered in less than 3 minutes and CAT scores were highly correlated with scores generated from the original instrument. Conclusions CAT scores of the Late-Life FDI were highly comparable to those obtained from the full-length instrument with a small loss in accuracy, precision, and sensitivity to change. PMID:19038841

  10. Development of the computer-adaptive version of the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Christine M; Tian, Feng; Ni, Pengsheng; Kopits, Ilona M; Moed, Richard; Pardasaney, Poonam K; Jette, Alan M

    2012-12-01

    Having psychometrically strong disability measures that minimize response burden is important in assessing of older adults. Using the original 48 items from the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument and newly developed items, a 158-item Activity Limitation and a 62-item Participation Restriction item pool were developed. The item pools were administered to a convenience sample of 520 community-dwelling adults 60 years or older. Confirmatory factor analysis and item response theory were employed to identify content structure, calibrate items, and build the computer-adaptive testings (CATs). We evaluated real-data simulations of 10-item CAT subscales. We collected data from 102 older adults to validate the 10-item CATs against the Veteran's Short Form-36 and assessed test-retest reliability in a subsample of 57 subjects. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a bifactor structure, and multi-dimensional item response theory was used to calibrate an overall Activity Limitation Scale (141 items) and an overall Participation Restriction Scale (55 items). Fit statistics were acceptable (Activity Limitation: comparative fit index = 0.95, Tucker Lewis Index = 0.95, root mean square error approximation = 0.03; Participation Restriction: comparative fit index = 0.95, Tucker Lewis Index = 0.95, root mean square error approximation = 0.05). Correlation of 10-item CATs with full item banks were substantial (Activity Limitation: r = .90; Participation Restriction: r = .95). Test-retest reliability estimates were high (Activity Limitation: r = .85; Participation Restriction r = .80). Strength and pattern of correlations with Veteran's Short Form-36 subscales were as hypothesized. Each CAT, on average, took 3.56 minutes to administer. The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument CATs demonstrated strong reliability, validity, accuracy, and precision. The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument CAT can achieve psychometrically sound disability assessment in older

  11. Instruments assessing anxiety in adults with intellectual disabilities: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Heidi; van der Pas, Femke H; Evenhuis, Heleen M

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades several instruments measuring anxiety in adults with intellectual disabilities have been developed. To give an overview of the characteristics and psychometric properties of self-report and informant-report instruments measuring anxiety in this group. Systematic review of the literature. Seventeen studies studying 14 different instruments were found. Methodological quality as measured with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies checklist was insufficient for four studies, sufficient for seven, and good for six. For self-report, the Glasgow Anxiety Scale for people with a learning disability appears most promising, with good internal consistency (a = 0.96), high test-retest reliability (r = 0.95), sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%). For informant-report, the general anxiety subscale of the Anxiety, Depression and Mood Scale may be promising, with good internal consistency (a = 0.83 and a = 0.84) and excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.78 and ICC = 0.92), but poor interrater reliability (ICC = 0.39). Two instruments appear promising. However, these instruments have only been studied once or twice, whereas the methodological quality of these studies was varying. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Linking Frailty Instruments to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi, Roberta Vella; Vermeiren, Sofie; Gorus, Ellen; Habbig, Ann-Katrin; Petrovic, Mirko; Van Den Noortgate, Nele; De Vriendt, Patricia; Bautmans, Ivan; Beyer, Ingo

    2016-11-01

    To date, the major dilemma concerning frailty is the lack of a standardized language regarding its operationalization. Considering the demographic challenge that the world is facing, standardization of frailty identification is indeed the first step in tackling the burdensome consequences of frailty. To demonstrate this diversity in frailty assessment, the available frailty instruments have been linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF): a standardized and hierarchically coded language developed by World Health Organization regarding health conditions and their positive (functioning) and negative (disability) consequences. A systematic review on frailty instruments was carried out in PubMed, Web of Knowledge, and PsycINFO. The items of the identified frailty instruments were then linked to the ICF codes. 79 original or adapted frailty instruments were identified and categorized into single (n = 25) and multidomain (n = 54) groups. Only 5 frailty instruments (indexes) were linked to all 5 ICF components. Whereas the ICF components Body Functions and Activities and Participation were frequently linked to the frailty instruments, Body Structures, Environmental and Personal factors were sparingly represented mainly in the multidomain frailty instruments. This review highlights the heterogeneity in frailty operationalization. Environmental and personal factors should be given more thought in future frailty assessments. Being unambiguous, structured, and neutral, the ICF language allows comparing observations made with different frailty instruments. In conclusion, this systematic overview and ICF translation can be a cornerstone for future standardization of frailty assessment. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Characteristics of instruments screening for depression in adults with intellectual disabilities: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Heidi; Evenhuis, Heleen M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain information on feasibility, reliability and validity of available instruments screening for depression applied in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Therefore, literature was systematically reviewed. For self-report, the Glasgow Depression scale for people with a Learning Disability appears most promising (internal consistency α=0.90, test-retest reliability r=0.97, sensitivity 96% and specificity 90%). For informant-report three instruments seem promising: the Assessment of Dual Diagnosis (internal consistency α=0.77 and α=0.91, test-retest reliability r=0.94, interrater reliability r=0.98), the Reiss Screen for Maladaptive Behaviour (internal consistency α=0.58-0.83, interrater reliability r=0.61-0.84, sensitivity 80%, specificity 83%), and the Children's Depression Inventory (internal consistency α=0.86, sensitivity 83%, specificity 93%). None of these three instruments have been studied satisfactorily in this group, yet. More research on psychometric properties, especially sensitivity and specificity in the ID population, is needed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a computer-adaptive physical function instrument for Social Security Administration disability determination.

    PubMed

    Ni, Pengsheng; McDonough, Christine M; Jette, Alan M; Bogusz, Kara; Marfeo, Elizabeth E; Rasch, Elizabeth K; Brandt, Diane E; Meterko, Mark; Haley, Stephen M; Chan, Leighton

    2013-09-01

    To develop and test an instrument to assess physical function for Social Security Administration (SSA) disability programs, the SSA-Physical Function (SSA-PF) instrument. Item response theory (IRT) analyses were used to (1) create a calibrated item bank for each of the factors identified in prior factor analyses, (2) assess the fit of the items within each scale, (3) develop separate computer-adaptive testing (CAT) instruments for each scale, and (4) conduct initial psychometric testing. Cross-sectional data collection; IRT analyses; CAT simulation. Telephone and Internet survey. Two samples: SSA claimants (n=1017) and adults from the U.S. general population (n=999). None. Model fit statistics, correlation, and reliability coefficients. IRT analyses resulted in 5 unidimensional SSA-PF scales: Changing & Maintaining Body Position, Whole Body Mobility, Upper Body Function, Upper Extremity Fine Motor, and Wheelchair Mobility for a total of 102 items. High CAT accuracy was demonstrated by strong correlations between simulated CAT scores and those from the full item banks. On comparing the simulated CATs with the full item banks, very little loss of reliability or precision was noted, except at the lower and upper ranges of each scale. No difference in response patterns by age or sex was noted. The distributions of claimant scores were shifted to the lower end of each scale compared with those of a sample of U.S. adults. The SSA-PF instrument contributes important new methodology for measuring the physical function of adults applying to the SSA disability programs. Initial evaluation revealed that the SSA-PF instrument achieved considerable breadth of coverage in each content domain and demonstrated noteworthy psychometric properties. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of the Computer-Adaptive Version of the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Feng; Kopits, Ilona M.; Moed, Richard; Pardasaney, Poonam K.; Jette, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Having psychometrically strong disability measures that minimize response burden is important in assessing of older adults. Methods. Using the original 48 items from the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument and newly developed items, a 158-item Activity Limitation and a 62-item Participation Restriction item pool were developed. The item pools were administered to a convenience sample of 520 community-dwelling adults 60 years or older. Confirmatory factor analysis and item response theory were employed to identify content structure, calibrate items, and build the computer-adaptive testings (CATs). We evaluated real-data simulations of 10-item CAT subscales. We collected data from 102 older adults to validate the 10-item CATs against the Veteran’s Short Form-36 and assessed test–retest reliability in a subsample of 57 subjects. Results. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a bifactor structure, and multi-dimensional item response theory was used to calibrate an overall Activity Limitation Scale (141 items) and an overall Participation Restriction Scale (55 items). Fit statistics were acceptable (Activity Limitation: comparative fit index = 0.95, Tucker Lewis Index = 0.95, root mean square error approximation = 0.03; Participation Restriction: comparative fit index = 0.95, Tucker Lewis Index = 0.95, root mean square error approximation = 0.05). Correlation of 10-item CATs with full item banks were substantial (Activity Limitation: r = .90; Participation Restriction: r = .95). Test–retest reliability estimates were high (Activity Limitation: r = .85; Participation Restriction r = .80). Strength and pattern of correlations with Veteran’s Short Form-36 subscales were as hypothesized. Each CAT, on average, took 3.56 minutes to administer. Conclusions. The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument CATs demonstrated strong reliability, validity, accuracy, and precision. The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument CAT can achieve

  16. The Development of a Diagnostic Instrument to Measure Social Information Processing in Children with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, M.; Vriens, A.; Scheepmaker, M.; Smit, M.; Porton, E.

    2011-01-01

    A growing interest exists in the measuring of social adaptive functioning in children with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities (MBID), but valid instruments to measure this construct are lacking. The aim of the present study was to develop such an instrument and to examine it on its discriminate validity. In 141 children aged 8-12 years a…

  17. Evaluation of the late life disability instrument in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Pilot (LIFE-P) study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The late life disability instrument (LLDI) was developed to assess limitations in instrumental and management roles using a small and restricted sample. In this paper we examine the measurement properties of the LLDI using data from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Pilot (LIFE...

  18. Development of a Computer-Adaptive Physical Function Instrument for Social Security Administration Disability Determination

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Pengsheng; McDonough, Christine M.; Jette, Alan M.; Bogusz, Kara; Marfeo, Elizabeth E.; Rasch, Elizabeth K.; Brandt, Diane E.; Meterko, Mark; Chan, Leighton

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop and test an instrument to assess physical function (PF) for Social Security Administration (SSA) disability programs, the SSA-PF. Item Response Theory (IRT) analyses were used to 1) create a calibrated item bank for each of the factors identified in prior factor analyses, 2) assess the fit of the items within each scale, 3) develop separate Computer-Adaptive Test (CAT) instruments for each scale, and 4) conduct initial psychometric testing. Design Cross-sectional data collection; IRT analyses; CAT simulation. Setting Telephone and internet survey. Participants Two samples: 1,017 SSA claimants, and 999 adults from the US general population. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measure Model fit statistics, correlation and reliability coefficients, Results IRT analyses resulted in five unidimensional SSA-PF scales: Changing & Maintaining Body Position, Whole Body Mobility, Upper Body Function, Upper Extremity Fine Motor, and Wheelchair Mobility for a total of 102 items. High CAT accuracy was demonstrated by strong correlations between simulated CAT scores and those from the full item banks. Comparing the simulated CATs to the full item banks, very little loss of reliability or precision was noted, except at the lower and upper ranges of each scale. No difference in response patterns by age or sex was noted. The distributions of claimant scores were shifted to the lower end of each scale compared to those of a sample of US adults. Conclusions The SSA-PF instrument contributes important new methodology for measuring the physical function of adults applying to the SSA disability programs. Initial evaluation revealed that the SSA-PF instrument achieved considerable breadth of coverage in each content domain and demonstrated noteworthy psychometric properties. PMID:23578594

  19. Nutritional status and risk for disability in instrumental activities of daily living in older Brazilians.

    PubMed

    Corona, Ligiana Pires; Pereira de Brito, Tábatta Renata; Nunes, Daniella Pires; da Silva Alexandre, Tiago; Ferreira Santos, Jair Lício; de Oliveira Duarte, Yeda Aparecida; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the association between nutritional status and the incidence of disability regarding instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) among older adults. The study is part of the longitudinal SABE (Saúde, Bem-Estar e Envelhecimento; Health, Wellbeing and Ageing) Study that began in 2000 (first wave) with a multistage, clustered, probabilistic sample (n 2143) of older adults (≥60 years). The second wave was carried out in 2006, when 1115 elders were re-interviewed. The dependent variable was the occurrence of disability in 2006 (report of difficulty on ≥1 IADL). Nutritional status (measured at baseline) was classified on the basis of BMI: ≤23·0 kg/m2 (underweight); >23·0 and <28·0 kg/m2 (ideal range - reference); ≥28·0 and <30·0 kg/m2 (overweight); and ≥30·0 kg/m2 (obesity). São Paulo, Brazil. One thousand and thirty-four individuals without difficulties regarding IADL in 2000 were selected, 611 of whom were re-interviewed in 2006. In the multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for baseline variables (gender, age, number of chronic diseases, stroke, osteoarthritis and cognitive status), underweight (OR = 2·03; P = 0·034) and obesity (OR = 1·79; P = 0·022) remained associated with disability. Both underweight and obesity are associated with an increased risk of developing disability regarding IADL among older adults, in an independent fashion of other risk factors. Thus, adequate nutritional status is a key point to consider in the establishment of preventive measures.

  20. Psychometric characteristics of the Spanish version of instruments to measure neck pain disability

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Francisco M; Bagó, Joan; Royuela, Ana; Seco, Jesús; Giménez, Sergio; Muriel, Alfonso; Abraira, Víctor; Martín, José Luis; Peña, José Luis; Gestoso, Mario; Mufraggi, Nicole; Núñez, Montserrat; Corcoll, Josep; Gómez-Ochoa, Ignacio; Ramírez, Ma José; Calvo, Eva; Castillo, Ma Dolores; Martí, David; Fuster, Salvador; Fernández, Carmen; Gimeno, Nuria; Carballo, Alejandro; Milán, Álvaro; Vázquez, Dolores; Cañellas, Montserrat; Blanco, Ricardo; Brieva, Pilar; Rueda, Ma Trinidad; Álvarez, Luis; del Real, María Teresa Gil; Ayerbe, Joaquín; González, Luis; Ginel, Leovigildo; Ortega, Mariano; Bernal, Miryam; Bolado, Gonzalo; Vidal, Anna; Ausín, Ana; Ramón, Domingo; Mir, María Antonia; Tomás, Miquel; Zamora, Javier; Cano, Alejandra

    2008-01-01

    Background The NDI, COM and NPQ are evaluation instruments for disability due to NP. There was no Spanish version of NDI or COM for which psychometric characteristics were known. The objectives of this study were to translate and culturally adapt the Spanish version of the Neck Disability Index Questionnaire (NDI), and the Core Outcome Measure (COM), to validate its use in Spanish speaking patients with non-specific neck pain (NP), and to compare their psychometric characteristics with those of the Spanish version of the Northwick Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). Methods Translation/re-translation of the English versions of the NDI and the COM was done blindly and independently by a multidisciplinary team. The study was done in 9 primary care Centers and 12 specialty services from 9 regions in Spain, with 221 acute, subacute and chronic patients who visited their physician for NP: 54 in the pilot phase and 167 in the validation phase. Neck pain (VAS), referred pain (VAS), disability (NDI, COM and NPQ), catastrophizing (CSQ) and quality of life (SF-12) were measured on their first visit and 14 days later. Patients' self-assessment was used as the external criterion for pain and disability. In the pilot phase, patients' understanding of each item in the NDI and COM was assessed, and on day 1 test-retest reliability was estimated by giving a second NDI and COM in which the name of the questionnaires and the order of the items had been changed. Results Comprehensibility of NDI and COM were good. Minutes needed to fill out the questionnaires [median, (P25, P75)]: NDI. 4 (2.2, 10.0), COM: 2.1 (1.0, 4.9). Reliability: [ICC, (95%CI)]: NDI: 0.88 (0.80, 0.93). COM: 0.85 (0.75,0.91). Sensitivity to change: Effect size for patients having worsened, not changed and improved between days 1 and 15, according to the external criterion for disability: NDI: -0.24, 0.15, 0.66; NPQ: -0.14, 0.06, 0.67; COM: 0.05, 0.19, 0.92. Validity: Results of NDI, NPQ and COM were consistent with the

  1. Mobility disability in midlife: a longitudinal study of the role of anticipated instrumental support and social class.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, C J; Avlund, K; Lund, R

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of the evidence of a protective effect of social support on the functional ability of older people and social inequalities in mobility the present study aims to (1) study if onset of mobility disability in a middle-aged cohort is associated with social class and (2) study if anticipation of instrumental support has a protective effect on mobility at 6-year follow-up, and whether this effect is modified by social class. Data on 3549 40- and 50-year-old men and women were obtained from The Danish Longitudinal Study on Work, Unemployment and Health in 2000 and 2006. Ten percent of the study participants experienced onset of mobility disability at follow-up. Significantly more individuals in the lower social classes experienced onset of mobility disability and never anticipated instrumental support, compared to the higher social classes. In this middle-aged population the anticipation of instrumental support had no significant effect on mobility disability at 6-year follow-up. Social class did not modify the association between anticipated instrumental support and mobility, but was the most important confounder. Further research on the effect of social support on mobility in midlife is needed in order to identify individuals at risk of disability at an early stage.

  2. International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health in women with breast cancer: a proposal for measurement instruments.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Flávia Nascimento de; Koifman, Rosalina Jorge; Bergmann, Anke

    2013-06-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) aims at standardization, but its applicability requires consistent instruments. In Brazil, invasive therapeutic approaches are frequent, leading to functional alterations. The current study thus aimed to identify and discuss instruments capable of measuring ICF core set codes for breast cancer. The review included ICF studies in women with breast cancer diagnosis and studies with the objective of translating and validating instruments for the Brazilian population, and consistent with the codes. Review studies, systematic or not, were excluded. Eight instruments were selected, and the WHOQOL-Bref was the most comprehensive. The use of various instruments showed 19 coinciding codes, and the instruments as a whole covered 58 of the total of 81 codes. The use of multiple instruments is time-consuming, so new studies are needed to propose parsimonious tools capable of measuring functioning in women treated for breast cancer.

  3. Validated instruments used to measure attitudes of healthcare students and professionals towards patients with physical disability: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Instruments to detect changes in attitudes towards people with disabilities are important for evaluation of training programs and for research. While we were interested in instruments specific for medical students, we aimed to systematically review the medical literature for validated survey instruments used to measure attitudes of healthcare students and professionals towards patients with physical disability. Methods We electronically searched Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Health and Psychosocial Instruments. We included papers reporting on the development and/or validation of survey instruments to measure attitudes of healthcare students and professionals towards patients with physical disability. We excluded papers in which the attitudes were not measured in a provider-patient context. Two reviewers carried out titles and abstracts screening, full texts screening, and data abstraction in a duplicate and independent manner using standardized and pilot tested forms. Results We identified seven validated survey instruments used for healthcare students and professionals. These instruments were originally developed for the following target populations: general population (n = 4); dental students (n = 1); nursing students (n = 1); and rehabilitation professionals (n = 1). The types of validity reported for these instruments were content validity (n = 3), criterion-related validity (n = 1), construct validity (n = 2), face validity (n = 1), discriminant validity (n = 1), and responsiveness (n = 1). The most widely validated and used tool (ATDP) was developed in the late 1960s while the most recent instrument was developed in the early 1990s. Conclusion Of the seven identified validated instruments, less than half were specifically designed for healthcare students and professionals and none for medical students. There is a need to develop and validate a contemporary instrument specifically for medical students. PMID:21062438

  4. A Brief Screening Instrument for Emotionally Unstable and Dissocial Personality Disorder in Male Offenders with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, John L.; Novaco, Raymond W.

    2013-01-01

    Personality disorder is prevalent among offenders with intellectual disabilities (ID), and it is associated with their risk for violence and recurrent offending behaviour. A new staff-rated instrument, the Personality Disorder Characteristics Checklist (PDCC), designed to screen for ICD-10 dissocial and emotionally unstable personality…

  5. A Brief Screening Instrument for Emotionally Unstable and Dissocial Personality Disorder in Male Offenders with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, John L.; Novaco, Raymond W.

    2013-01-01

    Personality disorder is prevalent among offenders with intellectual disabilities (ID), and it is associated with their risk for violence and recurrent offending behaviour. A new staff-rated instrument, the Personality Disorder Characteristics Checklist (PDCC), designed to screen for ICD-10 dissocial and emotionally unstable personality…

  6. Development of Knowledge Domains and an Instrument to Assess Probation Officers' Knowledge of Offenders with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Valerie E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to assess probation officers knowledge levels of offenders with intellectual disabilities by utilizing a synthesis of subject matter analysis technique and a comprehensive review of literature. This study was conducted in two phases. The first phase was devoted to establishing the knowledge…

  7. A Proposal: Modification for Instruments and Tools Used in the Science Laboratory Setting for Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Denis

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this action research proposal is to create a Modification of Instruments and Tools in Science (MITS) program to address the need for providing Students With Disabilities (SWDs) appropriate access to scientific tools and techniques of scientific inquiry. This proposal contains a review of literature on SWDs, differentiating…

  8. Responsiveness and minimal clinically important difference for pain and disability instruments in low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Lauridsen, Henrik H; Hartvigsen, Jan; Manniche, Claus; Korsholm, Lars; Grunnet-Nilsson, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Background The choice of an evaluative instrument has been hampered by the lack of head-to-head comparisons of responsiveness and the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in subpopulations of low back pain (LBP). The objective of this study was to concurrently compare responsiveness and MCID for commonly used pain scales and functional instruments in four subpopulations of LBP patients. Methods The Danish versions of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the 23-item Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ), the physical function and bodily pain subscales of the SF36, the Low Back Pain Rating Scale (LBPRS) and a numerical rating scale for pain (0–10) were completed by 191 patients from the primary and secondary sectors of the Danish health care system. Clinical change was estimated using a 7-point transition question and a numeric rating scale for importance. Responsiveness was operationalised using standardardised response mean (SRM), area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC), and cut-point analysis. Subpopulation analyses were carried out on primary and secondary sector patients with LBP only or leg pain +/- LBP. Results RMQ was the most responsive instrument in primary and secondary sector patients with LBP only (SRM = 0.5–1.4; ROC = 0.75–0.94) whereas ODI and RMQ showed almost similar responsiveness in primary and secondary sector patients with leg pain (ODI: SRM = 0.4–0.9; ROC = 0.76–0.89; RMQ: SRM = 0.3–0.9; ROC = 0.72–0.88). In improved patients, the RMQ was more responsive in primary and secondary sector patients and LBP only patients (SRM = 1.3–1.7) while the RMQ and ODI were equally responsive in leg pain patients (SRM = 1.3 and 1.2 respectively). All pain measures demonstrated almost equal responsiveness. The MCID increased with increasing baseline score in primary sector and LBP only patients but was only marginally affected by patient entry point and pain location. The MCID of the percentage change score

  9. [Competency to provide cross-cultural nursing care for people with disability: a self-assessment instrument].

    PubMed

    Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag; Maia, Evanira Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the Cross-Cultural Nursing Theory, which develops foundations for care delivery, as the essence of nursing work, based on anthropology, which supports and explains culture and care aspects. This reflexive study was based on the Theory Analysis method to study the concepts aimed at constructing a Self-Assessment Instrument of Competencies for Cross-Cultural Care to Disabled People. After analyzing the main concepts, Culturally Competent Care and Cultural Communication, were analyzed, as well as the sub-concepts: assessment, values, bio-cultural diversity, skill, knowledge, identity, code and cultural empathy. The analysis cycle of cultural values supporting self-assessment was summarized. The Self-Assessment Instrument of Competencies for Cross-Cultural Nursing Care to Disabled People was constructed, specifically deafness, blindness or low sight, physical impairment and mental impairment, regarding greeting, accepting, helping, knowing and advocating. It is concluded that the theory joins characteristics for care delivery to disabled people.

  10. GPs' opinions of health assessment instruments for people with intellectual disabilities: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Bakker-van Gijssel, Esther J; Olde Hartman, Tim C; Lucassen, Peter Lbj; van den Driessen Mareeuw, Francine; Dees, Marianne K; Assendelft, Willem Jj; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny Mj

    2017-01-01

    GPs provide health care to people with intellectual disabilities (ID). People with ID find it difficult to express themselves concerning health-related matters. Applying health assessments is an effective method to reveal health needs, and can play a role in prevention and health promotion. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore GPs' considerations about applying a health assessment for people with ID. This focus group study was conducted among a selection of Dutch GPs. An interview guide was developed. All discussions were audiorecorded and transcribed. Analysis was performed using the framework analysis approach. Two researchers independently applied open coding and identified a thematic framework. This framework and the summaries of views per theme were discussed in the research team. After four focus groups, with 23 GPs, saturation was reached. Three main themes evolved: health assessments in relation to GPs' responsibility; the usefulness and necessity of health assessments; and barriers to using health assessments on people with ID. A health assessment instrument for people with ID can help GPs to focus on certain issues that are not so common in the general population. GPs are motivated to use such a tool if it is scientifically tested, and results in significant health gains. However, GPs identify barriers at the level of GP, patient, and organisation. Most GPs in the focus groups consider providing medical care to people with ID their responsibility and indicate that a health assessment instrument could be a valuable tool. In order to deliver good care, they need education and support. Many barriers need to be overcome before a health assessment instrument can be implemented. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  11. Construct Validity of the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Ekta; Mistry, Jay; Dobhal, Megha; Borra, Sujana; Paxton, Raheem J.

    2016-01-01

    Limited data exist on the validity of the Late-Life Function and Disability (LLFD) instrument in cancer survivors. We examined the construct validity of the abbreviated LLFD instrument in a sample of African-American breast cancer survivors. African American breast cancer survivors (n = 181) aged 50 years and older completed the abbreviated LLFD instrument and questions about sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), Cronbach alphas, and structural models were used to evaluate the construct validity of these measures. Minor modifications were made to the three-factor functional component portion of the inventory to improve model fit. Cronbach alpha’s (range 0.85–0.92) and inter-factor correlations (r = 0.3–0.5, all p < 0.05) were appropriate. The two-factor disability component fit the data and Cronbach alpha’s (0.91 and 0.98) were appropriate with a high inter-factor correlation (r = 0.95, p < 0.01). The average variance extracted (range = 0.55–0.93) and composite reliabilities (range = 0.86–0.98) were in acceptable ranges. Floor effects ranged from 7% for advanced lower function to 74% for personal role disability. Education and number of comorbidities were correlated significantly with functional outcomes. The abbreviated LLFD instrument had adequate construct validity in this sample of African American breast cancer survivors. Further studies are needed that examine the stability of the instrument over time. PMID:27854321

  12. The development of instruments to measure the work disability assessment behaviour of insurance physicians

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Variation in assessments is a universal given, and work disability assessments by insurance physicians are no exception. Little is known about the considerations and views of insurance physicians that may partly explain such variation. On the basis of the Attitude - Social norm - self Efficacy (ASE) model, we have developed measurement instruments for assessment behaviour and its determinants. Methods Based on theory and interviews with insurance physicians the questionnaire included blocks of items concerning background variables, intentions, attitudes, social norms, self-efficacy, knowledge, barriers and behaviour of the insurance physicians in relation to work disability assessment issues. The responses of 231 insurance physicians were suitable for further analysis. Factor analysis and reliability analysis were used to form scale variables and homogeneity analysis was used to form dimension variables. Thus, we included 169 of the 177 original items. Results Factor analysis and reliability analysis yielded 29 scales with sufficient reliability. Homogeneity analysis yielded 19 dimensions. Scales and dimensions fitted with the concepts of the ASE model. We slightly modified the ASE model by dividing behaviour into two blocks: behaviour that reflects the assessment process and behaviour that reflects assessment behaviour. The picture that emerged from the descriptive results was of a group of physicians who were motivated in their job and positive about the Dutch social security system in general. However, only half of them had a positive opinion about the Dutch Work and Income (Capacity for Work) Act (WIA). They also reported serious barriers, the most common of which was work pressure. Finally, 73% of the insurance physicians described the majority of their cases as 'difficult'. Conclusions The scales and dimensions developed appear to be valid and offer a promising basis for future research. The results suggest that the underlying ASE model, in

  13. The development of instruments to measure the work disability assessment behaviour of insurance physicians.

    PubMed

    Steenbeek, Romy; Schellart, Antonius Jm; Mulders, Henny; Anema, Johannes R; Kroneman, Herman; Besseling, Jan

    2011-01-03

    Variation in assessments is a universal given, and work disability assessments by insurance physicians are no exception. Little is known about the considerations and views of insurance physicians that may partly explain such variation. On the basis of the Attitude--Social norm--self Efficacy (ASE) model, we have developed measurement instruments for assessment behaviour and its determinants. Based on theory and interviews with insurance physicians the questionnaire included blocks of items concerning background variables, intentions, attitudes, social norms, self-efficacy, knowledge, barriers and behaviour of the insurance physicians in relation to work disability assessment issues. The responses of 231 insurance physicians were suitable for further analysis. Factor analysis and reliability analysis were used to form scale variables and homogeneity analysis was used to form dimension variables. Thus, we included 169 of the 177 original items. Factor analysis and reliability analysis yielded 29 scales with sufficient reliability. Homogeneity analysis yielded 19 dimensions. Scales and dimensions fitted with the concepts of the ASE model. We slightly modified the ASE model by dividing behaviour into two blocks: behaviour that reflects the assessment process and behaviour that reflects assessment behaviour.The picture that emerged from the descriptive results was of a group of physicians who were motivated in their job and positive about the Dutch social security system in general. However, only half of them had a positive opinion about the Dutch Work and Income (Capacity for Work) Act (WIA). They also reported serious barriers, the most common of which was work pressure. Finally, 73% of the insurance physicians described the majority of their cases as 'difficult'. The scales and dimensions developed appear to be valid and offer a promising basis for future research. The results suggest that the underlying ASE model, in modified form, is suitable for describing the

  14. [Barcelona Test for Intellectual Disability: a new instrument for the neuropsychological assessment of adults with intellectual disability].

    PubMed

    Esteba-Castillo, S; Pena-Casanova, J; Garcia-Alba, J; Castellanos, M A; Torrents-Rodas, D; Rodriguez, E; Deus-Yela, J; Caixas, A; Novell-Alsina, R

    2017-05-16

    Neuropsychological assessment in individuals with intellectual disability is of utmost importance in order to determine the cognitive deficits underlying brain dysfunction and limiting intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior. However, no neuropsychological batteries in Spanish language have been created and validated for this population. To adapt the 'programa integrado de exploracion neuropsicologica-test Barcelona' and to validate the new version, the Barcelona Test for Intellectual Disability (TB-DI). To create normative data for its clinical use. The original test was modified based on data from a pilot sample of 65 individuals with intellectual disability. In order to study the psychometric properties of the TB-DI, it was administered to a sample of 170 individuals with intellectual disability and to a group of 60 individuals without it. The relevant variables for stratification of normative data were determined by means of regression models. The TB-DI was finally composed by 67 subtests grouped in eight cognitive domains and it showed good psychometric properties. Normative data were created for five groups taking into account intellectual disability level, age and acquired curricular competence. These data were organized in percentiles in a way that allows the creation of cognitive profiles in the clinical and experimental fields. The TB-DI constitutes a tool of high applicability in the population with intellectual disability. It shows adequate validity and reliability, and it has good psychometric properties. The cognitive profiles obtained by the TB-DI will provide valuable information for the treatment of adult adults with mild and moderate intellectual disability.

  15. The AMC Linear Disability Score (ALDS): a cross-sectional study with a new generic instrument to measure disability applied to patients with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Met, Rosemarie; Reekers, Jim A; Koelemay, Mark JW; Legemate, Dink A; de Haan, Rob J

    2009-01-01

    Background The AMC Linear Disability Score (ALDS) is a calibrated generic itembank to measure the level of physical disability in patients with chronic diseases. The ALDS has already been validated in different patient populations suffering from chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the clinimetric properties of the ALDS in patients with peripheral arterial disease. Methods Patients with intermittent claudication (IC) and critical limb ischemia (CLI) presenting from January 2007 through November 2007 were included. Risk factors for atherosclerosis, ankle/brachial index and toe pressure, the Vascular Quality of Life Questionnaire (VascuQol), and the ALDS were recorded. To compare ALDS and VascuQol scores between the two patient groups, an unpaired t-test was used. Correlations were determined between VascuQol, ALDS and pressure measurements. Results Sixty-two patients were included (44 male, mean ± sd age was 68 ± 11 years) with IC (n = 26) and CLI (n = 36). The average ALDS was significantly higher in patients with IC (80, ± 10) compared to patients with CLI (64, ± 18). Internal reliability consistency of the ALDS expressed as Cronbach's α coefficient was excellent (α > 0.90). There was a strong convergent correlation between the ALDS and the disability related Activity domain of the VascuQol (r = 0.64). Conclusion The ALDS is a promising clinimetric instrument to measure disability in patients with various stages of peripheral arterial disease. PMID:19822016

  16. Children with Disabilities Playing Musical Instruments: With the Right Adaptations and Help from Their Teachers and Parents, Students with Disabilities Can Play Musical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCord, Kimberly; Fitzgerald, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors share the story of Stephanie, a dyslexic student who experiences problems reading music. The authors recommend for music teachers to share the list of students wanting to play an instrument with special educators to find out if there are students who are receiving special education services, what their strengths and…

  17. Children with Disabilities Playing Musical Instruments: With the Right Adaptations and Help from Their Teachers and Parents, Students with Disabilities Can Play Musical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCord, Kimberly; Fitzgerald, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors share the story of Stephanie, a dyslexic student who experiences problems reading music. The authors recommend for music teachers to share the list of students wanting to play an instrument with special educators to find out if there are students who are receiving special education services, what their strengths and…

  18. Improvisation as Communication: Students with Communication Disabilities and Autism Using Call and Response on Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCord, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    Students with communication disabilities present challenges to general music teachers with inclusive music classrooms. Typically, students perform, compose and improvise with others in the class, but students with physical disabilities that include communication difficulties or students with autism are left out or at best marginally participate.…

  19. A Critical Review of Screening and Diagnostic Instruments for Autism Spectrum Disorders in People with Sensory Impairments in Addition to Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vaan, Gitta; Vervloed, Mathijs P. J.; Hoevenaars-van den Boom, Marella; Antonissen, Anneke; Knoors, Harry; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Instruments that are used for diagnosing of, or screening for, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may not be applicable to people with sensory disabilities in addition to intellectual disabilities. First, because they do not account for equifinality, the possibility that different conditions may lead to the same outcome. Second, because they do not…

  20. The Usefulness of the DBC-ASA as a Screening Instrument for Autism in Children with Intellectual Disabilities: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deb, Shoumitro; Dhaliwal, Akal-Joat; Roy, Meera

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To explore the validity of Developmental Behaviour Checklist-Autism Screening Algorithm (DBC-ASA) as a screening instrument for autism among children with intellectual disabilities. Method: Data were collected from the case notes of 109 children with intellectual disabilities attending a specialist clinic in the UK. Results: The mean score…

  1. A Critical Review of Screening and Diagnostic Instruments for Autism Spectrum Disorders in People with Sensory Impairments in Addition to Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vaan, Gitta; Vervloed, Mathijs P. J.; Hoevenaars-van den Boom, Marella; Antonissen, Anneke; Knoors, Harry; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Instruments that are used for diagnosing of, or screening for, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may not be applicable to people with sensory disabilities in addition to intellectual disabilities. First, because they do not account for equifinality, the possibility that different conditions may lead to the same outcome. Second, because they do not…

  2. Construct validity and responsiveness of Movakic: An instrument for the evaluation of motor abilities in children with severe multiple disabilities.

    PubMed

    Mensch, Sonja M; Echteld, Michael A; Evenhuis, Heleen M; Rameckers, Eugène A A

    2016-12-01

    Movakic is a newly developed instrument for measurement of motor abilities in children with severe multiple disabilities, with a satisfactory feasibility and content validity and good inter-observer and test-retest reliability. The objective of this study was to investigate its construct validity and responsiveness to change. Sixty children with severe multiple disabilities (mean age 7.7 years, range 2-16) were measured using Movakic six times during 18 months. Construct validity was assessed by correlating Movakic scores with expert judgment. In order to assess responsiveness, scores during 3-months intervals were compared (mean score-changes and intraclass correlations) during which some children experienced meaningful events influencing motor abilities and during which others experienced no such event. Forty-five percent of children had a lower cognitive development level than 6-month, 52% had Gross Motor Function Classification System level V and 37% had level IV. For 27 children all measurements were completed, six children dropped out. Construct validity was good (r=0.50-0.71). Responsiveness was demonstrated by significantly larger score changes after events than when such events did not occur. Movakic is a valid instrument for measuring motor abilities in children with severe multiple disabilities. Results suggest responsiveness to change in motor abilities after meaningful events.

  3. Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... it isn't a sickness. Most people with disabilities can - and do - work, play, learn, and enjoy full, healthy lives. Mobility aids and assistive devices can make daily tasks easier. About one in every five people in the United States has a disability. Some people are born with one. Others have ...

  4. Measuring Environmental Factors: Unique and Overlapping International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Coverage of 5 Instruments.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Allen W; Miskovic, Ana; Semik, Patrick; Wong, Alex; Dashner, Jessica; Baum, Carolyn; Magasi, Susan; Hammel, Joy; Tulsky, David S; Garcia, Sofia F; Jerousek, Sara; Lai, Jin-Shei; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Gray, David B

    2016-12-01

    To describe the unique and overlapping content of the newly developed Environmental Factors Item Banks (EFIB) and 7 legacy environmental factor instruments, and to evaluate the EFIB's construct validity by examining associations with legacy instruments. Cross-sectional, observational cohort. Community. A sample of community-dwelling adults with stroke, spinal cord injury, and traumatic brain injury (N=568). None. EFIB covering domains of the built and natural environment; systems, services, and policies; social environment; and access to information and technology; the Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors (CHIEF) short form; the Facilitators and Barriers Survey/Mobility (FABS/M) short form; the Home and Community Environment Instrument (HACE); the Measure of the Quality of the Environment (MQE) short form; and 3 of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System's (PROMIS) Quality of Social Support measures. The EFIB and legacy instruments assess most of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) environmental factors chapters, including chapter 1 (products and technology; 75 items corresponding to 11 codes), chapter 2 (natural environment and human-made changes; 31 items corresponding to 7 codes), chapter 3 (support and relationships; 74 items corresponding to 7 codes), chapter 4 (attitudes; 83 items corresponding to 8 codes), and chapter 5 (services, systems, and policies; 72 items corresponding to 16 codes). Construct validity is provided by moderate correlations between EFIB measures and the CHIEF, MQE barriers, HACE technology mobility, FABS/M community built features, and PROMIS item banks and by small correlations with other legacy instruments. Only 5 of the 66 legacy instrument correlation coefficients are moderate, suggesting they measure unique aspects of the environment, whereas all intra-EFIB correlations were at least moderate. The EFIB measures provide a brief and focused assessment of ICF

  5. Characteristics of Criterion-Referenced Instruments: Implications for Materials Selection for the Learning Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasi, Joyce F.

