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Sample records for disc degeneration model

  1. Modeling and optimization of an elastic arthroplastic disc for a degenerated disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghouchani, Azadeh; Ravari, Mohammad; Mahmoudi, Farid

    2011-10-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) of the L3-L4 motion segment using ABAQUS v 6.9 has been developed. The model took into account the material nonlinearities and is imposed different loading conditions. In this study, we validated the model by comparison of its predictions with several sets of experimental data. Disc deformation under compression and segmental rotational motions under moment loads for the normal disc model agreed well with the corresponding in vivo studies. By linking ABAQUS with MATLAB 2010.a, we determined the optimal Young s modulus as well as the Poisson's ratio for the artificial disc under different physiologic loading conditions. The results of the present study confirmed that a well-designed elastic arthroplastic disc preferably has an annulus modulus of 19.1 MPa and 1.24 MPa for nucleus section and Poisson ratio of 0.41 and 0.47 respectively. Elastic artificial disc with such properties can then achieve the goal of restoring the disc height and mechanical function of intact disc under different loading conditions and so can reduce low back pain which is mostly caused due to disc degeneration.

  2. A Review of Animal Models of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Pathophysiology, Regeneration, and Translation to the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Daly, Chris; Ghosh, Peter; Jenkin, Graham; Oehme, David; Goldschlager, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Lower back pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Discogenic pain secondary to intervertebral disc degeneration is a significant cause of low back pain. Disc degeneration is a complex multifactorial process. Animal models are essential to furthering understanding of the degenerative process and testing potential therapies. The adult human lumbar intervertebral disc is characterized by the loss of notochordal cells, relatively large size, essentially avascular nature, and exposure to biomechanical stresses influenced by bipedalism. Animal models are compared with regard to the above characteristics. Numerous methods of inducing disc degeneration are reported. Broadly these can be considered under the categories of spontaneous degeneration, mechanical and structural models. The purpose of such animal models is to further our understanding and, ultimately, improve treatment of disc degeneration. The role of animal models of disc degeneration in translational research leading to clinical trials of novel cellular therapies is explored. PMID:27314030

  3. A Review of Animal Models of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Pathophysiology, Regeneration, and Translation to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Lower back pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Discogenic pain secondary to intervertebral disc degeneration is a significant cause of low back pain. Disc degeneration is a complex multifactorial process. Animal models are essential to furthering understanding of the degenerative process and testing potential therapies. The adult human lumbar intervertebral disc is characterized by the loss of notochordal cells, relatively large size, essentially avascular nature, and exposure to biomechanical stresses influenced by bipedalism. Animal models are compared with regard to the above characteristics. Numerous methods of inducing disc degeneration are reported. Broadly these can be considered under the categories of spontaneous degeneration, mechanical and structural models. The purpose of such animal models is to further our understanding and, ultimately, improve treatment of disc degeneration. The role of animal models of disc degeneration in translational research leading to clinical trials of novel cellular therapies is explored. PMID:27314030

  4. Experimental model of intervertebral disc degeneration by needle puncture in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Issy, A.C.; Castania, V.; Castania, M.; Salmon, C.E.G.; Nogueira-Barbosa, M.H.; Bel, E. Del; Defino, H.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of intervertebral disc degeneration play an important role in clarifying the physiopathological mechanisms and testing novel therapeutic strategies. The objective of the present study is to describe a simple animal model of disc degeneration involving Wistar rats to be used for research studies. Disc degeneration was confirmed and classified by radiography, magnetic resonance and histological evaluation. Adult male Wistar rats were anesthetized and submitted to percutaneous disc puncture with a 20-gauge needle on levels 6-7 and 8-9 of the coccygeal vertebrae. The needle was inserted into the discs guided by fluoroscopy and its tip was positioned crossing the nucleus pulposus up to the contralateral annulus fibrosus, rotated 360° twice, and held for 30 s. To grade the severity of intervertebral disc degeneration, we measured the intervertebral disc height from radiographic images 7 and 30 days after the injury, and the signal intensity T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Histological analysis was performed with hematoxylin-eosin and collagen fiber orientation using picrosirius red staining and polarized light microscopy. Imaging and histological score analyses revealed significant disc degeneration both 7 and 30 days after the lesion, without deaths or systemic complications. Interobserver histological evaluation showed significant agreement. There was a significant positive correlation between histological score and intervertebral disc height 7 and 30 days after the lesion. We conclude that the tail disc puncture method using Wistar rats is a simple, cost-effective and reproducible model for inducing disc degeneration. PMID:23532265

  5. Biomechanics of Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, V.; Kodigudla, M.; Goel, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Disc degeneration and associated disorders are among the most debated topics in the orthopedic literature over the past few decades. These may be attributed to interrelated mechanical, biochemical, and environmental factors. The treatment options vary from conservative approaches to surgery, depending on the severity of degeneration and response to conservative therapies. Spinal fusion is considered to be the “gold standard” in surgical methods till date. However, the association of adjacent level degeneration has led to the evolution of motion preservation technologies like spinal arthroplasty and posterior dynamic stabilization systems. These new technologies are aimed to address pain and preserve motion while maintaining a proper load sharing among various spinal elements. This paper provides an elaborative biomechanical review of the technologies aimed to address the disc degeneration and reiterates the point that biomechanical efficacy followed by long-term clinical success will allow these nonfusion technologies as alternatives to fusion, at least in certain patient population. PMID:22745914

  6. In Vivo Mouse Intervertebral Disc Degeneration Model Based on a New Histological Classification

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Takashi; Sudo, Hideki; Iwasaki, Koji; Tsujimoto, Takeru; Ito, Yoichi M.; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    Although human intervertebral disc degeneration can lead to several spinal diseases, its pathogenesis remains unclear. This study aimed to create a new histological classification applicable to an in vivo mouse intervertebral disc degeneration model induced by needle puncture. One hundred six mice were operated and the L4/5 intervertebral disc was punctured with a 35- or 33-gauge needle. Micro-computed tomography scanning was performed, and the punctured region was confirmed. Evaluation was performed by using magnetic resonance imaging and histology by employing our classification scoring system. Our histological classification scores correlated well with the findings of magnetic resonance imaging and could detect degenerative progression, irrespective of the punctured region. However, the magnetic resonance imaging analysis revealed that there was no significant degenerative intervertebral disc change between the ventrally punctured and non-punctured control groups. To induce significant degeneration in the lumbar intervertebral discs, the central or dorsal region should be punctured instead of the ventral region. PMID:27482708

  7. Transplantation of goat bone marrow stromal cells to the degenerating intervertebral disc in a goat disc-injury model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yejia; Drapeau, Susan; An, Howard S.; Thonar, Eugene J-M.A.; Anderson, D. Greg

    2010-01-01

    Study Design In vivo randomized controlled study in the goat intervertebral disc (IVD) injury model. Objective To define the effects of allogeneic bone marrow-derived stromal cell injected into the degenerating goat IVDs. Summary of Background Data Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells to the degenerating disc has been suggested as a means to correct the biologic incompetence of the disc. However, large animal models with IVDs similar in shape and size to those of humans are needed to define the efficacy and safety of this approach. Methods Goat IVD degeneration was induced by stabbing with a #15 blade. One month after disc injury, the injured discs were randomly selected to receive goat bone marrow-derived stromal cell (suspended in hydrogel), saline (control), or hydrogel (control) injections. Three and 6 months after stem cell transplantation, goats were euthanized and the IVD were examined for biochemical content and tissue morphology. MR images at 3- and 6-month time points were also examined. Results The goat large animal model shows early degenerative changes following disc injury. Degenerating IVDs injected with bone marrow stromal cells showed significantly increased proteoglycan (PG) accumulation within their nucleus pulposus (NP) region. However, collagen content, MRI grade and histology did not show statistically significant differences between the cell-treated and control IVDs. Conclusions Following transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells, NP tissue contained more PG than control discs. Although this result was promising, the rate and severity of degeneration in this goat disc injury were modest, suggesting that a more severe injury and a larger sample size is indicated for future studies to better define the utility of cell therapies in this model. PMID:20890267

  8. Glucosamine Supplementation Demonstrates a Negative Effect On Intervertebral Disc Matrix in an Animal Model of Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lloydine; Vo, Nam; Coehlo, J. Paulo; Dong, Qing; Bechara, Bernard; Woods, Barrett; Hempen, Eric; Hartman, Robert; Preuss, Harry; Balk, Judith; Kang, James; Sowa, Gwendolyn

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Laboratory based controlled in vivo study Objective To determine the in vivo effects of oral glucosamine sulfate on intervertebral disc degeneration Summary of Background Data Although glucosamine has demonstrated beneficial effect in articular cartilage, clinical benefit is uncertain. A CDC report from 2009 reported that many patients are using glucosamine supplementation for low back pain (LBP), without significant evidence to support its use. Because disc degeneration is a major contributor of LBP, we explored the effects of glucosamine on disc matrix homeostasis in an animal model of disc degeneration. Methods Eighteen skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits were divided into four groups: control, annular puncture, glucosamine, and annular puncture+glucosamine. Glucosamine treated rabbits received daily oral supplementation with 107mg/day (weight based equivalent to human 1500mg/day). Annular puncture surgery involved puncturing the annulus fibrosus (AF) of 3 lumbar discs with a 16G needle to induce degeneration. Serial MRIs were obtained at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 20 weeks. Discs were harvested at 20 weeks for determination of glycosaminoglycan(GAG) content, relative gene expression measured by RT-PCR, and histological analyses. Results The MRI index and NP area of injured discs of glucosamine treated animals with annular puncture was found to be lower than that of degenerated discs from rabbits not supplemented with glucosamine. Consistent with this, decreased glycosaminoglycan was demonstrated in glucosamine fed animals, as determined by both histological and GAG content. Gene expression was consistent with a detrimental effect on matrix. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the net effect on matrix in an animal model in vivo, as measured by gene expression, MRI, histology, and total proteoglycan is anti-anabolic. This raises concern over this commonly used supplement, and future research is needed to establish the clinical relevance of these

  9. Lumbar intervertebral disc puncture under C-arm fluoroscopy: a new rat model of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Yang, Huilin; Huang, Yonghui; Wu, Yan; Sun, Taicun; Li, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    To establish a minimally invasive rat model of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) to better understand the pathophysiology of the human condition. The annulus fibrosus of lumbar level 4-5 (L4-5) and L5-6 discs were punctured by 27-gauge needles using the posterior approach under C-arm fluoroscopic guidance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histological examination by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed at baseline and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after disc puncture surgery to determine the degree of degeneration. All sixty discs (thirty rats) were punctured successfully. Only two of thirty rats subjected to the procedure exhibited immediate neurological symptoms. The MRI results indicated a gradual increase in Pfirrmann grade from 4 to 8 weeks post-surgery (P<0.05), and H&E staining demonstrated a parallel increase in histological grade (P<0.05). Expression levels of aggrecan, type II collagen (Col2), and Sox9 mRNAs, which encode disc components, decreased gradually post-surgery. In contrast, mRNA expression of type I collagen (Col1), an indicator of fibrosis, increased (P<0.05). The procedure of annular puncture using a 27-gauge needle under C-arm fluoroscopic guidance had a high success rate. Histological, MRI, and RT-PCR results revealed that the rat model of disc degeneration is a progressive pathological process that is similar to human IDD.

  10. Quantitative Analysis of Disc Degeneration Using Axial T2 Mapping in a Percutaneous Annular Puncture Model in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jee Won; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Su-Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate T2 relaxation time change using axial T2 mapping in a rabbit degenerated disc model and determine the most correlated variable with histologic score among T2 relaxation time, disc height index, and Pfirrmann grade. Materials and Methods Degenerated disc model was made in 4 lumbar discs of 11 rabbits (n = 44) by percutaneous annular puncture with various severities of an injury. Lumbar spine lateral radiograph, MR T2 sagittal scan and MR axial T2 mapping were obtained at baseline and 2 weeks and 4 weeks after the injury in 7 rabbits and at baseline and 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 6 weeks after the injury in 4 rabbits. Generalized estimating equations were used for a longitudinal analysis of changes in T2 relaxation time in degenerated disc model. T2 relaxation time, disc height index and Pfirrmann grade were correlated with the histologic scoring of disc degeneration using Spearman's rho test. Results There was a significant difference in T2 relaxation time between uninjured and injured discs after annular puncture. Progressive decrease in T2 relaxation time was observed in injured discs throughout the study period. Lower T2 relaxation time was observed in the more severely injured discs. T2 relaxation time showed the strongest inverse correlation with the histologic score among the variables investigated (r = -0.811, p < 0.001). Conclusion T2 relaxation time measured with axial T2 mapping in degenerated discs is a potential method to assess disc degeneration. PMID:26798222

  11. Spontaneous disc degeneration in the baboon model: magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Platenberg, R C; Hubbard, G B; Ehler, W J; Hixson, C J

    2001-10-01

    Degenerative disc disease is a major source of disability in humans. The baboon model is an excellent natural disease model to study comparable human disease, because baboons are relatively large (adult males 20-26 kg, adult females 12-17 kg), long-lived (30-45 years), well defined, easy to use, and closely related to humans. Published investigations with plain radiographs of disc degeneration in baboons indicated vertebral anatomy and changes that were remarkably similar to those seen in humans, and it would be valuable to determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathologic evaluation would be useful methods for studying the model, as MRI allows multi-planar visualization of tissues without the use of intravenous contrast and it is superior for evaluating disc hydration, annulus tears, and herniations. The thoracolumbar junctions from 47 randomly selected baboons, ranging in age from 2 weeks to 34 years, were evaluated with MRI and histopathology. Excellent correlation with MRI was observed for changes in disc desiccation, height, and age (P < 0.001). The pathologic analysis demonstrated P values of < 0.001 when comparing histopathology with age and MRI results. All severely degenerated discs seen by MRI were in baboons 14 years of age or older.

  12. A rat tail temporary static compression model reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration with decreased notochordal cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Yurube, Takashi; Kakutani, Kenichiro; Maeno, Koichiro; Takada, Toru; Yamamoto, Junya; Kurakawa, Takuto; Akisue, Toshihiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Nishida, Kotaro

    2014-03-01

    The intervertebral disc nucleus pulposus (NP) has two phenotypically distinct cell types-notochordal cells (NCs) and non-notochordal chondrocyte-like cells. In human discs, NCs are lost during adolescence, which is also when discs begin to show degenerative signs. However, little evidence exists regarding the link between NC disappearance and the pathogenesis of disc degeneration. To clarify this, a rat tail disc degeneration model induced by static compression at 1.3 MPa for 0, 1, or 7 days was designed and assessed for up to 56 postoperative days. Radiography, MRI, and histomorphology showed degenerative disc findings in response to the compression period. Immunofluorescence displayed that the number of DAPI-positive NP cells decreased with compression; particularly, the decrease was notable in larger, vacuolated, cytokeratin-8- and galectin-3-co-positive cells, identified as NCs. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells, which predominantly comprised non-NCs, increased with compression. Quantitative PCR demonstrated isolated mRNA up-regulation of ADAMTS-5 in the 1-day loaded group and MMP-3 in the 7-day loaded group. Aggrecan-1 and collagen type 2α-1 mRNA levels were down-regulated in both groups. This rat tail temporary static compression model, which exhibits decreased NC phenotype, increased apoptotic cell death, and imbalanced catabolic and anabolic gene expression, reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  13. Inflammation in intervertebral disc degeneration and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Molinos, Maria; Almeida, Catarina R.; Caldeira, Joana; Cunha, Carla; Gonçalves, Raquel M.; Barbosa, Mário A.

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is one of the major causes of low back pain, a problem with a heavy economic burden, which has been increasing in prevalence as populations age. Deeper knowledge of the complex spatial and temporal orchestration of cellular interactions and extracellular matrix remodelling is critical to improve current IVD therapies, which have so far proved unsatisfactory. Inflammation has been correlated with degenerative disc disease but its role in discogenic pain and hernia regression remains controversial. The inflammatory response may be involved in the onset of disease, but it is also crucial in maintaining tissue homeostasis. Furthermore, if properly balanced it may contribute to tissue repair/regeneration as has already been demonstrated in other tissues. In this review, we focus on how inflammation has been associated with IVD degeneration by describing observational and in vitro studies as well as in vivo animal models. Finally, we provide an overview of IVD regenerative therapies that target key inflammatory players. PMID:25673296

  14. Notochord Cells in Intervertebral Disc Development and Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Matthew R.; Séguin, Cheryle A.

    2016-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is a complex structure responsible for flexibility, multi-axial motion, and load transmission throughout the spine. Importantly, degeneration of the intervertebral disc is thought to be an initiating factor for back pain. Due to a lack of understanding of the pathways that govern disc degeneration, there are currently no disease-modifying treatments to delay or prevent degenerative disc disease. This review presents an overview of our current understanding of the developmental processes that regulate intervertebral disc formation, with particular emphasis on the role of the notochord and notochord-derived cells in disc homeostasis and how their loss can result in degeneration. We then describe the role of small animal models in understanding the development of the disc and their use to interrogate disc degeneration and associated pathologies. Finally, we highlight essential development pathways that are associated with disc degeneration and/or implicated in the reparative response of the tissue that might serve as targets for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:27252900

  15. Cell transplantation in lumbar spine disc degeneration disease

    PubMed Central

    Hohaus, C.; Ganey, T. M.; Minkus, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Low back pain is an extremely common symptom, affecting nearly three-quarters of the population sometime in their life. Given that disc herniation is thought to be an extension of progressive disc degeneration that attends the normal aging process, seeking an effective therapy that staves off disc degeneration has been considered a logical attempt to reduce back pain. The most apparent cellular and biochemical changes attributable to degeneration include a decrease in cell density in the disc that is accompanied by a reduction in synthesis of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix components. With this in mind, one therapeutic strategy would be to replace, regenerate, or augment the intervertebral disc cell population, with a goal of correcting matrix insufficiencies and restoring normal segment biomechanics. Biological restoration through the use of autologous disc chondrocyte transplantation offers a potential to achieve functional integration of disc metabolism and mechanics. We designed an animal study using the dog as our model to investigate this hypothesis by transplantation of autologous disc-derived chondrocytes into degenerated intervertebral discs. As a result we demonstrated that disc cells remained viable after transplantation; transplanted disc cells produced an extracellular matrix that contained components similar to normal intervertebral disc tissue; a statistically significant correlation between transplanting cells and retention of disc height could displayed. Following these results the Euro Disc Randomized Trial was initiated to embrace a representative patient group with persistent symptoms that had not responded to conservative treatment where an indication for surgical treatment was given. In the interim analyses we evaluated that patients who received autologous disc cell transplantation had greater pain reduction at 2 years compared with patients who did not receive cells following their discectomy surgery and discs in patients that

  16. RADIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTAL DISC DEGENERATION IN RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Emiliano; Vialle, Luiz Roberto; Arruda, André de Oliveira; Riet, Ricardo Nascimento; Krieger, Antônio Bernardo de Queiroz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To validate radiographic evaluation of a rabbit model for disc degeneration. Methods: Lumbar intervertebral discs of New Zealand rabbits were stabbed three times with a 18G needle at a limited depth of 5mm, through lateral approach. Serial radiographic images were taken on the early pre-and postoperative periods, and after four, eight and 12 weeks of the procedure, with subsequent analysis of disc height, osteophyte formation, endplate sclerosis, and presence of disc degeneration. The statistical analysis of data was validated by the Kappa coefficient, with a confidence interval (CI) of 95%. Results: A significant reduction of disc space was found on AP X-ray images after 12 postoperative weeks, with Kappa = 0.489 for CI 95% (0.25-0.72) with p < 0.001. X-ray signs of disc degeneration also presented Kappa = 0.63 for CI 95% (0.39-0.86) with p < 0.001. The remaining assessed criteria showed positive results, but with a lower Kappa value. Conclusion: The disc degeneration model using rabbits as proposed in this study was shown to be feasible, with positive X-ray correlation between pre- and postoperative images, validating the potential to induce disc degeneration in this animal model for future studies. PMID:27022512

  17. Development and Kinematic Verification of a Finite Element Model for the Lumbar Spine: Application to Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ibarz, Elena; Herrera, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge of the lumbar spine biomechanics is essential for clinical applications. Due to the difficulties to experiment on living people and the irregular results published, simulation based on finite elements (FE) has been developed, making it possible to adequately reproduce the biomechanics of the lumbar spine. A 3D FE model of the complete lumbar spine (vertebrae, discs, and ligaments) has been developed. To verify the model, radiological images (X-rays) were taken over a group of 25 healthy, male individuals with average age of 27.4 and average weight of 78.6 kg with the corresponding informed consent. A maximum angle of 34.40° is achieved in flexion and of 35.58° in extension with a flexion-extension angle of 69.98°. The radiological measurements were 33.94 ± 4.91°, 38.73 ± 4.29°, and 72.67°, respectively. In lateral bending, the maximum angles were 19.33° and 23.40 ± 2.39, respectively. In rotation a maximum angle of 9.96° was obtained. The model incorporates a precise geometrical characterization of several elements (vertebrae, discs, and ligaments), respecting anatomical features and being capable of reproducing a wide range of physiological movements. Application to disc degeneration (L5-S1) allows predicting the affection in the mobility of the different lumbar segments, by means of parametric studies for different ranges of degeneration. PMID:23509766

  18. Human Intervertebral Disc Internal Strain in Compression: The Effect of Disc Region, Loading Position, and Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Grace D.; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of the disc is mechanical; therefore, degenerative changes in disc mechanics and the interactions between the annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) in nondegenerate and degenerate discs are important to functional evaluation. The disc experiences complex loading conditions, including mechanical interactions between the pressurized NP and the surrounding fiber-reinforced AF. Our objective was to noninvasively evaluate the internal deformations of nondegenerate and degenerate human discs under axial compression with flexion, neutral, and extension positions using magnetic resonance imaging and image correlation. The side of applied bending (e.g., anterior AF in flexion) had higher tensile radial and compressive axial strains, and the opposite side of bending exhibited tensile axial strains even though the disc was loaded under axial compression. Degenerated discs exhibited higher compressive axial and tensile radial strains, which suggest that load distribution through the disc subcomponents are altered with degeneration, likely due to the depressurized NP placing more of the applied load directly on the AF. The posterior AF exhibited higher compressive axial and higher tensile radial strains than the other AF regions, and the strains were not correlated with degeneration, suggesting this region undergoes high strains throughout life, which may predispose it to failure and tears. In addition to understanding internal disc mechanics, this study provides important new data into the changes in internal strain with degeneration, data for validation of finite element models, and provides a technique and baseline data for evaluating surgical treatments. PMID:21337394

  19. MRI evaluation of spontaneous intervertebral disc degeneration in the alpaca cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Stolworthy, Dean K; Bowden, Anton E; Roeder, Beverly L; Robinson, Todd F; Holland, Jacob G; Christensen, S Loyd; Beatty, Amanda M; Bridgewater, Laura C; Eggett, Dennis L; Wendel, John D; Stieger-Vanegas, Susanne M; Taylor, Meredith D

    2015-12-01

    Animal models have historically provided an appropriate benchmark for understanding human pathology, treatment, and healing, but few animals are known to naturally develop intervertebral disc degeneration. The study of degenerative disc disease and its treatment would greatly benefit from a more comprehensive, and comparable animal model. Alpacas have recently been presented as a potential large animal model of intervertebral disc degeneration due to similarities in spinal posture, disc size, biomechanical flexibility, and natural disc pathology. This research further investigated alpacas by determining the prevalence of intervertebral disc degeneration among an aging alpaca population. Twenty healthy female alpacas comprised two age subgroups (5 young: 2-6 years; and 15 older: 10+ years) and were rated according to the Pfirrmann-grade for degeneration of the cervical intervertebral discs. Incidence rates of degeneration showed strong correlations with age and spinal level: younger alpacas were nearly immune to developing disc degeneration, and in older animals, disc degeneration had an increased incidence rate and severity at lower cervical levels. Advanced disc degeneration was present in at least one of the cervical intervertebral discs of 47% of the older alpacas, and it was most common at the two lowest cervical intervertebral discs. The prevalence of intervertebral disc degeneration encourages further investigation and application of the lower cervical spine of alpacas and similar camelids as a large animal model of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  20. Decellularized allogeneic intervertebral disc: natural biomaterials for regenerating disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhijun; Chen, Kai; Shan, Zhi; Chen, Shuai; Wang, Jiying; Mo, Jian; Ma, Jianjun; Xu, Wenbing; Qin, An; Fan, Shunwu

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with back pain and disc herniation. This study established a modified protocol for intervertebral disc (IVD) decellularization and prepared its extracellular matrix (ECM). By culturing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)(3, 7, 14 and 21 days) and human degenerative IVD cells (7 days) in the ECM, implanting it subcutaneously in rabbit and injecting ECM microparticles into degenerative disc, the biological safety and efficacy of decellularized IVD was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrated that cellular components can be removed completely after decellularization and maximally retain the structure and biomechanics of native IVD. We revealed that allogeneic ECM did not evoke any apparent inflammatory reaction in vivo and no cytotoxicity was found in vitro. Moreover, IVD ECM can induce differentiation of MSCs into IVD-like cells in vitro. Furthermore, allogeneic ECM microparticles are effective on the treatment of rabbit disc degeneration in vivo. In conclusion, our study developed an optimized method for IVD decellularization and we proved decellularized IVD is safe and effective for the treatment of degenerated disc diseases. PMID:26933821

  1. BMP-2 and BMP-2/7 Heterodimers Conjugated to a Fibrin/Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel in a Large Animal Model of Mild Intervertebral Disc Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Mirte; Detiger, Suzanne E L; Karfeld-Sulzer, Lindsay S; Smit, Theo H; Yayon, Avner; Weber, Franz E; Helder, Marco N

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is etiologically associated with low back pain and is currently only treated in severe cases with spinal fusion. Regenerative medicine attempts to restore degenerated tissue by means of cells, hydrogels, and/or growth factors and can therefore be used to slow, halt, or reverse the degeneration of the IVD in a minimally invasive manner. Previously, the growth factors bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 7 (BMP-2, -7) were shown to enhance disc regeneration, in vitro and in vivo. Since BMPs have only a short in vivo half-life, and to prevent heterotopic ossification, we evaluated the use of a slow release system for BMP-2 homodimers and BMP-2/7 heterodimers for IVD regeneration. BMP growth factors were conjugated to a fibrin/hyaluronic acid (FB/HA) hydrogel and intradiscally injected in a goat model of mild IVD degeneration to study safety and efficacy. Mild degeneration was induced in five lumbar discs of seven adult Dutch milk goats, by injections with the enzyme chondroitinase ABC. After 12 weeks, discs were treated with either FB/HA-hydrogel only or supplemented with 1 or 5 μg/mL of BMP-2 or BMP-2/7. BMPs were linked to the FB/HA hydrogels using a transglutaminase moiety, to be released through an incorporated plasmin cleavage site. After another 12 weeks, goats were sacrificed and discs were assessed using radiography, MRI T2* mapping, and biochemical and histological analyses. All animals maintained weight throughout the study and no heterotopic bone formation or other adverse effects were noted during follow-up. Radiographs showed significant disc height loss upon induction of mild degeneration. MRI T2* mapping showed strong and significant correlations with biochemistry and histology as shown before. Surprisingly, no differences could be demonstrated in any parameter between intervention groups. To our knowledge, this is the first large animal study evaluating BMPs conjugated to an FB/HA-hydrogel for the treatment of

  2. BMP-2 and BMP-2/7 Heterodimers Conjugated to a Fibrin/Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel in a Large Animal Model of Mild Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Mirte; Detiger, Suzanne E.L.; Karfeld-Sulzer, Lindsay S.; Smit, Theo H.; Yayon, Avner; Weber, Franz E.; Helder, Marco N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is etiologically associated with low back pain and is currently only treated in severe cases with spinal fusion. Regenerative medicine attempts to restore degenerated tissue by means of cells, hydrogels, and/or growth factors and can therefore be used to slow, halt, or reverse the degeneration of the IVD in a minimally invasive manner. Previously, the growth factors bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 7 (BMP-2, -7) were shown to enhance disc regeneration, in vitro and in vivo. Since BMPs have only a short in vivo half-life, and to prevent heterotopic ossification, we evaluated the use of a slow release system for BMP-2 homodimers and BMP-2/7 heterodimers for IVD regeneration. BMP growth factors were conjugated to a fibrin/hyaluronic acid (FB/HA) hydrogel and intradiscally injected in a goat model of mild IVD degeneration to study safety and efficacy. Mild degeneration was induced in five lumbar discs of seven adult Dutch milk goats, by injections with the enzyme chondroitinase ABC. After 12 weeks, discs were treated with either FB/HA-hydrogel only or supplemented with 1 or 5 μg/mL of BMP-2 or BMP-2/7. BMPs were linked to the FB/HA hydrogels using a transglutaminase moiety, to be released through an incorporated plasmin cleavage site. After another 12 weeks, goats were sacrificed and discs were assessed using radiography, MRI T2* mapping, and biochemical and histological analyses. All animals maintained weight throughout the study and no heterotopic bone formation or other adverse effects were noted during follow-up. Radiographs showed significant disc height loss upon induction of mild degeneration. MRI T2* mapping showed strong and significant correlations with biochemistry and histology as shown before. Surprisingly, no differences could be demonstrated in any parameter between intervention groups. To our knowledge, this is the first large animal study evaluating BMPs conjugated to an FB/HA-hydrogel for the

  3. Assessment of Functional and Behavioral Changes Sensitive to Painful Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Alon; Moon, Andrew; Purmessur, Devina; Skovrlj, Branko; Winkelstein, Beth A.; Cho, Samuel K.; Hecht, Andrew C.; Iatridis, James C.

    2015-01-01

    The development of an in vivo rodent discogenic pain model can provide insight into mechanisms for painful disc degeneration. Painful disc degeneration in rodents can be inferred by examining responses to external stimuli, observing pain-related behaviors, and measuring functional performance. This study compared the sensitivity of multiple pain and functional assessment methods to disc disruption for identifying the parameters sensitive to painful disc degeneration in rats. Disc degeneration was induced in rats by annular injury with saline injection. The severity of disc degeneration, pain sensitivity, and functional performance were compared to sham and näve control rats. Saline injection induced disc degeneration with decreased disc height and MRI signal intensity as well as more fibrous nucleus pulposus, disorganized annular lamellae and decreased proteoglycan. Rats also demonstrated increased painful behaviors including decreased hindpaw mechanical and thermal sensitivities, increased grooming, and altered gait patterns with hindpaw mechanical hyperalgesia and duration of grooming tests being most sensitive. This is the first study to compare sensitivities of different pain assessment methods in an in vivo rat model of disc degeneration. Hindpaw mechanical sensitivity and duration of grooming were the most sensitive parameters to surgically induced degenerative changes and overall results were suggestive of disc degeneration associated pain. PMID:25731955

  4. ISSLS PRIZE WINNER: INHIBITION OF NF-κB ACTIVITY AMELIORATES AGE-ASSOCIATED DISC DEGENERATION IN A MOUSE MODEL OF ACCELERATED AGING

    PubMed Central

    Nasto, Luigi A.; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Robinson, Andria R.; Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Clauson, Cheryl L.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Ngo, Kevin; Dong, Qing; Pola, Enrico; Lee, Joon Y.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Kang, James D.; Robbins, Paul D.; Vo, Nam V.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design NF-κB activity was pharmacologically and genetically blocked in an accelerated aging mouse model to mitigate age-related disc degenerative changes. Objective To study the mediatory role of NF-κB signaling pathway in age-dependent intervertebral disc degeneration. Summary of Background Data Aging is a major contributor to intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD), but the molecular mechanism behind this process is poorly understood. NF-κB is a family of transcription factors which play a central role in mediating cellular response to damage, stress, and inflammation. Growing evidence implicates chronic NF-κB activation as a culprit in many aging-related diseases, but its role in aging-related IDD has not been adequately explored. We studied the effects of NF-κB inhibition on IDD using a DNA repair-deficient mouse model of accelerated aging (Ercc1-/Δ mice) previously been reported to exhibit age-related IDD. Methods Systemic inhibition of NF-κB activation was achieved either genetically by deletion of one allele of the NF-κB subunit p65 (Ercc1-/Δp65+/- mice) or pharmacologically by chronic intra-peritoneal administration of the Nemo Binding Domain (8K-NBD) peptide to block the formation of the upstream activator of NF-κB, IκB Inducible Kinase (IKK), in Ercc1-/Δ mice. Disc cellularity, total proteoglycan content and proteoglycan synthesis of treated mice and untreated controls were assessed. Results Decreased disc matrix proteoglycan content, a hallmark feature of IDD, and elevated disc NF-κB activity were observed in discs of progeroid Ercc1-/Δ mice and naturally aged wild-type compared to young WT mice. Systemic inhibition of NF-κB by the 8K-NBD peptide in Ercc1-/Δ mice increased disc proteoglycan synthesis and ameriolated loss disc cellularity and matrix proteoglycan. These results were confirmed genetically by using the p65 haploinsufficient Ercc1-/Δp65+/- mice. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway

  5. Glucosamine loaded injectable silk-in-silk integrated system modulate mechanical properties in bovine ex-vivo degenerated intervertebral disc model.

    PubMed

    Murab, Sumit; Samal, Juhi; Shrivastava, Akshay; Ray, Alok Ranjan; Pandit, Abhay; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2015-07-01

    Injectable hydrogels offer a tremendous potential for treatment of degenerated intervertebral disc due to their ability to withstand complex loading, conforming precisely to the defect spaces and eliminating the need for invasive surgical procedures. We have developed an injectable hydrogel platform of N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) loaded silk hollow spheres embedded in silk hydrogel for in situ therapeutic release and enhanced mechanical strength. The assembled silk hydrogel provided adequate structural support to the ex vivo degenerated disc model in a cyclic compression test at par with the native tissue. Spatiotemporal release of GlcNAc in a controlled manner from the silk hollow microspheres trigger enhanced proteoglycan production from ADSCs embedded in the composite system. Role of MAPK and SMAD pathways in increasing proteoglycan production have been explored by immunohistological analysis as a result of the action of GlcNAc on the cells, elucidating the potential of injectable silk microsphere-in-silk hydrogel for the regeneration of degenerated disc tissue. PMID:25934453

  6. Genetic Factors in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yi; Egan, Brian; Wang, Jinxi

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a major cause of disability and imposes huge economic burdens on human society worldwide. Among many factors responsible for LBP, intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the most common disorder and is a target for intervention. The etiology of IDD is complex and its mechanism is still not completely understood. Many factors such as aging, spine deformities and diseases, spine injuries, and genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of IDD. In this review, we will focus on the recent advances in studies on the most promising and extensively examined genetic factors associated with IDD in humans. A number of genetic defects have been correlated with structural and functional changes within the intervertebral disc (IVD), which may compromise the disc’s mechanical properties and metabolic activities. These genetic and proteomic studies have begun to shed light on the molecular basis of IDD, suggesting that genetic factors are important contributors to the onset and progression of IDD. By continuing to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of IDD, specific early diagnosis and more effective treatments for this disabling disease will be possible in the future. PMID:27617275

  7. Molecular mechanisms of cell death in intervertebral disc degeneration (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, FAN; ZHAO, XUELING; SHEN, HONGXING; ZHANG, CAIGUO

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are complex structures that consist of three parts, namely, nucleus pulposus, annulus fibrosus and cartilage endplates. With aging, IVDs gradually degenerate as a consequence of many factors, such as microenvironment changes and cell death. Human clinical trial and animal model studies have documented that cell death, particularly apoptosis and autophagy, significantly contribute to IVD degeneration. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon include the activation of apoptotic pathways and the regulation of autophagy in response to nutrient deprivation and multiple stresses. In this review, we briefly summarize recent progress in understanding the function and regulation of apoptosis and autophagy signaling pathways. In particular, we focus on studies that reveal the functional mechanisms of these pathways in IVD degeneration. PMID:27121482

  8. Effect of intervertebral disc degeneration on disc cell viability: a numerical investigation.

    PubMed

    Galbusera, Fabio; Mietsch, Antje; Schmidt, Hendrik; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Neidlinger-Wilke, Cornelia

    2013-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc may be initiated and supported by impairment of the nutrition processes of the disc cells. The effects of degenerative changes on cell nutrition are, however, only partially understood. In this work, a finite volume model was used to investigate the effect of endplate calcification, water loss, reduction of disc height and cyclic mechanical loading on the sustainability of the disc cell population. Oxygen, lactate and glucose diffusion, production and consumption were modelled with non-linear coupled partial differential equations. Oxygen and glucose consumption and lactate production were expressed as a function of local oxygen concentration, pH and cell density. The cell viability criteria were based on local glucose concentration and pH. Considering a disc with normal water content, cell death was initiated in the centre of the nucleus for oxygen, glucose, and lactate diffusivities in the cartilaginous endplate below 20% of the physiological values. The initial cell population could not be sustained even in the non-calcified endplates when a reduction of diffusion inside the disc due to water loss was modelled. Alterations in the disc shape such as height loss, which shortens the transport route between the nutrient sources and the cells, and cyclic mechanical loads, could enhance cell nutrition processes. PMID:21970697

  9. Human cartilage endplate permeability varies with degeneration and intervertebral disc site.

    PubMed

    DeLucca, John F; Cortes, Daniel H; Jacobs, Nathan T; Vresilovic, Edward J; Duncan, Randall L; Elliott, Dawn M

    2016-02-29

    Despite the critical functions the human cartilage endplate (CEP) plays in the intervertebral disc, little is known about its structural and mechanical properties and their changes with degeneration. Quantifying these changes with degeneration is important for understanding how the CEP contributes to the function and pathology of the disc. Therefore the objectives of this study were to quantify the effect of disc degeneration on human CEP mechanical properties, determine the influence of superior and inferior disc site on mechanics and composition, and simulate the role of collagen fibers in CEP and disc mechanics using a validated finite element model. Confined compression data and biochemical composition data were used in a biphasic-swelling model to calculate compressive extrafibrillar elastic and permeability properties. Tensile properties were obtained by applying published tensile test data to an ellipsoidal fiber distribution. Results showed that with degeneration CEP permeability decreased 50-60% suggesting that transport is inhibited in the degenerate disc. CEP fibers are organized parallel to the vertebrae and nucleus pulposus and may contribute to large shear strains (0.1-0.2) and delamination failure of the CEP commonly seen in herniated disc tissue. Fiber-reinforcement also reduces CEP axial strains thereby enhancing fluid flux by a factor of 1.8. Collectively, these results suggest that the structure and mechanics of the CEP may play critical roles in the solute transport and disc mechanics. PMID:26874969

  10. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and related factors in Korean firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae-Won; Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Byun, Junsu; Lee, Jong-In; Kim, Kun-Hyung; Kim, Youngki; Song, Han-Soo; Lee, Chul-Gab; Kwon, Young-Jun; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Jeong, Kyoungsook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The job of firefighting can cause lumbar burden and low back pain. This study aimed to identify the association between age and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and whether the association differs between field and administrative (non-field) firefighters. Methods Subjects were selected using a stratified random sampling method. Firefighters were stratified by geographic area, gender, age and type of job. First, 25 fire stations were randomly sampled considering regional distribution. Then firefighters were stratified by gender, age and their job and randomly selected among the strata. A questionnaire survey and MRI scans were performed, and then four radiologists used Pfirrmann classification methods to determine the grade of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. Results Pfirrmann grade increased with lumbar intervertebral disc level. Analysis of covariance showed that age was significantly associated with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (p<0.05). The value of β (parameter estimate) was positive at all lumbar intervertebral disc levels and was higher in the field group than in the administrative group at each level. In logistic regression analysis, type of job was statistically significant only with regard to the L4–5 intervertebral disc (OR 3.498, 95% CI 1.241 to 9.860). Conclusions Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with age, and field work such as firefighting, emergency and rescue may accelerate degeneration in the L4–5 intervertebral disc. The effects of field work on lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration were not clear in discs other than at the level L4–5. PMID:27354080

  11. Modic Changes and Disc Degeneration Caused by Inoculation of Propionibacterium acnes inside Intervertebral Discs of Rabbits: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe; Zheng, Yuehuan; Yuan, Ye; Jiao, Yucheng; Xiao, Jiaqi; Zhou, Zezhu; Cao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate whether P. acnes could induce disc degeneration and Modic changes when inoculated into the discs of rabbits. Method. A wild-type strain of P. acnes isolated from a patient associated with Modic change and disc degeneration was inoculated into the intervertebral discs of rabbits. Meanwhile, S. aureus was injected into the discs to establish a model of discitis as the comparison and a standard strain of P. acnes was inoculated as the control. MRI and histological change were observed. Results. Both the P. acnes-inoculated and S. aureus-inoculated rabbits showed hyperintense signals at endplates and hypointense signals at nucleus pulposus on T2WI. However, P. acnes only resulted in moderate disc degeneration and endplates rupture in histological examination, which was different from the pathological change of discitis caused by S. aureus. In addition, higher death rates (2/3 versus 0/5) were observed in S. aureus-inoculated rabbits. Conclusion. Compared to S. aureus, the pathological change caused by P. acnes would be considered as Modic-I change and disc degeneration rather than a discitis. PMID:26925420

  12. Does lumbar facet arthrosis precede disc degeneration? A postmortem study.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Jason David; Lee, Michael J; Cassinelli, Ezequiel; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2007-11-01

    It is believed lumbar degeneration begins in the disc, where desiccation and collapse lead to instability and compensatory facet arthrosis. We explored the contrary contention that facet degeneration precedes disc degeneration by examining 647 skeletal lumbar spines. Using facet osteophytosis as a measure of facet degeneration and vertebral rim osteophytosis as a measure of disc degeneration, we assumed bone degeneration in both locations equally reflected the progression of those in the soft tissues. We graded arthrosis Grade 0 to 4 on a continuum from no arthritis to ankylosis. The data were analyzed for different age groups to examine patterns of degeneration with age. Specimens younger than 30 years of age had a higher prevalence of facet osteophytosis compared with vertebral rim osteophotosis at L1-L2 and L2-L3. Specimens aged 30 to 39 years showed more facet osteophytosis than vertebral rim osteophytosis at L4-L5. Specimens older than 40 years, however, showed more vertebral rim osteophytosis compared with facet osteophytosis at all levels except L4-L5 and L5-S1. This skeletal study suggests facet osteophytosis appears early in the degenerative process, preceding vertebral rim osteophytosis of degenerating intervertebral discs. However, once facets begin deteriorating with age, vertebral rim osteophytosis overtakes continued facet osteophytosis. These data challenge the belief that facet osteophytosis follows vertebral rim osteophytosis; rather, it appears vertebral rim osteophytosis progresses more rapidly in later years, but facet osteophotosis occurs early, predominating in younger individuals.

  13. Correlations between quantitative T2 and T1ρ MRI, mechanical properties and biochemical composition in a rabbit lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration model.

    PubMed

    Gullbrand, Sarah E; Ashinsky, Beth G; Martin, John T; Pickup, Stephen; Smith, Lachlan J; Mauck, Robert L; Smith, Harvey E

    2016-08-01

    Improved diagnostic measures for intervertebral disc degeneration are necessary to facilitate early detection and treatment. The aim of this study was to correlate changes in mechanical and biochemical properties with the quantitative MRI parameters T2 and T1ρ in rabbit lumbar discs using an ex vivo chymopapain digestion model. Rabbit lumbar spinal motion segments from animals less than 6 months of age were injected with 100 μl of saline (control) or chymopapain at 3, 15, or 100 U/ml (n = 5 per group). T2 and T1ρ MRI series were obtained at 4.7T. Specimens were mechanically tested in tension-compression and creep. Normalized nucleus pulposus (NP) water and GAG contents were quantified. Stepwise multiple linear regression was performed to determine which parameters contributed significantly to changes in NP T2 and T1ρ. When all groups were included, multiple regression yielded a model with GAG, compressive modulus, and the creep time constants as variables significantly impacting T2 (multiple r(2)  = 0.64, p = 0.006). GAG and neutral zone (NZ) modulus were identified as variables contributing to T1ρ (multiple r(2)  = 0.28, p = 0.08). When specimens with advanced degeneration were excluded from the multiple regression analysis, T2 was significantly predicted by compressive modulus, τ1, and water content (multiple r(2)  = 0.71, p = 0.009), while no variables were significant predictors in the model for T1ρ. These results indicate that quantitative MRI can detect changes in the mechanical and biochemical properties of the degenerated disc. T2 may be more sensitive to early stage degenerative changes than T1ρ, while both quantitative MRI parameters are sensitive to advanced degeneration. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1382-1388, 2016. PMID:27105019

  14. Genetic Association Studies in Lumbar Disc Degeneration: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Eskola, Pasi J.; Lemmelä, Susanna; Kjaer, Per; Solovieva, Svetlana; Männikkö, Minna; Tommerup, Niels; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.; Chan, Danny

    2012-01-01

    Objective Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Science, The Genetic Association Database and The Human Genome Epidemiology Network for information published between 1990–2011 addressing genes and lumbar disc degeneration. Two investigators independently identified studies to determine inclusion, after which they performed data extraction and analysis. The level of cumulative genetic association evidence was analyzed according to The HuGENet Working Group guidelines. Results Fifty-two studies were included for review. Forty-eight studies reported at least one positive association between a genetic marker and lumbar disc degeneration. The phenotype definition of lumbar disc degeneration was highly variable between the studies and replications were inconsistent. Most of the associations presented with a weak level of evidence. The level of evidence was moderate for ASPN (D-repeat), COL11A1 (rs1676486), GDF5 (rs143383), SKT (rs16924573), THBS2 (rs9406328) and MMP9 (rs17576). Conclusions Based on this first extensive systematic review on the topic, the credibility of reported genetic associations is mostly weak. Clear definition of lumbar disc degeneration phenotypes and large population-based cohorts are needed. An international consortium is needed to standardize genetic association studies in relation to disc degeneration. PMID:23185509

  15. Human L3L4 intervertebral disc mean 3D shape, modes of variation, and their relationship to degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peloquin, John M.; Yoder, Jonathon H.; Jacobs, Nathan T.; Moon, Sung M.; Wright, Alexander C.; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc mechanics are affected by both disc shape and disc degeneration, which in turn each affect the other; disc mechanics additionally have a role in the etiology of disc degeneration. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a favored tool to investigate these relationships, but limited data for intervertebral disc 3D shape has forced the use of simplified or single-subject geometries, with the effect of inter-individual shape variation investigated only in specialized studies. Similarly, most data on disc shape variation with degeneration is based on 2D mid-sagittal images, which incompletely define 3D shape changes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantify inter-individual disc shape variation in 3D, classify this variation into independently-occurring modes using a statistical shape model, and identify correlations between disc shape and degeneration. Three-dimensional disc shapes were obtained from MRI of 13 human male cadaver L3L4 discs. An average disc shape and four major modes of shape variation (representing 90% of the variance) were identified. The first mode represented disc axial area and was significantly correlated to degeneration (R2 = 0.44), indicating larger axial area in degenerate discs. Disc height variation occurred in three distinct modes, each also involving non-height variation. The statistical shape model provides an average L3L4 disc shape for FEA that is fully defined in 3D, and makes it convenient to generate a set of shapes with which to represent aggregate inter-individual variation. Degeneration grade-specific shapes can also be generated. To facilitate application, the model is included in this paper’s supplemental content. PMID:24792581

  16. Human L3L4 intervertebral disc mean 3D shape, modes of variation, and their relationship to degeneration.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, John M; Yoder, Jonathon H; Jacobs, Nathan T; Moon, Sung M; Wright, Alexander C; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-07-18

    Intervertebral disc mechanics are affected by both disc shape and disc degeneration, which in turn each affect the other; disc mechanics additionally have a role in the etiology of disc degeneration. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a favored tool to investigate these relationships, but limited data for intervertebral disc 3D shape has forced the use of simplified or single-subject geometries, with the effect of inter-individual shape variation investigated only in specialized studies. Similarly, most data on disc shape variation with degeneration is based on 2D mid-sagittal images, which incompletely define 3D shape changes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantify inter-individual disc shape variation in 3D, classify this variation into independently-occurring modes using a statistical shape model, and identify correlations between disc shape and degeneration. Three-dimensional disc shapes were obtained from MRI of 13 human male cadaver L3L4 discs. An average disc shape and four major modes of shape variation (representing 90% of the variance) were identified. The first mode represented disc axial area and was significantly correlated to degeneration (R(2)=0.44), indicating larger axial area in degenerate discs. Disc height variation occurred in three distinct modes, each also involving non-height variation. The statistical shape model provides an average L3L4 disc shape for FEA that is fully defined in 3D, and makes it convenient to generate a set of shapes with which to represent aggregate inter-individual variation. Degeneration grade-specific shapes can also be generated. To facilitate application, the model is included in this paper׳s supplemental content. PMID:24792581

  17. Soft tissue ossification and condylar cartilage degeneration following TMJ disc perforation in a rabbit pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Embree, Mildred C.; Iwaoka, George M.; Kong, Danielle; Martin, Brittany N.; Patel, Ryan K.; Lee, Andrew; Nathan, John M.; Eisig, Sidney B.; Safarov, Aram; Koslovsky, David A; Koch, Alia; Romanov, Alex; Mao, Jeremy J

    2015-01-01

    Objective There are limited clinical treatments for temporomandibular joint pathologies, including degenerative disease, disc perforation and heterotopic ossification. One barrier hindering the development of new therapies is that animal models recapitulating TMJ diseases are poorly established. The objective of this study was to develop an animal model for TMJ cartilage degeneration and disc pathology, including disc perforation and soft tissue heterotopic ossification. Methods New Zealand white rabbits (n=9 rabbits) underwent unilateral TMJ disc perforation surgery and sham surgery on the contralateral side. A 2.5 mm defect was created using a punch biopsy in rabbit TMJ disc. The TMJ condyles and discs were evaluated macroscopically and histologically after 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Condyles were blindly scored by 4 independent observers using OARSI recommendations for macroscopic and histopathological scoring of osteoarthritis in rabbit tissues. Results Histological evidence of TMJ condylar cartilage degeneration was apparent in experimental condyles following disc perforation relative to sham controls after 4 and 8 weeks, including surface fissures and loss of Safranin O staining. At 12 weeks, OARSI scores indicated experimental condylar cartilage erosion into the subchondral bone. Most strikingly, heterotopic ossification occurred within the TMJ disc upon perforation injury in 6 rabbits after 8 and 12 weeks. Conclusion We report for the first time a rabbit TMJ injury model that demonstrates condylar cartilage degeneration and disc ossification, which is indispensible for testing the efficacy of potential TMJ therapies. PMID:25573797

  18. Protective Effects of Cannabidiol on Lesion-Induced Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, João W.; Issy, Ana Carolina; Castania, Vitor A.; Salmon, Carlos E. G.; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.; Guimarães, Francisco S.; Defino, Helton L. A.; Bel, Elaine Del

    2014-01-01

    Disc degeneration is a multifactorial process that involves hypoxia, inflammation, neoinnervation, accelerated catabolism, and reduction in water and glycosaminoglycan content. Cannabidiol is the main non-psychotropic component of the Cannabis sativa with protective and anti-inflammatory properties. However, possible therapeutic effects of cannabidiol on intervertebral disc degeneration have not been investigated yet. The present study investigated the effects of cannabidiol intradiscal injection in the coccygeal intervertebral disc degeneration induced by the needle puncture model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analyses. Disc injury was induced in the tail of male Wistar rats via a single needle puncture. The discs selected for injury were punctured percutaneously using a 21-gauge needle. MRI and histological evaluation were employed to assess the results. The effects of intradiscal injection of cannabidiol (30, 60 or 120 nmol) injected immediately after lesion were analyzed acutely (2 days) by MRI. The experimental group that received cannabidiol 120 nmol was resubmitted to MRI examination and then to histological analyses 15 days after lesion/cannabidiol injection. The needle puncture produced a significant disc injury detected both by MRI and histological analyses. Cannabidiol significantly attenuated the effects of disc injury induced by the needle puncture. Considering that cannabidiol presents an extremely safe profile and is currently being used clinically, these results suggest that this compound could be useful in the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:25517414

  19. Protective effects of cannabidiol on lesion-induced intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Silveira, João W; Issy, Ana Carolina; Castania, Vitor A; Salmon, Carlos E G; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H; Guimarães, Francisco S; Defino, Helton L A; Del Bel, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Disc degeneration is a multifactorial process that involves hypoxia, inflammation, neoinnervation, accelerated catabolism, and reduction in water and glycosaminoglycan content. Cannabidiol is the main non-psychotropic component of the Cannabis sativa with protective and anti-inflammatory properties. However, possible therapeutic effects of cannabidiol on intervertebral disc degeneration have not been investigated yet. The present study investigated the effects of cannabidiol intradiscal injection in the coccygeal intervertebral disc degeneration induced by the needle puncture model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analyses. Disc injury was induced in the tail of male Wistar rats via a single needle puncture. The discs selected for injury were punctured percutaneously using a 21-gauge needle. MRI and histological evaluation were employed to assess the results. The effects of intradiscal injection of cannabidiol (30, 60 or 120 nmol) injected immediately after lesion were analyzed acutely (2 days) by MRI. The experimental group that received cannabidiol 120 nmol was resubmitted to MRI examination and then to histological analyses 15 days after lesion/cannabidiol injection. The needle puncture produced a significant disc injury detected both by MRI and histological analyses. Cannabidiol significantly attenuated the effects of disc injury induced by the needle puncture. Considering that cannabidiol presents an extremely safe profile and is currently being used clinically, these results suggest that this compound could be useful in the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  20. Protective effects of cannabidiol on lesion-induced intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Silveira, João W; Issy, Ana Carolina; Castania, Vitor A; Salmon, Carlos E G; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H; Guimarães, Francisco S; Defino, Helton L A; Del Bel, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Disc degeneration is a multifactorial process that involves hypoxia, inflammation, neoinnervation, accelerated catabolism, and reduction in water and glycosaminoglycan content. Cannabidiol is the main non-psychotropic component of the Cannabis sativa with protective and anti-inflammatory properties. However, possible therapeutic effects of cannabidiol on intervertebral disc degeneration have not been investigated yet. The present study investigated the effects of cannabidiol intradiscal injection in the coccygeal intervertebral disc degeneration induced by the needle puncture model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analyses. Disc injury was induced in the tail of male Wistar rats via a single needle puncture. The discs selected for injury were punctured percutaneously using a 21-gauge needle. MRI and histological evaluation were employed to assess the results. The effects of intradiscal injection of cannabidiol (30, 60 or 120 nmol) injected immediately after lesion were analyzed acutely (2 days) by MRI. The experimental group that received cannabidiol 120 nmol was resubmitted to MRI examination and then to histological analyses 15 days after lesion/cannabidiol injection. The needle puncture produced a significant disc injury detected both by MRI and histological analyses. Cannabidiol significantly attenuated the effects of disc injury induced by the needle puncture. Considering that cannabidiol presents an extremely safe profile and is currently being used clinically, these results suggest that this compound could be useful in the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:25517414

  1. Degenerated human intervertebral discs contain autoantibodies against extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Capossela, S; Schläfli, P; Bertolo, A; Janner, T; Stadler, B M; Pötzel, T; Baur, M; Stoyanov, J V

    2014-04-04

    Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs) is associated with back pain and elevated levels of inflammatory cells. It has been hypothesised that discogenic pain is a direct result of vascular and neural ingrowth along annulus fissures, which may expose the avascular nucleus pulposus (NP) to the systemic circulation and induce an autoimmune reaction. In this study, we confirmed our previous observation of antibodies in human degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs cultured in vitro. We hypothesised that the presence of antibodies was due to an autoimmune reaction against specific proteins of the disc. Furthermore we identified antigens which possibly trigger an autoimmune response in degenerative disc diseases. We demonstrated that degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs contain IgG antibodies against typical extracellular proteins of the disc, particularly proteins of the NP. We identified IgGs against collagen type II and aggrecan, confirming an autoimmune reaction against the normally immune privileged NP. We also found specific IgGs against collagens types I and V, but not against collagen type III. In conclusion, this study confirmed the association between disc degeneration and autoimmunity, and may open the avenue for future studies on developing prognostic, diagnostic and therapy-monitoring markers for degenerative disc diseases.

  2. Dual release of dexamethasone and TGF-β3 from polymeric microspheres for stem cell matrix accumulation in a rat disc degeneration model.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cheng-zhen; Li, Hao; Tao, Yi-qing; Peng, Li-hua; Gao, Jian-qing; Wu, Jing-jun; Li, Fang-cai; Hua, Jian-ming; Chen, Qi-xin

    2013-12-01

    Low back pain is frequently caused by nucleus pulposus (NP) degeneration. Tissue engineering is a powerful therapeutic strategy which could restore the normal biomechanical motion of the human spine. Previously we reported that a new nanostructured three-dimensional poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microsphere, which is loaded with dexamethasone and growth factor embedded heparin/poly(l-lysine) nanoparticles via a layer-by-layer system, was an effective cell carrier in vitro for NP tissue engineering. This study aimed to investigate whether the implantation of adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC)-seeded PLGA microspheres into the rat intervertebral disc could regenerate the degenerated disc. Changes in disc height by plain radiograph, T2-weighted signal intensity in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histology, immunohistochemistry and matrix-associated gene expression were evaluated in normal controls (NCs) (without operations), a degeneration control (DC) group (with needle puncture, injected only with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium), a PLGA microspheres (PMs) treatment group (with needle puncture, PLGA microspheres only injection), and PLGA microspheres loaded with ADSCs treatment (PMA) group (with needle puncture, PLGA microspheres loaded with ADSC injection) for a 24-week period. The results showed that at 24 weeks post-transplantation, the PM and PMA groups regained disc height values of ∼63% and 76% and MRI signal intensities of ∼47% and 76%, respectively, compared to the NC group. Biochemistry, immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis also indicated the restoration of proteoglycan accumulation in the discs of the PM and PMA groups. However, there was almost no restoration of proteoglycan accumulation in the discs of the DC group compared with the PM and PMA groups. Taken together, these data suggest that ADSC-seeded PLGA microspheres could partly regenerate the degenerated disc in vivo after implantation into the rat degenerative intervertebral

  3. Disc in Flames: Roles of TNF-α and IL-1β in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Zariel I.; Schoepflin, Zachary R.; Choi, Hyowon; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2016-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is an important mechanical structure that allows range of motion of the spinal column. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc, incited by aging, traumatic insult, genetic predisposition, or other factors, is often defined by functional and structural changes in the tissue, including excessive breakdown of the extracellular matrix, increased disc cell senescence and death, and compromised biomechanical function of the tissue. Intervertebral disc degeneration is strongly correlated with low back pain, which is a highly prevalent and costly condition, significantly contributing to loss in productivity and health care costs. Disc degeneration is a chronic, progressive condition, and current therapies are limited and often focused on symptomatic pain relief rather than curtailing the progression of the disease. Inflammatory processes, exacerbated by cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β are believed to be key mediators of disc degeneration and low back pain. In this review, we describe the contributions of TNF-α and IL-1β to changes seen during disc degeneration at the cellular and tissue level, new evidence suggesting a link between infection of the spine and low back pain, and the emerging therapeutic modalities aimed at combating these processes. PMID:26388614

  4. Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease: Disc Degeneration Symptoms and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Shafaq; Rehmani, Muhammad Asim Khan; Raees, Aisha; Alvi, Arsalan Ahmad; Ashraf, Junaid

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional and observational. Purpose To evaluate the different aspects of lumbar disc degenerative disc disease and relate them with magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings and symptoms. Overview of Literature Lumbar disc degenerative disease has now been proven as the most common cause of low back pain throughout the world. It may present as disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis, facet joint arthropathy or any combination. Presenting symptoms of lumbar disc degeneration are lower back pain and sciatica which may be aggravated by standing, walking, bending, straining and coughing. Methods This study was conducted from January 2012 to June 2012. Study was conducted on the diagnosed patients of lumbar disc degeneration. Diagnostic criteria were based upon abnormal findings in MRI. Patients with prior back surgery, spine fractures, sacroiliac arthritis, metabolic bone disease, spinal infection, rheumatoid arthritis, active malignancy, and pregnancy were excluded. Results During the targeted months, 163 patients of lumbar disc degeneration with mean age of 43.92±11.76 years, came into Neurosurgery department. Disc degeneration was most commonly present at the level of L4/L5 105 (64.4%).Commonest types of disc degeneration were disc herniation 109 (66.9%) and lumbar spinal stenosis 37 (22.7%). Spondylolisthesis was commonly present at L5/S1 10 (6.1%) and associated mostly with lumbar spinal stenosis 7 (18.9%). Conclusions Results reported the frequent occurrence of lumbar disc degenerative disease in advance age. Research efforts should endeavor to reduce risk factors and improve the quality of life. PMID:24353850

  5. Biological treatment strategies for disc degeneration: potentials and shortcomings

    PubMed Central

    Nerlich, Andreas G.; Boos, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology, cell biology and material sciences have opened a new emerging field of techniques for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. These new treatment modalities aim for biological repair of the affected tissues by introducing cell-based tissue replacements, genetic modifications of resident cells or a combination thereof. So far, these techniques have been successfully applied to various tissues such as bone and cartilage. However, application of these treatment modalities to cure intervertebral disc degeneration is in its very early stages and mostly limited to experimental studies in vitro or in animal studies. We will discuss the potential and possible shortcomings of current approaches to biologically cure disc degeneration by gene therapy or tissue engineering. Despite the increasing number of studies examining the therapeutic potential of biological treatment strategies, a practicable solution to routinely cure disc degeneration might not be available in the near future. However, knowledge gained from these attempts might be applied in a foreseeable future to cure the low back pain that often accompanies disc degeneration and therefore be beneficial for the patient. PMID:16983559

  6. Angiogenesis in the degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    David, Gh; Iencean, SM; Mohan, A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the study is to show the histological and biochemical changes that indicate the angiogenesis of the intervertebral disc in lumbar intervertebral disc hernia and the existence of epidemiological correlations between these changes and the risk factors of lumbar intervertebral disc hernia, as well as the patient's quality of life (QOL). We have studied 50 patients aged between 18 and 73 years old, who have undergone lumbar intervertebral disc hernia surgery, making fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor level measurements, as elements in the process of appreciating the disc angiogenesis. Also, pre–surgery and post–surgery QOL has been measured, as well as the intensity of the pain syndrome. We have identified factors capable of stimulating vascular endothelial growth (VEGF, FGF–2) for the examined disc material, but histological examination did not show angiogenesis. The process of angiogenesis at the degenerated intervertebral disc level affects the patient's quality of life both pre and postoperatively, and may be a predictive factor for the post–operative results. Patients can prevent the appearance of angiogenesis type degenerative processes of the intervertebral disc by avoiding angiogenesis correlated factors (weight control, physical effort, and smoking). PMID:20968201

  7. Disc cell senescence in intervertebral disc degeneration: Causes and molecular pathways

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chencheng; Liu, Huan; Yang, Minghui; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Yue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The accumulation of senescent disc cells in degenerative intervertebral disc (IVD) suggests the detrimental roles of cell senescence in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Disc cell senescence decreased the number of functional cells in IVD. Moreover, the senescent disc cells were supposed to accelerate the process of IDD via their aberrant paracrine effects by which senescent cells cause the senescence of neighboring cells and enhance the matrix catabolism and inflammation in IVD. Thus, anti-senescence has been proposed as a novel therapeutic target for IDD. However, the development of anti-senescence therapy is based on our understanding of the molecular mechanism of disc cell senescence. In this review, we focused on the molecular mechanism of disc cell senescence, including the causes and various molecular pathways. We found that, during the process of IDD, age-related damages together with degenerative external stimuli activated both p53-p21-Rb and p16-Rb pathways to induce disc cell senescence. Meanwhile, disc cell senescence was regulated by multiple signaling pathways, suggesting the complex regulating network of disc cell senescence. To understand the mechanism of disc cell senescence better contributes to developing the anti-senescence-based therapies for IDD. PMID:27192096

  8. Role of Cytokines in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Pain and Disc-content

    PubMed Central

    Risbud, Makarand V.; Shapiro, Irving. M

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is the major contributor to back/neck and radicular pain. It is characterized by an elevation in levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1 α/β, IL-6 and IL-17 secreted by the disc cells themselves; these cytokines promote matrix degradation, chemokine production and changes in cell phenotype. The resulting imbalance between catabolic and anabolic responses leads to degeneration, as well as herniation and radicular pain. Release of chemokines from degenerating discs promote infiltration and activation of T and B cells, macrophages, neutrophils, and mast cells further amplifying the inflammatory cascade. Immunocyte migration into the disc is accompanied by the appearance of microvasculature and nerve fibers arising from the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). In this inflammatory milieu, neurogenic factors in particular nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derive neurotrophic factor (BDNF) generated by disc and immune cells induce expression of pain associated cation channels in DRGs. Depolarization of these channels is likely to promote discogenic and radicular pain and reinforce the cytokine-mediated degenerative cascade. Taken together, the enhanced understanding of the contribution of cytokines and immune cells to catabolic and nociceptive processes provide new targets for treating symptomatic disc disease. PMID:24166242

  9. Effects of Tobacco Smoking on the Degeneration of the Intervertebral Disc: A Finite Element Study.

    PubMed

    Elmasry, Shady; Asfour, Shihab; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Travascio, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is associated with numerous pathological conditions. Compelling experimental evidence associates smoking to the degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). In particular, it has been shown that nicotine down-regulates both the proliferation rate and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis of disc cells. Moreover, tobacco smoking causes the constriction of the vascular network surrounding the IVD, thus reducing the exchange of nutrients and anabolic agents from the blood vessels to the disc. It has been hypothesized that both nicotine presence in the IVD and the reduced solute exchange are responsible for the degeneration of the disc due to tobacco smoking, but their effects on tissue homeostasis have never been quantified. In this study, a previously presented computational model describing the homeostasis of the IVD was deployed to investigate the effects of impaired solute supply and nicotine-mediated down-regulation of cell proliferation and biosynthetic activity on the health of the disc. We found that the nicotine-mediated down-regulation of cell anabolism mostly affected the GAG concentration at the cartilage endplate, reducing it up to 65% of the value attained in normal physiological conditions. In contrast, the reduction of solutes exchange between blood vessels and disc tissue mostly affected the nucleus pulposus, whose cell density and GAG levels were reduced up to 50% of their normal physiological levels. The effectiveness of quitting smoking on the regeneration of a degenerated IVD was also investigated, and showed to have limited benefit on the health of the disc. A cell-based therapy in conjunction with smoke cessation provided significant improvements in disc health, suggesting that, besides quitting smoking, additional treatments should be implemented in the attempt to recover the health of an IVD degenerated by tobacco smoking.

  10. Effects of Tobacco Smoking on the Degeneration of the Intervertebral Disc: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Elmasry, Shady; Asfour, Shihab; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Travascio, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is associated with numerous pathological conditions. Compelling experimental evidence associates smoking to the degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). In particular, it has been shown that nicotine down-regulates both the proliferation rate and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis of disc cells. Moreover, tobacco smoking causes the constriction of the vascular network surrounding the IVD, thus reducing the exchange of nutrients and anabolic agents from the blood vessels to the disc. It has been hypothesized that both nicotine presence in the IVD and the reduced solute exchange are responsible for the degeneration of the disc due to tobacco smoking, but their effects on tissue homeostasis have never been quantified. In this study, a previously presented computational model describing the homeostasis of the IVD was deployed to investigate the effects of impaired solute supply and nicotine-mediated down-regulation of cell proliferation and biosynthetic activity on the health of the disc. We found that the nicotine-mediated down-regulation of cell anabolism mostly affected the GAG concentration at the cartilage endplate, reducing it up to 65% of the value attained in normal physiological conditions. In contrast, the reduction of solutes exchange between blood vessels and disc tissue mostly affected the nucleus pulposus, whose cell density and GAG levels were reduced up to 50% of their normal physiological levels. The effectiveness of quitting smoking on the regeneration of a degenerated IVD was also investigated, and showed to have limited benefit on the health of the disc. A cell-based therapy in conjunction with smoke cessation provided significant improvements in disc health, suggesting that, besides quitting smoking, additional treatments should be implemented in the attempt to recover the health of an IVD degenerated by tobacco smoking. PMID:26301590

  11. Biological repair of the degenerated intervertebral disc by the injection of growth factors

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The homeostasis of intervertebral disc (IVD) tissues is accomplished through a complex and precise coordination of a variety of substances, including cytokines, growth factors, enzymes and enzyme inhibitors. Recent biological therapeutic strategies for disc degeneration have included attempts to up-regulate the production of key matrix proteins or to down-regulate the catabolic events induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Several approaches to deliver these therapeutic biologic agents have been proposed and tested in a preclinical setting. One of the most advanced biological therapeutic approaches to regenerate or repair a degenerated disc is the injection of a recombinant growth factor. Abundant evidence for the efficacy of growth factor injection therapy for the treatment of IVD degeneration can be found in preclinical animal studies. Recent data obtained from animal studies on changes in cytokine expression following growth factor injection illustrate the great potential for patients with chronic discogenic low back pain. The first clinical trial for growth factor injection has been initiated and the results of that study may prove the usefulness of growth factor injection for treating the symptoms of patients with degenerative disc diseases. The focus of this review article is the effects of an in vivo injection of growth factors on the biological repair of the degenerated intervertebral disc in animal models. The effects of growth factor injection on the symptoms of patients with low back pain, the therapeutic target of growth factor injection and the limitations of the efficacy of growth factor therapy are also reviewed. Further quantitative studies on the effect of growth factor injection on pain generation and the long term effects on the endplate and cell survival after an injection using large animals are needed. An international academic-industrial consortium addressing these aims, such as was achieved for osteoarthritis (The Osteoarthritis Initiative

  12. Reconstitution of degenerated ovine lumbar discs by STRO-3-positive allogeneic mesenchymal precursor cells combined with pentosan polysulfate.

