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Sample records for disclosing hiv status

  1. HIV knowledge, stigma, and illness beliefs among pediatric caregivers in Ghana who have not disclosed their child's HIV status.

    PubMed

    Paintsil, Elijah; Renner, Lorna; Antwi, Sampson; Dame, Joycelyn; Enimil, Anthony; Ofori-Atta, Angela; Alhassan, Amina; Ofori, Irene Pokuaa; Cong, Xiangyu; Kyriakides, Tassos; Reynolds, Nancy R

    2015-01-01

    The majority of HIV-infected children in sub-Saharan Africa have not been informed of their HIV status. Caregivers are reluctant to disclose HIV status to their children because of concern about the child's ability to understand, parental sense of guilt, and fear of social rejection and isolation. We hypothesized that the low prevalence of pediatric HIV disclosure in Ghana is due to lack of accurate HIV information and high HIV stigma among caregivers. This is a preliminary analysis of baseline data of an HIV pediatric disclosure intervention study in Ghana ("Sankofa"). "Sankofa" - is a two-arm randomized controlled clinical trial comparing disclosure intervention plus usual care (intervention arm) vs usual care (control arm) at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH; control arm) and Komfo-Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH; intervention arm). We enrolled HIV-infected children, ages 7-18 years who do not know their HIV status, and their caregivers. Baseline data of caregivers included demographic characteristics; Brief HIV Knowledge Questionnaire (HIV-KQ-18); Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire; and HIV Stigma Scale. Simple and multivariable linear regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between caregiver characteristics and HIV knowledge, stigma, and illness perception. Two hundred and ninety-eight caregivers were enrolled between January 2013 and July 2014 at the two study sites; KBTH (n = 167) and KATH (n = 131). The median age of caregivers was 41 years; 80.5% of them were female and about 60% of caregivers were HIV-positive. Seventy-eight percent of caregivers were self-employed with low household income. In both unadjusted and adjusted analyses, HIV negative status and lower level of education were associated with poor scores on HIV-KQ. HIV positive status remained significant for higher level of stigma in the adjusted analyses. None of the caregiver's characteristics predicted caregiver's illness perception. Intensification of HIV education in

  2. HIV knowledge, stigma, and illness beliefs among pediatric caregivers in Ghana who have not disclosed their child's HIV status

    PubMed Central

    Paintsil, Elijah; Renner, Lorna; Antwi, Sampson; Dame, Joycelyn; Enimil, Anthony; Ofori-Atta, Angela; Alhassan, Amina; Ofori, Irene Pokuaa; Cong, Xiangyu; Kyriakides, Tassos; Reynolds, Nancy R.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of HIV-infected children in sub-Saharan Africa have not been informed of their HIV status. Caregivers are reluctant to disclose HIV status to their children because of concern about the child’s ability to understand, parental sense of guilt, and fear of social rejection and isolation. We hypothesized that the low prevalence of pediatric HIV disclosure in Ghana is due to lack of accurate HIV information and high HIV stigma among caregivers. This is a preliminary analysis of baseline data of an HIV pediatric disclosure intervention study in Ghana (“Sankofa”). “Sankofa” – is a two-arm randomized controlled clinical trial comparing disclosure intervention plus usual care (intervention arm) vs usual care (control arm) at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH; control arm) and Komfo-Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH; intervention arm). We enrolled HIV-infected children, ages 7–18 years who do not know their HIV status, and their caregivers. Baseline data of caregivers included demographic characteristics; Brief HIV Knowledge Questionnaire (HIV-KQ-18); Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire; and HIV Stigma Scale. Simple and multivariable linear regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between caregiver characteristics and HIV knowledge, stigma, and illness perception. Two hundred and ninety-eight caregivers were enrolled between January 2013 and July 2014 at the two study sites; KBTH (n = 167) and KATH (n = 131). The median age of caregivers was 41 years; 80.5% of them were female and about 60% of caregivers were HIV-positive. Seventy-eight percent of caregivers were self-employed with low household income. In both unadjusted and adjusted analyses, HIV negative status and lower level of education were associated with poor scores on HIV-KQ. HIV positive status remained significant for higher level of stigma in the adjusted analyses. None of the caregiver’s characteristics predicted caregiver’s illness perception. Intensification of

  3. [Does post-test counseling support PLHIV in disclosing their HIV status? Practices and propositions by counselors in Burkina Faso].

    PubMed

    Ky-Zerbo, Odette; Somé, Jean-François; Simaga, Fodé

    2013-07-01

    Disclosure of HIV test results is discussed during post-test counseling, following norms. However, while barriers to disclosing a positive HIV result have been documented, the literature is sparse on the way guidelines are applied in the field. The aim of this article is to describe and analyze counseling practices regarding HIV disclosure to 'significant others' (partner, family members, friends) reported by clients and providers of HIV voluntary counseling and testing in Burkina Faso. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in urban and rural areas in 2008 . A questionnaire incorporating semi-open questions was used. A total of 542 people who completed the test in 2007 and 111 service providers of HIV counseling and testing were interviewed. The data were analyzed using SPSS 12. Only 29% of those tested stated that disclosure to partner or family members was discussed with them during post-test counseling. This result is explained by providers' uncertainties and concerns regarding how to disclose, risks related to disclosure and adverse consequences of disclosure. Strategies are developed by counseling providers to support people who have been diagnosed HIV positive in disclosing to significant others, but they recognize that these actions are insufficient. Providers' suggestions are to keep fighting against the stigmatization of PLHIV, to improve counseling providers' competence in this area, and to adopt legal texts to make mandatory disclosure of the HIV result to partners. The study identified several ways to improve counseling practices regarding clients' disclosure of their HIV status in Burkina Faso. These findings could have significance for Africa as a whole.

  4. A combined chemometric and quantitative NMR analysis of HIV/AIDS serum discloses metabolic alterations associated with disease status.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Tracy R; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Sitole, Lungile J; Martin, Jeffery N; Steffens, Francois; Meyer, Debra

    2014-11-01

    Individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) often suffer from concomitant metabolic complications. Treatment with antiretroviral therapy has also been shown to alter the metabolism of patients. Although chemometric analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of human sera can distinguish normal sera (HIVneg) from HIV-infected sera (HIVpos) and sera from HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART), quantitative analysis of the discriminating metabolites and their relationship to disease status has yet to be determined. The objectives of the study were to analyze NMR spectra of HIVneg, HIVpos, and ART serum samples with a combination of chemometric and quantitative methods and to compare the NMR data with disease status as measured by viral load and CD4 count. High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy was performed on HIVneg (N = 10), HIVpos (N = 10), and ART (N = 10) serum samples. Chemometric linear discriminant analysis classified the three groups of spectra with 100% accuracy. Concentrations of 12 metabolites were determined with a semi-parametric metabolite quantification method named high-resolution quantum estimation (HR-QUEST). CD4 count was directly associated with alanine (p = 0.008), and inversely correlated with both glutamine (p = 0.017) and glucose (p = 0.022) concentrations. A multivariate linear model using alanine, glutamine and glucose as covariates demonstrated an association with CD4 count (p = 0.038). The combined chemometric and quantitative analysis of the data disclosed previously unknown associations between specific metabolites and disease status. The observed associations with CD4 count are consistent with metabolic disorders that are commonly seen in HIV-infected patients.

  5. Cutaneous histoplasmosis disclosing an HIV-infection*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Silvares, Maria Regina Cavariani; de Camargo, Rosangela Maria Pires; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycosis endemic in extensive areas of the Americas. The authors report on an urban adult male patient with uncommon oral-cutaneous lesions proven to be histoplasmosis. Additional investigation revealed unnoticed HIV infection with CD4+ cell count of 7/mm3. The treatment was performed with amphotericin B, a 2065 mg total dose followed by itraconazole 200mg/daily plus antiretroviral therapy with apparent cure. Histoplasmosis is an AIDS-defining opportunistic disease process; therefore, its clinical diagnosis must drive full laboratory investigation looking for unnoted HIV-infection. PMID:23793220

  6. HIV/AIDS Case Managers and Client HIV Status Disclosure: Perceived Client Needs, Practices, and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Klein, Susan J.; Kalichman, Moira O.; O'Connell, Daniel A.; Freedman, Jay A.; Eaton, Lisa; Cain, Demetria

    2007-01-01

    People living with HIV/AIDS often need assistance in deciding whether or how to disclose their HIV status to others, and case managers are in a unique position to offer this assistance. The current study surveyed 223 case managers providing services to people living with HIV/AIDS in New York State. The survey was conducted anonymously, and case…

  7. Caregivers' intentions to disclose HIV diagnosis to children living with HIV in South Africa: a theory-based approach.

    PubMed

    Jemmott, John B; Heeren, G Anita; Sidloyi, Lulama; Marange, C Show; Tyler, Joanne C; Ngwane, Zolani

    2014-06-01

    When children know their HIV serostatus, they are more likely to cooperate with steps to manage their health and the risk of transmitting HIV to others. Mounting evidence indicates that caregivers often do not disclose to HIV-positive children that the children are living with HIV, but little is known about the modifiable determinants of pediatric HIV disclosure. The present study examined theory-of-planned-behavior predictors of the intention to disclose to children their HIV diagnosis. The participants were 100 caregivers of HIV-positive children in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Proportional-odds logistic regression analysis revealed that normative support for disclosure and caregiver-child communication predicted the intention to disclose, whereas behavioral beliefs regarding the consequences of disclosing and self-efficacy to disclose did not. The results suggest that interventions to increase pediatric HIV disclosure in South Africa should help caregivers enlist support for disclosure among important referents and improve communication with their HIV-infected children.

  8. Keeping and Disclosing a Secret among People with HIV in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landau, Gila; York, Alan S.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the association of key variables with the intention to disclose and actual disclosure to an additional significant other of being HIV-infected. Sixty-five participants were recruited from five AIDS/HIV centers in Israeli hospitals. Participants completed questionnaires at entry to the study. They were asked about the extent to…

  9. HIV-1 evolution: frustrating therapies, but disclosing molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Das, Atze T.; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Replication of HIV-1 under selective pressure frequently results in the evolution of virus variants that replicate more efficiently under the applied conditions. For example, in patients on antiretroviral therapy, such evolution can result in variants that are resistant to the HIV-1 inhibitors, thus frustrating the therapy. On the other hand, virus evolution can help us to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie HIV-1 replication. For example, evolution of a defective virus mutant can result in variants that overcome the introduced defect by restoration of the original sequence or by the introduction of additional mutations in the viral genome. Analysis of the evolution pathway can reveal the requirements of the element under study and help to understand its function. Analysis of the escape routes may generate new insight in the viral life cycle and result in the identification of unexpected biological mechanisms. We have developed in vitro HIV-1 evolution into a systematic research tool that allows the study of different aspects of the viral replication cycle. We will briefly review this method of forced virus evolution and provide several examples that illustrate the power of this approach. PMID:20478891

  10. HIV-1 evolution: frustrating therapies, but disclosing molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Das, Atze T; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-06-27

    Replication of HIV-1 under selective pressure frequently results in the evolution of virus variants that replicate more efficiently under the applied conditions. For example, in patients on antiretroviral therapy, such evolution can result in variants that are resistant to the HIV-1 inhibitors, thus frustrating the therapy. On the other hand, virus evolution can help us to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie HIV-1 replication. For example, evolution of a defective virus mutant can result in variants that overcome the introduced defect by restoration of the original sequence or by the introduction of additional mutations in the viral genome. Analysis of the evolution pathway can reveal the requirements of the element under study and help to understand its function. Analysis of the escape routes may generate new insight in the viral life cycle and result in the identification of unexpected biological mechanisms. We have developed in vitro HIV-1 evolution into a systematic research tool that allows the study of different aspects of the viral replication cycle. We will briefly review this method of forced virus evolution and provide several examples that illustrate the power of this approach.

  11. Prevalence and predictors of facing a legal obligation to disclose HIV serostatus to sexual partners among people living with HIV who inject drugs in a Canadian setting:a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Sophie; Kaida, Angela; Nguyen, Paul; Dobrer, Sabina; Ogilvie, Gina; Hogg, Robert; Kerr, Thomas; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan; Milloy, M.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In October 2012, the Canadian Supreme Court ruled that people living with HIV must disclose their HIV status before sex that poses a "realistic possibility" of HIV transmission, clarifying that in circumstances where condom-protected penile-vaginal intercourse occurred with a low viral load (< 1500 copies/mL), the realistic possibility of transmission would be negated. We estimated the proportion of people living with HIV who use injection drugs who would face a legal obligation to disclose under these circumstances. Methods: : We used cross-sectional survey data from a cohort of people living with HIV who inject drugs. Participants interviewed since October 2012 who self-reported recent penile-vaginal intercourse were included. Participants self-reporting 100% condom use with a viral load consistently < 1500 copies/mL were assumed to have no legal obligation to disclose. Logistic regression identified factors associated with facing a legal obligation to disclose. Results: We included 176 participants, 44% of whom were women: 94% had a low viral load, and 60% self-reported 100% condom use. If condom use and low viral load were required to negate the realistic possibility of transmission, 44% would face a legal obligation to disclose. Factors associated with facing a legal obligation to disclose were female sex (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-4.24), having 1 recent sexual partner (v. > 1) (adjusted OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.24-5.78) and self-reporting a stable relationship (adjusted OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.03-3.91). Interpretation: Almost half the participants in our analytic sample would face a legal obligation to disclose to sexual partners under these circumstances (with an increased burden among women), adding further risk of criminalization within this marginalized and vulnerable community. PMID:27398360

  12. Sex and secrecy: How HIV-status disclosure affects safe sex among HIV-positive adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Toska, Elona; Cluver, Lucie D.; Hodes, Rebecca; Kidia, Khameer K.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-positive adolescents who engage in unsafe sex are at heightened risk for transmitting or re-acquiring HIV. Disclosure of HIV-status to sexual partners may impact on condom use, but no study has explored the effects of (i) adolescent knowledge of one's HIV-status, (ii) knowledge of partner status and (iii) disclosure to partners, on safer sex behaviour. This study aimed to identify whether knowledge of HIV-status by HIV-positive adolescents and partners was associated with safer sex. Eight fifty eight HIV-positive adolescents (10–19 years old, 52% female, 68.1% vertically infected) who had ever initiated antiretroviral treatment in 41 health facilities in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, were interviewed using standardised questionnaires. Quantitative analyses used multivariate logistic regressions, controlling for confounders. Qualitative research included interviews, focus group discussions and observations with 43 HIV-positive teenagers and their healthcare workers. N = 128 (14.9%) of the total sample had ever had sex, while N = 109 (85.1%) of sexually active adolescents had boy/girlfriend. In total, 68.1% of the sample knew their status, 41.5% of those who were sexually active and in relationships knew their partner's status, and 35.5% had disclosed to their partners. For adolescents, knowing one's status was associated with safer sex (OR = 4.355, CI 1.085–17.474, p = .038). Neither knowing their partner's status, nor disclosing one's HIV-status to a partner, were associated with safer sex. HIV-positive adolescents feared rejection, stigma and public exposure if disclosing to sexual and romantic partners. Counselling by healthcare workers for HIV-positive adolescents focused on benefits of disclosure, but did not address the fears and risks associated with disclosure. These findings challenge assumptions that disclosure is automatically protective in sexual and romantic relationships for HIV-positive adolescents, who may be ill-equipped to

  13. Disclosing in utero HIV/ARV exposure to the HIV-exposed uninfected adolescent: is it necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Jao, Jennifer; Hazra, Rohan; Mellins, Claude A; Remien, Robert H; Abrams, Elaine J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The tremendous success of antiretroviral therapy has resulted in a diminishing population of perinatally HIV-infected children on the one hand and a mounting number of HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) children on the other. As the oldest of these HEU children are reaching adolescence, questions have emerged surrounding the implications of HEU status disclosure to these adolescents. This article outlines the arguments for and against disclosure of a child's HEU status. Discussion Disclosure of a child's HEU status, by definition, requires disclosure of maternal HIV status. It is necessary to weigh the benefits and harms which could occur with disclosure in each of the following domains: psychosocial impact, long-term physical health of the HEU individual and the public health impact. Does disclosure improve or worsen the psychological health of the HEU individual and extended family unit? Do present data on the long-term safety of in utero HIV/ARV exposure reveal potential health risks which merit disclosure to the HEU adolescent? What research and public health programmes or systems need to be in place to afford monitoring of HEU individuals and which, if any, of these require disclosure? Conclusions At present, it is not clear that there is sufficient evidence on whether long-term adverse effects are associated with in utero HIV/ARV exposures, making it difficult to mandate universal disclosure. However, as more countries adopt electronic medical record systems, the HEU status of an individual should be an important piece of the health record which follows the infant not only through childhood and adolescence but also adulthood. Clinicians and researchers should continue to approach the dialogue around mother–child disclosure with sensitivity and a cogent consideration of the evolving risks and benefits as new information becomes available while also working to maintain documentation of an individual's perinatal HIV/ARV exposures as a vital part of his

  14. Factors Related to Family Therapists' Breaking Confidence When Clients Disclose High-Risks-to-HIV/AIDS Sexual Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pais, Shobha; Piercy, Fred; Miller, JoAnn

    1998-01-01

    Through a national survey of marriage and family therapists, this study examines what therapists do when their HIV-positive clients disclose that they are engaging in high-risk sexual behavior. Participants (N=309) were more likely to break confidence when their clients were male, young, gay, or African American. Describes characteristic of…

  15. HIV Serosorting, Status Disclosure, and Strategic Positioning Among Highly Sexually Active Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Grov, Christian; Rendina, H. Jonathon; Moody, Raymond L.; Ventuneac, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Researchers have identified harm reduction strategies that gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) use to reduce HIV transmission—including serosorting, status disclosure, and strategic positioning. We report on patterns of these behaviors among 376 highly sexually active (i.e., 9+partners, <90 days) GBMSM: mean age of 37, 49.5% men of color, 87.8% gay identified, 57.5% college educated. We found evidence that many men engaged in serosorting, status disclosure, and strategic positioning; however, rates varied based on the participant's HIV status. HIV-positive and HIV-negative men both engaged in sex with men of similar status more often than they engaged in sex with men known to be a different HIV status (i.e., serosorting). However, HIV-negative men disclosed their HIV-status with about half of their partners, whereas HIV-positive participants disclosed with only about one-third. With regard to strategic positioning, HIV-positive participants were the receptive partner about half the time with their HIV-negative partners and with their HIV-positive partners. In contrast, strategic positioning was very common among HIV-negative participants—they rarely bottomed with HIV-positive partners, bottomed about one-third of the time with status-unknown partners, and 42% of the time (on average) with HIV-negative partners. Highly sexually active GBMSM are a critical population in which to both investigate HIV prevention strategies as well as develop effective intervention programs. Providers and clinicians might be well served to include a wide range of behavioral harm reduction strategies in addition to condom use and biomedical approaches to reduce onward HIV transmission. PMID:26348322

  16. Prevalence and pattern of disclosure of HIV status in HIV-infected children in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Kallem, Stacey; Renner, Lorna; Ghebremichael, Musie; Paintsil, Elijah

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) HIV-infected children are surviving into adulthood. Despite, emerging evidence of the benefits of disclosure, when and how to disclose the diagnosis of HIV to children remain a clinical dilemma. We investigated the prevalence and determinants of HIV disclosure in a cross-sectional study of 71 caregiver-child dyads from the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Care Program at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital (Accra, Ghana). The children were from 8 to 14 years with median age of 10.39 years. The prevalence of disclosure was 21%. Age (p<0.01), the level of education (p<0.01), deceased biologic father (p=0.02), administration of own HIV medications (p=0.02), and longer duration on HIV medication (p=0.02) were significantly associated with disclosure. The low prevalence of disclosure underscores the need for a systematic and a staged approach in disclosing HIV status to infected children in resource limited countries. PMID:20607381

  17. Social Support and HIV-Status Disclosure to Friends and Family: Implications for HIV-Positive Youth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sonia; Yamazaki, Michiyo; Harris, D. Robert; Harper, Gary W.; Ellen, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The fear of negative reactions from friends and family members affects many HIV-positive adolescents’ decisions regarding disclosure of their HIV status. The complex relationships and interplay among social support, fear of stigma, and disclosure of HIV status needs to be better understood among youth living with HIV. Methods Social support from friends and family members, and HIV status disclosure were examined among 402 youth, aged 12 to 24 years, living with HIV. Results In separate analyses, 1) HIV positive youth who reported more than one close friend, as well as 2) HIV positive youth who reported that friends and family members continued to socialize with them after disclosure of their HIV diagnosis, had higher levels of perceived social support overall (both p<0.05). Furthermore, perceived social support did not differ significantly between those participants for whom no family member knew their HIV status and those for whom at least one family member knew their status (p=0.13). Race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, education level, and current living situation were not associated with family's knowledge of the participants’ HIV infection status (p>0.07). Conclusion This investigation adds important information concerning youth living with HIV, whose early disclosure experiences may influence their resilience and future coping mechanisms regarding experienced stigma, and thus influence the length of time they conceal their HIV status, their decision to disclose their status, and potentially their decisions regarding treatment. Interventions and support systems to assist youth living with HIV with disclosure, as well as medical care, may improve their overall quality of life. PMID:25940217

  18. Disclosing food allergy status in schools: health-related stigma among school children in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Dean, Jennifer; Fenton, Nancy E; Shannon, Sara; Elliott, Susan J; Clarke, Ann

    2016-09-01

    In 2006, 3 years after the tragic death of 13-year-old Sabrina Shannon, the Province of Ontario (Canada) passed Sabrina's Law ushering in a new era of focus and concern for severe food allergic children at risk of anaphylaxis. Questions were raised at the time regarding the potential of doing more harm than good with the new legislation. This paper reports the experiences of health-related stigma among food allergic children at risk of anaphylaxis who were required to disclose their health status under this new legislation. In 2008, in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 children and youth and their parents in order to explore the experiences living with a severe food allergy. This particular study explores their experiences of felt and enacted stigma in the school setting as a result of the disclosure process. Interviews were tape recorded with permission and transcribed for subsequent thematic analysis using NVIVO, a qualitative analysis software package. Results indicate that participants were stigmatised as a result of protective school policies under the law, and that created tension between their physical safety and social well-being. Sabrina's Law also led to a cultural shift in awareness of food allergies that resulted in some participants normalising their health status, offering promising directions for the future.

  19. Secondary Disclosure of Parental HIV Status Among Children Affected by AIDS in Henan, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Stanton, Bonita

    2012-01-01

    Abstract For children affected by AIDS, one psychological challenge is whether or how to disclose their parents' HIV status to others (secondary disclosure). The current study, utilizing data from 962 rural children affected by AIDS in central China, examines children's perceptions regarding secondary disclosure (intention of disclosure, openness, and negative feelings) and their association with children's demographic and psychosocial factors. The findings indicated that a high proportion of children preferred not to disclose parental HIV status to others, would not like to tell the truth to others in the situations of having to talk about parental HIV, and also had strong negative feelings about the disclosure. The study findings confirmed that keeping secrecy of parental HIV infection was associated with higher level of negative psychological outcomes (e.g., depression, loneliness, perceived stigma, and enacted stigma), and children's age was strongly associated with both their perceptions of secondary disclosure and psychological measures. PMID:22845686

  20. Strategies and Outcomes of HIV Status Disclosure in HIV-Positive Young Women with Abuse Histories

    PubMed Central

    Czaplicki, Lauren; Andrinopoulos, Katherine; Muessig, Kathryn; Hamvas, L.; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Young women with HIV and histories of physical and/or sexual abuse in childhood may be vulnerable to difficulties with disclosure to sexual partners. Abuse in childhood is highly prevalent in HIV-positive women, and has been associated with poorer communication, low assertiveness, low self worth, and increased risk for sexual and other risk behaviors that increase the risk of secondary transmission of HIV. HIV disclosure may be an important link between abuse and sexual risk behaviors. Qualitative interviews with 40 HIV-positive young women with childhood physical and/or sexual abuse were conducted; some women had also experienced adult victimization. Results suggest that HIV-positive women with abuse histories use a host of strategies to deal with disclosure of HIV status, including delaying disclosure, assessing hypothetical responses of partners, and determining appropriate stages in a relationship to disclose. Stigma was an important theme related to disclosure. We discuss how these disclosure processes impact sexual behavior and relationships and discuss intervention opportunities based on our findings. PMID:23596649

  1. HIV Status Disclosure Among People Living with HIV in the Era of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy (cART)

    PubMed Central

    Madi, Deepak; Gupta, Parul; Bhaskaran, Unnikrishnan; Ramapuram, John T.; Rao, Satish; Mahalingam, Soundarya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As patients with HIV live longer due to Combination Anti-Retroviral Therapy (cART) serostatus disclosure becomes an important issue. Disclosure can have both positive and negative outcomes. Disclosure of HIV status has been associated with better adherence to medication and reduction in levels of psychological distress. Stigma and disruption of family relationships are barriers for disclosure. Most studies regarding disclosure status have been conducted in West. There are many cultural differences in Indian society when compared to west. There is a dearth of research in the field of disclosure of HIV infection in India. Aim To determine the prevalence of HIV status disclosure among people living with HIV (PLHIV) in South India. Materials and Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was done in the hospital attached to Kasturba Medical College (KMC), Mangalore, India from May–June 2013. PLHIV of age more than 18 years were included. During the study period 111 consecutive patients who consented for the study were enrolled. Statistical Analysis Data was collected using a pre-tested interviewer administered semi structured questionnaire. Data collected was analysed using SPSS Version 11.5 statistical software. Descriptive statistics were done and the results are presented as proportions and mean. Results The mean age of the study population was 44.86 ± 10.8 years. Majority of the study subjects were men 76 (68.4%). Out of 111 study subjects, 102 (91.9%) had disclosed their HIV status to at least one person while 9 (8.1%) had not disclosed their HIV status to anyone. Disclosure on doctor’s advice was the main reason for 56 (54.9%) participants to disclose their HIV status. The main reason for non-disclosure was fear of shame in family. Conclusion Disclosure rate was high in our study in the era of cART. Society must stop discriminating against PLHIV so that they can disclose their serostatus and gain access to care and treatment services without

  2. Disclosure of HIV status and adherence to daily drug regimens among HIV-infected children in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Bikaako-Kajura, Winnie; Luyirika, Emmanuel; Purcell, David W; Downing, Julia; Kaharuza, Frank; Mermin, Jonathan; Malamba, Samuel; Bunnell, Rebecca

    2006-07-01

    Pediatric adherence to daily drug regimens has not been widely assessed in Africa where majority of HIV infected children live. Using in-depth interviews of 42 HIV-infected children taking ART and/or cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, and 42 primary caregivers, at a comprehensive HIV/AIDS clinic in Uganda, we evaluated their adherence experiences for purposes of program improvement. Daily drug regimens provided by the pediatric clinic included cotrimoxazole prophylaxis as well as ART and cotrimoxazole combined. Complete disclosure of HIV status by caregivers to children and strong parental relationships were related to good adherence. Structural factors including poverty and stigma were barriers to adherence even for children who had had complete disclosure and a supportive relationship with a parent. To ensure adherence to life-extending medications, our findings underscore the need for providers to support caregivers to disclose, provide on-going support and maintain open communication with HIV-infected children taking cotrimoxazole prophylaxis and ART.

  3. HIV status disclosure, depressive symptoms, and sexual risk behavior among HIV-positive young men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Stephanie H.; Valera, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    The rate of HIV infection among young men who have sex with men (YMSM) is increasing in the United States, and targeted research is needed to inform interventions aimed at reducing HIV transmission in this population. This study aims to understand the association between HIV status disclosure and sexual risk behavior among HIV-positive YMSM. A particular focus is given to depressive symptoms and their potential role in explaining the association between HIV disclosure and sexual risk behavior. In a sample of 991 YMSM receiving care at 20 clinics across the United States, Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to explore these associations. Approximately one-half (52.4 %) of participants reported disclosing to their current sexual/romantic partner. Disclosure to family members was negatively associated with sexual risk behavior. Also, depressive symptoms were positively associated with sexual risk behavior. We discuss the implications of our findings for future research and intervention. PMID:25773478

  4. Disclosure of HIV Status to Health Care Providers in the Netherlands: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Stutterheim, Sarah E; Sicking, Lenneke; Baas, Ineke; Brands, Ronald; Roberts, Hilde; van Brakel, Wim H; Lechner, Lilian; Kok, Gerjo; Bos, Arjan E R

    2016-01-01

    We qualitatively investigated perspectives on HIV disclosure to health care providers (HCP) by people living with HIV (PLWH). Perspectives varied across PLWH and between PLWH and HCP. Some PLWH felt they should always disclose so that HCP could take necessary precautions or because disclosure optimized care. Others felt that disclosure was not an obligation but a courtesy. Still others felt that disclosure was unnecessary as all HCP should apply universal precautions or because HIV status was not relevant to care. Most HCP claimed they should be informed about patients' HIV status as this would reduce occupational risk of infection and improve care. HCP also felt that disclosure concerns by PLWH were unnecessary given the HCP' duty of professional confidentiality. Some acknowledged that disclosure was not always necessary but still indicated wanting to be informed. Perspectives on HIV disclosure in health care settings differed substantially between PLWH and HCP.

  5. Factors Associated with Parents' Decision To Disclose Their HIV Diagnosis to Their Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Lori S.; Battles, Haven B.; Heilman, Nancy E.

    1998-01-01

    Interviews with parents and children and standardized measures for parental depression, family environment, and social support satisfaction were completed to examine the process and consequences of disclosure of parental HIV infection. Results showed that parents struggle with disclosure, fearing their children will be emotionally harmed or cannot…

  6. Why Tell Children: A Synthesis of the Global Literature on Reasons for Disclosing or Not Disclosing an HIV Diagnosis to Children 12 and under

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Beatrice J.; Letteney, Susan; Okoro, Chioma N.

    2016-01-01

    While the psychological and health benefits of knowing one’s HIV diagnosis have been documented for adults and adolescents, practice is still in development for younger children. Moderating conditions for whether or not to tell a child he/she has HIV vary by region and local context. They include accessibility of treatment, consideration of HIV as a stigmatizing condition, prevalence of HIV, and an accompanying presumption that any illness is HIV-related, parent or caregiver concerns about child reactions, child’s worsening health, assumptions about childhood and child readiness to know a diagnosis, and lack of policies such as those that would prevent bullying of affected children in schools. In this systematic review of the global literature, we summarize the reasons caregivers give for telling or not telling children 12 and under their HIV diagnosis. We also include articles in which children reflect on their desires for being told. While a broad number of reasons are given for telling a child – e.g., to aid in prevention, adaptation to illness (e.g., primarily to promote treatment adherence), understanding social reactions, and maintaining the child–adult relationship – a narrower range of reasons, often related to immediate child or caregiver well-being or discomfort, are given for not telling. Recommendations are made to improve the context for disclosure by providing supports before, during, and after disclosure and to advance the research agenda by broadening samples and refining approaches. PMID:27660752

  7. Willingness to disclose STI status to sex partners among college-age men in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Elizabeth J.; McGregor, Kyle A.; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Hansen, Cathlene Hardy; Ott, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    Disclosure of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) to sexual partners is critical to the prevention, treatment and control of STIs. We examine intra- and inter-personal influences on willingness to disclose STI status among college-age males. Participants (n = 1064) were aged 17-24 years and recruited from a variety of university and community venues. Using independent samples t-test, Pearson chi-squares test, and binary logistic regression, we examined the relationship between willingness to disclose a STI and intra- and inter-personal factors, including age, masculinity values, interpersonal violence, partner cell phone monitoring, alcohol and/or drug use, condom use, number and characteristics of sex partners, and previous STI. Results reveal that among college-age males, type of sex partner and masculinity values are significant variables in predicting whether or not an individual is willing to disclose. These data can inform STI control programs to more effectively address the complex issues associated with STI disclosure to sex partners. PMID:26859810

  8. Nutrition Status of HIV+ Children in Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nnyepi, Maria; Bennink, Maurice R.; Jackson-Malete, Jose; Venkatesh, Sumathi; Malete, Leapetswe; Mokgatlhe, Lucky; Lyoka, Philemon; Anabwani, Gabriel M.; Makhanda, Jerry; Weatherspoon, Lorraine J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Identifying and addressing poor nutritional status in school-aged children is often not prioritized relative to HIV/AIDS treatment. The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the benefits of integrating nutrition (assessment and culturally acceptable food supplement intervention) in the treatment strategy for this target group.…

  9. The Association Between HIV Disclosure Status and Perceived Barriers to Care Faced by Women Living with HIV in Latin America, China, Central/Eastern Europe, and Western Europe/Canada

    PubMed Central

    Loutfy, Mona; Johnson, Margaret; Walmsley, Sharon; Samarina, Anna; Vasquez, Patricia; Hao-Lan, He; Madihlaba, Tshepiso; Martinez-Tristani, Marisol

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Generally, women are less likely than men to disclose their HIV status. This analysis examined the relationship between HIV disclosure and (1) perceived barriers to care and (2) quality of life (QoL) for women with HIV. The ELLA (EpidemioLogical study to investigate the popuLation and disease characteristics, barriers to care, and quAlity of life for women living with HIV) study enrolled HIV-positive women aged ≥18 years. Women completed the 12-item Barriers to Care Scale (BACS) questionnaire. QoL was assessed using the Health Status Assessment. BACS and QoL were stratified by dichotomized HIV disclosure status (to anyone outside the healthcare system). Multilevel logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with disclosure. Of 1945 patients enrolled from Latin America, China, Central/Eastern Europe, and Western Europe/Canada between July 2012 and September 2013, 1929 were included in the analysis (disclosed, n = 1724; nondisclosed, n = 205). Overall, 55% of patients lived with a husband/partner, 53% were employed, and 88% were receiving antiretroviral therapy. Patients who were with a serodiscordant partner were more likely to disclose (p = 0.0003). China had a disproportionately higher percentage of participants who did not disclose at all (nearly 30% vs. <15% for other regions). Mean BACS severity scores for medical/psychological service barriers and most personal resource barriers were significantly lower for the disclosed group compared with the nondisclosed group (p ≤ 0.02 for all). Compared with the disclosed group, the nondisclosed group reported statistically significantly higher (p ≤ 0.03) BACS item severity scores for 8 of the 12 potential barriers to care. The disclosed group reported better QoL. Overall, HIV nondisclosure was associated with more severe barriers to accessing healthcare by women with HIV. PMID:27551959

  10. The Association Between HIV Disclosure Status and Perceived Barriers to Care Faced by Women Living with HIV in Latin America, China, Central/Eastern Europe, and Western Europe/Canada.

    PubMed

    Loutfy, Mona; Johnson, Margaret; Walmsley, Sharon; Samarina, Anna; Vasquez, Patricia; Hao-Lan, He; Madihlaba, Tshepiso; Martinez-Tristani, Marisol; van Wyk, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Generally, women are less likely than men to disclose their HIV status. This analysis examined the relationship between HIV disclosure and (1) perceived barriers to care and (2) quality of life (QoL) for women with HIV. The ELLA (EpidemioLogical study to investigate the popuLation and disease characteristics, barriers to care, and quAlity of life for women living with HIV) study enrolled HIV-positive women aged ≥18 years. Women completed the 12-item Barriers to Care Scale (BACS) questionnaire. QoL was assessed using the Health Status Assessment. BACS and QoL were stratified by dichotomized HIV disclosure status (to anyone outside the healthcare system). Multilevel logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with disclosure. Of 1945 patients enrolled from Latin America, China, Central/Eastern Europe, and Western Europe/Canada between July 2012 and September 2013, 1929 were included in the analysis (disclosed, n = 1724; nondisclosed, n = 205). Overall, 55% of patients lived with a husband/partner, 53% were employed, and 88% were receiving antiretroviral therapy. Patients who were with a serodiscordant partner were more likely to disclose (p = 0.0003). China had a disproportionately higher percentage of participants who did not disclose at all (nearly 30% vs. <15% for other regions). Mean BACS severity scores for medical/psychological service barriers and most personal resource barriers were significantly lower for the disclosed group compared with the nondisclosed group (p ≤ 0.02 for all). Compared with the disclosed group, the nondisclosed group reported statistically significantly higher (p ≤ 0.03) BACS item severity scores for 8 of the 12 potential barriers to care. The disclosed group reported better QoL. Overall, HIV nondisclosure was associated with more severe barriers to accessing healthcare by women with HIV.

  11. Caregivers’ Attitudes towards HIV Testing and Disclosure of HIV Status to At-Risk Children in Rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Rick; Grant, Eisha; Muyindike, Winnie; Maling, Samuel; Card, Claire; Henry, Carol; Nazarali, Adil J.

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers of HIV-positive children were interviewed in the Mbarara and Isingiro districts of Uganda to identify current trends in practices related to HIV testing and the disclosure of HIV status to the child. A total of 28 caregivers of at least one HIV-positive child participated in semi-structured interviews exploring when and why they tested the child for HIV, when the child was informed of their positive status, and what the caregiver did to prepare themselves and the child for status disclosure. For a majority (96%) of respondents, the decision to test the child for HIV was due to existing illness in either the child or a relative. Other common themes identified included the existence of stigma in the caregivers’ communities and doubt that the children truly understood what was being explained to them when their status was disclosed. Most (65%) children were informed of their HIV status between the ages of 5 and 9, with the mean age of disclosure occurring at the age of 7. General provision of HIV information typically began at the same age as disclosure, and as many as two thirds (64%) of the caregivers sought advice from an HIV counsellor prior to disclosure. How a caregiver chose to prepare themselves and the child did not affect the caregiver’s perception of whether the disclosure experience was beneficial or not. These findings suggest that the HIV disclosure experience in Mbarara and Isingiro districts differs from current guidelines, especially with respect to age of disclosure, how caregivers prepare themselves and the child, and approaching disclosure as an ongoing process. The doubts expressed by caregivers regarding the child’s level of HIV understanding following the disclosure experience suggest the children may be insufficiently prepared at the time of the initial disclosure event. The findings also suggest that examining the content of pre-disclosure counselling and HIV education, and how health care professionals are trained to

  12. Men's Serostatus Disclosure to Parents: Associations Among Social Support, Ethnicity, and Disease Status in Men Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, Erin M.; Antoni, Michael H.; Lopez, Corina R.; Durán, Ron E.; Penedo, Frank J.; Bandiera, Frank C.; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Klimas, Nancy; Kumar, Mahendra; Schneiderman, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Background Directly disclosing a positive HIV serostatus to family members can affect psychological and disease status. Perceptions that one is in a supportive family environment may moderate these effects; however, ethnic differences may exist in the support processes of families coping with HIV. Methods We examined the role of serostatus disclosure to parents, HIV-specific family support, and ethnicity (Latino versus non-Hispanic White) in explaining disease status (HIV Viral Load, CD4+ cell count) in a sample of men living with HIV (MLWH). Men (n = 120) reported whether they had disclosed their serostatus to their mothers and fathers, rated their perceptions of HIV-specific social support received from family members, and provided morning peripheral venous blood samples to assess immune function. We also collected psychosocial and urinary neuroendocrine indicators of stress/distress as possible mediator variables. Results A three-way interaction emerged between serostatus disclosure to mothers, HIV-specific family support, and ethnicity in explaining both viral load and CD4+ cell count. Non-Hispanic White men who had disclosed to mothers and were receiving high family support had a lower viral load and higher CD4+ cell count, but Latino men who had disclosed to mothers and were receiving low family support had a higher viral load. These associations were not accounted for by men's medication adherence, psychological distress, or neuroendocrine hormones. Disclosure to fathers was not related to disease status. Conclusions The effects of serostatus disclosure on disease status may depend, in part, on ethnic differences in the interpersonal processes of men's close family relationships. PMID:19486655

  13. Current status and prospects of HIV treatment.

    PubMed

    Cihlar, Tomas; Fordyce, Marshall

    2016-06-01

    Current antiviral treatments can reduce HIV-associated morbidity, prolong survival, and prevent HIV transmission. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) containing preferably three active drugs from two or more classes is required for durable virologic suppression. Regimen selection is based on virologic efficacy, potential for adverse effects, pill burden and dosing frequency, drug-drug interaction potential, resistance test results, comorbid conditions, social status, and cost. With prolonged virologic suppression, improved clinical outcomes, and longer survival, patients will be exposed to antiretroviral agents for decades. Therefore, maximizing the safety and tolerability of cART is a high priority. Emergence of resistance and/or lack of tolerability in individual patients require availability of a range of treatment options. Development of new drugs is focused on improving safety (e.g. tenofovir alafenamide) and/or resistance profile (e.g. doravirine) within the existing drug classes, combination therapies with improved adherence (e.g. single-tablet regimens), novel mechanisms of action (e.g. attachment inhibitors, maturation inhibitors, broadly neutralizing antibodies), and treatment simplification with infrequent dosing (e.g. long-acting injectables). In parallel with cART innovations, research and development efforts focused on agents that target persistent HIV reservoirs may lead to prolonged drug-free remission and HIV cure.

  14. Counselling about HIV serological status disclosure: nursing practice or law enforcement? a Foucauldian reflection.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Patrick; Holmes, Dave; Roy, Marie

    2015-06-01

    Recently, focus groups and qualitative interviews with nurses who provide frontline care for persons living with HIV highlighted the contentiousness surrounding the seemingly innocuous activity of counselling clients about HIV-status disclosure, hereafter disclosure counselling. These empirical studies highlighted that while some nurses felt they should instruct clients to disclose their HIV-positive status if HIV transmission were possible, other nurses were equally adamant that such counselling was outside the nursing scope of practice. A review of these opposing perceptions about disclosure counselling, including an examination of the empirical evidence which supports each point, revealed that the dichotomous arguments needed to be nuanced. The empirical evidence about serostatus disclosure neither supported nor refuted either of these assertions; rather, it substantiated parts of each. To create this understanding, both empirical and theoretical works are used. First, the results of empirical studies about serostatus disclosure, or lack thereof and HIV transmission is presented; as part of this, Marks and Crepaz's HIV disclosure and exposure framework is examined. Second, the work of Michel Foucault on disciplinary and pastoral power is drawn from. The outcome is a nuanced understanding about the interrelationships between disclosure counselling and nursing practice and a final interpretation about what this understanding means for public health practice.

  15. Disclosure of HIV Serostatus and Sexual Orientation Among HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiuyun; Chi, Peilian; Zhang, Liying; Zhang, Yan; Fang, Xiaoyi; Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    This study addressed the issue of disclosing HIV status and sexual orientation, and explored the consequences of such disclosures among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. In-depth individual interviews were conducted with 37 HIV-positive MSM. Of these participants, 3 (8.1%) disclosed neither their HIV status nor their sexual orientation to anyone; 24 (64.9%) voluntarily disclosed both their HIV-positive status and their sexual orientation; 7 (18.9%) voluntarily disclosed their HIV status only, and 3 (8.1%) involuntarily disclosed their HIV status and sexual orientation. Parents, partners, siblings and close friends were the most common disclosure targets. HIV-positive MSM were less likely to disclose their sexual orientation than their HIV status. The positive consequences of disclosure included receiving support, acquiring family care, reducing stress, improving mood and developing more positive values and beliefs. The negative consequences included the participants' perception of rejection and stigma toward themselves and their families. However, the stigma mainly comes from "outsiders" rather than family members and close friends. We did not find any differences with respect to consequences between participants who disclosed their HIV status only and those who disclosed both their HIV status and sexual orientation. In conclusion, partners, siblings and friends were main disclosure targets, and HIV positive MSM preferred to disclose their HIV serostatus than their sexual orientation. Voluntarily disclosing one's HIV status to significant others resulted in more positive consequences than negative consequences. Theses results were informative for developing mental health and coping interventions.

  16. Current status of HIV/AIDS in the ART era.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Kazuhisa

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) spread to humans from chimpanzees (HIV-1 groups M and N), gorillas (HIV-1 groups P and O), and sooty mangabeys (HIV-2). HIV is spread mainly through blood or body fluids. Subjects can become infected with HIV by sexual contact, needle sharing, blood transfusions, or maternal transmissions as a blood-borne virus or via breast-milk. The incubation period of HIV-1 from infection to the development of AIDS ranges from 8 to 11 years. In the past 3 decades, HIV has caused a great burden to global wealth and health. According to the WHO global health survey, 36.7 million people were infected with HIV, causing 1.1 million deaths in 2015. Since the discovery of HIV-1, many anti-retroviral drugs have been developed. Following the discovery and wide-spread use of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) the life expectancy of HIV infected individuals has substantially increased. By 2015, all major guidelines recommended treating all HIV-infected adults regardless of their CD4 count. Despite effective ART with virological suppression, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), cardiovascular diseases (CVD), metabolic syndrome (MS), bone abnormalities and non-HIV-associated malignancies remain a major complication associated with HIV infection. In this review article, I would like to describe recent ART status and problems in the ART-era.

  17. DISCLOSE Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Van Hollen, Chris [D-MD-8

    2010-04-29

    06/29/2010 Read the second time. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 448. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Correlates and Experiences of HIV Stigma in Prisoners Living With HIV in Indonesia: A Mixed-Method Analysis.

    PubMed

    Culbert, Gabriel J; Earnshaw, Valerie A; Wulanyani, Ni Made Swasti; Wegman, Martin P; Waluyo, Agung; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-01-01

    In Indonesia, the syndemic nature of HIV, drug use, and incarceration may influence experiences of stigma for HIV-infected prisoners. This mixed-method study explores HIV stigma in prisoners living with HIV in Indonesia. Randomly selected male HIV-infected prisoners (n = 102) from two large prisons in Jakarta completed in-depth interviews and a structured HIV stigma survey. Quantitative results found four groups of HIV-infected prisoners with significantly higher HIV stigma levels, including those: (a) with drug-related offenses, (b) seeking help to decrease drug use, (c) diagnosed with HIV before the current incarceration, and (d) who had not disclosed their HIV status to family members or friends. Qualitative results highlighted the prominent role of HIV stigma in decisions to disclose HIV status to family members, partners, and other prisoners. Interventions should address HIV stigma in HIV-infected prisoners in Indonesia to achieve HIV treatment as prevention goals.

  19. Correlates and Experiences of HIV Stigma in Prisoners Living with HIV in Indonesia: A Mixed Method Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Culbert, Gabriel J.; Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Wulanyani, Ni Made Swasti; Wegman, Martin P.; Waluyo, Agung; Altice, Frederick L.

    2015-01-01

    In Indonesia, the syndemic nature of HIV, drug use, and incarceration may influence experiences of stigma for HIV-infected prisoners. This mixed method study explores HIV stigma in prisoners living with HIV in Indonesia. Randomly selected male HIV-infected prisoners (n = 102) from two large prisons in Jakarta completed in-depth interviews and a structured HIV stigma survey. Quantitative results found 4 groups of HIV-infected prisoners with significantly higher HIV stigma levels, including those: (a) with drug-related offenses, (b) seeking help to decrease drug use, (c) diagnosed with HIV before the current incarceration, and (d) who had not disclosed their HIV status to family members or friends. Qualitative results highlighted the prominent role of HIV stigma in decisions to disclose HIV status to family members, partners, and other prisoners. Interventions should address HIV stigma in HIV-infected prisoners in Indonesia to achieve HIV treatment as prevention goals. PMID:26304049

  20. The impact of fear, secrecy, and stigma on parental disclosure of HIV status to children: a qualitative exploration with HIV positive parents attending an ART clinic in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Madiba, Sphiwe

    2012-11-28

    South Africa is one of the sub Saharan countries where considerable progress in providing antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been made. The increased access to ART contributes to improvements in the prognosis of HIV and parents are more likely to raise their children than ever before. The study examined the social context influencing disclosure of parental HIV status to children from the perspectives of fathers and mothers accessing ART from an academic hospital in South Africa. Three focus group interviews were conducted with 26 non-disclosed biological parents of children aged between 7 and 18 years. Their ages ranged between 20-60 years and they cared for a total of 60 children. Parental decision not to disclose their HIV status to children was influenced by the fear of death and dying, the influence of television and media, stigma and discrimination. Parents delayed disclosure of their HIV status to children because children believed that AIDS kills. Parents also feared that the child may not be able to keep the parent's HIV status secret and might result in the family being subjected to stigma, discrimination, and isolation. Fear of stigma and discrimination were also responsible for the continuous efforts by parents to protect their HIV status from their children, family and neighbour's. Parents also delayed disclosure to children because they lacked disclosure skills and needed support for disclosure from health care providers. Healthcare providers are in a unique position to provide such support and guidance and assist parents to disclose and children to cope with parental HIV infection.

  1. HIV Status among Patients with Tuberculosis and HIV Testing Practices by Connecticut Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ian T.; Lobato, Mark N.; Gutierrez, Jesus; Sosa, Lynn E.

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status of persons infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is important for individual treatment and preventing transmission. This evaluation analyzed surveillance data and surveyed health care providers who care for patients with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) to understand the factors contributing to suboptimal levels of Connecticut patients with TB having a known HIV status. During 2008 to 2010, 208 (76.2%) of 273 patients had a known HIV status; 12 (5.8%) were HIV-positive. Patients who were more likely to have a known HIV status were younger (40.5 vs 54.6 years, P < .001) or received care in a TB clinic (risk ratio, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.12–1.42). Among 77 providers, 48 (62.3%) completed the survey, 42 (87.5%) reported routinely offering HIV testing to patients with TB, and 26 (54.2%) reported routinely offering HIV testing to patients with latent TB infection (LTBI). We conclude that interventions for improving HIV testing should focus on non-TB clinic providers and patients with LTBI. PMID:23442493

  2. Antiretroviral Therapy as HIV Prevention: Status and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Kartik K.

    2010-01-01

    As antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection has become increasingly accessible, attention has focused on whether these drugs can used for prevention because of increased tolerability of newer medications, decreased cost, and the limitations of other approaches. We review the status of antiretroviral HIV prevention, including chemoprophylaxis, as well as the effects of treatment of infected individuals on prevention. It is possible that the life-saving agents that have transformed the natural history of AIDS can be a critical component of HIV prevention efforts, but their ultimate role in affecting HIV transmission dynamics remains to be defined. PMID:20724682

  3. Facilitating HIV status disclosure for pregnant women and partners in rural Kenya: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Women’s ability to safely disclose their HIV-positive status to male partners is essential for uptake and continued use of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) services. However, little is known about the acceptability of potential approaches for facilitating partner disclosure. To lay the groundwork for developing an intervention, we conducted formative qualitative research to elicit feedback on three approaches for safe HIV disclosure for pregnant women and male partners in rural Kenya. Methods This qualitative acceptability research included in-depth interviews with HIV-infected pregnant women (n = 20) and male partners of HIV-infected women (n = 20) as well as two focus groups with service providers (n = 16). The participants were recruited at health care facilities in two communities in rural Nyanza Province, Kenya, during the period June to November 2011. Data were managed in NVivo 9 and analyzed using a framework approach, drawing on grounded theory. Results We found that facilitating HIV disclosure is acceptable in this context, but that individual participants have varying expectations depending on their personal situation. Many participants displayed a strong preference for couples HIV counseling and testing (CHCT) with mutual disclosure facilitated by a trained health worker. Home-based approaches and programs in which pregnant women are asked to bring their partners to the healthcare facility were equally favored. Participants felt that home-based CHCT would be acceptable for this rural setting, but special attention must be paid to how this service is introduced in the community, training of the health workers who will conduct the home visits, and confidentiality. Conclusion Pregnant couples should be given different options for assistance with HIV disclosure. Home-based CHCT could serve as an acceptable method to assist women and men with safe disclosure of HIV status. These findings can inform the design and

  4. HIV-related stigma, service utilization, and status disclosure among truck drivers crossing the Southern borders in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pulerwitz, J; Michaelis, A P; Lippman, S A; Chinaglia, M; Díaz, J

    2008-08-01

    HIV-related stigma and discrimination (S&D) have been shown to impede prevention, care and treatment. Yet, few quantitative studies have tested the associations between stigma, service utilization and status disclosure, especially in countries with concentrated HIV epidemics. Surveys, administered to a random sample of 1,775 truck drivers crossing Southern borders in Brazil, included items on multiple conceptual domains of S&D, such as fear of casual contact and blame towards people living with HIV/AIDS. Pearson's chi-square tests and logistic regression were used to examine correlations. Less stigma (both individual items and grouped as a scale) was significantly correlated with VCT use (pdisclose HIV-positive test results (p=0.013). Findings indicate that stigma is an important barrier to HIV testing and disclosure among truck drivers in Southern Brazil. Learning more about stigma is important given the growing assertions that testing is a 'critical gateway' to HIV prevention and treatment. As access to HIV testing and treatment improves, providers increasingly need to understand and address how stigma acts as a barrier to services.

  5. Family secrets: disclosure of HIV status among gay men with HIV/AIDS to the family of origin.

    PubMed

    Kadushin, G

    2000-01-01

    A mail survey obtained a sample of 117 gay men with HIV/AIDS to examine levels of disclosure of HIV status to the family of origin and the association between disclosure and levels of support and barriers to support from the family. Among men with HIV there was a significant difference in knowledge of HIV status between family members such that mothers and siblings were more likely to be knowledgeable than fathers. For the total sample disclosure of HIV status was associated with higher levels of support from all family members and with a lower level of barrier to support from mothers and fathers. Implications for practice are discussed.

  6. The global HIV epidemic: current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Abdool Karim, Quarraisha

    2013-06-01

    Three decades after the first reported cases of AIDS we have within our reach sufficient evidence to substantially alter the HIV epidemic at a country level regardless of mode of transmission of HIV. There are a growing number of countries demonstrating control of the epidemic. Human rights violations and/or legislation relating to sexual orientation, status of minors, injecting drug use and sex work together with stigma and discrimination remain key barriers to knowledge of HIV status and access to appropriate services. The use of anti-retrovirals prophylactically to reduce sexual and vertical transmission and systemically to treat infected infants and adults is central to the optimism in responses to the epidemic. In the current fiscal climate careful thought needs to be given to how to efficiently optimise combinations of what is available to have the biggest impact in the context of limited human and infrastructure resources.

  7. Assessment of nutritional status of HIV-infected patients at a tertiary centre in North India.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sunita; Wanchu, Ajay; Khurana, Sudha

    2007-07-01

    Infection with HIV has an adverse effect on nutritional status, and can result in progressive involuntary weight loss. We assessed the nutritional status of our patients with HIV infection and found that HIV-infected patients had significantly low nutrient intake and body mass index as compared with controls. Involuntary weight loss, altered body composition and reduced nutritional status were present throughout the stages of HIV infection.

  8. The risks of partner violence following HIV status disclosure, and health service responses: narratives of women attending reproductive health services in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Colombini, Manuela; James, Courtney; Ndwiga, Charity; Mayhew, Susannah H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For many women living with HIV (WLWH), the disclosure of positive status can lead to either an extension of former violence or new conflict specifically associated with HIV status disclosure. This study aims to explore the following about WLWH: 1. the women's experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) risks following disclosure to their partners; 2. an analysis of the women's views on the role of health providers in preventing and addressing IPV, especially following HIV disclosure. Methods Thirty qualitative interviews were conducted with purposively selected WLWH attending clinics in Kenya. Data were coded using NVivo 9 and analyzed thematically. Results Nearly one third of the respondents reported experiencing physical and/or emotional violence inflicted by their partners following the sero-disclosure, suggesting that HIV status disclosure can be a period of heightened risk for partner stigma and abuse, and financial withdrawal, and thus should be handled with caution. Sero-concordance was protective for emotional and verbal abuse once the partner knew his positive status, or knew the woman knew his status. Our results show acceptance of the role of the health services in helping prevent and reduce anticipated fear of partner stigma and violence as barriers to HIV disclosure. Some of the approaches suggested by our respondents included couple counselling, separate counselling sessions for men, and facilitated disclosure. The women's narratives illustrate the importance of integrating discussions on risks for partner violence and fear of disclosure into HIV counselling and testing, helping women develop communication skills in how to disclose their status, and reducing fear about marital separation and break-up. Women in our study also confirmed the key role of preventive health services in reducing blame for HIV transmission and raising awareness on HIV as a chronic disease. However, several women reported receiving no counselling on safe

  9. Suit to proceed in claim that pharmacy revealed HIV status.

    PubMed

    1999-12-24

    A Federal judge in Milwaukee left intact a claim that the Osco Drug Store chain negligently caused ¿John Doe' emotional distress and exposed him to harassment. The store published, without his permission, his letter of thanks to an Osco pharmacist for helping him to obtain the protease inhibitor Norvir. After the letter was printed in an internal newsletter and posted at the store, John Doe received anonymous phone calls and his house was vandalized. The judge called Osco's argument that Osco was entrapped into revealing John Doe's HIV status "absurd." The judge dismissed the violation of privacy counts stating that Wisconsin's privacy law was only linked to HIV test results, which the Osco document did not mention. However, the judge left intact the claim of negligent infliction of emotional distress. The plaintiff's attorney plans to file a motion for reconsideration of the privacy and HIV information claims in Florida, John Doe's primary area of residence.

  10. Reasons for disclosure of HIV status by people living with HIV/AIDS and in HIV care in Uganda: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Ssali, Sarah N; Atuyambe, Lynn; Tumwine, Christopher; Segujja, Eric; Nekesa, Nicolate; Nannungi, Annet; Ryan, Gery; Wagner, Glenn

    2010-10-01

    Most studies of HIV disclosure in Africa have focused on disclosure to spouses and sexual partners, and particularly among women. Few have examined disclosure to family, friends, and others. Understanding the reasons for disclosure and nondisclosure and how these reasons differ by disclosure target is needed for effective prevention interventions. Using a case study design and content analysis, this study explored whether the reasons for disclosure decisions differ by the nature of the relationship to the disclosure target. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 40 HIV clients in Kampala, with even stratification by gender and age. Most (95%) respondents reported disclosing to someone; among these, 84% disclosed to family members, 63% to friends, 21% to workplace colleagues, and 18% to others. Of the 24 participants who had a spouse, 13 (54%) reported disclosing to a spouse. The most common reasons for disclosure were to receive support (76%), associated with disclosure to family members; relationship ties (76%), associated with disclosure to all target types; explaining change in behavior or appearance (61%), associated with disclosing to family and friends; and HIV prevention (50%), associated with disclosure to spouse/partner and friends. The most common reasons for nondisclosure were: fear of abandonment, particularly among young women disclosing to spouse/partner; inaccessibility to the disclosure target; and not wanting to worry/upset the disclosure target. This exploratory analysis suggests that reasons for disclosure and nondisclosure differ depending on the targets of disclosure, highlighting the need for tailoring interventions for improving disclosure decisions making and outcomes.

  11. Alcohol Use, Socioeconomic Status and Risk of HIV Infections.

    PubMed

    Probst, Charlotte; Simbayi, Leickness C; Parry, Charles D H; Shuper, Paul A; Rehm, Jürgen

    2017-03-28

    The present study investigated the associations among alcohol use, socioeconomic status (SES), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, in the South African context. It was hypothesized that SES (predictor; measured as median split asset score) and alcohol use in the past 12 months (predictor) would interact such that current drinkers of low SES would be at an increased risk of testing HIV-positive (outcome). Nationally representative, cross-sectional survey data from 2005 (N = 16,110), 2008 (N = 13,055), and 2012 (N = 25,979) were analyzed using multinomial regression models. Current drinkers of low SES had an elevated risk of HIV infection in all survey years, ranging from a relative risk ratio (RRR) of 1.94 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29-3.00, t = 2.93, p = 0.002) in 2012 to RRR of 3.51 (95% CI 2.02-6.08, t = 4.47, p < 0.001) in 2008. Targeting preventive strategies to alcohol users of low SES could help reduce HIV burden and associated socioeconomic differences.

  12. To Tell or Not to Tell: Men's Disclosure of Their HIV-Positive Status to Their Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shehan, Constance L.; Uphold, Constance R.; Bradshaw, Patrick; Bender, Joyce; Arce, Natalie; Bender, Bradley

    2005-01-01

    Disclosing an HIV diagnosis to his mother may be the first step in a man's successful management of his illness, but it may also lead to added stress due to stigmatization. Analyzing data provided by 166 HIV-positive men who lived in the southeastern United States, we found that the most powerful correlate of disclosure was exposure to HIV through…

  13. Randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of an interactive group counseling intervention for HIV-positive women on prenatal depression and disclosure of HIV status.

    PubMed

    Kaaya, Sylvia F; Blander, Jeffrey; Antelman, Gretchen; Cyprian, Fileuka; Emmons, Karen M; Matsumoto, Kenji; Chopyak, Elena; Levine, Michelle; Smith Fawzi, Mary C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the effectiveness of group counseling, using a problem-solving therapy approach, on reducing depressive symptoms and increasing prenatal disclosure rates of HIV status among HIV-positive pregnant women living in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. A randomized controlled trial was performed comparing a six-week structured nurse-midwife facilitated psychosocial support group with the standard of care. Sixty percent of women in the intervention group were depressed post-intervention, versus 73% in the control group [Relative Risk (RR) = 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.67-1.01, p=0.066]. HIV disclosure rates did not differ across the two study arms. However, among those women who disclosed, there was a significantly higher level of overall personal satisfaction with the response to disclosure from family and friends among women in the treatment (88%) compared to the control group (62%; p=0.004). The results indicate reductions in the level of depressive symptoms comparable with major depressive disorder (MDD) for HIV-positive pregnant women participating in a group counseling intervention. Although the psychosocial group counseling did not significantly increase disclosure rates, an improvement in the level of personal satisfaction resulting from disclosure was associated with the intervention. This suggests that the counseling sessions have likely reduced the burden of depression and helped clients better manage partner reactions to disclosure. Public agencies and non-governmental organizations working in Tanzania and similar settings should consider offering structured psychosocial support groups to HIV-positive pregnant women to prevent poor mental health outcomes, promote early childhood development, and potentially impact HIV-related disease outcomes in the long term.

  14. Issues around childhood disclosure of HIV status – findings from a qualitative study in West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Das, A.; Detels, R.; Javanbakht, M.; Panda, S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Informing the children living with HIV (CLH) about their disease (disclosure) is important from the perspective of disease treatment and overall psychosocial development. There are no published studies that qualitatively explored HIV disclosure-related issues among CLH in India. Our aim was to provide insights into the perceptions of informal caregivers of CLH regarding childhood disclosure. Methods Children were defined as those aged <16 years. In-depth interviews were conducted with 34 primary caregivers of CLH aged 8 to 15 years old who were residing in West Bengal, India. The participants were recruited with the help of a community-based organization that provides need-based services to people living with HIV. Results We obtained caregivers’ perspectives on the motivators and barriers of childhood disclosure. Health benefits such as medication adherence emerged as an important motivator, while distress caused by disclosure and potential for stigma were identified as barriers. Health care providers were the preferred disclosers for most caregivers, followed by the caregivers themselves. Some caregivers wanted their child to learn about his/her HIV status by him/herself. There was no consensus among the caregivers about the ideal age for disclosure. Many preferred to wait until the child attained maturity or was of marriageable age. Discussion Disclosure of HIV status to children is an emotional issue, both for the caregiver and the child. Like most low-or middle-income countries, no standardized, age-appropriate disclosure guidelines exist in India. Our findings advocate adoption of a multi-faceted approach, including increased availability of social and familial support, for childhood HIV disclosure. PMID:27116937

  15. Sexual negotiation, HIV-status disclosure, and sexual risk behavior among Latino men who use the internet to seek sex with other men.

    PubMed

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Miner, Michael; Dolezal, Curtis; Rosser, B R Simon; Jacoby, Scott

    2006-08-01

    As part of a wider study of Internet-using Latino men who have sex with men (MSM), we studied the likelihood that HIV-negative (n=200) and HIV-positive (n=50) Latino MSM would engage in sexual negotiations and disclosure of their HIV status prior to their first sexual encounters with men met over the Internet. We also analyzed the sexual behaviors that followed online encounters. Our results showed that both HIV-negative and positive men were significantly more likely to engage in sexual negotiation and serostatus disclosure on the Internet than in person. Those who engaged in sexual negotiations were also more likely to use condoms for anal intercourse. Compared to HIV-negative MSM, HIV-positive MSM were significantly less likely to disclose their serostatus, and 41% of them acknowledged having misrepresented their serostatus to a prospective sexual partner met over the Internet. Although similar proportions of HIV-positive and negative men had condomless anal intercourse, HIV-positive MSM were more likely to report lack of intention to use condoms. Pleasure was the reason most frequently cited for lack of condom use. Cybersex was reported by only one-fifth of the sample. We conclude that the Internet, an understudied milieu of sexual networking, may present new possibilities for the implementation of risk reduction strategies, such as the promotion of sexual negotiation prior to first in-person encounter and serostatus disclosure.

  16. HIV status and sexual behaviour among gay men in Ottawa: considerations for public health

    PubMed Central

    O'Byrne, Patrick; Phillips, J Craig; Kitson, Cynthia; Bryan, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives HIV prevention efforts, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM), have not achieved maximum effectiveness. A survey of MSM in Ottawa, Canada was completed to ascertain whether there were differences in how the perceived HIV status of participants and their partners influenced sexual practices. Methods Self-directed surveys were administered to a convenience sample of 721 MSM in Ottawa, Canada from November 2011 through May 2012. Data collection occurred at 14 sites. The survey identified whether participants identified as HIV positive, negative or unsure of their HIV status. Results The findings indicated variation between HIV-negative MSM and those who are unsure of their HIV status. Men who were unsure of their HIV status were less likely to report that they asked sexual partners or have had their partners ask about HIV status. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that some MSM may base decisions about HIV prevention on discussion about HIV status with their partners, rather than condom use. These practices may increase, rather than decrease, HIV transmission. Survey findings and extant literature demonstrate a need to inform MSM about the limitations of serosorting as a prevention strategy, and to provide facilitated access to sexually transmitted infection testing and treatment to further reduce onward HIV transmission. PMID:25239290

  17. Nutritional status of persons with HIV infection, persons with HIV infection and tuberculosis, and HIV-negative individuals from southern India.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Padmapriyadarsini, C; Sukumar, B; Iliayas, Sheikh; Kumar, S Ramesh; Triveni, C; Gomathy, P; Thomas, Beena; Mathew, Minnie; Narayanan, P R

    2008-03-15

    We compared the nutritional status of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection alone, individuals with HIV infection and tuberculosis (after completion of antituberculosis treatment), and HIV-negative individuals and found that malnutrition, anemia, and hypoalbuminemia were most pronounced among HIV-positive patients with tuberculosis. Weight loss was associated with loss of fat in female patients and with loss of body cell mass in male patients.