    Discussed are characteristics of criterion referenced reading tests for use with learning disabled (LD) children, and analyzed are the Basic Educational Skills Inventory (BESI), the Prescriptive Reading Inventory (PRI), and the Cooper-McGuire Diagnostic Work-Analysis Test (CooperMcGuire). Criterion referenced tests are defined; and problems in…

  6. Wireless technologies and accessibility for people with disabilities: findings from a policy research instrument.

    PubMed

    Baker, Paul M A; Moon, Nathan W

    2008-01-01

    The near universal deployment in the United States of a wide variety of information and communications technologies, both wired and wireless, creates potential barriers to use for several key populations, including the poor, people with disabilities, and the aging. Equal access to wireless technologies and services can be achieved through a variety of mechanisms, including legislation and regulations, market-based solutions, and awareness and outreach-based approaches. This article discusses the results of policy research conducted by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC) using policy Delphi polling methodology to probe stakeholders' opinions on key access barrier issues and to explore potential policy responses. Participants included disability advocates, disability/wireless technology policy makers, and product developers/manufacturers. Respondent input informed subsequent development of potential policy initiatives to increase access to these technologies. The findings from the Delphi suggest that awareness issues remain most important, especially manufacturer awareness of user needs and availability of consumer information for selecting the most appropriate wireless devices and services. Other key issues included the ability of people with disabilities to afford technologies and inadequacies in legislation and policy making for ensuring their general accessibility, as well as usefulness in emergencies. Technical issues, including interoperability, speech-to-text conversion, and hearing aid compatibility, were also identified by participating stakeholders as important. To address all these issues, Delphi respondents favored goals and options congruent with voluntary market-driven solutions where possible but also supported federal involvement, where necessary, to aid this process.

  7. (Instrumental) Activities of Daily Living in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Daily living skills are important to ageing adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of these skills in older adults with ID and to investigate the influence of gender, age, level of ID and mobility on these skills. Daily living skills were measured with the Barthel Index (for Activities of…

  8. Development of an instrument to measure behavioral health function for work disability: item pool construction and factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Marfeo, Elizabeth E; Ni, Pengsheng; Haley, Stephen M; Jette, Alan M; Bogusz, Kara; Meterko, Mark; McDonough, Christine M; Chan, Leighton; Brandt, Diane E; Rasch, Elizabeth K

    2013-09-01

    To develop a broad set of claimant-reported items to assess behavioral health functioning relevant to the Social Security disability determination processes, and to evaluate the underlying structure of behavioral health functioning for use in development of a new functional assessment instrument. Cross-sectional. Community. Item pools of behavioral health functioning were developed, refined, and field tested in a sample of persons applying for Social Security disability benefits (N=1015) who reported difficulties working because of mental or both mental and physical conditions. None. Social Security Administration Behavioral Health (SSA-BH) measurement instrument. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) specified that a 4-factor model (self-efficacy, mood and emotions, behavioral control, social interactions) had the optimal fit with the data and was also consistent with our hypothesized conceptual framework for characterizing behavioral health functioning. When the items within each of the 4 scales were tested in CFA, the fit statistics indicated adequate support for characterizing behavioral health as a unidimensional construct along these 4 distinct scales of function. This work represents a significant advance both conceptually and psychometrically in assessment methodologies for work-related behavioral health. The measurement of behavioral health functioning relevant to the context of work requires the assessment of multiple dimensions of behavioral health functioning. Specifically, we identified a 4-factor model solution that represented key domains of work-related behavioral health functioning. These results guided the development and scale formation of a new SSA-BH instrument. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A brief screening instrument for emotionally unstable and dissocial personality disorder in male offenders with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John L; Novaco, Raymond W

    2013-01-01

    Personality disorder is prevalent among offenders with intellectual disabilities (ID), and it is associated with their risk for violence and recurrent offending behaviour. A new staff-rated instrument, the Personality Disorder Characteristics Checklist (PDCC), designed to screen for ICD-10 dissocial and emotionally unstable personality characteristics was evaluated for its reliability and validity, as applied to 129 male forensic patients with ID. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were very good. Supportive evidence for concurrent and discriminant validity was obtained in conjunction with an established staff-rated instrument, but not for patient self-report measures. Construct validity support was found for the PDCC in association with violent offence and hospital assault history and in significantly accounting for the number of physical assaults in hospital, controlling for multiple covariates. Results for the new measure were favourable in comparison to established instruments. It clinical utility for treatment planning and for the management of risk is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Using Rasch Analysis to Evaluate Accuracy of Individual Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) for Disability Measurement.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce; Li, Yanen

    2015-01-01

    Our study objectives were to examine the accuracy of individual activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental ADLs (IADLs) for disability measurement, and determine whether dependence or difficulty is more useful for disability measurement. We analyzed data from 499 patients with 2+ ADLs or 3+ IADLs who participated in a home visiting nurse intervention study, and whose function had been assessed at study baseline and 22 months. Rasch analysis was used to evaluate accuracy of 24 individual ADL and IADL items. The individual items differed in the amount of information provided in measuring functional disability along the range of disability, providing much more information in (usually) one part of the range. While nearly all of the Item Information Curves (IICs) for the ADL dependence, IADL difficulty, and IADL dependence items were unimodal with one information peak each, the IICs for ADL difficulty exhibited a bimodal pattern with two peaks. Which of the individual items performed better in disability measurement varied by the extent of functional disability (i.e., by how disabled the patients were). The information peaks of most ADLs and many IADLs rise or drop steeply in a relatively short distance. Thus, whether dependence or difficulty is superior often changes very quickly along the disability continuum. There was considerable heterogeneity in which individual items provided the most and the least information at the three points of interest examined across the disability range (-2 SD units, mean, +2 SD units). While the disability region (low, medium, and high disability) for which each individual item provided the most information remained quite stable between baseline and 22 months for ADL difficulty, IADL difficulty, and IADL dependence, relatively large shifts occurred for ADL dependence items. At the disability mean dependence items offered more information for assessment than difficulty. While ADLs also provided more information at -2 and +2 SD

  11. Validation of Catquest-9SF-A Visual Disability Instrument to Evaluate Patient Function After Corneal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Claesson, Margareta; Armitage, W John; Byström, Berit; Montan, Per; Samolov, Branka; Stenvi, Ulf; Lundström, Mats

    2017-09-01

    Catquest-9SF is a 9-item visual disability questionnaire developed for evaluating patient-reported outcome measures after cataract surgery. The aim of this study was to use Rasch analysis to determine the responsiveness of Catquest-9SF for corneal transplant patients. Patients who underwent corneal transplantation primarily to improve vision were included. One group (n = 199) completed the Catquest-9SF questionnaire before corneal transplantation and a second independent group (n = 199) completed the questionnaire 2 years after surgery. All patients were recorded in the Swedish Cornea Registry, which provided clinical and demographic data for the study. Winsteps software v.3.91.0 (Winsteps.com, Beaverton, OR) was used to assess the fit of the Catquest-9SF data to the Rasch model. Rasch analysis showed that Catquest-9SF applied to corneal transplant patients was unidimensional (infit range, 0.73-1.32; outfit range, 0.81-1.35), and therefore, measured a single underlying construct (visual disability). The Rasch model explained 68.5% of raw variance. The response categories of the 9-item questionnaire were ordered, and the category thresholds were well defined. Item difficulty matched the level of patients' ability (0.36 logit difference between the means). Precision in terms of person separation (3.09) and person reliability (0.91) was good. Differential item functioning was notable for only 1 item (satisfaction with vision), which had a differential item functioning contrast of 1.08 logit. Rasch analysis showed that Catquest-9SF is a valid instrument for measuring visual disability in patients who have undergone corneal transplantation primarily to improve vision.

  12. Development of a self-report physical function instrument for disability assessment: item pool construction and factor analysis.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Christine M; Jette, Alan M; Ni, Pengsheng; Bogusz, Kara; Marfeo, Elizabeth E; Brandt, Diane E; Chan, Leighton; Meterko, Mark; Haley, Stephen M; Rasch, Elizabeth K

    2013-09-01

    To build a comprehensive item pool representing work-relevant physical functioning and to test the factor structure of the item pool. These developmental steps represent initial outcomes of a broader project to develop instruments for the assessment of function within the context of Social Security Administration (SSA) disability programs. Comprehensive literature review; gap analysis; item generation with expert panel input; stakeholder interviews; cognitive interviews; cross-sectional survey administration; and exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to assess item pool structure. In-person and semistructured interviews and Internet and telephone surveys. Sample of SSA claimants (n=1017) and a normative sample of adults from the U.S. general population (n=999). Not applicable. Model fit statistics. The final item pool consisted of 139 items. Within the claimant sample, 58.7% were white; 31.8% were black; 46.6% were women; and the mean age was 49.7 years. Initial factor analyses revealed a 4-factor solution, which included more items and allowed separate characterization of: (1) changing and maintaining body position, (2) whole body mobility, (3) upper body function, and (4) upper extremity fine motor. The final 4-factor model included 91 items. Confirmatory factor analyses for the 4-factor models for the claimant and the normative samples demonstrated very good fit. Fit statistics for claimant and normative samples, respectively, were: Comparative Fit Index=.93 and .98; Tucker-Lewis Index=.92 and .98; and root mean square error approximation=.05 and .04. The factor structure of the physical function item pool closely resembled the hypothesized content model. The 4 scales relevant to work activities offer promise for providing reliable information about claimant physical functioning relevant to work disability. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. PARADISE 24 instrument: An observational study on psychosocial difficulties, quality of life, and disability levels in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Quintas, Rui; Cerniauskaite, Milda; Giovannetti, Ambra Mara; Schiavolin, Silvia; Raggi, Alberto; Covelli, Venusia; Villani, Flavio; Didato, Giuseppe; Deleo, Francesco; Franceschetti, Silvana; Binelli, Simona; Canafoglia, Laura; Casazza, Marina; Leonardi, Matilde

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this observational study was to test the effectiveness of the PARADISE 24 instrument in describing the psychosocial difficulties (PSDs) reported by people with epilepsy, their relation with disability, and quality-of-life (QoL) levels and, overall, to explore a horizontal epidemiology methodology applied to a sample of patients with epilepsy. A convenience sample of 80 adult patients with epilepsy was included in this cross-sectional study. Patients were interviewed using a structured protocol composed of demographic, clinical, and patient-reported outcome measures to collect PSDs associated with epilepsy. There were 80 patients, 40 females; mean age was 41.2years; mean disease duration was 18.7years; and mean number of AED was 2.09. Moderate severity rating according to clinicians' rating scale, low impact of comorbidities (mean: 2.36, SD: 2.97), high levels of QoL (mean: 30.00, SD: 4.4), medium levels of resilience (mean: 13.56, SD: 2.66), high levels of perceived empathy (mean: 15.05, SD: 4.74), poor or moderate perceived social support, and low levels of disability (mean: 10.85, SD: 10.05) were observed. The most frequently reported PSDs were related to tiredness (80%), emotional problems (73.75%), anxiety (68.75%), depressive mood (66.25%), and driving problems (61.25%). The EUROHIS-QOL (p=.003) had a negative significant relationship with PARADISE 24 while WHODAS-12 (p=.000) and CRS (p=.027) had a positive significant relationship with PARADISE 24. The PARADISE 24 permits data comparison and the creation of a complete description of a person's functioning and of all of his/her PSDs and allows better and more tailored interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a Self-Report Physical Function Instrument for Disability Assessment: Item Pool Construction and Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Christine M.; Jette, Alan M.; Ni, Pengsheng; Bogusz, Kara; Marfeo, Elizabeth E; Brandt, Diane E; Chan, Leighton; Meterko, Mark; Haley, Stephen M.; Rasch, Elizabeth K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To build a comprehensive item pool representing work-relevant physical functioning and to test the factor structure of the item pool. These developmental steps represent initial outcomes of a broader project to develop instruments for the assessment of function within the context of Social Security Administration (SSA) disability programs. Design Comprehensive literature review; gap analysis; item generation with expert panel input; stakeholder interviews; cognitive interviews; cross-sectional survey administration; and exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to assess item pool structure. Setting In-person and semi-structured interviews; internet and telephone surveys. Participants A sample of 1,017 SSA claimants, and a normative sample of 999 adults from the US general population. Interventions Not Applicable. Main Outcome Measure Model fit statistics Results The final item pool consisted of 139 items. Within the claimant sample 58.7% were white; 31.8% were black; 46.6% were female; and the mean age was 49.7 years. Initial factor analyses revealed a 4-factor solution which included more items and allowed separate characterization of: 1) Changing and Maintaining Body Position, 2) Whole Body Mobility, 3) Upper Body Function and 4) Upper Extremity Fine Motor. The final 4-factor model included 91 items. Confirmatory factor analyses for the 4-factor models for the claimant and the normative samples demonstrated very good fit. Fit statistics for claimant and normative samples respectively were: Comparative Fit Index = 0.93 and 0.98; Tucker-Lewis Index = 0.92 and 0.98; Root Mean Square Error Approximation = 0.05 and 0.04. Conclusions The factor structure of the Physical Function item pool closely resembled the hypothesized content model. The four scales relevant to work activities offer promise for providing reliable information about claimant physical functioning relevant to work disability. PMID:23542402

  15. Predictive Validity and Responsiveness of Patient-Reported and Performance-Based Measures of Function in the Boston RISE Study

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Marla K.; Jette, Alan M.; Ward, Rachel E.; Kurlinski, Laura A.; Kiely, Dan; Latham, Nancy K.; Bean, Jonathan F.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Patient-reported and performance-based measures (PBMs) are commonly used to measure physical function in studies of older adults. Selection of appropriate measures to address specific research questions is complex and requires knowledge of relevant psychometric properties. The aim of this study was to examine the predictive validity for adverse outcomes and responsiveness of a widely used patient-reported measure, the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI), compared with PBMs. Methods. We analyzed 2 years of follow-up data from Boston RISE, a cohort study of 430 primary care patients aged ≥65 years. Logistic and linear regression models were used to examine predictive validity for adverse outcomes and effect size and minimal detectable change scores were computed to examine responsiveness. Performance-based functional measures included the Short Physical Performance Battery, 400-m walk, gait speed, and stair-climb power test. Results. The LLFDI and PBMs showed high predictive validity for poor self-rated health, hospitalizations, and disability. The LLFDI function scale was the only measure that predicted falls. Absolute effect size estimates ranged from 0.54 to 0.64 for the LLFDI and from 0.34 to 0.63 for the PBMs. From baseline to 2 years, the percentage of participants with a change ≥ minimal detectable change was greatest for the LLFDI scales (46–59%) followed by the Short Physical Performance Battery (44%), gait speed (35%), 400-m walk (17%), and stair-climb power test (9%). Conclusions. The patient-reported LLFDI showed comparable psychometric properties to PBMs. Our findings support the use of the LLFDI as a primary outcome in gerontological research. PMID:25512569

  16. Criterion-Referenced Values of Grip Strength and Usual Gait Speed Using Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Disability as the Criterion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Chih; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Tsai, Yi-Fen; Chen, Ching-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Wang, Ching-Yi

    2017-01-10

    Current evidence suggests that grip strength and usual gait speed (UGS) are important predictors of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) disability. Knowing the optimum cut points of these tests for discriminating people with and without IADL disability could help clinicians or researchers to better interpret the test results and make medical decisions. The purpose of this study was to determine the cutoff values of grip strength and UGS for best discriminating community-dwelling older adults with and without IADL disability, separately for men and women, and to investigate their association with IADL disability. We conducted secondary data analysis on a national dataset collected in the Sarcopenia and Translational Aging Research in Taiwan (START). The data used in this study consisted of health data of 2420 community-dwelling older adults 65 years and older with no history of stroke and with complete data. IADL disability was defined as at least 1 IADL item scored as "need help" or "unable to perform." Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to estimate the optimum grip strength and UGS cut points for best discriminating older adults with/without IADL disability. The association between each physical performance (grip strength and UGS) and IADL disability was assessed with odds ratios (ORs). With IADL disability as the criterion, the optimal cutoff values of grip strength were 28.7 kg for men and 16.0 kg for women, and those for UGS were 0.76 m/s for men and 0.66 m/s for women. The grip strength test showed satisfactory discriminant validity (area under the curve > 0.7) in men and a strong association with IADL disability (OR > 4). Our cut points using IADL disability as the criterion were close to those indicating frailty or sarcopenia. Our reported cutoffs can serve as criterion-referenced values, along with those previously determined using different indicators, and provide important landmarks on the performance continua of older adults

  17. Cognitive modifiability of children with developmental disabilities: a multicentre study using Feuerstein's Instrumental Enrichment--Basic program.

    PubMed

    Kozulin, A; Lebeer, J; Madella-Noja, A; Gonzalez, F; Jeffrey, I; Rosenthal, N; Koslowsky, M

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed at exploring the effectiveness of cognitive intervention with the new "Instrumental Enrichment Basic" program (IE-basic), based on Feuerstein's theory of structural cognitive modifiability that contends that a child's cognitive functioning can be significantly modified through mediated learning intervention. The IE-basic progam is aimed at enhancing domain-general cognitive functioning in a number of areas (systematic perception, self-regulation abilities, conceptual vocabulary, planning, decoding emotions and social relations) as well as transferring learnt principles to daily life domains. Participants were children with DCD, CP, intellectual impairment of genetic origin, autistic spectrum disorder, ADHD or other learning disorders, with a mental age of 5-7 years, from Canada, Chile, Belgium, Italy and Israel. Children in the experimental groups (N=104) received 27-90 h of the program during 30-45 weeks; the comparison groups (N=72) received general occupational and sensory-motor therapy. Analysis of the pre- to post-test gain scores demonstrated significant (p<0.05) advantage of experimental over comparison groups in three WISC-R subtests ("Similarities", "Picture Completion", "Picture Arrangement") and Raven Coloured Matrices. Effect sizes ranged from 0.3 to 0.52. Results suggest that it is possible to improve cognitive functioning of children with developmental disability. No advantage was found for children with specific aetiology. Greater cognitive gains were demonstrated by children who received the program in an educational context where all teachers were committed to the principles of mediated learning. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The individual supported living (ISL) manual: a planning and review instrument for individual supported living arrangements for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Cocks, E; Thoresen, S; Williamson, M; Boaden, R

    2014-07-01

    Following the closure of large residential facilities over the past several decades, emphasis on community living for adults with developmental disabilities has strengthened. However, the concept of community living is ambiguous. The term is often associated with congregation of people with disabilities in ordinary houses 'in' the community. Group homes, the most common contemporary formal expression of 'community living', may use ordinary houses and accommodate a small number of residents comparable to a large family. Individual supported living (ISL) arrangements around a single person with a disability using person-centred principles are occurring with increasing frequency. The ISL manual was developed over 4 years in two sequential research projects to produce a quality framework articulating ISL and operationalising the framework into a review and planning instrument for ISL arrangements. The ISL manual was developed in three stages and overseen by a reference group of key stakeholders purposively recruited as well-versed in ISL. The first stage operationalised the quality framework over two half-day workshops with a group of key informants. Participants identified indicators and sources of evidence for each attribute of the quality framework. The quality framework, indicators, and sources of evidence were compiled into an initial evaluation instrument of nine themes consisting of 27 attributes. This was piloted in two rounds to enhance the utility of the instrument and develop the final manual which contained eight themes and 21 attributes. A comprehensive literature search was carried out to identify relevant empirical ISL studies. The literature search identified four empirical studies that incorporated ISL over the preceding 3 years. A previous literature search from the first research project that produced the quality framework spanned 27 years and identified five empirical studies. We concluded that the empirical base for developing evidence for the

  19. Convergence and divergence: differences in disability prevalence estimates in the United States and Canada based on four health survey instruments.

    PubMed

    Altman, Barbara M; Gulley, Stephen P

    2009-08-01

    An analysis of data from the Joint Canada/United States Survey of Health (JCUSH), allows us to compare prevalence estimates that result from four different question sets designed to assess disability from a group of respondents residing in either Canada or the United States. Depending upon the question set used and the coding applied to the responses, age-standardized prevalence estimates varied widely in both countries. In the U.S. noninstitutionalized adult population, disability prevalence estimates ranged from as low as 15.3% to as high as 36.4%, while in Canada the estimates ranged from 13.4% to 37.3%. Concordance and discordance in identification as disabled among these question sets were also examined. In both countries, less than 20% of those identified as disabled by any question set were identified as disabled on all four question sets when using conservative response coding to define disability. Concordance in answers to these questions was also found to be associated with older age, single marital status, low education and low income in both countries. Discordance between question set pairs was similar across both countries whether among measures based on the same domains of disability or different domains of disability. The theory, methods and future of disability measurement in health surveys are discussed in light of these findings. We conclude that understanding and interpreting national prevalence estimates requires more thoughtful attention to the purposes for which data are being collected, the specific definition and operationalizations of disability for those purposes, the methodology used in the data collection and analysis process and the areas of both commonality and difference in the populations identified by each question set. In terms of cross-cultural comparisons, the use of a common set of questions and answer categories and similar survey methodologies provides much more robust results.

  20. The World Health Organization Quality of Life instrument for people with intellectual and physical disabilities (WHOQOL-Dis): evidence of validity of the Brazilian version.

    PubMed

    Bredemeier, Juliana; Wagner, Gabriela Peretti; Agranonik, Marilyn; Perez, Tatiana Spalding; Fleck, Marcelo P

    2014-05-30

    The number of people with disabilities in Brazil and worldwide has grown substantially in recent decades. Cross-cultural quality of life instruments can be helpful in the development of interventions designed to meet the needs of this population and contribute to rational allocation of resources. This study sought to provide evidence of validity and reliability the Brazilian Portuguese version of WHOQOL-Dis-D (a cross-cultural, multicentre instrument developed by the WHOQOL-Group for the assessment of quality of life in persons with physical disability - PD) and WHOQOL-Dis-ID (for persons with intellectual disability - ID). Classical psychometric methods were used to conduct independent analyses of the PD and ID samples. Criterion groups were established for analysis of construct validity. Concurrent validity was assessed in relation to SWLS and BDI-II scores; discriminant validity, in relation to WHODAS-II. Cronbach alpha was used to test the instrument scales and subscales for reliability. The ID subgroup was retested, and test-retest reliability assessed by means of intraclass correlation coefficients and paired Student's t-test. A total of 162 (98 females) people with PD and 156 (55 females) people with ID participated in the study. Cronbach alpha was satisfactory across practically all domains and factors in the PD subsample. In IDs, most factors or domains had coefficients higher than 0.70, but four subscales exhibited less satisfactory performance. Evidence of construct and concurrent validity and reliability were obtained. The analyses presented herein provide satisfactory evidence of the validity and reliability of the instrument and corroborated the factor structure revealed during cross-cultural research. Further studies with larger sample sizes are required to obtain additional evidence of validity and reliability.

  1. The World Health Organization Quality of Life instrument for people with intellectual and physical disabilities (WHOQOL-Dis): evidence of validity of the Brazilian version

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The number of people with disabilities in Brazil and worldwide has grown substantially in recent decades. Cross-cultural quality of life instruments can be helpful in the development of interventions designed to meet the needs of this population and contribute to rational allocation of resources. This study sought to provide evidence of validity and reliability the Brazilian Portuguese version of WHOQOL-Dis-D (a cross-cultural, multicentre instrument developed by the WHOQOL-Group for the assessment of quality of life in persons with physical disability – PD) and WHOQOL-Dis-ID (for persons with intellectual disability – ID). Methods Classical psychometric methods were used to conduct independent analyses of the PD and ID samples. Criterion groups were established for analysis of construct validity. Concurrent validity was assessed in relation to SWLS and BDI-II scores; discriminant validity, in relation to WHODAS-II. Cronbach alpha was used to test the instrument scales and subscales for reliability. The ID subgroup was retested, and test-retest reliability assessed by means of intraclass correlation coefficients and paired Student’s t-test. Results A total of 162 (98 females) people with PD and 156 (55 females) people with ID participated in the study. Cronbach alpha was satisfactory across practically all domains and factors in the PD subsample. In IDs, most factors or domains had coefficients higher than 0.70, but four subscales exhibited less satisfactory performance. Evidence of construct and concurrent validity and reliability were obtained. Conclusions The analyses presented herein provide satisfactory evidence of the validity and reliability of the instrument and corroborated the factor structure revealed during cross-cultural research. Further studies with larger sample sizes are required to obtain additional evidence of validity and reliability. PMID:24886102

  2. A Computer-Adaptive Disability Instrument for Lower Extremity Osteoarthritis Research Demonstrated Promising Breadth, Precision and Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Jette, Alan M.; McDonough, Christine M.; Haley, Stephen M.; Ni, Pengsheng; Olarsch, Sippy; Latham, Nancy; Hambleton, Ronald K.; Felson, David; Kim, Young-jo; Hunter, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate a prototype measure (OA-DISABILITY-CAT) for osteoarthritis research using Item Response Theory (IRT) and Computer Adaptive Test (CAT) methodologies. Study Design and Setting We constructed an item bank consisting of 33 activities commonly affected by lower extremity (LE) osteoarthritis. A sample of 323 adults with LE osteoarthritis reported their degree of limitation in performing everyday activities and completed the Health Assessment Questionnaire-II (HAQ-II). We used confirmatory factor analyses to assess scale unidimensionality and IRT methods to calibrate the items and examine the fit of the data. Using CAT simulation analyses, we examined the performance of OA-DISABILITY-CATs of different lengths compared to the full item bank and the HAQ-II. Results One distinct disability domain was identified. The 10-item OA-DISABILITY-CAT demonstrated a high degree of accuracy compared with the full item bank (r=0.99). The item bank and the HAQ-II scales covered a similar estimated scoring range. In terms of reliability, 95% of OA-DISABILITY reliability estimates were over 0.83 versus 0.60 for the HAQ-II. Except at the highest scores the 10-item OA-DISABILITY-CAT demonstrated superior precision to the HAQ-II. Conclusion The prototype OA-DISABILITY-CAT demonstrated promising measurement properties compared to the HAQ-II, and is recommended for use in LE osteoarthritis research. PMID:19216052

  3. Effect of a community intervention programme promoting social interactions on functional disability prevention for older adults: propensity score matching and instrumental variable analyses, JAGES Taketoyo study

    PubMed Central

    Hikichi, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Naoki; Kondo, Katsunori; Aida, Jun; Takeda, Tokunori; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Background The efficacy of promoting social interactions to improve the health of older adults is not fully established due to residual confounding and selection bias. Methods The government of Taketoyo town, Aichi Prefecture, Japan, developed a resident-centred community intervention programme called ‘community salons’, providing opportunities for social interactions among local older residents. To evaluate the impact of the programme, we conducted questionnaire surveys for all older residents of Taketoyo. We carried out a baseline survey in July 2006 (prior to the introduction of the programme) and assessed the onset of functional disability during March 2012. We analysed the data of 2421 older people. In addition to the standard Cox proportional hazard regression, we conducted Cox regression with propensity score matching (PSM) and an instrumental variable (IV) analysis, using the number of community salons within a radius of 350 m from the participant's home as an instrument. Results In the 5 years after the first salon was launched, the salon participants showed a 6.3% lower incidence of functional disability compared with non-participants. Even adjusting for sex, age, equivalent income, educational attainment, higher level activities of daily living and depression, the Cox adjusted HR for becoming disabled was 0.49 (95% CI 0.33 to 0.72). Similar results were observed using PSM (HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.33 to 0.83) and IV-Cox analysis (HR 0.50, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.74). Conclusions A community health promotion programme focused on increasing social interactions among older adults may be effective in preventing the onset of disability. PMID:25888596

  4. Utilization of the Expanded Disability Status Scale as a distinctive instrument for walking impairment in persons with multiple sclerosis with mild disability.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Turhan; Savci, Sema; Coskuner Poyraz, Esra; Ozakbas, Serkan; Idiman, Egemen

    2016-01-01

    The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) is a well-established clinical measure to assess disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). Gait dysfunction is primarily considered for scoring only above EDSS 3.5. However, the changes in functional systems in below EDSS 3.5 may result gait disturbances. To determine the distinctive ability of the EDSS 2.0 in terms of walking impairment as well as fatigue, depression, and quality of life in persons with MS with mild disability. All participants underwent the neurological examination for generating an EDSS score and completed the measures of walking performance, as well as other measures of fatigue, depression, and quality of life. The participants were divided into two groups according to the EDSS scores (i.e. EDSS <2.0 and 2.0-3.5). Participants with EDSS 2.0-3.5 had significantly worse walking performance, as well as fatigue, depression, and quality of life levels than the participants with EDSS <2.0 (p <  0.05). The EDSS significantly correlated with the measures of walking performance, as well as other measures of fatigue, depression, and quality of life. The EDSS 2.0 has a distinctive ability in terms of walking impairment as well as fatigue, depression, and quality of life.

  5. I-CAN: A New Instrument to Classify Support Needs for People with Disability--Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riches, Vivienne C.; Parmenter, Trevor R.; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Hindmarsh, Gabrielle; Chan, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Background: The supports paradigm has shifted focus from assessing competence and deficits among people with disabilities to identifying supports needed to live meaningful and productive lives in inclusive settings. Consequently, a rigorous and robust system is required that is capable of accurately determining the type and intensity of support…

  6. Responsiveness to Self-Report Questions about Loneliness: A Comparison of Mainstream and Intellectual Disability-Specific Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stancliffe, R. J.; Wilson, N. J.; Bigby, C.; Balandin, S.; Craig, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: We compared responsiveness to two self-report assessments of loneliness: the "UCLA Loneliness Scale" (UCLALS) designed for the general community, and the "Modified Worker Loneliness Questionnaire" (MWLQ) designed for people with intellectual disability (ID). Methods: Participants were 56 older adults with…

  7. Responsiveness to Self-Report Questions about Loneliness: A Comparison of Mainstream and Intellectual Disability-Specific Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stancliffe, R. J.; Wilson, N. J.; Bigby, C.; Balandin, S.; Craig, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: We compared responsiveness to two self-report assessments of loneliness: the "UCLA Loneliness Scale" (UCLALS) designed for the general community, and the "Modified Worker Loneliness Questionnaire" (MWLQ) designed for people with intellectual disability (ID). Methods: Participants were 56 older adults with…

  8. I-CAN: A New Instrument to Classify Support Needs for People with Disability--Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riches, Vivienne C.; Parmenter, Trevor R.; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Hindmarsh, Gabrielle; Chan, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Background: The supports paradigm has shifted focus from assessing competence and deficits among people with disabilities to identifying supports needed to live meaningful and productive lives in inclusive settings. Consequently, a rigorous and robust system is required that is capable of accurately determining the type and intensity of support…

  9. Evaluating the Supports Intensity Scale as a Potential Assessment Instrument for Resource Allocation for Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Lee, Yue-Chune; Chang, Shu-chuan; Yu, Amy Pei-Lung

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential of using the Supports Intensity Scale (SIS) for resource allocation for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in Taiwan. SIS scores were compared with those obtained from three tools that are currently used in Taiwan for homecare services: the medical diagnosis issued by local authorities and two scales…

  10. Evaluating the Supports Intensity Scale as a Potential Assessment Instrument for Resource Allocation for Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Lee, Yue-Chune; Chang, Shu-chuan; Yu, Amy Pei-Lung

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential of using the Supports Intensity Scale (SIS) for resource allocation for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in Taiwan. SIS scores were compared with those obtained from three tools that are currently used in Taiwan for homecare services: the medical diagnosis issued by local authorities and two scales…

  11. Responsiveness to self-report questions about loneliness: a comparison of mainstream and intellectual disability-specific instruments.

    PubMed

    Stancliffe, R J; Wilson, N J; Bigby, C; Balandin, S; Craig, D

    2014-05-01

    We compared responsiveness to two self-report assessments of loneliness: the UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLALS) designed for the general community, and the Modified Worker Loneliness Questionnaire (MWLQ) designed for people with intellectual disability (ID). Participants were 56 older adults with disability - 40 individuals with ID and 16 without ID. They were individually assessed on the MWLQ and the UCLALS. The difficulty of the items in both scales was evaluated in relation to readability, features of question wording, question length and response format. The UCLALS was more difficult than the MWLQ on each of the difficulty dimensions assessed. There was significantly greater responsiveness to the MWLQ than the UCLALS, especially among people with ID. To enable as many people with ID as possible express their views on loneliness, the ID-specific MWLQ is a much better choice. However, this choice comes at the cost of ready comparison to loneliness data for the general community, which is available for widely used assessments such as the UCLALS. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSIDD.

  12. Cognitive Modifiability of Children with Developmental Disabilities: A Multicentre Study Using Feuerstein's Instrumental Enrichment-Basic Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozulin, A.; Lebeer, J.; Madella-Noja, A.; Gonzalez, F.; Jeffrey, I.; Rosenthal, N.; Koslowsky, M.

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed at exploring the effectiveness of cognitive intervention with the new "Instrumental Enrichment Basic" program (IE-basic), based on Feuerstein's theory of structural cognitive modifiability that contends that a child's cognitive functioning can be significantly modified through mediated learning intervention. The IE-basic…

  13. The ComFor: An Instrument for the Indication of Augmentative Communication in People with Autism and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noens, I.; van Berckelaer-Onnes, I.; Verpoorten, R.; van Duijn, G.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The ComFor (Forerunners in Communication) is an instrument to explore underlying competence for augmentative communication. More specifically, it measures perception and sense-making of non-transient forms of communication at the levels of presentation and representation. The target group consists primarily of individuals with autism…

  14. Career Instruments and High School Students with Learning Disabilities: Support for the Utility of Three Vocational Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dipeolu, Abiola O.

    2007-01-01

    Conventional wisdom in the area of assessment strongly supports the notion that instruments used for vocational or career decision-making purposes should possess sound psychometric properties. This study is a preliminary attempt to examine the reliability and validity of three important career decision-making measures administered to high school…

  15. Cognitive Modifiability of Children with Developmental Disabilities: A Multicentre Study Using Feuerstein's Instrumental Enrichment-Basic Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozulin, A.; Lebeer, J.; Madella-Noja, A.; Gonzalez, F.; Jeffrey, I.; Rosenthal, N.; Koslowsky, M.

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed at exploring the effectiveness of cognitive intervention with the new "Instrumental Enrichment Basic" program (IE-basic), based on Feuerstein's theory of structural cognitive modifiability that contends that a child's cognitive functioning can be significantly modified through mediated learning intervention. The IE-basic…

  16. The measurement of functioning using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: comparing qualifier ratings with existing health status instruments.

    PubMed

    Prodinger, Birgit; Stucki, Gerold; Coenen, Michaela; Tennant, Alan

    2017-10-08

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health is the international standard for describing and monitoring functioning. While the categories, the units of the classification, were not designed with measurement in mind, the hierarchical structure of the classification lends itself to the possibility of summating categories into some higher order domain. Focusing on the chapters of d4 Mobility, d5 Self-Care and d6 Domestic Life, this study seeks to ascertain if qualifiers rating of categories (0-No problem to 4-Complete problem) within those chapters can be summated, and whether such derived measurement is consistent with estimates obtained from well-known instruments which purport to measure the same constructs. The current study applies secondary analysis to data previously collected in the context of validating Core Sets for stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis. Data included qualifier-based ratings of the categories in the Core Sets, and the physical functioning sub-scale of the Short-Form 36, and the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0. To examine qualifier-comparator scale item agreement Kappa statistics were used. To identify whether appropriate gradients of the comparator scales were observed across qualifier levels, an Independent Sample Median Test of the ordinal scores was deployed. To investigate the internal validity of the summated ICF categories, the Rasch model was applied. Data from 2,927 subjects from Europe, Australasia, Middle East and South America were available for analysis; 36.3% had experienced a stroke, 35.8% osteoarthritis, and 27.9% had rheumatoid arthritis. The items from the Short-Form 36 could not match directly the qualifier categories as the former had only 3 response options. The Kappa between World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 items and categories was low. For all qualifiers, a significant (<0.001) overall gradient was observed across the

  17. The Parkinson's disease sleep scale: a new instrument for assessing sleep and nocturnal disability in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, K; Pal, S; DiMarco, A; Whately-Smith, C; Bridgman, K; Mathew, R; Pezzela, F; Forbes, A; Hogl, B; Trenkwalder, C

    2002-01-01

    Background: No formal instruments are available for quantifying sleep problems in Parkinson's disease. Objective: To develop a new sleep scale to quantify the various aspects of nocturnal sleep problems in Parkinson's disease, which may occur in up to 96% of affected individuals. Methods: Employing a multidisciplinary team approach, a visual analogue scale was devised addressing 15 commonly reported symptoms associated with sleep disturbance in Parkinson's disease—the Parkinson's disease sleep scale (PDSS). In all, 143 patients with Parkinson's disease completed the PDSS, covering the entire spectrum of disease from newly diagnosed to advanced stage. As controls, 137 age healthy matched subjects also completed the scale. Test–retest reliability was assessed in a subgroup of subjects. The Epworth sleepiness scale was also satisfactorily completed by 103 of the patients with Parkinson's disease. Results: PDSS scores in the Parkinson group were significantly different from the healthy controls. Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease had impaired scores compared with early/moderate disease. Individual items of the scale showed good discriminatory power between Parkinson's disease and healthy controls. Relevant items of the PDSS correlated with excessive daytime sleepiness. The scale showed robust test–retest reliability. Conclusions: This appears to be the first description of a simple bedside screening instrument for evaluation of sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease. A combination of subitems may help identify specific aspects of sleep disturbance, which in turn may help target treatment. PMID:12438461

  18. MS-CANE: a computer-aided instrument for neurological evaluation of patients with multiple sclerosis: enhanced reliability of expanded disability status scale (EDSS) assessment.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Y C; Hassin-Baer, S; Olmer, L; Barishev, R; Goldhammer, Y; Freedman, L; Mozes, B

    2000-10-01

    Kurtzke's EDSS remains the most widely-used measure for clinical evaluation of MS patients. However, several studies have demonstrated the limited reliability of this tool. We introduce a computerized instrument, MS-CANE (Multiple Sclerosis Computer-Aided Neurological Examination), for clinical evaluation and follow up of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to compare its reliability to that of conventional Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) assessment. We developed a computerized interactive instrument, based on the following principles: structured gathering of neurological findings, reduction of compound notions to their basic components, use of precise definitions, priority setting and automated calculations of EDSS and functional systems scores. An expert panel examined the consistency of MS-CANE with Kurtzke's specifications. To determine the effect of MS-CANE on the reliability of EDSS assessment, 56 MS patients underwent paired conventional EDSS and MS-CANE-based evaluations. The inter-observer agreement in both methods was determined and compared using the kappa statistic. The expert panel judged the tool to be compatible with the basic concepts of Kurtzke's EDSS. The use of MS-CANE increased the reliability of EDSS assessment: Kappa statistic was found to be 0.42 (i.e. moderate agreement) for conventional EDSS assessment versus 0.69 (i.e. substantial agreement) for MS-CANE (P=0.002). We conclude that the use of this tool may contribute towards a standardized and reliable assessment of EDSS. Within clinical trials, this could increase the power to detect effects, thus reducing trial duration and the cohort size required. Multiple Sclerosis (2000) 6 355 - 361

  19. Development, validation, and utility of an instrument to assess core competencies in the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) program.