    PubMed

    Oehme, David; Ghosh, Peter; Goldschlager, Tony; Itescu, Silviu; Shimon, Susan; Wu, Jiehua; McDonald, Courtney; Troupis, John M; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Jenkin, Graham

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Disc degeneration and associated low-back pain are major causes of suffering and disability. The authors examined the potential of mesenchymal precursor cells (MPCs), when formulated with pentosan polysulfate (PPS), to ameliorate disc degeneration in an ovine model. METHODS Twenty-four sheep had annular incisions made at L2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 to induce degeneration. Twelve weeks after injury, the nucleus pulposus of a degenerated disc in each animal was injected with ProFreeze and PPS formulated with either a low dose (0.1 million MPCs) or a high dose (0.5 million MPCs) of cells. The 2 adjacent injured discs in each spine were either injected with PPS and ProFreeze (PPS control) or not injected (nil-injected control). The adjacent noninjured L1-2 and L5-6 discs served as noninjured control discs. Disc height indices (DHIs) were obtained at baseline, before injection, and at planned death. After necropsy, 24 weeks after injection, the spines were subjected to MRI and morphological, histological, and biochemical analyses. RESULTS Twelve weeks after the annular injury, all the injured discs exhibited a significant reduction in mean DHI (low-dose group 17.19%; high-dose group 18.01% [p < 0.01]). Twenty-four weeks after injections, the discs injected with the low-dose MPC+PPS formulation recovered disc height, and their mean DHI was significantly greater than the DHI of PPS- and nil-injected discs (p < 0.001). Although the mean Pfirrmann MRI disc degeneration score for the low-dose MPC+PPS-injected discs was lower than that for the nil- and PPS-injected discs, the differences were not significant. The disc morphology scores for the nil- and PPS-injected discs were significantly higher than the normal control disc scores (p < 0.005), whereas the low-dose MPC+PPS-injected disc scores were not significantly different from those of the normal controls. The mean glycosaminoglycan content of the nuclei pulposus of the low-dose MPC+PPS-injected discs was significantly

  13. Clinical Impact of Sagittal Spinopelvic Parameters on Disc Degeneration in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young-Min; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The sagittal balance plays an important role in the determination of shear and compressive forces applied on the anterior (vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs) and posterior (facet joints) elements of the lumbar vertebral column. Many studies have also examined the effect of structural changes in the disc on the biomechanical characteristics of the spinal segment. Nevertheless, the relationship between sagittal balance and the degree of disc degeneration has not been extensively explored. Thus, here we investigated the relationships between various sagittal spinopelvic parameters and the degree of disc degeneration in young adults. A total of 278 young adult male patients were included in this study (age range: 18–24 years old). Multiple sagittal spinopelvic parameters, including pelvic incidence (PI), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), lumbar lordosis (LL), sacral inclination (SI), lumbosacral angle (LSA), and sacral table angle (STA), were measured from standing lateral lumbosacral radiographs. The degree of intervertebral disc degeneration was classified using a modified Pfirrmann scale. To assess the pain intensity of each patient, the visual analogue scale (VAS) score for low back pain (LBP) was obtained from all the patients. Finally, the relationships between these spinopelvic parameters and the degree of disc degeneration in young adults were analyzed. Also, we performed multiple logistic regression study. Out of all the spinopelvic parameters measured in this study, a low STA and a low SI were the only significant risk factors that were associated with disc degeneration in young adults. It means that patients with disc degeneration tend to have more severe sacral kyphosis and vertical sacrum. We found that patients with disc degeneration showed a lower SI and lower STA compared with patients without disc degeneration in young adults. Therefore, we suggest that the patients with disc degeneration tend to have more vertical sacrum, more

  14. Calcium pentosan polysulfate and sodium pentosan polysulfate may be used to treat intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia-Guo; Wang, Jia; Xin, Qi; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Sheng-Fei; Qi, Feng; Mao, Dong; Zhang, Zhi-Cheng

    2011-04-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a major health problem world-wide, and several spinal disorders are closely associated with it. Although people have invested a great deal of time and effort, how to prevent and reverse the IDD for the researchers is still a difficult and hot issue. Intervertebral disc belongs to cartilage tissue, and IDD also is the cartilage degeneration disease. A large quantity of studies have shown that Calcium pentosan polysulfate (CaPPS) and sodium pentosan polysulfate (NaPPS) possess chondroprotective activities and play an important role in maintaining cartilage integrity. We reasonably hypothesize that NaPPS and CaPPS may be used to treat IDD. The possible mechanism may include that: (1) the significant effects of NaPPS and CaPPS in improving capillary blood flow could maintain nutritional supply to intervertebral disc, and preserve intervertebral disc tissue against degeneration; (2) CaPPS and NaPPS preserve cartilage integrity, proteoglycan synthesis, and improve cartilage biomechanical properties; (3) as the multifaceted exosite inhibitors of proteinases NaPPS and CaPPS strongly impede the activity and production of proteinases; (4) promotion of the balance between proteinases and TIMPs also may be involved in treating IDD; (5) NaPPS and CaPPS exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects, and then reduce inflammation-induced IDD. If the hypothesis were conformed, the symptoms caused by IDD and its related diseases would be a corresponding alleviation or even disappearance, which could greatly alleviate the suffering of patients from disc degeneration diseases. Certainly, many roles of CaPPS and NaPPS, such as effectiveness, safety and side effects, need to be tested, and further works such as animal model and clinical trial, need to be done to prove this hypothesis.

  15. Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment for Discogenic Low Back Pain and Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zeckser, Jeffrey; Wolff, Michael; Tucker, Jason; Goodwin, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain with resultant loss of function, decreased productivity, and high economic costs is burdensome for both the individual and the society. Evidence suggests that intervertebral disc pathology is a major contributor to spine-related pain and degeneration. When commonly used conservative therapies fail, traditional percutaneous or surgical options may be beneficial for pain relief but are suboptimal because of their inability to alter disc microenvironment catabolism, restore disc tissue, and/or preserve native spine biomechanics. Percutaneously injected Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) therapy has recently gained clinical interest for its potential to revolutionarily treat disc-generated (discogenic) pain and associated disc degeneration. Unlike previous therapies to date, MSCs may uniquely offer the ability to improve discogenic pain and provide more sustained improvement by reducing disc microenvironment catabolism and regenerating disc tissue. Consistent treatment success has the potential to create a paradigm shift with regards to the treatment of discogenic pain and disc degeneration. PMID:26880958

  16. Investigation of intervertebral disc degeneration using multivariate FTIR spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Mader, Kerstin T; Peeters, Mirte; Detiger, Suzanne E L; Helder, Marco N; Smit, Theo H; Le Maitre, Christine L; Sammon, Chris

    2016-06-23

    Traditionally tissue samples are analysed using protein or enzyme specific stains on serial sections to build up a picture of the distribution of components contained within them. In this study we investigated the potential of multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to deconvolute 2nd derivative spectra of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopic images measured in transflectance mode of goat and human paraffin embedded intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue sections, to see if this methodology can provide analogous information to that provided by immunohistochemical stains and bioassays but from a single section. MCR-ALS analysis of non-degenerate and enzymatically in vivo degenerated goat IVDs reveals five matrix components displaying distribution maps matching histological stains for collagen, elastin and proteoglycan (PG), as well as immunohistochemical stains for collagen type I and II. Interestingly, two components exhibiting characteristic spectral and distribution profiles of proteoglycans were found, and relative component/tissue maps of these components (labelled PG1 and PG2) showed distinct distributions in non-degenerate versus mildly degenerate goat samples. MCR-ALS analysis of human IVD sections resulted in comparable spectral profiles to those observed in the goat samples, highlighting the inter species transferability of the presented methodology. Multivariate FTIR image analysis of a set of 43 goat IVD sections allowed the extraction of semi-quantitative information from component/tissue gradients taken across the IVD width of collagen type I, collagen type II, PG1 and PG2. Regional component/tissue parameters were calculated and significant correlations were found between histological grades of degeneration and PG parameters (PG1: p = 0.0003, PG2: p < 0.0001); glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content and PGs (PG1: p = 0.0055, PG2: p = 0.0001); and MRI T2* measurements and PGs (PG1: p = 0.0021, PG2: p < 0.0001). Additionally

  17. The role of interleukin-1 in the pathogenesis of human Intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Le Maitre, Christine Lyn; Freemont, Anthony J; Hoyland, Judith Alison

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the hypotheses that in human intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration there is local production of the cytokine IL-1, and that this locally produced cytokine can induce the cellular and matrix changes of IVD degeneration. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize five members of the IL-1 family (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1Ra (IL-1 receptor antagonist), IL-1RI (IL-1 receptor, type I), and ICE (IL-1β-converting enzyme)) in non-degenerate and degenerate human IVDs. In addition, cells derived from non-degenerate and degenerate human IVDs were challenged with IL-1 agonists and the response was investigated using real-time PCR for a number of matrix-degrading enzymes, matrix proteins, and members of the IL-1 family. This study has shown that native disc cells from non-degenerate and degenerate discs produced the IL-1 agonists, antagonist, the active receptor, and IL-1β-converting enzyme. In addition, immunopositivity for these proteins, with the exception of IL-1Ra, increased with severity of degeneration. We have also shown that IL-1 treatment of human IVD cells resulted in increased gene expression for the matrix-degrading enzymes (MMP 3 (matrix metalloproteinase 3), MMP 13 (matrix metalloproteinase 13), and ADAMTS-4 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs)) and a decrease in the gene expression for matrix genes (aggrecan, collagen II, collagen I, and SOX6). In conclusion we have shown that IL-1 is produced in the degenerate IVD. It is synthesized by native disc cells, and treatment of human disc cells with IL-1 induces an imbalance between catabolic and anabolic events, responses that represent the changes seen during disc degeneration. Therefore, inhibiting IL-1 could be an important therapeutic target for preventing and reversing disc degeneration. PMID:15987475

  18. Role of biomechanics on intervertebral disc degeneration and regenerative therapies: What needs repairing in the disc and what are promising biomaterials for its repair?

    PubMed Central

    Iatridis, James C.; Nicoll, Steven B.; Michalek, Arthur J.; Walter, Benjamin A.; Gupta, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Context Degeneration and injuries of the intervertebral disc result in large alterations in biomechanical behaviors. Repair strategies using biomaterials can be optimized based on biomechanical and biological requirements. Purpose To review current literature on 1) effects of degeneration, simulated degeneration, and injury on biomechanics of the intervertebral disc with special attention paid to needle puncture injuries which are a pathway for diagnostics and regenerative therapies; and 2) promising biomaterials for disc repair with a focus on how those biomaterials may promote biomechanical repair. Study Design/Setting A narrative review to evaluate the role of biomechanics on disc degeneration and regenerative therapies with a focus on what biomechanical properties need to be repaired and how to evaluate and accomplish such repairs using biomaterials. Model systems for screening of such repair strategies are also briefly described. Methods Papers were selected from two main Pubmed searches using keywords: intervertebral AND biomechanics (1823 articles) and intervertebral AND biomaterials (361 articles). Additional keywords (injury, needle puncture, nucleus pressurization, biomaterials, hydrogel, sealant, tissue engineering) were used to narrow articles to the topics most relevant to this review. Results Degeneration and acute disc injuries have the capacity to influence nucleus pulposus pressurization and annulus fibrosus integrity, which are necessary for effective disc function, and therefore, require repair. Needle injection injuries are of particular clinical relevance with potential to influence disc biomechanics, cellularity, and metabolism, yet these effects are localized or small, and more research is required to evaluate and reduce potential clinical morbidity using such techniques. NP replacement strategies, such as hydrogels, are required to restore NP pressurization or lost volume. AF repair strategies, including crosslinked hydrogels

  19. Evidence for an Important Role of Smad-7 in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Su, Yi-Jun; Zheng, Xin-Feng; Yang, Yue-Hua; Jiang, Sheng-Dan

    2015-01-01

    Smad-7 inhibited the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β)-induced proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes and completely antagonized the effect of TGF-β on the proliferation of the cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of Smad-7 to the pathophysiology of disc degeneration by determining the expression of Smad-7 in the degenerative intervertebral discs and its effect on the extracellular matrix metabolism of disc cells. Instability of the lumbar spine produced by imbalanced dynamic and static forces was used to induce intervertebral disc degeneration in rats. The expression of Smad-7 was assessed by the immunohistochemical method. Disc cell apoptosis was detected by in situ TUNEL staining. The effect of Smad-7 overexpression on the matrix metabolism of disc cells was analyzed in vitro by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting. Finally, intradiscal injection of the Smad-7 overexpression lentivirus was performed to evaluate the in vivo effect of Smad-7 on disc degeneration. Radiographic and histomorphological examinations showed that lumbar disc degeneration became more and more severe in the rats with induced instability. Immunohistochemical observation demonstrated increasing protein expression of Smad-7 in the degenerative discs. A significantly positive correlation was found between Smad-7 expression and the degree of disc degeneration and between Smad-7 expression and disc cell apoptosis. Overexpression of Smad-7 in disc cells inhibited the expression of TGF-β1, collagen type-I, collagen type-II, and aggrecan and promoted the expression of MMP-13, but did not change the expression of ADAMTS-5. The in vivo findings illustrated that intradiscal injection of lentivirus vector with Smad-7 overexpression accelerated the progress of disc degeneration. In conclusion, Smad-7 was highly expressed in the degenerative discs. Overexpression of Smad-7 weakened the protective role of TGF-β and accelerated the progress of

  20. MRI quantification of human spine cartilage endplate geometry: Comparison with age, degeneration, level, and disc geometry.

    PubMed

    DeLucca, John F; Peloquin, John M; Smith, Lachlan J; Wright, Alexander C; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2016-08-01

    Geometry is an important indicator of disc mechanical function and degeneration. While the geometry and associated degenerative changes in the nucleus pulposus and the annulus fibrosus are well-defined, the geometry of the cartilage endplate (CEP) and its relationship to disc degeneration are unknown. The objectives of this study were to quantify CEP geometry in three dimensions using an MRI FLASH imaging sequence and evaluate relationships between CEP geometry and age, degeneration, spinal level, and overall disc geometry. To do so, we assessed the MRI-based measurements for accuracy and repeatability. Next, we measured CEP geometry across a larger sample set and correlated CEP geometric parameters to age, disc degeneration, level, and disc geometry. The MRI-based measures resulted in thicknesses (0.3-1 mm) that are comparable to prior measurements of CEP thickness. CEP thickness was greatest at the anterior/posterior (A/P) margins and smallest in the center. The CEP A/P thickness, axial area, and lateral width decreased with age but were not related to disc degeneration. Age-related, but not degeneration-related, changes in geometry suggest that the CEP may not follow the progression of disc degeneration. Ultimately, if the CEP undergoes significant geometric changes with aging and if these can be related to low back pain, a clinically feasible translation of the FLASH MRI-based measurement of CEP geometry presented in this study may prove a useful diagnostic tool. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1410-1417, 2016.

  1. Allogeneic Articular Chondrocyte Transplantation Down Regulates IL-8 Gene Expression in the Degenerating Rabbit Intervertebral Disc in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yejia; Chee, Ana; Shi, Peng; Wang, Rui; Moss, Isaac; Chen, Er-Yun; He, Tong-Chuan; An, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate if repopulating the degenerating intervertebral disc (IVD) with articular chondrocytes (ACs) will decrease inflammation and restore disc structure. In this study, we aimed to determine if well-differentiated AC alone or transduced with adenovirus overexpressing BMP-7 gene may survive and inhibit inflammation or repair disc structure in the degenerating rabbit IVD. Design This was a biological study in a rabbit IVD-injury model in vivo. Dual cell tracking methods (IR dye-labeling and adenovirus transduction) were used to demonstrate the viability of allogeneic AC injected into degenerating rabbit IVDs. Interleukin (IL)-8 gene expression was determined via real-time PCR. Infiltrating inflammatory cells (macrophages, T-cells or neutrophils) were examined with immunohistochemistry. The IVDs were also examined by routine histology. Results ACs labeled with infrared (IR) dye were detected in the degenerating IVDs at both 2 and 8 weeks after injection. At the 2-week time point, IL-8 gene expression was comparable in IVDs injected with chondrocytes and in intact discs as control (P=0.647), while its expression in IVDs injected with saline increased 50fold (p=0.028). Transgene expression of red fluorescent protein, β-galactosidase, and BMP-7 diminished at 8 weeks post injection. IVDs injected with chondrocytes overexpressing hBMP-7 did not show lower IL-8 gene expression or improved histology. Macrophages were consistently detected by immunohistochemistry in the cartilage formation around the needle insertion sites in both the saline and chondrocyte groups, while neither T cells nor neutrophils were detected. Conclusions Allogeneic rabbit AC survived in the degenerating rabbit IVDs for at least 8 weeks. Cell treatment resulted in reduced IVD inflammation, but did not significantly improve IVD structure. PMID:25133623

  2. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 provokes interleukin-18-induced human intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ye, S.; Ju, B.; Wang, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Interleukin 18 (IL-18) is a regulatory cytokine that degrades the disc matrix. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) stimulates synthesis of the disc extracellular matrix. However, the combined effects of BMP-2 and IL-18 on human intervertebral disc degeneration have not previously been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the anabolic cytokine BMP-2 and the catabolic cytokine IL-18 on human nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) cells and, therefore, to identify potential therapeutic and clinical benefits of recombinant human (rh)BMP-2 in intervertebral disc degeneration. Methods Levels of IL-18 were measured in the blood of patients with intervertebral disc degenerative disease and in control patients. Human NP and AF cells were cultured in a NP cell medium and treated with IL-18 or IL-18 plus BMP-2. mRNA levels of target genes were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and protein levels of aggrecan, type II collagen, SOX6, and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) were assessed by western blot analysis. Results The serum level of patients (IL-18) increased significantly with the grade of IVD degeneration. There was a dramatic alteration in IL-18 level between the advanced degeneration (Grade III to V) group and the normal group (p = 0.008) Furthermore, IL-18 induced upregulation of the catabolic regulator MMP13 and downregulation of the anabolic regulators aggrecan, type II collagen, and SOX6 at 24 hours, contributing to degradation of disc matrix enzymes. However, BMP-2 antagonised the IL-18 induced upregulation of aggrecan, type II collagen, and SOX6, resulting in reversal of IL-18 mediated disc degeneration. Conclusions BMP-2 is anti-catabolic in human NP and AF cells, and its effects are partially mediated through provocation of the catabolic effect of IL-18. These findings indicate that BMP-2 may be a unique therapeutic option for prevention and reversal of disc degeneration. Cite this article: S. Ye

  3. Organ Culture Bioreactors – Platforms to Study Human Intervertebral Disc Degeneration and Regenerative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gantenbein, Benjamin; Illien-Jünger, Svenja; Chan, Samantha CW; Walser, Jochen; Haglund, Lisbet; Ferguson, Stephen J; Iatridis, James C; Grad, Sibylle

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades the application of bioreactors has revolutionized the concept of culturing tissues and organs that require mechanical loading. In intervertebral disc (IVD) research, collaborative efforts of biomedical engineering, biology and mechatronics have led to the innovation of new loading devices that can maintain viable IVD organ explants from large animals and human cadavers in precisely defined nutritional and mechanical environments over extended culture periods. Particularly in spine and IVD research, these organ culture models offer appealing alternatives, as large bipedal animal models with naturally occurring IVD degeneration and a genetic background similar to the human condition do not exist. Latest research has demonstrated important concepts including the potential of homing of mesenchymal stem cells to nutritionally or mechanically stressed IVDs, and the regenerative potential of “smart” biomaterials for nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosus repair. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about cell therapy, injection of cytokines and short peptides to rescue the degenerating IVD. We further stress that most bioreactor systems simplify the real in vivo conditions providing a useful proof of concept. Limitations are that certain aspects of the immune host response and pain assessments cannot be addressed with ex vivo systems. Coccygeal animal disc models are commonly used because of their availability and similarity to human IVDs. Although in vitro loading environments are not identical to the human in vivo situation, 3D ex vivo organ culture models of large animal coccygeal and human lumbar IVDs should be seen as valid alternatives for screening and feasibility testing to augment existing small animal, large animal, and human clinical trial experiments. PMID:25764196

  4. Organ culture bioreactors--platforms to study human intervertebral disc degeneration and regenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    Gantenbein, Benjamin; Illien-Jünger, Svenja; Chan, Samantha C W; Walser, Jochen; Haglund, Lisbet; Ferguson, Stephen J; Iatridis, James C; Grad, Sibylle

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades the application of bioreactors has revolutionized the concept of culturing tissues and organs that require mechanical loading. In intervertebral disc (IVD) research, collaborative efforts of biomedical engineering, biology and mechatronics have led to the innovation of new loading devices that can maintain viable IVD organ explants from large animals and human cadavers in precisely defined nutritional and mechanical environments over extended culture periods. Particularly in spine and IVD research, these organ culture models offer appealing alternatives, as large bipedal animal models with naturally occurring IVD degeneration and a genetic background similar to the human condition do not exist. Latest research has demonstrated important concepts including the potential of homing of mesenchymal stem cells to nutritionally or mechanically stressed IVDs, and the regenerative potential of "smart" biomaterials for nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosus repair. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about cell therapy, injection of cytokines and short peptides to rescue the degenerating IVD. We further stress that most bioreactor systems simplify the real in vivo conditions providing a useful proof of concept. Limitations are that certain aspects of the immune host response and pain assessments cannot be addressed with ex vivo systems. Coccygeal animal disc models are commonly used because of their availability and similarity to human IVDs. Although in vitro loading environments are not identical to the human in vivo situation, 3D ex vivo organ culture models of large animal coccygeal and human lumbar IVDs should be seen as valid alternatives for screening and feasibility testing to augment existing small animal, large animal, and human clinical trial experiments.

  5. High mechanical strain of primary intervertebral disc cells promotes secretion of inflammatory factors associated with disc degeneration and pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Excessive mechanical loading of intervertebral discs (IVDs) is thought to alter matrix properties and influence disc cell metabolism, contributing to degenerative disc disease and development of discogenic pain. However, little is known about how mechanical strain induces these changes. This study investigated the cellular and molecular changes as well as which inflammatory receptors and cytokines were upregulated in human intervertebral disc cells exposed to high mechanical strain (HMS) at low frequency. The impact of these metabolic changes on neuronal differentiation was also explored to determine a role in the development of disc degeneration and discogenic pain. Methods Isolated human annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were exposed to HMS (20% cyclical stretch at 0.001 Hz) on high-extension silicone rubber dishes coupled to a mechanical stretching apparatus and compared to static control cultures. Gene expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), neuronal growth factor (NGF) and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) was assessed. Collected conditioned media were analysed for cytokine content and applied to rat pheocromocytoma PC12 cells for neuronal differentiation assessment. Results HMS caused upregulation of TLR2, TLR4, NGF and TNFα gene expression in IVD cells. Medium from HMS cultures contained elevated levels of growth-related oncogene, interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-15, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), MCP-3, monokine induced by γ interferon, transforming growth factor β1, TNFα and NGF. Exposure of PC12 cells to HMS-conditioned media resulted in both increased neurite sprouting and cell death. Conclusions HMS culture of IVD cells in vitro drives cytokine and inflammatory responses associated with degenerative disc disease and low-back pain. This study provides evidence for a direct link between cellular strain, secretory factors, neoinnervation and potential degeneration and discogenic pain in vivo. PMID:24457003

  6. Longitudinal Comparison of Enzyme- and Laser-Treated Intervertebral Disc by MRI, X-Ray, and Histological Analyses Reveals Discrepancies in the Progression of Disc Degeneration: A Rabbit Study

    PubMed Central

    Colombier, Pauline; Lesoeur, Julie; Youl, Samy; Madec, Stéphane; Gauthier, Olivier; Hamel, Olivier; Guicheux, Jérôme; Clouet, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is considered an attractive prospect for the treatment of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. To assess the efficacy of the regenerative approach, animal models of IVD degeneration are needed. Among these animal models, chemonucleolysis based on the enzymatic degradation of the Nucleus Pulposus (NP) is often used, but this technique remains far from the natural physiopathological process of IVD degeneration. Recently, we developed an innovative animal model of IVD degeneration based on the use of a laser beam. In the present study, this laser model was compared with the chemonucleolysis model in a longitudinal study in rabbits. The effects of the treatments were studied by MRI (T2-weighted signal intensity (T2wsi)), radiography (IVD height index), and histology (NP area and Boos' scoring). The results showed that both treatments induced a degeneration of the IVD with a decrease in IVD height and T2wsi as well as NP area and an increase in Boos' scoring. The enzyme treatment leads to a rapid and acute process of IVD degeneration. Conversely, laser radiation induced more progressive and less pronounced degeneration. It can be concluded that laser treatment provides an instrumental in vivo model of slowly evolving IVD degenerative disease that can be of preclinical relevance for assessing new prophylactic biological treatments of disc degeneration. PMID:27247937

  7. Longitudinal Comparison of Enzyme- and Laser-Treated Intervertebral Disc by MRI, X-Ray, and Histological Analyses Reveals Discrepancies in the Progression of Disc Degeneration: A Rabbit Study.

    PubMed

    Fusellier, Marion; Colombier, Pauline; Lesoeur, Julie; Youl, Samy; Madec, Stéphane; Gauthier, Olivier; Hamel, Olivier; Guicheux, Jérôme; Clouet, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is considered an attractive prospect for the treatment of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. To assess the efficacy of the regenerative approach, animal models of IVD degeneration are needed. Among these animal models, chemonucleolysis based on the enzymatic degradation of the Nucleus Pulposus (NP) is often used, but this technique remains far from the natural physiopathological process of IVD degeneration. Recently, we developed an innovative animal model of IVD degeneration based on the use of a laser beam. In the present study, this laser model was compared with the chemonucleolysis model in a longitudinal study in rabbits. The effects of the treatments were studied by MRI (T2-weighted signal intensity (T2wsi)), radiography (IVD height index), and histology (NP area and Boos' scoring). The results showed that both treatments induced a degeneration of the IVD with a decrease in IVD height and T2wsi as well as NP area and an increase in Boos' scoring. The enzyme treatment leads to a rapid and acute process of IVD degeneration. Conversely, laser radiation induced more progressive and less pronounced degeneration. It can be concluded that laser treatment provides an instrumental in vivo model of slowly evolving IVD degenerative disease that can be of preclinical relevance for assessing new prophylactic biological treatments of disc degeneration. PMID:27247937

  8. Class 3 semaphorins expression and association with innervation and angiogenesis within the degenerate human intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Binch, Abbie L A; Cole, Ashley A; Breakwell, Lee M; Michael, Anthony L R; Chiverton, Neil; Creemers, Laura B; Cross, Alison K; Le Maitre, Christine L

    2015-07-30

    Nerve and blood vessel ingrowth during intervertebral disc degeneration, is thought to be a major cause of low back pain, however the regulation of this process is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the expression and regulation of a subclass of axonal guidance molecules known as the class 3 semaphorins, and their receptors; plexins and neuropilins within human NP tissue and their regulation by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Importantly this determined whether semaphorin expression was associated with the presence of nerves and blood vessels in tissues from human intervertebral discs. The study demonstrated that semaphorin3A, 3C, 3D, 3E and 3F and their receptors were expressed by native NP cells and further demonstrated their expression was regulated by IL-1β but to a lesser extent by IL-6 and TNFα. This is the first study to identify sema3C, sema3D and their receptors within the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs. Immunopositivity shows significant increases in semaphorin3C, 3D and their receptor neuropilin-2 in degenerate samples which were shown to contain nerves and blood vessels, compared to non-degenerate samples without nerves and blood vessels. Therefore data presented here suggests that semaphorin3C may have a role in promoting innervation and vascularisation during degeneration, which may go on to cause low back pain.

  9. A role for TNFα in intervertebral disc degeneration: A non-recoverable catabolic shift

    SciTech Connect

    Purmessur, D.; Walter, B.A.; Roughley, P.J.; Laudier, D.M.; Hecht, A.C.; Iatridis, James

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► TNFα induced catabolic changes similar to human intervertebral disc degeneration. ► The metabolic shift induced by TNFα was sustained following removal. ► TNFα induced changes suggestive of cell senescence without affecting cell viability. ► Interventions are required to stimulate anabolism and increase cell proliferation. -- Abstract: This study examines the effect of TNFα on whole bovine intervertebral discs in organ culture and its association with changes characteristic of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) in order to inform future treatments to mitigate the chronic inflammatory state commonly found with painful IDD. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα contribute to disc pathology and are implicated in the catabolic phenotype associated with painful IDD. Whole bovine discs were cultured to examine cellular (anabolic/catabolic gene expression, cell viability and senescence using β-galactosidase) and structural (histology and aggrecan degradation) changes in response to TNFα treatment. Control or TNFα cultures were assessed at 7 and 21 days; the 21 day group also included a recovery group with 7 days TNFα followed by 14 days in basal media. TNFα induced catabolic and anti-anabolic shifts in the nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) at 7 days and this persisted until 21 days however cell viability was not affected. Data indicates that TNFα increased aggrecan degradation products and suggests increased β-galactosidase staining at 21 days without any recovery. TNFα treatment of whole bovine discs for 7 days induced changes similar to the degeneration processes that occur in human IDD: aggrecan degradation, increased catabolism, pro-inflammatory cytokines and nerve growth factor expression. TNFα significantly reduced anabolism in cultured IVDs and a possible mechanism may be associated with cell senescence. Results therefore suggest that successful treatments must promote anabolism and cell proliferation in

  10. Catabolic effects of endothelial cell-derived microparticles on disc cells: Implications in intervertebral disc neovascularization and degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Pedro H I; Lozito, Thomas P; Cuperman, Thais; Yurube, Takashi; Moon, Hong J; Ngo, Kevin; Tuan, Rocky S; St Croix, Claudette; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Rodrigues, Luciano M R; Kang, James D; Vo, Nam V

    2016-08-01

    Neovascularization of intervertebral discs, a phenomenon considered pathological since normal discs are primarily avascular structures, occurs most frequently in annulus fibrosus (AF) of degenerated discs. Endothelial cells (ECs) are involved in this process, but the mechanism of the interaction between AF and endothelial cells is unclear. In this study, we evaluated the effects on matrix catabolic activity of AF cells by the extracellular endothelial microparticles (EMPs) and soluble protein factors (SUP fraction) produced from ECs. Passage 1 human AF cells grown in monolayer cultures were treated for 72 h with 250 µg of EMPs or SUP fraction isolated from culture of the microvascular endothelial cell line, HEMC-I. Live-cell imaging revealed uptake of EMPs by AF cells. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated increased mRNA expression of MMP-1 (50.3-fold), MMP-3 (4.5-fold) and MMP-13 (5.5-fold) in AF cell cultures treated with EMPs compared to untreated control. Western analysis also demonstrated increased MMP protein expression in EMP-treated AF cells. AF cells treated with the SUP fraction also exhibited a dramatic increase in MMP mRNA and protein expression. Increased MMP expression is primarily due to EMP or SUP stimulation of AF cells since EMPs or SUP fraction alone contained negligible amount of MMPs. Interestingly, MMP activity was elevated in AF cell cultures treated with EMPs but not with SUP. This study revealed enhanced matrix catabolism as a molecular consequence of action of ECs on AF cells via EMPs, which might be expected during neo-angiogenesis of degenerating disc. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1466-1474, 2016. PMID:27246627

  11. Altered Helical Axis Patterns of the Lumbar Spine Indicate Increased Instability with Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Arin M.; Nuckley, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Although the causes of low back pain are poorly defined and indistinct, degeneration of the intervertebral disc is most often implicated as the origin of pain. The biochemical and mechanical changes associated with degeneration result in the discs’ inability to maintain structure and function, leading to spinal instability and ultimately pain. Traditionally, a clinical exam assessing functional range-of-motion coupled with T2-weighted MRI revealing disc morphology are used to evaluate spinal health; however, these subjective measures fail to correlate well with pain or provide useful patient stratification. Therefore, improved quantification of spinal motion and objective MRI measures of disc health are necessary. An instantaneous helical axis (IHA) approach provides rich temporal three-dimensional data describing the pathway of motion, which is easily visualized. Eighteen cadaveric osteoligamentous lumbar spines (L4-5) from throughout the degenerative spectrum were tested in a pure moment fashion. IHA were calculated for flexion-extension and lateral bending. A correlational study design was used to determine the relationship between disc measurements from quantitative T2* MRI and IHA metrics. Increased instability and out-of-plane rotation with diminished disc health was observed during lateral bending, but not flexion-extension. This new analysis strategy examines the entire pathway of motion, rather than simplifying spinal kinematics to its terminal ends of motion and provides a more sensitive kinematic measurement of disc health. Ultimately, through the use of 3D dynamic fluoroscopy or similar methods, a patient's functional IHA in lateral bending may be measured and used to assess their disc health for diagnosis, progression tracking, and treatment evaluation. PMID:25481221

  12. The imbalance between TIMP3 and matrix-degrading enzymes plays an important role in intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Kang; Han, Xiuguo; Mao, Chuanyuan; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Tengfei; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-15

    It is well-known that one of the most important features of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Collagen and aggrecan are major components of ECM; the degradation of ECM in intervertebral discs (IVDs) is closely related to the activities of collagenase and aggrecanase. TIMP-3 is the most efficient inhibitor of aggrecanase in IVD. However, only few studies focus on the potential relationship between TIMP-3 and IDD. In our study, we found TIMP-3 gene expression was decreased after stimulating with LPS in rat nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. Then we used a lentivirus vector to reconstruct rat NP cells which high expressed TIMP-3 gene (LV-TIMP3). The upregulation of MMPs and ADAMTSs induced by LPS was significantly inhibited in LV-TIMP3 cells. After overexpression of TIMP-3, the aggrecan breakdown caused by LPS was also reduced in both monolayer culture and three-dimension culture model. To further study the relation between TIMP-3 and IDD, we collected human NP tissue samples of different degenerative degrees. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining showed that the expression of TIMP-3 was negatively correlated with the degree of intervertebral disc degeneration, while MMP-1 and ADAMTS-4 were markedly increased in degenerative IVD. Taken together, our results suggest that the imbalance between aggrecanase and TIMP-3 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IDD and therefore be a potential therapeutic target for treating IDD. PMID:26686417

  13. MSC response to pH levels found in degenerating intervertebral discs

    SciTech Connect

    Wuertz, Karin Godburn, Karolyn; Iatridis, James C.

    2009-02-20

    Painful degenerative disc disease is a major health problem and for successful tissue regeneration, MSCs must endure and thrive in a harsh disc microenvironment that includes matrix acidity as a critical factor. MSCs were isolated from bone marrow of Sprague-Dawley rats from two different age groups (<1 month, n = 6 and 4-5 months, n = 6) and cultured under four different pH conditions representative of the healthy, mildly or severely degenerated intervertebral disc (pH 7.4, 7.1, 6.8, and 6.5) for 5 days. Acidity caused an inhibition of aggrecan, collagen-1, and TIMP-3 expression, as well as a decrease in proliferation and viability and was associated with a change in cell morphology. Ageing had generally minor effects but young MSCs maintained greater mRNA expression levels. As acidic pH levels are typical of increasingly degenerated discs, our findings demonstrate the importance of early interventions and predifferentiation when planning to use MSCs for reparative treatments.

  14. Lumbar disc degeneration below a long arthrodesis (performed for scoliosis in adults) to L4 or L5.

    PubMed

    Harding, Ian J; Charosky, Sebastian; Vialle, Raphael; Chopin, Daniel H

    2008-02-01

    A retrospective analysis of adults treated with long instrumented fusion for scoliosis from the thoracic spine proximally to L4 or L5. To evaluate the long-term clinical outcomes as well as radiological changes in distal unfused mobile segments and to evaluate factors that may predispose to distal disc degeneration and/or poor outcome. A total of 151 mobile segments in 85 patients (65 female), mean age 43.2 (range 21-68), were studied. Curve type, number of fused levels and pelvic incidence were recorded. Clinical outcome was measured using the Whitecloud function scale and disc degeneration using the UCLA disc degeneration score. Spinal balance, local segmental angulations and lumbar lordosis were measured pre- and post-operatively as well as at the most recent follow up--mean 9.3 years (range 7-19). A total of 62% of patients had a good or excellent outcome. Eleven had a poor outcome of which ten underwent extension of fusion--five for pain alone, three for pain with stenosis and two for pseudarthroses. Pre-operative disc degeneration was often asymmetric and was slightly greater in older patients. Overall, there was a significant deterioration in disc degeneration (P < 0.0001) that did not correlate with clinical outcome. Disc degeneration correlated with the recent sagittal balance (Anova F = 14.285, P < 0.001) and the most recent lordosis (Anova F = 4.057, P = 0.048). The post-operative sagittal balance and local L5-S1 sagittal angulation correlated to L4 and L5 degeneration, respectively. There was no correlation between degeneration and age, pre-operative degenerative score, pelvic incidence, sacral slope, number of fused levels or distal level of fusion. Disc degeneration does occur below an arthrodesis for scoliosis in adults which does not correlate with clinical outcome. The correlation of loss of sagittal balance with disc degeneration may be as a result of degeneration causing the loss of balance or vice versa, i.e. sagittal imbalance causing

  15. The Involvement of Protease Nexin-1 (PN1) in the Pathogenesis of Intervertebral Disc (IVD) Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinghuo; Liu, Wei; Duan, Zhenfeng; Gao, Yong; Li, Shuai; Wang, Kun; Song, Yu; Shao, Zengwu; Yang, Shuhua; Yang, Cao

    2016-01-01

    Protease nexin-1 (PN-1) is a serine protease inhibitor belonging to the serpin superfamily. This study was undertaken to investigate the regulatory role of PN-1 in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disk (IVD) degeneration. Expression of PN-1 was detected in human IVD tissue of varying grades. Expression of both PN-1 mRNA and protein was significantly decreased in degenerated IVD, and the expression levels of PN-1 were correlated with the grade of disc degeneration. Moreover, a decrease in PN-1 expression in primary NP cells was confirmed. On induction by IL-1β, the expression of PN-1 in NP cells was decreased at day 7, 14, and 21, as shown by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. PN-1 administration decreased IL-1β-induced MMPs and ADAMTS production and the loss of Agg and Col II in NP cell cultures through the ERK1/2/NF-kB signaling pathway. The changes in PN-1 expression are involved in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration. Our findings indicate that PN-1 administration could antagonize IL-1β-induced MMPs and ADAMTS, potentially preventing degeneration of IVD tissue. This study also revealed new insights into the regulation of PN-1 expression via the ERK1/2/NF-kB signaling pathway and the role of PN-1 in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration. PMID:27460424

  16. Injection of human umbilical tissue–derived cells into the nucleus pulposus alters the course of intervertebral disc degeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leckie, Steven K.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Bechara, Bernard P.; Hartman, Robert A.; Coelho, Joao Paulo; Witt, William T.; Dong, Qing D.; Bowman, Brent W.; Bell, Kevin M.; Vo, Nam V.; Kramer, Brian C.; Kang, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Background context Patients often present to spine clinic with evidence of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). If conservative management fails, a safe and effective injection directly into the disc might be preferable to the risks and morbidity of surgery. Purpose To determine whether injecting human umbilical tissue–derived cells (hUTC) into the nucleus pulposus (NP) might improve the course of IDD. Design Prospective, randomized, blinded placebo–controlled in vivo study. Patient sample Skeletally mature New Zealand white rabbits. Outcome measures Degree of IDD based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biomechanics, and histology. Methods Thirty skeletally mature New Zealand white rabbits were used in a previously validated rabbit annulotomy model for IDD. Discs L2–L3, L3–L4, and L4–L5 were surgically exposed and punctured to induce degeneration and then 3 weeks later the same discs were injected with hUTC with or without a hydrogel carrier. Serial MRIs obtained at 0, 3, 6, and 12 weeks were analyzed for evidence of degeneration qualitatively and quantitatively via NP area and MRI Index. The rabbits were sacrificed at 12 weeks and discs L4–L5 were analyzed histologically. The L3–L4 discs were fixed to a robotic arm and subjected to uniaxial compression, and viscoelastic displacement curves were generated. Results Qualitatively, the MRIs demonstrated no evidence of degeneration in the control group over the course of 12 weeks. The punctured group yielded MRIs with the evidence of disc height loss and darkening, suggestive of degeneration. The three treatment groups (cells alone, carrier alone, or cells+carrier) generated MRIs with less qualitative evidence of degeneration than the punctured group. MRI Index and area for the cell and the cell+carrier groups were significantly distinct from the punctured group at 12 weeks. The carrier group generated MRI data that fell between control and punctured values but failed to reach a statistically

  17. High Prevalence of Disc Degeneration and Spondylolysis in the Lumbar Spine of Professional Beach Volleyball Players

    PubMed Central

    Külling, Fabrice A.; Florianz, Hannes; Reepschläger, Bastian; Gasser, Johann; Jost, Bernhard; Lajtai, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background: Beach volleyball is an intensive sport with high impact on the lumbar spine. Low back pain (LBP) is frequent among elite players. Increased prevalence of pathological changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the lumbar spine of elite athletes has been reported. Hypothesis: There is an increased prevalence of disc degeneration and spondylolysis in the MRI of the lumbar spine of professional beach volleyball players. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Twenty-nine fully competitive professional male volleyball players (mean age, 28 years) completed outcomes questionnaires and underwent a complete clinical examination and an MRI of their lumbar spine. Results: Whereas 86% of players suffered from LBP during their career, the incidence of LBP in the last 4 weeks was 35%. Pain rated using a visual analog scale (VAS) averaged 3 points (range, 0-8). Twenty-three of 29 players (79%) had at least 1 degenerated disc of Pfirrmann grade ≥3. The most affected spinal levels were L4-5 in 14 (48%) and L5-S1 in 15 players (52%); both levels were involved in 5 players (17%). Six of 29 (21%) players showed a spondylolysis grade 4 according to the Hollenburg classification; there was evidence of spondylolisthesis in 2 players. There was no significant correlation between LBP and MRI abnormalities. Conclusion: In the lumbar spine MRI of professional beach volleyball players, the prevalence of disc degeneration is 79%. Spondylolysis (21%) is up to 3 times higher compared with the normal population. Abnormal MRI findings did not correlate with LBP, thus MRIs have to be interpreted with caution. PMID:26535316

  18. Stemming the Degeneration: IVD Stem Cells and Stem Cell Regenerative Therapy for Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sivakamasundari, V; Lufkin, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) is immensely important for the integrity of vertebral column function. The highly specialized IVD functions to confer flexibility and tensile strength to the spine and endures various types of biomechanical force. Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is a prevalent musculoskeletal disorder and is the major cause of low back pain and includes the more severe degenerative lumbar scoliosis, disc herniation and spinal stenosis. DDD is a multifactorial disorder whereby an imbalance of anabolic and catabolic factors, or alterations to cellular composition, or biophysical stimuli and genetic background can all play a role in its genesis. However, our comprehension of IVD formation and theetiology of disc degeneration (DD) are far from being complete, hampering efforts to formulate appropriate therapies to tackle DD. Knowledge of the stem cells and various techniques to manipulate and direct them to particular fates have been promising in adopting a stem-cell based regenerative approach to DD. Moreover, new evidence on the residence of stem/progenitor cells within particular IVD niches has emerged holding promise for future therapeutic applications. Existing issues pertaining to current therapeutic approaches are also covered in this review. PMID:23951558

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging on disc degeneration changes after implantation of an interspinous spacer and fusion of the adjacent segment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaokang; Liu, Yingjie; Lian, Xiaofeng; Xu, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the changes of the lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after the implantation of interspinous device and the fusion of the adjacent segment. A total of 62 consecutive patients suffering L5/S1 lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with concomitant disc space narrowing or low-grade instability up to 5 mm translational slip in L5/S1 level were treated with lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) via posterior approach. Thirty-four of these patients (Coflex group) received an additional implantation of the interspinous spacer device (Coflex™) in the level L4/L5, while the rest of 28 patients (fusion group) underwent the fusion surgery alone. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at pre- and postoperative visits to compare the clinical outcomes and the changes of the L4/L5 vertebral disc degeneration on MRI in both Coflex and fusion group. Although both Coflex and fusion group showed improvements of the clinical outcomes assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) after surgery, patients in Coflex group had more significant amelioration (P < 0.05) compared to fusion group. During follow up, the postoperative disc degeneration changes in Coflex group assessed by the relative signal intensity (RSI) differed from those in fusion group (P < 0.05). The supplemental implantation of Coflex™ after the fusion surgery could delay the disc degeneration of the adjacent segment. PMID:26131210

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging on disc degeneration changes after implantation of an interspinous spacer and fusion of the adjacent segment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaokang; Liu, Yingjie; Lian, Xiaofeng; Xu, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the changes of the lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after the implantation of interspinous device and the fusion of the adjacent segment. A total of 62 consecutive patients suffering L5/S1 lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with concomitant disc space narrowing or low-grade instability up to 5 mm translational slip in L5/S1 level were treated with lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) via posterior approach. Thirty-four of these patients (Coflex group) received an additional implantation of the interspinous spacer device (Coflex™) in the level L4/L5, while the rest of 28 patients (fusion group) underwent the fusion surgery alone. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at pre- and postoperative visits to compare the clinical outcomes and the changes of the L4/L5 vertebral disc degeneration on MRI in both Coflex and fusion group. Although both Coflex and fusion group showed improvements of the clinical outcomes assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) after surgery, patients in Coflex group had more significant amelioration (P < 0.05) compared to fusion group. During follow up, the postoperative disc degeneration changes in Coflex group assessed by the relative signal intensity (RSI) differed from those in fusion group (P < 0.05). The supplemental implantation of Coflex™ after the fusion surgery could delay the disc degeneration of the adjacent segment.

  1. [MicroRNAs: a type of novel regulative factor for intervertebral disc degeneration].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Wenjun; Yang, Wei; Yu, Xiaohua; Yan, Yiguo; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Zhisheng

    2016-03-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is one of major causes for intervertebral disc degenerative diseases, and patients with IDD usually suffer from serious low back pain. The current treatments for patients with IDD only relieve the clinical symptom rather than restore biological balance of IDD, leading to inadequate and unsatisfactory results. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, non-coding, single-stranded RNA molecules, which regulate the gene expression at the post-transcription levels. Research evidences support the involvement of miRNAs in many biological processes, such as lipid metabolism, apoptosis, differentiation and organ development. Accumulating evidences indicate that the expressions of miRNAs change significantly in degenerative tissues. In addition, dysregulated miRNAs contribute to multiple pathological process of IDD, including proliferation and apoptosis of nucleus pulposus and extracellular matrix components, inflammatory response and cartilage endplates degeneration. In this review article, we summarize the expression profiles and roles of miRNAs in IDD, which may provide a novel strategy of biological therapy for the disease. PMID:27273991

  2. 2D segmentation of intervertebral discs and its degree of degeneration from T2-weighted magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, José Maria; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2014-03-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a disorder suffered by a large population around the world. A key factor causing this illness is Intervertebral Disc (IVD) degeneration, whose early diagnosis could help in preventing this widespread condition. Clinicians base their diagnosis on visual inspection of 2D slices of Magnetic Resonance (MR) images, which is subject to large interobserver variability. In this work, an automatic classification method is presented, which provides the Pfirrmann degree of degeneration from a mid-sagittal MR slice. The proposed method utilizes Active Contour Models, with a new geometrical energy, to achieve an initial segmentation, which is further improved using fuzzy C-means. Then, IVDs are classified according to their degree of degeneration. This classification is attained by employing Adaboost on five specific features: the mean and the variance of the probability map of the nucleus using two different approaches and the eccentricity of the fitting ellipse to the contour of the IVD. The classification method was evaluated using a cohort of 150 intervertebral discs assessed by three experts, resulting in a mean specificity (93%) and sensitivity (83%) similar to the one provided by every expert with respect to the most voted value. The segmentation accuracy was evaluated using the Dice Similarity Index (DSI) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of the point-to-contour distance. The mean DSI ± 2 standard deviation was 91:7% ±5:6%, the mean RMSE was 0:82mm and the 95 percentile was 1:36mm. These results were found accurate when compared to the state-of-the-art.

  3. Transplantation of CXCR4 Overexpressed Mesenchymal Stem Cells Augments Regeneration in Degenerated Intervertebral Discs.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ji-Nan; Cai, Feng; Wang, Feng; Wu, Xiao-Tao; Liu, Lei; Hong, Xin; Tang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    SDF-1/CXCR4 chemotaxis signals play important roles in regulating the stem cell-based tissue regeneration. The aim of this research is to evaluate whether high expression of CXCR4 enhances the migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and increases the efficiency of intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration. MSCs overexpressing CXCR (CXCR4-MSC) were created by lentiviral-CXCR4-vect transfection, labeled with SPIO, and transplanted into rabbit degenerative IVD induced by annulus puncture. X-ray and T2-weighted MR images of the spine were obtained at 0, 8, and 16 weeks post-transplantation. The transplanted stem cells were traced by both MR imaging and Prussian blue staining. The stem cell-based IVD degeneration was evaluated by quantifying the expression of aggrecan and type II collagen. The in vitro chemotaxis test was performed to study the migration of CXCR4-MSCs to the supplement of SDF-1. The CXCR4-overexpressing MSCs stably elevated the expression of CXCR4 and increased the migration to SDF-1. The SPIO-labeled CXCR4-MSC could be detected within the IVD by MRI till 16 weeks post-transplantation. Prussian blue staining evidenced more SPIO-positive cells within the IVD transplanted with CXCR4-MSCs. Compared to the control group, loss of disc height was slowed while the mRNA expression of aggrecan and type II collagen was increased by MSC transplantation, especially in the IVD supplemented with CXCR4-MSCs. CXCR4 overexpression promoted MSC retention within the IVD and enhanced the stem cell-based IVD regeneration. The SDF-1/CXCR4 chemotaxis signals might help provide a new perspective to understand stem cell migration and infiltration within the degenerated IVD. PMID:26788981

  4. Oestrogen and parathyroid hormone alleviate lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration in ovariectomized rats and enhance Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haobo; Ma, Jianxiong; Lv, Jianwei; Ma, Xinlong; Xu, Weiguo; Yang, Yang; Tian, Aixian; Wang, Ying; Sun, Lei; Xu, Liyan; Fu, Lin; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mitigation effect and mechanism of oestrogen and PTH on disc degeneration in rats after ovariectomy, as well as on Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity, thirty 3-month-old rats were ovariectomized and divided into three groups. Ten additional rats were used as controls. Eight weeks later, the rats were administered oestrogen or PTH for 12 weeks, and then discs were collected for tests. Results showed that nucleus pulposus cells in the Sham group were mostly notochord cells, while in the OVX group, cells gradually developed into chondrocyte-like cells. Oestrogen or PTH could partly recover the notochord cell number. After ovariectomy, the endplate roughened and endplate porosity decreased. After oestrogen or PTH treatment, the smoothness and porosity of endplate recovered. Compared with the Sham group, Aggrecan, Col2a and Wnt/β-catenin pathway expression in OVX group decreased, and either oestrogen or PTH treatment improved their expression. The biomechanical properties of intervertebral disc significantly changed after ovariectomy, and oestrogen or PTH treatment partly recovered them. Disc degeneration occurred with low oestrogen, and the underlying mechanisms involve nutrition supply disorders, cell type changes and decreased Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity. Oestrogen and PTH can retard disc degeneration in OVX rats and enhance Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity in nucleus pulposus. PMID:27279629

  5. MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptor 4 signal pathway in intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chuqiang; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Le; Tang, Long; Li, Shuangqing; Yang, Yixi; Yang, Fuguo; Zhang, Ping; Yang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Lower back pain (LBP) is a common and remitting problem. One of the primary causes of LBP is thought to be degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88 (MyD88)-dependent Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signal pathway in the mechanism of IVD degeneration. IVD nucleus pulposus cells isolated and cultured from the lumbar vertebrae of Wistar rats were stimulated by various doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 µg/ml) to simulate IVD degeneration. Cells were rinsed and cultured in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the levels of TLR4, MyD88, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA expression after 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 h of incubation. Additionally, western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses were used to determine the levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα, and IL-1β protein expression after 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation. The levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β mRNA all increased in the cells stimulated by 10 µg/ml LPS at 3, 6 and 9 h (all P<0.001). Furthermore, the levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β protein all increased at 24, 48 and 72 h (all P<0.001). Additionally, the mRNA and protein levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β increased significantly in the cells stimulated by 1, 10 and 100 µg/ml LPS compared with the control group, and reached a peak in the 10 µg/ml LPS group (all P<0.001). These results suggest that the MyD88-dependent TLR4 signal pathway is a target pathway in IVD degeneration. This pathway is time phase- and dose-dependent, and when activated can lead to the release of inflammatory factors that participate in IVD degeneration. PMID:27446251

  6. Prevalence and pattern of radiographic intervertebral disc degeneration in Vietnamese: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ho-Pham, Lan T; Lai, Thai Q; Mai, Linh D; Doan, Minh C; Pham, Hoa N; Nguyen, Tuan V

    2015-06-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is one of the most common skeletal disorders, yet few data are available in Asian populations. We sought to assess the prevalence and pattern of radiographic IDD in a Vietnamese population. This population-based cross-sectional investigation involved 170 men and 488 women aged ≥40 years, who were randomly sampled from the Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam). Anthropometric data, clinical history and self-reported back and neck pain were ascertained by a questionnaire. Plain radiographs (from the cervical spine, thoracic spine to the lumbar spine) were examined for the presence of disc space narrowing and/or osteophytosis using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading system. The presence of radiographic IDD was defined if the KL grade was 2 or greater in at least one disc. The prevalence of radiographic IDD was 62.4% (n = 106) in men and 54.7% (n = 267) in women. The most frequently affected site was the lumbar spine with prevalence being 50.6 and 43.2% in men and women, respectively. The prevalence of IDD increased with advancing age: 18.8% among those aged 40-49 years, and increased to 83.4% in those aged ≥60 years. Self-reported neck pain and lower back pain were found in 30 and 44% of individuals, respectively. There was no statistically significant association between self-reported neck pain and cervical spine OA. These data suggest that radiographic IDD is highly prevalent in the Vietnamese population, and that self-reported back pain is not a sensitive indicator of IDD.

  7. Prevalence and pattern of radiographic intervertebral disc degeneration in Vietnamese: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ho-Pham, Lan T; Lai, Thai Q; Mai, Linh D; Doan, Minh C; Pham, Hoa N; Nguyen, Tuan V

    2015-06-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is one of the most common skeletal disorders, yet few data are available in Asian populations. We sought to assess the prevalence and pattern of radiographic IDD in a Vietnamese population. This population-based cross-sectional investigation involved 170 men and 488 women aged ≥40 years, who were randomly sampled from the Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam). Anthropometric data, clinical history and self-reported back and neck pain were ascertained by a questionnaire. Plain radiographs (from the cervical spine, thoracic spine to the lumbar spine) were examined for the presence of disc space narrowing and/or osteophytosis using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading system. The presence of radiographic IDD was defined if the KL grade was 2 or greater in at least one disc. The prevalence of radiographic IDD was 62.4% (n = 106) in men and 54.7% (n = 267) in women. The most frequently affected site was the lumbar spine with prevalence being 50.6 and 43.2% in men and women, respectively. The prevalence of IDD increased with advancing age: 18.8% among those aged 40-49 years, and increased to 83.4% in those aged ≥60 years. Self-reported neck pain and lower back pain were found in 30 and 44% of individuals, respectively. There was no statistically significant association between self-reported neck pain and cervical spine OA. These data suggest that radiographic IDD is highly prevalent in the Vietnamese population, and that self-reported back pain is not a sensitive indicator of IDD. PMID:25791571

  8. Aquaporin 3 protects against lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration via the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huanxin; Jing, Yongbin; Xia, Jingjun; Wang, Xintao; You, Changcheng; Yan, Jinglong

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of aquaporin 3 (AQP3), a water channel which promotes glycerol permeability and water transport across cell membranes, is reduced in degenerative lumbar intervertebral disc (IVD) tissues. However, the role of AQP3 in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration has not recieved much scholarly attention. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of AQP3 on cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in human nucleus pulposus cells (hNPCs) using gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments, and to determine whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling is involved in the effect of AQP3 on IVD degeneration. hNPCs were transfected with the AQP3-pcDNA3.1 plasmid or AQP3 siRNA to overexpress or suppress AQP3. An MTT assay was performed to determine cell proliferation, and we found that AQP3 promoted hNPC proliferation. The expression of aggrecan, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)4 and ADAMTS5 was detected using western blot analysis, to examine the effect of AQP3 on ECM degradation in hNPCs. The results revealed that AQP3 inhibited ECM degradation in hNPCs. In addition, we found that Wnt/β-catenin signaling was suppressed by AQP3. However, the effect of AQP3 on hNPC proliferation and ECM degradation was reversed by treatment with lithium chloride, a known activator of Wnt/β‑catenin signaling. In conclusion, using in vitro and in vivo tests, we have reported for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that AQP3 exerts protective effects against IVD degeneration, and these are effected, at least partially, through the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26820815

  9. Enhancement of Lumbar Fusion and Alleviation of Adjacent Segment Disc Degeneration by Intermittent PTH(1-34) in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuang; Tian, Fa-Ming; Gou, Yu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Heng; Song, Hui-Ping; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Zhang, Liu

    2016-04-01

    Osteoporosis, which is prevalent in postmenopausal or aged populations, is thought to be a contributing factor to adjacent segment disc degeneration (ASDD), and the incidence and extent of ASDD may be augmented by osteopenia. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) (1-34) has already been shown to be beneficial in osteoporosis, lumbar fusion and matrix homeostasis of intervertebral discs. However, whether PTH(1-34) has a reversing or retarding effect on ASDD in osteopenia has not been confirmed. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of intermittent PTH(1-34) on ASDD in an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model. One hundred 3-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent L4 -L5 posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) with spinous-process wire fixation 4 weeks after OVX surgery. Control groups were established accordingly. PTH(1-34) was intermittently administered immediately after PLF surgery and lasted for 8 weeks using the following groups (n = 20) (V = vehicle): Sham+V, OVX+V, Sham+PLF+V, OVX+PLF+V, OVX+PLF+PTH. The fused segments showed clear evidence of eliminated motion on the fusion-segment based on manual palpation. Greater new bone formation in histology was observed in PTH-treated animals compared to the control group. The extent of ASDD was significantly increased by ovariotomy. Intermittent PTH(1-34) significantly alleviated ASDD by preserving disc height, microvessel density, relative area of vascular buds, endplate thickness and the relative area of endplate calcification. Moreover, protein expression results showed that PTH(1-34) not only inhibited matrix degradation by decreasing MMP-13, ADAMTS-4 and Col-I, but also promote matrix synthesis by increasing Col-II and Aggrecan. In conclusion, PTH(1-34), which effectively improves lumbar fusion and alleviates ASDD in ovariectomized rats, may be a potential candidate to ameliorate the prognosis of lumbar fusion in osteopenia.

  10. Translation of an Engineered Nanofibrous Disc-like Angle Ply Structure for Intervertebral Disc Replacement in a Small Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John T.; Milby, Andrew H.; Chiaro, Joseph A.; Kim, Dong Hwa; Hebela, Nader M.; Smith, Lachlan J.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration has been implicated in the etiology of low back pain; however the current surgical strategies for treating symptomatic disc disease are limited. A variety of materials have been developed to replace disc components, including the nucleus pulposus (NP), the annulus fibrosus (AF), and their combination into disc-like engineered constructs. We have previously shown that layers of electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffold, mimicking the hierarchical organization of the native AF, have functional parity with native tissue. Likewise, we have combined these structures with cell-seeded hydrogels (as an NP replacement) to form disc-like angle ply structures (DAPS). The objective of this study was to develop a model for the evaluation of DAPS in vivo. Through a series of studies, we developed a surgical approach to replace the rat caudal disc with an acellular DAPS and then stabilize the motion segment by external fixation. We then optimized cell infiltration into DAPS by including sacrificial poly(ethylene oxide) layers interspersed throughout the angle-ply structure. Our findings illustrate that DAPS are stable in the caudal spine, are infiltrated by cells from the peri-implant space, and that infiltration is expedited by providing additional routes for cell migration. These findings establish a new in vivo platform in which to evaluate and optimize the design of functional disc replacements. PMID:24560621

  11. The Relation Between Sacral Angle and Vertical Angle of Sacral Curvature and Lumbar Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Ahmad; Haddadi, Kaveh; Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Ganjeh, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to determine the reliability and validity of a goniometric measurement of the vertical angle of the sacrum and sacral angle (SA), and their relationships to lumbar degeneration. A herniated lumbar disc is one of the most frequent medical issues. Investigators in a number of studies have reported associated risk factors for prevalent disc degeneration. Atypical lumbosacral angles and curvature are thought to contribute to the degradation of the spine by many researchers. This study analyzed 360 patients referred to our clinic from 2013 to 2015 due to low back pain. A cross-sectional case–control study was designed in order to compare the sagittal alignment of the lumbosacral area in 3 groups of patients suffering from LBP. A total 120 patients were in a control group with a normal lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 120 patients had lumbar disk herniation (LDH), and 120 patients had spinal stenosis. From the sagittal plan of lumbar MRI, SA and vertical angle of sacral curvature (VASC) were determined and then analyzed. The means of VASC in these groups were: 38.98 (SD: 6.36 ± 0.58), 40.89 (SD: 7.69 ± 0.69), and 40.54 (SD: 7.13 ± 0.92), respectively (P = 0.089). Moreover, studies of SA in 3 groups showed that the means of SA were: 39.30 (SD: 6.69 ± 0.63), 40.52 (SD: 7.47 ± 0.65), and 35.63 (SD: 6.07 ± 0.79), respectively. Relation between SA and spinal stenosis was just statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05). One significant limitation of our study is the lack of standing MRI for increased accuracy of measurement. However, we were reluctant to give patients needless exposure to radiation from conventional X-ray, and instead used MRI scans. We did not find any significant correlation between the VASC and LDH in lumbar MRI. Also, SA is not an independent risk factor for LDH in men and women. We suggested that there are several biomechanical factors involved in LDH. PMID:26871821

  12. Retinal Cell Degeneration in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Masayuki; Aoki, Hitomi; Hirata, Akihiro; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Green, Paul G.; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of various retinal cell degeneration models in animal induced by chemicals (N-methyl-d-aspartate- and CoCl2-induced), autoimmune (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis), mechanical stress (optic nerve crush-induced, light-induced) and ischemia (transient retinal ischemia-induced). The target regions, pathology and proposed mechanism of each model are described in a comparative fashion. Animal models of retinal cell degeneration provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of the disease, and will facilitate the development of novel effective therapeutic drugs to treat retinal cell damage. PMID:26784179

  13. An In Vivo Model of Reduced Nucleus Pulposus Glycosaminoglycan Content in the Rat Lumbar Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Boxberger, John I.; Auerbach, Joshua D.; Sen, Sounok; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    Study Design An in vivo model resembling early stage disc degeneration in the rat lumbar spine. Objective Simulate the reduced glycosaminoglycan content and altered mechanics observed in intervertebral disc degeneration using a controlled injection of chondroitinase ABC (ChABC). Summary of Background Data Nucleus glycosaminoglycan reduction occurs early during disc degeneration; however, mechanisms through which degeneration progresses from this state are unknown. Animal models simulating this condition are essential for understanding disease progression and for development of therapies aimed at early intervention. Methods ChABC was injected into the nucleus pulposus, and discs were evaluated via micro-CT, mechanical testing, biochemical assays, and histology 4 and 12 weeks after injection. Results At 4 weeks, reductions in nucleus glycosaminoglycan level by 43%, average height by 12%, neutral zone modulus by 40%, and increases in range of motion by 40%, and creep strain by 25% were found. Neutral zone modulus and range of motion were correlated with nucleus glycosaminoglycan. At 12 weeks, recovery of some mechanical function was detected as range of motion and creep returned to control levels; however, this was not attributed to glycosaminoglycan restoration, because mechanics were no longer correlated with glycosaminoglycan. Conclusion An in vivo model simulating physiologic levels of glycosaminoglycan loss was created to aid in understanding the relationships between altered biochemistry, altered mechanics, and altered cellular function in degeneration. PMID:18197098

  14. Interleukin 1 Polymorphisms Contribute to Intervertebral Disc Degeneration Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Changfeng; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yong; Wang, Zhenyu; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objective We performed a meta-analysis to assess association between interleukin 1 (IL-1) polymorphisms and the risk of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration (IDD). Background A series of studies have investigated the association between common single nucleotide polymorphisms in IL-1 and IDD risk; however, the overall results are inconclusive. Methods Two independent investigators conducted a systematic search for relevant available studies. Allele frequencies were extracted from each study. The association between the IL-1α (+889C/T) or IL-1β (+3954C/T) polymorphism and IDD risk was measured by odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results Five and six studies, respectively, were ultimately included in the meta-analysis for the IL-1α (+889C/T) and IL-1β (+3954C/T) polymorphism. The combined results showed that the IL-1α (+889C/T) polymorphism was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to IDD, particularly in Caucasians (TT versus CC: OR = 2.95, 95% CI: 1.45, 6.04; Pheterogeneity = 0.82; TT versus CC/CT: OR = 2.29, 95% CI: 1.18, 4.47; Pheterogeneity = 0.20). In contrast, the IL-1β (+3954C/T) polymorphism showed a trend towards increased risk in Caucasians but no association in Asians. Conclusion This meta-analysis suggested that the IL-1α (+889C/T) polymorphism is significantly associated with risk of IDD, especially in Caucasian populations. PMID:27253397

  15. Extent of Disc Degeneration after Single-Level Cervical Anterior Microforaminotomy Analyzed with Long-Term Radiological Data

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chul

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prove the extents and details of cervical degeneration after anterior microforaminotomy (AMF) with 6-years follow-up. Methods A retrospective study of 24 patients, underwent single-level AMF, was performed. Clinical and radiologic data were analyzed with office charts, questionaires, and picture achieving and communication system images. Results According to Odom's criteria, 91.6% achieved favorable outcome. The mean visual analog scale score was improved from 8.6 to 3, and the mean neck disability index was improved from 27.9 to 7.3 (p<0.01). Eighteen cases (75%) showed disc height (DH) decrease. The disc invasion was correlated with DH decrease (p<0.05). The disc height decrease correlated with static, dynamic changes of shell angle and spur formation (p<0.05). Any radiological parameters did not affect the clinical outcome. Conclusion AMF is an effective technique for treating unilateral cervical radiculopathy. It showed excellent surgical outcomes even in long-term follow-ups. However, a decrease in DH occurred in a considerable number of patients. Disc invasion during surgery may be the trigger of sequential degeneration. PMID:25368761

  16. TGFβ and BMP Dependent Cell Fate Changes Due to Loss of Filamin B Produces Disc Degeneration and Progressive Vertebral Fusions

    PubMed Central

    Zieba, Jennifer; Forlenza, Kimberly Nicole; Khatra, Jagteshwar Singh; Sarukhanov, Anna; Duran, Ivan; Rigueur, Diana; Lyons, Karen M.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Merrill, Amy E.; Krakow, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive vertebral fusions and caused by loss of function mutations in Filamin B (FLNB). FLNB acts as a signaling scaffold by linking the actin cytoskleteon to signal transduction systems, yet the disease mechanisms for SCT remain unclear. Employing a Flnb knockout mouse, we found morphologic and molecular evidence that the intervertebral discs (IVDs) of Flnb–/–mice undergo rapid and progressive degeneration during postnatal development as a result of abnormal cell fate changes in the IVD, particularly the annulus fibrosus (AF). In Flnb–/–mice, the AF cells lose their typical fibroblast-like characteristics and acquire the molecular and phenotypic signature of hypertrophic chondrocytes. This change is characterized by hallmarks of endochondral-like ossification including alterations in collagen matrix, expression of Collagen X, increased apoptosis, and inappropriate ossification of the disc tissue. We show that conversion of the AF cells into chondrocytes is coincident with upregulated TGFβ signaling via Smad2/3 and BMP induced p38 signaling as well as sustained activation of canonical and noncanonical target genes p21 and Ctgf. These findings indicate that FLNB is involved in attenuation of TGFβ/BMP signaling and influences AF cell fate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the IVD disruptions in Flnb–/–mice resemble aging degenerative discs and reveal new insights into the molecular causes of vertebral fusions and disc degeneration. PMID:27019229

  17. Stem Cell Therapies for Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Immune Privilege Reinforcement by Fas/FasL Regulating Machinery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi-Jiao; Liu, Xu; Che, Lu; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Samartzis, Dino; Wang, Hai-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    As a main contributing factor to low back pain, intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the fundamental basis for various debilitating spinal diseases. The pros and cons of current treatment modalities necessitate biological treatment strategies targeting for reversing or altering the degeneration process in terms of molecules or genes. The advances in stem cell research facilitate the studies aiming for possible clinical application of stem cell therapies for IDD. Human NP cells are versatile with cell morphology full of variety, capable of synthesizing extracellular matrix components, engulfing substances by autophagy and phagocytosis, mitochondrial vacuolization indicating dysfunction, expressing Fas and FasL as significant omens of immune privileged sites. Human discs belong to immune privilege organs with functional FasL expression, which can interact with invasive immune cells by Fas-FasL regulatory machinery. IDD is characterized by decreased expression level of FasL with dysfunctional FasL, which in turn unbalances the interaction between NP cells and immune cells. Certain modulation factors might play a role in the process, such as miR-155. Accumulating evidence indicates that Fas-FasL network expresses in a variety of stem cells. Given the expression of functional FasL and insensitive Fas in stem cells (we term as FasL privilege), transplantation of stem cells into the disc may regenerate the degenerative disc by not only differentiating into NP-like cells, increasing extracellular matrix, but also reinforce immune privilege via interaction with immune cells by Fas-FasL network.

  18. TGFβ and BMP Dependent Cell Fate Changes Due to Loss of Filamin B Produces Disc Degeneration and Progressive Vertebral Fusions.

    PubMed

    Zieba, Jennifer; Forlenza, Kimberly Nicole; Khatra, Jagteshwar Singh; Sarukhanov, Anna; Duran, Ivan; Rigueur, Diana; Lyons, Karen M; Cohn, Daniel H; Merrill, Amy E; Krakow, Deborah

    2016-03-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive vertebral fusions and caused by loss of function mutations in Filamin B (FLNB). FLNB acts as a signaling scaffold by linking the actin cytoskleteon to signal transduction systems, yet the disease mechanisms for SCT remain unclear. Employing a Flnb knockout mouse, we found morphologic and molecular evidence that the intervertebral discs (IVDs) of Flnb-/-mice undergo rapid and progressive degeneration during postnatal development as a result of abnormal cell fate changes in the IVD, particularly the annulus fibrosus (AF). In Flnb-/-mice, the AF cells lose their typical fibroblast-like characteristics and acquire the molecular and phenotypic signature of hypertrophic chondrocytes. This change is characterized by hallmarks of endochondral-like ossification including alterations in collagen matrix, expression of Collagen X, increased apoptosis, and inappropriate ossification of the disc tissue. We show that conversion of the AF cells into chondrocytes is coincident with upregulated TGFβ signaling via Smad2/3 and BMP induced p38 signaling as well as sustained activation of canonical and noncanonical target genes p21 and Ctgf. These findings indicate that FLNB is involved in attenuation of TGFβ/BMP signaling and influences AF cell fate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the IVD disruptions in Flnb-/-mice resemble aging degenerative discs and reveal new insights into the molecular causes of vertebral fusions and disc degeneration. PMID:27019229

  19. Modelling planet-forming circumstellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woitke, P.

    2012-03-01

    With the improved wavelength coverage and instrumental capabilities to observe planet-forming circumstellar discs in the X-ray regime, the UV, and the near, mid and far infrared (XMM, HST, VLT, Spitzer, Herschel, soon ALMA) there is an increasing scientific need to develop equally sophisticated models for the physical, radiative and chemical processes in these discs. The discs are composed of dust and gas spanning 10 orders of magnitude in density, and temperatures differ by a factor of about 100. There is hard irradiation that provokes various non-LTE effects, thermal and position de-coupling of icy dust and gas, and the differential rotation causes instabilities and mixing. In the last few years, new theoretical models have been developed that simulate different aspects of these complicated physical systems. I will focus mainly on models that model the chemical, radiative, and heating & cooling processes in these discs, pointing out some important coupling mechanism and feedbacks between them. In the new major European FP7-SPACE project DIANA, we will use these novel disc models to coherently analyse and interpret new multi-wavelength data sets from X-ray to cm, probing in physics and chemistry in protoplanetary dicsc at different radii and depths. The general aim of the new models is to arrive at a common understanding of dust and gas, over the full radial extent of the disc, and to make use of continuum and line observations to constrain dust and gas properties in the disc. I will discuss where the various near-IR to sub-mm emissions (CO ro-vib, high-J CO lines, sub-mm CO lines, Spitzer water, Herschel/PACS water, Herschel/HIFI water, Herschel/PACS atomic lines) originate from, and how they are influenced by disc shape, irradiation, dust properties, and the chemical and radiative details.