  18. Nutritional status assessment of HIV-positive drug addicts.

    PubMed

    Varela, P; Marcos, A; Ripoll, S; Requejo, A; Herrera, P; Casas, A

    1990-05-01

    Since human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is known to lead to modifications of immune function and interrelationships among malnutrition, anergy and drug addiction have been shown, the aim of this work was to assess the nutritional status of 36 male heroin addicts under a period of detoxication (3 months). They were divided into two groups: (1) HIV negative (n = 20) and (2) HIV positive (n = 16); heights, weights and serum albumin concentration were measured and immune function was tested, using delayed hypersensitivity skin tests containing 7 antigens. No significant differences in anthropometric measurements were found between both groups, but anthropometric improvement was shown in every patient after the detoxication period. Serum albumin, often used as a classical index of malnutrition, remained within the normal values in both groups. The whole response to skin tests was depressed in both groups and no significant differences were shown between them. Therefore, these results might suggest that in spite of the apparent anthropometric recovery and the normal values of albumin, a subclinical malnutrition was indicated by the depressed immune function, which was more noticeable in the HIV-positive group.

  19. Poverty, hunger, education, and residential status impact survival in HIV.

    PubMed

    McMahon, James; Wanke, Christine; Terrin, Norma; Skinner, Sally; Knox, Tamsin

    2011-10-01

    Despite combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV infected people have higher mortality than non-infected. Lower socioeconomic status (SES) predicts higher mortality in many chronic illnesses but data in people with HIV is limited. We evaluated 878 HIV infected individuals followed from 1995 to 2005. Cox proportional hazards for all-cause mortality were estimated for SES measures and other factors. Mixed effects analyses examined how SES impacts factors predicting death. The 200 who died were older, had lower CD4 counts, and higher viral loads (VL). Age, transmission category, education, albumin, CD4 counts, VL, hunger, and poverty predicted death in univariate analyses; age, CD4 counts, albumin, VL, and poverty in the multivariable model. Mixed models showed associations between (1) CD4 counts with education and hunger; (2) albumin with education, homelessness, and poverty; and (3) VL with education and hunger. SES contributes to mortality in HIV infected persons directly and indirectly, and should be a target of health policy in this population.

  20. Substance Use and Psychosocial Status among People Living with HIV/AIDS Who Encountered HIV Stigma in China: Stratified Analyses by Socio-Economic Status

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoming; Liu, Yu; Qiao, Shan; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong; Chen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether the impact of HIV stigma on psychosocial status and substance use among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) differed by their socio-economic status (SES) in a Chinese setting. A total of 2,987 PLWHA were recruited from 12 sites with the highest number of cumulative HIV incidence in Guangxi, China. Participants were asked to provide information regarding their psychosocial status (e.g., depression, anxiety), history of substance use (e.g., tobacco, alcohol and drug) and SES (e.g., education, monthly income, residence type, and job category). By employing stratified multivariate regression analyses, we assessed stratum-specific impacts of HIV stigma on PLWHA’s psychosocial status and behaviors of substance use based upon participants’ SES. The impact of HIV stigma differed significantly on psychosocial status across SES gradients. Psychosocial status among people with higher education was more sensitive to HIV stigma compared with PLWHA who were less educated. The odds of substance use behaviors were higher among people with better monthly income than their low-income peers. Our study is the first paper to document the paucity of SES stratified analyses between HIV stigma and psychosocial status and substance use among PLWHA in China. We call for tailored intervention programs to target PLWHA with different backgrounds and characteristics in order to help them to better manage their seropositivity. PMID:27824948

  1. The relationships between HIV stigma, emotional status, and emotional regulation among HIV-affected children in rural China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Li, Xiaoming; Harrison, Sayward; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Children affected by HIV/AIDS have unique psychosocial needs that often go unaddressed in traditional treatment approaches. They are more likely than unaffected peers to encounter stigma, including overt discriminatory behaviors, as well as stereotyped attitudes. In addition, HIV-affected children are at risk for experiencing negative affect, including sadness and depression. Previous studies have identified a link between HIV stigma and the subsequent emotional status of children affected by HIV/AIDS. However, limited data are available regarding protective psychological factors that can mitigate the effects of HIV stigma and thus promote resiliency for this vulnerable population. Utilizing data from 790 children aged 6–17 years affected by parental HIV in rural central China this study aims to examine the association between HIV stigma, including both enacted and perceived stigma, and emotional status among HIV-affected children, as well as to evaluate the mediating effects of emotional regulation on the relationship between HIV stigma and emotional status. In addition, the moderating role of age is tested. Multiple regression was conducted to test the mediation model. We found that the experience of HIV stigma had a direct positive effect on negative emotions among children affected by HIV. Emotional regulation offers a level of protection, as it mediated the impact of HIV stigma on negative emotions. Moreover, age was found to moderate the relationship between perceived stigma and negative emotions. A significant interaction between perceived stigma and age suggested that negative emotions increase with age among those who perceived a higher level of stigmatization. Results suggest that children affected by HIV may benefit from interventions designed to enhance their capacity to regulate emotions and that health professionals should be aware of the link between stigma and negative emotion in childhood and adolescence and use the knowledge to inform

  2. Maternal HIV status affects the infant hemoglobin level

    PubMed Central

    Feleke, Berhanu Elfu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Children, especially infants, are highly vulnerable to iron-deficiency anemia because of their rapid growth of the brain and the rest of the body. The objectives of this study were to compare the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in infants born from HIV-positive mothers and HIV-negative mothers and to identify the determinants of iron-deficiency anemia in infants. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in Bahir Dar city. Simple random sampling technique was used to select the study participants. Mothers were interviewed; blood samples were collected from mothers and infants to measure the hemoglobin level and anthropometric indicators were obtained from the infants using world health organization standards. Descriptive statistics were used to estimate the prevalence of infantile anemia. Binary logistic regression and multiple linear regressions were used to identify the determinants of infant anemia. A total of 1459 infants born from HIV-positive and HIV-negative mothers were included. The prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in infants born from HIV-positive and HIV-negative mothers was 41.9% (95% CI: 39–44). Infantile iron-deficiency anemia was associated with maternal HIV infection (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.54 [95% CI: 1.65–3.9]), stunting (AOR 3.46 [95% CI: 2.41–4.97]), low income (AOR 2.72 [95% CI: 2–3.73]), maternal malaria during pregnancy (AOR 1.81 [95% CI: 1.33–2.47]), use of cow milk before 6 month (AOR 1.82 [95% CI: 1.35–2.45]), residence (AOR 0.09 [95% CI: 0.06–0.13]), history of cough or fever 7 days preceding the survey (AOR 2.71 [95% CI: 1.99–3.69]), maternal hemoglobin (B 0.65 [95% CI: 0.61–0.68]), educational status of mother (B 0.22 [95% CI: 0.2–0.23]), age of the mother (B –0.03 [95% CI: –0.03, –0.02]), and family size (B –0.14 [95% CI: –0.18,–0.11]). PMID:27495044

  3. Correlates of HIV-status awareness among adults in Nairobi slum areas.

    PubMed

    Ettarh, Remare Renner; Kimani, James; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Wekesah, Frederick

    2012-12-01

    The prevalence of HIV in the adult population in slum areas in Nairobi, Kenya, is higher than for residents in the city as a whole. This disparity suggests that the characteristics of slum areas may adversely influence the HIV-prevention strategies directed at reducing the national prevalence of HIV. The objective of the study was to identify some of the sociodemographic and behavioural correlates of HIV-status awareness among the adult population of two slums in Nairobi. In a household-based survey conducted by the African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC), 4 767 men and women aged between 15 and 54 years were randomly sampled from two slums (Korogocho and Viwandani) in Nairobi and data were collected on the social and health context of HIV and AIDS in these settlements. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with HIV-status awareness. The proportion of respondents that had ever been tested and knew their HIV status was 53%, with the women having greater awareness of their HIV status (62%) than the men (38%). Awareness of HIV status was significantly associated with age, sex, level of education, marital status and slum of residence. The lower level of HIV-status awareness among the men compared with the women in the slums suggests a poor uptake of HIV-testing services by males. Innovative strategies are needed to ensure greater access and uptake of HIV-testing services by the younger and less-educated residents of these slums if the barriers to HIV-status awareness are to be overcome.

  4. The importance of assessing self-reported HIV status in bio-behavioural surveys.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Lisa G; Sabin, Miriam Lewis; Prybylski, Dimitri; Sabin, Keith; McFarland, Willi; Baral, Stefan; Kim, Andrea A; Raymond, H Fisher

    2016-08-01

    In bio-behavioural surveys measuring prevalence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), respondents should be asked the results of their last HIV test. However, many government authorities, nongovernmental organizations, researchers and other civil society stakeholders have stated that respondents involved in such surveys should not be asked to self-report their HIV status. The reasons offered for not asking respondents to report their status are that responses may be inaccurate and that asking about HIV status may violate the respondents' human rights and exacerbate stigma and discrimination. Nevertheless, we contend that, in the antiretroviral therapy era, asking respondents in bio-behavioural surveys to self-report their HIV status is essential for measuring and improving access to - and coverage of - services for the care, treatment and prevention of HIV infection. It is also important for estimating the true size of the unmet needs in addressing the HIV epidemic and for interpreting the behaviours associated with the acquisition and transmission of HIV infection correctly. The data available indicate that most participants in health-related surveys are willing to respond to a question about HIV status - as one of possibly several sensitive questions about sexual and drug use behaviours. Ultimately, normalizing the self-reporting of HIV status could help the global community move from an era of so-called exceptionalism to one of destigmatization - and so improve the epidemic response worldwide.

  5. Variations in patterns of sexual risk behavior among Seattle-area MSM based on their HIV status, the HIV status of their partner and partner type.

    PubMed

    Burt, Richard D; Thiede, Hanne

    2012-04-01

    We evaluated sexual risk behavior in 368 Seattle-area MSM recruited in the 2008 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance survey. We found significant concordance between participants' self-reported HIV status and that of their sexual partners. Persons unaware of partners' HIV status were more likely to report only oral sex. Those aware were less likely to report non-concordant unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). Participants reporting themselves HIV-positive were more likely than those self-reporting HIV-negative status to report non-concordant UAI and several other sexual risk behaviors. The level of non-concordant UAI did not materially differ by whether their partner was a main or casual partner.

  6. Family group psychotherapy to support the disclosure of HIV status to children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Emanuele; Continisio, Grazia Isabella; Storace, Cinzia; Bruzzese, Eugenia; Mango, Carmela; Liguoro, Ilaria; Guarino, Alfredo; Officioso, Annunziata

    2013-06-01

    Disclosure of the HIV status to infected children is often delayed due to psychosocial problems in their families. We aimed at improving the quality of life in families of HIV-infected children, thus promoting disclosure of the HIV status to children by parents. Parents of 17 HIV-infected children (4.2-18 years) followed at our Center for pediatric HIV, unaware of their HIV status, were randomly assigned to the intervention group (8 monthly sessions of family group psychotherapy, FGP) or to the control group not receiving psychotherapy. Changes in the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB-I) and in the Short-Form State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Sf-STAI), as well as the HIV status disclosure to children by parents, were measured. Ten parents were assigned to the FGP group, while 7 parents to the controls. Psychological well-being increased in 70% of the FGP parents and none of the control group (p=0.017), while anxiety decreased in the FGP group but not in controls (60% vs. 0%, p=0.03). HIV disclosure took place for 6/10 children of the intervention group and for 1/7 of controls. Family group psychotherapy had a positive impact on the environment of HIV-infected children, promoting psychological well-being and the disclosure of the HIV status to children.

  7. Gender differences between predictors of HIV status among PWID in Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, K.F.; Dvoryak, S.; Garver-Apgar, C.; Davis, J.M.; Brewster, J.T.; Lisovska, O.; Booth, R.E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic in Ukraine is among the largest in Europe. While traditionally the epidemic has spread through injection risk behavior, sexual transmission is becoming more common. Previous research has found that women in Ukraine have higher rates of HIV and engage in more HIV risk behavior than men. This study extended that work by identifying risk factors that differentially predict men and women’s HIV status among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Ukraine. Methods From July 2010 through July 2013, 2480 sexually active PWID with unknown HIV status were recruited from three cities in Ukraine through street outreach. The average age was 31 years old. Results Women, who made up twenty-eight percent of the sample, had higher safe sex self-efficacy (p<0.01) and HIV knowledge (p<0.001) than men, but scored higher on both the risky injection (p<0.001) and risky sex (p<0.001) composite scores than men. Risky sex behaviors were associated with women’s HIV status more than men’s. We also report results identifying predictors of risky injection and sex behaviors. Conclusions Gender-specific interventions could address problem of HIV risk among women who inject drugs in a country with a growing HIV epidemic. Our findings suggest specific ways in which intervention efforts might focus on groups and individuals who are at the highest risk of contracting HIV (or who are already HIV positive) to halt the spread of HIV in Ukraine. PMID:24613219

  8. Nutritional status in patients with HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Stambullian, Marcela; Feliu, Susana; Slobodianik, Nora H

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional status of adults with HIV infection or with AIDS through the use of biochemical parameters. The study was performed on 43 patients (19 HIV+ and 24 AIDS patients), between 26 and 44 years of age, from low and medium socioeconomic status, with access to health care services; 35 patients were under highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) treatment. Body weight and height were determined, and the Body Mass Index calculated (kg/m2). Blood samples were collected from fasting patients. Plasma cholesterol (total, HDL and LDL), triacylglycerol, total protein, apolipoproteins A-I and B, albumin, transthyretin, retinol binding protein, and ceruloplasmin concentrations were determined. Plasma levels of zinc, copper, and selenium were determined in a haemolysis-free sample by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Statistical analyses were performed with the Student's t-test. AIDS patients showed changes in biochemical parameters, particularly an increase in fibrinogen and a trend to decreased transthyretin levels. These findings stress the importance of the inclusion of functional biochemical parameters in the periodic evaluation of these patients. This would allow an early assessment of the need for appropriate nutritional support, implemented along with the specific retroviral treatment. This would aim at delaying the progression of the disease, and might improve the prospects of survival and quality of life.

  9. The Status of HIV Prevention Efforts for Women in Correctional Facilities

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Tanya Telfair; Reid, Laurie C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In the United States, women are a significant proportion of the correctional population. Women also account for an increasing proportion of newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cases. When compared with white women, black women have higher incarceration rates and represent more of the newly diagnosed HIV cases. Correctional facilities offer an opportunity to provide women with HIV testing and prevention services so that they will know their status and receive HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) risk-reduction counseling and other preventive services. In this report, we describe incarcerated population statistics and HIV surveillance epidemiology for women. We also describe HIV prevention activities undertaken by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention. Additional research, program development, and implementation are needed to improve HIV prevention efforts for high-risk women. PMID:24116966

  10. The longitudinal and interactive effects of HIV status, stimulant use, and host genotype upon neurocognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    Levine, Andrew J; Reynolds, Sandra; Cox, Christopher; Miller, Eric N; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Becker, James T; Martin, Eileen; Sacktor, Ned

    2014-06-01

    Both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection and illicit stimulant use can adversely impact neurocognitive functioning, and these effects can be additive. However, significant variability exists such that as-of-yet unidentified exogenous and endogenous factors affect one's risk for neurocognitive impairment. Literature on both HIV and stimulant use indicates that host genetic variants in immunologic and dopamine-related genes are one such factor. In this study, the individual and interactive effects of HIV status, stimulant use, and genotype upon neurocognitive functioning were examined longitudinally over a 10-year period. Nine hundred fifty-two Caucasian HIV+ and HIV- cases from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study were included. All cases had at least two comprehensive neurocognitive evaluations between 1985 and 1995. Pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) data were examined in order to avoid the confounding effect of variable drug regimens. Linear mixed models were used, with neurocognitive domain scores as the outcome variables. No four-way interactions were found, indicating that HIV and stimulant use do not interact over time to affect neurocognitive functioning as a function of genotype. Multiple three-way interactions were found that involved genotype and HIV status. All immunologically related genes found to interact with HIV status affected neurocognitive functioning in the expected direction; however, only C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) and CCL3 affected HIV+ individuals specifically. Dopamine-related genetic variants generally affected HIV-negative individuals only. Neurocognitive functioning among HIV+ individuals who also used stimulants was not significantly different from those who did not use stimulants. The findings support the role of immunologically related genetic differences in CCL2 and CCL3 in neurocognitive functioning among HIV+ individuals; however, their impact is minor. Being consistent with findings from another cohort

  11. Breaking Binaries? Biomedicine and Serostatus Borderlands among Couples with Mixed HIV Status.

    PubMed

    Persson, Asha; Newman, Christy E; Ellard, Jeanne

    2017-02-28

    With recent breakthroughs in HIV treatment and prevention, the meanings of HIV-positivity and HIV-negativity are changing at biomedical and community levels. We explore how binary constructions of HIV serostatus identities are giving way to something more complex that brings both welcome possibilities and potential concerns. We draw on research with couples with mixed HIV status to argue that, in the context of lived experiences, serostatus identities have always been more ambiguous than allowed for in HIV discourse. However, their supposed dichotomous quality seems even more dubious now in view of contemporary biomedical technologies. Invoking the anthropological concept of "borderlands," we consider how biomedicine is generating more diverse serostatus identities, widening the options for how to live with HIV, and eroding the stigmatizing serostatus binary that has haunted the epidemic. But we also ask whether this emerging borderland, and its "normalizing" tendencies, is concomitantly giving rise to new and troubling binaries.

  12. Differences in risk behaviors, care utilization, and comorbidities in homeless persons based on HIV status.

    PubMed

    Parker, R David; Dykema, Shana

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional pilot project measured differences by HIV status in chronic health conditions, primary care and emergency department use, and high-risk behaviors of homeless persons through self-report. Using selective random sampling, 244 individuals were recruited from a homeless shelter. The reported HIV prevalence was 6.56% (n = 16), with the odds of HIV higher in persons reporting crack cocaine use. HIV-infected persons were more likely to report a source of regular medical care and less likely to use the emergency department than uninfected persons. Validation of findings through exploration of HIV and health care access in homeless persons is needed to confirm that HIV-infected homeless persons are more likely to have primary care. Distinctions between primary care and specialty HIV care also need to be explored in this context. If findings are consistent, providers who care for the homeless could learn more effective ways to engage homeless patients.

  13. Maternal Substance Use and HIV Status: Adolescent Risk and Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Noelle R.; Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Cleland, Charles M.; Vekaria, Pooja C.; Ferns, Bill

    2008-01-01

    We examined the risk and protective factors and mental health problems of 105 low SES, urban adolescents whose mothers were coping with alcohol abuse and other drug problems. Approximately half of the mothers were also HIV-infected. As hypothesized, there were few differences between adolescents of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected mothers in…

  14. Impact of incarceration experiences on reported HIV status and associated risk behaviours and disease comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Levina, Olga S.; Osipenko, Victoria; Ruiz, Monica S.; Sergeyev, Boris; Sirotkin, Aleksander V.; Vyshemirskaya, Inna

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Russian human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic among people who inject drugs (PWID) originated in Kaliningrad, but research into risk behaviours among PWID has been lacking. The potential for heterosexual spread has not been analysed. Methods: A sample of PWID was accrued using two methods. A questionnaire was administered to assess HIV-related risk behaviours for parenteral and sexual transmission, sociodemographic factors, HIV knowledge and attitudes about sexual risks. Data were analysed focusing on the role of imprisonment, factors associated with awareness of being HIV infected and condom use. Results: More than a quarter of the sample reported having been diagnosed with HIV infection, with higher prevalence among women and those with a history of incarceration. More than half reported having been diagnosed with hepatitis C virus infection. Those reporting being HIV positive were less likely to distribute used syringes to other PWID and more likely to have used a condom the last time they had sex. A history of incarceration was associated with higher rates of receptive syringe sharing among those not having ever received an HIV-positive diagnosis and a lower likelihood of believing that condoms are needed when having sex with a casual partner. Conclusion: Although extensive HIV testing has alerted many PWID to their HIV-positive status, which is associated with less distributive syringe sharing and higher likelihood of condom use, substantial risk for parenteral and especially sexual HIV transmission remains. More active prevention programs will be required to control the heterosexual spread of HIV. PMID:26381650

  15. Notification of HIV status disclosure and its related factors in HIV-infected adolescents in 2009 in the Aconda program (CePReF, CHU Yopougon) in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, The PRADO-CI Study

    PubMed Central

    Meless, Guanga David; Aka-Dago-Akribi, Hortense; Cacou, Chantal; François Eboua, Tanoh; Edmond Aka, Addi; Maxime Oga, Aimé; Bouah, Belinda; Eugène, Messou; Moh, Corinne; Arrivé, Elise; Timité-Konan, Marguerite; Leroy, Valériane

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We studied the frequency of documentation of disclosure of HIV status in medical charts and its correlates among HIV-infected adolescents in 2009, in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. Methods The PRADO-CI is a cross-sectional study aimed at studying HIV-infected adolescents’ social, psychological, and behavioural difficulties and their determinants in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. In this study, we present specific analyses on disclosure. All HIV-infected adolescents aged 13–21 years and followed at least once in 2009 in two urban HIV-care centres in Abidjan (Cepref and Yopougon Teaching Hospital) were enrolled in the study. Standardized data were extracted from medical records to document if there was notification of disclosure of HIV status in the medical record. Frequency of notification of HIV disclosure was estimated with its 95% confidence interval (CI) and correlates were analyzed using logistic regression. Results In 2009, 229 adolescents were included: 126 (55%) males; 93% on antiretroviral therapy (ART), 61% on cotrimoxazole prophylaxis. Their median age was 15 years at the time of the study. Among the 193 patients for whom information on HIV status disclosure was documented (84%), only 63 (32.6%; 95% CI=26.0–39.3%) were informed of their status. The proportion of adolescents informed increased significantly with age: 19% for 13–15 years, 33% for 16–18 years and 86% for 19–21 years (p <0.0001). Adolescents on ART tended to be more likely to be informed of their HIV status (34.5%) than those not treated (13.3%) (p=0.11). Those on cotrimoxazole were significantly more likely to be informed (39.6%) than those not (21.9%) (p=0.01). Disclosure was significantly higher in adolescents with a history of ART regimen change (p=0.003) and in those followed in the Cepref (48.4%) compared to the Yopougon Teaching Hospital (24.8%), (p=0.001). In multivariate analyses, disclosed HIV status was significantly higher in those followed-up in the Cepref compared

  16. Depression in Caregivers of Status-Naïve Pediatric HIV Patients Participating in a Status Disclosure Study in Haiti and the Dominican Republic: Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Dévieux, Jessy G.; Pinzón-Iregui, María Claudia; Abreu-Pérez, Rosa; Lerebours-Nadal, Leonel; Gaston, Stephanie; Dean, Andrew G.; Halpern, Mina; Rouzier, Vanessa; Bertrand, Rachel; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Pape, Jean William; Nicholas, Stephen W.; Blasini, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    A pilot study is underway to assess safety and acceptability of an intervention to disclose their HIV infection status to status-naïve pediatric antiretroviral therapy patients in Hispaniola [the island shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic (DR)]. Of 22 Haiti and 47 DR caregivers recruited to date, 68.2% Haiti and 34.0% DR caregivers had clinically significant depressive symptomatology at the time of enrollment (p = 0.008). Depressive symptom prevalence was higher in Haiti caregivers who were female (81.3% vs. 0 in males; p = 0.02) and in DR caregivers who were patients’ mothers (50.0%) or grandmothers (66.7%; 56.0% combined) than others (9.1%), (p < 0.001). Internalized stigma was more commonly reported by Haiti (85.7%) than DR (53.2%; p = 0.01) caregivers; 56.4% of Haiti and DR caregivers reporting internalized stigma vs. 26.1% of caregivers denying it had depressive symptoms (p = 0.02). Depression is common in Hispaniola caregivers possibly affecting disclosure timing. Study participation presents opportunities for addressing caregiver depression. PMID:25389181

  17. Comparison of methods for assessing nutritional status in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Niyongabo, T; Melchior, J C; Henzel, D; Bouchaud, O; Larouzé, B

    1999-10-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and is associated with a poor prognosis. To compare different measures of nutritional status in HIV-infected patients, we prospectively studied 88 outpatients seen at a Paris AIDS outpatient clinic for routine follow-up examinations. Nutritional status was assessed according to body weight loss (BWL, 4 classes), anthropometry, bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA), and subjective global assessment of nutritional status (SGA). Malnutrition was diagnosed in 22.4% of subjects using SGA, and 37.1% by BWL. SGA rapidly detected a worsening of nutritional status, while BWL detected malnutrition at an earlier stage. A good correlation was found between SGA class and body composition assessed by anthropometry and BIA. Deteriorating nutritional status diagnosed by SGA correlated with the CDC HIV disease class. SGA, a simple nutritional assessment, can serve as a basis for prescribing artificial nutrition, while BWL detects malnutrition at an earlier stage.

  18. Rethinking HIV/AID disclosure among women within the context of motherhood in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Iwelunmor, Juliet; Zungu, Nompumelelo; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O

    2010-08-01

    This qualitative study explored whether motherhood plays a role in influencing decisions to conceal or reveal knowledge of seropositive status among women living with HIV/AIDS in 2 South African communities: Gugulethu and Mitchell's Plain. Using the PEN-3 cultural model, we explored how HIV-positive women disclose their status to their mothers and how HIV-positive mothers make decisions about disclosure of their seropositive status. Our findings revealed 3 themes: the positive consequences of disclosing to mothers, how being a mother influences disclosure (existential role of motherhood), and the cost of disclosing to mothers (negative consequences). The findings highlight the importance of motherhood in shaping decisions to reveal or conceal knowledge of seropositive status. Implications for interventions on HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and support are discussed.

  19. Impact of HIV Infection Status on Interpretation of Quantitative PCR for Detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii

    PubMed Central

    Louis, M.; Guitard, J.; Jodar, M.; Ancelle, T.; Magne, D.; Lascols, O.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) is now a key diagnostic tool for Pneumocystis pneumonia. However, cutoffs to distinguish between infected and colonized patients according to their HIV status have not yet been determined. According to clinical, radiological, and biological data, we retrospectively classified bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples subjected to qPCR over a 3-year period into four categories, i.e., definite PCP, probable PCP, Pneumocystis colonization, and no infection. Fungal burden was then analyzed according to the HIV status of the patients. Among 1,212 episodes of pneumonia screened in immunocompromised patients, 52 and 27 HIV-positive patients were diagnosed with a definite and probable PCP, whereas 4 and 22 HIV-negative patients had definite and probable PCP, respectively. Among patients with definite or a probable PCP, HIV-negative patients had a significantly lower burden than HIV-positive patients (P < 10−4). In both groups, the median fungal burden was significantly higher in patients with definite PCP than in colonized patients. A single cutoff at 1.5 × 104 copies/ml allowed to differentiate colonized and infected HIV-positive patients with 100% sensitivity and specificity. In HIV-negative patients, cutoff values of 2.87 × 104 and 3.39 × 103 copies/ml resulted in 100% specificity and sensitivity, respectively. Using cutoffs determined for the whole population would have led us to set aside the diagnosis of PCP in 9 HIV-negative patients with definite or probable PCP. qPCR appeared to be the most sensitive test to detect Pneumocystis in BAL samples. However, because of lower inocula in HIV-negative patients, different cutoffs must be used according to the HIV status to differentiate between colonized and infected patients. PMID:26468505

  20. Sexual Behaviors and HIV Status: A Population-Based Study Among Older Adults in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Olivé, Francesc X.; Rohr, Julia K.; Houle, Brian C.; Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa W.; Wagner, Ryan G.; Salomon, Joshua A.; Kahn, Kathleen; Berkman, Lisa F.; Tollman, Stephen M.; Bärnighausen, Till

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify the unmet needs for HIV prevention among older adults in rural South Africa. Methods: We analyzed data from a population-based sample of 5059 men and women aged 40 years and older from the study Health and Aging in Africa: Longitudinal Studies of INDEPTH Communities (HAALSI), which was carried out in the Agincourt health and sociodemographic surveillance system in the Mpumalanga province of South Africa. We estimated the prevalence of HIV (laboratory-confirmed and self-reported) and key sexual behaviors by age and sex. We compared sexual behavior profiles across HIV status categories with and without age–sex standardization. Results: HIV prevalence was very high among HAALSI participants (23%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 21 to 24), with no sex differences. Recent sexual activity was common (56%, 95% CI: 55 to 58) across all HIV status categories. Condom use was low among HIV-negative adults (15%, 95% CI: 14 to 17), higher among HIV-positive adults who were unaware of their HIV status (27%, 95% CI: 22 to 33), and dramatically higher among HIV-positive adults who were aware of their status (75%, 95% CI: 70 to 80). Casual sex and multiple partnerships were reported at moderate levels, with slightly higher estimates among HIV-positive compared to HIV-negative adults. Differences by HIV status remained after age–sex standardization. Conclusions: Older HIV-positive adults in an HIV hyperendemic community of rural South Africa report sexual behaviors consistent with high HIV transmission risk. Older HIV-negative adults report sexual behaviors consistent with high HIV acquisition risk. Prevention initiatives tailored to the particular prevention needs of older adults are urgently needed to reduce HIV risk in this and similar communities in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27926667

  1. Vaccination with 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in infants according to HIV status

    PubMed Central

    Madhi, Shabir A.; Koen, Anthonet; Jose, Lisa; van Niekerk, Nadia; Adrian, Peter V.; Cutland, Clare; François, Nancy; Ruiz-Guiñazú, Javier; Yarzabal, Juan-Pablo; Moreira, Marta; Borys, Dorota; Schuerman, Lode

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Phase III, open-label, single-center, controlled study in South Africa (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00829010) to evaluate immunogenicity, reactogenicity, and safety of the 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (HIV+), HIV-exposed-uninfected (HEU), and HIV-unexposed-uninfected (HUU) children. Methods: Children stratified by HIV status received PHiD-CV primary vaccination (age 6/10/14 weeks; coadministered with routine childhood vaccines) and booster dose (age 9–10 months). Immune responses, assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent and functional assays, and safety were evaluated up to 14 months post-booster. Results: Of 83, 101, and 100 children enrolled in HIV+, HEU, and HUU groups, 70, 91, and 93 were included in according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort. For each vaccine-serotype, percentages of children with antibody concentrations ≥0.2 μg/mL were ≥97% 1 month post-primary vaccination and ≥98.5% 1 month post-booster (except for 6B and 23F at both timepoints). Post-primary vaccination, functional antibody responses were lower in HIV+ children: for each vaccine-serotype, percentages of children with opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) titres ≥8 were ≥72%, ≥81%, and ≥79% for HIV+, HEU, and HUU children. Post-booster, ≥87% of children in each group had OPA titres ≥8. Reactogenicity was similar across groups. Thirty one (37%) HIV+, 25 (25%) HEU, and 20 (20%) HUU children reported ≥1 serious adverse event. Five HIV+ and 4 HEU children died. One death (sudden infant death syndrome; HEU group; 3 days post-dose 1) was considered potentially vaccine-related. Conclusion: PHiD-CV was immunogenic and well-tolerated in HIV+, HEU, and HUU children, and has the potential to provide substantial benefit irrespective of HIV infection status. PMID:28079828

  2. Nutritional Status and Lipid Profile in HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Stambullian, M; Feliu, M S; Cassetti, L I; Slobodianik, N H

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, there have been many reports of HIV infection and abnormalities in lipid metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study aims at describing the nutritional status of HIV-infected adults and its relation to lipid profile through traditional [total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol (HDL), triglycerides (TG), non-HDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol (LDL)] and other parameters [Apolipoprotein B (ApoB), fibrinogen, and high sensitive-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP)]. A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated and references were taken from WHO. TC, HDL, TG and glucose were determined and non-HDL cholesterol and LDL were calculated. ApoB and fibrinogen were determined by quantitative radial immunodiffusion on agar plates (Diffuplate,Biocientífica SA,Argentina) and hs-CRP by immunoturbidimetric test. Qualitative variables were compared with the Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Quantitative variables were compared applying parametrics or nonparametric tests. Pearson test for correlations. Software SPSS 17.0. 97 patients were analyzed: 69.1% were men. 80% were on antiretroviral treatment. Average (SD) BMI was 24.3 (4.1) kg/m(2). 29.4% were overweight and 5.9% obese. Patients with a BMI ≥25.0 kg/m(2) presented significantly higher levels of TG, ApoB and glycemia than well-nourished people [246.1(169.0) vs. 142.9(78.4) mg/dL;p=0.029, 198.6(69.3) vs. 126.4(50.6) mg/dL;p=0.01 and 100 (3.2) vs. 90.2 (6.9) mg/dL;p=0.008 resp.] and a significantly decreased HDL [37.2(1.5) vs. 49.8(10.4) mg/dL;p<0.01]. No statistically significant correlation was found between ApoB and non-HDL (p=0,063). There was no evidence that there is a direct relation between Apo B and the other lipid parameters. The potential increase in CVD in this group of patients, would be related to the higher levels of TG, ApoB and overweight/obesity. Nutritional education is needed to promote a healthy weight to warn against the risk of

  3. Documentation Status as a Contextual Determinant of HIV Risk Among Young Transgender Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Palazzolo, Sarah L.; De Jesus, Maria; Maguire-Marshall, Molly; Barker, Suyanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the contextual factors that determine or mitigate vulnerability to HIV among Latina transgender women. Documentation status (legal authorization to live in the United States) has been cited by other studies as a barrier to recruitment or engagement in HIV-related care among immigrant Latinos, but not explored as a determinant of HIV risk for transgender immigrant Latinas. Methods: We collaborated with a community-based organization to explore these contextual, including social and structural, factors. In-depth interviews in Spanish captured life histories of eight 18- to 29-year-old transgender Latinas, who collectively self-identify as chicas trans. Codes were assigned deductively from the interview guide, and emerging themes were identified throughout data collection. Results: Most participants migrated to the United States from Central America after experiencing discrimination and violence in their countries of origin. Participants emphasized documentation status as a critical factor in three areas related to social and structural determinants of HIV risk: gender identity expression, access to services, and relationship power dynamics. Chicas trans who gained legal asylum reported greater control over sexual relationships, improved access to services, and less risky employment. Conclusions: Documentation status emerged as a key HIV risk factor for this population. For undocumented transgender Latinas, legal asylum appears to be a promising HIV-related protective factor. Further research could assess whether legal assistance combined with wraparound support services affects HIV prevention for this population. PMID:26669583

  4. Intestinal parasitic infections in Thai HIV-infected patients with different immunity status

    PubMed Central

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2001-01-01

    Background One of the major health problems among HIV seropositive patients is superimposed infection due to the defect of immunity. Furthermore, intestinal parasite infection, which is also one of the basic health problems in tropical region, is common in these patients. In this study, a cross sectional study to document the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection in Thai HIV-infected patients with different immune status was performed. Methods A study of stool samples from 60 Thai HIV-infected patients with different immune status was performed at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thailand. Each patient was examined for CD4 count and screened for diarrheal symptoms. Results The prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection among the HIV-infected patients in this study was 50 %. Non- opportunistic intestinal parasite infections such as hookworms, Opisthorchis viverrini and Ascaris lumbricoides were commonly found in HIV-infected people regardless of immune status with or without diarrheal symptoms. Opportunistic intestinal parasites such as Cryptosporidium, Isospora belli, Microsporidia and Strongyloides stercoralis infection were significantly more frequent in the low immunity group with diarrhea. Conclusion Therefore, opportunistic intestinal parasite infection should be suspected in any HIV infected patient with advanced disease presenting with diarrhea. The importance of tropical epidemic non-opportunistic intestinal parasite infections among HIV-infected patients should not be neglected. PMID:11394966

  5. HIV, tobacco use, and poverty: a potential cause of disparities in health status by race and socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Sowah, Leonard Anang; Busse, Sarah; Amoroso, Anthony

    2013-08-01

    Tobacco use in the U.S. has declined significantly since the 1960s, but differentially by socioeconomic status. Current HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection rates in the United States are higher in minorities and underprivileged individuals. Effective highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) has changed HIV into a chronic infection. Mortality among HIV patients is now as likely to be due to heart disease and cancers as HIV-related infections. In the current situation, one would expect public insurance plans to focus on interventions targeting lifestyle-associated behaviors such as tobacco use that have been found to be associated with increased risk for heart disease and cancers. Review of the AIDS Drug Assistance Program formularies and the Medicaid Programs of 50 states and the District of Columbia, however, revealed that coverage for smoking cessation is inadequate in most instances. To reduce health disparities, publicly funded programs that serve the nation's most vulnerable should provide coverage for effective tobacco cessation.

  6. DISCLOSE Act of 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Whitehouse, Sheldon [D-RI

    2012-03-21

    03/29/2012 Committee on Rules and Administration. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 112-770. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. DISCLOSE Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Whitehouse, Sheldon [D-RI

    2014-06-24

    07/23/2014 Committee on Rules and Administration. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 113-610. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. DISCLOSE Act of 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Whitehouse, Sheldon [D-RI

    2012-07-10

    07/24/2012 Committee on the Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Human Rights. Hearings held. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Internalized HIV and Drug Stigmas: Interacting Forces Threatening Health Status and Health Service Utilization Among People with HIV Who Inject Drugs in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Sarah K; Burke, Sara E; Dovidio, John F; Levina, Olga S; Uusküla, Anneli; Niccolai, Linda M; Heimer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Marked overlap between the HIV and injection drug use epidemics in St. Petersburg, Russia, puts many people in need of health services at risk for stigmatization based on both characteristics simultaneously. The current study examined the independent and interactive effects of internalized HIV and drug stigmas on health status and health service utilization among 383 people with HIV who inject drugs in St. Petersburg. Participants self-reported internalized HIV stigma, internalized drug stigma, health status (subjective rating and symptom count), health service utilization (HIV care and drug treatment), sociodemographic characteristics, and health/behavioral history. For both forms of internalized stigma, greater stigma was correlated with poorer health and lower likelihood of service utilization. HIV and drug stigmas interacted to predict symptom count, HIV care, and drug treatment such that individuals internalizing high levels of both stigmas were at elevated risk for experiencing poor health and less likely to access health services.

  10. Internalized HIV and Drug Stigmas: Interacting Forces Threatening Health Status and Health Service Utilization Among People with HIV Who Inject Drugs in St. Petersburg, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Sara E.; Dovidio, John F.; Levina, Olga S.; Uusküla, Anneli; Niccolai, Linda M.; Heimer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Marked overlap between the HIV and injection drug use epidemics in St. Petersburg, Russia, puts many people in need of health services at risk for stigmatization based on both characteristics simultaneously. The current study examined the independent and interactive effects of internalized HIV and drug stigmas on health status and health service utilization among 383 people with HIV who inject drugs in St. Petersburg. Participants self-reported internalized HIV stigma, internalized drug stigma, health status (subjective rating and symptom count), health service utilization (HIV care and drug treatment), sociodemographic characteristics, and health/behavioral history. For both forms of internalized stigma, greater stigma was correlated with poorer health and lower likelihood of service utilization. HIV and drug stigmas interacted to predict symptom count, HIV care, and drug treatment such that individuals internalizing high levels of both stigmas were at elevated risk for experiencing poor health and less likely to access health services. PMID:26050155

  11. Influence of HIV positive status on sexual behavior among males.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Filipe, E M; Newman, S P

    1998-12-01

    Findings are presented from a cross-sectional study comparing the sexual behavior of HIV-seronegative and HIV-seropositive men with male and female sex partners, with particular focus upon the practice of safer sex in both groups of men. The 150 HIV-seronegative and 86 HIV-seropositive participating males were recruited between August 1994 and February 1995 from public health centers in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, where they responded to a questionnaire. The men were 15-69 years old, of mean age 30 years. 78% were single, 14.4% were married/living together, 6.4% were separated/divorced, and 1.3% were widowers. 36% defined themselves as heterosexuals, 11.4% as bisexuals, and 36.4% as homosexuals, while 16.1% used other expressions. Compared to HIV-seronegative men, a smaller proportion of HIV-seropositive men had sexual contact with regular female partners and engaged in vaginal intercourse with that type of partner. Similarly, a smaller proportion of HIV-seropositive men engaged in overall sexual activity and reported a lower frequency of penetrative sexual practices. A high level of condom use with male and female sex partners was identified with no significant differences being found between the 2 serostatus groups. However, some risky sexual behavior was identified, especially with regular partners, suggesting that some men were continuing to have unsafe sex. HIV prevention programs should encourage both HIV-seronegative and HIV-seropositive men to practice safer sex.

  12. Weighing the Consequences: Self-Disclosure of HIV-Positive Status among African American Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Maribel; Levy, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Theorists posit that personal decisions to disclose being HIV positive are made based on the perceived consequences of that disclosure. This study examines the perceived costs and benefits of self-disclosure among African American injection drug users (IDUs). A total of 80 African American IDUs were interviewed in-depth subsequent to testing HIV…

  13. Does marital status matter in an HIV hyperendemic country? Findings from the 2012 South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Behaviour Survey

    PubMed Central

    Shisana, Olive; Risher, Kathryn; Celentano, David D; Zungu, Nompumelelo; Rehle, Thomas; Ngcaweni, Busani; Evans, Meredith GB

    2016-01-01

    Recently, South Africa has experienced declining marriage rates and the increasing practice of cohabitation without marriage. This study aims to improve the understanding of the relationship between marital status and HIV in South Africa, an HIV hyperendemic country, through an analysis of findings from the 2012 South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Behaviour Survey. The nationally representative population-based cross-sectional survey collected data on HIV and socio-demographic and behavioural determinants in South Africa. This analysis considered respondents aged 16 years and older who consented to participate in the survey and provided dried blood spot specimens for HIV testing (N=17,356). After controlling for age, race, having multiple sexual partners, condom use at last sex, urban/rural dwelling and level of household income, those who were married living with their spouse had significantly reduced odds of being HIV positive compared to all other marital status groups. HIV incidence was 0.27% among respondents who were married living with their spouses; the highest HIV incidence was found in the cohabiting group (2.91%). Later marriage (after age 24) was associated with increased odds of HIV prevalence. Our analysis suggests an association between marital status and HIV prevalence and incidence in contemporary South Africa, where odds of being HIV positive were found to be lower among married individuals who lived with their spouse compared to all other marital status groups. HIV prevention messages therefore need to be targeted to unmarried populations, especially cohabitating populations. As low socioeconomic status, low social cohesion and the resulting destabilization of sexual relationships may explain the increased risk of HIV among unmarried populations, it is necessary to address structural issues including poverty that create an environment unfavourable to stable sexual relationships. PMID:26551532

  14. The Relationship between Housing Status and HIV Risk among Active Drug Users: A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Hilario, Helena; Convey, Mark; Corbett, A. Michelle; Weeks, Margaret; Martinez, Maria

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between housing status and HIV risk using longitudinal, qualitative data collected in 2004-2005, from a purposeful sample of 65 active drug users in a variety of housed and homeless situations in Hartford, Connecticut. These data were supplemented with observations and in-depth interviews regarding drug use behavior collected in 2001-2005 to evaluate a peer-led HIV prevention intervention. Data reveal differences in social context within and among different housing statuses that affect HIV risky or protective behaviors including the ability to carry drug paraphernalia and HIV prevention materials, the amount of drugs in the immediate environment, access to subsidized and supportive housing, and relationships with others with whom drug users live. Policy implications of the findings, limitations to the data and future research are discussed. PMID:19142817

  15. Assessing the Consequences of Using Self-Report Data to Determine the Correlates of HIV Status: Conditional and Marginal Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rindskopf, David M.; Strauss, Shiela M.; Falkin, Gregory P.; Deren, Sherry

    2003-01-01

    This article examines whether relationships between individual characteristics and HIV status can be identified when self-report data are used as a proxy for HIV serotest results. The analyses use data obtained from HIV serotests and face-to-face interviews with 7,256 out-of-treatment drug users in ten sites from 1992 to 1998. Relationships…

  16. Sexual identity and HIV status influence the relationship between internalized stigma and psychological distress in black gay and bisexual men.

    PubMed

    Boone, Melissa R; Cook, Stephanie H; Wilson, Patrick A

    2016-01-01

    Experiences of internalized homophobia and HIV stigma in young Black gay and bisexual men (GBM) may lead to psychological distress, but levels of distress may be dependent upon their sexual identity or HIV status. In this study, we set out to explore the associations between psychological distress, sexual identity, and HIV status in young Black GBM. Participants were 228 young Black GBM who reported on their psychological distress, their HIV status, and their sexual identity. Results indicated that internalized homophobia was significantly related to psychological distress for gay men, but not for bisexual men. HIV stigma was related to psychological stress for HIV-positive men, but not for HIV-negative men. Results indicate a need for more nuanced examinations of the role of identity in the health and well-being of men who have sex with men.

  17. Effect of Couples Counselling on Reported HIV Risk Behaviour among HIV Serodiscordant Couples by ART Use, HIV Status and Gender in Rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    King, Rachel; Min, Jeong; Birungi, Josephine; Nyonyintono, Maureen; Muldoon, Katherine A.; Khanakwa, Sarah; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Moore, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined several measures of self-reported HIV risk behaviour in mutually disclosed sero-discordant couples over time to see if a couples counselling intervention was associated with changes in these behaviors. Methods We analysed data from a prospective cohort study of HIV sero-discordant couples in Jinja, Uganda collected between June 2009 and December 2011. Participants received couples counselling, at 3-monthly intervals. We examined trends in reported condom-use, number of concurrent sexual partners, knowledge of HIV serostatus of concurrent partners and condom use of concurrent partners using Generalized Estimating Equation models, comparing responses at study enrollment with responses at six, 12 18 and 24 months of follow-up. Results A total of 586 couples were enrolled and the female member was HIV positive in 255 (44%) of them. The median age for female participants was 35 years and 42 years for men. Reported condom use at last sex with spouse increased over time (p<0.001) with the largest increases found among couples where the positive participant never received ART during the study(an increase from 68.8% at enrollment to 97.1% at 24 months). Male participants reported reductions in the number of concurrent sexual partners (p<0.001), increase in the knowledge of the HIV serostatus of these partners (p = 0.001) and a trend towards improved condom-use among non-primary partners (p = 0.070). Reported reduced risky behaviors did not wane over the study period. Conclusion Couples counselling resulted in increased condom use among all participants and among men the intervention resulted in reductions in risk behaviour with concurrent sexual partners. Routine counselling for serodiscordant couples should be integrated in routine ART care programs. PMID:26384103

  18. Living with HIV, disclosure patterns and partnerships a decade after the introduction of HIV programmes in rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mkwanazi, Ntombizodumo B.; Rochat, Tamsen J.; Bland, Ruth M.

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of mother-to-child Transmission and HIV Treatment programmes were scaled-up in resource-constrained settings over a decade ago, but there is still much to be understood about women's experiences of living with HIV and their HIV disclosure patterns. This qualitative study explored women's experiences of living with HIV, 6–10 years after being diagnosed during pregnancy. The area has high HIV prevalence, and an established HIV treatment programme. Participants were enrolled in a larger intervention, “Amagugu”, that supported women (n = 281) to disclose their HIV status to their children. Post-intervention we conducted individual in-depth interviews with 20 randomly selected women, stratified by clinic catchment area, from the total sample. Interviews were entered into ATLAS.ti computer software for coding. Most women were living with their current sexual partner and half were still in a relationship with the child's biological father. Household exposure to HIV was high with the majority of women knowing at least one other HIV-infected adult in their household. Eighteen women had disclosed their HIV status to another person; nine had disclosed to their current partner first. Two main themes were identified in the analyses: living with HIV and the normalisation of HIV treatment at a family level; and the complexity of love relationships, in particular in long-term partnerships. A decade on, most women were living positively with HIV, accessing care, and reported experiencing little stigma. However, as HIV became normalised new challenges arose including concerns about access to quality care, and the need for family-centred care. Women's sexual choices and relationships were intertwined with feelings of love, loyalty and trust and the important supportive role played by partners and families was acknowledged, however, some aspects of living with HIV presented challenges including continuing to practise safe sex several years after HIV diagnosis. PMID

  19. Does marital status matter in an HIV hyperendemic country? Findings from the 2012 South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Behaviour Survey.

    PubMed

    Shisana, Olive; Risher, Kathryn; Celentano, David D; Zungu, Nompumelelo; Rehle, Thomas; Ngcaweni, Busani; Evans, Meredith G B

    2016-01-01

    South Africa has experienced declining marriage rates and the increasing practice of cohabitation without marriage. This study aims to improve the understanding of the relationship between marital status and HIV in South Africa, an HIV hyperendemic country, through an analysis of findings from the 2012 South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Behaviour Survey. The nationally representative population-based cross-sectional survey collected data on HIV and socio-demographic and behavioural determinants in South Africa. This analysis considered respondents aged 16 years and older who consented to participate in the survey and provided dried blood spot specimens for HIV testing (N = 17,356). After controlling for age, race, having multiple sexual partners, condom use at last sex, urban/rural dwelling and level of household income, those who were married living with their spouse had significantly reduced odds of being HIV-positive compared to all other marital spouses groups. HIV incidence was 0.27% among respondents who were married living with their spouses; the highest HIV incidence was found in the cohabiting group (2.91%). Later marriage (after age 24) was associated with increased odds of HIV prevalence. Our analysis suggests an association between marital status and HIV prevalence and incidence in contemporary South Africa, where odds of being HIV-positive were found to be lower among married individuals who lived with their spouses compared to all other marital status groups. HIV prevention messages therefore need to be targeted to unmarried populations, especially cohabitating populations. As low socio-economic status, low social cohesion and the resulting destabilization of sexual relationships may explain the increased risk of HIV among unmarried populations, it is necessary to address structural issues including poverty that create an environment unfavourable to stable sexual relationships.

  20. HIV-1, human interaction database: current status and new features.

    PubMed

    Ako-Adjei, Danso; Fu, William; Wallin, Craig; Katz, Kenneth S; Song, Guangfeng; Darji, Dakshesh; Brister, J Rodney; Ptak, Roger G; Pruitt, Kim D

    2015-01-01

    The 'Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), Human Interaction Database', available through the National Library of Medicine at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/retroviruses/hiv-1/interactions, serves the scientific community exploring the discovery of novel HIV vaccine candidates and therapeutic targets. Each HIV-1 human protein interaction can be retrieved without restriction by web-based downloads and ftp protocols and includes: Reference Sequence (RefSeq) protein accession numbers, National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene identification numbers, brief descriptions of the interactions, searchable keywords for interactions and PubMed identification numbers (PMIDs) of journal articles describing the interactions. In addition to specific HIV-1 protein-human protein interactions, included are interaction effects upon HIV-1 replication resulting when individual human gene expression is blocked using siRNA. A total of 3142 human genes are described participating in 12,786 protein-protein interactions, along with 1316 replication interactions described for each of 1250 human genes identified using small interfering RNA (siRNA). Together the data identifies 4006 human genes involved in 14,102 interactions. With the inclusion of siRNA interactions we introduce a redesigned web interface to enhance viewing, filtering and downloading of the combined data set.

  1. AIDS impact special issue 2015: interpersonal factors associated with HIV partner disclosure among HIV-infected people in China.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu

    2016-01-01

    HIV partner disclosure may facilitate social support, improve psychological well-being among HIV-infected individuals, and promote HIV testing and HIV prevention among their sexual partners. A growing literature emphasizes the critical role of interpersonal factors may play in decision-making and practice regarding HIV partner disclosure. However, there is a dearth of empirical studies that investigate how interpersonal factors may be associated with HIV partner disclosure. Using cross-sectional data collected from 791 HIV-infected people in Guangxi China, we examined the associations between these two interpersonal factors (quality of relationship with partner and family communication) and HIV partner disclosure. Descriptive analysis, t-test analysis, and gender stratified GLM analysis were conducted. We find that disclosing HIV status to partners was significantly related to better quality of relationship with partners and open and effective family communication. Gender and partner HIV status might moderate the associations between interpersonal factors and HIV partner disclosure. Our findings suggest the importance of considering relationship quality and enhancing open and comfortable family communication in HIV disclosure interventions. Gender difference and partner HIV status should be also considered in HIV disclosure intervention to address the diverse needs of HIV-infected people.

  2. AIDS impact special issue 2015: interpersonal factors associated with HIV partner disclosure among HIV-infected people in China

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV partner disclosure may facilitate social support, improve psychological well-being among HIV-infected individuals, and promote HIV testing and HIV prevention among their sexual partners. A growing literature emphasizes the critical role of interpersonal factors may play in decision-making and practice regarding HIV partner disclosure. However, there is a dearth of empirical studies that investigate how interpersonal factors may be associated with HIV partner disclosure. Using cross-sectional data collected from 791 HIV-infected people in Guangxi China, we examined the associations between these two interpersonal factors (quality of relationship with partner and family communication) and HIV partner disclosure. Descriptive analysis, t-test analysis, and gender stratified GLM analysis were conducted. We find that disclosing HIV status to partners was significantly related to better quality of relationship with partners and open and effective family communication. Gender and partner HIV status might moderate the associations between interpersonal factors and HIV partner disclosure. Our findings suggest the importance of considering relationship quality and enhancing open and comfortable family communication in HIV disclosure interventions. Gender difference and partner HIV status should be also considered in HIV disclosure intervention to address the diverse needs of HIV-infected people. PMID:26899370

  3. The Impact of Married Individuals Learning HIV Status in Malawi: Divorce, Number of Sexual Partners, and Condom Use With Spouses.

    PubMed

    Fedor, Theresa M; Kohler, Hans-Peter; Behrman, Jere R

    2015-02-01

    This article assesses how married individuals' knowledge of HIV status gained through HIV testing and counseling (HTC) affects divorce, the number of sexual partners, and the use of condoms within marriage. This study improves upon previous studies on this topic because the randomized incentives affecting the propensity to be tested for HIV permit control for selective testing. Instrumental variable probit and linear models are estimated, using a randomized experiment administered as part of the Malawi Longitudinal Study of Families and Health (MLSFH). The results indicate that knowledge of HIV status (1) does not affect chances of divorce for either HIV-negative or HIV-positive respondents; (2) reduces the number of reported sexual partners among HIV-positive respondents; and (3) increases reported condom use with spouses for both HIV-negative and HIV-positive respondents. These results imply that individuals actively respond to information about their HIV status that they learn during HTC, invoking protective behavior against future risk of HIV/AIDS for themselves and their actual and potential sexual partners. Some limitations of this study are a small sample size for those who are HIV-positive and dependence on self-reported sexual behaviors.

  4. Anthropometry of fetal growth in rural Malawi in relation to maternal malaria and HIV status

    PubMed Central

    Kalanda, B; van Buuren, S; Verhoeff, F; Brabin, B

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To describe fetal growth centiles in relation to maternal malaria and HIV status, using cross sectional measurements at birth. Design: A cross sectional study of pregnant women and their babies. Data on maternal socioeconomic status and current pregnancy, including HIV status and newborn anthropometry, were collected. Malaria parasitaemia was assessed in maternal peripheral and placental blood, fetal haemoglobin was measured in cord blood, and maternal HIV status was determined. Setting: Two district hospitals in rural southern Malawi, between March 1993 and July 1994. Outcome variables: Newborn weight, length, Rohrer's ponderal index. Results: Maternal HIV (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.76 (95% confidence interval 1.04 to 2.98)) and first pregnancy (AOR 1.83 (1.10 to 3.05)) were independently associated with low weight for age. Placental or peripheral parasitaemia at delivery (AOR 1.73 (1.02 to 2.88)) and primigravidae (AOR 2.13 (1.27 to 3.59)) were independently associated with low length for age. Maternal malaria at delivery and primiparity were associated with reduced newborn weight and length but not with disproportionate growth. Maternal HIV infection was associated only with reduced birth weight. The malaria and parity effect occurred throughout gestational weeks 30–40, but the HIV effect primarily after 38 weeks gestation. Conclusion: Fetal growth retardation in weight and length commonly occurs in this highly malarious area and is present from 30 weeks gestation. A maternal HIV effect on fetal weight occurred after 38 weeks gestation. PMID:15724042

  5. Emotion work: disclosing cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Grace J.; Aviv, Caryn; Levine, Ellen G.; Ewing, Cheryl; Au, Alfred

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality for all women in the US. Current research has focused on the psychological relationship and not the sociological relationship between emotions and the experience of breast cancer survivors. This paper focuses on the emotion work involved in self-disclosing a breast cancer diagnosis in a racially or ethnically diverse population. Methods The participants (n=176) selected for this study were African American, Asian American, Latina, and Caucasian women who had been diagnosed with stages 0, I, or II breast cancer within the past 4 years. They completed an in-depth qualitative interview on self-disclosure and social support. Findings The results indicate self-disclosing was done at a time when important decisions about treatment needed to be made. Different strategies for disclosure were used, all of which entailed emotion work. Respondents talked about the various elements of emotion work in the disclosure process including: managing others' worry, protecting and soothing others, and educating and instructing others.. For many respondents, disclosure without calculating emotional management meant opening up to others which meant support and an increase in emotional resources. Conclusions The findings in this paper have implications for women with breast cancer and demonstrate the need for women to be involved in honest disclosure and less emotional management of others' feelings. There is also a need for education about the nature of the cancer experience among people who are not well educated about the treatment and consequences of cancer. This need may be even stronger among racial and ethnic minorities. PMID:19434430

  6. IgM+ Memory B Cell Expression Predicts HIV-Associated Cryptococcosis Status

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Krishanthi; Metzger, Brian; Hanau, Lawrence H.; Guh, Alice; Rucker, Lisa; Badri, Sheila; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2009-01-01

    Background The role of B cells in resistance to Cryptococcus neoformans disease (i.e., cryptococcosis) is unknown. Given evidence that IgM+ memory B cells are required for immunity to other encapsulated pathogens, we hypothesized that these cells might contribute to resistance to cryptococcosis. Methods We compared levels of IgM expression on memory B cells in 29 HIV-infected individuals who had a history of cryptococcosis (the HIV+CN+ group) with levels in 30 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected subjects who had no history of cryptococcosis (the HIV+CN− group) and 20 HIV-uninfected subjects who had no history of cryptococcosis (the HIV− group) (cohort 1). We also determined levels of IgM expression on memory B cells in banked samples obtained before cryptococcosis onset from 31 participants in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, of whom 8 had HIV infection and subsequently developed cryptococcosis (the HIV+CN+ group), 8 had HIV infection and did not develop cryptococcosis (the HIV+CN− group), and 15 did not have HIV infection and did not develop cryptococcosis (the HIV− group) (cohort 2). Results In cohort 1, the percentage of memory B cells that expressed IgM was lower among HIV+CN+ subjects, compared with HIV+CN− subjects (P < .01) and HIV− subjects (P <.05); expression of IgM on ≤50% of memory B cells was a significant predictor of C. neoformans disease status (odds ratio, 5.5; P = .03). In cohort 2, the percentage of memory B cells that expressed IgM was lower in HIV+CN+ subjects than in HIV+CN− subjects (P = .02) and HIV− subjects (P < .01); an IgM+ memory B cell percentage of ≤38.5% was a significant predictor of future development of cryptococcosis (odds ratio, 14; P = .02). Conclusions These findings suggest that HIV-infected persons in whom the percentage of memory B cells that express IgM is decreased might be at greater risk for the development of cryptococcosis. PMID:19527168

  7. Housing Status and HIV Risk Behaviors among Transgender Women in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Jesse B.; Kisler, Kimberly A.; Reback, Cathy J.

    2014-01-01

    Due to social stigma, lack of social support, and minimal legal employment opportunities, transgender women (transwomen) face elevated rates of unstable housing. This study examined the association between housing status and HIV risk behaviors among 517 transwomen encountered through street outreach. Seven variables (including sociodemographics, HIV status, housing status, and sexual partner type) were used to estimate partial associations during multivariable analyses; housing status was coded trichotomously (housed, marginally housed, and homeless) for these analyses. Results demonstrated that homeless and marginally housed transwomen engaged in significantly higher rates of illicit drug use than housed transwomen; however, marginally housed and housed transwomen engaged in significantly higher rates of illegal hormone injections than homeless transwomen. Rates of sex work were high in the sample as a whole, though sex with an exchange partner was most common among the marginally housed transwomen. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that unstable housing moderated the association between HIV status and engagement in unprotected serodiscordant anal intercourse. The marginally housed transwomen exhibited the greatest risk profile for HIV acquisition or transmission. PMID:25190499

  8. Housing status and HIV risk behaviors among transgender women in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jesse B; Kisler, Kimberly A; Reback, Cathy J

    2014-11-01

    Due to social stigma, lack of social support, and minimal legal employment opportunities, transgender women (transwomen) face elevated rates of unstable housing. This study examined the association between housing status and HIV risk behaviors among 517 transwomen encountered through street outreach. Seven variables (including sociodemographics, HIV status, housing status, and sexual partner type) were used to estimate partial associations during multivariable analyses; housing status was coded trichotomously (housed, marginally housed, and homeless) for these analyses. Results demonstrated that homeless and marginally housed transwomen engaged in significantly higher rates of illicit drug use than housed transwomen; however, marginally housed and housed transwomen engaged in significantly higher rates of illegal hormone injections than homeless transwomen. Rates of sex work were high in the sample as a whole, though sex with an exchange partner was most common among the marginally housed transwomen. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that unstable housing moderated the association between HIV status and engagement in unprotected serodiscordant anal intercourse. The marginally housed transwomen exhibited the greatest risk profile for HIV acquisition or transmission.

  9. Regional variations in HIV disclosure in Thailand: implications for future interventions.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-J; Li, L; Jiraphongsa, C; Iamsirithaworn, S; Khumtong, S; Rotheram-Borus, M J

    2010-03-01

    People living with HIV (PLH) in Thailand face tremendous challenges, including HIV disclosure. With the advent of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy in Thailand, the positive benefits of HIV disclosure are becoming more salient. However, there are regional variations in the levels of HIV disclosure in Thailand. We examined and compared the levels of HIV disclosure in Northern and Northeastern Thailand. PLH (N = 410) were recruited from four district hospitals in the North and the Northeast. More PLH in the North reported disclosing HIV status to at least one family member in the household. PLH in the Northeast reported significantly lower levels of HIV disclosure within family and outside of family. HIV disclosure remains a significant challenge in Thailand, especially in the Northeast. We propose future interventions focusing on HIV disclosure to address the specific concerns and barriers to HIV disclosure, taking into account the regional differences in HIV disclosure.

  10. HIV status and age at first marriage among women in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Adair, Timothy

    2008-09-01

    Recent research has highlighted the risk of HIV infection for married teenage women compared with their unmarried counterparts (Clark, 2004). This study assesses whether a relationship exists, for women who have completed their adolescence (age 20-29 years), between HIV status with age at first marriage and the length of time between first sex and first marriage. Multivariate analysis utilizing the nationally representative 2004 Cameroon Demographic and Health Survey shows that late-marrying women and those with a longer period of pre-marital sex have the highest risk of HIV. Although women in urban areas overall marry later than their rural counterparts, the positive relationship between age at marriage and HIV risk is stronger in rural areas. The higher wealth status and greater number of lifetime sexual partners of late-marrying women contribute to their higher HIV risk. Given that the age at first marriage and the gap between first marriage and first sex have increased in recent years, focusing preventive efforts on late-marrying women will be of much importance in reducing HIV prevalence among females.

  11. Disclosure of HIV status and its impact on the loss in the follow-up of HIV-infected patients on potent anti-retroviral therapy programs in a (post-) conflict setting: A retrospective cohort study from Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Akilimali, Pierre Zalagile; Musumari, Patou Masika; Kashala-Abotnes, Espérance; Kayembe, Patrick Kalambayi; Lepira, François B.; Mutombo, Paulin Beya; Tylleskar, Thorkild; Ali, Mapatano Mala

    2017-01-01

    Background The study aimed to identify the impact of non-disclosure of HIV status on the loss to follow-up (LTFU) of patients receiving anti-retroviral therapy. Methodology A historic cohort of HIV patients from 2 major hospitals in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo was followed from 2004 to 2012. LTFU was defined as not taking an ART refill for a period of 3 months or longer since the last attendance, and had not yet been classified as ‘dead’ or ‘transferred-out’. Kaplan-Meier plots were used to determine the probability of LTFU as a function of time as inclusive of the cohort. The log-rank test was used to compare survival curves based on determinants. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to measure predictors of LTFU from the time of treatment induction until December 15th, 2012 (the end-point). Results The median follow-up time was 3.99 years (IQR = 2.33 to 5.59). Seventy percent of patients had shared their HIV status with others (95% CI: 66.3–73.1). The proportion of LTFU was 12% (95%CI: 9.6–14.4). Patients who did not share their HIV status (Adjusted HR 2.28, 95% CI 1.46–2.29), patients who did not live in the city of Goma (Adjusted HR 1.97, 95% CI 1.02–3.77), and those who attained secondary or higher education level (Adjusted HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.02–2.53) had a higher hazard of being LTFU. Conclusion This study shows the relationship between the non–disclosure HIV status and LTFU. Healthcare workers in similar settings should pay more attention to clients who have not disclosed their HIV status, and to those living far from health settings where they receive medication. PMID:28170410

  12. From Wasting to Obesity: The Contribution of Nutritional Status to Immune Activation in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Koethe, John R; Heimburger, Douglas C; PrayGod, George; Filteau, Suzanne

    2016-10-01

    The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on innate and adaptive immune activation occurs in the context of host factors, which serve to augment or dampen the physiologic response to the virus. Independent of HIV infection, nutritional status, particularly body composition, affects innate immune activation through a variety of conditions, including reduced mucosal barrier defenses and microbiome dysbiosis in malnutrition and the proinflammatory contribution of adipocytes and stromal vascular cells in obesity. Similarly, T-cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine expression are reduced in the setting of malnutrition and increased in obesity, potentially due to adipokine regulatory mechanisms restraining energy-avid adaptive immunity in times of starvation and exerting a paradoxical effect in overnutrition. The response to HIV infection is situated within these complex interactions between host nutritional health and immunologic function, which contribute to the varied phenotypes of immune activation among HIV-infected patients across a spectrum from malnutrition to obesity.

  13. Current status of drug use and HIV/AIDS prevention in drug users in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianhua; Li, Xinyue

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the current status of drug use and HIV/AIDS prevention for drug users in China and provide scientific evidence for HIV/AIDS prevention and control in drug users. Literature and articles related to drug abuse in China, as well as the results of prevention efforts and successful cases regarding HIV/AIDS prevention in drug users, are reviewed. Lessons learned are drawn out for the future improvement of work and the sustainable development of treatment programs. The number of drug users in China is increasing. Even though the number of opioid-type drug users is growing more slowly than in the past, the number of amphetamine-type stimulant users has increased sharply. It has been proven that methadone maintenance treatment and syringe exchange programs gradually and successfully control HIV/AIDS transmission in drug users. However, it is necessary to enhance these prevention methods and expand their coverage. In addition, the strengthening of antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment for HIV-infected drug users is crucial for HIV/AIDS prevention and control. The rapidly growing number of amphetamine-type stimulant users, along with their high-risk behavior, poses a hidden danger of greater HIV/AIDS transmission through sexual intercourse in the near future. PMID:25284965

  14. Discussing HIV Status: Is It Easier After 10 Years of Antiretroviral Treatment? The ANRS CO8 APROCO-COPILOTE Cohort.

    PubMed

    Préau, Marie; Laguette, Vanessa; March, Laura; Rabaud, Christian; Hardel, Lucile; Protopopescu, Camelia; Granier, Philippe; Pierret, Janine; Leport, Catherine; Raffi, François

    2017-01-01

    This study's objective was to explore the factors associated with the belief (or not) by people living with HIV that it is easier to talk about their seropositivity 10 years after initiating a protease inhibitor-containing ART. All patients in the ANRS CO8 APROCO-COPILOTE cohort who completed a self-administered questionnaire at 10 years of follow-up were included in this study. Forty-four percent of patients declared that discussing their seropositivity with their family was easier 10 years later, while 28 % declared this was true for discussing their status with a new sexual partner. Having a low socioeconomic status, not receiving social support from a steady partner and declaring a low number of discomforting symptoms 12 months after PI initiation were all independently associated with less difficulty in discussing seropositivity. This study highlights the difficulties in disclosing HIV 10 years after PI initiation, and the important influence of psychosocial factors and patients' daily-life experience on disclosure.