    PubMed

    Leff, Stephen S; Baum, Katherine T; Bevans, Katherine B; Blum, Nathan J

    2015-02-01

    To describe the development and psychometric evaluation of the Core Competency Measure (CCM), an instrument designed to assess professional competencies as defined by the Maternal Child Health Bureau (MCHB) and targeted by Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) programs. The CCM is a 44-item self-report measure comprised of six subscales to assess clinical, interdisciplinary, family-centered/cultural, community, research, and advocacy/policy competencies. The CCM was developed in an iterative fashion through participatory action research, and then nine cohorts of LEND trainees (N = 144) from 14 different disciplines completed the CCM during the first week of the training program. A 6-factor confirmatory factor analysis model was fit to data from the 44 original items. After three items were removed, the model adequately fit the data (comparative fit indices = .93, root mean error of approximation = .06) with all factor loadings exceeding .55. The measure was determined to be quite reliable as adequate internal consistency and test-retest reliability were found for each subscale. The instrument's construct validity was supported by expected differences in self-rated competencies among fellows representing various disciplines, and the convergent validity was supported by the pattern of inter-correlations between subscale scores. The CCM appears to be a reliable and valid measure of MCHB core competencies for our sample of LEND trainees. It provides an assessment of key training areas addressed by the LEND program. Although the measure was developed within only one LEND Program, with additional research it has the potential to serve as a standardized tool to evaluate the strengths and limitations of MCHB training, both within and between programs.

  20. Development, validity, and reliability of The Assessment of Pain and Occupational Performance (POP): a new instrument using two dimensions in the investigation of disability in back pain.

    PubMed

    Perneros, Gerd; Tropp, Hans

    2009-06-01

    Questionnaires for measuring the functional status of patients with low back pain (LBP) focus on disability and present responses for each question in a predetermined, fixed relationship between "can do/difficulties and pain." Their design does not permit a separation of the two. To present the development of The Assessment of Pain and Occupational Performance (POP) and to evaluate validity and reliability. A prospective, consecutive study of patients investigated by use of the POP. A total of 220 patients participated in the study. In a cross-sectional study including 53 patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, empirical tests of content and construct validity established the definitive version of the POP. The POP focuses on performance of activities. It is a disease-specific, discriminative assessment instrument designed for patients with back pain (BP) and LBP. Based on a semi-structured interview the POP investigates each of 36 activities in two dimensions, with separate, defined scales from "normally healthy" to "extremes" for level of activity (x-scale) and pain intensity (y-scale). The final scores are expressed in percent, 0% to 100%. Patients with chronic LBP (CLBP) (n=142) were allocated to the specific (S) group, that is, patients with specific LBP problems (n=97) or to the nonspecific (NS) group, that is, those with NS BP (n=45). The ability of the POP to differentiate between the two known groups was evaluated. Construct-convergent validity between the POP and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was carried out for the S group. Inter-rater reliability was established between six pairs of raters who examined 25 patients recruited from primary health care, the P-LBP group. In construct known group validity, the median, the interquartile range, and the Mann-Whitney U test showed that the S group had a significantly higher level of activity (p<.001) combined with worse pain (p=.001) compared with the NS group. There were significant differences between

  1. Postural control and fear of falling assessment in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review of instruments, international classification of functioning, disability and health linkage, and measurement properties.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cristino C; Lee, Annemarie; Granger, Catherine L; Miller, Kimberly J; Irving, Louis B; Denehy, Linda

    2013-09-01

    To systematically review the instruments used to assess postural control and fear of falling in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and to synthesize and evaluate their breadth of content and measurement properties. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, CINAHL, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, PEDro, and OTSeeker databases searched in September 2012. Two independent reviewers performed the selection of articles, the ICF linking process and quality assessment. Only quantitative studies were included, irrespective of language or publication date. This systematic review comprised two phases. Phase 1 aimed to identify the commonly used instruments to assess postural control and fear of falling in the COPD literature. The breadth of content of each instrument was examined based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). In phase 2, a measurement property search filter was adopted and used in four electronic databases to retrieve properties reported in the COPD population. The COSMIN checklist was used to assess the methodological quality of each measurement property reported. Seventeen out of 401 publications were eligible in phase 1. Seventeen instruments were identified including 15 for postural control and 2 for fear of falling assessment. The Berg Balance Scale, the Short Physical Performance Battery, and the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale were the most frequently used instruments to assess postural control and fear of falling respectively. The ICF categories covered varied considerably among instruments. The Balance Evaluation Systems test and ABC presented the greatest breadth of content. Measurement properties reported included criterion predictive validity (4 instruments), construct validity (11 instruments) and responsiveness (1 instrument), with inconsistent findings based on 'fair' and 'poor' quality studies. Different instruments with heterogeneous content have been used to assess postural

  2. Orientations toward Disability: Differences over the Lifecourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Rosalyn B.; Heckert, D. Alex

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study of differences in orientation toward disability over the lifecourse. The study was based on an instrument developed by the authors, the Questionnaire on Disability Identity and Opportunity (QDIO). This instrument measures two dimensions of disability: participation and orientation. Orientation, in turn,…

  3. Intellectual Disability

    MedlinePlus

    ... Knows What? (log-in required) Select Page Intellectual Disability Jun 16, 2010 NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet 8 ... ready! Back to top What is an Intellectual Disability? Intellectual disability is a term used when a ...

  4. Intellectual Disability

    MedlinePlus

    ... Who Knows What? Survey Item Bank Search for: Intellectual Disability NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet 8 January 2011 Links ... getting ready! Back to top What is an Intellectual Disability? Intellectual disability is a term used when a ...

  5. Disability in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Sanne M; Spijker, Jan; Licht, Carmilla M M; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Hardeveld, Florian; de Graaf, Ron; Batelaan, Neeltje M; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2014-09-01

    This study compares disability levels between different anxiety disorders and healthy controls. We further investigate the role of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour in disability, and whether differences in these symptom patterns contribute to disability differences between anxiety disorders. Data were from 1826 subjects from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). The Composite Interview Diagnostic Instrument was used to diagnose anxiety disorders. The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II was used to measure disability in six domains (cognition, mobility, selfcare, social interaction, life activities, participation). Severity of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour symptoms was measured using the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Fear Questionnaire. All anxiety disorders were associated with higher disability. Disability was generally highest in multiple anxiety disorder (e.g. mean disability in cognition=33.7) and social anxiety disorder (mean=32.7), followed by generalized anxiety disorder (mean=27.2) and panic disorder with agoraphobia (mean=26.3), and lowest in panic disorder without agoraphobia (mean=22.1). Anxiety arousal was more associated with disability in life activities (B=8.5, p<0.001) and participation (B=9.9, p<0.001) whereas avoidance behaviour was more associated with disability in cognition (B=7.4, p<0.001) and social interaction (B=8.6, p<0.001). Different disability patterns between anxiety disorders were not completely explained by anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour. The cross-sectional study design precludes any causal interpretations. In order to examine the full range of comorbidity among anxiety, a greater range of anxiety disorders would have been preferable. Disability is highest in social anxiety disorder and multiple anxiety disorder. Both anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour are associated with higher disability levels but do not fully explain the differences across anxiety

  6. The COURAGE Built Environment Outdoor Checklist: an objective built environment instrument to investigate the impact of the environment on health and disability.

    PubMed

    Quintas, Rui; Raggi, Alberto; Bucciarelli, Paola; Franco, Maria Grazia; Andreotti, Alessandra; Caballero, Francisco Félix; Olaya, Beatriz; Chatterji, Somnath; Galas, Aleksander; Meriläinen-Porras, Satu; Frisoni, Giovanni; Russo, Emanuela; Minicuci, Nadia; Power, Mick; Leonardi, Matilde

    2014-01-01

    A tool to assess the built environment, which takes into account issues of disability, accessibility and the need for data comparable across countries and populations, is much needed. The Collaborative Research on Ageing in Europe (COURAGE) in Europe Built Environment Outdoor Checklist (CBE-OUT) helps us to understand when features of the neighbourhood environment have either a positive or negative impact on the accessibility of neighbourhoods for healthy ageing. The CBE-OUT is composed of 128 items that can be recorded when present in the evaluated environment. Audits were performed in households randomly selected from each cluster of the sample for Finland, Poland and Spain, following precise rules defined by experts. Global scores were computed both section by section and in the overall checklist, rescaling the resulting scores from 0 (negative environment) to 100 (positive). The total number of completed CBE-OUT checklists was 2452 (Finland, 245; Poland, 972; and Spain, 1235). Mean global score for our sample is 49.3, suggesting an environment composed both of facilitating and hindering features. Significant differences were observed in the built environment features of the three countries and in particular between Finland and the other two. The assessment of features of built environment is crucial when thinking about ageing and enhanced participation. The COURAGE in Europe project developed this tool to collect information on built environment in an objective evaluation of environmental features and is a recommended methodology for future studies. The CBE-OUT checklist is an objective evaluation of the built environment and is centred on technical measurement of features present in the environment and has its foundations in the concepts of disability and accessibility operating in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) model. The CBE-OUT checklist can be analysed using both the total score and the single section score

  7. [DAD-6: an abbreviated version of the DAD scale (disability assessment for dementia). An instrument for detection of loss of autonomy at an early stage].

    PubMed

    de Rotrou, Jocelyne; Wu, Ya-Huei; Djabelkhir, Leila; Seux, Marie-Laure; Hugonot, Laurence; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie; Hanon, Olivier; Vidal, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the French version of DAD-6, a validated instrument for the assessment of IADL (instrumental activities of daily living) considered as intentional and complex activities. A loss of autonomy remains a major criterion in the diagnosis of dementia. In addition, IADL assessment is recommended as a primary outcome in dementia drug trials. Since the publication in 1969 by Lawton and Brody of an IADL scale, many instruments have been developed. However, their psychometric properties remain to be improved. The need for improving the early diagnosis yielded to the design of DAD-6, an instrument allowing capturing subtle difficulties in IADL management. The DAD-6 scale emphasizes the role of the cognitive function, mainly the executive function in early IADL impairment. DAD-6 requires the participation of an informant (a patient's proxy). Relative to patients' self-reports or performance-based methods, informant-based questionnaires are the most common and practical methods used in memory clinics. In previous work, DAD-6 score gradually decreased with increasing severity of the cognitive status. The present work shows the inter-rater reliability of DAD-6. The use of the scale with the same informants by one neurologist and two neuropsychologists, separately, indicated a high agreement between raters (alpha of Krippendorff>0.80).This work also highlights the main sources of bias in the context of evaluation based on subjective judgement. The authors stress the necessity of: 1--a clarification of the relationship between cognitive function and IADL; 2--the measurement of IADL performance in a routine neuropsychological assessment by experienced professionals.

  8. Screening for Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Carol; Duran-Flores, Deborah; Dumars, Kenneth W.; Stills, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Developmental disabilities are responsible for a combination of severe physical, mental, psychological and social deficits. They develop before age 22 years and involve a little more than 1% of the population. Screening for developmental disabilities is the first step in their prevention. Various screening instruments are available for use throughout the developmental years that are designed to detect the wide variety of developmental problems that interfere with a developing person's optimal adaptation to his or her environment. The screening instruments must be inexpensive, reproducible, widely available and cost effective to the child, family and society. PMID:2413633

  9. Disability Identity--Disability Pride

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a way of thinking about disability which has emerged out of the UK Disabled People's Movement over the last three decades in opposition to the preceding medical model of disability which viewed disability as synonymous with problem. Disabled people are increasingly challenging the notion that their embodiment is inherently…

  10. Aeronautic instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everling, E; Koppe, H

    1924-01-01

    The development of aeronautic instruments. Vibrations, rapid changes of the conditions of flight and of atmospheric conditions, influence of the air stream all call for particular design and construction of the individual instruments. This is shown by certain examples of individual instruments and of various classes of instruments for measuring pressure, change of altitude, temperature, velocity, inclination and turning or combinations of these.

  11. Disability retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Eligibility for disability retirement is discussed. General guidelines and a few standards are given. Usually the same basic medical principles apply to the evaluation of claims for disability retirement as apply to determining medical suitability for initial employment.

  12. Developmental Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    Developmental disabilities are severe, long-term problems. They may be physical, such as blindness. They may affect mental ability, ... everyday living. There are many causes of developmental disabilities, including Genetic or chromosome abnormalities. These cause conditions ...

  13. Disability retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Eligibility for disability retirement is discussed. General guidelines and a few standards are given. Usually the same basic medical principles apply to the evaluation of claims for disability retirement as apply to determining medical suitability for initial employment.

  14. Gyroscopic Instruments for Instrument Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brombacher, W G; Trent, W C

    1938-01-01

    The gyroscopic instruments commonly used in instrument flying in the United States are the turn indicator, the directional gyro, the gyromagnetic compass, the gyroscopic horizon, and the automatic pilot. These instruments are described. Performance data and the method of testing in the laboratory are given for the turn indicator, the directional gyro, and the gyroscopic horizon. Apparatus for driving the instruments is discussed.

  15. Physical fitness is predictive for a decline in the ability to perform instrumental activities of daily living in older adults with intellectual disabilities: Results of the HA-ID study.

    PubMed

    Oppewal, Alyt; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I M; van Wijck, Ruud; Schoufour, Josje D; Evenhuis, Heleen M

    2015-01-01

    The ability to perform instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) is important for one's level of independence. A high incidence of limitations in IADL is seen in older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), which is an important determinant for the amount of support one needs. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of physical fitness for the ability to perform IADL, over a 3-year follow-up period, in 601 older adults with ID. At baseline, an extensive physical fitness assessment was performed. In addition, professional caregivers completed the Lawton IADL scale, both at baseline and at follow-up. The average ability to perform IADL declined significantly over the 3-year follow-up period. A decline in the ability to perform IADL was seen in 44.3% of the participants. The percentage of participants being completely independent in IADL declined from 2.7% to 1.3%. Manual dexterity, balance, comfortable and fast gait speed, muscular endurance, and cardiorespiratory fitness were significant predictors for a decline in IADL after correcting for baseline IADL and personal characteristics (age, gender, level of ID, and Down syndrome). This can be interpreted as representing the predictive validity of the physical tests for a decline in IADL. This study shows that even though older adults with ID experience dependency on others due to cognitive limitations, physical fitness also is an important aspect for IADL, which stresses the importance of using physical fitness tests and physical fitness enhancing programs in the care for older adults with ID. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Disabilities, Benefits, and Disability Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Michael A.

    1986-01-01

    The study attempted to relate patterns of disabilities to amounts of money received in social security benefits. Findings from structured interviews with parents of 248 disabled young adults (ages 18-22) indicated that the United Kingdom social security system gives more recognition to costs arising from physical than from mental disability.…

  17. Commentary on measuring disability.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Howard H

    2013-09-01

    This is a commentary on 5 articles in this issue of Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation that report on several related studies of new approaches to measuring disability. The project was grounded in theory, beginning with the development of a conceptual framework enhanced by a literature review and expert consultation within and outside of the Social Security Administration. The investigators then used item response theory to develop test items, which they organized into computer adaptive testing instruments and tested them for their psychometric properties. All in all, it is a groundbreaking set of studies and an enormously valuable contribution to the field. Hopefully it will also be tested as an alternative approach to assessing disability in the Social Security Administration disability benefits programs.

  18. Measurement Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-01-01

    International Technology Corporation (INTEC) manufactures a line of instruments used for determining the optical properties of materials used in solar energy applications. Some of INTEC's instruments are based on NASA technology, including the Willey Alpha Meter and McDonald Emissometer. The emissometer is a commercial version of a system developed by Lewis Research Center to test efficiency- increasing coatings on solar panels. These instruments are used by manufacturers of solar equipment, government, university and private laboratories.

  19. Cordless Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    Black & Decker's new cordless lightweight battery powered precision instruments, adapted from NASA's Apollo Lunar Landing program, have been designed to give surgeons optimum freedom and versatility in the operating room. Orthopedic instrument line includes a drill, a driver/reamer and a sagittal saw. All provide up to 20 minutes on a single charge. Power pack is the instrument's handle which is removable for recharging. Microprocessor controlled recharging unit can recharge two power packs together in 30 minutes. Instruments can be gas sterilized, steam-sterilized in an autoclave or immersed for easy cleaning.

  20. Cordless Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Black & Decker's new cordless lightweight battery powered precision instruments, adapted from NASA's Apollo Lunar Landing program, have been designed to give surgeons optimum freedom and versatility in the operating room. Orthopedic instrument line includes a drill, a driver/reamer and a sagittal saw. All provide up to 20 minutes on a single charge. Power pack is the instrument's handle which is removable for recharging. Microprocessor controlled recharging unit can recharge two power packs together in 30 minutes. Instruments can be gas sterilized, steam-sterilized in an autoclave or immersed for easy cleaning.

  1. Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittiprapaporn, Wichian, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Learning disability is a classification that includes several disorders in which a person has difficulty learning in a typical manner. Depending on the type and severity of the disability, interventions may be used to help the individual learn strategies that will foster future success. Some interventions can be quite simplistic, while others are…

  2. Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittiprapaporn, Wichian, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Learning disability is a classification that includes several disorders in which a person has difficulty learning in a typical manner. Depending on the type and severity of the disability, interventions may be used to help the individual learn strategies that will foster future success. Some interventions can be quite simplistic, while others are…

  3. Learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lyon, G R

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 5% of all public school students are identified as having a learning disability (LD). LD is not a single disorder, but includes disabilities in any of seven areas related to reading, language, and mathematics. These separate types of learning disabilities frequently co-occur with one another and with social skill deficits and emotional or behavioral disorders. Most of the available information concerning learning disabilities relates to reading disabilities, and the majority of children with learning disabilities have their primary deficits in basic reading skills. An important part of the definition of LD is its exclusions: learning disabilities cannot be attributed primarily to mental retardation, emotional disturbance, cultural difference, or disadvantage. Thus, the concept of LD focuses on the notion of a discrepancy between a child's academic achievement and his or her apparent capacity to learn. Recent research indicates, however, that disability in basic reading skills is primarily caused by deficits in phonological awareness, which is independent of any achievement-capacity discrepancy. Deficits in phonological awareness can be identified in late kindergarten and first grade using inexpensive, straightforward testing protocol. Interventions have varying effectiveness, depending largely on the severity of the individual child's disability. The prevalence of learning disability identification has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. The "real" prevalence of LD is subject to much dispute because of the lack of an agreed-upon definition of LD with objective identification criteria. Some researchers have argued that the currently recognized 5% prevalence rate is inflated; others argue that LD is still underidentified. In fact, it appears that there are both sound and unsound reasons for the increase in identification rates. Sound reasons for the increase include better research, a broader definition of disability in reading, focusing on

  4. SURVEY INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, C J

    1954-01-19

    This pulse-type survey instrument is suitable for readily detecting {alpha} particles in the presence of high {beta} and {gamma} backgrounds. The instruments may also be used to survey for neutrons, {beta} particles and {gamma} rays by employing suitably designed interchangeable probes and selecting an operating potential to correspond to the particular probe.

  5. Multiple Disabilities. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The term "multiple disabilities" is general and broad. From the term, you cannot tell how many disabilities a child has; which disabilities are involved; or how severe each disability is. Many combinations of disabilities are possible. The different disabilities will also have a combined impact. That is why it is also important to ask:…

  6. Uses of evidence in disability outcomes and effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Jette, Alan M; Keysor, Julie J

    2002-01-01

    Outcomes and effectiveness research is a category of health services research that gauges how well the health care needs of persons with disabilities are being met. Using Patrick's Model of Health Promotion for people with disabilities as a framework for analysis, this article examines outcomes and effectiveness research related to the health care needs of persons with disabilities. The three most pressing research priorities are clear theoretical conceptualizations and qualitative research on health outcomes relevant to the needs of persons with disabilities; a systemic analysis of existing assessment instruments' utility for disability outcomes research; and the development and testing of new outcome instruments.

  7. Psychological Assessment of the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pool, Donald A.

    The paper examines issues, philosophy and guidelines for psychological assessment of the disabled. Focused on are: (1) adjustments in testing procedures and (2) applicability of standard norms with commonly used psychological test instruments for the assessment of ability, interest, and personality. The importance of accurate assessment for…

  8. Instrumentation '79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Surveys the state of commerical development of analytical instrumentation as reflected by the Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy. Includes optical spectroscopy, liquid chromatography, magnetic spectrometers, and x-ray. (Author/MA)

  9. [Shoulder disability questionnaires: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Fayad, F; Mace, Y; Lefevre-Colau, M M

    2005-07-01

    To identify all available shoulder disability questionnaires designed to measure physical functioning and to examine those with satisfactory clinimetric quality. We used the Medline database and the "Guide des outils de mesure de l'évaluation en médecine physique et de réadaptation" textbook to search for questionnaires. Analysis took into account the development methodology, clinimetric quality of the instruments and frequency of their utilization. We classified the instruments according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Thirty-eight instruments have been developed to measure disease-, shoulder- or upper extremity-specific outcome. Four scales assess upper-extremity disability and 3 others shoulder disability. We found 6 scales evaluating disability and shoulder pain, 7 scales measuring the quality of life in patients with various conditions of the shoulder, 14 scales combining objective and subjective measures, 2 pain scales and 2 unclassified scales. Older instruments developed before the advent of modern measurement development methodology usually combine objective and subjective measures. Recent instruments were designed with appropriate methodology. Most are self-administered questionnaires. Numerous shoulder outcome measure instruments are available. There is no "gold standard" for assessing shoulder function outcome in the general population.

  10. Development of an Instrument for Assessing Elder Care Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Åhsberg, Elizabeth; Fahlström, Gunilla; Rönnbäck, Eva; Granberg, Ann-Kristin; Almborg, Ann-Helene

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To construct a needs assessment instrument for older people using a standardized terminology (International classification of functioning, disability, and health [ICF]) and assess its psychometrical properties. Method: An instrument was developed comprising questions to older people regarding their perceived care needs. The instrument's…

  11. Crystallographic Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanov, L. A.; Fetisov, G. V.; Howard, J. A. K.

    1998-07-01

    Innovations in crystallographic instrumentation and the rapid development of methods of diffraction measurement have led to a vast improvement in our ability to determine crystal and molecular structure. This up-to-date resource will allow the reader to harness the potential of X-ray diffraction instruments. Different sources of X-radiation used in crystallography are introduced, including synchrotron radiation, as well as a systematic review of detectors for X-rays and basic instruments for single crystal and powder diffractometry. The principles of the diffraction experiment are discussed and related to their practical application with a comparative description of different scan procedures. Diffraction data collection and processing are also reviewed and methods for error correction are described. This book will provide a useful guide for researchers and students starting in this area of science, as well as skilled crystallographers.

  12. Instrumented SSH

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Scott; Campbell, Scott

    2009-05-27

    NERSC recently undertook a project to access and analyze Secure Shell (SSH) related data. This includes authentication data such as user names and key fingerprints, interactive session data such as keystrokes and responses, and information about noninteractive sessions such as commands executed and files transferred. Historically, this data has been inaccessible with traditional network monitoring techniques, but with a modification to the SSH daemon, this data can be passed directly to intrusion detection systems for analysis. The instrumented version of SSH is now running on all NERSC production systems. This paper describes the project, details about how SSH was instrumented, and the initial results of putting this in production.

  13. Research Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The GENETI-SCANNER, newest product of Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc. (PSI), rapidly scans slides, locates, digitizes, measures and classifies specific objects and events in research and diagnostic applications. Founded by former NASA employees, PSI's primary product line is based on NASA image processing technology. The instruments karyotype - a process employed in analysis and classification of chromosomes - using a video camera mounted on a microscope. Images are digitized, enabling chromosome image enhancement. The system enables karyotyping to be done significantly faster, increasing productivity and lowering costs. Product is no longer being manufactured.

  14. Geoscience instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, E. A. (Editor); Mercanti, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    Geoscience instrumentation systems are considered along with questions of geoscience environment, signal processing, data processing, and design problems. Instrument platforms are examined, taking into account ground platforms, airborne platforms, ocean platforms, and space platforms. In situ and laboratory sensors described include acoustic wave sensors, age sensors, atmospheric constituent sensors, biological sensors, cloud particle sensors, electric field sensors, electromagnetic field sensors, precision geodetic sensors, gravity sensors, ground constituent sensors, horizon sensors, humidity sensors, ion and electron sensors, magnetic field sensors, tide sensors, and wind sensors. Remote sensors are discussed, giving attention to sensing techniques, acoustic echo-sounders, gamma ray sensors, optical sensors, radar sensors, and microwave radiometric sensors.

  15. What is "normal" disability? An investigation of disability in the general population.

    PubMed

    Mewes, Ricarda; Rief, Winfried; Stenzel, Nikola; Glaesmer, Heide; Martin, Alexandra; Brähler, Elmar

    2009-03-01

    Many studies have investigated the highly relevant association between pain and disability in clinical groups using the Pain Disability Index (PDI). To interpret these results, knowledge of disability in the general population is crucial. Moreover, to investigate criterion validity of the PDI, the influence on health care utilisation (HCU) is of special interest. In the present study, a broadened version of the PDI was psychometrically evaluated with a large representative sample of the general population. The independent impact of disability on HCU was also investigated. A representative sample of the German general population (N=2510) was screened for disability, somatic complaints, mental health (PHQ) and HCU. Following a psychometric evaluation of the PDI, data are provided about the distribution of disability in the general population. For the prediction of HCU, stepwise linear regression analysis was calculated. The psychometric evaluation of the PDI revealed a one-factor solution, high reliability, and satisfactory construct validity. Percentage scores for the distribution of disability are provided for those people reporting at least one pain/somatic symptom. These data allow a better description of disability in clinical samples. Somatic complaints, disability, unemployment or retirement, depression and anxiety explained 26% of the variance for HCU. The PDI is an economical, reliable and valid self-rating instrument for assessing disability caused by physical symptoms. HCU in the general population is determined by the number and severity of somatic complaints and also by disability. Symptoms and disability play a crucial but somewhat independent role.

  16. Weather Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantley, L. Reed, Sr.; Demanche, Edna L.; Klemm, E. Barbara; Kyselka, Will; Phillips, Edwin A.; Pottenger, Francis M.; Yamamoto, Karen N.; Young, Donald B.

    This booklet presents some activities to measure various weather phenomena. Directions for constructing a weather station are included. Instruments including rain gauges, thermometers, wind vanes, wind speed devices, humidity devices, barometers, atmospheric observations, a dustfall jar, sticky-tape can, detection of gases in the air, and pH of…

  17. Weather Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantley, L. Reed, Sr.; Demanche, Edna L.; Klemm, E. Barbara; Kyselka, Will; Phillips, Edwin A.; Pottenger, Francis M.; Yamamoto, Karen N.; Young, Donald B.

    This booklet presents some activities to measure various weather phenomena. Directions for constructing a weather station are included. Instruments including rain gauges, thermometers, wind vanes, wind speed devices, humidity devices, barometers, atmospheric observations, a dustfall jar, sticky-tape can, detection of gases in the air, and pH of…

  18. Disability Insurance

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Elliot A.

    1985-01-01

    A disability insurance policy provides specified income benefits when the insured person becomes unable to work because of illness or accident. With an individual policy, the insured person is generally the policy holder. With a group plan, the employer is the policy holder. An individual policy can provide several optional benefits in addition to disability benefits, which are not available in a group plan. In assessing risk, the insurer uses the application, the agent's report, a physical examination, the attending physician's report, and sometimes a consumer investigation company's inspection report. Records from the Medical Information Bureau, an association of American and Canadian life insurance companies, may also be used. The process of claims adjudication is described, as are differences between short-term and long-term disability claims. Many group policies have a rehabilitation provision; payments may continue while the claimant undergoes rehabilitation or retraining. Imagesp1928-a PMID:21274206

  19. RHIC instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.; Witkover, R.L.

    1998-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) consists of two 3.8 km circumference rings utilizing 396 superconducting dipoles and 492 superconducting quadrupoles. Each ring will accelerate approximately 60 bunches of 10{sup 11} protons to 250 GeV, or 10{sup 9} fully stripped gold ions to 100 GeV/nucleon. Commissioning is scheduled for early 1999 with detectors for some of the 6 intersection regions scheduled for initial operation later in the year. The injection line instrumentation includes: 52 beam position monitor (BPM) channels, 56 beam loss monitor (BLM) channels, 5 fast integrating current transformers and 12 video beam profile monitors. The collider ring instrumentation includes: 667 BPM channels, 400 BLM channels, wall current monitors, DC current transformers, ionization profile monitors (IPMs), transverse feedback systems, and resonant Schottky monitors. The use of superconducting magnets affected the beam instrumentation design. The BPM electrodes must function in a cryogenic environment and the BLM system must prevent magnet quenches from either fast or slow losses with widely different rates. RHIC is the first superconducting accelerator to cross transition, requiring close monitoring of beam parameters at this time. High space-charge due to the fully stripped gold ions required the IPM to collect magnetically guided electrons rather than the conventional ions. Since polarized beams will also be accelerated in RHIC, additional constraints were put on the instrumentation. The orbit must be well controlled to minimize depolarizing resonance strengths. Also, the position monitors must accommodate large orbit displacements within the Siberian snakes and spin rotators. The design of the instrumentation will be presented along with results obtained during bench tests, the injection line commissioning, and the first sextant test. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. RHIC instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T. J.; Witkover, R. L.

    1998-12-10

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) consists of two 3.8 km circumference rings utilizing 396 superconducting dipoles and 492 superconducting quadrupoles. Each ring will accelerate approximately 60 bunches of 10{sup 11} protons to 250 GeV, or 10{sup 9} fully stripped gold ions to 100 GeV/nucleon. Commissioning is scheduled for early 1999 with detectors for some of the 6 intersection regions scheduled for initial operation later in the year. The injection line instrumentation includes: 52 beam position monitor (BPM) channels, 56 beam loss monitor (BLM) channels, 5 fast integrating current transformers and 12 video beam profile monitors. The collider ring instrumentation includes: 667 BPM channels, 400 BLM channels, wall current monitors, DC current transformers, ionization profile monitors (IPMs), transverse feedback systems, and resonant Schottky monitors. The use of superconducting magnets affected the beam instrumentation design. The BPM electrodes must function in a cryogenic environment and the BLM system must prevent magnet quenches from either fast or slow losses with widely different rates. RHIC is the first superconducting accelerator to cross transition, requiring close monitoring of beam parameters at this time. High space-charge due to the fully stripped gold ions required the IPM to collect magnetically guided electrons rather than the conventional ions. Since polarized beams will also be accelerated in RHIC, additional constraints were put on the instrumentation. The orbit must be well controlled to minimize depolarizing resonance strengths. Also, the position monitors must accommodate large orbit displacements within the Siberian snakes and spin rotators. The design of the instrumentation will be presented along with results obtained during bench tests, the injection line commissioning, and the first sextant test.

  1. RHIC instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, T. J.; Witkover, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) consists of two 3.8 km circumference rings utilizing 396 superconducting dipoles and 492 superconducting quadrupoles. Each ring will accelerate approximately 60 bunches of 1011 protons to 250 GeV, or 109 fully stripped gold ions to 100 GeV/nucleon. Commissioning is scheduled for early 1999 with detectors for some of the 6 intersection regions scheduled for initial operation later in the year. The injection line instrumentation includes: 52 beam position monitor (BPM) channels, 56 beam loss monitor (BLM) channels, 5 fast integrating current transformers and 12 video beam profile monitors. The collider ring instrumentation includes: 667 BPM channels, 400 BLM channels, wall current monitors, DC current transformers, ionization profile monitors (IPMs), transverse feedback systems, and resonant Schottky monitors. The use of superconducting magnets affected the beam instrumentation design. The BPM electrodes must function in a cryogenic environment and the BLM system must prevent magnet quenches from either fast or slow losses with widely different rates. RHIC is the first superconducting accelerator to cross transition, requiring close monitoring of beam parameters at this time. High space-charge due to the fully stripped gold ions required the IPM to collect magnetically guided electrons rather than the conventional ions. Since polarized beams will also be accelerated in RHIC, additional constraints were put on the instrumentation. The orbit must be well controlled to minimize depolarizing resonance strengths. Also, the position monitors must accommodate large orbit displacements within the Siberian snakes and spin rotators. The design of the instrumentation will be presented along with results obtained during bench tests, the injection line commissioning, and the first sextant test.

  2. Comparing children's self-report instruments for health-related quality of life using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY).

    PubMed

    Petersson, Christina; Simeonsson, Rune J; Enskar, Karin; Huus, Karina

    2013-05-04

    Children with chronic conditions often experience a long treatment which can be complex and negatively impacts the child's well-being. In planning treatment and interventions for children with chronic conditions, it is important to measure health-related quality of life (HrQoL). HrQoL instruments are considered to be a patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) and should be used in routine practice. The aim of this study was to compare the content dimensions of HrQoL instruments for children's self-reports using the framework of ICF-CY. The sample consist of six instruments for health-related quality of life for children 5 to 18 years of age, which was used in the Swedish national quality registries for children and adolescents with chronic conditions. The following instruments were included: CHQ-CF, DCGM-37, EQ-5D-Y, KIDSCREEN-52, Kid-KINDL and PedsQL 4.0. The framework of the ICF-CY was used as the basis for the comparison. There were 290 meaningful concepts identified and linked to 88 categories in the classification ICF-CY with 29 categories of the component body functions, 48 categories of the component activities and participation and 11 categories of the component environmental factors. No concept were linked to the component body structures. The comparison revealed that the items in the HrQoL instruments corresponded primarily with the domains of activities and less with environmental factors. In conclusion, the results confirm that ICF-CY provide a good framework for content comparisons that evaluate similarities and differences to ICF-CY categories. The results of this study revealed the need for greater consensus of content across different HrQoL instruments. To obtain a detailed description of children's HrQoL, DCGM-37 and KIDSCREEN-52 may be appropriate instruments to use that can increase the understanding of young patients' needs.

  3. with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Debra L.; Jones, Vita L.; Sparks, Shannon L.; Aldridge, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Parents from culturally diverse backgrounds need to feel that they play a vital role in the future success of their sons or daughters with disabilities. Differences in culture and ethnicity can affect families' involvement in transition planning and the goals that they emphasize for their children. Families of diverse backgrounds were surveyed and…

  4. Understanding Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwell, Richard D.

    2001-01-01

    A language arts teacher at a California middle school describes an exercise he developed to help students understand disabilities through virtual, firsthand experience. As students simulate being blind, unable to walk, they learn how to adjust, innovate, compensate, cooperate, and empathize with one another. (MLH)

  5. Transition Educators: Instrumental Personnel in Fulfilling the Promise of ADA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Marta W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and its implementation at the local level. Identifies barriers to implementation and outlines suggestions for transition educators who are instrumental in fulfilling the promise of ADA. (Author/JOW)

  6. Psychometric Evaluation of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale in Adults with Functional Limitations.

    PubMed

    Murrock, Carolyn J; Bekhet, Abir; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A

    2016-01-01

    Enjoyment is an important construct for understanding physical activity participation, and it has not been examined in adults with functional limitations. This secondary analysis reported the reliability and validity of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES) in a convenience sample of 40 adults with functional limitations. The participants completed the PACES, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) prior to beginning a 12-week feasibility dance intervention study. Results indicated reliability as Cronbach's alpha was .95 and mean inter-item correlation was .52. To further support reliability, homogeneity of the instrument was evaluated using item-to-total scale correlations. Homogeneity was supported as all items had corrected item-to-total correlations greater than .30. For validity, the PACES was significantly related to only the Physical Function component of the LLFDI (r = .38, p = .02), but not the CES-D. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 3-factor structure that accounted for 73.76% of the variance. This feasibility intervention dance study represented the first attempt to examine the psychometric properties of the PACES in adults with functional limitations. The findings demonstrate support for the scale's reliability and validity among adults with functional limitations. Results are informative as further psychometric testing of the PACES is recommended using randomized clinical trials with larger sample sizes. Enjoyment for physical activity is an important construct for understanding physical activity participation in adults with functional limitations.

  7. Disablement, Disability and the Nigerian Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abang, Theresa B.

    1988-01-01

    The condition of the disabled in developing nations, particularly Nigeria, is considered. Discussed are prevention of disability by control of infectious diseases, effects of myth and superstition on attitudes toward the disabled, the lack of medical facilities, and the rights of the disabled to an education and building access. (Author/DB)

  8. Aging With Disability for Midlife and Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, Lois M; Latham, Kenzie; Clarke, Philippa J

    2017-07-01

    This analysis brings "aging with disability" into middle and older ages. We study U.S. adults ages 51+ and ages 65+ with persistent disability (physical, household management, personal care; physical limitations, instrumental activities of daily living [IADLs], activities of daily living [ADLs]), using Health and Retirement Study data. Two complementary approaches are used to identify persons with persistent disability, one based directly on observed data and the other on latent classes. Both approaches show that persistent disability is more common for persons ages 65+ than ages 51+ and more common for physical limitations than IADLs and ADLs. People with persistent disability have social and health disadvantages compared to people with other longitudinal experiences. The analysis integrates two research avenues, aging with disability and disability trajectories. It gives empirical heft to government efforts to make aging with disability an age-free (all ages) rather than age-targeted (children and youths) perspective.

  9. The evolution of disability in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Lisa M; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Anderson, Karen E; Vaughan, Christopher G; Reich, Stephen G; Fishman, Paul S; Weiner, William J

    2008-04-30

    The objectives of this study are to assess the level of disease severity associated with disability in Parkinson disease (PD) and the sequence of loss of independence in basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADLs and IADLs). Six hundred eighteen patients with PD were evaluated for disease severity with the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) and for disability with the Older Americans Resource and Services Disability Subscale (OARS). The association between patient-reported disability on ADLs and IADLs and level of disease severity on the total UPDRS was examined cross-sectionally. Disability, with loss of independent function is reported between total UPDRS scores 30 to 40, and HY stages II to III. Difficulty with daily activities, without loss of independent function is reported earlier, at UPDRS <20 and HY I to II. Difficulty with walking is initially reported, followed by problems with a number of gait-dependent activities including housework, dressing, transferring in and out of bed, and traveling in the community. The transition from HY stage II to III marks a pivotal milestone in PD, when gait and balance impairment results in disability in many gait-dependent activities. The onset of disability in PD can be identified by asking patients about their walking, housework, dressing, and traveling. While individual patients vary in progression, the benchmarks of disability in this study provide guidance when counseling patients about prognosis. Better understanding of the stages of disability may facilitate the development of novel outcome measures in clinical trials in PD.

  10. 20 CFR 404.1211 - Interstate instrumentalities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Coverage of Employees of State and Local Governments What Groups of Employees... section 218 of the Act, interstate instrumentalities are treated, to the extent practicable, as States... are subject to the same rules that are applied to the States; (c) They may divide retirement systems...

  11. Disability Experience and Measurement.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, Lois M

    2016-10-01

    Top themes of international research on disability in the past three decades are discussed: disability dynamics, buffers and barriers for disability, disability trends, and disability among very old persons. Each theme is highlighted by research examples. Turning to measurement, I discuss traditional measures of disability, new longer and shorter ones, and composites like disability-free life expectancy, noting their merits. Contemporary models of disability are presented, ranging from visual images to formal theories. The article ends on how scientists can facilitate movement of disability science into health care practice and policy.

  12. Rural People with Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics & States Topics View more Rural People with Disabilities People with disabilities, young and old, who live ... Act for local government? How many people with disabilities live in rural areas? According to the U.S. ...

  13. Disability and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data Articles & Key Findings Disability-Related Documents Materials & Multimedia Fact Sheets Infographics Disability Impacts All of Us ... and adults with mobility limitations and intellectual or learning disabilities are at greatest risk for obesity. 1, ...

