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Sample records for disco articular adherido

  1. Modelo de galaxia disco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledesma, M.; Mosconi, M.

    El objetivo de este trabajo es estudiar la formación de galaxias anillo, a través de simulaciones numéricas. En el estudio numérico es necesario construir el modelo de una galaxia disco normal, en condición de equilibrio estable, que se ajuste a los parámetros observacionales disponibles de estos objetos. En dicho modelo se considera la galaxia constituída por un halo de materia oscura, un bulge y el disco propiamente dicho. A partir de perfiles de densidad obtenidos de las observaciones, se lleva a cabo la distribución espacial de las partículas, a través del ``Método del rechazo". La asignación de velocidades se realiza considerando que las partículas del disco están aproximadamente en equilibrio rotacional, y se agregan dispersiones de velocidad de acuerdo con el parámetro de Toomre Q=1.5.

  2. DISCOS- DYNAMIC INTERACTION SIMULATION OF CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program was developed for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft. In the use of DISCOS, the physical system undergoing analysis may be generally described as a cluster of contiguous flexible structures (bodies) that comprise a mechanical system, such as a spacecraft. The entire system (spacecraft) or portions thereof may be either spinning or nonspinning. Member bodies of the system may undergo large relative excursions, such as those of appendage deployment or rotor/ stator motion. The general system of bodies is, by its inherent nature, a feedback system in which inertial forces (such as those due to centrifugal and Coriolis acceleration) and the restoring and damping forces are motion-dependent. The system may possess a control system in which certain position and rate errors are actively controlled through the use of reaction control jets, servomotors, or momentum wheels. Bodies of the system may be interconnected by linear or nonlinear springs and dampers, by a gimbal and slider block mechanism, or by any combination of these. The DISCOS program can be used to obtain nonlinear and linearized time response of the system, interaction constant forces in the system, total system resonance properties, and frequency domain response and stability information for the system. DISCOS is probably the most powerful computational tool to date for the computer simulation of actively controlled coupled multi-flexible-body systems. The program is not easy to understand and effectively apply, but is not intended for simple problems. The DISCOS user is expected to have extensive working knowledge of rigid-body and flexible-body dynamics, finite-element techniques, numerical methods, and frequency-domain analysis. Various applications of DISCOS include simulation of the Shuttle payload deployment/retrieval mechanism, solar panel array deployment, antenna

  3. Articular cartilage biochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuettner, K.E.; Schleyerbach, R.; Hascall, V.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains six parts, each consisting of several papers. The part titles are: Cartilage Matrix Components; Biosynthesis and Characterization of Cartilage--Specific Matrix Components and Events; Cartilage Metabolism; In Vitro Studies of Articular Cartilage Metabolism; Normal and Pathologic Metabolism of Cartilage; and Destruction of the Articular Cartilage in Rheumatoid Diseases. Some of the paper topics are: magnetic resonance imaging; joint destruction; age-related changes; proteoglycan structure; and biosynthesis of cartilage proteoglycan.

  4. DISCOS- DYNAMIC INTERACTION SIMULATION OF CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program was developed for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft. In the use of DISCOS, the physical system undergoing analysis may be generally described as a cluster of contiguous flexible structures (bodies) that comprise a mechanical system, such as a spacecraft. The entire system (spacecraft) or portions thereof may be either spinning or nonspinning. Member bodies of the system may undergo large relative excursions, such as those of appendage deployment or rotor/ stator motion. The general system of bodies is, by its inherent nature, a feedback system in which inertial forces (such as those due to centrifugal and Coriolis acceleration) and the restoring and damping forces are motion-dependent. The system may possess a control system in which certain position and rate errors are actively controlled through the use of reaction control jets, servomotors, or momentum wheels. Bodies of the system may be interconnected by linear or nonlinear springs and dampers, by a gimbal and slider block mechanism, or by any combination of these. The DISCOS program can be used to obtain nonlinear and linearized time response of the system, interaction constant forces in the system, total system resonance properties, and frequency domain response and stability information for the system. DISCOS is probably the most powerful computational tool to date for the computer simulation of actively controlled coupled multi-flexible-body systems. The program is not easy to understand and effectively apply, but is not intended for simple problems. The DISCOS user is expected to have extensive working knowledge of rigid-body and flexible-body dynamics, finite-element techniques, numerical methods, and frequency-domain analysis. Various applications of DISCOS include simulation of the Shuttle payload deployment/retrieval mechanism, solar panel array deployment, antenna

  5. [Intra-articular injections].

    PubMed

    Chapelle, Ch

    2015-09-01

    It is not unusual for a specialist or general practitioner to be presented with a pathology which necessitates the use of an intra-articular injection of corticosteroids, hyaluronic acid or a local anaesthetic. It would seem to be interesting to update and to precise the techniques and methods of intraarticular injections which have appeared in recent international publications, when we know that 30 % of the injections given into the knee and so called "dry" are incorrect and, therefore, inefficient. The indication of an articular injection depends, firstly, on the diagnosis which should be done with great care; after which should be an objective analysis complete with secondary effects linked to both the injection and the product used. The conditions of asepsis, the choice of needles and quantities of the injection and even the ways of the injections should be reviewed in detail. The last studies clearly question the secondary effects of the cartilage degradations of the cortisone given as an intra-articular injection and shows its efficiency on the pain and inflammatory phenomonen in osteoarthritis. Studies on hyaluronic acid are often contradictory going from a modest result to an important pain relief but it is necessary to be aware that the objective criteria are difficult to interpret. The use of local anaesthetics in intra-articular is limited by the few indications in view of the major risk of aggravating the pre-existing lesions by the disappearing signs of pain.

  6. Order (n) DISCOS for multibody systems with gear reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, Hon M.; Turner, James D.; Frisch, Harold P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in O(n) algorithms (where n is the number of bodies in the system) and parallel processing have drastically reduced the computer time needed to simulate systems involving many bodies. This paper presents a gear-reduction model for the O(n) version of DISCOS, a standard software package for simulation and analysis of flexible multibody systems. The gear-reduction model allows the accurate modeling of harmonic drives, which are commonly used in robot joints. The formulation has been implemented and validated with known results. The gear model can also be used for gear-train, rack-and-pinion, and screw joints.

  7. Shrinkage-mediated imaging of entire organs and organisms using uDISCO.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chenchen; Cai, Ruiyao; Quacquarelli, Francesca Paola; Ghasemigharagoz, Alireza; Lourbopoulos, Athanasios; Matryba, Paweł; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Dichgans, Martin; Hellal, Farida; Ertürk, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Recent tissue-clearing approaches have become important alternatives to standard histology approaches. However, light scattering in thick tissues and the size restrictions on samples that can be imaged with standard light-sheet microscopy pose limitations for analyzing large samples such as an entire rodent body. We developed 'ultimate DISCO' (uDISCO) clearing to overcome these limitations in volumetric imaging. uDISCO preserves fluorescent proteins over months and renders intact organs and rodent bodies transparent while reducing their size up to 65%. We used uDISCO to image neuronal connections and vasculature from head to toe over 7 cm and to perform unbiased screening of transplanted stem cells within the entire body of adult mice. uDISCO is compatible with diverse labeling methods and archival human tissue, and it can readily be used in various biomedical applications to study organization of large organ systems throughout entire organisms. PMID:27548807

  8. DISCO: A 3D Moving-mesh Magnetohydrodynamics Code Designed for the Study of Astrophysical Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffell, Paul C.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the publicly available moving-mesh magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code DISCO. DISCO is efficient and accurate at evolving orbital fluid motion in two and three dimensions, especially at high Mach numbers. DISCO employs a moving-mesh approach utilizing a dynamic cylindrical mesh that can shear azimuthally to follow the orbital motion of the gas. The moving mesh removes diffusive advection errors and allows for longer time-steps than a static grid. MHD is implemented in DISCO using an HLLD Riemann solver and a novel constrained transport (CT) scheme that is compatible with the mesh motion. DISCO is tested against a wide variety of problems, which are designed to test its stability, accuracy, and scalability. In addition, several MHD tests are performed which demonstrate the accuracy and stability of the new CT approach, including two tests of the magneto-rotational instability, one testing the linear growth rate and the other following the instability into the fully turbulent regime.

  9. The NIF DISCO Framework: facilitating automated integration of neuroscience content on the web.

    PubMed

    Marenco, Luis; Wang, Rixin; Shepherd, Gordon M; Miller, Perry L

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes the capabilities of DISCO, an extensible approach that supports integrative Web-based information dissemination. DISCO is a component of the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF), an NIH Neuroscience Blueprint initiative that facilitates integrated access to diverse neuroscience resources via the Internet. DISCO facilitates the automated maintenance of several distinct capabilities using a collection of files 1) that are maintained locally by the developers of participating neuroscience resources and 2) that are "harvested" on a regular basis by a central DISCO server. This approach allows central NIF capabilities to be updated as each resource's content changes over time. DISCO currently supports the following capabilities: 1) resource descriptions, 2) "LinkOut" to a resource's data items from NCBI Entrez resources such as PubMed, 3) Web-based interoperation with a resource, 4) sharing a resource's lexicon and ontology, 5) sharing a resource's database schema, and 6) participation by the resource in neuroscience-related RSS news dissemination. The developers of a resource are free to choose which DISCO capabilities their resource will participate in. Although DISCO is used by NIF to facilitate neuroscience data integration, its capabilities have general applicability to other areas of research.

  10. Disco funerals, a risk situation for HIV infection among youth in Kisumu, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Njue, Carolyne; Voeten, Helene ACM; Remes, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    Objective We investigated the so called ‘disco funeral’ phenomenon in Kisumu, Kenya, whereby community members including adolescents congregate at the home of the deceased for several days, accompanied by music and dancing. We explored whether disco funerals are a risk situation for HIV/STI infection among youth. Design Cross-sectional qualitative study. Methods We conducted 44 in-depth interviews with male and female adolescents aged 15 to 20 in Kisumu municipality in Nyanza Province, Kenya. We also made observations during 6 disco funerals. Results Disco funerals were an important place for young people to hang out; they increased the opportunities to meet and engage in (risky) sexual activities. Many adolescents reported having casual sex on these occasions, sometimes with multiple partners, and mostly without condoms. Some girls were forced into sex, and there were several accounts of gang rape. Sex in exchange for money was reported frequently. Drugs and alcohol seemed to facilitate unprotected, multiple-partner, coerced, and transactional sex. Conclusions In Kisumu, a town with a generalized HIV/AIDS epidemic, the high AIDS mortality leads to frequent disco funerals. Because many adolescents are having unprotected, transactional, or coerced sex at these occasions, disco funerals might contribute to the high HIV prevalence among youth, especially among adolescent girls. HIV interventions urgently need to include outreach actions to youth who hang out at disco funerals, and link up with parents and funeral organizers to reduce risk situations. PMID:19165086

  11. Towards Regeneration of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masahiro; Ohta, Yoichi; Larmour, Colleen; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage is classified into permanent hyaline cartilage and has significant differences in structure, extracelluar matrix components, gene expression profile, and mechanical property from transient hyaline cartilage found in growth plate. In the process of synovial joint development, articular cartilage is originated from the interzone, developing at the edge of the cartilaginous anlagen, it establishes zonal structure over time and supports smooth movement of the synovial joint through life. The cascade actions of key regulators such as Wnts, GDF5, Erg, and PTHLH coordinate sequential steps of articular cartilage formation. Articular chondrocytes are restrictedly controlled not to differentiate into a hypertrophic stage by autocrine and paracrine factors and extracerllular matrix microenvironment, but retain potential to undergo hypertrophy. The basal calcified zone of articular cartilage is connected with subchondral bone, but not invaded by blood vessels nor replaced by bone, which is highly contrasted with the growth plate. Articular cartilage has limited regenerative capacity, but likely possesses and potentially uses intrinsic stem cell source in the superficial layer, Ranvier’s groove, the intra-articular tissues such as synovium and fat pad, and marrow below the subchondral bone. Considering the biological views on articular cartilage, several important points are raised for regeneration of articular cartilage. We should evaluate the nature of regenerated cartilage as permanent hyaline cartilage and not just hyaline cartilage. We should study how a hypertrophic phenotype of transplanted cells can be lastingly suppressed in regenerating tissue. Further, we should develop the methods and reagents to activate recruitment of intrinsic stem/progenitor cells into the damaged site. PMID:24078496

  12. Extra-articular Snapping Hip

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Context: Snapping hip, or coxa saltans, is a vague term used to describe palpable or auditory snapping with hip movements. As increasing attention is paid to intra-articular hip pathologies such as acetabular labral tears, it is important to be able to identify and understand the extra-articular causes of snapping hip. Evidence Acquisition: The search terms snapping hip and coxa sultans were used in PubMed to locate suitable studies of any publication date (ending date, November 2008). Results: Extra-articular snapping may be caused laterally by the iliotibial band or anteriorly by the iliopsoas tendon. Snapping of the iliopsoas tendon usually requires contraction of the hip flexors and may be difficult to differentiate from intra-articular causes of snapping. Dynamic ultrasound can help detect abrupt tendon translation during movement, noninvasively supporting the diagnosis of extra-articular snapping hip. The majority of cases of snapping hip resolve with conservative treatment, which includes avoidance of aggravating activities, stretching, and anti-inflammatory medication. In recalcitrant cases, surgery to lengthen the iliotibial band or the iliopsoas tendon has produced symptom relief but may result in prolonged weakness. Conclusions: In treating active patients with snapping soft tissues around the hip, clinicians should recognize that the majority of cases resolve without surgical intervention, while being mindful of the potential for concomitant intra-articular and internal snapping hips. PMID:23015936

  13. Resident mesenchymal progenitors of articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Maria Elena; Yasuhara, Rika; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capacity of self-renewal and repair. Insufficient number and activity of resident mesenchymal (connective tissue) progenitors is likely one of the underlying reasons. Chondroprogenitors reside not only in the superficial zone of articular cartilage but also in other zones of articular cartilage and in the neighboring tissues, including perichondrium (groove of Ranvier), synovium and fat pad. These cells may respond to injury and contribute to articular cartilage healing. In addition, marrow stromal cells can migrate through subchondral bone when articular cartilage is damaged. We should develop drugs and methods that correctly stimulate resident progenitors for improvement of repair and inhibition of degenerative changes in articular cartilage. PMID:25179676

  14. Resident mesenchymal progenitors of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Candela, Maria Elena; Yasuhara, Rika; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capacity of self-renewal and repair. Insufficient number and activity of resident mesenchymal (connective tissue) progenitors is likely one of the underlying reasons. Chondroprogenitors reside not only in the superficial zone of articular cartilage but also in other zones of articular cartilage and in the neighboring tissues, including perichondrium (groove of Ranvier), synovium and fat pad. These cells may respond to injury and contribute to articular cartilage healing. In addition, marrow stromal cells can migrate through subchondral bone when articular cartilage is damaged. We should develop drugs and methods that correctly stimulate resident progenitors for improvement of repair and inhibition of degenerative changes in articular cartilage. PMID:25179676

  15. Articular Cartilage Injury in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Timothy R.; Mithoefer, Kai; Scopp, Jason M.; Mandelbaum, Bert R.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions in the athletic population are observed with increasing frequency and, due to limited intrinsic healing capacity, can lead to progressive pain and functional limitation over time. If left untreated, isolated cartilage lesions can lead to progressive chondropenia or global cartilage loss over time. A chondropenia curve is described to help predict the outcome of cartilage injury based on different lesion and patient characteristics. Nutriceuticals and chondroprotective agents are being investigated as tools to slow the development of chondropenia. Several operative techniques have been described for articular cartilage repair or replacement and, more recently, cartilage regeneration. Rehabilitation guidelines are being developed to meet the needs of these new techniques. Next-generation techniques are currently evaluated to optimize articular cartilage repair biology and to provide a repair cartilage tissue that can withstand the high mechanical loads experienced by the athlete with consistent long-term durability. PMID:26069548

  16. A comparison of the pharmacophore identification programs: Catalyst, DISCO and GASP.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogendra; Gillet, Valerie J; Bravi, Gianpaolo; Leach, Andrew R

    2002-01-01

    Three commercially available pharmacophore generation programs, Catalyst/HipHop, DISCO and GASP, were compared on their ability to generate known pharmacophores deduced from protein-ligand complexes extracted from the Protein Data Bank. Five different protein families were included Thrombin, Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2, Dihydrofolate Reductase, HIV Reverse Transcriptase and Thermolysin. Target pharmacophores were defined through visual analysis of the data sets. The pharmacophore models produced were evaluated qualitatively through visual inspection and according to their ability to generate the target pharmacophores. Our results show that GASP and Catalyst outperformed DISCO at reproducing the five target pharmacophores. PMID:12602956

  17. A comparison of the pharmacophore identification programs: Catalyst, DISCO and GASP.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogendra; Gillet, Valerie J; Bravi, Gianpaolo; Leach, Andrew R

    2002-01-01

    Three commercially available pharmacophore generation programs, Catalyst/HipHop, DISCO and GASP, were compared on their ability to generate known pharmacophores deduced from protein-ligand complexes extracted from the Protein Data Bank. Five different protein families were included Thrombin, Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2, Dihydrofolate Reductase, HIV Reverse Transcriptase and Thermolysin. Target pharmacophores were defined through visual analysis of the data sets. The pharmacophore models produced were evaluated qualitatively through visual inspection and according to their ability to generate the target pharmacophores. Our results show that GASP and Catalyst outperformed DISCO at reproducing the five target pharmacophores.

  18. Engineering Lubrication in Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  19. Engineering lubrication in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    McNary, Sean M; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-04-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  20. Discos de acreción circumplanares: Modelo de Co-acreción

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, M. G.; de Elía, G.

    Los discos de acreción circumplanetarios precursores de los satélites regulares de los planetas gigantes, se pueden formar por cuatro mecanismos (Pollack y otros, 1991, In Uranus, Bergtralh, Miner y Mattews, Eds., p. 469, Univ. de Arizona Press, Tucson). En este trabajo estudiamos uno de tales mecanismos: el Modelo de Co-acreción. En dicho modelo, el disco circumplanetario se forma a partir de las colisiones mutuas entre planetesimales dentro de la esfera de Hill del planeta durante el proceso de formación planetaria. Realizamos un modelo semi-analítico para calcular la masa del disco y compararla con la masa requerida para formar los satélites regulares de los planetas gigantes. Hemos obtenido una cota superior para la masa del disco que resulta inferior a la masa de los satélites más grandes de los planetas gigantes. En principio, estos resultados permitirían descartar el modelo de co-acreción como uno de los procesos que podrían dar lugar a la formación de los satélites regulares. Estos resultados permiten obtener restricciones en el escenario de formación planetaria y en los mecanismos de formación de sistemas de satélites.

  1. Discos de acresção em sistemas Be-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes de Oliveira, R.; Janot-Pacheco, E.

    2003-08-01

    Alguns fenômenos de outbursts em Be-X sugerem a existência, mesmo que temporária, de um disco de acresção quando da passagem do objeto compacto pelo periastro orbital. Neste trabalho avaliamos a possibilidade de formação do disco de acresção em sistemas Be+estrela de neutrons e Be+anã branca, e a influência da excentricidade orbital na ocorrência deste fenômeno. Utilizamos a expressão analítica para o momento angular específico da matéria constituinte de um meio em expansão lenta, como é o caso do disco circunstelar das estrelas Be, proposta por Wang(1981), sob a condição básica de que o raio de circularização deva ser maior do que o raio de Alfvén. Concluímos que existe um limite para o período orbital do sistema acima do qual não é possível a formação do disco de acresção, e que este valor aumenta para sistemas com excentricidade orbital maior.

  2. Observaciones del disco solar y de una protuberancia quiescente en radiación ultravioleta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirigliano, D.; Vial, J.-C.; Rovira, M.

    Observaciones del disco solar y de una protuberancia quiescente en el rango de longitudes de onda ultravioleta fueron obtenidas con el instrumento CDS (Coronal Diagnostic Spectrograph) y SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of emitted radiation) a bordo de la sonda SOHO. El propósito es investigar las velocidades macroscópicas de varias especies metálicas que se observan tanto en el disco solar como en el plasma de las protuberancias. Para calcular las velocidades del disco solar aplicamos una técnica mixta para modelar la distribución de estructuras en UV en el Sol quieto. Las velocidades macroscópicas en las protuberancias se calcularon a partir de los corrimientos Doppler en cada línea espectral y luego se tomaron las del disco solar como referencia. Obtuvimos valores absolutos para las velocidades macroscópicas entre 5 y 40 km/seg. También detectamos comportamientos diferentes en las velocidades de las protuberancias en el centro con respecto a los bordes.

  3. DISCOS- DYNAMIC INTERACTION SIMULATION OF CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES (DEC VAX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program was developed for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft. In the use of DISCOS, the physical system undergoing analysis may be generally described as a cluster of contiguous flexible structures (bodies) that comprise a mechanical system, such as a spacecraft. The entire system (spacecraft) or portions thereof may be either spinning or nonspinning. Member bodies of the system may undergo large relative excursions, such as those of appendage deployment or rotor/ stator motion. The general system of bodies is, by its inherent nature, a feedback system in which inertial forces (such as those due to centrifugal and Coriolis acceleration) and the restoring and damping forces are motion-dependent. The system may possess a control system in which certain position and rate errors are actively controlled through the use of reaction control jets, servomotors, or momentum wheels. Bodies of the system may be interconnected by linear or nonlinear springs and dampers, by a gimbal and slider block mechanism, or by any combination of these. The DISCOS program can be used to obtain nonlinear and linearized time response of the system, interaction constant forces in the system, total system resonance properties, and frequency domain response and stability information for the system. DISCOS is probably the most powerful computational tool to date for the computer simulation of actively controlled coupled multi-flexible-body systems. The program is not easy to understand and effectively apply, but is not intended for simple problems. The DISCOS user is expected to have extensive working knowledge of rigid-body and flexible-body dynamics, finite-element techniques, numerical methods, and frequency-domain analysis. Various applications of DISCOS include simulation of the Shuttle payload deployment/retrieval mechanism, solar panel array deployment, antenna

  4. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair. PMID:25869133

  5. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair.

  6. Tensorial electrokinetics in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-09-15

    Electrokinetic phenomena contribute to biomechanical functions of articular cartilage and underlie promising methods for early detection of osteoarthritic lesions. Although some transport properties, such as hydraulic permeability, are known to become anisotropic with compression, the direction-dependence of cartilage electrokinetic properties remains unknown. Electroosmosis experiments were therefore performed on adult bovine articular cartilage samples, whereby fluid flows were driven by electric currents in directions parallel and perpendicular to the articular surface of statically compressed explants. Magnitudes of electrokinetic coefficients decreased slightly with compression (from approximately -7.5 microL/As in the range of 0-20% compression to -6.0 microL/As in the 35-50% range) consistent with predictions of microstructure-based models of cartilage material properties. However, no significant dependence on direction of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was detected, even for conditions where the hydraulic permeability tensor is known to be anisotropic. This contrast may also be interpreted using microstructure-based models, and provides insights into structure-function relationships in cartilage extracellular matrix and physical mediators of cell responses to tissue compression. Findings support the use of relatively simple isotropic modeling approaches for electrokinetic phenomena in cartilage and related materials, and indicate that measurement of electrokinetic properties may provide particularly robust means for clinical evaluation of cartilage matrix integrity.