  15. Dental Health Status of HIV-Positive Patients and Related Variables in Southeast Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saravani, Shirin; Nosrat Zehi, Tahereh; Kadeh, Hamideh; Mir, Sarvar

    2016-01-01

    Background Different factors can be responsible for the increased prevalence of dental caries and missing teeth in HIV-positive patients. Objectives This study evaluates dental health status and its relationship with social, behavioral, and medical factors in HIV-positive patients under the coverage of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences in Southeast Iran. Patients and Methods In a cross-sectional study, the dental health status of 119 HIV-positive patients was assessed in accordance with WHO indices and included decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT). A questionnaire on different social, behavioral, and medical variables was filled out for every case and the relationship and correlation of the variables to dental health status were investigated using One-way ANOVA, the Kruskal Wallis test, the t-test, the Mann-Whitney test, Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient, and Pearson correlation. Results The mean value of DMFT index was 11.87 ± 8.08, where the mean values of decayed and missing teeth were 8.42 ± 5.44 and 3.43 ± 4.07, respectively. DMFT index, decayed, and missing teeth correlated only with age (P < 0.0001, P = 0.009, P < 0.0001) and duration of HIV involvement (P = 0.004, P = 0.031, P = 0.007). Conclusions The dental health status of HIV-positive patients in this region was almost inappropriate. Most social, behavioral, and medical factors had no influence on dental health; only a correlation between dental health, age, and duration of HIV involvement was observed. PMID:27622173

  16. DISCLOSE 2012 Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Van Hollen, Chris [D-MD-8

    2012-02-09

    07/12/2012 Motion to Discharge Committee filed by Mr. Van Hollen. Petition No: 112-4. (Discharge petition text with signatures.) (All Actions) Notes: On 7/12/2012, a motion was filed to discharge the Committees on House Administration and the Judiciary from the consideration of H.R.4010. A discharge petition requires 218 signatures for further action. (Discharge Petition No. 112-4: text with signatures.) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. Caregiving responsibilities and burden among older people by HIV status and other determinants in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mugisha, Joseph; Scholten, Francien; Owilla, Sebastian; Naidoo, Nirmala; Seeley, Janet; Chatterji, Somnath; Kowal, Paul; Boerma, Ties

    2013-01-01

    Older caregivers have major caregiving responsibilities in countries severely affected by the HIV epidemic, but little is known about their own health and well-being. We conducted this study to assess the association of caregiving responsibilities and self-perceived burden with caregivers' health, HIV status, background characteristics and care-receiving among older people in South Western Uganda. Men and women aged 50 years and older were recruited from existing cohort studies and clinic registers and interviewed at home. Health was measured through a composite score of health in eight domains, anthropometry and handgrip strength. Summary measures of caregiving responsibilities and self-reported burden were used to analyse the main associations. There were 510 participants, including 198 living with HIV. Four fifths of women and 66% of men were caregivers. Older respondents with no care responsibility had poorer scores on all health indicators (self-reported health score, body mass index and grip strength). Having a caregiving responsibility was not associated with poorer health status or quality of life. Notably, HIV-infected people, whether on antiretroviral treatment (ART) or not, had similar caregiving responsibilities and health status as others. The self-reported burden associated with caregiving was significantly associated with a poorer health score. One third of female caregivers were the single adult in the household with larger caregiving responsibilities. Many of these women are in the poorest wealth quartile of the households in the study and are therefore more likely to need assistance. Physical and financial supports were received by 70% and 63%, respectively. Those with larger caregiving responsibilities more frequently received support. Caregiving responsibilities were associated with better health status, greater satisfaction and quality of life. Older HIV-infected people, whether on ART or not, had similar caregiving responsibilities and self

  18. Rhode Island kills bill forcing inmates to reveal HIV status.

    PubMed

    1996-09-06

    Rhode Island Governor Lincoln Almond vetoed legislation allowing State prison guards to learn the names of adult inmates infected with HIV. The bill was brought before the governor for two consecutive years. Almond stated that the disclosure requirement, supported by the Brotherhood of Correctional Officers, is not medically necessary, nor would it prevent transmission of the virus to guards or other inmates. Use of universal precautions will prevent transmission far better than any disclosure program, according to the governor.

  19. Self-Efficacy for Sexual Risk Reduction and Partner HIV Status as Correlates of Sexual Risk Behavior Among HIV-Positive Adolescent Girls and Women.

    PubMed

    Boone, Melissa R; Cherenack, Emily M; Wilson, Patrick A

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about the correlates of sexual risk behavior among HIV-positive adolescent girls and women in the United States. This study investigates two potential factors related to unprotected vaginal and anal intercourse (UVAI) that have yet to be thoroughly studied in this group: self-efficacy for sexual risk reduction and partner HIV status. Data was analyzed from 331 HIV-positive adolescent girls and women between 12 and 24 years old who reported vaginal and/or anal intercourse with a male partner in the past 3 months at fifteen sites across the United States. Results show that overall self-efficacy (B=-0.15, p=0.01), self-efficacy to discuss safe sex with one's partner (B=-0.14, p=0.01), and self-efficacy to refuse unsafe sex (B=-0.21, p=0.01) are related to UVAI episodes. Participants with only HIV-positive partners or with both HIV-positive and HIV-negative partners showed a trend towards higher percentages of UVAI episodes compared to participants with only HIV-negative partners (F(2, 319)=2.80, p=0.06). These findings point to the importance of including self-efficacy and partner HIV status in risk-reduction research and interventions developed for HIV-positive adolescent girls and young women.

  20. Disclosure of Their HIV Status to Infected Children: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pinzón-Iregui, María C.; Malow, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996, HIV-infected children often survive beyond adolescence. To assess worldwide trends in disclosure since ART was introduced, we reviewed articles that refer to disclosure of their status to HIV-infected children, and which described patient, health care provider and/or caregiver opinions about disclosure and/or reported the proportion of children who knew their diagnosis. Most studies (17 [55%]) were performed in low- or middle-income (LMI) countries. In the 21 articles that included information on whether the children knew their status, the proportion who knew ranged from 1.2 to 75.0% and was lower in LMI (median = 20.4%) than industrialized countries (43%; p = 0.04). LMI country study participants who knew their status tended to have learned it at older ages (median = 9.6 years) than industrialized country participants (median = 8.3 years; p = 0.09). The most commonly reported anticipated risks (i.e. emotional trauma to child and child divulging status to others) and benefits (i.e. improved ART adherence) of disclosure did not vary by the country’s economic development. Only one article described and evaluated a disclosure process. Despite recommendations, most HIV-infected children worldwide do not know their status. Disclosure strategies addressing caregiver concerns are urgently needed. PMID:23070738

  1. Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Safrit, Jeffrey T; Fast, Patricia E; Gieber, Lisa; Kuipers, Hester; Dean, Hansi J; Koff, Wayne C

    2016-06-03

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the cause of one of the most lethal pandemics in human history, although in recent years access to highly effective anti-retroviral therapy has provided new hope worldwide. Transmission of HIV by sexual contact, childbirth and injection drug use has been reduced, but 2 million are newly infected each year, and much of the transmission is from people who do not know their status. In addition to known methods, a preventive vaccine is needed to end the pandemic. The extraordinary mutability and genetic diversity of HIV is an enormous challenge, but vaccines are being designed for broad coverage. Computer-aided design of mosaic immunogens, incorporating many epitopes from the entire genome or from conserved regions aim to induce CD8+ T cells to kill virus-infected cells or inhibit virus replication, while trimeric envelope proteins or synthetic mimics aim to induce broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies similar to those cloned from some infected patients. Induction of more potent and durable responses may require new adjuvants or replicating chimeric vectors chimeras that bear HIV genes. Passive or genetic delivery of broadly neutralizing antibodies may provide broad protection and/or lead to insights for vaccine designers. Proof-of-concept trials in non-human primates and in one human efficacy trial have provided scientific clues for a vaccine that could provide broad and durable protection against HIV. The use of vaccines to destroy HIV reservoirs as part of therapy or cure is now also being explored.

  2. Substance-related coping, HIV-related factors, and mental health among an HIV-positive sexual minority community sample.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Robert J; Colbourn, Scholar L; Gemberling, Tess M; Graham, James; Stroud, Caroline H

    2015-01-01

    HIV-positive status poses a unique set of social stressors, especially among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) persons. Among these difficulties are the internalization of HIV-related stigma and poor mental health. Unfortunately, substance use as a coping mechanism is also common, dependent on other demographic factors, among HIV-positive and LGB samples. The present study integrates these bodies of literature by examining main and interactive effects of HIV-related experiences (i.e., disclosure of HIV-positive status, fear of disclosure, HIV-related victimization, and internalized HIV-related stigma) and substance-related coping with discrimination as they impact mental health (i.e., stress, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and suicide and self-injury proneness). Participants were 216 HIV-positive LGB community members from an urban community medical clinic. Prominent results included: (1) robust negative effects of internalized HIV-related stigma on all mental health indicators when controlling for other HIV-related experiences and (2) a significant interaction in which substance-related coping significantly increases suicide proneness, only for those who have disclosed HIV-positive status to family or friends. Results are discussed with respect to theoretical perspectives of internalized stigma, implications for clinical work with LGB persons of HIV-positive status, and future research.

  3. Nutritional status changes in HIV-infected children receiving combined antiretroviral therapy including protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fiore, P; Donelli, E; Boni, S; Pontali, E; Tramalloni, R; Bassetti, D

    2000-11-01

    Maintaining linear growth and weight gain in HIV-infected children is often difficult. Nutritional evaluation and support are recognised as important factors to improve their quality of life. Combination antiretroviral therapy including protease inhibitors (HAART) reduces HIV-viral load and improves survival, quality of life and nutritional status. Our study aimed to determine changes in nutrional status based on body weight, height and nutritional habits, of HIV-infected children receiving HAART. Possible side effects of lipid metabolism were also studied. Twenty five children, 13 treated with HAART (group B) were followed up for 12 months. We did not observe statistically significant differences in nutritional status over that time or between groups A and B. Inadequate energy intake was more common in patients with advanced HIV-disease. Hyperlipidemia was found in 70% of children receiving ritonavir and in approximately 50% of children receiving nelfinavir. We observed an important although not statistically significative modification in the height of those in group B.

  4. Factors Associated with Inconsistent Condom Use in Adolescents with Negative or Unknown HIV status in Northwest Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Lee; Kouya, Francine; Kwalar, Rene; Pilapil, Mariecel; Saito, Kohta; Palmer, Nancy; Posada, Roberto; Tih, Pius Muffih; Welty, Thomas; Jao, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between utilization of HIV testing and condom use amongst Cameroonian youth/adolescents who are not known to be HIV-infected. Background Worldwide, HIV is spreading most quickly amongst youth/adolescents. Between 44% and 82% of sexually active youth in Cameroon report inconsistent condom use. Data regarding utilization of HIV testing and condom use is lacking. Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered to 431 youth ages 12-26 years in Cameroon from September to December 2011. Data on socio-demographics, sexual risk behaviors, self-reported HIV status, and condom use were collected. We compared rates of inconsistent condom use between those known HIV negative who utilized testing (HIV-N) versus those with unknown status due to unutilized testing (HIV-U). Inconsistent condom use was defined as responding “never,” “sometimes,” or “usually,” while consistent condom use was defined as responding “always” to questions regarding frequency of condom use. Generalized Estimating Equations were applied to assess the association between HIV testing and inconsistent condom use adjusting for other confounders. Results Of 414 eligible respondents, 205 were HIV-U and 209 HIV-N. HIV-U subjects were younger (mean age =16.4 vs. 17.9, p<0.001) and more likely to report living in an urban area (p=0.002) than HIV-N subjects. Seventy-two percent (137/191) of sexually active youth reported inconsistent condom use. After adjusting for potential confounders, HIV-U status [Odds Ratio (OR) =3.97, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) =1.68-6.01] was associated with inconsistent condom use. Similarly, female gender (OR=3.2, 95% CI=1.29-7.89) was associated with inconsistent condom use, while older age at sexual debut was associated with a decreased risk for inconsistent condom use (OR=0.67, 95% CI=0.56-0.81). Conclusion Cameroonian adolescents report high rates of inconsistent condom use which we found to be associated with self

  5. HIV Prevention with Young Men Who Have Sex with Men: Parents Know and Parents Matter; Is it Time to Develop Family-Based Programs for This Vulnerable Population?

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Robert; Mustanski, Brian; Donenberg, Geri

    2008-01-01

    We examined the potential for a family-based HIV prevention approach for gay and bisexually-identified young men who have sex with men (MSM). The majority of our urban, ethnically-diverse sample disclosed their sexual orientation to parents, who were generally supportive. Family connectedness significantly decreased the odds of an HIV positive status. PMID:18639797

  6. Bloodborne Infections: Should They Be Disclosed? Is Differential Treatment Necessary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukka, Christine

    2004-01-01

    There are students and staff in many schools with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or HIV infections. Should parents or guardians be expected to disclose students' bloodborne infections to school officials? Can infected students play contact sports given the increased risk of blood spills? What type of response plan should schools develop in the event of…

  7. Maternal HIV disclosure to HIV-uninfected children in rural South Africa: a pilot study of a family-based intervention

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As access to treatment increases, large numbers of HIV-positive parents are raising HIV-negative children. Maternal HIV disclosure has been shown to have benefits for mothers and children, however, disclosure rates remain low with between 30-45% of mothers reporting HIV disclosure to their children in both observational and intervention studies. Disclosure of HIV status by parent to an HIV-uninfected child is a complex and challenging psychological and social process. No intervention studies have been designed and tested in Southern Africa to support HIV-positive parents to disclose their status, despite this region being one of the most heavily affected by the HIV epidemic. Method This paper describes the development of a family-centred, structured intervention to support mothers to disclose their HIV status to their HIV-negative school-aged children in rural South Africa, an area with high HIV prevalence. The intervention package includes printed materials, therapeutic tools and child-friendly activities and games to support age-appropriate maternal HIV disclosure, and has three main aims: (1) to benefit family relationships by increasing maternal HIV disclosure; (2) to increase children’s knowledge about HIV and health; (3) to improve the quality of custody planning for children with HIV-positive mothers. We provide the theoretical framework for the intervention design and report the results of a small pilot study undertaken to test its acceptability in the local context. Results The intervention was piloted with 24 Zulu families, all mothers were HIV-positive and had an HIV-negative child aged 6–9 years. Lay counsellors delivered the six session intervention over a six to eight week period. Qualitative data were collected on the acceptability, feasibility and the effectiveness of the intervention in increasing disclosure, health promotion and custody planning. All mothers disclosed something to their children: 11/24 disclosed fully using the

  8. Dating, marriage, and parenthood for HIV-positive heterosexual Puerto Rican men: normalizing perspectives on everyday life with HIV.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Francisco; Sheehan, Diana M; Gonzalez, Arnaldo

    2015-03-01

    HIV-positive men are living long and healthier lives while managing HIV as a chronic illness. Although research has extensively documented the experiences of illness of people living with HIV, dating, marriage, and fatherhood among heterosexual Latino men has not been examined. To address this gap, this study used a qualitative study design to examine patterns and strategies for dating, marriage, and parenthood among 24 HIV-positive heterosexual Puerto Rican men living in Boston. The findings in our study indicate that an HIV diagnosis does not necessarily deter men from having an active sexual life, marrying, or having children. In fact, for some of the men, engaging in these social and life-changing events is part of moving on and normalizing life with HIV; these men planned for, achieved, and interpreted these events in the context of establishing normalcy with HIV. Although the HIV diagnosis discouraged some men from engaging in sexual relations, getting married, or having children, others fulfilled these desires with strategies aimed to reconciling their HIV status in their personal life, including dating or marrying HIV-positive women only. Additional important themes identified in this study include the decision to disclose HIV status to new sexual partners as well as the decision to accept the risk of HIV transmission to a child or partner in order to fulfill desires of fatherhood. Understanding the personal struggles, decision-making patterns, and needs of HIV-positive heterosexual men can aid in designing interventions that support healthy living with HIV.

  9. At Risk: The Relationship between Experiences of Child Sexual Abuse and Women's HIV Status in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ione R.

    2012-01-01

    Child sexual abuse in Papua New Guinea is a human rights issue as well as an indicator of HIV risk in women. This study aimed to develop knowledge about the link between violence experienced by women and their HIV status. The study used a mixed method approach to collect quantitative and qualitative data through structured interviews with a sample…

  10. Micronutrient status and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

    PubMed

    Bogden, J D; Baker, H; Frank, O; Perez, G; Kemp, F; Bruening, K; Louria, D

    1990-01-01

    This study surveyed serum concentrations of vitamins, electrolytes, and trace elements in subjects seropositive for HIV-1 by ELISA and confirmatory Western blot. Thirty subjects (26 males, 4 females) were recruited at a hospital clinic. Seventeen were classified as having mild or severe ARC (AIDS-related complex), 7 had AIDS, and 6 were asymptomatic. Eight had experienced weight loss of 10 pounds or more in the past 6 months. Most (93%) were anergic to skin test antigens. Percentages of subjects with below normal plasma concentrations include: zinc-30%, calcium-27%, magnesium-30%, carotenes-31%, total choline-50%, and ascorbate-27%. Eighty-seven percent of the subjects had at least one abnormally low value. Percentages with above normal values include: folate-37% and carnitine-37%. Some subjects with above normal values for plasma vitamins reported self-supplementation, usually with large doses. The results suggest that one or more abnormally low concentrations of the plasma micronutrients studied here are likely to be present in the majority of HIV seropositive patients.

  11. Genomic architecture of HIV-1 infection: current status & challenges.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurvinder; Sharma, Gaurav; Kumar, Neeraj; Kaul, Mrinali H; Bansal, Rhea A; Vajpayee, Madhu; Wig, Naveet; Sharma, Surender K; Mehra, Narinder K

    2013-11-01

    Studies on host genomics have revealed the existence of identifiable HIV-1 specific protective factors among infected individuals who remain naturally resistant viraemia controllers with little or no evidence of virus replication. These factors are broadly grouped into those that are immune associated (MHC, chemokines, cytokines, CTLs and others), linked to viral entry (chemokine co-receptors and ligands), act as post-entry restriction elements (TRIM5a, APOBEC3) and those associated with viral replication (cytokines and others). These features have been identified through multiple experimental approaches ranging from candidate gene approaches, genome wide association studies (GWAS), expression analysis in conjunction with functional assays in humans to primate based models. Several studies have highlighted the individual and population level gross differences both in the viral clade sequences as well as host determined genetic associations. This review collates current information on studies involving major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as well as non MHC genes in the context of HIV-1 infection and AIDS involving varied ethnic groups. Special focus of the review is on the genetic studies carried out on the Indian population. Further challenges with regard to therapeutic interventions based on current knowledge have been discussed along with discussion on documented cases of stem cell therapy and very early highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) interventions.

  12. Controlling the HIV/AIDS epidemic: current status and global challenges

    PubMed Central

    Demberg, Thorsten; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the current status of the global HIV pandemic and strategies to bring it under control. It updates numerous preventive approaches including behavioral interventions, male circumcision (MC), pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis (PREP and PEP), vaccines, and microbicides. The manuscript summarizes current anti-retroviral treatment options, their impact in the western world, and difficulties faced by emerging and resource-limited nations in providing and maintaining appropriate treatment regimens. Current clinical and pre-clinical approaches toward a cure for HIV are described, including new drug compounds that target viral reservoirs and gene therapy approaches aimed at altering susceptibility to HIV infection. Recent progress in vaccine development is summarized, including novel approaches and new discoveries. PMID:22912636

  13. Factors Associated With Smoking Status among HIV-Positive Patients in Routine Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Zyambo, Cosmas M; Willig, James H; Cropsey, Karen L; Carson, April P; Wilson, Craig; Tamhane, Ashutosh R; Westfall, Andrew O; Burkholder, Greer A

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment-related reductions in morbidity and mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients have been attenuated by cigarette smoking, which increases risk of cardiovascular, respiratory, and neoplastic diseases. This study investigated factors associated with smoking status among HIV-positive patients. Methods This cross-sectional study included 2,464 HIV-positive patients attending the HIV Clinic at the University of Alabama at Birmingham between April 2008 and December 2013. Smoking status (current, former, never), psychosocial factors, and clinical characteristics were assessed. Multinomial logistic regression was used to obtain unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of the various factors with smoking status. Results Among HIV-positive patients (mean age 45 years, 75% male, 55% African-American), the majority reported a history of smoking (39% current and 22% former smokers). In adjusted models, patient characteristics associated with increased odds of current smoking were male gender (OR for heterosexual men, 1.8 [95% CI: 1.3–2.6]; for men who have sex with men, 1.5 [1.1–1.9]), history of respiratory diseases (1.5 [1.2–1.9]), unsuppressed HIV viral load (>50 copies/mL) (1.5 [1.1–1.9]), depression (1.6 [1.3–2.0]), anxiety (1.6 [1.2–2.1]), and prior and current substance abuse (4.7 [3.6–6.1] and 8.3 [5.3–13.3] respectively). Male gender, anxiety, and substance abuse were also associated with being a former smoker. Conclusions Smoking was common among HIV-positive patients, with several psychosocial factors associated with current and former smoking. This suggests smoking cessation programs in HIV clinic settings may achieve greater impact by integrating interventions that also address illicit substance abuse and mental health. PMID:26767146

  14. Perceptions and Experiences about Self-Disclosure of HIV Status among Adolescents with Perinatal Acquired HIV in Poor-Resourced Communities in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mokgatle, Mathildah

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is limited research on the disclosure experiences of adolescents with perinatal acquired HIV (PAH). The study explores how adolescents with PAH experience living with HIV and examined their perceptions and experiences regarding disclosure and onward self-disclosure to friends and sexual partners. Methods. Thematic analysis was used to analyze in-depth interviews conducted with 37 adolescents. Findings. Adolescents received disclosure about their status at mean age of 12 years. They perceived disclosure as necessary and appreciated the truthful communication they received. Adolescents have learned to accept and live with HIV, and they desired to be healthy and normal like other people. After receiving disclosure, they found their treatment meaningful, and they adhered to medication. However, they also expressed a strong message that their HIV status was truly their secret and that self-disclosure to others will take the feeling of being normal away from them because they will be treated differently. Conclusion. Adolescents maintained secrecy in order to be accepted by their peers but also to protect themselves from stigma and isolation. Given that adolescents want to be informed of their HIV status but desire controlling self-disclosure of their HIV status, these should form the basis for development of disclosure interventions. PMID:27672451

  15. [Disclosure of infant HIV status: mothers' experiences and health workers' interpretations in Burkina Faso].

    PubMed

    Desclaux, Alice; Alfieri, Chiara

    2013-07-01

    Disclosure of HIV status in infants is a special case which does not correspond to general recommendations for counseling as defined for adults, and few norms exist. Whereas preventing mother to child transmission (PMTCT) programs should result in 700,000 annual disclosures regarding infants born to HIV-positive mothers in Africa, the actual figures are much lower and the conditions for disclosure implementation and its social dimensions in the field are not precisely documented. The aims of this article are to describe and analyze the experience of HIV status disclosure for infants and children on the basis of interviews held with mothers and PMTCT teams in Burkina Faso. The method was based on repeated interviews with 37 mothers and with health workers. Their discourses show the complexity of disclosure in a context characterized by uncertainty. They show delays due to difficulties in venipuncture and in methods for laboratory diagnosis and information management in health services. HIV disclosure is implemented by PMTCT physicians and also other professionals, sometimes in other services. The mother plays a key role, sometimes by requesting disclosure; the father is generally informed only secondarily, in spite of his legal responsibility for the child. Interactions analysis reveals some ambiguities of disclosure, regarding information that doctors keep secret, reciprocal expectations of communication between doctors and mothers, mothers' interpretation of apparent signs regarding their child's health, and uncertain information being given. The information often contains guilt-inducing elements for mothers; communication about follow-up does not reduce this effect. These results encourage the elaboration of a model for specific counseling that should provide mothers with general information, and personalized interaction and support that they need in order to receive and manage disclosure of their child's HIV status.

  16. The relationship between ART adherence and smoking status among HIV+ individuals

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Jose L.; Catley, Delwyn; Lee, Hyoung S.; Goggin, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Smoking is highly prevalent among HIV+ individuals and studies indicate that it may be associated with poor ART adherence, though the relationship is poorly understood. In addition little is known about interest in quitting among HIV+ smokers who are having adherence difficulties. We examined smoking and ART adherence among 203 HIV+ individuals enrolled in a randomized trial of interventions to increase ART adherence. Prior analyses indicated there were no overall treatment group effects. Smoking status and motivation to quit was assessed at baseline and ART adherence was assessed at week 12, 24, 36, and 48. Longitudinal generalized estimating equation analysis that controlled for treatment group revealed that smoking status was not significantly related to adherence over time. Motivation to quit was high with 58% intending to quit in the next 6 months and 25% intending to quit in the next 30 days. Findings suggest that smoking is not associated with adherence among those with adherence difficulties. However it does not diminish importance of addressing both behaviors especially given HIV+ smokers substantial interest in changing smoking behavior. PMID:25572828

  17. Disclosing traumatic experiences: Correlates, context, and consequences.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Brigid R; Lewis, Cara C; Gobin, Robyn L

    2016-03-01

    The type and severity of traumatic events differentially predict negative posttraumatic outcomes, with betrayal traumas (in which the victim is perpetrated by someone s/he trusts) touted as the most harmful. Although disclosure is considered an important component of the "healing process," nondisclosure and delayed disclosure persist. This study explored factors predicting and the context surrounding disclosure as well as the link between disclosure timing and a trauma survivor's experience with depression. Participants (N = 124) were attendees of a Mental Health Awareness event who had experienced a traumatic event. Participant report of traumatic experiences revealed that 28.2%, 36.3%, and 35.5% of participants had experienced a low betrayal (LB), medium betrayal (MB), and high betrayal (HB) trauma, respectively. Almost half (43.5%) disclosed immediately after the trauma, 32.3% disclosed within a month, and 24.2% disclosed after 1 month or more. Betrayal trauma level significantly predicted disclosure timing with individuals who had experienced HB traumas significantly more likely to delay disclosure (HB:LB, odds ratio [OR] = 21.79; MB:LB, OR = 4.57). Trauma survivors predominantly first disclosed to informal support sources (e.g., friends, family), typically citing that they thought it would allow them to feel better or they perceived the other person to be concerned about their well-being as their reason for disclosing. Experiencing a HB trauma predicted subsequent depression severity, but disclosure status was not predictive of subsequent depression. Results will be discussed with respect to implications for assessment and interventions for trauma survivors.

  18. Protection against discrimination based on HIV/AIDS status in Canada: the legal framework.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Richard; Gold, Jennifer

    2005-04-01

    Respecting, protecting ,and fulfilling the human rights of people living with, and vulnerable to, HIV/AIDS has been recognized as an essential element of ethical and effective responses to the epidemic. Human rights law provides one critical tool for implementing a human rights-based approach to HIV/AIDS. Freedom from discrimination is a foundational human rights principle, and is a touchstone of both international and domestic human rights law. This article examines the ways in which Canadian law currently protects people against discrimination based on HIV/AIDS status. The article also reviews the equality rights provision of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms; federal, provincial, and territorial anti-discrimination statutes and policies; and some of the key cases that have applied and developed these legislative protections. Finally, the article looks at the issue of remedies for discrimination under Canadian law. (Other forms of discrimination relevant to people living with HIV/AIDS--specifically, discrimination based on grounds relevant to people from groups disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS-related stigma--will be analyzed in similar detail in a future issue of the Review.)

  19. Association of maternal depression and infant nutritional status among women living with HIV in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kaaya, Sylvia; Garcia, Maria E; Li, Nan; Lienert, Jeffrey; Twayigize, William; Spiegelman, Donna; Smith Fawzi, Mary C

    2016-07-01

    Antenatal and post-natal depression has demonstrated a significant burden in sub-Saharan Africa, with rates ranging from 10% to 35%. However, perinatal women living with HIV in Tanzania have reported an even greater prevalence of depression (43-45%). The primary goal of this study was to examine the relationship between maternal depression and infant malnutrition among women living with HIV. The design was a retrospective cohort study within the context of a randomised controlled trial among women living with HIV and their infants. Within this trial, 699 mother-child pairs were analysed for the present study. Although antenatal depression was not associated with infant malnutrition and post-natal depression was negatively associated [relative risk (RR = 0.80, P = 0.04], cumulative depression demonstrated a positive association with infant wasting (RR = 1.08, P < 0.01) and underweight (RR = 1.03, P < 0.01) after controlling for confounding factors. Variation in the association between depression and infant nutritional status was observed for episodic vs. chronic depression. These findings suggest that providing evidence-based services for persistent depression among women living with HIV may have an effect on infant malnutrition. In addition, other positive outcomes may be related to infant cognitive development as well as HIV disease prognosis and survival among women.

  20. The severity, extent and recurrence of necrotizing periodontal disease in relation to HIV status and CD4+ T cell count.

    PubMed

    Phiri, Reality; Feller, Liviu; Blignaut, Elaine

    2010-10-01

    South Africa ranks among the three countries with the highest prevalence of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa, with an estimated 29.5% of women attending antenatal clinics being infected. Necrotizing periodontal disease is a well recognized HIV-associated oral condition. The objective of this investigation was to determine a possible correlation between the extent, severity and treatment outcome of necrotizing periodontal disease in relation to a person's HIV status and CD4+ T cell count. Data from 105 consecutive patients presenting with necrotizing periodontal disease at an academic oral health centre in South Africa were analysed. All patients were provided with an opportunity to undergo voluntary counseling and testing for HIV infection, were treated for necrotizing periodontal disease and followed over a period of nine months. The mean age of the cohort was 28 years old (range 12 - 52). Of 98 (93.3%) patients unaware of their HIV serostatus at the initial visit, 59 (56.2%) consented to testing. In total 45 (42.9%) were HIV-seropositive with a mean CD4+ T cell count of 222.7 cells/microl and 14 (13.3%) were HIV-seronegative, with a significantly higher mean CD4+ T cell count of 830 cells/microl (Fisher's exact test, p < 0.001), while the status of 46 (43.8%) remained unknown. In 101 (96.2%) patients, > or = 5 tooth sites were affected, and in 27 (26%) > or = 4 mm of gingival tissue were affected. This study, which included HIV-seropositive, HIV-seronegative and persons of unknown HIV status, revealed no statistical evidence that HIV infection was associated with the extent, severity or relapse of necrotizing periodontal disease. No statistically significant association could be demonstrated between the extent, severity and recurrence of necrotizing periodontal disease and a CD4+ T cell count < or = 200 cells/microl among HIV-seropositive patients.

  1. COMMUNITY DISCLOSURE BY PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV IN RURAL CHINA

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chiao-Wen; Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Feng, Nan; Ji, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    The decision to disclose HIV serostatus is a complex and a challenging task because of potential stigma, blame, and fear associated with HIV infection. Despite continued research on HIV disclosure, literature on HIV disclosure to community is still scarce. The purpose of the study is to describe patterns of HIV status disclosure to community members in a sample of HIV-infected men and women in rural China. This study used the baseline data of a randomized controlled intervention trial for HIV-affected families in China. The data was collected between late 2011 to early 2013. In addition to demographic and HIV-related clinical characteristics, we collected the extent of HIV disclosure to members within the community. We first calculated descriptive statistics and frequencies to describe the demographics of the sample. We then compared the extents of HIV disclosure to different community members. We performed chi-square tests to determine whether the demographic and socioeconomic variables were associated with the extent of HIV disclosure to community. A total of 522 PLH were included in the study. The results show that age and family income are associated with the extent of disclosure of HIV status to members within the community, including neighbor, village leaders, people in the village, and coworkers. More disclosures were found among older age groups. People with less family income tend to disclose more to the community than those with higher family income. There is a need to explore the association of HIV disclosure to the community to help realize the public health and personal implications of disclosure. Our results underscore the potential benefits of age and socioeconomic status–specific interventions in the efforts to dispel barriers to HIV status disclosure to the community. PMID:27427924

  2. Facilitating Disclosure of HIV-Positive Status to Family Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Charles H.

    1996-01-01

    Based on a review of an article and drawing on the experiences of five women, offers a model for facilitating disclosure of Human Immunodeficiency Virus status. Outlines a six-step process for understanding disclosure, which includes adjusting to the diagnosis, evaluating personal disclosure skills, and taking inventory. Lists implications for…

  3. Housing status and HIV risk behaviors: implications for prevention and policy.

    PubMed

    Aidala, Angela; Cross, Jay E; Stall, Ron; Harre, David; Sumartojo, Esther

    2005-09-01

    This paper examines housing as a contextual factor affecting drug and sexual risk behaviors among HIV positive people using pooled interview data from 2149 clients presenting for services at 16 medical and social service agencies participating in a multi-site evaluation study. The odds of recent drug use, needle use or sex exchange at the baseline interview was 2-4 times as high among the homeless and unstably housed compared to persons with stable housing. Follow-up data collected 6-9 months after baseline showed that change in housing status was associated with change in risk behaviors. Persons whose housing status improved between baseline and follow-up significantly reduced their risks of drug use, needle use, needle sharing and unprotected sex by half in comparison to individuals whose housing status did not change. In addition, for clients whose housing status worsened between baseline and follow-up, their odds of recently exchanging sex was over five times higher than for clients whose housing status did not change. The provision of housing is a promising structural intervention to reduce the spread of HIV.

  4. Nutritional status, symptoms experienced and general state of health in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, A; Nordström, G

    2001-09-01

    The aim of the study was to describe HIV-infected patients with respect to nutritional status, symptoms experienced, general state of health, and relevant medical and laboratory data. An additional aim was to study the relationships between some of these variables. On admission to an acute care hospital in Sweden, 25 HIV-positive men were consecutively included in the study. Medical data, anthropometric variables such as weight, height, body mass index (BMI) and percentage weight loss were studied. The following instruments were used: the subjective global assessment (SGA) was used to determine nutritional status; the oral assessment guide (OAG) was used for subjective assessment of the oral cavity; and the numeric rating scale (NRS) was used to assess the symptoms experienced. The Health Index (HI) was used to evaluate general state of health. The results showed that more than half of the patients had suspected/severe malnutrition; between 48% and 72% complained of moderate to severe symptoms of various kinds. Two thirds felt their general state of health was rather poor or very poor. Correlations showed that the lower the BMI, the worse the nutritional status (SGA); the greater the weight loss in percent, the worse the nutritional status (SGA); and the worse the general state of health (HI), the worse the nutritional status (SGA). In conclusion, it is important that nurses have good knowledge concerning nutritional problems in order to be able to detect these conditions at an early stage and/or to endeavour to prevent them.

  5. Levels of childhood vaccination coverage and the impact of maternal HIV status on child vaccination status in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa*

    PubMed Central

    Ndirangu, James; Bärnighausen, Till; Tanser, Frank; Tint, Khin; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To analyse coverage of childhood vaccinations in a rural South African population and investigate whether maternal HIV status is associated with children’s vaccination status. Methods 2 431 children with complete information, 12–23 months of age at some point during the period January 2005 through December 2006 and resident in the Africa Centre Demographic Surveillance Area at the time of their birth were investigated. We examined the relationship between maternal HIV status and child vaccination status for five vaccinations [Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP3), poliomyelitis (polio3), hepatitis B (HepB3), and measles] in multiple logistic regressions, controlling for household wealth, maternal age, maternal education and distances to roads, fixed and mobile clinics. Results Coverage of the five vaccinations ranged from 89.3% (95% CI 81.7–93.9) for BCG to 77.3% (67.1–83.6) for measles. Multivariably, maternal HIV-positive status was significantly associated with lower adjusted odds ratios (AOR) of child vaccination for all vaccines [(AOR) 0.60–0.74, all P≤ 0.036] except measles (0.75, P= 0.073), distance to mobile clinic was negatively associated with vaccination status (all P≤ 0.029), household wealth was positively (all P≤ 0.013) and distance to nearest road negatively (all P≤ 0.004) associated with vaccination status. Conclusion Positive maternal HIV status independently reduces children’s probability to receive child vaccinations, which likely contributes to the morbidity and mortality differential between children of HIV-positive and HIV-negative mothers. As a means of increasing vaccination coverage, policy makers should consider increasing the number of mobile clinics in this and similar communities in rural Africa. PMID:19737375

  6. Testing comprehensive models of disclosure of sexual orientation in HIV-positive Latino men who have sex with men (MSM).

    PubMed

    García, Luis I; Lechuga, Julia; Zea, María Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Individuals who disclose their sexual orientation are more likely to also disclose their HIV status. Disclosure of HIV-serostatus is associated with better health outcomes. The goal of this study was to build and test comprehensive models of sexual orientation that included eight theory-informed predictors of disclosure to mothers, fathers, and closest friends in a sample of HIV-positive Latino gay and bisexual men. US acculturation, gender nonconformity to hegemonic masculinity in self-presentation, comfort with sexual orientation, gay community involvement, satisfaction with social support, sexual orientation and gender of the closest friend emerged as significant predictors of disclosure of sexual orientation.

  7. Socio-economic status and HIV/AIDS stigma in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Amuri, Mbaraka; Mitchell, Steve; Cockcroft, Anne; Andersson, Neil

    2011-03-01

    Tanzania has a generalised AIDS epidemic but the estimated adult HIV prevalence of 6% is much lower than in many countries in Southern Africa. HIV infection rates are reportedly higher in urban areas, among women and among those with more education. Stigma has been found to be more common in poorer, less-educated people, and those in rural areas. We examined associations between poverty and other variables and a stigmatising attitude (belief that HIV/AIDS is punishment for sinning). The variables we examined in a multivariate model included: food sufficiency (as an indicator of poverty), age, sex, marital status, education, experience of intimate partner violence, condom-related choice disability, discussion about HIV/AIDS, sources of information about HIV/AIDS and urban or rural residence. Of the 1,130 men and 1,803 women interviewed, more than half (58%) did not disagree that "HIV/AIDS is punishment for sinning". Taking other variables into account, people from the poorest households (without enough food in the last week) were more likely to believe HIV/AIDS is punishment for sinning (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.29, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.06-1.59). Others factors independently associated with this stigmatising attitude were: having less than primary education (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.03-1.62); having experienced intimate partner violence in the last year (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.12-1.75); being choice disabled for condom use (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.08-1.71); and living in rural areas (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.06-2.90). The level of HIV and AIDS stigma in Tanzania is high with independent associations with several disadvantages: poverty, less education and living in rural areas. Other vulnerable groups, such as survivors of intimate partner violence, are also more likely to have a stigmatising attitude. HIV prevention programmes should take account of stigma, especially among the disadvantaged, and take care not to increase it.

  8. Serodiscordance and disclosure among HIV-positive pregnant women in the Southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Nacius, Lori A; Levison, Judy; Minard, Charles G; Fasser, Carl; Davila, Jessica A

    2013-04-01

    The prevalence of HIV-positive pregnant women in relationships with HIV-negative men in the United States is unclear. The purpose of this study was to calculate the prevalence of HIV-positive pregnant women with a serodiscordant (HIV-negative) partner within a single clinic population, assess disclosure of their HIV status, and examine factors associated with disclosure. All HIV-positive pregnant women who received prenatal care at the Harris County Hospital District Women's Program at Northwest Health Center in Houston TX between 1/1/2006 and 4/1/2011 were identified. Data were obtained from electronic medical records. Prevalence of serodiscordance and disclosure was calculated, and predictors of disclosure were evaluated. We identified 212 HIV-positive pregnant women. About 40% had a serodiscordant partner, and 34% had a partner with an unknown HIV status. Disclosure occurred in over 90% of women with a serodiscordant partner and in 68% of women with partners whose HIV status was unknown. Among pregnant women who knew their HIV status prior to the current pregnancy and had a serodiscordant partner, 92% reported disclosing their status prior to conception. Our data indicated that serodiscordant relationships are common in our clinic population. Suboptimal disclosure rates were observed, especially among women who have a partner with an unknown HIV status. Further research is needed to evaluate the prevalence of serodiscordance and disclosure in other United States populations.

  9. Buddhism, the status of women and the spread of HIV/AIDS in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Klunklin, Areewan; Greenwood, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    The common-sense construction of Buddhism is that of a general power for good; the less positive aspects of Buddhism's power, especially when reinforced by folklore and ancient superstition, is infrequently recognised. In this article we make explicit Buddhism's less positive power, particularly as it relates to the status of women and, by implication, its role in the human immunodeficiency (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in Thailand. The Buddhist, folklore, and superstitious bases of Thai misogyny are explored, together with its expression in the differential gender roles of women and men. In addition, the attitudes of both women and men to commercial sex workers (CSWs) and condom use is discussed. The implications of these attitudinal analyses to the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in Thailand is outlined. We argue that the current spread of HIV/AIDS in Thailand is primarily a function of the inferior status of women, which, in turn, is a function of Buddhism and Thai cultural beliefs. In light of this, some realistic strategies to address the problem also are discussed.

  10. The nutritional status of children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Souza, Déborah Teixeira; Rondó, Patrícia Helen Carvalho; Reis, Ligia Cardoso

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to assess the nutritional status of children and adolescents with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). One hundred and eighteen subjects aged 6-19 years attending an outpatient clinic in São Paulo city were involved in the study. The following anthropometric measurements were assessed: weight, height, waist circumference and triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness. One (0.9%) adolescent was diagnosed with abdominal obesity based on waist circumference measurement; three (2.5%) adolescents were obese based on subscapular skinfold thickness. According to the body mass index, the population studied was mainly eutrophic. The prevalence of fat redistribution, a characteristic of patients with HIV/AIDS under HAART, was low. We advise the development of further studies to assess the nutritional status of children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS using anthropometric measurements as well as computed tomography to detect fat redistribution.

  11. Nutritional status of HIV-positive patients in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    De Senna, Andrea F Kroll; De Oliveira, Solange A; Velarde, Luis G C; Setúbal, Sérgio

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to assess the nutritional status of HIV-positive patients in a hospital in the city of Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We studied 235 patients (130 men and 105 women) from May 2009 to June 2010. The frequency of undernourishment among women was 7.6%; 26.7% of the women were overweight, and 16.2% were obese. Among men, the frequency of undernourishment was 3.8%; 25.4% of the men were overweight, and 6.9% were obese. A logistic regression was done to investigate the relationship between nutritional status and potential predisposing factors. Women were more frequently affected by obesity and undernourishment than men. However, only the difference in obesity was significant, and women had almost three times higher odds of being obese (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.03-6.65). According to a nationwide survey done in Brazil during 2008-2009, 50.1% of the Brazilian healthy males were overweight, and 12.5% were obese; 48% of healthy females were overweight, and 16.9% were obese. Although the prevalence of undernourishment in HIV-positive patients is now lower than that observed in the beginning of the AIDS epidemic and excess weight is increasingly common among people living with HIV/AIDS, the proportion of excess weight was found lower and of undernourishment was higher in the present study than that found in the Brazilian population.

  12. Is Socio-Economic Status a Determinant of HIV-Related Stigma Attitudes in Zimbabwe? Findings from Project Accept

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Basant; Chingono, Alfred; Sibanda, E.; Machingura, Ian

    2016-01-01

    HIV related stigma and discrimination is a known barrier for HIV prevention and care. We aimed to assess the relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and HIV related stigma in Zimbabwe. This paper uses data from Project Accept, which examined the impact of community-based voluntary counseling and testing intervention on HIV incidence and stigma. Total of 2522 eligible participants responded to a psychometric assessment tool, which assessed HIV related stigma and discrimination attitudes on 4 point Likert scale. The tool measured three components of HIV-related stigma: shame, blame and social isolation, perceived discrimination, and equity. Participants’ ownership of basic assets was used to assess the socio-economic status. Shame, blame and social isolation component of HIV related stigma was found to be significantly associated with medium [odds ratio (OR)=1.73, P<0.01] and low SES (OR=1.97, P<0.01), indicating more stigmatizing attitudes by participants belonging to medium and low SES in comparison to high SES. For HIV related stigma and discrimination programs to be effective, they should take into account the socio-economic context of target population. PMID:28299151

  13. Is Socio-Economic Status a Determinant of HIV-Related Stigma Attitudes in Zimbabwe? Findings from Project Accept.

    PubMed

    Mateveke, Kudzanai; Singh, Basant; Chingono, Alfred; Sibanda, E; Machingura, Ian

    2016-08-17

    HIV related stigma and discrimination is a known barrier for HIV prevention and care. We aimed to assess the relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and HIV related stigma in Zimbabwe. This paper uses data from Project Accept, which examined the impact of community-based voluntary counseling and testing intervention on HIV incidence and stigma. Total of 2522 eligible participants responded to a psychometric assessment tool, which assessed HIV related stigma and discrimination attitudes on 4 point Likert scale. The tool measured three components of HIV-related stigma: shame, blame and social isolation, perceived discrimination, and equity. Participants' ownership of basic assets was used to assess the socio-economic status. Shame, blame and social isolation component of HIV related stigma was found to be significantly associated with medium [odds ratio (OR)=1.73, P<0.01] and low SES (OR=1.97, P<0.01), indicating more stigmatizing attitudes by participants belonging to medium and low SES in comparison to high SES. For HIV related stigma and discrimination programs to be effective, they should take into account the socio-economic context of target population.

  14. Relationship between HIV Stigma and Self-Isolation among People Living with HIV in Tennessee

    PubMed Central

    Audet, Carolyn M.; McGowan, Catherine C.; Wallston, Kenneth A.; Kipp, Aaron M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction HIV stigma is a contributing factor to poor patient outcomes. Although HIV stigma has been documented, its impact on patient well-being in the southern US is not well understood. Methods Thirty-two adults participated in cognitive interviews after completing the Berger HIV or the Van Rie stigma scale. Participant responses were probed to ensure the scales accurately measured stigma and to assess the impact stigma had on behavior. Results Three main themes emerged regarding HIV stigma: (1) negative attitudes, fear of contagion, and misperceptions about transmission; (2) acts of discrimination by families, friends, health care providers, and within the workplace; and (3) participants’ use of self-isolation as a coping mechanism. Overwhelming reluctance to disclose a person’s HIV status made identifying enacted stigma with a quantitative scale difficult. Discussion Fear of discrimination resulted in participants isolating themselves from friends or experiences to avoid disclosure. Participant unwillingness to disclose their HIV status to friends and family could lead to an underestimation of enacted HIV stigma in quantitative scales. PMID:23950897

  15. Provision of antiretroviral prophylaxis to child rape victims in South Africa: HIV status and delayed reporting.

    PubMed

    Collings, Steven J

    2005-02-01

    In a sample of 780 South African child victims of rape (girls under the age of 18 years; age M= 10.5 yr., SD=4.8), 10% did not qualify for antiretroviral prophylaxis because HIV status at presentation was positive and a further 34.1% did not qualify because the rape was reported more than 72 hours after the alleged offense. Regression analyses indicated that child rape victims who reported that they had been sexually active prior to the rape constitute a particularly high risk group for HIV infection and suggest primary and secondary prevention programs should be designed to decrease sexual activity among children and to encourage more immediate reporting of rape among younger children, children who are not sexually active, and children who are incestuously abused.

  16. HIV testing men in the antenatal setting: understanding male non-disclosure

    PubMed Central

    Katz, David A.; Kiarie, James N.; John-Stewart, Grace C.; Richardson, Barbra A.; John, Francis N.; Farquhar, Carey

    2010-01-01

    Summary Prevention of infant HIV is a powerful incentive for maternal HIV diagnosis and an opportunity to increase male HIV testing and disclosure of HIV status within couples. We examined male HIV disclosure in couples who attended a Nairobi antenatal clinic (ANC), had individual HIV testing, and were counseled to disclose to their partner. At 2-week follow-up, males and females independently reported HIV disclosure. Of 2,104 women, 1,993 requested partner attendance; 313 male partners came, of whom 183 chose individual HIV testing. Of 106 couples who followed-up, 93% of both partners reported disclosure by females vs. 71% by males (p<0.0001); 27% of men reported disclosure while their female partner reported not knowing partner HIV status. In these couples, male ANC HIV testing did not result in shared knowledge of HIV status. Couple counseling models that incorporate disclosure may yield greater HIV prevention benefits than offering individual partner HIV testing services at ANC. PMID:19833691

  17. Benefits of Disclosure of HIV Status to Infected Children and Adolescents: Perceptions of Caregivers and Health Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Gyamfi, Eric; Okyere, Paul; Appiah-Brempong, Emmanuel; Adjei, Rose Odotei; Mensah, Kofi Akohene

    2015-01-01

    The rate of disclosure of HIV status to infected children and adolescents remains low in developing countries. We used a mixed-method approach to determine the perceptions of caregivers and health care providers about the benefits of HIV status disclosure to infected children and adolescents and to assess the support needed by caregivers during disclosure. We recruited a convenience sample of 118 caregivers of HIV-infected children and adolescents for the quantitative component of the study and completed in-depth qualitative interviews with 10 purposefully sampled key informants, including health care providers and volunteer workers. The main benefits of disclosure included improved medication adherence and healthier, more responsible adolescent sexual behavior. The main supports required by caregivers during disclosure included biomedical information, emotional and psychological support, and practical guidelines regarding disclosure. We confirmed the importance of disclosure to HIV-infected children and adolescents and the need to develop culturally specific disclosure guidelines.

  18. Nutritional status and complementary feeding among HIV-exposed infants: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kamenju, Pili; Liu, Enju; Hertzmark, Ellen; Spiegelman, Donna; Kisenge, Rodrick; Kupka, Roland; Aboud, Said; Manji, Karim P; Duggan, Christopher; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2016-09-30

    Complementary feeding is crucial for improving child survival and promoting growth and development, particularly among HIV-exposed children who have higher risk of morbidity and mortality than their un-exposed peers. This prospective study employed an infant and child feeding index (ICFI) to measure complementary feeding and determine its association with nutritional status among 2092 HIV-exposed infants followed from 6 to 24 months of age in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The ICFI measured both quality and quantity of complementary feeding, including current breastfeeding status, food consistency, dietary diversity scores (DDS), food group frequency score, and meal frequency. The ICFI score ranged from 0 to 9; the median score was 6 (Inter-Quartile Range, IQR= 4-7). After adjusting for potential confounders, high ICFI scores were associated with reduced risk of stunting (high vs. low tertile hazard ratio, HR: 0.72; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.57, 0.91; P< 0.01) and underweight (high vs. low tertile HR: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.61, 1.02; P= 0.07). Low DDS were associated with higher risk of stunting (low vs. high tertile HR: 1.59; 95% CI: 1.23, 2.07; P< 0.01) and underweight (low vs. high tertile HR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.96; P= 0.01). In this setting, high DDS and ICFI scores were protective of stunting and underweight. We recommend for nutrition programs in low-income countries to emphasize educating HIV-exposed children's caregivers on the importance of dietary diversity and optimal complementary feeding to improve nutritional status in this important subpopulation.

  19. Effects of long-term use of HAART on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nittayananta, Wipawee; Talungchit, Sineepat; Jaruratanasirikul, Sutep; Silpapojakul, Kachornsakdi; Chayakul, Panthip; Nilmanat, Ampaipith; Pruphetkaew, Nannapat

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to determine the effects of long-term use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects. METHODS Oral examination and measurement of saliva flow rate of both unstimulated and wax-stimulated whole saliva were performed in HIV-infected subjects with and without HAART, and in non-HIV individuals. The following data were recorded; duration and risk of HIV infection, type and duration of HAART, CD4 cell count, viral load, presence of orofacial pain, oral dryness, oral burning sensation, oral lesions, cervical caries, and periodontal pocket. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the effects of long-term use of HAART on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty-seven HIV-infected subjects – 99 on HAART (age range 23–57 years, mean 39 years) and 58 not on HAART (age range 20–59 years, mean 34 years) – and 50 non-HIV controls (age range 19–59 years, mean 36 years) were enrolled. The most common HAART regimen was 2 NRTI + 2 NNRTI. HIV-infected subjects without HAART showed greater risks of having orofacial pain, oral dryness, oral lesions, and periodontal pockets than those with short-term HAART (P < 0.01). The subjects with long-term HAART were found to have a greater risk of having oral lesions than those with short-term HAART (P < 0.05). The unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rates of the subjects with HAART were significantly lower than in those without HAART (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION We conclude that long-term HAART has adverse effects on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects. PMID:20202089

  20. Effect of HIV status on fertility desire and knowledge of long-acting reversible contraception of postpartum Malawian women.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Michele S; Rosenberg, Nora E; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Stuart, Gretchen S; Miller, William C; Kaliti, Stephen M; Mwale, Mwawi; Bonongwe, Phylos P; Tang, Jennifer H

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the most recent pregnancy intentions and family planning preferences of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected postpartum Malawian women, and to assess whether HIV status is associated with fertility desire and knowledge of intrauterine contraception (IUC) and the subdermal contraceptive implant. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the baseline characteristics of Malawian women enrolled in a prospective cohort study assessing postpartum contraceptive uptake and continuation. Women at a government hospital completed a baseline survey assessing reproductive history, family planning preferences, and knowledge of IUC and the implant. We used Pearson's chi-square tests to compare these parameters between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women. Modified Poisson regression was performed to assess the association between HIV status and fertility desire and knowledge about IUC and the implant. Of 634 postpartum women surveyed, HIV-infected women were more likely to report their most recent pregnancy was unintended (49% vs. 37%, p = 0.004). Nearly all women (97%) did not want a child in the next 2 years, but HIV-infected women were more likely to desire no more children (adjusted prevalence ratio [PR]: 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33, 1.89). HIV-infected women were also less likely to know that IUC (adjusted PR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.61, 0.84) and the implant (adjusted PR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.75, 0.92) are safe during breast-feeding. Postpartum women strongly desire family spacing and many HIV-infected postpartum women desire no more children, suggesting an important role for these long-acting methods. Education about the efficacy and safety of IUC and the implant particularly during breast-feeding may facilitate postpartum use.

  1. Structural bridging network position is associated with HIV status in a younger Black men who have sex with men epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nirav S.; Iveniuk, James; Muth, Stephen Q.; Michaels, Stuart; Jose, Jo-Anne; Laumann, Edward O.; Schneider, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Younger Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) ages 16–29 have the highest rates of HIV in the United States. Despite increased attention to social and sexual networks as a framework for biomedical intervention, the role of measured network positions, such as bridging and their relationship to HIV risk has received limited attention. A network sample (N=620) of BMSM respondents (n=154) and their MSM and transgendered person network members (n=466) was generated through respondent driven sampling of BMSM and elicitation of their personal networks. Bridging status of each network member was determined by a constraint measure and was used to assess the relationship between this bridging and unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), sex-drug use (SDU), group sex (GS) and HIV status within the network in South Chicago. Low, moderate and high bridging was observed in 411 (66.8%), 81 (13.2%) and 123 (20.0%) of the network. In addition to age and having sex with men only, moderate and high levels of bridging were associated with HIV status (AOR 3.19; 95% CI 1.58–6.45 and AOR 3.83; 95% CI 1.23–11.95, respectively). Risk behaviors observed including UAS, GS, and SDU were not associated with HIV status, however, they clustered together in their associations with one another. Bridging network position but not risk behavior was associated with HIV status in this network sample of younger BMSM. Socio-structural features such as position within the network may be important when implementing effective HIV prevention interventions in younger BMSM populations. PMID:24337699

  2. Assessing Nutrient Intake and Nutrient Status of HIV Seropositive Patients Attending Clinic at Chulaimbo Sub-District Hospital, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Onyango, Agatha Christine; Walingo, Mary Khakoni; Mbagaya, Grace; Kakai, Rose

    2012-01-01

    Background. Nutritional status is an important determinant of HIV outcomes. Objective. To assess the nutrient intake and nutrient status of HIV seropositive patients attending an AIDS outpatient clinic, to improve the nutritional management of HIV-infected patients. Design. Prospective cohort study. Setting. Comprehensive care clinic in Chulaimbo Sub-District Hospital, Kenya. Subjects. 497 HIV sero-positive adults attending the clinic. Main Outcome Measures. Evaluation of nutrient intake using 24-hour recall, food frequency checklist, and nutrient status using biochemical assessment indicators (haemoglobin, creatinine, serum glutamate pyruvate (SGPT) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV)). Results. Among the 497 patients recruited (M : F sex ratio: 1.4, mean age: 39 years ± 10.5 y), Generally there was inadequate nutrient intake reported among the HIV patients, except iron (10.49 ± 3.49 mg). All the biochemical assessment indicators were within normal range except for haemoglobin 11.2 g/dL (11.4 ± 2.60 male and 11.2 ± 4.25 female). Conclusions. Given its high frequency, malnutrition should be prevented, detected, monitored, and treated from the early stages of HIV infection among patients attending AIDS clinics in order to improve survival and quality of life. PMID:22997571

  3. HIV/AIDS-related stigma in South African alcohol-serving venues and its potential impact on HIV disclosure, testing, and treatment-seeking behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Velloza, Jennifer; Watt, Melissa H.; Choi, Karmel W.; Abler, Laurie; Kalichman, Seth C.; Skinner, Donald; Pieterse, Desiree; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol-serving venues in South Africa are sites for high-risk behaviours that may lead to HIV transmission. Prevention and treatment interventions are sorely needed in these settings, but HIV-related stigma may limit their effectiveness. This study explored expressions of stigma among alcohol-serving venue patrons in Cape Town and examined the potential impact of stigma on HIV disclosure, testing, and treatment-seeking behaviours. A total of 92 in-depth interviews with male and female, Black and Coloured patrons were conducted. Transcripts were analysed via memo-writing and diagramming techniques. Many participants mentioned knowing other patrons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH), and this visibility of HIV impacted expressions of HIV-related stigma. Participants discussed four forms of HIV-related stigma in the venues: fearing PLWH, fearing HIV acquisition, blaming others for spreading HIV, and isolating PLWH. HIV visibility and expressions of HIV-related stigma, particularly fear of isolation, influenced participants’ willingness to disclose their status. HIV-related stigma in the venues also appeared to indirectly influence testing and treatment-seeking behaviour outside the venue. Results suggest that efforts to change norms and reduce expressions of HIV-related stigma in alcohol-serving venues are necessary to successfully deliver tailored HIV prevention interventions and increase uptake of HIV testing and care in this important social setting. PMID:25630531

  4. Influence of HIV Status and Age on Cognitive Representations of Others

    PubMed Central

    Carstensen, Laura L.; Fredrickson, Barbara L.

    2011-01-01

    In 2 studies the postulate that the perception of time left in life influences the ways that people conceptualize social relationships was explored. It was hypothesized that when time is limited, emotional aspects of relationships are highly salient. In Study 1, a card-sort paradigm involving similarity judgments demonstrated, for a sample of persons 18 to 88 years old, that the prominence of affect in the mental representations of prospective social partners is positively associated with age. In Study 2, the same experimental approach was applied to a sample of young gay men similar to one another in age, but notably different in their health status (that is, HIV negative; HIV positive, asymptomatic; and HIV positive, symptomatic). It was found that, with age held constant, increasing closeness to the end of life is also associated with an increasing prominence of affect in the mental representations of social partners. The results suggest that the perception of limited time, rather than chronological age, is the critical variable influencing mental representations of social partners. PMID:9848799

  5. Disclosure of HIV-positive status to Latino gay men's social networks.

    PubMed

    Zea, María Cecilia; Reisen, Carol A; Poppen, Paul J; Echeverry, John J; Bianchi, Fernanda T

    2004-03-01

    This study explored disclosure of serostatus in a sample of 155 HIV-positive Latino gay men from New York City and Washington, DC. We examined rates of disclosure to different members of the social network: mothers, fathers, close friends, and primary sexual partners. There were high rates of disclosure of HIV-positive serostatus to main partners and closest friends and lower rates to fathers and mothers. We examined the role of 3 contextual target-dependent factors (emotional closeness to target, anticipated reactions from target, and target's knowledge of sexual orientation), as well as acculturation and time since diagnosis. Three separate logistic regression models were performed to predict disclosure of HIV-positive status to 3 targets: mothers, fathers, and closest friends. We found that disclosure was not a generalized tendency, but rather different factors were influential depending on the target. Whether the target was aware of participant's sexual orientation was associated with disclosure in all 3 models. Greater emotional closeness also predicted disclosure to mother and father; greater U.S. acculturation was associated with disclosure to father and marginally to mother. A longer time since diagnosis was associated with disclosure to the closest friend. These findings highlight the importance of taking into account roles and relationships, and their effect on disclosure.

  6. Study of Basic Coagulation Parameters among HIV Patients in Correlation to CD4 Counts and ART Status

    PubMed Central

    Manimaran, D; Rachakatla, Praveen; Bharathi, K; Afroz, Tameem; Sagar, Radha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection is known to cause coagulation abnormalities by various mechanism, especially during its late course. Aim The objective of this study was to analyse platelet count, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time among HIV infected patients and to analyse these parameters with respect to their CD4 count and ART status. Materials and Methods A case control study was conducted with 120 HIV infected patients and 40 normal individuals. The blood samples were collected after obtaining consent from the subjects. The blood samples were processed for platelet count, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time and CD4 count. The results were tabulated and analysed with statistical package. Results The platelet count was significantly decreased in HIV infected patients compared to controls. Though HIV patients with CD4 count less than 200cells/mm3 showed a decreased platelet count compared to those with CD4 count greater than 200cells/mm3, it was not statistically significant. Prothrombin Time (PT) and Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT) was significantly prolonged in HIV patients, but only aPTT showed significant inverse correlation with CD4 count. None of the parameters showed statistical significance on comparing HIV patients on ART with those not on ART. Conclusion Basic coagulation tests like platelet count, PT and especially aPTT can be used as prospective screening test to assess severity in HIV patients in resource limited settings where CD4 count is not available. PMID:27437222

  7. The interstitial nuclei of the human anterior hypothalamus: an investigation of variation with sex, sexual orientation, and HIV status.

    PubMed

    Byne, W; Tobet, S; Mattiace, L A; Lasco, M S; Kemether, E; Edgar, M A; Morgello, S; Buchsbaum, M S; Jones, L B

    2001-09-01

    The interstitial nuclei of the human anterior hypothalamus (INAH1-4) have been considered candidates for homology with the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area of the rat. Volumetric sexual dimorphism has been described for three of these nuclei (INAH1-3), and INAH3 has been reported to be smaller in homosexual than heterosexual men. The current study measured the INAH in Nissl-stained coronal sections in autopsy material from 34 presumed heterosexual men (24 HIV- and 10 HIV+), 34 presumed heterosexual women (25 HIV- and 9 HIV+), and 14 HIV+ homosexual men. HIV status significantly influenced the volume of INAH1 (8% larger in HIV+ heterosexual men and women relative to HIV- individuals), but no other INAH. INAH3 contained significantly more neurons and occupied a greater volume in presumed heterosexual males than females. No sex difference in volume was detected for any other INAH. No sexual variation in neuronal size or density was observed in any INAH. Although there was a trend for INAH3 to occupy a smaller volume in homosexual men than in heterosexual men, there was no difference in the number of neurons within the nucleus based on sexual orientation.

  8. Nutritional Status of HIV-positive Patients in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Solange A.; Velarde, Luis G.C.; Setúbal, Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of this cross-sectional study was to assess the nutritional status of HIV-positive patients in a hospital in the city of Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We studied 235 patients (130 men and 105 women) from May 2009 to June 2010. The frequency of undernourishment among women was 7.6%; 26.7% of the women were overweight, and 16.2% were obese. Among men, the frequency of undernourishment was 3.8%; 25.4% of the men were overweight, and 6.9% were obese. A logistic regression was done to investigate the relationship between nutritional status and potential predisposing factors. Women were more frequently affected by obesity and undernourishment than men. However, only the difference in obesity was significant, and women had almost three times higher odds of being obese (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.03-6.65). According to a nationwide survey done in Brazil during 2008-2009, 50.1% of the Brazilian healthy males were overweight, and 12.5% were obese; 48% of healthy females were overweight, and 16.9% were obese. Although the prevalence of undernourishment in HIV-positive patients is now lower than that observed in the beginning of the AIDS epidemic and excess weight is increasingly common among people living with HIV/AIDS, the proportion of excess weight was found lower and of undernourishment was higher in the present study than that found in the Brazilian population. PMID:25895192

  9. Factors influencing social self-disclosure among adolescents living with HIV in Eastern Africa.

    PubMed

    Nöstlinger, Christiana; Bakeera-Kitaka, Sabrina; Buyze, Jozefien; Loos, Jasna; Buvé, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) face many psychosocial challenges, including HIV disclosure to others. Given the importance of socialization during the adolescent transition process, this study investigated the psychological and social factors influencing self-disclosure of own HIV status to peers. We examined social HIV self-disclosure to peers, and its relationship to perceived HIV-related stigma, self-efficacy to disclose, self-esteem, and social support among a sample of n = 582 ALHIV aged 13-17 years in Kampala, Uganda, and Western Kenya. Data were collected between February and April 2011. Among them, 39% were double orphans. We conducted a secondary data analysis to assess the degree of social disclosure, reactions received, and influencing factors. Interviewer-administered questionnaires assessed medical, socio-demographic, and psychological variables (Rosenberg self-esteem scale; self-efficacy to disclose to peers), HIV-related stigma (10-item stigma scale), and social support (family-life and friends). Descriptive, bivariate, and logistic regression analyses were performed with social self-disclosure to peers with gender as covariates. Almost half of ALHIV had told nobody (except health-care providers) about their HIV status, and about 18% had disclosed to either one of their friends, schoolmates, or a boy- or girlfriend. Logistic regression models revealed that having disclosed to peers was significantly related to being older, being a paternal orphan, contributing to family income, regular visits to the HIV clinic, and greater social support through peers. Low self-efficacy to disclose was negatively associated to the outcome variable. While social self-disclosure was linked to individual factors such as self-efficacy, factors relating to the social context and adolescents' access to psychosocial resources play an important role. ALHIV need safe environments to practice disclosure skills. Interventions should enable them to make optimal use of

  10. Prison employees not immune from HIV disclosure suit.

    PubMed

    1999-04-30

    The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that people do not lose their right to maintain confidentiality of their HIV status upon being jailed. A case filed by [name removed], an inmate at the Albion Correctional Facility in New York, alleged that a corrections officer gratuitously disclosed her HIV-positive status and transsexual status to a coworker in front of other inmates. The disclosures exposed [name removed] to harassment by guards and prisoners. Although [name removed] died of AIDS-related complications in 1995, her estate continued the suit. Judge Dennis G. Jacobs ruled that while it was permissible to disclose such information for legitimate penological purposes, this revelation was done for gossip with deliberate indifference to the inmate's safety. The judge also found the defendants were entitled to qualified immunity because the right to privacy in a prison setting had not been established at the time of the disclosures.