  14. Learning Disabilities in Campers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peniston, Lorraine C.

    1999-01-01

    Notes that camp directors and counselors should be familiar with learning disabilities. Defines learning disabilities and explains accommodations of materials, procedures, and equipment; modification of activities; individuals' learned compensation strategies; and communication issues. Sidebar defines types of learning disabilities. (SAS)

  15. Learning Disabilities in Campers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peniston, Lorraine C.

    1999-01-01

    Notes that camp directors and counselors should be familiar with learning disabilities. Defines learning disabilities and explains accommodations of materials, procedures, and equipment; modification of activities; individuals' learned compensation strategies; and communication issues. Sidebar defines types of learning disabilities. (SAS)

  16. Teachers' Attitudes toward Students with Disabilities in Haiti

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupoux, Errol; Hammond, Helen; Ingalls, Lawrence; Wolman, Clara

    2006-01-01

    After conducting a thorough review of the state of inclusion of students with disabilities in Haiti, the authors present a study that investigates the attitudes of urban and rural teachers in Haiti toward inclusion. Participants were administered the Opinions Relative to Integration (ORI) of Students with Disabilities instrument. Reliability of…

  17. Effects of Disability and Sex of Counselor on Student Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toner, Ignatius J.; Johnson, Mark L.

    1979-01-01

    The preferences of sixth grade and tenth grade students for disabled vs nondisabled school counselors was assessed through a person perception instrument. The disabled counselor was preferred to the nondisabled counselor, regardless of the sex of the counselor or the sex and grade level of the student. (Author)

  18. Right to Inclusive Education for Students with Disabilities in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, Brent C.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the current inclusive education system in Kenya, and how those practices relate to Article 24 of the United Nations' Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Local laws and international instruments are presented to shed light on the extent to which students with disabilities have a right to inclusive…

  19. Right to Inclusive Education for Students with Disabilities in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, Brent C.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the current inclusive education system in Kenya, and how those practices relate to Article 24 of the United Nations' Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Local laws and international instruments are presented to shed light on the extent to which students with disabilities have a right to inclusive…

  20. Longitudinal Changes in Disabled Husbands' and Wives' Receipt of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel-Miller, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study contrasts 2-year adjustments in disabled husbands' and wives' amount of received care following both worsening and recovery in personal (activities of daily living [ADLs]) and routine care (instrumental activities of daily living [IADLs]) disability. Design and Methods: Using longitudinal data on 789 husbands and…

  1. Optical Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Precision Lapping and Optical Co. has developed a wide variety of hollow retroreflector systems for applications involving the entire optical spectrum; they are, according to company literature, cheaper, more accurate, lighter and capable of greater size than solid prisms. Precision Lapping's major customers are aerospace and defense companies, government organizations, R&D and commercial instrument companies. For example, Precision Lapping supplies hollow retroreflectors for the laser fire control system of the Army's Abrams tank, and retroreflectors have been and are being used in a number of space tests relative to the Air Force's Strategic Defense Initiative research program. An example of a customer/user is Chesapeake Laser Systems, producer of the Laser Tracker System CMS-2000, which has applications in SDI research and industrial robotics. Another customer is MDA Scientific, Inc., manufacturer of a line of toxic gas detection systems used to monitor hazardous gases present in oil fields, refineries, offshore platforms, chemical plants, waste storage sites and other locations where gases are released into the environment.

  2. Screening for pre-clinical disability in different residential settings.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Kate; Day, Lesley; Hill, Keith D; Jolley, Damien; Newstead, Stuart; Cicuttini, Flavia; Segal, Leonie; Flicker, Leon

    2010-08-03

    Preventing disability and offering effective interventions to older people during early decline in function is most likely to be effective if those most at risk of progressive disablement are able to be identified. Similarly the ability to easily identify a group with similar functional profile from disparate sectors of the community is of significant benefit to researchers. This study aimed to (1) describe the use of a pre-clinical disability screening tool to select a functionally comparable group of older men and women with early functional limitation from different settings, and (2) explore factors associated with function and disability. Self-reported function and disability measured with the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument along with a range of physical performance measurements were compared across residential settings and gender in a sample of 471 trial participants identified as pre-clinically disabled after being screened with the Fried pre-clinical disability tool. Factors that might lie on the pathway to progressive disablement were identified using multiple linear regression analysis. We found that a sample population, screened for pre-clinical disability, had a functional status and disability profile reflecting early functional limitation, regardless of residential setting or gender. Statistical models identified a range of factors associated with function and disability which explained a greater degree of the variation in function, than disability. We selected a group of people with a comparable function and disability profile, consistent with the pre-clinical stage of disability, from a sample of older Australian men and women from different residential settings using the Fried pre-clinical disability screening tool. The results suggest that the screening tool can be used with greater confidence for research, clinical and population health purposes. Further research is required to examine the validity of the tool. These findings offer

  3. Assessing Behaviour Support Plans for People with Intellectual Disability before and after the Victorian Disability Act 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Louise; Wilson, Linda; Wilson, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study sought to elucidate the extent to which behaviour support plans for people with intellectual disability are inclusive of best practice criteria, with a comparison made prior to and following proclamation of the Disability Act (2006) in Victoria, Australia. Method: This study used a data collection instrument developed by the…

  4. Postsecondary Students and Disability Stigma: Development of the Postsecondary Student Survey of Disability-Related Stigma (PSSDS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trammell, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Few instruments or studies have been designed to measure the degree of stigmatization experienced by college and University students with disabilities. Yet, many researchers acknowledge through qualitative studies and other forms of experiential data that postsecondary students with disabilities do in fact encounter significant stigma effects.…

  5. Rasch analysis of the Roland disability questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Andrew M

    2003-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey using patient questionnaires was conducted. OBJECTIVE To assess whether the Roland Disability Questionnaire satisfies the Rasch model including unidimensionality and item separation. The Roland Disability Questionnaire, the most widely used patient-assessed measure of health outcome for back pain, has undergone several evaluations for its measurement properties including reliability, validity, and responsiveness. However, there is no published work relating to the underlying dimensionality of the instrument and the extent to which individual items contribute to the construct of physical disability resulting from low back pain. Patients entering a randomized controlled trial of exercise, manipulation, and usual management for back pain completed a questionnaire that included the Roland Disability Questionnaire. The Winsteps program was used to assess whether the Roland Disability Questionnaire fits the Rasch model. Item fit was assessed using the Infit and Outfit statistics. The Roland Disability Questionnaire was completed by 1008 (90%) of the patients taking part in the trial. Most of the items in the Roland Disability Questionnaire contribute to a single underlying construct. However, four items had poor Outfit statistics, suggesting that they do not contribute sufficiently to the scale hierarchy. Several items positioned around the middle of the hierarchy are not sufficiently distinct in terms of difficulty. There were very few items positioned at the extremes of the hierarchy. The Roland Disability Questionnaire largely satisfies the Rasch model for unidimensionality. However, the instrument could be improved through the removal of poorly fitting items and the addition of items at the upper and lower points of the scale hierarchy. The distribution of Roland Disability Questionnaire scores should be carefully considered before statistical testing is undertaken. Rasch transformed scores can be used to deal with deficiencies in the scale

  6. Understanding the Philosophical Foundations of Disabilities to Maximize the Potential of Response to Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Nai-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    In the United States and elsewhere in the world, disabilities are being studied by two different schools of thought: special education and disability studies. In the field of special education, analyses are often pragmatic and instrumental. In contrast, analyses in the field of disability studies are often historical and cultural, explaining…

  7. Understanding the Philosophical Foundations of Disabilities to Maximize the Potential of Response to Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Nai-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    In the United States and elsewhere in the world, disabilities are being studied by two different schools of thought: special education and disability studies. In the field of special education, analyses are often pragmatic and instrumental. In contrast, analyses in the field of disability studies are often historical and cultural, explaining…

  8. Disability Rises Gradually for a Cohort of Older Americans.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, Lois M; Brown, Dustin C; Zajacova, Anna

    2017-01-01

    We study changes in average disability over nearly two decades for a large epidemiological cohort of older Americans. As some people exit by mortality, do average disability levels for the living cohort rise rapidly, rise gradually, stay steady, or decline? Data are from the Study of Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) cohort for 1993-2010. Cohort members are aged 70+ in 1993 (mean = 77.5 years), and the survivors are aged 87+ in 2010 (mean = 90.2 years). Personal care disability (activities of daily living), household management disability (instrumental activities of daily living), and physical limitations are studied. We study average disability for the living cohort over time and the disability histories for decedent and survivor groups. Average disability rises gradually over time for the living cohort. Earlier decedent groups have higher average disability than later ones. Near death, disability rises sharply for all decedent groups. Longer surviving groups have less average disability, and slower disability increases, than shorter surviving groups. All results are repeated for younger cohort members (baseline age = 70-79 years), older ones (baseline age = 80+ years), women, and men. As a cohort ages, average disability among living members increases gradually, signaling behavioral, psychological, and biological fitness in very old persons. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Disability Rises Gradually for a Cohort of Older Americans.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, Lois M; Brown, Dustin C; Zajacova, Anna

    2016-03-11

    We study changes in average disability over nearly two decades for a large epidemiological cohort of older Americans. As some people exit by mortality, do average disability levels for the living cohort rise rapidly, rise gradually, stay steady, or decline? Data are from the Study of Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) cohort for 1993-2010. Cohort members are aged 70+ in 1993 (mean = 77.5 years), and the survivors are aged 87+ in 2010 (mean = 90.2 years). Personal care disability (activities of daily living), household management disability (instrumental activities of daily living), and physical limitations are studied. We study average disability for the living cohort over time and the disability histories for decedent and survivor groups. Average disability rises gradually over time for the living cohort. Earlier decedent groups have higher average disability than later ones. Near death, disability rises sharply for all decedent groups. Longer surviving groups have less average disability, and slower disability increases, than shorter surviving groups. All results are repeated for younger cohort members (baseline age = 70-79 years), older ones (baseline age = 80+ years), women, and men. As a cohort ages, average disability among living members increases gradually, signaling behavioral, psychological, and biological fitness in very old persons.

  10. A Needs Assessment for Learning Disabled Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clitheroe, H. C.; And Others

    A needs assessment was conducted with clients of the Rehabilitation Center for Brain Dysfunction (Irvine, California) and other local populations of learning-disabled adults. This report discusses the background of the problem addressed by the needs assessment, presents the results of an in-depth analysis of the responses to the survey instrument,…

  11. Standardized Assessment of the Developmentally Disabled Person.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinck, Christine

    Steps are outlined in the construction of two self-report assessment scales designed to measure general life satisfaction and leisure activity levels of developmentally disabled adults. The potential usefulness of a reliable, valid self-report instrument as a measurement tool in client programming is noted in the context of a review of similar…

  12. The disablement process.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, L M; Jette, A M

    1994-01-01

    Building on prior conceptual schemes, this article presents a sociomedical model of disability, called The Disablement Process, that is especially useful for epidemiological and clinical research. The Disablement Process: (1) describes how chronic and acute conditions affect functioning in specific body systems, generic physical and mental actions, and activities of daily life, and (2) describes the personal and environmental factors that speed or slow disablement, namely, risk factors, interventions, and exacerbators. A main pathway that links Pathology, Impairments, Functional Limitations, and Disability is explicated. Disability is defined as difficulty doing activities in any domain of life (from hygiene to hobbies, errands to sleep) due to a health or physical problem. Feedback effects are included in the model to cover dysfunction spirals (pernicious loops of dysfunction) and secondary conditions (new pathology launched by a given disablement process). We distinguish intrinsic disability (without personal or equipment assistance) and actual disability (with such assistance), noting the scientific and political importance of measuring both. Disability is not a personal characteristic, but is instead a gap between personal capability and environmental demand. Survey researchers and clinicians tend to focus on personal capability, overlooking the efforts people commonly make to reduce demand by activity accommodations, environmental modifications, psychological coping, and external supports. We compare the disablement experiences of people who acquire chronic conditions early in life (lifelong disability) and those who acquire them in mid or late life (late-life disability). The Disablement Process can help inform research (the epidemiology of disability) and public health (prevention of disability) activities.

  13. Philosophy meets disability.

    PubMed

    Louhiala, P

    2009-09-01

    The question "what is disability" and its implications are addressed in a new book Arguing about disability: philosophical perspectives, which aims to fill the gap between disability studies and philosophy. The structure of the book has been organised roughly on the basis of three branches of philosophy: metaphysics, political philosophy and ethics. One of the main themes of the book is the characterisation of a third way of thinking about disability, a way between two extremes, the medical and social models of disability.

  14. Identification of Learning Disabilities in Ontario: A Validity Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacIntyre, Robert B.; And Others

    The study examined the process by which diagnostic data on children thought to have learning disabilities (LD) are generated and used. Emphasis was placed on the validity of test instruments in common use in the field. Since part of the practical validity of any instrument used to identify an LD child rests on the validity of the LD construct…

  15. Identification of Learning Disabilities in Ontario: A Validity Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacIntyre, Robert B.; And Others

    The study examined the process by which diagnostic data on children thought to have learning disabilities (LD) are generated and used. Emphasis was placed on the validity of test instruments in common use in the field. Since part of the practical validity of any instrument used to identify an LD child rests on the validity of the LD construct…

  16. Inclusion Practices for Students with Disabilities in Three Schools Which Are Meeting Accountability Mandates of No Child Left Behind: A Multiple Site Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antley, Tina M. B.

    2010-01-01

    Two recent pieces of federal legislation have greatly influenced how schools educate students with disabilities. While Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (2004) requires that schools assess students with disabilities using the same assessment instruments with which their non-disabled peers are tested, the No Child Left Behind…

  17. Inclusion Practices for Students with Disabilities in Three Schools Which Are Meeting Accountability Mandates of No Child Left Behind: A Multiple Site Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antley, Tina M. B.

    2010-01-01

    Two recent pieces of federal legislation have greatly influenced how schools educate students with disabilities. While Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (2004) requires that schools assess students with disabilities using the same assessment instruments with which their non-disabled peers are tested, the No Child Left Behind…

  18. Measuring disability with parsimony.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, L M; Merrill, S S; Liu, X

    1999-01-01

    Health surveys, especially those for older persons, include numerous detailed items about disability. There has been little effort to develop a global disability item, that is, one question that covers the concept of disability briefly but well. This article discusses how parsimony can be achieved through a single item, or less desirably by reductions of detailed items. Results of three analyses on the issue of compact disability indicators, using public-use data sets (AHEAD, HRS, BRFSS), are presented. The analyses study relationships of global disability to both detailed disability items and global health. Overall, the results show that a global disability item has good coverage of specific disabilities and is distinct from self-rated health. Routine inclusion of a global disability item in surveys is recommended, and specific suggestions are made to aid its design.

  19. Americans With Disabilities Act.

    PubMed

    Walk, E E; Ahn, H C; Lampkin, P M; Nabizadeh, S A; Edlich, R F

    1993-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act gives all Americans with disabilities a chance to achieve the same quality of life that individuals without disabilities enjoy. This act prohibits discrimination on the basis of disabilities in employment, public services, privately operated public accommodations, services, and telecommunications. The Americans with Disabilities Act is divided into five titles. Title I of the act pertains to discrimination against the disabled in the workplace. Title II prevents discrimination against persons with a disability in state and local government services. Title III prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities in places of public accommodations and commercial facilities. Title IV ensures that companies offering telephone services to the general public provide special services for individuals with hearing and speech impairments. Under the enforcement provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, stringent penalties will be implemented for failure to comply with its provisions.

  20. Low activated incore instrument

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, D.E.

    1994-04-19

    Instrumentation is described for nuclear reactor head-mounted incore instrumentation systems fabricated of low nuclear cross section materials (i.e., zirconium or titanium). The instrumentation emits less radiation than that fabricated of conventional materials. 9 figures.

  1. Low activated incore instrument

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, Douglas E.

    1994-01-01

    Instrumentation for nuclear reactor head-mounted incore instrumentation systems fabricated of low nuclear cross section materials (i.e., zirconium or titanium). The instrumentation emits less radiation than that fabricated of conventional materials.

  2. Mathematics Screening: The Development and Pilot Study of a Mathematics Screening Instrument for K-2 Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes an action research project to develop a math screening instrument that would be effective (valid and reliable) and efficient (time for administration). An instrument was developed after review of the mathematics assessment and mathematics disabilities literature. The instrument was administered to kindergarten, first, and…

  3. Evaluating musical instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D. Murray

    2014-04-01

    Scientific measurements of sound generation and radiation by musical instruments are surprisingly hard to correlate with the subtle and complex judgments of instrumental quality made by expert musicians.

  4. The violence of disablism.

    PubMed

    Goodley, Dan; Runswick-Cole, Katherine

    2011-05-01

    This article addresses the multi-faceted nature of violence in the lives of disabled people, with a specific focus on the accounts of disabled children and their families. Traditionally, when violence and disability have been considered together, this has emphasised the disabled subject whom inevitably exhibits violent challenging behaviour. Recently, however, more attention has been paid to violence experienced by disabled people, most notably in relation to hate crime. This article embraces theories that do not put the problems of disablism or violence back onto disabled people but magnify and expose processes of disablism that are produced in the relationships between people, which sometimes involve violence. This, we argue, means taking seriously the role of social relationships, institutions and culture in the constitution of violence. Disabled children, we argue, are enculturated by the violence of disablism. We follow Žižek's advice to step back from the obvious signals of violence to 'perceive the contours of the background which generates such outbursts', and identify four elements of the violence of disablism which we define as real, psychoemotional, systemic and cultural. We come to the conclusion that violence experienced by disabled children and their families says more about the dominant culture of disablism than it does of the acts of a few seemingly irrational, unreasonable, mean or violent individuals. We conclude that there is a need for extensive cultural deconstruction and reformation.

  5. Profile of arthritis disability.

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugge, L. M.; Juarez, L.

    2001-01-01

    Using the 1994-95 National Health Interview Supplement Disability Supplement, the authors study levels of disabilities and accommodations among US adults with arthritis disability, compared to people with disability due to other conditions. Arthritis-disabled people are defined in two ways. One definition covers a broad range of arthritis and rheumatic conditions, and the other concentrates solely on arthritis. The authors find that arthritis-disabled people have more total disabilities than other-disabled peop e. However, their disabilities are less severe, have shorter durations, and accumulate more gradually over time. Despite more disabilities, people with arthritis disability use fewer assistive and service accommodations than other-disabled people. They do use more mobility aids. Because arthritis is the leading chronic condition for middle-aged and older adults, th s profile of extensive but mild-to-moderate disability is experienced by many millions of adults. Accommodations for arthritis may also be extensive but aimed more toward self-care than toward assistive and medical services. PMID:11889283

  6. A measure of perceived stigma in people with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Ali, Afia; Strydom, Andre; Hassiotis, Angela; Williams, Rachael; King, Michael

    2008-11-01

    There is a lack of validated instruments measuring perceived stigma in people with intellectual disability. To develop a valid and reliable self-rated instrument to measure perceived stigma that can be completed by people with mild to moderate intellectual disability. A literature search was used to generate a list of statements. Professionals, individuals with intellectual disability and carers were consulted about the suitability of statements. An instrument was developed containing statements about stigma with accompanying photographs. Test-retest reliability, internal consistency and the factor structure of the instrument were evaluated. The instrument was completed by 109 people once and 88 people twice. Items with limited variability in responses and kappa coefficients lower than 0.4 were dropped. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two factors: ;perceived discrimination' (seven items) and ;reaction to discrimination' (four items). One item loaded onto both factors. Cronbach's alpha for the ten-item instrument was 0.84. This instrument will further our understanding of the impact of stigma in people with intellectual disability in clinical and research settings.

  7. What is an Intellectual Disability?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids Talk About: Coaches What Is an Intellectual Disability? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Is an Intellectual Disability? ... becoming an independent person. continue What Causes Intellectual Disabilities? Intellectual disabilities happen because the brain gets injured ...

  8. Disabilities - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Emergencies Now: Information for People with Disabilities - English Prepare for Emergencies Now: Information for People with ... for Emergencies Now: Information for People with Disabilities - English Prepare for Emergencies Now: Information for People with ...

  9. Individual Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frostig, Marianne; And Others

    The following workshop presentations consider learning disabilities: "Educational Goals of the Perceptually Handicapped" by Marianne Frostig, "Remediation of Reading Problems" by Gilbert Schiffman, "Early Identification of Learning Disabilities" by Katrina de Hirsch, and "What Are Some Speech and Hearing…

  10. DEFINING DISABILITY: DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A DISABILITY SEVERITY INDEX IN INHERITED NEUROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Michael E.; Feldman, Eva L.; Carlos, Ruth C.; Siskind, Carly

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a reliable patient-reported scale that grades the severity of disability in inherited neuropathy, from an in-depth analysis of patient and healthcare provider perspectives on what constitutes mild, moderate and severe disability. Design In this prospective, cross-sectional study, a 19-item Disability questionnaire was developed following literature and expert review. Between 2011–2012, the Disability Questionnaire was provided to Health Care Providers experienced in inherited neuropathy attending national scientific meetings, and to patients self-registered with the Inherited Neuropathy Consortium – Rare Diseases Clinical Research Consortium on-line contact registry. Provider and patient responses were compared utilizing a 2-sided unpaired t-test with Bonferroni correction. The questionnaire was then assessed for validity, reliability, and unidimensionality. Results We analyzed 259 Disability Questionnaires (167 patients, 92 providers); these showed perfect agreement between patient and provider responses on qualitative descriptions of disability, but significant differences in quantitative responses on items corresponding to minimal or severe disability (p < 0.001). Validity and Test-retest reliability of the Questionnaire was excellent (Cronbach’s alpha =0.96; ICC= 0.977 [0.951–0.993]. Exploratory factor analysis and the Mokken Scaling Procedure supported the unidimensionality of the Disability Severity Index. Conclusion The Disability Severity Index is a unique instrument, categorizing disability from the patient’s perspective, and will undergo further cross-validation studies in inherited neuropathy. This Index may have applications to other peripheral neuropathies, and would thus benefit from future validation studies in the appropriate cohorts. PMID:25157034

  11. IOT Overview: IR Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, E.

    In this instrument review chapter the calibration plans of ESO IR instruments are presented and briefly reviewed focusing, in particular, on the case of ISAAC, which has been the first IR instrument at VLT and whose calibration plan served as prototype for the coming instruments.

  12. Disability Accommodation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flick-Hruska, Connie, Comp.; Blythe, Gretchen, Comp.

    Designed as a resource for two-year college faculty and staff working with students with disabilities, this handbook contains facts about various disabilities, practical suggestions for improving services, and resource points for further information. Following a brief introduction, legal implications regarding disabled students are discussed for…

  13. Social Psychoanalytic Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodley, Dan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores connections and tensions between psychoanalysis and disability studies. The first part of the paper considers contemporaneous engagements with the psyche by a number of disability studies writers. These scholars have remained accountable to a politicised disability studies but have pushed for critical encounters with the…

  14. Work Disability in Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Judith

    This paper begins by examining the history of disability payments to disabled workers, specifically disability payments to coal workers. Efforts by the United Mine Workers of America made mine health and safety an issue in the 1960s, and continuing liberalization of the law continued through the 1970s. The identification of coal miners with…

  15. Substance Abuse and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Amos

    A review of the literature provides the conclusion that individuals with a disability versus those without a disability are more likely to have a substance abuse problem and less likely to get effective treatment. Data suggest 10-40% of all individuals in treatment for substance abuse have a coexisting physical or mental disability. Alcohol rates…

  16. Science and Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanovich, Keith E.

    1988-01-01

    Reactions to H. Lee Swanson's paper "Toward a Metatheory of Learning Disabilities" are outlined, and his arguments are applied to reading disabilities, focusing on the importance of the scientific attitude, the misuse of ecological validity, interpretation of Thomas Kuhn's work, modularity and reading disability, and scientific progress…

  17. Science and Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanovich, Keith E.

    1988-01-01

    Reactions to H. Lee Swanson's paper "Toward a Metatheory of Learning Disabilities" are outlined, and his arguments are applied to reading disabilities, focusing on the importance of the scientific attitude, the misuse of ecological validity, interpretation of Thomas Kuhn's work, modularity and reading disability, and scientific progress…

  18. Social Psychoanalytic Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodley, Dan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores connections and tensions between psychoanalysis and disability studies. The first part of the paper considers contemporaneous engagements with the psyche by a number of disability studies writers. These scholars have remained accountable to a politicised disability studies but have pushed for critical encounters with the…

  19. Astronomical Instruments in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Sreeramula Rajeswara

    The earliest astronomical instruments used in India were the gnomon and the water clock. In the early seventh century, Brahmagupta described ten types of instruments, which were adopted by all subsequent writers with minor modifications. Contact with Islamic astronomy in the second millennium AD led to a radical change. Sanskrit texts began to lay emphasis on the importance of observational instruments. Exclusive texts on instruments were composed. Islamic instruments like the astrolabe were adopted and some new types of instruments were developed. Production and use of these traditional instruments continued, along with the cultivation of traditional astronomy, up to the end of the nineteenth century.

  20. Instruments for the assessment of social anxiety disorder: Validation studies.

    PubMed

    Osório, Flávia de Lima; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Loureiro, Sonia Regina

    2012-10-22

    Great progress has been observed in the literature over the last decade regarding the validation of instruments for the assessment of Social Anxiety Disorder in the Brazilian context. Particularly outstanding in this respect is the production of a group of Brazilian investigators regarding the psychometric study of the following instruments: Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, Social Phobia Inventory, Brief Social Phobia Scale, Disability Profile, Liebowitz Self-Rated Disability Scale, Social Phobia Safety Behaviors Scale and Self-Statements During Public Speaking Scale, which have proved to be appropriate and valid for use in the adult Brazilian population, representing resources for the assessment of social anxiety in clinical and experimental situations.

  1. Instruments for the assessment of social anxiety disorder: Validation studies

    PubMed Central

    Osório, Flávia de Lima; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Loureiro, Sonia Regina

    2012-01-01

    Great progress has been observed in the literature over the last decade regarding the validation of instruments for the assessment of Social Anxiety Disorder in the Brazilian context. Particularly outstanding in this respect is the production of a group of Brazilian investigators regarding the psychometric study of the following instruments: Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, Social Phobia Inventory, Brief Social Phobia Scale, Disability Profile, Liebowitz Self-Rated Disability Scale, Social Phobia Safety Behaviors Scale and Self-Statements During Public Speaking Scale, which have proved to be appropriate and valid for use in the adult Brazilian population, representing resources for the assessment of social anxiety in clinical and experimental situations. PMID:24175172

  2. Portable direct reading instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermon-Cruz, Ivette Z.

    1991-09-01

    Direct reading instruments are those instruments in which the analysis of the contaminant is carried out within the instrument itself. When selecting equipment, the industrial hygienist must consider the physical characteristics of the instruments as well as their performance characteristics and price. Some of the methods of detection that are used in instruments with multi-gas detection capabilities are: photoionization, Flame ionization, infrared, gas chromatography, infrared photoacoustic, and electrochemical.

  3. Perceived Effort of Walking: Relationship With Gait, Physical Function and Activity, Fear of Falling, and Confidence in Walking in Older Adults With Mobility Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Julius, Leslie M.; Brach, Jennifer S.; Wert, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although clinicians have a number of measures to use to describe walking performance, few, if any, of the measures capture a person's perceived effort in walking. Perceived effort of walking may be a factor in what a person does versus what he or she is able to do. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the relationship of perceived effort of walking with gait, function, activity, fear of falling, and confidence in walking in older adults with mobility limitations. Design This investigation was a cross-sectional, descriptive, relational study. Methods The study took place at a clinical research training center. The participants were 50 older adults (mean age=76.8 years, SD=5.5) with mobility limitations. The measurements used were the Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) for walking; gait speed; the Modified Gait Abnormality Rating Scale; energy cost of walking; Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) for total, basic, and advanced lower-extremity function and for disability limitations; activity and restriction subscales of the Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFFE); activity counts; SAFFE fear subscale; and Gait Efficacy Scale (GES). The relationship of the RPE of walking with gait, function, activity, fear, and confidence was determined by using Spearman rank order coefficients and an analysis of variance (adjusted for age and sex) for mean differences between groups defined by no exertion during walking and some exertion during walking. Results The RPE was related to confidence in walking (GES, R=−.326, P=.021) and activity (activity counts, R=.295, P=.044). The RPE groups (no exertion versus some exertion) differed in LLFDI scores for total (57.9 versus 53.2), basic (68.6 versus 61.4), and advanced (49.1 versus 42.6) lower-extremity function; LLFDI scores for disability limitations (74.9 versus 67.5); SAFFE fear subscale scores (0.346 versus 0.643); and GES scores (80.1 versus 67.8) (all P<.05

  4. Mars Miniature Science Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soon Sam; Hayati, Samad; Lavery, David; McBrid, Karen

    2006-01-01

    For robotic Mars missions, all the science information is gathered through on-board miniature instruments that have been developed through many years of R&D. Compared to laboratory counterparts, the rover instruments require miniaturization, such as low mass (1-2 kg), low power (> 10 W) and compact (1-2 liter), yet with comparable sensitivity. Since early 1990's, NASA recognized the need for the miniature instruments and launched several instrument R&D programs, e.g., PIDDP (Planetary Instrument Definition and Development). However, until 1998, most of the instrument R&D programs supported only up to a breadboard level (TRL 3, 4) and there is a need to carry such instruments to flight qualifiable status (TU 5, 6) to respond to flight AOs (Announcement of Opportunity). Most of flight AOs have only limited time and financial resources, and can not afford such instrument development processes. To bridge the gap between instrument R&D programs and the flight instrument needs, NASA's Mars Technology Program (MTP) created advanced instrumentation program, Mars Instrument Development Project (MIDP). MIDP candidate instruments are selected through NASA Research Announcement (NRA) process [l]. For example, MIDP 161998-2000) selected and developed 10 instruments, MIDP II (2003-2005) 16 instruments, and MIDP III (2004-2006) II instruments.Working with PIs, JPL has been managing the MIDP tasks since September 1998. All the instruments being developed under MIDP have been selected through a highly competitive NRA process, and employ state-of-the-art technology. So far, four MIDP funded instruments have been selected by two Mars missions (these instruments have further been discussed in this paper).

  5. Mars Miniature Science Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soon Sam; Hayati, Samad; Lavery, David; McBrid, Karen

    2006-01-01

    For robotic Mars missions, all the science information is gathered through on-board miniature instruments that have been developed through many years of R&D. Compared to laboratory counterparts, the rover instruments require miniaturization, such as low mass (1-2 kg), low power (> 10 W) and compact (1-2 liter), yet with comparable sensitivity. Since early 1990's, NASA recognized the need for the miniature instruments and launched several instrument R&D programs, e.g., PIDDP (Planetary Instrument Definition and Development). However, until 1998, most of the instrument R&D programs supported only up to a breadboard level (TRL 3, 4) and there is a need to carry such instruments to flight qualifiable status (TU 5, 6) to respond to flight AOs (Announcement of Opportunity). Most of flight AOs have only limited time and financial resources, and can not afford such instrument development processes. To bridge the gap between instrument R&D programs and the flight instrument needs, NASA's Mars Technology Program (MTP) created advanced instrumentation program, Mars Instrument Development Project (MIDP). MIDP candidate instruments are selected through NASA Research Announcement (NRA) process [l]. For example, MIDP 161998-2000) selected and developed 10 instruments, MIDP II (2003-2005) 16 instruments, and MIDP III (2004-2006) II instruments.Working with PIs, JPL has been managing the MIDP tasks since September 1998. All the instruments being developed under MIDP have been selected through a highly competitive NRA process, and employ state-of-the-art technology. So far, four MIDP funded instruments have been selected by two Mars missions (these instruments have further been discussed in this paper).

  6. Beyond (Models of) Disability?

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, Jonas-Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The strategy of developing an ontology or models of disability as a prior step to settling ethical issues regarding disabilities is highly problematic for two reasons. First, key definitional aspects of disability are normative and cannot helpfully be made value-neutral. Second, if we accept that the contested concept of disability is value-laden, it is far from obvious that there are definitive reasons for choosing one interpretation of the concept over another. I conclude that the concept of disability is better left ethically open-ended or broad enough to encompass the examination of various ethical issues (such as oppression, minority rights, or physical discomfort). Alternatively, the concept of disability could be altogether abandoned in order to focus on specific issues without being hindered by debates about the nature of disability. Only political costs, rather than conceptual considerations internal to the models, could be weighed against such a conclusion. PMID:26892249

  7. Piping inspection instrument carriage

    SciTech Connect

    Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

    1993-09-20

    This invention is comprised of a pipe inspection instrument carriage for use with a pipe crawler or other locomotion means for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has means mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and means for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has means for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure.

  8. Multimorbidity Combinations and Disability in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, Ana R; Markwardt, Sheila; Botoseneanu, Anda

    2016-06-01

    Multimorbidity (multiple co-occurring chronic diseases) is associated with greater likelihood of disability and mortality, above and beyond the risk attributable to individual diseases. This study identifies prevalent multimorbidity patterns and evaluates their association with disability among U.S. older adults. Prospective cohort study using longitudinal Health and Retirement Study data (2010-2012). We included 8,782 participants aged 65 years and older and used negative binomial models to examine prospective disability, measured by the combined activities of daily living-instrumental activities of daily living index. Multimorbidity was defined as the co-occurring combination of at least two of the following chronic diseases: hypertension, cardiovascular disease, lung disease, diabetes, cancer, arthritis, stroke, cognitive impairment, or high depressive symptoms (CES-D score ≥ 4). We found 291 unique disease combinations with 1 to 1,167 older adults per disease combination. The three most prevalent combinations were: (a) hypertension and arthritis (n = 1,167); (b) hypertension, arthritis, and cardiovascular disease (n = 510); and (c) hypertension, arthritis, and diabetes (n = 430). Only one of the prevalent combinations included depressive symptoms (in combination with arthritis, hypertension; n = 129). This group showed the highest level of activities of daily living-instrumental activities of daily living disability compared to healthy participants or participants with a single disease (either included in the combination or different from diseases in the combination) even after adjusting for age, gender, education, race/ethnicity, and body mass index. Clinicians stand to gain from a better understanding of which disease combinations are more and less disabling among older adults. Understanding how multimorbidity combinations relate to functional status is an important step towards reducing disability and sustaining independent living among older adults.

  9. Feasibility of Eight Physical Fitness Tests in 1,050 Older Adults with Intellectual Disability: Results of the Healthy Ageing with Intellectual Disabilities Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Although physical fitness is relevant for well-being and health, knowledge on the feasibility of instruments to measure physical fitness in older adults with intellectual disability (ID) is lacking. As part of the study Healthy Ageing with Intellectual Disabilities with 1,050 older clients with ID in three Dutch care services, the feasibility of 8…

  10. Feasibility of Eight Physical Fitness Tests in 1,050 Older Adults with Intellectual Disability: Results of the Healthy Ageing with Intellectual Disabilities Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Although physical fitness is relevant for well-being and health, knowledge on the feasibility of instruments to measure physical fitness in older adults with intellectual disability (ID) is lacking. As part of the study Healthy Ageing with Intellectual Disabilities with 1,050 older clients with ID in three Dutch care services, the feasibility of 8…

  11. [Social and demographic factors v smoking tobacco among disabled countrymen].

    PubMed

    Rzempowska, Jadwiga; Jerzyk-Rajbiś, Małgorzata; Koźlak, Violetta; Cebulska, Violetta

    2010-01-01

    Smoking Tobacco is a problem which is concerned with all environments including disabled people. It is involved in increasing a lot of diseases, especially intensify disability and earlier passing away. The main objective of this thesis was the assessment of the problem of being addicted to smoke tobacco among disabled countrymen and the identification of the social and demographic factors, which have influence on smoking tobacco by disabled people. The researches were done among disabled people lived in villages of Kalisz. The questionnaire of survey was an instrument of the research. Demographic features such as: gender, age, education, marital status, cause and the age of becoming disabled were analyzed. 175 disabled people (69 men and 96 women) with the 18 - 45 age group were examined. Chi square test was capitalize on the statistical compilation. 5% mistake of deduction was accepted (p < 0.05). The statistical analysis showed dependence of smoking cigarettes on gender, cause and age of becoming disabled (p < 0.05). The identification of factors affected by smoking cigarettes allowed to isolate the smaller groups of disabled people to whom programs including healthy way of life should be promoted.

  12. National Trends in Mental Health Disability, 1997–2009

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. I assessed recent trends in mental health disability in the US nonelderly adult population in the context of trends in physical disabilities and psychological distress. Methods. Using data for 312 364 adults aged 18 to 64 years from the US National Health Interview Survey, 1997 to 2009, I examined time trends in self-reported disability attributed to mental health conditions, disability attributed to other chronic problems, and significant psychological distress (measured by using the K6 instrument). Results. The prevalence of self-reported mental health disability increased from 2.0% of the nonelderly adult population in the first 3 years (1997 to 1999) to 2.7% in the last 3 years (2007 to 2009), corresponding to an increase of almost 2 million disabled adults. Disability attributed to other chronic conditions decreased and significant psychological distress did not change appreciably. Change in self-reported mental health disability was more pronounced in adults who also reported disability attributed to other chronic conditions or significant psychological distress but who had no mental health contacts in the past year. Conclusions. These findings highlight the need for improved access to mental health services in the community and for better integration of these services with primary care. PMID:21940913

  13. Measuring disability in ankylosing spondylitis: comparison of bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index with revised Leeds Disability Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Eyres, Sophie; Tennant, Alan; Kay, Lesley; Waxman, Robin; Helliwell, Philip S

    2002-05-01

    Disability has been identified as a core outcome measure in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The Dougados Functional Index (DFI) and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) have been selected as core measures of function in this disease. However, neither of these instruments has undergone rigorous psychometric testing. The psychometric properties of 2 measures of disability, the BASFI and the revised Leeds Disability Questionnaire (RLDQ), were compared in a cohort of 208 outpatients with AS. Rasch analysis was used to examine the properties of each measure and to compare them on a common scale. Test-retest was assessed in a cohort of 149 subjects who completed each instrument twice over an interval of 2 weeks. Both instruments gave an even spread of scores across the study group, but BASFI responses were positively skewed and RLDQ responses negatively skewed. There was a highly significant difference between perceived severity groups for both instruments (Kruskal-Wallis chi-squared: RLDQ, 75.1; BASFI, 80.4; both p < 0.0001). Both instruments gave acceptable test-retest scores (RLDQ ICC = 0.95, 95% CI 0.93-0.97; BASFI ICC = 0.94, 95% CI 0.92-0.96). Both instruments were found to be unidimensional according to the Rasch model, but the BASFI had more items displaying differential item functioning. Category disordering was apparent with the BASFI but not the RLDQ. However, both instruments displayed disordered item thresholds. Neither instrument can be used as an interval measure. Both measures had "towers" of thresholds whereby several thresholds were marking the same point on the underlying disability construct. This was particularly notable in the case of the BASFI. Both the BASFI and RLDQ provide a unidimensional measure of function in AS that is in accord with patient perception of disease severity. Neither instrument can be used as an interval measure. Changing the way that the instruments are scored, for example by collapsing categories, may improve

  14. Woodwind Instrument Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperl, Gary

    1980-01-01

    The author presents a simple maintenance program for woodwind instruments which includes the care of tendon corks, the need for oiling keys, and methods of preventing cracks in woodwind instruments. (KC)

  15. Regional Instrumentation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromie, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the activities of regional instrumentation centers that utilize the state-of-the-art instruments and methodology in basic scientific research. The emphasis is on the centers involved in mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, lasers, and accelerators. (SA)

  16. Woodwind Instrument Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperl, Gary

    1980-01-01

    The author presents a simple maintenance program for woodwind instruments which includes the care of tendon corks, the need for oiling keys, and methods of preventing cracks in woodwind instruments. (KC)

  17. Animation of MARDI Instrument

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-09-30

    This frame from an animation shows a zoom into the Mars Descent Imager MARDI instrument onboard NASA Phoenix Mars Lander. The Phoenix team will soon attempt to use a microphone on the MARDI instrument to capture sounds of Mars.