  7. DISCOS- DYNAMIC INTERACTION SIMULATION OF CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES (DEC VAX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program was developed for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft. In the use of DISCOS, the physical system undergoing analysis may be generally described as a cluster of contiguous flexible structures (bodies) that comprise a mechanical system, such as a spacecraft. The entire system (spacecraft) or portions thereof may be either spinning or nonspinning. Member bodies of the system may undergo large relative excursions, such as those of appendage deployment or rotor/ stator motion. The general system of bodies is, by its inherent nature, a feedback system in which inertial forces (such as those due to centrifugal and Coriolis acceleration) and the restoring and damping forces are motion-dependent. The system may possess a control system in which certain position and rate errors are actively controlled through the use of reaction control jets, servomotors, or momentum wheels. Bodies of the system may be interconnected by linear or nonlinear springs and dampers, by a gimbal and slider block mechanism, or by any combination of these. The DISCOS program can be used to obtain nonlinear and linearized time response of the system, interaction constant forces in the system, total system resonance properties, and frequency domain response and stability information for the system. DISCOS is probably the most powerful computational tool to date for the computer simulation of actively controlled coupled multi-flexible-body systems. The program is not easy to understand and effectively apply, but is not intended for simple problems. The DISCOS user is expected to have extensive working knowledge of rigid-body and flexible-body dynamics, finite-element techniques, numerical methods, and frequency-domain analysis. Various applications of DISCOS include simulation of the Shuttle payload deployment/retrieval mechanism, solar panel array deployment, antenna

  8. Extra and Intra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, R K; Banskota, B; Rijal, S; Banskota, A K

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is not so rare intra-articular condition secondary to synovial metaplasia, that affects the knee joint. Extra-articular synovial chondromatosis however is an extremely rare condition that usually involves the synovial sheath or bursa of the foot or hand. We present two cases of synovial chondromatosis, one intra and one extra-articular. The first case was a 25 year old lady who presented with pain, swelling and restricted range of motion of left knee and was found to have an intra-articular synovial chondromatosis which was treated successfully by joint debridement. The second case was that of a 22 year old man who presented with right knee pain and was diagnosed to have an extra-articular synovial chondromatosis of his right medial hamstring tendon sheath, excision of which resulted in complete relief of symptoms. PMID:27549506

  9. Extra-articular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina; Tanasescu, R

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main characteristic is persistent joint inflammation that results in joint damage and loss of function. Although RA is more common in females, extra-articular manifestations of the disease are more common in males. The extra-articular manifestations of RA can occur at any age after onset. It is characterised by destructive polyarthritis and extra-articular organ involvement, including the skin, eye, heart, lung, renal, nervous and gastrointestinal systems. The frequence of extra-articular manifestations in RA differs from one country to another. Extra-articular organ involvement in RA is more frequently seen in patients with severe, active disease and is associated with increased mortality. Incidence and frequence figures for extra-articular RA vary according to study design. Extra-articular involvement is more likely in those who have RF and/or are HLA-DR4 positive. Occasionally, there are also systemic manifestations such as vasculitis, visceral nodules, Sjögren's syndrome, or pulmonary fibrosis present. Nodules are the most common extra-articular feature, and are present in up to 30%; many of the other classic features occur in 1% or less in normal clinic settings. Sjögren's syndrome, anaemia of chronic disease and pulmonary manifestations are relatively common – in 6-10%, are frequently present in early disease and are all related to worse outcomes measures of rheumatoid disease in particular functional impairment and mortality. The occurrence of these systemic manifestations is a major predictor of mortality in patients with RA. This paper focuses on extra-articular manifestations, defined as diseases and symptoms not directly related to the locomotor system. PMID:21977172

  10. GoDisco: Selective Gossip Based Dissemination of Information in Social Community Based Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Anwitaman; Sharma, Rajesh

    We propose and investigate a gossip based, social principles and behavior inspired decentralized mechanism (GoDisco) to disseminate information in online social community networks, using exclusively social links and exploiting semantic context to keep the dissemination process selective to relevant nodes. Such a designed dissemination scheme using gossiping over a egocentric social network is unique and is arguably a concept whose time has arrived, emulating word of mouth behavior and can have interesting applications like probabilistic publish/subscribe, decentralized recommendation and contextual advertisement systems, to name a few. Simulation based experiments show that despite using only local knowledge and contacts, the system has good global coverage and behavior.

  11. Supporting Biomaterials for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Drescher, Wolf; Rath, Björn; Tingart, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and researchers worldwide are continuously faced with the challenge of regenerating articular cartilage defects. However, until now, it has not been possible to completely mimic the biological and biochemical properties of articular cartilage using current research and development approaches. In this review, biomaterials previously used for articular cartilage repair research are addressed. Furthermore, a brief discussion of the state of the art of current cell printing procedures mimicking native cartilage is offered in light of their use as future alternatives for cartilage tissue engineering. Inkjet cell printing, controlled deposition cell printing tools, and laser cell printing are cutting-edge techniques in this context. The development of mimetic hydrogels with specific biological properties relevant to articular cartilage native tissue will support the development of improved, functional, and novel engineered tissue for clinical application. PMID:26069634

  12. Characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Serra, Ines; Husson, Zoé; Bartlett, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A wide range of stimuli can activate sensory neurons and neurons innervating specific tissues often have distinct properties. Here, we used retrograde tracing to identify sensory neurons innervating the hind paw skin (cutaneous) and ankle/knee joints (articular), and combined immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology analysis to determine the neurochemical phenotype of cutaneous and articular neurons, as well as their electrical and chemical excitability. Results Immunohistochemistry analysis using RetroBeads as a retrograde tracer confirmed previous data that cutaneous and articular neurons are a mixture of myelinated and unmyelinated neurons, and the majority of both populations are peptidergic. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons, voltage-gated inward currents and action potential parameters were largely similar between articular and cutaneous neurons, although cutaneous neuron action potentials had a longer half-peak duration (HPD). An assessment of chemical sensitivity showed that all neurons responded to a pH 5.0 solution, but that acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) currents, determined by inhibition with the nonselective acid-sensing ion channel antagonist benzamil, were of a greater magnitude in cutaneous compared to articular neurons. Forty to fifty percent of cutaneous and articular neurons responded to capsaicin, cinnamaldehyde, and menthol, indicating similar expression levels of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8), respectively. By contrast, significantly more articular neurons responded to ATP than cutaneous neurons. Conclusion This work makes a detailed characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons and highlights the importance of making recordings from identified neuronal populations: sensory neurons innervating different tissues have subtly different properties

  13. Human stem cells and articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Inui, Atsuyuki; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-11-05

    The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  14. Growth factor transgenes interactively regulate articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuiliang; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J; Trippel, Stephen B

    2013-04-01

    Adult articular chondrocytes lack an effective repair response to correct damage from injury or osteoarthritis. Polypeptide growth factors that stimulate articular chondrocyte proliferation and cartilage matrix synthesis may augment this response. Gene transfer is a promising approach to delivering such factors. Multiple growth factor genes regulate these cell functions, but multiple growth factor gene transfer remains unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that multiple growth factor gene transfer selectively modulates articular chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis. We tested the hypothesis by delivering combinations of the transgenes encoding insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1), bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and bone morphogenetic protien-7 (BMP-7) to articular chondrocytes and measured changes in the production of DNA, glycosaminoglycan, and collagen. The transgenes differentially regulated all these chondrocyte activities. In concert, the transgenes interacted to generate widely divergent responses from the cells. These interactions ranged from inhibitory to synergistic. The transgene pair encoding IGF-I and FGF-2 maximized cell proliferation. The three-transgene group encoding IGF-I, BMP-2, and BMP-7 maximized matrix production and also optimized the balance between cell proliferation and matrix production. These data demonstrate an approach to articular chondrocyte regulation that may be tailored to stimulate specific cell functions, and suggest that certain growth factor gene combinations have potential value for cell-based articular cartilage repair.

  15. Articular Cartilage Changes in Maturing Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Luria, Ayala; Chu, Constance R.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articular cartilage has a unique functional architecture capable of providing a lifetime of pain-free joint motion. This tissue, however, undergoes substantial age-related physiologic, mechanical, biochemical, and functional changes that reduce its ability to overcome the effects of mechanical stress and injury. Many factors affect joint function in the maturing athlete—from chondrocyte survival and metabolism to structural composition and genetic/epigenetic factors governing cartilage and synovium. An evaluation of age-related changes for joint homeostasis and risk for osteoarthritis is important to the development of new strategies to rejuvenate aging joints. Objective: This review summarizes the current literature on the biochemical, cellular, and physiologic changes occurring in aging articular cartilage. Data Sources: PubMed (1969-2013) and published books in sports health, cartilage biology, and aging. Study Selection: Keywords included aging, athlete, articular cartilage, epigenetics, and functional performance with age. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Data Extraction: To be included, research questions addressed the effect of age-related changes on performance, articular cartilage biology, molecular mechanism, and morphology. Results: The mature athlete faces challenges in maintaining cartilage health and joint function due to age-related changes to articular cartilage biology, morphology, and physiology. These changes include chondrocyte loss and a decline in metabolic response, alterations to matrix and synovial tissue composition, and dysregulation of reparative responses. Conclusion: Although physical decline has been regarded as a normal part of aging, many individuals maintain overall fitness and enjoy targeted improvement to their athletic capacity throughout life. Healthy articular cartilage and joints are needed to maintain athletic performance and general activities. Genetic and potentially reversible

  16. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  17. Intra-articular therapy in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Uthman, I; Raynauld, J; Haraoui, B

    2003-01-01

    The medical literature was reviewed from 1968–2002 using Medline and the key words "intra-articular" and "osteoarthritis" to determine the various intra-articular therapies used in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are the most frequently used intra-articular therapies in osteoarthritis. Other intra-articular substances such as orgotein, radiation synovectomy, dextrose prolotherapy, silicone, saline lavage, saline injection without lavage, analgesic agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucosamine, somatostatin, sodium pentosan polysulfate, chloroquine, mucopolysaccharide polysulfuric acid ester, lactic acid solution, and thiotepa cytostatica have been investigated as potentially therapeutic in the treatment of arthritic joints. Despite the lack of strong, convincing, and reproducible evidence that any of the intra-articular therapies significantly alters the progression of osteoarthritis, corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are widely used in patients who have failed other therapeutic modalities for lack of efficacy or toxicity. As a practical approach for a knee with effusion, steroid injections should be considered while the presence of symptomatic "dry" knees may favour the hyaluronic acid approach. The virtual absence of serious side effects, coupled with the perceived benefits, make these approaches attractive. PMID:12954956

  18. NIFTI and DISCOS: New concepts for a compact accelerator neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1995-06-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses fluoride compounds, such as lead or beryllium fluoride, to efficiently degrade high energy neutrons from the lithium target to the lower energies required for BNCT. The fluoride compounds are in turn encased in an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron filter, which has a deep window in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films or sheets of discrete droplets--through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is re-accelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator--target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production--resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons--while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current. Parametric trade studies of the NIFTI and DISCOS concepts are described. These include analyses of a broad range of NIFTI designs using the Monte carlo MCNP neutronics code, as well as mechanical and thermal-hydraulic analyses of various DISCOS designs.

  19. DISCO: An object-oriented system for music composition and sound design

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, H. G.; Tipei, S.; Wright, J. M.

    2000-09-05

    This paper describes an object-oriented approach to music composition and sound design. The approach unifies the processes of music making and instrument building by using similar logic, objects, and procedures. The composition modules use an abstract representation of musical data, which can be easily mapped onto different synthesis languages or a traditionally notated score. An abstract base class is used to derive classes on different time scales. Objects can be related to act across time scales, as well as across an entire piece, and relationships between similar objects can replicate traditional music operations or introduce new ones. The DISCO (Digital Instrument for Sonification and Composition) system is an open-ended work in progress.

  20. Intra-articular fractures of the hand.

    PubMed

    Oak, Nikhil; Lawton, Jeffrey N

    2013-11-01

    Fractures of the hand are common injuries and in particular, fractures involving the articular surfaces can present difficulties to the orthopedic surgeon in practice. Although the treatment of these fractures needs to be individualized based on fracture pattern and location, the goals for these fractures are to restore the alignment, stability, and congruity and to allow for early motion to prevent stiffness and traumatic arthritis. This article classifies the various types of intra-articular hand fractures as well as the workup and management of these injuries. PMID:24209952

  1. Preparation of Articular Cartilage Specimens for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stupina, T A

    2016-08-01

    We developed and adapted a technology for preparation of articular cartilage specimens for scanning electron microscopy. The method includes prefixation processing, fixation, washing, and dehydration of articular cartilage specimens with subsequent treatment in camphene and air-drying. The technological result consists in prevention of deformation of the articular cartilage structures. The method is simpler and cheaper than the known technologies. PMID:27591865

  2. Evolução temporal de discos circunstelares em estrelas Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, M. V. M.; Leister, N. V.; Levenhagen, R. S.

    2003-08-01

    A pesquisa do mecanismo que leva uma estrela do tipo Be a perder massa e formar um envelope circunstelar, nomeado como fenômeno Be, é uma questão em aberto, intrigante, e que adquire contornos interessantes em face às informações espectroscópicas de alta resolução. Nesta última década, consolida-se a idéia de que a forma destes envelopes é de tipo discóide, obedecendo a uma lei Kepleriana de velocidades, e mais ainda, recentemente há evidências de que a distribuição de matéria nestes discos pode assumir um caráter de anel. Medidas de algumas dimensões de discos circunstelares puderam ser obtidas pela análise de espectros de alta resolução e alta relação sinal-ruído para as estrelas Be: alpha Eri (HD 10144, B3Vpe), omicron And (HD 217675, B6IIIpe), e eta Cen (HD el972, B1.5Vne), no período dos anos de 1991 a 2001. Alguns modelos clássicos de envelope predizem uma distribuição de massa que decresce suavemente a partir da superfície estelar. Entretanto, considerando que a separação de picos de emissão em perfis de linhas do HeI e H-alpha, alargados por efeitos cinemáticos, é função do raio estelar e da velocidade rotacional projetada (vsini); nossos resultados sugerem a presença de um anel de matéria circunstelar, que aparece logo após a ejeção do material fotosférico, imediatamente acima da superfície estelar, e que se expande para raios maiores ao longo do tempo, eventualmente desconectando-se da superfície por uma região de densidade de matéria mínima. Tais interpretações revivem a idéia de que anéis de matéria circunstelar podem ser os responsáveis por algumas variabilidades em perfis de linhas de emissão, como as variações V/R.

  3. Combined 3DISCO clearing method, retrograde tracer and ultramicroscopy to map corneal neurons in a whole adult mouse trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Launay, Pierre-Serge; Godefroy, David; Khabou, Hanen; Rostene, William; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Baudouin, Christophe; Melik Parsadaniantz, Stéphane; Reaux-Le Goazigo, Annabelle

    2015-10-01

    Tissue clearing and subsequent imaging of intact transparent tissues have provided an innovative way to analyze anatomical pathways in the nervous system. In this study, we combined a recent 3-dimensional imaging of solvent cleared organ (3DISCO) procedure, light-sheet microscopy, fluorescent retrograde tracer, and Imaris software to 3D map corneal sensory neurons within a whole adult mouse trigeminal ganglion (TG). We first established the optimized steps to easily and rapidly clear a fixed TG. We found that the 3DISCO procedure gave excellent results and took less than 3 h to clear the TG. In a second set of experiments, a retrograde tracer (cholera toxin B Alexa 594-conjugated) was applied to de-epithelialized cornea to retrograde-labeled corneal sensory neurons. Two days later, TGs were cleared by the 3DISCO method and serial imaging was performed using light-sheet ultramicroscopic technology. High-resolution images of labeled neurons can be easily and rapidly obtained from a 3D reconstructed whole mouse TG. We then provided a 3D reconstruction of corneal afferent neurons and analyzed their precise localization in the TG. Thus, we showed that neurons supplying corneal sensory innervation exhibit a highly specific limited dorsomedial localization within the TG. We report that our combined method offers the possibility to perform manual (on 20 μm sections) and automated (on 3D reconstructed TG) counting of labeled cells in a cleared mouse TG. To conclude, we illustrate that the combination of the 3DISCO clearing method with light-sheet microscopy, retrograde tracer, and automatic counting represents a rapid and reliable method to analyze a subpopulation of neurons within the peripheral and central nervous system.

  4. Surface of articular cartilage: immunohistological studies.

    PubMed

    Duance, V C

    1983-10-01

    Using several physical techniques the surface of articular cartilage has been reported to be structurally different from the deeper layers. In this paper using immunohistochemical methods, the surface has been shown to contain a characteristically different collagen, Type I in contrast to Type II which is the major collagen of cartilage. These results support previous proposals for a surface layer, or lamina splendens, the presence of which would be of considerable importance in understanding the degradation of cartilage in arthritides. PMID:6678620

  5. The quality of healing: articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Gomoll, Andreas H; Minas, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Articular cartilage lacks an intrinsic capacity for self-repair, and once damaged, it never heals. This creates an opportunity for surgical intervention, whether to stimulate a healing response that results in the formation of a lower-quality fibrocartilaginous scar or formal cartilage repair in the form of cartilage transplants. This article will review the nature of cartilage injury and discuss indications and techniques for repair.

  6. Inducing articular cartilage phenotype in costochondral cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Costochondral cells may be isolated with minimal donor site morbidity and are unaffected by pathologies of the diarthrodial joints. Identification of optimal exogenous stimuli will allow abundant and robust hyaline articular cartilage to be formed from this cell source. Methods In a three factor, two level full factorial design, the effects of hydrostatic pressure (HP), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), and chondroitinase ABC (C-ABC), and all resulting combinations, were assessed in third passage expanded, redifferentiated costochondral cells. After 4 wks, the new cartilage was assessed for matrix content, superficial zone protein (SZP), and mechanical properties. Results Hyaline articular cartilage was generated, demonstrating the presence of type II collagen and SZP, and the absence of type I collagen. TGF-β1 upregulated collagen synthesis by 175% and glycosaminoglycan synthesis by 75%, resulting in a nearly 200% increase in tensile and compressive moduli. C-ABC significantly increased collagen content, and fibril density and diameter, leading to a 125% increase in tensile modulus. Hydrostatic pressure increased fibril diameter by 30% and tensile modulus by 45%. Combining TGF-β1 with C-ABC synergistically increased collagen content by 300% and tensile strength by 320%, over control. No significant differences were observed between C-ABC/TGF-β1 dual treatment and HP/C-ABC/TGF-β1. Conclusions Employing biochemical, biophysical, and mechanical stimuli generated robust hyaline articular cartilage with a tensile modulus of 2 MPa and a compressive instantaneous modulus of 650 kPa. Using expanded, redifferentiated costochondral cells in the self-assembling process allows for recapitulation of robust mechanical properties, and induced SZP expression, key characteristics of functional articular cartilage. PMID:24330640

  7. Polarized IR microscopic imaging of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Xia, Yang; Bidthanapally, Aruna

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this spectroscopic imaging study is to understand the anisotropic behavior of articular cartilage under polarized infrared radiation at 6.25 microm pixel resolution. Paraffin embedded canine humeral cartilage-bone blocks were used to obtain 6 microm thick tissue sections. Two wire grid polarizers were used to manipulate the polarization states of IR radiation by setting them for various polarizer/analyzer angles. The characteristics of the major chemical components (amide I, amide II, amide III and sugar) of articular cartilage were investigated using (a) a polarizer and (b) a combination of a polarizer and an analyzer. These results were compared to those obtained using only an analyzer. The infrared anisotropy (variation in infrared absorption as a function of polarization angles) of amide I, amide II and amide III bands correlates with the orientation of collagen fibrils along the tissue depth in different histological zones. An 'anisotropic flipping' region of amide profiles indicates the possibility of using Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) to determine the histological zones in cartilage. Cross-polarization experiment indicates the resolution of overlapping peaks of collagen triple helix and/or proteoglycan in articular cartilage.

  8. Articular Cartilage Injury and Potential Remedies.

    PubMed

    Chubinskaya, Susanna; Haudenschild, Dominik; Gasser, Seth; Stannard, James; Krettek, Christian; Borrelli, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Osteoarthritis affects millions of people worldwide, is associated with joint stiffness and pain, and often causes significant disability and loss of productivity. Osteoarthritis is believed to occur as a result of ordinary "wear and tear" on joints during the course of normal activities of daily living. Posttraumatic osteoarthritis is a particular subset of osteoarthritis that occurs after a joint injury. Developing clinically relevant animal models will allow investigators to delineate the causes of posttraumatic osteoarthritis and develop means to slow or prevent its development after joint injury. Chondroprotectant compounds, which attack the degenerative pathways at a variety of steps, are being developed in an effort to prevent posttraumatic osteoarthritis and offer great promise. Often times, cartilage degradation after joint injury occurs despite our best efforts. When this happens, there are several evolving techniques that offer at least short-term relief from the effects of posttraumatic osteoarthritis. Occasionally, these traumatic lesions are so large that dramatic steps must be taken in an attempt to restore articular congruity and joint stability. Fresh osteochondral allografts have been used in these settings and offer the possibility of joint preservation. For patients presenting with neglected displaced intra-articular fractures that have healed, intra-articular osteotomy techniques are being developed in an effort to restore joint congruity and function. This article reviews the results of a newly developed animal model of posttraumatic osteoarthritis, several promising chondroprotectant compounds, and also cartilage techniques that are used when degenerative cartilage lesions develop after joint injury. PMID:26584267

  9. Polarized IR microscopic imaging of articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Xia, Yang; Bidthanapally, Aruna

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this spectroscopic imaging study is to understand the anisotropic behavior of articular cartilage under polarized infrared radiation at 6.25 µm pixel resolution. Paraffin embedded canine humeral cartilage-bone blocks were used to obtain 6 µm thick tissue sections. Two wire grid polarizers were used to manipulate the polarization states of IR radiation by setting them for various polarizer/analyzer angles. The characteristics of the major chemical components (amide I, amide II, amide III and sugar) of articular cartilage were investigated using (a) a polarizer and (b) a combination of a polarizer and an analyzer. These results were compared to those obtained using only an analyzer. The infrared anisotropy (variation in infrared absorption as a function of polarization angles) of amide I, amide II and amide III bands correlates with the orientation of collagen fibrils along the tissue depth in different histological zones. An 'anisotropic flipping' region of amide profiles indicates the possibility of using Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) to determine the histological zones in cartilage. Cross-polarization experiment indicates the resolution of overlapping peaks of collagen triple helix and/or proteoglycan in articular cartilage.