  20. Vitamin D Receptor Gene, Matrix Metalloproteinase 3 Polymorphisms and the Risk of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration Susceptibility: Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongjing; Zhao, Shujie; Xu, Nanwei

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have evaluated the association between vitamin D receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) polymorphisms and the risk of intervertebral disc degeneration susceptibility. The findings were inconsistent. This meta-analysis aimed to systematically assess the association between vitamin D receptor, MMP-3 polymorphisms and the risk of intervertebral disc degeneration susceptibility. A search of various databases was done covering all papers published until December 31th, 2014. Eight, 4, 3 studies were finally included that addressed the risk of intervertebral disc degeneration susceptibility and vitamin D receptor FokI (rs2228570), ApaI (rs7975232), and MMP-3 (rs731236) polymorphisms, respectively. FokI (f vs. F: summary odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76–1.69; ff vs. FF: OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.59–1.77; ff vs. Ff/FF: OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.70–1.58), ApaI (a vs. A: OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.45–1.19; aa vs. AA: OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.22–1.25 p=0.14; aa vs. AA/Aa: OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.53–0.89) in the vitamin D receptor gene and MMP3 polymorphisms (5A vs. 6A: OR, 1.92; 95% CI, 0.77–4.80; 5A5A vs. 6A6A: OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 0.75–6.24; 5A5A vs. 5A6A/6A6A: OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 0.72–3.44) were not obviously associated with risk of intervertebral disc degeneration susceptibility. FokI, ApaI polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene and MMP-3 polymorphism are not obvious risk factors for intervertebral disc degeneration susceptibility. PMID:27790329

  1. Photoreceptor Cells Influence Retinal Vascular Degeneration in Mouse Models of Retinal Degeneration and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haitao; Tang, Jie; Du, Yunpeng; Saadane, Aicha; Tonade, Deoye; Samuels, Ivy; Veenstra, Alex; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kern, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Loss of photoreceptor cells is associated with retinal vascular degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa, whereas the presence of photoreceptor cells is implicated in vascular degeneration in diabetic retinopathy. To investigate how both the absence and presence of photoreceptors could damage the retinal vasculature, we compared two mouse models of photoreceptor degeneration (opsin−/− and RhoP23H/P23H ) and control C57Bl/5J mice, each with and without diabetes. Methods Retinal thickness, superoxide, expression of inflammatory proteins, ERG and optokinetic responses, leukocyte cytotoxicity, and capillary degeneration were evaluated at 1 to 10 months of age using published methods. Results Retinal photoreceptor cells degenerated completely in the opsin mutants by 2 to 4 months of age, and visual function subsided correspondingly. Retinal capillary degeneration was substantial while photoreceptors were still present, but slowed after the photoreceptors degenerated. Diabetes did not further exacerbate capillary degeneration in these models of photoreceptor degeneration, but did cause capillary degeneration in wild-type animals. Photoreceptor cells, however, did not degenerate in wild-type diabetic mice, presumably because the stress responses in these cells were less than in the opsin mutants. Retinal superoxide and leukocyte damage to retinal endothelium contributed to the degeneration of retinal capillaries in diabetes, and leukocyte-mediated damage was increased in both opsin mutants during photoreceptor cell degeneration. Conclusions Photoreceptor cells affect the integrity of the retinal microvasculature. Deterioration of retinal capillaries in opsin mutants was appreciable while photoreceptor cells were present and stressed, but was less after photoreceptors degenerated. This finding proves relevant to diabetes, where persistent stress in photoreceptors likewise contributes to capillary degeneration. PMID:27548901

  2. Novel genetic variants associated with lumbar disc degeneration in northern Europeans: a meta-analysis of 4600 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Frances M K; Bansal, Aruna T; van Meurs, Joyce B; Bell, Jordana T; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Suri, Pradeep; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sambrook, Philip N; Hofman, Albert; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita; Menni, Cristina; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Slagboom, P Eline; Hunter, David J; MacGregor, Alex J; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Spector, Tim D

    2013-01-01

    Objective Lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) is an important cause of low back pain, which is a common and costly problem. LDD is characterised by disc space narrowing and osteophyte growth at the circumference of the disc. To date, the agnostic search of the genome by genome-wide association (GWA) to identify common variants associated with LDD has not been fruitful. This study is the first GWA meta-analysis of LDD. Methods We have developed a continuous trait based on disc space narrowing and osteophytes growth which is measurable on all forms of imaging (plain radiograph, CT scan and MRI) and performed a meta-analysis of five cohorts of Northern European extraction each having GWA data imputed to HapMap V.2. Results This study of 4600 individuals identified four single nucleotide polymorphisms with p<5×10−8, the threshold set for genome-wide significance. We identified a variant in the PARK2 gene (p=2.8×10−8) associated with LDD. Differential methylation at one CpG island of the PARK2 promoter was observed in a small subset of subjects (β=8.74×10−4, p=0.006). Conclusions LDD accounts for a considerable proportion of low back pain and the pathogenesis of LDD is poorly understood. This work provides evidence of association of the PARK2 gene and suggests that methylation of the PARK2 promoter may influence degeneration of the intervertebral disc. This gene has not previously been considered a candidate in LDD and further functional work is needed on this hitherto unsuspected pathway. PMID:22993228

  3. The correlation between microvessel pathological changes of the endplate and degeneration of the intervertebral disc in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, SEN; LIAO, MEIMEI; LI, JIANPING; PENG, HAO; XIONG, MIN

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the pathological microvessel changes to the endplate and the degeneration of the intervertebral disc of diabetic rats were examined in order to identify the possible mechanism by which diabetes mellitus (DM) induces degeneration of the intervertebral disc. A total of 30 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups. DM was induced in one of the groups by streptozotocin (STZ) administration. The rats were sacrificed 4, 8 and 12 weeks later. Five rats from each group were sacrificed at each time interval and lumbar disc and endplate tissue were obtained from each rat. The histological changes, collagen expression, microvessel density (MVD) and apoptosis of the disc were investigated by different methods. The expression of collagen I in the diabetic DM group was higher compared to the control group at the three time points (P<0.01), in contrast to the expression of collagen II. The factor VIII-related antigen (FVIII RAg) was expressed in the control and DM groups, while its expression was relatively low in the DM group. The MVD of the DM group was smaller compared to that of the control group at the three time points (P<0.01). The apoptotic index (AI) in the diabetic group was significantly higher compared to that of the control group at the three time points (P<0.01). A negative correlation was observed between the MVD of the endplates and the notochordal cell AI in the two groups. Compared to the control group, the endplate MVD decreased and the cavity became smaller or disappeared in the diabetic rats. In conclusion, there was a negative correlation between MVD and degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc in diabetic rats. PMID:23408796

  4. A pilot study of the prevalence of lumbar disc degeneration in elite athletes with lower back pain at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games

    PubMed Central

    Ong, A; Anderson, J; Roche, J

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To observe the prevalence of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration in elite athletes as compared with published literature of changes seen in non-athletes—that is, normal population. Methods: The lumbar spines of 31 Olympic athletes who presented to the Olympic Polyclinic with low back pain and/or sciatica were examined using magnetic resonance imaging. Three criteria were looked at: (a) the loss of disc signal intensity; (b) the loss of disc height; (c) the presence of disc displacement. The results were then recorded and correlated with the lumbar levels. Results: The disc signal intensity was progressively reduced the more caudal the disc space. It was most common at the L5/S1 level, and, of the abnormal group, 36% (n = 11) showed the most degenerative change. Disc height reduction was also found to be most common at the L5/S1 level. However, the most common height reduction was only mild. A similar trend of increased prevalence of disc herniation was noted with more caudal levels. At the L5/S1 level, 58% were found to have an element of disc displacement, most of which were disc bulges. Compared with changes seen in the normal population (non-athletes) as described in the literature, disc degeneration defined by the above criteria was found to be significantly more severe in these Olympic athletes. Conclusions: Although the study was limited, the results suggest that elite athletes have a greater prevalence and greater degree of lumbar disc degeneration than the normal population. A more detailed follow up study should be considered to investigate which particular training activities have the most impact on the lumbar spine, and how to modify training methods so as to avoid the long term sequelae of degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:12782554

  5. Aging, vertebral density, and disc degeneration alter the tensile stress-strain characteristics of the human anterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Neumann, P; Ekström, L A; Keller, T S; Perry, L; Hansson, T H

    1994-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the human lumbar anterior longitudinal ligament were investigated, and the influence of aging, disc degeneration, and vertebral bone density on these properties was determined. Tensile mechanical properties of the vertebra-anterior longitudinal ligament-vertebra complex were determined for 16 segments from cadavera of individuals who had been 21-79 years old (mean, 52.1 years) at the time of death. Regional strain patterns associated with three sites across the width and three sites along the length of the anterior longitudinal ligament were measured with use of a video-based motion analysis system. In the young, normal anterior longitudinal ligament, the elastic moduli of the insertion and substance regions of the ligament were similar (approximately 500 MPa). During aging (21-79 years), the elastic modulus of the substance region increased 2-fold, whereas the elastic modulus of the insertion decreased 3-fold; this resulted in an approximately 5-fold difference in elastic modulus between these regions in the older spine. The strength of the bone-ligament complex decreased approximately 2-fold (from 29 to 13 MPa) over this same age range. The outer portion of the anterior longitudinal ligament consistently had the highest peak tensile strains (11.8 +/- 2.7%) in all of the specimens examined. Preparations with nondegenerated discs and high bone density were significantly stronger (66%) and failed in the ligament substance; in contrast, segments from older individuals with degenerated discs and lower bone density failed in the ligament insertion regions.

  6. Prevalence of adjacent segment disc degeneration in patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion based on pre-operative MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Lundine, Kristopher M; Davis, Gavin; Rogers, Myron; Staples, Margaret; Quan, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a widely accepted surgical treatment for symptomatic cervical spondylosis. Some patients develop symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration, occasionally requiring further treatment. The cause and prevalence of adjacent segment degeneration and disease is unclear at present. Proponents for motion preserving surgery such as disc arthroplasty argue that this technique may decrease the "strain" on adjacent discs and thus decrease the incidence of symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration. The purpose of this study was to assess the pre-operative prevalence of adjacent segment degeneration in patients undergoing ACDF. A database review of three surgeons' practice was carried out to identify patients who had undergone a one- or two-level ACDF for degenerative disc disease. Patients were excluded if they were operated on for recent trauma, had an inflammatory arthropathy (for example, rheumatoid arthritis), or had previous spine surgery. The pre-operative MRI of each patient was reviewed and graded using a standardised methodology. One hundred and six patient MRI studies were reviewed. All patients showed some evidence of intervertebral disc degeneration adjacent to the planned operative segment(s). Increased severity of disc degeneration was associated with increased age and operative level, but was not associated with sagittal alignment. Disc degeneration was more common at levels adjacent to the surgical level than at non-adjacent segments, and was more severe at the superior adjacent level compared with the inferior adjacent level. These findings support the theory that adjacent segment degeneration following ACDF is due in part to the natural history of cervical spondylosis.

  7. Photochemically crosslinked collagen annulus plug: a potential solution solving the leakage problem of cell-based therapies for disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chik, T K; Ma, X Y; Choy, T H; Li, Y Y; Diao, H J; Teng, W K; Han, S J; Cheung, K M C; Chan, B P

    2013-09-01

    Intra-disc injection of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to treat disc degeneration may lead to unfavorable complications, particularly osteophyte formation. Development of an effective method to block the injection portal, prevent the leakage of injected cells and materials and, hence, prevent osteophyte formation is of the utmost importance before MSC-based therapies can be applied in a clinical setting. Here we seek to alleviate the cell leakage problem and the associated complication osteophyte formation by developing an injectable annulus plug to block the injection portal during intra-disc delivery. Specifically, we fabricated a needle-shaped collagen plug by photochemical crosslinking and successfully delivered it intra-discally, in association with MSCs in collagen microsphere carriers, using a custom-made delivery device. The mechanical performance of the plug and its effectiveness in reducing cell leakage were evaluated ex vivo under compression and in torsion push-out tests. The results demonstrate that the plug survived physiologically relevant loadings and significantly reduced leakage and enhanced retention of the injected materials. Finally, a pilot in vivo study in rabbits was conducted to evaluate the performance of the plug. Microcomputed tomography imaging and histology revealed that the plug significantly reduced osteophyte formation. This work suggests the potential of the annulus plug as an adjunct or annulus closure device for intra-disc delivery of cells and materials.

  8. Anterior Herniation of Partially Calcified and Degenerated Cervical Disc Causing Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ozdol, Cagatay; Turk, Cezmi Cagri; Yildirim, Ali Erdem; Dalgic, Ali

    2015-08-01

    We report a rare case of anterior cervical disc herniation associated with dysphagia. A 32-year-old man presented with complaints of dysphagia and concomitant pain in the right arm resistant to conservative therapy. On physical examination with respect to the muscle strength, the right shoulder abduction and flexion of the forearm were 3/5. Lateral X-ray revealed calcified osteophytes at the anterior C4-5 level. Magnetic resonance imaging showed soft disc herniation involving the right C6 root at the C5-6 level and anterior herniation of the C4-5 cervical disc. Anterior discectomies for C4-5 and C5-6 levels stabilized and ameliorated the dysphagia and pain. Cervical disc herniation usually presents with radicular findings. However, dysphagia may be an uncommon presentation. Anterior cervical disc herniation should be considered in a patient presenting with dysphagia. PMID:26240723

  9. Single-nucleotide polymorphism in the hyaluronan and proteoglycan link protein 1 (HAPLN1) gene is associated with spinal osteophyte formation and disc degeneration in Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Urano, Tomohiko; Narusawa, Ken'ichiro; Shiraki, Masataka; Sasaki, Noriko; Hosoi, Takayuki; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Inoue, Satoshi

    2011-04-01

    Spinal osteoarthritis including disc degeneration is a very common condition in the axial skeletons of aged people. Recently, spinal osteoarthritis has been shown to be influenced by specific genetic risk factors. Vertebral osteophytes, endplate sclerosis, and intervertebral disc narrowing are recognized as radiographic features of spinal disc degeneration. HAPLN1 is a key component of the cartilage extracellular matrix; thus, variations in this gene may affect the pathogenesis of cartilage-related diseases such as spinal degeneration. Here, we examine the association between an HAPLN1 gene polymorphism and the radiographic features of spinal degeneration. We evaluated the degree of endplate sclerosis, osteophyte formation, and disc space narrowing in 622 Japanese postmenopausal women. Four SNPs in the HAPLN1 gene-in the 5' flanking region, intron 1, intron 2, and intron 4-were analyzed using the TaqMan polymerase chain reaction method. We found that compared to subjects with the CC or CT genotype, those with the TT genotype for an SNP at intron 2 (rs179851) were significantly overrepresented among the subjects with higher scores for osteophyte formation (P = 0.0001; odds ratio 2.12; 95% confidence interval 1.45-3.11, as determined by logistic regression analysis) and disc space narrowing (P = 0.0057; odds ratio 1.83; 95% confidence interval 1.19-2.83). Consistent with the involvement of the HAPLN1 gene in cartilage metabolism, a variation in a specific HAPLN1 gene locus may be associated with spinal degeneration.

  10. A prospective randomised study on the long-term effect of lumbar fusion on adjacent disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Per; Möller, Hans; Shalabi, Adel; Yu, Yiang Xiao; Hedlund, Rune

    2009-08-01

    The existence and importance of an accelerated adjacent segment disc degeneration (ASD) after lumbar fusion have previously not been demonstrated by RCTs. The objectives of this study were, to determine whether lumbar fusion in the long term accelerates degenerative changes in the adjacent disc and whether this affects the outcome, by using a prospective randomised design. A total of 111 patients, aged 18-55, with isthmic spondylolisthesis were randomised to exercise (EX, n = 34) or posterolateral fusion (PLF, n = 77), with (n = 37) or without pedicle screw instrumentation (n = 40). The minimum 10 years FU rate was 72%, with a mean FU time of 12.6 years (range 10-17 years). Three radiographic methods of ASD quantification were used, i.e. two digital radiographic measurement methods and the semi quantitative UCLA grading scale. One digital measurement method showed a mean disc height reduction by 2% in the EX group and by 15% in the PLF group (p = 0.0016), and the other showed 0.5 mm more disc height reduction in the PLF compared to the Ex group (ns). The UCLA grading scale showed normal discs in 100% of patients in the EX group, compared to 62% in the PLF group (p = 0.026). There were no significant differences between instrumented and non-instrumented patients. In patients with laminectomy we found a significantly higher incidence of ASD compared to non laminectomised patients (22/47 vs. 2/16 respectively, p = 0.015). In the longitudinal analysis, the posterior and anterior disc heights were significantly reduced in the PLF group, whereas in the EX group only the posterior disc height was significantly reduced. Except for global outcome, which was significantly better for patients without ASD, the clinical outcome was not statistically different in patients with and without ASD. In conclusion, the long-term RCT shows that fusion accelerates degenerative changes at the adjacent level compared with natural history. The study suggests that not only fusion, but also

  11. Comparison of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy and open lumbar surgery for adjacent segment degeneration and recurrent disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan-Chieh; Lee, Chih-Hsun; Wei, Li; Lui, Tai-Ngar; Lin, Tien-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The goal of the present study was to examine the clinical results of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and open lumbar surgery for patients with adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) and recurrence of disc herniation. Methods. From December 2011 to November 2013, we collected forty-three patients who underwent repeated lumbar surgery. These patients, either received PELD (18 patients) or repeated open lumbar surgery (25 patients), due to ASD or recurrence of disc herniation at L3-4, L4-5, or L5-S1 level, were assigned to different groups according to the surgical approaches. Clinical data were assessed and compared. Results. Mean blood loss was significantly less in the PELD group as compared to the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Hospital stay and mean operating time were shorter significantly in the PELD group as compared to the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Immediate postoperative pain improvement in VAS was 3.5 in the PELD group and -0.56 in the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. For ASD and recurrent lumbar disc herniation, PELD had more advantages over open lumbar surgery in terms of reduced blood loss, shorter hospital stay, operating time, fewer complications, and less postoperative discomfort.

  12. Accelerated Aging of Intervertebral Discs in a Mouse Model of Progeria

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Nam; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Robinson, Andria; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Bentley, Douglas; Taylor, Lauren; Studer, Rebecca; Usas, Arvydas; Huard, Johnny; Alber, Sean; Watkins, Simon C.; Lee, Joon; Coehlo, Paulo; Wang, Dong; Loppini, Mattia; Robbins, Paul D.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Kang, James

    2012-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a common and debilitating disorder that results in reduced flexibility of the spine, pain, and reduced mobility. Risk factors for IDD include age, genetic predisposition, injury, and other environmental factors such as smoking. Loss of proteoglycans (PGs) contributes to IDD with advancing age. Currently there is a lack of a model for rapid investigation of disc aging and evaluation of therapeutic interventions. Here we examined progression of disc aging in a murine model of a human progeroid syndrome caused by deficiency of the DNA repair endonuclease, ERCC1–XPF (Ercc1−/Δ mice). The ERCC1-deficient mice showed loss of disc height and degenerative structural changes in their vertebral bodies similar to those reported for old rodents. Compared to their wild-type littermates, Ercc1−/Δ mice also exhibit other age-related IDD characteristics, including premature loss of disc PG, reduced matrix PG synthesis, and enhanced apoptosis and cell senescence. Finally, the onset of age-associated disc pathologies was further accelerated in Ercc1−/Δ mice following chronic treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent mechlorethamine. These results demonstrate that Ercc1−/Δ mice represent an accurate and rapid model of disc aging and provide novel evidence that DNA damage negatively impacts PG synthesis. PMID:20973062

  13. Matrix stiffness promotes cartilage endplate chondrocyte calcification in disc degeneration via miR-20a targeting ANKH expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Han; Sun, Chao; Yao, Yuan; Fan, Xin; Liu, Huan; Cui, You-Hong; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Yue

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical environment is crucial for intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). However, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of cartilage endplate (CEP) calcification by altered matrix stiffness remain unclear. In this study, we found that matrix stiffness of CEP was positively correlated with the degree of IDD, and stiff matrix, which mimicked the severe degeneration of CEP, promoted inorganic phosphate-induced calcification in CEP chondrocytes. Co-expression analysis of the miRNA and mRNA profiles showed that increasing stiffness resulted in up-regulation of miR-20a and down-regulation of decreased ankylosis protein homolog (ANKH) during inorganic phosphate-induced calcification in CEP chondrocytes. Through a dual luciferase reporter assay, we confirmed that miR-20a directly targets 3′-untranslated regions of ANKH. The inhibition of miR-20a attenuated the calcium deposition and calcification-related gene expression, whereas the overexpression of miR-20a enhanced calcification in CEP chondrocytes on stiff matrix. The rescue of ANKH expression restored the decreased pyrophosphate efflux and inhibited calcification. In clinical samples, the levels of ANKH expression were inversely associated with the degeneration degree of CEP. Thus, our findings demonstrate that the miR-20a/ANKH axis mediates the stiff matrix- promoted CEP calcification, suggesting that miR-20a and ANKH are potential targets in restraining the progression of IDD. PMID:27142968

  14. Matrix stiffness promotes cartilage endplate chondrocyte calcification in disc degeneration via miR-20a targeting ANKH expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Han; Sun, Chao; Yao, Yuan; Fan, Xin; Liu, Huan; Cui, You-Hong; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Yue

    2016-05-04

    The mechanical environment is crucial for intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). However, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of cartilage endplate (CEP) calcification by altered matrix stiffness remain unclear. In this study, we found that matrix stiffness of CEP was positively correlated with the degree of IDD, and stiff matrix, which mimicked the severe degeneration of CEP, promoted inorganic phosphate-induced calcification in CEP chondrocytes. Co-expression analysis of the miRNA and mRNA profiles showed that increasing stiffness resulted in up-regulation of miR-20a and down-regulation of decreased ankylosis protein homolog (ANKH) during inorganic phosphate-induced calcification in CEP chondrocytes. Through a dual luciferase reporter assay, we confirmed that miR-20a directly targets 3'-untranslated regions of ANKH. The inhibition of miR-20a attenuated the calcium deposition and calcification-related gene expression, whereas the overexpression of miR-20a enhanced calcification in CEP chondrocytes on stiff matrix. The rescue of ANKH expression restored the decreased pyrophosphate efflux and inhibited calcification. In clinical samples, the levels of ANKH expression were inversely associated with the degeneration degree of CEP. Thus, our findings demonstrate that the miR-20a/ANKH axis mediates the stiff matrix- promoted CEP calcification, suggesting that miR-20a and ANKH are potential targets in restraining the progression of IDD.

  15. Is the Transport of a Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent Decreased in a Degenerated or Aged Disc? A Post Contrast MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Tibiletti, Marta; Galbusera, Fabio; Ciavarro, Cristina; Brayda-Bruno, Marco

    2013-01-01

    A post contrast magnetic resonance imaging study has been performed in a wide population of low back pain patients to investigate which radiological and phenotypic characteristics influence the penetration of the contrast agent in lumbar discs in vivo. 37 patients affected by different pathologies (disc herniation, spondylolisthesis, foraminal stenosis, central canal stenosis) were enrolled in the study. The selected population included 26 male and 11 female subjects, with a mean age of 42.4±9.3 years (range 18–60). Magnetic resonance images of the lumbar spine were obtained with a 1.5 T scanner (Avanto, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) with a phased-array back coil. A paramagnetic non–ionic contrast agent was injected with a dose of 0.4 ml/kg. T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were subsequently acquired at 5 time points, 5 and 10 minutes, 2, 4 and 6 hours after injection. Endplates presented clear enhancement already 5 minutes after injection, and showed an increase in the next 2 hours followed by a decrease. At 5 and 10 minutes, virtually no contrast medium was present inside the intervertebral disc; afterwards, enhancement significantly increased. Highly degenerated discs showed higher enhancement in comparison with low and medium degenerated discs. Discs classified as Pfirrmann 5 showed a statistically significant higher enhancement than Pfirrmann 1, 2 and 3 at all time points but the first one, possibly due to vascularization. Disc height collapse and Modic changes significantly increased enhancement. Presence of endplate defects did not show any significant influence on post contrast enhancement, but the lack of a clear classification of endplate defects as seen on magnetic resonance scans may be shadowing some effects. In conclusion, disc height, high level of degeneration and presence of Modic changes are factors which increase post contrast enhancement in the intervertebral disc. The effect of age could not be demonstrated. PMID:24146913

  16. A computational model of motor neuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    Le Masson, Gwendal; Przedborski, Serge; Abbott, L F

    2014-08-20

    To explore the link between bioenergetics and motor neuron degeneration, we used a computational model in which detailed morphology and ion conductance are paired with intracellular ATP production and consumption. We found that reduced ATP availability increases the metabolic cost of a single action potential and disrupts K+/Na+ homeostasis, resulting in a chronic depolarization. The magnitude of the ATP shortage at which this ionic instability occurs depends on the morphology and intrinsic conductance characteristic of the neuron. If ATP shortage is confined to the distal part of the axon, the ensuing local ionic instability eventually spreads to the whole neuron and involves fasciculation-like spiking events. A shortage of ATP also causes a rise in intracellular calcium. Our modeling work supports the notion that mitochondrial dysfunction can account for salient features of the paralytic disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, including motor neuron hyperexcitability, fasciculation, and differential vulnerability of motor neuron subpopulations.

  17. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration associated with axial and radiating low back pain in ageing SPARC-null mice.

    PubMed

    Millecamps, Magali; Tajerian, Maral; Naso, Lina; Sage, E Helene; Stone, Laura S

    2012-06-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) is a complex, multifactorial disorder with unclear underlying mechanisms. In humans and rodents, decreased expression of secreted protein acidic rich in cysteine (SPARC) is associated with intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and signs of LBP. The current study investigates the hypothesis that IVD degeneration is a risk factor for chronic LBP. SPARC-null and age-matched control mice ranging from 6 to 78 weeks of age were evaluated in this study. X-ray and histologic analysis revealed reduced IVD height, increased wedging, and signs of degeneration (bulging and herniation). Cutaneous sensitivity to cold, heat, and mechanical stimuli were used as measures of referred (low back and tail) and radiating pain (hind paw). Region specificity was assessed by measuring icilin- and capsaicin-evoked behaviour after subcutaneous injection into the hind paw or upper lip. Axial discomfort was measured by the tail suspension and grip force assays. Motor impairment was determined by the accelerating rotarod. Physical function was evaluated by voluntary activity after axial strain or during ambulation with forced lateral flexion. SPARC-null mice developed (1) region-specific, age-dependent hypersensitivity to cold, icilin, and capsaicin (hind paw only), (2) axial discomfort, (3) motor impairment, and (4) reduced physical function. Morphine (6 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced cutaneous sensitivity and alleviated axial discomfort in SPARC-null mice. Ageing SPARC-null mice mirror many aspects of the complex and challenging nature of LBP in humans and incorporate both anatomic and functional components of the disease. The current study supports the hypothesis that IVD degeneration is a risk factor for chronic LBP.

  18. Pineal gland calcification, lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta calcifying atherosclerosis correlate in low back pain subjects: A cross-sectional observational CT study.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Sönmez, Iclal; Cakıt, Burcu Duyur; Koşar, Pınar; Koşar, Uğur

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this cross-sectional observational study was to assess the possible impact of pineal gland calcification upon the intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta atherosclerosis in subjects with low back pain, and to investigate the course of these processes with aging. The study was carried out on 81 (66 women and 15 men) subjects: younger than 45 years (group X, n=22), 45-65 years of age (group Y, n=45), and older than 65 years (group Z, n=14). In addition to clinical data, computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain as well as X-ray and CT examination of the lumbar spine were recorded in this study. The degree of disc degeneration and calcification rates of aortic wall and pineal gland were independently determined by two radiologists. Both ratio of calcified pineal gland and density of pineal calcification increased progressively with aging. Also, both the degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score increased with advancing age. On CT scan, a positive correlation between degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score was found (r=0.306, p<0.01). Importantly, there was a positive association between calcification of the pineal gland and degenerative disc disease in X-ray or CT study (r=0.378 and r=0.295, p<0.005 and p<0.01, respectively), as well as between abdominal aorta atherosclerosis and pineal calcification (r=0.634, p<0.001). Our findings suggest that there is a significant interaction between pineal gland calcification and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and also abdominal aorta atherosclerosis. However, further studies with a larger subject cohorts are needed. PMID:18215511

  19. Calcification in the ovine intervertebral disc: a model of hydroxyapatite deposition disease

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, D.; Taylor, T. K. F.; Dillon, C. T.; Read, R.; Cake, M.; Little, C. B.

    2009-01-01

    The study design included a multidisciplinary examination of the mineral phase of ovine intervertebral disc calcifications. The objective of the study was to investigate the mineral phase and its mechanisms of formation/association with degeneration in a naturally occurring animal model of disc calcification. The aetiology of dystrophic disc calcification in adult humans is unknown, but occurs as a well-described clinical disorder with hydroxyapatite as the single mineral phase. Comparable but age-related pathology in the sheep could serve as a model for the human disorder. Lumbar intervertebral discs (n = 134) of adult sheep of age 6 years (n = 4), 8 years (n = 12) and 11 years (n = 2) were evaluated using radiography, morphology, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, histology, immunohistology and proteoglycan analysis. Half of the 6-year, 84% of the 8-year and 86% of the 11-year-old discs had calcific deposits. These were not well delineated by plain radiography. They were either: (a) punctate deposits in the outer annulus, (b) diffuse deposits in the transitional zone or inner annulus fibrosus with occasional deposits in the nucleus, or (c) large deposits in the transitional zone extending variably into the nucleus. Their maximal incidence was in the lower lumbar discs (L4/5–L6/7) with no calcification seen in the lumbosacral or lower thoracic discs. All deposits were hydroxyapatite with large crystallite sizes (800–1,300 Å) compared to cortical bone (300–600 Å). No type X-collagen, osteopontin or osteonectin were detected in calcific deposits, although positive staining for bone sialoprotein was evident. Calcified discs had less proteoglycan of smaller hydrodynamic size than non-calcified discs. Disc calcification in ageing sheep is due to hydroxyapatite deposition. The variable, but large, crystal size and lack of protein markers indicate that this does not occur by

  20. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Analysis of Trace Elements in Degenerated Intervertebral Disc Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Frankowski, Marcin; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Czabak-Garbacz, Róża; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek; Gasik, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated trace elements (TE) in human intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue. Trace element presence can have diverse meanings: essential TE show the metabolic modalities of the tissue, while environmentally-related TE indicate pollution and tissue-specific absorption and accumulation. IVD is a highly specific compartment with impaired communication with adjacent bone. Analysis of TE in IVD provides new insights regarding tissue metabolism and IVD communication with other tissues. Material/Methods Thirty intervertebral discs were acquired from 22 patients during surgical treatment for degenerative disease. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to evaluate the concentrations of Al, Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni, Mo, Mg, and Zn. Results Al, Pb, Cu, Mg, and Zn were detected in all samples. Pb was significantly positively correlated with age, and Ni concentration was weakly correlated with population count in the patient’s place of residence. Only Cu was observed in higher concentrations in IVD compared to in other tissues. Significant positive correlations were observed between the following pairs: Mg/Zn, Mg/Al, Mg/Pb, Zn/Al, Zn/Pb, and Al/Pb. Negative correlations were observed between Mg/Cd, Zn/Cd, Mg/Mo, and Mo/Pb. Conclusions This study is one of few to profile the elements in intervertebral discs in patients with degenerative changes. We report significant differences between trace element concentrations in intervertebral discs compared to in other tissues. Knowledge of the TE accumulation pattern is vital for better understanding intervertebral disc nutrition and metabolism. PMID:25366266

  1. Vitamin D Receptor Gene and Aggrecan Gene Polymorphisms and the Risk of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration — A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinlin; Han, Luo

    2012-01-01

    Background A series of studies have been conducted to evaluate the associations between vitamin D receptor (VDR) and aggrecan variable numbers of tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphisms and the risk of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD), but produced conflicting results. Objective we performed a meta-analysis to address a more accurate estimation of the associations between the above gene polymorphisms and the risk of IDD. Methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify all the relevant studies. The fixed or random effect model was selected based on the heterogeneity test among studies evaluated using the I2. Publication bias was estimated using Begg's funnel plots and Egger's regression test. Results A total of 9, 5, 3, and 7 studies were finally included in the analyses for the associations between the VDR TaqI (rs731236), FokI (rs2228570), ApaI (rs7975232), or aggrecan VNTR polymorphisms and the risk of IDD, respectively. The combined results showed that none of the VDR (TaqI, FokI, ApaI) polymorphisms were significantly associated with the risk of IDD. In contrast, the alleles with shorter VNTR length was found to significantly increase the risk of IDD (≦25 vs. >25: OR = 1.850, 95%CI 1.477–2.318; ≦23 vs. >23: OR = 1.955, 95%CI 1.41–2.703). Subgroup analysis confirmed the above results. After excluding studies deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) in controls, no other studies were found to significantly influence the pooled effects in each genetic model. No potential publication bias was detected. Conclusion This meta-analysis suggested that the alleles with shorter VNTR length significantly increased the risk of IDD, while the VDR (TaqI, FokI, ApaI) gene polymorphisms were not significantly associated with the risk of IDD. Since potential confounders could not be ruled out completely, further studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:23209686

  2. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  3. Grand Challenges in Protoplanetary Disc Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Ilee, John D.; Forgan, Duncan H.; Facchini, Stefano; Price, Daniel J.; Boneberg, Dominika M.; Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Gonzalez, Jean-François; Hutchison, Mark A.; Kamp, Inga; Laibe, Guillaume; Lyra, Wladimir; Meru, Farzana; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Panić, Olja; Rice, Ken; Suzuki, Takeru; Teague, Richard; Walsh, Catherine; Woitke, Peter; Community authors

    2016-10-01

    The Protoplanetary Discussions conference-held in Edinburgh, UK, from 2016 March 7th-11th-included several open sessions led by participants. This paper reports on the discussions collectively concerned with the multi-physics modelling of protoplanetary discs, including the self-consistent calculation of gas and dust dynamics, radiative transfer, and chemistry. After a short introduction to each of these disciplines in isolation, we identify a series of burning questions and grand challenges associated with their continuing development and integration. We then discuss potential pathways towards solving these challenges, grouped by strategical, technical, and collaborative developments. This paper is not intended to be a review, but rather to motivate and direct future research and collaboration across typically distinct fields based on community-driven input, to encourage further progress in our understanding of circumstellar and protoplanetary discs.

  4. Gaseous discs at intermediate redshifts from kinematic data modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipper, R.; Tamm, A.; Tenjes, P.; Tempel, E.

    2016-10-01

    Our purpose is to measure thickness of gaseous discs in 0 < z < 1.2 galaxies. As gas dispersions are sensitive to scale height of gaseous discs, we model the kinematics of galaxies using Jeans equations. The resulting thicknesses of gaseous discs at higher redshifts are more thicker (and arbitrary) while nearby ones are thinner. We also found that clumpiness of galaxy is a possible indicator of the gas disc thickness.

  5. Treatment outcome of chronic low back pain and radiographic lumbar disc degeneration are associated with inflammatory and matrix degrading gene variants: a prospective genetic association study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammatory and matrix degrading gene variants have been reported to be associated with disc degeneration. Some of these variants also modulate peripheral pain. This study examines the association of these genetic variants with radiographic lumbar disc degeneration and changes in pain and disability at long-term after surgical and cognitive behavioural management. Methods 93 unrelated patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) for duration of >1 year and lumbar disc degeneration were treated with lumbar fusion or cognitive intervention and exercises. Standardised questionnaires included the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Visual Analog Score (VAS) for CLBP, were filled in by patients both at baseline and at 9 years follow-up. Degenerative changes at baseline Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography scans, were graded as moderate and severe (N=79). Yield and quality of blood and saliva DNA was assessed by nano drop spectrophotometry. Eight SNPs in 5 inflammatory and matrix degrading genes were successfully genotyped. Single marker and haplotype association with severity of degeneration, number of discs involved, changes in ODI and VAS CLBP, was done using Haploview, linear regression and R-package Haplostats. Results Association analysis of individual SNPs revealed association of IL18RAP polymorphism rs1420100 with severe degeneration (p = 0.05) and more than one degenerated disc (p = 0.02). From the same gene two SNPs, rs917997 and rs1420106, were found to be in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) and were associated with post treatment improvement in disability (p = 0.02). Haplotype association analysis of 5 SNPs spanning across IL18RAP, IL18R1 and IL1A genes revealed significant associations with improvement in disability (p=0.02) and reduction in pain (p=0.04). An association was found between MMP3 polymorphism rs72520913 and improvement in pain (p = 0.03) and with severe degeneration (p = 0.006). Conclusions The findings of the

  6. Expression levels of IL-17 and TNF-α in degenerated lumbar intervertebral discs and their correlation

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XIAO-GANG; HOU, HONG-WEI; LIU, YI-LIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression and roles of interleukin (IL)-17 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) and to identify the association between the effects of IL-17 and TNF-α in IDD. This may increase understanding of the pathogenic mechanism underlying IDD, and aid the development of alternative therapies. The experimental group consisted of 40 samples of nucleus pulposus tissue obtained from the intervertebral discs (IVDs) of patients with IDD by surgical intervention, and was further divided into an annulus fibrosus disrupted group, comprising 18 patients in which the external annulus was ruptured, and an annulus fibrosus intact group comprising 22 patients. The control group consisted of 20 samples of nucleus pulposus tissue from the IVDs of patients with traumatic lumbar disc fractures. The mRNA and protein expression levels of IL-17 and TNF-α in the 50 tissue samples were detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining, respectively, and the results were statistically analyzed. The IL-17 and TNF-α protein and mRNA expression levels in the annulus fibrosus disrupted and annulus fibrosus intact groups were both higher compared with those in the control group. In addition, the expression levels of IL-17 and TNF-α in the annulus fibrosus disrupted group were significantly higher compared with those in the annulus fibrosus intact group (P<0.01). A positive correlation was identified between the mRNA and protein expression levels of IL-17 and TNF-α in the experimental group (r=0.957, P<0.01). IL-17 and TNF-α may therefore be involved in the progression of human IDD, and may have synergistic effects in the development of IDD. PMID:27284317

  7. Three-dimensional morphological and signal intensity features for detection of intervertebral disc degeneration from magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, A; Fripp, J; Engstrom, C; Walker, D; Weber, M-A; Schwarz, R; Crozier, S

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Advances in MRI hardware and sequences are continually increasing the amount and complexity of data such as those generated in high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) scanning of the spine. Efficient informatics tools offer considerable opportunities for research and clinically based analyses of magnetic resonance studies. In this work, we present and validate a suite of informatics tools for automated detection of degenerative changes in lumbar intervertebral discs (IVD) from both 3D isotropic and routine two-dimensional (2D) clinical T2-weighted MRI. Materials and methods An automated segmentation approach was used to extract morphological (traditional 2D radiological measures and novel 3D shape descriptors) and signal appearance (extracted from signal intensity histograms) features. The features were validated against manual reference, compared between 2D and 3D MRI scans and used for quantification and classification of IVD degeneration across magnetic resonance datasets containing IVD with early and advanced stages of degeneration. Results and conclusions Combination of the novel 3D-based shape and signal intensity features on 3D (area under receiver operating curve (AUC) 0.984) and 2D (AUC 0.988) magnetic resonance data deliver a significant improvement in automated classification of IVD degeneration, compared to the combination of previously used 2D radiological measurement and signal intensity features (AUC 0.976 and 0.983, respectively). Further work is required regarding the usefulness of 2D and 3D shape data in relation to clinical scores of lower back pain. The results reveal the potential of the proposed informatics system for computer-aided IVD diagnosis from MRI in large-scale research studies and as a possible adjunct for clinical diagnosis. PMID:23813538

  8. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist delivered directly and by gene therapy inhibits matrix degradation in the intact degenerate human intervertebral disc: an in situ zymographic and gene therapy study

    PubMed Central

    Le Maitre, Christine L; Hoyland, Judith A; Freemont, Anthony J

    2007-01-01

    Data implicate IL-1 in the altered matrix biology that characterizes human intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. In the current study we investigated the enzymic mechanism by which IL-1 induces matrix degradation in degeneration of the human IVD, and whether the IL-1 inhibitor IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) will inhibit degradation. A combination of in situ zymography (ISZ) and immunohistochemistry was used to examine the effects of IL-1 and IL-1Ra on matrix degradation and metal-dependent protease (MDP) expression in explants of non-degenerate and degenerate human IVDs. ISZ employed three substrates (gelatin, collagen, casein) and different challenges (IL-1β, IL-1Ra and enzyme inhibitors). Immunohistochemistry was undertaken for MDPs. In addition, IL-1Ra was introduced into degenerate IVD explants using genetically engineered constructs. The novel findings from this study are: IL-1Ra delivered directly onto explants of degenerate IVDs eliminates matrix degradation as assessed by multi-substrate ISZ; there is a direct relationship between matrix degradation assessed by ISZ and MDP expression defined by immunohistochemistry; single injections of IVD cells engineered to over-express IL-1Ra significantly inhibit MDP expression for two weeks. Our findings show that IL-1 is a key cytokine driving matrix degradation in the degenerate IVD. Furthermore, IL-1Ra delivered directly or by gene therapy inhibits IVD matrix degradation. IL-1Ra could be used therapeutically to inhibit degeneration of the IVD. PMID:17760968

  9. The role of TGF-β1/Smad2/3 pathway in platelet-rich plasma in retarding intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huilin; Yuan, Chenxi; Wu, Chunshen; Qian, Jiale; Shi, Qing; Li, Xuefeng; Zhu, Xuesong; Zou, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections are an effective way to retard intervertebral disc degeneration, but the mechanism of action is unclear. Activated platelets release some growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), which positively modulate the extracellular matrix of nucleus pulposus cells. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanism underlying the PRP-mediated inhibition of intervertebral disc degeneration. In an in vitro study, we found that the proliferation of nucleus pulposus cells was greatly enhanced with 2.5% PRP treatment. The TGF-β1 concentration was much higher after PRP treatment. PRP administration effectively increased the collagen II, aggrecan and sox-9 mRNA levels and decreased collagen X levels. However, Western blotting demonstrated that specifically inhibiting TGF-β1 signalling could significantly prevent nucleus pulpous cellular expression of Smad2/3 and matrix protein. In a rabbit study, magnetic resonance imaging revealed significant recovery signal intensity in the intervertebral discs of the PRP injection group compared with the very low signal intensity in the control groups. Histologically, the PRP plus inhibitor injection group had significantly lower expression levels of Smad2/3 and collagen II than the PRP group. These results demonstrated that a high TGF-β1 content in the platelets retarded disc degeneration in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting the TGF-β1/Smad2/3 pathway could prevent this recovery by inactivating Smad2/3 and down-regulating the extracellular matrix. Therefore, the TGF-β1/Smad2/3 pathway might play a critical role in the ability of PRP to retard intervertebral disc degeneration.

  10. Correlation of serum trace elements and melatonin levels to radiological, biochemical, and histological assessment of degeneration in patients with intervertebral disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Mehmet; Yenisey, Cigdem; Akyüz, Orhan; Ozsunar, Yelda; Erkus, Muhan; Biçakçi, Tuncay

    2006-02-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the blood concentrations of some trace elements and melatonin (MLT) in patients with intervertebral disc herniation (IDH) and to investigate the interaction of histological and biochemical degeneration findings with aging. The present study was carried out on 13 subjects (8 women and 5 men) diagnosed with IDH. They were divided into three groups according to their ages. Nighttime serum MLT, zinc (Zn), and magnesium (Mg) levels were determined in all patients. In addition, computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain and magnetic resonance imaging examination of the lumbar spine were obtained in this study. The Zn level and Zn/Mg ratio showed a decline in patients with IDH with aging, whereas the serum Mg level and tissue hydroxyproline content increased. A positive correlation between serum Zn and MLT concentrations was found (r=0.104, p=0.734). In addition, there was a positive correlation between serum Zn level and Zn/Mg ratio (r=0.835 and p<0.01), and a negative correlation between serum Mg level and Zn/Mg ratio (r=-0.571, p<0.05). On CT study, both volume percentage of calcified pineal gland and density of calcification were found to increase progressively with advancing age. The results of semiquantitative evaluation of disc tissues of patients with IDH for histological degeneration findings showed that 66.7% of discs treated had slight degeneration in younger age group, but 75.0% and 100% of discs had moderate or marked degeneration in older age groups. Our data indicated that there is a close relationship between MLT and Zn or Mg levels in the serum samples of patients with IDH, and the levels of these elements might be affected by the presence of degeneration process and serum MLT level, or vice versa. PMID:16444002

  11. The Relation Between Sacral Angle and Vertical Angle of Sacral Curvature and Lumbar Disc Degeneration: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Ahmad; Haddadi, Kaveh; Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Ganjeh, Hamid Reza

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the reliability and validity of a goniometric measurement of the vertical angle of the sacrum and sacral angle (SA), and their relationships to lumbar degeneration.A herniated lumbar disc is one of the most frequent medical issues. Investigators in a number of studies have reported associated risk factors for prevalent disc degeneration. Atypical lumbosacral angles and curvature are thought to contribute to the degradation of the spine by many researchers. This study analyzed 360 patients referred to our clinic from 2013 to 2015 due to low back pain. A cross-sectional case-control study was designed in order to compare the sagittal alignment of the lumbosacral area in 3 groups of patients suffering from LBP. A total 120 patients were in a control group with a normal lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 120 patients had lumbar disk herniation (LDH), and 120 patients had spinal stenosis. From the sagittal plan of lumbar MRI, SA and vertical angle of sacral curvature (VASC) were determined and then analyzed.The means of VASC in these groups were: 38.98 (SD: 6.36 ± 0.58), 40.89 (SD: 7.69 ± 0.69), and 40.54 (SD: 7.13 ± 0.92), respectively (P = 0.089). Moreover, studies of SA in 3 groups showed that the means of SA were: 39.30 (SD: 6.69 ± 0.63), 40.52 (SD: 7.47 ± 0.65), and 35.63 (SD: 6.07 ± 0.79), respectively. Relation between SA and spinal stenosis was just statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05).One significant limitation of our study is the lack of standing MRI for increased accuracy of measurement. However, we were reluctant to give patients needless exposure to radiation from conventional X-ray, and instead used MRI scans. We did not find any significant correlation between the VASC and LDH in lumbar MRI. Also, SA is not an independent risk factor for LDH in men and women. We suggested that there are several biomechanical factors involved in LDH. PMID:26871821

  12. Treatment of Symptomatic Lumbar Disc Degeneration with the VariLift-L Interbody Fusion System: Retrospective Review of 470 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Warren F.; Fichtel, Frank; del Monaco, Diana Cardenas

    2016-01-01

    Background Many first generation stand-alone fusion cages required endplate decortication and surgical impaction during the procedure resulting in segmental subsidence, implant migration and loss of lordosis postoperatively. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate radiographically, in a large series of patients, whether engineering and design modifications incorporated in a specific stand-alone, expandable interbody fusion device (VariLift®-L) adequately addressed previously recognized deficiencies of stand-alone interbody cages. Methods In this retrospective chart review of 470 patients (642 treated levels), we evaluated radiographic evidence of fusion, subsidence and migration following a one- or two-level PLIF procedure utilizing this stand-alone expandable interbody fusion device. A secondary objective was to corroborate the low morbidity and symptomatic improvements achieved with previous interbody cage devices used to treat symptomatic disc degeneration. Results The average postoperative followup was 3.9 ± 1.8 years and a solid fusion rate of 94% was achieved among patients with ≥ 9 months of radiographic followup. Subsidence > 3 mm was noted at 10 levels with no cases of device migration. Composite back pain severity scores improved from 8.5 ± 1.5 preoperatively to 0.8 ± 1.5 at final followup (p<0.001) and 94% of patients met or exceeded the minimal clinical important difference of 3.8 points. Eighteen patients required reoperation following the index procedure; 16 of these patients were treated for adjacent segment disease. Conclusions (LOE) The VariLift-L device has excellent clinical and technical performance characteristics, providing adequate stabilization of the anterior column without the need for supplemental posterior instrumentation. Level of Evidence IV. IRB Approval: Expedited Federal Register Categories 5& 7: Methodist IRB 3/30/2011; Informed Consent statement: retrospective data collection, patients signed consent forms

  13. Development of a Large Animal Long-Term Intervertebral Disc Organ Culture Model That Includes the Bony Vertebrae for Ex Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Grant, Michael; Epure, Laura M; Salem, Omar; AlGarni, Nizar; Ciobanu, Ovidiu; Alaqeel, Motaz; Antoniou, John; Mwale, Fackson

    2016-07-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a common cause of low back pain. Testing potential therapeutics in the regeneration of the disc requires the use of model systems. Although several animal models have been developed to investigate IVD degeneration, they are technically challenging to prepare, expensive, present with limitations when performing biomechanical studies on the disc, and are impractical in large-scale screening of novel anabolic and scaffolding agents. An IVD organ culture system offers an inexpensive alternative. In the current paradigm, the bony endplates are removed to allow for nutrient diffusion and maintenance of disc cell viability. Although this is an excellent system for testing biologics, it results in concave cartilage endplates and, as such, requires special platens for loading purposes in a bioreactor as flat ones can overload the annular disc region leading to improper loading. Furthermore, the absence of bone makes it unsuitable for applying complex cyclic loading, a topic of interest in the study of chronic progressive degeneration, as multiaxial loading is more representative of daily forces encountered by the IVD. We have developed and validated a novel long-term IVD organ culture model that retains vertebral bone and is easy to prepare. Our model is ideal for testing potential drugs and alternate-based therapies, in addition to investigating the long-term effects of loading paradigms on disc degeneration and repair. PMID:27216856

  14. Genetic polymorphisms of interleukin-1 alpha and the vitamin d receptor in mexican mestizo patients with intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cervin Serrano, Salvador; González Villareal, Dalia; Aguilar-Medina, Maribel; Romero-Navarro, Jose Guillermo; Romero Quintana, Jose Geovanni; Arámbula Meraz, Eliakym; Osuna Ramírez, Ignacio; Picos-Cárdenas, Veronica; Granados, Julio; Estrada-García, Iris; Sánchez-Schmitz, Guzman; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the most common diagnosis in patients with back pain, a leading cause of musculoskeletal disability worldwide. Several conditions, such as occupational activities, gender, age, and obesity, have been associated with IDD. However, the development of this disease has strong genetic determinants. In this study, we explore the possible association between rs1800587 (c.-949C>T) of interleukin-1 alpha (IL1A) and rs2228570 (c.2T>V) and rs731236 (c.1056T>C) of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and the development of IDD in northwestern Mexican Mestizo population. Gene polymorphisms were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism, in two groups matched by age and gender: patients with symptomatic lumbar IDD (n = 100) and subjects with normal lumbar-spine MRI-scans (n = 100). Distribution of the mutated alleles in patients and controls was 27.0% versus 28.0% (P = 0.455) for T of rs1800587 (IL1A); 53.0% versus 58.0% (P = 0.183) for V of rs2228570 (VDR); and 18.0% versus 21.0% (P = 0.262) for C of rs731236 (VDR). Our results showed no association between the studied polymorphisms and IDD in this population. This is the first report on the contribution of gene polymorphisms on IDD in a Mexican population.

  15. Genetic Polymorphisms of Interleukin-1 Alpha and the Vitamin D Receptor in Mexican Mestizo Patients with Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cervin Serrano, Salvador; González Villareal, Dalia; Aguilar-Medina, Maribel; Romero-Navarro, Jose Guillermo; Romero Quintana, Jose Geovanni; Arámbula Meraz, Eliakym; Osuna Ramírez, Ignacio; Picos-Cárdenas, Veronica; Granados, Julio; Estrada-García, Iris; Sánchez-Schmitz, Guzman; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the most common diagnosis in patients with back pain, a leading cause of musculoskeletal disability worldwide. Several conditions, such as occupational activities, gender, age, and obesity, have been associated with IDD. However, the development of this disease has strong genetic determinants. In this study, we explore the possible association between rs1800587 (c.-949C>T) of interleukin-1 alpha (IL1A) and rs2228570 (c.2T>V) and rs731236 (c.1056T>C) of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and the development of IDD in northwestern Mexican Mestizo population. Gene polymorphisms were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism, in two groups matched by age and gender: patients with symptomatic lumbar IDD (n = 100) and subjects with normal lumbar-spine MRI-scans (n = 100). Distribution of the mutated alleles in patients and controls was 27.0% versus 28.0% (P = 0.455) for T of rs1800587 (IL1A); 53.0% versus 58.0% (P = 0.183) for V of rs2228570 (VDR); and 18.0% versus 21.0% (P = 0.262) for C of rs731236 (VDR). Our results showed no association between the studied polymorphisms and IDD in this population. This is the first report on the contribution of gene polymorphisms on IDD in a Mexican population. PMID:25506053

  16. An Association Study of Interleukin 18 Receptor Genes (IL18R1 and IL18RAP) in Lumbar Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Omair, Ahmad; Lie, Benedicte Alexandra; Reikeras, Olav; Brox, Jens Ivar

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To examine association of candidate genetic variants in structural, inflammatory, matrix modifying, vitamin D receptor genes and variants associated with osteoarthritis, with surgical candidates and surgical patients with lumbar disc degeneration (LDD), in light of their previously reported susceptibility for LDD. Methods: Genotyping of 146 Norwegian LDD patients and 188 Norwegian controls was performed for 20 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from collagen, aggrecan, interleukin, VDR, MMP3 and COX2 genes and 7 SNPs from osteoarthritic genes. Results: The neighboring genes IL18R1 and IL18RAP polymorphisms (rs2287037 and rs1420100), showed a statistically non-significant risk for developing LDD (OR 1.36 [95 % CI 0.99 – 1.87]; p=0.06 and OR 1.33 [95 % CI 0.98-1.81]; p=0.07). Homozygosity of these risk alleles was associated with LDD (p=0.023 and p=0.027). The non-risk alleles at these SNPs were situated on a haplotype negatively associated with LDD (p=0.008). Carriage of at least one non-risk allele at both loci also reduces the risk of developing LDD (OR 0.51 [95 % CI 0.33-0.80]; p=0.003). Conclusion: Our findings support the polygenic nature of LDD and suggest that variation in interleukin 18 receptor genes could affect the risk of severe LDD and associated low back pain. PMID:22550553

  17. Degenerated intervertebral disc prolapse and its association of collagen I alpha 1 Spl gene polymorphism: A preliminary case control study of Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Anjankar, Shailendra D; Poornima, Subhadra; Raju, Subodh; Jaleel, MA; Bhiladvala, Dilnavaz; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2015-01-01

    Background: Degenerated disc disease (DDD) is a common disorder responsible for increased morbidity in a productive age group. Its etiology is multifactorial and genetic factors have been predominantly implicated. Disc prolapse results due to tear in the annulus, which is a fibrous structure composed largely of type I collagen. Functional polymorphism at the Sp1 site of the collagen I alpha 1 (COL1A1) gene has shown a positive association with DDD in Dutch and Greek populations. The purpose of this study was to assess COL1A1 Sp1 gene polymorphism in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Fifty clinically and radiologically proven patients with disc prolapse requiring surgery were included as cases and 50 healthy, age-matched volunteers served as controls. After isolating DNA from their blood sample, genotyping for COL1A1 polymorphism (rs1800012) was performed and identified as GG, GT, and TT. Results: The mean age and body mass index in cases and controls were similar. 76% of the patients were males. The most common site of disc degeneration was L4–L5 (36%), followed by L5–S1 (34%). Homozygous–GG, heterozygous GT, and homozygous TT genotypes were seen in 38 (76%), 10 (20%) and 2 (4%) cases respectively, controls had similar percentage of genotypes as well. The alleles in cases and the control group showed no significant difference (P = 0.6744) and followed the Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium in the study population. Conclusion: The COL1A1 (rs1800012) is in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in the present subset of Indian population. But taken as a single factor, it was not found to be associated with DDD in this preliminary study. Disc degeneration is multifactorial and also anticipated to be a result of multiple genes involvement and gene-gene interaction. PMID:26806964

  18. Aquaporin 1 and 5 expression decreases during human intervertebral disc degeneration: Novel HIF-1-mediated regulation of aquaporins in NP cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Zariel I; Gogate, Shilpa S; Day, Rebecca; Binch, Abbie; Markova, Dessislava Z; Chiverton, Neil; Cole, Ashley; Conner, Matt; Shapiro, Irving M; Le Maitre, Christine L; Risbud, Makarand V

    2015-05-20

    Objectives of this study were to investigate whether AQP1 and AQP5 expression is altered during intervertebral disc degeneration and if hypoxia and HIF-1 regulate their expression in NP cells. AQP expression was measured in human tissues from different degenerative grades; regulation by hypoxia and HIF-1 was studied using promoter analysis and gain- and loss-of-function experiments. We show that both AQPs are expressed in the disc and that mRNA and protein levels decline with human disease severity. Bioinformatic analyses of AQP promoters showed multiple evolutionarily conserved HREs. Surprisingly, hypoxia failed to induce promoter activity or expression of either AQP. While genomic chromatin immunoprecipitation showed limited binding of HIF-1α to conserved HREs, their mutation did not suppress promoter activities. Stable HIF-1α suppression significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of both AQPs, but HIF-1α failed to induce AQP levels following accumulation. Together, our results demonstrate that AQP1 and AQP5 expression is sensitive to human disc degeneration and that HIF-1α uniquely maintains basal expression of both AQPs in NP cells, independent of oxemic tension and HIF-1 binding to promoter HREs. Diminished HIF-1 activity during degeneration may suppress AQP levels in NP cells, compromising their ability to respond to extracellular osmolarity changes. PMID:25844601

  19. Aquaporin 1 and 5 expression decreases during human intervertebral disc degeneration: novel HIF-1-mediated regulation of aquaporins in NP cells

    PubMed Central

    Day, Rebecca; Binch, Abbie; Markova, Dessislava Z.; Chiverton, Neil; Cole, Ashley; Conner, Matt; Shapiro, Irving M.; Le Maitre, Christine L.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives of this study were to investigate whether AQP1 and AQP5 expression is altered during intervertebral disc degeneration and if hypoxia and HIF-1 regulate their expression in NP cells. AQP expression was measured in human tissues from different degenerative grades; regulation by hypoxia and HIF-1 was studied using promoter analysis and gain- and loss-of-function experiments. We show that both AQPs are expressed in the disc and that mRNA and protein levels decline with human disease severity. Bioinformatic analyses of AQP promoters showed multiple evolutionarily conserved HREs. Surprisingly, hypoxia failed to induce promoter activity or expression of either AQP. While genomic chromatin immunoprecipitation showed limited binding of HIF-1α to conserved HREs, their mutation did not suppress promoter activities. Stable HIF-1α suppression significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of both AQPs, but HIF-1α failed to induce AQP levels following accumulation. Together, our results demonstrate that AQP1 and AQP5 expression is sensitive to human disc degeneration and that HIF-1α uniquely maintains basal expression of both AQPs in NP cells, independent of oxemic tension and HIF-1 binding to promoter HREs. Diminished HIF-1 activity during degeneration may suppress AQP levels in NP cells, compromising their ability to respond to extracellular osmolarity changes. PMID:25844601

  20. Body mass index is associated with lumbar disc degeneration in young Finnish males: subsample of Northern Finland birth cohort study 1986

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of environmental factors in lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (DD) in young adults is largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether body mass index (BMI), smoking, and physical activity are associated with lumbar DD among young adults. Methods The Oulu Back Study (OBS) is a subpopulation of the 1986 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC 1986) and it originally included 2,969 children. The OBS subjects received a postal questionnaire, and those who responded (N = 1,987) were invited to the physical examination. The participants (N = 874) were invited to lumbar MRI study. A total of 558 young adults (325 females and 233 males) underwent MRI that used a 1.5-T scanner at the mean age of 21. Each lumbar intervertebral disc was graded as normal (0), mildly (1), moderately (2), or severely (3) degenerated. We calculated a sum score of the lumbar DD, and analyzed the associations between environmental risk factors (smoking, physical activity and weight-related factors assessed at 16 and 19 years) and DD using ordinal logistic regression, the results being expressed as cumulative odds ratios (COR). All analyses were stratified by gender. Results Of the 558 subjects, 256 (46%) had no DD, 117 (21%) had sum score of one, 93 (17%) sum score of two, and 92 (17%) sum score of three or higher. In the multivariate ordinal logistic regression model, BMI at 16 years (highest vs. lowest quartile) was associated with DD sum score among males (COR 2.35; 95% CI 1.19-4.65) but not among females (COR 1.29; 95% CI 0.72-2.32). Smoking of at least four pack-years was associated with DD among males, but not among females (COR 2.41; 95% CI 0.99-5.86 and 1.59; 95% 0.67-3.76, respectively). Self-reported physical activity was not associated with DD. Conclusions High BMI at 16 years was associated with lumbar DD at 21 years among young males but not among females. High pack-years of smoking showed a comparable association in males, while physical activity had

  1. OPG rs2073617 polymorphism is associated with upregulated OPG protein expression and an increased risk of intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jing-Bo; Zhan, Xin-Li; Wang, Wen-Jun; Yan, Yi-Guo; Liu, Chong

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the associations between three distinct osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene polymorphisms and the risk of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). A total of 200 IDD patients and 200 healthy controls were recruited from the Department of Spine Surgery at the First Affiliated Hospital of the University of South China (Hengyang, China) between January 2013 and May 2014. The allele, genotype and haplotype frequency distributions of three OPG polymorphisms in the study and control populations were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction prior to restriction fragment length polymorphism or high resolution melting assays. In addition, serum OPG levels were measured via an ELISA. The genotype and allele frequencies of the OPG rs2073617 polymorphisms were significantly higher in the IDD patients, as compared with the control group (P<0.05). Furthermore, carriers of the C allele exhibited a higher risk of IDD, as compared with carriers of the T allele (P<0.001). Conversely, the genotype and allele frequencies of the two other gene polymorphisms, rs2073618 and rs3102735, showed no significant differences between the patients and controls (P>0.05). The serum OPG levels were significantly higher in IDD patients with TT, TC and CC genotypes at the OPG rs2073617 polymorphism, as compared with the control group (P<0.05). Logistic-regression analysis suggested that high serum levels of OPG were positively correlated with IDD risk, whereas the T-C-A, T-G-A and T-G-G haplotypes were negatively correlated with IDD risk (P<0.05). Furthermore, the G-T-G haplotype was associated with protection against IDD (P=0.008), whereas the G-C-G haplotype was associated with an elevated susceptibility to IDD (P=0.007). The results of the present study suggested that OPG rs2073617 polymorphisms and upregulated serum levels of OPG were associated with an increased risk of IDD, whereas the T-C-A, T-G-A and T-G-G haplotypes were protective factors for IDD. The results of the

  2. Notochordal cells protect nucleus pulposus cells from degradation and apoptosis: implications for the mechanisms of intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The relative resistance of non-chondrodystrophic (NCD) canines to degenerative disc disease (DDD) may be due to a combination of anabolic and anti-catabolic factors secreted by notochordal cells within the intervertebral disc (IVD) nucleus pulposus (NP). Factors known to induce DDD include interleukin-1 beta (IL-1ß) and/or Fas-Ligand (Fas-L). Therefore we evaluated the ability of notochordal cell conditioned medium (NCCM) to protect NP cells from IL-1ß and IL-1ß +FasL-mediated cell death and degeneration. Methods We cultured bovine NP cells with IL-1ß or IL-1ß+FasL under hypoxic serum-free conditions (3.5% O2) and treated the cells with either serum-free NCCM or basal medium (Advanced DMEM/F-12). We used flow cytometry to evaluate cell death and real-time (RT-)PCR to determine the gene expression of aggrecan, collagen 2, and link protein, mediators of matrix degradation ADAMTS-4 and MMP3, the matrix protection molecule TIMP1, the cluster of differentiation (CD)44 receptor, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and Ank. We then determined the expression of specific apoptotic pathways in bovine NP cells by characterizing the expression of activated caspases-3, -8 and -9 in the presence of IL-1ß+FasL when cultured with NCCM, conditioned medium obtained using bovine NP cells (BCCM), and basal medium all supplemented with 2% FBS. Results NCCM inhibits bovine NP cell death and apoptosis via suppression of activated caspase-9 and caspase-3/7. Furthermore, NCCM protects NP cells from the degradative effects of IL-1ß and IL-1ß+Fas-L by up-regulating the expression of anabolic/matrix protective genes (aggrecan, collagen type 2, CD44, link protein and TIMP-1) and down-regulating matrix degrading genes such as MMP-3. Expression of ADAMTS-4, which encodes a protein for aggrecan remodeling, is increased. NCCM also protects against IL-1+FasL-mediated down-regulation of Ank expression. Furthermore, NP cells treated with NCCM in the presence of IL-1ß+Fas-L down

  3. Adjacent segment degeneration after single-level anterior cervical decompression and fusion: disc space distraction and its impact on clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Li, Yongqian; Kong, Fanlong; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Yingze; Shen, Yong

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to find whether excessive distraction of the disc space for cage insertion was a risk factor for adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF). One hundred and sixteen consecutive patients who underwent ACDF for single-level cervical disc herniation between June 2006 and November 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Preoperative, postoperative and final follow-up disc height (DH), sagittal segmental alignment (SSA), and sagittal alignment of the cervical spine (SACS) were measured and compared between the ASD group and non-ASD group. In 116 patients, ASD was radiographically proven in 28 (24.1%) patients. The clinical outcomes were significantly improved compared to the preoperative scores in both groups. However, the postoperative and final follow-up DH of the ASD group were significantly higher than in the non-ASD group (p<0.05). In addition, the postoperative DH was significantly correlated with the postoperative or final follow-up SSA (p<0.05). However, postoperative DH was not found to significantly correlate with postoperative or final follow-up SACS (p=0.072 and p=0.096, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that postoperative DH was the most significant risk factor for ASD. The clinical outcomes of ACDF for single-level degenerative cervical disc disease were satisfactory. Postoperative DH (the distracted distance) had the greatest impact on the incidence of ASD. Excessive disc space distraction is a considerable risk factor for the development of radiographic ASD.

  4. Gas Modelling in the Disc of HD 163296

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilling, I.; Woitke, P.; Meeus, G.; Mora, A.; Montesinos, B.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Eiroa, C.; Thi, W. -F.; Isella, A.; Roberge, A.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Kamp, I.; Pinte, C.; Sandell, G.; Vacca, W. D.; Menard, F.; Mendigutia, I.; Duchene, G.; Dent, W. R. F.; Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present detailed model fits to observations of the disc around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. This well-studied object has an age of approx. 4Myr, with evidence of a circumstellar disc extending out to approx. 540AU. We use the radiation thermo-chemical disc code ProDiMo to model the gas and dust in the circumstellar disc of HD 163296, and attempt to determine the disc properties by fitting to observational line and continuum data. These include new Herschel/PACS observations obtained as part of the open-time key program GASPS (Gas in Protoplanetary Systems), consisting of a detection of the [Oi] 63 m line and upper limits for several other far infrared lines. We complement this with continuum data and ground-based observations of the CO-12 3-2, 2-1 and CO-13 J=1-0 line transitions, as well as the H2 S(1) transition. We explore the effects of stellar ultraviolet variability and dust settling on the line emission, and on the derived disc properties. Our fitting efforts lead to derived gas/dust ratios in the range 9-100, depending on the assumptions made. We note that the line fluxes are sensitive in general to the degree of dust settling in the disc, with an increase in line flux for settled models. This is most pronounced in lines which are formed in the warm gas in the inner disc, but the low excitation molecular lines are also affected. This has serious implications for attempts to derive the disc gas mass from line observations. We derive fractional PAH abundances between 0.007 and 0.04 relative to ISM levels. Using a stellar and UV excess input spectrum based on a detailed analysis of observations, we find that the all observations are consistent with the previously assumed disc geometry

  5. In vitro assessment of biomaterial-induced remodeling of subchondral and cancellous bone for the early intervention of joint degeneration with focus on the spinal disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCanless, Jonathan D.

    Osteoarthritis-associated pain of the spinal disc, knee, and hip derives from degeneration of cartilagenous tissues in these joints. Traditional therapies have focused on these cartilage (and disc specific nucleus pulposus) changes as a means of treatment through tissue grafting, regenerative synthetic implants, non-regenerative space filling implants, arthroplasty, and arthrodesis. Although such approaches may seem apparent upon initial consideration of joint degeneration, tissue pathology has shown changes in the underlying bone and vascular bed precede the onset of cartilaginous changes. It is hypothesized that these changes precedent joint degeneration and as such may provide a route for early prevention. The current work proposes an injectable biomaterial-based therapy within these subchondral and cancellous bone regions as a means of preventing or reversing osteoarthritis. Two human concentrated platelet releasate-containing alginate hydrogel/beta-tricalcium phosphate composites have been developed for this potential biomaterial application. The undertaking of assessing these materials through bench-, in vitro, and ex vivo work is described herein. These studies showed the capability of the biomaterials to initiate a wound healing response in monocytes, angiogenic and differentiation behavior in immature endothelial cells, and early osteochondral differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. These cellular activities are associated with fracture healing and endochondral bone formation, demonstrating the potential of the biomaterials to induce osseous and vascular tissue remodeling underlying osteoarthritic joints as a novel therapy for a disease with rapidly growing healthcare costs.