  18. Regional Instrumentation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromie, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the activities of regional instrumentation centers that utilize the state-of-the-art instruments and methodology in basic scientific research. The emphasis is on the centers involved in mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, lasers, and accelerators. (SA)

  19. Definition and Assessment of Disability in Mental Disorders under the Perspective of the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF).

    PubMed

    Linden, Michael

    2017-03-01

    This article provides an overview of definitions and assessment instruments of disability, an important topic in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic illnesses, and in expert appraisals in social and forensic medicine. Health problems are manifested not only in symptoms, but also regularly in impairment or disability in everyday life, which is especially true for mental disorders. According to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) of the World Health Organization, disability can be understood as chronic suffering from symptoms of illness, or limitations of executing capacities, or inability to participate in selected areas of life. Operationally, disability can be defined as "capacity limitations which hinder the ability to execute needed activities and thereby participation in a given environment". This capacity-context-interaction model shows that there is no general disability but only context-related disability, which has manifold consequences for diagnosis and care. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Instrumentation in arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gurvis, D E

    1987-10-01

    Successful operations result from the interplay of several factors. The artfulness and technical skill of the surgeon are paramount. The instruments are also important. Whereas in traditional surgery one instrument can often be substituted for another with equally good results, arthroscopic surgery offers no such luxury. The specialized instruments are the sine qua non of the procedure. An intimate knowledge of the instruments and their uses and abuses comes together in an arthroscopic procedure to produce the end result: a successfully completed arthroscopy.

  1. Understanding and reducing disability in older adults following critical illness.

    PubMed

    Brummel, Nathan E; Balas, Michele C; Morandi, Alessandro; Ferrante, Lauren E; Gill, Thomas M; Ely, E Wesley

    2015-06-01

    To review how disability can develop in older adults with critical illness and to explore ways to reduce long-term disability following critical illness. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science and Google Scholar for studies reporting disability outcomes (i.e., activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and mobility activities) and/or cognitive outcomes among patients treated in an ICU who were 65 years or older. We also reviewed the bibliographies of relevant citations to identify additional citations. We identified 19 studies evaluating disability outcomes in critically ill patients who were 65 years and older. Descriptive epidemiologic data on disability after critical illness. Newly acquired disability in activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and mobility activities was commonplace among older adults who survived a critical illness. Incident dementia and less severe cognitive impairment were also highly prevalent. Factors related to the acute critical illness, ICU practices, such as heavy sedation, physical restraints, and immobility, as well as aging physiology, and coexisting geriatric conditions can combine to result in these poor outcomes. Older adults who survive critical illness have physical and cognitive declines resulting in disability at greater rates than hospitalized, noncritically ill and community dwelling older adults. Interventions derived from widely available geriatric care models in use outside of the ICU, which address modifiable risk factors including immobility and delirium, are associated with improved functional and cognitive outcomes and can be used to complement ICU-focused models such as the ABCDEs.

  2. Aeronautic Instruments. Section VI : Oxygen Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, F L

    1923-01-01

    This report contains statements as to amount of oxygen required at different altitudes and the methods of storing oxygen. The two types of control apparatus - the compressed oxygen type and the liquid oxygen type - are described. Ten different instruments of the compressed type are described, as well as the foreign instruments of the liquid types. The performance and specifications and the results of laboratory tests on all representative types conclude this report.

  3. The Instrumental Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeates, Devin Rodney

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation is to enable better predictive models by engaging raw experimental data through the Instrumental Model. The Instrumental Model captures the protocols and procedures of experimental data analysis. The approach is formalized by encoding the Instrumental Model in an XML record. Decoupling the raw experimental data from…

  4. The Instrumental Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeates, Devin Rodney

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation is to enable better predictive models by engaging raw experimental data through the Instrumental Model. The Instrumental Model captures the protocols and procedures of experimental data analysis. The approach is formalized by encoding the Instrumental Model in an XML record. Decoupling the raw experimental data from…

  5. Injuries and Individuals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Chaudhry, Ramiz A.

    2009-01-01

    Children and adults with disabilities are at an increased risk of injury. Falls are the leading mechanism of injury regardless of the disability status and are even more common in those with moderate or severe disabilities. The setting for the injury differs with the disability status. Compared to individuals with moderate or no disabilities,…

  6. Laparoscopic dissecting instruments.

    PubMed

    Park, A E; Mastrangelo, M J; Gandsas, A; Chu, U; Quick, N E

    2001-03-01

    The authors provide an overview of laparoscopic dissecting instruments and discuss early development, surgical options, and special features. End effectors of different shapes and functions are described. A comparison of available energy sources for laparoscopic instruments includes discussion of thermal dissection, ultrasonic dissection, and water-jet dissection. The ergonomic risks and challenges inherent in the use of current laparoscopic instruments are outlined, as well as ergonomic issues for the design of future instruments. New directions that laparoscopic instrumentation may take are considered in connection with developing technology in robotics, haptic feedback, and MicroElectroMechanical Systems.

  7. High temperature geophysical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1988-06-01

    The instrumentation development program was to proceed in parallel with scientific research and was driven by the needs of researchers. The development of these instruments has therefore included numerous geophysical field tests, many of which have resulted in the publication of scientific articles. This paper is a brief summary of some of the major geophysical instruments that have been developed and tested under the High Temperature Geophysics Program. These instruments are briefly described and references are given for further detailed information and for scientific papers that have resulted from the use of these instruments. 9 refs., 14 figs.

  8. Measuring quality in services for children with an intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Koornneef, Erik

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the application of one particular quality measurement tool, the SERVQUAL instrument, as a potential mechanism to measure quality in services for children with disabilities Staff and family of children with an intellectual disability in two organisations providing specialist therapy and day completed an adapted SERVQUAL questionnaire. A total of 81 SERVQUAL questionnaires were distributed and 59 questionnaires were returned (response rate of 73 per cent). The SERVQUAL instrument can be considered as a useful diagnostic tool to identify particular strengths and areas for improvement in services for people with disabilities as the instrument lends itself for the monitoring of the effectiveness of quality improvement initiatives over time. The findings also showed relatively high customer expectations and the organisations involved in this research are currently not meeting all of these high expectations as significant quality gaps were found in the areas of reliability and responsiveness. The sample size was relatively small and the measurement of quality using the SERVQUAL instrument remains a challenge, due to the conceptual and empirical difficulties. The SERVQUAL instrument is probably most be attractive to service managers and funding organisations because of its ability to identify gaps in the quality of the service. The tool had been used to measure quality in services for people with disabilities and the research has shown that this tool might be an important additional quality measurement tool for services.

  9. Disability and global development.

    PubMed

    Durocher, Joan; Lord, Janet; Defranco, Allison

    2012-07-01

    The United States invests billions of taxpayer dollars each year into foreign assistance programs that foster international diplomacy and development directed toward improving the quality of life for people around the world. These programs develop economies and combat poverty, promote democracy and governance, build new infrastructure, advance and protect human rights, among other development goals. The United States cannot effectively accomplish the goals of foreign assistance programs unless it undertakes measures to ensure that the programs are accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities. The United States has been a leader in advancing the rights of people with disabilities and must continue to promote disability rights through its international development work. Overseas economic development will not be successful unless people with disabilities are included. Because of the significant number of people with disabilities in developing countries, if they are not included, the very economic growth the United States is trying to foster will be hindered. The goals of democracy and governance programs cannot be achieved without the inclusion of people with disabilities. In many countries, domestic law contains blatant discriminatory provisions for people with disabilities that undermine access to justice and full participation in society. The provisions that discriminate against people with disabilities include arbitrary exclusions in electoral codes, sweeping plenary guardianship laws with no due-process protections, discriminatory banking practices, and inaccessible court proceedings. National disability legal frameworks remain underdeveloped throughout the world.

  10. Culture and Disability Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Carroll M.

    1983-01-01

    A substantial amount of literature suggests that illness behavior in the United States is a product of a patient's core culture; equally credible findings do not support this contention. Most students and graduates in the health care professions believe that illness and disability behavior are affected by a patient's culture, but they are hard put to find convincing examples of that relationship. In experience with medical students studying the social and cultural bases of illness behavior, with patients who are disabled and with persons who claim disability in the absence of physical disease or disabling psychopathology, I observed no deviant disability behavior that was typical for the members of any cultural group, and no behavior was displayed by the members of one cultural group that was not seen in members of other cultural groups. No cultural stereotypes were upheld. I did find evidence that disability behavior is influenced by personality factors, social situations and the gains derived from the disability status. Evolving concepts of “entitlement,” which are closely related to socioeconomic status, also have a significant influence. The impact of feedback from others in a person's many social and medical subcultures is a more crucial determinant of illness and disability behavior, except in those for whom illness and disability behavior is determined by the limitations imposed by the disease or by a personality structure resistant to cultural expectations and social feedback. PMID:6666106

  11. Evaluation of stroke disability.

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, J.; Keltz, E.; Stein, M. C.; White, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    The disabilities resulting from a stroke are not well understood from the epidemiologic or functional point of view. The stroke may impair mental status, perception, sensation, communication and motor ability; the total resulting disability is related to the extent of impairment in each of these areas. A complete evaluation in all these areas has to be done to determine the degree of disability before any rehabilitation program is planned. A comprehensive approach to evaluating stroke disability is presented that includes correlating the degree of impairment in each of the above-mentioned areas with the overall functional ability of the patient. PMID:1260603

  12. Disability and voting.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Ueda, Michiko

    2014-07-01

    For millions of people with disabilities in the United States, exercising the fundamental right to vote remains a challenge. Over the last few decades, the U.S. government has enacted several pieces of legislation to make voting accessible to individuals with disabilities. We examine trends in self-reported voting rates among people with and without disabilities to uncover evidence for the effects of these policies on political participation. We also explore what policy change is necessary to encourage people with disabilities to vote by investigating whether the participation rates vary by the types of disabilities. We analyze the Current Population Survey (CPS) data in the years of presidential elections for the period of 1980-2008. Our analysis shows that the population aged 18-64 with work-preventing disabilities has been persistently less likely to vote compared to the corresponding population without such disabilities. In addition, individuals with cognitive and mobility impairments have the lowest rates of electoral participation. The gap in the likelihood of voting in-person between people with and without disabilities is considerably larger than the gap in the likelihood of voting by-mail, regardless of the types of impairments that they have. The participation gap between people with and without disabilities did not decrease over the last three decades despite the presence of federal laws that aimed at removing barriers for voting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Matter of Disability.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David T; Snyder, Sharon L

    2016-12-01

    By ruling out questions of impairment from the social critique of disability, Disability Studies (DS) analyses establish a limit point in the field. Of course the setting of "limits" enables possibilities in multiple directions as well as fortifies boundaries of refusal. For instance, impairment (the biological conditions of an organism's inefficient attachment to the world) becomes in DS simultaneously a productive refusal to interpret disabled bodies as inferior to non-disabled bodies (i.e. pathologized) and a bar to thinking through more active engagements with disability as materiality. Disability materiality such as conditions produced by ecological toxicities serve as active switch-points for creative corporeal navigations of the interaction between bodies and environments.In fact in this paper we want to propose a more "lively" definition of disability materiality to existing definitions of impairment as limiting expressions of non-normative bodies. We have no useful ways of explaining disability as adaptation and it's time we begin the process of theorizing more active ideas of materiality that extend existing ideas of disability beyond simplistic conceptions of socially rejected biologies made available by social constructivist thought.

  14. The social model of disability: dichotomy between impairment and disability.

    PubMed

    Anastasiou, Dimitris; Kauffman, James M

    2013-08-01

    The rhetoric of the social model of disability is presented, and its basic claims are critiqued. Proponents of the social model use the distinction between impairment and disability to reduce disabilities to a single social dimension-social oppression. They downplay the role of biological and mental conditions in the lives of disabled people. Consequences of denying biological and mental realities involving disabilities are discussed. People will benefit most by recognizing both the biological and the social dimensions of disabilities.

  15. Seismic instrumentation of buildings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Çelebi, Mehmet

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information on how and why we deploy seismic instruments in and around building structures. The recorded response data from buildings and other instrumented structures can be and are being primarily used to facilitate necessary studies to improve building codes and therefore reduce losses of life and property during damaging earthquakes. Other uses of such data can be in emergency response situations in large urban environments. The report discusses typical instrumentation schemes, existing instrumentation programs, the steps generally followed in instrumenting a structure, selection and type of instruments, installation and maintenance requirements and data retrieval and processing issues. In addition, a summary section on how recorded response data have been utilized is included. The benefits from instrumentation of structural systems are discussed.

  16. Studies in Reaction to Disability. XII: Structure of Attitudes toward the Physically Disabled; Disability Factor Scales--Amputation, Blindness, Cosmetic Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siller, Jerome; And Others

    To describe and to develop instruments to measure attitudes toward amputees, the blind, and those with cosmetic conditions, three groups of subjects responded to one of three large pools of items tapping attitudes toward the three disability conditions. Three new groups of about 500 subjects of diverse demographic characteristics were given one of…

  17. Office of Disability Employment Policy

    MedlinePlus

    ... OF LABOR Facebook Twitter RSS Email Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) Menu About ODEP About ODEP ... Youth in Transition Publications for Order and Download Disability Statistics September 2017 Disability Employment Statistics Ages 16 ...

  18. Disability and Health: Healthy Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Health and Wellness of Persons with Disabilities Health Care Reform Health care reform for Americans with disabilities: ... the Affordable Care Act . Getting the Best Possible Health Care People with disabilities must get the care and ...

  19. An Interactive Multimedia Program to Prevent HIV Transmission in Men with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Jennifer; Clark, Khaya; Sarno, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of a computer-based interactive multimedia HIV/AIDS prevention program for men with intellectual disability (ID) was examined using a quasi-experimental within-subjects design. Thirty-seven men with mild to moderate intellectual disability evaluated the program. The pretest and posttest instruments assessed HIV/AIDS knowledge…

  20. Traditional Chinese Values and Attitudes of Chinese University Students toward People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Nan Zhang; Xiao, Fei

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore relationships between traditional Chinese values and attitudes toward people with intellectual disabilities. A total of 534 college students in China participated in the study. Two instruments that measure Chinese values and attitudes toward people with intellectual disabilities were used. Results indicated…

  1. Measuring Faculty Attitudes and Perceptions toward Disability at a Four-Year University: A Validity Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Allison

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to develop and field test the ExCEL survey instrument, intended to measure faculty attitudes toward and perceptions about students with disabilities at four-year colleges and universities. A secondary purpose was to examine how demographic characteristics of the sample and prior disability-focused training…

  2. National Databases with Information on College Students with Disabilities. NCCSD Research Brief. Volume 1, Issue 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avellone, Lauren; Scott, Sally

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research brief was to identify and provide an overview of national databases containing information about college students with disabilities. Eleven instruments from federal and university-based sources were described. Databases reflect a variety of survey methods, respondents, definitions of disability, and research questions.…

  3. An Interactive Multimedia Program to Prevent HIV Transmission in Men with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Jennifer; Clark, Khaya; Sarno, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of a computer-based interactive multimedia HIV/AIDS prevention program for men with intellectual disability (ID) was examined using a quasi-experimental within-subjects design. Thirty-seven men with mild to moderate intellectual disability evaluated the program. The pretest and posttest instruments assessed HIV/AIDS knowledge…

  4. A National Evaluation of Residential Camp Programs Serving Persons with Disabilities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannan, Steve A.; Arick, Joel; Fullerton, Ann

    A study conducted a nationwide evaluation of 15 residential camp programs designed for children, youth, and young adults with mild to severe disabilities. The study involved 2,184 campers (ages 7-19) with disabilities and was undertaken to further validate evaluation instrumentation, evaluate residential camp programs for children with…

  5. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Notes on Genealogy and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winzer, Margret; Mazurek, Kas

    2014-01-01

    The dense and complex "Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities" (CRPD) is both a human rights treaty and a development tool. It supplements the web of existing human rights instruments insofar as they relate to disability. Schooling is enshrouded as a rights-based case; inclusive education as a development tool for all…

  6. Floor Effects Associated with Universal Screening and Their Impact on the Early Identification of Reading Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catts, Hugh W.; Petscher, Yaacov; Schatschneider, Christopher; Bridges, Mindy Sittner; Mendoza, Katherin

    2009-01-01

    Response to intervention (RTI) holds great promise for the early identification and prevention of reading disabilities. The success of RTI rests in part on the accuracy of universal screening tools used within this framework. Despite advancements, screening instruments designed to identify children at risk for reading disabilities continue to have…

  7. Reliability and Validity of the Bayesian Identification Procedure for Learning Disabled Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alley, Gordon R.; And Others

    The study investigated the reliability and validity of professional groups using the Modified Component Disability Instrument to identify/evaluate learning disabled (LD) adolescents. Ss included 166 LD teachers, speech clinicians, remedial reading teachers, school psychologists, school principals, and school counselors. Calculations were made for…

  8. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Notes on Genealogy and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winzer, Margret; Mazurek, Kas

    2014-01-01

    The dense and complex "Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities" (CRPD) is both a human rights treaty and a development tool. It supplements the web of existing human rights instruments insofar as they relate to disability. Schooling is enshrouded as a rights-based case; inclusive education as a development tool for all…

  9. College Students with Disabilities in Teacher Education: Faculty Attitudes and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyser, Yona; Greenberger, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Increasing numbers of students with disabilities are enrolled in post-secondary institutions. This study examined faculty attitudes and practices regarding students with disabilities in teacher education. Participants were 188 faculty in seven colleges, in Israel, who responded to a survey instrument about attitudes and practices. Faculty reported…

  10. Measuring Faculty Attitudes and Perceptions toward Disability at a Four-Year University: A Validity Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Allison

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to develop and field test the ExCEL survey instrument, intended to measure faculty attitudes toward and perceptions about students with disabilities at four-year colleges and universities. A secondary purpose was to examine how demographic characteristics of the sample and prior disability-focused training…

  11. Disability, poverty and development.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    Disability is both a cause and consequence of poverty. Eliminating world poverty is unlikely to be achieved unless the rights and needs of people with disabilities are taken into account. According to the United Nations, one person in 20 has a disability. More than three out of four of these live in a developing country. More often than not they are among the poorest of the poor. Recent World Bank estimates suggest they may account for as many as one in five of the world's poorest. Disability limits access to education and employment, and leads to economic and social exclusion. Poor people with disabilities are caught in a vicious cycle of poverty and disability, each being both a cause and a consequence of the other. A large proportion of disability is preventable. Achieving the international development targets for economic, social and human development will undoubtedly reduce the levels of disability in many poor countries. However, general improvements in living conditions will not be enough. Specific steps are still required, not only for prevention, but also to ensure that people with disabilities are able to participate fully in the development process, obtain a fair share of the benefits, and claim their rights as full and equal members of society. An integrated approach is required, linking prevention and rehabilitation with empowerment strategies and changes in attitudes. This paper assesses the significance of disability as a key development issue, and its importance in relation to poverty, human rights, and the achievement of internationally agreed development targets. It also sets out ways in which development co-operation, including DFID's own work, can help incorporate the rights and needs of people with disabilities into the mainstream of poverty reduction work and the achievement of human rights.

  12. Present status of aircraft instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    This report gives a brief description of the present state of development and of the performance characteristics of instruments included in the following group: speed instruments, altitude instruments, navigation instruments, power-plant instruments, oxygen instruments, instruments for aerial photography, fog-flying instruments, general problems, summary of instrument and research problems. The items considered under performance include sensitivity, scale errors, effects of temperature and pressure, effects of acceleration and vibration, time lag, damping, leaks, elastic defects, and friction.

  13. Longitudinal changes in disabled husbands' and wives' receipt of care.

    PubMed

    Noël-Miller, Claire

    2010-10-01

    This study contrasts 2-year adjustments in disabled husbands' and wives' amount of received care following both worsening and recovery in personal (activities of daily living [ADLs]) and routine care (instrumental activities of daily living [IADLs]) disability. Using longitudinal data on 789 husbands and 778 wives from the Health and Retirement Study (2000 and 2002), changes in marital partners' monthly hours of spousal and nonspousal care were jointly modeled using bivariate Tobit models. In addition, asymmetry in the magnitude of responses to worsening and improvement of function was examined. Disabled husbands receive more hours of spousal and nonspousal care following worsening in ADL function than wives. Conversely, disabled wives lose more spousal and nonspousal care hours following improvements in ADL disability than husbands. Moreover, wives recovering in ADL function lose more hours of spousal care than they receive following worsening in personal care disability. There is no evidence of corresponding gender differences in the dynamics of assistance received following changes in IADL function. Compared with husbands, disabled wives are disadvantaged in the adjustment of their personal care hours. Although disabled married community residents receive more hours of care than their unmarried counterparts, there are important gender differences in the advantages offered by marriage.

  14. Athletic training students with disabilities: a survey of entry-level education programs.

    PubMed

    Newsham, Katherine R

    2006-01-01

    The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 created and expanded protection for people with disabilities. To identify the proportion of students with disabilities enrolled in entry-level athletic training education programs (ATEPs), to examine the nature of the disabilities reported by these students, and to assess the number of ATEPs with policies (beyond technical standards) for admitting students with disabilities. I distributed a survey via e-mail and the US Postal Service. The survey instrument was adapted from a tool used in similar research on medical education programs. Entry-level ATEPs. The survey was distributed to program directors at 292 Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Program-accredited entry-level ATEPs. Using frequency analysis, I determined the rate at which students with disabilities enrolled in entry-level ATEPs and the types of disabilities represented. Disabilities represented in the study were related to learning, auditory, visual, emotional, orthopaedic, mobility, and motor skill impairments. Of the 283 surveys delivered, 105 (37%) were completed and returned. A total of 70% of respondents reported enrollment of students with disabilities in their ATEPs. The number of students with disabilities in entry-level ATEPs increased during the 4-year period of this study, and the proportion of students with disabilities has also increased annually (from 1.8% to 2.6%). The most common type of impairment was a learning disability, accounting for more than 80% of all disabilities reported. Fewer than 10% of the ATEPs had a specific enrollment policy for students with disabilities. The number of students with disabilities in entry-level ATEPs is increasing, yet this figure is well below the 9% reported for the general student population. Most institutions rely on technical standards or student disability officers to determine if a student with a disability is otherwise qualified for selection into

  15. Athletic Training Students With Disabilities: A Survey of Entry-Level Education Programs

    PubMed Central

    Newsham, Katherine R

    2006-01-01

    Context: The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 created and expanded protection for people with disabilities. Objective: To identify the proportion of students with disabilities enrolled in entry-level athletic training education programs (ATEPs), to examine the nature of the disabilities reported by these students, and to assess the number of ATEPs with policies (beyond technical standards) for admitting students with disabilities. Design: I distributed a survey via e-mail and the US Postal Service. The survey instrument was adapted from a tool used in similar research on medical education programs. Setting: Entry-level ATEPs. Patients or Other Participants: The survey was distributed to program directors at 292 Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Program–accredited entry-level ATEPs. Main Outcome Measure(s): Using frequency analysis, I determined the rate at which students with disabilities enrolled in entry-level ATEPs and the types of disabilities represented. Disabilities represented in the study were related to learning, auditory, visual, emotional, orthopaedic, mobility, and motor skill impairments. Results: Of the 283 surveys delivered, 105 (37%) were completed and returned. A total of 70% of respondents reported enrollment of students with disabilities in their ATEPs. The number of students with disabilities in entry-level ATEPs increased during the 4-year period of this study, and the proportion of students with disabilities has also increased annually (from 1.8% to 2.6%). The most common type of impairment was a learning disability, accounting for more than 80% of all disabilities reported. Fewer than 10% of the ATEPs had a specific enrollment policy for students with disabilities. Conclusions: The number of students with disabilities in entry-level ATEPs is increasing, yet this figure is well below the 9% reported for the general student population. Most institutions rely on technical

  16. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. President Bush's position is that he "will not be satisfied until every American who wants a job can find a…

  17. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. President Bush's position is that he "will not be satisfied until every American who wants to work can find…

  18. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. Employers can make sound business decisions and gain a competitive advantage by using this guide to increase the…

  19. Beauty and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    People often hold stereotypical notions about disability, assuming people with significant disabilities offer little in terms of friendship or contribution. Some are even repulsed by that person's physical appearance. Such responses, evident within the Christian community as well, fail to acknowledge the inherent worth of the person as created in…

  20. Disciplining Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Janieth

    2012-01-01

    Discipline in schools can be difficult, especially when dealing with students with disabilities. In fact, Clash (2006) reported that working with students with disabilities under stringent legal demands has become a source of stress for many principals. The typical principal has not received extensive preservice or inservice training in this area.…

  1. Disabled Students of Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Zelma Lloyd; Ball-Brown, Brenda

    1993-01-01

    Explores why few disabled students of color use student services. Details why some of these students were unnecessarily placed in special education programs and focuses on the experiences of this group. Addresses general cultural differences that can affect responses between people of color and disability services. Provides guidelines for service…

  2. Developmental Disabilities Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TEACHING Exceptional Children, 1995

    1995-01-01

    The Developmental Disabilities Act provides funds to State Developmental Disabilities Councils to formulate comprehensive systems of services, supports, and other assistance. The act also supports protection and advocacy systems to protect legal rights, university-affiliated programs to provide preservice preparation, and national initiatives to…

  3. Assessment of Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Lorrie A.

    The assessment and diagnosis of learning disabilities (LD) in the school is problematic. How do educators determine who is learning disabled? What practices are recommended? The main focus of the paper is on specific, relatively technical points that influence the validity of assessment. Since technical concerns are only one of the factors…

  4. The Disabled: Media's Monster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdan, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    From the early nineteenth century to the present, horror, gangster, and adventure films, television, the comics, and newspapers have shown physical and mental disabilities to connote murder, violence, and danger. Such false portrayals have promoted negative public attitudes toward people with disabilities. (Author/MJL)

  5. Disciplining Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Janieth

    2012-01-01

    Discipline in schools can be difficult, especially when dealing with students with disabilities. In fact, Clash (2006) reported that working with students with disabilities under stringent legal demands has become a source of stress for many principals. The typical principal has not received extensive preservice or inservice training in this area.…

  6. Transporting Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1998-01-01

    Under the 1973 Rehabilitation Act (Section 504) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, school districts must transport students with disabilities to a site providing a free, appropriate education in the least restrictive environment. This article discusses federal and state laws governing student transportation, including wheelchair…

  7. Introduction: Childhood and Disability.

    PubMed

    Salter, Erica K

    2017-06-21

    From growth attenuation therapy for severely developmentally disabled children to the post-natal management of infants with trisomy 13 and 18, pediatric treatment decisions regularly involve assessments of the probability and severity of a child's disability. Because these decisions are almost always made by surrogate decision-makers (parents and caregivers) and because these decision-makers must often make decisions based on both prognostic guesses and potentially biased quality of life judgments, they are among the most ethically complex in pediatric care. As the introduction to HEC Forum's special thematic issue on Childhood and Disability, this article orients the reader to the history of bioethics' relationship to both pediatric ethics and disability studies and introduces the issue's five manuscripts. As clinicians, disability scholars, philosophers and clinical ethicists writing on various aspects of pediatric disability, the articles' authors all invite readers to dig beneath an overly-simplified version of what disability might mean to children and families and instead embrace a posture of genuine humility, recognizing both the limits and harms of traditional medical and bioethical responses (or indifferences) to the disabled child.

  8. Biologic Patterns of Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, Carl V.; Linn, Richard T.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the use of Rasch analysis to elucidate biological patterns of disability present in the functional ability of persons undergoing medical rehabilitation. Uses two measures, one for inpatients and one for outpatients, to illustrate the approach and provides examples of some biological patterns of disability associated with specific types…

  9. Dads and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Cindy, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on the relationship of fathers and their children with disabilities. It reports a study of 86 Kansas fathers of children (ages 5 to 8) with and without disabilities. The study was conducted in order to identify more options for fathers wishing to increase their involvement with their children. The study sent surveys of…

  10. Analyzing Disability Accommodation Statements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard-Brak, L.; Lan, W. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Studies have indicated that the willingness of faculty members to accommodate students with disabilities differs according to academic discipline and instructor gender. The authors examined the attitudes of faculty members toward students with disabilities as reflected in course syllabi to discern instructor willingness to accommodate these…

  11. Learning about Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popp, Rita Ann

    1983-01-01

    The author describes lessons provided for regular class elementary students to help them understand disabilities and disabled persons. Objectives, materials needed, and activities are outlined for six lessons focusing on the following topics: individual differences, wheelchairs; devices that help people walk; amputation, artificial limbs, and…

  12. Learning Disabled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoy, Cheri; Gregg, Noel

    1986-01-01

    The emerging population of learning disabled college students is presenting a new challenge to college professionals: admission officers, counselors, financial aid personnel, academic advisors, and professors. Learning disablities interfere with the ability to perceive, process, sort, store, or retrieve information regardless of level of…

  13. Learning about Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popp, Rita Ann

    1983-01-01

    The author describes lessons provided for regular class elementary students to help them understand disabilities and disabled persons. Objectives, materials needed, and activities are outlined for six lessons focusing on the following topics: individual differences, wheelchairs; devices that help people walk; amputation, artificial limbs, and…

  14. Ghana: Disability and Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botts, Betsy H.; Evans, William H.

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive study explores the educational system and attitudes toward disability in the Volta Region of Ghana. Traditional, Christian, and Islamic beliefs toward disability are explored. Educators from Accra and three families from the Volta Region with children with special needs are interviewed in an effort to explore the connection…

  15. Permanent Disability Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Chovil, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    This paper is a review of the theory and practice of disability evaluation with emphasis on the distinction between medical impairment and disability. The requirements for making an accurate assessment of medical impairments are discussed. The author suggests three basic standards which can be used for establishing a simplified method of assessing physical impairment. PMID:20469213

  16. Assisted Dying & Disability.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Christopher A

    2017-07-01

    This article explores at least two dominant critiques of assisted dying from a disability rights perspective. In spite of these critiques, I conclude that assisted dying ought to be permissible. I arrive at the conclusion that if we respect and value people with disabilities, we ought to permit assisted dying. I do so in the following manner. First, I examine recent changes in legislation that have occurred since the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End-of-Life Decision-Making report, published in this journal. I suggest that these changes are likely to only strengthen opposition to assisted dying from disability rights activists and people with disabilities. Second, I focus on respect for people with disabilities and in particular, respect for their autonomy and decision-making abilities. Third, I explore the opposition to assisted dying that focuses on risk and the vulnerability of people with disabilities. Here I suggest that this risk ought not to be of special concern. Ultimately, I conclude that upholding respect for the disabled requires the legalization of assisted dying, rather than the denial of access in a misguided effort to protect people with disabilities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Disabilities in Written Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Teresa J.

    2011-01-01

    Regular education teachers may have received inadequate preparation to work with the variety of student disabilities encountered in the classroom, or they may have received limited training regarding the full range of learning disabilities and their effects on classroom performance. Along with problems in the area of math, students may also have…

  18. 2005 Disability Awareness Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The mission of Disability Awareness Night is to expand awareness of the 54 million Americans with disabilities, by highlighting their extraordinary achievements and the perseverance and dedication of the families, caregivers, physicians, nurses, therapists and teachers involved in their care and development. The presentation of the EP Maxwell…

  19. Learning Disabilities: Lifelong Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Shirley C., Ed.; Ellis, William, Ed.

    This book contains papers on learning disabilities based on presentations made at the "Summit on Learning Disabilities: A National Responsibility," held in September 1994. The first section provides an overview and includes "The State of Research" (G. Reid Lyon). The second section focuses on education and includes:…

  20. Beauty and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    People often hold stereotypical notions about disability, assuming people with significant disabilities offer little in terms of friendship or contribution. Some are even repulsed by that person's physical appearance. Such responses, evident within the Christian community as well, fail to acknowledge the inherent worth of the person as created in…

  1. The Disabled: Media's Monster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdan, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    From the early nineteenth century to the present, horror, gangster, and adventure films, television, the comics, and newspapers have shown physical and mental disabilities to connote murder, violence, and danger. Such false portrayals have promoted negative public attitudes toward people with disabilities. (Author/MJL)

  2. Learning Disabilities: Lifelong Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Shirley C., Ed.; Ellis, William, Ed.

    This book contains papers on learning disabilities based on presentations made at the "Summit on Learning Disabilities: A National Responsibility," held in September 1994. The first section provides an overview and includes "The State of Research" (G. Reid Lyon). The second section focuses on education and includes:…

  3. Learning Disabilities and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Paul J., Ed.; Brown, Dale S., Ed.

    This book provides information on preparing individuals with learning disabilities for the challenges of employment and outlines the rights of those with learning disabilities in the workplace. Introductory chapters in Part 1 include: "Life after School: Challenges in the Workplace" (Paul J. Gerber); "The New Economy in the 21st…

  4. 77 FR 8234 - National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Disability and Rehabilitation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-- Disability and Rehabilitation Research... Disability and Rehabilitation Research-- Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program-- Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project--Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and...

  5. Gemini Instrument Upgrade Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Ruben; Goodsell, Stephen; Kleinman, Scot

    2016-08-01

    The Gemini Observatory* remains committed to keeping its operational instrumentation competitive and serving the needs of its user community. Currently the observatory operates a 4 instruments + 1 AO system at each site. At Gemini North the GMOS-N, GNIRS, NIFS and NIRI instruments are offered supported by the ALTAIR AO system. In the south, GMOS-S, F-2, GPI and GSAOI are offered instrumentation and GeMS is the provided AO System. This paper reviews our strategy to keep our instrumentation suite competitive, examines both our current funded upgrade projects and our potential future enhancements. We summarize the work done and the results so far obtained within the instrument upgrade program.

  6. Review of Instrumented Indentation

    PubMed Central

    VanLandingham, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    Instrumented indentation, also known as depth-sensing indentation or nanoindentation, is increasingly being used to probe the mechanical response of materials from metals and ceramics to polymeric and biological materials. The additional levels of control, sensitivity, and data acquisition offered by instrumented indentation systems have resulted in numerous advances in materials science, particularly regarding fundamental mechanisms of mechanical behavior at micrometer and even sub-micrometer length scales. Continued improvements of instrumented indentation testing towards absolute quantification of a wide range of material properties and behavior will require advances in instrument calibration, measurement protocols, and analysis tools and techniques. In this paper, an overview of instrumented indentation is given with regard to current instrument technology and analysis methods. Research efforts at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) aimed at improving the related measurement science are discussed. PMID:27413609

  7. VIRUS instrument enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, T.; Allen, R.; Mondrik, N.; Rheault, J. P.; Sauseda, M.; Boster, E.; James, M.; Rodriguez-Patino, M.; Torres, G.; Ham, J.; Cook, E.; Baker, D.; DePoy, Darren L.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Hill, G. J.; Perry, D.; Savage, R. D.; Good, J. M.; Vattiat, Brian L.

    2014-08-01

    The Visible Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument will be installed at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope† in the near future. The instrument will be housed in two enclosures that are mounted adjacent to the telescope, via the VIRUS Support Structure (VSS). We have designed the enclosures to support and protect the instrument, to enable servicing of the instrument, and to cool the instrument appropriately while not adversely affecting the dome environment. The system uses simple HVAC air handling techniques in conjunction with thermoelectric and standard glycol heat exchangers to provide efficient heat removal. The enclosures also provide power and data transfer to and from each VIRUS unit, liquid nitrogen cooling to the detectors, and environmental monitoring of the instrument and dome environments. In this paper, we describe the design and fabrication of the VIRUS enclosures and their subsystems.

  8. Enabling disability inclusive practices within the University of Cape Town curriculum: A case study.

    PubMed

    Ohajunwa, Chioma; Mckenzie, Judith; Lorenzo, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    Disability inclusion in the curricula of higher education institutions contributes to socially responsive graduates with a capacity to address the cross-cutting issue of disability in development. This article discusses a study conducted at the University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa, to explore disability inclusion. An instrumental case study approach was adopted and a thematic analysis of data was done. Academic staff found a variety of ways to include disability, such as discussions in class, practice and service learning, but mainly as part of disciplinary requirements. Including disability as an issue of social justice stems mostly from the personal interest of staff, and is done in an ad hoc manner. Disability should be valued, and integrated into the curriculum in a structured manner as a perspective on diversity with which to interrogate our beliefs about ourselves and society. Theorising on disability is needed, as well as the unique perspectives that emerge across interdisciplinary boundaries, especially within the African context.

  9. Wet chemistry instrument prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A wet chemistry instrument prototype for detecting amino acids in planetary soil samples was developed. The importance of amino acids and their condensation products to the development of life forms is explained. The characteristics of the instrument and the tests which were conducted to determine the materials compatibility are described. Diagrams are provided to show the construction of the instrument. Data obtained from the performance tests are reported.

  10. Instrumentation in Earthquake Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havskov, Jens; Alguacil, Gerardo

    Here is unique and comprehensive coverage of modern seismic instrumentation, based on the authors' practical experience of a quarter-century in seismology and geophysics. Their goal is to provide not only detailed information on the basics of seismic instruments but also to survey equipment on the market, blending this with only the amount of theory needed to understand the basic principles. Seismologists and technicians working with seismological instruments will find here the answers to their practical problems.

  11. Aircrew Screening Instruments Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    available tools . Several vendors indicated that they will have new selection instruments available within a few months. These are not listed. As noted...AFCAPS-FR-2011-0012 AIRCREW SCREENING INSTRUMENTS REVIEW Diane L. Damos Damos Aviation Services, Inc...June 2007 – August 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Aircrew Screening Instruments Review 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA3089-06-F-0385 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  12. Sterilization of Medical Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-06

    possible use with medical instruments and skin catheters. To address this challenge, MicroStructure Technologies (MicroST) is developing an...Project: DARPA - Sterilization of Medical Instruments Contract: # FA9550-06-C-0054 Principal Investigator: Joseph Birmingham Report: FINAL Report 1...as medical instruments and skin catheters. To address this challenge, MicroStructure Technologies (MicroST) is proposing a compact, low maintenance

  13. Alternative Policy Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    CpRE CENTER FOR POLICY RESEARCH IN EDUCATION Alternative Policy o Instruments I Lorraine M. McDonnell Richard F. Elmore November 1987 DTICELECTE...03 Alternative Policy Instruments Lorraine M. McDonnell The RAND Corporation Richard F. Elmore Michigan State University November 1987 THRAND...range of policy instruments available or on the political and organizational conditions needed for each to work as intended. Policy decisions would

  14. Instrument validation project

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, B.A.; Daymo, E.A.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Zhang, J.