  10. Extra-articular deformity is always correctable intra-articularly: to the contrary.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2009-09-01

    The operative word in this debate is "always." In my opinion, there are some cases better served by extra-articular correction. The question then becomes which ones, and how does the surgeon determine? There are 4 considerations: the magnitude of the deformity, the relationship of the deformity to the knee, the side of the deformity (varus or valgus), and whether the femur or the tibia is affected by the deformity. A larger deformity is more important, but just as important is its relationship to the knee. Large deformities distant to the knee have little impact on the knee. Varus deformities require lateral intra-articular overresection, which produces lateral instability. Valgus deformities require medial overresection, which produces medial instability. Lateral instability is stabilized by the dynamic lateral stabilizers (popliteus, lateral head of the gastrocnemius, biceps femoris, and iliotibial tract) and is better tolerated than medial instability. The best way to determine the consequence of the malalignment in question is to template the knee by drawing the mechanical axis from the femoral head or ankle to the center of the knee, and then the resection level that will be required. This will demonstrate the amount of overresection required to correct the extra-articular deformity, and in some cases will indicate the advantage of an extra-articular correction.

  11. [Intra-articular infiltrations in rheumatology: update].

    PubMed

    Chevalier-Ruggeri, Paola; Zufferey, Pascal

    2016-01-13

    Intra-articular treatments are very useful in the daily practice of rheumatology, although their survival in the joint cavity is short and their mode of action still widely misunderstood. Corticosteroids were first used in fifty's, and are still the most widely used, despite potential local and systemic side effects. In recentyears, other molecules have been developed, especially in the treatment of osteoarthritis, but their effectiveness is controversial. Therapeutic trials were conducted with biological treatments in inflammatory arthritis, without success so far In the area of biotechnology, molecules to increase the survival of drugs into the joint are in preparation.

  12. A fonte ionizante do disco de acreção no núcleo de NGC1097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, R. N.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.

    2003-08-01

    Observações em raios-X revelam o "coração" dos núcleos ativos de galáxias, pois esse tipo de radiação provém das suas regiões mais internas, próximas ao buraco negro central. Neste trabalho apresentamos observações em raios-X da região central da galáxia NGC1097, que hospeda um buraco negro supermassivo e um disco de acreção cuja emissão vem sendo observada há dez anos através da linha de emissão Ha larga (10000 km/s) e de duplo pico. As observações em raios-X - que foram obtidas com o Telescópio Chandra - foram combinadas com observações no ultravioleta obtidas com o Telescópio Espacial Hubble e são usadas para estudar as características da fonte central que ioniza o disco de acreção. A distribuição espectral de energia é comparada com a predita por modelos, em particular o de uma estrutura "ADAF" ("advection dominated accretion flow") na parte interna do disco. Tal estrutura produz um espectro de emissão de linhas estreitas tipo LINER, como observado em NGC1097 e em rádio-galáxias que apresentam linhas de Balmer largas de duplo pico. Apresentamos também uma comparação entre outros LINERs com linhas de emissão largas de duplo pico, disponíveis na literatura ou nos arquivos do Chandra e do Telescópio Espacial Hubble e discutimos as correspondentes implicações para modelos da fonte central.

  13. Validation of the Galileo scan platform control design using DISCOS. [Dynamic Interaction Simulation of COntrols and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chodas, J. L.; Macala, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The flexibility of the Galileo spacecraft's scan platform control system stator structure, which lies between the scan platform and one of the control actuators, has been a major design consideration. Tests have been conducted to verify the prevention of undesirable interactions between the structure and the control loop, by means of the Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program. The scan platform's control design has been validated for the achievement of 140-microradians maximum position deviation and 50 microradians of jitter over 1-sec intervals.

  14. Treatment of articular fractures with continuous passive motion.

    PubMed

    Onderko, Laura Lynn; Rehman, Saqib

    2013-07-01

    This article presents a review of the basic science and current research on the use of continuous passive motion therapy after surgery for an intra-articular fracture. This information is useful for surgeons in the postoperative management of intra-articular fractures in determining the best course of treatment to reduce complications and facilitate quicker recovery. PMID:23827837

  15. Toward patient-specific articular contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Henak, Corinne R.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanics of contacting cartilage layers is fundamentally important to understanding the development, homeostasis and pathology of diarthrodial joints. Because of the highly nonlinear nature of both the materials and the contact problem itself, numerical methods such as the finite element method are typically incorporated to obtain solutions. Over the course of five decades, we have moved from an initial qualitative understanding of articular cartilage material behavior to the ability to perform complex, three-dimensional contact analysis, including multiphasic material representations. This history includes the development of analytical and computational contact analysis methods that now provide the ability to perform highly nonlinear analyses. Numerical implementations of contact analysis based on the finite element method are rapidly advancing and will soon enable patient-specific analysis of joint contact mechanics using models based on medical image data. In addition to contact stress on the articular surfaces, these techniques can predict variations in strain and strain through the cartilage layers, providing the basis to predict damage and failure. This opens up exciting areas for future research and application to patient-specific diagnosis and treatment planning applied to a variety of pathologies that affect joint function and cartilage homeostasis. PMID:25698236

  16. Imaging of articular cartilage: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    RONGA, MARIO; ANGERETTI, GLORIA; FERRARO, SERGIO; DE FALCO, GIOVANNI; GENOVESE, EUGENIO A.; CHERUBINO, PAOLO

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the gold standard method for non-invasive assessment of joint cartilage, providing information on the structure, morphology and molecular composition of this tissue. There are certain minimum requirements for a MRI study of cartilage tissue: machines with a high magnetic field (> 1.5 Tesla); the use of surface coils; and the use of T2-weighted, proton density-weighted fast-spin echo (T2 FSE-DP) and 3D fat-suppressed T1-weighted gradient echo (3D-FS T1W GRE) sequences. For better contrast between the different joint structures, MR arthography is a method that can highlight minimal fibrillation or fractures of the articular surface and allow evaluation of the integrity of the native cartilage-repair tissue interface. To assess the biochemical composition of cartilage and cartilage repair tissue, various techniques have been proposed for studying proteoglycans [dGEMRIC, T1rho mapping, sodium (23Na) imaging MRI, etc.], collagen, and water distribution [T2 mapping, “magnetisation transfer contrast”, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and so on]. Several MRI classifications have been proposed for evaluating the processes of joint degeneration (WORMS, BLOKS, ICRS) and post-surgical maturation of repair tissue (MOCART, 3D MOCART). In the future, isotropic 3D sequences set to improve image quality and facilitate the diagnosis of disorders of articular structures adjacent to cartilage. PMID:25606557

  17. Lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence in articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rathakrishnan, C; Tiku, M L

    1993-08-01

    We were recently able to measure intracellular levels of hydrogen peroxide within normal articular chondrocytes using the trapped indicator 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. Further studies have shown that stimulated chondrocytes produce luminol-dependent chemiluminescence, suggesting that these cells produce hydrogen peroxide and singlet oxygen. In the present study, we have investigated the lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence response in normal articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes either in suspension or adhered to cover slips showed lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. There was a dose-dependent increase in chemiluminescence response when chondrocytes were incubated with soluble stimuli like phorbol-myristate-acetate, concanavalin A, and f-met-leu-phe. Catalase and the metabolic inhibitor, sodium azide, which inhibits the enzyme myeloperoxidase, had no inhibitory effect on lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence production. Only the antioxidant, superoxide dismutase, prevented lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence, indicating that this assay measures the production of superoxide anions by chondrocytes. We confirmed that chondrocytes release superoxide radicals using the biochemical assay of ferricytochrome c reduction. Since cartilage tissue is semi-transparent, we were able to measure chemiluminescence response in live cartilage tissue, showing that chondrocytes which are embedded within the matrix can also generate superoxide anion radicals. Reactive oxygen intermediates have been shown to play a significant role in the degradation of matrix in arthritis. Our previous and present studies suggest that oxygen radicals produced by chondrocytes may be an important mechanism by which chondrocytes induce cartilage matrix degradation.

  18. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo; Michielon, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory. PMID:26075244

  19. Toward patient-specific articular contact mechanics.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Henak, Corinne R; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2015-03-18

    The mechanics of contacting cartilage layers is fundamentally important to understanding the development, homeostasis and pathology of diarthrodial joints. Because of the highly nonlinear nature of both the materials and the contact problem itself, numerical methods such as the finite element method are typically incorporated to obtain solutions. Over the course of five decades, we have moved from an initial qualitative understanding of articular cartilage material behavior to the ability to perform complex, three-dimensional contact analysis, including multiphasic material representations. This history includes the development of analytical and computational contact analysis methods that now provide the ability to perform highly nonlinear analyses. Numerical implementations of contact analysis based on the finite element method are rapidly advancing and will soon enable patient-specific analysis of joint contact mechanics using models based on medical image data. In addition to contact stress on the articular surfaces, these techniques can predict variations in strain and strain through the cartilage layers, providing the basis to predict damage and failure. This opens up exciting areas for future research and application to patient-specific diagnosis and treatment planning applied to a variety of pathologies that affect joint function and cartilage homeostasis.

  20. Aquecimento alfvênico viscoso-resistivo em discos de acresção ao redor de estrelas T Tauri clássicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, W. M.; Vasconcelos, M. J.

    2003-08-01

    Com a crescente disponibilidade de dados observacionais sobre estrelas T Tauri, a busca por modelos mais precisos vem se tornando cada vez maior. Estes modelos devem explicar, entre outras coisas, o mecanismo dissipativo responsável pelo transporte de momento angular no disco de acresção que acredita-se, circunda estas estrelas. O mecanismo mais viável, do ponto de vista teórico, é uma instabilidade MHD conhecida como "instabilidade magnetorotacional ou Balbus-Hawley" (IBH). Esta instabilidade veio mostrar que o campo magnético desempenha um papel importante na evolução destes objetos mas requer, no entanto, um acoplamento mínimo entre o gás e o campo magnético no disco que não é atingido para os valores de temperatura obtidos do modelo padrão. Contudo, alguns mecanismos de aquecimento para o disco precisam ser examinados. Neste trabalho, propomos a dissipação de ondas Alfvén como uma fonte de aquecimento para o disco. Se o gás apresentar uma condutividade elétrica finita e viscosidade, teremos um tipo de amortecimento para as ondas denominado amortecimento viscoso-resistivo que será aqui considerado. Este mecanismo é aplicado ao modelo de disco em camadas. Calculam-se as taxas de aquecimento Alfvênico, a temperatura efetiva do disco bem como as taxas de ionização decorrentes deste aquecimento e do aquecimento gerado pela absorção de raios cósmicos. Comparações com os dados observacionais de Kitamura et. al. (2001) são efetuadas, ressaltando-se os pontos comuns entre suas observações e nossos dados teóricos.

  1. Articular and abarticular manifestations in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Abourazzak, Fatima Ezzahra; Akasbi, Nessrine; Houssaini, Ghita Sqalli; Bazouti, Sabah; Bensbaa, Salma; Hachimi, Hicham; Ajdi, Farida; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Objective Diabetes mellitus (DM), a worldwide high-prevalence disease, is associated with a large variety of rheumatic manifestations. It affects the connective tissues in many ways and causes alterations in the periarticular and the musculoskeletal systems. In most cases, these manifestations are associated with functional disability and pain, affecting the quality of life of the diabetic patient. The aim of our study is to review the different articular and abarticular manifestations in diabetic patients and the associated factors of these rheumatic manifestations. Material and Methods A cross-sectional study that includes all patients suffering from type 2 DM who present with articular or abarticular manifestations. Results We included 116 diabetic patients presenting with articular or abarticular manifestations. Our study showed four important findings. First, a large variety of articular and abarticular manifestations were present in patients with type 2 DM. Second, osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee was the most frequent articular manifestations. It was seen in 49% of our patients. Third, the most common manifestations in diabetic Moroccan patients were carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, and diabetic cheiroarthropathy (29%, 23%, and 16%, respectively). Fourth, there was a significant association between vascular complications and the development of articular and abarticular manifestations. Conclusion This study shows that the articular and abarticular manifestations in diabetic Moroccan patients are dominated by CTS, adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, and diabetic cheiroarthropathy, with a significant association between vascular complications and the development of some of these manifestations. PMID:27708897

  2. Osteoarthritis and articular chondrocalcinosis in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, E; Dieppe, P; Maddison, P; Evison, G

    1983-01-01

    One hundred consecutive admissions to an acute geriatric unit were examined for clinical and radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis (OA) and articular chondrocalcinosis (ACC). Thirty-four patients had ACC. This was age related, the prevalence rising from 15% in patients aged 65-74 years to 44% in patients over 84 years. The commonly involved joints were the knee (25%), public symphysis (15%), and wrist (9%). No other aetiological factors predisposing to ACC were found. Of the 25 patients with ACC in the knee 7 had no symptoms or signs and no radiographic evidence of OA at that site. However, the combination of ACC and radiographic OA was characterised by an increase in clinical joint disease. Features of inflammation (joint swelling and joint line tenderness) involving the knee, wrist, and elbow were particularly common in ACC. It is concluded that ACC is common in the elderly and is associated with an increased incidence of joint disease. PMID:6859960

  3. Extending the NIF DISCO framework to automate complex workflow: coordinating the harvest and integration of data from diverse neuroscience information resources.

    PubMed

    Marenco, Luis N; Wang, Rixin; Bandrowski, Anita E; Grethe, Jeffrey S; Shepherd, Gordon M; Miller, Perry L

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes how DISCO, the data aggregator that supports the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF), has been extended to play a central role in automating the complex workflow required to support and coordinate the NIF's data integration capabilities. The NIF is an NIH Neuroscience Blueprint initiative designed to help researchers access the wealth of data related to the neurosciences available via the Internet. A central component is the NIF Federation, a searchable database that currently contains data from 231 data and information resources regularly harvested, updated, and warehoused in the DISCO system. In the past several years, DISCO has greatly extended its functionality and has evolved to play a central role in automating the complex, ongoing process of harvesting, validating, integrating, and displaying neuroscience data from a growing set of participating resources. This paper provides an overview of DISCO's current capabilities and discusses a number of the challenges and future directions related to the process of coordinating the integration of neuroscience data within the NIF Federation.

  4. [Influence of the disco-scene on the psyche and soma of young people: psychometric, computerized-EEG and physiological studies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Saletu, B; Schultes, M; Grünberger, J

    1982-03-31

    Investigating the personality profile of 90 young disco-visitors, it was found that the group on the whole did not differ from the norm. However, a more detailed analysis according to age and sex demonstrated that young female "disco-fans" (under the age of 20 years) exhibited an increased desire for communication and contacts but also a less critical and a more pronounced self-admiring attitude than controls, while this was not observed in males. Subsequently, the effect of a typical disco-night on physiological, neurophysiological and psychometric variables was studied in 13 young disco-visitors. The results suggested an increased activation and arousal as reflected by the increased critical flicker fusion frequency, heart rate and blood pressure. Moreover, psychomotor activity, drive and mood were found to be improved, while attention, concentration, attention variability, reaction time and mnestic function deteriorated as compared with a control night. Digital computer period analysis of the electroencephalogram revealed an increased of theta and beta activity, and a decrease of alpha activity. The profile of the latter CNS changes shows a certain similarity to the pharmaco-EEG profiles of antidepressants. The findings are discussed.

  5. Ultrasound Backscattering Is Anisotropic in Bovine Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, Satu I; Liukkonen, Jukka; Tiitu, Virpi; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2015-07-01

    Collagen, proteoglycans and chondrocytes can contribute to ultrasound scattering in articular cartilage. However, anisotropy of ultrasound scattering in cartilage is not fully characterized. We investigate this using a clinical intravascular ultrasound device with ultrasound frequencies of 9 and 40 MHz. Osteochondral samples were obtained from intact bovine patellas, and cartilage was imaged in two perpendicular directions: through articular and lateral surfaces. At both frequencies, ultrasound backscattering was higher (p < 0.05) when measured through the lateral surface of cartilage. In addition, the composition and structure of articular cartilage were investigated with multiple reference methods involving light microscopy, digital densitometry, polarized light microscopy and Fourier infrared imaging. Reference methods indicated that acoustic anisotropy of ultrasound scattering arises mainly from non-uniform distribution of chondrocytes and anisotropic orientation of collagen fibers. To conclude, ultrasound backscattering in articular cartilage was found to be anisotropic and dependent on the frequency in use. PMID:25933711

  6. Ultrasound Backscattering Is Anisotropic in Bovine Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, Satu I; Liukkonen, Jukka; Tiitu, Virpi; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2015-07-01

    Collagen, proteoglycans and chondrocytes can contribute to ultrasound scattering in articular cartilage. However, anisotropy of ultrasound scattering in cartilage is not fully characterized. We investigate this using a clinical intravascular ultrasound device with ultrasound frequencies of 9 and 40 MHz. Osteochondral samples were obtained from intact bovine patellas, and cartilage was imaged in two perpendicular directions: through articular and lateral surfaces. At both frequencies, ultrasound backscattering was higher (p < 0.05) when measured through the lateral surface of cartilage. In addition, the composition and structure of articular cartilage were investigated with multiple reference methods involving light microscopy, digital densitometry, polarized light microscopy and Fourier infrared imaging. Reference methods indicated that acoustic anisotropy of ultrasound scattering arises mainly from non-uniform distribution of chondrocytes and anisotropic orientation of collagen fibers. To conclude, ultrasound backscattering in articular cartilage was found to be anisotropic and dependent on the frequency in use.

  7. Fractures of the articular processes of the cervical spine

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, J.H.; Goldstein, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    Fractures of the articular processes occurred in 16 (20.8%) of 77 patients with cervical spine fractures as demonstrated by multidirectional tomography. Plain films demonstrated the fractures in only two patients. Acute cervical radiculopathy occurred in five of the patients with articular process fractures (superior process, two cases; inferior process, three cases). Persistent neck pain occurred in one other patient without radiculopathy. Three patients suffered spinal cord damage at the time of injury, which was not the result of the articular process fracture itself. In the other seven cases, no definite sequelae occurred. However, disruption of the facet joint may predispose to early degenerative joint disease and chronic pain; unilateral or bilateral facet dislocation was present in five patients. In patients with cervical trauma who develop cervical radiculopathy, tomography should be performed to evaluate the articular processes.

  8. [Structure of the articular cartilage in the middle aged].

    PubMed

    Kop'eva, T N; Mul'diiarov, P Ia; Bel'skaia, O B; Pastel', V B

    1983-10-01

    In persons 17-83 years of age having no articular disorders 39 samples of the patellar articular cartilage, the articulated surface and the femoral head have been studied histochemically, histometrically and electron microscopically. Age involution of the articular cartilage is revealed after 40 years of age as a progressive decrease in chondrocytes density in the superficial and (to a less degree) in the intermediate zones. This is accompanied with a decreasing number of 3- and 4-cellular lacunae and with an increasing number of unicellular and hollow lacunae. In some chondrocytes certain distrophic and necrotic changes are revealed. In the articular matrix the zone with the minimal content of glycosaminoglycans becomes thicker and keratansulfate content in the territorial matrix of the cartilage deep zone grows large.

  9. Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Consolidation Measurement of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wellard, Robert Mark; Ravasio, Jean-Philippe; Guesne, Samuel; Bell, Christopher; Oloyede, Adekunle; Tevelen, Greg; Pope, James M.; Momot, Konstantin I.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the opportunity to study biological tissues and processes in a non-disruptive manner. The technique shows promise for the study of the load-bearing performance (consolidation) of articular cartilage and changes in articular cartilage accompanying osteoarthritis. Consolidation of articular cartilage involves the recording of two transient characteristics: the change over time of strain and the hydrostatic excess pore pressure (HEPP). MRI study of cartilage consolidation under mechanical load is limited by difficulties in measuring the HEPP in the presence of the strong magnetic fields associated with the MRI technique. Here we describe the use of MRI to image and characterize bovine articular cartilage deforming under load in an MRI compatible consolidometer while monitoring pressure with a Fabry-Perot interferometer-based fiber-optic pressure transducer. PMID:24803188

  10. Pendulum mass affects the measurement of articular friction coefficient.

    PubMed

    Akelman, Matthew R; Teeple, Erin; Machan, Jason T; Crisco, Joseph J; Jay, Gregory D; Fleming, Braden C

    2013-02-01

    Friction measurements of articular cartilage are important to determine the relative tribologic contributions made by synovial fluid or cartilage, and to assess the efficacy of therapies for preventing the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Stanton's equation is the most frequently used formula for estimating the whole joint friction coefficient (μ) of an articular pendulum, and assumes pendulum energy loss through a mass-independent mechanism. This study examines if articular pendulum energy loss is indeed mass independent, and compares Stanton's model to an alternative model, which incorporates viscous damping, for calculating μ. Ten loads (25-100% body weight) were applied in a random order to an articular pendulum using the knees of adult male Hartley guinea pigs (n=4) as the fulcrum. Motion of the decaying pendulum was recorded and μ was estimated using two models: Stanton's equation, and an exponential decay function incorporating a viscous damping coefficient. μ estimates decreased as mass increased for both models. Exponential decay model fit error values were 82% less than the Stanton model. These results indicate that μ decreases with increasing mass, and that an exponential decay model provides a better fit for articular pendulum data at all mass values. In conclusion, inter-study comparisons of articular pendulum μ values should not be made without recognizing the loads used, as μ values are mass dependent. PMID:23122223

  11. The surface of articular cartilage contains a progenitor cell population.

    PubMed

    Dowthwaite, Gary P; Bishop, Joanna C; Redman, Samantha N; Khan, Ilyas M; Rooney, Paul; Evans, Darrell J R; Haughton, Laura; Bayram, Zubeyde; Boyer, Sam; Thomson, Brian; Wolfe, Michael S; Archer, Charles W

    2004-02-29

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that articular cartilage growth is achieved by apposition from the articular surface. For such a mechanism to occur, a population of stem/progenitor cells must reside within the articular cartilage to provide transit amplifying progeny for growth. Here, we report on the isolation of an articular cartilage progenitor cell from the surface zone of articular cartilage using differential adhesion to fibronectin. This population of cells exhibits high affinity for fibronectin, possesses a high colony-forming efficiency and expresses the cell fate selector gene Notch 1. Inhibition of Notch signalling abolishes colony forming ability whilst activated Notch rescues this inhibition. The progenitor population also exhibits phenotypic plasticity in its differentiation pathway in an embryonic chick tracking system, such that chondroprogenitors can engraft into a variety of connective tissue types including bone, tendon and perimysium. The identification of a chondrocyte subpopulation with progenitor-like characteristics will allow for advances in our understanding of both cartilage growth and maintenance as well as provide novel solutions to articular cartilage repair. PMID:14762107

  12. Morphological characteristics of posterolateral articular fragments in tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Gao; Zhi-Jun, Pan; Qiang, Zheng; Hang, Li

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of posterolateral tibial plateau fractures is controversial, and information regarding this specific fracture pattern is lacking. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the frequency and morphological features of posterolateral articular fragments in tibial plateau fractures. A retrospective radiographic and chart review was performed on a consecutive series of patients who sustained tibial plateau fractures between May 2008 and August 2012. The articular surface area, maximum posterior cortical height, sagittal fracture angle, and amount of displacement were measured on computed tomography scans using the Picture and Archiving Communication System. Thirty-six (15%) of 242 injuries demonstrated a posterolateral fracture fragment comprising a mean 14.3% of the articular surface of the total tibial plateau (range, 8% to 32%). Mean major articular fragment angle was 23° (range, 62° to -43°), mean maximum posterior cortical height was 29 mm (range, 18 to 42 mm), and mean sagittal fracture angle was 77° (range, 58° to 97°). The posterolateral plateau articular fracture fragment has morphological characteristics of a conically shaped fragment with a relatively small articular surface area and sagittal fracture angle. Recognizing these morphological features will help the clinician formulate an effective surgical plan.