  6. Effects of initial boost with TGF-beta 1 and grade of intervertebral disc degeneration on 3D culture of human annulus fibrosus cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) culture in porous biomaterials as well as stimulation with growth factors are known to be supportive for intervertebral disc cell differentiation and tissue formation. Unless sophisticated releasing systems are used, however, effective concentrations of growth factors are maintained only for a very limited amount of time in in vivo applications. Therefore, we investigated, if an initial boost with transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) is capable to induce a lasting effect of superior cartilaginous differentiation in slightly and severely degenerated human annulus fibrosus (AF) cells. Methods Human AF tissue was harvested during surgical treatment of six adult patients with lumbar spinal diseases. Grading of disc degeneration was performed with magnet resonance imaging. AF cells were isolated and expanded in monolayer culture and rearranged three-dimensionally in a porous biomaterial consisting of stepwise absorbable poly-glycolic acid and poly-(lactic-co-glycolic) acid and a supportive fine net of non-absorbable polyvinylidene fluoride. An initial boost of TGF-beta 1 or TGF-beta 1 and hyaluronan was applied and compared with controls. Matrix formation was assessed at days 7 and 21 by (1) histological staining of the typical extracellular matrix molecules proteoglycan and type I and type II collagens and by (2) real-time gene expression analysis of aggrecan, decorin, biglycan, type I, II, III, and X collagens as well as of catabolic matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-13. Results An initial boost with TGF-beta 1 or TGF-beta 1 and hyaluronan did not enhance the expression of characteristic AF matrix molecules in our 3D culture system. AF cells showed high viability in the progressively degrading biomaterial. Stratification by grade of intervertebral disc degeneration showed that AF cells from both, slightly degenerated, or severely degenerated tissue are capable of significant up-regulations of characteristic matrix

  7. The Effect of Gamma Irradiation on the Biological Properties of Intervertebral Disc Allografts: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies in a Beagle Model

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yu; Ruan, Dike; Luk, Keith D. K.; He, Qing; Wang, Chaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Study Design An animal experiment about intervertebral disc allograft. Objective To explore the feasibility to decellularize disc allografts treated by 6°Co Gamma Irradiation, and simultaneously, to assess the possibility to make use of the decellularized natural disc scaffold for disc degeneration biotherapy. Summary of Background Data Studies of both animal and human disc allograft transplantation indicated that the disc allograft may serve as a scaffold to undertake the physiological responsibility of the segment. Methods Experiment in vitro: 48 discs of beagles were harvested and divided randomly into four groups including a control group and three irradiated groups. Immediate cell viability and biomechanical properties of the discs were checked and comparisons were made among these groups. Experiment in vivo: 24 beagles accepted single-level allografted disc treated with different doses of gamma irradiation. Plain X-rays and MRIs were taken before and after surgery. Then, the spinal columns were harvested en bloc from the sacrificed beagles and were examined morphologically. Results There were significant differences of both the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus immediate cell viabilities among the various groups. There were no obvious differences of the biomechanical properties among the four groups. The disc height and range of motion decreased significantly in all groups as time went on. The observed indexes in irradiated groups were much smaller than those in the control group, but the indexes in 18-kGy group were larger than those in 25-kGy and 50-kGy groups. Both MRI and macroscopic findings showed that the segmental degeneration in the control and 18-kGy group was less severe than that in 25-kGy and 50-kGy groups. Conclusion Gamma Irradiation can decellularize disc allograft successfully to provide natural scaffold for the study of degenerative disc disease therapy, and also can be used as an effective method to produce adjustable animal models

  8. Acid-sensing ion channel 1a regulates the survival of nucleus pulposus cells in the acidic environment of degenerated intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Feng; Wang, Feng; Hong, Xin; Xie, Xin-Hui; Shi, Rui; Xie, Zhi-Yang; Wu, Xiao-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Activation of acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) is responsible for tissue injury caused by acidosis in nervous systems. But its physiological and pathological roles in nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) are unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ASIC1a regulates the survival of NPCs in the acidic environment of degenerated discs. Materials and Methods: NPCs were isolated and cultured followed by immunofluorescent staining and Western-blot analysis for ASIC1a. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) was determined by Ca2+-imaging using Fura-2-AM. Cell necrosis, apoptosis, and senescence following acid exposure were determined using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide dual-staining and cell cycle analysis, respectively, followed by Western-blot analysis for apoptosis-related proteins (Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3) and senescence-related proteins (p53, p21, and p16). Effects of treatment with psalmotoxin-1 (PcTX1, blocker of ASIC1a) on [Ca2+]i and cell survival were investigated. Results: ASIC1a was detected in healthy NPCs, and its expression was significantly higher in degenerated cells. When NPCs were treated with PcTX1, acid-induced increases in [Ca2+]i were significantly inhibited. PcTX1 treatment also resulted in decreased LDH release, cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in acid condition. Acid exposure decreased the expression of Bcl-2 and increased the expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and senescence-related proteins (p53, p21, and p16), which was inhibited by PcTX1. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that further understanding of ASIC1a functionality may provide not only a novel insight into intervertebral disc biology but also a novel therapeutic target for intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:27746861

  9. Potential Role of lncRNAs in Contributing to Pathogenesis of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration Based on Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Ni, Haijian; Zhao, Yingchuan; Chen, Kai; Li, Ming; Li, Cheng; Zhu, Xiaodong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Our study intended to identify potential long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and genes, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Material/Methods The microarray of GSE56081 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, including 5 human control nucleus pulposus tissues and 5 degenerative nucleus pulposus tissues, which was on the basis of GPL15314 platform. Identification of differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs were performed between the 2 groups. Then, gene ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analyses were performed to analyze the biological functions and pathways for the differentially expressed mRNAs. Simultaneously, lncRNA-mRNA weighted coexpression network was constructed using the WGCNA package, followed by GO and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses for the genes in the modules. Finally, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was visualized. Results A total of 135 significantly up- and 170 down-regulated lncRNAs and 2133 significantly up- and 1098 down-regulated mRNAs were identified. Additionally, UBA52 (ubiquitin A-52 residue ribosomal protein fusion product 1), with the highest connectivity degree in PPI network, was remarkably enriched in the pathway of metabolism of proteins. Eight lncRNAs – LINC00917, CTD-2246P4.1, CTC-523E23.5, RP4-639J15.1, RP11-363G2.4, AC005082.12, MIR132, and RP11-38F22.1 – were observed in the modules of lncRNA-mRNA weighted coexpression network. Moreover, SPHK1 in the green-yellow module was significantly enriched in positive regulation of cell migration. Conclusions LncRNAs LINC00917, CTD-2246P4.1, CTC-523E23.5, RP4-639J15.1, RP11-363G2.4, AC005082.12, MIR132, and RP11-38F22.1 were differentially expressed and might play important roles in the development of IDD. Key genes, such as UBA52 and SPHK1, may be pivotal biomarkers for IDD. PMID:26556537

  10. Polarimetric Models of Circumstellar Discs Including Aggregate Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Mahesh

    The work conducted in this thesis examines the nature of circumstellar discs by investigating irradiance and polarization of scattered light. Two circumstellar discs are investigated. Firstly, H-band high contrast imaging data on the transitional disc of the Herbig Ae/Be star HD169142 are presented. The images were obtained through the polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) technique on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the adaptive optics system NACO. Our observations use longer exposure times, allowing us to examine the edges of the disc. Analysis of the observations shows distinct signs of polarization due to circumstellar material, but due to excessive saturation and adaptive optics errors further information on the disc could not be inferred. The HD169142 disc is then modelled using the 3D radiative transfer code Hyperion. Initial models were constructed using a two disc structure, however recent PDI has shown the existence of an annular gap. In addition to this the annular gap is found not to be devoid of dust. This then led to the construction of a four-component disc structure. Estimates of the mass of dust in the gap (2.10E-6 Msun) are made as well as for the planet (1.53E-5 Msun (0.016 Mjupiter)) suspected to be responsible for causing the gap. The predicted polarization was also estimated for the disc, peaking at ~14 percent. The use of realistic dust grains (ballistic aggregate particles) in Monte Carlo code is also examined. The fortran code DDSCAT is used to calculate the scattering properties for aggregates which are used to replace the spherical grain models used by the radiative transfer code Hyperion. Currently, Hyperion uses four independent elements to define the scattering matrix, therefore the use of rotational averaging and a 50/50 percent population of grains and their enantiomers were explored to reduce the number of contributing scattering elements from DDSCAT. A python script was created to extract the scattering data from the DDSCAT

  11. Proteomic identification of unique photoreceptor disc components reveals the presence of PRCD, a protein linked to retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Skiba, Nikolai P.; Spencer, William J.; Salinas, Raquel Y.; Lieu, Eric C.; Thompson, J. Will; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.

    2013-01-01

    Visual signal transduction takes place on the surface of flat membrane vesicles called photoreceptor discs, which reside inside the light-sensitive outer segment organelle of vertebrate photoreceptor cells. While biochemical studies have indicated that discs are built with a handful of highly specialized proteins, proteomic studies have yielded databases consisting of hundreds of entries. We addressed this controversy by employing protein correlation profiling which allows identification of unique components of organelles that can be fractionated but not purified to absolute homogeneity. We subjected discs to sequential steps of fractionation and identified the relative amounts of proteins in each fraction by label-free quantitative mass spectrometry. This analysis demonstrated that the photoreceptor disc proteome contains only eleven components, which satisfy the hallmark criterion for being unique disc-resident components: the retention of a constant molar ratio among themselves across fractionation steps. Remarkably, one of them is PRCD, a protein whose mutations have been shown to cause blindness, yet cellular localization remained completely unknown. Identification of PRCD as a novel disc-specific protein facilitates understanding its functional role and the pathobiological significance of its mutations. Our study provides a striking example how protein correlation profiling allows a distinction between constitutive components of cellular organelles and their inevitable contaminants. PMID:23672200

  12. On degenerate models of cosmic inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Rhiannon; Palma, Gonzalo A.; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Sypsas, Spyros E-mail: gpalmaquilod@ing.uchile.cl E-mail: s.sypsas@apctp.org

    2014-10-01

    In this article we discuss the role of current and future CMB measurements in pinning down the model of inflation responsible for the generation of primordial curvature perturbations. By considering a parameterization of the effective field theory of inflation with a modified dispersion relation arising from heavy fields, we derive the dependence of cosmological observables on the scale of heavy physics Λ{sub UV}. Specifically, we show how the f{sub NL} non-linearity parameters are related to the phase velocity of curvature perturbations at horizon exit, which is parameterized by Λ{sub UV}. BICEP2 and PLANCK findings are shown to be consistent with a value Λ{sub UV} ∼ Λ{sub GUT}. However, we find a degeneracy in the parameter space of inflationary models that can only be resolved with a detailed knowledge of the shape of the non-Gaussian bispectrum.

  13. Photochemical-dynamical models of externally FUV irradiated protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Boubert, Douglas; Facchini, Stefano; Bisbas, Thomas G.; Clarke, Cathie J.

    2016-09-01

    There is growing theoretical and observational evidence that protoplanetary disc evolution may be significantly affected by the canonical levels of far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation found in a star forming environment, leading to substantial stripping of material from the disc outer edge even in the absence of nearby massive stars. In this paper we perform the first full radiation hydrodynamic simulations of the flow from the outer rim of protoplanetary discs externally irradiated by such intermediate strength FUV fields, including direct modelling of the photon dominated region (PDR) which is required to accurately compute the thermal properties. We find excellent agreement between our models and the semi-analytic models of Facchini et al. (2016) for the profile of the flow itself, as well as the mass loss rate and location of their "critical radius". This both validates their results (which differed significantly from prior semi-analytic estimates) and our new numerical method, the latter of which can now be applied to elements of the problem that the semi-analytic approaches are incapable of modelling. We also obtain the composition of the flow, but given the simple geometry of our models we can only hint at some diagnostics for future observations of externally irradiated discs at this stage. We also discuss the potential for these models as benchmarks for future photochemical-dynamical codes.

  14. Degeneration of the Y chromosome in evolutionary aging models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, M. P.; Onody, R. N.

    2005-06-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerated and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Recombination of XX pairs is pointed out as the key factor for the Y chromosome degeneration. However, there is an additional evolutionary force driving sex-chromosomes evolution. Here we show this mechanism by means of two different evolutionary models, in which sex chromosomes with non-recombining XX and XY pairs of chromosomes is considered. Our results show three curious effects. First, we observed that even when both XX and XY pairs of chromosomes do not recombine, the Y chromosomes still degenerate. Second, the accumulation of mutations on Y chromosomes followed a completely different pattern then those accumulated on X chromosomes. And third, the models may differ with respect to sexual proportion. These findings suggest that a more primeval mechanism rules the evolution of Y chromosomes due exclusively to the sex-chromosomes asymmetry itself, i.e., the fact that Y chromosomes never experience female bodies. Over aeons, natural selection favored X chromosomes spontaneously, even if at the very beginning of evolution, both XX and XY pairs of chromosomes did not recombine.

  15. Lipofuscin accumulation, abnormal electrophysiology, and photoreceptor degeneration in mutant ELOVL4 transgenic mice: a model for macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Karan, G; Lillo, C; Yang, Z; Cameron, D J; Locke, K G; Zhao, Y; Thirumalaichary, S; Li, C; Birch, D G; Vollmer-Snarr, H R; Williams, D S; Zhang, K

    2005-03-15

    Macular degeneration is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by photoreceptor degeneration and atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the central retina. An autosomal dominant form of Stargardt macular degeneration (STGD) is caused by mutations in ELOVL4, which is predicted to encode an enzyme involved in the elongation of long-chain fatty acids. We generated transgenic mice expressing a mutant form of human ELOVL4 that causes STGD. In these mice, we show that accumulation by the RPE of undigested phagosomes and lipofuscin, including the fluorophore, 2-[2,6-dimethyl-8-(2,6,6-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl)-1E,3E,5E,7E-octatetraenyl]-1-(2-hyydroxyethyl)-4-[4-methyl-6-(2,6,6,-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl)-1E,3E,5E-hexatrienyl]-pyridinium (A2E) is followed by RPE atrophy. Subsequently, photoreceptor degeneration occurs in the central retina in a pattern closely resembling that of human STGD and age-related macular degeneration. The ELOVL4 transgenic mice thus provide a good model for both STGD and dry age-related macular degeneration, and represent a valuable tool for studies on therapeutic intervention in these forms of blindness. PMID:15749821

  16. From birth to death of protoplanetary discs: modelling their formation, evolution and dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Kunitomo, Masanobu; Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.

    2016-09-01

    The formation, evolution and dispersal processes of protoplanetary discs are investigated and the disc lifetime is estimated. The gravitational collapse of a pre-stellar core forms both a central star and a protoplanetary disc. The central star grows by accretion from the disc and irradiation by the central star heats up the disc and generates a thermal wind, which results in the disc's dispersal. Using the one-dimensional diffusion equation, we calculate the evolution of protoplanetary discs numerically. To calculate the disc evolution from formation to dispersal, we add source and sink terms that represent gas accretion from pre-stellar cores and photoevaporation, respectively. We find that the disc lifetimes of typical pre-stellar cores are around 2-4 million years (Myr). A pre-stellar core with high angular momentum forms a larger disc with a long lifetime, while a disc around an X-ray-luminous star has a short lifetime. Integrating disc lifetimes under various masses and angular velocities of pre-stellar cores and X-ray luminosities of young stellar objects, we obtain the disc fraction at a given stellar age and mean lifetime of the disc. Our model indicates that the mean lifetime of a protoplanetary disc is 3.7 Myr, which is consistent with the observational estimate from young stellar clusters. We also find that the dispersion of X-ray luminosity is needed to reproduce the observed disc fraction.

  17. Disc Volume Reduction with Percutaneous Nucleoplasty in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Kasch, Richard; Mensel, Birger; Schmidt, Florian; Ruetten, Sebastian; Barz, Thomas; Froehlich, Susanne; Seipel, Rebecca; Merk, Harry R.; Kayser, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Study Design We assessed volume following nucleoplasty disc decompression in lower lumbar spines from cadaveric pigs using 7.1Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Purpose To investigate coblation-induced volume reductions as a possible mechanism underlying nucleoplasty. Methods We assessed volume following nucleoplastic disc decompression in pig spines using 7.1-Tesla MRI. Volumetry was performed in lumbar discs of 21 postmortem pigs. A preoperative image data set was obtained, volume was determined, and either disc decompression or placebo therapy was performed in a randomized manner. Group 1 (nucleoplasty group) was treated according to the usual nucleoplasty protocol with coblation current applied to 6 channels for 10 seconds each in an application field of 360°; in group 2 (placebo group) the same procedure was performed but without coblation current. After the procedure, a second data set was generated and volumes calculated and matched with the preoperative measurements in a blinded manner. To analyze the effectiveness of nucleoplasty, volumes between treatment and placebo groups were compared. Results The average preoperative nucleus volume was 0.994 ml (SD: 0.298 ml). In the nucleoplasty group (n = 21) volume was reduced by an average of 0.087 ml (SD: 0.110 ml) or 7.14%. In the placebo group (n = 21) volume was increased by an average of 0.075 ml (SD: 0.075 ml) or 8.94%. The average nucleoplasty-induced volume reduction was 0.162 ml (SD: 0.124 ml) or 16.08%. Volume reduction in lumbar discs was significant in favor of the nucleoplasty group (p<0.0001). Conclusions Our study demonstrates that nucleoplasty has a volume-reducing effect on the lumbar nucleus pulposus in an animal model. Furthermore, we show the volume reduction to be a coblation effect of nucleoplasty in porcine discs. PMID:23209677

  18. Collisional modelling of the debris disc around HIP 17439

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüppler, Ch.; Löhne, T.; Krivov, A. V.; Ertel, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Eiroa, C.

    2014-07-01

    We present an analysis of the debris disc around the nearby K2 V star HIP 17439. In the context of the Herschel DUNES key programme, the disc was observed and spatially resolved in the far-IR with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE instruments. In a previous study, we assumed that the size and radial distribution of the circumstellar dust are independent power laws. There, several scenarios capable of explaining the observations were suggested after exploring a very broad range of possible model parameters. In this paper, we perform a follow-up in-depth collisional modelling of these scenarios to further distinguish between them. In our models we consider collisions, direct radiation pressure, and drag forces, which are the actual physical processes operating in debris discs. We find that all scenarios discussed in the first paper are physically reasonable and can reproduce the observed spectral energy distribution along with the PACS surface brightness profiles reasonably well. In one model, the dust is produced beyond 120 au in a narrow planetesimal belt and is transported inwards by Poynting-Robertson and stellar wind drag. Good agreement with the observed radial profiles would require stellar winds by about an order of magnitude stronger than the solar value, which is not confirmed - although not ruled out - by observations. Another model consists of two spatially separated planetesimal belts, a warm inner and a cold outer one. This scenario would probably imply the presence of planets clearing the gap between the two components. Finally, we show qualitatively that the observations can be explained by assuming the dust is produced in a single, but broad planetesimal disc with a surface density of solids rising outwards, as expected for an extended disc that experiences a natural inside-out collisional depletion. Prospects of distinguishing between the competing scenarios by future observations are discussed.

  19. Internal kinematics of modelled interacting disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberger, T.; Kapferer, W.; Schindler, S.; Böhm, A.; Kutdemir, E.; Ziegler, B. L.

    2006-10-01

    We present an investigation of galaxy-galaxy interactions and their effects on the velocity fields of disc galaxies in combined N-body/hydrodynamic simulations, which include cooling, star formation with feedback, and galactic winds. Rotation curves (RCs) of the gas are extracted from these simulations in a way that follows the procedure applied to observations of distant, small, and faint galaxies as closely as possible. We show that galaxy-galaxy mergers and fly-bys disturb the velocity fields significantly and hence the RCs of the interacting galaxies, leading to asymmetries and distortions in the RCs. Typical features of disturbed kinematics are significantly rising or falling profiles in the direction of the companion galaxy and pronounced bumps in the RCs. In addition, tidal tails can leave strong imprints on the rotation curve. All these features are observable for intermediate redshift galaxies, on which we focus our investigations. We use a quantitative measure for the asymmetry of rotation curves to show that the appearance of these distortions strongly depends on the viewing angle. We also find in this way that the velocity fields settle back into relatively undisturbed equilibrium states after unequal mass mergers and fly-bys. About 1 Gyr after the first encounter, the RCs show no severe distortions anymore. These results are consistent with previous theoretical and observational studies. As an illustration of our results, we compare our simulated velocity fields and direct images with rotation curves from VLT/FORS spectroscopy and ACS images of a cluster at z=0.53 and find remarkable similarities.

  20. Simple and accurate modelling of the gravitational potential produced by thick and thin exponential discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Flynn, C.; Candlish, G. N.; Fellhauer, M.; Gibson, B. K.

    2015-04-01

    We present accurate models of the gravitational potential produced by a radially exponential disc mass distribution. The models are produced by combining three separate Miyamoto-Nagai discs. Such models have been used previously to model the disc of the Milky Way, but here we extend this framework to allow its application to discs of any mass, scalelength, and a wide range of thickness from infinitely thin to near spherical (ellipticities from 0 to 0.9). The models have the advantage of simplicity of implementation, and we expect faster run speeds over a double exponential disc treatment. The potentials are fully analytical, and differentiable at all points. The mass distribution of our models deviates from the radial mass distribution of a pure exponential disc by <0.4 per cent out to 4 disc scalelengths, and <1.9 per cent out to 10 disc scalelengths. We tabulate fitting parameters which facilitate construction of exponential discs for any scalelength, and a wide range of disc thickness (a user-friendly, web-based interface is also available). Our recipe is well suited for numerical modelling of the tidal effects of a giant disc galaxy on star clusters or dwarf galaxies. We consider three worked examples; the Milky Way thin and thick disc, and a discy dwarf galaxy.

  1. Collisional modelling of the AU Microscopii debris disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüppler, Ch.; Löhne, T.; Krivov, A. V.; Ertel, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Wolf, S.; Wyatt, M. C.; Augereau, J.-C.; Metchev, S. A.

    2015-09-01

    AU Microscopii's debris disc is one of the most famous and best-studied debris discs and one of only two resolved debris discs around M stars. We perform in-depth collisional modelling of the AU Mic disc including stellar radiative and corpuscular forces (stellar winds), aiming at a comprehensive understanding of the dust production and the dust and planetesimal dynamics in the system. Our models are compared to a suite of observational data for thermal and scattered light emission, ranging from the ALMA radial surface brightness profile at 1.3 mm to spatially resolved polarisation measurements in the visible. Most of the data are shown to be reproduced with dust production in a belt of planetesimals with an outer edge at around 40 au and subsequent inward transport of dust by stellar winds. A low dynamical excitation of the planetesimals with eccentricities up to 0.03 is preferred. The radial width of the planetesimal belt cannot be constrained tightly. Belts that are 5 au and 17 au wide, as well as a broad 44 au-wide belt, are consistent with observations. All models show surface density profiles that increase with distance from the star up to ≈40 au, as inferred from observations. The best model is achieved by assuming a stellar mass loss rate that exceeds the solar one by a factor of 50. The models reproduce the spectral energy distribution and the shape of the ALMA radial profile well, but deviate from the scattered light observations more strongly. The observations show a bluer disc colour and a lower degree of polarisation for projected distances <40 au than predicted by the models. These deviations may be reduced by taking irregularly shaped dust grains which have scattering properties different from the Mie spheres used in this work. From tests with a handful of selected dust materials, we favour mixtures of silicate, carbon, and ice of moderate porosity. We also address the origin of the unresolved central excess emission detected by ALMA and show that

  2. Radiative seesaw model with degenerate Majorana dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi; Orikasa, Yuta

    2016-06-01

    We study a three-loop-induced neutrino mass model with exotic vectorlike isospin doublet leptons which contain a dark matter candidate. Then we explore lepton flavor violations and dark matter physics in a coannihilation system. In this paper, the nearly degenerate Majorana fermion dark matter can naturally be achieved at the two-loop level, while the mass splitting can be larger than O (200 ) keV which is required from the constraint of the direct detection search with spin-independent inelastic scattering through the Z -boson portal. As a result, a monochromatic photon excess, with threshold energy greater than O (200 ) keV , is predicted in our model and could be measured through indirect detection experiments such as INTEGRAL.

  3. A model for the disc Lyman alpha emission of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffel, L.B.; Vidal-Madjar, A. ); Prange, R.; Emerich, C. ); McConnell, J.C. )

    1991-06-01

    A new efficient radiative transfer algorithm for inhomogeneous atmospheres has been used to simulate the limb to limb Lyman {alpha} reflectivities observed with the Voyager ultraviolet spectrometer during the flyby of Uranus. It was shown that complete frequency redistribution should be adequate to describe the disc emissions. The model atmosphere used was derived using a combination of Voyager measurements and modeling. Atomic H densities calculated had sources derivable directly from solar FUV and EUV fluxes. To fit the observations, four contributions are evaluated: (1) the resonance scattering of solar Lyman {alpha} radiation, (2) Rayleigh-Raman scattering of solar Lyman {alpha} radiation, (3) the resonance scattering of interplanetary Lyman {alpha} radiation, and (4) a possible internal source of unknown origin. From comparison with the observations, and provided that the published Voyager calibrations are correct, it is shown that only atmospheres with low eddy diffusion coefficients (K{sub H}{le}100 cm{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}) and an internal source could simulate both the shape and the strength of the measured disc emission. The main results are then that the direct solar Lyman {alpha} scattering contribution (type 1 plus type 2) is of the order of 760 R, the scattering of interplanetary Lyman {alpha} contributes about 320 R, and a small additional internal source providing about 100-500 R is needed to match the measurements. Further, the analysis of the disc intensities suggests that there is no strong variation of K with latitude.

  4. Clinical and radiological outcome of anterior–posterior fusion versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for symptomatic disc degeneration: a retrospective comparative study of 133 patients

    PubMed Central

    Schwender, James D.; Safriel, Yair; Gilbert, Thomas J.; Mehbod, Amir A.; Denis, Francis; Transfeldt, Ensor E.; Wroblewski, Jill M.

    2009-01-01

    Abundant data are available for direct anterior/posterior spine fusion (APF) and some for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), but only few studies from one institution compares the two techniques. One-hundred and thirty-three patients were retrospectively analyzed, 68 having APF and 65 having TLIF. All patients had symptomatic disc degeneration of the lumbar spine. Only those with one or two-level surgeries were included. Clinical chart and radiologic reviews were done, fusion solidity assessed, and functional outcomes determined by pre- and postoperative SF-36 and postoperative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and a satisfaction questionnaire. The minimum follow-up was 24 months. The mean operating room time and hospital length of stay were less in the TLIF group. The blood loss was slightly less in the TLIF group (409 vs. 480 cc.). Intra-operative complications were higher in the APF group, mostly due to vein lacerations in the anterior retroperitoneal approach. Postoperative complications were higher in the TLIF group due to graft material extruding against the nerve root or wound drainage. The pseudarthrosis rate was statistically equal (APF 17.6% and TLIF 23.1%) and was higher than most published reports. Significant improvements were noted in both groups for the SF-36 questionnaires. The mean ODI scores at follow-up were 33.5 for the APF and 39.5 for the TLIF group. The patient satisfaction rate was equal for the two groups. PMID:19125304

  5. Differential expression of p38 MAPK α, β, γ, δ isoforms in nucleus pulposus modulates macrophage polarization in intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chen; Cao, Peng; Gao, Yang; Wu, Ming; Lin, Yun; Tian, Ye; Yuan, Wen

    2016-01-01

    P38MAPK mediates cytokine induced inflammation in nucleus pulposus (NP) cells and involves in multiple cellular processes which are related to intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression, activation and function of p38 MAPK isoforms (α,β, γ and δ) in degenerative NP and the effect of p38 activation in NP cells on macrophage polarization. P38 α, β and δ isoforms are preferential expressed, whereas the p38γ isoform is absent in human NP tissue. LV-sh-p38α, sh-p38β transfection in NP cells significantly decreased the ADAMTS-4,-5, MMP-13,CCL3 expression and restored collagen-II and aggrecan expression upon IL-1β stimulation. As compared with p38α and p38β, p38δ exhibited an opposite effect on ADAMTS-4,-5, MMP-13 and aggrecan expression in NP cells. Furthermore, the production of GM-CSF and IFNγ which were trigged by p38α or p38β in NP cells induced macrophage polarization into M1 phenotype. Our finding indicates that p38 MAPK α, β and δ isoform are predominantly expressed and activated in IDD. P38 positive NP cells modulate macrophage polarization through the production of GM-CSF and IFNγ. Hence, Our study suggests that selectively targeting p38 isoforms could ameliorate the inflammation in IDD and regard IDD progression. PMID:26911458

  6. Design and fabrication of 3D-printed anatomically shaped lumbar cage for intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration treatment.

    PubMed

    Serra, T; Capelli, C; Toumpaniari, R; Orriss, I R; Leong, J J H; Dalgarno, K; Kalaskar, D M

    2016-01-01

    Spinal fusion is the gold standard surgical procedure for degenerative spinal conditions when conservative therapies have been unsuccessful in rehabilitation of patients. Novel strategies are required to improve biocompatibility and osseointegration of traditionally used materials for lumbar cages. Furthermore, new design and technologies are needed to bridge the gap due to the shortage of optimal implant sizes to fill the intervertebral disc defect. Within this context, additive manufacturing technology presents an excellent opportunity to fabricate ergonomic shape medical implants. The goal of this study is to design and manufacture a 3D-printed lumbar cage for lumbar interbody fusion. Optimisations of the proposed implant design and its printing parameters were achieved via in silico analysis. The final construct was characterised via scanning electron microscopy, contact angle, x-ray micro computed tomography (μCT), atomic force microscopy, and compressive test. Preliminary in vitro cell culture tests such as morphological assessment and metabolic activities were performed to access biocompatibility of 3D-printed constructs. Results of in silico analysis provided a useful platform to test preliminary cage design and to find an optimal value of filling density for 3D printing process. Surface characterisation confirmed a uniform coating of nHAp with nanoscale topography. Mechanical evaluation showed mechanical properties of final cage design similar to that of trabecular bone. Preliminary cell culture results showed promising results in terms of cell growth and activity confirming biocompatibility of constructs. Thus for the first time, design optimisation based on computational and experimental analysis combined with the 3D-printing technique for intervertebral fusion cage has been reported in a single study. 3D-printing is a promising technique for medical applications and this study paves the way for future development of customised implants in spinal

  7. Adverse effects of stromal vascular fraction during regenerative treatment of the intervertebral disc: observations in a goat model.

    PubMed

    Detiger, Suzanne E L; Helder, Marco N; Smit, Theodoor H; Hoogendoorn, Roel J W

    2015-09-01

    Stromal vascular fraction (SVF), an adipose tissue-derived heterogeneous cell mixture containing, among others, multipotent adipose stromal cells (ASCs) and erythrocytes, has proved beneficial for a wide range of applications in regenerative medicine. We sought to establish intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration by injecting SVF intradiscally during a one-step surgical procedure in an enzymatically (Chondroitinase ABC; cABC) induced goat model of disc degeneration. Unexpectedly, we observed a severe inflammatory response that has not been described before, including massive lymphocyte infiltration, neovascularisation and endplate destruction. A second study investigated two main suspects for these adverse effects: cABC and erythrocytes within SVF. The same destructive response was observed in healthy goat discs injected with SVF, thereby eliminating cABC as a cause. Density gradient removal of erythrocytes and ASCs purified by culturing did not lead to adverse effects. Following these observations, we incorporated an extra washing step in the SVF harvesting protocol. In a third study, we applied this protocol in a one-step procedure to a goat herniation model, in which no adverse responses were observed either. However, upon intradiscal injection of an identically processed SVF mixture into our goat IVD degeneration model during a fourth study, the adverse effects surprisingly occurred again. Despite our quest for the responsible agent, we eventually could not identify the mechanism through which the observed destructive responses occurred. Although we cannot exclude that the adverse effects are species-dependent or model-specific, we advertise caution with the clinical application of autologous SVF injections into the IVD until the responsible agent(s) are identified. PMID:25682272

  8. Inner disc obscuration in GRS 1915+105 based on relativistic slim disc model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierdayanti, K.; Sadowski, A.; Mineshige, S.; Bursa, M.

    2013-11-01

    We study the observational signatures of the relativistic slim disc of 10 M⊙ black hole, in a wide range of mass accretion rate, dot{m}, dimensionless spin parameter, a*, and viewing angle, i. In general, the innermost temperature, Tin, increases with the increase of i for a fixed value of dot{m} and a*, due to the Doppler effect. However, for i > 50° and dot{m}>dot{m}_turn, Tin starts to decrease with the increase of dot{m}. This is a result of self-obscuration - the radiation from the innermost hot part of the disc is blocked by the surrounding cooler part. The value of dot{m}_turn and the corresponding luminosities depend on a* and i. Such obscuration effects cause an interesting behaviour on the disc luminosity (Ldisc)-Tin plane for high inclinations. In addition to the standard disc branch which appears below dot{m}_turn and which obeys L_disc ∝ T_in4 relation, another branch above dot{m}_turn, which is nearly horizontal, may be observed at luminosities close to the Eddington luminosity. We show that these features are likely observed in a Galactic X-ray source, GRS 1915+105. We support a high spin parameter (a* > 0.9) for GRS 1915+105 since otherwise the high value of Tin and small size of the emitting region (rin < 1rS) cannot be explained.

  9. Cell Therapy Using Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cell Overexpressing BMP-7 for Degenerative Discs in a Rat Tail Disc Model.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative discs can cause low back pain. Cell-based transplantation or growth factors therapy have been suggested as a strategy to stimulate disc regeneration. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMDMSC) containing bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) gene were constructed. We evaluated the effectiveness of these BMP-7 overexpressing cells on degenerative discs in rat tails. In vitro and in vivo studies were designed. In the first stage, the rats were divided into two group according to discs punctured by different needle gauges (18 gauge and 22 gauge). In the second stage, the ideal size of needle was used to induce rat tail disc degeneration. These animals are divided into three groups according to timing of treatment (zero-week, two-week, four-week). Each group was divided into three treating subgroups: control group, BMDMSC group, and Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSC group. Each rat undergoes radiography examination every two weeks. After eight weeks, the discs were histologically examined with hematoxylin and eosin stain and Alcian blue stain. The 18-gauge group exhibited significant decrease in disc height index (%) than 22-gauge group at eight weeks at both Co6-7 (58.1% ± 2.8% vs. 63.7% ± 1.0%, p = 0.020) and Co8-9 discs (62.7% ± 2.8% vs. 62.8% ± 1.5%, p = 0.010). Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSCs group showed significant difference in disc height index compared to the BMDMSCs group at both Co6-7 (93.7% ± 1.5% vs. 84.8% ± 1.0%, p = 0.011) and Co8-9 (86.0% ± 2.1% vs. 81.8% ± 1.7%, p = 0.012). In Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSCs group, the zero-week treatment subgroup showed significant better in disc height index compared to two-week treatment group (p = 0.044), and four-week treatment group (p = 0.011). The zero-week treatment subgroup in Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSCs group also had significant lower histology score than two-week treatment (4.3 vs. 5.7, p = 0.045) and four-week treatment (4.3 vs. 6.0, p = 0.031). In conclusion, Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSC can slow down the progression of disc

  10. Cell Therapy Using Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cell Overexpressing BMP-7 for Degenerative Discs in a Rat Tail Disc Model

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative discs can cause low back pain. Cell-based transplantation or growth factors therapy have been suggested as a strategy to stimulate disc regeneration. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMDMSC) containing bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) gene were constructed. We evaluated the effectiveness of these BMP-7 overexpressing cells on degenerative discs in rat tails. In vitro and in vivo studies were designed. In the first stage, the rats were divided into two group according to discs punctured by different needle gauges (18 gauge and 22 gauge). In the second stage, the ideal size of needle was used to induce rat tail disc degeneration. These animals are divided into three groups according to timing of treatment (zero-week, two-week, four-week). Each group was divided into three treating subgroups: control group, BMDMSC group, and Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSC group. Each rat undergoes radiography examination every two weeks. After eight weeks, the discs were histologically examined with hematoxylin and eosin stain and Alcian blue stain. The 18-gauge group exhibited significant decrease in disc height index (%) than 22-gauge group at eight weeks at both Co6-7 (58.1% ± 2.8% vs. 63.7% ± 1.0%, p = 0.020) and Co8-9 discs (62.7% ± 2.8% vs. 62.8% ± 1.5%, p = 0.010). Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSCs group showed significant difference in disc height index compared to the BMDMSCs group at both Co6-7 (93.7% ± 1.5% vs. 84.8% ± 1.0%, p = 0.011) and Co8-9 (86.0% ± 2.1% vs. 81.8% ± 1.7%, p = 0.012). In Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSCs group, the zero-week treatment subgroup showed significant better in disc height index compared to two-week treatment group (p = 0.044), and four-week treatment group (p = 0.011). The zero-week treatment subgroup in Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSCs group also had significant lower histology score than two-week treatment (4.3 vs. 5.7, p = 0.045) and four-week treatment (4.3 vs. 6.0, p = 0.031). In conclusion, Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSC can slow down the progression of disc

  11. The life cycles of Be viscous decretion discs: Time-dependent modelling of infrared continuum observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, R. G.; Carciofi, A. C.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Rivinius, Th.; Baade, D.; Rímulo, L. R.

    2016-10-01

    We apply the viscous decretion disc (VDD) model to interpret the infrared disc continuum emission of 80 Be stars observed in different epochs. In this way, we determined 169 specific disc structures, namely their density scale, ρ0, and exponent, n. We found that the n values range mainly between 1.5 and 3.5, and ρ0 varies between 10-12 and 10-10 g cm-3, with a peak close to the lower value. Our large sample also allowed us to firmly establish that the discs around early-type stars are denser than in late-type stars. Additionally, we estimated the disc mass decretion rates and found that they range between 10-12 and 10-9 M⊙ yr-1. These values are compatible with recent stellar evolution models of fast-rotating stars. One of the main findings of this work is a correlation between the ρ0 and n values. In order to find out whether these relations can be traced back to the evolution of discs or have some other origin, we used the VDD model to calculate temporal sequences under different assumptions for the time profile of the disc mass injection. The results support the hypothesis that the observed distribution of disc properties is due to a common evolutionary path. In particular, our results suggest that the timescale for disc growth, during which the disc is being actively fed by mass injection episodes, is shorter than the timescale for disc dissipation, when the disc is no longer fed by the star and dissipates as a result of the viscous diffusion of the disc material.

  12. System modeling with the DISC framework: evidence from safety-critical domains.

    PubMed

    Reiman, Teemu; Pietikäinen, Elina; Oedewald, Pia; Gotcheva, Nadezhda

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to illustrate the development and application of the Design for Integrated Safety Culture (DISC) framework for system modeling by evaluating organizational potential for safety in nuclear and healthcare domains. The DISC framework includes criteria for good safety culture and a description of functions that the organization needs to implement in order to orient the organization toward the criteria. Three case studies will be used to illustrate the utilization of the DISC framework in practice.

  13. Kinematic modelling of disc galaxies using graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekiaris, G.; Glazebrook, K.; Fluke, C. J.; Abraham, R.

    2016-01-01

    With large-scale integral field spectroscopy (IFS) surveys of thousands of galaxies currently under-way or planned, the astronomical community is in need of methods, techniques and tools that will allow the analysis of huge amounts of data. We focus on the kinematic modelling of disc galaxies and investigate the potential use of massively parallel architectures, such as the graphics processing unit (GPU), as an accelerator for the computationally expensive model-fitting procedure. We review the algorithms involved in model-fitting and evaluate their suitability for GPU implementation. We employ different optimization techniques, including the Levenberg-Marquardt and nested sampling algorithms, but also a naive brute-force approach based on nested grids. We find that the GPU can accelerate the model-fitting procedure up to a factor of ˜100 when compared to a single-threaded CPU, and up to a factor of ˜10 when compared to a multithreaded dual CPU configuration. Our method's accuracy, precision and robustness are assessed by successfully recovering the kinematic properties of simulated data, and also by verifying the kinematic modelling results of galaxies from the GHASP and DYNAMO surveys as found in the literature. The resulting GBKFIT code is available for download from: http://supercomputing.swin.edu.au/gbkfit.

  14. Building disc structure and galaxy properties through angular momentum: the DARK SAGE semi-analytic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Adam R. H.; Croton, Darren J.; Mutch, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    We present the new semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution, DARK SAGE, a heavily modified version of the publicly available SAGE code. The model is designed for detailed evolution of galactic discs. We evolve discs in a series of annuli with fixed specific angular momentum, which allows us to make predictions for the radial and angular-momentum structure of galaxies. Most physical processes, including all channels of star formation and associated feedback, are performed in these annuli. We present the surface density profiles of our model spiral galaxies, both as a function of radius and specific angular momentum, and find that the discs naturally build a pseudo-bulge-like component. Our main results are focused on predictions relating to the integrated mass-specific angular momentum relation of stellar discs. The model produces a distinct sequence between these properties in remarkable agreement with recent observational literature. We investigate the impact Toomre disc instabilities have on shaping this sequence and find they are crucial for regulating both the mass and spin of discs. Without instabilities, high-mass discs would be systematically deficient in specific angular momentum by a factor of ˜2.5, with increased scatter. Instabilities also appear to drive the direction in which the mass-spin sequence of spiral galaxy discs evolves. With them, we find galaxies of fixed mass have higher specific angular momentum at later epochs.

  15. Linking continuous and discrete intervertebral disc models through homogenisation.

    PubMed

    Karajan, N; Röhrle, O; Ehlers, W; Schmitt, S

    2013-06-01

    At present, there are two main numerical approaches that are frequently used to simulate the mechanical behaviour of the human spine. Researchers with a continuum-mechanical background often utilise the finite-element method (FEM), where the involved biological soft and hard tissues are modelled on a macroscopic (continuum) level. In contrast, groups associated with the science of human movement usually apply discrete multi-body systems (MBS). Herein, the bones are modelled as rigid bodies, which are connected by Hill-type muscles and non-linear rheological spring-dashpot models to represent tendons and cartilaginous connective tissue like intervertebral discs (IVD). A possibility to benefit from both numerical methods is to couple them and use each approach, where it is most appropriate. Herein, the basic idea is to utilise MBS in simulations of the overall body and apply the FEM only to selected regions of interest. In turn, the FEM is used as homogenisation tool, which delivers more accurate non-linear relationships describing the behaviour of the IVD in the multi-body dynamics model. The goal of this contribution is to present an approach to couple both numerical methods without the necessity to apply a gluing algorithm in the context of a co-simulation. Instead, several pre-computations of the intervertebral disc are performed offline to generate an approximation of the homogenised finite-element (FE) result. In particular, the discrete degrees of freedom (DOF) of the MBS, that is, three displacements and three rotations, are applied to the FE model of the IVD, and the resulting homogenised forces and moments are recorded. Moreover, a polynomial function is presented with the discrete DOF of the MBS as variables and the discrete forces an moments as function values. For the sake of a simple verification, the coupling method is applied to a simplified motion segment of the spine. Herein, two stiff cylindrical vertebrae with an interjacent homogeneous

  16. Nonlinear finite element analysis of anular lesions in the L4/5 intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Little, J P; Adam, C J; Evans, J H; Pettet, G J; Pearcy, M J

    2007-01-01

    Degenerate intervertebral discs exhibit both material and structural changes. Structural defects (lesions) develop in the anulus fibrosus with age. While degeneration has been simulated in numerous previous studies, the effects of structural lesions on disc mechanics are not well known. In this study, a finite element model (FEM) of the L4/5 intervertebral disc was developed in order to study the effects of anular lesions and loss of hydrostatic pressure in the nucleus pulposus on the disc mechanics. Models were developed to simulate both healthy and degenerate discs. Degeneration was simulated with either rim, radial or circumferential anular lesions and by equating nucleus pressure to zero. The anulus fibrosus ground substance was represented as a nonlinear incompressible material using a second-order polynomial, hyperelastic strain energy equation. Hyperelastic material parameters were derived from experimentation on sheep discs. Endplates were assumed to be rigid, and annulus lamellae were assumed to be vertical in the unloaded state. Loading conditions corresponding to physiological ranges of rotational motion were applied to the models and peak rotation moments compared between models. Loss of nucleus pulposus pressure had a much greater effect on the disc mechanics than the presence of anular lesions. This indicated that the development of anular lesions alone (prior to degeneration of the nucleus) has minimal effect on disc mechanics, but that disc stiffness is significantly reduced by the loss of hydrostatic pressure in the nucleus. With the degeneration of the nucleus, the outer innervated anulus or surrounding osteo-ligamentous anatomy may therefore experience increased strains. PMID:17383659

  17. Disc galaxy modelling with a particle-by-particle made-to-measure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Jason A. S.; Kawata, Daisuke

    2013-04-01

    We have developed the initial version of a new particle-by-particle adaptation of the made-to-measure (M2M) method, aiming to model the Galactic disc from upcoming Galactic stellar survey data. In our new particle-by-particle M2M, the observables of the target system are compared with those of the model galaxy at the position of the target stars (i.e. particles). The weights of the model particles are changed to reproduce the observables of the target system, and the gravitational potential is automatically adjusted by the changing weights of the particles. This paper demonstrates, as the initial work, that the particle-by-particle M2M can recreate a target disc system created by an N-body simulation in a known dark matter potential, with no error in the observables. The radial profiles of the surface density, velocity dispersion in the radial and perpendicular directions, and the rotational velocity of the target disc are all well reproduced from the initial disc model, whose scalelength is different from that of the target disc. We also demonstrate that our M2M can be applied to an incomplete data set and recreate the target disc reasonably well when the observables are restricted to a part of the disc. We discuss our calibration of the model parameters and the importance of regularization.

  18. The chemodynamical evolution of the Milky Way disc - A new modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchev, Ivan; Chiappini, Cristina; Martig, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recent advancements in the field of galaxy formation and evolution, fully self-consistent simulations are still unable to make the detailed predictions necessary for the planned and ongoing large spectroscopic and photometric surveys of the Milky Way disc. These difficulties arise from the very uncertain nature of sub-grid physical energy feedback within models, affecting both star formation rates and chemical enrichment. To avoid these problems, we have introduced a new approach which consists of fusing disc chemical evolution models with compatible numerical simulations. We demonstrate the power of this method by showing that a range of observational results can be explained by our new model. We show that due to radial migration from mergers at high redshift and the central bar at later times, a sizable fraction of old metal-poor, high-[α/Fe] stars can reach the solar vicinity. This naturally accounts for a number of recent observations related to both the thin and thick discs, despite the fact that we use thin-disc chemistry only. Within the framework of our model, the MW thick disc has emerged naturally from (i) stars born with high velocity dispersions at high redshift, (ii) stars migrating from the inner disc very early on due to strong merger activity, and (iii) further radial migration driven by the bar and spirals at later times. A significant fraction of old stars with thick-disc characteristics could have been born near the solar radius.

  19. Storm fronts over galaxy discs: models of how waves generate extraplanar gas and its anomalous kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, Curtis; Smith, Daniel C.

    2009-09-01

    The existence of partially ionized, diffuse gas and dust clouds at kiloparsec scale distances above the central planes of edge-on, galaxy discs was an unexpected discovery about 20 years ago. Subsequent observations showed that this extended or extraplanar diffuse interstellar gas (EDIG) has rotation velocities approximately 10-20 per cent lower than those in the central plane, and has been hard to account for. Here, we present results of hydrodynamic models, with radiative cooling and heating from star formation. We find that in models with star formation generated stochastically across the disc, an extraplanar gas layer is generated as long as the star formation is sufficiently strong. However, this gas rotates at nearly the same speed as the midplane gas. We then studied a range of models with imposed spiral or bar waves in the disc. EDIG layers were also generated in these models, but primarily over the wave regions, not over the entire disc. Because of this partial coverage, the EDIG clouds move radially, as well as vertically, with the result that observed kinematic anomalies are reproduced. The implication is that the kinematic anomalies are the result of three-dimensional motions when the cylindrical symmetry of the disc is broken. Thus, the kinematic anomalies are the result of bars or strong waves, and more face-on galaxies with such waves should have an asymmetric EDIG component. The models also indicate that the EDIG can contain a significant fraction of cool gas, and that some star formation can be triggered at considerable heights above the disc mid-plane. We expect all of these effects to be more prominent in young, forming discs, to play a role in rapidly smoothing disc asymmetries and in working to self-regulate disc structure.

  20. Retinal Changes in an ATP-Induced Model of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Aplin, Felix P.; Vessey, Kirstan A.; Luu, Chi D.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fletcher, Erica L.

    2016-01-01

    In rodents and felines, intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been shown to induce photoreceptor death providing a tractable model of retinal degeneration in these species. This study investigated the long term effects of photoreceptor loss in an ATP induced feline model of retinal degeneration. Six normal sighted felines were unilaterally blinded using intravitreal ATP injections and assessed using electroretinography (ERG) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). At 30 h (n = 3) or 12 weeks (n = 3) post-injection, the animals were euthanized and the eyes enucleated. Retinae were sectioned and labeled using immunohistochemistry for markers of cell death, neural remodeling and gliosis. Ongoing cell death and retinal degeneration was observed in the outer retina at both 30 h and 12 weeks following unilateral ATP injection. Markers of mid to late-stage retinal remodeling such as cell displacement and aberrant neurite growth were observed in the inner retina at 12 weeks post-injection. Ganglion cells appeared to remain intact in ATP injected eyes. Müller cell gliosis was observed throughout the inner and outer retina, in some parts completely enveloping and/or displacing the surviving neural tissue. Our data suggests that the ATP injected feline retina continues to undergo progressive retinal degeneration and exhibits abnormalities consistent with a description of retinal remodeling commonly seen in other models of retinal degeneration. These findings validate the use of intravitreal ATP injection in feline as a large animal model of retinal degeneration which may aid in development of therapies aiming to restore visual function after photoreceptor degeneration. PMID:27199678

  1. Thermal Modeling of Disc Brake Rotor in Frictional Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Belhocine; Ghazaly, Nouby Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Safety aspect in automotive engineering has been considered as a number one priority in development of new vehicle. Each single system has been studied and developed in order to meet safety requirement. Instead of having air bag, good suspension systems, good handling and safe cornering, there is one most critical system in the vehicle which is brake systems. The objective of this work is to investigate and analyze the temperature distribution of rotor disc during braking operation using ANSYS Multiphysics. The work uses the finite element analysis techniques to predict the temperature distribution on the full and ventilated brake disc and to identify the critical temperature of the rotor. The analysis also gives us, the heat flux distribution for the two discs.

  2. Modeling the Compact Disc Read System in Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinaus, Brad; Veum, Mick

    2009-01-01

    One of the great, engaging aspects of physics is its application to everyday technology. The compact disc player is an example of one such technology that applies fundamental principles from optics in order to efficiently store and quickly retrieve information. We have created a lab in which students use simple optical components to assemble a…

  3. Quasar discs. II - A composite model for the broad-line region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzer, Hagai

    1987-03-01

    The possibility of geometrically thin accretion discs in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) was discussed in Paper I of this series (H. Netzer, 1985). The apparent luminosity of such discs depends on the viewing angle and this may be the reason for the observed correlation of continuum brightness and line equivalent width. This idea is taken one step further in the present work and the emission line spectrum of a gas exposed to the anisotropic ionizing radiation of a disc is investigated. One example which is studied in detail is that of a disc UV continuum combined with an isotropic X-ray source. Analysis of the L-M relationship in AGNs, within the framework of the new model, shows that these objects have smaller central masses and higher accretion efficiencies compared with previous estimates. There are important consequences for the two-phase model and cloud formation, and specific predictions of the observed LUV/LX, which is angle dependent.

  4. Non-LTE models for the gaseous metal component of circumstellar discs around white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, S.; Nagel, T.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.

    2011-06-01

    Context. Gaseous metal discs around single white dwarfs have been discovered recently. They are thought to develop from disrupted planetary bodies. Aims: Spectroscopic analyses will allow us to study the composition of extrasolar planetary material. We investigate in detail the first object for which a gas disc was discovered (SDSS J122859.93+104032.9). Methods: We perform non-LTE modelling of viscous gas discs by computing the detailed vertical structure and line spectra. The models are composed of carbon, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, calcium, and hydrogen with chemical abundances typical for Solar System asteroids. Line asymmetries are modelled by assuming spiral-arm and eccentric disc structures as suggested by hydrodynamical simulations. Results: The observed infrared Ca ii emission triplet can be modelled with a hydrogen-deficient metal gas disc located inside of the tidal disruption radius, with Teff ≈ 6000 K and a surface mass density of Σ ≈ 0.3 g/cm2. The inner radius is well constrained at about 0.64 R⊙. The line profile asymmetry can be reproduced by either a spiral-arm structure or an eccentric disc, the latter being favoured by its time variability behaviour. Such structures, reaching from 0.64 to 1.5 R⊙, contain a mass of about 3-6 × 1021 g, the latter equivalent to the mass of a 135-km diameter Solar System asteroid.

  5. The subcritical baroclinic instability in local accretion disc models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesur, G.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2010-04-01

    Context. The presence of vortices in accretion discs has been debated for more than a decade. Baroclinic instabilities might be a way to generate these vortices in the presence of a radial entropy gradient. However, the nature of these instabilities is still unclear and 3D parametric instabilities can lead to the rapid destruction of these vortices. Aims: We present new results exhibiting a subcritical baroclinic instability (SBI) in local shearing box models. We describe the 2D and 3D behaviour of this instability using numerical simulations and we present a simple analytical model describing the underlying physical process. Methods: We investigate the SBI in local shearing boxes, using either the incompressible Boussinesq approximation or a fully compressible model. We explore the parameter space varying several local dimensionless parameters and we isolate the regime relevant for the SBI. 3D shearing boxes are also investigated using high resolution spectral methods to resolve both the SBI and 3D parametric instabilities. Results: A subcritical baroclinic instability is observed in flows stable for the Solberg-Hoïland criterion using local simulations. This instability is found to be a nonlinear (or subcritical) instability, which cannot be described by ordinary linear approaches. It requires a radial entropy gradient weakly unstable for the Schwartzchild criterion and a strong thermal diffusivity (or equivalently a short cooling time). In compressible simulations, the instability produces density waves which transport angular momentum outward with typically α ⪉ 3 × 10-3, the exact value depending on the background temperature profile. Finally, the instability survives in 3D, vortex cores becoming turbulent due to parametric instabilities. Conclusions: The subcritical baroclinic instability is a robust phenomenon, which can be captured using local simulations. The instability survives in 3D thanks to a balance between the 2D SBI and 3D parametric

  6. A finite element model of the L4-L5-S1 human spine segment including the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the discs.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Hector E; Gómez, Lessby; García, Jose J

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to study disc degeneration and the risk of injury during occupational activities, a new finite element (FE) model of the L4-L5-S1 segment of the human spine was developed based on the anthropometry of a typical Colombian worker. Beginning with medical images, the programs CATIA and SOLIDWORKS were used to generate and assemble the vertebrae and create the soft structures of the segment. The software ABAQUS was used to run the analyses, which included a detailed model calibration using the experimental step-wise reduction data for the L4-L5 component, while the L5-S1 segment was calibrated in the intact condition. The range of motion curves, the intradiscal pressure and the lateral bulging under pure moments were considered for the calibration. As opposed to other FE models that include the L5-S1 disc, the model developed in this study considered the regional variations and anisotropy of the annulus as well as a realistic description of the nucleus geometry, which allowed an improved representation of experimental data during the validation process. Hence, the model can be used to analyze the stress and strain distributions in the L4-L5 and L5-S1 discs of workers performing activities such as lifting and carrying tasks. PMID:26415632

  7. A finite element model of the L4-L5-S1 human spine segment including the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the discs.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Hector E; Gómez, Lessby; García, Jose J

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to study disc degeneration and the risk of injury during occupational activities, a new finite element (FE) model of the L4-L5-S1 segment of the human spine was developed based on the anthropometry of a typical Colombian worker. Beginning with medical images, the programs CATIA and SOLIDWORKS were used to generate and assemble the vertebrae and create the soft structures of the segment. The software ABAQUS was used to run the analyses, which included a detailed model calibration using the experimental step-wise reduction data for the L4-L5 component, while the L5-S1 segment was calibrated in the intact condition. The range of motion curves, the intradiscal pressure and the lateral bulging under pure moments were considered for the calibration. As opposed to other FE models that include the L5-S1 disc, the model developed in this study considered the regional variations and anisotropy of the annulus as well as a realistic description of the nucleus geometry, which allowed an improved representation of experimental data during the validation process. Hence, the model can be used to analyze the stress and strain distributions in the L4-L5 and L5-S1 discs of workers performing activities such as lifting and carrying tasks.

  8. Loss of Ikbkap Causes Slow, Progressive Retinal Degeneration in a Mouse Model of Familial Dysautonomia

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Grisela

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Familial dysautonomia (FD) is an autosomal recessive congenital neuropathy that is caused by a mutation in the gene for inhibitor of kappa B kinase complex-associated protein (IKBKAP). Although FD patients suffer from multiple neuropathies, a major debilitation that affects their quality of life is progressive blindness. To determine the requirement for Ikbkap in the developing and adult retina, we generated Ikbkap conditional knockout (CKO) mice using a TUBA1a promoter-Cre (Tα1-Cre). In the retina, Tα1-Cre expression is detected predominantly in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). At 6 months, significant loss of RGCs had occurred in the CKO retinas, with the greatest loss in the temporal retina, which is the same spatial phenotype observed in FD, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, and dominant optic atrophy. Interestingly, the melanopsin-positive RGCs were resistant to degeneration. By 9 months, signs of photoreceptor degeneration were observed, which later progressed to panretinal degeneration, including RGC and photoreceptor loss, optic nerve thinning, Müller glial activation, and disruption of layers. Taking these results together, we conclude that although Ikbkap is not required for normal development of RGCs, its loss causes a slow, progressive RGC degeneration most severely in the temporal retina, which is later followed by indirect photoreceptor loss and complete retinal disorganization. This mouse model of FD is not only useful for identifying the mechanisms mediating retinal degeneration, but also provides a model system in which to attempt to test therapeutics that may mitigate the loss of vision in FD patients.

  9. Probabilistic Fatigue Life Prediction of Turbine Disc Considering Model Parameter Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Liping; Yu, Le; Zhu, Shun-Peng; Ding, Liangliang; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Aiming to improve the predictive ability of Walker model for fatigue life prediction and taking the turbine disc alloy GH4133 as the application example, this paper investigates a new approach for probabilistic fatigue life prediction when considering parameter uncertainty inherent in the life prediction model. Firstly, experimental data are used to update the model parameters using Bayes' theorem, so as to obtain the posterior probability distribution functions of two parameters of the Walker model, as well to achieve the probabilistic life prediction model for turbine disc. During the updating process, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique is used to generate samples of the given distribution and estimating the parameters distinctly. After that, the turbine disc life is predicted using the probabilistic Walker model based on Monte Carlo simulation technique. The experimental results indicate that: (1) after using the small sample test data obtained from turbine disc, parameter uncertainty of the Walker model can be quantified and the corresponding probabilistic model for fatigue life prediction can be established using Bayes' theorem; (2) there exists obvious dispersion of life data for turbine disc when predicting fatigue life in practical engineering application.

  10. Disc instability models for X-ray transients: evidence for evaporation and low α-viscosity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menou, Kristen; Hameury, Jean-Marie; Lasota, Jean-Pierre; Narayan, Ramesh

    2000-05-01

    We construct time-dependent models of accretion discs around black holes and neutron stars. We investigate the effect that evaporation of the inner disc regions during quiescence has upon the predictions of the disc instability model (DIM) for these systems. We do not include irradiation of the disc in the models. Removing the inner, most unstable, parts of the accretion disc increases the predicted recurrence times. However, DIMs with values of the viscosity parameter αhot~0.1 and αcold~0.02 (values typically used in applications of the DIM to standard dwarf nova outbursts) fail to reproduce the long recurrence times of soft X-ray transients (unless we resort to fine-tuning the parameters), independent of the evaporation strength. We show that models in which evaporation is included and a smaller value of αcold (~0.005) used do reproduce the long recurrence times and the accretion rates at the level of the Eddington rate observed in outburst. The large difference between the values of αhot and αcold, if confirmed once disc irradiation is included, suggests that several viscosity mechanisms operate in these accretion discs. For some parameter sets our models predict re-flares during the decline from outburst. The re-flares are a physical property of the model and result from the formation of a heating front in the wake of an initial cooling front, and subsequent multiple front reflections. The re-flares disappear in low-α models where front reflection cannot occur.

  11. Contrasting Roles for Axonal Degeneration in an Autoimmune versus Viral Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, Ikuo; Tanaka, Tomoko; Terry, Emily Jane; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Although demyelination is a cardinal feature in multiple sclerosis, axonal injury also occurs. We tested whether a delay in axonal degeneration could affect the disease severity in two models for multiple sclerosis: experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection. We compared wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice with C57BL/Wlds (Wld) mice, which carry a mutation that delays axonal degeneration. In EAE, both mouse strains were sensitized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide and showed a similar disease onset, MOG-specific lymphoproliferative responses, and inflammation during the acute stage of EAE. However, during the chronic stage, B6 mice continued to show paralysis with a greater extent of axonal damage, demyelination, and MOG-specific lymphoproliferative responses compared with Wld mice, which showed complete recovery. In TMEV infection, only Wld mice were paralyzed and had increased inflammation, virus antigen-positive cells, and TMEV-specific lymphoproliferative responses versus infected B6 mice. Because TMEV can use axons to disseminate in the brain, axonal degeneration in B6 mice might be a beneficial mechanism that limits the virus spread, whereas slow axonal degeneration in Wld mice could favor virus spread. Therefore, axonal degeneration plays contrasting roles (beneficial versus detrimental) depending on the initiator driving the disease. PMID:17200195

  12. Simulating the sensitivity of cell nutritive environment to composition changes within the intervertebral disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, C. Ruiz; Malandrino, A.; van Rijsbergen, MM.; Lacroix, D.; Ito, K.; Noailly, J.

    2016-05-01

    Altered nutrition in the intervertebral disc affects cell viability and can generate catabolic cascades contributing to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Such degradation is expected to affect couplings between disc mechanics and nutrition, contributing to accelerate degenerative processes. However, the relation of ECM changes to major biophysical events within the loaded disc remains unclear. A L4-L5 disc finite element model including the nucleus (NP), annulus (AF) and endplates was used and coupled to a transport-cell viability model. Solute concentrations and cell viability were evaluated along the mid-sagittal plane path. A design of experiment (DOE) was performed. DOE parameters corresponded to AF and NP biochemical tissue measurements in discs with different degeneration grades. Cell viability was not affected by any parameter combinations defined. Nonetheless, the initial water content was the parameter that affected the most the solute contents, especially glucose. Calculations showed that altered NP composition could negatively affect AF cell nutrition. Results suggested that AF and NP tissue degeneration are not critical to nutrition-related cell viability at early-stage of disc degeneration. However, small ECM degenerative changes may alter significantly disc nutrition under mechanical loads. Coupling disc mechano-transport simulations and enzyme expression studies could allow identifying spatiotemporal sequences related to tissue catabolism.

  13. Investigation of intervertebral disc degeneration using multivariate FTIR spectroscopic imaging† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5fd00160a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Mirte; Detiger, Suzanne E. L.; Helder, Marco N.; Smit, Theo H.; Le Maitre, Christine L.; Sammon, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally tissue samples are analysed using protein or enzyme specific stains on serial sections to build up a picture of the distribution of components contained within them. In this study we investigated the potential of multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to deconvolute 2nd derivative spectra of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopic images measured in transflectance mode of goat and human paraffin embedded intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue sections, to see if this methodology can provide analogous information to that provided by immunohistochemical stains and bioassays but from a single section. MCR-ALS analysis of non-degenerate and enzymatically in vivo degenerated goat IVDs reveals five matrix components displaying distribution maps matching histological stains for collagen, elastin and proteoglycan (PG), as well as immunohistochemical stains for collagen type I and II. Interestingly, two components exhibiting characteristic spectral and distribution profiles of proteoglycans were found, and relative component/tissue maps of these components (labelled PG1 and PG2) showed distinct distributions in non-degenerate versus mildly degenerate goat samples. MCR-ALS analysis of human IVD sections resulted in comparable spectral profiles to those observed in the goat samples, highlighting the inter species transferability of the presented methodology. Multivariate FTIR image analysis of a set of 43 goat IVD sections allowed the extraction of semi-quantitative information from component/tissue gradients taken across the IVD width of collagen type I, collagen type II, PG1 and PG2. Regional component/tissue parameters were calculated and significant correlations were found between histological grades of degeneration and PG parameters (PG1: p = 0.0003, PG2: p < 0.0001); glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content and PGs (PG1: p = 0.0055, PG2: p = 0.0001); and MRI T2* measurements and PGs (PG1: p = 0.0021, PG2: p < 0.0001). Additionally

  14. Magnetorotationally driven wind cycles in local disc models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riols, A.; Ogilvie, G. I.; Latter, H.; Ross, J. P.

    2016-09-01

    Jets, from the protostellar to the AGN context, have been extensively studied but their connection to the turbulent dynamics of the underlying accretion disc is poorly understood. Following a similar approach to Lesur et al. (2013), we examine the role of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the production and acceleration of outflows from discs. Via a suite of one-dimensional shearing-box simulations of stratified discs we show that magneto-centrifugal winds exhibit cyclic activity with a period of 10 - 20 Ω-1, a few times the orbital period. The cycle seems to be more vigorous for strong vertical field; it is robust to the variation of relevant parameters and independent of numerical details. The convergence of these solutions (in particular the mass loss rate) with vertical box size is also studied. By considering a sequence of magnetohydrostatic equilibria and their stability, the periodic activity may be understood as the succession of the following phases: (a) a dominant MRI channel mode, (b) strong magnetic field generation, (c) consequent wind launching, and ultimately (d) vertical expulsion of the excess magnetic field by the expanding and accelerating gas associated with the wind. We discuss potential connections between this behaviour and observed time-variability in disk-jet systems.

  15. Analytical model of electron transport in polycrystalline, degenerately doped ZnO films

    SciTech Connect

    Bikowski, André Ellmer, Klaus

    2014-10-14

    An analytical description of the charge carrier transport, valid for non-degenerated and degenerated semiconductors, was developed, critically reviewed, and fitted to the temperature-dependent Hall mobility data of magnetron sputtered, degenerately doped ZnO:Al films. Our extended model for grain boundary scattering in semiconductors of arbitrary degeneracy is based on previous models from literature and suitable to describe the Hall mobility of the carriers as a function of the free carrier concentration and the temperature at the same time. It is mathematically simple enough for a fast fit procedure, which is not possible with most of the previous models. Applying a combined transport model consisting of ionized impurity scattering, phonon scattering, and grain boundary scattering in degenerate semiconductors, we were able to determine the trap density at the grain boundaries Nₜ ≈ 3×10¹³ to 5×10¹³cm⁻² and the deformation potential E{sub ac} in the range of 5 eV to 9 eV depending on the details of the transport model.

  16. Cervical Arthroplasty for Moderate to Severe Disc Degeneration: Clinical and Radiological Assessments after a Minimum Follow-Up of 18 Months: Pfirrmann Grade and Cervical Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Kim, Do Yeon; Ji, Gyu Yeul; Kim, Yeo Ju; Hyun, Dongkeun; Kim, Eun Young; Park, Hyeonseon; Park, Hyeong-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Clinical outcomes and radiologic results after cervical arthroplasty have been reported in many articles, yet relatively few studies after cervical arthroplasty have been conducted in severe degenerative cervical disc disease. Materials and Methods Sixty patients who underwent cervical arthroplasty (Mobi-C®) between April 2006 and November 2011 with a minimum follow-up of 18 months were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into two groups according to Pfirrmann classification on preoperative cervical MR images: group A (Pfirrmann disc grade III, n=38) and group B (Pfirrmann disc grades IV or V, n=22). Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores of neck and arm pain, modified Oswestry Disability Index (mODI) score, and radiological results including cervical range of motion (ROM) were assessed before and after surgery. Results VAS and mean mODI scores decreased after surgery from 5.1 and 57.6 to 2.7 and 31.5 in group A and from 6.1 and 59.9 to 3.7 and 38.4 in group B, respectively. In both groups, VAS and mODI scores significantly improved postoperatively (p<0.001), although no significant intergroup differences were found. Also, cervical dynamic ROM was preserved or gradually improved up to 18 months after cervical arthroplasty in both groups. Global, segmental and adjacent ROM was similar for both groups during follow-up. No cases of device subsidence or extrusion were recorded. Conclusion Clinical and radiological results following cervical arthroplasty in patients with severe degenerative cervical disc disease were no different from those in patients with mild degenerative cervical disc disease after 18 months of follow-up. PMID:24954339

  17. Interaction of A2E with Model Membranes. Implications to the Pathogenesis of Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    De, Soma; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2002-01-01

    Deposition of a fluorophoric material, known as lipofuscin, in retinal pigment epithelium cells has been speculated to be one of the biomarkers of age-related macular degeneration. One of the fluorophores of lipofuscin has been characterized as A2E, a pyridinium bisretinoid. Its cationic nature along with two hydrophobic retinal chains suggests that it can disrupt the membrane integrity by its detergent-like activity and can thus cause cellular damage. With this notion, we studied in detail the interaction between A2E and the model membranes of different lipid compositions using fluorescence steady-state and fluorescence anisotropy measurements. A transition from vesicular to micellar structure occurred upon incorporation of A2E into the lipid bilayer. However, the A2E concentration at which this transition occurred depends on the lipid composition. A lipid mixture containing 10% phosphatidylserine (PS) (close to disc membrane PS content) behaved similarly to a lipid mixture having no PS. In contrast, vesicles containing 20% PS showed significantly different behavior. Membrane solubilization by A2E was also confirmed by vesicle leakage experiments. A2E also showed significant activity in liposome-mediated gene transfection. A lipid formulation containing 40% A2E and a helper lipid showed plasmid DNA transfection efficiency comparable to commercially available transfection reagents with no evidence of cytotoxicity. These results contribute to understanding the mechanism underlying the A2E-induced cellular dysfunction. PMID:12149277

  18. Linear moose model with pairs of degenerate gauge boson triplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalbuoni, Roberto; Coradeschi, Francesco; de Curtis, Stefania; Dominici, Daniele

    2008-05-01

    The possibility of a strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking sector, as opposed to the weakly interacting light Higgs of the standard model, is not yet ruled out by experiments. In this paper we make an extensive study of a deconstructed model (or “moose” model) providing an effective description of such a strong symmetry breaking sector, and show its compatibility with experimental data for a wide portion of the model parameter space. The model is a direct generalization of the previously proposed D-BESS model.

  19. Linear moose model with pairs of degenerate gauge boson triplets

    SciTech Connect

    Casalbuoni, Roberto; Coradeschi, Francesco; De Curtis, Stefania; Dominici, Daniele

    2008-05-01

    The possibility of a strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking sector, as opposed to the weakly interacting light Higgs of the standard model, is not yet ruled out by experiments. In this paper we make an extensive study of a deconstructed model (or ''moose'' model) providing an effective description of such a strong symmetry breaking sector, and show its compatibility with experimental data for a wide portion of the model parameter space. The model is a direct generalization of the previously proposed D-BESS model.

  20. Precipitation Model Validation in 3rd Generation Aeroturbine Disc Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, G. B.; Jou, H.-J.; Jung, J.; Sebastian, J. T.; Misra, A.; Locci, I.; Hull, D.

    2008-01-01

    In support of application of the DARPA-AIM methodology to the accelerated hybrid thermal process optimization of 3rd generation aeroturbine disc alloys with quantified uncertainty, equilibrium and diffusion couple experiments have identified available fundamental thermodynamic and mobility databases of sufficient accuracy. Using coherent interfacial energies quantified by Single-Sensor DTA nucleation undercooling measurements, PrecipiCalc(TM) simulations of nonisothermal precipitation in both supersolvus and subsolvus treated samples show good agreement with measured gamma particle sizes and compositions. Observed longterm isothermal coarsening behavior defines requirements for further refinement of elastic misfit energy and treatment of the parallel evolution of incoherent precipitation at grain boundaries.

  1. A simple model for the evolution of disc galaxies: the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naab, Thorsten; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2006-03-01

    A simple model for the evolution of disc galaxies is presented. We adopt three numbers from observations of the Milky Way disc, Σd the local surface mass density, rd the stellar scalelength (of the assumed exponential disc), vc, the amplitude of the (assumed flat) rotation curve, and physically, the (local) dynamical Kennicutt star formation prescription, standard chemical evolution equations assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and a model for spectral evolution of stellar populations. We can determine the detailed evolution of the model with only the addition of standard cosmological scalings with the time of the dimensional parameters. A surprising wealth of detailed specifications follows from this prescription including the gaseous infall rate as a function of radius and time, the distribution of stellar ages and metallicities with time and radius, surface brightness profiles at different wavelengths, colours, etc. Some of the detailed properties are as follows: the global gas infall rate and the global star formation rate are almost constant at 2-3 and 2-4 Msolar yr-1 during the evolution of the disc. The present-day total masses in stars and in gas are 2.7 × 1010 and 9.5 × 109 Msolar, respectively, and the disc has an absolute K-band magnitude of -23.2. The present-day stellar scalelength (normalized to 3 kpc) in the K band and is larger than at shorter wavelengths. At the solar neighbourhood stars started to form ~10 Gyr ago at an increasing rate, peaking four billion years ago and then slowly declining in good agreement with observations. The mean age of long-lived stars at the solar neighbourhood is about 4 Gyr. The local surface densities of the stars and gas are 35 and 15 Msolar pc-2, respectively. The metallicity distribution of the stars at the solar radius is narrow with a peak at [Z/Zsolar]=-0.1. The present-day metallicity gradient is -0.046 dex kpc-1 and has been significantly steeper in the past. Using a Chabrier initial mass function

  2. MRI channel flows in vertically stratified models of accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latter, Henrik N.; Fromang, Sebastien; Gressel, Oliver

    2010-08-01

    Simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in `unstratified' shearing boxes exhibit powerful coherent flows, whereby the fluid vertically splits into countermoving planar jets or `channels'. Channel flows correspond to certain axisymmetric linear MRI modes, and their preponderance follows from the remarkable fact that they are approximate non-linear solutions of the MHD equations in the limit of weak magnetic fields. We show in this paper, analytically and with one-dimensional numerical simulations, that this property is also shared by certain axisymmetric MRI modes in vertically stratified shearing boxes. These channel flows rapidly capture significant amounts of magnetic and kinetic energy, and thus are vulnerable to secondary shear instabilities. We examine these parasites in the vertically stratified context, and estimate the maximum amplitudes that channels attain before they are destroyed. These estimates suggest that a dominant channel flow will usually drive the disc's magnetic field to thermal strengths. The prominence of these flows and their destruction place enormous demands on simulations, but channels in their initial stages also offer a useful check on numerical codes. These benchmarks are especially valuable given the increasing interest in the saturation of the stratified MRI. Lastly, we speculate on the potential connection between `run-away' channel flows and outburst behaviour in protostellar and dwarf nova discs.

  3. Retinal degeneration in animal models with a defective visual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Continuous generation of visual chromophore through the visual (retinoid) cycle is essential to maintain eyesight and retinal heath. Impairments in this cycle and related pathways adversely affect vision. In this review, we summarize the chemical reactions of vitamin A metabolites involved in the retinoid cycle and describe animal models of associated human diseases. Development of potential therapies for retinal disorders in these animal models is also introduced. PMID:25210527

  4. The artificial disc: theory, design and materials.

    PubMed

    Bao, Q B; McCullen, G M; Higham, P A; Dumbleton, J H; Yuan, H A

    1996-06-01

    Low back pain is one of the most common medical conditions in the Western world. Disc degeneration, an inevitable process of aging, of variable rate and degree, is one of the major causes of low back pain. Currently, there are two major surgical interventions for treating conditions related to the degenerative disc: discectomy and fusion. Although discectomy and fusion produce a relatively good short-term clinical result in relieving pain, both these surgical treatments alter the biomechanics of the spine, possibly leading to further degeneration of the surrounding tissues and the discs at adjacent levels. Over the past 35 years, a tremendous effort has been made to develop an artificial disc to replace the degenerated disc. The goal is the restoration of the natural biomechanics of the segment after disc excision, thus relieving pain and preventing further degeneration at adjacent segments. However, the artificial disc faces a complex biomechanical environment which makes replication of the biomechanics difficult and long-term survival challenging to designs and materials. The purpose of this article is to examine the factors of importance in designing a disc replacement. Topics covered include the structure and function of the natural disc, the changes that occur with disc degeneration and existing methods of treatment for the degenerative spine. The progress in achieving a functional, long-lasting disc replacement is outlined.