  11. Facilitators and Barriers to Discussing HIV Prevention With Adolescents: Perspectives of HIV-Infected Parents

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Janet S.; Weber, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined HIV-infected parents’ conversations about HIV prevention with their uninfected children, including what facilitated or hindered communication. Methods. Parents with HIV/AIDS (n = 90) who had children aged 10 to 18 years were recruited for a mixed method study from 2009 to 2010. Interviews assessed facilitators and barriers to discussing HIV prevention. A questionnaire identified the frequency and content of conversations, parental confidence level, and perceived importance of discussing preventive topics. Results. Eighty-one percent of parents reported “sometimes” or “often” communicating about HIV prevention. A subset of parents found these conversations difficult; 44% indicated their desire for support. Facilitators to communication included utilizing support, focusing on the benefits of talking, and having a previous relationship with one’s child. Barriers to discussions included fear of negative consequences, living in denial, and lacking a parental role model who discussed safer sex. Parents varied as to how they believed their HIV status affected communication. Those who did not disclose their HIV status to their children reported less frequent communication; self-efficacy partially mediated this relationship. Conclusions. Findings highlighted the need for communication skills training that support HIV-infected parents in their efforts to discuss HIV-related information with adolescents. PMID:23763390

  12. The inter-relation of maternal immune competence, HIV-1 viral load, and nutritional status in preventing vertical transmission: an alternative to chemoprophylaxis?

    PubMed

    Moran, P J; Welles, S L; Williams, M A

    1998-11-01

    As the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) global pandemic moves towards the end of its second decade, women of reproductive age throughout the world have been shown to be increasingly at risk for acquiring HIV-1 infection. Recently, the focus for preventive measures has expanded to include preventing the perinatal transmission of HIV-1 to fetuses and newborns. This manuscript reviews the available literature that examines risk factors for perinatal transmission, immunopathogenesis of HIV-1 infection, and the role that antioxidant micronutrients play in modulating immune response to HIV-1 disease progression. The available information provides a compelling case for the design of studies that evaluate the extent to which maternal HIV-1 viremia and disease progression are modulated by her nutritional status. Should results from these studies confirm that antioxidant micronutrient status is inversely related to HIV-1 RNA load, particularly in economically vulnerable populations, carefully designed and executed supplementation trials would be warranted.

  13. Can women 'refuse' condoms? Dilemmas of condom negotiation among men living with HIV in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mfecane, Sakhumzi

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes challenges that men living with HIV experience in negotiating condom use with sexual partners. After testing HIV-positive, the men in this study attended support groups of people living with HIV. Here they were taught to behave 'responsibly' by adopting safer sex measures. However, some men faced strong resistance from women concerning condom use, particularly from women with whom they had been sexually involved prior to testing HIV-positive. This paper explores the reasoning behind the rejection of condoms by women, focusing specifically on the nature of relationships, disclosure of HIV status and gender power dynamics. Analysis of the findings, which are taken from an ethnographic study conducted over 14 months, indicates that efforts to initiate condom use allowed women to challenge men's authority in sexual affairs and assert their own (limited) agency - albeit by demanding unprotected sex. However, women's rejection of condoms occurred in a knowledge vacuum about their own HIV risk because male partners had failed to disclose their HIV status prior to initiating condoms. Interventions need to encourage men to disclose their HIV status before they initiate condom use with their sexual partners. Furthermore men need to encourage their partners to be open about their sexual needs.

  14. Narratives of HIV disclosure and masculinity in a South African village.

    PubMed

    Mfecane, Sakhumzi

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes men's experiences of disclosing their HIV status, arguing that disclosure restored their social respect, which was previously undermined by an illness from AIDS. Results are from a 14-month ethnographic study conducted in rural South African health facility, among a group of 25 men attending an AIDS support group. The men included in this study tested while they were critically ill and some were negatively labelled as 'already dead' because of their poor state of health. The majority voluntarily disclosed their HIV status to the public after recovering from the physical symptoms of AIDS. This elicited positive reaction from the community, who treated them with admiration for disclosing their HIV status. The paper emphasises the fact that the good response received by participants from the community was predicated mainly on having healthy physical looks that men gained from using antiretroviral medication. This paper then further analyses the ways in which a 'healthy appearance' facilitates disclosure of HIV status and also disrupts the stigma attached to HIV in the studied community.

  15. HIV testing and clinical status upon admission to a specialized health care unit in Pará, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Abati, Paulo Afonso Martins; Segurado, Aluisio Cotrim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HIV-infected individuals upon admission to a reference health care center. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted between 1999 and 2010 on 527 individuals with confirmed serological diagnosis of HIV infection who were enrolled in an outpatient health care service in Santarém, PA, Northern Brazil. Data were collected from medical records and included the reason for HIV testing, clinical status, and count of peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes upon enrollment. The data were divided into three groups, according to the patient’s year of admission – P1 (1999-2002), P2 (2003-2006), and P3 (2007-2010) – for comparative analysis of the variables of interest. RESULTS In the study group, 62.0% of the patients were assigned to the P3 group. The reason for undergoing HIV testing differed between genders. In the male population, most tests were conducted because of the presence of symptoms suggesting infection. Among women, tests were the result of knowledge of the partner’s seropositive status in groups P1 and P2. Higher proportion of women undergoing testing because of symptoms of HIV/AIDS infection abolished the difference between genders in the most recent period. A higher percentage of patients enrolling at a more advanced stage of the disease was observed in P3. CONCLUSIONS Despite the increased awareness of the number of HIV/AIDS cases, these patients have identified their serological status late and were admitted to health care units with active disease. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Pará presents specificities in its progression that indicate the complex characteristics of the epidemic in the Northern region of Brazil and across the country. PMID:25741647

  16. Mediation and Moderation: Testing Relationships between Symptom Status, Functional Health, and Quality of Life in HIV Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryu, Ehri; West, Stephen G.; Sousa, Karen H.

    2009-01-01

    We extended Wilson and Cleary's (1995) health-related quality of life model to examine the relationships among symptom status (Symptoms), functional health (Disability), and quality of life (QOL). Using a community sample (N = 956) of male HIV positive patients, we tested a mediation model in which the relationship between Symptoms and QOL is…

  17. Partner Disclosure and Early CD4 Response among HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Treatment in Nairobi Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, T. Tony; Yatich, Nelly; Ngomoa, Richard; McGrath, Christine J.; Richardson, Barbra A.; Sakr, Samah R.; Langat, Agnes; John-Stewart, Grace C.; Chung, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Disclosure of HIV serostatus can have significant benefits for people living with HIV/AIDS. However, there is limited data on whether partner disclosure influences ART treatment response. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of newly diagnosed, ART-naïve HIV-infected adults (>18 years) who enrolled at the Coptic Hope Center in Nairobi, Kenya between January 1st 2009 and July 1st 2011 and initiated ART within 3 months. Analysis was restricted to adults who reported to have either disclosed or not disclosed their HIV status to their partner. Analysis of CD4 response at 6 and 12 months post-ART was stratified by age group. Results Among 615 adults newly initiating ART with partner disclosure data and 12 month follow-up, mean age was 38 years and 52% were male; 76% reported that they had disclosed their HIV-status to their partner. Those who disclosed were significantly younger and more likely to be married/cohabitating than non-disclosers. At baseline, median CD4 counts were similar between disclosure groups. Among younger adults (< 38 years) those who disclosed had higher CD4 recovery than those who did not at 6 months post- ART (mean difference = 31, 95% CI 3 to 58 p = 0.03) but not at 12 months (mean difference = 17, 95% CI -19 to 52, p = 0.4). Among older adults (≥ 38years) there was no observed difference in CD4 recovery at 6 or 12 months between disclosure groups. Conclusion Among younger adults, disclosure of HIV status to partners may be associated with CD4 recovery following ART. PMID:27711164

  18. Morbidity and nutrition status of rural drug-naïve Kenyan women living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Charlotte G; Nyandiko, Winstone; Siika, Abraham; Drorbaugh, Natalie; Samari, Goleen; Ettyang, Grace; Ernst, Judith A

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes morbidity in a group of HIV-positive drug-naïve rural women in western Kenya. A total of 226 drug-naïve HIV-positive women were evaluated for baseline morbidity, immune function, and anthropometry before a food-based nutrition intervention. Kenyan nurses visited women in their homes and conducted semi-structured interviews regarding symptoms and physical signs experienced at the time of the visit and during the previous week and physical inspection. Blood and urine samples were examined for determination of immune function (CD4, CD8, and total lymphocyte counts), anaemia, malaria, and pregnancy status. Intradermal skin testing with tuberculin (PPD), candida, and tetanus toxoid antigens was also performed to evaluate cell-mediated immunity. Anthropometry was measured, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Seventy-six per cent of the women reported being sick on the day of the interview or within the previous week. Illnesses considered serious were reported by 13.7% of women. The most frequent morbidity episodes reported were upper respiratory tract infections (13.3%), suspected malaria (5.85%), skeletal pain (4.87%), and stomach pain (4.42%). The most common morbidity signs on physical inspection were respiratory symptoms, most commonly rhinorrhea and coughing. Confirmed malaria and severe diarrhea were significantly associated with a higher BMI.

  19. Why Are Self-Disclosing Counselors Attractive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peca-Baker, Theresa M., Friedlander, Myrna L.

    1989-01-01

    Contrasted counselors who disclosed personal material similar to client's problem, counselors who disclosed problematic but irrelevant information, counselors who disclosed nothing, and counselors whose similarity was revealed by someone else, using 60 college students role-playing clients. Found both disclosures and similarity information had…

  20. Abnormalities in body composition and nutritional status in HIV-infected children and adolescents on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, L C de Barros; Gonçalves, E M; de Carvalho, W R G; Guerra-Junior, G; Centeville, M; Aoki, F H; Morcillo, A M; dos Santos Vilela, M M; da Silva, M T N

    2011-08-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to compare growth, nutritional status and body composition outcomes between a group of 94 HIV-infected children and adolescents on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and 364 healthy controls, and to evaluate their association with clinical and lifestyle variables within the HIV-infected group. When compared with the control group, HIV patients had higher risk of stunting (odds ratio [OR] 5.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.83-10.04) and thinness (OR 4.7, 95% CI: 2.44-9.06), higher waist-to-hip ratios (medians 0.89 versus 0.82 for boys and 0.90 versus 0.77 for girls, P < 0.001), and lower prevalence of overweight or obesity (OR 0.33, 95% CI: 0.14-0.78). Protease inhibitor usage was associated with thinness (OR 3.51, 95% CI 1.07-11.44) and lipoatrophy (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.37-8.95). HIV-infected children on ART showed significant nutritional status and body composition abnormalities, consistent with the severity of vertical HIV infection and the consequences of prolonged ART.

  1. HIV Disclosure and Sexual Transmission Behaviors among an Internet Sample of HIV-positive Men Who Have Sex with Men in Asia: Implications for Prevention with Positives

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chongyi; Lim, Sin How; Guadamuz, Thomas E.; Koe, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between HIV disclosure and sexual transmission behaviors, and factors that influence disclosure are unknown among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in Asia. We describe disclosure practices and sexual transmission behaviors, and correlates of disclosure among this group of MSM in Asia. A cross-sectional multi-country online survey was conducted among 416 HIV-positive MSM. Data on disclosure status, HIV-related risk behaviors, disease status, and other characteristics were collected. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify significant correlates of disclosure. Only 7.0% reported having disclosed their HIV status to all partners while 67.3% did not disclose to any. The majority (86.5%) of non-disclosing participants had multiple partners and unprotected insertive or receptive anal intercourse with their partners (67.5%). Non-disclosure was significantly associated with non-disclosure from partners (AOR = 37.13, 95% CI: 17.22, 80.07), having casual partners only (AOR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.03, 3.53), drug use before sex on a weekly basis (AOR: 6.48, 95% CI: 0.99, 42.50), being diagnosed with HIV between 1–5 years ago (AOR = 2.23, 95% CI: 1.05, 4.74), and not knowing one’s viral load (AOR = 2.80, 95% CI: 1.00, 7.83). Given the high HIV prevalence and incidence among MSM in Asia, it is imperative to include Prevention with Positives for MSM. Interventions on disclosure should not solely focus on HIV-positive men but also need to include their sexual partners and HIV-negative men. PMID:22198313

  2. The Relationship Between Online Social Network Use, Sexual Risk Behaviors, and HIV Sero-Status Among a Sample of Predominately African American and Latino Men Who have Sex with Men (MSM) Social Media Users.

    PubMed

    Chiu, ChingChe J; Young, Sean D

    2015-06-01

    Social networking technologies have emerged as potential platforms to reach HIV(+) MSM in HIV interventions. This study sought to compare use of online social networking sites (SNSs) and sexual risk behaviors between HIV(+) and HIV(-) individuals among a sample of predominately African American and Latino SNS-using MSM. A total of 112 MSM Facebook users were recruited online and offline and completed an online survey. We performed regression models to assess the association between HIV status, SNS use, and sexual risk behaviors. After adjusting for age, race, and employment status, being HIV positive was significantly associated with a greater number of sexual partners (ARR = 2.84, p = 0.0017) and lower comfort levels of discussing HIV/STI status on SNSs (AOR: 0.23, p = 0.011). Findings suggest that HIV status is associated with sexual risk behaviors and SNS use among SNS-using MSM. We discuss the implications for online HIV prevention.

  3. HLA-A is a Predictor of Hepatitis B e Antigen Status in HIV-Positive African Adults.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philippa C; Carlson, Jonathan M; Beloukas, Apostolos; Malik, Amna; Jooste, Pieter; Ogwu, Anthony; Shapiro, Roger; Riddell, Lynn; Chen, Fabian; Luzzi, Graz; Jesuthasan, Gerald; Jeffery, Katie; Jojic, Nebojsa; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Carrington, Mary; Goulder, Philip J R; Geretti, Anna Maria; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-04-15

    Outcomes of chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) are varied, with increased morbidity reported in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. The factors driving different outcomes are not well understood, but there is increasing interest in an HLA class I effect. We therefore studied the influence of HLA class I on HBV in an African HIV-positive cohort. We demonstrated that virologic markers of HBV disease activity (hepatitis B e antigen status or HBV DNA level) are associated with HLA-A genotype. This finding supports the role of the CD8(+) T-cell response in HBV control, and potentially informs future therapeutic T-cell vaccine strategies.

  4. “It’s My Secret”: Fear of Disclosure among Sub-Saharan African Migrant Women Living with HIV/AIDS in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Arrey, Agnes Ebotabe; Bilsen, Johan; Lacor, Patrick; Deschepper, Reginald

    2015-01-01

    Patients with HIV not only have to deal with the challenges of living with an incurable disease but also with the dilemma of whether or not to disclose their status to their partners, families and friends. This study explores the extent to which sub-Saharan African (SSA) migrant women in Belgium disclose their HIV positive status, reasons for disclosure/non-disclosure and how they deal with HIV disclosure. A qualitative study consisting of interviews with twenty-eight SSA women with HIV/AIDS was conducted. Thematic content analysis was employed to identify themes as they emerged. Our study reveals that these women usually only disclose their status to healthcare professionals because of the treatment and care they need. This selective disclosure is mainly due to the taboo of HIV disease in SSA culture. Stigma, notably self-stigma, greatly impedes HIV disclosure. Techniques to systematically incorporate HIV disclosure into post-test counseling and primary care services are highly recommended. PMID:25781906

  5. Socioeconomic status as a risk factor for HIV infection in women in East, Central and Southern Africa: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wojcicki, Janet Maia

    2005-01-01

    This is a critical, systematic review of the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and HIV infection in women in Southern, Central and Eastern Africa. In light of the interest in micro-credit programmes and other HIV prevention interventions structured to empower women through increasing women's access to funds and education, this review examines the epidemiological and public health literature, which ascertains the association between low SES using different measurements of SES and risk of HIV infection in women. Also, given the focus on structural violence and poverty as factors driving the HIV epidemic at a structural/ecological level, as advocated by Paul Farmer and others, this study examines the extent to which differences in SES between individuals in areas with generalized poverty affect risk for SES. Out of 71 studies retrieved, 36 studies met the inclusion criteria including 30 cross-sectional, one case-control and five prospective cohort or nested case-control studies. Thirty-five studies used at least one measurement of female's SES and fourteen also included a measurement of partner's SES. Studies used variables measuring educational level, household income and occupation or employment status at the individual and neighbourhood level to ascertain SES. Of the 36 studies, fifteen found no association between SES and HIV infection, twelve found an association between high SES and HIV infection, eight found an association between low SES and HIV infection and one was mixed. In interpreting these results, this review examines the role of potential confounders and effect modifiers such as history of STDs, number of partners, living in urban or rural areas and time and location of study in sub-Saharan Africa. It is argued that STDs and number of partners are on the causal pathway under investigation between HIV and SES and should not be adjusted as confounders in any analysis. In conclusion, it is argued that in low-income sub-Saharan Africans

  6. The Impact of Stigma and Social Support on Development of Post-traumatic Growth Among Persons Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Kamen, Charles; Vorasarun, Chaniga; Canning, Ty; Kienitz, Eliza; Weiss, Carolyn; Flores, Sergio; Etter, Darryl; Lee, Susanne; Gore-Felton, Cheryl

    2016-06-01

    Given high rates of trauma in people living with HIV (PLH) and the health benefits of posttraumatic growth (PTG), understanding how to foster PTG in PLH exposed to trauma could be of interest to clinical psychologists working with this population. The current study examined factors theoretically related to development of PTG in PLH, namely HIV-related stigma, disclosure of HIV status, and emotional support. A sample of 334 HIV-positive adults answered a battery of self-report questionnaires. HIV-related stigma, disclosure to sexual partners, and emotional support were significant predictors of PTG: stigma was associated with lower PTG, whereas disclosure and emotional support were associated with higher PTG. Disclosure and emotional support remained significantly associated with PTG in the model including demographic factors and stigma. These findings highlight the need for development of interventions that can aid PLH in disclosing their HIV status to sexual partners and increasing available social support.

  7. Housing Status, Medical Care, and Health Outcomes Among People Living With HIV/AIDS: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael G.; Shubert, Virginia; Gogolishvili, David; Globerman, Jason; Rueda, Sergio; Bozack, Anne K.; Caban, Maria; Rourke, Sean B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Accumulating evidence suggests responses to HIV that combine individual-level interventions with those that address structural or contextual factors that influence risks and health outcomes of infection. Housing is such a factor. Housing occupies a strategic position as an intermediate structural factor, linking “upstream” economic, social, and cultural determinants to the more immediate physical and social environments in which everyday life is lived. The importance of housing status for HIV prevention and care has been recognized, but much of this attention has focused on homeless individuals as a special risk group. Analyses have less often addressed community housing availability and conditions as factors influencing population health or unstable, inadequate, or unaffordable housing as a situation or temporary state. A focus on individual-level characteristics associated with literal homelessness glosses over social, economic, and policy drivers operating largely outside any specific individual’s control that affect housing and residential environments and the health resources or risk exposures such contexts provide. Objectives. We examined the available empirical evidence on the association between housing status (broadly defined), medical care, and health outcomes among people with HIV and analyzed results to inform future research, program development, and policy implementation. Search methods. We searched 8 electronic health and social science databases from January 1, 1996, through March 31, 2014, using search terms related to housing, dwelling, and living arrangements and HIV and AIDS. We contacted experts for additional literature. Selection criteria. We selected articles if they were quantitative analyses published in English, French, or Spanish that included at least 1 measure of housing status as an independent variable and at least 1 health status, health care, treatment adherence, or risk behavior outcome among people with HIV in

  8. Keeping the secret: how HIV-positive children in Iringa, Tanzania, respond to the perceived need for silence and secrecy.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Marguerite

    2015-01-01

    Children who live with HIV may experience two aspects of disclosure: receiving disclosure and disclosing their status to others. The objective of this paper is to explore how HIV-positive children respond to: (1) the disclosure process; and (2) the perceived need for secrecy and silence concerning living with HIV. Thirteen HIV-positive children between the ages of 10 and 15 years were recruited through a HIV treatment centre in Iringa, Tanzania. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with the children and staff members. The children received disclosure about their status from healthcare workers rather than caregivers. Several children were asked by their caregivers to keep their status secret, some chose to do so themselves, largely to avoid experienced or perceived stigma from the community. Secrecy had an impact on potentially supportive relationships. Children tend to mimic adult responses, including partial disclosure and lying to others.

  9. A Mixed-Methods Study Supporting a Model of Chinese Parental HIV Disclosure

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joyce P.; Xie, Tianyi; Simoni, Jane M.; Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-ti

    2017-01-01

    Parents who are HIV-positive confront difficult decisions regarding whether, when, and how to disclose their HIV status to their children. In China, a setting of acute HIV stigma where family harmony is culturally valued, limited research has been conducted on parental disclosure. We aimed to develop a model of parental disclosure that accounts for the cultural context in China based on a mixed-methods study. In our individual, in-depth interviews (N = 24) as well as survey data (N = 84) collected from parents living with HIV in Shanghai and Beijing, we found the primary barriers to disclosure were stigma, fear of exposing the mode by which they acquired HIV, psychologically burdening the child, rejection by the child, and negative social consequences for the family. Parents concurrently cited many motivations for disclosure, such as disease progression, ensuring safety of the child, gaining assistance, and fulfilling their parental responsibility. Most parents had not actively disclosed their HIV status (68 %); many parents reported some form of partial disclosure (e.g., sharing they have a blood disease but not labeling it HIV), unplanned disclosure, or unintentional disclosure to their children by other people. Findings informed the development of a Chinese Parental HIV Disclosure Model, with primary components accounting for distal cultural factors, decision-making (balancing approach and avoid motivations), the disclosure event, and outcomes resulting from the disclosure. This model highlights the cultural context of the Chinese parental disclosure process, and may be useful in guiding future observational research and intervention work. PMID:25877832

  10. Dating, Marriage, and Parenthood for HIV-Positive Heterosexual Puerto Rican Men: Normalizing Perspectives on Everyday Life With HIV

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Francisco; Sheehan, Diana M.; Gonzalez, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    HIV-positive men are living long and healthier lives while managing HIV as a chronic illness. Although research has extensively documented the experiences of illness of people living with HIV, dating, marriage, and fatherhood among heterosexual Latino men has not been examined. To address this gap, this study used a qualitative study design to examine patterns and strategies for dating, marriage, and parenthood among 24 HIV-positive heterosexual Puerto Rican men living in Boston. The findings in our study indicate that an HIV diagnosis does not necessarily deter men from having an active sexual life, marrying, or having children. In fact, for some of the men, engaging in these social and life-changing events is part of moving on and normalizing life with HIV; these men planned for, achieved, and interpreted these events in the context of establishing normalcy with HIV. Although the HIV diagnosis discouraged some men from engaging in sexual relations, getting married, or having children, others fulfilled these desires with strategies aimed to reconciling their HIV status in their personal life, including dating or marrying HIV-positive women only. Additional important themes identified in this study include the decision to disclose HIV status to new sexual partners as well as the decision to accept the risk of HIV transmission to a child or partner in order to fulfill desires of fatherhood. Understanding the personal struggles, decision-making patterns, and needs of HIV-positive heterosexual men can aid in designing interventions that support healthy living with HIV. PMID:24794822

  11. Dietary intake and nutritional status of HIV-1-infected children and adolescents in Florianopolis, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hillesheim, Elaine; Lima, Luiz R A; Silva, Rosane C R; Trindade, Erasmo B S M

    2014-05-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the nutritional status and dietary intake of HIV-infected children and adolescents and the relationship between nutritional status and dietary intake and CD4(+) T-cell count and viral load. The sample was composed of 49 subjects aged 7-17 years and living in Florianópolis, Brazil. Nutritional status was assessed by height-for-age and body mass index-for-age. Dietary intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Spearman correlations and multiple linear regressions were used to determine the relationship between energy, nutrient intake and body mass index-for-age and CD4(+) T-cell count and viral load. The mean body mass index-for-age and height-for-age values were -0.26 ± 0.86 and -0.56 ± 0.92, respectively. The energy intake was 50.8% above the estimated energy requirement and inadequate intake of polyunsaturated fat, cholesterol, fibre, calcium and vitamin C was present in 100%, 57.1%, 40.8%, 61.2% and 26.5% of the sample, respectively. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that energy intake was correlated with CD4+ T-cell count (r = 0.33; p = 0.028) and viral load (r = -0.35; p = 0.019). These data showed low body mass index-for-age and height-for-age z-scores, high energy intake and inadequate intake of important nutrients for immune function, growth and control of chronic diseases. A lower energy intake was correlated with viral suppression and immune preservation.

  12. Safer disclosure of HIV serostatus for women living with HIV who experience or fear violence: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Caitlin E; Haberlen, Sabina; Amin, Avni; Baggaley, Rachel; Narasimhan, Manjulaa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Supporting individuals as they disclose their HIV serostatus may lead to a variety of individual and public health benefits. However, many women living with HIV are hesitant to disclose their HIV status due to fear of negative outcomes such as violence, abandonment, relationship dissolution and stigma. Methods We conducted a systematic review of studies evaluating interventions to facilitate safer disclosure of HIV status for women living with HIV who experience or fear violence. Articles, conference abstracts and programme reports were included if they reported post-intervention evaluation results and were published before 1 April 2015. Searching was conducted through electronic databases for peer-reviewed articles and conference abstracts, reviewing websites of relevant organizations for grey literature, hand searching reference lists of included studies and contacting experts. Systematic methods were used for screening and data abstraction, which was conducted in duplicate. Study quality (rigor) was assessed with the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Results Two interventions met the inclusion criteria: the Safe Homes and Respect for Everyone cluster-randomized trial of combination HIV and intimate partner violence (IPV) services in Rakai, Uganda, and the South Africa HIV/AIDS Antenatal Post-Test Support study individual randomized trial of an enhanced counselling intervention for pregnant women undergoing HIV testing and counselling. Both programmes integrated screening for IPV into HIV testing services and trained counsellors to facilitate discussions about disclosure based on a woman's risk of violence. However, both were implemented as part of multiple-component interventions, making it impossible to isolate the impact of the safer disclosure components. Conclusions The existing evidence base for interventions to facilitate safe HIV serostatus disclosure for women who experience or fear violence is limited. Development and implementation of new

  13. Vitamin D status and its association with morbidity including wasting and opportunistic illnesses in HIV-infected women in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Saurabh; Mugusi, Ferdinand M; Spiegelman, Donna; Villamor, Eduardo; Finkelstein, Julia L; Hertzmark, Ellen; Giovannucci, Edward L; Msamanga, Gernard I; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin D has a potential role in preventing HIV-related complications, based on its extensive involvement in immune and metabolic function, including preventing osteoporosis and premature cardiovascular disease. However, this association has not been examined in large studies or in resource-limited settings. Vitamin D levels were assessed in 884 HIV-infected pregnant women at enrollment in a trial of multivitamin supplementation (excluding vitamin D) in Tanzania. Information on HIV related complications was recorded during follow-up (median, 70 months). Proportional hazards models and generalized estimating equations were used to assess the relationship of vitamin D status with these outcomes. Women with low vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D<32 ng/mL) had 43% higher risk of reaching a body mass index (BMI) less than 18 kg/m(2) during the first 2 years of follow-up, compared to women with adequate vitamin D levels (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.43; 95% confidence intervals: [1.03-1.99]). The relationship between continuous vitamin D levels and risk of BMI less than 18 kg/m(2) during follow-up was inverse and linear (p=0.03). Women with low vitamin D levels had significantly higher incidence of acute upper respiratory infections (HR: 1.27 [1.04-1.54]) and thrush (HR: 2.74 [1.29-5.83]) diagnosed during the first 2 years of follow-up. Low vitamin D status was a significant risk factor for wasting and HIV-related complications such as thrush during follow-up in this prospective cohort in Tanzania. If these protective associations are confirmed in randomized trials, vitamin D supplementation could represent a simple and inexpensive method to improve health and quality of life of HIV-infected patients, particularly in resource-limited settings.

  14. Exploring risk of experiencing intimate partner violence after HIV infection: a qualitative study among women with HIV attending postnatal services in Swaziland

    PubMed Central

    Mulrenan, Claire; Colombini, Manuela; Kikuvi, Joshua; Mayhew, Susannah H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore risks of experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) after HIV infection among women with HIV in a postnatal care setting in Swaziland. Design A qualitative semistructured in-depth interview study, using thematic analysis with deductive and inductive coding, of IPV experiences after HIV infection extracted from service-integration interview transcripts. Setting Swaziland. Participants 19 women with HIV, aged 18–44, were purposively sampled for an in-depth interview about their experiences of services, HIV and IPV from a quantitative postnatal cohort participating in an evaluation of HIV and reproductive health services integration in Swaziland. Results Results indicated that women were at risk of experiencing IPV after HIV infection, with 9 of 19 disclosing experiences of physical violence and/or coercive control post-HIV. IPV was initiated through two key pathways: (1) acute interpersonal triggers (eg, status disclosure, mother-to-child transmission of HIV) and (2) chronic normative tensions (eg, fertility intentions, initiating contraceptives). Conclusions The results highlight a need to mitigate the risk of IPV for women with HIV in shorter and longer terms in Swaziland. While broader changes are needed to resolve gender disparities, practical steps can be institutionalised within health facilities to reduce, or avoid increasing, IPV pathways for women with HIV. These might include mutual disclosure between partners, greater engagement of Swazi males with HIV services, and promoting positive masculinities that support and protect women. Trial registration number NCT01694862. PMID:25976760

  15. Prevention Needs of HIV-Positive Men and Women Awaiting Release from Prison

    PubMed Central

    Thibodeau, Laura; BlueSpruce, June; Yard, Samantha S.; Seal, David W.; Amico, K. Rivet; Bogart, Laura M.; Mahoney, Christine; Balderson, Benjamin H. K.; Sosman, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Greater understanding of barriers to risk reduction among incarcerated HIV+ persons reentering the community is needed to inform culturally tailored interventions. This qualitative study elicited HIV prevention-related information, motivation and behavioral skills (IMB) needs of 30 incarcerated HIV+ men and women awaiting release from state prison. Unmet information needs included risk questions about viral loads, positive sexual partners, and transmission through casual contact. Social motivational barriers to risk reduction included partner perceptions that prison release increases sexual desirability, partners’ negative condom attitudes, and HIV disclosure-related fears of rejection. Personal motivational barriers included depression and strong desires for sex or substance use upon release. Behavioral skills needs included initiating safer behaviors with partners with whom condoms had not been used prior to incarceration, disclosing HIV status, and acquiring clean needles or condoms upon release. Stigma and privacy concerns were prominent prison context barriers to delivering HIV prevention services during incarceration. PMID:21553252

  16. Prevention needs of HIV-positive men and women awaiting release from prison.

    PubMed

    Catz, Sheryl L; Thibodeau, Laura; BlueSpruce, June; Yard, Samantha S; Seal, David W; Amico, K Rivet; Bogart, Laura M; Mahoney, Christine; Balderson, Benjamin H K; Sosman, James M

    2012-01-01

    Greater understanding of barriers to risk reduction among incarcerated HIV+ persons reentering the community is needed to inform culturally tailored interventions. This qualitative study elicited HIV prevention-related information, motivation and behavioral skills (IMB) needs of 30 incarcerated HIV+ men and women awaiting release from state prison. Unmet information needs included risk questions about viral loads, positive sexual partners, and transmission through casual contact. Social motivational barriers to risk reduction included partner perceptions that prison release increases sexual desirability, partners' negative condom attitudes, and HIV disclosure-related fears of rejection. Personal motivational barriers included depression and strong desires for sex or substance use upon release. Behavioral skills needs included initiating safer behaviors with partners with whom condoms had not been used prior to incarceration, disclosing HIV status, and acquiring clean needles or condoms upon release. Stigma and privacy concerns were prominent prison context barriers to delivering HIV prevention services during incarceration.

  17. How well does spirituality predict health status in adults living with HIV-Disease: A Neuman systems model study.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Rachel K

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between spirituality and health status of 39 adult men and women living with HIV-disease. A model building approach was used to explore the associations among the five variables of the Neuman systems model, which was the guiding framework for the study. The model presented includes existential well-being, meaningfulness, age, and income.

  18. HIV Status Does Not Influence Outcome in Patients With Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Treated With Chemotherapy Using Doxorubicin, Bleomycin, Vinblastine, and Dacarbazine in the Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Era

    PubMed Central

    Montoto, Silvia; Shaw, Kate; Okosun, Jessica; Gandhi, Shreyans; Fields, Paul; Wilson, Andrew; Shanyinde, Milensu; Cwynarski, Kate; Marcus, Robert; de Vos, Johannes; Young, Anna Marie; Tenant-Flowers, Melinda; Orkin, Chloe; Johnson, Margaret; Chilton, Daniella; Gribben, John G.; Bower, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The prognosis of HIV-infected patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era approaches that of the general population when they are treated with the same protocols. We analyzed the outcome of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treated with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) in the HAART era according to HIV serostatus to establish whether this also holds true for HL. Patients and Methods From 1997 to 2010, 224 patients newly diagnosed with HL, of whom 93 were HIV positive, were consecutively treated with ABVD chemotherapy. HIV-positive patients had more high-risk disease according to the International Prognostic Score (IPS) than HIV-negative patients (IPS ≥ 3: 68% v 26%, respectively; P < .001). Forty-seven HIV-positive patients had a CD4 count less than 200/μL, and 92 patients received HAART during chemotherapy. Results The complete response rate was 74% for HIV-positive patients and 79% for HIV-negative patients (P = not significant). After a median follow-up of 60 months (range, 8 to 174 months), 23 patients (16 HIV-negative and seven HIV-positive patients) have experienced relapse at a median time of 6 months (range, 1 to 106 months). Five-year event-free survival (EFS) was 59% (95% CI, 47% to 70%) for HIV-positive patients and 66% (95% CI, 57% to 74%) for HIV-negative patients (P = not significant). Five-year overall survival (OS) was 81% (95% CI, 69% to 89%) and 88% (95% CI, 80% to 93%) for HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients, respectively (P = not significant). HIV status did not predict OS or EFS on multivariate analysis including IPS and HIV status. Conclusion This mature study demonstrates that HIV-positive patients with HL have more extensive disease with more adverse prognostic factors than HIV-negative patients, but when treated with ABVD, HIV infection does not adversely affect OS or EFS. PMID:23045581

  19. Leveraging Cancer Therapeutics for the HIV Cure Agenda: Current Status and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Polizzotto, Mark N; Chen, Grace; Tressler, Randall L; Godfrey, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    Despite effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) and undetectable HIV RNA in the plasma, latent replication-competent HIV persists indefinitely in long-lived cells. Cessation of ART results in rebound of HIV from these persistent reservoirs. While this was thought to be an insurmountable obstacle to viral eradication, recent cases suggest otherwise. To date one patient has been "cured" of HIV and several others have been able to interrupt ART without viral rebound for prolonged periods. These events have sparked renewed interest in developing strategies that will allow eradication of HIV in infected individuals. We review the current knowledge of HIV latency and the viral reservoir, describe the potential utility of emerging cancer therapeutics in HIV cure research with an emphasis on pathways implicated in reservoir persistence, and outline opportunities and challenges in the context of the current clinical trial and regulatory environment.

  20. Leveraging Cancer Therapeutics for the HIV Cure Agenda: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Polizzotto, Mark N.; Chen, Grace; Tressler, Randall L.; Godfrey, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Despite effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) and undetectable HIV RNA in the plasma, latent replication-competent HIV persists indefinitely in long-lived cells. Cessation of ART results in rebound of HIV from these persistent reservoirs. While this was thought to be an insurmountable obstacle to viral eradication, recent cases suggest otherwise. To date one patient has been “cured” of HIV and several others have been able to interrupt ART without viral rebound for prolonged periods. These events have sparked renewed interest in developing strategies that will allow eradication of HIV in infected individuals. We review the current knowledge of HIV latency and the viral reservoir, describe the potential utility of emerging cancer therapeutics in HIV cure research with an emphasis on pathways implicated in reservoir persistence, and outline opportunities and challenges in the context of the current clinical trial and regulatory environment. PMID:26224205

  1. Food consumption patterns, diversity of food nutrients and mean nutrient intake in relation to HIV/AIDS status in Kisumu district Kenya.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Agatha Christine; Walingo, Mary Khakoni; Othuon, Lucas

    2009-09-01

    As the causes and consequences of the AIDS epidemic become clearer, so does the fundamental importance of food and nutritional security for HIV-affected individuals. Even as food insecurity remains a major problem in poor households, its effects are worsened in disease states like HIV infection. Food deficiency and nutritional inadequacy compromise an individual's physical status and work capacity, and may also diminish their resource base and household provisioning. The prevalence of HIV and AIDS in Kenya threatens food production systems, which intensifies poverty, increases the nutritional implications for HIV-infected individuals, accelerates the rate of orphanhood beyond what existing social networks can cope with, and basically affects all indicators of socio-economic development in the country. This cross-sectional study sought to assess food and nutrient intake in HIV-affected versus non-HIV-affected households. Purposive sampling was used to select 160 households (77 HIV-affected households and 83 non-HIV-affected households) in Kisumu district, a lowland area along Lake Victoria. A consolidated questionnaire that included a food-frequency checklist and personal 24-hour dietary recall was used to gather information from 40 households. The data were analysed quantitatively; descriptive statistics were mainly measures of central tendency, and inferential statistics involved chi-square tests and independent t-test samples. A table depicting food composition was used to compute the nutrient intake of each household. The findings reveal a significant relationship between a household's HIV/AIDS status and nutrient intake.

  2. Associations between Forced Sexual Initiation, HIV Status, Sexual Risk Behavior, Life Stressors, and Coping Strategies among Adolescents in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Some individuals experience their first sexual intercourse through physically forced sex, which affects the way they experience and cope with stress. We examined differences in sexual risk behavior, experience of stressors, and use of stress-coping strategies among adolescents in Nigeria based on their history of forced sexual initiation and HIV status. Methods We analyzed data from 436 sexually active 10–19-year-old adolescents recruited through a population-based survey from 12 Nigerian states. Using Lazarus and Folkman’s conceptual framework of stress and coping, we assessed if adolescents who reported forced sexual initiation were more likely to report HIV sexual risk practices, to report as stressors events related to social expectations, medical care and body images, and loss and grief, and to use more avoidance than adaptive coping strategies to manage stress. We also assessed if HIV status affected experience of stressors and use of coping strategies. Results Eighty-one adolescents (18.6%) reported a history of forced sexual initiation; these participants were significantly more likely to report anal sex practices (OR: 5.04; 95% CI: 2.14–11.87), and transactional sex (OR: 2.80; 95% CI: 1.56–4.95). Adolescents with no history of forced sexual initiation were more likely to identify as stressors, life events related to social expectations (OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.96–1.11) and loss and grief (OR: 1.34; 95% CI: 0.73–2.65), but not those related to medical care and body images (OR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.34–1.18). They were also more likely to use adaptive responses (OR: 1.48; 95% CI: 0.62–3.50) than avoidance responses (OR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.49–1.64) to cope with stress, though these differences were not significant. More adolescents with a history of forced sexual initiation who were HIV positive identified as stressors, life events related to medical care and body images (p = 0.03) and loss and grief (p = 0.009). Adolescents reporting forced

  3. Intimate Partner Violence after Disclosure of HIV Test Results among Pregnant Women in Harare, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Shamu, Simukai; Zarowsky, Christina; Shefer, Tamara; Temmerman, Marleen; Abrahams, Naeemah

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV status disclosure is a central strategy in HIV prevention and treatment but in high prevalence settings women test disproportionately and most often during pregnancy. This study reports intimate partner violence (IPV) following disclosure of HIV test results by pregnant women. Methods In this cross sectional study we interviewed 1951 postnatal women who tested positive and negative for HIV about IPV experiences following HIV test disclosure, using an adapted WHO questionnaire. Multivariate regression models assessed factors associated with IPV after disclosure and controlled for factors such as previous IPV and other known behavioural factors associated with IPV. Results Over 93% (1817) disclosed the HIV results to their partners (96.5% HIV− vs. 89.3% HIV+, p<0.0001). Overall HIV prevalence was 15.3%, (95%CI:13.7–16.9), 35.2% among non-disclosers and 14.3% among disclosers. Overall 32.8% reported IPV (40.5% HIV+; 31.5% HIV− women, p = 0.004). HIV status was associated with IPV (partially adjusted 1.43: (95%CI:1.00–2.05 as well as reporting negative reactions by male partners immediately after disclosure (adjusted OR 5.83, 95%CI:4.31–7.80). Factors associated with IPV were gender inequity, past IPV, risky sexual behaviours and living with relatives. IPV after HIV disclosure in pregnancy is high but lower than and is strongly related with IPV before pregnancy (adjusted OR 6.18, 95%CI: 3.84–9.93). Conclusion The study demonstrates the interconnectedness of IPV, HIV status and its disclosure with IPV which was a common experience post disclosure of both an HIV positive and HIV negative result. Health services must give attention to the gendered nature and consequences of HIV disclosure such as enskilling women on how to determine and respond to the risks associated with disclosure. Efforts to involve men in antenatal care must also be strengthened. PMID:25350001

  4. Household and community HIV/AIDS status and child malnutrition in sub-Saharan Africa: evidence from the demographic and health surveys.

    PubMed

    Magadi, Monica A

    2011-08-01

    This paper examines the extent to which under five children in households or communities adversely affected by HIV/AIDS are disadvantaged, in comparison with other children in less affected households/communities. The study is based on secondary analysis of the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data collected during 2003-2008 from 18 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, where the DHS has included HIV test data for adults of reproductive age. We apply multilevel logistic regression models that take into account the effect of contextual community/country level HIV/AIDS factors on child malnutrition. The outcome variable of interest is child undernutrition: stunting, wasting and underweight. The results suggest that across countries in sub-Saharan Africa, children whose mothers are infected with HIV are significantly more likely to be stunted, wasted or underweight compared to their counterparts of similar demographic and socio-economic background whose mothers are not infected. However, the nutritional status of children who are paternal orphans or in households where other adults are HIV positive are not significantly different from non-orphaned children or those in households where no adult is infected with HIV. Other adult household members being HIV positive is, however, associated with higher malnutrition among younger children below the age of one. Further analysis reveals that the effect of mothers' HIV status on child nutritional status (underweight) varies significantly across communities within countries, the effect being lower in communities with generally higher levels of malnutrition. Overall, the findings have important implications for policy and programme efforts towards improved integration of HIV/AIDS and child nutrition services in affected communities and other sub-groups of the population made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS. In particular, children whose mothers are infected with HIV deserve special attention.

  5. Status of HIV and hepatitis C virus infections among prisoners in the Middle East and North Africa: review and synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Heijnen, Marieke; Mumtaz, Ghina R; Abu-Raddad, Laith J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The status of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among incarcerated populations in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and the links between prisons and the HIV epidemic are poorly understood. This review synthesized available HIV and HCV data in prisons in MENA and highlighted opportunities for action. Methods The review was based on data generated through the systematic searches of the MENA HIV/AIDS Epidemiology Synthesis Project (2003 to December 15, 2015) and the MENA HCV Epidemiology Synthesis Project (2011 to December 15, 2015). Sources of data included peer-reviewed publications and country-level reports and databases. Results and discussion We estimated a population of 496,000 prisoners in MENA, with drug-related offences being a major cause for incarceration. Twenty countries had data on HIV among incarcerated populations with a median prevalence of 0.6% in Afghanistan, 6.1% in Djibouti, 0.01% in Egypt, 2.5% in Iran, 0% in Iraq, 0.1% in Jordan, 0.05% in Kuwait, 0.7% in Lebanon, 18.0% in Libya, 0.7% in Morocco, 0.3% in Oman, 1.1% in Pakistan, 0% in Palestine, 1.2% in Saudi Arabia, 0% in Somalia, 5.3% in Sudan and South Sudan, 0.04% in Syria, 0.05% in Tunisia, and 3.5% in Yemen. Seven countries had data on HCV, with a median prevalence of 1.7% in Afghanistan, 23.6% in Egypt, 28.1% in Lebanon, 15.6% in Pakistan, and 37.8% in Iran. Syria and Libya had only one HCV prevalence measure each at 1.5% and 23.7%, respectively. There was strong evidence for injecting drug use and the use of non-sterile injecting-equipment in prisons. Incarceration and injecting drugs, use of non-sterile injecting-equipment, and tattooing in prisons were found to be independent risk factors for HIV or HCV infections. High levels of sexual risk behaviour, tattooing and use of non-sterile razors among prisoners were documented. Conclusions Prisons play an important role in HIV and HCV dynamics in MENA and have facilitated the emergence of large HIV epidemics in

  6. Racial differences in the accuracy of perceived partner HIV status among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Grey, Jeremy A; Rothenberg, Richard; Sullivan, Patrick S; Rosenberg, Eli S

    2015-01-01

    We compared perceptions of partner HIV status to HIV test results in a cross-sectional study of sexual networks of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Atlanta. We then examined differences between black and white MSM in the predictive value of perceived partner status. We recruited men ("seeds") using time-space venue sampling. These seeds then referred up to three partners, who could also refer partners. All participants reported sexual behavior and HIV status for recent partners and received HIV tests. For partners who enrolled, we compared laboratory diagnoses to their partner's perception of their status. Black MSM who perceived themselves to be HIV negative were more likely than perceived-negative white MSM to have a positive partner among those they perceived to be HIV negative or whose status was unknown to them (OR=6.6). Furthermore, although frequency of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) was similar by race, black men were more likely to have had UAI with an unknown-positive partner (OR=9.3).

  7. Analyses of Sensitivity to the Missing-at-Random Assumption Using Multiple Imputation With Delta Adjustment: Application to a Tuberculosis/HIV Prevalence Survey With Incomplete HIV-Status Data.

    PubMed

    Leacy, Finbarr P; Floyd, Sian; Yates, Tom A; White, Ian R

    2017-01-10

    Multiple imputation with delta adjustment provides a flexible and transparent means to impute univariate missing data under general missing-not-at-random mechanisms. This facilitates the conduct of analyses assessing sensitivity to the missing-at-random (MAR) assumption. We review the delta-adjustment procedure and demonstrate how it can be used to assess sensitivity to departures from MAR, both when estimating the prevalence of a partially observed outcome and when performing parametric causal mediation analyses with a partially observed mediator. We illustrate the approach using data from 34,446 respondents to a tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence survey that was conducted as part of the Zambia-South Africa TB and AIDS Reduction Study (2006-2010). In this study, information on partially observed HIV serological values was supplemented by additional information on self-reported HIV status. We present results from 2 types of sensitivity analysis: The first assumed that the degree of departure from MAR was the same for all individuals with missing HIV serological values; the second assumed that the degree of departure from MAR varied according to an individual's self-reported HIV status. Our analyses demonstrate that multiple imputation offers a principled approach by which to incorporate auxiliary information on self-reported HIV status into analyses based on partially observed HIV serological values.

  8. Importance of Women's Relative Socioeconomic Status within Sexual Relationships in Communication about Safer Sex and HIV/STI Prevention.

    PubMed

    Muchomba, Felix M; Chan, Christine; El-Bassel, Nabila

    2015-06-01

    The socioeconomic status (SES) of women is increasingly considered an important factor for HIV/STI risk. The HIV/STI literature has largely focused on women's absolute levels of SES, and therefore, the importance of their SES relative to their male sexual partners remains understudied. This paper examines the association between women's relative SES and frequency of safer sex communication among heterosexual couples. A convenience sample of 342 couples (N = 684) recruited in New York City was asked about frequency of discussions with their partner about the need to use male condoms, about HIV prevention, and about STI prevention in the previous 90 days. Differences between partners in education, income, employment, housing, and incarceration history were combined using principal component analysis to form an index of women's relative SES. Negative binomial regression models assessed associations between woman's relative SES and communication frequency controlling for age, sex, race, ethnicity, education, and relationship type using a generalized estimating equation framework. On average, participants had 2.5, 4.2, and 4.8 discussions regarding the need to use male condoms, about HIV prevention, and about STI prevention, respectively. A one standard deviation increase in a woman's relative SES score was associated with increased frequency of discussions about male condom use (adjusted rate ratio [aRR], 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.29), about HIV prevention (aRR, 1.25; CI, 1.14-1.37), and about STI prevention (aRR, 1.29; CI, 1.18-1.41). Women's relative SES may be an important factor for sexual communication, and further research on its role in HIV/STI risk may uncover avenues for intervention.

  9. Fluctuations in Blood Marginal Zone B-Cell Frequencies May Reflect Migratory Patterns Associated with HIV-1 Disease Progression Status

    PubMed Central

    Poudrier, Johanne; Roger, Michel

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that overexpression of BLyS/BAFF was associated with increased relative frequencies of innate “precursor” marginal zone (MZ)-like B-cells in the blood of HIV-1-infected rapid and classic progressors. However, along with relatively normal BLyS/BAFF expression levels, these cells remain unaltered in elite-controllers (EC), rather, percentages of more mature MZ-like B-cells are decreased in the blood of these individuals. Fluctuations in frequencies of blood MZ-like B-cell populations may reflect migratory patterns associated with disease progression status, suggesting an important role for these cells in HIV-1 pathogenesis. We have therefore longitudinally measured plasma levels of B-tropic chemokines by ELISA-based technology as well as their ligands by flow-cytometry on blood B-cell populations of HIV-1-infected individuals with different rates of disease progression and uninfected controls. Migration potential of B-cell populations from these individuals were determined by chemotaxis assays. We found important modulations of CXCL13-CXCR5, CXCL12-CXCR4/CXCR7, CCL20-CCR6 and CCL25-CCR9 chemokine-axes and increased cell migration patterns in HIV progressors. Interestingly, frequencies of CCR6 expressing cells were significantly elevated within the precursor MZ-like population, consistent with increased migration in response to CCL20. Although we found little modulation of chemokine-axes in EC, cell migration was greater than that observed for uninfected controls, especially for MZ-like B-cells. Overall the immune response against HIV-1 may involve recruitment of MZ-like B-cells to peripheral sites. Moreover, our findings suggest that “regulated” attraction of these cells in a preserved BLyS/BAFF non-inflammatory environment, such as encountered in EC could be beneficial to the battle and even control of HIV. PMID:27203285

  10. The Silk Road Health Project: How Mobility and Migration Status Influence HIV Risks among Male Migrant Workers in Central Asia

    PubMed Central

    El-Bassel, Nabila; Gilbert, Louisa; Shaw, Stacey A.; Mergenova, Gaukhar; Terlikbayeva, Assel; Primbetova, Sholpan; Ma, Xin; Chang, Mingway; Ismayilova, Leyla; Hunt, Tim; West, Brooke; Wu, Elwin; Beyrer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We examined whether mobility, migrant status, and risk environments are associated with sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV risk behaviors (e.g. sex trading, multiple partners, and unprotected sex). Methods We used Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) to recruit external male migrant market vendors from Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan as well internal migrant and non-migrant market vendors from Kazakhstan. We conducted multivariate logistic regressions to examine the effects of mobility combined with the interaction between mobility and migration status on STIs and sexual risk behaviors, when controlling for risk environment characteristics. Results Mobility was associated with increased risk for biologically-confirmed STIs, sex trading, and unprotected sex among non-migrants, but not among internal or external migrants. Condom use rates were low among all three groups, particularly external migrants. Risk environment factors of low-income status, debt, homelessness, and limited access to medical care were associated with unprotected sex among external migrants. Conclusion Study findings underscore the role mobility and risk environments play in shaping HIV/STI risks. They highlight the need to consider mobility in the context of migration status and other risk environment factors in developing effective prevention strategies for this population. PMID:26967159

  11. Stigmatization of patients with HIV/AIDS among doctors and nurses in Belize.

    PubMed

    Andrewin, Aisha; Chien, Li-Yin

    2008-11-01

    This study, conducted from August to September 2007, utilized a population-based survey to investigate stigmatizing attitudes and acts of discrimination against HIV/AIDS patients among doctors and nurses working in public hospitals in Belize. A total of 230 subjects (81.0%) completed the survey. The mean age was 36.8 years; 75% were women; 61% were nurses; 74% were Belizean. Stigmatization was greatest for "attitudes of blame/judgment"; disclosing a patient's HIV/AIDS status to colleagues was the most frequent act of discrimination (29%). Formal HIV/AIDS training was significantly associated with less stigmatization for "attitudes towards imposed measures" (p < .01); "attitudes of blame/judgment" (p < 0.05); and testing without consent (p < 0.05). Doctors showed more stigmatization in "attitudes towards imposed measures," conducted HIV tests without consent and disclosed patient status to colleagues more frequently than nurses (p < 0.05) while nurses gave differential care to patients based on HIV status more frequently (p < 0.01) than doctors. Female and religious health care workers (HCWs) were more stigmatizing in their "attitudes of blame/judgment" than male and nonreligious HCWs (p < 0.05). Cuban HCWs were more stigmatizing in their "attitudes toward imposed measures" and were less comfortable dealing with HIV/AIDS patients than their Belizean counterparts (p < 0.01). Older age was associated with less frequent disclosure of patients' HIV status (p < 0.05). HIV/AIDS training that incorporates stigma reduction strategies tailored to the target groups identified is needed. Additionally, we recommend that the effectiveness of national HIV/AIDS policies be investigated.

  12. A pilot study of immigration status, homosexual self-acceptance, social support, and HIV reduction in high risk Asian and Pacific Islander men.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, L S; Faust, M; Roque, J S; Loue, S

    1999-04-01

    This article reports the results of a cross-sectional study that was conducted to describe the sexual behavior and HIV risk reduction behaviors of homosexual and bisexual Asian and Pacific Islander men and to relate immigration status, self-acceptance as a homosexual, and levels of social support to the adoption of safe sexual behaviors in this population. Thirty-one gay and bisexual Asian and Pacific Islander men in San Diego County, California, participated. Generally high levels of knowledge about HIV and transmission risks as well as self-acceptance and social support were found. While most (84%) reported some attempts to increase condom use in the previous 6 months, 42% reported engaging in unprotected intercourse during that same time period. An inverse relationship between self-acceptance and utilization of risk reduction strategies was found. No association was found between immigration status or self-reported HIV status and level of HIV knowledge, level of HIV risk behavior, or level of HIV risk reduction efforts. The findings are discussed within the context of other social network studies and HIV prevention programs for gay and bisexual Asian and Pacific Islander men.

  13. ‘I am doing fine only because I have not told anyone’: the necessity of concealment in the lives of people living with HIV in India

    PubMed Central

    George, Mathew Sunil; Lambert, Helen

    2015-01-01

    In HIV prevention and care programmes, disclosure of status by HIV-positive individuals is generally encouraged to contain the infection and provide adequate support to the person concerned. Lack of disclosure is generally framed as a barrier to preventive behaviours and accessing support. The assumption that disclosure is beneficial is also reflected in studies that aim to identify determinants of disclosure and recommend individual-level measures to promote disclosure. However, in contexts where HIV infection is stigmatised and there is fear of rejection and discrimination among those living with HIV, concealment of status becomes a way to try and regain as much as possible the life that was disrupted by the discovery of HIV infection. In this study of HIV-positive women and children in India, concealment was considered essential by individuals and families of those living with HIV to re-establish and maintain their normal lives in an environment where stigma and discrimination were prevalent. This paper describes why women and care givers of children felt the need to conceal HIV status, the various ways in which people tried to do so and the implications for treatment of people living with HIV. We found that while women were generally willing to disclose their status to their husband or partner, they were very keen to conceal their status from all others, including family members. Parents and carers with an HIV-positive child were not willing to disclose this status to the child or to others. Understanding the different rationales for concealment would help policy makers and programme managers to develop more appropriate care management strategies and train care providers to assist clients in accessing care and support without disrupting their lives. PMID:25706959

  14. Disclosure of their Status to Youth with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Sagué, Consuelo; Pinzón-Iregui, Maria Claudia; Abreu-Pérez, Rosa; Lerebours-Nadal, Leonel; Navarro, Christi M.; Ibanez, Gladys; Soto, Solange; Halpern, Mina; Nicholas, Stephen W.; Dévieux, Jessy G.

    2014-01-01

    A mixed-methods study was conducted to determine the proportion of HIV-infected children who knew their status, identify characteristics associated with children’s knowledge of their status, and describe caregivers’ and adolescents’ experiences relevant to disclosure in the Dominican Republic (DR). Of 327 patients aged 6–18 years treated in the principal DR pediatric HIV facilities, 74 (22.6%) knew their status. Patients aged 13 years or older and/or who had participated in non-clinical activities for HIV-infected children were more likely to know their status. Caregivers who had disclosed cited healthcare providers’ advice, children’s desire to know and concerns that children might initiate sexual activity before knowing or discover their status by accidental or malicious disclosure. Non-disclosing caregivers worried that children would be traumatized by disclosure and/or stigmatized if they revealed it to others. Adolescents supported disclosure by 10–12 years of age, considered withholding of children’s HIV diagnosis ill-advised, and recommended a disclosure process focused initially on promoting non-stigmatizing attitudes about HIV. PMID:25186784

  15. HIV testing in re-education through labour camps in Guangxi Autonomous Region, China (a cross-sectional survey)

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Lorraine; Reekie, Joanne; Liu, Wei; Chen, Yi; Wu, Zunyou; Li, Jianghong; Zhang, Lei; Wand, Handan; Donovan, Basil; Butler, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV testing is mandatory in re-education-through-labour camps (laojiaosuo) in China yet no studies have reported on the process. Methods The survey response rate was 100% although 29 detainees were excluded because they were under 18 years of age. A cross-sectional face-to-face survey was conducted in three labour camps in Guangxi, located in the south-western region of China. Results Of the 755 detainees surveyed, 725 (96%) reported having a blood test in the labour camps of whom 493 (68%) thought this included an HIV test. 61 detainees self-reported they were HIV infected, their status confirmed by medical records, if available. Of these, 53 (87%) recalled receiving post-test HIV education, and 15 (25%) were currently receiving HIV antiretroviral therapy. Pretest education on HIV was provided to 233/725 (32%) detainees. The study further reports on detainees’ reactions and feelings towards non-disclosure and disclosure of their HIV test results in the labour camps. Conclusions Mandatory testing is almost universal in the labour camps although a proportion of detainees were unaware that this included an HIV test. HIV test results should be disclosed to all labour camp detainees to reduce their distress of not knowing and prevent misconceptions about their HIV status. Labour camps provide another opportunity to implement universal treatment (‘Test and Treat’) to prevent the spread of HIV. PMID:25739879

  16. Barriers and Facilitators of HIV Disclosure: Perspectives from HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Jeffrey R; Salomon, Elizabeth; Mayer, Kenneth; Capistrant, Benjamin; Safren, Steven

    2008-01-01

    HIV disclosure among sexually active HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) is a complex phenomenon. To better understand factors that impact the decision-making process regarding HIV disclosure among HIV-infected MSM, the present study analyzed content from previously conducted counseling sessions where HIV disclosure was selected as the primary focus of the session. The counselor/participant dialogue was audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed qualitatively using content analysis. Factors identified as barriers that deter HIV-infected MSM from disclosing include rejection, issues of confidentiality, possible missed sexual opportunities, partner's HIV status, deferred responsibility, sexual partner type, and public sex environments. Participants identified ethical obligation, the potential for a dating relationship, timing of disclosure, and bidirectional communication as facilitators of disclosure. Findings can be used for policy development as well as to guide social workers and other healthcare providers' assessment and development of clinical interventions addressing sexual health among HIV-infected MSM as it relates to HIV disclosure.

  17. Relations between circumcision status, sexually transmitted infection history, and HIV serostatus among a national sample of men who have sex with men in the United States.

    PubMed

    Jozkowski, Kristen; Rosenberger, Joshua G; Schick, Vanessa; Herbenick, Debby; Novak, David S; Reece, Michael

    2010-08-01

    Circumcision's potential link to HIV/sexually transmitted infections (STI) has been at the center of recent global public health debates. However, data related to circumcision and sexual health remain limited, with most research focused on heterosexual men. This study sought to assess behavioral differences among a large sample of circumcised and noncircumcised men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States. Data were collected from 26,257 U.S. MSM through an online survey. Measures included circumcision status, health indicators, HIV/STI screening and diagnosis, sexual behaviors, and condom use. Bivariate and regression analyses were conducted to determine differences between HIV/STI status, sexual behaviors, and condom use among circumcised and noncircumcised men. Circumcision status did not significantly predict HIV testing (p > 0.05), or HIV serostatus (p > 0.05), and there were no significant differences based on circumcision status for most STI diagnosis [syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, human papilloma virus (HPV)]. Being noncircumcised was predictive of herpes-2 diagnosis, however, condom use mediated this relationship. These data provide one of the first large national assessments of circumcision among MSM. While being noncircumcised did not increase the likelihood of HIV and most STI infections, results indicated that circumcision was associated with higher rates of condom use, suggesting that those who promote condoms among MSM may need to better understand condom-related behaviors and attitudes among noncircumcised men to enhance the extent to which they are willing to use condoms consistently.

  18. HIV/AIDS fatalism, beliefs and prevention indicators in Gabon:comparisons between Gabonese and Malians.

    PubMed

    Hess, Rosanna F; Mbavu, Martin

    2010-06-01

    HIV/AIDS fatalism may impact on individuals' health-seeking behaviour and HIV-prevention efforts. This descriptive study measured levels of HIV/AIDS fatalism and documented HIV/AIDS beliefs and practices among a sample of Gabonese and Malians living in Gabon, West Africa. The Powe Fatalism Inventory-HIV/AIDS version was used to measure levels of fatalism, while a short-answer survey was used to document personal beliefs and behaviours related to HIV and AIDS among 160 people in Gabon. The mean score of HIV/AIDS fatalism for the total sample was 6.8 on a 15-point scale. Malians had a more fatalistic outlook than Gabonese (mean scores 9.4 versus 5.3), Muslims were more fatalistic than persons of other religions (mean scores 9.2 versus 5.3), while healthcare providers were less fatalistic than non-providers (mean scores 3.8 versus 7.4). People that did not believe that HIV/AIDS is a punishment from God had a lower mean score of fatalism than those who did. Most of the sample believed that AIDS is a real disease, and most did not think that only immoral people discuss HIV and AIDS. The HIV-prevention indicators that related to lower scores of fatalism included knowing HIV-positive people, having had more years of formal education, a willingness to disclose one's HIV status (if known), and experience of HIV/AIDS education. Respondents who had tested for HIV were no less fatalistic than those who had never tested. The findings provide data from a part of the world where HIV/AIDS beliefs have rarely been documented. The results indicate a need for additional studies on correlations between HIV/ AIDS fatalism, HIV-prevention behaviours, and religious belief systems.

  19. Intimate relationships in young adults with perinatally acquired HIV: a qualitative study of strategies used to manage HIV disclosure.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Clare; Evangeli, Michael; Frize, Graham; Foster, Caroline; Fidler, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of children born with perinatally acquired HIV (PAH) are surviving into late adolescence and early adulthood. At this developmental stage, forming and sustaining intimate relationships is important. Young adults with PAH face both normative challenges and additional, HIV-related, relationship stressors. One key issue is the decision about whether and how to share their HIV status with others. Being able to disclose one's HIV status to sexual partners may reduce the risk of onward HIV transmission but is associated with the fear of rejection. There has been little research on how young people with PAH manage such disclosure-related stressors in intimate relationships. This study examined how disclosure challenges are managed by young adults with PAH in the UK within their intimate relationships. Seven participants (five females and two males) currently or previously in an intimate relationship, aged 18-23 years, were recruited from a UK hospital clinic. The majority of participants were of sub-Saharan African origins. They took part in in-depth interviews, with data analysed according to the principles of interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four themes were elicited: (1) decisions about starting, continuing or resuming relationships shaped by disclosure, (2) disclosing early to avoid the pain of future rejection, (3) using condoms to avoid disclosure and (4) testing likely partner reactions to disclosure. The study revealed the significant extent to which HIV disclosure affected the experience of relationships in this population. Interventions to support adolescents and young adults with PAH to disclose to their partners should be developed alongside guidance for professionals. Future research should include older samples of adults with PAH and studies in sub-Saharan African settings.