  13. Pendulum mass affects the measurement of articular friction coefficient.

    PubMed

    Akelman, Matthew R; Teeple, Erin; Machan, Jason T; Crisco, Joseph J; Jay, Gregory D; Fleming, Braden C

    2013-02-01

    Friction measurements of articular cartilage are important to determine the relative tribologic contributions made by synovial fluid or cartilage, and to assess the efficacy of therapies for preventing the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Stanton's equation is the most frequently used formula for estimating the whole joint friction coefficient (μ) of an articular pendulum, and assumes pendulum energy loss through a mass-independent mechanism. This study examines if articular pendulum energy loss is indeed mass independent, and compares Stanton's model to an alternative model, which incorporates viscous damping, for calculating μ. Ten loads (25-100% body weight) were applied in a random order to an articular pendulum using the knees of adult male Hartley guinea pigs (n=4) as the fulcrum. Motion of the decaying pendulum was recorded and μ was estimated using two models: Stanton's equation, and an exponential decay function incorporating a viscous damping coefficient. μ estimates decreased as mass increased for both models. Exponential decay model fit error values were 82% less than the Stanton model. These results indicate that μ decreases with increasing mass, and that an exponential decay model provides a better fit for articular pendulum data at all mass values. In conclusion, inter-study comparisons of articular pendulum μ values should not be made without recognizing the loads used, as μ values are mass dependent.

  14. Arthroscopic transtendinous repair of articular-sided pasta (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Lu, Liangyu; Lu, Zhe; Xiao, Lei; Kang, Yifan; Wang, Zimin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical efficacy of arthroscopic transtendinous repair of partial articular-sided PASTA (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury. Methods: From February 2011 to July 2014, 12 cases of PASTA, aged 29 to 72 years with an average of 52.9 ± 13.3 years, were treated arthoscopically. To repair PASTA, articular-sided rotator cuff tear was explored, injury site was punctured and labeled with PDS absorbable monofilament suture (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ, USA) suture, subacromial bursa was cleaned up with acromioplasty, and integrity of bursa-side rotator cuff was assessed. Then with arthroscope in glenohumeral joint, footprint of the bursa-side supraspinatus tendon was preserved, rivets were introduced into the joint through supraspinatus tendon, joint-side partial tear was sutured, and anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint was established. The patients were followed up post-operatively for 12-36 months, average 22 ± 7.3 months. The clinical outcomes were emulated with ASES (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons) Shoulder Score system and UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) Shoulder rating scale. Results: The post-operative ASES score was 89.7 ± 5.6, higher than the pre-operative one 49.8 ± 9.8 (t = 12.25, P <0.0001). While UCLA scale increased from the pre-operative 17.3, ± 3.3 to the post-operative 30.4 ± 3.2 points (t = 9.87, P <0.0001), with a satisfaction rate of 11/12 (91.7%). Conclusion: Trans-tendon repair is ideal for PASTA with advantage of maximal preservation of the normal rotator cuff tissue, anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint and stable fixation of tendon-bone interface. PMID:25784979

  15. A possible barrier function of the articular surface.

    PubMed

    Takada, N; Wada, I; Sugimura, I; Sakuma, E; Maruyama, H; Matsui, N

    1999-12-01

    Since MacConaill first reported the existence of a thin additional layer of the articular cartilage and named it the lamina splendens, there have been various opinions as to the role of this layer in the lubrication of the articular surface. We studied the superficial portion of the articular cartilage in the 20 day-old and 30 day-old rats using light and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, we studied the articular cartilage of the rat whose "cover layer" had been removed mechanically. Also, intraarticular latex beads injection, intraarticular dye injection using lithium carmine and supravital staining experiments were performed. On day 20, dye injected intraarticularly was clearly observed by light microscopy in chondrocytes situated in the deeper layers. The dye injected in the 30 day-old rats, however, was not seen in the chondrocytes but was found only in the superficial layer. Dye was found in the chondrocytes when supravital staining was performed in the articular cartilage of 30 day-old rats after mechanical removal of the cover layer. By transmission electron microscopy, a superficial layer consisted of fine filamentous structures was observed on the articular surface of the 30 day-old rats. The cover layer was destroyed by intraarticular injected latex beads in 30 day-old rats. These findings strongly support the idea that the cover layer acts as a barrier against substances which invade from the surface of the articular cartilage. The development period of the cover layer coincides with the initiation of weight bearing, and joint cartilage debris and pressure changes might further promote maturation. PMID:10659579

  16. Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in a rabbit osteoarthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, N-T.; Cui, Y-P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Recent studies have shown that systemic injection of rapamycin can prevent the development of osteoarthritis (OA)-like changes in human chondrocytes and reduce the severity of experimental OA. However, the systemic injection of rapamycin leads to many side effects. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of intra-articular injection of Torin 1, which as a specific inhibitor of mTOR which can cause induction of autophagy, is similar to rapamycin, on articular cartilage degeneration in a rabbit osteoarthritis model and to investigate the mechanism of Torin 1’s effects on experimental OA. Methods Collagenase (type II) was injected twice into both knees of three-month-old rabbits to induce OA, combined with two intra–articular injections of Torin 1 (400 nM). Degeneration of articular cartilage was evaluated by histology using the Mankin scoring system at eight weeks after injection. Chondrocyte degeneration and autophagosomes were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Matrix metallopeptidase-13 (MMP-13) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR).Beclin-1 and light chain 3 (LC3) expression were examined by Western blotting. Results Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 significantly reduced degeneration of the articular cartilage after induction of OA. Autophagosomes andBeclin-1 and LC3 expression were increased in the chondrocytes from Torin 1-treated rabbits. Torin 1 treatment also reduced MMP-13 and VEGF expression at eight weeks after collagenase injection. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in collagenase-induced OA, at least partially by autophagy activation, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach for preventing cartilage degeneration and treating OA. Cite this article: N-T. Cheng, A. Guo, Y-P. Cui. Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in a

  17. Extra-articular Mimickers of Lateral Meniscal Tears

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Joseph U.; Strauss, Eric J.; Lodha, Sameer; Bach, Bernard R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Lateral meniscus tears are a common entity seen in sports medicine. Although lateral-side knee pain is often the result of a meniscus injury, several extra-articular pathologies share signs and symptoms with a meniscus tear. It is critical for the clinician to be able to identify and understand extra-articular pathologies that can present similar to a lateral meniscus tear. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature conducted through a MEDLINE search for all relevant articles between 1980 and February 2010. Study Type: Clinical review. Results: Common extra-articular pathologies that can mimic lateral meniscal tears include iliotibial band syndrome, proximal tibiofibular joint instability, snapping biceps femoris or popliteus tendons, and peroneal nerve compression syndrome or neuritis. The patient history, physical examination features, and radiographic findings can be used to separate these entities from the more common intra-articular knee pathologies. Conclusions: In treating patients who present with lateral-sided knee pain, clinicians should be able to recognize and treat extra-articular pathologies that can present in a similar fashion as lateral meniscus tears. PMID:23015995

  18. Targeting TGFβ Signaling in Subchondral Bone and Articular Cartilage Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Gehau; Cao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative joint disease, and there is no disease-modifying therapy for OA currently available. Targeting of articular cartilage alone may not be sufficient to halt this disease progression. Articular cartilage and subchondral bone act as a functional unit. Increasing evidence indicates that transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) plays a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis of both articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Activation of extracellular matrix latent TGFβ at the appropriate time and location is the prerequisite for its function. Aberrant activation of TGFβ in the subchondral bone in response to abnormal mechanical loading environment induces formation of osteroid islets at onset of osteoarthritis. As a result, alteration of subchondral bone structure changes the stress distribution on the articular cartilage and leads to its degeneration. Thus, inhibition of TGFβ activity in the subchondral bone may provide a new avenue of treatment for OA. In this review, we will respectively discuss the role of TGFβ in homeostasis of articular cartilage and subchondral bone as a novel target for OA therapy. PMID:24745631

  19. Intra-articular Placement of an Intraosseous Catheter.

    PubMed

    Grabel, Zachary; DePasse, J Mason; Lareau, Craig R; Born, Christopher T; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-02-01

    Gaining vascular access is essential in the resuscitation of critically ill patients. Intraosseous (IO) placement is a fundamentally important alternative to intravenous (IV) access in conditions where IV access delays resuscitation or is not possible. This case report presents a previously unreported example of prehospital misplacement of an IO catheter into the intra-articular space of the knee joint. This report serves to inform civilian and military first responders, as well as emergency medicine physicians, of intra-articular IO line placement as a potential complication of IO vascular access. Infusion of large amounts of fluid into the joint space could damage the joint and be catastrophic to a patient who needs immediate IV fluids or medications. In addition, intra-articular IO placement could result in septic arthritis of the knee. PMID:25483729

  20. Three-dimensional collagen architecture in bovine articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, A K; Blunn, G W; Archer, C W; Bentley, G

    1991-09-01

    The three-dimensional architecture of bovine articular cartilage collagen and its relationship to split lines has been studied with scanning electron microscopy. In the middle and superficial zones, collagen was organised in a layered or leaf-like manner. The orientation was vertical in the intermediate zone, curving to become horizontal and parallel to the articular surface in the superficial zone. Each leaf consisted of a fine network of collagen fibrils. Adjacent leaves merged or were closely linked by bridging fibrils and were arranged according to the split-line pattern. The surface layer (lamina splendens) was morphologically distinct. Although ordered, the overall collagen structure was different in each plane (anisotropic) a property described in previous morphological and biophysical studies. As all components of the articular cartilage matrix interact closely, the three-dimensional organisation of collagen is important when considering cartilage function and the processes of cartilage growth, injury and repair. PMID:1894669

  1. Cryoprotectant kinetic analysis of a human articular cartilage vitrification protocol.

    PubMed

    Shardt, Nadia; Al-Abbasi, Khaled K; Yu, Hana; Jomha, Nadr M; McGann, Locksley E; Elliott, Janet A W

    2016-08-01

    We recently published a protocol to vitrify human articular cartilage and a method of cryoprotectant removal in preparation for transplantation. The current study's goal was to perform a cryoprotectant kinetic analysis and theoretically shorten the procedure used to vitrify human articular cartilage. First, the loading of the cryoprotectants was modeled using Fick's law of diffusion, and this information was used to predict the kinetics of cryoprotectant efflux after the cartilage sample had been warmed. We hypothesized that diffusion coefficients obtained from the permeation of individual cryoprotectants into porcine articular cartilage could be used to provide a reasonable prediction of the cryoprotectant loading and of the combined cryoprotectant efflux from vitrified human articular cartilage. We tested this hypothesis with experimental efflux measurements. Osteochondral dowels from three patients were vitrified, and after warming, the articular cartilage was immersed in 3 mL X-VIVO at 4 °C in two consecutive solutions, each for 24 h, with the solution osmolality recorded at various times. Measured equilibrium values agreed with theoretical values within a maximum of 15% for all three samples. The results showed that diffusion coefficients for individual cryoprotectants determined from experiments with 2-mm thick porcine cartilage can be used to approximate the rate of efflux of the combined cryoprotectants from vitrified human articular cartilage of similar thickness. Finally, Fick's law of diffusion was used in a computational optimization to shorten the protocol with the constraint of maintaining the theoretical minimum cryoprotectant concentration needed to achieve vitrification. The learning provided by this study will enable future improvements in tissue vitrification.

  2. Extending the NIF DISCO framework to automate complex workflow: coordinating the harvest and integration of data from diverse neuroscience information resources

    PubMed Central

    Marenco, Luis N.; Wang, Rixin; Bandrowski, Anita E.; Grethe, Jeffrey S.; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Miller, Perry L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes how DISCO, the data aggregator that supports the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF), has been extended to play a central role in automating the complex workflow required to support and coordinate the NIF’s data integration capabilities. The NIF is an NIH Neuroscience Blueprint initiative designed to help researchers access the wealth of data related to the neurosciences available via the Internet. A central component is the NIF Federation, a searchable database that currently contains data from 231 data and information resources regularly harvested, updated, and warehoused in the DISCO system. In the past several years, DISCO has greatly extended its functionality and has evolved to play a central role in automating the complex, ongoing process of harvesting, validating, integrating, and displaying neuroscience data from a growing set of participating resources. This paper provides an overview of DISCO’s current capabilities and discusses a number of the challenges and future directions related to the process of coordinating the integration of neuroscience data within the NIF Federation. PMID:25018728

  3. Effects of surgically induced instability on rat knee articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J M; Felten, D L; Peterson, R G; O'Connor, B L

    1982-01-01

    Degenerative lesions in the articular cartilage were present following transection of the anterior cruciate ligament in the rat. These lesions included surface disruptions, a reduction in matrix proteoglycans, and cellular changes and therefore were similar to lesions seen in dogs following transection of the anterior cruciate ligament as well as lesions seen in other mechanical derangement models. Lesions were more frequently encountered in animals that had been exercised on a treadmill. This suggests that the rat knee joint may be a useful small animal model in studying the effect of mechanical derangement on articular tissues. Images Figs. 1-2 Figs. 3-4 Figs. 5-6 PMID:7076535

  4. Utility of Intra-articular Hip Injections for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Wahab; Khan, Moin; Alradwan, Hussain; Williams, Ryan; Simunovic, Nicole; Ayeni, Olufemi R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a condition that is becoming increasingly recognized as a common etiology of hip pain in athletes, adolescents, and adults. However, history and clinical examination are often inconclusive in reaching a diagnosis, while imaging often detects asymptomatic abnormalities. Treatment has traditionally been limited to surgery, with the role of conservative management remaining unclear. Purpose: To evaluate the utility of the intra-articular hip injection in the diagnosis and management of FAI. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PubMed databases were screened in duplicate for studies published between January 1946 and January 2014. Search terms included femoroacetabular impingement, hip impingement, and intra-articular injection. Quality assessment using the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS) scale was completed for all included studies. Data evaluated included study design, study objectives, number of hips, injected product, duration of pain relief, and outcomes measured. Results: Our search yielded 8 studies involving 281 hips. Studies were categorized into diagnostic (4 studies), therapeutic (3 studies), and prognostic (1 study) applications. Patients with FAI and its degenerative sequelae obtained greater relief from diagnostic intra-articular hip injection than those without (P < .05). The diagnostic intra-articular injection performed under ultrasound guidance was better tolerated than injections performed under fluoroscopic guidance (pain rating, 5.6 vs 3.0; P < .1). Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid was the most effective at providing pain relief (in 23 patients), with significant improvements of functional outcome measures (Harris Hip Score, visual analog scale) present at 12 months. Pooled results with corticosteroid injection resulted in improvement in only 15% (9/60) of patients at 6 weeks. A negative response to intra-articular

  5. Pseudomonas arthritis treated with parenteral and intra-articular ceftazidime.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, K; Hilton, R C; Sen, R A

    1985-01-01

    A 73-year-old diabetic presented with septic arthritis of the knee; Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated. She was successfully treated with a combination of parenteral and intra-articular ceftazidime, after failure to eradicate the organism with adequate serum levels of gentamicin and full doses of azlocillin. PMID:3896166

  6. ELASTICITY OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE: EFFECT OF IONS AND VISCOUS SOLUTIONS.

    PubMed

    SOKOLOFF, L

    1963-09-13

    The deformability of articular cartilage is increased by cations, more so by polyvalent than monovalent ones. Trivalent cations also depress elastic recovery. Failure of viscous solutions to alter the elastic behavior suggests ultra-filtration by cartilage as a possible mechanism in synovial lubrication.

  7. Current Concepts of Articular Cartilage Restoration Techniques in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Stuart, Michael J.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articular cartilage injuries are common in patients presenting to surgeons with primary complaints of knee pain or mechanical symptoms. Treatment options include comprehensive nonoperative management, palliative surgery, joint preservation operations, and arthroplasty. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search on articular cartilage restoration techniques of the knee was conducted to identify outcome studies published from 1993 to 2013. Special emphasis was given to Level 1 and 2 published studies. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Current surgical options with documented outcomes in treating chondral injuries in the knee include the following: microfracture, osteochondral autograft transfer, osteochondral allograft transplant, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Generally, results are favorable regarding patient satisfaction and return to sport when proper treatment algorithms and surgical techniques are followed, with 52% to 96% of patients demonstrating good to excellent clinical outcomes and 66% to 91% returning to sport at preinjury levels. Conclusion: Clinical, functional, and radiographic outcomes may be improved in the majority of patients with articular cartilage restoration surgery; however, some patients may not fully return to their preinjury activity levels postoperatively. In active and athletic patient populations, biological techniques that restore the articular surface may be options that provide symptom relief and return patients to their prior levels of function. PMID:24790697

  8. Human patellar articular proportions: recent and Pleistocene patterns

    PubMed Central

    TRINKAUS, ERIK

    2000-01-01

    The degrees of mediolateral asymmetry of the patellar articular facet, as well as the median and lateral articular angles of the facet, were compared across samples of recent humans and of Pleistocene archaic and modern fossil humans. All samples exhibit considerable variability in these patellar proportions. The articular angles are similar across the different samples, but there is a trend towards decreasing lateral angles with decreasing robusticity. The archaic humans exhibit significantly more symmetry of the medial and lateral facets than do any of the recent human samples. However, given the variability in medial versus lateral patellofemoral contact forces documented for extant humans and the roles of the distal oblique portions of vastus medialis and vastus lateralis in patellar stabilisation, it is unclear to what extent this variation in patellar articular proportions may affect knee kinesiology. The contrasts may be related to different levels of patellar stability and/or musculoskeletal hypertrophy, but they appear unlikely to have affected primary knee function. PMID:10853969

  9. In vivo cartilage formation from growth factor modulated articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bradham, D M; Horton, W E

    1998-07-01

    Recent procedures for autologous repair of cartilage defects may be difficult in elderly patients because of the loss of stem cells and chondrocytes that occurs with age and the slow in vitro proliferation of chondrocytes from aged cartilage. In this study secondary chondroprogenitor cells were obtained by modulating the phenotype of articular chondrocytes with growth factors and stimulating the proliferation of these cells in culture. Chondrocytes isolated from the articular cartilage of mature New Zealand White rabbits were exposed to a combination of transforming growth factor beta and basic fibroblast growth factor treatment. These cells ceased the production of Collagen II (a marker for the chondrocyte phenotype) and underwent a 136-fold increase in cell number. Next, the cells were placed in high density culture and reexpressed the chondrocyte phenotype in vitro and formed hyaline cartilage in an in vivo assay. Primary chondrocytes obtained from articular cartilage of elderly humans could be manipulated in a similar fashion in vitro. These human secondary chondroprogenitor cells formed only cartilage tissue when assayed in vivo and in tissue bioreactors. This approach may be essential for autologous repair of degenerated articular cartilage in elderly patients with osteoarthritis.

  10. Chondrocyte distribution in the articular cartilage of human femoral condyles.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, R S; Palfrey, A J

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of chondrocytes throughout the total thickness of articular cartilage from the femoral condyles of infants, children and adults has been studied using serial sections cut parallel as well as perpendicular to the articular surface. The thickness of the articular cartilage was estimated in fixed sections. In one of the adult specimens, the thickness of the articular cartilage was estimated firstly by direct measurement of the cut surfaces of a series of blocks cut from both condyles and then from the number of parallel sections of the cartilage prepared from those blocks. Cell density was highest in the superficial zone of all specimens examined, declining to lower values in the deep zone of the cartilage. Within this pattern the infant specimens had the highest values for cell density and the adults the lowest, with values for children in an intermediate range. There was no significant variation in cell density across the condyles of the selected adult specimen. The absolute values for cartilage thickness depended on the method used, but in general total thickness was found to approximately double from late gestation to maturity. In the selected adult specimen, the cartilage was thickest just anterior and posterior to the main weight-bearing area of the condyles. PMID:3198480

  11. Corrective Osteotomy for Intra-Articular Distal Humerus Malunion

    PubMed Central

    Kinaci, Ahmet; Buijze, Geert A.; Leeuwen, Diederik H.van; Jupiter, Jesse B.; Marti, Rene K.; Kloen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: An intra-articular distal humerus malunion can be disabling. To improve function, reduce pain and/or prevent further secondary osteoarthritis an intra-articular corrective osteotomy can be considered. Herein we present the indications, practical guidelines for pre- operative planning and surgical technique. Subsequently, we provide long-term results in a small series. Methods: We included six consecutive patients operated for intra-articular distal humerus malunion. Mean follow-up was 88 months. At lastest follow up elbow function was assessed according to standardized questionnaires and classification systems. Results: All six patients healed their osteotomies. Three patients had a postoperative complication which were treated succesfully. Range of motion improved significantly and all patients were satisfied with the outcome. The elbow performance scores were good to excellent in all. Correlation analyses showed that age and level of osteoarthritis are very strong predictors for the long-term elbow function and quality of life. Conclusion: An intra-articular corrective osteotomy for a malunited distal humerus fracture is a worthwhile procedure. Based on our results it should particularly be considered in young patients with minimal osteoarthritis and moderate to severe functional disability and/or pain. PMID:27200396

  12. Evaluation of apparent fracture toughness of articular cartilage and hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinghua; Rennerfeldt, Deena A.; Friis, Elizabeth A.; Gehrke, Stevin H.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, biomaterials-based tissue-engineering strategies, including the use of hydrogels, have offered great promise for repairing articular cartilage. Mechanical failure testing in outcome analyses is of crucial clinical importance to the success of engineered constructs. Interpenetrating networks (IPNs) are gaining more attention, due to their superior mechanical integrity. This study provided a combination testing method of apparent fracture toughness, which was applied to both articular cartilage and hydrogels. The apparent fracture toughnesses of two groups, hydrogels and articular cartilage, were evaluated based on the modified single-edge notch test and ASTM standards on the single-edge notch test and compact tension test. The results demonstrated that the toughness for articular cartilage (348 ± 43 MPa/mm½) was much higher than that for hydrogels. With a toughness value of 10.8 ± 1.4 MPa/mm½, IPNs of agarose and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) looked promising. The IPNs were 1.4 times tougher than PEG-DA alone, although still over an order of magnitude less tough than cartilage. A new method was developed to evaluate hydrogels and cartilage in a manner that enabled a more relevant direct comparison for fracture testing of hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering. Moreover, a target toughness value for cartilage of using this direct comparison method has been identified (348 ± 43 MPa/mm½), and the toughness discrepancy to be overcome between hydrogels and cartilage has been quantified. PMID:24700577

  13. Computational aspects in mechanical modeling of the articular cartilage tissue.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Mequanint, Kibret; Herzog, Walter

    2013-04-01

    This review focuses on the modeling of articular cartilage (at the tissue level), chondrocyte mechanobiology (at the cell level) and a combination of both in a multiscale computation scheme. The primary objective is to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of conventional models implemented to study the mechanics of the articular cartilage tissue and chondrocytes. From monophasic material models as the simplest form to more complicated multiscale theories, these approaches have been frequently used to model articular cartilage and have contributed significantly to modeling joint mechanics, addressing and resolving numerous issues regarding cartilage mechanics and function. It should be noted that attentiveness is important when using different modeling approaches, as the choice of the model limits the applications available. In this review, we discuss the conventional models applicable to some of the mechanical aspects of articular cartilage such as lubrication, swelling pressure and chondrocyte mechanics and address some of the issues associated with the current modeling approaches. We then suggest future pathways for a more realistic modeling strategy as applied for the simulation of the mechanics of the cartilage tissue using multiscale and parallelized finite element method.