  5. Degenerate mobilities in phase field models are insufficient to capture surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alpha A.; Münch, Andreas; Süli, Endre

    2015-08-01

    Phase field models frequently provide insight into phase transitions and are robust numerical tools to solve free boundary problems corresponding to the motion of interfaces. A body of prior literature suggests that interface motion via surface diffusion is the long-time, sharp interface limit of microscopic phase field models such as the Cahn-Hilliard equation with a degenerate mobility function. Contrary to this conventional wisdom, we show that the long-time behaviour of degenerate Cahn-Hilliard equation with a polynomial free energy undergoes coarsening, reflecting the presence of bulk diffusion, rather than pure surface diffusion. This reveals an important limitation of phase field models that are frequently used to model surface diffusion.

  6. The Effect of Sustained Compression on Oxygen Metabolic Transport in the Intervertebral Disc Decreases with Degenerative Changes

    PubMed Central

    Malandrino, Andrea; Noailly, Jérôme; Lacroix, Damien

    2011-01-01

    Intervertebral disc metabolic transport is essential to the functional spine and provides the cells with the nutrients necessary to tissue maintenance. Disc degenerative changes alter the tissue mechanics, but interactions between mechanical loading and disc transport are still an open issue. A poromechanical finite element model of the human disc was coupled with oxygen and lactate transport models. Deformations and fluid flow were linked to transport predictions by including strain-dependent diffusion and advection. The two solute transport models were also coupled to account for cell metabolism. With this approach, the relevance of metabolic and mechano-transport couplings were assessed in the healthy disc under loading-recovery daily compression. Disc height, cell density and material degenerative changes were parametrically simulated to study their influence on the calculated solute concentrations. The effects of load frequency and amplitude were also studied in the healthy disc by considering short periods of cyclic compression. Results indicate that external loads influence the oxygen and lactate regional distributions within the disc when large volume changes modify diffusion distances and diffusivities, especially when healthy disc properties are simulated. Advection was negligible under both sustained and cyclic compression. Simulating degeneration, mechanical changes inhibited the mechanical effect on transport while disc height, fluid content, nucleus pressure and overall cell density reductions affected significantly transport predictions. For the healthy disc, nutrient concentration patterns depended mostly on the time of sustained compression and recovery. The relevant effect of cell density on the metabolic transport indicates the disturbance of cell number as a possible onset for disc degeneration via alteration of the metabolic balance. Results also suggest that healthy disc properties have a positive effect of loading on metabolic transport. Such

  7. The effect of sustained compression on oxygen metabolic transport in the intervertebral disc decreases with degenerative changes.

    PubMed

    Malandrino, Andrea; Noailly, Jérôme; Lacroix, Damien

    2011-08-01

    Intervertebral disc metabolic transport is essential to the functional spine and provides the cells with the nutrients necessary to tissue maintenance. Disc degenerative changes alter the tissue mechanics, but interactions between mechanical loading and disc transport are still an open issue. A poromechanical finite element model of the human disc was coupled with oxygen and lactate transport models. Deformations and fluid flow were linked to transport predictions by including strain-dependent diffusion and advection. The two solute transport models were also coupled to account for cell metabolism. With this approach, the relevance of metabolic and mechano-transport couplings were assessed in the healthy disc under loading-recovery daily compression. Disc height, cell density and material degenerative changes were parametrically simulated to study their influence on the calculated solute concentrations. The effects of load frequency and amplitude were also studied in the healthy disc by considering short periods of cyclic compression. Results indicate that external loads influence the oxygen and lactate regional distributions within the disc when large volume changes modify diffusion distances and diffusivities, especially when healthy disc properties are simulated. Advection was negligible under both sustained and cyclic compression. Simulating degeneration, mechanical changes inhibited the mechanical effect on transport while disc height, fluid content, nucleus pressure and overall cell density reductions affected significantly transport predictions. For the healthy disc, nutrient concentration patterns depended mostly on the time of sustained compression and recovery. The relevant effect of cell density on the metabolic transport indicates the disturbance of cell number as a possible onset for disc degeneration via alteration of the metabolic balance. Results also suggest that healthy disc properties have a positive effect of loading on metabolic transport. Such

  8. Disc erosion in Models 103 and 104 of Beall mitral valve prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Ricardo; Verduras, María José; Lopez-Quintana, Alfonso; Riera, Luis; Zerolo, Ignacio; Martinez-Bordiu, Cristóbal

    1981-01-01

    Three cases of severe disc variance and erosion of the Teflon-disc Beall mitral valve prosthesis (Models 103 and 104) are reported. In two patients, the Beall mitral valves were excised and replaced with two Björk-Shiley mitral valves. The remaining patient did not survive, and at autopsy, the lens was found at the aortic bifurcation level. Because of this potentially lethal complication, careful follow-up of patients with Beall mitral valve prostheses (Models 103 and 104) is recommended. Images PMID:15216211

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Biological Aging in Intervertebral Discs

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Nam V.; Hartman, Robert A.; Patil, Prashanti R.; Risbud, Makarand V.; Kletsas, Dimitris; Iatridis, James C.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Le Maitre, Christine L.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Kang, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age is the greatest risk factor for the majority of human ailments, including spine-related chronic disability and back pain, which stem from age-associated intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Given the rapid global rise in the aging population, understanding the biology of intervertebral disc aging in order to develop effective therapeutic interventions to combat the adverse effects of aging on disc health is now imperative. Fortunately, recent advances in aging research have begun to shed light on the basic biological process of aging. Here we review some of these insights and organize the complex process of disc aging into three different phases to guide research efforts to understand the biology of disc aging. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge and the recent progress made to elucidate specific molecular mechanisms underlying disc aging. In particular, studies over the last few years have uncovered cellular senescence and genomic instability as important drivers of disc aging. Supporting evidence comes from DNA repair-deficient animal models that show increased disc cellular senescence and accelerated disc aging. Additionally, stress-induced senescent cells have now been well documented to secrete catabolic factors, which can negatively impact the physiology of neighboring cells and ECM. These along with other molecular drivers of aging are reviewed in depth to shed crucial insights into the underlying mechanisms of age-related disc degeneration. We also highlight molecular targets for novel therapies and emerging candidate therapeutics that may mitigate age-associated IDD. PMID:26890203

  10. Yttrium oxide nanoparticles prevent photoreceptor death in a light-damage model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Rajendra N; Merwin, Miles J; Han, Zongchao; Conley, Shannon M; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R; Naash, Muna I

    2014-10-01

    Photoreceptor (PR) cells are prone to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. An imbalance between the production of ROS and cellular antioxidant defenses contributes to PR degeneration and blindness in many different ocular disease states. Yttrium oxide (Y2O3) nanoparticles (NPs) are excellent free radical scavengers owing to their nonstoichiometric crystal defects. Here we utilize a murine light-stress model to test the efficacy of Y2O3 NPs (~10-14nm in diameter) in ameliorating retinal oxidative stress-associated degeneration. Our studies demonstrate that intravitreal injections of these NPs at doses ranging from 0.1 to 5.0µM 2 weeks before acute light stress protect PRs from degeneration. This protection is reflected both structurally (i.e., decreased light-associated thinning of the outer nuclear layer) and functionally (i.e., preservation of scotopic and photopic electroretinogram amplitudes). We also observe preservation of structure and function when NPs are delivered immediately after acute light stress, although the magnitude of the preservation is smaller, and only doses ranging from 1.0 to 5.0µM were effective. We show that the Y2O3 NPs are nontoxic and well tolerated after intravitreal delivery. Our results suggest that Y2O3 NPs have astonishing antioxidant benefits and, with further exploration, may be an excellent strategy for the treatment of oxidative stress associated with multiple forms of retinal degeneration.

  11. Loss of Ikbkap Causes Slow, Progressive Retinal Degeneration in a Mouse Model of Familial Dysautonomia

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Grisela

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Familial dysautonomia (FD) is an autosomal recessive congenital neuropathy that is caused by a mutation in the gene for inhibitor of kappa B kinase complex-associated protein (IKBKAP). Although FD patients suffer from multiple neuropathies, a major debilitation that affects their quality of life is progressive blindness. To determine the requirement for Ikbkap in the developing and adult retina, we generated Ikbkap conditional knockout (CKO) mice using a TUBA1a promoter-Cre (Tα1-Cre). In the retina, Tα1-Cre expression is detected predominantly in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). At 6 months, significant loss of RGCs had occurred in the CKO retinas, with the greatest loss in the temporal retina, which is the same spatial phenotype observed in FD, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, and dominant optic atrophy. Interestingly, the melanopsin-positive RGCs were resistant to degeneration. By 9 months, signs of photoreceptor degeneration were observed, which later progressed to panretinal degeneration, including RGC and photoreceptor loss, optic nerve thinning, Müller glial activation, and disruption of layers. Taking these results together, we conclude that although Ikbkap is not required for normal development of RGCs, its loss causes a slow, progressive RGC degeneration most severely in the temporal retina, which is later followed by indirect photoreceptor loss and complete retinal disorganization. This mouse model of FD is not only useful for identifying the mechanisms mediating retinal degeneration, but also provides a model system in which to attempt to test therapeutics that may mitigate the loss of vision in FD patients. PMID:27699209

  12. [INFLUENCE OF AUTOLOGOUS CHONDROCYTES TRANSPLANTATION ON THE INTERVERTEBRAL DISC STATE IN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF OSTEOCHONDROSIS].

    PubMed

    Khyzhnyak, M V

    2015-07-01

    The degenerative changes in the nucleus pulposus and fibrous ring of the intervertebral discs are the basis of spinal osteochondrosis. A large number of models, including biological, where some mechanisms of their development were worked out and studied, was used to study the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of degenerative spinal changes. The deserved place in the comparative experiments and especially the different methods of therapeutic effects on the tissues of the intervertebral discs in degenerative spinal changes is taken by the experimental methods. The biochemical changes of the intervertebral disc structures were analyzed under the administration of cultured autologous cell of nucleus pulposus suspension against a background of experimental model of rat osteochondrosis. PMID:26591226

  13. Degenerate Bogdanov-Takens bifurcations in a one-dimensional transport model of a fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Blank, H. J.; Kuznetsov, Yu. A.; Pekkér, M. J.; Veldman, D. W. M.

    2016-09-01

    Experiments in tokamaks (nuclear fusion reactors) have shown two modes of operation: L-mode and H-mode. Transitions between these two modes have been observed in three types: sharp, smooth and oscillatory. The same modes of operation and transitions between them have been observed in simplified transport models of the fusion plasma in one spatial dimension. We study the dynamics in such a one-dimensional transport model by numerical continuation techniques. To this end the MATLAB package CL_MATCONTL was extended with the continuation of (codimension-2) Bogdanov-Takens bifurcations in three parameters using subspace reduction techniques. During the continuation of (codimension-2) Bogdanov-Takens bifurcations in 3 parameters, generically degenerate Bogdanov-Takens bifurcations of codimension-3 are detected. However, when these techniques are applied to the transport model, we detect a degenerate Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation of codimension 4. The nearby 1- and 2-parameter slices are in agreement with the presence of this codimension-4 degenerate Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation, and all three types of L-H transitions can be recognized in these slices. The same codimension-4 situation is observed under variation of the additional parameters in the model, and under some modifications of the model.

  14. Stress Analysis of Anterior-Disc-Displaced Temporomandibular Joint Using Individual Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masao; Tanaka, Eiji; Todoh, Masahiro; Asai, Daisuke; Kuroda, Yukiko

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder relates to the biomechanical irregularity of the structual joint components, and the behavior of soft tissue components is considered as a key to understand the biomechanical condition in the TMJ. The configuration of joint components, however, closely depends on individual patients. In this study, attention has been focused on the stress and displacement of irregular TMJs with anterior disc displacement. Using biplane magnetic resonance (MR) images, typical anterior-disc-displaced (ADD) TMJ of a patient with temporomandibular disorder has been modeled individually. The stress distribution in ADD TMJs has been compared with that in normal TMJs. Parameter studies with the elastic modulus have been carried out and it revealed that the stress distribution in the TMJ is highly dependent on the connective tissue modulus as well as disc modulus in the case of ADD TMJ, and that the disc displacement due to mouth opening movement depends on disc modulus in normal TMJ but depends on retrodiscal connective tissue in ADD TMJ.

  15. Dynamics of Astrophysical Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellwood, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Preface; Names and addresses of participants; Conference photograph; 1. Spiral waves in Saturn's rings; 2. Structure of the Uranian rings; 3. Planetary rings: theory; 4. Simulations of light scattering in planetary rings; 5. Accretion discs around young stellar objects and the proto-Sun; 6. The ß Pictoris disc: a planetary rather than a protoplanetary one; 7. Optical polarimetry and thermal imaging of the disc axound ß Pictoris; 8. Observations of discs around protostars and young stars; 9. VLA observations of ammonia towaxd moleculax outflow sources; 10. Derivation of the physical properties of molecular discs by an MEM method; 11. Masers associated with discs around young stars; 12. The nature of polarisation discs axound young stars; 13. The correlation between the main parameters of the interstellar gas (including Salpeter's spectrum of masses) as a result of the development of turbulent Rossby waves; 14. Discs in cataclysmic variables and X-ray binaries; 15. A disc instability model for soft X-ray transients containing black holes; 16. X-ray variability from the accretion disc of NGC 5548; 17. Viscously heated coronae and winds around accretion discs; 18. Optical emission line profiles of symbiotic stars; 19. The effect of formation of Fell in winds confined to discs for luminous stars; 20. Observational evidence for accretion discs in active galactic nuclei; 21. The fuelling of active galactic nuclei by non-axisynlinetric instabilities; 22. The circum-nuclear disc in the Galactic centre; 23. Non-axisymmetric instabilities in thin self-gravitating differentially rotating gaseous discs; 24. Non-linear evolution of non-axisymmetric perturbations in thin self-gravitating gaseous discs; 25. Eccentric gravitational instabilities in nearly Keplerian discs; 26. Gravity mode instabilities in accretion tori; 27. The stability of viscous supersonic shear flows - critical Reynolds numbers and their implications for accretion discs; 28. Asymptotic analysis of overstable

  16. Mechanical testing and modelling of carbon-carbon composites for aircraft disc brakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Luke R.

    The objective of this study is to improve the understanding of the stress distributions and failure mechanisms experienced by carbon-carbon composite aircraft brake discs using finite element (FE) analyses. The project has been carried out in association with Dunlop Aerospace as an EPSRC CASE studentship. It therefore focuses on the carbon-carbon composite brake disc material produced by Dunlop Aerospace, although it is envisaged that the approach will have broader applications for modelling and mechanical testing of carbon-carbon composites in general. The disc brake material is a laminated carbon-carbon composite comprised of poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) derived carbon fibres in a chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) deposited matrix, in which the reinforcement is present in both continuous fibre and chopped fibre forms. To pave the way for the finite element analysis, a comprehensive study of the mechanical properties of the carbon-carbon composite material was carried out. This focused largely, but not entirely, on model composite materials formulated using structural elements of the disc brake material. The strengths and moduli of these materials were measured in tension, compression and shear in several orientations. It was found that the stress-strain behaviour of the materials were linear in directions where there was some continuous fibre reinforcement, but non-linear when this was not the case. In all orientations, some degree of non-linearity was observed in the shear stress-strain response of the materials. However, this non-linearity was generally not large enough to pose a problem for the estimation of elastic moduli. Evidence was found for negative Poisson's ratio behaviour in some orientations of the material in tension. Additionally, the through-thickness properties of the composite, including interlaminar shear strength, were shown to be positively related to bulk density. The in-plane properties were mostly unrelated to bulk density over the range of

  17. AAV-mediated gene therapy in mouse models of recessive retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-jing; Lei, Lei; Dai, Xufeng; Shi, Wei; Liu, Xuan; Dinculescu, Astra; McDowell, J. Hugh

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, more and more mutant genes that cause retinal diseases have been detected. At the same time, many naturally occurring mouse models of retinal degeneration have also been found, which show similar changes to human retinal diseases. These, together with improved viral vector quality allow more and more traditionally incurable inherited retinal disorders to become potential candidates for gene therapy. Currently, the most common vehicle to deliver the therapeutic gene into target retinal cells is the adeno-associated viral vector (AAV). Following delivery to the immuno-priviledged subretinal space, AAV-vectors can efficiently target both retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor cells, the origin of most retinal degenerations. This review focuses on the AAV-based gene therapy in mouse models of recessive retinal degenerations, especially those in which delivery of the correct copy of the wild-type gene has led to significant beneficial effects on visual function, as determined by morphological, biochemical, electroretinographic and behavioral analysis. The past studies in animal models and ongoing successful LCA2 clinical trials, predict a bright future for AAV gene replacement treatment for inherited recessive retinal diseases. PMID:22300136

  18. A Model of the Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Drosophila Eye Disc Development.

    PubMed

    Fried, Patrick; Sánchez-Aragón, Máximo; Aguilar-Hidalgo, Daniel; Lehtinen, Birgitta; Casares, Fernando; Iber, Dagmar

    2016-09-01

    Patterning and growth are linked during early development and have to be tightly controlled to result in a functional tissue or organ. During the development of the Drosophila eye, this linkage is particularly clear: the growth of the eye primordium mainly results from proliferating cells ahead of the morphogenetic furrow (MF), a moving signaling wave that sweeps across the tissue from the posterior to the anterior side, that induces proliferating cells anterior to it to differentiate and become cell cycle quiescent in its wake. Therefore, final eye disc size depends on the proliferation rate of undifferentiated cells and on the speed with which the MF sweeps across the eye disc. We developed a spatio-temporal model of the growing eye disc based on the regulatory interactions controlled by the signals Decapentaplegic (Dpp), Hedgehog (Hh) and the transcription factor Homothorax (Hth) and explored how the signaling patterns affect the movement of the MF and impact on eye disc growth. We used published and new quantitative data to parameterize the model. In particular, two crucial parameter values, the degradation rate of Hth and the diffusion coefficient of Hh, were measured. The model is able to reproduce the linear movement of the MF and the termination of growth of the primordium. We further show that the model can explain several mutant phenotypes, but fails to reproduce the previously observed scaling of the Dpp gradient in the anterior compartment. PMID:27626238

  19. A Model of the Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Drosophila Eye Disc Development

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Patrick; Sánchez-Aragón, Máximo; Lehtinen, Birgitta; Casares, Fernando; Iber, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Patterning and growth are linked during early development and have to be tightly controlled to result in a functional tissue or organ. During the development of the Drosophila eye, this linkage is particularly clear: the growth of the eye primordium mainly results from proliferating cells ahead of the morphogenetic furrow (MF), a moving signaling wave that sweeps across the tissue from the posterior to the anterior side, that induces proliferating cells anterior to it to differentiate and become cell cycle quiescent in its wake. Therefore, final eye disc size depends on the proliferation rate of undifferentiated cells and on the speed with which the MF sweeps across the eye disc. We developed a spatio-temporal model of the growing eye disc based on the regulatory interactions controlled by the signals Decapentaplegic (Dpp), Hedgehog (Hh) and the transcription factor Homothorax (Hth) and explored how the signaling patterns affect the movement of the MF and impact on eye disc growth. We used published and new quantitative data to parameterize the model. In particular, two crucial parameter values, the degradation rate of Hth and the diffusion coefficient of Hh, were measured. The model is able to reproduce the linear movement of the MF and the termination of growth of the primordium. We further show that the model can explain several mutant phenotypes, but fails to reproduce the previously observed scaling of the Dpp gradient in the anterior compartment. PMID:27626238

  20. From hidden symmetry to extra dimensions: A five-dimensional formulation of the degenerate BESS model

    SciTech Connect

    Coradeschi, Francesco; De Curtis, Stefania; Dominici, Daniele

    2010-07-01

    We consider the continuum limit of a moose model corresponding to a generalization to N sites of the degenerate BESS model. The five-dimensional formulation emerging in this limit is a realization of a RS1 type model with SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} in the bulk, broken by boundary conditions and a vacuum expectation value on the infrared brane. A low-energy effective Lagrangian is derived by means of the holographic technique and corresponding bounds on the model parameters are obtained.

  1. From hidden symmetry to extra dimensions: A five-dimensional formulation of the degenerate BESS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coradeschi, Francesco; de Curtis, Stefania; Dominici, Daniele

    2010-07-01

    We consider the continuum limit of a moose model corresponding to a generalization to N sites of the degenerate BESS model. The five-dimensional formulation emerging in this limit is a realization of a RS1 type model with SU(2)L⊗SU(2)R in the bulk, broken by boundary conditions and a vacuum expectation value on the infrared brane. A low-energy effective Lagrangian is derived by means of the holographic technique and corresponding bounds on the model parameters are obtained.

  2. A model-independent investigation on quasi-degenerate neutrino mass models and their significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Subhankar; Singh, N. Nimai

    2013-12-01

    The prediction of possible hierarchy of neutrino masses mostly depends on the model chosen. Dissociating the μ-τ interchange symmetry from discrete flavor symmetry based models, makes the neutrino mass matrix less predictive and motivates one to seek the answer from different phenomenological frameworks. This insists on proper parametrization of the neutrino mass matrices concerning individual hierarchies. In this work, an attempt has been made to study the six different cases of quasi-degenerate (QDN) neutrino models with mass matrices, mLLν parametrized with two free parameters (α,η), standard Wolfenstein parameter (λ) and input mass scale, m0˜0.08 eV. We start with a μ-τ symmetric neutrino mass matrix followed by a correction from charged lepton sector. The parametrization emphasizes on the existence of four independent texture zero building blocks common to all the QDN models under μ-τ symmetric framework and is found to be invariant under any choice of solar angle. In our parametrization, solar angle is controlled from neutrino sector whereas the charged lepton sector drives the reactor and atmospheric mixing angles. The individual models are tested in the framework of oscillation experiments, cosmological observation and future experiments involving β-decay and 0νββ experiments, and any reason to discard the QDN mass models with relatively lower mass is unfounded. Although the QDNH-Type IA model shows strong preference for sin2θ12=0.32, yet this is not sufficient to rule out the other models. The present work leaves a scope to extend the search of most favorable QDN mass model from observed baryon asymmetry of the Universe.

  3. ICT and e-Governance: A Conceptual Model of e-DISC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejasvee, Sanjay; Sarangdevot, S. S.; Gahlot, Devendra; Gour, Vishal; Sandal, Shruti

    2010-11-01

    One of the most important objectives of e-governance is, proper distribution and delivery of government information and services to the citizens. By progression in resources of information technology, great opportunities comes to the government for serve information and services to the citizens and public sector in better manner. This paper intends to examine and explore the conceptual model of e-DISC (Effective Deliverance of Information and Services to the Citizens) The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of e-government in India with the concept of e-DISC with ICTs and how to deal with challenges and barriers for successful e-DISC model with accuracy. The obtained results prove that the utilizing and by increasing interest in the new electronic, information, and communication technologies (ICTs) and e-DISC model in recent time, government improved the quality of e-governance and delivery of information and services and acknowledged the awareness of the system is also valuable.

  4. Gene therapy restores vision and delays degeneration in the CNGB1(-/-) mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Michalakis, Stylianos; Koch, Susanne; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Schulze, Elisabeth; Becirovic, Elvir; Koch, Fred; Seide, Christina; Beck, Susanne C; Seeliger, Mathias W; Mühlfriedel, Regine; Biel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a severe retinal disease characterized by a progressive degeneration of rod photoreceptors and a secondary loss of cone function. Here, we used CNGB1-deficient (CNGB1(-/-)) mice, a mouse model for autosomal recessive RP, to evaluate the efficacy of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy for the treatment of RP. The treatment restored normal expression of rod CNG channels and rod-driven light responses in the CNGB1(-/-) retina. This led to a substantial delay of retinal degeneration and long-term preservation of retinal morphology. Finally, treated CNGB1(-/-) mice performed significantly better than untreated mice in a rod-dependent vision-guided behavior test. In summary, this study holds promise for the treatment of rod channelopathy-associated retinitis pigmentosa by AAV-mediated gene replacement.

  5. Primary amines protect against retinal degeneration in mouse models of retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Akiko; Golczak, Marcin; Chen, Yu; Okano, Kiichiro; Kohno, Hideo; Shiose, Satomi; Ishikawa, Kaede; Harte, William; Palczewska, Grazyna; Maeda, Tadao; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrate vision is initiated by photoisomerization of the visual pigment chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, and is maintained by continuous regeneration of this retinoid through a series of reactions termed the retinoid cycle. However, toxic side reaction products, especially those involving reactive aldehyde groups of the photoisomered product, all-trans-retinal, can cause severe retinal pathology. Here we lowered peak concentrations of free all-trans-retinal with primary amine-containing FDA-approved drugs that did not inhibit chromophore regeneration in mouse models of retinal degeneration. Schiff base adducts between all-trans-retinal and these amines were identified by mass spectrometry. Adducts were observed in mouse eyes only when an experimental drug protected the retina from degeneration in both short-term and long-term treatment experiments. This study demonstrates a molecular basis of all-trans-retinal-induced retinal pathology and identifies an assemblage of FDA-approved compounds with protective effects against this pathology in a mouse model that displays features of Stargardt’s and age-related retinal degeneration. PMID:22198730

  6. Disc-planet interactions in subkeplerian discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, S.-J.

    2009-11-01

    Context: One class of protoplanetary disc models, the X-wind model, predicts strongly subkeplerian orbital gas velocities, a configuration that can be sustained by magnetic tension. Aims: We investigate disc-planet interactions in these subkeplerian discs, focusing on orbital migration for low-mass planets and gap formation for high-mass planets. Methods: We use linear calculations and nonlinear hydrodynamical simulations to measure the torque and look at gap formation. In both cases, the subkeplerian nature of the disc is treated as a fixed external constraint. Results: We show that, depending on the degree to which the disc is subkeplerian, the torque on low-mass planets varies between the usual type I torque and the one-sided outer Lindblad torque, which is also negative but an order of magnitude stronger. In strongly subkeplerian discs, corotation effects can be ignored, making migration fast and inward. Gap formation near the planet's orbit is more difficult in such discs, since there are no resonances close to the planet accommodating angular momentum transport. The location of the gap is shifted inwards with respect to the planet, leaving the planet on the outside of a surface density depression. Conclusions: Depending on the degree to which a protoplanetary disc is subkeplerian, disc-planet interactions can be very different from the usual Keplerian picture, making these discs in general more hazardous for young planets.

  7. A self-consistent model for the evolution of the gas produced in the debris disc of β Pictoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Q.; Wyatt, M.; Carswell, R. F.; Pringle, J. E.; Matrà, L.; Juhász, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a self-consistent model for the evolution of gas produced in the debris disc of β Pictoris. Our model proposes that atomic carbon and oxygen are created from the photodissociation of CO, which is itself released from volatile-rich bodies in the debris disc due to grain-grain collisions or photodesorption. While the CO lasts less than one orbit, the atomic gas evolves by viscous spreading resulting in an accretion disc inside the parent belt and a decretion disc outside. The temperature, ionization fraction and population levels of carbon and oxygen are followed with the photodissociation region model CLOUDY, which is coupled to a dynamical viscous α model. We present new gas observations of β Pic, of C I observed with Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment and O I observed with Herschel, and show that these along with published C II and CO observations can all be explained with this new model. Our model requires a viscosity α > 0.1, similar to that found in sufficiently ionized discs of other astronomical objects; we propose that the magnetorotational instability is at play in this highly ionized and dilute medium. This new model can be tested from its predictions for high-resolution ALMA observations of C I. We also constrain the water content of the planetesimals in β Pic. The scenario proposed here might be at play in all debris discs and this model could be used more generally on all discs with C, O or CO detections.

  8. Glucosamine sulfate effect on the degenerated patellar cartilage: preliminary findings by pharmacokinetic magnetic resonance modeling.

    PubMed

    Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Sanz-Requena, Roberto; Rodrigo, José Luis; Alberich-Bayarri, Angel; Carot, José Miguel

    2009-06-01

    Normal and degenerated cartilages have different magnetic resonance (MR) capillary permeability (K(trans)) and interstitial interchangeable volume (v(e)). Our hypothesis was that glucosamine sulfate treatment modifies these neovascularity abnormalities in osteoarthritis. Sixteen patients with patella degeneration, randomly distributed into glucosamine or control groups, underwent two 1.5-Tesla dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (treatment initiation and after 6 months). The pain visual analog scale (VAS) and American Knee Society (AKS) score were used. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used. Percentages of variations (postreatment-pretreatment/pretreatment) were compared (t-test for independent data). In the glucosamine group, pain and functional outcomes statistically improved (VAS: 7.3 +/- 1.1 to 3.6 +/- 1.3, p < 0.001; AKS: 18.6 +/- 6.9 to 42.9 +/- 2.7, p < 0.01). Glucosamine significantly increased K(trans) at 6 months (-54.4 +/- 21.2% vs 126.7 +/- 56.9%, p < 0.001, control vs glucosamine). In conclusion, glucosamine sulfate decreases pain while improving functional outcome in patients with cartilage degeneration. Glucosamine sulfate increases K(trans), allowing its proposal as a surrogate imaging biomarker after 6 months of treatment. PMID:19214525

  9. Analysis of the RPE sheet in the rd10 retinal degeneration model

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yi

    2011-01-04

    The normal RPE sheet in the C57Bl/6J mouse is subclassified into two major tiling patterns: A regular generally hexagonal array covering most of the surface and a 'soft network' near the ciliary body made of irregularly shaped cells. Physics models predict these two patterns based on contractility and elasticity of the RPE cell, and strength of cellular adhesion between cells. We hypothesized and identified major changes in RPE regular hexagonal tiling pattern in rdl0 compared to C57BL/6J mice. RPE sheet damage was extensive but occurred in rd10 later than expected, after most retinal degeneration. RPE sheet changes occur in zones with a bullseye pattern. In the posterior zone around the optic nerve RPE cells take on larger irregular and varied shapes to form an intact monolayer. In mid periphery, there is a higher than normal density of cells that progress into involuted layers of RPE under the retina. The periphery remains mostly normal until late stages of degeneration. The number of neighboring cells varies widely depending on zone and progression. RPE morphology continues to deteriorate long after the photoreceptors have degenerated. The RPE cells are bystanders to the rd10 degeneration within photo receptors, and the collateral damage to the RPE sheet resembles stimulation of migration or chemotaxis. Quantitative measures of the tiling patterns and histopathology detected here, scripted in a pipeline written in Perl and Cell Profiler (an open source Matlab plugin), are directly applicable to RPE sheet images from noninvasive fundus autofluorescence (FAF), adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-cSLO), and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) of patients with early stage AMD or RP.

  10. Mitochondrial Alterations and Oxidative Stress in an Acute Transient Mouse Model of Muscle Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramadasan-Nair, Renjini; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Mishra, Sudha; Sunitha, Balaraju; Mythri, Rajeswara Babu; Nalini, Atchayaram; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Harsha, Hindalahalli Chandregowda; Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas; Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) and inflammatory myopathies (IMs) are debilitating skeletal muscle disorders characterized by common pathological events including myodegeneration and inflammation. However, an experimental model representing both muscle pathologies and displaying most of the distinctive markers has not been characterized. We investigated the cardiotoxin (CTX)-mediated transient acute mouse model of muscle degeneration and compared the cardinal features with human MDs and IMs. The CTX model displayed degeneration, apoptosis, inflammation, loss of sarcolemmal complexes, sarcolemmal disruption, and ultrastructural changes characteristic of human MDs and IMs. Cell death caused by CTX involved calcium influx and mitochondrial damage both in murine C2C12 muscle cells and in mice. Mitochondrial proteomic analysis at the initial phase of degeneration in the model detected lowered expression of 80 mitochondrial proteins including subunits of respiratory complexes, ATP machinery, fatty acid metabolism, and Krebs cycle, which further decreased in expression during the peak degenerative phase. The mass spectrometry (MS) data were supported by enzyme assays, Western blot, and histochemistry. The CTX model also displayed markers of oxidative stress and a lowered glutathione reduced/oxidized ratio (GSH/GSSG) similar to MDs, human myopathies, and neurogenic atrophies. MS analysis identified 6 unique oxidized proteins from Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples (n = 6) (versus controls; n = 6), including two mitochondrial proteins. Interestingly, these mitochondrial proteins were down-regulated in the CTX model thereby linking oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that mitochondrial alterations and oxidative damage significantly contribute to CTX-mediated muscle pathology with implications for human muscle diseases. PMID:24220031

  11. OFD1, as a Ciliary Protein, Exhibits Neuroprotective Function in Photoreceptor Degeneration Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Jieping; Li, Peng; Li, Zongyi; Xu, Jingying; Gao, Furong; Jin, Caixia; Tian, Haibin; Zhang, Jingfa; Li, Weiye; Lu, Lixia; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Ofd1 is a newly identified causative gene for Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a photoreceptor degenerative disease. This study aimed to examine Ofd1 localization in retina and further to investigate its function in photoreceptor degeneration models. Ofd1 localization in rat retina was examined using immunofluorescence. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced rats and Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats were used as photoreceptor degeneration models. The expression pattern of Ofd1, other ciliary associated genes and Wnt signaling pathway genes were examined in rat models. Furthermore, pEGFP-Ofd1-CDS and pSUPER-Ofd1-shRNA were constructed to overexpress and knockdown the expression level in 661W and R28 cells. MNU was also used to induce cell death. Cilia formation was observed using immunocytochemistry (ICC). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected using the 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. Apoptosis genes expression was examined using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Ofd1 localized to outer segments of rat retina photoreceptors. Ofd1 and other ciliary proteins expression levels increased from the 1st and 4th postnatal weeks and decreased until the 6th week in the RCS rats, while their expression consistently decreased from the 1st and 7th day in the MNU rats. Moreover, Wnt signaling pathway proteins expression was significantly up-regulated in both rat models. Knockdown of Ofd1 expression resulted in a smaller population, shorter length of cell cilia, and lower cell viability. Ofd1 overexpression partially attenuated MNU toxic effects by reducing ROS levels and mitigating apoptosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating Ofd1 localization and its function in rat retina and in retinal degeneration rat models. Ofd1 plays a role in controlling photoreceptor cilium length and number. Importantly, it demonstrates a neuroprotective function by protecting the photoreceptor from

  12. Macular degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the center of the field of vision. Macular degeneration results from a partial breakdown of the insulating ... choroid layer of blood vessels behind the retina. Macular degeneration results in the loss of central vision only.

  13. Cerebellar Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Degeneration? Cerebellar degeneration is a process in which neurons in the cerebellum - the area of the brain ... proteins that are necessary for the survival of neurons. Associated diseases: Diseases that are specific to the ...

  14. [Spine disc MR image analysis using improved independent component analysis based active appearance model and Markov random field].

    PubMed

    Hao, Shijie; Zhan, Shu; Jiang, Jianguo; Li, Hong; Ian, Rosse

    2010-02-01

    As there are not many research reports on segmentation and quantitative analysis of soft tissues in lumbar medical images, this paper presents an algorithm for segmenting and quantitatively analyzing discs in lumbar Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Vertebrae are first segmented using improved Independent component analysis based active appearance model (ICA-AAM), and lumbar curve is obtained with Minimum Description Length (MDL); based on these results, fast and unsupervised Markov Random Field (MRF) disc segmentation combining disc imaging features and intensity profile is further achieved; finally, disc herniation is quantitatively evaluated. The experiment proves that the proposed algorithm is fast and effective, thus providing doctors with aid in diagnosing and curing lumbar disc herniation.

  15. Neuroprotective Effects of Voluntary Exercise in an Inherited Retinal Degeneration Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, Adam M.; Lawson, Eric C.; Prunty, Megan; Gogniat, Marissa; Aung, Moe H.; Chakraborty, Ranjay; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our previous investigations showed that involuntary treadmill exercise is neuroprotective in a light-induced retinal degeneration mouse model, and it may act through activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptors. This study investigated whether voluntary running wheel exercise can be neuroprotective in an inheritable model of the retinal degenerative disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP), rd10 mice. Methods Breeding pairs of rd10 and C57BL/6J mice were given free-spinning (active) or locked (inactive) running wheels. Pups were weaned into separate cages with their parents' respective wheel types, and visual function was tested with ERG and a virtual optokinetic system at 4, 5, and 6 weeks of age. Offspring were killed at 6 weeks of age and retinal cross-sections were prepared for photoreceptor nuclei counting. Additionally, separate cohorts of active and inactive rd10 pups were injected daily for 14 days after eye opening with a selective TrkB receptor antagonist (ANA-12) or vehicle solution and assessed as described above. Results Mice in the rd10 active group exhibited significant preservation of visual acuity, cone nuclei, and total photoreceptor nuclei number. Injection with ANA-12 precluded the preservation of visual acuity and photoreceptor nuclei number in rd10 mice. Conclusions Voluntary running partially protected against the retinal degeneration and vision loss that otherwise occurs in the rd10 mouse model of RP. This protection was prevented by injection of ANA-12, suggesting that TrkB activation mediates exercise's preservation of the retina. Exercise may serve as an effective, clinically translational intervention against retinal degeneration. PMID:26567796

  16. Inner retinal change in a novel rd1-FTL mouse model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Greferath, Ursula; Anderson, Emily E; Jobling, Andrew I; Vessey, Kirstan A; Martinez, Gemma; de Iongh, Robb U; Kalloniatis, Michael; Fletcher, Erica L

    2015-01-01

    While photoreceptor loss is the most devastating result of inherited retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa, inner retinal neurons also undergo significant alteration. Detailing these changes has become important as many vision restorative therapies target the remaining neurons. In this study, the rd1-Fos-Tau-LacZ (rd1-FTL) mouse model was used to explore inner retinal change at a late stage of retinal degeneration, after the loss of photoreceptor nuclei. The rd1-FTL model carries a mutation in the phosphodiesterase gene, Pde6b, and an axonally targeted transgenic beta galactosidase reporter system under the control of the c-fos promoter. Retinae of transgenic rd1-FTL mice and control FTL animals aged 2-12 months were processed for indirect fluorescence immunocytochemistry. At 2 months of age, a time when the majority of photoreceptor nuclei are lost, there was negligible c-fos reporter (FTL) expression, however, from 4 months, reporter expression was observed to increase within subpopulations of amacrine and ganglion cells within the central retina. These areas of inner retinal FTL expression coincided with regions that contained aberrant Müller cells. Specifically, these cells exhibited reduced glutamine synthetase and Kir4.1 immunolabelling, whilst showing evidence of proliferative gliosis (increased cyclinD1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression). These changes were limited to distinct regions where cone photoreceptor terminals were absent. Overall, these results highlight that distinct areas of the rd1-FTL central retina undergo significant glial alterations after cone photoreceptor loss. These areas coincide with up-regulation of the c-fos reporter in the inner retina, which may represent a change in neuronal function/plasticity. The rd1-FTL mouse is a useful model system to probe changes that occur in the inner retina at later stages of retinal degeneration. PMID:26283925

  17. Effects of Subretinal Gene Transfer at Different Time Points in a Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xufeng; Zhang, Hua; Han, Juanjuan; He, Ying; Zhang, Yangyang; Qi, Yan; Pang, Ji-jing

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1) is necessary for photoreceptors to generate an important lipid component of their membranes. The absence of LPCAT1 results in early and rapid rod and cone degeneration. Retinal degeneration 11 (rd11) mice carry a mutation in the Lpcat1 gene, and are an excellent model of early-onset rapid retinal degeneration (RD). To date, no reports have documented gene therapy administration in the rd11 mouse model at different ages. In this study, the AAV8 (Y733F)-smCBA-Lpcat1 vector was subretinally injected at postnatal day (P) 10, 14, 18, or 22. Four months after injection, immunohistochemistry and analysis of retinal morphology showed that treatment at P10 rescued about 82% of the wild-type retinal thickness. However, the diffusion of the vector and the resulting rescue were limited to an area around the injection site that was only 31% of the total retinal area. Injection at P14 resulted in vector diffusion that covered approximately 84% of the retina, and we found that gene therapy was more effective against RD when exposure to light was limited before and after treatment. We observed long-term preservation of electroretinogram (ERG) responses, and preservation of retinal structure, indicating that early treatment followed by limited light exposure can improve gene therapy effectiveness for the eyes of rd11 mice. Importantly, delayed treatment still partially preserved M-cones, but not S-cones, and M-cones in the rd11 retina appeared to have a longer window of opportunity for effective preservation with gene therapy. These results provide important information regarding the effects of subretinal gene therapy in the mouse model of LPCAT1-deficiency. PMID:27228218

  18. The three-dimension model for the rock-breaking mechanism of disc cutter and analysis of rock-breaking forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao-Huang; Sun, Fei

    2012-06-01

    To study the rock deformation with three-dimensional model under rolling forces of disc cutter, by carrying out the circular-grooving test with disc cutter rolling around on the rock, the rock mechanical behavior under rolling disc cutter is studied, the mechanical model of disc cutter rolling around the groove is established, and the theory of single-point and double-angle variables is proposed. Based on this theory, the physics equations and geometric equations of rock mechanical behavior under disc cutters of tunnel boring machine (TBM) are studied, and then the balance equations of interactive forces between disc cutter and rock are established. Accordingly, formulas about normal force, rolling force and side force of a disc cutter are derived, and their validity is studied by tests. Therefore, a new method and theory is proposed to study rock-breaking mechanism of disc cutters.

  19. Modelling accretion disc and stellar wind interactions: the case of Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, I. M.; Petropoulou, M.; Mimica, P.; Giannios, D.

    2016-07-01

    Sgr A* is an ideal target to study low-luminosity accreting systems. It has been recently proposed that properties of the accretion flow around Sgr A* can be probed through its interactions with the stellar wind of nearby massive stars belonging to the S-cluster. When a star intercepts the accretion disc, the ram and thermal pressures of the disc terminate the stellar wind leading to the formation of a bow shock structure. Here, a semi-analytical model is constructed which describes the geometry of the termination shock formed in the wind. With the employment of numerical hydrodynamic simulations, this model is both verified and extended to a region prone to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Because the characteristic wind and stellar velocities are in ˜108 cm s-1 range, the shocked wind may produce detectable X-rays via thermal bremsstrahlung emission. The application of this model to the pericentre passage of S2, the brightest member of the S-cluster, shows that the shocked wind produces roughly a month long X-ray flare with a peak luminosity of L ≈ 4 × 1033 erg s-1 for a stellar mass-loss rate, disc number density, and thermal pressure strength of dot{M}_w= 10^{-7} M_{⊙} yr^{-1}, nd = 105 cm-3, and α = 0.1, respectively. This peak luminosity is comparable to the quiescent X-ray emission detected from Sgr A* and is within the detection capabilities of current X-ray observatories. Its detection could constrain the density and thickness of the disc at a distance of ˜3000 gravitational radii from the supermassive black hole.

  20. Stress Reduction in Adjacent Level Discs via Dynamic Instrumentation: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Castellvi, Antonio E.; Huang, Hao; Vestgaarden, Tov; Saigal, Sunil; Pienkowski, David

    2007-01-01

    Background Conventional (rigid) fusion instrumentation is believed to accelerate the degeneration of adjacent discs by increasing stresses caused by motion discontinuity. Fusion instrumentation that employs reduced rod stiffness and increased axial motion, or dynamic instrumentation, may partially alleviate this problem, but the effects of this instrumentation on the stresses in the adjacent disc are unknown. We used a finiteelement model to calculate and compare the stresses in the adjacent-level disc that are induced by rigid and dynamic posterior lumbar fusion instrumentation. Methods A 3-dimensional finite-element model of the lumbar spine was obtained that simulated flexion and extension. The L5–S1 segment of this model was fused, and the L4–L5 segment was fixed with rigid or dynamic instrumentation. The mechanical properties of the dynamic instrumentation were determined by laboratory testing and then used in the finite-element model. Peak stresses in the lumbar discs were calculated and compared. Results The reduced-stiffness component of the dynamic instrumentation was associated with a 1% to 2% reduction in peak compressive stresses in the adjacent-level disc (at 45° flexion), and the increased axial motion component of this instrumentation reduced peak disc stress by 8% to 9%. Areas of disc tissue exposed to 80% of peak stresses of 6.17 MPa were 47% less for discs adjacent to dynamic instrumentation than for those adjacent to rigid instrumentation. Conclusions Reduced stiffness and increased axial motion of dynamic posterior lumbar fusion instrumentation designs result in an approximately 10% cumulative stress reduction for each flexion cycle. The effect of this stress reduction over many cycles may be substantial. Clinical Relevance The cumulative effect of this reduced amplitude and distribution of peak stresses in the adjacent disc may partially alleviate the problem of adjacent-level disc degeneration. PMID:25802582

  1. M2M modelling of the Galactic disc via PRIMAL: fitting to Gaia error added data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Jason A. S.; Kawata, Daisuke

    2014-09-01

    We have adapted our made-to-measure (M2M) algorithm PRIMAL to use mock Milky Way like data constructed from an N-body barred galaxy with a boxy bulge in a known dark matter potential. We use M0 giant stars as tracers, with the expected error of the ESA (European Space Agency) space astrometry mission Gaia. We demonstrate the process of constructing mock Gaia data from an N-body model, including the conversion of a galactocentric Cartesian coordinate N-body model into equatorial coordinates and how to add error to it for a single stellar type. We then describe the modifications made to PRIMAL to work with observational error. This paper demonstrates that PRIMAL can recover the radial profiles of the surface density, radial velocity dispersion, vertical velocity dispersion and mean rotational velocity of the target disc, along with the pattern speed of the bar, to a reasonable degree of accuracy despite the lack of accurate target data. We also construct mock data which take into account dust extinction and show that PRIMAL recovers the structure and kinematics of the disc reasonably well. In other words, the expected accuracy of the Gaia data is good enough for PRIMAL to recover these global properties of the disc, at least in a simplified condition, as used in this paper.

  2. A toy model for magnetic connection in black hole accretion disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ding-Xiong; Ye, Yong-Chun; Li, Yang; Liu, Dong-Mei

    2007-01-01

    A toy model for magnetic connection in black hole (BH) accretion disc is discussed based on a poloidal magnetic field generated by a single electric current flowing around a Kerr BH in the equatorial plane. We discuss the effects of the coexistence of two kinds of magnetic connection (MC) arising, respectively, from (1) the closed field lines connecting the BH horizon with the disc (henceforth MCHD) and (2) the closed field lines connecting the plunging region with the disc (henceforth MCPD). The magnetic field configuration is constrained by conservation of magnetic flux and a criterion of the screw instability of the magnetic field. Two parameters λ and αm are introduced to describe our model instead of resolving the complicated magnetohydrodynamic equations. Compared with MCHD, energy and angular momentum of the plunging particles are extracted via MCPD more effectively, provided that the BH spin is not very high. It turns out that negative energy can be delivered to the BH by the plunging particles without violating the second law of BH thermodynamics, however it cannot be realized via MCPD in a stable way.

  3. Interpreting Degenerate Solutions in Unfolding by Use of the Vector Model and the Compensatory Distance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Deun, K.; Groenen, P. J. F.; Heiser, W. J.; Busing, F. M. T. A.; Delbeke, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we reconsider the merits of unfolding solutions based on loss functions involving a normalization on the variance per subject. In the literature, solutions based on Stress-2 are often diagnosed to be degenerate in the majority of cases. Here, the focus lies on two frequently occurring types of degeneracies. The first type typically…

  4. Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion in patients with cervical disc degeneration: a prospective outcome study of 258 patients (181 fused with autologous bone graft and 77 fused with a PEEK cage)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) is challenging with respect to both patient selection and choice of surgical procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of ACDF, with respect to both patient selection and choice of surgical procedure: fusion with an autologous iliac crest graft (AICG) versus fusion with an artificial cage made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Methods This was a non-randomized prospective single-center outcome study of 258 patients who underwent ACDF for cervical disc degeneration (CDD). Fusion was attained with either tricortical AICG or PEEK cages without additional anterior plating, with treatment selected at surgeon's discretion. Radicular pain, neck-pain, headache and patient satisfaction with the treatment were scored using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Results The median age was 47.5 (28.3-82.8) years, and 44% of patients were female. 59% had single-level ACDF, 40% had two level ACDF and 1% had three-level ACDF. Of the patients, 181 were fused with AICG and 77 with a PEEK-cage. After surgery, the patients showed a significant reduction in radicular pain (ΔVAS = 3.05), neck pain (ΔVAS = 2.30) and headache (ΔVAS = 0.55). Six months after surgery, 48% of patients had returned to work: however 24% were still receiving workers' compensation. Using univariate and multivariate analyses we found that high preoperative pain intensity was significantly associated with a decrease in pain intensity after surgery, for all three pain categories. There were no significant correlations between pain relief and the following patient characteristics: fusion method (AICG or PEEK-cage), sex, age, number of levels fused, disc level fused, previous neck surgery (except for neck pain), previous neck trauma, or preoperative symptom duration. Two hundred out of the 256 (78%) patients evaluated the surgical result as successful. Only 27/256 (11%) classified the surgical result as a failure. Patient satisfaction

  5. Drosophila Imaginal Discs as a Model of Epithelial Wound Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Bolton, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The Drosophila larval imaginal discs, which form the adult fly during metamorphosis, are an established model system for the study of epithelial tissue damage. The disc proper is a simple columnar epithelium, but it contains complex patterning and cell-fate specification, and is genetically tractable. These features enable unbiased genetic screens to identify genes involved in all aspects of the wound response, from sensing damage to wound closure, initiation of regeneration, and re-establishment of proper cell fates. Identification of the genes that facilitate epithelial wound closure and regeneration will enable development of more sophisticated wound treatments for clinical use. Recent Advances: Imaginal disc epithelia can be damaged in many different ways, including fragmentation, induction of cell death, and irradiation. Recent work has demonstrated that the tissue's response to damage varies depending on how the wound was induced. Here, we summarize the different responses activated in these epithelial tissues after the different types of damage. Critical Issues: These studies highlight that not all wounds elicit the same response from the surrounding tissue. A complete understanding of the various wound-healing mechanisms in Drosophila will be a first step in understanding how to manage damaged human tissues and optimize healing in different clinical contexts. Future Directions: Further work is necessary to understand the similarities and differences among an epithelial tissue's responses to different insults. Ongoing studies will identify the genes and pathways employed by injured imaginal discs. Thus, work in this genetically tractable system complements work in more conventional wound-healing models. PMID:27274435

  6. A wind-driving disc model for the mm-wavelength polarization structure of HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakos, Titos; Tzeferacos, Petros; Königl, Arieh

    2016-08-01

    The recent advent of spatially resolved mm- and cm-wavelength polarimetry in protostellar accretion discs could help clarify the role of magnetic fields in the angular momentum transport in these systems. The best case to date is that of HL Tau, where the inability to produce a good fit to the 1.25-mm data with a combination of vertical and azimuthal magnetic field components was interpreted as implying that centrifugally driven winds (CDWs) are probably not a significant transport mechanism on the ˜102 au scale probed by the observations. Using synthetic polarization maps of heuristic single-field-component discs and of a post-processed simulation of a wind-driving disc, we demonstrate that a much better fit to the data can be obtained if the radial field component, a hallmark of the CDW mechanism, dominates in the polarized emission region. A similar inference was previously made in modelling the far-infrared polarization map of the pc-scale dust ring in the Galactic centre. To reconcile this interpretation with theoretical models of protostellar discs, which indicate that the wind is launched from a comparatively high elevation above the mid-plane, we propose that most of the polarized emission originates - with a high (≳ 10%) intrinsic degree of polarization - in small (≲ 0.1 mm) grains that remain suspended above the mid-plane, and that the bulk of the mm-wavelength emission is produced - with low intrinsic polarization - by larger grains that have settled to the mid-plane.

  7. Relationship between the complement system, risk factors and prediction models in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Bora, Nalini S; Matta, Bharati; Lyzogubov, Valeriy V; Bora, Puran S

    2015-02-01

    Studies performed over the past decade in humans and experimental animals have been a major source of information and improved our understanding of how dysregulation of the complement system contributes to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) pathology. Drusen, the hall-mark of dry-type AMD are reported to be the by-product of complement mediated inflammatory processes. In wet AMD, unregulated complement activation results in increased production of angiogenic growth factors leading to choroidal neovascularization both in humans and in animal models. In this review article we have linked the complement system with modifiable and non-modifiable AMD risk factors as well as with prediction models of AMD. Understanding the association between the complement system, risk factors and prediction models will help improve our understanding of AMD pathology and management of this disease.

  8. A model for the disc Lyman alpha emission of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben Jaffel, L.; Prange, R.; Emerich, C.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Mcconnell, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    A new efficient radiative transfer algorithm for nonhomogeneous model atmospheres has been applied to the Uranian atmosphere. The contribution of the scatter solar Lyman-alpha to the Uranain emission is of the order of 300 R, and the Rayleigh contribution may reach 450 R for small values of the eddy diffusion coefficient (EDC). The total solar contribution may then reach about 750 R for a solar flux of 2.5 x 10 to the 11th photons/sq cm/s/A. A level of up to 400 R is confirmed in some directions for the interstellar wind contribution. The values of the atmospheric EDC necessary to mimic the observations are 50-100 sq cm/s. A small additional source located on the dayside Uranian atmosphere seems necessary correctly to fit the shape of the limb to limb intensity variation, especially near the limbs. Its contribution to the emergent intensity would range from 100 to 500 R.

  9. Inflammation and Cell Death in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: An Immunopathological and Ultrastructural Model.

    PubMed

    Ardeljan, Christopher P; Ardeljan, Daniel; Abu-Asab, Mones; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) remains elusive despite the characterization of many factors contributing to the disease in its late-stage phenotypes. AMD features an immune system in flux, as shown by changes in macrophage polarization with age, expression of cytokines and complement, microglial accumulation with age, etc. These point to an allostatic overload, possibly due to a breakdown in self vs. non-self when endogenous compounds and structures acquire the appearance of non-self over time. The result is inflammation and inflammation-mediated cell death. While it is clear that these processes ultimately result in degeneration of retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor, the prevalent type of cell death contributing to the various phenotypes is unknown. Both molecular studies as well as ultrastructural pathology suggest pyroptosis, and perhaps necroptosis, are the predominant mechanisms of cell death at play, with only minimal evidence for apoptosis. Herein, we attempt to reconcile those factors identified by experimental AMD models and integrate these data with pathology observed under the electron microscope-particularly observations of mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA leakage, autophagy, and cell death. PMID:25580276

  10. Early acetabular cartilage degeneration in a rabbit model of developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangxin; Meng, Qingxia; Ma, Ruixue; Chen, Guangxiang; Cheng, Liang; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mild developmental dysplasia of hip (DDH) causes high morbidity of osteoarthritis (OA) on adult. It is thought that change of collagen and proteoglycans in cartilage may be the direct reasons for osteoarthritis. Objective: To detect the changes of the expressions of type II collagen of acetabular cartilage in early DDH and to investigate the relevance between type II collagen and the degeneration mechanism of the acetabular cartilage. Methods: The rabbit model of DDH was successfully established by applying the method of knee extending and fixing with cylinder cast in which left lower extremity as experimental group and right one as control group, checking with X-ray after 5 weeks. The stains of H&E and toluidine blue were applied on the samples of acetabular cartilage to observe the morphological changes of chondrocytes and extracellular matrix (ECM). The immunohistochemical staining and Western-blot were employed to respectively qualify and quantitate the expression of type II collagen. Results: Pathohistology observing indicated the signs of retrogressive changes of acetabular cartilage in experimental group. Also, the positive stained cells in type II collagen in experimental group was higher based on immunohistochemiscal staining. The quantitative amounts of type II collagen by Western-blot in experimental group was higher significant difference existed between two groups (t = 2.18, P < 0.05). Conclusions: The expression of type II collagen is correlated to a degeneration of acetabular cartilage and increase obviously in early DDH. PMID:26550441

  11. Treatment with isotretinoin inhibits lipofuscin accumulation in a mouse model of recessive Stargardt's macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Radu, Roxana A; Mata, Nathan L; Nusinowitz, Steven; Liu, Xinran; Sieving, Paul A; Travis, Gabriel H

    2003-04-15

    Recessive Stargardt's macular degeneration is an inherited blinding disease of children caused by mutations in the ABCR gene. The primary pathologic defect in Stargardt's disease is accumulation of toxic lipofuscin pigments such as N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E) in cells of the retinal pigment epithelium. This accumulation appears to be responsible for the photoreceptor death and severe visual loss in Stargardt's patients. Here, we tested a therapeutic strategy to inhibit lipofuscin accumulation in a mouse model of recessive Stargardt's disease. Isotretinoin (Accutane) has been shown to slow the synthesis of 11-cis-retinaldehyde and regeneration of rhodopsin by inhibiting 11-cis-retinol dehydrogenase in the visual cycle. Light activation of rhodopsin results in its release of all-trans-retinaldehyde, which constitutes the first reactant in A2E biosynthesis. Accordingly, we tested the effects of isotretinoin on lipofuscin accumulation in abcr(-/-) knockout mice. Isotretinoin blocked the formation of A2E biochemically and the accumulation of lipofuscin pigments by electron microscopy. We observed no significant visual loss in treated abcr(-/-) mice by electroretinography. Isotretinoin also blocked the slower, age-dependent accumulation of lipofuscin in wild-type mice. These results corroborate the proposed mechanism of A2E biogenesis. Further, they suggest that treatment with isotretinoin may inhibit lipofuscin accumulation and thus delay the onset of visual loss in Stargardt's patients. Finally, the results suggest that isotretinoin may be an effective treatment for other forms of retinal or macular degeneration associated with lipofuscin accumulation.

  12. Determining the mid-plane conditions of circumstellar discs using gas and dust modelling: a study of HD 163296

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneberg, Dominika M.; Panić, Olja; Haworth, Thomas J.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Min, Michiel

    2016-09-01

    The mass of gas in protoplanetary discs is a quantity of great interest for assessing their planet formation potential. Disc gas masses are, however, traditionally inferred from measured dust masses by applying an assumed standard gas-to-dust ratio of g/d = 100. Furthermore, measuring gas masses based on CO observations has been hindered by the effects of CO freeze-out. Here we present a novel approach to study the mid-plane gas by combining C18O line modelling, CO snowline observations and the spectral energy distribution and selectively study the inner tens of au where freeze-out is not relevant. We apply the modelling technique to the disc around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296 with particular focus on the regions within the CO snowline radius, measured to be at 90 au in this disc. Our models yield the mass of C18O in this inner disc region of M_{C^{18}O}({<}90 au)˜ 2× 10^{-8} M⊙. We find that most of our models yield a notably low g/d < 20, especially in the disc mid-plane (g/d < 1). Our only models with a more interstellar medium (ISM)-like g/d require C18O to be underabundant with respect to the ISM abundances and a significant depletion of sub-micron grains, which is not supported by scattered light observations. Our technique can be applied to a range of discs and opens up a possibility of measuring gas and dust masses in discs within the CO snowline location without making assumptions about the gas-to-dust ratio.

  13. MRI Evaluation of Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rupal; Mehta, Chetan; Patel, Narrotam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lower back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease is a condition that affects young to middle-aged persons with peak incidence at approximately 40 y. MRI is the standard imaging modality for detecting disc pathology due to its advantage of lack of radiation, multiplanar imaging capability, excellent spinal soft-tissue contrast and precise localization of intervertebral discs changes. Aims and Objective: To evaluate the characterization, extent, and changes associated with the degenerative lumbar disc disease by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Study Design: Cross-sectional and observational study. Materials and Methods: A total 109 patients of the lumbar disc degeneration with age group between 17 to 80 y were diagnosed & studied on 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging machine. MRI findings like lumbar lordosis, Schmorl’s nodes, decreased disc height, disc annular tear, disc herniation, disc bulge, disc protrusion and disc extrusion were observed. Narrowing of the spinal canal, lateral recess and neural foramen with compression of nerve roots observed. Ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was observed. Result: Males were more commonly affected in Degenerative Spinal Disease & most of the patients show loss of lumbar lordosis. Decreased disc height was common at L5-S1 level. More than one disc involvement was seen per person. L4 – L5 disc was the most commonly involved. Annular disc tear, disc herniation, disc extrusion, narrowing of spinal canal, narrowing of lateral recess, compression of neural foramen, ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was common at the L4 –L5 disc level. Disc buldge was common at L3 – L4 & L4 – L5 disc level. Posterior osteophytes are common at L3 - L4 & L5 –S1 disc level. L1- L2 disc involvement and spondylolisthesis are less common. Conclusion: Lumbar disc degeneration is the most common cause of low back pain. Plain radiograph can be helpful in visualizing gross anatomic changes in

  14. Modelling the inner debris disc of HR 8799

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contro, B.; Horner, J.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Marshall, J. P.; Hinse, T. C.

    2016-11-01

    In many ways, the HR 8799 planetary system strongly resembles our own. It features four giant planets and two debris belts, analogues to the Asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts. Here, we present the results of dynamical simulations of HR8799's inner debris belt, to study its structure and collisional environment. Our results suggest that HR 8799's inner belt is highly structured, with gaps between regions of dynamical stability. The belt is likely constrained between sharp inner and outer edges, located at ˜6 and ˜8 au, respectively. Its inner edge coincides with a broad gap cleared by the 4:1 mean-motion resonance with HR 8799e. Within the belt, planetesimals are undergoing a process of collisional attrition like that observed in the Asteroid belt. However, whilst the mean collision velocity in the Asteroid belt exceeds 5 km s-1, the majority of collisions within HR 8799's inner belt occur with velocities of order 1.2 km s-1, or less. Despite this, they remain sufficiently energetic to be destructive - giving a source for the warm dust detected in the system. Interior to the inner belt, test particles remain dynamically unstirred, aside from narrow bands excited by distant high-order resonances with HR 8799e. This lack of stirring is consistent with earlier thermal modelling of HR 8799's infrared excess, which predicted little dust inside 6 au. The inner system is sufficiently stable and unstirred that the formation of telluric planets is feasible, although such planets would doubtless be subject to a punitive impact regime, given the intense collisional grinding required in the inner belt to generate the observed infrared excess.

  15. Modelling the Inner Debris Disc of HR 8799

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contro, Bruna; Horner, Jonti; Wittenmyer, Rob; Marshall, Jonathan P.; Hinse, T. C.

    2016-08-01

    In many ways, the HR 8799 planetary system strongly resembles our own. It features four giant planets and two debris belts, analogues to the Asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts. Here, we present the results of dynamical simulations of HR8799's inner debris belt, to study its structure and collisional environment. Our results suggest that HR 8799's inner belt is highly structured, with gaps between regions of dynamical stability. The belt is likely constrained between sharp inner and outer edges, located at ˜6 and ˜8 au, respectively. Its inner edge coincides with a broad gap cleared by the 4:1 mean-motion resonance with HR 8799e. Within the belt, planetesimals are undergoing a process of collisional attrition like that observed in the Asteroid belt. However, whilst the mean collision velocity in the Asteroid belt exceeds 5 kms-1, the majority of collisions within HR 8799's inner belt occur with velocities of order 1.2 kms-1, or less. Despite this, they remain sufficiently energetic to be destructive - giving a source for the warm dust detected in the system. Interior to the inner belt, test particles remain dynamically unstirred, aside from narrow bands excited by distant high-order resonances with HR 8799e. This lack of stirring is consistent with earlier thermal modelling of HR 8799's infrared excess, which predicted little dust inside 6 au. The inner system is sufficiently stable and unstirred that the formation of telluric planets is feasible, although such planets would doubtless be subject to a punitive impact regime, given the intense collisional grinding required in the inner belt to generate the observed infrared excess.

  16. Comparison of Measured Direct Normal Irradiance Data to Calculated Using the Disc Model for the Texas Panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Vick, B. D.; Myers, D.

    2011-01-01

    It is important that we convert from fossil energy to wind and solar energy. Wind energy is currently the cheapest form of renewable energy, but it is usually a poor match to utility electrical generation in the Great Plains of the United States. Concentrating solar power (CSP) plants are a better match to utility electrical loading, but so far none of these plants have been constructed in the Great Plains. Part of the reason no CSP plants have been constructed is lack of confidence in the solar resource data required (direct normal irradiance or DNI for short). There are several models for converting global solar radiation to DNI, and one of them is the DISC model. Both DNI data and global radiation data were collected at the USDA-Agricultural Research Laboratory at Bushland, Texas, for the years 2009 and 2010. Using the DISC model and measured global radiation data, DNI was calculated and compared to measured DNI data. The total annual solar energy estimated with the model was 5% greater than what was actually measured which was fairly close. However, on a monthly or hourly basis, the percentage difference could be as high as 25%. Analysis of individual months and days resulted in some recommendations for improving the DISC model. Some of the poor correlations between measured solar energy and calculated solar energy using the DISC model implied that another model (DIRINDEX) might be better. Therefore, additional work is planned to investigate the DIRINDEX model with the same data set to see if the correlation improves. This work may potentially lead to the increased use of solar energy for electrical generation, which will decrease the use of fossil fuels and the environmental pollution from fossil fuel power plants. Direct normal irradiance (DNI) is required in the performance estimation of concentrating solar energy systems. The objective of this paper is to compare measured and modeled DNI data for a site in the Texas Panhandle (Bushland, Texas) to determine

  17. Understanding discs in binary YSOs - detailed modelling of VV CrA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scicluna, P.; Wolf, S.; Ratzka, T.; Costigan, G.; Launhardt, R.; Leinert, C.; Ober, F.; Manara, C. F.; Testi, L.

    2016-05-01

    Given that a majority of stars form in multiple systems, in order to fully understand the star- and planet-formation processes we must seek to understand them in multiple stellar systems. With this in mind, we present an analysis of the enigmatic binary T-Tauri system VV Corona Australis, in which both components host discs, but only one is visible at optical wavelengths. We seek to understand the peculiarities of this system by searching for a model for the binary which explains all the available continuum observations of the system. We present new mid-infrared interferometry and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy along with archival millimetre-wave observations, which resolve the binary at 1.3 mm for the first time. We compute a grid of pre-main-sequence radiative transfer models and calculate their posterior probabilities given the observed spectral energy distributions and mid-infrared interferometric visibilities of the binary components, beginning with the assumption that the only differences between the two components are their inclination and position angles. Our best-fitting solution corresponds to a relatively low-luminosity T-tauri binary, with each component's disc having a large scaleheight and viewed at moderate inclination (˜50°), with the infrared companion inclined by ˜5° more than the primary. Comparing the results of our model to evolutionary models suggests stellar masses ˜1.7 M⊙ and an age for the system of 3.5 Myr, towards the upper end of previous estimates. Combining these results with accretion indicators from NIR spectroscopy, we determine an accretion rate of 4.0 × 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 for the primary. We suggest that future observations of VV Corona Australis and similar systems should prioritize high angular resolution sub-mm and NIR imaging of the discs and high-resolution optical/NIR spectroscopy of the central stars.

  18. Non-degenerated Ground States and Low-degenerated Excited States in the Antiferromagnetic Ising Model on Triangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Andrea

    2014-02-01

    We study the unexpected asymptotic behavior of the degeneracy of the first few energy levels in the antiferromagnetic Ising model on triangulations of closed Riemann surfaces. There are strong mathematical and physical reasons to expect that the number of ground states (i.e., degeneracy) of the antiferromagnetic Ising model on the triangulations of a fixed closed Riemann surface is exponential in the number of vertices. In the set of plane triangulations, the degeneracy equals the number of perfect matchings of the geometric duals, and thus it is exponential by a recent result of Chudnovsky and Seymour. From the physics point of view, antiferromagnetic triangulations are geometrically frustrated systems, and in such systems exponential degeneracy is predicted. We present results that contradict these predictions. We prove that for each closed Riemann surface S of positive genus, there are sequences of triangulations of S with exactly one ground state. One possible explanation of this phenomenon is that exponential degeneracy would be found in the excited states with energy close to the ground state energy. However, as our second result, we show the existence of a sequence of triangulations of a closed Riemann surface of genus 10 with exactly one ground state such that the degeneracy of each of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th excited energy levels belongs to O( n), O( n 2), O( n 3) and O( n 4), respectively.

  19. Constitutive model for flake graphite cast iron automotive brake discs: induced anisotropic damage model under complex loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustins, L.; Billardon, R.; Hild, F.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper details an elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model for automotive brake discs made of flake graphite cast iron. In a companion paper (Augustins et al. in Contin Mech Thermodyn, 2015), the authors proposed a one-dimensional setting appropriate for representing the complex behavior of the material (i.e., asymmetry between tensile and compressive loadings) under anisothermal conditions. The generalization of this 1D model to 3D cases on a volume element and the associated challenges are addressed. A direct transposition is not possible, and an alternative solution without unilateral conditions is first proposed. Induced anisotropic damage and associated constitutive laws are then introduced. The transition from the volume element to the real structure and the numerical implementation require a specific basis change. Brake disc simulations with this constitutive model show that unilateral conditions are needed for the friction bands. A damage deactivation procedure is therefore defined.

  20. Constitutive model for flake graphite cast iron automotive brake discs: induced anisotropic damage model under complex loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustins, L.; Billardon, R.; Hild, F.

    2016-01-01

    The present paper details an elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model for automotive brake discs made of flake graphite cast iron. In a companion paper (Augustins et al. in Contin Mech Thermodyn, 2015), the authors proposed a one-dimensional setting appropriate for representing the complex behavior of the material (i.e., asymmetry between tensile and compressive loadings) under anisothermal conditions. The generalization of this 1D model to 3D cases on a volume element and the associated challenges are addressed. A direct transposition is not possible, and an alternative solution without unilateral conditions is first proposed. Induced anisotropic damage and associated constitutive laws are then introduced. The transition from the volume element to the real structure and the numerical implementation require a specific basis change. Brake disc simulations with this constitutive model show that unilateral conditions are needed for the friction bands. A damage deactivation procedure is therefore defined.

  1. Validation of the actuator disc approach in PHOENICS using small scale model wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simisiroglou, N.; Sarmast, S.; Breton, S.-P.; Ivanell, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this study two wind turbine setups are investigated numerically: (a) the flow around a single model wind turbine and (b) the wake interaction between two in-line model wind turbines. This is done by using Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and an actuator disc (ACD) technique in the computational fluid dynamics code PHOENICS. The computations are conducted for the design condition of the rotors using four different turbulence closure models. The computed axial velocity field as well as the turbulent kinetic energy are compared with PIV measurements. For the two model wind turbine setup, the thrust and power coefficient are also computed and compared with measurements. The results show that this RANS ACD method is able to predict the overall behaviour of the flow with low computational effort and that the turbulence closure model has a direct effect on the predicted wake development.

  2. Isotretinoin treatment inhibits lipofuscin accumulation in a mouse model of recessive Stargardt's macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Radu, Roxana A; Mata, Nathan L; Nusinowitz, Steven; Liu, Xinran; Travis, Gabriel H

    2004-01-01

    Recessive Stargardt's macular degeneration is an inherited blinding disease of children caused by mutations in the ABCR gene. The primary pathologic defect in Stargardt's discase is accumulation of toxic lipofuscin pigments such as N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E) in cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This accumulation appears to be responsible for the photoreceptor death and severe visual loss in Stargardt's patients. Here, we tested a novel therapeutic strategy to inhibit lipofuscin accumulation in a mouse model of recessive Stargardt's disease. Isotretinoin (Accutane) has been shown to slow the synthesis of 11-cis-retinaldehyde (11cRAL) and regeneration of rhodopsin by inhibiting 11-cis-retinol dehydrogenase (11cRDH) in the visual cycle. Light activation of rhodopsin results in its release of all-trans-retinaldehyde (atRAL), which constitutes the first reactant in A2E biosynthesis. Accordingly, we tested the effects of isotretinoin on lipofuscin accumulation in abcr-/- knockout mice. Isotretinoin blocked the formation of A2E biochemically and the accumulation of lipofuscin pigments by electron microscopy. We observed no significant visual loss in treated abcr-/- mice by electroretinography. Isotretinoin also blocked the slower, age-dependent accumulation of lipofuscin in wild-type mice. These results corroborate the proposed mechanism of A2E biogenesis. Further, they suggest that treatment with isotretinoin may inhibit lipofuscin accumulation and thus delay the onset of visual loss in Stargardt's patients. Finally, the results suggest that isotretinoin may be an effective treatment for other forms of retinal or macular degeneration associated with lipofuscin accumulation.