  20. Education and Nutritional Status of Orphans and Children of HIV-Infected Parents in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Vinod; Arnold, Fred; Otieno, Fredrick; Cross, Anne; Hong, Rathavuth

    2007-01-01

    We examined whether orphaned and fostered children and children of HIV-infected parents are disadvantaged in schooling, nutrition, and health care. We analyzed data on 2,756 children aged 0-4 years and 4,172 children aged 6-14 years included in the 2003 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey, with linked anonymous HIV testing, using multivariate…

  1. Aboriginal status is a prognostic factor for mortality among antiretroviral naïve HIV-positive individuals first initiating HAART

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Viviane D; Kretz, Patricia; Palepu, Anita; Bonner, Simon; Kerr, Thomas; Moore, David; Daniel, Mark; Montaner, Julio SG; Hogg, Robert S

    2006-01-01

    Background Although the impact of Aboriginal status on HIV incidence, HIV disease progression, and access to treatment has been investigated previously, little is known about the relationship between Aboriginal ethnicity and outcomes associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). We undertook the present analysis to determine if Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal persons respond differently to HAART by measuring HIV plasma viral load response, CD4 cell response and time to all-cause mortality. Methods A population-based analysis of a cohort of antiretroviral therapy naïve HIV-positive Aboriginal men and women 18 years or older in British Columbia, Canada. Participants were antiretroviral therapy naïve, initiated triple combination therapy between August 1, 1996 and September 30, 1999. Participants had to complete a baseline questionnaire as well as have at least two follow-up CD4 and HIV plasma viral load measures. The primary endpoints were CD4 and HIV plasma viral load response and all cause mortality. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the association between Aboriginal status and CD4 cell response, HIV plasma viral load response and all-cause mortality while controlling for several confounder variables. Results A total of 622 participants met the study criteria. Aboriginal status was significantly associated with no AIDS diagnosis at baseline (p = 0.0296), having protease inhibitor in the first therapy (p = 0.0209), lower baseline HIV plasma viral load (p < 0.001), less experienced HIV physicians (P = 0.0133), history of IDU (p < 0.001), not completing high school (p = 0.0046), and an income of less than $10,000 per year (p = 0.0115). Cox proportional hazards models controlling for clinical characteristics found that Aboriginal status had an increased hazard of mortality (HR = 3.12, 95% CI: 1.77–5.48) but did not with HIV plasma viral load response (HR = 1.15, 95% CI: 0.89–1.48) or CD4 cell response (HR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.73

  2. Characteristics of HIV-infected adolescents enrolled in a disclosure intervention trial in western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Vreeman, Rachel C.; Scanlon, Michael L.; Marete, Irene; Mwangi, Ann; Inui, Thomas S.; McAteer, Carole I.; Nyandiko, Winstone M.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of one’s own HIV status is essential for long-term disease management, but there are few data on how disclosure of HIV status to infected children and adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa is associated with clinical and psychosocial health outcomes. We conducted a detailed baseline assessment of the disclosure status, medication adherence, HIV stigma, depression, emotional and behavioral difficulties, and quality of life among a cohort of Kenyan children enrolled in an intervention study to promote disclosure of HIV status. Among 285 caregiver–child dyads enrolled in the study, children’s mean age was 12.3 years. Caregivers were more likely to report that the child knew his/her diagnosis (41%) compared to self-reported disclosure by children (31%). Caregivers of disclosed children reported significantly more positive views about disclosure compared to caregivers of non-disclosed children, who expressed fears of disclosure related to the child being too young to understand (75%), potential psychological trauma for the child (64%), and stigma and discrimination if the child told others (56%). Overall, the vast majority of children scored within normal ranges on screenings for behavioral and emotional difficulties, depression, and quality of life, and did not differ by whether or not the child knew his/her HIV status. A number of factors were associated with a child’s knowledge of his/her HIV diagnosis in multivariate regression, including older age (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.5–2.1), better WHO disease stage (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4–4.4), and fewer reported caregiver-level adherence barriers (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1–3.4). While a minority of children in this cohort knew their HIV status and caregivers reported significant barriers to disclosure including fears about negative emotional impacts, we found that disclosure was not associated with worse psychosocial outcomes. PMID:26616121

  3. Current status of HIV/AIDS in Cameroon: how effective are control strategies?

    PubMed

    Mbanya, Dora; Sama, Martyn; Tchounwou, Paul

    2008-12-01

    Nearly three decades after its discovery, HIV infection remains the number one killer disease in Sub- Saharan Africa where up to 67% of the world's 33 million infected people live. In Cameroon, based on a Demographic Health Survey carried out in 2004, the national HIV prevalence is estimated at 5.5% with women and youths being predominantly infected. Orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) from the HIV and AIDS pandemic have increased steadily over the years; hospital occupancy is estimated at about 30%, hence stretching the health system; co-infections like HIV/tuberculosis have been reported to reach 40-50% of infected cases and 95% of teachers are said not to be productive on several counts. Thus, the impact is multi-sectorial. Furthermore, the HIV epidemic in Cameroon is peculiar because of the wide HIV-1 genetic diversity of HIV-1 Group M observed with several subtypes reported (A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K), predominantly subtype A. There are also circulating recombinant forms, mainly CRF02_AG. In addition, HIV-1 Groups O and N have all been noted in Cameroon. These findings have great implications not only for HIV diagnosis, but also for responsiveness to therapy as well as for vaccine development. In 1986, the initial response of the Cameroon government to the increasing trends in the HIV/AIDS infection was to create a National AIDS Control Committee to coordinate a national AIDS programme. By 2000, the first National Strategic Plan was drawn for 2000-2005. The second National Strategic Plan for 2006-2010 is currently being implemented and covers various axes. Some results obtained show that there has been significantly positive outcomes noted in the various arms of intervention by the Cameroon government.

  4. HIV Infection and AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa: Current Status, Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Kharsany, Ayesha B.M.; Karim, Quarraisha A.

    2016-01-01

    Global trends in HIV infection demonstrate an overall increase in HIV prevalence and substantial declines in AIDS related deaths largely attributable to the survival benefits of antiretroviral treatment. Sub-Saharan Africa carries a disproportionate burden of HIV, accounting for more than 70% of the global burden of infection. Success in HIV prevention in sub-Saharan Africa has the potential to impact on the global burden of HIV. Notwithstanding substantial progress in scaling up antiretroviral therapy (ART), sub-Saharan Africa accounted for 74% of the 1.5 million AIDS related deaths in 2013. Of the estimated 6000 new infections that occur globally each day, two out of three are in sub-Saharan Africa with young women continuing to bear a disproportionate burden. Adolescent girls and young women aged 15-24 years have up to eight fold higher rates of HIV infection compared to their male peers. There remains a gap in women initiated HIV prevention technologies especially for women who are unable to negotiate the current HIV prevention options of abstinence, behavior change, condoms and medical male circumcision or early treatment initiation in their relationships. The possibility of an AIDS free generation cannot be realized unless we are able to prevent HIV infection in young women. This review will focus on the epidemiology of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa, key drivers of the continued high incidence, mortality rates and priorities for altering current epidemic trajectory in the region. Strategies for optimizing the use of existing and increasingly limited resources are included. PMID:27347270

  5. Ending overly broad HIV criminalization: Canadian scientists and clinicians stand for justice.

    PubMed

    Kazatchkine, Cécile; Bernard, Edwin; Eba, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In Canada, people living with HIV who do not disclose their HIV status prior to sexual acts risk prosecution for aggravated sexual assault even if they have sex with a condom or while having a low (or undetectable) viral load, they had no intent to transmit HIV, and no transmission occurred. In 2013, six distinguished Canadian HIV scientists and clinicians took ground-breaking action to advance justice by co-authoring the "Canadian consensus statement on HIV and its transmission in the context of the criminal law." This effort was born out of the belief that the application of criminal law to HIV non-disclosure was being driven by a poor appreciation of the science of HIV. More than 75 HIV scientists and clinicians Canada-wide have now endorsed the statement, agreeing that "[they] have a professional and ethical responsibility to assist those in the criminal justice system to understand and interpret current medical and scientific evidence regarding HIV." As some 61 countries have adopted laws that specifically allow for HIV criminalization, and prosecutions for HIV non-disclosure, exposure and transmission have been reported in at least 49 countries, the authors hope that others around the world will take similar action.

  6. Vaccination status of people living with HIV/AIDS in outpatient care in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Gilmara Holanda da; Galvão, Marli Teresinha Gimeniz; Medeiros, Camila Martins de; Rocha, Ryvanne Paulino; Lima, Maria Amanda Correia; Fechine, Francisco Vagnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has increased the survival of patients with HIV/AIDS, thus necessitating health promotion practice with immunization. Vaccines are critical components for protecting people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The purpose of study was to analyze the vaccination status of PLWHA in outpatient care in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. Cross-sectional study performed from June 2014 to June 2015. The screening was done with patients in antiretroviral therapy, 420 patients underwent screening, but only 99 met the inclusion criteria. Data were collected for interviews using forms to characterize sociodemographic, clinical and vaccination situations. Only 14 patients had complete vaccination schedules. The most used vaccines were hepatitis B, influenza vaccine and 23-valent pneumococcal. There was no difference between men and women regarding the proportion of PLWHA with full vaccination schedule or between sex, skin color, marital status, sexual orientation, religion or occupational status. There was no difference between having or not having a complete vaccination schedule and age, years of education, family income or number of hospitalizations. CD4+ T-cells count of patients with incomplete immunization was lower than patients with complete immunization. Health education strategies can be done individually or in groups to explain the importance of vaccination and to remind about doses to be administered. Most patients did not have proper adherence to vaccination schedules, especially due to lack of guidance. Results implied that education in health is important for vaccination adhesion, knowledge of adverse events and continuation of schemes.

  7. Influence of marital and educational status on clients' psychosocial adjustment to HIV/AIDS in Calabar, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akpabio, Idongesit I; Uyanah, David A; Osuchukwu, Nelson C; Samson-Akpan, Patience E

    2010-06-01

    A comparative descriptive design and a stratified random sampling technique were adopted to study the influence of marital and educational status on the psychological, social, and spiritual adjustment of 280 respondents living with HIV/AIDS in two randomly selected clinics within Calabar, Nigeria. A 30 item questionnaire, with a content validity index of 0.92 and a Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient of 0.94, was used for data collection, with due attention to ethical considerations. The findings showed that marital status had a significant influence on the respondents' psychological and social adjustment but not on their spiritual adjustment. Those that were married and those with higher educational qualifications had better psychological adjustment than those who had never married. The marital and educational status of clients should be considered when conducting education or counseling, making recommendations, or organizing support groups for living with HIV/AIDS. Furthermore, advocacy aimed at meeting the psychosocial needs of single and less-educated clients could enhance their psychosocial adjustment.

  8. The association of HIV/AIDS treatment side effects with health status, work productivity, and resource use.

    PubMed

    daCosta DiBonaventura, Marco; Gupta, Shaloo; Cho, Michelle; Mrus, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Due to stable incidence and improved survival rates, there are an increasing number of patients living with HIV/AIDS in the USA. Although highly effective, current antiretroviral therapies are associated with a variety of side effects. The role side effects play on health outcomes has not been fully examined. The current study assessed the association of medication side effects with (1) self-assessed health status; (2) work productivity and activity impairment; and (3) healthcare resource utilization. Data were from a cross-sectional patient-reported survey fielded in the USA using a dual methodology of Internet and paper questionnaires. A total of 953 patients living with HIV/AIDS who were currently taking a medication for their condition were included in the analyses. The most frequent side effects reported by patients were fatigue (70.72%), diarrhea (62.96%), insomnia (58.97%), dizziness (52.78%), neuropathy (52.68%), joint pain (52.36%), nausea (51.63%), and abdominal pain (50.37%). The presence of each side effect was associated with reduced self-assessed health status, increased productivity loss, increased activity impairment, and increased healthcare resource use. Controlling for CD4 cell counts in regression modeling did little to diminish the impact of side effects. Although not all side effects were associated with all outcomes, every side effect was associated with worse health status, some measure of increased work productivity loss, and/or some measure of increased healthcare resource use. Patients are living longer with HIV and, therefore, spending a greater length of time on treatment. The results of the current study suggest that many of these patients are experiencing a wide array of side effects from these therapies. These side effects have demonstrated a profound association with self-assessed health, work productivity, and healthcare resource use. Improved management of these side effects or development of treatments with a better side effect

  9. Moving towards a reliable HIV incidence test - current status, resources available, future directions and challenges ahead.

    PubMed

    Murphy, G; Pilcher, C D; Keating, S M; Kassanjee, R; Facente, S N; Welte, A; Grebe, E; Marson, K; Busch, M P; Dailey, P; Parkin, N; Osborn, J; Ongarello, S; Marsh, K; Garcia-Calleja, J M

    2017-04-01

    In 2011 the Incidence Assay Critical Path Working Group reviewed the current state of HIV incidence assays and helped to determine a critical path to the introduction of an HIV incidence assay. At that time the Consortium for Evaluation and Performance of HIV Incidence Assays (CEPHIA) was formed to spur progress and raise standards among assay developers, scientists and laboratories involved in HIV incidence measurement and to structure and conduct a direct independent comparative evaluation of the performance of 10 existing HIV incidence assays, to be considered singly and in combinations as recent infection test algorithms. In this paper we report on a new framework for HIV incidence assay evaluation that has emerged from this effort over the past 5 years, which includes a preliminary target product profile for an incidence assay, a consensus around key performance metrics along with analytical tools and deployment of a standardized approach for incidence assay evaluation. The specimen panels for this evaluation have been collected in large volumes, characterized using a novel approach for infection dating rules and assembled into panels designed to assess the impact of important sources of measurement error with incidence assays such as viral subtype, elite host control of viraemia and antiretroviral treatment. We present the specific rationale for several of these innovations, and discuss important resources for assay developers and researchers that have recently become available. Finally, we summarize the key remaining steps on the path to development and implementation of reliable assays for monitoring HIV incidence at a population level.

  10. Spiritual Well-Being, Depressive Symptoms, and Immune Status Among Women Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Dalmida, Safiya George; Holstad, Marcia McDonnell; DiIorio, Colleen; Laderman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Spirituality is a resource some HIV-positive women use to cope with HIV, and it also may have positive impact on physical health. This cross-sectional study examined associations of spiritual well-being (SWB), with depressive symptoms, and CD4 cell count and percentages among a non-random sample of 129 predominantly African-American (AA) HIV-positive women. Significant inverse associations were observed between depressive symptoms and SWB (r=-.55, p=.0001), and its components, existential well-being (EWB) (r=-.62, p=.0001) and religious well-being (RWB) (r=-.36, p=.0001). Significant positive associations were observed between EWB and CD4 cell count (r=.19, p< .05) and also between SWB (r=.24, p<.05), RWB (r=.21, p<.05), and EWB (r=.22, p<.05) and CD4 cell percentages. In this sample of HIV-positive women SWB, EWB, and RWB accounted for a significant amount of variance in depressive symptoms and CD4 cell percentages, above and beyond that explained by demographic variables, HIV medication adherence, and HIV viral load (log). Depressive symptoms were not significantly associated with CD4 cell counts or percentages. A significant relationship was observed between spiritual/religious practices (prayer/meditation and reading spiritual/religious material) and depressive symptoms. Further research is needed to examine relationships between spirituality, mental and physical health among HIV-positive women. PMID:19533506

  11. Education and nutritional status of orphans and children of HIV-infected parents in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vinod; Arnold, Fred; Otieno, Fredrick; Cross, Anne; Hong, Rathavuth

    2007-10-01

    We examined whether orphaned and fostered children and children of HIV-infected parents are disadvantaged in schooling, nutrition, and health care. We analyzed data on 2,756 children aged 0-4 years and 4,172 children aged 6-14 years included in the 2003 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey, with linked anonymous HIV testing, using multivariate logistic regression. Results indicate that orphans, fostered children, and children of HIV-infected parents are significantly less likely to attend school than non-orphaned/non-fostered children of HIV-negative parents. Children of HIV-infected parents are more likely to be underweight and wasted, and less likely to receive medical care for ARI and diarrhea. Children of HIV-negative single mothers are also disadvantaged on most indicators. The findings highlight the need to expand child welfare programs to include not only orphans but also fostered children, children of single mothers, and children of HIV-infected parents, who tend to be equally, if not more, disadvantaged.

  12. Individual and Neighborhood Characteristics Associated with HIV Among Black and Latino Adults Who Use Drugs and Unaware of Their HIV-Positive Status, New York City, 2000-2004.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Crystal Fuller; Rivera, Alexis V; Crawford, Natalie D; Gordon, Kirsha; White, Kellee; Vlahov, David; Galea, Sandro

    2016-12-01

    With mounting evidence of how neighborhood socioeconomic context influences individual behavior, investigation of neighborhood social context and sex/drug use risk behavior could help explain and provide insight into solutions to solve persistent racial disparities in HIV. Interviewer-administered surveys and HIV testing among street-recruited individuals who reported illicit drug use in New York City were conducted from 2000 to 2004. Individuals were geocoded to census tracts, and generalized estimating equations were used to determine correlates of being newly diagnosed with HIV at study enrollment. Analyses were completed in 2014. Of the 920 participants, 10.5 % were HIV-positive, and among those, 45 % were diagnosed at study enrollment. After restricting the sample to those who self-reported negative HIV status (n = 867), 72 % were male, 65 % Latino, and 5.1 % tested HIV-positive. After adjustment, those testing HIV-positive were more likely to report male same-sex partnership (p < 0.01) and less likely to be homeless compared with those confirmed HIV-negative (p < 0.01). Neighborhood-adjusted models indicated those from neighborhoods with less deprivation (p < 0.05), and a higher proportion of owner-occupied homes (p < 0.01) were more likely to test HIV-positive. Additionally, Black individuals who used drugs and were from neighborhoods with a higher proportion of Black residents were more likely to be newly diagnosed compared to Latino individuals who used drugs and were from neighborhoods with lower proportions of Black residents (p < 0.05). These data suggest that HIV prevention and treatment efforts should continue widening its reach to those unaware of their HIV infection, namely men who have sex with men, heavy, drug-involved Black communities, and both Black and Latino communities from relatively less disadvantaged neighborhoods.

  13. Pilot Trial of a Disclosure Intervention for HIV+ Mothers: The TRACK Program

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Debra A.; Armistead, Lisa; Marelich, William D.; Payne, Diana L.; Herbeck, Diane M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The Teaching, Raising, And Communicating with Kids (TRACK) program was a longitudinal pilot-trial intervention designed to assist mothers living with HIV (MLH) to disclose their serostatus to their young children (age 6 – 12 years). Method MLH and child dyads (N = 80 dyads) were recruited and randomized to intervention or control; the intervention group had three individual sessions and one follow-up phone call. The sessions focused on preparing MLH for disclosure through behavioral exercises utilizing Derlaga’s model of HIV-disclosure. Both MLH and their child were assessed across multiple time-points (baseline, 3-, 6-, and 9-months) regarding disclosure of HIV status, and specific outcome variables (i.e., relationship context, mother’s health, child’s mental health, and family outcomes). Results MLH in the intervention group were six times more likely to disclose their HIV status than those in the control group (O.R. 6.33, 95% C.I.: 1.64 – 24.45), with 33% disclosing in the intervention group compared to 7.3% in the control group. MLHs in the intervention group showed increases in disclosure self-efficacy across time, increased communication with their child, and improvement in emotional functioning. Children of MLHs in the intervention group exhibited reductions in depression and anxiety, and increases in happiness. Conclusions TRACK was found to be successful in helping MLH disclose their HIV status to their children, with positive outcomes noted for both MLH and their children. PMID:21355637

  14. Immunological status does not influence hepatitis c virus or liver fibrosis in HIV-hepatitis C virus-coinfected patients.

    PubMed

    Collazos, Julio; Cartón, José Antonio; Asensi, Víctor

    2011-04-01

    The possible effects on liver fibrosis and HCV viral load of the immunological status of HIV-HCV-coinfected patients are unclear. A cohort of HIV-HCV-coinfected patients was divided according to the current CD4 counts into poor (≤200/μl, n = 117) or good (≥500/μl, n = 441) immunological status. The groups were compared for diverse HCV- and fibrosis-related parameters. Fibrosis was evaluated by transient elastometry and other noninvasive indexes. Many variables were significantly associated with the immunological status in univariate analyses, including fibrosis parameters. However, in multivariate analyses current immunological status or nadir CD4 were not associated with HCV viral load (p = 0.8 and p = 0.3, respectively), liver fibrosis at the time of evaluation (p = 0.9 for both), or fibrosis progression over time (p = 0.98 and p = 0.8, respectively). The factors independently associated with significant fibrosis, advanced fibrosis, and cirrhosis, as compared with minimal or no fibrosis, were alcohol abuse [OR 3.57 (95% CI 1.43-8.85), p = 0.006; OR 10.10 (3.75-27.03), p < 0.0001; and OR 31.25 (10.6-90.90), p < 0.0001, respectively], HBsAg positivity [OR 9.09 (1.47-55.56), p = 0.02; OR 55.56 (9.80-333.33), p < 0.0001; and OR 43.48 (4.76-476.19), p = 0.0008, respectively], and platelet counts [OR 0.994 (0.989-0.998), p = 0.006; OR 0.990 (0.985-0.995), p = 0.0003; and OR 0.985 (0.979-0.991), p < 0.0001, respectively]. Immunological status did not associate with any fibrosis stage (significant fibrosis, p = 0.7; advanced fibrosis, p = 0.4; and cirrhosis p = 0.9). The current or past immunological status of HIV-HCV-coinfected patients does not seem to have any significant influence on HCV viral load or on the development of liver fibrosis when adjusting for important covariates.

  15. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Sexual Network Mixing: A Log-Linear Analysis of HIV Status by Partnership and Sexual Behavior Among Most at-Risk MSM.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kayo; Williams, Mark L

    2015-06-01

    Mixing patterns within sexual networks have been shown to have an effect on HIV transmission, both within and across groups. This study examined sexual mixing patterns involving HIV-unknown status and risky sexual behavior conditioned on assortative/dissortative mixing by race/ethnicity. The sample used for this study consisted of drug-using male sex workers and their male sex partners. A log-linear analysis of 257 most at-risk MSM and 3,072 sex partners was conducted. The analysis found two significant patterns. HIV-positive most at-risk Black MSM had a strong tendency to have HIV-unknown Black partners (relative risk, RR = 2.91, p < 0.001) and to engage in risky sexual behavior (RR = 2.22, p < 0.001). White most at-risk MSM with unknown HIV status also had a tendency to engage in risky sexual behavior with Whites (RR = 1.72, p < 0.001). The results suggest that interventions that target the most at-risk MSM and their sex partners should account for specific sexual network mixing patterns by HIV status.

  16. Acceptability of Couples’ Voluntary HIV Testing Among HIV-infected Patients in Care and Their HIV-negative Partners in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Kristin M.; Canary, Lauren; Workowski, Kimberly; Lockard, Annie; Jones, Jeb; Sullivan, Patrick; Hills, Katherine; Fofana, Kadija; Stephenson, Rob; Allen, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Couples’ voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CHTC) is an HIV risk reduction strategy not widely available in the US. Methods: We assessed willingness to participate in CHTC among US HIV-infected clinic patients via tablet-based survey and among HIV-negative persons with HIV-infected partners in care via mixed-method phone interviews. Results: Most of the N=64 HIV-infected partners surveyed were men (89%), on antiretroviral treatment (ART) (92%), and many self-identified homosexual (62%). We observed high levels of willingness to participate in CHTC (64%) among HIV-infected partners. Reasons for not wanting to participate included perceived lack of need (26%), desire to self-disclose their status (26%), and fear of being asked sensitive questions with their partner present (17%). HIV-infected partners were interested in discussing ART (48%), other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (44%), and relationship agreements like monogamy (31%) during CHTC sessions. All N=15 HIV-negative partners interviewed were men, most identified as homosexual (73%), and about half (54%) reported consistent condom use with HIV-infected partners. We observed high levels of willingness to participate in CHTC (87%) among HIV-negative partners, who were also interested in discussing ART (47%), other STIs (47%), mental health services (40%), and relationship agreements (33%). Most negative partners (93%) indicated that they believed their HIV-infected partner was virally suppressed, but in the event that they were not, many (73%) were willing to take pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Conclusion: These results indicate that CHTC for serodiscordant couples is acceptable and should emphasize aspects most pertinent to these couples, such as discussion of ART/PrEP, STIs, and relationship agreements. PMID:27014393

  17. "My mother told me I must not cook anymore"--food, culture, and the context of HIV- and AIDS-related stigma in three communities in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Okoror, T A; Airhihenbuwa, C O; Zungu, M; Makofani, D; Brown, D C; Iwelunmor, J

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of food as an instrument in expressing and experiencing HIV/AIDS stigma by HIV-positive women and their families, with the goal of reducing discrimination. It goes beyond willingness to share utensils, which has been identified in HIV/AIDS research. As part of an ongoing capacity-building HIV/AIDS stigma project in South Africa, 25 focus groups and 15 key informant interviews were conducted among 195 women and 54 men in three Black communities. Participants were asked to discuss how they were treated in the family as women living with HIV and AIDS, and data was organized using the PEN-3 model. Findings highlight both the positive and negative experiences HIV-positive women encounter. Women would not disclose their HIV status to avoid being isolated from participating in the socio-cultural aspects of food preparation, while others that have disclosed their status have experienced alienation. The symbolic meanings of food should be a major consideration when addressing the elimination of HIV/AIDS stigma in South Africa.

  18. The interplay between socio-demographic variables, nutritional and immune status of HIV-positive/AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Oguntibeju, O O; van den Heever, W M J; Van Schalkwyk, F E

    2007-10-15

    This study examined the association between socio-demographic factors (educational level and employment status) and the nutritional and immune status of 35 HIV-positive/AIDS patients at baseline. Assessment of selected macro-and micronutrient dietary intake was done using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Evaluation of anthropometric profiles (body mass index, waist-hip ratio and percentage of body fat) was also evaluated. A questionnaire was applied to obtain information on the educational level and employment status of the patients. The CD4+ T-cell counts and viral loads of the same patients were determined using the flow cytometry and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method respectively. An association between educational level and dietary intake was significant (p < 0.05) for total dietary fibre, selenium and vitamin C. There was no significant (p > 0.05) association between the two socio-demographic variables (education and employment) and anthropometric profiles. The association between education, employment and CD4+ T-cell count was not significant (p > 0.05). The viral load showed a significant (p < 0.05) association with employment status but not correlated with education. The sample size or certain inherent biological and social factors probably affected the outcomes of the interplay between the two selected socio-demographic factors and the nutritional and immune status. It is suggested that the results of this study should be interpreted with caution. Further studies with larger sample sizes are recommended.

  19. Geographically structured populations of Cryptococcus neoformans Variety grubii in Asia correlate with HIV status and show a clonal population structure.

    PubMed

    Khayhan, Kantarawee; Hagen, Ferry; Pan, Weihua; Simwami, Sitali; Fisher, Matthew C; Wahyuningsih, Retno; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Chowdhary, Anuradha; Ikeda, Reiko; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Khan, Ziauddin; Ip, Margaret; Imran, Darma; Sjam, Ridhawati; Sriburee, Pojana; Liao, Wanqing; Chaicumpar, Kunyaluk; Vuddhakul, Varaporn; Meyer, Wieland; Trilles, Luciana; van Iersel, Leo J J; Meis, Jacques F; Klaassen, Corné H W; Boekhout, Teun

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is an important fungal disease in Asia with an estimated 140,000 new infections annually the majority of which occurs in patients suffering from HIV/AIDS. Cryptococcus neoformans variety grubii (serotype A) is the major causative agent of this disease. In the present study, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) using the ISHAM MLST consensus scheme for the C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex was used to analyse nucleotide polymorphisms among 476 isolates of this pathogen obtained from 8 Asian countries. Population genetic analysis showed that the Asian C. neoformans var. grubii population shows limited genetic diversity and demonstrates a largely clonal mode of reproduction when compared with the global MLST dataset. HIV-status, sequence types and geography were found to be confounded. However, a correlation between sequence types and isolates from HIV-negative patients was observed among the Asian isolates. Observations of high gene flow between the Middle Eastern and the Southeastern Asian populations suggest that immigrant workers in the Middle East were originally infected in Southeastern Asia.

  20. HIV/STI risk by migrant status among workers in an urban high-end entertainment centre in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Mantell, Joanne E; Kelvin, Elizabeth A; Sun, Xiaoming; Zhou, Jianfang; Exner, Theresa M; Hoffman, Susie; Zhou, Feng; Sandfort, Theo G M; Leu, Cheng-Shiun

    2011-04-01

    Large-scale internal migration in China may be an important mechanism for the spread of HIV/sexually transmitted infections (STIs) because of the risk behaviours of migrants. We conducted a self-administered survey among 724 employees of a high-end entertainment centre in Kunshan, Jiangsu Province, China. Using logistic regression, we examined the association of hometown of origin (Kunshan city, elsewhere in Jiangsu Province, or another province in China) and consecutive years living in Kunshan with measures of HIV/STI risk behaviour. We found that increased time living in Kunshan was associated with lower odds of using condoms as contraception [odds ratio (OR) = 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.64-0.95] and consistent condom use with a casual partner (OR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.47-0.93), after controlling for gender, marital status age and income. The odds of having had an STI were significantly lower for Kunshan natives than those originally from outside provinces (OR = 0.25, 95% CI: 0.07-0.96), but increasing years living in Kunshan was not related to lower risk for an STI. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that migrants living far from home participate in higher risk behaviour than locals. Findings suggest that adaptation to local culture over time may increase HIV/STI risk behaviours, a troublesome finding.

  1. HIV disclosure as practice and public policy

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Barry D.; Corriveau, Patrice; Elliott, Richard; Globerman, Jason; English, Ken; Rourke, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Responses to the largest surveys of HIV-positive people in Ontario show that most either disclose to or do not have partners who are HIV-negative or of unknown status. Non-disclosure strategies and assumptions are reported by relatively small sets of people with some variation according to employment status, sexual orientation, gender, ethnicity, and having had a casual partner. Interviews with 122 people living with HIV show that disclosure is an undertaking fraught with emotional pitfalls complicated by personal histories of having misread cues or having felt deceived leading up to their own sero-conversion, then having to negotiate a stigmatized status with new people. In gay communities, constructions of the self as individual actors in a marketplace of risk co-exist with the sexual etiquette developed throughout the AIDS era of care of the self and other through safer sex. Among heterosexual populations, notions of responsibility show some divergence by gender. The findings of this study suggest that the heightened pressure of criminal sanction on decision-making about disclosure in personal interactions does not address difficulties in HIV transmission and is unlikely to result in enhanced prevention. PMID:26339127

  2. Nondisclosure of HIV Status in a Clinical Trial Setting: Antiretroviral Drug Screening Can Help Distinguish Between Newly Diagnosed and Previously Diagnosed HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marzinke, Mark A.; Clarke, William; Wang, Lei; Cummings, Vanessa; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Breaud, Autumn; Griffith, Sam; Buchbinder, Susan; Shoptaw, Steven; del Rio, Carlos; Magnus, Manya; Mannheimer, Sharon; Fields, Sheldon D.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Wheeler, Darrell P.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Fogel, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    In The HIV Prevention Trials Network 061 study, 155 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected men reported no prior HIV diagnosis; 83 of those men had HIV RNA levels of <1000 copies/mL at enrollment. Antiretroviral drug testing revealed that 65 of the 83 (78.3%) men were on antiretroviral treatment. Antiretroviral drug testing can help distinguish between newly diagnosed and previously diagnosed HIV infection. PMID:24092804

  3. Protecting HIV-positive women's human rights: recommendations for the United States National HIV/AIDS Strategy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aziza; Hanssens, Catherine; Kelly, Brook

    2009-11-01

    To bring the United States in line with prevailing human rights standards, its National HIV/AIDS Strategy will need to explicitly commit to a human rights framework when developing programmes and policies that serve the unaddressed needs of women. This paper focuses on two aspects of the institutionalized mistreatment of people with HIV: 1) the criminalization of their consensual sexual conduct; and 2) the elimination of informed and documented consensual participation in their diagnosis through reliance on mandatory and opt-out testing policies. More than half of US states have HIV-specific laws criminalizing the consensual sexual activity of people with HIV, regardless of whether transmission occurs. Many of these laws hinge prosecution on the failure of HIV-positive people to disclose their HIV status to a sexual partner. The Obama Administration should explore administrative and legislative incentives to eliminate these laws and prosecutions, and target a portion of prevention funding for anti-stigma training. Testing policies should be reconsidered to remove opt-out and/or mandatory HIV testing as a condition for receipt of federal funding; incentives should encourage states to adopt local policies mandating counseling; and voluntary HIV testing should be offered regardless of the provider's undocumented perception of an individual's risk.

  4. Influence of Coping, Social Support, and Depression on Subjective Health Status Among HIV-Positive Adults With Different Sexual Identities

    PubMed Central

    Mosack, Katie E.; Weinhardt, Lance S.; Kelly, Jeffrey A.; Gore-Felton, Cheryl; McAuliffe, Timothy L.; Johnson, Mallory O.; Remien, Robert H.; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Ehrhardt, Anke A.; Chesney, Margaret A.; Morin, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined associations between psychosocial variables (coping self-efficacy, social support, and cognitive depression) and subjective health status among a large national sample (N = 3,670) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons with different sexual identities. After controlling for ethnicity, heterosexual men reported fewer symptoms than did either bisexual or gay men and heterosexual women reported fewer symptoms than did bisexual women. Heterosexual and bisexual women reported greater symptom intrusiveness than did heterosexual or gay men. Coping self-efficacy and cognitive depression independently explained symptom reports and symptom intrusiveness for heterosexual, gay, and bisexual men. Coping self-efficacy and cognitive depression explained symptom intrusiveness among heterosexual women. Cognitive depression significantly contributed to the number of symptom reports for heterosexual and bisexual women and to symptom intrusiveness for lesbian and bisexual women. Individuals likely experience HIV differently on the basis of sociocultural realities associated with sexual identity. Further, symptom intrusiveness may be a more sensitive measure of subjective health status for these groups. PMID:19064372

  5. Prevalence of sexually transmitted infections among pregnant women with known HIV status in northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Msuya, Sia E; Uriyo, Jacqueline; Hussain, Akhtar; Mbizvo, Elizabeth M; Jeansson, Stig; Sam, Noel E; Stray-Pedersen, Babill

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and other reproductive tract infections (RTIs) among pregnant women in Moshi, Tanzania and to compare the occurrence of STIs/RTIs among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and uninfected women. Methods Pregnant women in their 3rd trimester (N = 2654) were recruited from two primary health care clinics between June 2002 and March 2004. They were interviewed, examined and genital and blood samples were collected for diagnosis of STIs/RTIs and HIV. Results The prevalence of HIV, active syphilis and herpes simplex virus – type 2 (HSV-2) were 6.9%, 0.9% and 33.6%, respectively, while 0.5% were positive for N gonorrhoeae, 5.0% for T vaginalis and 20.9% for bacterial vaginosis. Genital tract infections were more prevalent in HIV-seropositive than seronegative women, statistically significant for syphilis (3.3% vs 0.7%), HSV-2 (43.2% vs 32.0%), genital ulcers (4.4% vs 1.4%) and bacterial vaginosis (37.2% vs 19.6%). In comparison with published data, a declining trend for curable STIs/RTIs (syphilis, trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis) was noted. Conclusion Rates of STIs and RTIs are still high among pregnant women in Moshi. Where resources allow, routine screening and treatment of STIs/RTIs in the antenatal care setting should be offered. Higher STIs/RTIs in HIV-seropositive women supports the expansion of HIV-counseling and testing services to all centers offering antenatal care. After identification, STIs/RTIs need to be aggressively addressed in HIV-seropositive women, both at antenatal and antiretroviral therapy care clinics. PMID:19243592

  6. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Inhibition Does Not Adversely Affect Immune or Virological Status in HIV Infected Men And Women: A Pilot Safety Study

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Scott R.; Reeds, Dominic N.; Royal, Michael; Struthers, Heidi; Laciny, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Context: People infected with HIV have a higher risk for developing insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease than the general population. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP4) inhibitors are glucose-lowering medications with pleiotropic actions that may particularly benefit people with HIV, but the immune and virological safety of DPP4 inhibition in HIV is unknown. Objective: DPP4 inhibition will not reduce CD4+ T lymphocyte number or increase HIV viremia in HIV-positive adults. Design: This was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind safety trial of sitagliptin in HIV-positive adults. Setting: The study was conducted at an academic medical center. Participants: Twenty nondiabetic HIV-positive men and women (9.8 ± 5.5 years of known HIV) taking antiretroviral therapy and with stable immune (625 ± 134 CD4+ T cells per microliter) and virological (<48 copies HIV RNA per milliliter) status. Intervention: The intervention included sitagliptin (100 mg/d) vs matching placebo for up to 24 weeks. Main Outcome Measures: CD4+ T cell number and plasma HIV RNA were measured every 4 weeks; fasting serum regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), stromal derived factor (SDF)-1α, Soluble TNF receptor II, and oral glucose tolerance were measured at baseline, week 8, and the end of study. ANOVA was used for between-group comparisons; P < .05 was considered significant. Results: Compared with placebo, sitagliptin did not reduce CD4+ T cell count, plasma HIV RNA remained less than 48 copies/mL, RANTES and soluble TNF receptor II concentrations did not increase. SDF1α concentrations declined (P < .0002) in the sitagliptin group. The oral glucose tolerance levels improved in the sitagliptin group at week 8. Conclusions: Despite lowering SDF1α levels, sitagliptin did not adversely affect immune or virological status, or increase immune activation, but did improve glycemia in healthy, nondiabetic HIV-positive adults. These safety data

  7. HIV Status, Burden of Comorbid Disease, and Biomarkers of Inflammation, Altered Coagulation, and Monocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    Armah, Kaku A.; McGinnis, Kathleen; Baker, Jason; Gibert, Cynthia; Butt, Adeel A.; Bryant, Kendall J.; Goetz, Matthew; Tracy, Russell; Oursler, Krisann K.; Rimland, David; Crothers, Kristina; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria; Crystal, Steve; Gordon, Adam; Kraemer, Kevin; Brown, Sheldon; Gerschenson, Mariana; Leaf, David A.; Deeks, Steven G.; Rinaldo, Charles; Kuller, Lewis H; Justice, Amy; Freiberg, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Background. Biomarkers of inflammation, altered coagulation, and monocyte activation are associated with mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the general population and among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected people. We compared biomarkers for inflammation, altered coagulation, and monocyte activation between HIV-infected and uninfected people in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS). Methods. Biomarkers of inflammation (interleukin-6 [IL-6]), altered coagulation (d-dimer), and monocyte activation (soluble CD14 [sCD14]) were measured in blood samples from 1525 HIV-infected and 843 uninfected VACS participants. Logistic regression was used to determine the association between HIV infection and prevalence of elevated (>75th percentile) biomarkers, adjusting for confounding comorbidities. Results. HIV-infected veterans had less prevalent CVD, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, hazardous drinking, and renal disease, but more dyslipidemia, hepatitis C, and current smoking than uninfected veterans. Compared to uninfected veterans, HIV-infected veterans with HIV-1 RNA ≥500 copies/mL or CD4 count <200 cells/µL had a significantly higher prevalence of elevated IL-6 (odds ratio [OR], 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI],1.14–2.09; OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.60–3.16, respectively) and d-dimer (OR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.44–2.71, OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.22–2.32, respectively) after adjusting for comorbidities. HIV-infected veterans with a CD4 cell count <200 cells/µL had significantly higher prevalence of elevated sCD14 compared to uninfected veterans (OR, 2.60; 95% CI, 1.64–4.14). These associations still persisted after restricting the analysis to veterans without known confounding comorbid conditions. Conclusions. These data suggest that ongoing HIV replication and immune depletion significantly contribute to increased prevalence of elevated biomarkers of inflammation, altered coagulation, and monocyte activation. This contribution is independent of

  8. SAMHD1 controls cell cycle status, apoptosis and HIV-1 infection in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Bonifati, Serena; Daly, Michele B; St Gelais, Corine; Kim, Sun Hee; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Shepard, Caitlin; Kennedy, Edward M; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek; Wu, Li

    2016-08-01

    SAMHD1 limits HIV-1 infection in non-dividing myeloid cells by decreasing intracellular dNTP pools. HIV-1 restriction by SAMHD1 in these cells likely prevents activation of antiviral immune responses and modulates viral pathogenesis, thus highlighting a critical role of SAMHD1 in HIV-1 physiopathology. Here, we explored the function of SAMHD1 in regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in monocytic THP-1 cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated THP-1 cells with stable SAMHD1 knockout. We found that silencing of SAMHD1 in cycling cells stimulates cell proliferation, redistributes cell cycle population in the G1/G0 phase and reduces apoptosis. These alterations correlated with increased dNTP levels and more efficient HIV-1 infection in dividing SAMHD1 knockout cells relative to control. Our results suggest that SAMHD1, through its dNTPase activity, affects cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis, and emphasize a key role of SAMHD1 in the interplay between cell cycle regulation and HIV-1 infection.

  9. Newcomer Status as a Protective Factor among Hispanic Migrant Workers for HIV Risk.

    PubMed

    McCoy, H Virginia; Shehadeh, Nancy; Rubens, Muni; Navarro, Christi M

    2014-01-01

    The HIV rate among U.S. migrant workers is 10 times that of the national rate. The highly unstable lifestyle of migrant workers places them at heightened vulnerability to sexually transmitted infections; hence, there is a need to investigate the attitudes and sexual risk factors that may play a protective role in the transmission of HIV in this population. This study examines the association between attitudes and HIV risk behaviors among Hispanic male and female migrant workers (n = 255) and their length of stay (shorter length of stay as a protective factor) in Immokalee, FL, USA. Pearson's correlation and regression analyses were utilized to analyze the relationship between HIV risk behaviors (intention to use condoms and alcohol use) with length of stay in Immokalee. Longer length of stay positively correlated with number of drinks (p < 0.05) and frequency of drinks (p < 0.01) and negatively correlated with ethnic identity search (p < 0.05). Regression analysis showed that length of stay predicted both behavioral intention to use condoms (p < 0.05) and alcohol consumption (p < 0.05). The findings suggest that migrant workers who are new to Immokalee may have a higher likelihood of practicing protective HIV risk behaviors and having more favorable attitudes toward risk reduction than long-timers. This study might provide important new evidence on the drivers of multiple concurrent and potential protective factors against risky sexual behaviors among Hispanic migrant workers.

  10. SAMHD1 controls cell cycle status, apoptosis and HIV-1 infection in monocytic THP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonifati, Serena; Daly, Michele B.; St Gelais, Corine; Kim, Sun Hee; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A.; Shepard, Caitlin; Kennedy, Edward M.; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Kim, Baek; Wu, Li

    2016-08-15

    SAMHD1 limits HIV-1 infection in non-dividing myeloid cells by decreasing intracellular dNTP pools. HIV-1 restriction by SAMHD1 in these cells likely prevents activation of antiviral immune responses and modulates viral pathogenesis, thus highlighting a critical role of SAMHD1 in HIV-1 physiopathology. Here, we explored the function of SAMHD1 in regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in monocytic THP-1 cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated THP-1 cells with stable SAMHD1 knockout. We found that silencing of SAMHD1 in cycling cells stimulates cell proliferation, redistributes cell cycle population in the G{sub 1}/G{sub 0} phase and reduces apoptosis. These alterations correlated with increased dNTP levels and more efficient HIV-1 infection in dividing SAMHD1 knockout cells relative to control. Our results suggest that SAMHD1, through its dNTPase activity, affects cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis, and emphasize a key role of SAMHD1 in the interplay between cell cycle regulation and HIV-1 infection.

  11. Healthcare provider intervention on smoking and quit attempts among HIV-positive versus HIV-negative MSM smokers in Chengdu, China.

    PubMed

    Berg, Carla J; Nehl, Eric J; Wang, Xiaodong; Ding, Yingying; He, Na; Johnson, Brent A; Wong, Frank Y

    2014-01-01

    Given the implications for smoking among HIV-positive individuals and high smoking and HIV rates among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China, we examined sociodemographic, smoking-related, psychosocial, and substance use factors in relation to HIV status; receiving some sort of healthcare provider intervention regarding smoking; and having made a quit attempt in the past year in a sample of MSM smokers in Chengdu. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 381 MSM smokers recruited by a nongovernmental organization in Chengdu in 2012-2013. Of these, 350 disclosed their HIV status and 344 (188 HIV-positive and 156 HIV-negative) provided completed data. Half (50.0%) reported at least one quit attempt in their lifetime; 30.5% reported a quit attempt in the past year. The majority (59.4%) reported that a healthcare provider had intervened in some way (assessed smoking, advised quitting, provided assistance), most commonly by assessing smoking status (50.0%). HIV-positive individuals were more likely to report a healthcare provider intervening on their smoking (p < .001). Those who received provider intervention were more likely to have attempted to quit ever (p = .009) and in the past year (p < .001). Those HIV-positive were more likely to have attempted to quit since diagnosis if a provider had intervened (p = .001). Multivariate regression documented that being HIV-positive (p < .001), greater cigarette consumption (p = .02), less frequent drinking (p = .03), and greater depressive symptoms (p = .003) were significant correlates of healthcare provider intervention. Multivariate regression also found that healthcare provider intervention (p = .003), older age (p = .01), and higher autonomous motivation (p = .007) were significant correlates of attempting to quit in the past year. Given the impact of healthcare provider intervention regarding smoking on quit attempts among MSM, greater training and support is needed to promote consistent intervention on smoking in the

  12. The Amagugu Intervention: A Conceptual Framework for Increasing HIV Disclosure and Parent-Led Communication about Health among HIV-Infected Parents with HIV-Uninfected Primary School-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Rochat, Tamsen J.; Mitchell, Joanie; Stein, Alan; Mkwanazi, Ntombizodumo Brilliant; Bland, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in access to HIV prevention and treatment have reduced vertical transmission of HIV, with most children born to HIV-infected parents being HIV-uninfected themselves. A major challenge that HIV-infected parents face is disclosure of their HIV status to their predominantly HIV-uninfected children. Their children enter middle childhood and early adolescence facing many challenges associated with parental illness and hospitalization, often exacerbated by stigma and a lack of access to health education and support. Increasingly, evidence suggests that primary school-aged children have the developmental capacity to grasp concepts of health and illness, including HIV, and that in the absence of parent-led communication and education about these issues, HIV-exposed children may be at increased risk of psychological and social problems. The Amagugu intervention is a six-session home-based intervention, delivered by lay counselors, which aims to increase parenting capacity to disclose their HIV status and offer health education to their primary school-aged children. The intervention includes information and activities on disclosure, health care engagement, and custody planning. An uncontrolled pre–post-evaluation study with 281 families showed that the intervention was feasible, acceptable, and effective in increasing maternal disclosure. The aim of this paper is to describe the conceptual model of the Amagugu intervention, as developed post-evaluation, showing the proposed pathways of risk that Amagugu aims to disrupt through its intervention targets, mechanisms, and activities; and to present a summary of results from the large-scale evaluation study of Amagugu to demonstrate the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention model. This relatively low-intensity home-based intervention led to: increased HIV disclosure to children, improvements in mental health for mother and child, and improved health care engagement and custody planning for the child. The

  13. The Amagugu Intervention: A Conceptual Framework for Increasing HIV Disclosure and Parent-Led Communication about Health among HIV-Infected Parents with HIV-Uninfected Primary School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Tamsen J; Mitchell, Joanie; Stein, Alan; Mkwanazi, Ntombizodumo Brilliant; Bland, Ruth M

    2016-01-01

    Advances in access to HIV prevention and treatment have reduced vertical transmission of HIV, with most children born to HIV-infected parents being HIV-uninfected themselves. A major challenge that HIV-infected parents face is disclosure of their HIV status to their predominantly HIV-uninfected children. Their children enter middle childhood and early adolescence facing many challenges associated with parental illness and hospitalization, often exacerbated by stigma and a lack of access to health education and support. Increasingly, evidence suggests that primary school-aged children have the developmental capacity to grasp concepts of health and illness, including HIV, and that in the absence of parent-led communication and education about these issues, HIV-exposed children may be at increased risk of psychological and social problems. The Amagugu intervention is a six-session home-based intervention, delivered by lay counselors, which aims to increase parenting capacity to disclose their HIV status and offer health education to their primary school-aged children. The intervention includes information and activities on disclosure, health care engagement, and custody planning. An uncontrolled pre-post-evaluation study with 281 families showed that the intervention was feasible, acceptable, and effective in increasing maternal disclosure. The aim of this paper is to describe the conceptual model of the Amagugu intervention, as developed post-evaluation, showing the proposed pathways of risk that Amagugu aims to disrupt through its intervention targets, mechanisms, and activities; and to present a summary of results from the large-scale evaluation study of Amagugu to demonstrate the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention model. This relatively low-intensity home-based intervention led to: increased HIV disclosure to children, improvements in mental health for mother and child, and improved health care engagement and custody planning for the child. The

  14. HIV Testing and Cross Border Migrant Vulnerability: Social Integration and Legal/Economic Status Among Cross Border Migrant Workers in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ford, Kathleen; Holumyong, Charamporn

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper was to identify factors related to the use of HIV testing among cross border migrants in Thailand. Two measures of vulnerability (social integration and legal/economic status) as well as HIV knowledge, risk behaviour, and demographic factors were tested for association with HIV testing. Data were drawn from a survey of 2600 sexually active migrants age 15-59 in multiple provinces of Thailand. The measures of social integration (AOR = 1.14(95 % CI 1.09, 1.20) female; AOR = 1.12 (95 %CI 1.05, 1.19) male) and legal-income status (AOR = 1.12 (95 % CI 1.07, 1.18) female; AOR = 1.31 (95 %CI 1.20, 1.42) male) were positively related to the odds of reporting an HIV test for both male and female migrants. Exposure to AIDS programming including attending an AIDS meeting and possessing AIDS knowledge was also related to an increase in HIV testing. In addition, reproductive health factors including sexual risk behavior and childbirth increased the rate of HIV testing.

  15. Immigration status and HIV-risk related behaviors among female sex workers in South America.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Christian T; Mosquera, Carlos; Serra, Margarita; Gianella, Alberto; Avila, Maria M; Laguna-Torres, Victor; Carr, Jean K; Montano, Silvia M; Sanchez, José L

    2008-03-01

    This study compares immigrant (i.e., foreigner) with non-immigrant (i.e., local/native) HIV-related risk behaviors among female sex workers (FSW) in South America. A total of 1,845 FSW were enrolled in Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Uruguay. According to their nationality, 10.1% of participants were immigrant FSW. Immigrant FSW were more likely to be younger in Argentina; to work in a disco/bar in Bolivia; to be single and use illegal drugs in Ecuador; and to work in a brothel, consume alcohol, and have sex with foreign clients in Uruguay. HIV-related sexual and drug use behaviors were more common among immigrant FSW in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Uruguay. Country-specific HIV/STI prevention and control programs should be developed for immigrant FSW populations in South America.

  16. Sexual behaviour among people with HIV according to self-reported antiretroviral treatment and viral load status

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Fiona C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess, among people with HIV, the association of self-reported antiretroviral treatment (ART) and viral load status with condomless sex with an HIV-serodifferent partner (CLS-D). Design: Cross-sectional study of 3258 HIV-diagnosed adults in the United Kingdom, 2011–2012. Methods: CLS-D in the past 3 months and self-reported ART/viral load were ascertained by questionnaire. Clinic-recorded viral load was documented. HIV-transmission risk sex (CLS-D-HIV-risk) was defined as CLS-D together with either not on ART or clinic-recorded viral load more than 50 copies/ml. Results: Of 3178 participants diagnosed more than 3 months ago, 2746 (87.9%) were on ART, of whom self-reported viral load was ‘50 copies/ml/ or less/undetectable’ for 78.4%; ‘more than 50 copies/ml/detectable’ for 8.3%; ‘do not know/missing’ for 13.3%. CLS-D prevalence was 14.9% (326/2189), 6.4% (23/360) and 10.7% (67/629) among men who have sex with men, heterosexual men and women, respectively. Among men who have sex with men, CLS-D prevalence was 18.8% among those not on ART; 15.2% among those on ART with undetectable self-reported viral load; 9.8% among those on ART without undetectable self-reported viral load. Compared with ‘on ART with undetectable self-reported viral load’, prevalence ratios (95% confidence interval) adjusted for demographic/HIV-related factors were: 0.66 (0.45, 0.95) for ‘on ART without undetectable self-reported viral load’, and 1.08 (0.78, 1.49) for ‘not on ART’ (global P = 0.021). Among heterosexual men and women (combined), ART/self-reported viral load was not associated with CLS-D [corresponding adjusted prevalence ratios: 1.14 (0.73, 1.79) for ‘on ART without undetectable self-reported viral load’; 0.88 (0.44, 1.77) for ‘not on ART’, P = 0.77]. CLS-D-HIV-risk prevalence was 3.2% among all participants; 16.1% for ‘not on ART’; 0.6% for ‘on ART with undetectable self-reported viral load; 4.2% for ‘on ART

  17. Children's Expressed Emotions when Disclosing Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayfan, Liat; Mitchell, Emilie B.; Goodman, Gail S.; Eisen, Mitchell L.; Qin, Jianjian

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Our goal was to examine children's expressed emotions when they disclose maltreatment. Little scientific research exists on this topic, and yet children's emotional expressions at disclosure may inform psychological theory and play a crucial role in legal determinations. Method: One hundred and twenty-four videotaped forensic interviews…

  18. 31 CFR 1010.717 - Disclosing information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disclosing information. 1010.717 Section 1010.717 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS Administrative...

  19. Optimism and Education Buffer the Effects of Syndemic Conditions on HIV Status among African American Men who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Ann; Jemmott, John B.; Stevens, Robin; Rutledge, Scott Edward; Icard, Larry D.

    2014-01-01

    The present study sought to replicate effects of the number of syndemic psychosocial health conditions on sexual risk behavior and HIV infection among a sample of high-risk African American men who have sex with men (MSM) and to identify resilience factors that may buffer these effects. We used baseline data from an HIV risk-reduction trial to examine whether a higher number of syndemic conditions was associated with higher rates of self-reported sexual risk behavior and HIV infection. Using logistic regression models, we tested for interactions between number of syndemic conditions and several potential resilience factors to identify buffering effects. Replicating previous studies, we found significant associations between numbers of syndemic conditions and higher rates of sexual risk behavior and HIV infection. Surprisingly, we also replicated a previous finding (Stall et al., 2003) that the effects of syndemic burden on HIV status fell off at the highest levels of syndemic conditions. Among a variety of potential resilience factors, two--optimism and education--buffered the syndemic effect on HIV prevalence. This is, to our knowledge, the first paper to identify resilience factors buffering against syndemic effects among MSM. It also constitutes a significant contribution to the literature regarding prevention among black MSM. These results point to the need to identify HIV-positive black MSM and provide effective treatment for them and to develop interventions addressing both syndemic and resilience factors. PMID:24705710

  20. Risk Environments, Race/Ethnicity, and HIV Status in a Large Sample of People Who Inject Drugs in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Hannah L. F.; Linton, Sabriya; Kelley, Mary E.; Ross, Zev; Wolfe, Mary E.; Chen, Yen-Tyng; Zlotorzynska, Maria; Hunter-Jones, Josalin; Friedman, Samuel R.; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Tempalski, Barbara; DiNenno, Elizabeth; Broz, Dita; Wejnert, Cyprian; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We analyzed relationships between place characteristics and being HIV-negative among black, Latino, and white people who inject drugs (PWID) in the US. Methods Data on PWID (N = 9077) were from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2009 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance. Administrative data were analyzed to describe the 968 ZIP codes, 51 counties, and 19 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) where they lived. Multilevel multivariable models examined relationships between place characteristics and HIV status. Exploratory population attributable risk percents (e-PAR%s) were estimated. Results Black and Latino PWID were more likely to be HIV-negative if they lived in less economically disadvantaged counties, or in MSAs with less criminal-justice activity (i.e., lower drug-related arrest rates, lower policing/corrections expenditures). Latino PWID were more likely to be HIV-negative in MSAs with more Latino isolation, less black isolation, and less violent crime. E-PAR%s attributed 8–19% of HIV cases among black PWID and 1–15% of cases among Latino PWID to place characteristics. Discussion Evaluations of structural interventions to improve economic conditions and reduce drug-related criminal justice activity may show evidence that they protect black and Latino PWID from HIV infection. PMID:26974165

  1. Optimism and education buffer the effects of syndemic conditions on HIV status among African American men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Ann; Jemmott, John B; Stevens, Robin; Rutledge, Scott Edward; Icard, Larry D

    2014-11-01

    The present study sought to replicate effects of the number of syndemic psychosocial health conditions on sexual risk behavior and HIV infection among a sample of high-risk African American men who have sex with men (MSM) and to identify resilience factors that may buffer these effects. We used baseline data from an HIV risk-reduction trial to examine whether a higher number of syndemic conditions was associated with higher rates of self-reported sexual risk behavior and HIV infection. Using logistic regression models, we tested for interactions between number of syndemic conditions and several potential resilience factors to identify buffering effects. Replicating previous studies, we found significant associations between numbers of syndemic conditions and higher rates of sexual risk behavior and HIV infection. Surprisingly, we also replicated a previous finding (Stall et al., Am J Public Health, 93(6):939-942, 2003) that the effects of syndemic burden on HIV status fell off at the highest levels of syndemic conditions. Among a variety of potential resilience factors, two-optimism and education-buffered the syndemic effect on HIV prevalence. This is, to our knowledge, the first paper to identify resilience factors buffering against syndemic effects among MSM. It also constitutes a significant contribution to the literature regarding prevention among black MSM. These results point to the need to identify HIV-positive black MSM and provide effective treatment for them and to develop interventions addressing both syndemic and resilience factors.

  2. Efficiency of diagnostic methods for correlation between prevalence of enteric protozoan parasites and HIV/AIDS status--an experience of a tertiary care hospital in East Delhi.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Bineeta; Sinha, Sanchaita; Das, Shukla; Rustagi, Nitesh; Jhamb, Rajat

    2010-10-01

    Since the beginning of the AIDS pandemic, opportunistic infections have been recognized as common complications of HIV infection. Enteric protozoan parasitic infections are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in HIV infected patients. The present study is, therefore, aimed to determine the prevalence of these parasites and study their association with immune status in HIV patients with emphasis on the correlation between various diagnostic techniques to give an accurate diagnosis to avoid empirical treatment. This prospective study, carried out between November 2009 and May 2010 included all HIV seropositive patients presenting with diarrhea to the ART center. A total of 64 stool samples were analyzed by wet mount examination, three different staining techniques, and antigen detection by ELISA for various enteric protozoan infections. Total prevalence of enteric protozoan parasites was 30%. Among the total cases, Cryptosporidium was seen in 12% cases followed by Giardia, E. histolytica and Isospora belli. The maximum diagnostic yield for coccidian parasites was with safranin-methylene blue staining technique. Parasitic burden contributes towards early morbidity in HIV infection. This study provides important information about prevalence of intestinal protozoan parasites in HIV infection. A combination of procedures should be carried out for the screening of stool specimens of HIV patients for better diagnosis and management.

  3. Perceptions Towards Condom Use, Sexual Activity, and HIV Disclosure among HIV-Positive African American Men Who Have Sex with Men: Implications for Heterosexual Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Harawa, Nina T.; Ramamurthi, Hema Codathi; Bingham, Trista A.

    2006-01-01

    Disproportionately high HIV/AIDS rates and frequent non-gay identification (NGI) among African American men who have sex with men or with both men and women (MSM/W) highlight the importance of understanding how HIV-positive African American MSM/W perceive safer sex, experience living with HIV, and decide to disclose their HIV status. Thirty predominately seropositive and non-gay identifying African American MSM/W in Los Angeles participated in three semi-structured focus group interviews, and a constant comparison method was used to analyze responses regarding condom use, sexual activity after an HIV diagnosis, and HIV serostatus disclosure. Condom use themes included its protective role against disease and pregnancy, acceptability concerns pertaining to aesthetic factors and effectiveness, and situational influences such as exchange sex, substance use, and suspicions from female partners. Themes regarding the impact of HIV on sexual activity included rejection, decreased partner seeking, and isolation. Serostatus disclosure themes included disclosure to selective partners and personal responsibility. Comprehensive HIV risk-reduction strategies that build social support networks, condom self-efficacy, communication skills, and a sense of collective responsibility among NGI African American MSM/W while addressing HIV stigma in the African American community as a whole are suggested. PMID:16736115

  4. Disclosure of parental HIV infection to children and psychosocial impact on children in China: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liying; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang; Kaljee, Linda; Stanton, Bonita

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study aims to investigate parental HIV disclosure and psychological impact from the perspectives of their children. In-depth individual interviews with 47 children who had lost one or both parents to AIDS were conducted in China. All transcripts were coded using the software ATLAS.ti 5. Results showed that few of children knew of parental HIV status before the death of their parents. The main disclosers were the children’s current caregivers. Some children knew about their parent’s HIV infection based on their own observations or through overheard conversation, or their interactions with villagers. Both positive and negative psychological outcomes related to parental HIV disclosure were reported. Psychological counseling is needed for both parents and children to dealing with the parental HIV infection. PMID:24761258

  5. HIV Disclosure and Unprotected Sex Among Vietnamese Men with a History of Drug Use.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Luo, Sitong; Rogers, Benjamin; Lee, Sung-Jae; Tuan, Nguyen Anh

    2016-12-19

    Additional barriers to self-disclosure of HIV status exist for people living with HIV (PLH) with a history of drug use. The objectives of this study were to explore the extent of HIV disclosure, sexual practice patterns and the relationships between HIV disclosure and unprotected sex among Vietnamese male PLH with a history of drug use. We used cross-sectional data of a sample of 133 PLH collected from a randomized controlled intervention trial in Vietnam. More than one-quarter of the participants reported not disclosing their HIV status to any sexual partners. Self-reported rates of condom use were 67.8, 51.1 and 32.6% with regular, casual, and commercial partners, respectively. Unprotected sex, testing positive for heroin, and fewer years since HIV diagnosis were significantly associated with lower level of HIV disclosure. Future intervention programs should focus on the complex interplay among HIV disclosure, drug use, and unprotected sexual practices in this vulnerable population.

  6. Experiences of Discrimination Among Youth with HIV/AIDS in Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Owoaje, Eme T.

    2012-01-01

    Nigerian youth currently bear a disproportionate burden of the HIV epidemic. This paper presents findings on the occurrence of HIV-related discrimination among youth with HIV accessing care in Ibadan, Nigeria. A cross-sectional study was conducted and information on history of discrimination experienced by 170 youth with HIV was obtained. About 80% of respondents had disclosed their HIV status. The majority had informed their spouses (66.3%), mothers (47.1%), fathers (39.1%) and siblings (37.7%). Sixteen (11.5%) respondents [15 (93.8%) females and one (6.2%) male] had suffered discrimination since disclosure of their status. Of these, 25.0% respondents were sent out of their matrimonial homes by their husbands, 25.0% were abandoned by their spouses and 12.5% indicated their fiancé broke up their relationship. A higher proportion of females (12.9%) than males (4.3%) had suffered discrimination. In addition, a significant proportion of respondents who were separated/divorced (73.3%) had been victims of discrimination compared with those who were widowed (10.5%) or single (5.9%) (P<0.05). The study confirmed that young people living with HIV/AIDS, especially women experience extreme forms of discrimination. More efforts aimed at addressing HIV/AIDS-related discrimination are required especially as it is a known barrier to HIV prevention and treatment efforts.

  7. Antiretrovirals for Primary HIV Prevention: The Current Status of Pre- and Post-Exposure Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Krakower, Douglas S.; Jain, Sachin; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    In light of the 2 million HIV infections that occur globally each year, there is a need to optimize strategies that integrate biomedical and behavioral approaches to HIV prevention. Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) immediately after acute high-risk exposures and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for those who engage in recurrent high-risk behaviors are promising bio-behavioral approaches to decreasing HIV transmission. Guidelines have recommended PEP for occupational and non-occupational exposures for over 15 years, but uptake of PEP has been limited, partly as a result of insufficient awareness of this intervention among persons at highest risk for acquiring HIV. However, since the publication of large randomized clinical trials demonstrating the efficacy of PrEP, and the dissemination of guidelines endorsing its use, there is a renewed focus on bio-behavioral prevention. Numerous studies have recently assessed the acceptability of bio-behavioral prevention programs among diverse populations or described experiences implementing these programs in “real-world” settings. As research and clinical data informing optimal utilization of PEP and PrEP are rapidly accumulating, this review provides a timely summary of recent progress in bio-behavioral prevention. By contextualizing the most noteworthy recent findings regarding PEP and PrEP, this review seeks to inform successful implementation of these promising prevention approaches. PMID:25600106

  8. Results from an Empirical Study of School Principals' Decisions about Disclosure of HIV Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenneville, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    Elementary school principals' decisions about disclosure of school age children's confidential medical information was empirically studied. Participants included a stratified sample of 339 elementary school principals from the seven largest school districts in Florida. Each participant received one of six vignettes describing a student with HIV,…

  9. [Influence of HIV/AIDS infection on some biochemical indicators of the nutritional status].

    PubMed

    Linares, M E; Bencomo, J F; Pérez, L E; Tórrez, O; Barrera, O

    2002-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyze the influence of nutritional state among HIV-1 infected people, according to the different clinical stages referred by the CDC (Control Disease Center of the United States) in 1987, as well as the changes in the concentrations of some biochemical markers linked to nutritional state. A similar study was carried out in a control group with UltramicroELISA non-reagent healthy individuals, anthropometrically classified. Concentrations of total proteins, albumin, cholesterol, triglycerides, urea, uric acid and creatinine were analyzed by sex and clinical group, comparing the levels obtained through a variance study. When comparing HIV-1 asymptomatic infected patients to HIV-1 and HIV-2 non infected people, the results showed a non significant increase in the level of total proteins with a significant decrease of albumin and creatinine, the latter observed only in male patients. In stage IV patients, an important decrease of cholesterol and a significant increase of the triglycerides were found, as well as the lowest albumin levels. Urea and uric acid levels did not experience statistically significant changes. It was concluded that the study of biochemical markers is advisable, since it contributes to the detection by default of malnutrition marginal states in infected individuals.

  10. Determining Predictors of True HIV Status Using an Errors-in-Variables Model with Missing Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rindskopf, David; Strauss, Shiela

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate a model for categorical data that parallels the MIMIC model for continuous data. The model is equivalent to a latent class model with observed covariates; further, it includes simple handling of missing data. The model is used on data from a large-scale study of HIV that had both biological measures of infection and self-report…

  11. Colorectal Cancer Screening at the Nexus of HIV, Minority Statuses, and Cultural Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I.; Diaz, Tressa P.; Park, Soon H.; Bowen, Talita; Patrick, Kevin; Tamang, Suresh; Braun, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The incidence of non-AIDS-defining cancers has increased significantly among persons living with HIV (PLHIV). Screening education is recommended. Purpose: Social learning, minority stress, and cultural safety theories informed this pilot to assess the feasibility of a colorectal cancer screening intervention targeted to PLHIV, with…

  12. Relationship Between Health Literacy, Knowledge of Health Status, and Beliefs about HIV/AIDS Transmission among Ryan White Clients in Miami

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooss, Angela; Brock-Getz, Petra; Ladner, Robert; Fiano, Theresa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between health literacy, knowledge of health status, and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) transmission beliefs among recipients of Ryan White care. Design: Quota and convenience sampled, quantitative analysis captured with closed and…

  13. HIV disclosure patterns, predictors, and psychosocial correlates among HIV positive women in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rena; Ratner, Jamie; Gore-Felton, Cheryl; Kadzirange, Gerard; Woelk, Godfrey; Katzenstein, David

    2012-01-01

    Disclosure of positive HIV status in Sub-Saharan Africa has been associated with safer sexual practices and better antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, but associations with psychosocial function are unclear. We examined patterns and psychosocial correlates of disclosure in a Zimbabwean community. Two hundred HIV positive women at different stages of initiating ART participated in a cross-sectional study examining actual disclosures, disclosure beliefs, perceived stigma, self-esteem, depression, and quality of life. Ninety-seven percent of the women disclosed to at least one person, 78% disclosed to their current husband/partner, with an average disclosure of four persons per woman. The majority (85-98%) of disclosures occurred in a positive manner and 72-95% of the individuals reacted positively. Factors significantly correlated with HIV disclosure to partners included being married, later age at menses, longer duration of HIV since diagnosis, being on ART, being more symptomatic at baseline, ever having used condoms, and greater number of partners in the last year. In multivariate analysis, being married and age at menses predicted disclosure to partners. Positive disclosure beliefs, but not the total number of disclosures, significantly correlated with lower perceived stigma (ρ = 0.44 for personalized subscale and ρ = 0.51 for public subscale, both p<0.0001), higher self-esteem (ρ = 0.15, p=0.04), and fewer depressive symptoms (ρ = -0.14, p=0.05). In conclusion, disclosure of positive HIV status among Zimbabwean women is common and is frequently met with positive reactions. Moreover, positive disclosure beliefs correlate significantly with psychosocial measures, including lower perceived stigma, higher self-esteem, and lower depression.