  14. Biphasic surface amorphous layer lubrication of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Graindorge, Simon; Ferrandez, Wendy; Jin, Zhongmin; Ingham, Eileen; Grant, Colin; Twigg, Peter; Fisher, John

    2005-12-01

    The biphasic nature of articular cartilage has been acknowledged for some time and is known to play an important role in many of the biomechanical functions performed by this unique tissue. From the lubrication point of view however, a simple biphasic model is unable to account for the extremely low friction coefficients that have been recorded experimentally, particularly during start-up. In addition, research over the last decade has indicated the presence of a surface amorphous layer on top of articular cartilage. Here, we present results from a finite element model of articular cartilage that includes a thin, soft, biphasic surface amorphous layer (BSAL). The results of this study show that a thin BSAL, with lower elastic modulus, dramatically altered the load sharing between the solid and liquid phases of articular cartilage, particularly in the near-surface regions of the underlying bulk cartilage and within the surface amorphous layer itself where the fluid load support exceeded 85%. By transferring the load from the solid phase to the fluid phase, the biphasic surface layer improves lubrication and reduces friction, whilst also protecting the underlying cartilage surface by 'shielding' the solid phase from elevated stresses. The increase in lubrication effectiveness is shown to be greatest during short duration loading scenarios, such as shock loads.

  15. Evidence for a negative Pasteur effect in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Lee, R B; Urban, J P

    1997-01-01

    Uptake of external glucose and production of lactate were measured in freshly-excised bovine articular cartilage under O2 concentrations ranging from 21% (air) to zero (N2-bubbled). Anoxia (O2 concentration < 1% in the gas phase) severely inhibited both glucose uptake and lactate production. The decrease in lactate formation correlated closely with the decrease in glucose uptake, in a mole ratio of 2:1. This reduction in the rate of glycolysis in anoxic conditions is seen as evidence of a negative Pasteur effect in bovine articular cartilage. Anoxia also suppressed glycolysis in articular cartilage from horse, pig and sheep. Inhibitors acting on the glycolytic pathway (2-deoxy-D-glucose, iodoacetamide or fluoride) strongly decreased aerobic lactate production and ATP concentration, consistent with the belief that articular cartilage obtains its principal supply of ATP from substrate-level phosphorylation in glycolysis. Azide or cyanide lowered the ATP concentration in aerobic cartilage to approximately the same extent as did anoxia but, because glycolysis (lactate production) was also inhibited by these treatments, the importance of any mitochondrial ATP production could not be assessed. A negative Pasteur effect would make chondrocytes particularly liable to suffer a shortage of energy under anoxic conditions. Incorporation of [35S]sulphate into proteoglycan was severely curtailed by treatments, such as anoxia, which decreased the intracellular concentration of ATP.

  16. The Role of Tissue Engineering in Articular Cartilage Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijie; Hu, Jerry; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair and regeneration continue to be largely intractable due to the poor regenerative properties of this tissue. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to repair, regenerate, and/or improve injured or diseased articular cartilage functionality, has evoked intense interest and holds great potential for improving articular cartilage therapy. This review provides an overall description of the current state and progress in articular cartilage repair and regeneration. Traditional therapies and related problems are introduced. More importantly, a variety of promising cell sources, biocompatible tissue engineered scaffolds, scaffoldless techniques, growth factors, and mechanical stimuli used in current articular cartilage tissue engineering are reviewed. Finally, the technical and regulatory challenges of articular cartilage tissue engineering and possible future directions are discussed. PMID:20201770

  17. Datação do disco galáctico pela nucleocosmocronologia do [Th/Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Peloso, E. F.; da Silva, L.; Arany-Prado, L. I.

    2003-08-01

    A nucleocosmocronologia emprega abundâncias de nuclídeos radioativos na datação de escalas de tempo astrofísicas. O 232Th é um nuclídeo radioativo com meia-vida de 14 Gano, enquanto que os dois isótopos mais abundantes do Eu são estáveis. O decaimento radioativo do Th modifica as razões de abundâncias [Th/Eu], fornecendo assim um meio de sondar a escala de formação das populações estelares. O objetivo deste trabalho é averiguar a possibilidade de estimar uma idade para o disco Galáctico através da nucleocosmocronologia do [Th/Eu] e investigar o nível de incerteza associado a esta estimativa. Para tanto, foi selecionada uma amostra de 20 estrelas anãs ou subgigantes de tipos espectrais F5 a G9, com -1,00 £ [Fe/H] £ +0,30 e idade(Gano) £ 13. As abundâncias de Th e Eu foram obtidas por síntese espectral das linhas localizadas em 4019,1 Å e 4129,7 Å, respectivamente. Uma comparação destas abundâncias com outros resultados da literatura demonstra que nossos valores apresentam dispersão 2 a 3 vezes menor que qualquer trabalho anterior. Os parâmetros atmosféricos e abundâncias dos elementos que contaminam as regiões espectrais destas linhas foram determinados por nós, de maneira totalmente autoconsistente, através de análise espectral detalhada diferencial em relação ao Sol. As idades estelares individuais foram determinadas através de curvas isócronas teóricas no diagrama HR. Foi realizada, então, uma análise cronológica dos gráficos [Th/Eu] vs. [Fe/H] e [Th/Eu] vs. idade. Os dados estelares foram comparados a curvas calculadas para 3 idades do disco Galáctico - 9, 12, 15 Gano - e foi estudada a sensibilidade à idade assumida no cálculo do ajuste destas curvas aos dados. Estas curvas foram calculadas com base num modelo analítico de evolução química da Galáxia que leva em consideração a formação de refugos, que são compostos pelos remanescentes da evolução estelar, pelos resíduos da formação de estrelas de

  18. Application of stem cells for articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Nathaniel S; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue lacking self-regeneration capacity upon lesion. Current surgical intervention by application of in vitro-expanded autologous chondrocytes transplantation procedure is associated with several disadvantages, including donor-site morbidity and inferior fibrocartilage formation at the defect site. However, recent advancements in tissue engineering have provided notable strategies for stem cell-based therapies and articular cartilage tissue engineering. In this review, we discuss the current strategies to engineer cartilage tissues from adult stem cells and human embryonic stem cell-derived cells. The characteristics of adult stem cells, the microenvironmental control of cell fate determination, and the limitation imposed by the intrinsic nature of stem cells are discussed. The strategy to commit the stem cells for functional cartilage tissues in vivo is also discussed.

  19. Structural and metabolic changes in articular cartilage induced by iodoacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, J.; Hoedt-Schmidt, S.; Kalbhen, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The chemically induced injury to articular cartilage, caused by two successive intra-articular injections of sodium iodoacetate, has been used in studies on the effects of anti-inflammatory and of potentially chondroprotective agents. It has been assumed that the injurious effects are caused by inhibition of the glycolytic pathway. In the present study this inhibition has been shown to be greater than expected from in vitro studies, and to influence equally other oxidative pathways. However, the response is clearly not a simple one in that some of the surface chondrocytes, and synovial lining cells in close proximity to the cartilage, show virtually no inhibition. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1390193

  20. 3D braid scaffolds for regeneration of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyunchul; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Park, Sook Young; Huh, Jeong Eun; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2014-06-01

    Regenerating articular cartilage in vivo from cultured chondrocytes requires that the cells be cultured and implanted within a biocompatible, biodegradable scaffold. Such scaffolds must be mechanically stable; otherwise chondrocytes would not be supported and patients would experience severe pain. Here we report a new 3D braid scaffold that matches the anisotropic (gradient) mechanical properties of natural articular cartilage and is permissive to cell cultivation. To design an optimal structure, the scaffold unit cell was mathematically modeled and imported into finite element analysis. Based on this analysis, a 3D braid structure with gradient axial yarn distribution was designed and manufactured using a custom-built braiding machine. The mechanical properties of the 3D braid scaffold were evaluated and compared with simulated results, demonstrating that a multi-scale approach consisting of unit cell modeling and continuum analysis facilitates design of scaffolds that meet the requirements for mechanical compatibility with tissues. PMID:24556323

  1. Molecular conformational changes in articular cartilage using NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Justin; Schmidt, Walter

    2004-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is used to study the conformational changes of the collagen and glycosaminoglycan molecules in bovine articular cartilage. Molecular conformation will change with the charge on each molecule. The charge on each molecule varies spatially throughout the cartilage. For a given point in space, the charge on each molecule can be screened by placing the cartilage in an increasingly ionic environment. The conformational changes are noted through changes in the chemical shifts in the NMR spectrum as a function of salt concentration.

  2. The effects of exercise on human articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Eckstein, F; Hudelmaier, M; Putz, R

    2006-01-01

    The effects of exercise on articular hyaline articular cartilage have traditionally been examined in animal models, but until recently little information has been available on human cartilage. Magnetic resonance imaging now permits cartilage morphology and composition to be analysed quantitatively in vivo. This review briefly describes the methodological background of quantitative cartilage imaging and summarizes work on short-term (deformational behaviour) and long-term (functional adaptation) effects of exercise on human articular cartilage. Current findings suggest that human cartilage deforms very little in vivo during physiological activities and recovers from deformation within 90 min after loading. Whereas cartilage deformation appears to become less with increasing age, sex and physical training status do not seem to affect in vivo deformational behaviour. There is now good evidence that cartilage undergoes some type of atrophy (thinning) under reduced loading conditions, such as with postoperative immobilization and paraplegia. However, increased loading (as encountered by elite athletes) does not appear to be associated with increased average cartilage thickness. Findings in twins, however, suggest a strong genetic contribution to cartilage morphology. Potential reasons for the inability of cartilage to adapt to mechanical stimuli include a lack of evolutionary pressure and a decoupling of mechanical competence and tissue mass. PMID:16637874

  3. Repair and tissue engineering techniques for articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Eleftherios A.; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Malizos, Konstantinos N.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Chondral and osteochondral lesions due to injury or other pathology commonly result in the development of osteoarthritis, eventually leading to progressive total joint destruction. Although current progress suggests that biologic agents can delay the advancement of deterioration, such drugs are incapable of promoting tissue restoration. The limited ability of articular cartilage to regenerate renders joint arthroplasty an unavoidable surgical intervention. This Review describes current, widely used clinical repair techniques for resurfacing articular cartilage defects; short-term and long-term clinical outcomes of these techniques are discussed. Also reviewed is a developmental pipeline of regenerative biological products that over the next decade could revolutionize joint care by functionally healing articular cartilage. These products include cell-based and cell-free materials such as autologous and allogeneic cell-based approaches and multipotent and pluripotent stem-cell-based techniques. Central to these efforts is the prominent role that tissue engineering has in translating biological technology into clinical products; therefore, concomitant regulatory processes are also discussed. PMID:25247412

  4. Genesis and morphogenesis of limb synovial joints and articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Decker, Rebekah S; Koyama, Eiki; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Limb synovial joints are intricate structures composed of articular cartilage, synovial membranes, ligaments and an articular capsule. Together, these tissues give each joint its unique shape, organization and biomechanical function. Articular cartilage itself is rather complex and organized in distinct zones, including the superficial zone that produces lubricants and contains stem/progenitor cells. For many years there has been great interest in deciphering the mechanisms by which the joints form and come to acquire such unique structural features and diversity. Decades ago, classic embryologists discovered that the first overt sign of joint formation at each prescribed limb site was the appearance of a dense and compact population of mesenchymal cells collectively called the interzone. Work carried out since then by several groups has provided evidence that the interzone cells actively participate in joint tissue formation over developmental time. This minireview provides a succinct but comprehensive description of the many important recent advances in this field of research. These include studies using various conditional reporter mice to genetically trace and track the origin, fate and possible function of joint progenitor cells; studies on the involvement and roles in signaling pathways and transcription factors in joint cell determination and functioning; and studies using advanced methods of gene expression analyses to uncover novel genetic determinants of joint formation and diversity. The overall advances are impressive, and the findings are not only of obvious interest and importance but also have major implications in the conception of future translational medicine tools to repair and regenerate defective, overused or aging joints.

  5. DEXAMETHASONE PROMOTES CPPD CRYSTAL FORMATION BY ARTICULAR CHONDROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, Mark; Mitton, Elizabeth; Muth, Emily; Rosenthal, Ann K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals (CPPD) are commonly found in osteoarthritic joints and correlate with a poor prognosis. Intra-articular corticosteroids, such as dexamethasone (Dxm), are commonly used therapies for osteoarthritis with or without CPPD deposition. Dxm has variable effects in mineralization models. We investigated the effects of Dxm on CPPD crystal formation in a well established tissue culture model. Methods Porcine articular chondrocytes were incubated with ATP to generate CPPD crystals. Chondrocytes incubated with or without ATP were exposed to 1–100 nM Dxm in the presence of 45Ca. Mineralization was measured by 45Ca uptake in the cell layer. We also investigated the effect of Dxm on mineralization-regulating enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase, NTPPPH and transglutaminase. Results Dxm significantly increased ATP-induced mineralization by articular chondrocytes. While alkaline phosphatase and NTPPPH activities were unchanged by Dxm, transglutaminase activity increased in a clear dose responsive manner. Levels of factor XIIIA mRNA and protein were increased by Dxm, while type II Tgase protein was unchanged. Transglutaminase inhibitors suppressed Dxm-induced increases in CPPD crystal formation. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential for Dxm to contribute to pathologic mineralization in cartilage and reinforce a central role for the transglutaminase enzymes in CPPD crystal formation. PMID:19132782

  6. A vision on the future of articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Cucchiarini, M; Madry, H; Guilak, F; Saris, D B; Stoddart, M J; Koon Wong, M; Roughley, P

    2014-05-06

    An AO Foundation (Davos, Switzerland) sponsored workshop "Cell Therapy in Cartilage Repair" from the Symposium "Where Science meets Clinics" (September 5-7, 2013, Davos) gathered leaders from medicine, science, industry, and regulatory organisations to debate the vision of cell therapy in articular cartilage repair and the measures that could be taken to narrow the gap between vision and current practice. Cell-based therapy is already in clinical use to enhance the repair of cartilage lesions, with procedures such as microfracture and articular chondrocyte implantation. However, even though long term follow up is good from a clinical perspective and some of the most rigorous randomised controlled trials in the regenerative medicine/orthopaedics field show beneficial effect, none of these options have proved successful in restoring the original articular cartilage structure and functionality in patients so far. With the remarkable recent advances in experimental research in cell biology (new sources for chondrocytes, stem cells), molecular biology (growth factors, genes), biomaterials, biomechanics, and translational science, a combined effort between scientists and clinicians with broad expertise may allow development of an improved cell therapy for cartilage repair. This position paper describes the current state of the art in the field to help define a procedure adapted to the clinical situation for upcoming translation in the patient.

  7. Depth Dependence of Shear Properties in Articular Cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Mark; Gleghorn, Jason; Bonassar, Lawrence; Cohen, Itai

    2007-03-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly complex and heterogeneous material in its structure, composition and mechanical behavior. Understanding these spatial variations is a critical step in designing replacement tissue and developing methods to diagnose and treat tissue affected by damage or disease. Existing techniques in particle image velocimetry (PIV) have been used to map the shear properties of complex materials; however, these methods have yet to be applied to understanding shear behavior in cartilage. In this talk, we will show that confocal microscopy in conjunction with PIV techniques can be used to determine the depth dependence of the shear properties of articular cartilage. We will show that the shear modulus of this tissue varies by over an order of magnitude over its depth, with the least stiff region located about 200 microns from the surface. Furthermore, our data indicate that the shear strain profile of articular cartilage is sensitive to both the degree of compression and the total applied shear strain. In particular, we find that cartilage strain stiffens most dramatically in a region 200-500 microns below the surface. Finally, we will describe a physical model that accounts for this behavior by taking into account the local buckling of collagen fibers just below the cartilage surface and present second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging data addressing the collagen orientation before and after shear.

  8. Effects of vimentin disruption on the mechanoresponses of articular chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Yin, Li; Song, Xiongbo; Yang, Hao; Ren, Xiang; Gong, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is subjected to repetitive mechanical loading during life time. As the only cellular component of articular cartilage, chondrocytes play a key role in the mechanotransduction within this tissue. The mechanoresponses of chondrocytes are largely determined by the cytoskeleton. Vimentin intermediate filaments, one of the major cytoskeletal components, have been shown to regulate chondrocyte phenotype. However, the contribution of vimentin in chondrocyte mechanoresponses remains less studied. In this study, we seeded goat articular chondrocytes on a soft polyacrylamide gel, and disrupted the vimentin cytoskeleton using acrylamide. Then we applied a transient stretch or compression to the cells, and measured the changes of cellular stiffness and traction forces using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry and Traction Force Microscopy, respectively. In addition, to study the effects of vimentin disruption on the intracellular force generation, we treated the cells with a variety of reagents that are known to increase or decrease cytoskeletal tension. We found that, after a compression, the contractile moment and cellular stiffness were not affected in untreated chondrocytes, but were decreased in vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes; after a stretch, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes showed a lower level of fluidization-resolidification response compared to untreated cells. Moreover, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes didn't show much difference to control cells in responding to reagents that target actin and ROCK pathway, but showed a weaker response to histamine and isoproterenol. These findings confirmed chondrocyte vimentin as a major contributor in withstanding compressive loading, and its minor role in regulating cytoskeletal tension. PMID:26616052

  9. Effects of vimentin disruption on the mechanoresponses of articular chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Yin, Li; Song, Xiongbo; Yang, Hao; Ren, Xiang; Gong, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is subjected to repetitive mechanical loading during life time. As the only cellular component of articular cartilage, chondrocytes play a key role in the mechanotransduction within this tissue. The mechanoresponses of chondrocytes are largely determined by the cytoskeleton. Vimentin intermediate filaments, one of the major cytoskeletal components, have been shown to regulate chondrocyte phenotype. However, the contribution of vimentin in chondrocyte mechanoresponses remains less studied. In this study, we seeded goat articular chondrocytes on a soft polyacrylamide gel, and disrupted the vimentin cytoskeleton using acrylamide. Then we applied a transient stretch or compression to the cells, and measured the changes of cellular stiffness and traction forces using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry and Traction Force Microscopy, respectively. In addition, to study the effects of vimentin disruption on the intracellular force generation, we treated the cells with a variety of reagents that are known to increase or decrease cytoskeletal tension. We found that, after a compression, the contractile moment and cellular stiffness were not affected in untreated chondrocytes, but were decreased in vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes; after a stretch, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes showed a lower level of fluidization-resolidification response compared to untreated cells. Moreover, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes didn't show much difference to control cells in responding to reagents that target actin and ROCK pathway, but showed a weaker response to histamine and isoproterenol. These findings confirmed chondrocyte vimentin as a major contributor in withstanding compressive loading, and its minor role in regulating cytoskeletal tension.

  10. [Present status and perspective of articular cartilage regeneration].

    PubMed

    Wakitani, Shigeyuki

    2007-05-01

    Because the capacity of articular cartilage for repair is limited, defects are a major clinical problem, and there is at present no satisfactory clinical technique to regenerate cartilage defects. Current clinical practice involves the bone stimulation technique, which breaks subchondral bone to facilitate cartilage repair from bone marrow derived cells and cytokines. This consists of multiple perforations, abrasions, and micro-fractures. However, with this procedure, cartilage defects are repaired with fibrocartilage, which is known to be biochemically and biomechanically different from normal hyaline cartilage and degeneration occurs in the reparative tissue. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for repair of human articular cartilage was reported in 1994, and approved by the USA Food and Drug Association in 1997. This procedure has been performed for more than 20000 people all over the world, but its effectiveness is still controversial. Mosaic plasty was explored in the 1990s. Using this procedure, we can repair defects with hyaline cartilage, but the donor site morbidity is unsolved. To explore a new method for cartilage repair, we transplanted autologous culture-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal cells into articular cartilage defects. Clinical symptoms were improred but the repair cartilage was not hyaline cartilage. Further improvement is required. Many investigations have been made in the search for better means of repair, including gene transduction and the addition of growth factors during cell culture. In addition to bone marrow mesenchymal cells, synovial cells, adipocytes, muscle cells, etc. have been evaluated.

  11. Management of articular cartilage defects of the knee.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Asheesh; Feeley, Brian T; Williams, Riley J

    2010-04-01

    Articular cartilage has a poor intrinsic capacity for healing. The goal of surgical techniques to repair articular cartilage injuries is to achieve the regeneration of organized hyaline cartilage. Microfracture and other bone marrow stimulation techniques involve penetration of the subchondral plate in order to recruit mesenchymal stem cells into the chondral defect. The formation of a stable clot that fills the lesion is of paramount importance to achieve a successful outcome. Mosaicplasty is a viable option with which to address osteochondral lesions of the knee and offers the advantage of transplanting hyaline cartilage. However, limited graft availability and donor site morbidity are concerns. Transplantation of an osteochondral allograft consisting of intact, viable articular cartilage and its underlying subchondral bone offers the ability to address large osteochondral defects of the knee, including those involving an entire compartment. The primary theoretical advantage of autologous chondrocyte implantation is the development of hyaline-like cartilage rather than fibrocartilage in the defect, which presumably leads to better long-term outcomes and longevity of the healing tissue. Use of synthetic scaffolds is a potentially attractive alternative to traditional cartilage procedures as they are readily available and, unlike allogeneic tissue transplants, are associated with no risk of disease transmission. Their efficacy, however, has not been proven clinically.