  3. Geometrical aspects of patient-specific modelling of the intervertebral disc: collagen fibre orientation and residual stress distribution.

    PubMed

    Marini, Giacomo; Studer, Harald; Huber, Gerd; Püschel, Klaus; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    Patient-specific modelling of the spine is a powerful tool to explore the prevention and the treatment of injuries and pathologies. Albeit several methods have been proposed for the discretization of the bony structures, the efficient representation of the intervertebral disc anisotropy remains a challenge, especially with complex geometries. Furthermore, the swelling of the disc's nucleus pulposus is normally added to the model after geometry definition, at the cost of changes of the material properties and an unrealistic description of the prestressed state. The aim of this study was to develop techniques, which preserve the patient-specific geometry of the disc and allow the representation of the system anisotropy and residual stresses, independent of the system discretization. Depending on the modelling features, the developed approaches resulted in a response of patient-specific models that was in good agreement with the physiological response observed in corresponding experiments. The proposed methods represent a first step towards the development of patient-specific models of the disc which respect both the geometry and the mechanical properties of the specific disc. PMID:26243011

  4. Prize of the best thesis 2015: Study of debris discs through state-of-the-art numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Q.; Thébault, P.

    2015-12-01

    This proceeding summarises the thesis entitled ``Study of debris discs with a new generation numerical model'' by Quentin Kral, for which he obtained the prize of the best thesis in 2015. The thesis brought major contributions to the field of debris disc modelling. The main achievement is to have created, almost ex-nihilo, the first truly self-consistent numerical model able to simultaneously follow the coupled collisional and dynamical evolutions of debris discs. Such a code has been thought as being the ``Holy Grail'' of disc modellers for the past decade, and while several codes with partial dynamics/collisions coupling have been presented, the code developed in this thesis, called ``LIDT-DD'' is the first to achieve a full coupling. The LIDT-DD model, which is the first of a new-generation of fully self-consistent debris disc models is able to handle both planetesimals and dust and create new fragments after each collision. The main idea of LIDT-DD development was to merge into one code two approaches that were so far used separately in disc modelling, that is, an N-body algorithm to investigate the dynamics, and a statistical scheme to explore the collisional evolution. This complex scheme is not straightforward to develop as there are major difficulties to overcome: 1) collisions in debris discs are highly destructive and produce clouds of small fragments after each single impact, 2) the smallest (and most numerous) of these fragments have a strongly size-dependent dynamics because of the radiation pressure, and 3) the dust usually observed in discs is precisely these smallest grains. These extreme constraints had so far prevented all previous attempts at developing self-consistent disc models to succeed. The thesis contains many examples of the use of LIDT-DD that are not yet published but the case of the collision between two asteroid-like bodies is studied in detail. In particular, LIDT-DD is able to predict the different stages that should be observed

  5. A Naturally-Derived Compound Schisandrin B Enhanced Light Sensation in the pde6c Zebrafish Model of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liyun; Xiang, Lue; Liu, Yiwen; Venkatraman, Prahatha; Chong, Leelyn; Cho, Jin; Bonilla, Sylvia; Jin, Zi-Bing; Pang, Chi Pui; Ko, Kam Ming; Ma, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Retinal degeneration is often progressive. This feature has provided a therapeutic window for intervention that may extend functional vision in patients. Even though this approach is feasible, few promising drug candidates are available. The scarcity of new drugs has motivated research to discover novel compounds through different sources. One such example is Schisandrin B (SchB), an active component isolated from the five-flavor fruit (Fructus Schisandrae) that is postulated in traditional Chinese medicines to exert prophylactic visual benefit. This SchB benefit was investigated in this study in pde6cw59, a zebrafish retinal-degeneration model. In this model, the pde6c gene (phosphodiesterase 6C, cGMP-specific, cone, alpha prime) carried a mutation which caused cone degeneration. This altered the local environment and caused the bystander rods to degenerate too. To test SchB on the pde6cw59 mutants, a treatment concentration was first determined that would not cause morphological defects, and would initiate known physiological response. Then, the mutants were treated with the optimized SchB concentration before the appearance of retinal degeneration at 3 days postfertilization (dpf). The light sensation of animals was evaluated at 6 dpf by the visual motor response (VMR), a visual startle that could be initiated by drastic light onset and offset. The results show that the VMR of pde6cw59 mutants towards light onset was enhanced by the SchB treatment, and that the initial phase of the enhancement was primarily mediated through the mutants’ eyes. Further immunostaining analysis indicates that the treatment specifically reduced the size of the abnormally large rods. These observations implicate an interesting hypothesis: that the morphologically-improved rods drive the observed VMR enhancement. Together, these investigations have identified a possible visual benefit of SchB on retinal degeneration, a benefit that can potentially be further developed to extend

  6. A Naturally-Derived Compound Schisandrin B Enhanced Light Sensation in the pde6c Zebrafish Model of Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyun; Xiang, Lue; Liu, Yiwen; Venkatraman, Prahatha; Chong, Leelyn; Cho, Jin; Bonilla, Sylvia; Jin, Zi-Bing; Pang, Chi Pui; Ko, Kam Ming; Ma, Ping; Zhang, Mingzhi; Leung, Yuk Fai

    2016-01-01

    Retinal degeneration is often progressive. This feature has provided a therapeutic window for intervention that may extend functional vision in patients. Even though this approach is feasible, few promising drug candidates are available. The scarcity of new drugs has motivated research to discover novel compounds through different sources. One such example is Schisandrin B (SchB), an active component isolated from the five-flavor fruit (Fructus Schisandrae) that is postulated in traditional Chinese medicines to exert prophylactic visual benefit. This SchB benefit was investigated in this study in pde6cw59, a zebrafish retinal-degeneration model. In this model, the pde6c gene (phosphodiesterase 6C, cGMP-specific, cone, alpha prime) carried a mutation which caused cone degeneration. This altered the local environment and caused the bystander rods to degenerate too. To test SchB on the pde6cw59 mutants, a treatment concentration was first determined that would not cause morphological defects, and would initiate known physiological response. Then, the mutants were treated with the optimized SchB concentration before the appearance of retinal degeneration at 3 days postfertilization (dpf). The light sensation of animals was evaluated at 6 dpf by the visual motor response (VMR), a visual startle that could be initiated by drastic light onset and offset. The results show that the VMR of pde6cw59 mutants towards light onset was enhanced by the SchB treatment, and that the initial phase of the enhancement was primarily mediated through the mutants' eyes. Further immunostaining analysis indicates that the treatment specifically reduced the size of the abnormally large rods. These observations implicate an interesting hypothesis: that the morphologically-improved rods drive the observed VMR enhancement. Together, these investigations have identified a possible visual benefit of SchB on retinal degeneration, a benefit that can potentially be further developed to extend

  7. Monte Carlo study of strongly interacting degenerate fermions: A model for voltage-biased bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armour, Wes; Hands, Simon; Strouthos, Costas

    2013-03-01

    We formulate a model of Nf=4 flavors of relativistic fermion in 2+1d in the presence of a chemical potential μ coupled to two flavor doublets with opposite sign, akin to isospin chemical potential in QCD. This is argued to be an effective theory for low energy electronic excitations in bilayer graphene, in which an applied voltage between the layers ensures equal populations of particles on one layer and holes on the other. The model is then reformulated on a spacetime lattice using staggered fermions, and in the absence of a sign problem, simulated using an orthodox hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm. With the coupling strength chosen to be close to a quantum critical point believed to exist for Nfdegenerate fermion system, with a remnant Fermi surface distorted by a superfluid excitonic condensate. The model thus shows qualitatively different behavior to any model with μ≠0 previously studied by lattice simulation.

  8. Longitudinal changes in the structure and inflammatory response of the intervertebral disc due to stab injury in a murine organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Adam C; Liu, Jennifer W; Tang, Simon Y

    2016-08-01

    Despite the significant public health impact of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and low back pain, it remains challenging to investigate the multifactorial molecular mechanisms that drive the degenerative cascade. Organ culture model systems offer the advantage of allowing cells to live and interact with their native extracellular matrix, while simultaneously reducing the amount of biological variation and complexity present at the organismal level. Murine organ cultures in particular also allow the use of widely available genetically modified animals with molecular level reporters that would reveal insights on the degenerative cascade. Here, we utilize an organ culture system of murine lumbar functional spinal units where we are able to maintain the cellular, metabolic, and structural, and mechanical stability of the whole organ over a 21-day period. Furthermore, we describe a novel approach in organ culture by using tissues from animals with an NF-κB-luc reporter in combination with a mechanical injury model, and are able to show that proinflammatory factors and cytokines such as NF-κB and IL-6 produced by IVD cells can be monitored longitudinally during culture in a stab injury model. Taken together, we utilize a murine organ culture system that maintains the cellular and tissue level behavior of the intervertebral disc and apply it to transgenic animals that allow the monitoring of the inflammatory profile of IVDs. This approach could provide important insights on the molecular and metabolic mediators that regulate the homeostasis of the IVD. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1431-1438, 2016. PMID:27273204

  9. Degenerate limit thermodynamics beyond leading order for models of dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, Constantinos; Muccioli, Brian; Prakash, Madappa; Lattimer, James M.

    2015-12-01

    Analytical formulas for next-to-leading order temperature corrections to the thermal state variables of interacting nucleons in bulk matter are derived in the degenerate limit. The formalism developed is applicable to a wide class of non-relativistic and relativistic models of hot and dense matter currently used in nuclear physics and astrophysics (supernovae, proto-neutron stars and neutron star mergers) as well as in condensed matter physics. We consider the general case of arbitrary dimensionality of momentum space and an arbitrary degree of relativity (for relativistic models). For non-relativistic zero-range interactions, knowledge of the Landau effective mass suffices to compute next-to-leading order effects, but for finite-range interactions, momentum derivatives of the Landau effective mass function up to second order are required. Results from our analytical formulas are compared with the exact results for zero- and finite-range potential and relativistic mean-field theoretical models. In all cases, inclusion of next-to-leading order temperature effects substantially extends the ranges of partial degeneracy for which the analytical treatment remains valid. Effects of many-body correlations that deserve further investigation are highlighted.

  10. Early articular cartilage degeneration in a developmental dislocation of the hip model results from activation of β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Ning, Bo; Sun, Jun; Yuan, Yi; Yao, Jie; Wang, Peng; Ma, Ruixue

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dislocation or dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is one of the most common deformities in children. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent long-term complication. The molecular mechanism of early articular cartilage degeneration in DDH is still unclear. It is well known that β-catenin plays a crucial role in articular cartilage degeneration. The objective of this study was to verify the relationship between β-catenin and DDH cartilage degeneration. We used a DDH model that was established by modification of swaddling position in newborn Wistar rats. The hips were isolated from the DDH model rats and untreated control group at the age of 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. β-Catenin gene and protein were investigated by quantitative (q)RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Collagen X and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, markers of early cartilage degeneration, were assessed by qRT-PCR. Primary chondrocytes were cultured from cartilage of two groups at the age of 8 weeks. Expression of β-catenin, collagen X and MMP-13 was detected. Continued high expression of β-catenin was observed in cartilage from DDH model rats. mRNA and protein expression of β-catenin was significantly increased in primary chondrocytes of the DDH model compared with the control group. Collagen X and MMP-13 expression was higher in the cartilage and chondrocytes from DDH model rats than the control group. Our findings suggest that early cartilage degeneration in DDH may result from activation of β-catenin signaling. PMID:24817933

  11. Stress in Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Distraction

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Ralph E.; Ilharreborde, Brice; Zhao, Kristin D.; Berglund, Lawrence J.; Bronfort, Gert; An, Kai-Nan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT The intervertebral disc is a common source of low back pain. Prospective studies suggest that treatments that intermittently distract the disc might be beneficial for chronic low back pain. Although the potential exists for distraction therapies to affect the disc biomechanically their effect on intradiscal stress is debated. PURPOSE To determine if distraction alone, distraction combined with flexion or distraction combined with extension can reduce nucleus pulposus pressure and posterior anulus compressive stress in cadaveric lumbar discs compared to simulated standing or lying. STUDY DESIGN Laboratory study using single cadaveric motion segments. OUTCOME MEASURES Strain gauge measures of nucleus pulposus pressure and compressive stress in the anterior and posterior annulus fibrosus METHODS Intradiscal stress profilometry was performed on 15 motion segments during 5 simulated conditions: standing, lying, and 3 distracted conditions. Disc degeneration was graded by inspection from 1 (normal) to 4 (severe degeneration). RESULTS All distraction conditions markedly reduced nucleus pressure compared to either simulated standing or lying. There was no difference between distraction with flexion and distraction with extension in regard to posterior annulus compressive stress. Discs with little or no degeneration appeared to distributed compressive stress differently than those with moderate or severe degeneration. CONCLUSIONS Distraction appears to predictably reduce nucleus pulposus pressure. The effect of distraction therapy on the distribution of compressive stress may be dependent in part on the health of the disc. PMID:17981092

  12. Persistent inflammatory state after photoreceptor loss in an animal model of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Noailles, Agustina; Maneu, Victoria; Campello, Laura; Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Microglia act as the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, including the retina. In response to damaging stimuli microglia adopt an activated state, which can progress into a phagocytic phenotype and play a potentially harmful role by eliciting the expression and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to assess longitudinal changes in microglia during retinal degeneration in the homozygous P23H rat, a model of dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Microglial phenotypes, morphology and density were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and cytokine antibody array. In addition, we performed electroretinograms to evaluate the retinal response. In the P23H retina, sclera, choroid and ciliary body, inflammatory cells increased in number compared with the control at all ages analyzed. As the rats became older, a higher number of amoeboid MHC-II+ cells were observed in the P23H retina, which correlated with an increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that, in the P23H model, retinal neuroinflammation persists throughout the rat’s life span even after photoreceptor depletion. Therefore, the inclusion of anti-inflammatory drugs at advanced stages of the neurodegenerative process may provide better retinal fitness so the remaining cells could still be used as targets of cellular or gene therapies. PMID:27624537

  13. Persistent inflammatory state after photoreceptor loss in an animal model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Noailles, Agustina; Maneu, Victoria; Campello, Laura; Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Microglia act as the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, including the retina. In response to damaging stimuli microglia adopt an activated state, which can progress into a phagocytic phenotype and play a potentially harmful role by eliciting the expression and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to assess longitudinal changes in microglia during retinal degeneration in the homozygous P23H rat, a model of dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Microglial phenotypes, morphology and density were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and cytokine antibody array. In addition, we performed electroretinograms to evaluate the retinal response. In the P23H retina, sclera, choroid and ciliary body, inflammatory cells increased in number compared with the control at all ages analyzed. As the rats became older, a higher number of amoeboid MHC-II(+) cells were observed in the P23H retina, which correlated with an increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that, in the P23H model, retinal neuroinflammation persists throughout the rat's life span even after photoreceptor depletion. Therefore, the inclusion of anti-inflammatory drugs at advanced stages of the neurodegenerative process may provide better retinal fitness so the remaining cells could still be used as targets of cellular or gene therapies. PMID:27624537

  14. Imaging Axonal Degeneration and Repair in Preclinical Animal Models of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yandamuri, Soumya S; Lane, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a central nervous system (CNS) disease characterized by chronic neuroinflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage. Infiltration of activated lymphocytes and myeloid cells are thought to be primarily responsible for white matter damage and axonopathy. Over time, this neurologic damage manifests clinically as debilitating motor and cognitive symptoms. Existing MS therapies focus on symptom relief and delay of disease progression through reduction of neuroinflammation. However, long-term strategies to remyelinate, protect, or regenerate axons have remained elusive, posing a challenge to treating progressive forms of MS. Preclinical mouse models and techniques, such as immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and genomic and proteomic analysis have provided advances in our understanding of discrete time-points of pathology following disease induction. More recently, in vivo and in situ two-photon (2P) microscopy has made it possible to visualize continuous real-time cellular behavior and structural changes occurring within the CNS during neuropathology. Research utilizing 2P imaging to study axonopathy in neuroinflammatory demyelinating disease has focused on five areas: (1) axonal morphologic changes, (2) organelle transport and health, (3) relationship to inflammation, (4) neuronal excitotoxicity, and (5) regenerative therapies. 2P imaging may also be used to identify novel therapeutic targets via identification and clarification of dynamic cellular and molecular mechanisms of axonal regeneration and remyelination. Here, we review tools that have made 2P accessible for imaging neuropathologies and advances in our understanding of axonal degeneration and repair in preclinical models of demyelinating diseases. PMID:27242796

  15. Persistent inflammatory state after photoreceptor loss in an animal model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Noailles, Agustina; Maneu, Victoria; Campello, Laura; Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2016-09-14

    Microglia act as the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, including the retina. In response to damaging stimuli microglia adopt an activated state, which can progress into a phagocytic phenotype and play a potentially harmful role by eliciting the expression and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to assess longitudinal changes in microglia during retinal degeneration in the homozygous P23H rat, a model of dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Microglial phenotypes, morphology and density were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and cytokine antibody array. In addition, we performed electroretinograms to evaluate the retinal response. In the P23H retina, sclera, choroid and ciliary body, inflammatory cells increased in number compared with the control at all ages analyzed. As the rats became older, a higher number of amoeboid MHC-II(+) cells were observed in the P23H retina, which correlated with an increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that, in the P23H model, retinal neuroinflammation persists throughout the rat's life span even after photoreceptor depletion. Therefore, the inclusion of anti-inflammatory drugs at advanced stages of the neurodegenerative process may provide better retinal fitness so the remaining cells could still be used as targets of cellular or gene therapies.

  16. Selective degeneration of septal and hippocampal GABAergic neurons in a mouse model of amyloidosis and tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Loreth, Desirée; Ozmen, Laurence; Revel, Florent G; Knoflach, Frédéric; Wetzel, Philine; Frotscher, Michael; Metzger, Friedrich; Kretz, Oliver

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by brain accumulation of amyloid-β peptide and neurofibrillary tangles, which are believed to initiate a pathological cascade that results in progressive impairment of cognitive functions and eventual neuronal death. To obtain a mouse model displaying the typical AD histopathology of amyloidosis and tauopathy, we generated a triple-transgenic mouse line (TauPS2APP) by overexpressing human mutations of the amyloid precursor protein, presenilin2 and tau genes. Stereological analysis of TauPS2APP mice revealed significant neurodegeneration of GABAergic septo-hippocampal projection neurons as well as their target cells, the GABAergic hippocampal interneurons. In contrast, the cholinergic medial septum neurons remained unaffected. Moreover, the degeneration of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons was dependent on the hippocampal subfield and interneuronal subtype investigated, whereby the dentate gyrus and the NPY-positive interneurons, respectively, were most strongly affected. Neurodegeneration was also accompanied by a change in the mRNA expression of markers for inhibitory interneurons. In line with the loss of inhibitory neurons, we observed functional changes in TauPS2APP mice relative to WT mice, with strongly enhanced long-term potentiation in the medial-perforant pathway input to the dentate gyrus, and stereotypic hyperactivity. Our data indicate that inhibitory neurons are the targets of neurodegeneration in a mouse model of amyloidosis and tauopathy, thus pointing to a possible role of the inhibitory network in the pathophysiological and functional cascade of Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Strongly Correlated Superconductivity close to a Mott transition in orbitally degenerate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, Massimo; Fabrizio, Michele; Castellani, Claudio; Tosatti, Erio

    2004-03-01

    Recently a novel strongly correlated superconductivity (SCS) scenario has been proposed [1] which deals with the question whether and under which conditions Cooper-pairing may get enhanced by strong electron repulsion close to a Mott transition. The core of the SCS proposal is that the effective repulsion between quasiparticles vanishes close to the Mott transition, whereas any pairing attraction will remain unrenormalized if it acts inside the spin channel. This scenario was originally demonstrated through a Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) solution of a model for doped fullerenes, but it is believed to be far more general. Very recently, a twofold orbitally degenerate model with inverted Hund rule exchange has been proposed as a new candidate for SCS [2]. We report fresh DMFT work that fully confirms this expectation, and provides an extremely appealing phase diagram, where superconductivity arises by doping the Mott insulator, out of an unstable a pseudogapped metal, very much as it happens in cuprates. [1] M. Capone, M. Fabrizio, C. Castellani, and E. Tosatti, Science 296, 2364 (2002). [2] M. Fabrizio, A.F. Ho, L. De Leo, and G. Santoro, Phys. Rev. Lett., to appear; L. De Leo and M. Fabrizio, unpublished.

  18. Imaging Axonal Degeneration and Repair in Preclinical Animal Models of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yandamuri, Soumya S.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a central nervous system (CNS) disease characterized by chronic neuroinflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage. Infiltration of activated lymphocytes and myeloid cells are thought to be primarily responsible for white matter damage and axonopathy. Over time, this neurologic damage manifests clinically as debilitating motor and cognitive symptoms. Existing MS therapies focus on symptom relief and delay of disease progression through reduction of neuroinflammation. However, long-term strategies to remyelinate, protect, or regenerate axons have remained elusive, posing a challenge to treating progressive forms of MS. Preclinical mouse models and techniques, such as immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and genomic and proteomic analysis have provided advances in our understanding of discrete time-points of pathology following disease induction. More recently, in vivo and in situ two-photon (2P) microscopy has made it possible to visualize continuous real-time cellular behavior and structural changes occurring within the CNS during neuropathology. Research utilizing 2P imaging to study axonopathy in neuroinflammatory demyelinating disease has focused on five areas: (1) axonal morphologic changes, (2) organelle transport and health, (3) relationship to inflammation, (4) neuronal excitotoxicity, and (5) regenerative therapies. 2P imaging may also be used to identify novel therapeutic targets via identification and clarification of dynamic cellular and molecular mechanisms of axonal regeneration and remyelination. Here, we review tools that have made 2P accessible for imaging neuropathologies and advances in our understanding of axonal degeneration and repair in preclinical models of demyelinating diseases. PMID:27242796

  19. Adalimumab Reduces Photoreceptor Cell Death in A Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fernández de la Cámara, Cristina; Hernández-Pinto, Alberto M.; Olivares-González, Lorena; Cuevas-Martín, Carmen; Sánchez-Aragó, María; Hervás, David; Salom, David; Cuezva, José M.; de la Rosa, Enrique J.; Millán, José M; Rodrigo, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that inflammation is involved in the progression of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) both in patients and in animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Adalimumab, a monoclonal anti-TNFα antibody, on retinal degeneration in a murine model of human autosomal recessive RP, the rd10 mice at postnatal day (P) 18. In our housing conditions, rd10 retinas were seriously damaged at P18. Adalimumab reduced photoreceptor cell death, as determined by scoring the number of TUNEL-positive cells. In addition, nuclear poly (ADP) ribose (PAR) content, an indirect measure of PAR polymerase (PARP) activity, was also reduced after treatment. The blockade of TNFα ameliorated reactive gliosis, as visualized by decreased GFAP and IBA1 immunolabelling (Müller cell and microglial markers, respectively) and decreased up-regulation of TNFα gene expression. Adalimumab also improved antioxidant response by restoring total antioxidant capacity and superoxide dismutase activity. Finally, we observed that Adalimumab normalized energetic and metabolic pattern in rd10 mouse retinas. Our study suggests that the TNFα blockade could be a successful therapeutic approach to increase photoreceptor survival during the progression of RP. Further studies are needed to characterize its effect along the progression of the disease. PMID:26170250

  20. Peripheral Disc Margin Shape and Internal Disc Derangement: Imaging Correlation in Significantly Painful Discs Identified at Provocation Lumbar Discography

    PubMed Central

    Bartynski, W.S.; Rothfus, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Annular margin shape is used to characterize lumbar disc abnormality on CT/MR imaging studies. Abnormal discs also have internal derangement including annular degeneration and radial defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between disc-margin shape and annular internal derangement on post-discogram CT in significantly painful discs encountered at provocation lumbar discography (PLD). Significantly painful discs were encountered at 126 levels in 86 patients (47 male, 39 female) studied by PLD where no prior surgery had been performed and response to intradiscal lidocaine after provocation resulted in either substantial/total relief or no improvement after lidocaine administration. Post-discogram CT and discogram imaging was evaluated for disc-margin characteristics (bulge/protrusion), features of disc internal derangement (radial annular defect [RD: radial tear/fissure/annular gap], annular degeneration) and presence/absence of discographic contrast leakage. In discs with focal protrusion, 50 of 63 (79%) demonstrated Grade 3 RD with 13 (21%) demonstrating severe degenerative change only. In discs with generalized-bulge-only, 48 of 63 (76%) demonstrated degenerative change only (primarily Dallas Grade 3) with 15 of 63 (24%) demonstrating a RD (Dallas Grade 3). Differences were highly statistically significant (p<0.001). Pain elimination with intra-discal lidocaine correlated with discographic contrast leakage (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape correlates with features of internal derangement in significantly painful discs encountered at PLD. Discs with focal protrusion typically demonstrate RD while generalized bulging discs typically demonstrated degenerative changes only (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape may provide an important imaging clue to the cause of chronic discogenic low back pain. PMID:22681741

  1. Peripheral disc margin shape and internal disc derangement: imaging correlation in significantly painful discs identified at provocation lumbar discography.

    PubMed

    Bartynski, W S; Rothfus, W E

    2012-06-01

    Annular margin shape is used to characterize lumbar disc abnormality on CT/MR imaging studies. Abnormal discs also have internal derangement including annular degeneration and radial defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between disc-margin shape and annular internal derangement on post-discogram CT in significantly painful discs encountered at provocation lumbar discography (PLD). Significantly painful discs were encountered at 126 levels in 86 patients (47 male, 39 female) studied by PLD where no prior surgery had been performed and response to intradiscal lidocaine after provocation resulted in either substantial/total relief or no improvement after lidocaine administration. Post-discogram CT and discogram imaging was evaluated for disc-margin characteristics (bulge/protrusion), features of disc internal derangement (radial annular defect [RD: radial tear/fissure/annular gap], annular degeneration) and presence/absence of discographic contrast leakage. In discs with focal protrusion, 50 of 63 (79%) demonstrated Grade 3 RD with 13 (21%) demonstrating severe degenerative change only. In discs with generalized-bulge-only, 48 of 63 (76%) demonstrated degenerative change only (primarily Dallas Grade 3) with 15 of 63 (24%) demonstrating a RD (Dallas Grade 3). Differences were highly statistically significant (p<0.001). Pain elimination with intra-discal lidocaine correlated with discographic contrast leakage (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape correlates with features of internal derangement in significantly painful discs encountered at PLD. Discs with focal protrusion typically demonstrate RD while generalized bulging discs typically demonstrated degenerative changes only (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape may provide an important imaging clue to the cause of chronic discogenic low back pain. PMID:22681741

  2. Loss of Tau Elicits Axonal Degeneration in a Mouse Model of AD

    PubMed Central

    Cantillana, Viviana; Vitek, Michael P.; Wilcock, Donna M.; Lynch, John R.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    A central issue in the pathogenesis of tauopathy is the question of how tau protein dysfunction leads to neurodegeneration. We have previously demonstrated that the absence of tau protein is associated with destabilization of microtubules and impaired neurite outgrowth (Dawson et al., 2001, Rapoport et al., 2002). We now hypothesize that the absence of functional tau protein may render the central nervous system more vulnerable to secondary insults such as the overexpression of mutated beta amyloid precursor protein (APP) and traumatic brain injury. We therefore crossed tau knockout mice (Dawson et al., 2001) to mice overexpressing a mutated human APP (APP670,671, Asw) (Hsiao et al., 1996) and created a mouse model (Asw/mTau−/−) that provides evidence that the loss of tau causes degeneration of neuronal processes. The overexpression of APP670,671 in tau knockout mice, elicits the extensive formation of axonal spheroids. While spheroids are only found associated with Aβ plaques in mice expressing APP670,671 on an endogenous mouse tau background (Irizarry et al., 1997), Asw/mTau−/− mice have spheroids not only surrounding Aβ plaques but also in white matter tracts and in the neuropil. Plaque associated and neuropil dystrophic neurites and spheroids are prominent features of Alzheimer’s disease (Masliah et al., 1993, Terry, 1996, Stokin et al., 2005). Thus our current data suggests that loss of tau may lead to neurodegeneration. PMID:20434528

  3. Effect of a Complex Lutein Formula in an Animal Model for Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yin-Pin; Ke, Chia-Ying; Kuo, Chih-Chieh; Lee, Yih-Jing

    2016-08-31

    Several retinal degenerative diseases cause vision loss and retinal cell death. Currently, people face prolonged exposure to digital screens, rendering vision protection from light exposure a critical topic. In this study, we designed a complex lutein formula (CLF) by combining several natural compounds: Calendula officinalis, Lycium barbarum, Vaccinium myrtillus, Cassia obtusifolia, and Rhodiola rosea. In addition, we evaluated the protective effects of the formula on retinal functions in an animal model for light-induced retinal degeneration. We employed electroretinography to analyse retinal function, and conducted a histological examination of the morphological changes in the retina treated under various conditions. We revealed that the retinal function in animals exposed to light for 7 days decreased significantly; however, the retinal function of animals that had received the CLF exhibited superior performance, despite light exposure. In addition, a greater portion of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) (i.e. the nuclei of photoreceptors) in these animals was preserved compared with the animals that had not received the formula after 7 days of light exposure. These results revealed that our dietary CLF supplement attenuated retinal function loss resulting from long-term light exposure. PMID:27426260

  4. Non-local correlation and quantum discord in two atoms in the non-degenerate model

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.-B.A.

    2012-12-15

    By using geometric quantum discord (GQD) and measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN), quantum correlation is investigated for two atoms in the non-degenerate two-photon Tavis-Cummings model. It is shown that there is no asymptotic decay for MIN while asymptotic decay exists for GQD. Quantum correlations can be strengthened by introducing the dipole-dipole interaction. The evolvement period of quantum correlation gets shorter with the increase in the dipole-dipole parameter. It is found that there exists not only quantum nonlocality without entanglement but also quantum nonlocality without quantum discord. Also, the MIN and GQD are raised rather than entanglement, and also with weak initial entanglement, there are MIN and entanglement in a interval of death quantum discord. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Geometric quantum discord (GQD) and measurement induced nonlocality (MIN) are used to investigate the correlations of two two-level atoms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is no asymptotic decay for MIN while asymptotic decay exists for GQD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum correlations can be strengthened by introducing the dipole-dipole interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There exists not only quantum nonlocality without entanglement but also without discord. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weak initial entanglement leads to MIN and entanglement in intervals of death discord.

  5. Neuoroprotective efficacies by KUS121, a VCP modulator, on animal models of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Tomoko; Muraoka, Yuki; Ikeda, Hanako Ohashi; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Kondo, Mineo; Terasaki, Hiroko; Kakizuka, Akira; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is one of the leading causes of adult blindness and has no established therapy. We have shown that valosin-containing protein (VCP) modulators, Kyoto University Substances (KUSs), ameliorated abnormally low ATP levels by inhibiting the ATPase of VCP, thereby protected several types of cells, including retinal neurons, from cell death-inducing insults. In this study, we found that KUS121, one of the VCP modulators, effectively protects photoreceptors both morphologically and functionally, in two animal models of retinal degeneration, rd12 mice and RP rabbits with a rhodopsin (Pro347Leu) mutation. In rd12 mice, KUS121 suppressed the loss of photoreceptors, not only rods but also cones, as well as the visual function deterioration. Significant protective effects existed even when the medication was started in later stages of the disease. In RP rabbits, KUS121 suppressed thinning of the outer nuclear layer and maintained visual function. In the retinas treated with KUS121, suppression of endoplasmic reticulum stress, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin and suppression of disease-associated apoptosis were evident. The ability of KUS121 to protect photoreceptors, especially cones, even in later stages of the disease may contribute to the preservation of central vision in RP patients, which is important for quality of vision. PMID:27503804

  6. Degeneration in Arousal Neurons in Chronic Sleep Disruption Modeling Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Fenik, Polina; Zhan, Guanxia; Xin, Ryan; Veasey, Sigrid C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic sleep disruption (CSD) is a cardinal feature of sleep apnea that predicts impaired wakefulness. Despite effective treatment of apneas and sleep disruption, patients with sleep apnea may have persistent somnolence. Lasting wake disturbances in treated sleep apnea raise the possibility that CSD may induce sufficient degeneration in wake-activated neurons (WAN) to cause irreversible wake impairments. Implementing a stereological approach in a murine model of CSD, we found reduced neuronal counts in representative WAN groups, locus coeruleus (LC) and orexinergic neurons, reduced by 50 and 25%, respectively. Mice exposed to CSD showed shortened sleep latencies lasting at least 4 weeks into recovery from CSD. As CSD results in frequent activation of WAN, we hypothesized that CSD promotes mitochondrial metabolic stress in WAN. In support, CSD increased lipofuscin within select WAN. Further, examining the LC as a representative WAN nucleus, we observed increased mitochondrial protein acetylation and down-regulation of anti-oxidant enzyme and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA. Remarkably, CSD markedly increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha within WAN, and not in adjacent neurons or glia. Thus, CSD, as observed in sleep apnea, results in a composite of lasting wake impairments, loss of select neurons, a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidative mitochondrial stress response in WAN, consistent with a degenerative process with behavioral consequences. PMID:26074865

  7. Neuoroprotective efficacies by KUS121, a VCP modulator, on animal models of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomoko; Muraoka, Yuki; Ikeda, Hanako Ohashi; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Kondo, Mineo; Terasaki, Hiroko; Kakizuka, Akira; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is one of the leading causes of adult blindness and has no established therapy. We have shown that valosin-containing protein (VCP) modulators, Kyoto University Substances (KUSs), ameliorated abnormally low ATP levels by inhibiting the ATPase of VCP, thereby protected several types of cells, including retinal neurons, from cell death-inducing insults. In this study, we found that KUS121, one of the VCP modulators, effectively protects photoreceptors both morphologically and functionally, in two animal models of retinal degeneration, rd12 mice and RP rabbits with a rhodopsin (Pro347Leu) mutation. In rd12 mice, KUS121 suppressed the loss of photoreceptors, not only rods but also cones, as well as the visual function deterioration. Significant protective effects existed even when the medication was started in later stages of the disease. In RP rabbits, KUS121 suppressed thinning of the outer nuclear layer and maintained visual function. In the retinas treated with KUS121, suppression of endoplasmic reticulum stress, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin and suppression of disease-associated apoptosis were evident. The ability of KUS121 to protect photoreceptors, especially cones, even in later stages of the disease may contribute to the preservation of central vision in RP patients, which is important for quality of vision. PMID:27503804

  8. Early cyclosporin A treatment retards axonal degeneration in an experimental peripheral nerve injection injury model

    PubMed Central

    Erkutlu, Ibrahim; Alptekin, Mehmet; Geyik, Sirma; Geyik, Abidin Murat; Gezgin, Inan; Gök, Abdulvahap

    2015-01-01

    Injury to peripheral nerves during injections of therapeutic agents such as penicillin G potassium is common in developing countries. It has been shown that cyclosporin A, a powerful immunosuppressive agent, can retard Wallerian degeneration after peripheral nerve crush injury. However, few studies are reported on the effects of cyclosporin A on peripheral nerve drug injection injury. This study aimed to assess the time-dependent efficacy of cyclosporine-A as an immunosuppressant therapy in an experimental rat nerve injection injury model established by penicillin G potassium injection. The rats were randomly divided into three groups based on the length of time after nerve injury induced by cyclosporine-A administration (30 minutes, 8 or 24 hours). The compound muscle action potentials were recorded pre-injury, early post-injury (within 1 hour) and 4 weeks after injury and compared statistically. Tissue samples were taken from each animal for histological analysis. Compared to the control group, a significant improvement of the compound muscle action potential amplitude value was observed only when cyclosporine-A was administered within 30 minutes of the injection injury (P < 0.05); at 8 or 24 hours after cyclosporine-A administration, compound muscle action potential amplitude was not changed compared with the control group. Thus, early immunosuppressant drug therapy may be a good alternative neuroprotective therapy option in experimental nerve injection injury induced by penicillin G potassium injection. PMID:25883626

  9. Deafness and Retinal Degeneration in A Novel USH1C Knock-In Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Jennifer J.; Gordon, William C.; Farris, Hamilton E.; MacDonald, Glen H.; Cunningham, Dale E.; Robbins, Carol A.; Tempel, Bruce L.; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.; Keats, Bronya J.

    2010-01-01

    Usher syndrome is the leading cause of combined deaf-blindness, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the auditory and visual impairment are poorly understood. Usher I is characterized by profound congenital hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction and progressive retinitis pigmentosa beginning in early adolescence. Using the c.216G>A cryptic splice site mutation in exon 3 of the USH1C gene found in Acadian Usher I patients in Louisiana, we constructed the first mouse model that develops both deafness and retinal degeneration. The same truncated mRNA transcript found in Usher 1C patients is found in the cochleae and retinas of these knock-in mice. Absent auditory-evoked brainstem responses indicated that the mutant mice are deaf at one month of age. Cochlear histology showed disorganized hair cell rows, abnormal bundles, and loss of both inner and outer hair cells in the middle turns and at the base. Retinal dysfunction as evident by an abnormal electroretinogram was seen as early as 1 month of age, with progressive loss of rod photoreceptors between 6 and 12 months of age. This knock-in mouse reproduces the dual sensory loss of human Usher I, providing a novel resource to study the disease mechanism and the development of therapies. PMID:20095043

  10. Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in a rabbit osteoarthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, N-T.; Cui, Y-P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Recent studies have shown that systemic injection of rapamycin can prevent the development of osteoarthritis (OA)-like changes in human chondrocytes and reduce the severity of experimental OA. However, the systemic injection of rapamycin leads to many side effects. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of intra-articular injection of Torin 1, which as a specific inhibitor of mTOR which can cause induction of autophagy, is similar to rapamycin, on articular cartilage degeneration in a rabbit osteoarthritis model and to investigate the mechanism of Torin 1’s effects on experimental OA. Methods Collagenase (type II) was injected twice into both knees of three-month-old rabbits to induce OA, combined with two intra–articular injections of Torin 1 (400 nM). Degeneration of articular cartilage was evaluated by histology using the Mankin scoring system at eight weeks after injection. Chondrocyte degeneration and autophagosomes were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Matrix metallopeptidase-13 (MMP-13) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR).Beclin-1 and light chain 3 (LC3) expression were examined by Western blotting. Results Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 significantly reduced degeneration of the articular cartilage after induction of OA. Autophagosomes andBeclin-1 and LC3 expression were increased in the chondrocytes from Torin 1-treated rabbits. Torin 1 treatment also reduced MMP-13 and VEGF expression at eight weeks after collagenase injection. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in collagenase-induced OA, at least partially by autophagy activation, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach for preventing cartilage degeneration and treating OA. Cite this article: N-T. Cheng, A. Guo, Y-P. Cui. Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in a

  11. A model for flexi-bar to evaluate intervertebral disc and muscle forces in exercises.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Masoud; Nikkhoo, Mohammad; Ashouri, Sajad; Asghari, Mohsen; Parnianpour, Mohamad; Khalaf, Kinda

    2016-10-01

    This study developed and validated a lumped parameter model for the FLEXI-BAR, a popular training instrument that provides vibration stimulation. The model which can be used in conjunction with musculoskeletal-modeling software for quantitative biomechanical analyses, consists of 3 rigid segments, 2 torsional springs, and 2 torsional dashpots. Two different sets of experiments were conducted to determine the model's key parameters including the stiffness of the springs and the damping ratio of the dashpots. In the first set of experiments, the free vibration of the FLEXI-BAR with an initial displacement at its end was considered, while in the second set, forced oscillations of the bar were studied. The properties of the mechanical elements in the lumped parameter model were derived utilizing a non-linear optimization algorithm which minimized the difference between the model's prediction and the experimental data. The results showed that the model is valid (8% error) and can be used for simulating exercises with the FLEXI-BAR for excitations in the range of the natural frequency. The model was then validated in combination with AnyBody musculoskeletal modeling software, where various lumbar disc, spinal muscles and hand muscles forces were determined during different FLEXI-BAR exercise simulations. PMID:27477521

  12. Small heat shock proteins mediate cell-autonomous and -nonautonomous protection in a Drosophila model for environmental-stress-induced degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Fumiko; Koonce, Noelle L; Guo, Linda; Fatima, Shahroz; Qiu, Catherine; Moon, Mackenzie T; Zheng, Yunzhen; Ordway, Richard W

    2016-09-01

    Cell and tissue degeneration, and the development of degenerative diseases, are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that affect protein misfolding and proteotoxicity. To better understand the role of the environment in degeneration, we developed a genetic model for heat shock (HS)-stress-induced degeneration in Drosophila This model exhibits a unique combination of features that enhance genetic analysis of degeneration and protection mechanisms involving environmental stress. These include cell-type-specific failure of proteostasis and degeneration in response to global stress, cell-nonautonomous interactions within a simple and accessible network of susceptible cell types, and precise temporal control over the induction of degeneration. In wild-type flies, HS stress causes selective loss of the flight ability and degeneration of three susceptible cell types comprising the flight motor: muscle, motor neurons and associated glia. Other motor behaviors persist and, accordingly, the corresponding cell types controlling leg motor function are resistant to degeneration. Flight motor degeneration was preceded by a failure of muscle proteostasis characterized by diffuse ubiquitinated protein aggregates. Moreover, muscle-specific overexpression of a small heat shock protein (HSP), HSP23, promoted proteostasis and protected muscle from HS stress. Notably, neurons and glia were protected as well, indicating that a small HSP can mediate cell-nonautonomous protection. Cell-autonomous protection of muscle was characterized by a distinct distribution of ubiquitinated proteins, including perinuclear localization and clearance of protein aggregates associated with the perinuclear microtubule network. This network was severely disrupted in wild-type preparations prior to degeneration, suggesting that it serves an important role in muscle proteostasis and protection. Finally, studies of resistant leg muscles revealed that they sustain proteostasis and the microtubule

  13. Small heat shock proteins mediate cell-autonomous and -nonautonomous protection in a Drosophila model for environmental-stress-induced degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Fumiko; Koonce, Noelle L.; Guo, Linda; Fatima, Shahroz; Qiu, Catherine; Moon, Mackenzie T.; Zheng, Yunzhen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell and tissue degeneration, and the development of degenerative diseases, are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that affect protein misfolding and proteotoxicity. To better understand the role of the environment in degeneration, we developed a genetic model for heat shock (HS)-stress-induced degeneration in Drosophila. This model exhibits a unique combination of features that enhance genetic analysis of degeneration and protection mechanisms involving environmental stress. These include cell-type-specific failure of proteostasis and degeneration in response to global stress, cell-nonautonomous interactions within a simple and accessible network of susceptible cell types, and precise temporal control over the induction of degeneration. In wild-type flies, HS stress causes selective loss of the flight ability and degeneration of three susceptible cell types comprising the flight motor: muscle, motor neurons and associated glia. Other motor behaviors persist and, accordingly, the corresponding cell types controlling leg motor function are resistant to degeneration. Flight motor degeneration was preceded by a failure of muscle proteostasis characterized by diffuse ubiquitinated protein aggregates. Moreover, muscle-specific overexpression of a small heat shock protein (HSP), HSP23, promoted proteostasis and protected muscle from HS stress. Notably, neurons and glia were protected as well, indicating that a small HSP can mediate cell-nonautonomous protection. Cell-autonomous protection of muscle was characterized by a distinct distribution of ubiquitinated proteins, including perinuclear localization and clearance of protein aggregates associated with the perinuclear microtubule network. This network was severely disrupted in wild-type preparations prior to degeneration, suggesting that it serves an important role in muscle proteostasis and protection. Finally, studies of resistant leg muscles revealed that they sustain proteostasis and the

  14. Thalamus Degeneration and Inflammation in Two Distinct Multiple Sclerosis Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Wagenknecht, Nina; Becker, Birte; Scheld, Miriam; Beyer, Cordian; Clarner, Tim; Hochstrasser, Tanja; Kipp, Markus

    2016-09-01

    There is a broad consensus that multiple sclerosis (MS) represents more than an inflammatory disease: it harbors several characteristic aspects of a classical neurodegenerative disorder, i.e., damage to axons, synapses, and nerve cell bodies. While several accepted paraclinical methods exist to monitor the inflammatory-driven aspects of the disease, techniques to monitor progression of early and late neurodegeneration are still in their infancy and have not been convincingly validated. It was speculated that the thalamus with its multiple reciprocal connections is sensitive to inflammatory processes occurring in different brain regions, thus acting as a "barometer" for diffuse brain parenchymal damage in MS. To what extent the thalamus is affected in commonly applied MS animal models is, however, not known. In this article we describe direct and indirect damage to the thalamus in two distinct MS animal models. In the cuprizone model, we observed primary oligodendrocyte stress which is followed by demyelination, microglia/astrocyte activation, and acute axonal damage. These degenerative cuprizone-induced lesions were found to be more severe in the lateral compared to the medial part of the thalamus. In MOG35-55-induced EAE, in contrast, most parts of the forebrain, including the thalamus were not directly involved in the autoimmune attack. However, important thalamic afferent fiber tracts, such as the spinothalamic tract were inflamed and demyelinated on the spinal cord level. Quantitative immunohistochemistry revealed that this spinal cord inflammatory-demyelination is associated with neuronal loss within the target region of the spinothalamic tract, namely the sensory ventral posterolateral nucleus of the thalamus. This study highlights the possibility of trans-neuronal degeneration as one mechanism of secondary neuronal damage in MS. Further studies are now warranted to investigate involved cell types and cellular mechanisms. PMID:27491786

  15. Advances in Susceptibility Genetics of Intervertebral Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin'gang; Sun, Zhengming; Liu, Jiangtao; Guo, Xiong

    2008-01-01

    The traditional view that the etiology of lumbar disc herniation is primarily due to age, gender, occupation, smoking and exposure to vehicular vibration dominated much of the last century. Recent research indicates that heredity may be largely responsible for the degeneration as well as herniation of intervertebral discs. Since 1998, genetic influences have been confirmed by the identification of several genes forms associated with disc degeneration. These researches are paving the way for a better understanding of the biologic mechanisms. Now, many researchers unanimously agree that lumbar disc herniation appears to be similar to other complex diseases, whose etiology has both environmental and hereditary influence, each with a part of contribution and relative risk. Then addressing the etiological of lumbar disc herniation, it is important to integrate heredity with the environment factors. For the purpose of this review, we have limited our discussion to several susceptibility genes associated with disc degeneration. PMID:18781226

  16. Validation and application of an intervertebral disc finite element model utilizing independently constructed tissue-level constitutive formulations that are nonlinear, anisotropic, and time-dependent.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Nathan T; Cortes, Daniel H; Peloquin, John M; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-08-22

    Finite element (FE) models are advantageous in the study of intervertebral disc mechanics as the stress-strain distributions can be determined throughout the tissue and the applied loading and material properties can be controlled and modified. However, the complicated nature of the disc presents a challenge in developing an accurate and predictive disc model, which has led to limitations in FE geometry, material constitutive models and properties, and model validation. The objective of this study was to develop a new FE model of the intervertebral disc, to validate the model's nonlinear and time-dependent responses without tuning or calibration, and to evaluate the effect of changes in nucleus pulposus (NP), cartilaginous endplate (CEP), and annulus fibrosus (AF) material properties on the disc mechanical response. The new FE disc model utilized an analytically-based geometry. The model was created from the mean shape of human L4/L5 discs, measured from high-resolution 3D MR images and averaged using signed distance functions. Structural hyperelastic constitutive models were used in conjunction with biphasic-swelling theory to obtain material properties from recent tissue tests in confined compression and uniaxial tension. The FE disc model predictions fit within the experimental range (mean ± 95% confidence interval) of the disc's nonlinear response for compressive slow loading ramp, creep, and stress-relaxation simulations. Changes in NP and CEP properties affected the neutral-zone displacement but had little effect on the final stiffness during slow-ramp compression loading. These results highlight the need to validate FE models using the disc's full nonlinear response in multiple loading scenarios.

  17. Validation and application of an intervertebral disc finite element model utilizing independently constructed tissue-level constitutive formulations that are nonlinear, anisotropic, and time-dependent.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Nathan T; Cortes, Daniel H; Peloquin, John M; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-08-22

    Finite element (FE) models are advantageous in the study of intervertebral disc mechanics as the stress-strain distributions can be determined throughout the tissue and the applied loading and material properties can be controlled and modified. However, the complicated nature of the disc presents a challenge in developing an accurate and predictive disc model, which has led to limitations in FE geometry, material constitutive models and properties, and model validation. The objective of this study was to develop a new FE model of the intervertebral disc, to validate the model's nonlinear and time-dependent responses without tuning or calibration, and to evaluate the effect of changes in nucleus pulposus (NP), cartilaginous endplate (CEP), and annulus fibrosus (AF) material properties on the disc mechanical response. The new FE disc model utilized an analytically-based geometry. The model was created from the mean shape of human L4/L5 discs, measured from high-resolution 3D MR images and averaged using signed distance functions. Structural hyperelastic constitutive models were used in conjunction with biphasic-swelling theory to obtain material properties from recent tissue tests in confined compression and uniaxial tension. The FE disc model predictions fit within the experimental range (mean ± 95% confidence interval) of the disc's nonlinear response for compressive slow loading ramp, creep, and stress-relaxation simulations. Changes in NP and CEP properties affected the neutral-zone displacement but had little effect on the final stiffness during slow-ramp compression loading. These results highlight the need to validate FE models using the disc's full nonlinear response in multiple loading scenarios. PMID:24998992

  18. An extended biphasic model for charged hydrated tissues with application to the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, W; Karajan, N; Markert, B

    2009-06-01

    Finite element models for hydrated soft biological tissue are numerous but often exhibit certain essential deficiencies concerning the reproduction of relevant mechanical and electro-chemical responses. As a matter of fact, singlephasic models can never predict the interstitial fluid flow or related effects like osmosis. Quite a few models have more than one constituent, but are often restricted to the small-strain domain, are not capable of capturing the intrinsic viscoelasticity of the solid skeleton, or do not account for a collagen fibre reinforcement. It is the goal of this contribution to overcome these drawbacks and to present a thermodynamically consistent model, which is formulated in a very general way in order to reproduce the behaviour of almost any charged hydrated tissue. Herein, the Theory of Porous Media (TPM) is applied in combination with polyconvex Ogden-type material laws describing the anisotropic and intrinsically viscoelastic behaviour of the solid matrix on the basis of a generalised Maxwell model. Moreover, other features like the deformation-dependent permeability, the possibility to include inhomogeneities like varying fibre alignment and behaviour, or osmotic effects based on the simplifying assumption of Lanir are also included. Finally, the human intervertebral disc is chosen as a representative for complex soft biological tissue behaviour. In this regard, two numerical examples will be presented with focus on the viscoelastic and osmotic capacity of the model.

  19. Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... common early symptom. Dry AMD happens when the light-sensitive cells in the macula slowly break down. Your gradually lose your central vision. A common early symptom is that straight lines appear crooked. Regular comprehensive eye exams can detect macular degeneration before the disease ...

  20. A nonlinear model for magnetoacoustic waves in dense dissipative plasmas with degenerate electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Jahangir, R.; Siddiq, M.; Eliasson, B.

    2014-10-15

    The properties of nonlinear fast magnetoacoustic waves in dense dissipative plasmas with degenerate electrons are studied theoretically in the framework of the Zabolotskaya-Khokhlov (ZK) equation for small but finite amplitude excitations. Shock-like solutions of the ZK equation are obtained and are applied to parameters relevant to white dwarf stars.

  1. Molecular hydrogen is protective against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostriatal degeneration in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuan; Ito, Mikako; Fujita, Yasunori; Ito, Masafumi; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Masuda, Akio; Suzuki, Yumi; Maesawa, Satoshi; Kajita, Yasukazu; Hirayama, Masaaki; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ohta, Shigeo; Ohno, Kinji

    2009-04-01

    Molecular hydrogen serves as an antioxidant that reduces hydroxyl radicals, but not the other reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. In the past year, molecular hydrogen has been reported to prevent or ameliorate eight diseases in rodents and one in human associated with oxidative stress. In Parkinson's disease, mitochondrial dysfunction and the associated oxidative stress are major causes of dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra. We examined effects of approximately 50%-saturated molecular hydrogen in drinking water before or after the stereotactic surgery on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostrital degeneration in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Methamphetamine-induced behavioral analysis showed that molecular hydrogen prevented both the development and progression of the nigrostrital degeneration. Tyrosine hydroxylase staining of the substantia nigra and striatum also demonstrated that pre- and post-treatment with hydrogen prevented the dopaminergic cell loss. Our studies suggest that hydrogen water is likely able to retard the development and progression of Parkinson's disease. PMID:19356598

  2. A mathematical model for describing the retinal nerve fiber bundle trajectories in the human eye: average course, variability, and influence of refraction, optic disc size and optic disc position.

    PubMed

    Jansonius, Nomdo M; Schiefer, Julia; Nevalainen, Jukka; Paetzold, Jens; Schiefer, Ulrich

    2012-12-01

    Previously we developed a mathematical model for describing the retinal nerve fiber bundle trajectories in the superior-temporal and inferior-temporal regions of the human retina, based on traced trajectories extracted from fundus photographs. Aims of the current study were to (i) validate the existing model, (ii) expand the model to the entire retina and (iii) determine the influence of refraction, optic disc size and optic disc position on the trajectories. A new set of fundus photographs was collected comprising 28 eyes of 28 subjects. From these 28 photographs, 625 trajectories were extracted. Trajectories in the temporal region of the retina were compared to the existing model. In this region, 347 of 399 trajectories (87%) were within the 95% central range of the existing model. The model was extended to the nasal region. With this extension, the model can now be applied to the entire retina that corresponds to the visual field as tested with standard automated perimetry (up to approximately 30° eccentricity). There was an asymmetry between the superior and inferior hemifields and a considerable location-specific inter-subject variability. In the nasal region, we found two "singularities", located roughly at the one and five o'clock positions for the right optic disc. Here, trajectories from relatively widespread areas of the retina converge. Associations between individual deviations from the model and refraction, optic disc size and optic disc position were studied with multiple linear regression. Refraction (P = 0.021) and possibly optic disc inclination (P = 0.09) influenced the trajectories in the superior-temporal region.

  3. Retinal Degeneration in a Rodent Model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fliesler, Steven J.; Peachey, Neal S.; Richards, Michael J.; Nagel, Barbara A.; Vaughan, Dana K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the electrophysiologic, histologic, and biochemical features of an animal model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS). Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with AY9944, a selective inhibitor of 3β-hydroxysterol-Δ7-reductase (the affected enzyme in SLOS). Dark- and light-adapted electroretinograms were obtained from treated and control animals. From each animal, 1 retina was analyzed by microscopy, and the contralateral retina plus serum samples were analyzed for sterol composition. The main outcome measures were rod and cone electroretinographic amplitudes and implicit times, outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness, rod outer segment length, pyknotic ONL nucleus counts, and the 7-dehydrocholesterol/ cholesterol mole ratio in the retina and serum. Results By 10 weeks’ postnatal age, rod and cone electroretinographic wave amplitudes in AY9944-treated animals were significantly reduced and implicit times were significantly increased relative to controls. Maximal rod photoresponse and gain values were reduced approximately 2-fold in treated animals relative to controls. The ONL thickness and average rod outer segment length were reduced by approximately 18% and 33%, respectively, and ONL pyknotic nucleus counts were approximately 4.5-fold greater in treated animals relative to controls. The retinal pigment epithelium of treated animals contained massive amounts of membranous/lipid inclusions not routinely observed in controls. The 7-dehydrocholesterol/cholesterol mole ratios in treated retinas and serum samples were approximately 5:1 and 9:1, respectively, whereas the ratios in control tissues were essentially zero. Conclusions This rodent model exhibits the key biochemical hallmarks associated with SLOS and displays electrophysiologic deficits comparable to or greater than those observed in the human disease. Clinical Relevance These results predict retinal degeneration in patients with SLOS, particularly those with the more severe (type II

  4. A model of progressive photo-oxidative degeneration and inflammation in the pigmented C57BL/6J mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Natoli, Riccardo; Jiao, Haihan; Barnett, Nigel L; Fernando, Nilisha; Valter, Krisztina; Provis, Jan M; Rutar, Matt

    2016-06-01

    Light-induced degeneration in rodent retinas is an established model for of retinal degeneration, including the roles of oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory activity. In these models, photoreceptor death is elicited via photo-oxidative stress, and is exacerbated by recruitment of subretinal macrophages and activation of immune pathways including complement propagation. Existing light damage models have relied heavily on albino rodents, and mostly using acute light stimuli. These albino models have proven valuable in uncovering the pathogenic mechanisms of such pathways in the context of retinal disease. However, their inherent albinism hinders comparability to normal retinal physiology, and also makes gene technology analysis time-consuming due to the predominance of the pigmented mouse strains in these applications. In this study, we characterise a new light damage model utilising C57BL/6J mice over a 7 day period of chronic light exposure. We use high-efficiency LED technology to deliver a sustained intensity of 100 k lux with negligible modulation of ambient temperature. We show that in the C57BL/6J mouse, chronic light exposure elicits the cardinal features of light damage including photoreceptor degeneration, atrophy of the choriocapillaris, decreased retinal function and increases in oxidative stress markers 4-HNE and 8-OHG, which emerge progressively over the 7 day period of exposure. These changes are accompanied by robust recruitment of IBA1+ and F4/80 + microglia/macrophages to the ONL and subretinal space, followed the strong up-regulation of monocyte-chemoattractants Ccl2, Ccl3, and Ccl12, as well as increases in expression of complement component C3. These findings are in agreement with prior damage models conducted in albino rodents such as Balb/c mice, and support the use of this new model in further investigating the causative features of oxidative stress and inflammation in retinal disease. PMID:27155143

  5. Dose Optimization for Single Intradiscal Administration of the Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Inhibitor, Etanercept, in Rat Disc Injury Models

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Takane; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Go; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Inoue, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Experimental animal study. Purpose We aimed to determine the optimal dose of a single direct injection of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitor, etanercept, by using the rat model of degenerative intervertebral disc from injury. Overview of Literature The pain-related peptide expression was suppressed in the etanercept (100 µg and 1,000 µg)-administered groups in a dose-dependent manner. Methods The neurotracer FluoroGold (FG) was applied to the surfaces of L4/5 discs to label their innervating dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (n=50). Ten rats were included in the nonpunctured disc sham surgery control group, whereas the other 40 were included in the experimental group in which intervertebral discs were punctured with a 23-gauge needle. Saline or etanercept (10 µg, 100 µg, or 1,000 µg) was injected into the punctured discs (n=10 for each treatment). After 14 days of surgery, DRGs from L1 to L6 were harvested, sectioned, and immunostained for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The proportion of FG-labeled CGRP-immunoreactive DRG neurons was evaluated in all the groups. Results There were no significant differences between the puncture+saline group and the puncture+10-µg etanercept group (p >0.05). However, a significant decrease in the percentage of FG and CGRP double-positive cells in FG-positive cells was observed in the etanercept (100 µg and 1,000 µg)-administered groups in a dose-dependent manner (p <0.05). Conclusions When a low dose of the TNF-α inhibitor (10 µg of etanercept) was directly administered to the rat intervertebral disc in the rat model of degenerative intervertebral disc from injury, no suppressive effect on the pain-related peptide expression was observed. However, when a higher dose of etanercept (100 µg and 1,000 µg) was administered, the pain-related peptide expression was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:27559439

  6. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging detection of basal forebrain cholinergic degeneration in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kerbler, Georg M; Hamlin, Adam S; Pannek, Kerstin; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Keller, Marianne D; Rose, Stephen E; Coulson, Elizabeth J

    2013-02-01

    Loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is an early and key feature of Alzheimer's disease, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumetric measurement of the basal forebrain has recently gained attention as a potential diagnostic tool for this condition. The aim of this study was to determine whether loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons underpins changes which can be detected through diffusion MRI using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and probabilistic tractography in a mouse model. To cause selective basal forebrain cholinergic degeneration, the toxin saporin conjugated to a p75 neurotrophin receptor antibody (mu-p75-SAP) was used. This resulted in ~25% loss of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and significant loss of terminal cholinergic projections in the hippocampus, as determined by histology. To test whether lesion of cholinergic neurons caused basal forebrain, hippocampal, or whole brain atrophy, we performed manual segmentation analysis, which revealed no significant atrophy in lesioned animals compared to controls (Rb-IgG-SAP). However, analysis by DTI of the basal forebrain area revealed a significant increase in fractional anisotropy (FA; +7.7%), mean diffusivity (MD; +6.1%), axial diffusivity (AD; +8.5%) and radial diffusivity (RD; +4.0%) in lesioned mice compared to control animals. These parameters strongly inversely correlated with the number of choline acetyl transferase-positive neurons, with FA showing the greatest association (r(2)=0.72), followed by MD (r(2)=0.64), AD (r(2)=0.64) and RD (r(2)=0.61). Moreover, probabilistic tractography analysis of the septo-hippocampal tracts originating from the basal forebrain revealed an increase in streamline MD (+5.1%) and RD (+4.3%) in lesioned mice. This study illustrates that moderate loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (representing only a minor proportion of all septo-hippocampal axons) can be detected by measuring either DTI parameters of the basal forebrain nuclei or

  7. Use of adipose stem cells and polylactide discs for tissue engineering of the temporomandibular joint disc

    PubMed Central

    Mäenpää, Katja; Ellä, Ville; Mauno, Jari; Kellomäki, Minna; Suuronen, Riitta; Ylikomi, Timo; Miettinen, Susanna

    2010-01-01

    There is currently no suitable replacement for damaged temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs after discectomy. In the present study, we fabricated bilayer biodegradable polylactide (PLA) discs comprising a non-woven mat of poly(L/D)lactide (P(L/D)LA) 96/4 and a P(L/DL)LA 70/30 membrane plate. The PLA disc was examined in combination with adipose stem cells (ASCs) for tissue engineering of the fibrocartilaginous TMJ disc in vitro. ASCs were cultured in parallel in control and chondrogenic medium for a maximum of six weeks. Relative expression of the genes, aggrecan, type I collagen and type II collagen present in the TMJ disc extracellular matrix increased in the ASC-seeded PLA discs in the chondrogenic medium. The hypertrophic marker, type X collagen, was moderately induced. Alcian blue staining showed accumulation of sulphated glycosaminoglycans. ASC differentiation in the PLA discs was close to that observed in pellet cultures. Comparison of the mRNA levels revealed that the degree of ASC differentiation was lower than that in TMJ disc-derived cells and tissue. The pellet format supported the phenotype of the TMJ disc-derived cells under chondrogenic conditions and also enhanced their hyalinization potential, which is considered part of the TMJ disc degeneration process. Accordingly, the combination of ASCs and PLA discs has potential for the development of a tissue-engineered TMJ disc replacement. PMID:19474082

  8. Spinal disc rehabilitation: a new technology.

    PubMed

    Goodman, C J

    1998-01-01

    Low back pain and "computer neck" are frequent complaints during visits to a physician. Back and neck pain affects up to 60% of all employees at some time in their careers and is personally and financially devastating. Repetitive mechanical stress leads to disc degeneration, loss of disc height, and other abnormalities. The PT machine, which is controlled and coordinated by onboard computer and fiberoptic feedback sensors, is the first biorobotic system that alleviates intradiscal pressure and myospasm.

  9. The dead zone size limits in a proto-stellar accretion disc model heated by the damping of Alfvén waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatenco-Pereira, V.

    2015-05-01

    Heating of proto-stellar accretion discs has been studied by several authors. Jatenco-Pereira (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 431:3150, 2013) proposed a disc model with two heating mechanisms: the "anomalous" viscosity considered in terms of the α-prescription and the damping of Alfvén waves. As the discs are composed of dust, it was considered that when charged dust particles acquire the same (cyclotron) frequency as the waves, a resonance occurs that leads to the damping of the waves. Here we show that the increase in the temperature of the disc midplane implies in the reduction of the size of the quiescent region in proto-stellar discs and compare it with the actual position of the solar system planets.

  10. Constitutive model for flake graphite cast iron automotive brake discs: from macroscopic multiscale models to a 1D rheological description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustins, L.; Billardon, R.; Hild, F.

    2016-07-01

    One of the critical points of the thermomechanical fatigue design process is the correct description of the cyclic behavior of the material. This work focuses on the material of automotive brake discs, namely flake graphite cast iron. The specificity of this material is its asymmetric behavior under tensile and compressive loadings, which is due to the shape of graphite that acts as small cracks. Multiscale models inspired from the literature are first presented. They lead to a good description of the material behavior under cyclic loadings. An elastoviscoplastic constitutive model is then proposed in a one-dimensional setting in order to accurately describe cyclic tests from room temperature up to {600^{circ}{C}}.

  11. Total disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Vital, J-M; Boissière, L

    2014-02-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) (partial disc replacement will not be described) has been used in the lumbar spine since the 1980s, and more recently in the cervical spine. Although the biomechanical concepts are the same and both are inserted through an anterior approach, lumbar TDR is conventionally indicated for chronic low back pain, whereas cervical TDR is used for soft discal hernia resulting in cervicobrachial neuralgia. The insertion technique must be rigorous, with precise centering in the disc space, taking account of vascular anatomy, which is more complex in the lumbar region, particularly proximally to L5-S1. All of the numerous studies, including prospective randomized comparative trials, have demonstrated non-inferiority to fusion, or even short-term superiority regarding speed of improvement. The main implant-related complication is bridging heterotopic ossification with resulting loss of range of motion and increased rates of adjacent segment degeneration, although with an incidence lower than after arthrodesis. A sufficiently long follow-up, which has not yet been reached, will be necessary to establish definitively an advantage for TDR, particularly in the cervical spine. PMID:24412045

  12. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal tissue in two primate models of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Hiroshi; Mandai, Michiko; Matsushita, Keizo; Kuwahara, Atsushi; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Nakano, Tokushige; Assawachananont, Juthaporn; Kimura, Toru; Saito, Koichi; Terasaki, Hiroko; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Sasai, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Masayo

    2016-01-01

    Retinal transplantation therapy for retinitis pigmentosa is increasingly of interest due to accumulating evidence of transplantation efficacy from animal studies and development of techniques for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells into retinal tissues or cells. In this study, we aimed to assess the potential clinical utility of hESC-derived retinal tissues (hESC-retina) using newly developed primate models of retinal degeneration to obtain preparatory information regarding the potential clinical utility of these hESC-retinas in transplantation therapy. hESC-retinas were first transplanted subretinally into nude rats with or without retinal degeneration to confirm their competency as a graft to mature to form highly specified outer segment structure and to integrate after transplantation. Two focal selective photoreceptor degeneration models were then developed in monkeys by subretinal injection of cobalt chloride or 577-nm optically pumped semiconductor laser photocoagulation. The utility of the developed models and a practicality of visual acuity test developed for monkeys were evaluated. Finally, feasibility of hESC-retina transplantation was assessed in the developed monkey models under practical surgical procedure and postoperational examinations. Grafted hESC-retina was observed differentiating into a range of retinal cell types, including rod and cone photoreceptors that developed structured outer nuclear layers after transplantation. Further, immunohistochemical analyses suggested the formation of host–graft synaptic connections. The findings of this study demonstrate the clinical feasibility of hESC-retina transplantation and provide the practical tools for the optimization of transplantation strategies for future clinical applications. PMID:26699487

  13. Collective molecular dissipation on Navier-Stokes macroscopic scales: Accretion disc viscous modeling in SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzafame, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    In the nonlinear Navier-Stokes viscous flow dynamics, physical damping is mathematically accomplished by a braking term in the momentum equation, corresponding to a heating term in the energy equation, both responsible of the conversion of mechanical energy into heat. In such two terms, it is essential the role of the viscous stress tensor, relative to contiguous macroscopic moving flow components, depending on the macroscopic viscosity coefficient ν. A working formulation for ν can always be found analytically, tuning some arbitrary parameters in the current known formulations, according to the geometry, morphology and physics of the flow. Instead, in this paper, we write an alternative hybrid formulation for ν, where molecular parameters are also included. Our expression for ν has a more physical interpretation of the internal damping in dilute gases because the macroscopic viscosity is related to the small scale molecular dissipation, not strictly dependent on the flow morphology, as well as it is free of any arbitrary parameter. Results for some basic 2D tests are shown in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) framework. An application to the 3D accretion disc modeling for low mass cataclysmic variables is also discussed. Consequences of the macroscopic viscosity coefficient reformulation in a more strictly physical terms on the thermal conductivity coefficient for dilute gases are also discussed.

  14. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs) as a chronic experimental model for investigation of retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Andrew; Hopes, Marina; Wright, Phillip; Broadway, David C; Sanderson, Julie

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing need for models of human diseases that utilise native, donated human tissue in order to model disease processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies. In this paper we assessed the suitability of adult human retinal explants as a potential model of chronic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration. Our results confirmed that RGC markers commonly used in rodent studies (NeuN, βIII Tubulin and Thy-1) were appropriate for labelling human RGCs and followed the expected differential expression patterns across, as well as throughout, the macular and para-macular regions of the retina. Furthermore, we showed that neither donor age nor post-mortem time (within 24 h) significantly affected the initial expression levels of RGC markers. In addition, the feasibility of using human post mortem donor tissue as a long-term model of RGC degeneration was determined with RGC protein being detectable up to 4 weeks in culture with an associated decline in RGC mRNA and significant, progressive, apoptotic labelling of NeuN(+) cells. Differences in RGC apoptosis might have been influenced by medium compositions indicating that media constituents could play a role in supporting axotomised RGCs. We propose that using ex vivo human explants may prove to be a useful model for testing the effectiveness of neuroprotective strategies.

  15. An accretion disc-irradiation hybrid model for the optical/UV variability in radio-quiet quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Li, Shuang-Liang; Gu, Minfeng; Guo, Hengxiao

    2016-10-01

    The optical/ultraviolet (UV) variability of quasars has been discovered to be correlated with other quasar properties, such as luminosity, black hole mass and rest-frame wavelength. However, the origin of variability has been a puzzle so far. In this work, we upgrade the accretion disc model, which assumed the variability is caused by the change of global mass accretion rate, by constraining the disc size to match the viscous time-scale of accretion disc to the variability time-scale observed and by including the irradiation/X-ray reprocessing to make the emitted spectrum become steeper. We find this hybrid model can reproduce the observed bluer-when-brighter trend quite well, which is used to validate the theoretical model by several works recently. The traditional correlation between the variability amplitude and rest-frame wavelength can also be well fitted by our model. In addition, a weak positive correlation between variability amplitude and black hole mass is present, qualitatively consistent with recent observations.