  14. Pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV infection: current status, future opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Krakower, Douglas S; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2015-02-01

    As the global incidence of HIV exceeds 2 million new infections annually, effective interventions to decrease HIV transmission are needed. Randomized, placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that daily oral antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with a fixed-dose combination tablet containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine can significantly reduce HIV incidence among diverse at-risk populations. In these studies, the efficacy of PrEP was correlated with levels of adherence. Official guidelines recommend provision of PrEP to people at greatest risk of HIV acquisition, and demonstration projects suggest that high levels of uptake and adherence are possible outside of controlled studies. However, several potential barriers to implementing PrEP remain. These challenges include low awareness and utilization of PrEP by at-risk individuals, uncertainty about adherence in 'real-world' settings, the majority of healthcare providers being untrained in PrEP provision, limited data about potential adverse effects from long-term use of tenofovir-emtricitabine, high costs of PrEP medications, and stigma associated with PrEP use and the behaviors that would warrant PrEP. Innovative pharmacologic chemoprophylactic approaches could provide solutions to some of these challenges. Less-than-daily oral dosing regimens and long-acting injectable medications could reduce pill burdens and facilitate adherence, and local delivery of PrEP medications to genital compartments via gels, rings and films may limit systemic drug exposure and potential toxicities. As the portfolio of chemoprophylactic agents and delivery systems expands to meet the diverse sexual health needs and product preferences of individuals who may benefit from PrEP, it is hoped that antiretroviral chemoprophylaxis could become an acceptable, feasible, and highly effective addition to existing HIV prevention strategies.

  15. The reproductive health behaviors of HIV-infected young women in the United States: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Carter, Marion W; Kraft, Joan M; Hatfield-Timajchy, Kendra; Snead, Margaret C; Ozeryansky, Larisa; Fasula, Amy M; Koenig, Linda J; Kourtis, Athena P

    2013-12-01

    HIV-infected young women in the United States have important reproductive health needs that are made more complex by their HIV status. We searched Pubmed and relevant bibliographies to identify 32 articles published from 2001 to July 2012 that described the prevalence, correlates, and characteristics of the sexual activity, relationships, pregnancy intentions, HIV status disclosure, and contraceptive and condom use among US HIV-infected adolescents and young women. Our synthesis of those articles found that, like youth not infected with HIV, substantial proportions of HIV-infected youth were sexually active, and most sought romantic or sexual relationships, though their serostatus may have affected the pace of physical and emotional intimacy. Disclosure was difficult, and large proportions of HIV-infected youth had not disclosed their serostatus to recent partners. A few studies suggest that most HIV-infected young women hoped to have children in the future, but many wanted to avoid pregnancy until later. Only one study described contraceptive use among this population in detail and found that condoms were a primary method of contraception. The results point to substantial gaps in published research, particularly in the areas of pregnancy intentions and contraceptive use. Much more needs to be done in research and health services to better understand and meet the complex health needs of HIV-infected young women.

  16. Weight status and associated factors among HIV-infected people on antiretroviral therapy in rural Dikgale, Limpopo, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Background Underweight in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected people on antiretroviral therapy (ART) complicates the management of HIV infection and contributes to mortality, whereas overweight increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Aim The study determined weight status and associated factors in people with HIV infection receiving ART. Setting Rural primary health care clinics in Dikgale, Limpopo province, South Africa. Methods A cross-sectional study in which data were collected using the World Health Organization (WHO) stepwise approach to surveillance (STEPS) questionnaire and calculated using WHO analysis programmes guide. Weight and height were measured using standard WHO procedures, and body mass index was calculated as weight (kg)/height (m2). Data on ART duration were extracted from patients’ files. CD4 lymphocyte counts and viral load were determined using standard laboratory techniques. Results Of the 214 participants, 8.9%, 54.7% and 36.4% were underweight, normal weight and overweight, respectively. Physical activity (OR: 0.99, p = 0.001) and male gender (OR: 0.29, p = 0.04) were negatively associated with overweight. Men who used tobacco were more likely to be underweight than non-tobacco users (OR: 10.87, p = 0.02). Neither ART duration nor viral load or CD4 count was independently associated with underweight or overweight in multivariate analysis. Conclusion A high proportion of people on ART were overweight and a smaller proportion underweight. There is a need to simultaneously address the two extreme weight problems in this vulnerable population through educating them on benefits of avoiding tobacco, engaging in physical activity and raising awareness of CVD risk. PMID:28155318

  17. Cervical cancer screening by visual inspection in Côte d'Ivoire, operational and clinical aspects according to HIV status

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer screening is not yet standard of care of women attending HIV care clinics in Africa and presents operational challenges that need to be addressed. Methods A cervical cancer screening program based on visual inspection methods was conducted in clinics providing antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. An itinerant team of midwives was in charge of proposing cervical cancer screening to all HIV-positive women enrolled in ART clinics as well as to HIV-negative women who were attending the Abidjan national blood donor clinic. Positively screened women were systematically referred to a colposcopic examination. A phone-based tracking procedure was implemented to reach positively screened women who did not attend the medical consultation. The association between HIV status and cervical cancer screening outcomes was estimated using a multivariate logistic model. Results The frequency of positive visual inspection was 9.0% (95% CI 8.0-10.0) in the 2,998 HIV-positive women and 3.9% (95% CI 2.7-5.1) in the 1,047 HIV-negative ones (p < 10-4). In multivariate analysis, HIV infection was associated with a higher risk of positive visual inspection [OR = 2.28 (95% CI 1.61-3.23)] as well as more extensive lesions involving the endocervical canal [OR = 2.42 (95% CI 1.15-5.08)]. The use of a phone-based tracking procedure enabled a significant reduction of women not attending medical consultation after initial positive screening from 36.5% to 19.8% (p < 10-4). Conclusion The higher frequency of positive visual inspection among HIV-positive women supports the need to extend cervical cancer screening program to all HIV clinics in West Africa. Women loss to follow-up after being positively screened is a major concern in cervical screening programs but yet, partly amenable to a phone tracking procedure. PMID:22443255

  18. Deconstructing stigma: perceptions of HIV-seropositive mothers and their disclosure to children.

    PubMed

    Letteney, Susan; LaPorte, Heidi Heft

    2004-01-01

    This study addressed the perceptions of stigma and disclosure behavior of HIV-seropositive mothers. Eighty-eight HIV-seropositive women in New York City completed two independent measures of stigma, the Perceived Stigma Scale and the Devaluation-Discrimination Measure. Disclosers (67%) and nondisclosers (33%) were similar in most sociodemographic characteristics-marital status, race, religion and employment, with the exception of age and education. Significant differences were found between disclosure groups in the use of secrecy as a stigmamanagement tool and in perceived devaluation-discrimination associated with an HIV diagnosis. Nondisclosers to children were significantly more likely than disclosers to use secrecy as a stigma management tool (t =-2.76; p =.01), and to feel devalued and discriminated against as a result of HIV serostatus (t = 3.11; p =.01). Disclosure of parental HIV serostatus to children is an important aspect of continuous care and custody planning. Secrecy and perceptions of devaluation and discrimination related to HIV diagnosis should be seen as barriers to disclosure of serostatus to children.

  19. Knowledge of pregnant women on transmission of HIV infection through breast feeding.

    PubMed

    Kasinga, F; Mogotlane, S M; van Rensburg, G H

    2008-09-01

    Although breast-feeding is nature's way of providing nutrition to the baby, in HIV positive mothers this has been identified as one of the means through which HIV infection is transmitted from the mother to the child. In Africa where children under the age of 5 are killed by preventable diseases like diarrhoea, the issue of HIV transmission through breast feeding poses an added huge problem. Research has, however shown that exclusive infant feeding, be it breast or formula, reduces the risk substantially. It is imperative that mothers be informed about safer methods of infant feeding so that HIV infection is kept to a minimum. The objective of the study was to explore and describe the knowledge that pregnant women had about mother to child transmission of HIV infection through breast-feeding. A non-experimental quantitative exploratory and descriptive research design was used to explore the knowledge women had on mother to child transmission of HIV infection through breast-feeding. From the data collected, it showed that although women were aware of the susceptibility of children to HIV infection if fed on breast and formula feeds simultaneously by HIV positive mothers, exclusive feeding was a problem as people associated the practise with a positive HIV status. Women who had not disclosed their HIV status and were HIV positive, found it difficult to comply with the requirement to exclusively feed their infants. These either continued with complementary feeds or did not collect the free formula milk supply preferring instead to buy the formula feeds privately. In this study it was recommended that information on transmission of HIV infection from mother to child through breast -feeding including the benefits of exclusive infant feeding, be it breast or formula, for the first three to six months be provided to the community so that relatives can support the mother on infant feeding method of choice.

  20. Impact of orphan status on HIV treatment outcomes and retention in care of children and adolescents in Asia.

    PubMed

    Huy, Bui Vu; Teeraananchai, Sirinya; Oanh, Le Ngoc; Tucker, John; Kurniati, Nia; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Truong, Khanh Huu; Khol, Vohith; Nguyen, Lam Van; Chau Do, Viet; Lumbiganon, Pagakrong; Kongstan, Nantaka; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Sudjaritruk, Tavitiya; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Yusoff, Nik Khairulddin Nik; Mohd Razali, Kamarul Azahar; Wati, Dewi Kumara; Fong, Moy Siew; Nallusamy, Revathy; Kariminia, Azar; Sohn, Annette H

    2016-10-05

    An analysis of the impact of orphanhood at antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation on HIV outcomes in Asia included 4300 children; 51% were male. At ART initiation, 1805 (42%) were non-orphans (median age: 3 years), 1437 (33%) were single orphans (6 years) and 1058 (25%) were double orphans (7 years). Ten-year post-ART survival was 93.4-95.2% across orphan categories. Clinic transfers were higher among single and double orphans than non-orphans (41% vs 11%, P<0.001). On multivariate analysis, children ≥3 years at ART initiation (hazard ratio 1.58 vs <3 years, 95% confidence interval: 1.11-2.24) were more likely to be lost to follow-up. Although post-ART mortality and retention did not differ by orphan status, orphans were at greater risk of starting ART at older ages, and with more severe immunosuppression and poorer growth.

  1. Does knowledge about antiretroviral therapy and mother-to-child transmission affect the relationships between HIV status and fertility preferences and contraceptive use? New evidence from Nigeria and Zambia.

    PubMed

    Bankole, Akinrinola; Biddlecom, Ann E; Dzekedzeke, Kumbutso; Akinyemi, Joshua O; Awolude, Olutosin; Adewole, Isaac F

    2014-09-01

    The increasing availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and drug regimens to prevent mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) has probably changed the context of childbearing for people living with HIV. Using data from 2009-2010 community-based surveys in Nigeria and Zambia, this study explores whether women's knowledge about ART and PMTCT influences the relationship between HIV status and fertility preferences and contraceptive behaviour. The findings show that women living with HIV are more likely to want more children in Nigeria and to want to limit childbearing in Zambia compared with HIV-negative women. While there is no significant difference in contraceptive use by women's HIV status in the two countries, women who did not know their HIV status are less likely to use contraceptives relative to women who are HIV-negative. Knowledge about ART reduces the childbearing desires of HIV-positive women in Nigeria and knowledge about PMTCT increases desire for more children among HIV-positive women in Zambia, as well as contraceptive use among women who do not know their HIV status. The findings indicate that knowledge about HIV prevention and treatment services changes how living with HIV affects childbearing desires and, at least in Zambia, pregnancy prevention, and highlight the importance of access to accurate knowledge about ART and PMTCT services to assist women and men to make informed childbearing decisions. Knowledge about ART and PMTCT should be promoted not only through HIV treatment and maternal and newborn care facilities but also through family planning centres and the mass media.

  2. Genomics dataset of unidentified disclosed isolates.

    PubMed

    Rekadwad, Bhagwan N

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of DNA sequences is necessary for higher hierarchical classification of the organisms. It gives clues about the characteristics of organisms and their taxonomic position. This dataset is chosen to find complexities in the unidentified DNA in the disclosed patents. A total of 17 unidentified DNA sequences were thoroughly analyzed. The quick response codes were generated. AT/GC content of the DNA sequences analysis was carried out. The QR is helpful for quick identification of isolates. AT/GC content is helpful for studying their stability at different temperatures. Additionally, a dataset on cleavage code and enzyme code studied under the restriction digestion study, which helpful for performing studies using short DNA sequences was reported. The dataset disclosed here is the new revelatory data for exploration of unique DNA sequences for evaluation, identification, comparison and analysis.

  3. Perspective: Disclosing hidden sources of funding.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2009-09-01

    In this article, the author discusses ethical and policy issues related to the disclosure of hidden sources of funding in research. The author argues that authors have an ethical obligation to disclose hidden sources of funding and that journals should adopt policies to enforce this obligation. Journal policies should require disclosure of hidden sources of funding that authors know about and that have a direct relation to their research. To stimulate this discussion, the author describes a recent case: investigators who conducted a lung cancer screening study had received funding from a private foundation that was supported by a tobacco company, but they did not disclose this relationship to the journal. Investigators and journal editors must be prepared to deal with these issues in a manner that promotes honesty, transparency, fairness, and accountability in research. The development of well-defined, reasonable policies pertaining to hidden sources of funding can be a step in this direction.

  4. Current status and perspectives of plant-based candidate vaccines against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Rubio-Infante, Néstor; Govea-Alonso, Dania O; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia

    2012-03-01

    Genetically engineered plants are economical platforms for the large-scale production of recombinant proteins and have been used over the last 21 years as models for oral vaccines against a wide variety of human infectious and autoimmune diseases with promising results. The main inherent advantages of this approach consist in the absence of purification needs and easy production and administration. One relevant infectious agent is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), since AIDS evolved as an alarming public health problem implicating very high costs for government agencies in most African and developing countries. The design of an effective and inexpensive vaccine able to limit viral spread and neutralizing the viral entry is urgently needed. Due to the limited efficacy of the vaccines assessed in clinical trials, new HIV vaccines able to generate broad immune profiles are a priority in the field. This review discusses the current advances on the topic of using plants as alternative expression systems to produce functional vaccine components against HIV, including antigens from Env, Gag and early proteins such as Tat and Nef. Ongoing projects of our group based on the expression of chimeric proteins comprising C4 and V3 domains from gp120, as an approach to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies are mentioned. The perspectives of the revised approaches, such as the great need of assessing the oral immunogenicity and a detailed immunological characterization of the elicited immune responses, are also discussed.

  5. Food Security Status is Related to Mental Health Quality of Life Among Persons Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Hatsu, Irene; Hade, Erinn; Campa, Adriana

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the association between health related quality of life and food security among persons living with HIV (PLHIV). We studied 167 PLHIV who completed questionnaires assessing food security, disease symptomatology, and several domains of the SF-36 health related quality of life survey. HIV disease state was assessed from medical records. Associations between independent and outcome variables were determined through linear regression models. Compared to food security, very low food security was significantly associated with lower mental component summary scores, [average difference -4.98 (95 % CI -9.85, -0.10)]; mental health, [average difference -5.44 (95 % CI -10.08, -0.81)]; and general health, [average difference -5.13 (95 % CI -9.65, -0.65)] after adjusting for covariates. About a fourth of participants experienced severe food insecurity, which negatively influenced their mental health and general wellbeing. The inclusion of resources for food assistance in HIV treatment programs may help ameliorate mental health challenges faced by PLHIV.

  6. The current status of the use of oral medication to prevent HIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ramjee, Gita

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This review was designed to evaluate the progress in studies of the use of oral and topical antiretroviral medication for primary HIV prevention. Recent findings Non-human primate data has suggested that the administration of antiretroviral medication before or after retroviral exposure can protect against the establishment of chronic infection. Over the past two decades, observational studies have demonstrated the safety of antiretroviral agents for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and more recent efficacy studies have demonstrated that tenofovir with or without emtricitabine can protect against HIV when used as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Efficacy studies have been conducted in diverse populations, including men and transgender women who have sex with men, young African heterosexuals, and injection drug users. Three studies in African women evaluating oral and topical tenfovir-based regimens did not demonstrate efficacy, in large part because of suboptimal medication adherence. Further research is underway to determine the optimal ways to provide chemoprophylaxis, the optimal medications, and dosing regimens. Summary PrEP can be effective in decreasing HIV transmission to at risk uninfected persons, but further research is needed to determine the optimal modes of delivery. PMID:26049946

  7. Stages of HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hospitalization and Palliative Care Friends & Family Dating and Marriage Family Planning Mixed-Status Couples Discrimination Legal Issues ... National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day National Gay Men's HIV/AIDS Awareness Day National Latinx AIDS ...

  8. Parental HIV disclosure in Burkina Faso: experiences and challenges in the era of HAART.

    PubMed

    Tiendrebeogo, Georges; Hejoaka, Fabienne; Belem, Edwige Mireille; Compaoré, Pascal Louis Germain; Wolmarans, Liezel; Soubeiga, André; Ouangraoua, Nathalie

    2013-07-01

    Increasingly parents living with HIV will have to confront the dilemmas of concealing their lifelong treatment or disclosing to their children exposed to their daily treatment practices. However, limited data are available regarding parental HIV disclosure to children in Burkina Faso. Do parents on antiretroviral therapy disclose their HIV status to their children? What drives them? How do they proceed and how do children respond? We conducted in-depth interviews with 63 parents of children aged seven and above where the parents had been in treatment for more than 3 years in two major cities of Burkina Faso. Interviews addressed parental disclosure and the children's role in their parents' treatment. The rate of parental HIV status disclosure is as high as that of non-disclosure. Factors associated with parental disclosure include female sex, parent's older age, parent's marital history and number of children. After adjustment, it appears that the only factor remaining associated with parental disclosure was the female gender of the parent. In most of the cases, children suspected, and among non-disclosers many believed their children already knew without formal disclosure. Age of the children and history of divorce or widowhood were associated with parental disclosure. Most parents believed children do not have the necessary emotional skills to understand or that they cannot keep a secret. However, parents who disclosed to their children did not experience blame nor was their secret revealed. Rather, children became treatment supporters. Challenges to parental HIV disclosure to children are neither essential nor specific since disclosure to adults is already difficult because of perceived risk of public disclosure and subsequent stigma. However, whether aware or not of their parents' HIV-positive status, children contribute positively to the care of parents living with HIV. Perceptions about children's vulnerability and will to protect them against stigma lead

  9. Using communication privacy management theory to examine HIV disclosure to sexual partners/spouses among PLHIV in Guangxi.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiwen; Li, Xiaoming; Qiao, Shan; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhengzhu

    2015-01-01

    The current study employed Communication Privacy Management (CPM) theory to examine the factors associated with disclosure of HIV infection to sexual partners or spouses as well as gender differences in these associations among a sample of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in China. A total of 1254 PLHIV who had 5-16 years old children were invited to answer the questions related to disclosure of HIV infection to sexual partners/spouses. Prevalence of HIV disclosure was reported. Key variables related to CPM theory (such as motivations for disclosure and nondisclosure, HIV-related stigma, and relational factors) were compared between females and males. Logistic regression was employed to determine the factors of influencing whether or not the participants disclosed their HIV status to spouses/partners for the male, the female and the combined samples. Fear of rejection was a significant predictor of HIV nondisclosure for the male, the female and the combined samples. Concern about privacy was a significant factor in not disclosing to sexual partners/spouses only in the male sample. The endorsement of duty to inform/educate was the only motivation factor that was significantly related to HIV disclosure for the three samples. The motivation to establish a close/supportive relationship with intimate partners/spouses was found to be associated with HIV disclosure for the combined and male samples. The current study confirmed the utilities of CPM in studying HIV disclosure to sexual partners/spouse. The findings have theoretical and practical implications for HIV disclosure interventions among PLHIV in Guangxi.

  10. Addressing gender inequalities to improve the sexual and reproductive health and wellbeing of women living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Avni

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Globally, women constitute 50% of all persons living with HIV. Gender inequalities are a key driver of women's vulnerabilities to HIV. This paper looks at how these structural factors shape specific behaviours and outcomes related to the sexual and reproductive health of women living with HIV. Discussion There are several pathways by which gender inequalities shape the sexual and reproductive health and wellbeing of women living with HIV. First, gender norms that privilege men's control over women and violence against women inhibit women's ability to practice safer sex, make reproductive decisions based on their own fertility preferences and disclose their HIV status. Second, women's lack of property and inheritance rights and limited access to formal employment makes them disproportionately vulnerable to food insecurity and its consequences. This includes compromising their adherence to antiretroviral therapy and increasing their vulnerability to transactional sex. Third, with respect to stigma and discrimination, women are more likely to be blamed for bringing HIV into the family, as they are often tested before men. In several settings, healthcare providers violate the reproductive rights of women living with HIV in relation to family planning and in denying them care. Lastly, a number of countries have laws that criminalize HIV transmission, which specifically impact women living with HIV who may be reluctant to disclose because of fears of violence and other negative consequences. Conclusions Addressing gender inequalities is central to improving the sexual and reproductive health outcomes and more broadly the wellbeing of women living with HIV. Programmes that go beyond a narrow biomedical/clinical approach and address the social and structural context of women's lives can also maximize the benefits of HIV prevention, treatment, care and support. PMID:26643464

  11. It's not just what you say: relationships of HIV dislosure and risk reduction among MSM in the post-HAART era.

    PubMed

    Klitzman, R; Exner, T; Correale, J; Kirshenbaum, S B; Remien, R; Ehrhardt, A A; Lightfoot, M; Catz, S L; Weinhardt, L S; Johnson, M O; Morin, S F; Rotheram-Borus, M J; Kelly, J A; Charlebois, E

    2007-07-01

    In the post-HAART era, critical questions arise as to what factors affect disclosure decisions and how these decisions are associated with factors such as high-risk behaviors and partner variables. We interviewed 1,828 HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), of whom 46% disclosed to all partners. Among men with casual partners, 41.8% disclosed to all of these partners and 21.5% to none. Disclosure was associated with relationship type, perceived partner HIV status and sexual behaviors. Overall, 36.5% of respondents had unprotected anal sex (UAS) with partners of negative/unknown HIV status. Of those with only casual partners, 80.4% had >1 act of UAS and 58% of these did not disclose to all partners. This 58% were more likely to self-identify as gay (versus bisexual), be aware of their status for <5 years and have more partners. Being on HAART, viral load and number of symptoms were not associated with disclosure. This study - the largest conducted to date of disclosure among MSM and one of the few conducted post-HAART - indicates that almost 1/5th reported UAS with casual partners without disclosure, highlighting a public health challenge. Disclosure needs to be addressed in the context of relationship type, partner status and broader risk-reduction strategies.

  12. Gender, socio-economic status, migration origin and neighbourhood of residence are barriers to HIV testing in the Paris metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Massari, Veronique; Lapostolle, Annabelle; Cadot, Emmanuelle; Parizot, Isabelle; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Chauvin, Pierre

    2011-12-01

    In France, numerous HIV patients still discover their HIV status as a result of AIDS-related symptoms. We investigated factors related to the absence of any HIV testing in men and women separately, using the data from the SIRS cohort, which includes 3023 households representative of the Paris metropolitan area in 2005. The failure to use HIV testing services was studied in relation to individual socio-economic and demographic factors as well as some psychosocial characteristics. The effect of the characteristics of the residential neighbourhood was also analysed using multilevel models. In multivariate analysis, the factors associated with no history of HIV testing in women were an age >44 years, the absence of any pregnancy during the previous 15 years, a low education level, unemployment, to have had no or only one steady relationship in one's lifetime, to have a religious affiliation and to live in a poor neighbourhood. In men, factors were age <30 or >44 years, to have had no or only one steady relationship during one's lifetime, to have a religious affiliation and to perceive oneself as being at low risk of HIV infection. An association according to the "migration origin" was observed among men: foreigners and French men born to (at least) one foreign parent were more likely not to have been tested than French men born to two French parents. We conclude that gender, social and territorial differences exist in HIV testing among people living in the Paris area. More systematic proposals of HIV test in primary care would be an effective policy to overcome these persistent social stratifications.

  13. The impact of criminalization of HIV non-disclosure on the healthcare engagement of women living with HIV in Canada: a comprehensive review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Sophie E; Milloy, M-J; Ogilvie, Gina; Greene, Saara; Nicholson, Valerie; Vonn, Micheal; Hogg, Robert; Kaida, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In 2012, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that people living with HIV (PLWH) must disclose their HIV status to sexual partners prior to sexual activity that poses a “realistic possibility” of HIV transmission for consent to sex to be valid. The Supreme Court deemed that the duty to disclose could be averted if a person living with HIV both uses a condom and has a low plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load during vaginal sex. This is one of the strictest legal standards criminalizing HIV non-disclosure worldwide and has resulted in a high rate of prosecutions of PLWH in Canada. Public health advocates argue that the overly broad use of the criminal law against PLWH undermines efforts to engage individuals in healthcare and complicates gendered barriers to linkage and retention in care experienced by women living with HIV (WLWH). Methods We conducted a comprehensive review of peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed evidence published between 1998 and 2015 evaluating the impact of the criminalization of HIV non-disclosure on healthcare engagement of WLWH in Canada across key stages of the cascade of HIV care, specifically: HIV testing and diagnosis, linkage and retention in care, and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Where available, evidence pertaining specifically to women was examined. Where these data were lacking, evidence relating to all PLWH in Canada or other international jurisdictions were included. Results and discussion Evidence suggests that criminalization of HIV non-disclosure may create barriers to engagement and retention within the cascade of HIV care for PLWH in Canada, discouraging access to HIV testing for some people due to fears of legal implications following a positive diagnosis, and compromising linkage and retention in healthcare through concerns of exposure of confidential medical information. There is a lack of published empirical evidence focused specifically on women, which is a concern given the growing population of WLWH in

  14. Feasibility of using an iPod touch device and acceptability of a stigma reduction intervention with HIV-infected women in the Deep South.

    PubMed

    Relf, Michael V; Silva, Susan G; Williams, Megan Scull; Moore, Elizabeth; Arscott, Joyell; Caiola, Courtney; Barroso, Julie

    2015-10-01

    As with many infectious diseases throughout history, stigma is a part of the trajectory of the HIV disease process. HIV-related stigma impedes women from being tested for HIV. Once infected, HIV-related stigma hinders women from disclosing their HIV status to sexual partners and health care providers, engaging in medical care, effectively self-managing the disease after infection, and adhering to anti-retroviral therapy. After three decades of the HIV epidemic, no evidenced-based, culturally relevant, gender-specific interventions exist to help women infected with HIV manage the stigma associated with HIV infection. This manuscript reports the feasibility of using an iPod touch device and acceptability of a stigma reduction intervention with HIV-infected women in the Deep South in a mixed-method, randomized clinical trial. Results from the study demonstrate that it is feasible to utilize an iPod touch device to deliver an HIV-related stigma intervention to women. Further, women report that the HIV-related stigma intervention is acceptable and meaningful.

  15. Intimate relationships in young adults with perinatally acquired HIV: partner considerations.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Clare; Evangeli, Michael; Frize, Graham; Foster, Caroline; Fidler, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Due to developments in anti-retroviral treatment, an increasing number of children with perinatally acquired HIV are now surviving into late adolescence and young adulthood. This cohort is facing normative challenges in terms of their intimate relationships as well as challenges that face all individuals with HIV regardless of the route of transmission (for example, concerns about disclosure). There may be additional issues specific to having grown up with HIV that affect intimate relationships, for example, the awareness of being HIV positive before the onset of intimate relationships and the way that identity is shaped by having lived with HIV from a young age. To date there has been some limited research on the experience of intimate relationships in perinatally infected adolescents but none in young adults. This exploratory study examined, in depth, experiences of intimate relationships in perinatally acquired young adults and how they perceived having grown up with HIV to have affected such relationships. Seven participants (five females, two males) aged 18-23 years, were interviewed, with the data analysed according to the principles of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Three themes emerged that related to partners' perceptions of HIV: (1) HIV being viewed by partners as being linked to AIDS and sexual transmission, (2) discrepancy between young people and their partners' views of HIV, (3) partner views of risk of HIV transmission. There were strong links between participants' personal experiences of HIV-related challenges, for example, disclosure and HIV-related stigma, and their thinking about the perceptions of partners. These findings have important implications for supporting young people in disclosing their HIV status to intimate partners in appropriate ways. Suggestions for future research are offered.

  16. Household food insecurity, maternal nutritional status, and infant feeding practices among HIV-infected Ugandan women receiving combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Young, Sera L; Plenty, Albert H J; Luwedde, Flavia A; Natamba, Barnabas K; Natureeba, Paul; Achan, Jane; Mwesigwa, Julia; Ruel, Theodore D; Ades, Veronica; Osterbauer, Beth; Clark, Tamara D; Dorsey, Grant; Charlebois, Edwin D; Kamya, Moses; Havlir, Diane V; Cohan, Deborah L

    2014-11-01

    Household food insecurity (HHFI) may be a barrier to both optimal maternal nutritional status and infant feeding practices, but few studies have tested this relationship quantitatively, and never among HIV-infected individuals. We therefore described the prevalence of HHFI and explored if it was associated with poorer maternal nutritional status, shorter duration of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) and fewer animal-source complementary foods. We assessed these outcomes using bivariate and multivariate analyses among 178 HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding (BF) women receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in the PROMOTE trial (NCT00993031), a prospective, longitudinal cohort study in Tororo, Uganda. HHFI was common; the prevalence of severe, moderate, and little to no household hunger was 7.3, 39.9, and 52.8 %, respectively. Poor maternal nutritional status was common and women in households experiencing moderate to severe household hunger (MSHH) had statistically significantly lower body mass index (BMIs) at enrollment (21.3 vs. 22.5, p < 0.01) and prior to delivery (22.6 vs. 23.8, p < 0.01). BMI across time during pregnancy, but not gestational weight gain, was significantly lower for MSHH [adjusted beta (95 % CI) -0.79 (-1.56, -0.02), p = 0.04; -2.06 (-4.31, 0.19), p = 0.07], respectively. The prevalence (95 % CI) of EBF at 6 months was 67.2 % (59.7-73.5 %), and the proportion of women BF at 12 months was 80.4 % (73.3-85.7 %). MSHH was not associated with prevalence of EBF at 6 months or BF at 12 months. However, among those women still EBF at 4 months (81.4 % of population), those experiencing MSHH were significantly more likely to cease EBF between 4 and 6 months (aHR 2.38, 95 % CI 1.02-5.58). The prevalence of HHFI, maternal malnutrition, and suboptimal infant feeding practices are high and the causal relationships among these phenomena must be further explored.

  17. Community Cultural Norms, Stigma and Disclosure to Sexual Partners among Women Living with HIV in Thailand, Brazil and Zambia (HPTN 063)

    PubMed Central

    Ojikutu, Bisola O.; Pathak, Subash; Srithanaviboonchai, Kriengkrai; Limbada, Mohammed; Friedman, Ruth; Li, Shuying; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Safren, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Serostatus disclosure may facilitate decreased HIV transmission between serodiscordant partners by raising risk awareness and heightening the need for prevention. For women living with HIV (WLWH), the decision to disclose may be influenced by culturally determined, community-level stigma and norms. Understanding the impact of community HIV stigma and gender norms on disclosure among WLWH in different countries may inform intervention development. Methods HPTN063 was a longitudinal, observational study of sexually active HIV-infected individuals, including heterosexual women, in care in Zambia, Thailand and Brazil. At baseline, a questionnaire measuring community HIV stigma and gender norms, anticipated stigma, demographic, partner/relationship characteristics, and intimate partner violence was administered. Longitudinal HIV disclosure to sexual partners was determined via audio-computer assisted self-interview (ACASI) at the baseline and quarterly during the one year following up. Logistic regression was conducted to identify the predictors of disclosure. Results Almost half (45%) of women living with HIV acknowledged perceived community HIV stigma (the belief that in their community HIV infection among women is associated with sex work and multiple sexual partners). Many women (42.9%) also acknowledged perceived community gender norms (the belief that traditional gender norms such as submissiveness to husbands/male sexual partners is necessary and that social status is lost if one does not procreate). HIV disclosure to current sex partners was reported by 67% of women. In multivariate analysis, among all women, those who were older [OR 0.16, 95%CI(0.06,0.48)], reported symptoms of severe depression [OR 0.53, 95%CI(0.31, 0.90)], endorsed anticipated stigma [OR 0.30, 95%CI(0.18, 0.50)], and were unmarried [OR 0.43, 95%CI(0.26,0.71)] were less likely to disclose to current partners. In an analysis stratified by marital status and cohabitation, unmarried

  18. Psychometric Evaluation of the HIV Stigma Scale in a Swedish Context

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Maria H.; Wettergren, Lena; Wiklander, Maria; Svedhem-Johansson, Veronica; Eriksson, Lars E.

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-related stigma has negative consequences for infected people's lives and is a barrier to HIV prevention. Therefore valid and reliable instruments to measure stigma are needed to enable mapping of HIV stigma. This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the HIV stigma scale in a Swedish context with regard to construct validity, data quality, and reliability. Methods The HIV stigma scale, developed by Berger, Ferrans, and Lashley (2001), was distributed to a cross-sectional sample of people living with HIV in Sweden (n = 194). The psychometric evaluation included exploratory factor analysis together with an analysis of the distribution of scores, convergent validity by correlations between the HIV stigma scale and measures of emotional well-being, and an analysis of missing items and floor and ceiling effects. Reliability was assessed using Cronbach's α. Results The exploratory factor analysis suggested a four-factor solution, similar to the original scale, with the dimensions personalised stigma, disclosure concerns, negative self-image, and concerns with public attitudes. One item had unacceptably low loadings and was excluded. Correlations between stigma dimensions and emotional well-being were all in the expected direction and ranged between −0.494 and −0.210. The instrument generated data of acceptable quality except for participants who had not disclosed their HIV status to anybody. In line with the original scale, all subscales demonstrated acceptable internal consistency with Cronbach's α 0.87–0.96. Conclusion A 39-item version of the HIV stigma scale used in a Swedish context showed satisfactory construct validity and reliability. Response alternatives are suggested to be slightly revised for items assuming the disclosure of diagnosis to another person. We recommend that people that have not disclosed should skip all questions belonging to the dimension personalised stigma. Our analysis confirmed construct validity

  19. Retrospective cohort study of cancer incidence and mortality by HIV status in a Georgia, USA, prisoner cohort during the HAART era

    PubMed Central

    Zlotorzynska, Maria; Spaulding, Anne C; Messina, Lauren C; Coker, Daniella; Ward, Kevin; Easley, Kirk; Baillargeon, Jacques; Mink, Pamela J; Simard, Edgar P

    2016-01-01

    Objective Non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs) have emerged as significant contributors to cancer mortality and morbidity among persons living with HIV (PLWH). Because NADCs are also associated with many social and behavioural risk factors that underlie HIV, determining the extent to which each of these factors contributes to NADC risk is difficult. We examined cancer incidence and mortality among persons with a history of incarceration, because distributions of other cancer risk factors are likely similar between prisoners living with HIV and non-infected prisoners. Design Registry-based retrospective cohort study. Participants Cohort of 22 422 persons incarcerated in Georgia, USA, prisons on 30 June 1991, and still alive in 1998. Outcome measures Cancer incidence and mortality were assessed between 1998 and 2009, using cancer and death registry data matched to prison administrative records. Age, race and sex-adjusted standardised mortality and incidence ratios, relative to the general population, were calculated for AIDS-defining cancers, viral-associated NADCs and non-infection-associated NADCs, stratified by HIV status. Results There were no significant differences in cancer mortality relative to the general population in the cohort, regardless of HIV status. In contrast, cancer incidence was elevated among the PLWH. Furthermore, incidence of viral-associated NADCs was significantly higher among PLWH versus those without HIV infection (standardised incidence ratio=6.1, 95% CI 3.0 to 11.7, p<0.001). Conclusions Among PLWH with a history of incarceration, cancer incidence was elevated relative to the general population, likely related to increased prevalence of oncogenic viral co-infections. Cancer prevention and screening programmes within prisons may help to reduce the cancer burden in this high-risk population. PMID:27067888

  20. Social, Structural and Behavioral Determinants of Overall Health Status in a Cohort of Homeless and Unstably Housed HIV-Infected Men

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Elise D.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Moore, Kelly; Cohen, Jennifer; Bangsberg, David R.; Havlir, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies indicate multiple influences on the overall health of HIV-infected persons; however, few assess and rank longitudinal changes in social and structural barriers that are disproportionately found in impoverished populations. We empirically ranked factors that longitudinally impact the overall health status of HIV-infected homeless and unstably housed men. Methods and Findings Between 2002 and 2008, a cohort of 288 HIV+ homeless and unstably housed men was recruited and followed over time. The population was 60% non-Caucasian and the median age was 41 years; 67% of study participants reported recent drug use and 20% reported recent homelessness. At baseline, the median CD4 cell count was 349 cells/µl and 18% of eligible persons (CD4<350) took antiretroviral therapy (ART). Marginal structural models were used to estimate the population-level effects of behavioral, social, and structural factors on overall physical and mental health status (measured by the SF-36), and targeted variable importance (tVIM) was used to empirically rank factors by their influence. After adjusting for confounding, and in order of their influence, the three factors with the strongest negative effects on physical health were unmet subsistence needs, Caucasian race, and no reported source of instrumental support. The three factors with the strongest negative effects on mental health were unmet subsistence needs, not having a close friend/confidant, and drug use. ART adherence >90% ranked 5th for its positive influence on mental health, and viral load ranked 4th for its negative influence on physical health. Conclusions The inability to meet food, hygiene, and housing needs was the most powerful predictor of poor physical and mental health among homeless and unstably housed HIV-infected men in an urban setting. Impoverished persons will not fully benefit from progress in HIV medicine until these barriers are overcome, a situation that is likely to continue fueling the

  1. The Impact of HIV Status, HIV Disease Progression and Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms on the Health-Related Quality of Life of Rwandan Women Genocide Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Tracy L.; Hoover, Donald R.; Shi, Qiuhu; Cohen, Mardge H.; Mutimura, Eugene; Adedimeji, Adebola A.; Anastos, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We examined whether established associations between HIV disease and HIV disease progression on worse health-related quality of life (HQOL) were applicable to women with severe trauma histories, in this case Rwandan women genocide survivors, the majority of whom were HIV infected. Additionally, this study attempted to clarify whether post-traumatic stress symptoms were uniquely associated with HQOL or confounded with depression. Methods The Rwandan Women’s Interassociation Study and Assessment (RWISA) was a longitudinal prospective study of HIV-infected and uninfected women. At study entry 922 women (705 HIV+ and 217 HIV−) completed measures of symptoms of post-traumatic stress and HQOL as well as other demographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics. Results Even after controlling for potential confounders and mediators, HIV+ women, in particular those with the lowest CD4 counts, scored significantly worse on HQOL and overall QOL than did HIV− women. Even after controlling for depression and HIV disease progression, women with more post-traumatic stress symptoms scored worse on HQOL and overall QOL than women with fewer post-traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusions This study demonstrated that post-traumatic stress symptoms were independently associated with HQOL and overall QOL, independent of depression and other confounders or potential mediators. Future research should examine whether the long term impact of treatment on physical and psychological symptoms of HIV and post-traumatic stress symptoms would generate improvement in HQOL. PMID:23271207

  2. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection among HIV-1-infected injection drug users in Dali, China: prevalence and infection status in a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuan; Qiu, Chao; Xia, Xueshan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing

    2015-04-01

    To assess the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and to investigate their mutual influences on infection status among human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-seropositive injection drug users (IDUs). A cross-sectional study was conducted among HIV infected IDUs in Dali, China. The participants were tested for serological markers of HBV and HCV infection, alanine transaminase (ALT) activity and CD4(+) T cell count. HCV genotype was determined by sequencing. Of 529 patients, 498 (94.1 %) HIV infected IDUs agreed to participate. The overall prevalence of HCV infection (anti-HCV antibody positive) and spontaneous HCV clearance were 90.8 % (452/498) and 21.5 % (97/452), respectively. Of 411 subjects who had not received HBV vaccine, 296 (72.0 %) were positive for antibody against HBV core antigen (HBcAb), while 274 (66.7 %) were positive for both HCV antibody and HBcAb. HBV antigens were detected in 52 of the HBV-infected subjects (17.6 %). HCV clearance was associated with HBV antigenemia (p = 0.0002) and higher CD4(+) T cell count (p = 0.0294). Resolved HBV infection was associated with HCV genotype 3 (p = 0.0365). HBV and HCV infection are highly prevalent and mutually influence infection status in HIV-1 infected IDUs in Dali, China.

  3. Periradicular lesions in HIV-infected patients attending the faculty of dentistry: clinical findings, socio-demographics status, habits and laboratory data - seeking an association

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Tatiana Vasconcellos; Ferreira, Sonia Maria Soares; Silva-Júnior, Arley; dos Santos Marotta, Patrícia; Noce, Cesar Werneck; de Carvalho Ferreira, Dennis; Gonçalves, Lucio Souza

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of periradicular lesions in HIV-infected Brazilian patients and to assess the correlation of several factors with the periradicular status. METHOD: One hundred full-mouth periapical radiographs were evaluated. A total of 2,214 teeth were evaluated for the presence of periradicular lesions, caries lesions, coronal restorations, pulp cavity exposure and endodontic treatment. RESULTS: The prevalence of periradicular lesions was 46%. There were no significant differences between individuals with or without periradicular lesions with respect to their socio-demographic status, habits, laboratory data and route of HIV infection. However, the presence of a periradicular lesion was statistically correlated with the number of teeth with endodontic treatment (p = 0.018), inadequate endodontic treatment (p = 0.025), images suggesting pulp cavity exposure (p = 0.002) and caries lesions (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of periradicular lesions in HIV-infected individuals was 46% and was not related to HIV infection. PMID:25318095

  4. The effect of increased primary schooling on adult women's HIV status in Malawi and Uganda: Universal Primary Education as a natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Behrman, Julia Andrea

    2015-02-01

    This paper explores the causal relationship between primary schooling and adult HIV status in Malawi and Uganda, two East African countries with some of the highest HIV infection rates in the world. Using data from the 2010 Malawi Demographic Health Survey and the 2011 Uganda AIDS Indicator Survey, the paper takes advantage of a natural experiment, the implementation of Universal Primary Education policies in the mid 1990s. An instrumented regression discontinuity approach is used to model the relationship between increased primary schooling and adult women's HIV status. Results indicate that a one-year increase in schooling decreases the probability of an adult woman testing positive for HIV by 0.06 (p < 0.01) in Malawi and by 0.03 (p < 0.05) in Uganda. These results are robust to a variety of model specifications. In a series of supplementary analyses a number of potential pathways through which such effects may occur are explored. Findings indicate increased primary schooling positively affects women's literacy and spousal schooling attainment in Malawi and age of marriage and current household wealth in Uganda. However primary schooling has no effect on recent (adult) sexual behavior.

  5. Nondisclosure of HIV Infection to Sex Partners and Alcohol’s Role: A Russian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Debbie M.; Quinn, Emily; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Raj, Anita; Walley, Alexander Y.; Bridden, Carly; Chaisson, Christine; Lioznov, Dmitry; Blokhina, Elena; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2013-01-01

    Nondisclosure of one’s HIV infection to sexual partners obviates safer sex negotiations and thus jeopardizes HIV transmission prevention. The role of alcohol use in the disclosure decision process is largely unexplored. This study assessed the association between alcohol use and recent nondisclosure of HIV serostatus to sex partners by HIV-infected risky drinkers in St. Petersburg, Russia. Approximately half (317/605; 52.4 %) reported not having disclosed their HIV serostatus to all partners since awareness of infection. Using three separate GEE logistic regression models, we found no significant association between alcohol dependence, risky alcohol use (past 30 days), or alcohol use at time of sex (past 30 days) with recent (past 3 months) nondisclosure (AOR [95 %CI] 0.81 [0.55, 1.20], 1.31 [0.79, 2.17], 0.75 [0.54, 1.05], respectively). Alcohol use at time of sex was associated with decreased odds of recent nondisclosure among seroconcordant partners and among casual partners. Factors associated with nondisclosure were relationship with a casual partner, a serodiscordant partner, multiple sex partners, awareness of HIV diagnosis less than 1 year, and a lifetime history of sexually transmitted disease. Nondisclosure of HIV status to sex partners is common among HIV-infected Russians, however alcohol does not appear to be a predictor of recent disclosure. PMID:22677972

  6. Male circumcision and HIV status among Latino immigrant MSM in New York City.

    PubMed

    Reisen, Carol A; Zea, Maria Cecilia; Poppen, Paul J; Bianchi, Fernanda T

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated protective effects of circumcision in a sample of immigrant Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). A survey in Portuguese, Spanish, or English was administered with computer-assisted self-interview technology with audio enhancement (A-CASI) to 482 MSM from Brazil (n=146), Colombia (n=169), and the Dominican Republic (n=167), living in the New York metropolitan area. Logistic regression revealed that after controlling for age, income, education, having had syphilis, having done sex work, and preferring the receptive role in anal intercourse, uncircumcised men were almost twice as likely to be HIV-positive as circumcised men. Follow-up analyses revealed, however, that the protective effects occurred only among the group of Colombian men.

  7. Psychosocial correlates of nutritional status among people living with HIV on antiretroviral therapy: A matched case-control study in Central zone of Tigray, Northern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Weldu, Meresa Gebremedhin; Misgina, Kebede Haile

    2017-01-01

    Background Malnutrition hastens progression to Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Syndromes (AIDS) related illnesses; undermines adherence and response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-poor settings. However, nutritional status of people living with HIV (PLHIV) can be affected by various psychosocial factors which have not been well explored in Ethiopia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine psychosocial correlates of nutritional status among people living with HIV (PLHIV) on ART in Central zone of Tigray, Northern Ethiopia. Methods A matched case-control study design was conducted to assess psychosocial correlates of nutritional status among PLHIV on ART. Data were collected by an interviewer-administered technique using structured pre-tested questionnaire, record review using a checklist and anthropometric measurements. Cases were selected by simple random sampling and controls purposively to match the selected cases. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute relevant associations by STATA version 12. Results The psychosocial factors independently associated with malnutrition were ever consuming alcohol after starting ART [AOR = 4.7, 95% CI: 1.8–12.3], ever smoking cigarette after starting ART [AOR = 7.6, 95% CI: 2.3–25.5], depression [AOR = 2.8, 95% CI: 1.3, 6.1], not adhering to ART [AOR = 6.8,95% CI: 2.0–23.0] and being in the second lowest wealth quintile [AOR = 4.3,95% CI: 1.1–17.7]. Conclusion Ever consuming alcohol and ever smoking cigarette after starting ART, depression, not adhering to ART and being in the second lowest wealth quintile were significantly associated with malnutrition. Therefore; policies, strategies, and programs targeting people living with HIV should consider psychosocial factors that can impact nutritional status of people living with HIV enrolled on ART. PMID:28301592

  8. CD127 Expression, Exhaustion Status and Antigen Specific Proliferation Predict Sustained Virologic Response to IFN in HCV/HIV Co-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kared, Hassen; Saeed, Sahar; Klein, Marina B.; Shoukry, Naglaa H.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the HIV co-infected population. Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) remains a major component of anti-HCV therapy despite its deleterious effects on the immune system. Furthermore, IFN-α was recently shown to diminish the size of the latent HIV reservoir. The objectives of this study were to monitor the impact of IFN-α on T cell phenotype and proliferation of HIV and HCV-specific T cells during IFN therapy, and to identify immune markers that can predict the response to IFN in HICV/HIV co-infected patients. We performed longitudinal analyses of T cell numbers, phenotype and function in co-infected patients undergoing IFN-α therapy with different outcomes including IFN-α non-responders (NR) (n = 9) and patients who achieved sustained virologic response (SVR) (n = 19). We examined the expression of activation (CD38, HLA-DR), functional (CD127) and exhaustion markers (PD1, Tim-3, CD160 and CD244) on total CD4 and CD8 T cells before, during and after therapy. In addition, we examined the HIV- and HCV-specific proliferative responses against HIV-p24 and HCV-NS3 proteins. Frequencies of CD127+ CD4 T cells were higher in SVR than in NR patients at baseline. An increase in CD127 expression on CD8 T cells was observed after IFN-α therapy in all patients. In addition, CD8 T cells from NR patients expressed a higher exhaustion status at baseline. Finally, SVR patients exhibited higher proliferative response against both HIV and HCV antigens at baseline. Altogether, SVR correlated with higher expression of CD127, lower T cell exhaustion status and better HIV and HCV proliferative responses at baseline. Such factors might be used as non-invasive methods to predict the success of IFN–based therapies in co-infected individuals. PMID:25007250

  9. "How can I tell?" Consequences of HIV status disclosure among couples in eastern African communities in the context of an ongoing HIV "test-and-treat" trial.

    PubMed

    Maeri, Irene; El Ayadi, Alison; Getahun, Monica; Charlebois, Edwin; Akatukwasa, Cecilia; Tumwebaze, Dennis; Itiakorit, Harriet; Owino, Lawrence; Kwarisiima, Dalsone; Ssemmondo, Emmanuel; Sang, Norton; Kabami, Jane; Clark, Tamara D; Petersen, Maya; Cohen, Craig R; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Kamya, Moses; Havlir, Diane; Camlin, Carol S

    2016-01-01

    People living with HIV/AIDS anticipate HIV-related stigma and fear disclosure to intimate partners. Yet, disclosure is critical to reducing HIV transmission and improving care engagement. This qualitative study characterized HIV disclosure experiences and normative beliefs among couples in communities participating in an HIV test-and-treat trial in Kenya and Uganda (Sustainable East Africa Research in Community Health, NCT#01864603). In-depth interviews were conducted with care providers (n = 50), leaders (n = 32) and members (n = 112) of eight communities. Data were analyzed using grounded theoretical approaches and Atlas.ti software. Findings confirmed gender differences in barriers to disclosure: while both men and women feared blame and accusation, women also feared violence and abandonment ("I did not tell my husband because [what if] I tell him and he abandons me at the last moment when I am in labor?"). Positive consequences included partner support for increased care-seeking and adherence ("My husband keeps on reminding me 'have you taken those drugs?'") Yet negative consequences included partnership dissolution, blame, and reports of violence ("some men beat their wives just because of that [bringing HIV medications home]"). Among HIV-infected individuals in discordant relationships, men more often reported supportive spouses ("we normally share [HIV-risk-reduction strategies] since I have been infected and she is HIV negative"), than did women ("my husband refused to use condoms and even threatened to marry another wife"). Care providers lent support for HIV-positive women who wanted to engage partners in testing but feared negative consequences: "They engaged the two of us in a session and asked him if we could all test." Findings demonstrate differing experiences and support needs of women and men living with HIV in eastern Africa, with HIV-positive women in discordant couples particularly vulnerable to negative consequences of disclosure

  10. Effects of Disclosing Sponsored Content in Blogs

    PubMed Central

    van Reijmersdal, Eva A.; Fransen, Marieke L.; van Noort, Guda; Opree, Suzanna J.; Vandeberg, Lisa; Reusch, Sanne; van Lieshout, Floor; Boerman, Sophie C.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents two studies examining the effects of disclosing online native advertising (i.e., sponsored content in blogs) on people’s brand attitude and purchase intentions. To investigate the mechanisms underlying these effects, we integrated resistance theories with the persuasion knowledge model. We theorize that disclosures activate people’s persuasion knowledge, which in turn evokes resistance strategies that people use to cope with the persuasion attempt made in the blog. We tested our predications with two experiments (N = 118 and N = 134). We found that participants indeed activated persuasion knowledge in response to disclosures, after which they used both cognitive (counterarguing) and affective (negative affect) resistance strategies to decrease persuasion. The obtained insights do not only advance our theoretical understanding of how disclosures of sponsored blogs affect persuasion but also provide valuable insights for legislators, advertisers, and bloggers. PMID:27721511

  11. Acceptability, feasibility and challenges of implementing an HIV prevention intervention for people living with HIV/AIDS among healthcare providers in Mozambique: Results of a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Jaiantilal, Prafulta; Gutin, Sarah A.; Cummings, Beverley; Mbofana, Francisco; Rose, Carol Dawson

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite the Mozambique government's efforts to curb human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), national prevalence is 11.5% and support is needed to expand HIV-related services and improve program quality. Positive prevention (PP) programs, which prioritize HIV prevention with people living with HIV and AIDS (PLHIV), have been recognized as an important intervention for preventing new HIV infections. To address this, an evidence-based PP training intervention was implemented with HIV healthcare providers in Mozambique. This study focuses on the acceptability and feasibility of a PP intervention in HIV clinics from the healthcare provider perspective. In-depth interviews were conducted with 31 healthcare providers from three provinces who participated in PP trainings in Mozambique. Interview data were coded using content analysis. Study data suggest that healthcare providers found PP acceptable, feasible to implement in their HIV work in clinic settings, and valued this strategy to improve HIV prevention. The PP training also led providers to feel more comfortable counseling their patients about prevention, with a more holistic approach that included HIV testing, treatment and encouraging PLHIV to live positively. While overall acceptance of the PP training was positive, several barriers to feasibility surfaced in the data. Patient-level barriers included resistance to disclosing HIV status due to fear of stigma and discrimination, difficulty negotiating for condom use, difficulty engaging men in testing and treatment, and the effects of poverty on accessing care. Providers also identified work environment barriers including high patient load, time constraints, and frequent staff turnover. Recognizing PP as an important intervention, healthcare providers should be trained to provide comprehensive prevention, care and treatment for PLHIV. Further work is needed to explore the complex social dynamics and cultural challenges

  12. Colorectal Cancer Screening at the Nexus of HIV, Minority Statuses, and Cultural Safety

    PubMed Central

    Ka‘opua, Lana Sue I.; Diaz, Tressa P.; Park, Soon H.; Bowen, Talita; Patrick, Kevin; Tamang, Suresh; Braun, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence of non-AIDS-defining cancers has increased significantly among persons living with HIV (PLHIV). Screening education is recommended. Purpose Social learning, minority stress, and cultural safety theories informed this pilot to assess the feasibility of a colorectal cancer screening intervention targeted to PLHIV, with additional tailoring for relevance to Native Hawaiians, a group with low participation in cancer screening. Method The targeted education included behavioral modeling and barriers counseling in a culturally safe environment. Using a 2-group, pre/posttest design, AIDS service organizations were randomized to culturally responsive or standard education. AIDS service organizations consumers recruited through venue-based promotions were the unit of analysis. Knowledge–attitudes–practices, fecal occult blood test screening completion, and intervention feasibility were measured. Results Treatment arm participants, regardless of ethnicity, adhered to fecal occult blood test instructions and achieved increases in screening knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Relevance and acceptability of the educational intervention were endorsed. Discussion The culturally responsive intervention was successful in this group of PLHIV. Additional tailoring may be needed to reach PLHIV who do not participate in organizational activities. Conclusion/Translation to Health Education Practice This culturally responsive intervention shows promise for efficacy testing in a broader PLHIV population. Constituent-involving strategies were central to its development and delivery. PMID:24653993

  13. Risk factors in HIV-associated diarrhoeal disease: the role of drinking water, medication and immune status.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, J N S; Wade, T J; Charles, S; Vu, M; Hubbard, A; Wright, C C; Levy, D; Jensen, P; Colford, J M

    2002-02-01

    In a cross-sectional survey of 226 HIV-infected men, we examined the occurrence of diarrhoea and its relationship to drinking water consumption patterns, risk behaviours, immune status and medication use. Diarrhoea was reported by 47% of the respondents. Neither drinking boiled nor filtered water was significantly associated with diarrhoea (OR = 0.5 [0.2, 1.6], 1.2 [0.6, 2.5] respectively), whereas those that drank bottled water were at risk for diarrhoea (OR = 3.0 [1.1, 7.8]). Overall, 47% always or often used at least one water treatment. Of the 37% who were very concerned about drinking water, 62% had diarrhoea, 70% always or often used at least one water treatment. An increase in CD4 count was protective only for those with a low risk of diarrhoea associated with medication (OR = 0.6 [0.5, 0.9]). A 30% attributable risk to diarrhoea was estimated for those with high medication risk compared to those with low medication risk. The significant association between concern with drinking water and diarrhoea as well as between concern with drinking water and water treatment suggests awareness that drinking water is a potential transmission pathway for diarrhoeal disease. At the same time we found that a significant portion of diarrhoea was associated with other sources not related to drinking water such as medication usage.

  14. Food Insecurity, Socioeconomic Status, and HIV-Related Risk Behavior Among Women in Farming Households in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Lauren J.; Njau, Prosper F.; Msolla, Mbette Mshindo; Padian, Nancy S.

    2013-01-01

    Food insecurity (FI) is associated with higher-risk sexual behavior in some studies. However, the overlap between FI and socioeconomic status (SES) has been poorly described. The study objectives were to: (1) determine the relationship between household FI and four dimensions of SES among sexually active Tanzanian women in farming households: expenditures, assets, flooring material of the home, and land ownership; and (2) determine whether FI is associated with higher-risk sexual behavior and relationship power. In male-headed households, FI was associated with assets, flooring material, and land ownership but not expenditures. There was no association between FI and the four dimensions of SES in female-headed households. Among women in male-headed households, but not female household heads themselves, severe FI was associated with a non-significant increase in the likelihood of being in a relationship because of material goods [adjusted prevalence ratio (PRa) = 1.76, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.81, 3.81] and was inversely associated with being able to ask partners to use condoms (PRa = 0.47, 95 % CI 0.25, 0.88). There was not a strong association between food security and relationship power. Our findings suggest that the association between FI and HIV risk behavior may differ depending on the type of household. PMID:24097335

  15. Anal human papillomavirus genotype distribution in HIV-infected men who have sex with men by geographical origin, age, and cytological status in a Spanish cohort.

    PubMed

    Torres, Montserrat; González, Cristina; del Romero, Jorge; Viciana, Pompeyo; Ocampo, Antonio; Rodríguez-Fortúnez, Patricia; Masiá, Mar; Blanco, José Ramón; Portilla, Joaquín; Rodríguez, Carmen; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; del Amo, Julia; Ortiz, Marta

    2013-11-01

    Knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in populations at risk for anal cancer is needed. Here, we describe the anal HPV genotype distribution in a large Spanish cohort (Cohort of the Spanish HIV Research Network HPV [CoRIS-HPV]) of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) according to geographical origin, age, and cytological status. A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 1,439 HIV-infected MSM (2007 to 2012) was performed. Anal HPV genotyping was performed using the Linear Array HPV genotyping test. Descriptive analyses of subject characteristics, prevalences, and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. The global prevalences of HPV, high-risk HPV (HR-HPV), and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) types were 95.8%, 83.0%, and 72.7%, respectively. Among the HR-HPV types, HPV16 was the most common, followed by HPV59, -39, -51, -18, and -52. The prevalence of multiple HR-HPV infections was 58.5%. There were no differences in the crude analyses between Spanish and Latin-American MSM for most HPV types, and a peak in prevalence for most HPV types was seen in patients in their late thirties. Globally and by specific HPV groups, men with abnormal anal cytologies had a higher prevalence of infection than those with normal cytologies. This study has the largest number of HIV-positive MSM with HPV genotype data analyzed according to cytological status as far as we know. The information gained from this study can help with the design of anal cancer prevention strategies in HIV-positive patients.

  16. Anal Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men by Geographical Origin, Age, and Cytological Status in a Spanish Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Montserrat; González, Cristina; del Romero, Jorge; Viciana, Pompeyo; Ocampo, Antonio; Rodríguez-Fortúnez, Patricia; Masiá, Mar; Blanco, José Ramón; Portilla, Joaquín; Rodríguez, Carmen; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; del Amo, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in populations at risk for anal cancer is needed. Here, we describe the anal HPV genotype distribution in a large Spanish cohort (Cohort of the Spanish HIV Research Network HPV [CoRIS-HPV]) of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) according to geographical origin, age, and cytological status. A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 1,439 HIV-infected MSM (2007 to 2012) was performed. Anal HPV genotyping was performed using the Linear Array HPV genotyping test. Descriptive analyses of subject characteristics, prevalences, and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. The global prevalences of HPV, high-risk HPV (HR-HPV), and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) types were 95.8%, 83.0%, and 72.7%, respectively. Among the HR-HPV types, HPV16 was the most common, followed by HPV59, -39, -51, -18, and -52. The prevalence of multiple HR-HPV infections was 58.5%. There were no differences in the crude analyses between Spanish and Latin-American MSM for most HPV types, and a peak in prevalence for most HPV types was seen in patients in their late thirties. Globally and by specific HPV groups, men with abnormal anal cytologies had a higher prevalence of infection than those with normal cytologies. This study has the largest number of HIV-positive MSM with HPV genotype data analyzed according to cytological status as far as we know. The information gained from this study can help with the design of anal cancer prevention strategies in HIV-positive patients. PMID:23966501

  17. IV drug users: changes in risk behaviour according to HIV status in a national survey in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Rodríguez, M; dé lá Fuente, L; Bravo, M J; Lardelli, P; Barrio, G

    1994-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To determine whether HIV positive intravenous drug users (IVDUs) who were receiving outpatient treatment for opiate and cocaine abuse or dependence used practices aimed at reducing the spread of HIV. DESIGN--Cross sectional study of behaviour and HIV serostatus in IVDUs. SETTING--A nationwide sample, from 83 health centres for outpatient treatment, stratified by autonomous regions. PARTICIPANTS--Altogether 1074 IVDUs were recruited. HIV serostatus could be verified in 738 (68.7%) of these. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Crude and adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals were estimated to assess the association between HIV serostatus and behavioural changes. In their daily interactions with other members of the same household, seropositive subjects more frequently used preventive methods aimed at avoiding transmission than seronegative patients. Treatment for abuse or dependency before the current regimen had a greater impact in HIV positive than HIV negative subjects in terms of abstaining from risk behaviours. There was a significant trend toward lower drug consumption in HIV positive subjects, and the number of seropositive and seronegative IVDUs who stopped injecting their drugs was significantly higher among the former. Seropositive subjects were also more likely to stop sharing drug injecting equipment and to change their sexual habits; they reported an increased consistent use of condoms. CONCLUSIONS--HIV positive IVDUs were more likely to change their risk behaviours than their HIV negative counterparts. PMID:7964355

  18. Foreign-born status as a predictor of engagement in HIV care in a large US metropolitan health system.

    PubMed

    Levison, Julie H; Regan, Susan; Khan, Iman; Freedberg, Kenneth A

    2017-02-01

    We sought to determine the linkage to and retention in HIV care after HIV diagnosis in foreign-born compared with US-born individuals. From a clinical data registry, we identified 619 patients aged ≥18 years with a new HIV diagnosis between 2000 and 2012. Timely linkage to care was the proportion of patients with an ICD-9 code for HIV infection (V08 or 042) associated with a primary care or infectious disease physician within 90 days of the index positive HIV test. Retention in HIV care was the presence of an HIV primary care visit in each 6-month period of the 24-month measurement period from the index HIV test. We used Cox regression analysis with adjustment for hypothesized confounders (age, gender, race/ethnicity, substance abuse, year, and location of HIV diagnosis). Foreign-born individuals comprised 36% (225/619) of the cohort. Index CD4 count was 225/µl (IQR 67-439/µl) in foreign-born compared with 328/µl (IQR 121-527/µl) in US-born individuals (p < .001). The proportion linked to care was 87% (196/225) in foreign-born compared with 77% (302/394) in US-born individuals (p = .002). The adjusted hazard ratio of linkage to HIV care in foreign-born compared with US-born individuals was 1.28 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.56). Once linked, there was no difference in retention in care or virologic suppression at 24 months. These results show that despite late presentation to HIV care, foreign-born persons can subsequently engage in HIV care as well as US-born persons. Interventions that promote HIV screening in foreign-born persons are a promising way to improve outcomes in these populations.