  12. En bloc joystick reduction of a comminuted intra-articular distal radius fracture: a technical trick.

    PubMed

    Siegall, Evan; Ziran, Bruce

    2014-08-01

    A patient with a 1-month-old intra-articular distal radius fracture (treated closed in a splint) presented with an unacceptable degree of pain and stiffness caused by shortening and dorsal angulation of the distal radius. The fracture was comminuted with 4 or 5 distinct fragments, several involving the articular surface. Surgical correction was attempted. During the procedure, it was noted that, though the distal radius was shortened and angulated, there was actually acceptable congruity of the articular surface itself, despite the intra-articular nature of the fracture. Bone quality was poor and healing incomplete. Thus, we were concerned the currently congruous articular surface would fall apart with manipulation. Given this situation, we used a unique scaffolding technique with Kirschner wires placed in perpendicular fashion to both hold the articular surface intact and manipulate it en bloc. This technique is a simple way to turn a complex fracture into an easily reduced 2-part fracture.

  13. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea treated with osteochondral autograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Leeman, Joshua J; Motamedi, Daria; Wildman-Tobriner, Ben; O’Donnell, Richard J; Link, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma can present a diagnostic challenge both clinically and with imaging because it presents differently from the classic cortical osteoid osteoma. Given the lesion’s proximity to overlying cartilage, the patient underwent resection of the lesion with osteochondral autograft transplantation at the surgical defect. A comprehensive literature review and discussion of intra-articular osteoma will be provided. PMID:27761182

  14. Intra-articular haemangioma of the knee in the skeletally immature.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kai Ann; Singh, Vivek Ajit; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi

    2013-11-01

    Intra-articular haemangioma is a rare and uncommon condition that sometimes presents in infants. The lesion can be a diagnostic challenge, with misdiagnosis often leading to delayed diagnosis and treatment. It is essential to establish and treat the condition early, as intra-articular haemangioma can lead to destruction of the joint and secondary arthrosis. Herein, we report the case of a five-year-old boy who presented with intra-articular haemangioma and discuss the management of his condition.

  15. Autologous chondrocyte repair of an articular defect in the humeral head.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Fox, Jeff A; Freeman, Kevin B; Joy, Edward

    2002-10-01

    Articular cartilage lesions remain a difficult problem for the patient and physician. A variety of procedures and treatments have been proposed to lessen symptoms and restore the articular surface. The knee joint has been the focus of the vast majority of these cartilage restoration procedures. Articular cartilage lesions of the humerus are significantly less common, and their management remains poorly defined. This paper presents a case report of a young athlete with a large full-thickness articular cartilage defect of the proximal humerus and subsequent treatment using autologous chondrocyte implantation.

  16. Condições físicas do disco de acréscimo da nova-anã V4140 SGR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, B.; Baptista, R.

    2003-08-01

    Discos de acréscimo são aparatos cósmicos que permitem que matéria seja eficientemente acrescida sobre uma fonte compacta pela remoção de momento angular via tensões viscosas enquanto transforma a energia potencial gravitacional em calor e, posteriormente, em radiação. Sistemas binários semi-ligados, como Variáveis Cataclísmicas (VCs) não-magnéticas, são talvez os melhores ambientes encontrados para o estudo da física desses discos de acréscimo. O desenvolvimento de técnicas de imageamento indireto, como o mapeamento por eclipses (MME) e a tomografia Doppler, permitiu avanços importantes na compreensão da física dos processos de acréscimo desses sistemas. V4140 Sagitarii é uma VC eclipsante de curto período orbital (~ 90 min) que não havia sido classificada como nova-anã ou polar. Neste trabalho apresentamos a análise do mapeamento por eclipse feito com dados de fotometria CCD nas bandas B, V e R de V4140 Sgr realizada no LNA. O objeto foi observado no declínio de erupção em julho de 1992 e em erupção em julho de 2001, isso indicou a classificação do sistema como uma nova-anã. A análise, feita sobre os mapas já apresentados em trabalho anterior, apresenta (i) diagrama cor-cor, que indica uma emissão opticamente espessa nas partes internas do disco em quiescência (R < RL1); (ii) diagrama cor-magnitude, usado para inferir uma distância de 600 +/- 10 pc ao sistema; (iii) a distribuição radial de temperatura observada que concorda com a lei de disco espesso em estado estacionário TµR-3/4, com temperaturas em torno de 10000 K e 3000 K ns partes internas e externas do disco em quiescência, respectivamente; (iv) a evolução da distribuição de temperatura no declínio de erupção; (v) estimativa da transferência de massa de 109.9+/-0.1 M¤/ano em quiescência, similar àquelas observadas em novas-like. O sistema é comparado à outras novas-anãs (e.g. OY Car e Z Cha) em quiescência e erupção, mostrando-se tratar um

  17. Intra-Articular Injections of Polyphenols Protect Articular Cartilage from Inflammation-Induced Degradation: Suggesting a Potential Role in Cartilage Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Venkatachalam; Madhan, Balaraman; Tiku, Moti L

    2015-01-01

    Arthritic diseases, such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, inflict an enormous health care burden on society. Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease with high prevalence among older people, and rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune inflammatory disease, both lead to irreversible structural and functional damage to articular cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of polyphenols such as catechin, quercetin, epigallocatechin gallate, and tannic acid, on crosslinking type II collagen and the roles of these agents in managing in vivo articular cartilage degradation. The thermal, enzymatic, and physical stability of bovine articular cartilage explants following polyphenolic treatment were assessed for efficiency. Epigallocatechin gallate and tannic acid-treated explants showed >12 °C increase over native cartilage in thermal stability, thereby confirming cartilage crosslinking. Polyphenol-treated cartilage also showed a significant reduction in the percentage of collagen degradation and the release of glycosaminoglycans against collagenase digestion, indicating the increase physical integrity and resistance of polyphenol crosslinked cartilage to enzymatic digestion. To examine the in vivo cartilage protective effects, polyphenols were injected intra-articularly before (prophylactic) and after (therapeutic) the induction of collagen-induced arthritis in rats. The hind paw volume and histomorphological scoring was done for cartilage damage. The intra-articular injection of epigallocatechin gallate and tannic acid did not significantly influence the time of onset or the intensity of joint inflammation. However, histomorphological scoring of the articular cartilage showed a significant reduction in cartilage degradation in prophylactic- and therapeutic-groups, indicating that intra-articular injections of polyphenols bind to articular cartilage and making it resistant to degradation despite ongoing inflammation. These studies establish

  18. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage Surface: Morphogens, Cells, and Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Ryosuke; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2015-10-01

    The articular cartilage is a well-organized tissue for smooth and friction-free joint movement for locomotion in animals and humans. Adult articular cartilage has a very low self-regeneration capacity due to its avascular nature. The regeneration of articular cartilage surface is critical to prevent the progression to osteoarthritis (OA). Although various joint resurfacing procedures in experimental articular cartilage defects have been developed, no standardized clinical protocol has yet been established. The three critical ingredients for tissue regeneration are morphogens and growth factors, cells, and scaffolds. The concepts based on the regeneration triad have been extensively investigated in animal models. However, these studies in animal models have demonstrated variable results and outcomes. An optimal animal model must precisely mimic and model the sequence of events in articular cartilage regeneration in human. In this article, the progress and remaining challenges in articular cartilage regeneration in animal models are reviewed. The role of individual morphogens and growth factors in cartilage regeneration has been investigated. In normal articular cartilage homeostasis, morphogens and growth factors function sequentially in tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cell-based repair of articular cartilage defects, performed with or without various growth factors and scaffolds, has been widely attempted in animal models. Stem cells, including embryonic and adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, have also been reported as attractive cell sources for articular cartilage surface regeneration. Several studies with regard to scaffolds have been advanced, including recent investigations based on nanomaterials, functional mechanocompatible scaffolds, multilayered scaffolds, and extracellular matrix scaffolds for articular cartilage surface regeneration. Continuous refinement of animal models in chondral and osteochondral defects provide opportunities

  19. Importance of reference gene selection for articular cartilage mechanobiology studies

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sabah, A.; Stadnik, P.; Gilbert, S.J.; Duance, V.C.; Blain, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Identification of genes differentially expressed in mechano-biological pathways in articular cartilage provides insight into the molecular mechanisms behind initiation and/or progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Quantitative PCR (qPCR) is commonly used to measure gene expression, and is reliant on the use of reference genes for normalisation. Appropriate validation of reference gene stability is imperative for accurate data analysis and interpretation. This study determined in vitro reference gene stability in articular cartilage explants and primary chondrocytes subjected to different compressive loads and tensile strain, respectively. Design The expression of eight commonly used reference genes (18s, ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, PPIA, RPL4, SDHA and YWHAZ) was determined by qPCR and data compared using four software packages (comparative delta-Ct method, geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper). Calculation of geometric means of the ranked weightings was carried out using RefFinder. Results Appropriate reference gene(s) for normalisation of mechanically-regulated transcript levels in articular cartilage tissue or isolated chondrocytes were dependent on experimental set-up. SDHA, YWHAZ and RPL4 were the most stable genes whilst glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and to a lesser extent Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), showed variable expression in response to load, demonstrating their unsuitability in such in vitro studies. The effect of using unstable reference genes to normalise the expression of aggrecan (ACAN) and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) resulted in inaccurate quantification of these mechano-sensitive genes and erroneous interpretation/conclusions. Conclusion This study demonstrates that commonly used ‘reference genes’ may be unsuitable for in vitro cartilage chondrocyte mechanobiology studies, reinforcing the principle that careful validation of reference genes is essential prior to each experiment to

  20. The collagen fibril organization in human articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Minns, R J; Steven, F S

    1977-01-01

    In this scanning electron microscopic study blocks of collagen fibrils were prepared from human articular cartilage, using two techinques which selectively removed either the proteoglycans alone, or both the proteoglycans and the collagen fibrils, of the non-calcified cartilage layer. Amino acid analysis of the fibrils confirmed the purity of the collagen after proteoglycan extraction. The cartilage was scanned in four different ways: (1) normal to the articular surface, (2) in superficial sections, (3) on surfaces of blocks which had been broken in planes parallel to artificial splits make by the insertion of a pin, and (4) on fracture surfaces which traversed the calcified cartilage and the subchondral bone. Five features of the organization of the collagen fibrils were specially noted: (1) Individual fibrils within the trabeculae joined to form small fibre bundles which became grouped into larger bundles at the calcified/uncalcified interface. (2) Fibrils in the deep and middle zones which, exhibiting the characteristic surface periodicity of collagen, were generally oriented towars the articular surface in large bundles approximately 55 micronm across. (3) In the superficial zone, fibrils ran parallel to the surface. (4) The surface fibrils had random orientation, even at the bases of empty lacunae vacated by chondrocytes during specimen preparation. (5) The collagen fibrils of the lacunar walls appeared to be thinner and more closely packed than thos between the lacunae. The fine collagen fibrils associated with the lacunar walls were frequently observed to pass through a large lacunar space, resulting in the formation of two or more compartments, each of which was presumably filled with a chondrocyte in the living cartilage. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:870478

  1. Biochemical composition of the superficial layer of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Crockett, R; Grubelnik, A; Roos, S; Dora, C; Born, W; Troxler, H

    2007-09-15

    To gain more information on the mechanism of lubrication in articular joints, the superficial layer of bovine articular cartilage was mechanically removed in a sheet of ice that formed on freezing the cartilage. Freeze-dried samples contained low concentrations of chondroitin sulphate and protein. Analysis of the protein by SDS PAGE showed that the composition of the sample was comparable to that of synovial fluid (SF). Attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy of the dried residue indicated that the sample contained mostly hyaluronan. Moreover, ATR-IR spectroscopy of the upper layer of the superficial layer, adsorbed onto silicon, showed the presence of phospholipids. A gel could be formed by mixing hyaluronan and phosphatidylcholine in water with mechanical properties similar to those of the superficial layer on cartilage. Much like the superficial layer of natural cartilage, the surface of this gel became hydrophobic on drying out. Thus, it is proposed that the superficial layer forms from hyaluronan and phospholipids, which associate by hydrophobic interactions between the alkyl chains of the phospholipids and the hydrophobic faces of the disaccharide units in hyaluronan. This layer is permeable to material from the SF and the cartilage, as shown by the presence of SF proteins and chondroitin sulphate. As the cartilage dries out after removal from the joint, the phospholipids migrate towards the surface of the superficial layer to reduce the surface tension. It is also proposed that the highly efficient lubrication in articular joints can, at least in part, be attributed to the ability of the superficial layer to adsorb and hold water on the cartilage surface, thus creating a highly viscous boundary protection.

  2. [Symptomatic and evolutive characteristics of articular destruction noted in chondrocalcinosis].

    PubMed

    Villiaumey, J; Larget-Piet, B; Menza, C D; Rotterdam, M

    1975-04-01

    Referring to 17 personal observations, the authors endeavour to clarify the main clinical and radiological traits of the destructive arthropathies occuring in patients suffering from diffuse, articular chondrocalcinosis. These arthropathies appear to be relatively frequent and older, obese women suffering from demineralization are more readily affected. The knees, coxo-femoral joints and the shoulders are principally concerned, and to a lesser extent the wrists, the trapezo-metacarpal joints and even the spine. The lesions can be polyarticular and symmetrical, be grouped in more or less random oligoarticular combinations or may occur in only a single joint space. Clinically, these destructive arthropathies give rise to severe pain and very marked functional impotence. The joints are swollen without any signs of inflammation. The joint movements are painful, stiff, and limited. Axial deviations are frequent. Radiologically, the lesions occur throughout the cartilage sheath, the inter-chondrial bone, and in the underlying epiphysary bone, in the form of massive geodes and massives loss of tissue substance. On the other hand, the process of reconstruction is very limited. In the patients studied, chondrocalcinosis was proved by the very characteristic pictures of calcic incrustations of the cartilage sheath and the fibro-cartilages, by the discovery of micro-crystals of calcium pyrophosphate in the articular fluid or, at biopsy, by the thickness of the synovial fluid. This chondrocalcinosis was primary in the cases. These destructive lesions were easily distinguishable from nervous or diabetic osteo-arthropathies, and from tumoral, infectious, rheumatic, or vascular changes. Thus, chondrocalcinosis is among the most common causes of osteo-articular destruction. It should be looked for systematically in all patients with lytic arthropathies of unknown etiology.

  3. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Emi; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte

  4. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Asmar, A; Barrett-Jolley, R; Werner, A; Kelly, R; Stacey, M

    2016-04-01

    Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca(2+) activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  5. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, A.; Barrett-Jolley, R.; Werner, A.; Kelly, R.; Stacey, M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca2+ activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  6. Extra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis Eroding and Penetrating the Acromion.

    PubMed

    El Rassi, George; Matta, Jihad; Hijjawi, Ayman; Khair, Ousama Abou; Fahs, Sara

    2015-10-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder is an uncommon disorder. It usually affects the glenohumeral joint and is characterized by metaplasia of the synovium leading to the formation of osteochondral loose bodies. Few cases of extra-articular subacromial synovial chondromatosis involving the rotator cuff tendon have been reported in the literature. The treatment of previously reported cases consisted of open bursectomy and removal of loose bodies. We report a case of subacromial synovial chondromatosis without rotator cuff involvement but with severe erosion and fracture of the acromion. Treatment consisted of shoulder arthroscopy to remove all loose bodies, total bursectomy, and debridement of the acromion. Potential benefits of arthroscopy were also evaluated. PMID:26697302

  7. Extra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis Eroding and Penetrating the Acromion

    PubMed Central

    El Rassi, George; Matta, Jihad; Hijjawi, Ayman; Khair, Ousama Abou; Fahs, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder is an uncommon disorder. It usually affects the glenohumeral joint and is characterized by metaplasia of the synovium leading to the formation of osteochondral loose bodies. Few cases of extra-articular subacromial synovial chondromatosis involving the rotator cuff tendon have been reported in the literature. The treatment of previously reported cases consisted of open bursectomy and removal of loose bodies. We report a case of subacromial synovial chondromatosis without rotator cuff involvement but with severe erosion and fracture of the acromion. Treatment consisted of shoulder arthroscopy to remove all loose bodies, total bursectomy, and debridement of the acromion. Potential benefits of arthroscopy were also evaluated. PMID:26697302

  8. Biochemical effects of estrogen on articular cartilage in ovariectomized sheep.

    PubMed

    Turner, A S; Athanasiou, K A; Zhu, C F; Alvis, M R; Bryant, H U

    1997-01-01

    Cartilage is a sex-hormone-sensitive tissue but the role of estrogen in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) remains controversial. In this study, intrinsic material properties and thickness of articular cartilage of the knee joint of ovariectomized (OVX) and estrogen-treated sheep were measured. Skeletally mature ewes (N = 36, same breed, same housing 4-5 years old) were divided into; sham treated (n = 9), OVX (N = 13), OVX plus one estradiol implant (OVXE; N = 10) and OVX plus two estradiol implants (OVX2E; N = 4). Twelve months following sham procedure or OVX, sheep were euthanized and articular cartilage from a total of 216 points in the left femorotibial (knee) joints was tested for aggregate modulus, Poisson's ratio, permeability, thickness and shear modulus (six sites per sheep). When all of the sites in each knee were grouped together, OVX had a significant effect on articular cartilage. The sham cartilage of all sites grouped together had a larger aggregate modulus (P = 0.001) and a larger shear modulus (P = 0.054) than the OVX tissue. No statistically significant differences were seen for permeability and thickness between OVX, sham, OVXE and OVX2E. Differences existed in biomechanical properties at the different sites that were tested. Overall, no one location tended to be lowest or highest for all variables. This biomechanical study suggests that OVX may have a detrimental effect on the intrinsic material properties of the articular cartilage of the knee, even though the cartilage of the OVX animals appeared normal. Treatment with estradiol implants ameliorated these deleterious effects and may have helped maintain the tissue's structural integrity. Our study supports epidemiological studies of OA in women after menopause. The protective effect of estrogen and it's therapeutic effect remain to be further defined. This model may allow the relationship of estrogen and estrogen antagonists to be studied in greater detail, and may be valuable for the

  9. Microscale surface friction of articular cartilage in early osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Jane; Amrein, Matthias W; Matyas, John R

    2013-09-01

    Articular cartilage forms the articulating surface of long bones and facilitates energy dissipation upon loading as well as joint lubrication and wear resistance. In normal cartilage, boundary lubrication between thin films at the cartilage surface reduces friction in the absence of interstitial fluid pressurization and fluid film lubrication by synovial fluid. Inadequate boundary lubrication is associated with degenerative joint conditions such as osteoarthritis (OA), but relations between OA and surface friction, lubrication and wear in boundary lubrication are not well defined. The purpose of the present study was to measure microscale boundary mode friction of the articular cartilage surface in an in vivo experimental model to better understand changes in cartilage surface friction in early OA. Cartilage friction was measured on the articular surface by atomic force microscopy (AFM) under applied loads ranging from 0.5 to 5 μN. Microscale AFM friction analyses revealed depth dependent changes within the top-most few microns of the cartilage surface in this model of early OA. A significant increase of nearly 50% was observed in the mean engineering friction coefficient for OA cartilage at the 0.5 μN load level; no significant differences in friction coefficients were found under higher applied loads. Changes in cartilage surface morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy included cracking and roughening of the surface indicative of disruption and wear accompanied by an apparent disintegration of the thin surface lamina from the underlying matrix. Immunohistochemical staining of lubricin - an important cartilage surface boundary lubricant - did not reveal differences in spatial distribution near the cartilage surface in OA compared to controls. The increase in friction at the 0.5 μN force level is interpreted to reflect changes in the interfacial mechanics of the thin surface lamina of articular cartilage: increased friction implies reduced

  10. Effect of passive motion on articular cartilage in rat osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jie; Liang, Jun; Wang, Yubin; Wang, Huifang

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of moderate passive motion on articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA) caused by knee fracture. Sprague-Dawley rats (age, 8 weeks) with knee fractures were used to construct rat knee early- and middle-stage OA models. The stages were fixed for three and six weeks, with 20 rats analyzed at each stage. The experimental groups were exercised daily for 15 m/min with a specified duration. Following the completion of exercise, the effects of proper passive motion on cartilage thickness, the Mankin rating, cartilage collagen matrix, proteoglycan content and the morphological structure of the cartilage in the rat OA models were measured at the various degenerative stages caused by knee fracture. The proteoglycan content of the cartilage matrix, type II collagen fibers and the number of cartilage cells undergoing apoptosis were semiquantified. For early- and middle-stage OA, the cartilage layers in the three- or six-week experimental groups were significantly thicker and the levels of proteoglycans and type II collagen fibers in the weight-bearing area of the cartilage were significantly higher when compared with the control groups (P<0.05). In addition, the Mankin ratings were lower and ligament tension was increased when compared with the control group (P<0.05). In the early-stage OA group, significantly decreased apoptotic rates (P<0.05) were observed in the three- and six-week experimental groups, however, no significant decrease was observed in the middle-stage OA group. In the early-stage OA rats, the thickness of the cartilage layer, as well as the levels of proteoglycans and type II collagen fibers, in the six-week experimental group, were significantly higher compared with the control and three-week subgroups, and a decreased apoptotic rate was observed (P<0.05). In the six-week experimental middle-stage OA group, significant differences were observed in the content of proteoglycans and type II collagen

  11. [Brucine chitosan thermosensitive hydrogel for intra-articular injection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Peng; Liu, Wen; Chen, Hong-Xuan; Cai, Bao-Chang

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a sustained release converse thermosensitive hydrogel for intra-articular injection using chitosan-glycerol-borax as matrix, its physical properties and biocompatibility were investigated. Taking gelation time and gelation condition as index, the influence of concentration of chitosan, ratio of chitosan to glycerol, pH on physical properties of hydrogel were investigated. And then the in vitro drug release, rheological properties and biocompatibility were studied. The thermosensitive hydrogel flows easily at room temperature and turns to gelation at body temperature, which can certainly prolong the release of drug and has good biocompatibility. PMID:22812012

  12. Intra-articular and Peri-articular Tumours and Tumour Mimics- What a Clinician and Onco-imaging Radiologist Should Know

    PubMed Central

    DHANDA, Sunita; QUEK, Swee Tian; BATHLA, Girish; JAGMOHAN, Pooja

    2014-01-01

    Definitive determination of the cause of articular swelling may be difficult based on just the clinical symptoms, physical examinations and laboratory tests. Joint disorders fall under the realms of rheumatology and general orthopaedics; however, patients with joint conditions manifesting primarily as intra-articular and peri-articular soft tissue swelling may at times be referred to an orthopaedic oncology department with suspicion of a tumour. In such a situation, an onco-radiologist needs to think beyond the usual neoplastic lesions and consider the diagnoses of various non-neoplastic arthritic conditions that may be clinically masquerading as masses. Differential diagnoses of articular lesions include infectious and non-infectious synovial proliferative processes, degenerative lesions, deposition diseases, vascular malformations, benign and malignant neoplasms and additional miscellaneous conditions. Many of these diseases have specific imaging findings. Knowledge of these radiological characteristics in an appropriate clinical context will allow for a more confident diagnosis. PMID:24876802

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa septic arthritis of knee after intra-articular ozone injection.