    1996-06-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company Project W-211 is responsible for providing the system capabilities to remove radioactive waste from ten double-shell tanks used to store radioactive wastes on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The project is also responsible for measuring tank waste slurry properties prior to injection into pipeline systems, including the Replacement of Cross-Site Transfer System. This report summarizes studies of the appropriateness of the instrumentation specified for use in Project W-211. The instruments were evaluated in a test loop with simulated slurries that covered the range of properties specified in the functional design criteria. The results of the study indicate that the compact nature of the baseline Project W-211 loop does not result in reduced instrumental accuracy resulting from poor flow profile development. Of the baseline instrumentation, the Micromotion densimeter, the Moore Industries thermocouple, the Fischer and Porter magnetic flow meter, and the Red Valve Pressure transducer meet the desired instrumental accuracy. An alternate magnetic flow meter (Yokagawa) gave nearly identical results as the baseline fischer and Porter. The Micromotion flow meter did not meet the desired instrument accuracy but could potentially be calibrated so that it would meet the criteria. The Nametre on-line viscometer did not meet the desired instrumental accuracy and is not recommended as a quantitative instrument although it does provide qualitative information. The recommended minimum set of instrumentation necessary to ensure the slurry meets the Project W-058 acceptance criteria is the Micromotion mass flow meter and delta pressure cells.

  15. Satellite oceanography - The instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that no instrument is sensitive to only one oceanographic variable; rather, each responds to a combination of atmospheric and oceanic phenomena. This complicates data interpretation and usually requires that a number of observations, each sensitive to somewhat different phenomena, be combined to provide unambiguous information. The distinction between active and passive instruments is described. A block diagram illustrating the steps necessary to convert data from satellite instruments into oceanographic information is included, as is a diagram illustrating the operation of a radio-frequency radiometer. Attention is also given to the satellites that carry the various oceanographic instruments.

  16. Space applications instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzner, R. A.; Oberholtzer, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A compendium of resumes of 158 instrument systems or experiments, of particular interest to space applications, is presented. Each resume exists in a standardized format, permitting entries for 26 administrative items and 39 scientific or engineering items. The resumes are organized into forty groups determined by the forty spacecraft with which the instruments are associated. The resumes are followed by six different cross indexes, each organized alphabetically according to one of the following catagories: instrument name, acronym, name of principal investigator, name of organization employing the principal investigator, assigned experiment number, and spacecraft name. The resumes are associated with a computerized instrument resume search and retrieval system.

  17. [Controlling instruments in radiology].

    PubMed

    Maurer, M

    2013-10-01

    Due to the rising costs and competitive pressures radiological clinics and practices are now facing, controlling instruments are gaining importance in the optimization of structures and processes of the various diagnostic examinations and interventional procedures. It will be shown how the use of selected controlling instruments can secure and improve the performance of radiological facilities. A definition of the concept of controlling will be provided. It will be shown which controlling instruments can be applied in radiological departments and practices. As an example, two of the controlling instruments, material cost analysis and benchmarking, will be illustrated.

  18. Instrument performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Swinth, K.L.

    1993-03-01

    Deficiencies exist in both the performance and the quality of health physics instruments. Recognizing the implications of such deficiencies for the protection of workers and the public, in the early 1980s the DOE and the NRC encouraged the development of a performance standard and established a program to test a series of instruments against criteria in the standard. The purpose of the testing was to establish the practicality of the criteria in the standard, to determine the performance of a cross section of available instruments, and to establish a testing capability. Over 100 instruments were tested, resulting in a practical standard and an understanding of the deficiencies in available instruments. In parallel with the instrument testing, a value-impact study clearly established the benefits of implementing a formal testing program. An ad hoc committee also met several times to establish recommendations for the voluntary implementation of a testing program based on the studies and the performance standard. For several reasons, a formal program did not materialize. Ongoing tests and studies have supported the development of specific instruments and have helped specific clients understand the performance of their instruments. The purpose of this presentation is to trace the history of instrument testing to date and suggest the benefits of a centralized formal program.

  19. 20 CFR 404.1033 - Work for a wholly owned instrumentality of a foreign government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Work Excluded from Employment § 404.1033 Work for a wholly owned instrumentality of a... work is excluded from employment if— (1) The instrumentality is wholly owned by the foreign government...

  20. 20 CFR 404.1033 - Work for a wholly owned instrumentality of a foreign government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Work Excluded from Employment § 404.1033 Work for a wholly owned instrumentality of a... work is excluded from employment if— (1) The instrumentality is wholly owned by the foreign government...

  1. 20 CFR 404.1033 - Work for a wholly owned instrumentality of a foreign government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Work Excluded from Employment § 404.1033 Work for a wholly owned instrumentality of a... work is excluded from employment if— (1) The instrumentality is wholly owned by the foreign government...

  2. 20 CFR 404.1033 - Work for a wholly owned instrumentality of a foreign government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Work Excluded from Employment § 404.1033 Work for a wholly owned instrumentality of a... work is excluded from employment if— (1) The instrumentality is wholly owned by the foreign government...

  3. 20 CFR 404.1033 - Work for a wholly owned instrumentality of a foreign government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Work Excluded from Employment § 404.1033 Work for a wholly owned instrumentality of a... work is excluded from employment if— (1) The instrumentality is wholly owned by the foreign government...

  4. Impact of arthritis on disability among older Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Al Snih, S; Markides, K S; Ostir, G V; Goodwin, J S

    2001-01-01

    To estimate the impact of self-reported diagnosis of arthritis at baseline on the two year incidence of limitation in activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living in initially non-disabled Mexican-American elderly. Longitudinal study. SETTING Southwestern United States (Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona and California). A probability sample of 2,167 non-institutionalized Mexican-American men and women, aged 65 or older. Having ever been told by a doctor that a subject had arthritis, Activities of Daily Living (ADL), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), depressive symptomatology, presence of chronic diseases (diabetes mellitus, heart attack, stroke, cancer), and body mass index (BMI). Among non-disabled persons at baseline, 11.2% of subjects with arthritis reported at least one ADL limitation after two years, compared to 6.9% of subjects without arthritis. Similarly, among non-disabled persons at baseline, 34.7% of subjects with arthritis reported at least one IADL limitation after two years, compared to 27.0% of subjects without arthritis. In logistic regression analysis, depression, diabetes, and arthritis were found to be predictive of the development of ADL disability, controlling for sociodemographic variables. Depression was the only condition that significantly predicted IADL disability. Subjects with arthritis were more likely to develop ADL and IADL disability over a two-year period than those without arthritis.

  5. 75 FR 62676 - Disability Determinations by State Agency Disability Examiners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Parts 404 and 416 RIN 0960-AG87 Disability Determinations by State Agency Disability... a temporary basis to permit State agency disability examiners to make fully favorable determinations in certain claims for disability benefits under titles II and XVI of the Social Security Act (Act...

  6. 75 FR 9821 - Disability Determinations by State Agency Disability Examiners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Parts 404 and 416 RIN 0960-AG87 Disability Determinations by State Agency Disability... to amend our rules to permit disability examiners in the State agencies to make fully favorable determinations in certain claims for disability benefits under titles II and XVI of the Social Security Act (Act...

  7. Exploring Postsecondary Education Disability Service's Standards: Alignment with Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    A study analyzing the perspectives held by higher education's disability service providers in regards to disability and/or students with disabilities in the implementation of program standards was carried out using a sequential mixed-methods design. Using the knowledge gather by Disability Studies scholars, the study used the constructs of…

  8. Intellectual Disabilities. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Intellectual disability" is a term used when a person has certain limitations in mental functioning and in skills such as communicating, taking care of him or herself, and social skills. These limitations will cause a child to learn and develop more slowly than a typical child. Following a brief story about a child with an intellectual…

  9. Does Learning Disabled Equal Language Disabled?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Lyn

    Twenty-nine learning disabled (LD) students in grades 1-4 were compared with non-LD students on comprehension of relative clauses. Ss were given baseline, 2-way, and 3-way reversible sentences to test comprehension and examine strategy differences. Results showed that LD students performed more poorly than non-LD students for all sentence types at…

  10. JBI instrumentation services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muccio, M.; Lopez, E.; McKeel, R.

    2005-05-01

    The Joint Battlespace Infosphere (JBI) is an information management infrastructure that provides a basic set of flexible core services: publish, subscribe, and query. Managed Information Objects (MIOs) are published by JBI clients and are subsequently managed and disseminated to other subscribing JBI Clients by the JBI Core Services. MIOs can also be archived into a repository managed by the JBI Core Services upon publication and can later be queried for by JBI Clients. A reference implementation (RI) of the JBI Core Services using Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) technology is currently being developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory Information Directorate (AFRL/IF) in Rome, NY. JBI Instrumentation Services will allow users to gain insight into what activity is occurring inside the JBI Core Services. The phase 1 Instrumentation Services implementation has been developed as a standalone system that interacts with the JBI Core Services through a set of interfaces that provide a low impact, multi-implementation compatible connection. The Instrumentation Services Architecture makes use of the Instrumentation Entity Model to create entities that describe the real elements of the JBI Core Services: platforms, connections, users, nodes, and sequences. These entities populate the Instrumentation Space and are accessed by clients through the Instrumentation Client API (ICAPI). A web-based client that makes use of this ICAPI has been developed to visualize instrumentation information and demonstrate the capabilities of the Instrumentation Services. This client utilizes numerical rate graphs and dynamic graph trees to visualize JBI activity. This paper describes the phase 1 Instrumentation Services Architecture and development efforts involved in creating the JBI Instrumentation Services and prototype instrumentation client.

  11. Predictors of Life Satisfaction in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, S. M.; Chan, F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to examine factors that predict life satisfaction in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). Two groups of variables were studied: life skills (interpersonal, instrumental and leisure) and higher-order predictors (social support, self-determination and productivity). Method: Fifty-six participants…

  12. Exploring Children's Strengths: A Planning Strategy for Disabled Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, Nancy

    Measuring the exchange process between teacher and child, a neglected but necessary pursuit, is dependent upon the identification of the behavior system through which information is exchanged and upon the instrumentation used for measuring that exchange. This paper describes an instructional strategy, intended for use with disabled readers, in…

  13. Assessment of Anger Coping Skills in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willner, P.; Brace, N.; Phillips, J.

    2005-01-01

    Recent controlled studies have supported the effectiveness of anger management training for people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). This report describes an evaluation instrument designed to assess their usage of specific anger coping skills. The Profile of Anger Coping Skills (PACS) is designed for completion by a staff member or carer.…

  14. An Examination of Graduate Students' Perceptions toward Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallister, Leslie; Wilson, Kalah; Baker, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Research has examined faculty attitudes towards students with disabilities (SWDs) and accommodations, but little research examines graduate students' attitudes toward SWDs. This project used the ATDP scale to examine graduate students' attitudes toward SWDs. This instrument was augmented with a qualitative, open-ended question that focused on…

  15. Risk of Fall for Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiba, Yoichi; Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Yoshida, Futoshi; Keino, Hiromi; Hasegawa, Mariko; Ikari, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Shikako; Hosokawa, Masanori

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to identify risk factors for falling and establish a method to assess risk for falls in adults with intellectual disabilities. In a cross-sectional survey of 144 Japanese adults, we found that age, presence of epilepsy, and presence of paretic conditions were independent risk factors. The Tinetti balance and gait instrument was…

  16. Behavioral Coping Styles of Mentally Retarded and Learning Disabled Pupils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Barrie Jo; Marsh, George E., II

    The Coping Analysis Schedule for Educational Settings (CASES), an observation instrument to identify students' primary coping or interaction styles, was evaluated with 44 educable mentally retarded (EMR), learning disabled (LD), or normal children (7 to 11 years old). CASES is intended to be a quantitative tool for collecting the data required…

  17. Predictors of Life Satisfaction in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, S. M.; Chan, F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to examine factors that predict life satisfaction in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). Two groups of variables were studied: life skills (interpersonal, instrumental and leisure) and higher-order predictors (social support, self-determination and productivity). Method: Fifty-six participants…

  18. Examining the Instructional Contexts of Students with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulgren, Janis A.; Carta, Judith J.

    1993-01-01

    This literature review focuses on methodologies, instruments, and findings from research on the instructional contexts of elementary and secondary students with learning disabilities. The review covers the time that students were engaged in different activities in different settings, interactions between teachers and students, and students'…

  19. Faculty Attitudes toward Teaching Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Sharon; Hitchcock, John

    2014-01-01

    The attitudes of adult basic education faculty members toward teaching adults with learning disabilities are likely to influence the success of their students; however, there are no existing survey instruments that measure this construct or the practical knowledge faculty members should have to effectively serve the population. A new survey…

  20. Faculty Attitudes toward Teaching Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Sharon; Hitchcock, John

    2014-01-01

    The attitudes of adult basic education faculty members toward teaching adults with learning disabilities are likely to influence the success of their students; however, there are no existing survey instruments that measure this construct or the practical knowledge faculty members should have to effectively serve the population. A new survey…

  1. Discrimination Evidence for Examining Fourth Grade Students' Learning Disability Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Abdulhameed S.; Al-Harthy, Ibrahim S.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of discriminate variables (perceptual-motor, hyperactivity disorder, neurological and psychological skills) to distinguish between normal (n = 68) and students with learning disabilities (n = 72) in fourth grade. Three instruments were developed: perceptual-motor scale, hyperactivity disorder scale, skills test…

  2. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Galen W., Ed.

    1975-01-01

    Identifies a trend in analytical chemistry toward greater use of instruments and a need for an understanding of the basic principles involved in instrumentation. This need can be fulfilled using homebuilt equipment; examples are provided in the areas of electrolytic conductance and electronic coulometry. (GS)

  3. Instrument for Curriculum Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huetteman, Julie Doidge; Benson, RoseAnn

    A comprehensive Instrument for Curriculum Evaluation (ICE) was developed to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate curriculum materials. The instrument contains 115 statements for assessing 11 aspects of curriculum: philosophy, needs assessment, theme, goals, learning objectives and standards, scope and sequence, field testing, instructor…

  4. Instrumentation in endourology

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Rakesh; Monga, Manoj

    2011-01-01

    Success with endourological procedures requires expertise and instrumentation. This review focuses on the instrumentation required for ureteroscopy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy, and provides a critical assessment of in vitro and clinical studies that have evaluated the comparative effectiveness of these medical devices. PMID:21904568

  5. Sterilization of endoscopic instruments.

    PubMed

    Sabnis, Ravindra B; Bhattu, Amit; Vijaykumar, Mohankumar

    2014-03-01

    Sterilization of endoscopic instruments is an important but often ignored topic. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature on the sterilization of endoscopic instruments and elaborate on the appropriate sterilization practices. Autoclaving is an economic and excellent method of sterilizing the instruments that are not heat sensitive. Heat sensitive instruments may get damaged with hot sterilization methods. Several new endoscopic instruments such as flexible ureteroscopes, chip on tip endoscopes, are added in urologists armamentarium. Many of these instruments are heat sensitive and hence alternative efficacious methods of sterilization are necessary. Although ethylene oxide and hydrogen peroxide are excellent methods of sterilization, they have some drawbacks. Gamma irradiation is mainly for disposable items. Various chemical agents are widely used even though they achieve high-level disinfection rather than sterilization. This article reviews various methods of endoscopic instrument sterilization with their advantages and drawbacks. If appropriate sterilization methods are adopted, then it not only will protect patients from procedure-related infections but prevent hypersensitive allergic reactions. It will also protect instruments from damage and increase its longevity.

  6. Visual impairment and disability in older adults.

    PubMed

    Rubin, G S; Roche, K B; Prasada-Rao, P; Fried, L P

    1994-12-01

    Previous studies have reported that reduced visual acuity is associated with functional dependence in older persons. The purpose of this study was to determine whether components of vision impairment besides reduced acuity contribute to reduced functional independence. Community dwelling adults aged 65 years and older were administered a battery of vision tests including distance acuity, letter contrast sensitivity, disability glare, and stereoacuity. A physical function questionnaire assessed self-reported difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL's), Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL's), and mobility activities. A visual function questionnaire assessed self-reported difficulty with a wide variety of everyday visual activities. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that reduced acuity and reduced contrast sensitivity were independently associated with an overall vision disability score. Acuity was associated with difficulty in tasks requiring good resolution and adaption to changing light conditions, whereas contrast sensitivity was associated with difficulty in tasks requiring distance judgments, night driving, and mobility. Glare and stereoacuity were not associated with self-reported disability. Reduced acuity and contrast sensitivity are significant risk factors for self-reported disability.

  7. Contaminated dental instruments.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Dickson, M; Aitken, J; Bagg, J

    2002-07-01

    There is current concern in the UK over the possible transmission of prions via contaminated surgical instruments. Some dental instruments (endodontic files) raise particular concerns by virtue of their intimate contact with terminal branches of the trigeminal nerve. A visual assessment using a dissecting light microscope and scanning electron microscopy of endodontic files after clinical use and subsequent decontamination was performed. The instruments examined were collected from general dental practices and from a dental hospital. Seventy-six per cent (22/29) of the files retrieved from general dental practices remained visibly contaminated, compared with 14% (5/37) from the dental hospital. Current methods for decontaminating endodontic instruments used in dentistry may be of an insufficient standard to completely remove biological material. Improved cleaning methods and the feasibility of single use endodontic instruments require further investigation.

  8. Rethinking disability: the social model of disability and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Goering, Sara

    2015-06-01

    Disability is commonly viewed as a problem that exists in a person's body and requires medical treatment. The social model of disability, by contrast, distinguishes between impairment and disability, identifying the latter as a disadvantage that stems from a lack of fit between a body and its social environment. This paper describes the social model of disability and then considers how it might deal with chronic disease or impairment and why medical professionals should learn about disability perspectives to improve their practice.

  9. Dickens and disability.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1996-12-01

    The novels of Charles Dickens include many vivid portraits of individuals with physical disabilities or deformities, and these conditions are often used symbolically to highlight some of the author's recurring themes. Disabled children are depicted as innocent victims, while their older counterparts are most often viewed as corrupt victimizers whose physical deformities are outward manifestations of their inner depravity. Punishment for moral failings in non-disabled characters frequently takes the form of paralysis and/or aphasia resulting from a cerebrovascular accident. In this context the wheelchair becomes a potent metaphor of imprisonment as a form of retributive justice.

  10. Sexual rights and disability.

    PubMed

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2011-03-01

    This paper argues against Appel's recent proposal-in this journal-that there is a fundamental human right to sexual pleasure, and that therefore the sexual pleasure of severely disabled people should be publicly funded-by thereby partially legalising prostitution. An alternative is proposed that does not need to pose a new positive human right; does not need public funding; does not need the legalisation of prostitution; and that would offer a better experience to the severely disabled: charitable non-profit organisations whose members would voluntarily and freely provide sexual pleasure to the severely disabled.

  11. Disability Studies. NRC Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Perri

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several decades, what people now refer to as "disability studies" has been a powerful influence on policy and practice in regards to people with disabilities. Disability studies has evolved as a means of addressing how people with disabilities have been treated historically and how they continue to be treated. The field of disability…

  12. The Excessive Appearance of Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalko, Rod

    2009-01-01

    This paper engages the appearance of disability in contemporary Western culture. Rather than taking disability for granted as a biomedical condition, I interrogate how disability is made to appear in our culture, including its appearance as a biomedical condition. Fundamentally, disability appears to us as a trouble and, as such, cultural…

  13. Information Package on Disability Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Perri; Lewin, Lori

    This document is a resource guide to disabilities studies, an approach to disability which seeks to examine the social, economic, and political forces that for years have served to marginalize and oppress people with disabilities. Following an introduction that explains the field of disability studies, Section 1 is an annotated bibliography of 13…

  14. Reflections on Growing Up Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Reginald L., Ed.

    The book offers firsthand accounts of the experiences and perceptions of disabled persons, as well as the views of parents of disabled children. Entries include the following titles: "Reflections of Disabled Children" (J. Umbreit and D. Baker); "The Handicap That Had No Name" (D. Brown); "Orthopedically Disabled: Determination on Wheels" (D.…

  15. Paralympic Athletes and "Knowing Disability"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Hayley

    2012-01-01

    This article explores non-disabled young people's understandings of Paralympic athletes and the disability sports they play. The article examines how society has come to know disability by discussing medical and social model views of disability. The conceptual tools offered by Pierre Bourdieu are utilised as a means of understanding the nature and…

  16. Paralympic Athletes and "Knowing Disability"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Hayley

    2012-01-01

    This article explores non-disabled young people's understandings of Paralympic athletes and the disability sports they play. The article examines how society has come to know disability by discussing medical and social model views of disability. The conceptual tools offered by Pierre Bourdieu are utilised as a means of understanding the nature and…

  17. Aeronautic Instruments. Section II : Altitude Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mears, A H; Henrickson, H B; Brombacher, W G

    1923-01-01

    This report is Section two of a series of reports on aeronautic instruments (Technical Report nos. 125 to 132, inclusive). This section discusses briefly barometric altitude determinations, and describes in detail the principal types of altimeters and barographs used in aeronautics during the recent war. This is followed by a discussion of performance requirements for such instruments and an account of the methods of testing developed by the Bureau of Standards. The report concludes with a brief account of the results of recent investigations. For accurate measurements of altitude, reference must also be made to thermometer readings of atmospheric temperature, since the altitude is not fixed by atmospheric pressure alone. This matter is discussed in connection with barometric altitude determination.

  18. [Measurement of shoulder disability in the athlete: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Fayad, F; Mace, Y; Lefevre-Colau, M M; Poiraudeau, S; Rannou, F; Revel, M

    2004-08-01

    To identify all available shoulder disability questionnaires and to examine those that could be used for athlete. We systematically reviewed the literature in Medline using the keywords shoulder, function, scale, index, score, questionnaire, disability, quality of life, assessment, and evaluation. We searched for scales used for athletes with the keywords scale name AND (sport OR athlete). Data were completed by using the "Guide des Outils de Mesure et d'Evaluation en Médecine Physique et de Réadaptation" textbook. Analysis took into account the clinimetric quality of the instruments and the number of items specifically related to sports. A total of 37 instruments have been developed to measure disease-, shoulder-specific or upper extremity specific outcome. Older instruments were developed before the advent of modern measurement methods. They usually combined objective and subjective measures. Recent instruments were designed with use of more advanced methods. Most are self-administered questionnaires. Fourteen scales included items assessing sport activity. Four of these scales have been used to assess shoulder disability in athlete. Six scales have been used to assess such disability but do not have specific items related to sports. There is no gold standard for assessing shoulder outcome in the general population and no validated outcome instruments specifically for athletes. We suggest the use of ASES, WOSI and WORC scales for evaluating shoulder function in the recreational athletes. The DASH scale should be evaluated in this population. The principal criterion in evaluating shoulder function in the high level athlete is a return to the same level of sport performance. Further studies are required to identify measurement tools for shoulder disability that have a high predictive value for return to sport.

  19. Sexuality and Intellectual Disability

    MedlinePlus

    ... refers to those defined by AAIDD classification and DSM IV. In everyday language they are frequently referred ... both include others and exclude some defined by DSM IV. American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities ( ...

  20. Disability Mentoring Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-07

    A student from the Maryland School For the Blind explores an object while learning about Meteorites, Asteroids and Comets during NASA's Disability Mentoring Day, Thursday, April 7, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washignton. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  1. Disability Mentoring Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-07

    A student from the Maryland School For the Blind asks a question while learning about Meteorites, Asteroids and Comets during NASA's Disability Mentoring Day, Thursday, April 7, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washignton. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  2. Disability Mentoring Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-07

    A student from the Maryland School For the Blind explores a braille map during NASA's Disability Mentoring Day, Thursday, April 7, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washignton. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  3. Disability Mentoring Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-07

    Students from the Maryland School for the Blind learn about space food from NASA Public Affairs specialist Nora Normandy, right, during Disability Mentoring Day, Thursday, April 7, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  4. Disability Mentoring Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-07

    Students from the Maryland School for the Blind learn about astronauts during NASA's Disability Mentoring Day, Thursday, April 7, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washignton. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  5. Dementia in intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Rory; Ali, Afia; Hassiotis, Angela

    2014-03-01

    Dementia is emerging as a significant condition in the population with intellectual disability. This review is aimed at clinicians working in the field. We revisit what is known on the subject and expand on this with results from recent research. The emphasis of this review is on the clinical research rather than laboratory or molecular research. Research has encompassed all aspects of dementia in intellectual disability, from epidemiology, assessment and diagnosis, through to management. There remains a lack of evidence concerning both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment of dementia in people with intellectual disability. Recent research has tended to focus on dementia in Down syndrome. More research is necessary in order to translate improvements in the understanding of the neuropathology of intellectual disability and dementia into effective treatments. There is also a need to investigate the optimum environment in which to provide holistic care for individuals affected.

  6. Facts about Developmental Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... MADDS Case Definitions Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Multimedia & Tools Links to ... Developmental disabilities are a group of conditions due to an impairment in physical, learning, language, or behavior areas. These conditions begin during ...

  7. What Are Learning Disabilities?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most common learning disabilities include the following: Dyslexia. This condition causes problems with language skills, particularly reading. People with dyslexia may have difficulty spelling, understanding sentences, and recognizing ...

  8. Disabilities Act in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daynes, Kristine S.

    1990-01-01

    Eight true or false questions explore implications of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Topics include AIDS, drug abuse, undue hardship, reasonable accommodation, and company size affected by the law. (SK)

  9. Disabilities Act in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daynes, Kristine S.

    1990-01-01

    Eight true or false questions explore implications of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Topics include AIDS, drug abuse, undue hardship, reasonable accommodation, and company size affected by the law. (SK)

  10. Instrumented balance and walking assessments in persons with multiple sclerosis show strong test-retest reliability.

    PubMed

    Craig, Jordan J; Bruetsch, Adam P; Lynch, Sharon G; Horak, Fay B; Huisinga, Jessie M

    2017-05-22

    There is a need for objective movement assessment for clinical research trials aimed at improving gait and balance in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Wireless inertial sensors can accurately measure numerous walking and balance parameters but these measures require evaluation of reliability in PwMS. The current study determined the test-retest reliability of wireless inertial sensor measures obtained during an instrumented standing balance test and an instrumented Timed Up and Go test in PwMS. Fifteen PwMS and 15 healthy control subjects (HC) performed an instrumented standing balance and instrumented Timed Up and Go (TUG) test on two separate days. Ten instrumented standing balance measures and 18 instrumented TUG measures were computed from the wireless sensor data. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to determine test-retest reliability of all instrumented standing balance and instrumented TUG measures. Correlations were evaluated between the instrumented standing balance and instrumented TUG measures and self-reported walking and balance performance, fall history, and clinical disability. For both groups, ICCs for instrumented standing balance measures were best for spatio-temporal measures, while frequency measures were less reliable. All instrumented TUG measures exhibited good to excellent (ICCs > 0.60) test-retest reliability in PwMS and in HC. There were no correlations between self-report walking and balance scores and instrumented TUG or instrumented standing balance metrics, but there were correlations between instrumented TUG and instrumented standing balance metrics and fall history and clinical disability status. Measures from the instrumented standing balance and instrumented TUG tests exhibit good to excellent reliability, demonstrating their potential as objective assessments for clinical trials. A subset of the most reliable measures is recommended for measuring walking and balance in clinical settings.

  11. The DKIST Instrumentation Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woeger, Friedrich

    2016-05-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope with its four meter diameter aperture will be the largest telescope in the world for solar observations when it is commissioned in the year 2019. In order to harness its scientific potential immediately, DKIST will integrate five instruments that each will provide unique functionality to measure properties of the solar atmosphere at unprecedented spatial resolution.In this paper we discuss the unique capabilities in the DKIST instrument suite that consists of the Visible Broadband Imager (VBI), the Visible Spectro-Polarimeter (ViSP), the Visible Tunable Filter (VTF), the Diffraction-Limited Near-Infrared Spectro-Polarimeter (DL-NIRSP), and the Cryogenic Near-Infrared Spectro-Polarimeter (Cryo-NIRSP).In addition, we will explain the facility's approach to supporting high spatial resolution data acquisition with multiple instruments simultaneously by means of the Facility Instrument Distribution Optics. This system of wavelength separating and interchangeable beamsplitters will enable a variety of different ways to optically configure the light beam to the instruments. This approach ensures that the DKIST instruments can use their individual advantages in a multitude of different observing scenarios. The DKIST instrumentation suite will enable crucial new insights into complex physical processes that occur on spatial scales that are smaller than any solar structure observed in the past.

  12. Drugs, discrimination and disability.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Frances

    2009-12-01

    Whether addiction to prohibited drugs should be classified as a disability for the purposes of disability discrimination is a controversial question in Australia. The leading Australian case of Marsden v Human Rights Equal Opportunity Commission & Coffs Harbour & District Ex-Servicemen & Women's Memorial Club Ltd (HREOC, No H98/51, 30 August 1999); [2000] FCA 1619 concerned a disability discrimination complaint brought by Mr Marsden as a result of his treatment by the club. The case was brought as a public interest test case by the New South Wales Legal Aid Commission. Mr Marsden was on a methadone program at the time. The reasoning of the decision at the Federal Court opened the way for a finding that dependence on illegal drugs constituted a disability under disability discrimination legislation. The media reaction to the court's decision led to State and federal governments proposing legislation limiting legal protection from discrimination for people addicted to illegal drugs on the basis of their drug use. While the proposed federal legislation lapsed after objections from a coalition of medical, legal and other advocacy groups, the New South Wales legislation still provides that, in employment matters, it is not unlawful to discriminate against a person on the ground of disability if the disability relates to the person's addiction to a prohibited drug and the person is actually addicted to a prohibited drug at the time of the discrimination. The article details the sequence of events in the Marsden case, reflects on the role of public interest litigation in achieving social justice outcomes and suggests that Australia's recent ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on 17 July 2008 should encourage legislators to review legislation which may have a discriminatory effect on people suffering from addictions.

  13. Aircraft Speed Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beij, K Hilding

    1933-01-01

    This report presents a concise survey of the measurement of air speed and ground speed on board aircraft. Special attention is paid to the pitot-static air-speed meter which is the standard in the United States for airplanes. Air-speed meters of the rotating vane type are also discussed in considerable detail on account of their value as flight test instruments and as service instruments for airships. Methods of ground-speed measurement are treated briefly, with reference to the more important instruments. A bibliography on air-speed measurement concludes the report.

  14. Mass spectrometers: instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooks, R. G.; Hoke, S. H., II; Morand, K. L.; Lammert, S. A.

    1992-09-01

    Developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation over the past three years are reviewed. The subject is characterized by an enormous diversity of designs, a high degree of competition between different laboratories working with either different or similar techniques and by extremely rapid progress in improving analytical performance. Instruments can be grouped into genealogical charts based on their physical and conceptual interrelationships. This is illustrated using mass analyzers of different types. The time course of development of particular instrumental concepts is illustrated in terms of the s-curves typical of cell growth. Examples are given of instruments which are at the exponential, linear and mature growth stages. The prime examples used are respectively: (i) hybrid instruments designed to study reactive collisions of ions with surfaces: (ii) the Paul ion trap; and (iii) the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the area of ion/surface collisions, reactive collisions such as hydrogen radical abstraction from the surface by the impinging ion are studied. They are shown to depend upon the chemical nature of the surface through the use of experiments which utilize self-assembled monolayers as surfaces. The internal energy deposited during surface-induced dissociation upon collision with different surfaces in a BEEQ instrument is also discussed. Attention is also given to a second area of emerging instrumentation, namely technology which allows mass spectrometers to be used for on-line monitoring of fluid streams. A summary of recent improvements in the performance of the rapidly developing quadrupole ion trap instrument illustrates this stage of instrument development. Improvements in resolution and mass range and their application to the characterization of biomolecules are described. The interaction of theory with experiment is illustrated through the role of simulations of ion motion in the ion trap. It is emphasized that mature instruments play a

  15. Wind instruments and headaches.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lage, Juan F; Galarza, Marcelo; Pérez-Espejo, Miguel-Angel; López-Guerrero, Antonio L; Felipe-Murcia, Matías

    2013-03-01

    The authors illustrate the cases of two children with headaches, one diagnosed with Chiari type 1 malformation and the other with hydrocephalus, who played wind instruments. Both patients manifested that their headaches worsened with the efforts made during playing their musical instruments. We briefly comment on the probable role played by this activity on the patients' intracranial pressure and hypothesize that the headaches might be influenced by increases in their intracranial pressure related to Valsalva maneuvers. We had serious doubts on if we should advise our young patients about giving up playing their music instruments.

  16. Testing Aircraft Instruments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-11

    AD-A095 680 ARMY TEST AND EVALUATION COMMAND ABERDEEN PROVING GRO--ETC F/S 1/4 TESTING AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENTS .(U) FEB 81 CLASSIFIED TOP-6-3-013 ML I...Test and Evaluation Command -?Final 7, Ts .to .. eg----- ( -4_ Fia - / + I ORG REPORT STesting Aircraft Instruments , j P I- I. AUTHOR(es) S. CONTRACT...Identify by block number) This document presents information and procedures for testing aircraft flight and systems performance instruments in the functional

  17. Instrument Attitude Precision Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    2004-01-01

    A novel approach is presented in this paper to analyze attitude precision and control for an instrument gimbaled to a spacecraft subject to an internal disturbance caused by a moving component inside the instrument. Nonlinear differential equations of motion for some sample cases are derived and solved analytically to gain insight into the influence of the disturbance on the attitude pointing error. A simple control law is developed to eliminate the instrument pointing error caused by the internal disturbance. Several cases are presented to demonstrate and verify the concept presented in this paper.

  18. Social Frailty and Functional Disability: Findings From the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Studies.

    PubMed

    Teo, Nigel; Gao, Qi; Nyunt, Ma Shwe Zin; Wee, Shiou Liang; Ng, Tze-Pin

    2017-07-01

    To examine the association between the social frailty (SF) phenotype and functional disability, independently of the physical frailty (PF) phenotype, and compare the abilities of the PF, SF, and combined social and physical (PSF) indexes for predicting functional disability. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of a population-based cohort (Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study, SLAS-1) of 2406 community-dwelling older adults with 3 years of follow-up (N = 1254 and N = 1557 for instrumental activity of daily living (IADL) disability and severe disability (≥3 basic ADL) respectively). Seven-item social frailty index (living arrangements, education, socioeconomic status, and social network and support, 0 = nil SF, 1 = low, 2-7 = high), PF phenotype (Fried criteria), and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) disability and severe disability (≥3 basic ADLs). Compared to nil SF, low and high SF were significantly associated with 1.3 to 2.4 fold increased prevalence and incidence of IADL disability, and 6.3 fold increase in severe disability. Frail individuals with and without SF stood out with 5-11 fold increased prevalence and incidence of IADL disability and 21-25 fold increased prevalence and incidence of severe disability, compared to robust individuals without SF. A combined PSF index more accurately identified individuals with increased risk of functional disability (ROC = 64%) and severe disability (ROC = 81%) than either the SF or the PF indexes alone (55% to 68%). The SF index alone or in combination with the PF index has clinical relevance and utility for identifying and stratifying older people at risk of disability. The mental frailty construct is closely related to SF and should be further investigated in future studies. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Usefulness of the Supports Intensity Scale (SIS) for Persons with Other than Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossaert, G.; Kuppens, S.; Buntinx, W.; Molleman, C.; Van den Abeele, A.; Maes, B.

    2009-01-01

    In response to the shift from a system-centred care model to a person-centred support model, the Supports Intensity Scale (SIS) has been developed as an instrument to assess the support needs of persons with intellectual disabilities. The instrument is used as a tool for constructing individual support plans, as well as a tool for resource…

  20. A Comparison of Learning Disabled and Other Children on the Ability to Make Functional Time Estimates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, John M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A reliable instrument was developed to identify elementary-age children who have difficulty with time estimation, as indicated by choices on a pencil-and-paper test. The instrument was used to compare performances of learning disabled and nondisabled children. Findings provide empirical support for temporal difficulties among learning disabled…

  1. Sports and disability.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Pamela E; Clayton, Gerald H

    2010-03-01

    Participation in recreational and competitive sports at an early age has long been touted as a positive influence on growth and development, and for fostering lifelong healthy lifestyles. The benefits of an active lifestyle include not only fitness, but the promotion of a sense of inclusion and improved self-esteem. These benefits are well documented in all populations, and their importance has been summarized in the recent Healthy People 2010 guidelines. The American Academy of Pediatrics has recently produced a summary statement on the benefits of activity for disabled children. They note that children with disabilities tend to have an overall lower level of fitness and an increased level of obesity. For this population, developing a lifelong desire to be active can be a simple means for limiting illness and much of the morbidity associated with sedentary lifestyles often associated with disability. For disabled youth, participation in disabled sports programs available nationally and internationally can be an effective means to promote such precepts. The goal of this focused review is to improve the learner's knowledge of the positive impact that active lifestyles can have on overall health in the disabled youth population and, as a result, modify their practice by incorporating recreational and competitive sport activities as part of improving overall patient care.

  2. Work status and disability trajectories over 12 months after injury among workers in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Langley, John; Lilley, Rebbecca; Samaranayaka, Ari; Derrett, Sarah

    2014-03-07

    To describe work and disability trajectories over 12 months following injury among workers. Workers injured at work or elsewhere (n=2626) were sourced from the Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study, a longitudinal cohort study in New Zealand, with the primary objective of identifying factors associated with disability following injury. Work and disability status was assessed at 3- and 12-months post injury. The measure of disability was the brief WHODAS II 12-item instrument. Participants were dichotomised into 'disability' or 'no disability' groups based on whether their WHODAS score was greater than, or equal to, 10. In terms of 12-month work status, there are 16 different scenarios. These were grouped into 4 categories: sustained work (SW), delayed return to work (RTW), non-sustained RTW, and sustained off-work. We had complete information for 1975 workers. The largest group (68%) was SW, 32% of which had disability at either time point. The second largest group consisted of 17% of workers who were classified as delayed RTW, 76% of whom were disabled at either time point. Among the non-sustained RTW group (7%), 52% had disability at either time point. Of the sustained off-work group (8%), 80% were disabled at either 3- or 12-months. Although return to work is a useful provider performance indicator of injury compensation and rehabilitation it is inadequate from a wider societal perspective and needs to be complemented by other important outcome measures such as disability status.

  3. Writing Instrument Profiles for Mastery of Instrumental Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Daniel; Fernandez, Jorge; Nalliah, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Because of the rapidly changing nature of chemical instrumentation, students must be trained in how to learn and understand new instruments. Toward this end, students are asked to create small instrument manuals, or instrument profiles, for the major pieces of equipment studied during an instrumental analysis course. This writing-intensive process…

  4. Disability in the Individual ADL, IADL, and Mobility among Older Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Bleijenberg, N; Zuithoff, N P A; Smith, A K; de Wit, N J; Schuurmans, M J

    2017-01-01

    To examine the risk of disability in 15 individual ADL, IADL, and mobility in older adults by age; and to assess the association of multimorbidity, gender, and education with disability. A prospective cohort study. The sample included 805 community-dwelling older people aged 60+ living in the Netherlands. Disability was assessed using the Katz-15 Index of Independence in Basic Activities of Daily Living (ADL), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) and one mobility item. Disability in any of these activities was defined as the inability to perform the activity without assistance. The risk of disability by age for each individual ADL, IADL, and for mobility was assessed using Generalized mixed models. Disability in activities as household tasks, traveling, shopping, and continence had the highest risk and increased rapidly with age. The risk traveling disability among people aged 65 with two comorbidities increase from 9% to 37% at age 85. Disability in using the telephone, managing medications, finances, transferring, and toileting, had a very low risk and hardly increased with age. Compared to those without chronic conditions, those with ≥ 3 chronic conditions had a 3 to 5 times higher risk of developing disability. Males had a higher risk of disability in managing medication (P=0.005), and preparing meals (P=0.019), whereas females had a higher risk of disability with traveling (P=0.001). No association between education and disability on the individual ADL, IADL, and mobility was observed. Older adults were mostly disabled in physical related activities, whereas disability in more cognitive related activities was less often experienced. The impact of multimorbidity on disability in each activity was substantial, while education was not.