  19. Effect of Early Antiretroviral Therapy on Sexual Behaviors and HIV-1 Transmission Risk Among Adults With Diverse Heterosexual Partnership Statuses in Côte d'Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Kévin; Gabillard, Delphine; Moh, Raoul; Danel, Christine; Fassassi, Raïmi; Desgrées-du-Loû, Annabel; Eholié, Serge; Lert, France; Anglaret, Xavier; Dray-Spira, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Background. The effect of early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART; ie, at CD4+ T-cell counts >350 cells/mm3) on sexual behaviors and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) transmission risk has not been documented in populations other than HIV-serodiscordant couples in stable relationships. Methods. On the basis of data from a behavioral study nested in a randomized, controlled trial (Temprano-ANRS12136) of early ART, we compared proportions of risky sex (ie, unprotected sex with a partner of negative/unknown HIV status) reported 12 months after inclusion between participants randomly assigned to initiate ART immediately (hereafter, “early ART”) or according to ongoing World Health Organization criteria. Group-specific HIV transmission rates were estimated on the basis of sexual behaviors and viral load–specific per-act HIV transmission probabilities. The ratio of transmission rates was computed to estimate the protective effect of early ART. Results. Among 957 participants (baseline median CD4+ T-cell count, 478 cells/mm3), 46.0% reported sexual activity in the past month; of these 46.0%, sexual activity for 41.5% involved noncohabiting partners. The proportion of subjects who engaged in risky sex was 10.0% in the early ART group, compared with 12.8% in the standard ART group (P = .17). After accounting for sexual behaviors and viral load, we estimated that the protective effect of early ART was 90% (95% confidence interval, 81%–95%). Conclusion. Twelve months after inclusion, patients in the early and standard ART groups reported similar sexual behaviors. Early ART decreased the estimated risk of HIV transmission by 90%, suggesting a major prevention benefit among seronegative sex partners in stable or casual relationships with seropositive individuals. PMID:23990567

  20. Role of Quantitative CSF Microscopy to Predict Culture Status and Outcome in HIV-Associated Cryptococcal Meningitis in a Brazilian Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, José E.; Gerhardt, Juliana; Peixoto de Miranda, Érique J.; Dauar, Rafi F.; Oliveira Filho, Gilberto S.; Penalva de Oliveira, Augusto C.; Boulware, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate clinical, laboratory, and quantitative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cryptococcal cell counts for associations with in-hospital outcomes of HIV-infected patients with cryptococcal meningitis. Design Retrospective study. Methods 98 HIV-infected adult patients with CSF culture-proven cryptococcal meningitis admitted between January 2006 and June 2008 at a referral center in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Results Cryptococcal meningitis was the first AIDS-defining illness in 69% of whom 97% (95/98) had known prior HIV-infection. The median CD4+ T cell count was 39 cells/mcL (IQR: 17–87 cells/mcL). Prior antiretroviral therapy (ART) was reported in 50%. Failure to sterilize the CSF by 7–14 days was associated with baseline fungal burden of ≥10 yeasts/mcL by quantitative CSF microscopy (OR=15.3, 95% CI: 4.1–56.7;P<.001) and positive blood cultures (OR=11.5, 95% CI:1.2–109;P=.034). At 7–14 days, ≥10 yeasts/mcL CSF was associated with positive CSF cultures in 98% vs. 36% when <10 yeasts/mcL CSF (P<.001). In-hospital mortality was 30% and associated with symptoms duration for >14 days, altered mental status (P<.001), CSF WBC counts <5 cells/mcL (P=.027), intracranial hypertension (P=.011), viral loads >50,000 copies/mL (P=.036), ≥10 yeasts/mcL CSF at 7–14 days (P=.038), and intracranial pressure >50 cmH20 at 7–14 days (P=.007). Conclusion Most patients were aware of their HIV-status. Fungal burden of ≥10 yeasts/mcL by quantitative CSF microscopy predicted current CSF culture status and may be useful to customize the induction therapy. High uncontrolled intracranial pressure was associated with mortality. PMID:22578940

  1. Efficacy of three-tone disclosing agent as an adjunct in caries risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jayanthi, Mungara; Shilpapriya, Mangalampally; Reddy, Venumbaka Nilaya; Elangovan, Arun; Sakthivel, Rajendran; Vijayakumar, Poornima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Today, most approaches to caries viewed that catastrophic change in normal plaque biofilm is responsible for the disease. The behavior and composition of the biofilm are a reflection of the oral environment; the caries is a reflection of adverse changes occurring in that environment. Thus, it is important to identify the pathogenicity of the plaque biofilm so as to predict the caries risk. The recently developed three-tone plaque disclosing agent was used to test its ability in identifying the pathogenicity of plaque. Aim: To assess the efficacy of three-tone plaque disclosing agent in identifying the plaque pathogenicity and correlate with the clinical caries status and microbiological findings. Materials and Methods: Sixty children of 6–13 years age group of both sexes were clinically examined for caries and plaque scores, and then disclosing agent was applied; the color stained plaque samples were collected and cultured for microbiological assessment, and the data were analyzed based on the caries status of the children. Results: There was a significant difference between the pathological plaque of caries active and caries free group (P < 0.05). The pathological plaque scores and the total colony counts, Streptococcus counts and mutans streptococci counts increased with the increase in caries. Conclusion: Three-tone plaque disclosing agent was effective in identifying pathological plaque and can be used as one of the chairside adjuvants in caries risk assessment. PMID:26321835

  2. One Year After ART Initiation: Psychosocial Factors Associated with Stigma Among HIV-Positive Mozambicans

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, C. R.; Micek, M. A.; Pfeiffer, J.; Montoya, P.; Matediane, E.; Jonasse, T.; Cunguara, A.; Rao, D.; Gloyd, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    The pathways through which stigma is associated with psychological distress remains understudied in Africa. This study evaluates stigma among 277 Mozambicans who were on an antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens for a full year. Using bivariate and multiple regression analyses, we examine psychosocial factors (disclosure decisions, perceived social support, and depression) associated with stigma, at ART initiation and one year later. We found one year after initiating ART, participants reported no change in stigma, a decreased in perceived social support, and an increase in depressive symptomology. Disclosing HIV status to friends (vs. family or partner) was associated with lower levels of stigma. These findings suggest that HIV care in comparable settings should include counselling, support groups, and peer support, that includes stigma and disclosure concerns prior to and during the first year following diagnosis. Most importantly, assessment and treatment of depression should be incorporated into ongoing HIV care. PMID:19639405

  3. Terms Used for People Living With HIV in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Mupenda, Bavon; Duvall, Sandra; Maman, Suzanne; Pettifor, Audrey; Holub, Christina; Taylor, Eboni; Rennie, Stuart; Kashosi, Mujalambo; Lema, Mamie; Behets, Frieda

    2015-01-01

    For this study we conducted in-depth interviews with 29 youth living with HIV (YLWH) and key informant interviews with 8 HIV care/support providers. We describe terms used to portray people living with HIV (PLWH) in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Labels commonly used, mostly derogatory, described PLWH as walking corpses, dangers to others, or people deserving to die before others get infected. Blame and other accusations were directed at PLWH through anchoring or objectification. Being labeled sometimes made these youth suffer in silence, afraid to disclose their status, or avoid performing actions in public, preferring to let others do them. YLWH need psychosocial support to mitigate the harmful effects of these labels and strengthen their coping skills, whereas community, institutional, and national efforts are needed for stigma reduction. PMID:24463633

  4. Antiretroviral Therapy to Prevent HIV Acquisition in Serodiscordant Couples in a Hyperendemic Community in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Bärnighausen, Till; Tanser, Frank; Iwuji, Collins C.; De Gruttola, Victor; Seage, George R.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Pillay, Deenan; Harling, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Background. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) was highly efficacious in preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in stable serodiscordant couples in the HPTN-052 study, a resource-intensive randomized controlled trial with near-perfect ART adherence and mutual HIV status disclosure among all participating couples. However, minimal evidence exists of the effectiveness of ART in preventing HIV acquisition in stable serodiscordant couples in “real-life” population-based settings in hyperendemic communities of sub-Saharan Africa, where health systems are typically resource-poor and overburdened, adherence to ART is often low, and partners commonly do not disclose their HIV status to each other. Methods. Data arose from a population-based open cohort in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. A total of 17 016 HIV-uninfected individuals present between January 2005 and December 2013 were included. Interval-censored time-updated proportional hazards regression was used to assess how the ART status affected HIV transmission risk in stable serodiscordant relationships. Results. We observed 1619 HIV seroconversions in 17 016 individuals, over 60 349 person-years follow-up time. During the follow-up period, 1846 individuals had an HIV-uninfected and 196 had an HIV-infected stable partner HIV incidence was 3.8/100 person-years (PY) among individuals with an HIV-infected partner (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3–5.6), 1.4/100 PY (.4–3.5) among those with HIV-infected partners receiving ART, and 5.6/100 PY (3.5–8.4) among those with HIV-infected partners not receiving ART. Use of ART was associated with a 77% decrease in HIV acquisition risk among serodiscordant couples (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.23; 95% CI, .07–.80). Conclusions. ART initiation was associated with a very large reduction in HIV acquisition in serodiscordant couples in rural KwaZulu-Natal. However, this “real-life” effect was substantially lower than the effect observed in the HPTN-052

  5. Informatic interrogation of CSF proteomic profiles from HIV-infected subjects implicates acute phase and complement systems in shifting cognitive status.

    PubMed

    Ubaida-Mohien, Ceereena; Lamberty, Benjamin; Dickens, Alex M; Mielke, Michelle M; Marcotte, Thomas; Sacktor, Ned; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott; Franklin, D; Cibrowski, Pawel; Tharakan, Ravi; McArthur, Justin C; Fox, Howard; Haughey, Norman J

    2017-04-10

    The prevalence of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND) has not changed considerably in the last two decades. Potent antiretroviral therapy (ART) has shifted the severity of HAND to milder phenotypes, but excess morbidity and mortality continue to be associated with HAND. Changes in numerous markers of immune function, inflammation and cellular stress have been repeatedly associated with HAND but the underlying systems that drive these changes have not been identified. In this study we used systems informatics to interrogate the CSF proteomic content of longitudinal samples obtained from HIV-infected adults with stably unimpaired, stably impaired, worsening, or improving neurocognitive (NC) performance. The patterns of change in CSF protein content implicated the induction of acute phase and complement systems as important regulators of NC status. Worsening NC performance was preceded by induction of acute phase and complement systems, while improving NC performance was preceded by a downregulation of these systems.

  6. Self-reported HIV and HCV Screening Rates and Sero-Status among Substance Abuse Treatment Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Diana; Feaster, Daniel J.; Gooden, Lauren; Douaihy, Antoine; Mandler, Raul; Erickson, Sarah J.; Kyle, Tiffany; Haynes, Louise; Schwartz, Robert; Das, Moupali; Metsch, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Substance users are at increased risk for HIV and HCV infection. Still, many substance use treatment programs (SUTP) fail to offer HIV/HCV testing. The present secondary analysis of screening data from a multi-site randomized trial of rapid HIV testing examines self-reported HIV/HCV testing patterns and serostatus of 2,473 SUTP patients in 12 community-based sites that had not previously offered on-site testing. Results indicate that most respondents screened for the randomized trial tested more than a year prior to intake for HIV (52%) and HCV (38%). Prevalence rates were 3.6% and 30% for HIV and HCV, respectively. The majority of participants that were HIV (52.2%) and HCV-positive (40.5%) reported having been diagnosed within the last one to five years. Multivariable logistic regression showed that members of high-risk groups were more likely to have tested. Bundled HIV/HCV testing and linkage to care issues are recommended for expanding testing in community-based SUTP settings. PMID:25952768

  7. Costs and benefits of secrecy: the dilemma experienced by adolescents seropositive for HIV.

    PubMed

    Galano, Eliana; Turato, Egberto Ribeiro; Succi, Regina Célia; de Souza Marques, Heloisa Helena; Della Negra, Marinella; da Silva, Mariliza Henrique; do Carmo, Fabiana Bononi; Gouvea, Aida de Fátima Barbosa; Delmas, Philippe; Côté, José; Machado, Daisy Maria

    2017-03-01

    This study explored the experiences of the first generation of adolescents who acquired HIV through vertical transmission when disclosing their diagnosis to friends and romantic partners. The study sample was selected by convenience, with 20 patients (13-20 years old) participating in a qualitative investigation using individual interviews (language: Portuguese; duration: 45 minutes). The participants were followed in specialized clinics for the treatment of pediatric AIDS in São Paulo, Brazil. The results suggest that families who live with HIV tend to keep it a secret, and such behavior is learned and accepted unquestioningly as natural. Respect for privacy and the fear of rejection, coupled with the belief that information about their disease will be spread, are the main beliefs with which participants justify their secrecy. In terms of romantic relationships, adolescents were aware that their HIV status should at some point be shared with current or future sexual partners. However, the decision to reveal an HIV diagnosis in romantic relationships is permeated by anxieties, uncertainties about the right time, and fear of abandonment. In any case, telling the truth requires trust, guarantees of the other's love, and, in some cases, probing romantic partners beforehand to learn their perceptions about the disease. Participants who had experiences disclosing their HIV status shared positive and negative results, including emotional support, acceptance, and understanding, along with ostracism, discrimination, and abandonment by family members. The findings of this paper reinforce the challenges of revealing an HIV diagnosis to third parties. It requires understanding the meaning and importance of the secret for each patient, along with the conflict between the right to confidentiality and the responsibility of treating others exposed to the disease. All these aspects should be discussed extensively with this population and incorporated into clinical practice.

  8. Home-based HIV counseling and testing: Client experiences and perceptions in Eastern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Though prevention and treatment depend on individuals knowing their HIV status, the uptake of testing remains low in Sub-Saharan Africa. One initiative to encourage HIV testing involves delivering services at home. However, doubts have been cast about the ability of Home-Based HIV Counseling and Testing (HBHCT) to adhere to ethical practices including consent, confidentiality, and access to HIV care post-test. This study explored client experiences in relation these ethical issues. Methods We conducted 395 individual interviews in Kumi district, Uganda, where teams providing HBHCT had visited 6–12 months prior to the interviews. Semi-structured questionnaires elicited information on clients’ experiences, from initial community mobilization up to receipt of results and access to HIV services post-test. Results We found that 95% of our respondents had ever tested (average for Uganda was 38%). Among those who were approached by HBHCT providers, 98% were informed of their right to decline HIV testing. Most respondents were counseled individually, but 69% of the married/cohabiting were counseled as couples. The majority of respondents (94%) were satisfied with the information given to them and the interaction with the HBHCT providers. Most respondents considered their own homes as more private than health facilities. Twelve respondents reported that they tested positive, 11 were referred for follow-up care, seven actually went for care, and only 5 knew their CD4 counts. All HIV infected individuals who were married or cohabiting had disclosed their status to their partners. Conclusion These findings show a very high uptake of HIV testing and satisfaction with HBHCT, a large proportion of married respondents tested as couples, and high disclosure rates. HBHCT can play a major role in expanding access to testing and overcoming disclosure challenges. However, access to HIV services post-test may require attention. PMID:23146071

  9. Perceived dental needs and attitudes toward dental treatments in HIV-infected Thais.

    PubMed

    Rungsiyanont, Sorasun; Vacharotayangul, Piamkamon; Lam-Ubol, Aroonwan; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Phanuphak, Praphan; Phanuphak, Nittaya

    2012-01-01

    Despite the advancement in highly active antiretroviral therapy and improved health status of HIV-infected individuals, dental problems are still affecting their life and well-beings. We aimed to establish the prevalence of oral and dental complaints among HIV-infected patients, the prevalence of delayed access to dental service, and factors related with delayed access to dental service. A cross-sectional study using self-report questionnaire completed by the HIV-positive subjects was conducted at the largest HIV research clinic in Thailand during 2009-2010. Of all 299 subjects (28.6% males, 71% females, and 0.4% sex change from male to female: ages ranged from 22 to 59 years [mean 36.7±5.53)]), 84.3% reported of having past or present illnesses or problems related to the dental or oral conditions. The most reported problems were dental hypersensitivity (93.3%), bleeding from the gum (92.1%), and having dental caries (65.9%). Two-hundred and forty-two subjects (80.9%) would not disclose their HIV status when seeing a dentist. The most cited reasons of such behavior were their personal right whether to reveal or not, and being afraid of not receiving dental treatment from the dentists or staffs (51.7 and 40.9%, respectively). It is important to note that HIV-subjects admitted to having fear of being discriminated by the dental staffs even if they trusted their dentists as having high morality. In conclusion, our HIV-subjects had good basic knowledge of oral health with regard to HIV infection, experienced common dental problems, and wished to have accesses to HIV-dental specialist services, if possible.

  10. An expressive therapy group disclosure intervention for women living with HIV improves social support, self-efficacy, and the safety and quality of relationships: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Machtinger, Edward L; Lavin, Sonja M; Hilliard, Starr; Jones, Rhodessa; Haberer, Jessica E; Capito, Kristen; Dawson-Rose, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Women living with HIV (WLHIV) face high rates of morbidity and mortality. HIV disclosure interventions have been identified as a promising but under-evaluated approach for WLHIV to improve their health and well-being. The Medea Project is an expressive therapy group intervention that was first developed to help incarcerated women develop the confidence and skills to tell their stories publicly in theatrical performances. The intervention was subsequently adapted as a community-based disclosure intervention for WLHIV. Our study describes an analysis of the impact of the Medea Project on the lives of the WLHIV who participated. All participating WLHIV publicly disclosed their HIV status during the performances. Five impact themes emerged from the data: sisterhood, catharsis, self-acceptance, safer and healthier relationships, and gaining a voice. Our study identifies a voluntary, effective, and broadly beneficial disclosure intervention for women living with HIV.

  11. The current status and challenges in the development of fusion inhibitors as therapeutics for HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jian Jun; Ma, Xue Ting; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Xiao Yi; Wang, Cun Xin

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 membrane fusion as a part of the process of viral entry in the target cells is facilitated by gp41 and gp120, which are encoded by Env gene of HIV-1. Based on the structure and the mechanism researches, new treatment options targeting HIV-1 entry process have been proposed. Enfuvirtide, which mimics amino acid sequences of viral envelope glycoprotein gp41, is the first HIV-1 fusion inhibitor approved by FDA. Although it fulfills vital functions by binding to gp41 and abolishing the membrane fusion reaction when used in combination, it could induce drug resistant virus variants. Currently, a number of design and modification schemes have been presented, a large number of prospective fusion peptides have emerged. For these fusion inhibitors, multiple mutations in gp41 have been associated with the loss of susceptibility to agents. This review reported the current developments and innovative designs of HIV-1 membrane fusion inhibitors.

  12. Measuring HIV- and AIDS-related stigma and discrimination in Nicaragua: results from a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Ugarte, William J; Högberg, Ulf; Valladares, Eliette C; Essén, Birgitta

    2013-04-01

    Psychometric properties of external HIV-related stigma and discrimination scales and their predictors were investigated. A cross-sectional community-based study was carried out among 520 participants using an ongoing health and demographic surveillance system in León, Nicaragua. Participants completed an 18-item HIV stigma scale and 19 HIV and AIDS discrimination-related statements. A factor analysis found that 15 of the 18 items in the stigma scale and 18 of the 19 items in the discrimination scale loaded clearly into five- and four-factor structures, respectively. Overall Cronbach's alpha of .81 for the HIV stigma scale and .91 for the HIV discrimination scale provided evidence of internal consistency. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis identified that females, rural residents, people with insufficient HIV-related transmission knowledge, those not tested for HIV, those reporting an elevated self-perception of HIV risk, and those unwilling to disclose their HIV status were associated with higher stigmatizing attitudes and higher discriminatory actions towards HIV-positive people. This is the first community-based study in Nicaragua that demonstrates that overall HIV stigma and discrimination scales were reliable and valid in a community-based sample comprised of men and women of reproductive age. Stigma and discrimination were reported high in the general population, especially among sub-groups. The findings in the current study suggest community-based strategies, including the monitoring of stigma and discrimination, and designing and implementing stigma reduction interventions, are greatly needed to reduce inequities and increase acceptance of persons with HIV.

  13. HIV-1 Amino Acid Changes Among Participants With Virologic Failure: Associations With First-line Efavirenz or Atazanavir Plus Ritonavir and Disease Status

    PubMed Central

    Mollan, Katie; Daar, Eric S.; Sax, Paul E.; Balamane, Maya; Collier, Ann C.; Fischl, Margaret A.; Lalama, Christina M.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Tierney, Camlin; Katzenstein, David

    2012-01-01

    Background. Although specific human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance mutations are well studied, little is known about cumulative amino acid changes, or how regimen and participant characteristics influence these changes. Methods. In the AIDS Clinical Trials Group randomized study A5202 of treatment-naive HIV-infected participants, cumulative HIV-1 amino acid changes from pretreatment to virologic failure were evaluated in protease and reverse transcriptase (RT) gene sequences. Results. Among 265 participants with virologic failure, those assigned atazanavir plus ritonavir (ATV/r) did not have significantly more protease changes compared with those assigned efavirenz (EFV) (P ≥ .13). In contrast, participants with virologic failure assigned EFV had more RT changes, including and excluding known resistance codons (P < .001). At pretreatment, lower CD4 cell count, major resistance, more amino acid mixtures (all P < .001), hepatitis C antibody negativity (P = .05), and black race/ethnicity (P = .02) were associated with more HIV-1 amino acid changes. Conclusions. Virologic failure following EFV-containing treatment was associated with more HIV-1 amino acid changes compared to failure of ATV/r-containing treatment. Furthermore, we show that non–drug resistance mutations occurred more frequently among those failing EFV, the clinical relevance of which warrants further investigation. Pretreatment immunologic status may play a role in viral evolution during treatment, as evidenced by increased amino acid changes among those with lower pretreatment CD4 count. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00118898. PMID:23148287

  14. Evaluation of needle exchange in central London: behaviour change and anti-HIV status over one year.

    PubMed

    Hart, G J; Carvell, A L; Woodward, N; Johnson, A M; Williams, P; Parry, J V

    1989-05-01

    From November 1987 to October 1988, numbers of clients, visits made and syringes dispensed and returned were monitored at the needle exchange of the Middlesex Hospital, London, UK. A sample of clients were interviewed 1 month after entry to the scheme and again 3 months later to evaluate changes in injecting and sexual risk behaviours for HIV infection. Clients were asked to donate saliva for anti-HIV immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody capture radioimmunoassay (GACRIA). The rate of lending and borrowing used injecting equipment fell, both compared with rates prior to entry to the scheme and during the period of study. Frequency of injecting did not increase and there was reduced incidence of abscesses. There was a highly significant correlation between multiple sexual partners and condom use and a reduction in the proportion of clients with multiple partners. On entry to the study, seven out of 121 (6%) clients were anti-HIV positive; after 3 months, a further two clients tested were found to be anti-HIV positive. Anti-HIV positivity prevalence for the year of study was nine out of 121 (7%). The scheme attracts clients, reduces injecting-related risk for HIV infection and has high equipment return rates. Saliva testing is acceptable to clients. Continued monitoring of anti-HIV in saliva is indicated.

  15. HIV Testing and Counselling in Colombia: Local Experience on Two Different Recruitment Strategies to Better Reach Low Socioeconomic Status Communities

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Quintero, Jaime; Mueses-Marin, Hector Fabio; Montaño-Agudelo, David; Pinzón-Fernández, María Virginia; Tello-Bolívar, Inés Constanza; Alvarado-Llano, Beatriz Eugenia; Martinez-Cajas, Jorge Luis

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing rates remain very low in Colombia, with only 20% of individuals at risk ever tested. In order to tackle this issue, the Corporacion de Lucha Contra el Sida (CLS) has implemented a multidisciplinary, provider-initiated, population-based HIV testing/counselling strategy named BAFI. In this report, we describe the experience of CLS at reaching populations from low socioeconomic backgrounds in 2008-2009. Two different approaches were used: one led by CLS and local health care providers (BAFI-1) and the other by CLS and community leaders (BAFI-2). Both approaches included the following: consented HIV screening test, a demographic questionnaire, self-reported HIV knowledge and behaviour questionnaires, pre- and posttest counselling, confirmatory HIV tests, clinical follow-up, access to comprehensive care and antiretroviral treatment. A total of 2085 individuals were enrolled in BAFI-1 and 363 in BAFI-2. The effectiveness indicators for BAFI-1 and BAFI-2, respectively, were HIV positive-confirmed prevalence = 0.29% and 3.86%, return rate for confirmatory results = 62.5% and 93.7%, return rate for comprehensive care = 83.3% and 92.8%, and ART initiation rate = 20% and 76.9%. Although more people were reached with BAFI-1, the community-led BAFI-2 was more effective at reaching individuals with a higher prevalence of behavioural risk factors for HIV infection. PMID:24592330

  16. Sexual risk related behaviour among youth living with HIV in central Uganda: implications for HIV prevention

    PubMed Central

    Ankunda, Racheal; Atuyambe, Lynn Muhimbuura; Kiwanuka, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As young people living with HIV grow their sexual behaviour and it's implication on HIV prevention is of concern. This study describes the sexual risk related-behaviours and factors associated with abstinence among Youth Living with HIV in central Uganda. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study among 338 unmarried youth between 15 and 24 years accessing HIV care in central Uganda. Data was collected using interviewer administered structured questionnaires. Adjusted prevalence proportion ratios (adj. PPRs) of factors associated with sexual abstinence for at least six months were determined by multivariable log-binomial regression. Results Overall, 79% (269/338) of respondents were abstaining from sexual intercourse for atleast six months, although, 45% (150/338) had ever been sexually active. Of the 283 respondents who desired to get married in future, 40% preferred negative marriage partners. Only 31% (39/126) of respondents in boy/girl relationships had disclosed their HIV status to their partners. Among those currently sexually active (n = 69), 57% did not consistently use condoms and 30% had more than one sexual partner in the past six months. The adj.PRR of abstinence was higher among youth between 15 and 19 years compared to those between 20 and 24 years (adj. PPR = 1.26, 95% CI; 1.08-1.46). The prevalence of abstinence was significantly lower among respondent who consumed alcohol (adj. PPR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.16-0.61). Conclusion Tailored interventions promoting disclosure, consistent condoms use and discouraging alcohol consumption among sero-positive youth could reduce HIV transmission risk. PMID:27642390

  17. 22 CFR 1304.6 - Records not disclosed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Records not disclosed. 1304.6 Section 1304.6 Foreign Relations MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE CORPORATION FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROCEDURES § 1304.6 Records not disclosed. (a) Records exempt from disclosure. Except as otherwise provided in this part,...

  18. 22 CFR 1304.6 - Records not disclosed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Records not disclosed. 1304.6 Section 1304.6 Foreign Relations MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE CORPORATION FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROCEDURES § 1304.6 Records not disclosed. (a) Records exempt from disclosure. Except as otherwise provided in this part,...

  19. 16 CFR 1101.25 - Notice of intent to disclose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Notice of intent to disclose. 1101.25 Section 1101.25 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT... Providing Notice and Opportunity To Comment Under Section 6(b)(1) § 1101.25 Notice of intent to disclose....

  20. 42 CFR 1001.1101 - Failure to disclose certain information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Failure to disclose certain information. 1001.1101 Section 1001.1101 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 1001.1101 Failure to disclose certain information. (a) Circumstance for exclusion. The OIG may...

  1. 22 CFR 1304.6 - Records not disclosed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Records not disclosed. 1304.6 Section 1304.6 Foreign Relations MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE CORPORATION FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROCEDURES § 1304.6 Records not disclosed. (a) Records exempt from disclosure. Except as otherwise provided in this part,...

  2. "Don't tell him you have HIV unless he's 'the one'": romantic relationships among adolescents and young adults with perinatal HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Fair, Cynthia; Albright, Jamie

    2012-12-01

    Individuals with perinatally-acquired HIV (PHIV) are surviving into young adulthood. Previous literature has explored the sexual behavior of those with PHIV. However, their perspectives on navigating romantic relationships are not well understood. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 35 young adults living with PHIV recruited from two pediatric infectious disease clinics in the southeast United States. The majority of participants were African American (n=27, 77.2%), female (n=23, 65.7%), and the mean age was 20.7 (range 15-30) years. Questions focused on experiences with dating and romantic relationships as well as relationship advice for others living with HIV. Transcribed interviews were coded for emergent themes. Qualitative analyses revealed that the majority of participants have dated and struggled with their HIV status in their intimate relationships. The majority of those who disclosed their HIV status to past partners had experienced some form of rejection. However, several participants reported receiving support upon disclosure. Some individuals had never disclosed to a romantic partner, but carefully managed intimacy by delaying dating, terminating relationships, and "taking it slow." Advice fell into two broad categories: "be safe" which referred to the physical protection of self and partners, as well as emotional protection from possible rejection. The second advice category was basic encouragement which stressed the importance for young adults living with HIV to have hope that they would find a supportive partner and to be patient. The focus of education must include not only transmission risk factors, but also developing and maintaining healthy relationships in the context of a highly stigmatized illness.

  3. Micronutrient supplementation has limited effects on intestinal infectious disease and mortality in a Zambian population of mixed HIV status: a cluster randomized trial1-3

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Paul; Katubulushi, Max; Todd, Jim; Banda, Rose; Yambayamba, Vera; Fwoloshi, Mildred; Zulu, Isaac; Kafwembe, Emmanuel; Yavwa, Felistah; Sanderson, Ian R; Tomkins, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Background: Diarrheal disease remains a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in Africa, but host defense against intestinal infection is poorly understood and may depend on nutritional status. Objective: To test the hypothesis that defense against intestinal infection depends on micronutrient status, we undertook a randomized controlled trial of multiple micronutrient supplementation in a population where there is borderline micronutrient deficiency. Design: All consenting adults (≥18 y) living in a carefully defined sector of Misisi, Lusaka, Zambia, were included in a cluster-randomized (by household), double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with a midpoint crossover. There were no exclusion criteria. Participants were given a daily tablet containing 15 micronutrients at just above the recommended nutrient intake or placebo. The primary endpoint was the incidence of diarrhea; secondary endpoints were severe episodes of diarrhea, respiratory infection, nutritional status, CD4 count, and mortality. Results: Five hundred participants were recruited and followed up for 3.3 y (10 846 person-months). The primary endpoint, incidence of diarrhea (1.4 episodes/y per person), did not differ with treatment allocation. However, severe episodes of diarrhea were reduced in the supplementation group (odds ratio: 0.50; 95% CI: 0.26, 0.92; P = 0.017). Mortality was reduced in HIV-positive participants from 12 with placebo to 4 with supplementation (P = 0.029 by log-rank test), but this was not due to changes in CD4 count or nutritional status. Conclusion: Micronutrient supplementation with this formulation resulted in only modest reductions in severe diarrhea and reduced mortality in HIV-positive participants. The trial was registered as ISRCTN31173864. PMID:18842788

  4. HIV status, breastfeeding modality at 5 months and postpartum maternal weight changes over 24 months in rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Chetty, Terusha; Carter, Rosalind J; Bland, Ruth M; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of infant feeding practices on postpartum weight change among HIV-infected and -uninfected women in South Africa. Methods In a non-randomised intervention cohort study of antiretroviral therapy-naïve women in South Africa, infants were classified as exclusive (EBF), mixed (MF) or non-breastfed (NBF) at each visit. We analysed infant feeding cumulatively from birth to 5 months using 24-hour feeding history (collected weekly for each of the preceding 7 days). Using generalised estimating equation mixed models, allowing for repeated measures, we compared postpartum weight change (kg) from the first maternal postpartum weight within the first 6 weeks (baseline weight) to each subsequent visit through 24 months among 2340 HIV-infected and -uninfected women with live births and at least two postpartum weight measurements. Results HIV-infected (−0.2 kg CI: −1.7 to 1.3 kg; P = 0.81) and -uninfected women (−0.5 kg; 95% CI: −2.1 to 1.2 kg; P = 0.58) had marginal non-significant weight loss from baseline to 24 months postpartum. Adjusting for HIV status, socio-demographic, pregnancy-related and infant factors, 5-month feeding modality was not significantly associated with postpartum weight change: weight change by 24 months postpartum, compared to the change in the reference EBF group, was 0.03 kg in NBF (95% CI: −2.5 to +2.5 kg; P = 0.90) and 0.1 kg in MF (95% CI: −3.0 to +3.2 kg; P = 0.78). Conclusion HIV-infected and -uninfected women experienced similar weight loss over 24 months. Weight change postpartum was not associated with 5-month breastfeeding modality among HIV-infected and -uninfected women. PMID:24720779

  5. Risk Behaviors and STI Prevalence Among People with HIV in El Salvador

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Bailey, G; Shah, N; Creswell, J; Guardado, ME; Nieto, AI; Estrada, MC; Cedillos, R; Pascale, JM; Monterroso, E

    2012-01-01

    To date, there are no studies from El Salvador among people with HIV to inform prevention programs. We conducted a study in El Salvador in 2008 among people with HIV using audio computer-assisted interviews on risk behaviors and access to health care. Blood was tested for syphilis and herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2). Active syphilis was defined as RPR titer ≥1:8. Genital specimens were tested for other sexually transmitted infections (STI) by PCR. We evaluated factors associated with unprotected sex with last stable partner of HIV-negative or unknown status among those reporting a stable partner. A total of 811 HIV-positive individuals participated: 413 men and 398 women. Prevalence of Chlamydia and gonorrhea was low (≤1%), while prevalence of other STI was high: Mycoplasma genitalium (14%), syphilis (15% seropositivity, active syphilis 3%) and HSV-2 (85%). In multivariate analysis, disclosing HIV status to partner (OR 0.2, 95% CI: 0.1-0.3, p<0.001), participation in HIV support groups (OR 0.3, 95% CI: 0.1-0.8, p=0.01), easy access to condoms (OR 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2-0.9, p=0.04) were protective factors for unprotected sex. Reporting a casual partner in the last 12 months (OR 3.6, 95% CI: 1.5-8.5, p=0.004). and having an STI (OR 2.6, 95% CI:1.3-5.5, p=0.02) were associated with an increased odds of unprotected sex. Prevention interventions among HIV-positives in El Salvador should focus on increasing condom access, promoting HIV disclosure and couples testing and reducing the number of partners. The positive role of support groups should be used to enhance behavioral change. PMID:23049671

  6. Increased HIV disclosure three months after an online video intervention for men who have sex with men (MSM).

    PubMed

    Chiasson, Mary Ann; Shaw, Francine Shuchat; Humberstone, Mike; Hirshfield, Sabina; Hartel, Diana

    2009-09-01

    A behavioral intervention for men who have sex with men (MSM) was created for online delivery. The nine-minute video drama "The Morning After" (www.hivbigdeal.org) was designed to promote critical thinking about HIV risk. MSM were recruited for the evaluation through banner ads on a subscription-based gay sexual meeting web site. Participants viewed the intervention online and completed online behavioral questionnaires at enrollment and three month follow-up. Each participant served as his own control. No participant incentives were provided. Follow-up was completed by 522 (54%) of 971 eligible men. Men completing follow-up were similar to those who did not by age and prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) but reported more lifetime sex partners. They also differed somewhat by race, education, and HIV testing. In the three months after the intervention, men were significantly more likely to disclose HIV status to partners (odds ratio [OR] = 3.37, p<0.001) and less likely to report a casual partner or UAI in their most recent sexual encounter than at baseline. Of 120 men HIV tested during follow-up, 17 (14%) reported being HIV seropositive. These findings show that MSM at high risk for HIV will participate in a brief online video intervention designed to engage critical thinking and that significant, self-reported increases in HIV disclosure and decreases in risk behavior occurred three months after MSM viewed the video.

  7. Sexual Behavior and Knowledge among Adolescents with Perinatally Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Compared to HIV-Uninfected Adolescents at an Urban Tertiary Center in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ashlesha; Pineda, Carol; Kest, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sexual behaviors and knowledge among PHIV-infected (PHIV(+)) adolescents in comparison with HIV-uninfected youths are not well understood and continue to be studied actively. Objective. To compare sexual behavior and sexual knowledge of PHIV(+) and HIV-uninfected adolescents at an urban, tertiary-care center in New Jersey. Study Design. Modified Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance questionnaire was administered to PHIV(+) and HIV-uninfected adolescents to assess and compare sexual behavior and knowledge over a 1-year-period. Results. Twenty-seven PHIV(+) and 100 HIV-uninfected adolescents were studied; 59% PHIV(+) and 52% HIV-uninfected adolescents were sexually active. A significantly higher proportion of PHIV(+) adolescents compared to HIV-uninfected adolescents reported ≥1 occasion of unprotected penetrative sex (p < 0.0001) and reported multiple (>4) sexual partners (p = 0.037). Significantly more PHIV(+) males reported receptive anal intercourse (p < 0.001). About 1/3 of adolescents in both groups were unaware that sexual abstinence can prevent HIV transmission and >80% adolescents in both groups did not consider multiple sexual partners a risk factor for HIV transmission. Only 25% PHIV(+) adolescents reported disclosing their seropositive status to their first sexual partners. Conclusions. High risk sexual behaviors were significantly more prevalent among PHIV(+) youths; however both groups demonstrated considerable gaps in sexual knowledge. There is an urgent need for heightening awareness about risky behaviors, interventions for prevention, and reproductive health promotion among adolescents.

  8. Apolipoprotein E ε4 genotype status is not associated with neuroimaging outcomes in a large cohort of HIV+ individuals.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Sarah A; Paul, Robert H; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Morgan, Erin E; Vaida, Florin; Deng, Qianqian; Chen, Jie Ashley; Letendre, Scott; Ellis, Ronald; Clifford, David B; Marra, Christina M; Collier, Ann C; Gelman, Benjamin B; McArthur, Justin C; McCutchan, J Allen; Simpson, David M; Morgello, Susan; Grant, Igor; Ances, Beau M

    2016-10-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies suggest a negative relationship between the apolipoprotein (ApoE) ε4 allele and brain integrity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (HIV+) individuals, although the presence of this relationship across adulthood remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to clarify the discrepancies using a large, diverse group of HIV+ individuals and multiple imaging modalities sensitive to HIV. The association of ApoE ε4 with structural neuroimaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was examined in 237 HIV+ individuals in the CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study. Cortical and subcortical gray matter, abnormal and total white matter, ventricles, sulcal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and cerebellar gray matter, white matter, and CSF volumes, and MRS concentrations of myo-inositol, creatine, N-acetyl-aspartate, and choline in the frontal white matter (FWM), frontal gray matter (FGM), and basal ganglia were examined. Secondary analyses explored this relationship separately in individuals ≥50 years old (n = 173) and <50 years old (n = 63). No significant differences were observed between ApoE ε4+ (ApoE ε3/ε4 and ApoE ε4/ε4) individuals (n = 69) and ApoE ε4- (ApoE ε2/ε3 and ApoE ε3/ε3) individuals (n = 167). When individuals were further divided by age, no significant genotype group differences were identified in individuals <50 or ≥50 years of age on any neuroimaging outcome. The ApoE ε4 allele did not affect brain integrity in this large, diverse sample of HIV+ individuals. The effects of ApoE ε4 may not be apparent until more advanced ages and may be more prominent when present along with other risk factors for neuronal damage.

  9. Estimating and disclosing the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease: challenges, controversies and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J Scott; Tersegno, Sarah M

    2010-01-01

    With Alzheimer’s disease increasing in prevalence and public awareness, more people are becoming interested in learning their chances of developing this condition. Disclosing Alzheimer’s disease risk has been discouraged because of the limited predictive value of available tests, lack of prevention and treatment options, and concerns regarding potential psychological and social harms. However, challenges to this status quo include the availability of direct-to-consumer health risk information (e.g., genetic susceptibility tests), as well as a growing literature suggesting that people seeking risk information for Alzheimer’s disease through formal education and counseling protocols generally find it useful and do not experience adverse effects. This paper reviews current and potential methods of risk assessment for Alzheimer’s disease, discusses the process and impact of disclosing risk to interested patients and consumers, and considers the practical and ethical challenges in this emerging area. Anticipated future directions are addressed. PMID:20856693

  10. Fatigue and sleep disturbance in HIV-positive women: a qualitative and biomedical approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Ti; Lee, Shih-Yu; Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Simoni, Jane M; Pan, Chengen; Bao, Meijuan; Lu, Hongzhou

    2013-01-01

    Aims and objectives This study explores how sleep and energy levels were affected in Chinese women diagnosed with HIV in China employing the Actiwatch actigraphy system to collect data on the women’s sleep characteristics. Background The worldwide AIDS pandemic, a major impetus behind the recent focus on global aspects of health, is one area in which the behavioural and biomedical expertise of nursing science is sorely needed. In particular, few studies of HIV+ women have examined the association of HIV-related stress with sleep disturbance and fatigue. Especially, fatigue and sleep disturbances are a common complaint among people with HIV. Design A qualitative study with actigraphy device used. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 19 HIV+ women in Shanghai, China, from December 2009–March 2010 and within this group, nine of the women agreed to wear an Actiwatch actigraphy device for 72 hours. Results Two major themes emerged from the in-depth interviews are as follows: sleep disturbance and fatigue. Participants presented varying amounts of sleeplessness, and fatigue resulting from nightmares, worrying about whether to disclose their diagnosis, and whether they might transmit the disease to their partners or children. Among the nine Actiwatch study participants, data shown that those who experienced fragmented sleep also slept more during the daytime. Conclusions In this study, Chinese HIV+ women described how stress had caused them to become sleepless. The objective data collected via Actiwatch showed that these women required longer nap times, which indicates they did not have refreshing nocturnal sleep. Designing a culturally acceptable stress management intervention for these women is urgently needed. Relevance to clinical practice Sleep and fatigue level should be evaluated in each visit with HIV care. Nurses need to be trained in evaluating the HIV+ patients’ sleep and fatigue status and refer them to psychologist and/or relaxation technique

  11. HIV-disclosure in the context of vertical transmission: HIV-positive mothers in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Varga, C A; Sherman, G G; Jones, S A

    2006-11-01

    HIV-disclosure among childbearing women remains poorly understood, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. This paper chronicles disclosure experiences of 31 women attending prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission services in Johannesburg. Data collection entailed repeat in-depth interviews over a nine-month period. Virtually all women (93.5%) had told at least one person (usually a partner), most voluntarily and within a week of the test result. Secondary disclosure was most likely with female family members, through indirect means and involuntary. Confidentiality breach by primary targets likely contributed to the observed high rates of involuntary secondary disclosure and negative secondary disclosure experiences. For most mothers, voluntary disclosure was driven by the desire to ensure adequate infant care and avoid vertical HIV transmission. The impact of disclosure was not always clear-cut. While most primary disclosure experiences were ultimately constructive, secondary disclosure more likely led to rejection, stigmatization and the withholding of financial support. Our data illustrate the influence of social contextual factors on disclosure patterns and impact. For these mothers, socio-cultural norms, the current media and political environment surrounding HIV/AIDS, household composition and social networks and childbearing status shaped disclosure experiences; sometimes constraining disclosure circumstances and sometimes creating a safe space to disclose. Programmatic implications are also discussed.

  12. To tell or not to tell: negotiating disclosure for people living with HIV on antiretroviral treatment in a South African setting.

    PubMed

    Linda, Pride

    2013-07-01

    Disclosure of HIV status occurs for a variety of reasons and in various contexts, such as to sexual partners to enable safer sexual choices, to health-care workers to access treatment and care services and to family and community members to gain various forms of support. The reasons for disclosure or non-disclosure are shaped by the relationships, needs and circumstances of people living with HIV (PLHIV) at the time of disclosure. The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe the act and experience of disclosure in order to understand how these experiences of disclosure impact on the lives of PLHIV on antiretroviral (ARV) treatment and influence adherence to treatment. Using a qualitative research design, I conducted an ethnographic study at and through the referral clinic at the Tygerberg Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. Ninety-three adult patients (75 women) participated in the study, 32 of whom were visited at home to conduct semi-structured in-depth interviews, and 61 of them participated in a cross-sectional study at the referral clinic using researcher-administered questionnaires. A general inductive approach was used to analyse the data. Participants in both arms of the study disclosed mainly to family members, then partners and then to friends and other persons; only five had not disclosed to anyone at all. In deciding to disclose or not, the author began to see how patients negotiated their disclosure. From weighing up other people's reactions, to being concerned about the effect of their disclosure on their disclosure targets, to concealing one's status to evade untoward negative reactions towards themselves. Further, negotiating one's disclosure is not only about to whom or how to disclose, it also means finding good opportunities to disclose or conceiving ways of hiding one's status and/or medication from others in order to enhance access and adherence to their ARV treatment. Perceived rather than actual stigma played an important role

  13. Variations in the Role of Social Support on Disclosure Among Newly Diagnosed HIV-Infected People Who Inject Drugs in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Go, Vivian F; Latkin, Carl; Le Minh, Nguyen; Frangakis, Constantine; Ha, Tran Viet; Sripaipan, Teerada; Mo, Tran Thi; Davis, Wendy W; Vu, Pham The; Quan, Vu Minh

    2016-01-01

    Stigma and perceived social support can influence the decision to disclose HIV positive status, especially for people who inject drugs (PWID). In this analysis, the association between social support and HIV disclosure among 336 newly diagnosed HIV-infected PWID in Northern Vietnam was assessed. One month after diagnosis, 34.8 % of participants had not disclosed to anyone. Disclosure to anyone and to a family member specifically, was associated with baseline social support in the form of positive interactions and a history of incarceration. Disclosing to a family member was less likely among those who had unprotected sex in the previous 3 months. Disclosure to an injecting partner was more likely among those with a history of being in a drug treatment program, knowing someone on ART and believing that ART is safe. These data suggest that social support may facilitate disclosure among family members, including spouses, while disclosure to injecting partners is greater when PWID know that ART is a safe and viable option.

  14. Variations in the role of social support on disclosure among newly diagnosed HIV-infected people who inject drugs in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Go, Vivian F.; Latkin, Carl; Le Minh, Nguyen; Frangakis, Constantine; Ha, Tran Viet; Sripaipan, Teerada; Mo, Tran Thi; Davis, Wendy W.; Vu, Pham The; Quan, Vu Minh

    2016-01-01

    Stigma and perceived social support can influence the decision to disclose HIV positive status, especially for people who inject drugs (PWID). In this analysis, the association between social support and HIV disclosure among 336 newly diagnosed HIV-infected PWID in Northern Vietnam was assessed. One month after diagnosis, 34.8% of participants had not disclosed to anyone. Disclosure to anyone and to a family member specifically, was associated with baseline social support in the form of positive interactions and a history of incarceration. Disclosing to a family member was less likely among those who had unprotected sex in the previous 3 months. Disclosure to an injecting partner was more likely among those with a history of being in a drug treatment program, knowing someone on ART and believing that ART is safe. These data suggest that social support may facilitate disclosure among family members, including spouses, while disclosure to injecting partners is greater when PWID know that ART is a safe and viable option. PMID:25972071

  15. On the Road to HIV/AIDS Competence in the Household: Building a Health-Enabling Environment for People Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Masquillier, Caroline; Wouters, Edwin; Mortelmans, Dimitri; van Wyk, Brian

    2015-01-01

    When aiming to provide chronic disease care within the context of human resource shortages, we should not only consider the responsibility of the individual person living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) but also the capacity of the social environment to actively encourage a lifestyle that fosters health. In this social environment, extensive efforts are thus required to increase HIV/AIDS knowledge, reduce stigma, stimulate HIV testing, improve health care-seeking behavior, and encourage safe sexual practices—described in the literature as the need for AIDS competence. In accordance with socio-ecological theory, one cannot restrict the research focus to communities, as AIDS competence studies should also incorporate the intermediate household level. In responding to this research need, the aim of this article is to conceptualize an “HIV/AIDS competent household” based on qualitative interviews and focus group discussions conducted in a township on the outskirts of Cape Town, South Africa. Our results show that a household’s supportive response to disclosure allows a patient to live openly as HIV positive in the household concerned. This may mark the start of the road to HIV/AIDS competence in the household, meaning the PLWHA receives sustainable support throughout the care continuum and positive living becomes the norm for the PLWHA and his or her household. A feedback loop might also be created in which other household members are encouraged to be tested and to disclose their status, which is an important step towards a sustainable response to HIV/AIDS-related challenges. Despite the fact that this road to HIV/AIDS competence at the household level is fragile and prone to various barriers, this article shows that the household has the potential to be a health-enabling environment for PLWHA. PMID:25794189

  16. Positive association between dietary iron intake and iron status in HIV-infected children in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Herculina S; Balk, Lisanne J; Viljoen, Michelle; Meyers, Tammy M

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a common complication of pediatric HIV infection and is associated with suboptimal cognitive performance and growth failure. Routine iron supplementation is not provided to South African HIV-infected children. We hypothesized that dietary iron intake without supplementation is sufficient to protect against iron deficiency (ID) in HIV-infected children receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. In this prospective study, the difference between dietary intakes of iron-deficient children (soluble transferrin receptor >9.4 mg/L) and iron-sufficient children after 18 months on highly active antiretroviral therapy was examined. The association between iron intake and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration was also assessed. Longitudinal data collected for 18 months from 58 HIV-infected African children were assessed by generalized estimation equations, with adjustment for demographic information, dietary intakes, growth parameters, and CD4%. After adjustment for covariates, the longitudinal association between dietary iron intake and Hb concentration remained significant. This association shows that for every 1-mg increase in iron intake per day, Hb increases by 1.1 g/L (P < .001). Mean Hb increased significantly after 18 months of follow-up (106 ± 14 to 129 ± 14 g/L, P < .01), but soluble transferrin receptor also increased (7.7 ± 2.7 to 8.9 ± 3.0 mg/L, P < .01). The incidence of ID increased from 15.2% at baseline to 37.2% after 18 months. Children with animal protein intakes greater than >20 g/d had significantly lower odds for ID at 18 months than did children with lower intakes (odds ratio, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.21-0.77). Dietary iron intake was insufficient to protect against ID, pointing to a need for low-dose iron supplementation for iron-deficient HIV-infected children and interventions to increase the consumption of animal protein.

  17. Reaching and Engaging Non-Gay Identified, Non-Disclosing Black Men who have Sex with both Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Ellen; Pass, Michael; Randolph, Doris; Murray, Deborah; Downing, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Non-gay identified (NGI) Black men who have sex with both men and women (MSMW) and use substances are at risk of acquiring and transmitting HIV to their partners. Homophobic community norms can discourage such men from disclosing their risk behaviour to female partners and others, including service providers. It is important to understand the dynamics of risk in this vulnerable population, but research is challenged by the men’s need for secrecy. In this paper we report on successful efforts to recruit 33 non-disclosing, NGI Black MSMW for in-depth interviews concerning substance use, HIV risk and attitudes toward disclosing their risk behaviour. We employed targeted and referral sampling, with initial contacts and/or key informants drawn from several types of settings in New York City including known gay venues, community organisations, neighbourhood networks and the Internet. Key informant gatekeepers and the ability to establish rapport proved central to success. Perceived stigma is a source of social isolation, but men are willing to discuss their risk behaviour when they trust interviewers to protect their privacy and engage with them in a non-judgemental manner. Findings imply that the most effective prevention approaches for this population may be those that target risk behaviours without focusing on disclosure of sexual identities. PMID:22937767

  18. HIV-related stigma and physical symptoms have a persistent influence on health-related quality of life in Australians with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The health-related quality of life (HRQL) of people living with HIV infection is an important consideration in HIV management. The PROQOL-HIV psychometric instrument was recently developed internationally as a contemporary, discriminating HIV-HRQL measure incorporating influential emotional dimensions such as stigma. Here we present the first within-country results of PROQOL-HIV using qualitative and quantitative data collected from a West Australian cohort who participated in the development and validation of PROQOL-HIV, and provide a comprehensive picture of HRQL in our setting. Methods We carried out a secondary analysis of data from Australian patients who participated in the international study: 15 in-depth interviews were conducted and 102 HRQL surveys using the PROQOL-HIV instrument and a symptom questionnaire were administered. We employed qualitative methods to extract description from the interview data and linear regression for exploration of the composite and sub-scale scores derived from the survey. Results Interviews revealed the long-standing difficulties of living with HIV, particularly in the domains of intimate relationships, perceived stigma, and chronic ill health. The novel PROQOL-HIV instrument discriminated impact of treatment via symptomatology, pill burden and treatment duration. Patients demonstrated lower HRQL if they were: newly diagnosed (p=0.001); naive to anti-retroviral treatment (p=0.009); reporting depression, unemployment or a high frequency of adverse symptoms, (all p<0.001). Total HRQL was notably reduced by perceived stigma with a third of surveyed patients reporting persistent fears of both disclosing their HIV status and infecting others. Conclusions The analysis showed that psychological distress was a major influence on HRQL in our cohort. This was compounded in people with poor physical health which in turn was associated with unemployment and depression. People with HIV infection are living longer and residual

  19. Citizenship status and engagement in HIV care: an observational cohort study to assess the association between reporting a national ID number and retention in public-sector HIV care in Johannesburg, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Kate; Clouse, Kate; Meyer-Rath, Gesine; MacLeod, William; Maskew, Mhairi; Sanne, Ian; Long, Lawrence; Fox, Matthew P

    2017-01-01

    Objective In many resource-limited settings, people from rural areas migrate to urban hubs in search of work. Thus, urban public-sector HIV clinics in South Africa (SA) often cater to both local residents and patients from other provinces and/or countries. The objective of this analysis was to compare programmatic treatment outcomes by citizenship status in an urban clinic in SA. Setting An urban public-sector HIV treatment facility in Johannesburg, SA. Participants We included all antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve, non-pregnant patients who initiated standard first-line treatment from January 2008 to December 2013. 12 219 patients were included and 59.5% were women. Primary outcome measure Patients were followed from ART initiation until death, transfer, loss to follow-up (LTF), or data set closure. We describe attrition (mortality and LTF) stratified by SA citizenship status (confirmed SA citizens (with national ID number), unconfirmed SA citizens (no ID), and foreign nationals) and model the risk of attrition using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results 70% of included patients were confirmed SA citizens, 19% were unconfirmed SA citizens, and 11% were foreign nationals. Unconfirmed SA citizens were far more likely to die or become LTF than other patients. A similar proportion of foreign nationals (18.2%) and confirmed SA citizens (17.7%) had left care at 1 year compared with 47.0% of unconfirmed SA citizens (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) unconfirmed SA vs confirmed SA: 2.68; 95% CI 2.42 to 2.97). By the end of follow-up, 75.5% of unconfirmed SA citizens had left care, approximately twice that of any other group. Conclusions Unconfirmed SA citizens were more likely to drop out of care after ART initiation than other patients. Further research is needed to determine whether this observed attrition is representative of migration and/or self-transfer to another HIV clinic as such high rates of attrition pose challenges for the success of the national ART

  20. Activating Killer Immunoglobulin Receptors and HLA-C: a successful combination providing HIV-1 control

    PubMed Central

    Malnati, Mauro S.; Ugolotti, Elisabetta; Monti, Maria Cristina; Battista, Davide De; Vanni, Irene; Bordo, Domenico; Sironi, Francesca; Larghero, Patrizia; Marco, Eddi Di; Biswas, Priscilla; Poli, Guido; Vicenzi, Elisa; Riva, Agostino; Tarkowski, Maciej; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Nozza, Silvia; Tripodi, Gino; Marras, Francesco; Maria, Andrea De; Pistorio, Angela; Biassoni, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Several studies demonstrated a relevant role of polymorphisms located within the HLA-B and -C loci and the Killer Immunoglobulin Receptors (KIRs) 3DL1 and 3DS1 in controlling HIV-1 replication. KIRs are regulatory receptors expressed at the surface of NK and CD8+ T-cells that specifically bind HLA-A and -B alleles belonging to the Bw4 supratype and all the -C alleles expressing the C1 or C2 supratype. We here disclose a novel signature associated with the Elite Controller but not with the long-term nonprogressor status concerning 2DS activating KIRs and HLA-C2 alleles insensitive to miRNA148a regulation. Overall, our findings support a crucial role of NK cells in the control of HIV-1 viremia. PMID:28211903

  1. Nutritional care and support among adults living with HIV at Hawassa Referral Hospital, southern Ethiopia: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tafese, Zelalem; Birhan, Yifru; Abebe, Hiwot

    2013-11-01

    Background Improving nutritional care and support for people living with HIV (PLHIV) is an integral part of comprehensive HIV treatment according to the National Nutritional Strategy of Ethiopia. However, there is no adequate published study that assesses the nutritional care and support services for adult people living with HIV/ AIDS (PLHIV) in this setting. Objective The objective of the study was to identify the existing nutritional care and support services and determine the challenges facing adults living with HIV at Hawassa Referral Hospital in southern Ethiopia. Methods A qualitative study was carried out using focus group discussions (FGDs), in-depth interviews and participant observation. Four FDGs were held and five in-depth interviews were conducted. A two-week participant observation was also conducted by trained nurses. All interviews and FDGs were tape-recorded and transcribed; those conducted in Amharic were translated back to English. Finally thematic analysis of the transcripts was performed. Results Most of the FDG participants were unsatisfied with their nutritional care and support services and expressed difficulty with disclosing their HIV status for fear of stigma and discrimination. The in-depth interviews and participant observation showed results similar to those of the FDG. Some key informants expressed a fear that such poor nutritional care and support may threaten the quality of life of people living with HIV and suggested that all stakeholders work on improving the services. Conclusion Current nutritional care and support services for people living with HIV are not well coordinated. They focus mainly on monthly supplementation of antiretroviral drugs and occasional handouts of food. The need to provide health education on antiretroviral drugs and nutrition, and to emphasise strategies aimed at improving the nutritional status of peoples living with HIV is critical. Furthermore, the study recommended strengthening the initiatives of some

  2. Circuit parties: sexual behaviors and HIV disclosure practices among men who have sex with men at the White Party, Palm Springs, California, 2003.

    PubMed

    Patel, P; Taylor, M M; Montoya, J A; Hamburger, M E; Kerndt, P R; Holmberg, S D

    2006-11-01

    The syphilis epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM) in major US cities and concomitant increases in high-risk sexual behavior, have raised concerns of increased HIV transmission in this population. Therefore, to provide information for health promotion and disease awareness efforts, we investigated sexual behaviors, partner selection preferences and HIV serostatus disclosure practices of MSM at the White Party in Palm Springs, California. Circuit party attendees reported engaging in unprotected anal sex, however, a high proportion reported disclosing their HIV status. These findings suggest that some gay men are serosorting as a risk reduction strategy or implementing sexual risk reduction strategies to protect themselves and their partners. In our study, HIV-negative men were nine times more likely to report a preference for a seroconcordant sexual partner. The self-protecting attitudes of HIV-negative men in our sample outweighed the partner-protecting attitudes of HIV-positive men. This suggests that prevention interventions focusing on HIV-positive persons are warranted.

  3. Strategic information is everyone's business: perspectives from an international stakeholder meeting to enhance strategic information data along the HIV Cascade for people who inject drugs.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Richard D; Hegle, Jennifer; Sabin, Keith; Agustian, Edo; Johnston, Lisa G; Mills, Stephen; Todd, Catherine S

    2015-10-16

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are at increased HIV transmission risk because of unsafe injecting practices and a host of other individual, network, and structural factors. Thus, PWID have a great need for services within the Cascade of HIV prevention, diagnosis, care, and treatment (HIV Cascade). Yet the systems that monitor their progress through the Cascade are often lacking. Subsequently, fewer reliable data are available to guide programs targeting this key population (KP). Programmatic data, which are helpful in tracking PWID through the Cascade, also are limited because not all countries have harm reduction programming from which to estimate Cascade indicators. Also, due to stigma and the illegal nature of drug use, PWID may not disclose their drug use behavior or HIV status when accessing services. Consequently, PWID appear to have low HIV testing rates and, for those living with HIV, lower access to health services and lower viral suppression rates than do other KP groups. This commentary, based on outcomes from an international stakeholder meeting, identifies data gaps and proposes solutions to strengthen strategic information (SI), the systematic collection, analysis, and dissemination of information, to optimize HIV prevention, care, and treatment programming for PWID.

  4. Association between polymorphisms in genes involved in lipid metabolism and immunological status in chronically HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Patricia; Guardiola, Montse; González, Marta; Vallvé, Joan Carles; Bonjoch, Anna; Puig, Jordi; Clotet, Bonaventura; Ribalta, Josep; Negredo, Eugènia

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have reported associations between lipid parameters and clinical progression of HIV infection. We performed a cross-sectional study including 468 antiretroviral-treated HIV-infected patients to investigate the impact of 13 polymorphisms of 9 genes affecting lipid metabolism and CD4 and CD8-T cell levels. Polymorphisms were identified in genes selected for their role in the development of atherogenic dyslipidemia, defined as triglycerides ⩾1.7mmol/L and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc) <1.02 in women or 1.28mmol/L in men. Lipid and lipoprotein parameters were determined in all participants, as well as CD4 and CD8 T-cell counts. ANOVA was performed to compare the mean values of lipid and CD4 and CD8 T-cell count data. A Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was applied. 468 patients were included, 148 of them had a diagnosis of atherogenic dyslipidemia. The polymorphism rs3135506 in APOA5 was associated with a 9% increase in triglycerides (p=0.002), 10% and 21% decrease in HDLc (p=0.005), and CD4 T-cell count (p=0.024), respectively. APOA5 rs662799, was associated with a 19% increase in CD8 T-cell count (p=0.002). Carriers of LPL rs328 in the dyslipidemic group presented 11% higher levels of HDLc (p=0.015) and 14% higher levels of CD4 cells (p=0.038). In conclusion, polymorphisms in genes associated to the development of atherogenic dyslipidemia, especially variants in APOA5 gene (rs3135506 and rs662799), can influence the circulating CD4 T-cell levels in chronically HIV-infected patients. These data support previous reports on the effect of lipid metabolism on immunologic parameters in HIV+ individuals on antiretroviral therapy.

  5. Virological and Immunological Status of the People Living with HIV/AIDS Undergoing ART Treatment in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Dumre, Shyam Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased the life span of the people living with HIV (PLHIV), but their virological and immunological outcomes are not well documented in Nepal. The study was conducted at a tertiary care center including 826 HIV-1 seropositive individuals undergoing ART for at least six months. Plasma viral load (HIV-1 RNA) was detected by Real Time PCR and CD4+ T-lymphocyte (CD4+) counts were estimated by flow cytometry. The mean CD4+ count of patients was 501 (95% CI = 325–579) cells/cumm, but about 35% of patients had CD4+ T cell counts below 350 cells/cumm. With increasing age, average CD4+ count was found to be decreasing (p = 0.005). Of the total cases, 82 (9.92%) were found to have virological failure (viral load: >1000 copies/ml). Tenofovir/Lamivudine/Efavirenz (TDF/3TC/EFV), the frequently used ART regimen in Nepal, showed virological failure in 11.34% and immunological failure in 37.17% of patients. Virological failure rate was higher among children < 15 years (14.5%) (p = 0.03); however, no association was observed between ART outcomes and gender or route of transmission. The study suggests there are still some chances of virological and immunological failures despite the success of highly active ART (HAART). PMID:27547761

  6. Effects of a mass media intervention on HIV-related stigma: 'Radio Diaries' program in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Creel, A H; Rimal, R N; Mkandawire, G; Böse, K; Brown, J W

    2011-06-01

    HIV-related stigma has been recognized as a significant public health issue, yet gaps remain in development and evaluation of mass media interventions to reduce stigma. The Malawi 'Radio Diaries' (RD) program features people with HIV telling stories about their everyday lives. This study evaluates the program's effects on stigma and the additional effects of group discussion. Thirty villages with 10 participants each were randomized to listen to RD only, to the program followed by group discussion or to a control program. Post-intervention surveys assessed four stigma outcomes: fear of casual contact, shame, blame and judgment and willingness to disclose HIV status. Regression analyses indicated that fear of casual contact was reduced by the intervention. Shame was reduced by the radio program, but only for those reporting prior exposure to the radio program and for those who did not have a close friend or relative with HIV. Shame was not reduced when the radio program was followed by discussion. The intervention reduced blame for men and not women and for younger participants but not older participants. Including people with HIV/AIDS in mass media interventions has potential to reduce stigma.

  7. Adolescent experiences of discrimination, harassment, connectedness to community and comfort with sexual orientation reported by adult men who have sex with men as a predictor of adult HIV status.

    PubMed

    Raymond, H Fisher; Chen, Yea-Hung; Stall, Ron D; McFarland, Willi

    2011-04-01

    Using data from a probability based sample of adult men who have sex with men (MSM) we examined the association of negative life factors during adolescence and adult HIV status. 521 MSM reported on experiences of connectedness to community, comfort with sexuality, harassment and discrimination due to their sexual orientation at ages 12-18 years. HIV status was determined by serological testing. Overall, men reported moderate levels of being harassed, being discriminated against and high levels of feeling disconnected from gay communities while reporting high levels of being uncomfortable with their sexuality at those ages. However, in analyses of scores on these factors, higher experiences of harassment, higher levels of discrimination and more discomfort with sexuality at these ages are associated with HIV-negative status as adults. This study suggests that the relationship between negative adolescent experiences among MSM and adult HIV infection may not be straightforward, but may also dependent upon aspects of the intensity of the negative experiences, the relationship of the victim and the perpertrator(s), the sexual identity of the victim at the time and/or the number of these experiences or the length of time over which they occurred. Studies investigating specific multiple stressors in adolescent gay development and their effect on adult health outcomes are needed.

  8. Black Americans Still Undertreated for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... status and are receiving treatment," said lead researcher Andre Dailey. He's an epidemiologist in the CDC's division ... the CDC's division of HIV/AIDS prevention. SOURCES: Andre Dailey, M.S.P.H., epidemiologist, division of HIV/ ...

  9. Rewards and challenges of providing HIV testing and counselling services: health worker perspectives from Burkina Faso, Kenya and Uganda.

    PubMed

    Bott, Sarah; Neuman, Melissa; Helleringer, Stephane; Desclaux, Alice; Asmar, Khalil El; Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf

    2015-10-01

    The rapid scale-up of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, counselling and treatment throughout sub-Saharan Africa has raised questions about how to protect patients' rights to consent, confidentiality, counselling and care in resource-constrained settings. The Multi-country African Testing and Counselling for HIV (MATCH) study investigated client and provider experiences with different modes of testing in sub-Saharan Africa. One component of that study was a survey of 275 HIV service providers in Burkina Faso, Kenya and Uganda that gathered quantifiable indicators and qualitative descriptions using a standardized instrument. This article presents provider perspectives on the challenges of obtaining consent, protecting confidentiality, providing counselling and helping clients manage disclosure. It also explores health workers' fear of infection within the workplace and their reports on discrimination against HIV clients within health facilities. HIV care providers in Burkina Faso, Kenya and Uganda experienced substantial rewards from their work, including satisfaction from saving lives and gaining professional skills. They also faced serious resource constraints, including staff shortages, high workloads, lack of supplies and inadequate infrastructure, and they expressed concerns about accidental exposure. Health workers described heavy emotional demands from observing clients suffer emotional, social and health consequences of being diagnosed with HIV, and also from difficult ethical dilemmas related to clients who do not disclose their HIV status to those around them, including partners. These findings suggest that providers of HIV testing and counselling need more resources and support, including better protections against HIV exposure in the workplace. The findings also suggest that health facilities could improve care by increasing attention to consent, privacy and confidentiality and that health policy makers and ethicists need to address some

  10. Brief Report: A Qualitative Analysis of Discussions about HIV in Families of Parents with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Cowgill, Burton O.; Bogart, Laura M.; Parra, Michelle T.; Ryan, Gery; Elliott, Marc N.; Park, Susan K.; Patch, Jennifer; Schuster, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore communication about HIV prevention, risk behaviors, and transmission in families affected by HIV. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 33 parents with HIV, 27 children (9- to 17-years old), and 19 adult children (≥18-years old) across the U.S. Coders reviewed transcripts, identified themes, and coded transcripts. Results Youth felt uncomfortable discussing HIV with their parent who has HIV because they worried about upsetting and reminding the parent of his/her illness. Adult children reported learning about HIV prevention by watching how the illness affected their parents. Few siblings reported talking with one another about HIV because they worried about upsetting their brother/sister and about their sibling unintentionally disclosing the parent's illness to others. Conclusions Discussions between youth and their parent with HIV and their siblings vary, highlighting the need for further research in this area. PMID:19028715

  11. HIV Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS HIV Transmission Language: English Transmisión del VIH Recommend on ...

  12. 16 CFR 1101.25 - Notice of intent to disclose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of intent to disclose. 1101.25 Section 1101.25 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INFORMATION DISCLOSURE UNDER SECTION 6(b) OF THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT Procedure for Providing Notice and Opportunity To Comment...

  13. 5 CFR 1631.15 - Information to be disclosed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... source. Exemption 4 permits withholding of “trade secrets and commercial or financial information... confidential commercial information, shall be notified as provided in § 1631.15(b)(3). After making such... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information to be disclosed....