    PubMed

    Seyman, Derya; Ozen, Nevgun Sepin; Inan, Dilara; Ongut, Gozde; Ogunc, Dilara

    2012-07-01

    We describe a case of septic arthritis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an immunocompetent patient following intra-articular ozone injection into the knee. To the best of our knowledge, and after considering the current literature,we believe this case is unique as no other reports of septic arthritis caused by P. aeruginosa following intra-articular ozone injection has been made.

  14. [Systematization of the articular surfaces of the carpometacarpal joints (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    el Bacha, A; Maillot, C

    1977-01-01

    A study, done on 100 hands, of the systematization of the articular surfaces of the carpometacarpal joints, clearly delineates the variability of circumference, dimesions, and relief of the articular facets. An attempt to draw general conclusions from this morphological study, in terms of arthrokinetics, leads to an understanding of the nature of the joints and the movements that are performed at this site.

  15. In vivo bone tunnel remodeling in symptomatic patients after ACL reconstruction: a retrospective comparison of articular and extra-articular fixation

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Dominic T.; Rasch, Helmut; Hirschmann, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background there is only a paucity of studies dealing with bone remodeling within the tunnels after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of tendon graft type and surgical fixation technique on bone tunnel remodeling in patients with symptomatic knees after ACL reconstruction. Methods in a retrospective study 99mTc-HDP bone tracer uptake (BTU) in SPECT/CT of 57 knees with symptoms of pain and/or instability after ACL reconstruction was investigated. All 57 knees were subdivided according their anatomy (femur and tibia), fixation (articular versus extra-articular fixation) and graft types into eight groups: femoral-articular versus extra-articular fixation using bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) and hamstring autografts; tibial-articular versus extra-articular fixation using patellar tendon and hamstring autografts; BTU grading for each area of the localisation scheme were recorded. Tunnel diameter and length was measured in the CT scans. Results BTU was higher for the articular fixation in the femur and for the extra-articular fixation in the tibial tunnel. Patellar tendon graft fixation showed a significantly higher BTU in the superior-lateral and posterior-central area of the tibia, meaning the areas of the tibial tunnel near the entrance into the joint. Tunnel enlargement correlated significantly with increased BTU (p<0.05). Conclusion assessment of in vivo bone tunnel remodelling in symptomatic patients after ACL reconstruction revealed different patterns of BTU with regards to graft and fixation method. PMID:26958543

  16. Extra-articular hip impingement: a narrative review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Cheatham, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing subgroup of patients with poor outcomes after hip arthroscopy for intra-articular pathology suggesting unrecognized cause(s) of impingement may exist. Extra-articular hip impingement (EHI) is an emerging group of conditions that have been associated with intra-articular causes of impingement and may be an unrecognized source of pain. EHI is caused by abnormal contact between the extra-articular regions of the proximal femur and pelvis. This review discusses the most common forms for EHI including: central iliopsoas impingement, subspine impingement, ischiofemoral impingement, and greater trochanteric-pelvic impingement. The clinical presentation of each pathology will be discussed since EHI conditions share similar clinical features as the intra-articular pathology but also contain some unique characteristics. PMID:27069266

  17. Hydrogels for the Repair of Articular Cartilage Defects

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Suzanne A.; Lowman, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    The repair of articular cartilage defects remains a significant challenge in orthopedic medicine. Hydrogels, three-dimensional polymer networks swollen in water, offer a unique opportunity to generate a functional cartilage substitute. Hydrogels can exhibit similar mechanical, swelling, and lubricating behavior to articular cartilage, and promote the chondrogenic phenotype by encapsulated cells. Hydrogels have been prepared from naturally derived and synthetic polymers, as cell-free implants and as tissue engineering scaffolds, and with controlled degradation profiles and release of stimulatory growth factors. Using hydrogels, cartilage tissue has been engineered in vitro that has similar mechanical properties to native cartilage. This review summarizes the advancements that have been made in determining the potential of hydrogels to replace damaged cartilage or support new tissue formation as a function of specific design parameters, such as the type of polymer, degradation profile, mechanical properties and loading regimen, source of cells, cell-seeding density, controlled release of growth factors, and strategies to cause integration with surrounding tissue. Some key challenges for clinical translation remain, including limited information on the mechanical properties of hydrogel implants or engineered tissue that are necessary to restore joint function, and the lack of emphasis on the ability of an implant to integrate in a stable way with the surrounding tissue. Future studies should address the factors that affect these issues, while using clinically relevant cell sources and rigorous models of repair. PMID:21510824

  18. Quantitative proteomic profiling of human articular cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lourido, Lucía; Calamia, Valentina; Mateos, Jesús; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Fernández-Tajes, Juan; Blanco, Francisco J; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common rheumatic pathology and is characterized primarily by articular cartilage degradation. Despite its high prevalence, there is no effective therapy to slow disease progression or regenerate the damaged tissue. Therefore, new diagnostic and monitoring tests for OA are urgently needed, which would also promote the development of alternative therapeutic strategies. In the present study, we have performed an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of secretomes from healthy human articular cartilage explants, comparing their protein profile to those from unwounded (early disease) and wounded (advanced disease) zones of osteoarthritic tissue. This strategy allowed us to identify a panel of 76 proteins that are distinctively released by the diseased tissue. Clustering analysis allowed the classification of proteins according to their different profile of release from cartilage. Among these proteins, the altered release of osteoprotegerin (decreased in OA) and periostin (increased in OA), both involved in bone remodelling processes, was verified in further analyses. Moreover, periostin was also increased in the synovial fluid of OA patients. Altogether, the present work provides a novel insight into the mechanisms of human cartilage degradation and a number of new cartilage-characteristic proteins with possible biomarker value for early diagnosis and prognosis of OA.

  19. Articular to diaphyseal proportions of human and great ape metatarsals.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Damiano

    2010-10-01

    This study proposes a new way to use metatarsals to identify locomotor behavior of fossil hominins. Metatarsal head articular dimensions and diaphyseal strength in a sample of chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, and humans (n = 76) are used to explore the relationships of these parameters with different locomotor modes. Results show that ratios between metatarsal head articular proportions and diaphyseal strength of the hallucal and fifth metatarsal discriminate among extant great apes and humans based on their different locomotor modes. In particular, the hallucal and fifth metatarsal characteristics of humans are functionally related to the different ranges of motion and load patterns during stance phase in the forefoot of humans in bipedal locomotion. This method may be applicable to isolated fossil hominin metatarsals to provide new information relevant to debates regarding the evolution of human bipedal locomotion. The second to fourth metatarsals are not useful in distinguishing among hominoids. Further studies should concentrate on measuring other important qualitative and quantitative differences in the shape of the metatarsal head of hominoids that are not reflected in simple geometric reconstructions of the articulation, and gathering more forefoot kinematic data on great apes to better understand differences in range of motion and loading patterns of the metatarsals.

  20. Resurfacing Damaged Articular Cartilage to Restore Compressive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Stephanie; Donnelly, Patrick E.; Gittens, Jamila; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Surface damage to articular cartilage is recognized as the initial underlying process causing the loss of mechanical function in early-stage osteoarthritis. In this study, we developed structure-modifying treatments to potentially prevent, stabilize or reverse the loss in mechanical function. Various polymers (chondroitin sulfate, carboxymethylcellulose, sodium hyaluronate) and photoinitiators (riboflavin, irgacure 2959) were applied to the surface of collagenase-degraded cartilage and crosslinked in situ using UV light irradiation. While matrix permeability and deformation significantly increased following collagenase-induced degradation of the superficial zone, resurfacing using tyramine-substituted sodium hyaluronate and riboflavin decreased both values to a level comparable to that of intact cartilage. Repetitive loading of resurfaced cartilage showed minimal variation in the mechanical response over a 7 day period. Cartilage resurfaced using a low concentration of riboflavin had viable cells in all zones while a higher concentration resulted in a thin layer of cell death in the uppermost superficial zone. Our approach to repair surface damage initiates a new therapeutic advance in the treatment of injured articular cartilage with potential benefits that include enhanced mechanical properties, reduced susceptibility to enzymatic degradation and reduced adhesion of macrophages. PMID:25468298

  1. A nonlinear biphasic viscohyperelastic model for articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    García, José Jaime; Cortés, Daniel Humberto

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on articular cartilage have shown nonlinear stress-strain curves under finite deformations as well as intrinsic viscous effects of the solid phase. The aim of this study was to propose a nonlinear biphasic viscohyperelastic model that combines the intrinsic viscous effects of the proteoglycan matrix with a nonlinear hyperelastic constitutive equation. The proposed equation satisfies objectivity and reduces for uniaxial loading to a solid type viscous model in which the actions of the springs are represented by the hyperelastic function proposed by Holmes and Mow [1990. J. Biomechanics 23, 1145-1156.]. Results of the model, that were efficiently implemented in an updated Lagrangian algorithm, were compared with experimental infinitesimal data reported by DiSilverstro and Suh [2001. J. Biomechanics 34, 519-525.] and showed acceptable fitting for the axial force (R(2)=0.991) and lateral displacement (R(2)=0.914) curves in unconfined compression as well as a good fitting of the axial indentation force curve (R(2)=0.982). In addition, the model showed an excellent fitting of finite-deformation confined compression stress relaxation data reported by Ateshian et al. [1997. J. Biomechanics 30, 1157-1164.] and Huang et al. [2005. J. Biomechanics 38, 799-809.] (R(2)=0.993 and R(2)=0.995, respectively). The constitutive equation may be used to represent the mechanical behavior of the proteoglycan matrix in a fiber reinforced model of articular cartilage.

  2. Human Articular Chondrocytes Express Multiple Gap Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mayan, Maria D.; Carpintero-Fernandez, Paula; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Martinez-de-Ilarduya, Oskar; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and involves progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate if chondrocytes from human articular cartilage express gap junction proteins called connexins (Cxs). We show that human chondrocytes in tissue express Cx43, Cx45, Cx32, and Cx46. We also find that primary chondrocytes from adults retain the capacity to form functional voltage-dependent gap junctions. Immunohistochemistry experiments in cartilage from OA patients revealed significantly elevated levels of Cx43 and Cx45 in the superficial zone and down through the next approximately 1000 μm of tissue. These zones corresponded with regions damaged in OA that also had high levels of proliferative cell nuclear antigen. An increased number of Cxs may help explain the increased proliferation of cells in clusters that finally lead to tissue homeostasis loss. Conversely, high levels of Cxs in OA cartilage reflect the increased number of adjacent cells in clusters that are able to interact directly by gap junctions as compared with hemichannels on single cells in normal cartilage. Our data provide strong evidence that OA patients have a loss of the usual ordered distribution of Cxs in the damaged zones and that the reductions in Cx43 levels are accompanied by the loss of correct Cx localization in the nondamaged areas. PMID:23416160

  3. A nonlinear biphasic viscohyperelastic model for articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    García, José Jaime; Cortés, Daniel Humberto

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on articular cartilage have shown nonlinear stress-strain curves under finite deformations as well as intrinsic viscous effects of the solid phase. The aim of this study was to propose a nonlinear biphasic viscohyperelastic model that combines the intrinsic viscous effects of the proteoglycan matrix with a nonlinear hyperelastic constitutive equation. The proposed equation satisfies objectivity and reduces for uniaxial loading to a solid type viscous model in which the actions of the springs are represented by the hyperelastic function proposed by Holmes and Mow [1990. J. Biomechanics 23, 1145-1156.]. Results of the model, that were efficiently implemented in an updated Lagrangian algorithm, were compared with experimental infinitesimal data reported by DiSilverstro and Suh [2001. J. Biomechanics 34, 519-525.] and showed acceptable fitting for the axial force (R(2)=0.991) and lateral displacement (R(2)=0.914) curves in unconfined compression as well as a good fitting of the axial indentation force curve (R(2)=0.982). In addition, the model showed an excellent fitting of finite-deformation confined compression stress relaxation data reported by Ateshian et al. [1997. J. Biomechanics 30, 1157-1164.] and Huang et al. [2005. J. Biomechanics 38, 799-809.] (R(2)=0.993 and R(2)=0.995, respectively). The constitutive equation may be used to represent the mechanical behavior of the proteoglycan matrix in a fiber reinforced model of articular cartilage. PMID:16316659

  4. Delivering Agents Locally into Articular Cartilage by Intense MHz Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Heikki J.; Ylitalo, Tuomo; Suuronen, Jussi-Petteri; Rahunen, Krista; Salmi, Ari; Saarakkala, Simo; Serimaa, Ritva; Hæggström, Edward

    2015-01-01

    There is no cure for osteoarthritis. Current drug delivery relies on systemic delivery or injections into the joint. Because articular cartilage (AC) degeneration can be local and drug exposure outside the lesion can cause adverse effects, localized drug delivery could permit new drug treatment strategies. We investigated whether intense megahertz ultrasound (frequency: 1.138 MHz, peak positive pressure: 2.7 MPa, Ispta: 5 W/cm2, beam width: 5.7 mm at −6 dB, duty cycle: 5%, pulse repetition frequency: 285 Hz, mechanical index: 1.1) can deliver agents into AC without damaging it. Using ultrasound, we delivered a drug surrogate down to a depth corresponding to 53% depth of the AC thickness without causing histologically detectable damage to the AC. This may be important because early osteoarthritis typically exhibits histopathologic changes in the superficial AC. In conclusion, we identify intense megahertz ultrasound as a technique that potentially enables localized non-destructive delivery of osteoarthritis drugs or drug carriers into articular cartilage. PMID:25922135

  5. Non-linear model for compression tests on articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Alfio; Guaily, Amr; Giverso, Chiara; Federico, Salvatore

    2015-07-01

    Hydrated soft tissues, such as articular cartilage, are often modeled as biphasic systems with individually incompressible solid and fluid phases, and biphasic models are employed to fit experimental data in order to determine the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the tissues. Two of the most common experimental setups are confined and unconfined compression. Analytical solutions exist for the unconfined case with the linear, isotropic, homogeneous model of articular cartilage, and for the confined case with the non-linear, isotropic, homogeneous model. The aim of this contribution is to provide an easily implementable numerical tool to determine a solution to the governing differential equations of (homogeneous and isotropic) unconfined and (inhomogeneous and isotropic) confined compression under large deformations. The large-deformation governing equations are reduced to equivalent diffusive equations, which are then solved by means of finite difference (FD) methods. The solution strategy proposed here could be used to generate benchmark tests for validating complex user-defined material models within finite element (FE) implementations, and for determining the tissue's mechanical and hydraulic properties from experimental data.

  6. A reappraisal of the structure of normal canine articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, J; Shackleton, D R; Billingham, M E; Bitensky, L; Chayen, J; Muir, I H

    1988-01-01

    It has been shown that some of the controversy over the structure of articular cartilage may be due to slight differences in the orientation of the sample that has been studied. As our decisive criterion we have used the simple physical fact that elongate proteins, such as collagen micelles, that can exhibit form-birefringence, had to show virtually straight extinction when viewed under crossed polars. The use of a variably adjustable microtome chuck facilitated small adjustments in the orientation of the cartilage to meet this criterion. Under these conditions, the collagen of the matrix has been shown to be aligned mainly perpendicularly to the surface which was bounded by a thin lamina in which the collagen showed birefringence at 90 degrees to that of the matrix. The conventionally described zonation of articular cartilage has been shown to be inadequate for that of the dog tibial plateau. The conventional Zone 2 has been shown to consist of two zones, Zones 2a and 2b, with different cell sizes, cell concentrations, and concentration of matrix components. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3198487

  7. Experience with carprofen in extra-articular inflammatory processes.

    PubMed

    Gotter, G

    1982-01-01

    Carprofen is a new non-steroidal compound with analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic properties. Eighty patients with different types of extra-articular inflammatory processes such as periarthritis humero-scapularis, tendinitis, bursitis, etc., were studied by means of two double-blind protocol designs comparing carprofen 150 and 300 mg daily, either as a b.i.d. or a t.i.d. administration, for two weeks. The criteria to determine the therapeutic properties of the compound was based on the improvement of spontaneous pain, pain with movement and functional limitation. Evolution of symptoms showed that either 150 or 300 mg carprofen administered as a b.i.d. schedule, were equally effective (chi 2 test between groups was not significant). According to a t.i.d. schedule results were better with 300 mg. General tolerance was excellent and only 15% of the patients receiving 300 mg complained of side-effects, such as nausea, mild dermatitis, acidity and insomnia. In conclusion, carprofen 150 or 300 mg has a good therapeutical activity in extra-articular inflammatory processes, employing either a b.i.d. or a t.i.d. schedule. PMID:6983966

  8. Expression of Angiotensin II Receptor-1 in Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yuki; Matsuo, Kosuke; Murata, Minako; Yudoh, Kazuo; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Inaba, Yutaka; Saito, Tomoyuki; Kato, Tomohiro; Masuko, Kayo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Besides its involvement in the cardiovascular system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAS) system has also been suggested to play an important role in inflammation. To explore the role of this system in cartilage damage in arthritis, we investigated the expression of angiotensin II receptors in chondrocytes. Methods. Articular cartilage was obtained from patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and traumatic fractures who were undergoing arthroplasty. Chondrocytes were isolated and cultured in vitro with or without interleukin (IL-1). The expression of angiotensin II receptor types 1 (AT1R) and 2 (AT2R) mRNA by the chondrocytes was analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AT1R expression in cartilage tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The effect of IL-1 on AT1R/AT2R expression in the chondrocytes was analyzed by quantitative PCR and flow cytometry. Results. Chondrocytes from all patient types expressed AT1R/AT2R mRNA, though considerable variation was found between samples. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed AT1R expression at the protein level. Stimulation with IL-1 enhanced the expression of AT1R/AT2R mRNA in OA and RA chondrocytes. Conclusions. Human articular chondrocytes, at least partially, express angiotensin II receptors, and IL-1 stimulation induced AT1R/AT2R mRNA expression significantly. PMID:23346400

  9. A Semi-Degradable Composite Scaffold for Articular Cartilage Defects

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Paul M.; Ng, Kenneth W.; Joh, Kiwon; Serino, Lorenzo P.; Warren, Russell F.; Torzilli, Peter A.; Maher, Suzanne A.

    2010-01-01

    Few options exist to replace or repair damaged articular cartilage. The optimal solution that has been suggested is a scaffold that can carry load and integrate with surrounding tissues; but such a construct has thus far been elusive. The objectives of this study were to manufacture and characterize a non-degradable hydrated scaffold. Our hypothesis was that the polymer content of the scaffold can be used to control its mechanical properties, while an internal porous network augmented with biological agents can facilitate integration with the host tissue. Using a two-step water-in-oil emulsion process a porous poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel scaffold combined with alginate microspheres was manufactured. The scaffold had a porosity of 11–30% with pore diameters of 107–187 μm, which readily allowed for movement of cells through the scaffold. Alginate microparticles were evenly distributed through the scaffold and allowed for the slow release of biological factors. The elastic modulus (Es) and Poisson’s ratio (υ), Aggregate modulus (Ha) and dynamic modulus (ED) of the scaffold were significantly affected by % PVA, as it varied from 10% to 20% wt/vol. Es and υ were similar to that of articular cartilage for both polymer concentrations, while Ha and ED were similar to that of cartilage only at 20% PVA. The ability to control scaffold mechanical properties, while facilitating cellular migration suggest that this scaffold is a potentially viable candidate for the functional replacement of cartilage defects. PMID:21308980

  10. Synthesis of hydrophilic intra-articular microspheres conjugated to ibuprofen and evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity on articular explants.

    PubMed

    Bédouet, Laurent; Moine, Laurence; Pascale, Florentina; Nguyen, Van-Nga; Labarre, Denis; Laurent, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The main limitation of current microspheres for intra-articular delivery of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is a significant initial burst release, which prevents a long-term drug delivery. In order to get a sustained delivery of NSAIDs without burst, hydrogel degradable microspheres were prepared by co-polymerization of a methacrylic derivative of ibuprofen with oligo(ethylene-glycol) methacrylate and poly(PLGA-PEG) dimethacrylate as degradable crosslinker. Microspheres (40-100 μm) gave a low yield of ibuprofen release in saline buffer (≈2% after 3 months). Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that intact ibuprofen was regenerated indicating that ester hydrolysis occurred at the carboxylic acid position of ibuprofen. Dialysis of release medium followed by alkaline hydrolysis show that in saline buffer ester hydrolysis occurred at other positions in the polymer matrix leading to the release of water-soluble polymers (>6-8000 Da) conjugated with ibuprofen showing that degradation and drug release are simultaneous. By considering the free and conjugated ibuprofen, 13% of the drug is released in 3 months. In vitro, ibuprofen-loaded MS inhibited the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 in articular cartilage and capsule explants challenged with lipopolysaccharides. Covalent attachment of ibuprofen to PEG-hydrogel MS suppresses the burst release and allows a slow drug delivery for months and the cyclooxygenase-inhibition property of regenerated ibuprofen is preserved.

  11. Transient anabolic effects accompany epidermal growth factor receptor signal activation in articular cartilage in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Signals from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have typically been considered to provide catabolic activities in articular cartilage, and accordingly have been suggested to have a causal role in osteoarthritis progression. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo roles for endogenous EGFR signal activation in articular cartilage. Methods Transgenic mice with conditional, limb-targeted deletion of the endogenous intracellular EGFR inhibitor Mig-6 were generated using CreLoxP (Mig-6-flox; Prx1Cre) recombination. Histology, histochemical staining and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm activation of EGFR signaling in the articular cartilage and joints, and to analyze phenotypic consequences of Mig-6 loss on articular cartilage morphology, proliferation, expression of progenitor cell markers, presence of chondrocyte hypertrophy and degradation of articular cartilage matrix. Results The articular cartilage of Mig-6-conditional knockout (Mig-6-cko) mice was dramatically and significantly thicker than normal articular cartilage at 6 and 12 weeks of age. Mig-6-cko articular cartilage contained a population of chondrocytes in which EGFR signaling was activated, and which were three to four times more proliferative than normal Mig-6-flox articular chondrocytes. These cells expressed high levels of the master chondrogenic regulatory factor Sox9, as well as high levels of putative progenitor cell markers including superficial zone protein (SZP), growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) and Notch1. Expression levels were also high for activated β-catenin and the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) mediators phospho-Smad2/3 (pSmad2/3). Anabolic effects of EGFR activation in articular cartilage were followed by catabolic events, including matrix degradation, as determined by accumulation of aggrecan cleavage fragments, and onset of hypertrophy as determined by type × collagen expression. By 16 weeks of age, the articular cartilage of

  12. Ultrasound evaluation of site-specific effect of simulated microgravity on articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Mu-Qing; Wang, Shu-Zhe; Zhang, Zong-Kang; Guo, Xia

    2010-07-01

    Space flight induces acute changes in normal physiology in response to the microgravity environment. Articular cartilage is subjected to high loads under a ground reaction force on Earth. The objectives of this study were to investigate the site dependence of morphological and ultrasonic parameters of articular cartilage and to examine the site-specific responses of articular cartilage to simulated microgravity using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Six rats underwent tail suspension (simulated microgravity) for four weeks and six other rats were kept under normal Earth gravity as controls. Cartilage thickness, ultrasound roughness index (URI), integrated reflection coefficient (IRC) and integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC) of cartilage tissues, as well as histological degeneration were measured at the femoral head (FH), medial femoral condyle (MFC), lateral femoral condyle (LFC), patello-femoral groove (PFG) and patella (PAT). The results showed site dependence not significant in all UBM parameters except cartilage thickness (p < 0.01) in the control specimens. Only minor changes in articular cartilage were induced by 4-week tail suspension, although there were significant decreases in cartilage thickness at the MFC and PAT (p < 0.05) and a significant increase in URI at the PAT (p < 0.01). This study suggested that the 4-week simulated microgravity had only mild effects on femoral articular cartilage in the rat model. This information is useful for human spaceflight and clinical medicine in improving understanding of the effect of microgravity on articular cartilage. However, the effects of longer duration microgravity experience on articular cartilage need further investigation. PMID:20620696

  13. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes.