  5. CALIPSO Instrument Operational

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-18

    CALIPSO Instrument Operational Thursday, September 11, 2014 The CALIPSO payload is back in data acquisition mode as of Wednesday, September 17, 2014.  CALIPSO data processing has returned to a nominal state, and...

  6. Carbon Footprint Reduction Instruments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page outlines the major differences between Renewable Energy Certificates (REC) and Project Offsets and what types of claims each instrument allows the organization to make in regards to environmental emissions claims.

  7. Hetdex: Virus Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanshin; Hill, G. J.; DePoy, D. L.; Tuttle, S.; Marshall, J. L.; Vattiat, B. L.; Prochaska, T.; Chonis, T. S.; Allen, R.; HETDEX Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Visible Integral-field-unit Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument is made up of 150+ individually compact and identical spectrographs, each fed by a fiber integral-field unit. The instrument provides integral field spectroscopy at wavelengths between 350nm and 550nm of over 33,600 spatial elements per observation, each 1.8 sq. arcsec on the sky, at R 700. The instrument will be fed by a new wide-field corrector (WFC) of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) with increased science field of view as large as 22arcmin diameter and telescope aperture of 10m. This will enable the HETDEX, a large area blind survey of Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies at redshift z < 3.5. The status of VIRUS instrument construction is summarized.

  8. NPP: The Five Instruments

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The NPP satellite has 5 instruments on board: VIIRS, CERES, CrIS, ATMS, and OMPS. Each one will deliver a specific set of data helping weather prediction and climate studies. This video is a quick ...

  9. Instrumentation for Materials Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claassen, Richard S.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses how sophisticated instrumentation techniques yield practical results in three typical materials problems: fracture analysis, joining, and compatibility. Describes techniques such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy. (MLH)

  10. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  11. Instrumentation for Materials Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claassen, Richard S.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses how sophisticated instrumentation techniques yield practical results in three typical materials problems: fracture analysis, joining, and compatibility. Describes techniques such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy. (MLH)

  12. Low cost instrumentation amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Amplifier can be used for many applications requiring high input impedance and common mode rejection, low drift, and gain accuracy on order of one percent. Performance of inexpensive amplifier approaches that of some commercial instrumentation amplifiers in many specifications.

  13. AIR Instrument Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, I. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.; Goldhagen, P.; Shinn, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    The large number of radiation types composing the atmospheric radiation requires a complicated combination of instrument types to fully characterize the environment. A completely satisfactory combination has not as yet been flown and would require a large capital outlay to develop. In that the funds of the current project were limited to essential integration costs, an international collaboration was formed with partners from six countries and fourteen different institutions with their own financial support for their participation. Instruments were chosen to cover sensitivity to all radiation types with enough differential sensitivity to separate individual components. Some instruments were chosen as important to specify the physical field component and other instruments were chosen on the basis that they could be useful in dosimetric evaluation. In the present paper we will discuss the final experimental flight package for the ER-2 flight campaign.

  14. IXO: The Instrument Complement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.; IWG, IXO

    2009-01-01

    The International X-ray Observatory (IXO) has recently been created as a mission concept by a joint team of NASA, ESA and JAXA scientists, based on the previous Constellation-X and XEUS concepts. Definition of the IXO instruments is still under evolution, but the core instrument complement will include a Wide Field X-ray Imager, an X-ray Calorimeter / Narrow Field X-ray Imager, and an X-ray Grating Spectrometer. Other, modest additional instruments (such as a hard X-ray capability, a polarimeter, and a high time resolution detector) will also be considered. We present the current status of the IXO instrument complement and offer the opportunity for discussion of ideas relevant to the IXO mission concept process.

  15. Mars Observer instrument complement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komro, Fred G.; Hujber, Frank N.

    1991-10-01

    The mechanical and electrical characteristics and the functional designs of the eight scientific instruments of the Mars Observer's instrument complex are described, and their respective principal investigators and sponsoring institutions are listed. These instruments include a gamma-ray spectrometer, a magnetometer/electron reflectometer, the Mars balloon relay, the Mars Observer camera, the Mars Observer laser altimeter, a pressure modulator infrared radiometer, a thermal emission spectrometer, and an ultrastable oscillator. With these instruments, the Mars Observer will be able to determine the elemental and mineralogical character of Martial surface material; to define globally the topography and the gravitational field; to establish the nature of the magnetic field; to determine the spatial and temporal distribution abundances, sources, and sinks of volatile material and dust over a seasonal cycle; and to explore the structure and circulation of Martian atmosphere.

  16. Cardiovascular instrumentation for spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schappell, R. T.; Polhemus, J. T.; Ganiaris, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The observation mechanisms dealing with pressure, flow, morphology, temperature, etc. are discussed. The approach taken in the performance of this study was to (1) review ground and space-flight data on cardiovascular function, including earlier related ground-based and space-flight animal studies, Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and recent bed-rest studies, (2) review cardiovascular measurement parameters required to assess individual performance and physiological alternations during space flight, (3) perform an instrumentation survey including a literature search as well as personal contact with the applicable investigators, (4) assess instrumentation applicability with respect to the established criteria, and (5) recommend future research and development activity. It is concluded that, for the most part, the required instrumentation technology is available but that mission-peculiar criteria will require modifications to adapt the applicable instrumentation to a space-flight configuration.

  17. TES Instrument Operational Status

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-02-26

    ... UPDATE: (1/24/2017)  The TES instrument metrology laser end of life testing that resumed on January 11, 2017 provided a gradual increase in the laser diode current. This increase has resulted in the restoration of the ...

  18. Aeronautic Instruments. Section III : Aircraft Speed Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Franklin L; Stearns, H O

    1923-01-01

    Part 1 contains a discussion and description of the various types of air speed measuring instruments. The authors then give general specifications and performance requirements with the results of tests on air speed indicators at the Bureau of Standards. Part 2 reports methods and laboratory apparatus used at the Bureau of Standards to make static tests. Methods are also given of combining wind tunnel tests with static tests. Consideration is also given to free flight tests. Part 3 discusses the problem of finding suitable methods for the purpose of measuring the speed of aircraft relative to the ground.

  19. VIRUS instrument collimator assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jennifer L.; DePoy, Darren L.; Prochaska, Travis; Allen, Richard D.; Williams, Patrick; Rheault, Jean-Philippe; Li, Ting; Nagasawa, Daniel Q.; Akers, Christopher; Baker, David; Boster, Emily; Campbell, Caitlin; Cook, Erika; Elder, Alison; Gary, Alex; Glover, Joseph; James, Michael; Martin, Emily; Meador, Will; Mondrik, Nicholas; Rodriguez-Patino, Marisela; Villanueva, Steven; Hill, Gary J.; Tuttle, Sarah; Vattiat, Brian; Lee, Hanshin; Chonis, Taylor S.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Tacon, Mike

    2014-07-01

    The Visual Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument is a baseline array 150 identical fiber fed optical spectrographs designed to support observations for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). The collimator subassemblies of the instrument have been assembled in a production line and are now complete. Here we review the design choices and assembly practices used to produce a suite of identical low-cost spectrographs in a timely fashion using primarily unskilled labor.

  20. Distributed System Instrumentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    PARADISE is a distributed instrumentation system working on DISE under CRONUS and uses a variety of tools and an Integration Platform. 20. DISTRIBUTION...distributed instrumentation system working on DISE under CRONUS and uses a variety of tools and an Integration Platform. In choosing the design approach...careful feasibility study, and have been proven to be suitable (in te: ins of performance, intrusiveness and functionality) for CRONUS and the DISE

  1. [The instrument for thermography].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Shinsuke

    2014-07-01

    Thermography is an imaging method using the instrument to detect infrared rays emitted from the body surface, and to plot them as a distribution diagram of the temperature information. Therefore, a thermographic instrument can be assumed to measure the skin temperature of the diseased region. Such an instrument is a useful device for noninvasive and objective assessment of various diseases. Examination using a thermographic instrument can assess the autonomic dysfunction by measuring the skin blood flow involved with the sympathetic innervation. Thermography is useful in assisting the determination of the therapeutic effect. However, autonomic dysfunction should be confirmed correctly with the assessment of thermatome that shows abnormal thermal distribution in the region of the disease. Thermography should make noticeable the difference between the body temperature of abnormal and normal sites, and show the alteration of temperature. Monitoring using thermography is useful to determine the effect of sympathetic nerve block. If a thermographic instrument is used, it is important that examiners should understand the function of the instrument, as well as its advantages and disadvantages.

  2. Medical instrument data exchange.

    PubMed

    Gumudavelli, Suman; McKneely, Paul K; Thongpithoonrat, Pongnarin; Gurkan, D; Chapman, Frank M

    2008-01-01

    Advances in medical devices and health care has been phenomenal during the recent years. Although medical device manufacturers have been improving their instruments, network connection of these instruments still rely on proprietary technologies. Even if the interface has been provided by the manufacturer (e.g., RS-232, USB, or Ethernet coupled with a proprietary API), there is no widely-accepted uniform data model to access data of various bedside instruments. There is a need for a common standard which allows for internetworking with the medical devices from different manufacturers. ISO/IEEE 11073 (X73) is a standard attempting to unify the interfaces of all medical devices. X73 defines a client access mechanism that would be implemented into the communication controllers (residing between an instrument and the network) in order to access/network patient data. On the other hand, MediCAN technology suite has been demonstrated with various medical instruments to achieve interfacing and networking with a similar goal in its open standardization approach. However, it provides a more generic definition for medical data to achieve flexibility for networking and client access mechanisms. In this paper, a comparison between the data model of X73 and MediCAN will be presented to encourage interoperability demonstrations of medical instruments.

  3. Advanced optical instruments technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Mike; Chrisp, Michael; Cheng, Li-Jen; Eng, Sverre; Glavich, Thomas; Goad, Larry; Jones, Bill; Kaarat, Philip; Nein, Max; Robinson, William

    1992-01-01

    The science objectives for proposed NASA missions for the next decades push the state of the art in sensitivity and spatial resolution over a wide range of wavelengths, including the x-ray to the submillimeter. While some of the proposed missions are larger and more sensitive versions of familiar concepts, such as the next generation space telescope, others use concepts, common on the Earth, but new to space, such as optical interferometry, in order to provide spatial resolutions impossible with other concepts. However, despite their architecture, the performance of all of the proposed missions depends critically on the back-end instruments that process the collected energy to produce scientifically interesting outputs. The Advanced Optical Instruments Technology panel was chartered with defining technology development plans that would best improve optical instrument performance for future astrophysics missions. At this workshop the optical instrument was defined as the set of optical components that reimage the light from the telescope onto the detectors to provide information about the spatial, spectral, and polarization properties of the light. This definition was used to distinguish the optical instrument technology issues from those associated with the telescope, which were covered by a separate panel. The panel identified several areas for optical component technology development: diffraction gratings; tunable filters; interferometric beam combiners; optical materials; and fiber optics. The panel also determined that stray light suppression instruments, such as coronagraphs and nulling interferometers, were in need of general development to support future astrophysics needs.

  4. Workplace disability management in postpolio syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saeki, S; Takemura, J; Matsushima, Y; Chisaka, H; Hachisuka, K

    2001-12-01

    Postpolio syndrome (PPS) is generally defined as a clinical syndrome of new weakness, fatigue, and pain in individuals who have previously recovered from acute paralytic poliomyelitis. These new problems may lead to loss of employment as well as new deficits in instrumental activities in daily living (cleaning, washing, shopping, transportation, etc.), walking, climbing stairs, and personal assistance. We presented three cases of PPS with working disabilities in Japan, and stated the issues confronted with. Particularly at the workplace, PPS individuals need special supports from both rehabilitation medicine and occupational health services, including improved nutrition, achieving ideal body weight, regular and sensible exercise, frequent checkups, and modifying working conditions.

  5. Aeronautic Instruments. Section V : Power Plant Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, G E; Sylvander, R C; Mueller, E F; Wilhelm, R M; Eaton, H N; Warner, John A C

    1923-01-01

    Part 1 gives a general discussion of the uses, principles, construction, and operation of airplane tachometers. Detailed description of all available instruments, both foreign and domestic, are given. Part 2 describes methods of tests and effect of various conditions encountered in airplane flight such as change of temperature, vibration, tilting, and reduced air pressure. Part 3 describes the principal types of distance reading thermometers for aircraft engines, including an explanation of the physical principles involved in the functioning of the instruments and proper filling of the bulbs. Performance requirements and testing methods are given and a discussion of the source of error and results of tests. Part 4 gives methods of tests and calibration, also requirements of gauges of this type for the pressure measurement of the air pressure in gasoline tanks and the engine oil pressure on airplanes. Part 5 describes two types of gasoline gauges, the float type and the pressure type. Methods of testing and calibrating gasoline depth gauges are given. The Schroeder, R. A. E., and the Mark II flowmeters are described.

  6. Validity of the Loewenstein occupational therapy cognitive assessment in people with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yuh; Chern, Jen-suh; Lin, Keh-chung

    2009-01-01

    We examined the psychometric properties (internal consistency, concurrent criterion validity, and known-group validity) of the Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA) in people with intellectual disabilities. A total of 111 people with intellectual disabilities and 19 people with no disabilities were included. We used Cronbach's alpha, Spearman's rho, the Kruskal-Wallis test, and one-way analysis of variance for analysis, where appropriate. Results showed good internal consistency on Orientation, Visual Perception, Spatial Perception, Visuomotor Organization, and Thinking Operations subscales (Cronbach's alphas = .82, .74, .76, .86, and .80, respectively), but not on the Motor Praxis subscale (alpha = .48). We found significant correlations between participants' performance on the Pictorial IQ test and disability level and scores on the LOTCA. The known-group validity of the LOTCA in people with intellectual disabilities was satisfactory. We concluded that the LOTCA is a suitable instrument for measuring cognitive abilities and visual perception in people with intellectual disabilities.

  7. Evaluation of the Personal Impact Health Assessment Questionnaire (PI HAQ) to capture the impact of disability in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wylde, Vikki; Livesey, Christine; Learmonth, Ian D; Blom, Ashley W; Hewlett, Sarah

    2010-06-01

    Measuring facts about disability may not reflect their personal impact. An individualized values instrument has been used to weight difficulty in performing activities of daily living in rheumatoid arthritis, and calculate personal impact (Personal Impact Health Assessment Questionnaire; PI HAQ). This study aimed to evaluate the PI HAQ in osteoarthritis (OA). Study 1: 51 people with OA completed short and long versions of the value instrument at 0 and 1 week. Study 2: 116 people with OA completed the short value instrument, disability and psychological measures at 0 and 4 weeks. Study 1: The eight-category and 20-item value instruments correlated well (r = 0.85) and scores differed by just 2.7%. The eight-category instrument showed good internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.85) and moderate one-week test-retest reliability (r = 0.68, Wilcoxon signed-rank test p = 0.16, intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] 0.62). Study 2: Values for disability were not associated with disability severity or clinical status. After weighting disability by value, the resulting PI HAQ scores were significantly associated with dissatisfaction with disability, perceived increase in disability, poor clinical status and life dissatisfaction, and differed significantly between people with high and low clinical status (convergent and discriminant construct validity). There was moderate association with the disease repercussion profile disability subscale (r = 0.511; p < 0.001) (criterion validity). The PI HAQ was stable over four weeks (ICC 0.81). These studies provide an initial evaluation of an instrument to measure the personal impact of disability in people with OA, setting disability within a personal context. Further studies, including sensitivity to change, are required.

  8. Dairy cow disability weights.

    PubMed

    McConnel, Craig S; McNeil, Ashleigh A; Hadrich, Joleen C; Lombard, Jason E; Garry, Franklyn B; Heller, Jane

    2017-08-01

    Over the past 175 years, data related to human disease and death have progressed to a summary measure of population health, the Disability-Adjusted Life Year (DALY). As dairies have intensified there has been no equivalent measure of the impact of disease on the productive life and well-being of animals. The development of a disease-adjusted metric requires a consistent set of disability weights that reflect the relative severity of important diseases. The objective of this study was to use an international survey of dairy authorities to derive disability weights for primary disease categories recorded on dairies. National and international dairy health and management authorities were contacted through professional organizations, dairy industry publications and conferences, and industry contacts. Estimates of minimum, most likely, and maximum disability weights were derived for 12 common dairy cow diseases. Survey participants were asked to estimate the impact of each disease on overall health and milk production. Diseases were classified from 1 (minimal adverse effects) to 10 (death). The data was modelled using BetaPERT distributions to demonstrate the variation in these dynamic disease processes, and to identify the most likely aggregated disability weights for each disease classification. A single disability weight was assigned to each disease using the average of the combined medians for the minimum, most likely, and maximum severity scores. A total of 96 respondents provided estimates of disability weights. The final disability weight values resulted in the following order from least to most severe: retained placenta, diarrhea, ketosis, metritis, mastitis, milk fever, lame (hoof only), calving trauma, left displaced abomasum, pneumonia, musculoskeletal injury (leg, hip, back), and right displaced abomasum. The peaks of the probability density functions indicated that for certain disease states such as retained placenta there was a relatively narrow range of

  9. The Nebraska Instrument Sharing Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David H.

    1986-01-01

    The Nebraska Instrument Sharing Consortium (NISC) is a group of small colleges that have banded together to provide modern instrumentation to their students at an affordable price. Consortium activities are described, including how the instruments are moved between campuses. (JN)

  10. Autonomy support in people with mild-to-borderline intellectual disability: Testing the Health Care Climate Questionnaire-Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Frielink, Noud; Schuengel, Carlo; Embregts, Petri J C M

    2017-05-24

    Autonomy support in people with intellectual disability (ID) is an important yet understudied topic. Psychometrically sound instruments are lacking. This study tested the factor structure and reliability of an instrument for assessing the extent people with intellectual disability perceive their support staff as autonomy supportive. In a single wave, 185 adults with mild-to-borderline intellectual disability filled in an adapted version of the Health Care Climate Questionnaire (i.e., HCCQ-ID). Forty of them participated in a second wave to determine test-retest-reliability. The HCCQ-ID consists of 15 items on a 5-point Likert scale. The expected one-factor structure was found. Internal consistency (α = 0.93) and test-retest reliability (r = .85) were good. The score distribution was skewed towards high satisfaction. The factor structure and reliability of the HCCQ-ID were supported for people with mild-to-borderline intellectual disability. Given the homogeneous factor structure and the high reliability, the number of items may be further optimized. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Reliability and Validity of the SPAID-G Checklist for Detecting Psychiatric Disorders in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertelli, Marco; Scuticchio, Daniela; Ferrandi, Angela, Lassi, Stefano; Mango, Francesco; Ciavatta, Claudio; Porcelli, Cesare; Bianco, Annamaria; Monchieri, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    SPAID (Psychiatric Instrument for the Intellectually Disabled Adult) is the first Italian tool-package for carrying out psychiatric diagnosis in adults with Intellectual Disabilities (ID). It includes the "G" form, for general diagnostic orientation, and specific checklists for all groups of syndromes stated by the available…

  12. Attitudes Towards the Sexuality of Adults with an Intellectual Disability: Parents, Support Staff, and a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuskelly, Monica; Bryde, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Attitudes toward the sexuality of adults with intellectual disability were assessed in parents and carers of adults with intellectual disability and in a community sample. An instrument that contained items relating to eight aspects of sexuality (sexual feelings, sex education, masturbation, personal relationships, sexual intercourse,…

  13. Mental Disorders and Problem Behavior in a Community Sample of Adults with Intellectual Disability: Three-Month Prevalence and Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hove, Oddbjorn; Havik, Odd E.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of mental disorders in a Norwegian sample of adults with intellectual disability (ID) using the "Psychopathology Checklists for Adults With Intellectual Disability" (P-AID; Hove & Havik, 2008), a screening instrument adopting diagnostic criteria from the "Diagnostic…

  14. Attitudes Towards the Sexuality of Adults with an Intellectual Disability: Parents, Support Staff, and a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuskelly, Monica; Bryde, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Attitudes toward the sexuality of adults with intellectual disability were assessed in parents and carers of adults with intellectual disability and in a community sample. An instrument that contained items relating to eight aspects of sexuality (sexual feelings, sex education, masturbation, personal relationships, sexual intercourse,…

  15. Reliability and Validity of the SPAID-G Checklist for Detecting Psychiatric Disorders in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertelli, Marco; Scuticchio, Daniela; Ferrandi, Angela, Lassi, Stefano; Mango, Francesco; Ciavatta, Claudio; Porcelli, Cesare; Bianco, Annamaria; Monchieri, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    SPAID (Psychiatric Instrument for the Intellectually Disabled Adult) is the first Italian tool-package for carrying out psychiatric diagnosis in adults with Intellectual Disabilities (ID). It includes the "G" form, for general diagnostic orientation, and specific checklists for all groups of syndromes stated by the available…

  16. The Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery and the WAIS-R in Assessment of Adults with Specific Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Lynda; Goldstein, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    Compared intellectual (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale for Adults-Revised) and neuropsychological (Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery) assessment as valid methods of identifying learning disabilities in adults. Findings from 155 subjects revealed that both instruments were able to distinguish adults with and without learning disabilities.…

  17. Measuring the Concept of Impact of Childhood Disability on Parents: Validation of a Multidimensional Measurement in a Cerebral Palsy Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyard, Audrey; Michelsen, Susan I.; Arnaud, Catherine; Lyons, Alan; Cans, Christine; Fauconnier, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Living with a child with a disability can affect family life in various domains. Impacts on time, expenses, work, relationships within the family, social relationships and physical and psychological health can be observed. The Family Impact of Childhood Disability (FICD) is a specific instrument designed to assess this situation. Used in a…

  18. Measuring the Concept of Impact of Childhood Disability on Parents: Validation of a Multidimensional Measurement in a Cerebral Palsy Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyard, Audrey; Michelsen, Susan I.; Arnaud, Catherine; Lyons, Alan; Cans, Christine; Fauconnier, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Living with a child with a disability can affect family life in various domains. Impacts on time, expenses, work, relationships within the family, social relationships and physical and psychological health can be observed. The Family Impact of Childhood Disability (FICD) is a specific instrument designed to assess this situation. Used in a…

  19. Development and Psychometric Properties of an Assessment for Persons with Intellectual Disability--The InterRAI ID

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Lynn; Hirdes, John P.; Fries, Brant E.; Smith, Trevor F.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the interRAI-Intellectual Disability (interRAI ID), a comprehensive instrument that assesses all key domains of interest to service providers relative to a person with an intellectual disability (ID). The authors report on the reliability and validity of embedded scales for cognition, self-care, aggression,…

  20. Blood gas analysis as a determinant of occupationally related disability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, W.K.; Zaldivar, G.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Arterial blood gas analysis is one of the criteria used by the Department of Labor to award total and permanent disability for coal workers' pneumoconiosis (Black Lung). We have observed that Black Lung claimants often undergo several blood gas analyses with widely differing results that sometimes range from complete normality to life-threatening hypoxemia in the same subject. We concluded that blood gas analysis in occupationally related disability determination is unreliable, in that quality control and instrumentation are variable; that severe hypoxemia is rare in coal workers' pneumoconiosis; and that such hypoxemia is nonspecific and correlates poorly with breathlessness.

  1. Helping Adult Educators Understand Disability Disclosure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocco, Tonette S.

    2001-01-01

    To help adult educators understand the process of disability disclosure, descriptions of the following are provided: the Americans with Disability Act of 1990, self-disclosure, disability disclosure, and identifying an undiagnosed disability. (Author/JOW)

  2. Bridging the Gap between Disability Studies and Disability Services in Higher Education: A Model Center on Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Alan L.; Sales, Amos

    2010-01-01

    The professional field of Disability Services in Higher Education and the academic discipline of Disability Studies share a perspective on disability that considers disability as a socially constructed phenomenon. Despite this common underpinning, there has been little effort or inquiry into the ways that disability services and Disability Studies…

  3. Madness as disability.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Sander L

    2014-12-01

    How does society imagine mental illness? Does this shift radically over time and with different social attitudes as well as scientific discoveries about the origins and meanings of mental illness? What happens when we begin to think about mental illness as madness, as a malleable concept constantly shifting its meaning? We thus look at the meanings associated with 'general paralysis of the insane' in the nineteenth century and autism today in regard to disability. In this case study we examine the claims by scholars such as the anthropologist Emily Martin and the psychiatrist Kay Jamison as to the relationship between mental illness, disability and creativity. Today, the health sciences have become concerned with mental illness as a form of disability. How does this change the meaning of madness for practitioners and patients? © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Physical Disability and Motivation

    PubMed Central

    Prosen, Harry

    1965-01-01

    Motivating the physically handicapped individual to assist in his own rehabilitation is a complex problem. Difficulties in motivation are often based on disturbances in body image, which in turn are related both to the premorbid personality and the handicap. Treatment must be directed at the body image as well as the physical disability. Emotional disturbance following body injury should be expected and its absence is abnormal. Adequate rehabilitation entails a consideration of the effect of the rehabilitation process on the disabled person. The patient's basic abilities must be used to improve motivation. Rehabilitation procedures must focus on practical ways of coping with everyday life. Physical disability can mobilize underlying inferiority feelings and increase the need for dependency. Judicious use must be made of success and frustration in the rehabilitation program. PMID:14296008

  5. Measuring preparedness for mammography in women with intellectual disabilities: a validation study of the Mammography Preparedness Measure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Claire Tienwey; Greenwood, Nechama; White, Laura F; Wilkinson, Joanne

    2015-05-01

    Women with intellectual disabilities have similar breast cancer rates as the general population, but lower rates of regular mammography and higher breast cancer mortality rates. Although prior qualitative work demonstrates that women with intellectual disabilities face unique, disability-specific barriers to mammography, the present authors lack standardized, validated instruments for measuring knowledge of breast cancer screening in this population. In addition, much research related to adults with intellectual disabilities focuses on family or carer perspectives, rather than involving women with intellectual disabilities, themselves. The present authors first pilot tested a general population instrument measuring breast cancer knowledge, and found that it did not perform adequately in women with intellectual disabilities. In response, the present authors developed the Mammography Preparedness Measure (MPM), a direct short interview tool to measure knowledge and preparedness in women with intellectual disabilities, themselves, rather than relying on caregiver or other reports, and using inclusive methodology. The present authors validated the MPM by assessing test-retest reliability. Average test-retest per cent agreement of 84%, ranging from 74 to 91% agreement per item, with an overall kappa of 0.59. The MPM appears to be a valid instrument appropriate for measuring mammography preparedness in women with intellectual disabilities. The success of this innovative tool suggests that direct, rather than informant-directed tools can be developed to measure health knowledge and cancer screening readiness in adults with intellectual disabilities, an important measure in studying and reducing disparities. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Thrice Disabling Disability: Enabling Inclusive, Socially Just Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, S. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this inquiry was to create a social justice-oriented inclusive and enabling pedagogy by situating traditional individualised views of disability alongside three alternative understandings: a disability studies in education perspective, a First Nations view of disability and one based upon the autism pride/autism-as-culture movement.…

  7. Dental fellowships in developmental disabilities help broaden care of disabled.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, F S; Kamen, P; Ratner, S; Rosenthal, R L

    1992-11-01

    Continuation of the national trend toward deinstitutionalization and community placement for persons with developmental disabilities, physical handicaps and other medical problems will mean increased demand for dentists trained to care for this segment of the population. The New York State Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities now offers dental fellowships in developmental disabilities to help fill the learning gap.

  8. Disability Services Offices for Students with Disabilities: A Campus Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cory, Rebecca C.

    2011-01-01

    Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) are often the starting places for conversations about students with disabilities in higher education. Section 504 and the ADA provide mandates for protection from discrimination and provision of reasonable disability accommodations (e.g., sign language…

  9. Math Disabilities and Reading Disabilities: Can They Be Separated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee; Jerman, Olga; Zheng, Xinhua

    2009-01-01

    This article synthesizes some of the published literature that selectively compares the cognitive functioning of children with math disabilities (MDs) with average-achieving children and poor readers (children with reading disabilities [RDs] or comorbid disabilities [RDs + MDs]). All studies in the synthesis report reading, IQ, and math scores for…

  10. Disability Services Offices for Students with Disabilities: A Campus Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cory, Rebecca C.

    2011-01-01

    Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) are often the starting places for conversations about students with disabilities in higher education. Section 504 and the ADA provide mandates for protection from discrimination and provision of reasonable disability accommodations (e.g., sign language…

  11. Math Disabilities and Reading Disabilities: Can They Be Separated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee; Jerman, Olga; Zheng, Xinhua

    2009-01-01

    This article synthesizes some of the published literature that selectively compares the cognitive functioning of children with math disabilities (MDs) with average-achieving children and poor readers (children with reading disabilities [RDs] or comorbid disabilities [RDs + MDs]). All studies in the synthesis report reading, IQ, and math scores for…

  12. Growing Up Physically Disabled: Factors in the Evaluation of Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Nancy

    1982-01-01

    Investigated how people with congenital orthopedic disabilities intially learn that they are different and how they learn the evaluative meaning associated with being disabled. Analyzed the content of 29 autobiographies. Results indicated that people born with orthopedic disabilities discover between ages 3 and 5 that they are different. (Author)

  13. Disability Studies, Disabled People and the Struggle for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Mike; Barnes, Colin

    2010-01-01

    This paper traces the relationship between the emergence of disability studies and the struggle for meaningful inclusion for disabled people with particular reference to the work of a pivotal figure in these developments: Len Barton. It is argued that the links between disability activism and the academy were responsible for the emergence of…

  14. Disability Studies, Disabled People and the Struggle for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Mike; Barnes, Colin

    2010-01-01

    This paper traces the relationship between the emergence of disability studies and the struggle for meaningful inclusion for disabled people with particular reference to the work of a pivotal figure in these developments: Len Barton. It is argued that the links between disability activism and the academy were responsible for the emergence of…

  15. Nonmetallic Diaphragms for Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, H N; Buckingham, C T

    1925-01-01

    This report, the second of a series of reports relating to the general subject of instrument diaphragms. The first report of the series was published as Technical Report no. 165, "diaphragms for aeronautic instruments," and comprised an outline of historical developments and theoretical principles. The present report relates entirely to nonmetallic diaphragms, the use of which in certain types of pressure elements has been increasing for some time. Little, if any, information has been available to aid the designer of instruments using this form of pressure element. It was to attempt to meet the need for such information that the investigation reported in this paper was undertaken. The report describes the various materials which have been used as nonmetallic diaphragms, discusses the factors which affect the performance of the diaphragms and gives the results of tests made for the purpose of investigating the effect produced by these factors.

  16. The AFTA coronagraph instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaklan, Stuart; Levine, Marie; Foote, Marc; Rodgers, Michael; Underhill, Michael; Marchen, Luis; Klein, Dan

    2013-09-01

    The Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (AFTA) study in 2012-2013 included a high-contrast stellar coronagraph to complement the wide-field infrared survey (WFIRST) instrument. The idea of flying a coronagraph on this telescope was met with some skepticism because the AFTA pupil has a large central obscuration with six secondary mirror struts that impact the coronagraph sensitivity. However, several promising coronagraph concepts have emerged, and a corresponding initial instrument design has been completed. Requirements on the design include observations centered 0.6 deg off-axis, on-orbit robotic serviceability, operation in a geosynchronous orbit, and room-temperature operation (driven by the coronagraph's deformable mirrors). We describe the instrument performance requirements, the optical design, an observational scenario, and integration times for typical detection and characterization observations.

  17. Aethalometer™ Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, Arthur J

    2016-04-01

    The Aethalometer is an instrument that provides a real-time readout of the concentration of “Black” or “Elemental” carbon aerosol particles (BC or E) in an air stream (see Figure 1 and Figure 2). It is a self-contained instrument that measures the rate of change of optical transmission through a spot on a filter where aerosol is being continuously collected and uses the information to calculate the concentration of optically absorbing material in the sampled air stream. The instrument measures the transmitted light intensities through the “sensing” portion of the filter, on which the aerosol spot is being collected, and a “reference” portion of the filter as a check on the stability of the optical source. A mass flowmeter monitors the sample air flow rate. The data from these three measurements is used to determine the mean BC content of the air stream.

  18. SPI instrumental background characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, P.; Vedrenne, G.; Roques, J. P.; Schönfelder, V.; Teegarden, B. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Knödlseder, J.; Wunderer, C.; Skinner, G. K.; Weidenspointner, G.; Attié, D.; Boggs, S.; Caraveo, P.; Cordier, B.; Diehl, R.; Gros, M.; Leleux, P.; Lichti, G. G.; Kalemci, E.; Kiener, J.; Lonjou, V.; Mandrou, P.; Paul, Ph.; Schanne, S.; von Ballmoos, P.

    2003-11-01

    In its space environment the INTEGRAL observatory is subject to an intense irradiation by energetic cosmic-ray particles that leads, via nuclear interactions with the telescope and spacecraft materials, to an important background of false events. In this paper we present the characteristics of the instrumental background that is observed in the spectrometer SPI (SPectrometer of INTEGRAL). We explain the tuning that has been performed on the parameters of the anticoincidence system in order to optimise the telescope sensitivity over the full energy range. Temporal variations of the instrumental background are discussed and methods are proposed that allow for their modelling in first order. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Spain), Czech Republic and Poland, and with the participation of Russia and the USA.

  19. Micro mushroom instrumentation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    An electronics circuit which provides for the recording of instrumentation data on an optical disk is disclosed. The optical disk is formatted in a spiral format instead of concentric tracks. The spiral format allows data to be recorded without the gaps that would be associated with concentric tracks. The instrumentation system provides each channel with a program instrumentation amplifier, a six pole lowpass switched capacitor filter, a sample and hold amplifier, and a digital to analog converter to provide automatic offset capability. Since each channel has its own components, simultaneous samples of every channel can be captured. All of the input signal's channel variables can be captured. All of the input signal's channel variables can be changed under software control without hardware changes. A single board computer is used for a system controller.

  20. Instrumentation at Gemini Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, S. J.; Boccas, Maxime; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Gomez, Percy; Murowinski, Rick; Chené, André-Nicolas; Henderson, David

    2014-07-01

    Gemini South's instrument suite has been completely transformed since our last biennial update. We commissioned the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) and its associated Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI) as well as Flamingos-2, our long-slit and multi-object infrared imager and spectrograph, and the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). We upgraded the CCDs in GMOS-S, our multi-object optical imager and spectrograph, with the GMOS-N CCD upgrade scheduled for 2015. Our next instrument, the Gemini High-resolution Optical SpecTrograph (GHOST) is in its preliminary design stage and we are making plans for the instrument to follow:Gen4#3.

  1. Approaches and tools for measuring disability in low and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Van Brakel, Wim H; Officer, Alana

    2008-03-01

    To review the current state-of-the-art of measuring disability in the context of countries where leprosy is endemic. Estimates of the prevalence of disability are often based on scanty data, collected with a myriad of different instruments. This is true for all four components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF); 1) body functions and structures, 2) activities and participation, 3) personal factors and 4) environmental factors, and for disability-related quality of life. There is an urgent need for data on leprosy-related disability, as well as for data on disability due to other causes. Data is needed as baseline for rehabilitation programmes, individual interventions, for programme monitoring and evaluation and for advocacy. Measurement instruments and qualitative data collection techniques now exist which are directly applicable in the context of most leprosy-endemic countries. We discuss several instruments compatible with the ICF conceptual framework. A validated generic instrument for measuring impairment is currently not available. For measuring activity and participation, we recommend the WHODAS, the SALSA scale and the Participation Scale. We recommend an inclusive focus, where people with leprosy-related disability are seen as a sub-group of people with disability in the wider context, since many of their needs are the same as those of others. The need for validation and collection of normative reference data is also discussed. Programmes and research projects should choose an appropriate set of tools and methods and seek to apply these systematically. This choice should be guided by data on the validity of these tools in the concerned context. Instruments should be revalidated formally in every new context. Similarly, locally relevant normative data should be collected and applied to ensure that decisions are based on valid interpretations and conclusions.

  2. Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation is based on the concept of smart sensor technology for testing with intelligence needed to perform sell-diagnosis of health, and to participate in a hierarchy of health determination at sensor, process, and system levels. A virtual sensor test instrumentation consists of five elements: (1) a common sensor interface, (2) microprocessor, (3) wireless interface, (4) signal conditioning and ADC/DAC (analog-to-digital conversion/ digital-to-analog conversion), and (5) onboard EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) for metadata storage and executable software to create powerful, scalable, reconfigurable, and reliable embedded and distributed test instruments. In order to maximize the efficient data conversion through the smart sensor node, plug-and-play functionality is required to interface with traditional sensors to enhance their identity and capabilities for data processing and communications. Virtual sensor test instrumentation can be accessible wirelessly via a Network Capable Application Processor (NCAP) or a Smart Transducer Interlace Module (STIM) that may be managed under real-time rule engines for mission-critical applications. The transducer senses the physical quantity being measured and converts it into an electrical signal. The signal is fed to an A/D converter, and is ready for use by the processor to execute functional transformation based on the sensor characteristics stored in a Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS). Virtual sensor test instrumentation is built upon an open-system architecture with standardized protocol modules/stacks to interface with industry standards and commonly used software. One major benefit for deploying the virtual sensor test instrumentation is the ability, through a plug-and-play common interface, to convert raw sensor data in either analog or digital form, to an IEEE 1451 standard-based smart sensor, which has instructions to program sensors for a wide variety of

  3. Serving Adult Learners with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polson, Cheryl J.; White, Warren J.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how adult basic educators can respond to the mandates of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Addresses remediation versus accommodation, disability identification, and how to choose and evaluate the effectiveness of accommodations. (JOW)

  4. Disability access. Open season.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brian

    2003-04-24

    A disability access audit carried out at a trust operating over 50 sites revealed that a 2.3m Pounds programme of work was needed. The audit took four months, with the team spending a day at each of the premises. The audit has been followed by a staff training programme in disability awareness. The trust's information systems now show if a patient did not attend an appointment because of difficulties with physical access. All letters to patients are produced in a minimum 12-point type.