  14. IRS Releases Tax Questionnaire that Asks Colleges to Disclose More

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelderman, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Nearly 400 colleges across the United States are about to be asked to disclose intimate financial details of their operations to the Internal Revenue Service. This article reports on a highly detailed financial questionnaire designed by the IRS for the first phase of its Colleges and Universities Compliance Project, which is part of a continuing…

  15. Enteric pathogens, immune status and therapeutic response in diarrhea in HIV/AIDS adult subjects from north India.

    PubMed

    Jha, Arun Kumar; Uppal, Beena; Chadha, Sanjim; Aggarwal, Prabhav; Ghosh, Roumi; Dewan, Richa

    2013-06-01

    Intestinal infection causing diarrheal disease is a dominant contributor to high morbidity and mortality in developing countries. This intervention study aimed to assess the response of specific anti-microbial and anti-retroviral therapy (ART) on enteropathogens identified in HIV/AIDS adult subjects from northern India. Seventy five ART naive (group 1) and seventy five ART adherent (group 2) HIV/AIDS adult subjects with diarrhea were enrolled. Stool samples from all subjects were examined for enteropathogens by wet mount, staining methods, culture and ELISA. Subjects with enteropathogens were started on specific therapy as per National AIDS Control Organisation, Government of India's guidelines. Follow-up stool samples were examined after 2-4 weeks of completion of therapy for persistence/clearing of enteropathogens. CD4+ T lymphocyte count was done for all subjects. At enrollment, group 1 had 26.13% bacterial, 57.66% parasitic & 16.22% fungal pathogens while group 2 had 11.9%, 69.05% & 19.05% pathogens, respectively. Parasitic diarrhea was more common than bacterial diarrhea. The coccidian parasites (Cryptosporidium spp. & Isospora belli) were the common parasites identified. Clearance of enteric pathogens was significant after specific anti-microbial therapy (p = 0.0001). Persistence of enteropathogens was seen primarily for coccidian parasites. Clearance of enteropathogens after specific therapy and the diagnostic yield of stool specimens were influenced by the CD4+ counts. Immune competence coupled with specific anti-microbial therapy displays the best response against enteric pathogens.

  16. How are important life events disclosed on facebook? Relationships with likelihood of sharing and privacy.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Jennifer L; Cummings, Megan B; Kubiniec, Ashley; Mogannam, Megan; Price, Madison; Todd, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    This study examined an aspect of Facebook disclosure that has as yet gone unexplored: whether a user prefers to share information directly, for example, through status updates, or indirectly, via photos with no caption or relationship status changes without context or explanation. The focus was on the sharing of important positive and negative life events related to romantic relationships, health, and work/school in relation to likelihood of sharing this type of information on Facebook and general attitudes toward privacy. An online survey of 599 adult Facebook users found that when positive life events were shared, users preferred to do so indirectly, whereas negative life events were more likely to be disclosed directly. Privacy shared little association with how information was shared. Implications for understanding the finer nuances of how news is shared on Facebook are discussed.

  17. Inconsistent condom use among HIV-positive women in the “Treatment as Prevention Era”: data from the Italian DIDI study

    PubMed Central

    Cicconi, Paola; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Castagna, Antonella; Quirino, Tiziana; Alessandrini, Anna; Gargiulo, Miriam; Francisci, Daniela; Anzalone, Enza; Liuzzi, Giuseppina; Pierro, Paola; Ammassari, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Translation of the evidence regarding the protective role of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on HIV sexual transmission rates into sexual behaviour patterns of HIV-infected subjects remains largely unexplored. This study aims to describe frequency of self-reported condom use among women living with HIV in Italy and to investigate the variables associated with inconsistent condom use (ICU). Methods DIDI (Donne con Infezione Da HIV) is an Italian multicentre study based on a questionnaire survey performed during November 2010 and February 2011. Women-reported frequency of condom use was dichotomized in “always” versus “at times”/“never” (ICU). Results Among 343 women, prevalence of ICU was 44.3%. Women declared a stable partnership with an HIV-negative (38%) and with an HIV-positive person (43%), or an occasional sexual partner (19%). Among the 194 women engaged in a stable HIV-negative or an occasional partnership, 51% reported fear of infecting the partner. Nonetheless, 43% did not disclose HIV-positive status. Less than 5% of women used contraceptive methods other than condoms. At multivariable analysis, variables associated with ICU in the subgroup of women with a stable HIV-negative or an occasional HIV-unknown partner were: having an occasional partner (AOR 3.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44–8.54, p=0.005), and reporting fear of infecting the sexual partner (AOR 3.20, 95% CI 1.43–7.16, p=0.004). Current use of HAART together with virological control in plasma level did not predict ICU after adjusting for demographic, behavioural and HIV-related factors. With regard to socio-demographic factors, lower education was the only variable significantly associated with ICU in the multivariate analysis (AOR 2.27, 95% CI 1.07–4.82, p=0.03). No association was found between high adherence to HAART and ICU after adjusting for potential confounders (AOR 0.89, 95% CI 0.39–2.01, p=0.78). Conclusions Currently in Italy, the

  18. HIV Serodisclosure and Sexual Behavior During International Travel.

    PubMed

    Truong, Hong-Ha M; Chen, Yea-Hung; Grasso, Michael; Robertson, Tyler; Tao, Luke; Fatch, Robin; Curotto, Alberto; McFarland, Willi; Grant, Robert M; Reznick, Olga; Raymond, H Fisher; Steward, Wayne T

    2016-07-01

    When traveling internationally, HIV serodisclosure and knowledge of partners' serostatus were hampered by the lack of a common language. Condomless anal intercourse was less likely to occur in partnerships where HIV serostatus was not disclosed or known. Taken together, these observations suggest that language barriers may affect sexual decision making.

  19. Severe events in the first 6 months of life in a cohort of HIV-unexposed infants from South Africa: effects of low birthweight and breastfeeding status

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Tanya; Jackson, Debra; Swanevelder, Sonja; Lombard, Carl; Engebretsen, Ingunn M S; Tylleskär, Thorkild; Goga, Ameena; Ekström, Eva-Charlotte; Sanders, David; Promise EBF study group

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report on risk factors for severe events (hospitalisation or infant death) within the first half of infancy amongst HIV-unexposed infants in South Africa. Methods South African data from the multisite community-based cluster-randomised trial PROMISE EBF promoting exclusive breastfeeding in three sub-Saharan countries from 2006 to 2008 were used. The South African sites were Paarl in the Western Cape Province, and Umlazi and Rietvlei in KwaZulu-Natal. This analysis included 964 HIV-negative mother–infant pairs. Data on severe events and infant feeding practices were collected at 3, 6, 12 and 24 weeks post-partum. We used a stratified extended Cox model to examine the association between the time to the severe event and covariates including birthweight, with breastfeeding status as a time-dependent covariate. Results Seventy infants (7%) experienced a severe event. The median age at first hospitalisation was 8 weeks, and the two main reasons for hospitalisation were cough and difficult breathing followed by diarrhoea. Stopping breastfeeding before 6 months (HR 2.4; 95% CI 1.2–5.1) and low birthweight (HR 2.4; 95% CI 1.3–4.3) were found to increase the risk of a severe event, whilst maternal completion of high school education was protective (HR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1–0.7). Conclusions A strengthened primary healthcare system incorporating promotion of breastfeeding and appropriate caring practices for low birthweight infants (such as kangaroo mother care) are critical. Given the leading reasons for hospitalisation, early administration of oral rehydration therapy and treatment of suspected pneumonia are key interventions needed to prevent hospitalisation in young infants. PMID:25053420

  20. Impact of age on care pathways of people living with HIV followed up in hospital.

    PubMed

    Jacomet, Christine; Berland, Pauline; Guiguet, Marguerite; Simon, Anne; Rey, David; Arvieux, Cédric; Pugliese, Pascal; Gerbaud, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    The aging population of people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (PLWH) is exposed to a widening spectrum of non-AIDS-defining diseases. Thus, our objective was to compare the health care offered to PLWH according to age. We conducted a multicenter cross-sectional study on PLWH who consulted at one of 59 French HIV reference centers from 15th to 19th October 2012. Using our survey questionnaires, PLWH self-reported the medical care they received, whether or not tied to HIV infection monitoring, during the previous year. A total of 650 PLWH participated in the survey (median age 48 years, Interquartile range (IQR) 40-54), of which 95 were aged 60 years or over (14.5%). Compared to younger PLWH, 60-and-over PLWH were more often under complementary health insurance cover and less socially deprived based on the French EPICES (Evaluation of Precarity and Inequalities in Health Examination Centers) score. The elderly PLWH presented more comorbidities and less coinfections with hepatitis viruses. During health care, therapeutic education was less often offered to older PLWH (14% vs. 26%, p = .01), but this difference was mainly explained by sociodemographic factors and clinical status. Over the previous 6 months, 74% of PLWH who were followed up in hospital had also consulted another doctor, with a mean of 3.75 consultations (±4.18) without difference between age groups. After adjustment for sociodemographic factors and comorbidities, PLWH over 60 years were more likely to have consulted medical specialists as outpatients in the last 6 months (odds ratio [OR] = 2.63 [1.11-6.20]). Whatever their age, 13% of PLWH had been refused care on disclosure of their HIV status, and 27% of PLWH still did not disclose their HIV status to some caregivers. Coordinated health care throughout patients' lives is crucial, as health-care pathways evolve toward outpatient care as the patients get older.

  1. Impact of Disclosure of HIV Infection on Health-Related Quality of Life Among Children and Adolescents With HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Anne M.; Williams, Paige L.; Howland, Lois C.; Storm, Deborah; Hutton, Nancy; Seage, George R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known concerning the impact of HIV status disclosure on quality of life, leaving clinicians and families to rely on research of children with other terminal illnesses. Objectives The purpose of this work was to examine the impact of HIV disclosure on pediatric quality of life and to describe the distribution of age at disclosure in a perinatally infected pediatric population. Methods A longitudinal analysis was conducted of perinatally HIV-infected youth ≥5 years of age enrolled in a prospective cohort study, Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group 219C, with ≥1 study visit before and after HIV disclosure. Age-specific quality-of-life instruments were completed by primary caregivers at routine study visits. The distribution of age at disclosure was summarized. Six quality-of-life domains were assessed, including general health perception, symptom distress, psychological status, health care utilization, physical functioning, and social/role functioning. For each domain, mixed-effects models were fit to estimate the effect of disclosure on quality of life. Results A total of 395 children with 2423 study visits were analyzed (1317 predisclosure visits and 1106 postdisclosure visits). The median age at disclosure was estimated to be 11 years. Older age at disclosure was associated with earlier year of birth. Mean domain scores were not significantly different at the last undisclosed visit compared with the first disclosed visit, with the exception of general health perception. When all of the visits were considered, 5 of 6 mean domain scores were lower after disclosure, although the differences were not significant. In mixed-effects models, disclosure did not significantly impact quality of life for any domain. Conclusions Age at disclosure decreased significantly over time. There were no statistically significant differences between predisclosure and postdisclosure quality of life; therefore, disclosure should be encouraged at an appropriate time

  2. Non-Verbal Behavior of Children Who Disclose or Do Not Disclose Child Abuse in Investigative Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Carmit; Hershkowitz, Irit; Malloy, Lindsay C.; Lamb, Michael E.; Atabaki, Armita; Spindler, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The study focused on children's nonverbal behavior in investigative interviews exploring suspicions of child abuse. The key aims were to determine whether non-verbal behavior in the pre-substantive phases of the interview predicted whether or not children would disclose the alleged abuse later in the interview and to identify…

  3. 32 CFR 806b.48 - Disclosing the medical records of minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disclosing the medical records of minors. 806b... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Disclosing Records to Third Parties § 806b.48 Disclosing the medical records of minors. Air Force personnel may disclose the medical records of minors to their parents or...

  4. The impact of stressful life events, symptom status, and adherence concerns on quality of life in people living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Corless, Inge B; Voss, Joachim; Guarino, A J; Wantland, Dean; Holzemer, William; Jane Hamilton, Mary; Sefcik, Elizabeth; Willard, Suzanne; Kirksey, Kenn; Portillo, Carmen; Rivero Mendez, Marta; Rosa, Maria E; Nicholas, Patrice K; Human, Sarie; Maryland, Mary; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Robinson, Linda; Cuca, Yvette

    2013-01-01

    Studies concerning persons living with HIV (PLWH) report that stressful life events (SLEs) contribute to an exacerbation of symptoms and reduced antiretroviral (ARV) adherence and quality of life (QOL). Little is known about whether these findings are site-specific. Our study's aims were to characterize the type and frequency of SLEs for PLWH in Puerto Rico, South Africa, and the United States, and to assess the impact of SLEs by national site, symptoms, and ARV adherence concerns on QOL. The sample consisted of 704 participants. The total number of SLEs correlated significantly with the total number of symptoms, adherence concerns, and QOL (p ≤ .001). Overall, 27.2% of the variance in QOL was explained by the aforementioned variables. Although SLEs were of concern to PLWH, worries about ARV adherence were of even greater concern. Routine assessment of ARV concerns and SLEs can promote ongoing ARV adherence and improved QOL.

  5. The Impact of Stressful Life events, Symptom Status, and Adherence Concerns on Quality of Life in People Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Corless, Inge B.; Voss, Joachim; Guarino, A.J.; Wantland, Dean; Holzemer, William; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Sefcik, Elizabeth F.; Willard, Suzanne; Kirksey, Kenn M.; Portillo, Carmen; Mendez, Marta Rivero; Rosa, Maria E.; Nicholas, Patrice K.; Human, Sarie; Maryland, Mary; Robinson, Linda; Cuca, Yvette

    2013-01-01

    Studies concerning persons living with HIV (PLWH) report that stressful life events (SLE) contribute to an exacerbation of symptoms and reduced antiretroviral (ARV) adherence and quality of life (QOL). Little is known about whether these findings are site-specific. Our study's aims were to characterize the type and frequency of SLE for PLWH in Puerto Rico, South Africa, and the United States and to assess the impact of SLE by national site, symptoms, and ARV adherence concerns on QOL. The sample consisted of 704 participants. The total number of SLE correlated significantly with the total number of symptoms, adherence concerns, and QOL (p ≤ .001). Overall, 27.2% of the variance in QOL was explained by the aforementioned variables. Although SLE were of concern to PLWH, worries about ARV adherence were of even greater concern. Routine assessment of ARV concerns and SLE can promote ongoing ARV adherence and improved QOL. PMID:23473660

  6. Infant feeding practice and associated factors among HIV positive mothers in Debre Markos Referral Hospital East Gojam zone, North West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Wakwoya, Elias Bekele; Zewudie, Tatek Abate; Gebresilasie, Kahsay Zenebe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The dilemma posed between lifesaving benefit and risk of transmission through breast feeding complicates infant feedings among communities grossly affected by HIV/AIDS. According to the world health organization’s guideline which was revised in 2010, exclusive breast feeding and exclusive replacement feeding are the recommended infant feeding practices for HIV positive mothers. The aim of this study was to assess infant feeding practice and associated factors among HIV positive mothers in Debre Markos Referral Hospital, North West Ethiopia. Methods An institutional based cross sectional study was conducted from May to September 2013. A Randomly selected 260 HIV positive mothers were included. The data were collected by using a pretested and structured questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate analysis were performed to check association and to control confounders. Results From a total of 260 HIV positive mothers, 85.8% of them were feeding their children based on the recommended feeding way of infant feeding practice with the remaining percentage 14.2% were practicing mixed feeding. In multivariate analysis mothers attending high school and above AOR = 5.3 [95% CI = 1.25-22.1], having antenatal care follow up AOR = 5.5 [95% CI = 1.5-20.16], being on anti-retro viral therapy AOR = 6.5 [95% CI = 1.88-22.51] and disclosure of HIV status AOR = 7.1 [95% CI = 1.26-39.76] were found to be independently associated with infant feeding practice. Conclusion This study revealed that large proportion of HIV positive mothers had followed the recommended infant feeding practice and significantly high number of mothers had practiced mixed feeding. Educating mothers, increasing ANC utilization, counseling mothers to start ART, encouraging and supporting mothers to disclose their HIV status were recommended. PMID:28154655

  7. Meaningful involvement of people living with HIV/AIDS in Uganda through linkages between network groups and health facilities: an evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Mi; Kalibala, Samuel; Neema, Stella; Lukwago, John; Weiss, Deborah C

    2012-01-01

    While community-based groups are able to provide vital support to people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV), their organizational and technical capacities are limited, and they frequently operate in isolation from PLHIV groups. We evaluated a three-year project implemented by the International HIV/AIDS Alliance in Uganda to increase the involvement of PLHIV in the HIV/AIDS response and to improve access to and utilization of prevention, treatment, care, and support services for households affected by HIV/AIDS. Information sources included project monitoring data, interviews with 113 key informants, and 17 focus group discussions in 11 districts. The evaluation found that PLHIV groups reached large numbers of people with education and awareness activities and made a growing number of referrals to health facilities and community-based services. The project trained individuals living openly with HIV as service providers in the community and at designated health facilities. Their presence helped to reduce the stigma that previously deterred PLHIV from seeking care and encouraged individuals to disclose their HIV status to spouses and family members. The project has put into practice the widely endorsed principles of greater and meaningful involvement of PLHIV in a systematic manner and on a large scale. A wide audience--ranging from grassroots PLHIV networks and AIDS service organizations to national-level non-governmental organizations, government agencies, and international organizations--can benefit from the lessons learned.

  8. HIV / AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... facebook share with twitter share with linkedin HIV/AIDS HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is the virus ... HIV/AIDS. Why Is the Study of HIV/AIDS a Priority for NIAID? Nearly 37 million people ...

  9. Using Health Provider Insights to Inform Pediatric HIV Disclosure: A Qualitative Study and Practice Framework from Kenya

    PubMed Central

    John-Stewart, Grace; Shah, Brandi; Wamalwa, Dalton; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth; Kelley, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Optimal pediatric HIV disclosure impacts illness and developmental experiences while improving access to timely treatment. However, disclosure rates in high HIV prevalence countries remain low and there are limited data on best practices. We conducted a qualitative study of disclosure practices and interviewed healthcare providers from five pediatric HIV clinics in Kenya. We identified themes central to disclosure practices, rationale for approaches, barriers to implementing disclosure, and creative strategies to overcome challenges. We used these insights to develop a practice-based framework for disclosure that is sensitive to practical challenges. Overall, providers had limited training but extensive experience in disclosure, endorsed individualized disclosure practices, invested substantial time on disclosure despite clinical burden, and noted adverse outcomes associated with unplanned or abrupt disclosure. Providers advocated for an approach to disclosure that is child-centered but respects caregiver fears and values. Caregiver support was provided to enable caregivers to be the person who ultimately disclosed HIV status to children. Unplanned or abrupt disclosure to children was reported to have severe and persistent adverse impact and was a stimulus to accelerate disclosure in scenarios when providers believed children may be suspecting their diagnosis. Based on these expert insights, the framework we developed incorporates concurrent evaluation of child and caregiver readiness, identifies cues to prompt disclosure discussions, includes caregiver education and support, and utilizes a gradual approach of unveiling HIV diagnosis to the child. PMID:25216105

  10. Acceptability and feasibility of mHealth and community-based directly observed antiretroviral therapy to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission in South African pregnant women under Option B+: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Nachega, Jean B; Skinner, Donald; Jennings, Larissa; Magidson, Jessica F; Altice, Frederick L; Burke, Jessica G; Lester, Richard T; Uthman, Olalekan A; Knowlton, Amy R; Cotton, Mark F; Anderson, Jean R; Theron, Gerhard B

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the acceptability and feasibility of mobile health (mHealth)/short message service (SMS) and community-based directly observed antiretroviral therapy (cDOT) as interventions to improve antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence for preventing mother-to-child human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission (PMTCT). Design and methods A mixed-method approach was used. Two qualitative focus group discussions with HIV-infected pregnant women (n=20) examined the acceptability and feasibility of two ART adherence interventions for PMTCT: 1) SMS text messaging and 2) patient-nominated cDOT supporters. Additionally, 109 HIV-infected, pregnant South African women (18–30 years old) receiving PMTCT services under single-tablet antiretroviral therapy regimen during pregnancy and breastfeeding and continuing for life (“Option B+”) were interviewed about mobile phone access, SMS use, and potential treatment supporters. Setting A community primary care clinic in Cape Town, South Africa. Participants HIV-infected pregnant women. Main outcomes Acceptability and feasibility of mHealth and cDOT interventions. Results Among the 109 women interviewed, individual mobile phone access and SMS use were high (>90%), and 88.1% of women were interested in receiving SMS ART adherence support messages such as reminders, motivation, and medication updates. Nearly all women (95%) identified at least one person close to them to whom they had disclosed their HIV status and would nominate as a cDOT supporter. Focus group discussions revealed that cDOT supporters and adherence text messages were valued, but some concerns regarding supporter time availability and risk of unintended HIV status disclosure were expressed. Conclusion mHealth and/or cDOT supporter as interventions to improve ART adherence are feasible in this setting. However, safe HIV status disclosure to treatment supporters and confidentiality of text messaging content about HIV and ART were deemed crucial. PMID

  11. Risk Factors for HIV Transmission and Barriers to HIV Disclosure: Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wallins, Amy; Toledo, Lauren; Murray, Ashley; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Gillespie, Scott; Leong, Traci; Graves, Chanda; Chakraborty, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Youth carry the highest incidence of HIV infection in the United States. Understanding adolescent and young adult (AYA) perspectives on HIV transmission risk is important for targeted HIV prevention. We conducted a mixed methods study with HIV-infected and uninfected youth, ages 18–24 years, from Atlanta, GA. We provided self-administered surveys to HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected AYAs to identify risk factors for HIV acquisition. By means of computer-assisted thematic analyses, we examined transcribed focus group responses on HIV education, contributors to HIV transmission, and pre-sex HIV status disclosure. The 68 participants had the following characteristics: mean age 21.5 years (standard deviation: 1.8 years), 85% male, 90% black, 68% HIV-infected. HIV risk behaviors included the perception of condomless sex (Likert scale mean: 8.0) and transactional sex (88% of participants); no differences were noted by HIV status. Qualitative analyses revealed two main themes: (1) HIV risk factors among AYAs, and (2) barriers to discussing HIV status before sex. Participants felt the use of social media, need for immediate gratification, and lack of concern about HIV disease were risk factors for AYAs. Discussing HIV status with sex partners was uncommon. Key reasons included: fear of rejection, lack of confidentiality, discussion was unnecessary in temporary relationships, and disclosure negatively affecting the mood. HIV prevention strategies for AYAs should include improving condom use frequency and HIV disclosure skills, responsible utilization of social media, and education addressing HIV prevention including the risks of transactional sex. PMID:26588663

  12. HETEROSEXUAL PARTNERSHIPS AND THE NEED FOR HIV PREVENTION AND TESTING FOR MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN AND WOMEN IN CHINA: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sijia; Song, Dandan; Huang, Wen; He, Huan; Wang, Min; Manning, David; Zaller, Nickolas; Zhang, Hongbo; Operario, Don

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that approximately 30% of men who have sex with men (MSM) in China have concurrent female partners. Men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) might “bridge” HIV transmission to their female sex partners. This study aimed to explore (a) motivations for why MSMW in China engage in relationships and sexual behaviors with female partners; (b) patterns of sexual behaviors and condom use between MSMW and their female partners; and (c) barriers to and strategies for encouraging MSMW and their female partners to undergo HIV testing. The authors conducted in-depth interviews with 30 MSMW in two urban cities in China, Guangzhou and Chengdu, and used thematic analysis methods to code and interpret the data. MSMW described family, social, and workplace pressures to have a female partner, and expressed futility about their ability to form stable same-sex relationships. Although participants reported concern about the risk of personally acquiring and transmitting HIV or other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) to their female partners, they described the challenges to using condoms with female partners. HIV-positive participants described how stigma restricted their ability to disclose their HIV status to female partners, and HIV-negative participants displayed less immediate concern about the need for female partners to undergo HIV testing. Participants described a range of possible strategies to encourage HIV testing among female partners. These findings highlight the urgent need for HIV risk reduction and testing interventions for Chinese MSMW in the context of heterosexual partnerships, and they also under-score the additional need for privacy and cultural sensitivity when designing future studies. PMID:25915698

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans and Streptococcus pneumoniae co-infection in post-traumatic meningitis in a patient with unknown HIV status.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Faryal; Fasih, Naima; Zafar, Afia

    2015-10-01

    Meningitis is a serious disease associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Mixed meningeal infections due to bacteria and fungi are exceptionally rare. Here we report a case of meningeal co-infection with cryptococcus neoformans and streptococcus pneumoniae in a patient with unknown human immunodeficiency virus status. Because of the rarity of such cases, stringent screening of every cerebrospinal fluid specimen to exclude the presence of multiple pathogens is imperative. Assessment of patients for immunodeficiencies in case of isolation of an opportunistic organism like cryptococcus is also needed.

  14. Parental HIV disclosure: from perspectives of children affected by HIV in Henan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junfeng; Li, Xiaoming; Qiao, Shan; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhang, Liying; Stanton, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    Culturally and developmentally appropriate parental HIV disclosure (i.e., parents disclose their HIV infection to children) has been shown to be closely related with the well-being of both HIV-infected parents and their children. However, current practices and effects of parental HIV disclosure remain poorly understood in low- and middle-income countries including China. Quantitative data from 626 children affected by parental HIV (orphans and vulnerable children) in Henan, China, were collected in 2011 to examine children's perceptions and knowledge regarding their parents' HIV disclosure practices and to assess the associations of these practices with children's demographic and psychosocial factors. The data in the current study revealed that only a small proportion of children learned parental HIV infection from their parents (direct disclosure), and many of these disclosure seemed being unplanned. Among the children who were not told by their parents, at least 95% of them either knew parental illness from others (indirect disclosure) or from their own observations or suspicions. The children reported similar disclosure practices by fathers and mothers. There were minimum differences between disclosed and nondisclosed children on a number of psychosocial measures. The findings support the notion that parental HIV disclosure is a complex process and can only be beneficial if it is carefully planned. The data in the current study suggest the needs for the culturally and developmentally appropriate approach in parental HIV disclosure in order to maximize both short- and long-term benefits to children, parents, and family functioning.

  15. Maximizing the impact of HIV prevention efforts: interventions for couples.

    PubMed

    Medley, Amy; Baggaley, Rachel; Bachanas, Pamela; Cohen, Myron; Shaffer, Nathan; Lo, Ying-Ru

    2013-01-01

    Despite efforts to increase access to HIV testing and counseling services, population coverage remains low. As a result, many people in sub-Saharan Africa do not know their own HIV status or the status of their sex partner(s). Recent evidence, however, indicates that as many as half of HIV-positive individuals in ongoing sexual relationships have an HIV-negative partner and that a significant proportion of new HIV infections in generalized epidemics occur within serodiscordant couples. Integrating couples HIV testing and counseling (CHTC) into routine clinic- and community-based services can significantly increase the number of couples where the status of both partners is known. Offering couples a set of evidence-based interventions once their HIV status has been determined can significantly reduce HIV incidence within couples and if implemented with sufficient scale and coverage, potentially reduce population-level HIV incidence as well. This article describes these interventions and their potential benefits.

  16. A Novel Modeling Approach for Estimating Patterns of Migration into and out of San Francisco by HIV Status and Race among Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alison J; Chen, Yea-Hung; Scheer, Susan; Raymond, H Fisher

    2017-03-23

    In the early 1980s, men who have sex with men (MSM) in San Francisco were one of the first populations to be affected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, and they continue to bear a heavy HIV burden. Once a rapidly fatal disease, survival with HIV improved drastically following the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy in 1996. As a result, the ability of HIV-positive persons to move into and out of San Francisco has increased due to lengthened survival. Although there is a high level of migration among the general US population and among HIV-positive persons in San Francisco, in- and out-migration patterns of MSM in San Francisco have, to our knowledge, never been described. Understanding migration patterns by HIV serostatus is crucial in determining how migration could influence both HIV transmission dynamics and estimates of the HIV prevalence and incidence. In this article, we describe methods, results, and implications of a novel approach for indirect estimation of in- and out-migration patterns, and consequently population size, of MSM by HIV serostatus and race in San Francisco. The results suggest that the overall MSM population and all the MSM subpopulations studied decreased in size from 2006 to 2014. Further, there were differences in migration patterns by race and by HIV serostatus. The modeling methods outlined can be applied by others to determine how migration patterns contribute to HIV-positive population size and output from these models can be used in a transmission model to better understand how migration can impact HIV transmission.

  17. ‘Are We Not Human?’ Stories of Stigma, Disability and HIV from Lusaka, Zambia and Their Implications for Access to Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Janet A.; Bond, Virginia A.; Nixon, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The advent of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in Southern Africa holds the promise of shifting the experience of HIV toward that of a manageable chronic condition. However, this potential can only be realized when persons living with HIV are able to access services without barriers, which can include stigma. Our qualitative study explored experiences of persons living with disabilities (PWD) in Lusaka, Zambia who became HIV-positive (PWD/HIV+). Methods and Findings We conducted interviews with 32 participants (21 PWD/HIV+ and 11 key informants working in the fields of HIV and/or disability). Inductive thematic analysis of interview transcripts was informed by narrative theory. Participants’ accounts highlighted the central role of stigma experienced by PWD/HIV+, with stigmatizing attitudes closely linked to prevailing societal assumptions that PWD are asexual. Seeking diagnostic and treatment services for HIV was perceived as evidence of PWD being sexually active. Participants recounted that for PWD/HIV+, stigma was enacted in a variety of settings, including the queue for health services, their interactions with healthcare providers, and within their communities. Stigmatizing accounts told about PWD/HIV+ were described as having important consequences. Not only did participants recount stories of internalized stigma (with its damaging effects on self-perception), but also that negative experiences resulted in some PWD preferring to “die quietly at home” rather than being subjected to the stigmatizing gaze of others when attempting to access life-preserving ART. Participants recounted how experiences of stigma also affected their willingness to continue ART, their willingness to disclose their HIV status to others, as well as their social relations. However, participants also offered counter-stories, actively resisting stigmatizing accounts and portraying themselves as resilient and resourceful social actors. Conclusions The study highlights a

  18. Children's Reasoning About Disclosing Adult Transgressions: Effects of Maltreatment, Child Age, and Adult Identity

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Thomas D.; Ahern, Elizabeth C.; Malloy, Lindsay C.; Quas, Jodi A.

    2012-01-01

    A total of two hundred ninety-nine 4- to 9-year-old maltreated and nonmaltreated children of comparable socioeconomic status and ethnicity judged whether children should or would disclose unspecified transgressions of adults (instigators) to other adults (recipients) in scenarios varying the identity of the instigator (stranger or parent), the identity of the recipient (parent, police, or teacher), and the severity of the transgression (“something really bad” or “something just a little bad”). Children endorsed more disclosure against stranger than parent instigators and less disclosure to teacher than parent and police recipients. The youngest maltreated children endorsed less disclosure than nonmaltreated children, but the opposite was true among the oldest children. Older maltreated children distinguished less than nonmaltreated children between parents and other types of instigators and recipients. PMID:21077859

  19. Children's reasoning about disclosing adult transgressions: effects of maltreatment, child age, and adult identity.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Thomas D; Ahern, Elizabeth C; Malloy, Lindsay C; Quas, Jodi A

    2010-01-01

    A total of two hundred ninety-nine 4- to 9-year-old maltreated and nonmaltreated children of comparable socioeconomic status and ethnicity judged whether children should or would disclose unspecified transgressions of adults (instigators) to other adults (recipients) in scenarios varying the identity of the instigator (stranger or parent), the identity of the recipient (parent, police, or teacher), and the severity of the transgression ("something really bad" or "something just a little bad"). Children endorsed more disclosure against stranger than parent instigators and less disclosure to teacher than parent and police recipients. The youngest maltreated children endorsed less disclosure than nonmaltreated children, but the opposite was true among the oldest children. Older maltreated children distinguished less than nonmaltreated children between parents and other types of instigators and recipients.

  20. Alcohol and drug use disorders, HIV status and drug resistance in a sample of Russian TB patients

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, M. F.; Krupitsky, E.; Tsoy, M.; Zvartau, E.; Brazhenko, N.; Jakubowiak, W.; E. McCaul, M.

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING: Alcohol use, tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behavior are of increasing concern in Russian TB patients. DESIGN: A prevalence study of alcohol use and HIV risk behavior was conducted in a sample of 200 adult men and women admitted to TB hospitals in St Petersburg and Ivanovo, Russia. RESULTS: Of the subjects, 72% were men. The mean age was 41. Active TB was diagnosed using a combination of chest X-ray, sputum smears and sputum cultures. Sixty-two per cent met DSM-IV criteria for current alcohol abuse or dependence. Drug use was uncommon, with only two patients reporting recent intravenous heroin use. There was one case of HIV infection. The mean total risk assessment battery score was 3.4. Depression was present in 60% of the sample, with 17% severely depressed. Alcohol abuse/dependence was associated with an eight-fold increase in drug resistance (OR 8.58; 95% CI 2.09-35.32). Patients with relapsing or chronic TB were more likely to meet the criteria for alcohol abuse/dependence (OR 2.56; 95% CI 1.0-6.54). CONCLUSION: Alcohol use disorders are common in patients being treated for active TB, and are associated with significant morbidity. Additional surveys are needed to examine the relationship between alcohol use disorders and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance. CONTEXTE: Chezles patients tuberculeux russes, l’utilisation d’alcool, la résistance aux médicaments antituberculeux et un comportement à risque pour le virus de l’immunodéficience humaine (VIH) sont des sujets croissants d’inquiétude. SCHÉMA: Une étude: de prévalence de l’utilisation d’alcool et du comportement à risque pour le VIH a été menée sur un échantillon de 200 hommes et femmes adultes, admis dans des hôpitaux pour la tuberculose (TB) de Saint-Pétersbourg et d’Ivanovo en Russie. RÉSULTATS: Il y avait 72% d’hommes dans l’échantillon. L’âge moyen est de 41 ans. On a diagnostiqué la TB active par l

  1. Smart HIV testing system.

    PubMed

    El Kateeb, Ali; Law, Peter; Chan, King

    2005-06-01

    The quick HIV testing method called "MiraWell Rapid HIV Test" uses a specialized testing kit to determine whether an individual's blood is contaminated with the HIV virus or not. When a drop of blood is placed on the center of the testing kit, a simple pattern will appear in the middle of the kit to indicate the test status, i.e., positive or negative. This HIV test should be done in a small clinic or in a lab and the test must be conducted by a trained technician. A smart HIV testing system was developed through this research to eliminate the human error that is associated with the use of the quick HIV testing kits. Also, the smart HIV system will improve the testing productivity in comparison to those achieved by the trained technicians. In this research, we have developed a cost-effective system that analyzes the image produced by the HIV kits. We have used a System-On-Chip (SOC) design approach based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology and the Xilinx Virtex SOC chip in building the system's prototype. The system used a CMOS digital camera to capture the image and an FPGA chip to process the captured image and send the testing results to the display unit. The system can be used in small clinics and pharmacies and eliminates the need for trained technicians. The system has been tested successfully and 98% of the tests were correct.

  2. Disclosing the potential impact of placebo controls in antidepressant trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Stephanie C.; McCullumsmith, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Background Although placebo-control clinical trials that withhold effective treatments can be permissible, how best to inform participants of the placebo design has received little attention. Aims To determine the effect of disclosing quantitative outcome estimates of individual treatment v. entering placebo-control randomised control trial (RCT) on willingness to enrol in such an RCT. Method We randomised 278 adult patients at a depression clinic to receive standard disclosure (n = 129) or enhanced (n = 149) quantitative outcome estimates (based on decision analysis) of individual treatment v. RCT, and assessed their willingness to enrol in the RCT. Results A greater proportion of those in the standard arm preferred enrolling in RCT (41.3% v. 23.8%, P = 0.002). Those in the standard arm preferred RCT more for direct benefit than altruism reasons, whereas the opposite was true in the enhanced arm. Conclusions Disclosing the quantitative outcome implications of placebos may select for fewer but more altruistic participants. Declaration of interest S.Y.H.K. was a DSMB member of a clinical trial sponsored by Hoffman-LaRoche and he receives royalties from Oxford University Press for his book Evaluation of Capacity to Consent to Treatment and Research. C.M. has served in the past year on a scientific advisory board and as a consultant for Janssen Pharmaceuticals. Copyright and usage This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703715

  3. 48 CFR 30.604 - Processing changes to disclosed or established cost accounting practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... disclosed or established cost accounting practices. 30.604 Section 30.604 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Administration 30.604 Processing changes to disclosed or established cost accounting...

  4. Characteristics of Women Enrolled into a Randomized Clinical Trial of Dapivirine Vaginal Ring for HIV-1 Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Palanee-Phillips, Thesla; Schwartz, Katie; Brown, Elizabeth R.; Govender, Vaneshree; Mgodi, Nyaradzo; Kiweewa, Flavia Matovu; Nair, Gonasagrie; Mhlanga, Felix; Siva, Samantha; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Jeenarain, Nitesha; Gaffoor, Zakir; Martinson, Francis; Makanani, Bonus; Naidoo, Sarita; Pather, Arendevi; Phillip, Jessica; Husnik, Marla J.; van der Straten, Ariane; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Baeten, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Women in sub-Saharan Africa are a priority population for evaluation of new biomedical HIV-1 prevention strategies. Antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis is a promising prevention approach; however, clinical trials among young women using daily or coitally-dependent products have found low adherence. Antiretroviral-containing vaginal microbicide rings, which release medication over a month or longer, may reduce these adherence challenges. Methods ASPIRE (A Study to Prevent Infection with a Ring for Extended Use) is a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial testing the safety and effectiveness of a vaginal ring containing the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor dapivirine for prevention of HIV-1 infection. We describe the baseline characteristics of African women enrolled in the ASPIRE trial. Results Between August 2012 and June 2014, 5516 women were screened and 2629 HIV-1 seronegative women between 18–45 years of age were enrolled from 15 research sites in Malawi, South Africa, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. The median age was 26 years (IQR 22–31) and the majority (59%) were unmarried. Nearly 100% of participants reported having a primary sex partner in the prior three months but 43% did not know the HIV-1 status of their primary partner; 17% reported additional concurrent partners. Nearly two-thirds (64%) reported having disclosed to primary partners about planned vaginal ring use in the trial. Sexually transmitted infections were prevalent: 12% had Chlamydia trachomatis, 7% Trichomonas vaginalis, 4% Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and 1% syphilis. Conclusions African HIV-1 seronegative women at risk of HIV -1 infection were successfully enrolled into a phase III trial of dapivirine vaginal ring for HIV-1 prevention. PMID:26061040

  5. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH ACCESS TO ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY AMONG PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV IN VIENTIANE CAPITAL, LAO PDR

    PubMed Central

    CHANVILAY, THAMMACHAK; YOSHIDA, YOSHITOKU; REYER, JOSHUA A; HAMAJIMA, NOBUYUKI

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since 2001, antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been available for people living with HIV (PLHIV) in Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR). Over 10 years of the ART program many HIV patients were found with advanced-stage AIDS in health care service facilities. This study aimed to examine factors associated with delayed access to ART among PLHIV in the capital of Vientiane. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 283 respondents (131 males and 152 females) aged 15 years or over. In this study, delayed access to ART was defined by a CD4 cell count of less than 350 cells/mm3 at the first screening, or those who presented with advanced AIDS-related symptoms. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by a logistic model. After adjustment, young people (OR=2.17; 95% CI: 1.00–4.68; p=0.049), low education (OR=0.23; 95% CI: 0.10–0.55; p=0.001) and duration between risk behavior and HIV test (OR=3.83; 95% CI: 1.22–12.00; p=0.021) were significantly associated with delayed access to ART. Low perception of high risk behaviors was one of the obstacles leading to delayed testing and inability to access ART. Almost all reported feeling self-stigma, and only 30.5% of men and 23.7% of women disclosed the HIV status to his/her partner/spouse. In conclusion, delayed access to ART was associated with individual factors and exposure to health care facility. In order to improve early detection HIV infection following access to ART, an improvement in perceptional knowledge of HIV, as well as reduction of HIV/AIDS-related stigma, might be needed. PMID:25797968

  6. "You Must Do the Test to Know Your Status": Attitudes to HIV Voluntary Counseling and Testing for Adolescents among South African Youth and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhail, Catherine Lorne; Pettifor, Audrey; Coates, Tom; Rees, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Reduced HIV risk behavior and increased use of care and support services have been demonstrated among adults accessing HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT). The impact of VCT on adolescents is, however, not known. Focus group discussions were held with adolescents and parents in two South African townships to establish the perceptions of and…

  7. [Comparison of human papilloma virus infection status between men who have sex with men recruited from gay bathhouses and HIV voluntary counseling and testing clinics respectively in Urumqi].

    PubMed

    Tian, T; Cai, A J; Huang, B X; Abidan, Ainiwaer; Wang, H; Dai, J H

    2017-01-10

    Objective: To understand the human papilloma virus (HPV) infection status in men who have sex with men (MSM) recruited from gay bathhouses and HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) clinics in Urumqi, Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, and identify the associated risk factors. Methods: A total of 200 MSM aged ≥18 years were recruited by using the " snowballing" sampling method from gay bathhouses and VCT clinics in Urumqi during March-May, 2016. The MSM recruited completed questionnaires after filling in the informed consent form. The information about their demographic characteristics and sexual behaviors were collected, and anal swabs were collected from them for HPV genotyping. Results: The overall HPV infection rate was 54.0%. The HPV infection rate was 66.7%(74/111) in MSM from gay bathhouses and 38.2%(34/89) in MSM from VCT clinics and the high risk type HPV infection rate was 39.6% (44/111) in MSM from gay bathhouses and 14.6% (13/89) in MSM from VCT clinics, the differences were significant (χ(2)=16.112, P<0.05; χ(2)=15.190, P<0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the major risk factors for HPV infection included activity in gay bathhouse (OR=3.732, 95% CI: 1.950-7.141) and anal sexual behavior (OR=2.555, 95%CI: 1.329-4.912). Conclusion: The prevalence of HPV in MSM from gay bathhouses was higher than that in MSM from VCT clinics, indicating that close attention should be paid to the behavior intervention in MSM.

  8. 43 CFR 3862.2-3 - Trustee to disclose nature of trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Trustee to disclose nature of trust. 3862... Lode Mining Claim Patent Applications § 3862.2-3 Trustee to disclose nature of trust. Any party applying for patent as trustee must disclose fully the nature of the trust and the name of the cestui...

  9. 43 CFR 3862.2-3 - Trustee to disclose nature of trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Trustee to disclose nature of trust. 3862... Lode Mining Claim Patent Applications § 3862.2-3 Trustee to disclose nature of trust. Any party applying for patent as trustee must disclose fully the nature of the trust and the name of the cestui...

  10. 43 CFR 3862.2-3 - Trustee to disclose nature of trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Trustee to disclose nature of trust. 3862... Lode Mining Claim Patent Applications § 3862.2-3 Trustee to disclose nature of trust. Any party applying for patent as trustee must disclose fully the nature of the trust and the name of the cestui...

  11. 43 CFR 3862.2-3 - Trustee to disclose nature of trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Trustee to disclose nature of trust. 3862... Lode Mining Claim Patent Applications § 3862.2-3 Trustee to disclose nature of trust. Any party applying for patent as trustee must disclose fully the nature of the trust and the name of the cestui...

  12. Community support and disclosure of HIV serostatus to family members by public-sector antiretroviral treatment patients in the Free State Province of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Edwin; van Loon, Francis; van Rensburg, Dingie; Meulemans, Herman

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the support of close relatives is fundamental in coping with HIV/AIDS and in accessing the emotional and material support necessary for sustained adherence to treatment. Because disclosure to family members is imperative to ensure their support, identifying tools or resources that can minimize the possible risks and maximize the potential benefits of disclosure should be useful in improving the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS. Where health systems require strengthening, engaging the community in HIV/AIDS care could potentially create an environment that encourages disclosure to family members. This study investigated the impact of community support initiatives (community health workers and treatment support groups), patient characteristics (age, gender, and education), and time since first diagnosis on the disclosure of serostatus to family members by a sample of 268 public-sector antiretroviral treatment patients in a province of South Africa between August 2004 and July 2007. Whereas gender, age, and education only weakly influenced disclosure, there was a strong and stable positive association between community support and disclosure to family members. The immediate and long-term impact of community support on the disclosure by seropositive patients to family members indicates that initiatives such as community health workers and HIV support groups run by people living with HIV/AIDS should be strengthened, especially for those patients who cannot disclose their status to immediate family and close friends.

  13. Women and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... How do you get HIV? How do you get tested for HIV? Is there are cure for HIV? What should pregnant women know about HIV? HIV Quick Facts What is HIV? HIV is the virus that causes AIDS. A person with HIV is called HIV positive (HIV+). HIV ...

  14. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in HIV prevention; current status and future directions: a summary of the DAIDS and BMGF sponsored think tank on pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) in HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Romano, Joseph; Kashuba, Angela; Becker, Stephen; Cummins, James; Turpin, Jim; Veronese, Fulvia

    2013-11-01

    Thirty years after its beginning, the HIV/AIDS epidemic is still raging around the world. According to UNAIDS, in 2011 alone 1.7M deaths were attributable to AIDS, and 2.5M people were newly infected by the virus. Despite the success in treating HIV-infected people with potent antiretroviral drugs, preventing HIV infection is the key to ending the epidemic. Recently, the efficacy of topical and systemic antiviral chemoprophylaxis (i.e., preexposure prophylaxis or "PrEP"), using the same drugs used for HIV treatment, has been demonstrated in a number of clinical trials. However, results from other trials have been inconsistent, especially those evaluating PrEP in women. These inconsistencies may result from our incomplete understanding of pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) at the mucosal sites of sexual transmission: the male and female gastrointestinal and reproductive tracts. The drug concentrations used in these trials were derived from those used for treatment; however, we still do not know the relationship between the therapeutic and the preventive dose. This article presents the first comprehensive review of the available data in the HIV pharmacology field from animal models to human studies, and outlines gaps, challenges, and future directions. Addressing these pharmacological gaps and challenges will be critical in selecting and advancing future PrEP candidates and strategies with the greatest impact on the HIV epidemic.

  15. Abnormalities in apolipoprotein and lipid levels in an HIV-infected Brazilian population under different treatment profiles: the relevance of apolipoprotein E genotypes and immunological status.

    PubMed

    Malavazi, Iran; Abrão, Emiliana P; Mikawa, Angela Y; Landgraf, Viviane O; da Costa, Paulo I

    2004-05-01

    HIV infection is associated with disturbances in lipid metabolism due to a host's response mechanism and the current antiretroviral therapy. The pathological appearance and progression of atherosclerosis is dependent on the presence of injurious agents in the vascular endothelium and variations in different subsets of candidate genes. Therefore, the Hha I polymorphism in the apolipoprotein E gene was evaluated in addition to triglycerides, total cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and apolipoprotein (apo) Al, B and E levels in 86 Brazilian HIV-infected patients and 29 healthy controls. The allele frequency for apoE in the HIV-infected group and controls was in agreement with data on the Brazilian population. Dyslipidemia was observed in the HIV group and verified by increased levels of triglycerides, VLDL and apoE, and decreased levels of HDL and apoAl. The greatest abnormalities in these biochemical variables were shown in the HIV-infected individuals whose immune function was more compromised. The effect of the genetic variation at the APOE gene on biochemical variables was more pronounced in the HIV-infected individuals who carried the apoE2/3 genotype. The highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART)-receiving group presented increased levels of total cholesterol and apoE. Dyslipidemia was a predictable consequence of HIV infection and the protease inhibitors intensified the increase in apoE values.

  16. Why relevant chemical information cannot be exchanged without disclosing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, Dmitry; Poroikov, Vladimir

    2005-09-01

    Both society and industry are interested in increasing the safety of pharmaceuticals. Potentially dangerous compounds could be filtered out at early stages of R&D by computer prediction of biological activity and ADMET characteristics. Accuracy of such predictions strongly depends on the quality & quantity of information contained in a training set. Suggestion that some relevant chemical information can be added to such training sets without disclosing chemical structures was generated at the recent ACS Symposium. We presented arguments that such safety exchange of relevant chemical information is impossible. Any relevant information about chemical structures can be used for search of either a particular compound itself or its close analogues. Risk of identifying such structures is enough to prevent pharma industry from relevant chemical information exchange.

  17. Exclusive breastfeeding and HIV/AIDS: a crossectional survey of mothers attending prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV clinics in southwestern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Aishat, Usman; David, Dairo; Olufunmilayo, Fawole

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prevention of Mother-To-Child-Transmission (PMTCT) of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) guideline recommends replacement feeding where it is acceptable, feasible, affordable, sustainable and safe. Where this is un-achievable, exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) is recommended during the first six months of life. Methods A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 600 HIV-positive using a two-stage sampling technique. Data on socio-demographics, infant feeding choice and factors influencing these choices were collected using semi-structured questionnaires. Results Majority of the mothers (86.0%) were married and aged 31.0 ± 5.7years. Slightly above half (53.0%) had≤2 children and more than two-third had disclosed their HIV status to their spouses. About two-third (61.0%) were traders with 75.0% earning monthly income ≤N5,000.00k. Half of the mothers had ≥4 antenatal care visits and 85.0% had infant feeding counselling. Infant feeding choices among the mothers were EBF (61.0%), ERF (26.0%) and MF (13.0%). The choice of EBF was influenced by spouse influence (84.0%), family influence (81.0%) and fear of stigmatisation (53.0%). Predictors of EBF were; monthly income (AOR = 2.6, C.I. =1.4-4.5), infant feeding counselling (AOR = 2.7, C.I. = 1.6-6.9) and fear of stigmatisation (AOR = 7. 2, C.I. = 2.1-23.6). Conclusion HIV positive mothers are faced with multiple challenges as they strive to practice exclusive breastfeeding. More extensive and comprehensive approach of infant feeding counseling with emphasis on behavioural change programmes in the context of HIV/AIDS within communities is advocated. PMID:26587157

  18. Why are some HIV/AIDS patients reluctant to receive antiviral therapy as soon as possible in China?

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Lu, Hongzhou

    2014-06-01

    In more than 20 years of medical practice, a surprising phenomenon has often occurred: some patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) decide not to go to the hospital and they do not let others know that they are suffering from the disease unless they believe that they are dieing. Zhang Shan (a pseudonym) is one such patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS who was reluctant to receive antiviral therapy as soon as possible, and this paper shares Zhang's story as he related it. Clearly, there are numerous views as to why patients in China behave as Zhang did. Presented here are several reasons, including society, history, morality and ideology, family, and education. Although all of these reasons do play a role, the patient's mindset and behavior is the most significant reason for a patient's reluctance to seek treatment or disclose his/her status. If the individual patient's mindset and behavior are not dealt with effectively, then HIV/AIDS can continue to spread and threaten additional lives and even the fabric of society. This paper analyzes the reasons why patients are hesitant to receive antiviral therapy, but this paper also suggests steps healthcare personnel can take to encourage patients to seek treatment. Such steps can save the lives of current patients with HIV/AIDS. In addition, sound public health measures and a rational approach to treatment are important to helping potential patients with HIV/AIDS.

  19. “I don't want financial support but verbal support.” How do caregivers manage children's access to and retention in HIV care in urban Zimbabwe?

    PubMed Central

    Busza, Joanna; Dauya, Ethel; Bandason, Tsitsi; Mujuru, Hilda; Ferrand, Rashida A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Children living with HIV experience particular challenges in accessing HIV care. Children usually rely on adult caregivers for access to care, including timely diagnosis, initiation of treatment and sustained engagement with HIV services. The aim of this study was to inform the design of a community-based intervention to support caregivers of HIV-positive children to increase children's retention in care as part of a programme introducing decentralized HIV care in primary health facilities. Methods Using an existing conceptual framework, we conducted formative research to identify key local contextual factors affecting children's linkages to HIV care in Harare, Zimbabwe. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 primary caregivers of HIV-positive children aged 6–15 years enrolled at a hospital clinic for at least six months, followed by interviews with nine key informants from five community-based organizations providing adherence support or related services. Results We identified a range of facilitators and barriers that caregivers experience. Distance to the hospital, cost of transportation, fear of disclosing HIV status to the child or others, unstable family structure and institutional factors such as drug stock-outs, healthcare worker absenteeism and unsympathetic school environments proved the most salient limiting factors. Facilitators included openness within the family, availability of practical assistance and psychosocial support from community members. Conclusions The proposed decentralization of HIV care will mitigate concerns about distance and transport costs but is likely to be insufficient to ensure children's sustained retention. Following this study, we developed a package of structured home visits by voluntary lay workers to proactively address other determinants such as disclosure within families, access to available services and support through caregivers’ social networks. A randomized controlled trial is underway to

  20. Development of a Standardized Approach to Disclosing Amyloid Imaging Research Results in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Lingler, Jennifer H.; Butters, Meryl A.; Gentry, Amanda L.; Hu, Lu; Hunsaker, Amanda E.; Klunk, William E.; Mattos, Meghan K.; Parker, Lisa A.; Roberts, J. Scott; Schulz, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The increased use of PET amyloid imaging in clinical research has sparked numerous concerns about whether and how to return such research test results to study participants. Chief among these is the question of how best to disclose amyloid imaging research results to individuals who have cognitive symptoms that could impede comprehension of the information conveyed. We systematically developed and evaluated informational materials for use in pre-test counseling and post-test disclosures of amyloid imaging research results in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Using simulated sessions, persons with MCI and their family care partners (N=10 dyads) received fictitious but realistic information regarding brain amyloid status, followed by an explanation of how results impact Alzheimer’s disease risk. Satisfaction surveys, comprehension assessments, and focus group data were analyzed to evaluate the materials developed. The majority of persons with MCI and their care partners comprehended and were highly satisfied with the information presented. Focus group data reinforced findings of high satisfaction and included 6 recommendations for practice: 1) offer pre-test counseling, 2) use clear graphics, 3) review participants’ own brain images during disclosures, 4) offer take-home materials, 5) call participants post-disclosure to address emerging questions, and 6) communicate seamlessly with primary care providers. Further analysis of focus group data revealed that participants understood the limitations of amyloid imaging, but nevertheless viewed the prospect of learning one’s amyloid status as valuable and empowering. PMID:27060950

  1. "Inside These Fences Is Our Own Little World": Prison-Based HIV Testing and HIV-Related Stigma Among Incarcerated Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Muessig, Kathryn E; Rosen, David L; Farel, Claire E; White, Becky L; Filene, Eliza J; Wohl, David A

    2016-04-01

    Correctional facilities offer opportunities to provide comprehensive HIV services including education, testing, treatment, and coordination of post- release care. However, these services may be undermined by unaddressed HIV stigma. As part of a prison-based HIV testing study, we interviewed 76 incarcerated men and women from the North Carolina State prison system. The sample was 72% men, median age 31.5 years (range: 19 to 60). Thematic analysis revealed high levels of HIV-related fear and stigma, homophobia, incomplete HIV transmission knowledge, beliefs that HIV is highly contagious within prisons ("HIV miasma"), and the View of HIV testing as protective. Interviewees described social distancing behaviors and coping mechanisms they perceived to be protective, including knowing their HIV status and avoiding contact with others and shared objects. Interviewees endorsed universal testing, public HIV status disclosure, and segregation of HIV-positive inmates. Intensified education and counseling efforts are needed to ameliorate entrenched HIV-transmission fears and stigmatizing beliefs.

  2. Truth-telling to the patient, family, and the sexual partner: a rights approach to the role of healthcare providers in adult HIV disclosure in China

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jing-Bao; Walker, Simon Thomas; Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Patients’ rights are central in today's legislation and social policies related to health care, including HIV care, in not only Western countries but around the world. However, given obvious socio-cultural differences it is often asked how or to what extent patients’ rights should be respected in non-Western societies such as China. In this paper, it is argued that the patients’ rights framework is compatible with Chinese culture, and that from the perspective of contemporary patient rights healthcare providers have a duty to disclose truthfully the diagnosis and prognosis to their patients, that the Chinese cultural practice of involving families in care should – with consent from the patient – be promoted out of respect for patients’ rights and well-being, and that healthcare providers should be prepared to address the issue of disclosing a patient's HIV status to sexual partner(s). Legally, the provider should be permitted to disclose without consent from the patient but not obliged to in all cases. The decision to do this should be taken with trained sensitivity to a range of ethically relevant considerations. Post-disclosure counseling or psychological support should be in place to address the concerns of potentially adverse consequences of provider-initiated disclosure and to maximize the psychosocial and medical benefits of the disclosure. There is an urgent need for healthcare providers to receive training in ethics and disclosure skills. This paper concludes also with some suggestions for improving the centerpiece Chinese legislation, State Council's “Regulations on AIDS Prevention and Control” (2006), to further safeguard the rights and well-being of HIV patients. PMID:26616129

  3. Truth-telling to the patient, family, and the sexual partner: a rights approach to the role of healthcare providers in adult HIV disclosure in China.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jing-Bao; Walker, Simon Thomas; Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Patients' rights are central in today's legislation and social policies related to health care, including HIV care, in not only Western countries but around the world. However, given obvious socio-cultural differences it is often asked how or to what extent patients' rights should be respected in non-Western societies such as China. In this paper, it is argued that the patients' rights framework is compatible with Chinese culture, and that from the perspective of contemporary patient rights healthcare providers have a duty to disclose truthfully the diagnosis and prognosis to their patients, that the Chinese cultural practice of involving families in care should - with consent from the patient - be promoted out of respect for patients' rights and well-being, and that healthcare providers should be prepared to address the issue of disclosing a patient's HIV status to sexual partner(s). Legally, the provider should be permitted to disclose without consent from the patient but not obliged to in all cases. The decision to do this should be taken with trained sensitivity to a range of ethically relevant considerations. Post-disclosure counseling or psychological support should be in place to address the concerns of potentially adverse consequences of provider-initiated disclosure and to maximize the psychosocial and medical benefits of the disclosure. There is an urgent need for healthcare providers to receive training in ethics and disclosure skills. This paper concludes also with some suggestions for improving the centerpiece Chinese legislation, State Council's "Regulations on AIDS Prevention and Control" (2006), to further safeguard the rights and well-being of HIV patients.

  4. Neurotoxic Profiles of HIV, Psychostimulant Drugs of Abuse, and their Concerted Effect on the Brain: Current Status of Dopamine System Vulnerability in NeuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Mark J.; Mactutus, Charles F.; Booze, Rosemarie M.

    2008-01-01

    There are roughly 30 to 40 million HIV infected individuals in the world as of December 2007, and drug abuse directly contributes to one-third of all HIV-infections in the United States. Antiretroviral therapy has increased the lifespan of HIV-seropositives, but CNS function often remains diminished, effectively decreasing quality of life. A modest proportion may develop HIV-associated dementia, the severity and progression of which is increased with drug abuse. HIV and drugs of abuse in the CNS target subcortical brain structures and DA systems in particular. This toxicity is mediated by a number of neurotoxic mechanisms, including but not limited to, aberrant immune response and oxidative stress. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies must be developed that can address a wide variety of disparate neurotoxic mechanisms and apoptotic cascades. This paper reviews the research pertaining to the where, what, and how of HIV and cocaine/methamphetamine toxicity in the CNS. Specifically, where these toxins most affect the brain, what aspects of the virus are neurotoxic, and how these toxins mediate neurotoxicity. PMID:18430470

  5. Supreme Court says Air Force may dismiss HIV-positive major.

    PubMed

    1999-05-28

    The U.S. Supreme Court decided unanimously that the Air Force has a right to dismiss an officer convicted by a court-martial for having unprotected sex with two women without disclosing his HIV-positive status. The court overturned a decision by a military appeals court to grant the defendant extraordinary relief under the All Writs Act. The defendant appealed his administrative dismissal, fearing he would lose medication access, and asserting that his removal was an unconstitutional violation of the "ex post facto" and double jeopardy clauses. The defendant had already served time in military confinement and lost salary following his court-martial. The justices stated that other statutory relief was available, and that the officer's dismissal was purely administrative, and unrelated to his court-martial.

  6. Impact of HIV Comprehensive Care and Treatment on Serostatus Disclosure among Cameroonian Patients in Rural District Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Suzan-Monti, Marie; Kouanfack, Charles; Boyer, Sylvie; Blanche, Jérôme; Bonono, Renée-Cécile; Delaporte, Eric; Carrieri, Patrizia M.; Moatti, Jean-Paul; Laurent, Christian; Spire, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    This work aimed to analyze the rate of disclosure to relatives and friends over time and to identify factors affecting disclosure among seropositive adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in rural district hospitals in the context of decentralized, integrated HIV care and task-shifting to nurses in Cameroon. Stratall was a 24-month, randomized, open-label trial comparing the effectiveness of clinical monitoring alone with laboratory plus clinical monitoring on treatment outcomes. It enrolled 459 HIV-infected ART-naive adults in 9 rural district hospitals in Cameroon. Participants in both groups were sometimes visited by nurses instead of physicians. Patients with complete data both at enrolment (M0) and at least at one follow-up visit were included in the present analysis. A mixed Poisson regression was used to estimate predictors of the evolution of disclosure index over 24 months (M24).The study population included 385 patients, accounting for 1733 face-to-face interviews at follow-up visits from M0 to M24. The median [IQR] number of categories of relatives and friends to whom patients had disclosed was 2 [1]–[3] and 3 [2]–[5] at M0 and M24 (p-trend<0.001), respectively. After multiple adjustments, factors associated with disclosure to a higher number of categories of relatives and friends were as follows: having revealed one’s status to one’s main partner, time on ART, HIV diagnosis during hospitalization, knowledge on ART and positive ratio of follow-up nurse-led to physician-led visits measuring task-shifting. ART delivered in the context of decentralized, integrated HIV care including task-shifting was associated with increased HIV serological status disclosure. PMID:23383117

  7. How HIV diagnosis and disclosure affect sexual behavior and relationships in Ugandan fishing communities.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Moriah; Birdthistle, Isolde; Seeley, Janet; Mpendo, Juliet; Asiki, Gershim

    2013-08-01

    In this article we examine how members of fishing communities on the shores of Lake Victoria in Uganda respond to HIV diagnosis in terms of disclosure to sexual partners. We then explore the subsequent changes in sexual behavior and relationships. To access this information, we collected life history data from 78 HIV-positive individuals in five fishing communities. We found that the strength of the sexual relationships shaped how and why individuals disclosed to partners, and that these relationships tended to be stronger when partners shared familial responsibility. Those who perceived their current sexual partnership to be weak sought to conceal their status by maintaining prediagnosis patterns of sexual behavior. The majority of the study's participants rarely changed their sexual behavior following HIV diagnosis, regardless of their relationship's strength. These findings elucidate barriers to disclosure and behavior change, and suggest that a life-course approach might enhance individual-level counseling so that counselors can provide tailored support to individuals regarding disclosure decisions and outcomes.

  8. Gender differences in determinants of condom use among HIV clients in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Walusaga, Happy Annet; Kyohangirwe, Rossette; Wagner, Glenn J

    2012-11-01

    Little research has examined gender differences in reporting of condom use, which is the goal of our analysis. A baseline study was conducted in two urban clinics and we examined data from sexually active clients entering HIV care who enrolled in a prospective longitudinal cohort study. The primary outcome was consistent condom use and determinant variables were demographics, physical health and immune status, economic well-being, relationship characteristics, psychosocial functioning, and self-efficacy. Of 280 participants, 129 were males and 151 females, and 41.7% had at least some secondary education; 60.7% did not always use condoms. Nearly half (48.1%) of men reported always using condoms compared to 31.8% of females. In bivariate analyses, men who consistently use condoms were more likely to be working, have a primary partner who was HIV negative, to have disclosed their HIV status to their primary partner, and to have higher general self-efficacy and condom use self-efficacy compared to men who did not always use condoms. Higher general self-efficacy and condom use self-efficacy were the only variables associated with reported consistent condom use among women. In regression analysis, working in the last 7 days, general self efficacy, and condom use self-efficacy were associated with consistent condom use among men. These findings reveal low rates of consistent condom use among people living with HIV, and a gender difference with men more likely to report consistent condom use. These data suggest the need for gender sensitive prevention programs and strategies, including programs that can provide women with greater control and self-efficacy regarding use of protective methods.

  9. HIV-positive status and preservation of privacy: a recent decision from the Italian Data Protection Authority on the procedure of gathering personal patient data in the dental office.

    PubMed

    Conti, Adelaide; Delbon, Paola; Laffranchi, Laura; Paganelli, Corrado; De Ferrari, Francesco

    2012-06-01

    The processing of sensitive information in the health field is subject to rigorous standards that guarantee the protection of information confidentiality. Recently, the Italian Data Protection Authority (Garante per la Protezione dei Dati Personali) stated their formal opinion on a standard procedure in dental offices involving the submission of a questionnaire that includes the patient's health status. HIV infection status is included on the form. The Authority has stated that all health data collection must be in accordance with the current Italian normative framework for personal data protection and respect the patient's freedom. This freedom allows the patient to decide, in a conscious and responsible way, whether to share health information with health personnel without experiencing any prejudice in the provision of healthcare requested. Moreover, data collection must be relevant and cannot exceed the principles of treatment goals with reference to the specific care of the concerned person. However, the need for recording information regarding HIV infection at the first appointment, regardless of the clinical intervention or therapeutic plan that needs to be conducted, should not alter the standard protection measures of the healthcare staff. In fact, these measures are adopted for every patient.

  10. HIV risk behaviours and determinants among people living with HIV/AIDS in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Duong Cong; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Tuan, Nguyen Anh; Thang, Bui Duc; Long, Nguyen Thanh; Fylkesnes, Knut

    2009-12-01

    There is a potentially high risk of HIV spreading from people living with HIV/AIDS. We conducted a cross-sectional study to examine HIV risk behaviours and their determinants among people living with HIV/AIDS. Eighty-two percent had been sexually active. Sex with multiple partners was reported by 20% and consistent condom use by about one third. More than half of the participants (52%) reported having injected drugs during the previous month, and 35% of those had shared needles and syringes. Voluntary HIV testing and having received condoms or injection equipment from the local HIV prevention program, were found to be significantly associated with fewer HIV risk behaviours. Having learned recently about personal HIV status, multiple sex partners, low educational attainment and young age were found to be associated with higher HIV risk behaviours. Giving high priority to targeted preventive and support programmes is likely to be a highly cost-effective strategy.

  11. Segmental hair testing to disclose chronic exposure to psychoactive drugs.

    PubMed

    Marchei, Emilia; Palmi, Ilaria; Pichini, Simona; Pacifici, Roberta; Anton Airaldi, Ileana-Rita; Costa Orvay, Juan Antonio; García Serra, Joan; Bonet Serra, Bartolomé; García-Algar, Óscar

    2016-06-15

    This study presents the case of a 4-year-old healthy child admitted to the paediatric ward for suspected accidental intoxication due to ingestion of narcoleptic drugs (methylphenidate, sertraline and quetiapine), taken on a regular basis by his 8-year-old brother affected by Asperger syndrome.Intoxication can be objectively assessed by measurements of drugs and metabolites in biological matrices with short-term (blood and urine) or long-term (hair) detection windows. At the hospital, the child's blood and urine were analysed by immunoassay (confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry), and sertraline and quetiapine and their metabolites were identified. The suspicion that the mother administered drugs chronically prompted the analysis of six, consecutive 2-cm segments of the child's hair, using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, thereby ac