  16. Mutant DISC1 affects methamphetamine-induced sensitization and conditioned place preference: a comorbidity model

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelov, Vladimir; Nomura, Jun; Kim, Jongho; Kannan, Geetha; Yang, Chunxia; Taniguchi, Yu; Abazyan, Bagrat; Valentine, Heather; Krasnova, Irina N.; Kamiya, Atsushi; Cadet, Jean Lud; Wong, Dean F.; Pletnikov, Mikhail V.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic factors involved in neuroplasticity have been implicated in major psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia, depression, and substance abuse. Given its extended interactome, variants in the Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) gene could contribute to drug addiction and psychiatric diseases. Thus, we evaluated how dominant-negative mutant DISC1 influenced the neurobehavioral and molecular effects of methamphetamine (METH). Control and mutant DISC1 mice were studied before or after treatment with non-toxic escalating dose (ED) of METH. In naïve mice, we assessed METH-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), dopamine (DA) D2 receptor density and the basal and METH-induced activity of DISC1 partners, AKT and GSK-3β in the ventral striatum. In ED treated mice, 4 weeks after METH treatment, we evaluated fear conditioning, depression-like responses in forced swim test, and the basal and METH-induced activity of AKT and GSK-3β in the ventral striatum. We found impairment in METH-induced CPP, decreased DA D2 receptor density and altered METH-induced phosphorylation of AKT and GSK-3β in naïve DISC1 female mice. The ED regimen was not neurotoxic as evidenced by unaltered brain regional monoamine tissue content. Mutant DISC1 significantly delayed METH ED-produced sensitization and affected drug-induced phosphorylation of AKT and GSK-3β in female mice. Our results suggest that perturbations in DISC1 functions in the ventral striatum may impact the molecular mechanisms of reward and sensitization, contributing to comorbidity between drug abuse and major mental diseases. PMID:21315744

  17. Mutant DISC1 affects methamphetamine-induced sensitization and conditioned place preference: a comorbidity model.

    PubMed

    Pogorelov, Vladimir M; Nomura, Jun; Kim, Jongho; Kannan, Geetha; Ayhan, Yavuz; Yang, Chunxia; Taniguchi, Yu; Abazyan, Bagrat; Valentine, Heather; Krasnova, Irina N; Kamiya, Atsushi; Cadet, Jean Lud; Wong, Dean F; Pletnikov, Mikhail V

    2012-03-01

    Genetic factors involved in neuroplasticity have been implicated in major psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia, depression, and substance abuse. Given its extended interactome, variants in the Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) gene could contribute to drug addiction and psychiatric diseases. Thus, we evaluated how dominant-negative mutant DISC1 influenced the neurobehavioral and molecular effects of methamphetamine (METH). Control and mutant DISC1 mice were studied before or after treatment with non-toxic escalating dose (ED) of METH. In naïve mice, we assessed METH-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), dopamine (DA) D2 receptor density and the basal and METH-induced activity of DISC1 partners, AKT and GSK-3β in the ventral striatum. In ED-treated mice, 4 weeks after METH treatment, we evaluated fear conditioning, depression-like responses in forced swim test, and the basal and METH-induced activity of AKT and GSK-3β in the ventral striatum. We found impairment in METH-induced CPP, decreased DA D2 receptor density and altered METH-induced phosphorylation of AKT and GSK-3β in naïve DISC1 female mice. The ED regimen was not neurotoxic as evidenced by unaltered brain regional monoamine tissue content. Mutant DISC1 significantly delayed METH ED-produced sensitization and affected drug-induced phosphorylation of AKT and GSK-3β in female mice. Our results suggest that perturbations in DISC1 functions in the ventral striatum may impact the molecular mechanisms of reward and sensitization, contributing to comorbidity between drug abuse and major mental diseases. PMID:21315744

  18. Wnt Signaling Activates Shh Signaling in Early Postnatal Intervertebral Discs, and Re-Activates Shh Signaling in Old Discs in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sinner, Debora; Wylie, Christopher C.; Dahia, Chitra Lekha

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are strong fibrocartilaginous joints that connect adjacent vertebrae of the spine. As discs age they become prone to failure, with neurological consequences that are often severe. Surgical repair of discs treats the result of the disease, which affects as many as one in seven people, rather than its cause. An ideal solution would be to repair degenerating discs using the mechanisms of their normal differentiation. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Using the mouse as a model, we previously showed that Shh signaling produced by nucleus pulposus cells activates the expression of differentiation markers, and cell proliferation, in the postnatal IVD. In the present study, we show that canonical Wnt signaling is required for the expression of Shh signaling targets in the IVD. We also show that Shh and canonical Wnt signaling pathways are down-regulated in adult IVDs. Furthermore, this down-regulation is reversible, since re-activation of the Wnt or Shh pathways in older discs can re-activate molecular markers of the IVD that are lost with age. These data suggest that biological treatments targeting Wnt and Shh signaling pathways may be feasible as a therapeutic for degenerative disc disease. PMID:24892825

  19. DnaJ-1 and karyopherin α3 suppress degeneration in a new Drosophila model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Wei-Ling; Hosking, Ryan R; Burr, Aaron A; Sutton, Joanna R; Ouyang, Michelle; Du, Xiaofei; Gomez, Christopher M; Todi, Sokol V

    2015-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) belongs to the family of CAG/polyglutamine (polyQ)-dependent neurodegenerative disorders. SCA6 is caused by abnormal expansion in a CAG trinucleotide repeat within exon 47 of CACNA1A, a bicistronic gene that encodes α1A, a P/Q-type calcium channel subunit and a C-terminal protein, termed α1ACT. Expansion of the CAG/polyQ region of CACNA1A occurs within α1ACT and leads to ataxia. There are few animal models of SCA6. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of the first Drosophila melanogaster models of SCA6, which express the entire human α1ACT protein with a normal or expanded polyQ. The polyQ-expanded version of α1ACT recapitulates the progressively degenerative nature of SCA6 when expressed in various fly tissues and the presence of densely staining aggregates. Additional studies identify the co-chaperone DnaJ-1 as a potential therapeutic target for SCA6. Expression of DnaJ-1 potently suppresses α1ACT-dependent degeneration and lethality, concomitant with decreased aggregation and reduced nuclear localization of the pathogenic protein. Mutating the nuclear importer karyopherin α3 also leads to reduced toxicity from pathogenic α1ACT. Little is known about the steps leading to degeneration in SCA6 and the means to protect neurons in this disease are lacking. Invertebrate animal models of SCA6 can expand our understanding of molecular sequelae related to degeneration in this disorder and lead to the rapid identification of cellular components that can be targeted to treat it.

  20. Finite element modelling of the articular disc behaviour of the temporo-mandibular joint under dynamic loads.

    PubMed

    Jaisson, Maxime; Lestriez, Philippe; Taiar, Redha; Debray, Karl

    2011-01-01

    The proposed biodynamic model of the articular disc joint has the ability to affect directly the complete chewing mechanism process and its related muscles defining its kinematics. When subjected to stresses from the mastication muscles, the disc absorbs one part and redistributes the other to become completely distorted. To develop a realistic model of this intricate joint a CT scan and MRI images from a patient were obtained to create sections (layers) and MRI images to create an anatomical joint CAD model, and its corresponding mesh element using a finite element method. The boundary conditions are described by the external forces applied to the joint model through a decomposition of the maximum muscular force developed by the same individual. In this study, the maximum force was operating at frequencies close to the actual chewing frequency measured through a cyclic loading condition. The reaction force at the glenoid fossa was found to be around 1035 N and is directly related to the frequency of indentation. It is also shown that over the years the areas of maximum stresses are located at the lateral portion of the disc and on its posterior rim. These forces can reach 13.2 MPa after a period of 32 seconds (s) at a frequency of 0.5 Hz. An important part of this study is to highlight resilience and the areas where stresses are at their maximum. This study provides a novel approach to improve the understanding of this complex joint, as well as to assess the different pathologies associated with the disc disease that would be difficult to study otherwise.

  1. A Porcine Animal Model for Early Meniscal Degeneration – Analysis of Histology, Gene Expression and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Six Months after Resection of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Kreinest, Michael; Reisig, Gregor; Ströbel, Philipp; Dinter, Dietmar; Attenberger, Ulrike; Lipp, Peter; Schwarz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective The menisci of the mammalian knee joint balance the incongruence between femoral condyle and tibial plateau and thus menisci absorb and distribute high loads. Degeneration processes of the menisci lead to pain syndromes in the knee joint. The origin of such degenerative processes on meniscal tissue is rarely understood and may be described best as an imbalance of anabolic and catabolic metabolism. A standardized animal model of meniscal degeneration is needed for further studies. The aim of the current study was to develop a porcine animal model with early meniscal degeneration. Material and Methods Resection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACLR) was performed on the left knee joints of eight Göttingen minipigs. A sham operation was carried out on the right knee joint. The grade of degeneration was determined 26 weeks after the operation using histology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Furthermore, the expression of 14 genes which code for extracellular matrix proteins, catabolic matrix metalloproteinases and inflammation mediators were analyzed. Results Degenerative changes were detected by a histological analysis of the medial meniscus after ACLR. These changes were not detected by MRI. In terms of their gene expression profile, these degenerated medial menisci showed a significantly increased expression of COL1A1. Conclusion This paper describes a new animal model for early secondary meniscal degeneration in the Göttingen minipig. Histopathological evidence of the degenerative changes could be described. This early degenerative changes could not be seen by NMR imaging. PMID:27434644

  2. Strategies for regeneration of the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Kalson, N S; Richardson, S; Hoyland, J A

    2008-09-01

    Low back pain resulting from degenerative disc disease is the most common cause of disability in the UK. Current low back pain treatments are aimed at either treating the symptoms of pain, or removing the source of pain itself, but do not address the biological basis of the disease. Our increasing understanding of the molecular biological basis for degenerative disc disease has enabled the development of strategies aimed at tackling the causes of degeneration. Here we review the progress that has been made in strategies using cells, biomaterials and growth factors aimed at regenerating the human intervertebral disc.

  3. Extracellular ATP inhibits Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation in an ex vivo model of Wallerian degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Youn Ho; Lee, Seo Jin; Jung, Junyang

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATP-treated sciatic explants shows the decreased expression of p75NGFR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular ATP inhibits the expression of phospho-ERK1/2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lysosomal exocytosis is involved in Schwann cell dedifferentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular ATP blocks Schwann cell proliferation in sciatic explants. -- Abstract: After nerve injury, Schwann cells proliferate and revert to a phenotype that supports nerve regeneration. This phenotype-changing process can be viewed as Schwann cell dedifferentiation. Here, we investigated the role of extracellular ATP in Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation during Wallerian degeneration. Using several markers of Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation in sciatic explants, we found that extracellular ATP inhibits Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation during Wallerian degeneration. Furthermore, the blockage of lysosomal exocytosis in ATP-treated sciatic explants is sufficient to induce Schwann cell dedifferentiation. Together, these findings suggest that ATP-induced lysosomal exocytosis may be involved in Schwann cell dedifferentiation.

  4. Time-dependent models of accretion discs with nuclear burning following the tidal disruption of a white dwarf by a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, Ben; Metzger, Brian D.

    2016-09-01

    We construct time-dependent one-dimensional (vertically averaged) models of accretion discs produced by the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by a binary neutron star (NS) companion. Nuclear reactions in the disc mid-plane burn the WD matter to increasingly heavier elements at sequentially smaller radii, releasing substantial energy which can impact the disc dynamics. A model for disc outflows is employed, by which cooling from the outflow balances other sources of heating (viscous, nuclear) in regulating the Bernoulli parameter of the mid-plane to a fixed value ≲0. We perform a comprehensive parameter study of the compositional yields and velocity distributions of the disc outflows for WDs of different initial compositions. For C/O WDs, the radial composition profile of the disc evolves self-similarly in a quasi-steady-state manner, and is remarkably robust to model parameters. The nucleosynthesis in helium WD discs does not exhibit this behaviour, which instead depends sensitively on factors controlling the disc mid-plane density (e.g. the strength of the viscosity, α). By the end of the simulation, a substantial fraction of the WD mass is unbound in outflows at characteristic velocities of ˜109 cm s-1. The outflows from WD-NS merger discs contain 10-4-3 × 10-3 M⊙ of radioactive 56Ni, resulting in fast (˜ week long) dim (˜1040 erg s-1) optical transients; shock heating of the ejecta by late-time outflows may increase the peak luminosity to ˜1043 erg s-1. The accreted mass on to the NS is probably not sufficient to induce gravitational collapse, but may be capable of spinning up the NS to periods of ˜10 ms, illustrating the feasibility of this channel in forming isolated millisecond pulsars.

  5. Macrophage invasion contributes to degeneration of stria vascularis in Pendred syndrome mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Jabba, Sairam V; Oelke, Alisha; Singh, Ruchira; Maganti, Rajanikanth J; Fleming, Sherry; Wall, Susan M; Everett, Lorraine A; Green, Eric D; Wangemann, Philine

    2006-01-01

    Background Pendred syndrome, an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by deafness and goiter, is caused by a mutation of SLC26A4, which codes for the anion exchanger pendrin. We investigated the relationship between pendrin expression and deafness using mice that have (Slc26a4+/+ or Slc26a4+/-) or lack (Slc26a4-/-) a complete Slc26a4 gene. Previously, we reported that stria vascularis of adult Slc26a4-/- mice is hyperpigmented and that marginal cells appear disorganized. Here we determine the time course of hyperpigmentation and marginal cell disorganization, and test the hypothesis that inflammation contributes to this tissue degeneration. Methods Slc26a4-/- and age-matched control (Slc26a4+/+ or Slc26a4+/-) mice were studied at four postnatal (P) developmental stages: before and after the age that marks the onset of hearing (P10 and P15, respectively), after weaning (P28-41) and adult (P74-170). Degeneration and hyperpigmentation stria vascularis was evaluated by confocal microscopy. Gene expression in stria vascularis was analyzed by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. In addition, the expression of a select group of genes was quantified in spiral ligament, spleen and liver to evaluate whether expression changes seen in stria vascularis are specific for stria vascularis or systemic in nature. Results Degeneration of stria vascularis defined as hyperpigmentation and marginal cells disorganization was not seen at P10 or P15, but occurred after weaning and was associated with staining for CD68, a marker for macrophages. Marginal cells in Slc26a4-/-, however, had a larger apical surface area at P10 and P15. No difference in the expression of Lyzs, C3 and Cd45 was found in stria vascularis of P15 Slc26a4+/- and Slc26a4-/- mice. However, differences in expression were found after weaning and in adult mice. No difference in the expression of markers for acute inflammation, including Il1a, Il6, Il12a, Nos2 and Nos3 were found at P15, after weaning or in adults. The

  6. A disc corona-jet model for the radio/X-ray correlation in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Erlin; Liu, B. F.

    2015-04-01

    The observed tight radio/X-ray correlation in the low spectral state of some black hole X-ray binaries implies the strong coupling of the accretion and jet. The correlation of L_R ∝ L_X^{˜ 0.5-0.7} was well explained by the coupling of a radiatively inefficient accretion flow and a jet. Recently, however, a growing number of sources show more complicated radio/X-ray correlations, e.g. L_R ∝ L_X^{˜ 1.4} for LX/LEdd ≳ 10-3, which is suggested to be explained by the coupling of a radiatively efficient accretion flow and a jet. In this work, we interpret the deviation from the initial radio/X-ray correlation for LX/LEdd ≳ 10-3 with a detailed disc corona-jet model. In this model, the disc and corona are radiatively and dynamically coupled. Assuming a fraction of the matter in the accretion flow, η ≡ dot{M}_jet/dot{M}, is ejected to form the jet, we can calculate the emergent spectrum of the disc corona-jet system. We calculate LR and LX at different dot{M}, adjusting η to fit the observed radio/X-ray correlation of the black hole X-ray transient H1743-322 for LX/LEdd > 10-3. It is found that always the X-ray emission is dominated by the disc corona and the radio emission is dominated by the jet. We noted that the value of η for the deviated radio/X-ray correlation for LX/LEdd > 10-3 is systematically less than that of the case for LX/LEdd < 10-3, which is consistent with the general idea that the jet is often relatively suppressed at the high-luminosity phase in black hole X-ray binaries.

  7. Heat distribution in disc brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenda, Frantisek; Soukup, Josef; Kampo, Jan

    2016-06-01

    This article is deals by the thermal analysis of the disc brake with floating caliper. The issue is solved by numerically. The half 2D model is used for solution in program ADINA 8.8. Two brake discs without the ventilation are solved. One disc is made from cast iron and the second is made from stainless steel. Both materials are an isotropic. By acting the pressure force on the brake pads will be pressing the pads to the brake disc. Speed will be reduced (slowing down). On the contact surface generates the heat, which the disc and pads heats. In the next part of article is comparison the maximum temperature at the time of braking. The temperatures of both materials for brake disc (gray cast iron, stainless steel) are compares. The heat flux during braking for the both materials is shown.

  8. Neuroinflammation mediated by IL-1β increases susceptibility of dopamine neurons to degeneration in an animal model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Koprich, James B; Reske-Nielsen, Casper; Mithal, Prabhakar; Isacson, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Background The etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) remains elusive despite identification of several genetic mutations. It is more likely that multiple factors converge to give rise to PD than any single cause. Here we report that inflammation can trigger degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. Methods We examined the effects of inflammation on the progressive 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease using immunohistochemistry, multiplex ELISA, and cell counting stereology. Results We show that a non-toxic dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced secretion of cytokines and predisposed DA neurons to be more vulnerable to a subsequent low dose of 6-hydroxydopamine. Alterations in cytokines, prominently an increase in interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), were identified as being potential mediators of this effect that was associated with activation of microglia. Administration of an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist resulted in significant reductions in tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ and attenuated the augmented loss of DA neurons caused by the LPS-induced sensitization to dopaminergic degeneration. Conclusion These data provide insight into the etiology of PD and support a role for inflammation as a risk factor for the development of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:18304357

  9. Do preoperative fear avoidance model factors predict outcomes after lumbar disc herniation surgery? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) surgery is usually recommended when conservative treatments fail to manage patients’ symptoms. However, many patients undergoing LDH surgery continue to report pain and disability. Preoperative psychological factors have shown to be predictive for postoperative outcomes. Our aim was to systematically review studies that prospectively examined the prognostic value of factors in the Fear Avoidance Model (FAM), including back pain, leg pain, catastrophizing, anxiety, fear-avoidance, depression, physical activity and disability, to predict postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing LDH surgery. Methods We performed a systematic literature review of prospective studies that measured any FAM factors preoperatively to predict postoperative outcomes for patients undergoing LDH surgery. Our search databases included PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. We assessed the quality of each included study using a certain quality assessment list. Degree of agreement between reviewers on quality assessment was examined. Results related to FAM factors in the included studies were summarized. Results Thirteen prospective studies met our inclusion criteria. Most studies were considered high quality. Heterogeneity was present between the included studies in many aspects. The most common FAM factors examinered were baseline pain, disability and depression. In, general, depression, fear-avoidance behaviors, passive pain coping, and anxiety FAM factors appeared to have negative influence on LDH surgical outcome. Baseline back pain and leg pain appeared to have differing prognostic value on LDH surgical outcomes. Conclusions FAM factors seem to influence LDH surgical outcomes. Patients with high levels of depression, anxiety and fear-avoidance behaviors are more likely to have poor outcomes following LDH surgery. Conversely, high levels of leg pain, but not back pain seem to be predictor for favorable LDH surgery outcome. More research is needed to

  10. Vertebral degenerative disc disease severity evaluation using random forest classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Hector E.; Yao, Jianhua; Burns, Joseph E.; Pham, Yasuyuki; Stieger, James; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) develops in the spine as vertebral discs degenerate and osseous excrescences or outgrowths naturally form to restabilize unstable segments of the spine. These osseous excrescences, or osteophytes, may progress or stabilize in size as the spine reaches a new equilibrium point. We have previously created a CAD system that detects DDD. This paper presents a new system to determine the severity of DDD of individual vertebral levels. This will be useful to monitor the progress of developing DDD, as rapid growth may indicate that there is a greater stabilization problem that should be addressed. The existing DDD CAD system extracts the spine from CT images and segments the cortical shell of individual levels with a dual-surface model. The cortical shell is unwrapped, and is analyzed to detect the hyperdense regions of DDD. Three radiologists scored the severity of DDD of each disc space of 46 CT scans. Radiologists' scores and features generated from CAD detections were used to train a random forest classifier. The classifier then assessed the severity of DDD at each vertebral disc level. The agreement between the computer severity score and the average radiologist's score had a quadratic weighted Cohen's kappa of 0.64.

  11. The circumstellar disc of FS Tau B - a self-consistent model based on observations in the mid-infrared with NACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchschlager, Florian; Wolf, Sebastian; Madlener, David

    2016-10-01

    Protoplanetary discs are a byproduct of the star formation process. In the dense mid-plane of these discs, planetesimals and planets are expected to form. The first step in planet formation is the growth of dust particles from submicrometre-sized grains to macroscopic mm-sized aggregates. The grain growth is accompanied by radial drift and vertical segregation of the particles within the disc. To understand this essential evolutionary step, spatially resolved multi-wavelength observations as well as photometric data are necessary which reflect the properties of both disc and dust. We present the first spatially resolved image obtained with NACO at the VLT in the Lp band of the near edge-on protoplanetary disc FS Tau B. Based on this new image, a previously published Hubble image in H band and the spectral energy distribution from optical to millimetre wavelengths, we derive constraints on the spatial dust distribution and the progress of grain growth. For this purpose we perform a disc modelling using the radiative transfer code MC3D. Radial drift and vertical sedimentation of the dust are not considered. We find a best-fitting model which features a disc extending from 2 au to several hundreds au with a moderately decreasing surface density and Mdisc = 2.8 × 10-2 M⊙. The inclination amounts to i = 80°. Our findings indicate that substantial dust grain growth has taken place and that grains of a size equal to or larger than 1 mm are present in the disc. In conclusion, the parameters describing the vertical density distribution are better constrained than those describing the radial disc structure.

  12. Finite element analysis of weightbath hydrotraction treatment of degenerated lumbar spine segments in elastic phase.

    PubMed

    Kurutz, M; Oroszváry, L

    2010-02-10

    3D finite element models of human lumbar functional spinal units (FSU) were used for numerical analysis of weightbath hydrotraction therapy (WHT) applied for treating degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine. Five grades of age-related degeneration were modeled by material properties. Tensile material parameters of discs were obtained by parameter identification based on in vivo measured elongations of lumbar segments during regular WHT, compressive material constants were obtained from the literature. It has been proved numerically that young adults of 40-45 years have the most deformable and vulnerable discs, while the stability of segments increases with further aging. The reasons were found by analyzing the separated contrasting effects of decreasing incompressibility and increasing hardening of nucleus, yielding non-monotonous functions of stresses and deformations in terms of aging and degeneration. WHT consists of indirect and direct traction phases. Discs show a bilinear material behaviour with higher resistance in indirect and smaller in direct traction phase. Consequently, although the direct traction load is only 6% of the indirect one, direct traction deformations are 15-90% of the indirect ones, depending on the grade of degeneration. Moreover, the ratio of direct stress relaxation remains equally about 6-8% only. Consequently, direct traction controlled by extra lead weights influences mostly the deformations being responsible for the nerve release; while the stress relaxation is influenced mainly by the indirect traction load coming from the removal of the compressive body weight and muscle forces in the water. A mildly degenerated disc in WHT shows 0.15mm direct, 0.45mm indirect and 0.6mm total extension; 0.2mm direct, 0.6mm indirect and 0.8mm total posterior contraction. A severely degenerated disc exhibits 0.05mm direct, 0.05mm indirect and 0.1mm total extension; 0.05mm direct, 0.25mm indirect and 0.3mm total posterior contraction. These

  13. Interrelation Between Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation in Models of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pujol-Lereis, Luciana M; Schäfer, Nicole; Kuhn, Laura B; Rohrer, Bärbel; Pauly, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Millions of individuals older than 50-years suffer from age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Associated with this multifactorial disease are polymorphisms of complement factor genes and a main environmental risk factor-oxidative stress. Until now the linkage between these risk factors for AMD has not been fully understood. Recent studies, integrating results on oxidative stress, complement activation, epidemiology and ocular pathology suggested the following sequence in AMD-etiology: initially, chronic oxidative stress results in modification of proteins and lipids in the posterior of the eye; these tissue alterations trigger chronic inflammation, involving the complement system; and finally, invasive immune cells facilitate pathology in the retina. Here, we summarize the results for animal studies which aim to elucidate this molecular interplay of oxidative events and tissue-specific complement activation in the eye.

  14. Quantitative MRI as a diagnostic tool of intervertebral disc matrix composition and integrity

    PubMed Central

    Mwale, Fackson; Iatridis, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Degenerative disc disease has been implicated as a major component of spine pathology. The current major clinical procedures for treating disc degeneration have been disappointing, because of altered spinal mechanics leading to subsequent degeneration at adjacent disc levels. Disc pathology treatment is shifting toward prevention and treatment of underlying etiologic processes at the level of the disc matrix composition and integrity and the biomechanics of the disc. The ability to perform such treatment relies on one’s ability to accurately and objectively assess the state of the matrix and the effectiveness of treatment by a non-invasive technique. In this review, we will summarize our advances in efforts to develop an objective, accurate, non-invasive diagnostic tool (quantitative MRI) in the detection and quantification of matrix composition and integrity and of biomechanical changes in early intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:19005703

  15. Correlation between SD-OCT, immunocytochemistry and functional findings in an animal model of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, Nicolás; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Sauvé, Yves; Segura, Francisco J.; Martínez-Navarrete, Gema; Tamarit, José Manuel; Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Sanchez-Cano, Ana; Pinilla, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The P23H rhodopsin mutation is an autosomal dominant cause of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The degeneration can be tracked using different anatomical and functional methods. In our case, we evaluated the anatomical changes using Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) and correlated the findings with retinal thickness values determined by immunocytochemistry.Methods: Pigmented rats heterozygous for the P23H mutation, with ages between P18 and P180 were studied. Function was assessed by means of optomotor testing and ERGs. Retinal thicknesses measurements, autofluorescence and fluorescein angiography were performed using Spectralis OCT. Retinas were studied by means of immunohistochemistry. Results: Between P30 and P180, visual acuity decreased from 0.500 to 0.182 cycles per degree (cyc/deg) and contrast sensitivity decreased from 54.56 to 2.98 for a spatial frequency of 0.089 cyc/deg. Only cone-driven b-wave responses reached developmental maturity. Flicker fusions were also comparable at P29 (42 Hz). Double flash-isolated rod-driven responses were already affected at P29. Photopic responses revealed deterioration after P29.A reduction in retinal thicknesses and morphological modifications were seen in OCT sections. Statistically significant differences were found in all evaluated thicknesses. Autofluorescence was seen in P23H rats as sparse dots. Immunocytochemistry showed a progressive decrease in the outer nuclear layer (ONL), and morphological changes. Although anatomical thickness measures were significantly lower than OCT values, there was a very strong correlation between the values measured by both techniques.Conclusions: In pigmented P23H rats, a progressive deterioration occurs in both retinal function and anatomy. Anatomical changes can be effectively evaluated using SD-OCT and immunocytochemistry, with a good correlation between their values, thus making SD-OCT an important tool for research in retinal degeneration. PMID:25565976

  16. Physicochemical properties of the aging and diabetic sand rat intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Ziv, I; Moskowitz, R W; Kraise, I; Adler, J H; Maroudas, A

    1992-03-01

    Hydration, fixed charge density, (FCD) and hydration under various osmotic pressures were compared in young, old, and young diabetic sand rats. This rat is a desert animal that may develop diabetes when fed a regular diet; it is also known to have radiographic and histologic evidence of intervertebral disc (IVD) disease. Forty-five rats and 180 IVD were used in this study; they were divided into three equal groups: young healthy, old healthy, and young diabetics. IVD, cancellous bone, and muscle were sampled from distal lumbar spines. The young diabetic rats (YD) were considerably heavier than the age-matched controls, had higher insulin and glucose levels, and all YD had cataracts. The discs of the young diabetic animals demonstrated decreased hydration, FCD and ability to resist compression under osmotic pressures as compared with the young and healthy discs and were more similar to the discs from old rats. The IVD is the most affected musculoskeletal connective tissue in sand rats with aging and diabetes. The aged and diabetic discs in the sand rat demonstrated changes similar to human changes with regard to lower hydration, FCD, and ability to resist osmotic pressure. Therefore, the sand rat may be a suitable animal model for studying the pathogenesis of disc degeneration.

  17. Macular degeneration (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Macular degeneration is a disease of the retina that affects the macula in the back of the eye. ... see fine details. There are two types of macular degeneration, dry and wet. Dry macular degeneration is more ...

  18. An ex vivo laser-induced spinal cord injury model to assess mechanisms of axonal degeneration in real-time.

    PubMed

    Okada, Starlyn L M; Stivers, Nicole S; Stys, Peter K; Stirling, David P

    2014-11-25

    Injured CNS axons fail to regenerate and often retract away from the injury site. Axons spared from the initial injury may later undergo secondary axonal degeneration. Lack of growth cone formation, regeneration, and loss of additional myelinated axonal projections within the spinal cord greatly limits neurological recovery following injury. To assess how central myelinated axons of the spinal cord respond to injury, we developed an ex vivo living spinal cord model utilizing transgenic mice that express yellow fluorescent protein in axons and a focal and highly reproducible laser-induced spinal cord injury to document the fate of axons and myelin (lipophilic fluorescent dye Nile Red) over time using two-photon excitation time-lapse microscopy. Dynamic processes such as acute axonal injury, axonal retraction, and myelin degeneration are best studied in real-time. However, the non-focal nature of contusion-based injuries and movement artifacts encountered during in vivo spinal cord imaging make differentiating primary and secondary axonal injury responses using high resolution microscopy challenging. The ex vivo spinal cord model described here mimics several aspects of clinically relevant contusion/compression-induced axonal pathologies including axonal swelling, spheroid formation, axonal transection, and peri-axonal swelling providing a useful model to study these dynamic processes in real-time. Major advantages of this model are excellent spatiotemporal resolution that allows differentiation between the primary insult that directly injures axons and secondary injury mechanisms; controlled infusion of reagents directly to the perfusate bathing the cord; precise alterations of the environmental milieu (e.g., calcium, sodium ions, known contributors to axonal injury, but near impossible to manipulate in vivo); and murine models also offer an advantage as they provide an opportunity to visualize and manipulate genetically identified cell populations and subcellular

  19. An ex vivo laser-induced spinal cord injury model to assess mechanisms of axonal degeneration in real-time.

    PubMed

    Okada, Starlyn L M; Stivers, Nicole S; Stys, Peter K; Stirling, David P

    2014-01-01

    Injured CNS axons fail to regenerate and often retract away from the injury site. Axons spared from the initial injury may later undergo secondary axonal degeneration. Lack of growth cone formation, regeneration, and loss of additional myelinated axonal projections within the spinal cord greatly limits neurological recovery following injury. To assess how central myelinated axons of the spinal cord respond to injury, we developed an ex vivo living spinal cord model utilizing transgenic mice that express yellow fluorescent protein in axons and a focal and highly reproducible laser-induced spinal cord injury to document the fate of axons and myelin (lipophilic fluorescent dye Nile Red) over time using two-photon excitation time-lapse microscopy. Dynamic processes such as acute axonal injury, axonal retraction, and myelin degeneration are best studied in real-time. However, the non-focal nature of contusion-based injuries and movement artifacts encountered during in vivo spinal cord imaging make differentiating primary and secondary axonal injury responses using high resolution microscopy challenging. The ex vivo spinal cord model described here mimics several aspects of clinically relevant contusion/compression-induced axonal pathologies including axonal swelling, spheroid formation, axonal transection, and peri-axonal swelling providing a useful model to study these dynamic processes in real-time. Major advantages of this model are excellent spatiotemporal resolution that allows differentiation between the primary insult that directly injures axons and secondary injury mechanisms; controlled infusion of reagents directly to the perfusate bathing the cord; precise alterations of the environmental milieu (e.g., calcium, sodium ions, known contributors to axonal injury, but near impossible to manipulate in vivo); and murine models also offer an advantage as they provide an opportunity to visualize and manipulate genetically identified cell populations and subcellular

  20. Disc nucleus fortification for lumbar degenerative disc disease: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Derrick A; Cook, Daniel J; Brad Bellotte, J; Oh, Michael Y; Whiting, Donald; Cheng, Boyle C

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal stability is attributed in part to osteoligamentous structures, including the vertebral body, facets, intervertebral discs, and posterior elements. The materials in this study provide an opportunity to augment the degenerated nucleus without removing native disc material, a procedure introduced here as "fortification." The objective of this study was to determine the effect of nucleus fortification on lumbar disc biomechanics. METHODS The authors performed in vitro analysis of human cadaveric functional spinal units (FSUs), along with characterization and quantification of movement of the units using biomechanical data in intact, disc-only, and fortified specimens. The units underwent removal of all posterior elements and annulus and were fortified by injecting a biogel into the nucleus pulposus. Each specimen was subjected to load testing, range of motion (ROM) quantification, and disc bulge measurements. Optoelectric tracking was used to quantify disc bulge. These criteria were assessed in the intact, disc-only, and fortified treatments. RESULTS Disc-only FSUs resulted in increased ROM when compared with intact and fortified conditions. Fortification of the FSU resulted in partial restoration of normal ROM in the treatment groups. Analysis of hysteresis loops showed more linear response in the fortified groups when compared with the intact and disc-only groups. CONCLUSIONS Disc nucleus fortification increases linearity and decreases ROM.

  1. Disc nucleus fortification for lumbar degenerative disc disease: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Derrick A; Cook, Daniel J; Brad Bellotte, J; Oh, Michael Y; Whiting, Donald; Cheng, Boyle C

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal stability is attributed in part to osteoligamentous structures, including the vertebral body, facets, intervertebral discs, and posterior elements. The materials in this study provide an opportunity to augment the degenerated nucleus without removing native disc material, a procedure introduced here as "fortification." The objective of this study was to determine the effect of nucleus fortification on lumbar disc biomechanics. METHODS The authors performed in vitro analysis of human cadaveric functional spinal units (FSUs), along with characterization and quantification of movement of the units using biomechanical data in intact, disc-only, and fortified specimens. The units underwent removal of all posterior elements and annulus and were fortified by injecting a biogel into the nucleus pulposus. Each specimen was subjected to load testing, range of motion (ROM) quantification, and disc bulge measurements. Optoelectric tracking was used to quantify disc bulge. These criteria were assessed in the intact, disc-only, and fortified treatments. RESULTS Disc-only FSUs resulted in increased ROM when compared with intact and fortified conditions. Fortification of the FSU resulted in partial restoration of normal ROM in the treatment groups. Analysis of hysteresis loops showed more linear response in the fortified groups when compared with the intact and disc-only groups. CONCLUSIONS Disc nucleus fortification increases linearity and decreases ROM. PMID:26771371

  2. American Macular Degeneration Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to content Contact DONATE Search for: Search Saving sight through research and education American Macular Degeneration Foundation Saving Sight Through Research and Education Menu About Macular Degeneration ...

  3. Riboflavin crosslinked high-density collagen gel for the repair of annular defects in intervertebral discs: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Grunert, Peter; Borde, Brandon H; Towne, Sara B; Moriguchi, Yu; Hudson, Katherine D; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Härtl, Roger

    2015-10-01

    Open annular defects compromise the ability of the annulus fibrosus to contain nuclear tissue in the disc space, and therefore lead to disc herniation with subsequent degenerative changes to the entire intervertebral disc. This study reports the use of riboflavin crosslinked high-density collagen gel for the repair of annular defects in a needle-punctured rat-tail model. High-density collagen has increased stiffness and greater hydraulic permeability than conventional low-density gels; riboflavin crosslinking further increases these properties. This study found that treating annular defects with crosslinked high-density collagen inhibited the progression of disc degeneration over 18 weeks compared to untreated control discs. Histological sections of FITC-labeled collagen gel revealed an early tight attachment to host annular tissue. The gel was subsequently infiltrated by host fibroblasts which remodeled it into a fibrous cap that bridged the outer disrupted annular fibers and partially repaired the defect. This repair tissue enhanced retention of nucleus pulposus tissue, maintained physiological disc hydration, and preserved hydraulic permeability, according to MRI, histological, and mechanical assessments. Degenerative changes were partially reversed in treated discs, as indicated by an increase in nucleus pulposus size and hydration between weeks 5 and 18. The collagen gel appeared to work as an instant sealant and by enhancing the intrinsic healing capabilities of the host tissue.

  4. Determination of the intervertebral disc space from CT images of the lumbar spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korez, Robert; Å tern, Darko; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc are among the most common causes of low back pain, where for individuals with significant symptoms surgery may be needed. One of the interventions is the total disc replacement surgery, where the degenerated disc is replaced by an artificial implant. For designing implants with good bone contact and continuous force distribution, the morphology of the intervertebral disc space and vertebral body endplates is of considerable importance. In this study we propose a method for the determination of the intervertebral disc space from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images of the lumbar spine. The first step of the proposed method is the construction of a model of vertebral bodies in the lumbar spine. For this purpose, a chain of five elliptical cylinders is initialized in the 3D image and then deformed to resemble vertebral bodies by introducing 25 shape parameters. The parameters are obtained by aligning the chain to the vertebral bodies in the CT image according to image intensity and appearance information. The determination of the intervertebral disc space is finally achieved by finding the planes that fit the endplates of the obtained parametric 3D models, and placing points in the space between the planes of adjacent vertebrae that enable surface reconstruction of the intervertebral disc space. The morphometric analysis of images from 20 subjects yielded 11:3 +/- 2:6, 12:1 +/- 2:4, 12:8 +/- 2:0 and 12:9 +/- 2:7 cm3 in terms of L1-L2, L2-L3, L3-L4 and L4-L5 intervertebral disc space volume, respectively.

  5. A self-consistent reduced model for dusty magnetorotationally unstable discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Balbus, Steven

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between settling of dust grains and magnetorotational instability (MRI) turbulence in protoplanetary discs is analysed. We use a reduced system of coupled ordinary differential equations to represent the interaction between the diffusion of grains and the inhibition of the MRI. The coupled equations are styled on a Landau equation for the turbulence and a Fokker-Planck equation for the diffusion. The turbulence-grain interaction is probably most relevant near the outer edge of the disc's quiescent, or 'dead' zone. Settling is most pronounced near the mid-plane, where a high dust concentration can self-consistently suppress the MRI. Under certain conditions, however, grains can reach high altitudes, a result of some observational interest. Finally, we show that the equilibrium solutions are linearly stable.

  6. Failure of lower motor neuron radial outgrowth precedes retrograde degeneration in a feline model of SMA

    PubMed Central

    Wakeling, Erin N.; Joussemet, Béatrice; Costiou, Patrick; Fanuel, Dominique; Moullier, Philippe; Barkats, Martine; Fyfe, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Feline SMA is a fully penetrant, autosomal recessive lower motor neuron disease in domestic cats that clinically resembles human SMA Type III. A whole genome linkage scan identified a ~140 kilobase deletion that abrogates expression of LIX1, a novel SMA candidate gene of unknown function. To characterize the progression of feline SMA, we assessed pathological changes in muscle and spinal cord from 3 days of age to beyond onset of clinical signs. EMG analysis indicating denervation occurred between 10 and 12 weeks, with the first neurological signs occurring at the same time. CMAP amplitudes were significantly reduced in the soleus and extensor carpi radialis muscles at 8 to 11 weeks. Quadriceps femoris muscle fibers from affected cats appeared smaller at 10 weeks; by 12 weeks atrophic fibers were more prevalent than in age-matched controls. In affected cats, significant loss of L5 ventral root axons was observed at 12 weeks. By 21 weeks of age, affected cats had 40% fewer L5 motor axons than normal. There was no significant difference in total L5 soma number, even at 21 weeks; thus degeneration begins distal to the cell body and proceeds retrogradely. Morphometric analysis of L5 ventral roots and horns revealed that 4 weeks prior to axon loss, motor axons in affected cats failed to undergo radial enlargement, suggesting a role for the putative disease gene, LIX1, in radial growth of axons. PMID:22120001

  7. Physical activity ameliorates cartilage degeneration in a rat model of aging: a study on lubricin expression.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, G; Castrogiovanni, P; Trovato, F M; Imbesi, R; Giunta, S; Szychlinska, M A; Loreto, C; Castorina, S; Mobasheri, A

    2015-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common musculoskeletal disorder characterized by slow progression and joint tissue degeneration. Aging is one of the most prominent risk factors for the development and progression of OA. OA is not, however, an inevitable consequence of aging and age-related changes in the joint can be distinguished from those that are the result of joint injury or inflammatory disease. The question that remains is whether OA can be prevented by undertaking regular physical activity. Would moderate physical activity in the elderly cartilage (and lubricin expression) comparable to a sedentary healthy adult? In this study we used physical exercise in healthy young, adult, and aged rats to evaluate the expression of lubricin as a novel biomarker of chondrocyte senescence. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used to evaluate the expression of lubricin in articular cartilage, while enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to quantify lubricin in synovial fluid. Morphological evaluation was done by histology to monitor possible tissue alterations. Our data suggest that moderate physical activity and normal mechanical joint loading in elderly rats improve tribology and lubricative properties of articular cartilage, promoting lubricin synthesis and its elevation in synovial fluid, thus preventing cartilage degradation compared with unexercised adult rats.

  8. Modelling the Galactic disc: perturbed distribution functions in the presence of spiral arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monari, Giacomo; Famaey, Benoit; Siebert, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    Starting from an axisymmetric equilibrium distribution function (DF) in action space, representing a Milky Way thin disc stellar population, we use the linearized Boltzmann equation to explicitly compute the response to a three-dimensional spiral potential in terms of the perturbed DF. This DF, valid away from the main resonances, allows us to investigate a snapshot of the velocity distribution at any given point in three-dimensional configuration space. Moreover, the first-order moments of the DF give rise to non-zero radial and vertical bulk flows - namely breathing modes - qualitatively similar to those recently observed in the extended solar neighbourhood. We show that these analytically predicted mean stellar motions are in agreement with the outcome of test-particle simulations. Moreover, we estimate for the first time the reduction factor for the vertical bulk motions of a stellar population compared to the case of a cold fluid. Such an explicit expression for the full perturbed DF of a thin disc stellar population in the presence of spiral arms will be helpful in order to dynamically interpret the detailed information on the Milky Way disc stellar kinematics that will be provided by upcoming large astrometric and spectroscopic surveys of the Galaxy.

  9. Complimentary action: C1q increases ganglion cell survival in an in vitro model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Linnéa; Arnér, Karin; Blom, Anna M; Ghosh, Fredrik

    2016-09-15

    Using a previously described retinal explant culture system as an acute injury model, we here explore the role of C1q, the initiator of the classical complement pathway, in neuronal cell survival and retinal homeostasis. Full-thickness adult rat retinal explants were divided into four groups, receiving the following supplementation: C1q (50nM), C1-inhibitor (C1-inh; Berinert; 500mg/l), C1q+C1-inh, and no supplementation (culture controls). Explants were kept for 12h or 2days after which they were examined morphologically and with a panel of immunohistochemical markers. C1q supplementation protects ganglion cells from degeneration within the explant in vitro system. This effect is correlated to an attenuated endogenous production of C1q, and a quiesced gliotic response. PMID:27609284

  10. Defective photoreceptor phagocytosis in a mouse model of enhanced S-cone syndrome causes progressive retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, Debarshi; Kevany, Brian M.; Genoud, Christel; Okano, Kiichiro; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Roman, Alejandro J.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Engel, Andreas; Adams, Mark D.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESCS), featuring an excess number of S cones, manifests as a progressive retinal degeneration that leads to blindness. Here, through optical imaging, we identified an abnormal interface between photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in 9 patients with ESCS. The neural retina leucine zipper transcription factor-knockout (Nrl−/−) mouse model demonstrates many phenotypic features of human ESCS, including unstable S-cone-positive photoreceptors. Using massively parallel RNA sequencing, we identified 6203 differentially expressed transcripts between wild-type (Wt) and Nrl−/− mouse retinas, with 6 highly significant differentially expressed genes of the Pax, Notch, and Wnt canonical pathways. Changes were also obvious in expression of 30 genes involved in the visual cycle and 3 key genes in photoreceptor phagocytosis. Novel high-resolution (100 nm) imaging and reconstruction of Nrl−/− retinas revealed an abnormal packing of photoreceptors that contributed to buildup of photoreceptor deposits. Furthermore, lack of phagosomes in the RPE layer of Nrl−/− retina revealed impairment in phagocytosis. Cultured RPE cells from Wt and Nrl−/− mice illustrated that the phagocytotic defect was attributable to the aberrant interface between ESCS photoreceptors and the RPE. Overcoming the retinal phagocytosis defect could arrest the progressive degenerative component of this disease.—Mustafi, D., Kevany, B. M., Genoud, C., Okano, K., Cideciyan, A. V., Sumaroka, A., Roman, A. J., Jacobson, S. G. Engel, A., Adams, M. D., Palczewski, K. Defective photoreceptor phagocytosis in a mouse model of enhanced S-cone syndrome causes progressive retinal degeneration. PMID:21659555

  11. Nephronophthisis and retinal degeneration in tmem218-/- mice: a novel mouse model for Senior-Løken syndrome?

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Gelfman, C M; Issa, T; Payne, B J; Hansen, G M; Read, R W; Jones, C; Pitcher, M R; Ding, Z-M; DaCosta, C M; Shadoan, M K; Vance, R B; Powell, D R

    2015-05-01

    Mice deficient in TMEM218 (Tmem218(-/-) ) were generated as part of an effort to identify and validate pharmaceutically tractable targets for drug development through large-scale phenotypic screening of knockout mice. Routine diagnostics, expression analysis, histopathology, and electroretinogram analyses completed on Tmem218(-/-) mice identified a previously unknown role for TMEM218 in the development and function of the kidney and eye. The major observed phenotypes in Tmem218(-/-) mice were progressive cystic kidney disease and retinal degeneration. The renal lesions were characterized by diffuse renal cyst development with tubulointerstitial nephropathy and disruption of tubular basement membranes in essentially normal-sized kidneys. The retinal lesions were characterized by slow-onset loss of photoreceptors, which resulted in reduced electroretinogram responses. These renal and retinal lesions are most similar to those associated with nephronophthisis (NPHP) and retinitis pigmentosa in humans. At least 10% of NPHP cases present with extrarenal conditions, which most often include retinal degeneration. Senior-Løken syndrome is characterized by the concurrent development of autosomal recessive NPHP and retinitis pigmentosa. Since mutations in the known NPHP genes collectively account for only about 30% of NPHP cases, it is possible that TMEM218 could be involved in the development of similar ciliopathies in humans. In reviewing all other reported mouse models of NPHP, we suggest that Tmem218(-/-) mice could provide a useful model for elucidating the pathogenesis of cilia-associated disease in both the kidney and the retina, as well as in developing and testing novel therapeutic strategies for Senior-Løken syndrome.

  12. Molecular composition of the intercalated disc in a spontaneous canine animal model of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Oxford, Eva M.; Everitt, Melanie; Coombs, Wanda; Fox, Philip R; Kraus, Marc; Gelzer, Anna RM; Saffitz, Jeffrey; Taffet, Steven M; Moïse, N. Sydney; Delmar, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) is characterized by ventricular arrhythmias, sudden death, and fatty or fibrofatty replacement of right ventricular myocytes. Recent studies have noted an association between human ARVD/C and molecular remodeling of intercalated disc structures. However, progress has been constrained by limitations inherent to human studies. Here, we studied the molecular composition of the intercalated disc structure in a naturally occurring animal model of ARVD/C (boxer dogs). Methods We studied hearts from 12 boxers with confirmed ARVD/C and two controls. Ventricular sections from four animals were examined by immunofluorescent microscopy. Frozen tissue samples were used for western blot analysis. Proteins investigated were N-cadherin, plakophilin 2, desmoplakin, plakoglobin, desmin, and connexin43 (Cx43). Results In control dogs, all proteins tested by immunofluorescence analysis yielded intense localized signals at sites of end-to-end cell apposition. In contrast, myocardial tissues from ARVD/C-afflicted boxers displayed preservation of N-Cadherin staining but loss of detectable signal for Cx43 at the intercalated disc location. Western blots indicated that the Cx43 protein was still present in the samples. Gene sequencing analysis revealed no mutations in desmoplakin, plakoglobin, Cx43, or plakophilin 2. Conclusions Mutation(s) responsible for ARVD/C in boxers lead, directly or indirectly, to severe modifications of mechanical and electrical cell-cell interactions. Furthermore, significant reduction in gap junction formation may promote a substrate for malignant ventricular arrhythmias. This model may help advance our understanding of the molecular basis, pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approach to patients with ARVD/C. PMID:17765621

  13. Current trends in biologics delivery to restore intervertebral disc anabolism.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Gianluca; See, Eugene; Pandit, Abhay

    2015-04-01

    Low back pain is generally attributed to intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. This is a multifactorial disease induced by genetic and environmental factors and that progresses with aging. Disc degeneration is characterized by a limited ability of IVD cells to produce functional matrix while producing abnormal amounts of matrix-degrading enzymes. The prolonged imbalance between anabolism and catabolism in degenerative discs alters their composition and hydration. In turn, this results in increased angiogenesis and the loss of the disc's ability to maintain its aneural condition. Inflammation in the IVD, in particular the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines, was found to favor innervation and also sensitization of the nociceptive pathways, thereby exacerbating degenerative symptoms. In this review, we discuss anti-inflammatory approaches to encounter disc catabolism, potential treatments to lower discogenic pain and pro-anabolic approaches in the form of protein delivery, gene therapy and cell delivery, to trigger regeneration in the IVD.

  14. Tissue Engineering a Biological Repair Strategy for Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Grace D; Leach, J Kent; Klineberg, Eric O

    2015-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is a critical part of the intersegmental soft tissue of the spinal column, providing flexibility and mobility, while absorbing large complex loads. Spinal disease, including disc herniation and degeneration, may be a significant contributor to low back pain. Clinically, disc herniations are treated with both nonoperative and operative methods. Operative treatment for disc herniation includes removal of the herniated material when neural compression occurs. While this strategy may have short-term advantages over nonoperative methods, the remaining disc material is not addressed and surgery for mild degeneration may have limited long-term advantage over nonoperative methods. Furthermore, disc herniation and surgery significantly alter the mechanical function of the disc joint, which may contribute to progression of degeneration in surrounding tissues. We reviewed recent advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies that may have a significant impact on disc herniation repair. Our review on tissue engineering strategies focuses on cell-based and inductive methods, each commonly combined with material-based approaches. An ideal clinically relevant biological repair strategy will significantly reduce pain and repair and restore flexibility and motion of the spine. PMID:26634189

  15. Tissue Engineering a Biological Repair Strategy for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Grace D.; Leach, J. Kent; Klineberg, Eric O.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The intervertebral disc is a critical part of the intersegmental soft tissue of the spinal column, providing flexibility and mobility, while absorbing large complex loads. Spinal disease, including disc herniation and degeneration, may be a significant contributor to low back pain. Clinically, disc herniations are treated with both nonoperative and operative methods. Operative treatment for disc herniation includes removal of the herniated material when neural compression occurs. While this strategy may have short-term advantages over nonoperative methods, the remaining disc material is not addressed and surgery for mild degeneration may have limited long-term advantage over nonoperative methods. Furthermore, disc herniation and surgery significantly alter the mechanical function of the disc joint, which may contribute to progression of degeneration in surrounding tissues. We reviewed recent advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies that may have a significant impact on disc herniation repair. Our review on tissue engineering strategies focuses on cell-based and inductive methods, each commonly combined with material-based approaches. An ideal clinically relevant biological repair strategy will significantly reduce pain and repair and restore flexibility and motion of the spine. PMID:26634189

  16. UV-induced retinal proteome changes in the rat model of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra; Klobučar, Marko; Sedić, Mirela; Micek, Vedran; Gehrig, Peter; Grossman, Jonas; Pavelić, Krešimir; Vojniković, Božidar

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by irreversible damage of photoreceptors in the central posterior part of the retina, called the macula and is the most common cause of vision loss in those aged over 50. A growing body of evidence shows that cumulative long-term exposure to UV radiation may be harmful to the retina and possibly leads to AMD irrespective of age. In spite of many research efforts, cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to UV-induced retinal damage and possibly retinal diseases such as AMD are not completely understood. In the present study we explored damage mechanisms accounting for UV-induced retinal phototoxicity in the rats exposed to UVA and UVB irradiation using a proteomics approach. Our study showed that UV irradiation induces profound changes in the retinal proteomes of the rats associated with the disruption of energy homeostasis, oxidative stress, DNA damage response and structural and functional impairments of the interphotoreceptor matrix components and their cell surface receptors such as galectins. Two small leucine-rich proteoglycans, biglycan and lumican, were identified as phototoxicity biomarkers associated with UV-induced disruption of interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM). In addition, UVB induced activation of Src kinase, which could account for cytoskeletal rearrangements in the retina was observed at the proteomics level. Pharmacological intervention either to target Src kinase with the aim of preventing cytoskeletal rearrangements in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and neuronal retina or to help rebuild damaged IPM may provide fresh avenues of treatment for patients suffering from AMD. PMID:26071645

  17. Photodegradation of retinal bisretinoids in mouse models and implications for macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Keiko; Zhao, Jin; Kim, Hye Jin; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2016-01-01

    Adducts of retinaldehyde (bisretinoids) form nonenzymatically in photoreceptor cells and accumulate in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells as lipofuscin; these fluorophores are implicated in the pathogenesis of inherited and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here we demonstrate that bisretinoid photodegradation is ongoing in the eye. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of eyes of dark-reared and cyclic light-reared wild-type mice, together with comparisons of pigmented versus albino mice, revealed a relationship between intraocular light and reduced levels of the bisretinoids A2E and A2-glycero-phosphoethanolamine (A2-GPE). Analysis of the bisretinoids A2E, A2-GPE, A2-dihydropyridine-phosphatidylethanolamine (A2-DHP-PE), and all-trans-retinal dimer-phosphatidylethanolamine (all-trans-retinal dimer-PE) also decreases in albino Abca4−/− mice reared in cyclic light compared with darkness. In albino Abca4−/− mice receiving a diet supplemented with the antioxidant vitamin E, higher levels of RPE bisretinoid were evidenced by HPLC analysis and quantitation of fundus autofluorescence; this effect is consistent with photooxidative processes known to precede bisretinoid degradation. Amelioration of outer nuclear layer thinning indicated that vitamin E treatment protected photoreceptor cells. Conversely, in-cage exposure to short-wavelength light resulted in reduced fundus autofluorescence, decreased HPLC-quantified A2E, outer nuclear layer thinning, and increased methylglyoxal (MG)-adducted protein. MG was also released upon bisretinoid photodegradation in cells. We suggest that the lower levels of these diretinal adducts in cyclic light-reared and albino mice reflect photodegradative loss of bisretinoid. These mechanisms may underlie associations among AMD risk, oxidative mechanisms, and lifetime light exposure. PMID:27274068

  18. Photodegradation of retinal bisretinoids in mouse models and implications for macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Keiko; Zhao, Jin; Kim, Hye Jin; Sparrow, Janet R

    2016-06-21

    Adducts of retinaldehyde (bisretinoids) form nonenzymatically in photoreceptor cells and accumulate in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells as lipofuscin; these fluorophores are implicated in the pathogenesis of inherited and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here we demonstrate that bisretinoid photodegradation is ongoing in the eye. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of eyes of dark-reared and cyclic light-reared wild-type mice, together with comparisons of pigmented versus albino mice, revealed a relationship between intraocular light and reduced levels of the bisretinoids A2E and A2-glycero-phosphoethanolamine (A2-GPE). Analysis of the bisretinoids A2E, A2-GPE, A2-dihydropyridine-phosphatidylethanolamine (A2-DHP-PE), and all-trans-retinal dimer-phosphatidylethanolamine (all-trans-retinal dimer-PE) also decreases in albino Abca4(-/-) mice reared in cyclic light compared with darkness. In albino Abca4(-/-) mice receiving a diet supplemented with the antioxidant vitamin E, higher levels of RPE bisretinoid were evidenced by HPLC analysis and quantitation of fundus autofluorescence; this effect is consistent with photooxidative processes known to precede bisretinoid degradation. Amelioration of outer nuclear layer thinning indicated that vitamin E treatment protected photoreceptor cells. Conversely, in-cage exposure to short-wavelength light resulted in reduced fundus autofluorescence, decreased HPLC-quantified A2E, outer nuclear layer thinning, and increased methylglyoxal (MG)-adducted protein. MG was also released upon bisretinoid photodegradation in cells. We suggest that the lower levels of these diretinal adducts in cyclic light-reared and albino mice reflect photodegradative loss of bisretinoid. These mechanisms may underlie associations among AMD risk, oxidative mechanisms, and lifetime light exposure. PMID:27274068

  19. [Hepatolenticular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Zudenigo, D; Relja, M

    1990-01-01

    Hepatolenticular degeneration (Wilson's disease) is a hereditary disease in which metabolic disorder of copper leads to its accumulation in the liver, brain, cornea and kidneys with consequent pathologic changes in those organs. Hereditary mechanism of the disease is autosomal recessive with prevalence of 30-100 per 1,000,000 inhabitants. Etiology of this disease is not yet explained. There are two hypotheses. The first one is that it is the disorder of ceruloplasmine metabolism caused by insufficient synthesis of normal ceruloplasmine, or synthesis of functionally abnormal ceruloplasmine. The second one is: the block of copper biliar excretion which is the consequence of the liver lysosomes functional defect. Pathogenetic mechanism of disease is firstly long-term accumulation of copper in the liver, and later, when the liver depo is full, its releasing in circulation and accumulation in the brain, cornea, kidneys and bones, which causes adequate pathologic changes. Toxic activity of copper is the consequence of its activity on enzymes, particularly on those with -SH group. There are two basic clinical forms of the disease: liver disease or neurologic disease. Before puberty the liver damage is more frequent, while in adolescents and young adults neurologic form of the disease is usual. The liver disease is nonspecific and characterized by symptoms of cirrhosis and chronic aggressive hepatitis. The only specificity is hemolytic anemia which, in combination with previous symptoms, is important for diagnosis of the disease. Neurologic symptoms are the most frequent consequence of pathologic changes in the basal ganglia. In our patients the most frequent symptoms were tremor (63%); dysarthria, choreoathetosis and rigor (38%); ataxia and mental disorders (31%); dysphagia and dystonia (12%), diplopia, hypersalivation, nystagmus and Babinski's sign (6%). Among pathologic changes in other tissues and organs the most important is the finding of Kayser-Fleischer ring in the

  20. Cost-utility analysis modeling at 2-year follow-up for cervical disc arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: A single-center contribution to the randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Daniel; Andres, Tate; Hoelscher, Christian; Ricart-Hoffiz, Pedro; Bendo, John; Goldstein, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with cervical disc herniations resulting in radiculopathy or myelopathy from single level disease have traditionally been treated with Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF), yet Cervical Disc Arthroplasty (CDA) is a new alternative. Expert suggestion of reduced adjacent segment degeneration is a promising future result of CDA. A cost-utility analysis of these procedures with long-term follow-up has not been previously reported. Methods We reviewed single institution prospective data from a randomized trial comparing single-level ACDF and CDA in cervical disc disease. Both Medicare reimbursement schedules and actual hospital cost data for peri-operative care were separately reviewed and analyzed to estimate the cost of treatment of each patient. QALYs were calculated at 1 and 2 years based on NDI and SF-36 outcome scores, and incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) analysis was performed to determine relative cost-effectiveness. Results Patients of both groups showed improvement in NDI and SF-36 outcome scores. Medicare reimbursement rates to the hospital were $11,747 and $10,015 for ACDF and CDA, respectively; these figures rose to $16,162 and $13,171 when including physician and anesthesiologist reimbursement. The estimated actual cost to the hospital of ACDF averaged $16,108, while CDA averaged $16,004 (p = 0.97); when including estimated physicians fees, total hospital costs came to $19,811 and $18,440, respectively. The cost/QALY analyses therefore varied widely with these discrepancies in cost values. The ICERs of ACDF vs CDA with Medicare reimbursements were $18,593 (NDI) and $19,940 (SF-36), while ICERs based on actual total hospital cost were $13,710 (NDI) and $9,140 (SF-36). Conclusions We confirm the efficacy of ACDF and CDA in the treatment of cervical disc disease, as our results suggest similar clinical outcomes at one and two year follow-up. The ICER suggests that the non-significant added benefit via ACDF comes at a

  1. Effect of Degeneration on Fluid–Solid Interaction within Intervertebral Disk Under Cyclic Loading – A Meta-Model Analysis of Finite Element Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nikkhoo, Mohammad; Khalaf, Kinda; Kuo, Ya-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Chun; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Parnianpour, Mohamad; Wang, Jaw-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The risk of low back pain resulted from cyclic loadings is greater than that resulted from prolonged static postures. Disk degeneration results in degradation of disk solid structures and decrease of water contents, which is caused by activation of matrix digestive enzymes. The mechanical responses resulted from internal solid–fluid interactions of degenerative disks to cyclic loadings are not well studied yet. The fluid–solid interactions in disks can be evaluated by mathematical models, especially the poroelastic finite element (FE) models. We developed a robust disk poroelastic FE model to analyze the effect of degeneration on solid–fluid interactions within disk subjected to cyclic loadings at different loading frequencies. A backward analysis combined with in vitro experiments was used to find the elastic modulus and hydraulic permeability of intact and enzyme-induced degenerated porcine disks. The results showed that the averaged peak-to-peak disk deformations during the in vitro cyclic tests were well fitted with limited FE simulations and a quadratic response surface regression for both disk groups. The results showed that higher loading frequency increased the intradiscal pressure, decreased the total fluid loss, and slightly increased the maximum axial stress within solid matrix. Enzyme-induced degeneration decreased the intradiscal pressure and total fluid loss, and barely changed the maximum axial stress within solid matrix. The increase of intradiscal pressure and total fluid loss with loading frequency was less sensitive after the frequency elevated to 0.1 Hz for the enzyme-induced degenerated disk. Based on this study, it is found that enzyme-induced degeneration decreases energy attenuation capability of disk, but less change the strength of disk. PMID:25674562

  2. The dark phase intraocular pressure elevation and retinal ganglion cell degeneration in a rat model of experimental glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Jacky M K; Vo, Nancy; Quan, Ann; Nam, Michael; Kyung, Haksu; Yu, Fei; Piri, Natik; Caprioli, Joseph

    2013-07-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation is considered as a major risk factor causing the progression of vision deterioration in glaucoma. Although it is known that the IOP level changes widely throughout the day and night, how the dark or light phase IOP elevation contributes to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration is still largely unclear. To examine the profile of IOP, modified laser photocoagulation was applied to the trabecular meshwork of Brown Norway rats and both light and dark phase IOPs were monitored approximately 1-2 times a week. The relationship between IOP elevation and RGC degeneration was investigated while RGC body loss was analyzed with Rbpms immunolabeling on retinal wholemount and axonal injury in the optic nerve was semi-quantified. The baseline awake dark and light IOPs were 30.4 ± 2.7 and 20.2 ± 2.1 mmHg respectively. The average dark IOP was increased to 38.2 ± 3.2 mmHg for five weeks after the laser treatment on 270° trabecular meshwork. However, there was no significant loss of RGC body and axonal injury. After laser treatment on 330° trabecular meshwork, the dark and light IOPs were significantly increased to 43.8 ± 4.6 and 23 ± 3.7 mmHg respectively for 5 weeks. The cumulative dark and light IOP elevations were 277 ± 86 and 113 ± 50 mmHg days respectively while the cumulative total (light and dark) IOP elevation was 213 ± 114 mmHg days. After 5 weeks, regional RGC body loss of 29.5 ± 15.5% and moderate axonal injury were observed. Axonal injury and loss of RGC body had a high correlation with the cumulative total IOP elevation (R(2) = 0.60 and 0.65 respectively). There was an association between the cumulative dark IOP elevation and RGC body loss (R(2) = 0.37) and axonal injury (R(2) = 0.51) whereas the associations between neuronal damages and the cumulative light IOP elevation were weak (for RGC body loss, R(2) = 0.01; for axonal injury, R(2) = 0.26). Simple linear regression model

  3. Astrocytes and Müller Cell Alterations During Retinal Degeneration in a Transgenic Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; Campello, Laura; Pinilla, Isabel; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Retinitis pigmentosa includes a group of progressive retinal degenerative diseases that affect the structure and function of photoreceptors. Secondarily to the loss of photoreceptors, there is a reduction in retinal vascularization, which seems to influence the cellular degenerative process. Retinal macroglial cells, astrocytes, and Müller cells provide support for retinal neurons and are fundamental for maintaining normal retinal function. The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of macroglial changes during retinal degeneration in P23H rats. Methods: Homozygous P23H line-3 rats aged from P18 to 18 months were used to study the evolution of the disease, and SD rats were used as controls. Immunolabeling with antibodies against GFAP, vimentin, and transducin were used to visualize macroglial cells and cone photoreceptors. Results: In P23H rats, increased GFAP labeling in Müller cells was observed as an early indicator of retinal gliosis. At 4 and 12 months of age, the apical processes of Müller cells in P23H rats clustered in firework-like structures, which were associated with ring-like shaped areas of cone degeneration in the outer nuclear layer. These structures were not observed at 16 months of age. The number of astrocytes was higher in P23H rats than in the SD matched controls at 4 and 12 months of age, supporting the idea of astrocyte proliferation. As the disease progressed, astrocytes exhibited a deteriorated morphology and marked hypertrophy. The increase in the complexity of the astrocytic processes correlated with greater connexin 43 expression and higher density of connexin 43 immunoreactive puncta within the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of P23H vs. SD rat retinas. Conclusions: In the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa, the loss of photoreceptors triggers major changes in the number and morphology of glial cells affecting the inner retina. PMID:26733810

  4. Proinsulin slows retinal degeneration and vision loss in the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; Isiegas, Carolina; Ayuso, Eduard; Ruiz, José M; de la Villa, Pedro; Bosch, Fatima; de la Rosa, Enrique J; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2012-12-01

    Proinsulin has been characterized as a neuroprotective molecule. In this work we assess the therapeutic potential of proinsulin on photoreceptor degeneration, synaptic connectivity, and functional activity of the retina in the transgenic P23H rat, an animal model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP). P23H homozygous rats received an intramuscular injection of an adeno-associated viral vector serotype 1 (AAV1) expressing human proinsulin (hPi+) or AAV1-null vector (hPi-) at P20. Levels of hPi in serum were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and visual function was evaluated by electroretinographic (ERG) recording at P30, P60, P90, and P120. Preservation of retinal structure was assessed by immunohistochemistry at P120. Human proinsulin was detected in serum from rats injected with hPi+ at all times tested, with average hPi levels ranging from 1.1 nM (P30) to 1.4 nM (P120). ERG recordings showed an amelioration of vision loss in hPi+ animals. The scotopic b-waves were significantly higher in hPi+ animals than in control rats at P90 and P120. This attenuation of visual deterioration correlated with a delay in photoreceptor degeneration and the preservation of retinal cytoarchitecture. hPi+ animals had 48.7% more photoreceptors than control animals. Presynaptic and postsynaptic elements, as well as the synaptic contacts between photoreceptors and bipolar or horizontal cells, were preserved in hPi+ P23H rats. Furthermore, in hPi+ rat retinas the number of rod bipolar cell bodies was greater than in control rats. Our data demonstrate that hPi expression preserves cone and rod structure and function, together with their contacts with postsynaptic neurons, in the P23H rat. These data strongly support the further development of proinsulin-based therapy to counteract retinitis pigmentosa.

  5. Proinsulin Slows Retinal Degeneration and Vision Loss in the P23H Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; Isiegas, Carolina; Ayuso, Eduard; Ruiz, José M.; de la Villa, Pedro; Bosch, Fatima; de la Rosa, Enrique J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Proinsulin has been characterized as a neuroprotective molecule. In this work we assess the therapeutic potential of proinsulin on photoreceptor degeneration, synaptic connectivity, and functional activity of the retina in the transgenic P23H rat, an animal model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP). P23H homozygous rats received an intramuscular injection of an adeno-associated viral vector serotype 1 (AAV1) expressing human proinsulin (hPi+) or AAV1-null vector (hPi−) at P20. Levels of hPi in serum were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and visual function was evaluated by electroretinographic (ERG) recording at P30, P60, P90, and P120. Preservation of retinal structure was assessed by immunohistochemistry at P120. Human proinsulin was detected in serum from rats injected with hPi+ at all times tested, with average hPi levels ranging from 1.1 nM (P30) to 1.4 nM (P120). ERG recordings showed an amelioration of vision loss in hPi+ animals. The scotopic b-waves were significantly higher in hPi+ animals than in control rats at P90 and P120. This attenuation of visual deterioration correlated with a delay in photoreceptor degeneration and the preservation of retinal cytoarchitecture. hPi+ animals had 48.7% more photoreceptors than control animals. Presynaptic and postsynaptic elements, as well as the synaptic contacts between photoreceptors and bipolar or horizontal cells, were preserved in hPi+ P23H rats. Furthermore, in hPi+ rat retinas the number of rod bipolar cell bodies was greater than in control rats. Our data demonstrate that hPi expression preserves cone and rod structure and function, together with their contacts with postsynaptic neurons, in the P23H rat. These data strongly support the further development of proinsulin-based therapy to counteract retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:23017108

  6. Efficacy of a Human Amniotic Tissue-derived Allograft, NuCel, in Patients Undergoing Posteriolateral Lumbar Fusions for Degenerative Disc Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease; Spinal Stenosis; Spondylolisthesis; Spondylosis; Intervertebral Disk Displacement; Intervertebral Disk Degeneration; Spinal Diseases; Bone Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Spondylolysis

  7. Electroacupuncture improves microcirculation and neuronal morphology in the spinal cord of a rat model of intervertebral disc extrusion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dai-Xun; Lu, Zhi-Song; Li, Ge-Bin; Sun, Sheng-Yong; Mu, Xiang; Lee, Peter; Chen, Wu

    2015-02-01

    Most studies on spinal cord neuronal injury have focused on spinal cord tissue histology and the expression of nerve cell damage and repair-related genes. The importance of the microcirculation is often ignored in spinal cord injury and repair research. Therefore, in this study, we established a rat model of intervertebral disc extrusion by inserting a silica gel pad into the left ventral surface of T13. Electroacupuncture was used to stimulate the bilateral Zusanli point (ST36) and Neiting point (ST44) for 14 days. Compared with control animals, blood flow in the first lumbar vertebra (L1) was noticeably increased in rats given electroacupuncture. Microvessel density in the T13 segment of the spinal cord was increased significantly as well. The number of normal neurons was higher in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. In addition, vacuolation in the white matter was lessened. No obvious glial cell proliferation was visible. Furthermore, hindlimb motor function was improved significantly. Collectively, our results suggest that electroacupuncture can improve neuronal morphology and microcirculation, and promote the recovery of neurological functions in a rat model of intervertebral disc extrusion. PMID:25883622

  8. Electroacupuncture improves microcirculation and neuronal morphology in the spinal cord of a rat model of intervertebral disc extrusion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dai-xun; Lu, Zhi-song; Li, Ge-bin; Sun, Sheng-yong; Mu, Xiang; Lee, Peter; Chen, Wu

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on spinal cord neuronal injury have focused on spinal cord tissue histology and the expression of nerve cell damage and repair-related genes. The importance of the microcirculation is often ignored in spinal cord injury and repair research. Therefore, in this study, we established a rat model of intervertebral disc extrusion by inserting a silica gel pad into the left ventral surface of T13. Electroacupuncture was used to stimulate the bilateral Zusanli point (ST36) and Neiting point (ST44) for 14 days. Compared with control animals, blood flow in the first lumbar vertebra (L1) was noticeably increased in rats given electroacupuncture. Microvessel density in the T13 segment of the spinal cord was increased significantly as well. The number of normal neurons was higher in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. In addition, vacuolation in the white matter was lessened. No obvious glial cell proliferation was visible. Furthermore, hindlimb motor function was improved significantly. Collectively, our results suggest that electroacupuncture can improve neuronal morphology and microcirculation, and promote the recovery of neurological functions in a rat model of intervertebral disc extrusion. PMID:25883622

  9. Immunization with DISC1 protein in an animal model of ADHD influences behavior and excitatory amino acids in prefrontal cortex and striatum.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, L A; Treno, C; Gironi Carnevale, U A; Arra, C; Boatto, G; Pagano, C; Tino, A; Nieddu, M; Michel, M; Prikulis, I; Carboni, E; de Souza Silva, M A; Huston, J P; Sadile, A G; Korth, C

    2015-03-01

    The Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene is involved in vulnerability to neuropsychiatric disorders. Naples high-excitability (NHE) rat model neuropsychiatric problems characterized by an unbalanced mesocortical dopamine system. Here, we assessed behavioral and neurochemical effects of immunization against multimeric rat DISC1 protein in adult NHE rats, an animal model of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and their Random-Bred (NRB) controls. Males of both lines received subcutaneous injections of vehicle (PB), adjuvant only (AD) or recombinant rat DISC1 protein purified from E. coli, suspended in AD (anti-DISC1) at age of 30, 45 and 60 postnatal days (pnd). At 75 pnd, the rats were exposed to a Làt maze and 2 days later to an Olton eight-arm radial maze, and horizontal (HA) and vertical activities (VA) were monitored. Non-selective (NSA) and selective spatial attention (SSA) were monitored in the Làt and in the Olton maze by duration of rearings and working memory, respectively. Post mortem neurochemistry in the prefrontal cortex (PFc), dorsal (DS) and ventral (VS) striatum of L-Glutamate, L-Aspartate and L-Leucine was performed. All immunized rats showed a clear humoral IgM (but not IgG) immune response against the immunogen, indicating that immunological self-tolerance to DISC1 can be overcome by immunization. NHE rats exhibited a higher unspecific IgM response to adjuvant, indicating an immunological abnormality. The sole anti-DISC1 immunization-specific behavioral in the NHE rats was an increased horizontal activity in the Làt maze. Adjuvant treatment increased vertical activity in both lines, but in the NRB controls it increased rearing and decreased horizontal activity. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis of soluble or membrane-trapped neurotransmitters aspartate, glutamate and leucine revealed increased soluble aspartate levels in the ventral striatum of NRB controls after anti-DISC1 immunization. Immune activation by

  10. Pharmacological Modulation of Photoreceptor Outer Segment Degradation in a Human iPS Cell Model of Inherited Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ruchira; Kuai, David; Guziewicz, Karina E; Meyer, Jackelyn; Wilson, Molly; Lu, Jianfeng; Smith, Molly; Clark, Eric; Verhoeven, Amelia; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Gamm, David M

    2015-11-01

    Degradation of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) by retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is essential for vision, and studies have implicated altered POS processing in the pathogenesis of some retinal degenerative diseases. Consistent with this concept, a recently established hiPSC-RPE model of inherited macular degeneration, Best disease (BD), displayed reduced rates of POS breakdown. Herein we utilized this model to determine (i) if disturbances in protein degradation pathways are associated with delayed POS digestion and (ii) whether such defect(s) can be pharmacologically targeted. We found that BD hiPSC-RPE cultures possessed increased protein oxidation, decreased free-ubiquitin levels, and altered rates of exosome secretion, consistent with altered POS processing. Application of valproic acid (VPA) with or without rapamycin increased rates of POS degradation in our model, whereas application of bafilomycin-A1 decreased such rates. Importantly, the negative effect of bafilomycin-A1 could be fully reversed by VPA. The utility of hiPSC-RPE for VPA testing was further evident following examination of its efficacy and metabolism in a complementary canine disease model. Our findings suggest that disturbances in protein degradation pathways contribute to the POS processing defect observed in BD hiPSC-RPE, which can be manipulated pharmacologically. These results have therapeutic implications for BD and perhaps other maculopathies. PMID:26300224

  11. The origin of UV-optical variability in AGN and test of disc models: XMM-Newton and ground-based observations of NGC 4395

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHardy, I. M.; Connolly, S. D.; Peterson, B. M.; Bieryla, A.; Chand, H.; Elvis, M. S.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Falco, E.; Gandhi, P.; Kaspi, S.; Latham, D.; Lira, P.; McCully, C.; Netzer, H.; Uemura, M.