  5. Functional Disability in Women Submitted to Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Nayara Priscila Dantas; Guedes, Thais Sousa Rodrigues; Holanda, Ayrton Martins; Reis, Mariane Albuquerque; da Silva, Clecia Patrocínio; Silva, Barbara Layse Rocha e; de Almeida, Gilmara Celli Maia; de Souza, Dyego Leandro Bezerra

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study presented herein was to verify the prevalence of functional disability and its associated factors in women submitted to breast cancer treatment. A cross-sectional study was carried out, in 101 women diagnosed with malignant breast cancer neoplasm, who underwent cancer treatment at least 12 months before the study, and remained under clinical monitoring. Functional disability was measured by the DASH instrument. Data collection included variables related to socioeconomic characteristics, life habits, health conditions, clinical tumor characteristics and therapeutic approach. Bivariate analysis was carried out by Pearson’s chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test, calculating the prevalence ratio with a 95% confidence interval. Multivariate analysis utilized Poisson’s Regression with robust variance. A statistical significance of 0.05 was considered. Prevalence of functional disability in the studied sample was 22.8% (CI95% 13.9-31.6). Functional disability was statistically significantly associated with age (p = 0.035) and access to health services (p = 0.028). It was concluded that younger patients suffered higher impact of breast cancer treatment on disability. Regarding access to health services, women that received public clinical monitoring reported higher occurrences of functional disability. This pointed towards the necessity of more organized, less bureaucratic, and effective health services in the assistance network, directed to the minimization of the impacts of cancer treatment on health and life conditions of breast cancer survivors. PMID:28610403

  6. Functional Disability in Women Submitted to Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed

    Dantas de Oliveira, Nayara Priscila; Guedes, Thais Sousa Rodrigues; Holanda, Ayrton Martins; Reis, Mariane Albuquerque; da Silva, Clecia Patrocínio; Rocha e Silva, Barbara Layse; Maia de Almeida, Gilmara Celli; de Souza, Dyego Leandro Bezerra

    2017-05-01

    The objective of the study presented herein was to verify the prevalence of functional disability and its associated factors in women submitted to breast cancer treatment. A cross-sectional study was carried out, in 101 women diagnosed with malignant breast cancer neoplasm, who underwent cancer treatment at least 12 months before the study, and remained under clinical monitoring. Functional disability was measured by the DASH instrument. Data collection included variables related to socioeconomic characteristics, life habits, health conditions, clinical tumor characteristics and therapeutic approach. Bivariate analysis was carried out by Pearson’s chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test, calculating the prevalence ratio with a 95% confidence interval. Multivariate analysis utilized Poisson’s Regression with robust variance. A statistical significance of 0.05 was considered. Prevalence of functional disability in the studied sample was 22.8% (CI95% 13.9-31.6). Functional disability was statistically significantly associated with age (p = 0.035) and access to health services (p = 0.028). It was concluded that younger patients suffered higher impact of breast cancer treatment on disability. Regarding access to health services, women that received public clinical monitoring reported higher occurrences of functional disability. This pointed towards the necessity of more organized, less bureaucratic, and effective health services in the assistance network, directed to the minimization of the impacts of cancer treatment on health and life conditions of breast cancer survivors. Creative Commons Attribution License

  7. Lightning Instrumentation at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colon, Jose L.; Eng, D.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes lightning phenomena with a brief explanation of lightning generation and lightning activity as related to KSC. An analysis of the instrumentation used at launching Pads 39 A&B for measurements of lightning effects is included with alternatives and recommendations to improve the protection system and upgrade the actual instrumentation system. An architecture for a new data collection system to replace the present one is also included. A novel architecture to obtain lightning current information from several sensors using only one high speed recording channel while monitoring all sensors to replace the actual manual lightning current recorders and a novel device for the protection system are described.

  8. Instrumentation Cables Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Muna, Alice Baca; LaFleur, Chris Bensdotter

    2016-10-01

    A fire at a nuclear power plant (NPP) has the potential to damage structures, systems, and components important to safety, if not promptly detected and suppressed. At Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant on March 22, 1975, a fire in the reactor building damaged electrical power and control systems. Damage to instrumentation cables impeded the function of both normal and standby reactor coolant systems, and degraded the operators’ plant monitoring capability. This event resulted in additional NRC involvement with utilities to ensure that NPPs are properly protected from fire as intended by the NRC principle design criteria (i.e., general design criteria 3, Fire Protection). Current guidance and methods for both deterministic and performance based approaches typically make conservative (bounding) assumptions regarding the fire-induced failure modes of instrumentation cables and those failure modes effects on component and system response. Numerous fire testing programs have been conducted in the past to evaluate the failure modes and effects of electrical cables exposed to severe thermal conditions. However, that testing has primarily focused on control circuits with only a limited number of tests performed on instrumentation circuits. In 2001, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted a series of cable fire tests designed to address specific aspects of the cable failure and circuit fault issues of concern1. The NRC was invited to observe and participate in that program. The NRC sponsored Sandia National Laboratories to support this participation, whom among other things, added a 4-20 mA instrumentation circuit and instrumentation cabling to six of the tests. Although limited, one insight drawn from those instrumentation circuits tests was that the failure characteristics appeared to depend on the cable insulation material. The results showed that for thermoset insulated cables, the instrument reading tended to drift

  9. Microtechnology for instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Mariella, R.

    1998-01-01

    For the last two decades, the majority of research and development at LLNL in microtechnology has focused on photonics devices and bulk micromachining, including miccroelectro-mechanical systems and associated areas. For the last ten years, we have used these capabilities to address our analytical instrumentation needs. Just as the miniature photonics have enable the fabrication of analytical instruments that are either higher performance, smaller, more portable, or are combinations of these. Examples of these are our portable thermal cyclers for DNA analysis, our hand-held gas chromatograph, our flow-stream-waveguide-based flow cytometer, and our etched-microchannel electrophoresis systems. This presentation will describe these and related developments.

  10. Animation of MARDI Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image to view the animation

    This animation shows a zoom into the Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) instrument onboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. The Phoenix team will soon attempt to use a microphone on the MARDI instrument to capture sounds of Mars.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Instrumentation in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takashima, K.

    1986-01-01

    Requirements in designing instrumentation systems and measurements of various physical quantities in wind tunnels are surveyed. Emphasis is given to sensors used for measuring pressure, temperature, and angle, and the measurements of air turbulence and boundary layers. Instrumentation in wind tunnels require accuracy, fast response, diversity and operational simplicity. Measurements of force, pressure, attitude angle, free flow, pressure distribution, and temperature are illustrated by a table, and a block diagram. The LDV (laser Doppler velocimeter) method for measuring air turbulence and flow velocity and measurement of skin friction and flow fields using laser holograms are discussed. The future potential of these techniques is studied.

  12. Instrumentation in medical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.

    1995-05-01

    The demand for clinical use of accelerated heavy charged-particle (proton and light-ion) beams for cancer treatment is now burgeoning worldwide. Clinical trials are underway at more than a dozen accelerators. Several hospital-based accelerator facilities dedicated to radiation treatment of human cancer have been constructed, and their number is growing. Many instruments in medical systems have been developed for modifying extracted particle beams for clinical application, monitoring the delivery of the treatment beams, and controlling the treatment processes to ensure patient safety. These in turn demand new developments of instruments in controlling beam extraction, beam tuning, and beam transportation at the medical systems.

  13. Standard NIM Instrumentation System

    SciTech Connect

    Costrell, Louis; Lenkszus, Frank R.; Rudnick, Stanley J.; Davey, Eric; Gould, John; Rankowitz, Seymour; Sims, William P.; Whitney, R. Roy; Dobinson, Robert W.; Verweij, Henk; Latner, Norman; Negro, Vincent C.; Barsotti, Edward J.; Droege, Thomas E.; Kerns, Cordon; Turner, Kathleen J.; Downing, Robert W.; Kirsten, Frederick A.; Larsh, A. E.; Loken, Stewart C.; Mack, Dick A.; Wagner, Lee J.; Lucena, Robert C.; O'Brien, Dennis W.; Gjovig, Allan; Naivar, Frank; Nelson, Ronald O.; White, D. Hywell; Akerlof, Carl; Stilwell, Donald E.; Trainor, James H.; Gobbi, Bruno; Biggerstaff, John A.; Hill, Nat W.; Schulze, Gerald K.; Gustavson, David B.; Horelick, Dale; Kunz, Paul F.; Paffrath, Leo; Walz, Helmut V.; Dawson, W. Kenneth; Cresswell, John; Dhawan, Satish; Gingell, Charles E. L.

    1990-05-01

    NIM is a standard modular instrumentation system that is in wide use throughout the world. As the NIM system developed and accommodations were made to a dynamic instrumentation field and a rapidly advancing technology, additions, revisions and clarifications were made. These were incorporated into the standard in the form of addenda and errata. This standard is a revision of the NIM document, AEC Report TID-20893 (Rev 4) dated July 1974. It includes all the addenda and errata items that were previously issued as well as numerous additional items to make the standard current with modern technology and manufacturing practice.

  14. Ocean Observation Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Airborne Ocean Color Imager (AOCI) was developed by Daedalus Enterprises, Inc. for Ames Research Center under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract as a simulator for an advanced oceanographic satellite instrument. The instrument measures water temperature and detects water color in nine wavelengths. Water color indicates chlorophyll content or phytoplankton. After EOCAP assistance and technical improvements, the AOCI was successfully commercialized by Daedalus Enterprises, Inc. One version provides commercial fishing fleets with information about fish locations, and the other is used for oceanographic research.

  15. Instrumental carbon monoxide dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Stetter, J R; Rutt, D R

    1980-10-01

    Modern technology for the ambient monitoring of carbon monoxide has been developed to produce a portable electrochemical instrument capable of the personal exposure to carbon monoxide. The performance characteristics of this device have been studied so that the unambiguous interpretation of field data could be performed. A study of the carbon monoxide exposure in a light manufacturing facility illustrate that effective dosimetry can be performed with expectations of accuracy typically better than +/- 15%, and that voluntary carbon monoxide exposures such as smoking were a significant contribution to the individual's exposure. Significant definition of the carbon monoxide exposure profile can be achieved with an instrument approach to the collection of the dosimetric data.

  16. Spectroelectrochemical Instrument Measures TOC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kounaves, Sam

    2011-01-01

    A spectroelectrochemical instrument has been developed for measuring the total organic carbon (TOC) content of an aqueous solution. Measurements of TOC are frequently performed in environmental, clinical, and industrial settings. Until now, techniques for performing such measurements have included, various ly, the use of hazardous reagents, ultraviolet light, or ovens, to promote reactions in which the carbon contents are oxidized. The instrument now being developed is intended to be a safer, more economical means of oxidizing organic carbon and determining the TOC levels of aqueous solutions and for providing a low power/mass unit for use in planetary missions.

  17. Advanced sensors and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calloway, Raymond S.; Zimmerman, Joe E.; Douglas, Kevin R.; Morrison, Rusty

    1990-01-01

    NASA is currently investigating the readiness of Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation to meet the requirements of new initiatives in space. The following technical objectives and technologies are briefly discussed: smart and nonintrusive sensors; onboard signal and data processing; high capacity and rate adaptive data acquisition systems; onboard computing; high capacity and rate onboard storage; efficient onboard data distribution; high capacity telemetry; ground and flight test support instrumentation; power distribution; and workstations, video/lighting. The requirements for high fidelity data (accuracy, frequency, quantity, spatial resolution) in hostile environments will continue to push the technology developers and users to extend the performance of their products and to develop new generations.

  18. Evaluation of disability and handicap following injury.

    PubMed

    Baldry Currens, J A

    2000-03-01

    Disability and handicap outcome measures are fundamental components of trauma system evaluation. These outcomes are described for survivors of major trauma, attended by the HEMS, London system. Together with measures of injury severity, three functional instruments (Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) and return to pre-injury work status (RTW)) were used to measure outcome in 201 trauma patients. By 12 months post injury 84.1% of cases were independent in Motor FIM, 88.1% in Cognitive FIM, 79.1% had good outcomes in GOS (grades 4 and 5) and 69.2% had returned to work. The functional measures showed a statistically significant relationship with minor and major and trauma (ISS < 16 and > or = 16): FIM (motor p < 0.002; cognitive p < 0.0003), GOS (p < 0.002) and RTW (p < 0.002). Division according to severity of principal injury confirmed the greatest disability and handicap resulted from the severest injuries (AIS 4-5): 68.9% achieved independence in Motor FIM, 73% in Cognitive FIM and only 40% returned to work. When grouped according to body region of principal injury, neurological injury, particularly severe injury (AIS 4-5) to head and spinal cord regions showed the poorest outcomes. FIM, GOS and RTW are recommended as standard indicators of disability and handicap for trauma registries and outcome studies.

  19. Mental health disabilities and human rights protections.

    PubMed

    Szmukler, G; Bach, M

    2015-01-01

    Around the world, reports regularly expose persistent and systemic human rights violations of patients in mental health services and facilities, and of those who are unable to access needed supports. A number of factors contribute - political will; the range and quality of services available; public and professional attitudes to mental health; stigma; health professionals' training and expertise; and available resources. This paper examines one of the main determinants, the legal framework. This sets the parameters for mental health policies and services and for applicable human rights norms and standards that can be realized in practice. We provide an overview of international human rights instruments in relation to mental health disabilities, and of the major human rights violations in this area. Key implications for mental health law reform are drawn with a particular focus on discrimination and coercive interventions. The major challenges posed by the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006) are examined. Current mental health laws, to greater or lesser degrees, fail to meet the newly required standards. We discuss reforms based on 'generic law' and 'legal capacity' principles that seek to meet those standards. We outline some emergent and promising examples of reform. The role of civil society and the importance of the standing of those with mental health disabilities in this process is noted.

  20. Disability search tips and resources.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Demographic projections for people living in the United States indicate a growing need for information on disabilities. This article discusses a limited number of concepts in disability, along with relevant thesaurus terms and suggested search techniques in four databases: PubMed, CINAHL, REHABDATA, and the Center for International Rehabilitation Research Information and Exchange's (CIRRIE) Database of International Research. The article closes with annotations of potentially useful websites that focus on concerns of persons with disabilities, their caregivers, and researchers in disability.

  1. A model for developing disability confidence.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Sally; Cancelliere, Sara

    2017-05-15

    Many clinicians, educators, and employers lack disability confidence which can affect their interactions with, and inclusion of people with disabilities. Our objective was to explore how disability confidence developed among youth who volunteered with children who have a disability. We conducted 30 in-depth interviews (16 without a disability, 14 with disabilities), with youth aged 15-25. We analyzed our data using an interpretive, qualitative, thematic approach. We identified four main themes that led to the progression of disability confidence including: (1) "disability discomfort," referring to lacking knowledge about disability and experiencing unease around people with disabilities; (2) "reaching beyond comfort zone" where participants increased their understanding of disability and became sensitized to difference; (3) "broadened perspectives" where youth gained exposure to people with disabilities and challenged common misperceptions and stereotypes; and (4) "disability confidence" which includes having knowledge of people with disabilities, inclusive, and positive attitudes towards them. Volunteering is one way that can help to develop disability confidence. Youth with and without disabilities both reported a similar process of developing disability confidence; however, there were nuances between the two groups. Implications for Rehabilitation The development of disability confidence is important for enhancing the social inclusion of people with disabilities. Volunteering with people who have a disability, or a disability different from their own, can help to develop disability confidence which involves positive attitudes, empathy, and appropriate communication skills. Clinicians, educators, and employers should consider promoting working with disabled people through such avenues as volunteering or service learning to gain disability confidence.

  2. The self-perception of a learning disability and its relationship to academic self-concept and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Heyman, W B

    1990-10-01

    Eighty-seven children with learning disabilities, aged 9 through 11 years 11 months, completed measures of self-esteem, academic self-concept, and self-perception of their learning disability. The Self-Perception of Learning Disability (SPLD) instrument measures the extent to which children with learning disabilities perceive their disability as (a) delimited rather than global, (b) modifiable rather than permanently limiting, and (c) not stigmatizing. It was hypothesized that self-perception of one's learning disability would be related positively to both academic self-concept and self-esteem, and that each of these relationships would remain significant when controlling for sex, ethnicity, age, reading and math achievement, self-contained versus mainstreamed classroom setting, and age at diagnosis. Correlations and multiple regression analyses confirmed these hypotheses. Results were discussed in terms of helping children to develop less negative self-perceptions of their disabilities.

  3. [Spanish version of the new World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS-II): initial phase of development and pilot study. Cantabria disability work group].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Barquero, J L; Vázquez Bourgón, E; Herrera Castanedo, S; Saiz, J; Uriarte, M; Morales, F; Gaite, L; Herrán, A; Ustün, T B

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to present the initial phases of the development of the Spanish version of the "World Health Organization Disablement Assessment Schedule II" WHO-DAS-II and also to describe the quantitative and qualitative methodological strategies used in the elaboration process of an instrument: i) compatible with the new International Classification of Functioning and Disability -ICIDH-2- of the World Health Organisation; ii) with criteria of cross-cultural applicability and; iii) to allow us to assess the disability in all its dimensions.

  4. Categories of Disability under IDEA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Every year, under the federal law known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), millions of children with disabilities receive special services designed to meet their unique needs. Early intervention services are provided through the state to infants and toddlers with disabilities under three years of age and their families. For…

  5. Computers, Technology, and Disability. [Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC. HEATH Resource Center.

    This paper describes programs and resources that focus on access of postsecondary students with disabilities to computers and other forms of technology. Increased access to technological devices and services is provided to students with disabilities under the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (Tech Act). Section…

  6. Disabled People in Japanese Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kojima, Yoko, Ed.; And Others

    The volume is intended to give readers a glimpse of the day-to-day life of disabled people in Japan. Eight brief papers present life experiences of a mentally retarded preschooler, severely disabled children, a child with muscular dystrophy, a young girl with polio living in the community, visually disabled and recovering mentally ill people…

  7. Disability Studies: Information and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven, Ed.; Shoultz, Bonnie, Ed.; Walker, Pamela, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This document reflects the diversity of the field of Disability Studies, including contributions representing different disability groups, perspectives, and disciplines. Resource information is presented in nine sections: (1) Books, Chapters, and Articles; (2) Films and Documentaries; (3) Academic Programs in Disability Studies in North America;…

  8. Supporting Young Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebbeler, Kathleen; Spiker, Donna

    2016-01-01

    What do we know about young children with delays and disabilities, and how can we help them succeed in prekindergarten through third grade? To begin with, Kathleen Hebbeler and Donna Spiker write, identifying children with delays and disabilities to receive specialized services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act poses several…

  9. Experimental Disability: A Gestalt Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lofaro, Gregory A.; James, Fleming, III

    1980-01-01

    Experimental disability offers rehabilitation counselor educators and trainers a vehicle for developing student-counselor awareness and sensitivity to psychosocial problems of disability. Gestalt counseling techniques, which emphasize the bipolarities of the disability experience, are used to explore the feelings, behaviors, and attitudes…

  10. The Gifted Learning Disabled Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1994

    This collection of articles on gifted learning disabled students begins with an explanation of the philosophy of the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University (Maryland), a list of characteristics of gifted disabled students, and three definitions of learning disabilities. The following papers are then provided: "Gifted but…

  11. Disability Studies and Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, John

    2011-01-01

    This article promotes the field of disability studies as a valuable resource for expanding art education's concept of disability and as a promising venue for interdisciplinary dialogue. While art education has persistently supported special education since its inception, disability advocacy has advanced in the past two decades toward…

  12. Employment and People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter issue offers six articles on employment of people with disabilities. "Employment and People with Disabilities: Challenges for the Nineties" (Frank Bowe) discusses the Americans with Disabilities Act, issues in unemployment and under-education, earnings, and implications for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative…

  13. The Gifted Learning Disabled Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1994

    This collection of articles on gifted learning disabled students begins with an explanation of the philosophy of the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University (Maryland), a list of characteristics of gifted disabled students, and three definitions of learning disabilities. The following papers are then provided: "Gifted but…

  14. Disabled People in Japanese Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kojima, Yoko, Ed.; And Others

    The volume is intended to give readers a glimpse of the day-to-day life of disabled people in Japan. Eight brief papers present life experiences of a mentally retarded preschooler, severely disabled children, a child with muscular dystrophy, a young girl with polio living in the community, visually disabled and recovering mentally ill people…

  15. Familial Patterns of Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Pedigree analysis of 12 young adults (9 of whom had learning disabilities) indicated that learning disability (LD) was strongly familial but that the type of disability (reading or math) was not directly inherited. Autoimmune disorders were significantly correlated with LD. In seven of the LD families, adults failed to overcome earlier reading and…

  16. Literary Characters Who Are Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Keith; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Determines which specific disability categories appear most often in literature, when they appear, and which authors have contributed most to their appearance. Physical disabilities have been portrayed most often, followed by alcoholism and sensory disorders. Most portrayals of disabilities appeared between 1900 and 1949 and Charles Dickens wrote…

  17. Disability Studies and Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, John

    2011-01-01

    This article promotes the field of disability studies as a valuable resource for expanding art education's concept of disability and as a promising venue for interdisciplinary dialogue. While art education has persistently supported special education since its inception, disability advocacy has advanced in the past two decades toward…

  18. Familial Patterns of Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Pedigree analysis of 12 young adults (9 of whom had learning disabilities) indicated that learning disability (LD) was strongly familial but that the type of disability (reading or math) was not directly inherited. Autoimmune disorders were significantly correlated with LD. In seven of the LD families, adults failed to overcome earlier reading and…

  19. Instrumentation Control Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 22 units to consider for use in a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of instrumentation control technician. All the units listed will not necessarily apply to every situation or tech prep consortium, nor will all the competencies within each unit be appropriate. Several units appear within each specific…

  20. Neutron instrumentation for biology

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    In the October 1994 round of proposals at the ILL, the external biology review sub- committee was asked to allocate neutron beam time to a wide range of experiments, on almost half the total number of scheduled neutron instruments: on 3 diffractometers, on 3 small angle scattering instruments, and on some 6 inelastic scattering spectrometers. In the 3.5 years since the temporary reactor shutdown, the ILL`s management structure has been optimized, budgets and staff have been trimmed, the ILL reactor has been re-built, and many of the instruments up-graded, many powerful (mainly Unix) workstations have been introduced, and the neighboring European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has established itself as the leading synchrotron radiation source and has started its official user program. The ILL reactor remains the world`s most intense dedicated neutron source. In this challenging context, it is of interest to review briefly the park of ILL instruments used to study the structure and energetics of small and large biological systems. A brief summary will be made of each class of experiments actually proposed in the latest ILL proposal round.

  1. Elementary Instrumental Music Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dolores A.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Our former Elementary Instrumental Music Program for 4th-6th graders was costly and ineffective. Students were bused to a high school in the middle of the instructional day--costs (time and transportation) were not compensatory with the program, which was experiencing a significant drop-out rate.…

  2. Instrument Measures Ocular Counterrolling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitan, Barry M.; Reschke, Millard F.; Spector, Lawrence N.

    1991-01-01

    Compact, battery-powered, noninvasive unit replaces several pieces of equipment and operator. Instrument that looks like pair of goggles with small extension box measures ocular counterrotation. Called "otolith tilt-translation reinterpretation" (OTTR) goggles, used in studies of space motion sickness. Also adapted to use on Earth and determine extent of impairment in patients who have impaired otolith functions.

  3. Music: Instrumental Techniques, Percussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearl, Jesse

    A course in introduction to music emphasizing harmony is presented. The approach used is a laboratory approach in which pupils will develop skill in playing percussion instruments, sing, listen to, read and compose music with emphasis on elementary concepts of harmony. Course objectives include: (1) The student will recognize duple, triple,…

  4. Portable dynamic fundus instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Gerald R. (Inventor); Meehan, Richard T. (Inventor); Hunter, Norwood R. (Inventor); Caputo, Michael P. (Inventor); Gibson, C. Robert (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A portable diagnostic image analysis instrument is disclosed for retinal funduscopy in which an eye fundus image is optically processed by a lens system to a charge coupled device (CCD) which produces recordable and viewable output data and is simultaneously viewable on an electronic view finder. The fundus image is processed to develop a representation of the vessel or vessels from the output data.

  5. HARMONI instrument control electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigante, José V.; Rodríguez Ramos, Luis F.; Zins, Gerard; Schnetler, Hermine; Pecontal, Arlette; Herreros, José Miguel; Clarke, Fraser; Bryson, Ian; Thatte, Niranjan

    2014-07-01

    HARMONI is an integral field spectrograph working at visible and near-infrared wavelengths over a range of spatial scales from ground layer corrected to fully diffraction-limited. The instrument has been chosen to be part of the first-light complement at the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). This paper describes the instrument control electronics to be developed at IAC. The large size of the HARMONI instrument, its cryogenic operation, and the fact that it must operate with enhanced reliability is a challenge from the point of view of the control electronics design. The present paper describes a design proposal based on the current instrument requirements and intended to be fully compliant with the ESO E-ELT standards, as well as with the European EMC and safety standards. The modularity of the design and the use of COTS standard hardware will benefit the project in several aspects, as reduced costs, shorter schedule by the use of commercially available components, and improved quality by the use of well proven solutions.

  6. Rain radar instrument definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Nicolas; Chenebault, J.; Suinot, Noel; Mancini, Paolo L.

    1996-12-01

    As a result of a pre-phase a study, founded by ESA, this paper presents the definition of a spaceborne Rain Radar, candidate instrument for earth explorer precipitation mission. Based upon the description of user requirements for such a dedicated mission, a mission analysis defines the most suitable space segment. At system level, a parametric analysis compares pros and cons of instrument concepts associated with rain rate retrieval algorithms in order to select the most performing one. Several trade-off analysis at subsystem level leads then to the definition of the proposed design. In particular, as pulse compression is implemented in order to increase the radar sensitivity, the selected method to achieve a pulse response with a side-lobe level below--60 dB is presented. Antenna is another critical rain radar subsystem and several designs are com pared: direct radiating array, single or dual reflector illuminated by single or dual feed arrays. At least, feasibility of centralized amplification using TWTA is compared with criticality of Tx/Rx modules for distributed amplification. Mass and power budgets of the designed instrument are summarized as well as standard deviations and bias of simulated rain rate retrieval profiles. The feasibility of a compliant rain radar instrument is therefore demonstrated.

  7. Music: Instrumental Techniques, Strings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Philip

    A course in music which emphasizes harmony is presented. The approach used is a laboratory one in which pupils will develop skill in playing orchestral string instruments, sing, listen to, read and compose music with emphasis on elementary concepts of harmony. Course objectives include: (1) The student will select the title of a familiar melody…

  8. Instrument for assaying radiation

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  9. Integrating Nephelometer Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Uin, J.

    2016-03-01

    The Integrating Nephelometer (Figure 1) is an instrument that measures aerosol light scattering. It measures aerosol optical scattering properties by detecting (with a wide angular integration – from 7 to 170°) the light scattered by the aerosol and subtracting the light scattered by the carrier gas, the instrument walls and the background noise in the detector (zeroing). Zeroing is typically performed for 5 minutes every day at midnight UTC. The scattered light is split into red (700 nm), green (550 nm), and blue (450 nm) wavelengths and captured by three photomultiplier tubes. The instrument can measure total scatter as well as backscatter only (from 90 to 170°) (Heintzenberg and Charlson 1996; Anderson et al. 1996; Anderson and Ogren 1998; TSI 3563 2015) At ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement), two identical Nephelometers are usually run in series with a sample relative humidity (RH) conditioner between them. This is possible because Nephelometer sampling is non-destructive and the sample can be passed on to another instrument. The sample RH conditioner scans through multiple RH values in cycles, treating the sample. This kind of setup allows to study how aerosol particles’ light scattering properties are affected by humidification (Anderson et al. 1996). For historical reasons, the two Nephelometers in this setup are labeled “wet” and “dry”, with the “dry” Nephelometer usually being the one before the conditioner and sampling ambient air (the names are switched for the MAOS measurement site due to the high RH of the ambient air).

  10. Elementary Instrumental Music Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dolores A.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Our former Elementary Instrumental Music Program for 4th-6th graders was costly and ineffective. Students were bused to a high school in the middle of the instructional day--costs (time and transportation) were not compensatory with the program, which was experiencing a significant drop-out rate.…

  11. Experimenting with Woodwind Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Simple experiments involving musical instruments of the woodwind family can be used to demonstrate the basic physics of vibrating air columns in resonance tubes using nothing more than straightforward measurements and data collection hardware and software. More involved experimentation with the same equipment can provide insight into the effects…

  12. Process Instrumentation. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, A. O., III; Fowler, Malcolm

    This module provides instructional materials that are designed to help teachers train students in job skills for entry-level jobs as instrumentation technicians. This text addresses the basics of troubleshooting control loops, and the transducers, transmitters, signal conditioners, control valves, and controllers that enable process systems to…

  13. The GLO Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordley, L.; Marshall, B. T.; McHugh, M. J.; Hervig, M. E.; Paxton, G. J.; Fish, C. S.; Bailey, S. M.; Marchant, A.

    2011-12-01

    Advanced solar occultation sensors, miniature in size and complexity, are now possible with modern space-qualified components and measurement techniques. This poster describes the GLO (Gfcr Limb Occultation) instrument, a static sensor with cubesat dimensions that performs solar occultation measurements using a combination of broadband and gas filter correlation channels. GLO can be applied to measure temperature, pressure, aerosol, and trace gases from cloud-top to the lower thermosphere. Though GLO has a broad range of applicability, for this poster we present a version of GLO designed for the UTLS. A feasibility study for such an instrument demonstrates unprecedented fidelity in retrieved profiles, with sub kilometer vertical resolution, of temperature, pressure, aerosol extinction from 0.4 to 4 microns and trace gases that are key to understanding UTLS exchange. Using a single 2D detector array to image the sun for all channels simultaneously, a 10 x 10 x 20 cm instrument is shown to provide UTLS profile measurements of geophysical parameters that are predicted to match or surpass the quality of such profiles from previous limb sensors. A suite of GLO instruments in different orbits can be used to provide global coverage that rivals limb emission sensors, but with occultation measurement capabilities in calibration, precision and accuracy.

  14. Instrumentation Control Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 22 units to consider for use in a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of instrumentation control technician. All the units listed will not necessarily apply to every situation or tech prep consortium, nor will all the competencies within each unit be appropriate. Several units appear within each specific…

  15. Instrument for Textbook Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huetteman, Julie Doidge

    An instrument to assist in assessing textbooks was created to provide a concise format for comparison and evaluation. Textbook characteristics were selected to illustrate content and proportion of characteristics of textbooks. Nine textbook characteristics were selected for quantifying the content areas of textbooks: (1) number of pages in the…

  16. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  17. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  18. Designing Intelligent Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.; Erner, Philip M.; Frasso, Scott

    2007-11-01

    Remote science operations require automated systems that can both act and react with minimal human intervention. One such vision is that of an intelligent instrument that collects data in an automated fashion, and based on what it learns, decides which new measurements to take. This innovation implements experimental design and unites it with data analysis in such a way that it completes the cycle of learning. This cycle is the basis of the Scientific Method. The three basic steps of this cycle are hypothesis generation, inquiry, and inference. Hypothesis generation is implemented by artificially supplying the instrument with a parameterized set of possible hypotheses that might be used to describe the physical system. The act of inquiry is handled by an inquiry engine that relies on Bayesian adaptive exploration where the optimal experiment is chosen as the one which maximizes the expected information gain. The inference engine is implemented using the nested sampling algorithm, which provides the inquiry engine with a set of posterior samples from which the expected information gain can be estimated. With these computational structures in place, the instrument will refine its hypotheses, and repeat the learning cycle by taking measurements until the system under study is described within a pre-specified tolerance. We will demonstrate our first attempts toward achieving this goal with an intelligent instrument constructed using the LEGO MINDSTORMS NXT robotics platform.

  19. Ozone monitoring instrument (OMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Johan; van den Oord, Gijsbertus H. J.; Hilsenrath, Ernest; te Plate, Maurice B.; Levelt, Pieternel F.; Dirksen, Ruud

    2002-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is an UV-Visible imaging spectrograph using two dimensional CCD detectors to register both the spectrum and the swath perpendicular to the flight direction. This allows having a wide swath (114 degrees) combined with a small ground pixel (nominally 13 x 24 km). The instrument is planned for launch on NASA's EOS-AURA satellite in June 2003. Currently the OMI Flight Model is being build. This shortly follows the Instrument Development Model (DM) which was built to, next to engineering purposes, verify the instrument performance. The paper presents measured results from this DM for optical parameters such as distortion, optical efficiency, stray light and polarization sensitivity. Distortion in the spatial direction is shown to be on sub-pixel level and the stray light levels are very low and almost free from ghost peaks. The polarization sensitivity is presently demonstrated to be below 10-3 but we aim to lower the detection limit by an order of magnitude to make sure that spectral residuals do not mix with trace gas absorption spectra. Critical detector parameters are presented such as the very high UV quantum efficiency (60 % at 270 nm), dark current behavior and the sensitivity to radiation.

  20. Instrument for Textbook Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huetteman, Julie Doidge

    An instrument to assist in assessing textbooks was created to provide a concise format for comparison and evaluation. Textbook characteristics were selected to illustrate content and proportion of characteristics of textbooks. Nine textbook characteristics were selected for quantifying the content areas of textbooks: (1) number of pages in the…

  1. The Reliability, Validity and Practical Utility of Measuring Supports Using the I-CAN Instrument: Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riches, Vivienne C.; Parmenter, Trevor R.; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Hindmarsh, Gabrielle; Chan, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Background: There is an urgent need for developing reliable, valid and practical instruments that assess and classify the support needed by persons with disability to function in their chosen living, working and social environments. I-CAN is an instrument that addresses the frequency and level of support needed (not individual skills or deficits)…

  2. Disability Mentoring Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-07

    A student from the Maryland School For the Blind touches a piece of moon rock while learning about Meteorites, Asteroids and Comets during NASA's Disability Mentoring Day, Thursday, April 7, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washignton. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  3. Medication and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Laurie L.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical syndrome which relates most frequently to the reading-disabled child is the attention deficity disorder. The child psychiatrist will generally resort to medication only when behavioral management techniques have failed. The two most frequently used medications are Ritalin and Dexedrine, central nervous system stimulants. (JN)

  4. Disability, Disorder, and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization's "International Classification of Diseases" ("ICD") is the most important diagnostic tool, worldwide, to ensure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities receive the supports they need to live richer, fuller lives. And yet, the "ICD" has naming conventions that create a conundrum for the field,…

  5. Choosing Disability, Visualizing Care.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rachel

    This article explores how visual images of dependency and care reflect and reinforce perceptions of people who are ill, disabled, or otherwise dependent, those who sustain them, and the meaning of the work they do. Scenes of care are a valuable index for understanding cultural assumptions about who is deserving of care, how and where care should be given, and who is obligated to serve as a giver of care. It positions these images in the context of the emphasis, within the disability rights movement, on independence. I argue that the insistence on independence entails a form of what Lauren Berlant calls "cruel optimism"-desire for the very things that undermine happiness and well-being-because they rely on a willful disregard of the inevitable interdependency that is a fact of all human existence, as well as the particular forms of dependency that pertain to many disabled bodies. The end of the article considers works of visual art that challenge dominant modes for representing how care is given and received. If the invisibility of caregiving is one aspect of our willful forgetting that all bodies are dependent, I'll argue that visual images of care are an essential resource for recognizing and reimagining its status in our society. One desired outcome of such reconsideration would be to complicate the meaning of autonomy-as it relates to choosing disability-as well as how the work of caregiving is acknowledged and valued.

  6. Dyslexia: Disability or Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redford, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    Redford, a veteran 5th grade teacher, addresses the question of whether, in the case of students with dyslexia, "it's time to ditch the disability classification and replace it with more positive language that embraces and appreciates [the condition] as a 'neurodifference' instead." Her answer is no--at least in the current education…

  7. Designing for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Selwyn

    Implications of the merits of normality and independence for the disabled, and their relevance to architectural design criteria are discussed. The introduction reflects the philosophical approach to the design and construction of public buildings and housing. Nine principle sections provide data and recommendations on the following topics:…

  8. Understanding Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walcot-Gayda, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Knowledgeable persons within the field frequently criticize definitions of "learning disabilities" for the choice of vocabulary, phrasing and implied ideas. Although there may never be a universally accepted definition, a definition that reflects current research is used in this article to make evident some of the cognitive and…

  9. Designing for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Selwyn

    Implications of the merits of normality and independence for the disabled, and their relevance to architectural design criteria are discussed. The introduction reflects the philosophical approach to the design and construction of public buildings and housing. Nine principle sections provide data and recommendations on the following topics:…

  10. Disability, Disorder, and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization's "International Classification of Diseases" ("ICD") is the most important diagnostic tool, worldwide, to ensure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities receive the supports they need to live richer, fuller lives. And yet, the "ICD" has naming conventions that create a conundrum for the field,…

  11. Health Professionals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Cinotti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    When it comes to education from K-12 and into the college years, the literature is replete with stories of the accomplishments of youngsters and adults with any number of disabilities who surpassed the expectations of their families and teachers. Similarly, there are an increasing number of examples of young men and women with a range of…

  12. Parenting with a Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Holly

    1993-01-01

    This guide discusses how adjusting to parenthood for some persons with physical disabilities requires additional accommodations. Changes in lifestyle, environmental adaptations and assistive technology may be necessary to make independent child care possible. Project Innovative Parenting (PIP) was developed with the purpose to empower…

  13. Computers for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    Describes adaptive technology for personal computers that accommodate disabled users and may require special equipment including hardware, memory, expansion slots, and ports. Highlights include vision aids, including speech synthesizers, magnification, braille, and optical character recognition (OCR); hearing adaptations; motor-impaired…

  14. Handbook of Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L., Ed.; Horner, Robert H., Ed.; Snell, Martha E., Ed.; Blacher, Jan, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This authoritative handbook reviews the breadth of current knowledge about developmental disabilities: neuroscientific and genetic foundations; the impact on health, learning, and behavior; and effective educational and clinical practices. Leading authorities analyze what works in intervening with diverse children and families, from infancy…

  15. Medication and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Laurie L.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical syndrome which relates most frequently to the reading-disabled child is the attention deficity disorder. The child psychiatrist will generally resort to medication only when behavioral management techniques have failed. The two most frequently used medications are Ritalin and Dexedrine, central nervous system stimulants. (JN)

  16. Neverstreaming: Preventing Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    Schools can reduce special-education and remedial instruction costs by helping students succeed in early grades. This article profiles several prevention and early intervention programs, including Success for All, Reading Recovery, Prevention of Learning Disabilities, the Carolina Abecedarian Project, Comer's School Development Program, and…

  17. Health Professionals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Cinotti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    When it comes to education from K-12 and into the college years, the literature is replete with stories of the accomplishments of youngsters and adults with any number of disabilities who surpassed the expectations of their families and teachers. Similarly, there are an increasing number of examples of young men and women with a range of…

  18. Intellectual Disability and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, C.; Picard, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The association between poverty and intellectual disability (ID) has been well documented. However, little is known about persons with ID who face circumstances of extreme poverty, such as homelessness. This paper describes the situation of persons with ID who were or are homeless in Montreal and are currently receiving services from a…

  19. Understanding Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walcot-Gayda, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Knowledgeable persons within the field frequently criticize definitions of "learning disabilities" for the choice of vocabulary, phrasing and implied ideas. Although there may never be a universally accepted definition, a definition that reflects current research is used in this article to make evident some of the cognitive and…

  20. Handbook of Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L., Ed.; Horner, Robert H., Ed.; Snell, Martha E., Ed.; Blacher, Jan, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This authoritative handbook reviews the breadth of current knowledge about developmental disabilities: neuroscientific and genetic foundations; the impact on health, learning, and behavior; and effective educational and clinical practices. Leading authorities analyze what works in intervening with diverse children and families, from infancy…