    2016-05-01

    The origin of short timescale (weeks/months) variability of AGN, whether due to intrinsic disc variations or reprocessing of X-ray emission by a surrounding accretion disc, has been a puzzle for many years. However recently a number of observational programmes, particularly of NGC 5548 with Swift, have shown that the UV/optical variations lag behind the X-ray variations in a manner strongly supportive of X-ray reprocessing. Somewhat surprisingly, the implied size of the accretion disc is ∼3 times greater than expected from a standard, smooth, Shakura-Sunyaev thin disc model. Although the difference may be explained by a clumpy accretion disc, it is not clear whether the difference will occur in all AGN or whether it may change as, eg, a function of black hole mass, accretion rate, or disc temperature. Measurements of interband lags for most AGN require long timescale monitoring, which is hard to arrange. However for low mass (< 106 M⊙) AGN, the combination of XMM-Newton EPIC (X-rays) with the optical monitor in fast readout mode allows an X-ray/UV-optical lag to be measured within a single long observation. Here we summarise previous related observations and report on XMM-Newton observations of NGC 4395 (mass 100 times lower, accretion rate ∼20 times lower than for NGC 5548). We find that the UVW1 lags the X-rays by ∼ 470 s. Simultaneous observations at 6 different ground based observatories also allowed the g-band lag (∼ 800s) to be measured. These observations are in agreement with X-ray reprocessing but initial analysis suggests that, for NGC 4395, they do not differ markedly from the predictions of the standard thin disc model.

  12. Temporo-spatial distribution of blood vessels in human lumbar intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Schaaf, Rainer; Wälchli, Beat; Boos, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    While there is consensus in the literature that blood vessels are confined to the outer anulus fibrosus of normal adult intervertebral disc, debate continues whether there is a vascular in-growths into inner parts of the intervertebral disc during degeneration. We therefore tested the hypothesis that vascular in-growth is not a distinct feature of disc degeneration. The specific endothelial cell marker CD 31 (PECAM) was used to immunohistochemically investigate 42 paraffin-embedded complete mid-sagittal human intervertebral disc sections of various ages (0–86 years) and varying extent of histomorphological degeneration. Additionally, 20 surgical disc samples from individuals (26–69 years) were included in this study. In discs of fetal to infantile age, blood vessels perforated the cartilaginous end plate and extended into the inner and outer anulus fibrosus, but not into the nucleus pulposus. In adolescents and adults, no blood vessels were seen except for the outer zone of the anulus fibrosus adjacent to the insertion to ligaments. The cartilaginous end plate remained free of vessels, except for areas with circumscribed destruction of the end plate. In advanced disc degeneration, no vessels were observed except for those few cases with complete, scar-like disc destruction. However, some rim lesions and occasionally major clefts were surrounded by a small network of capillary blood vessels extending into deeper zones of the anulus fibrosus. A subsequent morphometric analysis, revealed slightly “deeper” blood vessel extension in juvenile/adolescent discs when compared to young, mature and senile adult individuals with significantly “deeper” extension in the posterior than anterior anulus. The analysis of the surgical specimens showed that only sparse capillary blood vessels which did not extend into the nucleus pulposus even in major disc disruption. Our results show that vascular invasion deeper than the periphery was not observed during disc

  13. The excimer lamp induces cutaneous nerve degeneration and reduces scratching in a dry-skin mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Atsuko; Tominaga, Mitsutoshi; Kamata, Yayoi; Kaneda, Kazuyuki; Ko, Kyi C; Matsuda, Hironori; Kimura, Utako; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takamori, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Epidermal hyperinnervation, which is thought to underlie intractable pruritus, has been observed in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). The epidermal expression of axonal guidance molecules has been reported to regulate epidermal hyperinnervation. Previously, we showed that the excimer lamp has antihyperinnervative effects in nonpruritic dry-skin model mice, although epidermal expression of axonal guidance molecules was unchanged. Therefore, we investigated the antipruritic effects of excimer lamp irradiation and its mechanism of action. A single irradiation of AD model mice significantly inhibited itch-related behavior 1 day later, following improvement in the dermatitis score. In addition, irradiation of nerve fibers formed by cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons increased bleb formation and decreased nerve fiber expression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2, suggesting degenerative changes in these fibers. We also analyzed whether attaching a cutoff excimer filter (COF) to the lamp, thus decreasing cytotoxic wavelengths, altered hyperinnervation and the production of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), a DNA damage marker, in dry-skin model mice. Irradiation with COF decreased CPD production in keratinocytes, as well as having an antihyperinnervative effect, indicating that the antipruritic effects of excimer lamp irradiation with COF are due to induction of epidermal nerve degeneration and reduced DNA damage. PMID:24940652

  14. The excimer lamp induces cutaneous nerve degeneration and reduces scratching in a dry-skin mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Atsuko; Tominaga, Mitsutoshi; Kamata, Yayoi; Kaneda, Kazuyuki; Ko, Kyi C; Matsuda, Hironori; Kimura, Utako; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takamori, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Epidermal hyperinnervation, which is thought to underlie intractable pruritus, has been observed in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). The epidermal expression of axonal guidance molecules has been reported to regulate epidermal hyperinnervation. Previously, we showed that the excimer lamp has antihyperinnervative effects in nonpruritic dry-skin model mice, although epidermal expression of axonal guidance molecules was unchanged. Therefore, we investigated the antipruritic effects of excimer lamp irradiation and its mechanism of action. A single irradiation of AD model mice significantly inhibited itch-related behavior 1 day later, following improvement in the dermatitis score. In addition, irradiation of nerve fibers formed by cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons increased bleb formation and decreased nerve fiber expression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2, suggesting degenerative changes in these fibers. We also analyzed whether attaching a cutoff excimer filter (COF) to the lamp, thus decreasing cytotoxic wavelengths, altered hyperinnervation and the production of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), a DNA damage marker, in dry-skin model mice. Irradiation with COF decreased CPD production in keratinocytes, as well as having an antihyperinnervative effect, indicating that the antipruritic effects of excimer lamp irradiation with COF are due to induction of epidermal nerve degeneration and reduced DNA damage.

  15. Numerical simulation of a relaxation test designed to fit a quasi-linear viscoelastic model for temporomandibular joint discs.

    PubMed

    Commisso, Maria S; Martínez-Reina, Javier; Mayo, Juana; Domínguez, Jaime

    2013-02-01

    The main objectives of this work are: (a) to introduce an algorithm for adjusting the quasi-linear viscoelastic model to fit a material using a stress relaxation test and (b) to validate a protocol for performing such tests in temporomandibular joint discs. This algorithm is intended for fitting the Prony series coefficients and the hyperelastic constants of the quasi-linear viscoelastic model by considering that the relaxation test is performed with an initial ramp loading at a certain rate. This algorithm was validated before being applied to achieve the second objective. Generally, the complete three-dimensional formulation of the quasi-linear viscoelastic model is very complex. Therefore, it is necessary to design an experimental test to ensure a simple stress state, such as uniaxial compression to facilitate obtaining the viscoelastic properties. This work provides some recommendations about the experimental setup, which are important to follow, as an inadequate setup could produce a stress state far from uniaxial, thus, distorting the material constants determined from the experiment. The test considered is a stress relaxation test using unconfined compression performed in cylindrical specimens extracted from temporomandibular joint discs. To validate the experimental protocol, the test was numerically simulated using finite-element modelling. The disc was arbitrarily assigned a set of quasi-linear viscoelastic constants (c1) in the finite-element model. Another set of constants (c2) was obtained by fitting the results of the simulated test with the proposed algorithm. The deviation of constants c2 from constants c1 measures how far the stresses are from the uniaxial state. The effects of the following features of the experimental setup on this deviation have been analysed: (a) the friction coefficient between the compression plates and the specimen (which should be as low as possible); (b) the portion of the specimen glued to the compression plates (smaller

  16. Artificial Disc Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat this condition, alternatives to disc replacement include fusion, nonoperative care or no treatment. Typically, surgery is ... operative treatment for disc pain has been spinal fusion. This is a surgical procedure in which disc ...

  17. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-05-26

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration.

  18. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  19. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-05-26

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  20. Mechanical Vibrations Reduce the Intervertebral Disc Swelling and Muscle Atrophy from Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holguin, Nilsson; Muir, Jesse; Evans, Harlan J.; Qin, Yi-Xian; Rubin, Clinton; Wagshul, Mark; Judex, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Loss of functional weight bearing, such as experienced during space flight or bed rest (BR), distorts intervertebral disc (IVD) and muscle morphology. IVDs are avascular structures consisting of cells that may derive their nutrition and waste removal from the load induced fluid flow into and out of the disc. A diurnal cycle is produced by forces related to weight bearing and muscular activity, and comprised of a supine and erect posture over a 24 hr period. A diurnal cycle will include a disc volume change of approx. 10-13%. However, in space there are little or no diurnal changes because of the microgravity, which removes the gravitational load and compressive forces to the back muscles. The BR model and the etiology of the disc swelling and muscle atrophy could provide insight into those subjects confined to bed for chronic disease/injury and aging. We hypothesize that extremely low-magnitude, high frequency mechanical vibrations will abate the disc degeneration and muscle loss associated with long-term BR.

  1. On the Relative Relevance of Subject-Specific Geometries and Degeneration-Specific Mechanical Properties for the Study of Cell Death in Human Intervertebral Disk Models

    PubMed Central

    Malandrino, Andrea; Pozo, José M.; Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Frangi, Alejandro F.; van Rijsbergen, Marc M.; Ito, Keita; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Dao, Tien Tuan; Ho Ba Tho, Marie-Christine; Noailly, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Capturing patient- or condition-specific intervertebral disk (IVD) properties in finite element models is outmost important in order to explore how biomechanical and biophysical processes may interact in spine diseases. However, disk degenerative changes are often modeled through equations similar to those employed for healthy organs, which might not be valid. As for the simulated effects of degenerative changes, they likely depend on specific disk geometries. Accordingly, we explored the ability of continuum tissue models to simulate disk degenerative changes. We further used the results in order to assess the interplay between these simulated changes and particular IVD morphologies, in relation to disk cell nutrition, a potentially important factor in disk tissue regulation. A protocol to derive patient-specific computational models from clinical images was applied to different spine specimens. In vitro, IVD creep tests were used to optimize poro-hyperelastic input material parameters in these models, in function of the IVD degeneration grade. The use of condition-specific tissue model parameters in the specimen-specific geometrical models was validated against independent kinematic measurements in vitro. Then, models were coupled to a transport-cell viability model in order to assess the respective effects of tissue degeneration and disk geometry on cell viability. While classic disk poro-mechanical models failed in representing known degenerative changes, additional simulation of tissue damage allowed model validation and gave degeneration-dependent material properties related to osmotic pressure and water loss, and to increased fibrosis. Surprisingly, nutrition-induced cell death was independent of the grade-dependent material properties, but was favored by increased diffusion distances in large IVDs. Our results suggest that in situ geometrical screening of IVD morphology might help to anticipate particular mechanisms of disk degeneration. PMID:25717471

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells: potential application in intervertebral disc regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bojiang; Williams, Lisa; Diwan, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is one of the leading public health problems in developed countries. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is a major pathological process implicated in low back pain, which is characterized by cellular apoptosis and senescence with reduced synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM). Currently, there is no clinical therapy targeting the reversal of disc degeneration. Recent advances in cellular and molecular biology have provided an exciting approach to disc regeneration that focuses on the delivery of viable cells to the degenerative disc. Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells with self-renewal capacities and are able to differentiate into diverse specialized cell types, including chondrocyte lineages. The potential of stem cell therapy in disc degeneration is to repopulate the disc with viable cells capable of producing the ECM and restoring damaged tissue. The present literature review summarizes recent advances in basic research and clinical trials of MSCs to provide an outline of the key roles of MSCs therapies in disc repair. The review also discusses the controversies, challenges and therapeutic concepts for the future. PMID:26835326

  3. Stem cells: a new paradigm for disease modeling and developing therapies for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in people over age 55 in the U.S. and the developed world. This condition leads to the progressive impairment of central visual acuity. There are significant limitations in the understanding of disease progression in AMD as well as a lack of effective methods of treatment. Lately, there has been considerable enthusiasm for application of stem cell biology for both disease modeling and therapeutic application. Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used in cell culture assays and in vivo animal models. Recently a clinical trial was approved by FDA to investigate the safety and efficacy of the human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) transplantation in sub-retinal space of patients with dry AMD These studies suggest that stem cell research may provide both insight regarding disease development and progression, as well as direction for therapeutic innovation for the millions of patients afflicted with AMD. PMID:23452406

  4. Prediction of gauge couplings from anti-GUT and multi-degenerate vacuum: finetuning model suggests non-locality

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D. L.; Nielsen, H. B.

    1997-06-15

    We present our theoretical predictions for the three gauge coupling constants of the Standard Model (SM). For the famous finestructure constant our prediction is {alpha}{sup -1}=137{+-}9. These predictions are based on our Anti-Grand-Unified Theory (Anti-GUT) gauge group and the Multiple Point Criticality Principle (MPCP). Both Anti-GUT and MPCP are proposed as principles or laws underlying the SM. Both were originally suggested by our observation that the experimentally determined Standard Model Group (SMG) gauge couplings have non-generic patterns of values that could be explained by these two new principles. The observation that the gauge couplings assume values corresponding to a maximally degenerate vacuum lead to the MPCP. As the transitions between the different vacuua are first order, the MPCP provides a way of finetuning constants of Nature - without finetuned imput - in a manner reminescent of how temperature is 'finetuned' to 0 deg. C. In an equilibrated mixture of ice and water. In a 4-dimensional field theory, this mechanism for finetuning suggests a form of non-locality that, however, is phenomenologically tolerable because the only effect is the modification of the values of coupling constants. We argue that the time-machine type of paradoxes that plague non-local theories are avoided precisely when Nature obeys the MPCP.

  5. Frontotemporal Degeneration, the Next Therapeutic Frontier: Molecules and Animal Models for FTD drug development (Part 1 of 2 articles)

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Adam L.; Gold, Michael; Huey, Edward; Gao, Fen-Biao; Burton, Edward A.; Chow, Tiffany; Kao, Aimee; Leavitt, Blair; Lamb, Bruce; Grether, Megan; Knopman, David; Cairns, Nigel J.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Mitic, Laura; Roberson, Erik D.; Van Kammen, Daniel; Cantillon, Marc; Zahs, Kathleen; Salloway, Stephen; Morris, John; Tong, Gary; Feldman, Howard; Fillit, Howard; Dickinson, Susan; Khachaturian, Zaven; Sutherland, Margaret; Farese, Robert; Miller, Bruce L.; Cummings, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) is a common cause of dementia for which there are currently no approved therapies. Over the past decade there has been an explosion of knowledge about the biology and clinical features of FTD that has identified a number of promising therapeutic targets as well as animal models in which to develop drugs. The close association of some forms of FTD with neuropathological accumulation of tau protein or increased neuroinflammation due to progranulin protein deficiency suggests that a drug’s success in treating FTD may predict efficacy in more common diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A variety of regulatory incentives, clinical features of FTD, such as rapid disease progression, and relatively pure molecular pathology, suggest that there are advantages to developing drugs for FTD as compared to other more common neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. In March 2011, the Frontotemporal Dementia Treatment Study Group (FTSG) sponsored a conference entitled,“ FTD, the Next Therapeutic Frontier,” focused on pre-clinical aspects of FTD drug development. The goal of the meeting was to promote collaborations between academic researchers and biotechnology and pharmaceutical researchers to accelerate the development of new treatments for FTD. Here we report the key findings from the conference, including the rationale for FTD drug development, epidemiological, genetic and neuropathological features of FTD, FTD animal models and how best to use them and examples of successful drug-development collaborations in other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23043900

  6. Inflammatory Animal Model for Parkinson's Disease: The Intranigral Injection of LPS Induced the Inflammatory Process along with the Selective Degeneration of Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Machado, A.; Herrera, A. J.; Venero, J. L.; Santiago, M.; de Pablos, R. M.; Villarán, R. F.; Espinosa-Oliva, A. M.; Argüelles, S.; Sarmiento, M.; Delgado-Cortés, M. J.; Mauriño, R.; Cano, J.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an animal model of degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, the neuronal system involved in Parkinson's disease (PD). The implication of neuroinflammation on this disease was originally established in 1988, when the presence of activated microglia in the substantia nigra (SN) of parkinsonians was reported by McGeer et al. Neuroinflammation could be involved in the progression of the disease or even has more direct implications. We injected 2 μg of the potent proinflammatory compound lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in different areas of the CNS, finding that SN displayed the highest inflammatory response and that dopaminergic (body) neurons showed a special and specific sensitivity to this process with the induction of selective dopaminergic degeneration. Neurodegeneration is induced by inflammation since it is prevented by anti-inflammatory compounds. The special sensitivity of dopaminergic neurons seems to be related to the endogenous dopaminergic content, since it is overcome by dopamine depletion. Compounds that activate microglia or induce inflammation have similar effects to LPS. This model suggest that inflammation is an important component of the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system, probably also in PD. Anti-inflammatory treatments could be useful to prevent or slow down the rate of dopaminergic degeneration in this disease. PMID:22389821

  7. Defining the Catalytic Activity of Nanoceria in the P23H-1 Rat, a Photoreceptor Degeneration Model

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lily L.; Pye, Quentin N.; Chen, Lijuan; Seal, Sudipta; McGinnis, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Inorganic catalytic nanoceria or cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) are bona fide antioxidants that possess regenerative radical scavenging activities in vitro. Previously, we demonstrated that CeNPs had neuroprotective and anti-angiogenic properties in rodent retinal degeneration and neovascularization models. However, the cellular mechanisms and duration of the catalytic activity of CeNPs in preventing photoreceptor cell loss are still unknown. In this study, we sought to answer these questions using the P23H-1 rat, an autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) model. Methods A single dose of either saline or CeNPs was delivered intravitreally into the eyes of P23H-1 rats at 2–3 weeks of age. Retinal functions were examined at 3 to 7 weeks post injection. We quantified retinal proteins by Western blot analyses and counted the number of apoptotic (TUNEL+) profiles in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of retinal sections. We measured free 8-isoprostanes to quantify lipid peroxidation in retinal tissues. Results We observed increased rod and cone cell functions up to three weeks post injection. Apoptotic cells were reduced by 46%, 56%, 21%, and 24% at 3, 7, 14, 21 days, respectively, after CeNPs injection compared to saline. Additionally, reduction of lipid peroxidation in the retinas of CeNPs-treated vs saline-treated animals was detected 14 days post injection. Conclusions We validated that CeNPs were effective in delaying loss of photoreceptor cell function in an adRP rat model. This represents the fourth rodent retinal disease model that shows delay in disease progression after a single application of CeNPs. We further demonstrated that CeNPs slowed the rate of photoreceptor cell death. We deduced that the catalytic activity of CeNPs in vivo in this rat model to be undiminished for at least 7 days and then declined over the next 14 days after CeNPs administration. PMID:25822196

  8. Neocartilage integration in temporomandibular joint discs: physical and enzymatic methods

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Meghan K.; Arzi, Boaz; Prouty, Shannon M.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Integration of engineered musculoskeletal tissues with adjacent native tissues presents a significant challenge to the field. Specifically, the avascularity and low cellularity of cartilage elicit the need for additional efforts in improving integration of neocartilage within native cartilage. Self-assembled neocartilage holds significant potential in replacing degenerated cartilage, though its stabilization and integration in native cartilage require further efforts. Physical and enzymatic stabilization methods were investigated in an in vitro model for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc degeneration. First, in phase 1, suture, glue and press-fit constructs were compared in TMJ disc intermediate zone defects. In phase 1, suturing enhanced interfacial shear stiffness and strength immediately; after four weeks, a 15-fold increase in stiffness and a ninefold increase in strength persisted over press-fit. Neither suture nor glue significantly altered neocartilage properties. In phase 2, the effects of the enzymatic stabilization regimen composed of lysyl oxidase, CuSO4 and hydroxylysine were investigated. A full factorial design was employed, carrying forward the best physical method from phase 1, suturing. Enzymatic stabilization significantly increased interfacial shear stiffness after eight weeks. Combined enzymatic stabilization and suturing led to a fourfold increase in shear stiffness and threefold increase in strength over press-fit. Histological analysis confirmed the presence of a collagen-rich interface. Enzymatic treatment additionally enhanced neocartilage mechanical properties, yielding a tensile modulus over 6 MPa and compressive instantaneous modulus over 1200 kPa at eight weeks. Suturing enhances stabilization of neocartilage, and enzymatic treatment enhances functional properties and integration of neocartilage in the TMJ disc. Methods developed here are applicable to other orthopaedic soft tissues, including knee meniscus and hyaline articular

  9. The Application of Fiber-Reinforced Materials in Disc Repair

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Bao-Qing; Li, Hui; Zhu, Gang; Li, De-Yu; Fan, Yu-Bo; Wu, Shu-Qin

    2013-01-01

    The intervertebral disc degeneration and injury are the most common spinal diseases with tremendous financial and social implications. Regenerative therapies for disc repair are promising treatments. Fiber-reinforced materials (FRMs) are a kind of composites by embedding the fibers into the matrix materials. FRMs can maintain the original properties of the matrix and enhance the mechanical properties. By now, there are still some problems for disc repair such as the unsatisfied static strength and dynamic properties for disc implants. The application of FRMs may resolve these problems to some extent. In this review, six parts such as background of FRMs in tissue repair, the comparison of mechanical properties between natural disc and some typical FRMs, the repair standard and FRMs applications in disc repair, and the possible research directions for FRMs' in the future are stated. PMID:24383057

  10. Prevalence of Age-Related Changes in Ovine Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nisolle, Jean-François; Bihin, Benoît; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Neveu, Fabienne; Clegg, Peter; Dugdale, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaoqing; Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Ovine models are used to study intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The objective of the current study was to assess the naturally occurring age-related changes of the IVD that can be diagnosed by CT and MRI in the lumbar spine of sheep. We used CT and T2-weighted MR images to score the IVD (L6S1 to L1L2) in 41 sheep (age, 6 mo to 11 y) that were euthanized for reasons not related to musculoskeletal disease. T2 mapping and measurement of T2 time of L6S1 to L2L3 were performed in 22 of the sheep. Degenerative changes manifested as early as 2 y of age and occurred at every IVD level. Discs were more severely damaged in older sheep. The age effect of the L6S1 IVD was larger than the average age effect for the other IVD. The current study provides evidence that lesions similar to those encountered in humans can be identified by CT and MRI in lumbar spine of sheep. Ideally, research animals should be assessed at the initiation of preclinical trials to determine the extent of prevalent degenerative changes. The ovine lumbosacral disc seems particularly prone to degeneration and might be a favorable anatomic site for studying IVD degeneration.

  11. Prevalence of Age-Related Changes in Ovine Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nisolle, Jean-François; Bihin, Benoît; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Neveu, Fabienne; Clegg, Peter; Dugdale, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaoqing; Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Ovine models are used to study intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The objective of the current study was to assess the naturally occurring age-related changes of the IVD that can be diagnosed by CT and MRI in the lumbar spine of sheep. We used CT and T2-weighted MR images to score the IVD (L6S1 to L1L2) in 41 sheep (age, 6 mo to 11 y) that were euthanized for reasons not related to musculoskeletal disease. T2 mapping and measurement of T2 time of L6S1 to L2L3 were performed in 22 of the sheep. Degenerative changes manifested as early as 2 y of age and occurred at every IVD level. Discs were more severely damaged in older sheep. The age effect of the L6S1 IVD was larger than the average age effect for the other IVD. The current study provides evidence that lesions similar to those encountered in humans can be identified by CT and MRI in lumbar spine of sheep. Ideally, research animals should be assessed at the initiation of preclinical trials to determine the extent of prevalent degenerative changes. The ovine lumbosacral disc seems particularly prone to degeneration and might be a favorable anatomic site for studying IVD degeneration. PMID:27538861

  12. Macular Degeneration Partnership

    MedlinePlus

    AMD Macular Degeneration Partnership High Contrast Original + Font Size – Home About AMD Dry AMD Wet AMD Experience AMD Living with ... vision on a daily basis. AMD (Age Related Macular Degeneration) Partnership Listen AMD Month Public Service Announcement To ...

  13. DNA sensor model based on a carbon nanotube network in the degenerate limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadi, H. Karimi Feiz; Webb, J. F.; Ahmadi, M. T.; Rahmani, M.; Saeidmanesh, M.; Khalid, M.; Ismail, R.

    2012-11-01

    An analytical model of a possible DNA sensor based on a carbon nanotube network that functions as a selective detector of DNA molecules is presented. The ability to implement label-free electronic detection using a DNA sensor based on a carbon nanotube network constitutes an important step towards low-cost, highly sensitive, simple and accurate molecular diagnostics. In particular, there is an urgent need for a simple method of detection of DNA molecules as this will provided a new and efficient way to diagnosis genetic or pathogenic diseases. Bio-compatibility and high sensitivity towards environmental perturbations make graphene nanomaterials a good choice for a sensing layer in an electronic DNA sensor. In this study, a conductance model of a DNA sensor based on a carbon nanotube network is suggested and the performance of the model is evaluated by calculating current-voltage characteristics.

  14. Carnosic acid slows photoreceptor degeneration in the Pde6brd10 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kai; Tarchick, Matthew J.; Yu, Xiaoshan; Beight, Craig; Bu, Ping; Yu, Minzhong

    2016-01-01

    The photoreceptor cell death associated with the various genetic forms of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is currently untreatable and leads to partial or complete vision loss. Carnosic acid (CA) upregulates endogenous antioxidant enzymes and has proven neuroprotective in studies of neurodegenerative models affecting the brain. In this study, we examined the potential effect of CA on photoreceptor death in the Pde6brd10 mouse model of RP. Our data shows that CA provided morphological and functional preservation of photoreceptors. CA appears to exert its neuroprotective effects through inhibition of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26961159

  15. A new pathological classification of lumbar disc protrusion and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin-long

    2015-02-01

    Lumbar disc protrusion is common. Its clinical manifestations and treatments are closely related to the pathological changes; however, the pathological classification of lumbar disc protrusion is controversial. This article introduces a new pathological classification comprising four types of lumbar disc protrusion according to intraoperative findings. The damage-herniation type is probably caused by injury and is characterized by soft herniation, the capsule can easily be cut and the broken disc tissue blocks overflow or is easily removed. The broken disc substances should be completely removed; satisfactory results can be achieved by minimally invasive endoscopic surgery. The degeneration-protrusion type is characterized by hard and tough protrusions and the pathological process by degeneration and proliferative reaction. The nerve should be decompressed and relaxed with minimally invasive removal of the posterior wall; the bulged or protruded disc often need not be excised. The posterior vertebral osteochondrosis with disc protrusion type is characterized by deformity of the posterior vertebral body, osteochondral nodules and intervertebral disc protrusion. The herniated and fragmented disc tissue should be removed with partially protruding osteochondral nodules. Intervertebral disc cyst is of uncertain pathogenesis and is characterized by a cyst that communicates with the disc. Resection of the cyst under microscopic or endoscopic control can achieve good results; and whether the affected disc needs to be simultaneously resected is controversial. The new pathological classification proposed here is will aid better understanding of pathological changes and pathogenesis of lumbar disc protrusion and provides a reference for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25708029

  16. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Antagonist TM5484 Attenuates Demyelination and Axonal Degeneration in a Mice Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pelisch, Nicolas; Dan, Takashi; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Sekiguchi, Hiroki; Vaughan, Douglas E; van Ypersele de Strihou, Charles; Miyata, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by inflammatory demyelination and deposition of fibrinogen in the central nervous system (CNS). Elevated levels of a critical inhibitor of the mammalian fibrinolitic system, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) have been demonstrated in human and animal models of MS. In experimental studies that resemble neuroinflammatory disease, PAI-1 deficient mice display preserved neurological structure and function compared to wild type mice, suggesting a link between the fibrinolytic pathway and MS. We previously identified a series of PAI-1 inhibitors on the basis of the 3-dimensional structure of PAI-1 and on virtual screening. These compounds have been reported to provide a number of in vitro and in vivo benefits but none was tested in CNS disease models because of their limited capacity to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The existing candidates were therefore optimized to obtain CNS-penetrant compounds. We performed an in vitro screening using a model of BBB and were able to identify a novel, low molecular PAI-1 inhibitor, TM5484, with the highest penetration ratio among all other candidates. Next, we tested the effects on inflammation and demyelination in an experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice model. Results were compared to either fingolimod or 6α-methylprednisolone. Oral administration of TM5484 from the onset of signs, ameliorates paralysis, attenuated demyelination, and axonal degeneration in the spinal cord of mice. Furthermore, it modulated the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which plays a protective role in neurons against various pathological insults, and choline acetyltransferase, a marker of neuronal density. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential benefits of a novel PAI-1 inhibitor, TM5484, in the treatment of MS.

  17. n-Butylidenephthalide Protects against Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration and α-Synuclein Accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ru-Huei; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Liu, Shih-Ping; Chen, Chang-Shi; Chang, Wen-Lin; Chen, Yue-Mi; Huang, Jing-En; Li, Rong-Jhu; Tsai, Sung-Yu; Hung, Huey-Shan; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Wang, Yu-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Background Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that impairs motor skills and cognitive function. To date, the disease has no effective therapies. The identification of new drugs that provide benefit in arresting the decline seen in PD patients is the focus of much recent study. However, the lengthy time frame for the progression of neurodegeneration in PD increases both the time and cost of examining potential therapeutic compounds in mammalian models. An alternative is to first evaluate the efficacy of compounds in Caenorhabditis elegans models, which reduces examination time from months to days. n-Butylidenephthalide is the naturally-occurring component derived from the chloroform extract of Angelica sinensis. It has been shown to have anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory properties, but no reports have yet described the effects of n-butylidenephthalide on PD. The aim of this study was to assess the potential for n-butylidenephthalide to improve PD in C. elegans models. Methodology/Principal Findings In the current study, we employed a pharmacological strain that expresses green fluorescent protein specifically in dopaminergic neurons (BZ555) and a transgenic strain that expresses human α-synuclein in muscle cells (OW13) to investigate the antiparkinsonian activities of n-butylidenephthalide. Our results demonstrate that in PD animal models, n-butylidenephthalide significantly attenuates dopaminergic neuron degeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine; reduces α-synuclein accumulation; recovers lipid content, food-sensing behavior, and dopamine levels; and prolongs life-span of 6-hydroxydopamine treatment, thus revealing its potential as a possible antiparkinsonian drug. n-Butylidenephthalide may exert its effects by blocking egl-1 expression to inhibit apoptosis pathways and by raising rpn-6 expression to enhance the activity of proteasomes. Conclusions/Significance n-Butylidenephthalide may be one of

  18. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Antagonist TM5484 Attenuates Demyelination and Axonal Degeneration in a Mice Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pelisch, Nicolas; Dan, Takashi; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Sekiguchi, Hiroki; Vaughan, Douglas E; van Ypersele de Strihou, Charles; Miyata, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by inflammatory demyelination and deposition of fibrinogen in the central nervous system (CNS). Elevated levels of a critical inhibitor of the mammalian fibrinolitic system, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) have been demonstrated in human and animal models of MS. In experimental studies that resemble neuroinflammatory disease, PAI-1 deficient mice display preserved neurological structure and function compared to wild type mice, suggesting a link between the fibrinolytic pathway and MS. We previously identified a series of PAI-1 inhibitors on the basis of the 3-dimensional structure of PAI-1 and on virtual screening. These compounds have been reported to provide a number of in vitro and in vivo benefits but none was tested in CNS disease models because of their limited capacity to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The existing candidates were therefore optimized to obtain CNS-penetrant compounds. We performed an in vitro screening using a model of BBB and were able to identify a novel, low molecular PAI-1 inhibitor, TM5484, with the highest penetration ratio among all other candidates. Next, we tested the effects on inflammation and demyelination in an experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice model. Results were compared to either fingolimod or 6α-methylprednisolone. Oral administration of TM5484 from the onset of signs, ameliorates paralysis, attenuated demyelination, and axonal degeneration in the spinal cord of mice. Furthermore, it modulated the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which plays a protective role in neurons against various pathological insults, and choline acetyltransferase, a marker of neuronal density. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential benefits of a novel PAI-1 inhibitor, TM5484, in the treatment of MS. PMID:25915660

  19. Redundant disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barack, W. N.; Domas, P. A.; Beekman, S. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A rotatable disc is described that consists of parallel plates tightly joined together for rotation about a hub. Each plate is provided with several angularly projecting spaced lands. The lands of each plate are interposed in alternating relationship between the lands of the next adjacent plate. In this manner, circumferential displacement of adjacent sectors in any one plate is prevented in the event that a crack develops. Each plate is redundantly sized so that, in event of structural failure of one plate, the remaining plates support a proportionate share of the load of the failed plate. The plates are prevented from separating laterally through the inclusion of generally radially extending splines which are inserted to interlock cooperating, circumferentially adjacent lands.

  20. Calcitonin attenuates cartilage degeneration and nociception in an experimental rat model of osteoarthritis: role of TGF-β in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhi-Hong; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Chang, Yi-Chen; Huang, Shi-Ying; Lin, Yen-You; Hsieh, Shih-Peng; Lee, Hsin-Pai; Lin, Sung-Chun; Chen, Wu-Fu; Jean, Yen-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of the calcitonin (Miacalcin) in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) and in nociceptive behavior in an experimental rat model of OA and osteoporosis. OA was induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) of the right knee and by bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) in Wistar rats. Nociceptive behaviors (secondary mechanical allodynia and weight-bearing distribution of the hind paws) were analyzed prior to surgery and every week, beginning at 12 weeks after surgery, up to 20 weeks. At 20 weeks, histopathological studies were performed on the cartilage of the knee joints. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to examine the effect of calcitonin on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression in articular cartilage chondrocytes. Rats subjected to ACLT + OVX surgery showed obvious OA changes in the joints. Animals subjected to ACLT + OVX and treated with calcitonin showed significantly less cartilage degeneration and improved nociceptive tests compared with animals subjected to ACLT + OVX surgeries alone. Moreover, calcitonin increased TGF-β1 expression in chondrocytes in ACLT + OVX-affected cartilage. Subcutaneous injection of calcitonin (1) attenuated the development of OA, (2) concomitantly reduced nociception, and (3) modulated chondrocyte metabolism, possibly by increasing cellular TGF-β1 expression. PMID:27345362

  1. Macular Degeneration: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalifoux, L. M.

    1991-01-01

    This article presents information on macular degeneration for professionals helping persons with this disease adjust to their visual loss. It covers types of macular degeneration, the etiology of the disease, and its treatment. Also considered are psychosocial problems and other difficulties that persons with age-related macular degeneration face.…

  2. Degenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces.

    PubMed

    Schebarchov, D; Schulze, T P; Hendy, S C

    2014-02-21

    One of the simplest microscopic models for a thermally driven first-order phase transition is an Ising-type lattice system with nearest-neighbour interactions, an external field, and a degeneracy parameter. The underlying lattice and the interaction coupling constant control the anisotropic energy of the phase boundary, the field strength represents the bulk latent heat, and the degeneracy quantifies the difference in communal entropy between the two phases. We simulate the (stochastic) evolution of this minimal model by applying rejection-free canonical and microcanonical Monte Carlo algorithms, and we obtain caloric curves and heat capacity plots for square (2D) and face-centred cubic (3D) lattices with periodic boundary conditions. Since the model admits precise adjustment of bulk latent heat and communal entropy, neither of which affect the interface properties, we are able to tune the crystal nucleation barriers at a fixed degree of undercooling and verify a dimension-dependent scaling expected from classical nucleation theory. We also analyse the equilibrium crystal-melt coexistence in the microcanonical ensemble, where we detect negative heat capacities and find that this phenomenon is more pronounced when the interface is the dominant contributor to the total entropy. The negative branch of the heat capacity appears smooth only when the equilibrium interface-area-to-volume ratio is not constant but varies smoothly with the excitation energy. Finally, we simulate microcanonical crystal nucleation and subsequent relaxation to an equilibrium Wulff shape, demonstrating the model's utility in tracking crystal-melt interfaces at the atomistic level. PMID:24559357

  3. Degenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schebarchov, D.; Schulze, T. P.; Hendy, S. C.

    2014-02-21

    One of the simplest microscopic models for a thermally driven first-order phase transition is an Ising-type lattice system with nearest-neighbour interactions, an external field, and a degeneracy parameter. The underlying lattice and the interaction coupling constant control the anisotropic energy of the phase boundary, the field strength represents the bulk latent heat, and the degeneracy quantifies the difference in communal entropy between the two phases. We simulate the (stochastic) evolution of this minimal model by applying rejection-free canonical and microcanonical Monte Carlo algorithms, and we obtain caloric curves and heat capacity plots for square (2D) and face-centred cubic (3D) lattices with periodic boundary conditions. Since the model admits precise adjustment of bulk latent heat and communal entropy, neither of which affect the interface properties, we are able to tune the crystal nucleation barriers at a fixed degree of undercooling and verify a dimension-dependent scaling expected from classical nucleation theory. We also analyse the equilibrium crystal-melt coexistence in the microcanonical ensemble, where we detect negative heat capacities and find that this phenomenon is more pronounced when the interface is the dominant contributor to the total entropy. The negative branch of the heat capacity appears smooth only when the equilibrium interface-area-to-volume ratio is not constant but varies smoothly with the excitation energy. Finally, we simulate microcanonical crystal nucleation and subsequent relaxation to an equilibrium Wulff shape, demonstrating the model's utility in tracking crystal-melt interfaces at the atomistic level.

  4. Inner retinal preservation in rat models of retinal degeneration implanted with subretinal photovoltaic arrays.

    PubMed

    Light, Jacob G; Fransen, James W; Adekunle, Adewumi N; Adkins, Alice; Pangeni, Gobinda; Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Palanker, Daniel V; McCall, Maureen A; Pardue, Machelle T

    2014-11-01

    Photovoltaic arrays (PVA) implanted into the subretinal space of patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are designed to electrically stimulate the remaining inner retinal circuitry in response to incident light, thereby recreating a visual signal when photoreceptor function declines or is lost. Preservation of inner retinal circuitry is critical to the fidelity of this transmitted signal to ganglion cells and beyond to higher visual targets. Post-implantation loss of retinal interneurons or excessive glial scarring could diminish and/or eliminate PVA-evoked signal transmission. As such, assessing the morphology of the inner retina in RP animal models with subretinal PVAs is an important step in defining biocompatibility and predicting success of signal transmission. In this study, we used immunohistochemical methods to qualitatively and quantitatively compare inner retinal morphology after the implantation of a PVA in two RP models: the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) or transgenic S334ter-line 3 (S334ter-3) rhodopsin mutant rat. Two PVA designs were compared. In the RCS rat, we implanted devices in the subretinal space at 4 weeks of age and histologically examined them at 8 weeks of age and found inner retinal morphology preservation with both PVA devices. In the S334ter-3 rat, we implanted devices at 6-12 weeks of age and again, inner retinal morphology was generally preserved with either PVA design 16-26 weeks post-implantation. Specifically, the length of rod bipolar cells and numbers of cholinergic amacrine cells were maintained along with their characteristic inner plexiform lamination patterns. Throughout the implanted retinas we found nonspecific glial reaction, but none showed additional glial scarring at the implant site. Our results indicate that subretinally implanted PVAs are well-tolerated in rodent RP models and that the inner retinal circuitry is preserved, consistent with our published results showing implant-evoked signal transmission. PMID

  5. Inner retinal preservation in rat models of retinal degeneration implanted with subretinal photovoltaic arrays

    PubMed Central

    Light, Jacob G.; Fransen, James W.; Adekunle, Adewumi N.; Adkins, Alice; Pangeni, Gobinda; Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Palanker, Daniel V.; McCall, Maureen A.; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays (PVA) implanted into the subretinal space of patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are designed to electrically stimulate the remaining inner retinal circuitry in response to incident light, thereby recreating a visual signal when photoreceptor function declines or is lost. Preservation of inner retinal circuitry is critical to the fidelity of this transmitted signal to ganglion cells and beyond to higher visual targets. Post-implantation loss of retinal interneurons or excessive glial scarring could diminish and/or eliminate PVA-evoked signal transmission. As such, assessing the morphology of the inner retina in RP animal models with subretinal PVAs is an important step in defining biocompatibility and predicting success of signal transmission. In this study, we used immunohistochemical methods to qualitatively and quantitatively compare inner retinal morphology after the implantation of a PVA in two RP models: the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) or transgenic S334ter-line 3 (S334ter-3) rhodopsin mutant rat. Two PVA designs were compared. In the RCS rat, we implanted devices in the subretinal space at 4 weeks of age and histologically examined them at 8 weeks of age and found inner retinal morphology preservation with both PVA devices. In the S334ter-3 rat, we implanted devices at 6 to 12 weeks of age and again, inner retinal morphology was generally preserved with either PVA design 16 to 26 weeks post implantation. Specifically, the length of rod bipolar cells and numbers of cholinergic amacrine cells were maintained along with their characteristic inner plexiform lamination patterns. Throughout the implanted retinas we found nonspecific glial reaction, but none showed additional glial scarring at the implant site. Our results indicate that subretinally implanted PVAs are well-tolerated in rodent RP models and that the inner retinal circuitry is preserved, consistent with our published results showing implant-evoked signal transmission. PMID

  6. Prognosis of intervertebral disc loss from diagnosis of degenerative disc disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Lin, A.; Tay, K.; Romano, W.; Osman, Said

    2015-03-01

    Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is one of the most common causes of low back pain, and is a major factor in limiting the quality of life of an individual usually as they enter older stages of life, the disc degeneration reduces the shock absorption available which in turn causes pain. Disc loss is one of the central processes in the pathogenesis of DDD. In this study, we investigated whether the image texture features quantified from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be appropriate markers for diagnosis of DDD and prognosis of inter-vertebral disc loss. The main objective is to use simple image based biomarkers to perform prognosis of spinal diseases using non-invasive procedures. Our results from 65 subjects proved the higher success rates of the combination marker compared to the individual markers and in the future, we will extend the study to other spine regions to allow prognosis and diagnosis of DDD for a wider region.

  7. The Orientation and Dynamics of Estradiol and Estradiol Oleate in Lipid Membranes and HDL Disc Models

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Alexander; Scheidt, Holger A.; Feller, Scott E.; Metso, Jari; Badeau, Robert M.; Tikkanen, Matti J.; Wähälä, Kristiina; Jauhiainen, Matti; Huster, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) and E2 oleate associate with high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). Their orientation in HDLs is unknown. We studied the orientation of E2 and E2 oleate in membranes and reconstituted HDLs, finding that E2 and E2 oleate are membrane-associated and highly mobile. Our combination of NMR measurements, molecular dynamics simulation, and analytic theory identifies three major conformations where the long axis of E2 assumes a parallel, perpendicular, or antiparallel orientation relative to the membrane’s z-direction. The perpendicular orientation is preferred, and furthermore, in this orientation, E2 strongly favors a particular roll angle, facing the membrane with carbons 6, 7, 15, and 16, whereas carbons 1, 2, 11, and 12 point toward the aqueous phase. In contrast, the long axis of E2 oleate is almost exclusively oriented at an angle of ∼60° to the z-direction. In such an orientation, the oleoyl chain is firmly inserted into the membrane. Thus, both E2 and E2 oleate have a preference for interface localization in the membrane. These orientations were also found in HDL discs, suggesting that only lipid-E2 interactions determine the localization of the molecule. The structural mapping of E2 and E2 oleate may provide a design platform for specific E2-HDL-targeted pharmacological therapies. PMID:24988346

  8. Mouse genetics and proteomic analyses demonstrate a critical role for complement in a model of DHRD/ML, an inherited macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Donita L.; Fernandez-Godino, Rosario; Kaur, Inderjeet; Speicher, Kaye D.; Harnly, James M.; Lambris, John D.; Speicher, David W.; Pierce, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Macular degenerations, inherited and age related, are important causes of vision loss. Human genetic studies have suggested perturbation of the complement system is important in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration. The mechanisms underlying the involvement of the complement system are not understood, although complement and inflammation have been implicated in drusen formation. Drusen are an early clinical hallmark of inherited and age-related forms of macular degeneration. We studied one of the earliest stages of macular degeneration which precedes and leads to the formation of drusen, i.e. the formation of basal deposits. The studies were done using a mouse model of the inherited macular dystrophy Doyne Honeycomb Retinal Dystrophy/Malattia Leventinese (DHRD/ML) which is caused by a p.Arg345Trp mutation in EFEMP1. The hallmark of DHRD/ML is the formation of drusen at an early age, and gene targeted Efemp1R345W/R345W mice develop extensive basal deposits. Proteomic analyses of Bruch's membrane/choroid and Bruch's membrane in the Efemp1R345W/R345W mice indicate that the basal deposits comprise normal extracellular matrix (ECM) components present in abnormal amounts. The proteomic analyses also identified significant changes in proteins with immune-related function, including complement components, in the diseased tissue samples. Genetic ablation of the complement response via generation of Efemp1R345W/R345W:C3−/− double-mutant mice inhibited the formation of basal deposits. The results demonstrate a critical role for the complement system in basal deposit formation, and suggest that complement-mediated recognition of abnormal ECM may participate in basal deposit formation in DHRD/ML and perhaps other macular degenerations. PMID:23943789

  9. Testicular degeneration in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M; Murphy, Zoe; Selva, David M; Hamidizadeh, Reza; Pearson, Jacqueline; Petersén, Asa; Björkqvist, Maria; Muir, Cameron; Mackenzie, Ian R; Hammond, Geoffrey L; Vogl, A Wayne; Hayden, Michael R; Leavitt, Blair R

    2007-06-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an adult onset, neurodegenerative disorder that results from CAG expansion in the HD gene. Recent work has demonstrated testicular degeneration in mouse models of HD and alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in HD patients. Here, we show that HD patients have specific testicular pathology with reduced numbers of germ cells and abnormal seminiferous tubule morphology. In the YAC128 mouse model, testicular degeneration develops prior to 12 months of age, but at 12 months, there is no evidence for decreased testosterone levels or loss of GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus. This suggests that testicular pathology results from a direct toxic effect of mutant huntingtin in the testis and is supported by the fact that huntingtin is highly expressed in the affected cell populations in the testis. Understanding the pathogenesis of HD in the testis may reveal common critical pathways which lead to degeneration in both the brain and testis.

  10. Mathematical glimpse on the Y chromosome degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, M. P.

    2006-04-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerate and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Non-recombination of XY pairs has been pointed out as the key factor for the degeneration of the Y chromosome. The aim here is to show that there is a mathematical asymmetry in sex chromosomes which leads to the degeneration of Y chromosomes even in the absence of XX and XY recombination. A model for sex-chromosome evolution in a stationary regime is proposed. The consequences of their asymmetry are analyzed and lead us to a couple of conclusions. First, Y chromosome degeneration shows up sqrt{2} more often than X chromosome degeneration. Second, if nature prohibits female mortalities from beeing exactly 50%, then Y chromosome degeneration is inevitable.

  11. Axon degeneration: context defines distinct pathways.

    PubMed

    Geden, Matthew J; Deshmukh, Mohanish

    2016-08-01

    Axon degeneration is an essential part of development, plasticity, and injury response and has been primarily studied in mammalian models in three contexts: 1) Axotomy-induced Wallerian degeneration, 2) Apoptosis-induced axon degeneration (axon apoptosis), and 3) Axon pruning. These three contexts dictate engagement of distinct pathways for axon degeneration. Recent advances have identified the importance of SARM1, NMNATs, NAD+ depletion, and MAPK signaling in axotomy-induced Wallerian degeneration. Interestingly, apoptosis-induced axon degeneration and axon pruning have many shared mechanisms both in signaling (e.g. DLK, JNKs, GSK3α/β) and execution (e.g. Puma, Bax, caspase-9, caspase-3). However, the specific mechanisms by which caspases are activated during apoptosis versus pruning appear distinct, with apoptosis requiring Apaf-1 but not caspase-6 while pruning requires caspase-6 but not Apaf-1. PMID:27197022

  12. Do clones degenerate over time? Explaining the genetic variability of asexuals through population genetic models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Quest for understanding the nature of mechanisms governing the life span of clonal organisms lasts for several decades. Phylogenetic evidence for recent origins of most clones is usually interpreted as proof that clones suffer from gradual age-dependent fitness decay (e.g. Muller's ratchet). However, we have shown that a neutral drift can also qualitatively explain the observed distribution of clonal ages. This finding was followed by several attempts to distinguish the effects of neutral and non-neutral processes. Most recently, Neiman et al. 2009 (Ann N Y Acad Sci.:1168:185-200.) reviewed the distribution of asexual lineage ages estimated from a diverse array of taxa and concluded that neutral processes alone may not explain the observed data. Moreover, the authors inferred that similar types of mechanisms determine maximum asexual lineage ages in all asexual taxa. In this paper we review recent methods for distinguishing the effects of neutral and non-neutral processes and point at methodological problems related with them. Results and Discussion We found that contemporary analyses based on phylogenetic data are inadequate to provide any clear-cut answer about the nature and generality of processes affecting evolution of clones. As an alternative approach, we demonstrate that sequence variability in asexual populations is suitable to detect age-dependent selection against clonal lineages. We found that asexual taxa with relatively old clonal lineages are characterised by progressively stronger deviations from neutrality. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that some type of age-dependent selection against clones is generally operational in asexual animals, which cover a wide taxonomic range spanning from flatworms to vertebrates. However, we also found a notable difference between the data distribution predicted by available models of sequence evolution and those observed in empirical data. These findings point at the possibility that processes

  13. [Principles of intervertebral disc assessment in private accident insurance].

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, M; Dittrich, V; Röser, K

    2015-09-01

    Due to the spread of intervertebral disc degeneration, insurance companies and experts are regularly confronted with related assessments of insured persons under their private accident insurance. These claims pose a particular challenge for experts, since, in addition to the clinical assessment of the facts, extensive knowledge of general accident insurance conditions, case law and current study findings is required. Each case can only be properly assessed through simultaneous consideration of both the medical and legal facts. These guidelines serve as the basis for experts and claims.managers with respect to the appropriate individual factual assessment of intervertebral disc degeneration in private accident insurance. PMID:26548005

  14. Involvement of Autophagic Pathway in the Progression of Retinal Degeneration in a Mouse Model of Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Piano, Ilaria; Novelli, Elena; Della Santina, Luca; Strettoi, Enrica; Cervetto, Luigi; Gargini, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The notion that diabetic retinopathy (DR) is essentially a micro-vascular disease has been recently challenged by studies reporting that vascular changes are preceded by signs of damage and loss of retinal neurons. As to the mode by which neuronal death occurs, the evidence that apoptosis is the main cause of neuronal loss is far from compelling. The objective of this study was to investigate these controversies in a mouse model of streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes. Starting from 8 weeks after diabetes induction there was loss of rod but not of cone photoreceptors, together with reduced thickness of the outer and inner synaptic layers. Correspondingly, rhodopsin expression was downregulated and the scotopic electroretinogram (ERG) is suppressed. In contrast, cone opsin expression and photopic ERG response were not affected. Suppression of the scotopic ERG preceded morphological changes as well as any detectable sign of vascular alteration. Only sparse apoptotic figures were detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and glia was not activated. The physiological autophagy flow was altered instead, as seen by increased LC3 immunostaining at the level of outer plexiform layer (OPL) and upregulation of the autophagic proteins Beclin-1 and Atg5. Collectively, our results show that the streptozotocin induced DR in mouse initiates with a functional loss of the rod visual pathway. The pathogenic pathways leading to cell death develop with the initial dysregulation of autophagy well before the appearance of signs of vascular damage and without strong involvement of apoptosis.

  15. Human Disc Nucleus Properties and Vertebral Endplate Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Azucena G.; Slichter, Chloe K.; Acosta, Frank L.; Rodriguez-Soto, Ana E.; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Lotz, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Study of human cadaveric discs quantifying endplate permeability and porosity and correlating these with measures of disc quality: cell density, proteoglycan content, and overall degeneration. Permeability and porosity increased with age and were not correlated with cell density or overall degeneration, suggesting that endplate calcification may not accelerate disc degeneration. Study Design Experimental quantification of relationships between vertebral endplate morphology, permeability, disc cell density, glycosaminoglycan content and degeneration in samples harvested from human cadaveric spines. Objective To test the hypothesis that variation in endplate permeability and porosity contribute to changes in intervertebral disc cell density and overall degeneration. Summary of Background Data Cells within the intervertebral disc are dependent on diffusive exchange with capillaries in the adjacent vertebral bone. Previous findings suggest that blocked routes of transport negatively affect disc quality, yet there are no quantitative relationships between human vertebral endplate permeability, porosity, cell density and disc degeneration. Such relationships would be valuable for clarifying degeneration risk factors, and patient features that may impede efforts at disc tissue engineering. Methods Fifty-one motion segments were harvested from 13 frozen cadaveric human lumbar spines (32 to 85 years) and classified for degeneration using the MRI-based Pfirrmann scale. A cylindrical core was harvested from the center of each motion segment that included vertebral bony and cartilage endplates along with adjacent nucleus tissue. The endplate mobility, a type of permeability, was measured directly using a custom-made permeameter before and after the cartilage endplate was removed. Cell density within the nucleus tissue was estimated using the picogreen method while the nuclear GAG content was quantified using the DMMB technique. Specimens were imaged at 8 μm resolution using

  16. Retinoprotective Effects of Bilberry Anthocyanins via Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, and Anti-Apoptotic Mechanisms in a Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration Model in Pigmented Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Zhao, Liang; Lu, Feng; Yang, Xue; Deng, Qianchun; Ji, Baoping; Huang, Fenghong

    2015-12-14

    Excessive visible light exposure can induce damage to retinal cells and contribute to the development or progression of age-related macular degeneration. In this study we created a model of phototoxicity in pigmented rabbits. Furthermore, we investigated the protective effect of bilberry anthocyanin extract (BAE, Table A1) and explored the possible mechanisms of action in this model. The model of light-induced retinal damage was established by the pigmented rabbits exposed to light at 18,000 lx for 2 h, and they were sacrificed on day 7. After administration of BAE at dosages of 250 and 500 mg/kg/day, retinal dysfunction was significantly inhibited in terms of electroretinograms, and the decreased thicknesses of retinal outer nuclear layer and lengths of the outer segments of the photoreceptor cells were suppressed in rabbits with retinal degeneration. BAE attenuated the changes caused by light to certain apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3). The extract increased the levels of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase, as well as the total antioxidant capacity, but decreased the malondialdehyde level in the retinal cells. BAE inhibited the light-induced elevation in the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and angiogenic parameters (IL-1β and VEGF). Results showed that visible light-induced retinal degeneration model in pigmented rabbits was successfully established and BAE exhibited protective effects by increasing the antioxidant defense mechanisms, suppressing lipid peroxidation and proinflammatory cytokines, and inhibiting retinal cells apoptosis.

  17. Improved discovery of a nearly degenerate model: Minimal universal extra dimension model using M{sub T2} at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Hitoshi; Nojiri, Mihoko M.; Tobioka, Kohsaku

    2011-11-01

    We study the discovery potential of the minimal universal extra dimension model (MUED) and improve it by utilizing the multijet+lepton mode at the LHC. Since the MUED has a nearly degenerate spectrum, most events only have soft jets and small E{sub T}{sup miss}. The signature is challenging to search. We apply M{sub T2} for the event selection and set the invisible particle mass of M{sub T2} (test mass) to zero. The test mass is much smaller than the invisible particle mass of MUED. In that case, M{sub T2} of the signal can be large depending on up-stream radiation which includes initial state radiation. On the other hand, M{sub T2} of the background is mainly below the top quark mass. Hence, the signal is extracted from the background in the high M{sub T2} region. Since we use the leading jets for M{sub T2}, there is a combinatorics effect. We find that the effect also enhances the signal to background ratio for high M{sub T2}. We perform a detailed simulation with the matrix element correction to the QCD radiations. The discovery potential of the MUED is improved by the M{sub T2} cut, and the improvement is especially significant for the most degenerate parameter we consider, {Lambda}R=10.

  18. microRNA regulatory circuits in a mouse model of inherited retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Palfi, Arpad; Hokamp, Karsten; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Vencken, Sebastian; Millington-Ward, Sophia; Chadderton, Naomi; Carrigan, Mathew; Kortvely, Elod; Greene, Catherine M.; Kenna, Paul F.; Farrar, G. Jane

    2016-01-01

    miRNA dysregulation is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders, including those involving the retina. Up-regulation of miR-1/133 and miR-142, and down-regulation of miR-183/96/182 has been described in the RHO-P347S mouse retina, a model for a common form of inherited blindness. High-throughput LC-MS/MS was employed to analyse the protein expression of predicted targets for these miRNAs in RHO-P347S mouse retinas; 133 potential target genes were identified. Pathway over-representation analysis suggests G-protein signaling/visual transduction, and synaptic transmission for miR-1, and transmembrane transport, cell-adhesion, signal transduction and apoptosis for miR-183/96/182 as regulated functions in retina. Validation of miRNA-target mRNA interactions for miR-1, miR-96/182 and miR-96 targeting Ctbp2, Rac1 and Slc6a9, respectively, was demonstrated in vitro. In vivo interaction of miR-183/96/182 and Rac1 mRNA in retina was confirmed using miR-CATCH. Additional miRNAs (including miR-103-3p, miR-9-5p) were both predicted to target Rac1 mRNA and enriched by Rac1-miR-CATCH. Other Rac1-miR-CATCH-enriched miRNAs (including miR-125a/b-5p, miR-378a-3p) were not predicted to target Rac1. Furthermore, levels of ~25% of the retinal Rac1 interactors were determined by LC-MS/MS; expression of Rap1gds1 and Cav1 was elevated. Our data suggest significant utilisation of miRNA-based regulation in retina. Possibly more than 30 miRNAs interact with Rac1 in retina, targeting both UTRs and coding regions. PMID:27527066

  19. microRNA regulatory circuits in a mouse model of inherited retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Palfi, Arpad; Hokamp, Karsten; Hauck, Stefanie M; Vencken, Sebastian; Millington-Ward, Sophia; Chadderton, Naomi; Carrigan, Mathew; Kortvely, Elod; Greene, Catherine M; Kenna, Paul F; Farrar, G Jane

    2016-01-01

    miRNA dysregulation is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders, including those involving the retina. Up-regulation of miR-1/133 and miR-142, and down-regulation of miR-183/96/182 has been described in the RHO-P347S mouse retina, a model for a common form of inherited blindness. High-throughput LC-MS/MS was employed to analyse the protein expression of predicted targets for these miRNAs in RHO-P347S mouse retinas; 133 potential target genes were identified. Pathway over-representation analysis suggests G-protein signaling/visual transduction, and synaptic transmission for miR-1, and transmembrane transport, cell-adhesion, signal transduction and apoptosis for miR-183/96/182 as regulated functions in retina. Validation of miRNA-target mRNA interactions for miR-1, miR-96/182 and miR-96 targeting Ctbp2, Rac1 and Slc6a9, respectively, was demonstrated in vitro. In vivo interaction of miR-183/96/182 and Rac1 mRNA in retina was confirmed using miR-CATCH. Additional miRNAs (including miR-103-3p, miR-9-5p) were both predicted to target Rac1 mRNA and enriched by Rac1-miR-CATCH. Other Rac1-miR-CATCH-enriched miRNAs (including miR-125a/b-5p, miR-378a-3p) were not predicted to target Rac1. Furthermore, levels of ~25% of the retinal Rac1 interactors were determined by LC-MS/MS; expression of Rap1gds1 and Cav1 was elevated. Our data suggest significant utilisation of miRNA-based regulation in retina. Possibly more than 30 miRNAs interact with Rac1 in retina, targeting both UTRs and coding regions. PMID:27527066

  20. Detection of the optic disc in fundus images by combining probability models.

    PubMed

    Harangi, Balazs; Hajdu, Andras

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a combination method for the automatic detection of the optic disc (OD) in fundus images based on ensembles of individual algorithms. We have studied and adapted some of the state-of-the-art OD detectors and finally organized them into a complex framework in order to maximize the accuracy of the localization of the OD. The detection of the OD can be considered as a single-object detection problem. This object can be localized with high accuracy by several algorithms extracting single candidates for the center of the OD and the final location can be defined using a single majority voting rule. To include more information to support the final decision, we can use member algorithms providing more candidates which can be ranked based on the confidence ordered by the algorithms. In this case, a spatial weighted graph is defined where the candidates are considered as its nodes, and the final OD position is determined in terms of finding a maximum-weighted clique. Now, we examine how to apply in our ensemble-based framework all the accessible information supplied by the member algorithms by making them return confidence values for each image pixel. These confidence values inform us about the probability that a given pixel is the center point of the object. We apply axiomatic and Bayesian approaches, as in the case of aggregation of judgments of experts in decision and risk analysis, to combine these confidence values. According to our experimental study, the accuracy of the localization of OD increases further. Besides single localization, this approach can be adapted for the precise detection of the boundary of the OD. Comparative experimental results are also given for several publicly available datasets.

  1. Lubricin Protects the Temporomandibular Joint Surfaces from Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint essential for the mobility and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ is composed of the mandibular condyle, the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, and a fibrocartilagenous disc interposed between these bones. A fibrous capsule, lined on the luminal surface by the synovial membrane, links these bones and retains synovial fluid within the cavity. The major component of synovial fluid is lubricin, a glycoprotein encoded by the gene proteoglycan 4 (Prg4), which is synthesized by chondrocytes at the surface of the articular cartilage and by synovial lining cells. We previously showed that in the knee joint, Prg4 is crucial for maintenance of cartilage surfaces and for regulating proliferation of the intimal cells in the synovium. Consequently, the objective of this study was to determine the role of lubricin in the maintenance of the TMJ. We found that mice lacking lubricin have a normal TMJ at birth, but develop degeneration resembling TMJ osteoarthritis by 2 months, increasing in severity over time. Disease progression in Prg4−/− mice results in synovial hyperplasia, deterioration of cartilage in the condyle, disc and fossa with an increase in chondrocyte number and their redistribution in clusters with loss of superficial zone chondrocytes. All articular surfaces of the joint had a prominent layer of protein deposition. Compared to the knee joint, the osteoarthritis-like phenotype was more severe and manifested earlier in the TMJ. Taken together, the lack of lubricin in the TMJ causes osteoarthritis-like degeneration that affects the articular cartilage as well as the integrity of multiple joint tissues. Our results provide the first molecular evidence of the role of lubricin in the TMJ and suggest that Prg4−/− mice might provide a valuable new animal model for the study of the early events of TMJ osteoarthritis. PMID:25188282

  2. Lubricin protects the temporomandibular joint surfaces from degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adele; Duran, Juanita; Purcell, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint essential for the mobility and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ is composed of the mandibular condyle, the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, and a fibrocartilagenous disc interposed between these bones. A fibrous capsule, lined on the luminal surface by the synovial membrane, links these bones and retains synovial fluid within the cavity. The major component of synovial fluid is lubricin, a glycoprotein encoded by the gene proteoglycan 4 (Prg4), which is synthesized by chondrocytes at the surface of the articular cartilage and by synovial lining cells. We previously showed that in the knee joint, Prg4 is crucial for maintenance of cartilage surfaces and for regulating proliferation of the intimal cells in the synovium. Consequently, the objective of this study was to determine the role of lubricin in the maintenance of the TMJ. We found that mice lacking lubricin have a normal TMJ at birth, but develop degeneration resembling TMJ osteoarthritis by 2 months, increasing in severity over time. Disease progression in Prg4-/- mice results in synovial hyperplasia, deterioration of cartilage in the condyle, disc and fossa with an increase in chondrocyte number and their redistribution in clusters with loss of superficial zone chondrocytes. All articular surfaces of the joint had a prominent layer of protein deposition. Compared to the knee joint, the osteoarthritis-like phenotype was more severe and manifested earlier in the TMJ. Taken together, the lack of lubricin in the TMJ causes osteoarthritis-like degeneration that affects the articular cartilage as well as the integrity of multiple joint tissues. Our results provide the first molecular evidence of the role of lubricin in the TMJ and suggest that Prg4-/- mice might provide a valuable new animal model for the study of the early events of TMJ osteoarthritis.

  3. High-density channel model and detection method for signal readout from super-resolution near-field structure discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosogai, Shota; Ansai, Tsutomu; Yoshinari, Takehisa; Tanabe, Takaya

    2016-09-01

    Although a readout method using the super-resolution near-field structure (super-RENS) effect can overcome diffraction limits, readout characteristics for greatly surpassed high-density conditions do not become clear, because a high-density channel function having a differential response property is superimposed on a normal readout function. We propose a high-density channel model to indicate the properties of the super-RENS effect directly. This model can be expressed as a differential response function using the finite impulse response (FIR) filter model. It expresses the super-RENS readout process, which is divided on the basis of recording densities such as high and normal Blu-ray Disc™ densities. We estimated the properties of super-RENS readout signals by comparison between theoretical expressions and experiments. Results show that good signal quality require readout signals having sharp peaks and smaller offsets. We also evaluated the channel model by adding an adaptive FIR filter and a Viterbi decoder by simulations. Results show that the super-RENS disc can achieve a fourfold higher recording density if the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) is improved to 6 dB in the case of partial response (PR) (1 + D + D 2).

  4. Use of Annular Closure Device (Barricaid®) for Preventing Lumbar Disc Reherniation: One-Year Results of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Bang Sang; Ji, Gyu Yeul; Moon, Bongju; Ha, Yoon; Kim, Keung Nyun; Yoon, Do Heum

    2014-01-01

    Although lumbar discectomy is an effective treatment for lumbar disc herniation, complications exist, including postoperative disc height loss, facet joint degeneration, and recurrent disc herniation. To solve these problems, annular closure devices have been utilized in other countries, producing satisfactory results, but there has been no report of annular closure device use in our country. Here, we demonstrate the preliminary reports of Barricaid® insertion in 3 patients who underwent surgery for lumbar disc herniation. PMID:27169045

  5. miR-126 Regulation of Angiogenesis in Age-Related Macular Degeneration in CNV Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Lee, Amy Yi Wei; Wigg, Jonathan P.; Peshavariya, Hitesh; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    miR-126 has recently been implicated in modulating angiogenic factors in vascular development. Understandings its biological significance might enable development of therapeutic interventions for diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We aimed to determine the role of miR-126 in AMD using a laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) mouse model. CNV was induced by laser photocoagulation in C57BL/6 mice. The CNV mice were transfected with scrambled miR or miR-126 mimic. The expression of miR-126, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), Kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) and Sprouty-related EVH1 domain-containing protein 1 (SPRED-1) in ocular tissues were analyzed by qPCR and Western blot. The overexpression effects of miR-126 were also proven on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). miR-126 showed a significant decrease in CNV mice (p < 0.05). Both mRNA and protein levels of VEGF-A, KDR and SPRED-1 were upregulated with CNV; these changes were ameliorated by restoration of miR-126 (p < 0.05). CNV was reduced after miR-126 transfection. Transfection of miR-126 reduced the HMECs 2D-capillary-like tube formation (p < 0.01) and migration (p < 0.01). miR-126 has been shown to be a negative modulator of angiogenesis in the eye. All together these results high lights the therapeutic potential of miR-126 suggests that it may contribute as a putative therapeutic target for AMD in humans. PMID:27338342

  6. Computer aided diagnosis of degenerative intervertebral disc diseases from lumbar MR images.

    PubMed

    Oktay, Ayse Betul; Albayrak, Nur Banu; Akgul, Yusuf Sinan

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the automated diagnosis of the degenerative intervertebral disc disease in midsagittal MR images. The approach is based on combining distinct disc features under a machine learning framework. The discs in the lumbar MR images are first localized and segmented. Then, intensity, shape, context, and texture features of the discs are extracted with various techniques. A Support Vector Machine classifier is applied to classify the discs as normal or degenerated. The method is tested and validated on a clinical lumbar spine dataset containing 102 subjects and the results are comparable to the state of the art.

  7. The quiescent phase of galactic disc growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-07-01

    We perform a series of controlled N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies within non-growing, live dark matter haloes of varying mass and concentration. Our initial conditions include either a low-mass disc or a compact bulge. New stellar particles are continuously added on near-circular orbits to the existing disc, so spiral structure is continuously excited. To study the effect of combined spiral and giant molecular cloud (GMC) heating on the discs, we introduce massive, short-lived particles that sample a GMC mass function. An isothermal gas component is introduced for a subset of the models. We perform a resolution study and vary parameters governing the GMC population, the histories of star formation and radial scale growth. Models with GMCs and standard values for the disc mass and halo density provide the right level of self-gravity to explain the age-velocity dispersion relation of the solar neighbourhood (Snhd). GMC heating generates remarkably exponential vertical profiles with scaleheights that are radially constant and agree with observations of galactic thin discs. GMCs are also capable of significantly delaying bar formation. The amount of spiral-induced radial migration agrees with what is required for the metallicity distribution of the Snhd. However, in our standard models, the outward-migrating populations are not hot enough vertically to create thick discs. Thick discs can form in models with high baryon fractions, but the corresponding bars are too long, the young stellar populations too hot and the discs flare considerably.

  8. Mid- to Long-Term Outcomes of Cervical Disc Arthroplasty versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion for Treatment of Symptomatic Cervical Disc Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Eight Prospective Randomized Co