  14. Inter- and intra-specific scaling of articular surface areas in the hominoid talus

    PubMed Central

    Parr, William C H; Chatterjee, Helen J; Soligo, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The morphology of postcranial articular surfaces is expected to reflect their weight-bearing properties, as well as the stability and mobility of the articulations to which they contribute. Previous studies have mainly confirmed earlier predictions of isometric scaling between articular surface areas and body mass; the exception to this is ‘male-type’, convex articular surface areas, which may scale allometrically due to differences in locomotor strategies within the analysed samples. In the present study, we used new surface scanning technology to quantify more accurately articular surface areas and to test those predictions within the talus of hominoid primates, including modern humans. Our results, contrary to predictions, suggest that there are no generalised rules of articular scaling within the talus of hominoids. Instead, we suggest that articular scaling patterns are highly context-specific, depending on the role of each articulation during locomotion, as well as taxon- and sex-specific differences in locomotion and ontogenetic growth trajectories within any given sample. While this may prove problematic for inferring body mass based on articular surface area, it also offers new opportunities of gaining substantial insights into the locomotor patterns of extinct species. PMID:21323919

  15. MRI features of cervical articular process degenerative joint disease in Great Dane dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo; Penderis, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylomyelopathy or Wobbler syndrome commonly affects the cervical vertebral column of Great Dane dogs. Degenerative changes affecting the articular process joints are a frequent finding in these patients; however, the correlation between these changes and other features of cervical spondylomyelopathy are uncertain. We described and graded the degenerative changes evident in the cervical articular process joints from 13 Great Danes dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy using MR imaging, and evaluated the relationship between individual features of cervical articular process joint degeneration and the presence of spinal cord compression, vertebral foraminal stenosis, intramedullary spinal cord changes, and intervertebral disc degenerative changes. Degenerative changes affecting the articular process joints were common, with only 13 of 94 (14%) having no degenerative changes. The most severe changes were evident between C4-C5 and C7-T1 intervertebral spaces. Reduction or loss of the hyperintense synovial fluid signal on T2-weighted MR images was the most frequent feature associated with articular process joint degenerative changes. Degenerative changes of the articular process joints affecting the synovial fluid or articular surface, or causing lateral hypertrophic tissue, were positively correlated with lateral spinal cord compression and vertebral foraminal stenosis. Dorsal hypertrophic tissue was positively correlated with dorsal spinal cord compression. Disc-associated spinal cord compression was recognized less frequently.

  16. [Gait analysis after intra-articular calcaneus fractures].

    PubMed

    Siegmeth, A; Petje, G; Mittlmeier, T; Vécsei, V

    1996-01-01

    We retrospectively compared 20 patients with displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures by clinical assessment and dynamic pedography. Eleven were treated operatively, 9 conservatively. The purpose was to identify differences in post-traumatic gait performance and to correlate the pedographic data to a clinical score to show its reliability. Twenty individuals without a history of foot injuries were used as a control group. Both groups had restricted motion in the subtalar joint, increased hindfoot and midfoot loading and decreased forefoot loading. Furthermore, they showed prolonged contact phases and an impaired ability to speed up gait during the toe-off phase. Load transfer from the hindfoot to the forefoot showed typical distribution patterns. The operatively treated group showed better functional results with fewer subjective complaints.

  17. Hydrogel-Based Controlled Delivery Systems for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of bioactive factors is a very valuable strategy for articular cartilage repair. Nevertheless, the direct supply of such biomolecules is limited by several factors including rapid degradation, the need for supraphysiological doses, the occurrence of immune and inflammatory responses, and the possibility of dissemination to nontarget sites that may impair their therapeutic action and raise undesired effects. The use of controlled delivery systems has the potential of overcoming these hurdles by promoting the temporal and spatial presentation of such factors in a defined target. Hydrogels are promising materials to develop delivery systems for cartilage repair as they can be easily loaded with bioactive molecules controlling their release only where required. This review exposes the most recent technologies on the design of hydrogels as controlled delivery platforms of bioactive molecules for cartilage repair. PMID:27642587

  18. Hydrogel-Based Controlled Delivery Systems for Articular Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of bioactive factors is a very valuable strategy for articular cartilage repair. Nevertheless, the direct supply of such biomolecules is limited by several factors including rapid degradation, the need for supraphysiological doses, the occurrence of immune and inflammatory responses, and the possibility of dissemination to nontarget sites that may impair their therapeutic action and raise undesired effects. The use of controlled delivery systems has the potential of overcoming these hurdles by promoting the temporal and spatial presentation of such factors in a defined target. Hydrogels are promising materials to develop delivery systems for cartilage repair as they can be easily loaded with bioactive molecules controlling their release only where required. This review exposes the most recent technologies on the design of hydrogels as controlled delivery platforms of bioactive molecules for cartilage repair. PMID:27642587

  19. An articular index for the assessment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, D V; Dieppe, P A; Scott, J; Huskisson, E C

    1981-01-01

    An articular index was devised for the sequential assessment of patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Forty-eight joint units, chosen to reflect the characteristic pattern of the disease, were scored for tenderness on pressure or movement on a 4-point scale. Four observers examined patients to assess inter- and intraobserver error. The index was highly reproducible both within and between observers; intraobserver error was, however, significantly smaller. In a double-blind, cross-over trial the index was sufficiently sensitive to detect a statistically significant difference between the responses of patients with OA to an anti-inflammatory agent and to a simple analgesic. It is likely to be a useful addition to current methods of measurement in osteoarthritis. PMID:7008713

  20. Hydrogel-Based Controlled Delivery Systems for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of bioactive factors is a very valuable strategy for articular cartilage repair. Nevertheless, the direct supply of such biomolecules is limited by several factors including rapid degradation, the need for supraphysiological doses, the occurrence of immune and inflammatory responses, and the possibility of dissemination to nontarget sites that may impair their therapeutic action and raise undesired effects. The use of controlled delivery systems has the potential of overcoming these hurdles by promoting the temporal and spatial presentation of such factors in a defined target. Hydrogels are promising materials to develop delivery systems for cartilage repair as they can be easily loaded with bioactive molecules controlling their release only where required. This review exposes the most recent technologies on the design of hydrogels as controlled delivery platforms of bioactive molecules for cartilage repair.

  1. Potassium channels of pig articular chondrocytes are blocked by propofol.

    PubMed

    Mozrzymas, J W; Visintin, M; Vittur, F; Ruzzier, F

    1994-07-15

    The effect of propofol on the voltage-activated potassium channels in pig articular chondrocytes was investigated. Propofol was found to reversibly block the potassium channels in a dose-dependent manner. The blocking effect was voltage-independent and the Hill coefficient was 1.85 +/- 0.18. No changes either in the slope conductance or in the single channel kinetics were observed. The half-blocking concentration (Ec50) was 6.0 +/- 0.49 microM which is much lower than the concentrations used to observe the scavenging effect of the drug in an artificial synovial fluid. Interestingly, Ec50 found in our experiments is also smaller than the blood concentration of propofol used in anaesthesia. These results show that propofol may strongly affect the potassium channels in some non-excitable cells.

  2. [Chondrocalcinosis. Clinical impact of intra-articular calcium phosphate crystals].

    PubMed

    Fuerst, M

    2014-06-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals are known to cause acute attacks of pseudogout in joints but crystal deposition has also been reported to be associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Aside from CPPD crystals, basic calcium phosphates (BCPs), consisting of carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite (HA), tricalcium phosphate and octacalcium phosphate, have been found in synovial fluid, synovium and cartilage of patients with OA. Although CPPD crystals have been found to be associated with OA and are an important factor in joint disease, this has also recently been associated with a genetic defect. However, according to the most recent findings, the association of BCP crystals, such as apatite with OA is much stronger, as their presence significantly correlates with the severity of cartilage degeneration. Identification of BCP crystals in OA joints remains problematic due to a lack of simple and reliable methods of detection. The clinical and pathological relevance of cartilage mineralization in patients with OA is not completely understood. It is well established that mineralization of articular cartilage is often found close to hypertrophic chondrocytes. A significant correlation between the expression of type X collagen, a marker for chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage mineralization was observed. In the process of endochondral ossification, the link between hypertrophy and matrix mineralization is particularly well described. Hypertrophic chondrocytes in OA cartilage and at the growth line share certain features, not only hypertrophy but also a capability to mineralize the matrix. Recent data indicate that chondrocyte hypertrophy is a key factor in articular cartilage mineralization strongly linked to OA and does not characterize a specific subset of OA patients, which has important consequences for therapeutic strategies for OA. PMID:24924727

  3. Increasing the Dose of Autologous Chondrocytes Improves Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Guillén-García, Pedro; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Guillén-Vicente, Isabel; Caballero-Santos, Rosa; Guillén-Vicente, Marta; Abelow, Stephen; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Background: We hypothesized that implanting cells in a chondral defect at a density more similar to that of the intact cartilage could induce them to synthesize matrix with the features more similar to that of the uninjured one. Methods: We compared the implantation of different doses of chondrocytes: 1 million (n = 5), 5 million (n = 5), or 5 million mesenchymal cells (n = 5) in the femoral condyle of 15 sheep. Tissue generated by microfracture at the trochlea, and normal cartilage from a nearby region, processed as the tissues resulting from the implantation, were used as references. Histological and molecular (expression of type I and II collagens and aggrecan) studies were performed. Results: The features of the cartilage generated by implantation of mesenchymal cells and elicited by microfractures were similar and typical of a poor repair of the articular cartilage (presence of fibrocartilage, high expression of type I collagen and a low mRNA levels of type II collagen and aggrecan). Nevertheless, in the samples obtained from tissues generated by implantation of chondrocytes, hyaline-like cartilage, cell organization, low expression rates of type I collagen and high levels of mRNA corresponding to type II collagen and aggrecan were observed. These histological features, show less variability and are more similar to those of the normal cartilage used as control in the case of 5 million cells implantation than when 1 million cells were used. Conclusions: The implantation of autologous chondrocytes in type I/III collagen membranes at high density could be a promising tool to repair articular cartilage. PMID:26069691

  4. Black Colouration of the Knee Articular Cartilage after Spontaneously Recurrent Haemarthrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ishimaru, Daichi; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Mild discolouration of the articular cartilage is known to gradually occur during aging. However, pathological tissue pigmentation is occasionally induced under several specific conditions. In the present case, we performed total knee replacement in a patient with recurrent haemarthrosis. However, during the operation, we observed severe black colouration of the knee articular cartilage, due to the deposition of hemosiderin and lipofuscin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of severe cartilage pigmentation, due to hemosiderin and lipofuscin deposition in articular cartilage. PMID:27293933

  5. Pathogenesis and Prevention of Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis After Intra-articular Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Schenker, Mara L.; Mauck, Robert L.; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) occurs after traumatic injury to the joint. It is most common following injuries that disrupt the articular surface or lead to joint instability. The reported risk of PTOA following significant joint trauma is as high as 75%; articular fractures can increase the risk more than 20-fold. Despite recent advances in surgical management, the incidence of PTOA following intra-articular fractures has remained relatively unchanged over the last few decades. Pathogenesis of PTOA after intra-articular fracture is likely multifactorial and may be associated with acute cartilage injury as well as chronic joint overload secondary to instability, incongruity, and malalignment. Additional studies are needed to better elucidate how these factors contribute to the development of PTOA and to develop advanced treatment algorithms that consist of both acute biologic interventions targeted to decrease inflammation and cellular death in response to injury and improved surgical methods to restore stability, congruity, and alignment. PMID:24382876

  6. Exercise increases osteophyte formation and diminishes fibrillation following chemically induced articular cartilage injury.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J M; Brandt, K D

    1984-01-01

    The present study shows that a treadmill exercise regimen imposed on guinea-pigs whose articular cartilage has been damaged by intra-articular injection of IA reduces chondrocyte depletion, results in an increase in pericellular Safranin-O staining around surviving chondrocytes, and prevents fibrillation of the articular surface. The data suggest that exercise protected, or facilitated recovery of, chondrocytes subjected to chemical injury, and that the surviving cells then synthesised a matrix which was sufficiently normal to withstand impulsive joint loading. On the other hand, the exercise regimen accelerated osteophyte formation, and led to formation of osteophytes in sites at which they did not develop in animals which received intra-articular IA but which were not exercised. Images Fig. 1 (cont.) Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6526713

  7. [Intra-articular fracture of the distal radius: results following osteosynthesis with a support plate].

    PubMed

    Ferguson, G A; Leutenegger, A; Mark, G; Breiter, H; Rüedi, T

    1989-01-01

    The treatment of comminuted intra-articular fractures of the distal radius often requires an operative fixation. Beside the recently recommended external fixator, the support plate fixation offers a helpful alternative to treatment. Between 1980 and 1986, 30 wrists in 29 patients with intra-articular fractures of the distal radius were stabilized with a buttress plate an the Kantonsspital Chur, Switzerland. The mean follow-up-time was 15 months. These follow-ups showed that the buttress plate in treatment of complicated intra-articular fractures allows a satisfactory reduction and stabilization with restoration of the articular congruity and the possibility for early active assisted motion. Buttress plate fixation still remains a demanding technique, which in complicated cases, should be reserved for the experienced surgeon. PMID:2500786

  8. Pathogenesis and prevention of posttraumatic osteoarthritis after intra-articular fracture.

    PubMed

    Schenker, Mara L; Mauck, Robert L; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) occurs after traumatic injury to the joint. It is most common following injuries that disrupt the articular surface or lead to joint instability. The reported risk of PTOA following significant joint trauma is as high as 75%; articular fractures can increase the risk more than 20-fold. Despite recent advances in surgical management, the incidence of PTOA following intra-articular fractures has remained relatively unchanged over the last few decades. Pathogenesis of PTOA after intra-articular fracture is likely multifactorial and may be associated with acute cartilage injury as well as chronic joint overload secondary to instability, incongruity, and malalignment. Additional studies are needed to better elucidate how these factors contribute to the development of PTOA and to develop advanced treatment algorithms that consist of both acute biologic interventions targeted to decrease inflammation and cellular death in response to injury and improved surgical methods to restore stability, congruity, and alignment. PMID:24382876

  9. Condylar osteochondroma treated with total condylectomy and preservation of the articular disc: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Manuel Fernandez; Castillo, Jose Luis Del; Guerra, Mario Muñoz; Sanchez, Ruth Sanchez; La Plata, Maria Mancha De

    2015-06-01

    Osteochondroma is frequently found in the general skeleton but is rare in the condylar region of the mandible. We report a case of an osteochondroma of large size and rapid growth in the mandibular condyle, which was treated with total condylectomy and condylar replacement with a costochondral graft and preservation of the articular disc. In cases with a healthy and well-positioned articular disc, it may be preserved with no need of disc repositioning. PMID:26000086

  10. Condylar Osteochondroma Treated with Total Condylectomy and Preservation of the Articular Disc: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Manuel Fernandez; Castillo, Jose Luis Del; Guerra, Mario Muñoz; Sanchez, Ruth Sanchez; La Plata, Maria Mancha De

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondroma is frequently found in the general skeleton but is rare in the condylar region of the mandible. We report a case of an osteochondroma of large size and rapid growth in the mandibular condyle, which was treated with total condylectomy and condylar replacement with a costochondral graft and preservation of the articular disc. In cases with a healthy and well-positioned articular disc, it may be preserved with no need of disc repositioning. PMID:26000086

  11. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Synovial Joint and Articular Cartilage Formation

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, Maurizio; Koyama, Eiki; Shibukawa, Yoshihiro; Wu, Changshan; Tamamura, Yoshihiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi; Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Synovial joints and articular cartilage play crucial roles in skeletal function, but relatively little is actually known about their embryonic development. Here we first focused on the interzone, a thin mesenchymal cell layer forming at future joint sites that is widely thought to be critical for joint and articular cartilage development. To determine interzone cell origin and fate, we microinjected the vital fluorescent dye DiI at several peri-joint sites in chick limbs and monitored behavior and fate of labeled cells over time. Peri-joint mesenchymal cells located immediately adjacent to incipient joints migrated, became part of the interzone, and were eventually found in epiphyseal articular layer and joint capsule. Interzone cells isolated and reared in vitro expressed typical phenotypic markers, including GDF-5, Wnt-14 and CD-44, and differentiated into chondrocytes over time. To determine the molecular mechanisms of articular chondrocyte formation, we carried out additional studies on the ets transcription factor family member ERG and its alternatively-spliced variant C-1-1 that we previously found to be expressed in developing avian articular chondrocytes. We cloned the human counterpart of avian C-1-1 (ERGp55Δ81) and conditionally expressed it in transgenic mice under cartilage-specific Col2 gene promoter-enhancer control. The entire transgenic mouse limb chondrocyte population exhibited an immature articular-like phenotype and a virtual lack of growth plate formation and chondrocyte maturation compared to wild type littermate. Together, our studies reveal that peri-joint mesenchymal cells take part in interzone and articular layer formation, interzone cells can differentiate into chondrocytes, and acquisition of a permanent articular chondrocyte phenotype is aided and perhaps dictated by ets transcription factor ERG. PMID:16831907

  12. Effects of immobilization on articular cartilage: Autohistoradiographic findings with S35

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digiovanni, C.; Desantis, E.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of immobilization on the articular cartilage of rabbits was studied by light microscope. The knee joint of each rabbit was immobilized in a plaster in a position midway between flexion and extension for a 10 to 120 days period. Degenerative changes in the articular cartilage of increasing severity were observed. The fixation of the labeled SO4 by cartilage cells was decreased in advanced immobilization.

  13. Can intra-articular therapies prior to total knee arthroplasty increase the risk of periprosthetic infection?

    PubMed

    Yeo, Q Y; Lye, D C; Sathappan Ss, S S

    2015-02-01

    Intra-articular therapies, such as steroid injection, viscosupplement injection and acupuncture, are common non-surgical options for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. With any intra-articular injection or acupuncture procedure, there is a potential for inoculation with bacteria leading to possible knee infection. The authors report a patient who incurred an acute infection found after a total knee arthroplasty attributed to prior acupuncture procedure done as part of conservative treatment.

  14. Patellar Articular Overlap on MRI Is a Simple Alternative to Conventional Measurements of Patellar Height

    PubMed Central

    Munch, Jacqueline L.; Sullivan, Jaron P.; Nguyen, Joseph T.; Mintz, Douglas; Green, Daniel W.; Shubin Stein, Beth E.; Strickland, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patella alta describes an abnormally high-riding patella in relationship to the femur and has been shown to correlate with patellofemoral pain, instability, chondromalacia, and arthrosis. Conventional measurements of patella alta involve multiple measurements and are often not defined on cross-sectional imaging as related to radiographs. Hypothesis: Patellar articular overlap on sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will correlate well with conventional measurements of patella alta as measured by a standardized technique defined by our group. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: MRIs of 239 knees were reviewed by 3 attending surgeons with practices focusing on patellofemoral disease, as well as 2 sports medicine fellows and 1 musculoskeletal radiologist. Measurements included articular overlap, percentage of articular coverage, Caton-Deschamps index, Blackburne-Peel index, and modified Insall-Salvati index. Results: Interrater reliability was high for Caton-Deschamps, Blackburne-Peel, and modified Insall-Salvati indices (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.877, 0.828, and 0.787, respectively). Articular overlap and percentage articular coverage correlated well with each other (ICC, 0.961; P < .001) and with the Caton-Deschamps (overlap r = –0.271, P < .001; coverage r = –0.131, P = .037) and Blackburne-Peel (overlap r = 0.343, P < .001; coverage r = –0.238, P < .001) indices. Articular overlap and percentage coverage failed to correlate with the modified Insall-Salvati index (overlap r = –0.117, P = .091; coverage r = 0.007, P = .918). Conclusion: Patellar articular overlap and percentage of patellar articular coverage show promise as a simpler alternative to conventional, ratio-based measurements of patellar height. Future studies are needed to evaluate the range of normal and the relationship to our traditionally used measurements. PMID:27482530

  15. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Engraft into Rabbit Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; He, Na; Feng, Chenchen; Liu, Victor; Zhang, Luyi; Wang, Fei; He, Jiaping; Zhu, Tengfang; Wang, Shuyang; Qiao, Weiwei; Li, Suke; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Li; Dai, Chengxiang; Cao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to have the potential for articular cartilage regeneration, and are suggested for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Here, we investigated whether intra-articular injection of xenogeneic human adipose-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (haMPCs) promoted articular cartilage repair in rabbit OA model and engrafted into rabbit articular cartilage. The haMPCs were cultured in vitro, and phenotypes and differentiation characteristics of cells were evaluated. OA was induced surgically by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) and medical meniscectomy of knee joints. At six weeks following surgery, hyaluronic acid (HA) or haMPCs was injected into the knee joints, the contralateral knee served as normal control. All animals were sacrificed at the 16th week post-surgery. Assessments were carried out by macroscopic examination, hematoxylin/eosin (HE) and Safranin-O/Fast green stainings and immunohistochemistry. The data showed that haMPC treatment promoted cartilage repair. Signals of human mitochondrial can be directly detected in haMPC treated cartilage. The haMPCs expressed human leukocyte antigen I (HLA-I) but not HLA-II-DR in vivo. These results suggest that intra-articular injection of haMPCs promotes regeneration of articular cartilage in rabbit OA model, and support the notion that MPCs are transplantable between HLA-incompatible individuals. PMID:26023716

  16. Role of uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints

    PubMed Central

    KUMAR, P.; OKA, M.; TOGUCHIDA, J.; KOBAYASHI, M.; UCHIDA, E.; NAKAMURA, T.; TANAKA, K.

    2001-01-01

    The uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage, the ‘lamina splendens’ which provides a very low friction lubrication surface in articular joints, was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Complementary specimens were also observed under SEM at −10 °C without dehydration or sputter ion coating. Fresh adult pig osteochondral specimens were prepared from the patellas of pig knee joints and digested with the enzymes, hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease. Friction coefficients between a pyrex glass plate and the osteochondral specimens digested by enzymes as well as natural (undigested) specimens were measured, using a thrust collar apparatus. Normal saline, hyaluronic acid (HA) and a mixture of albumin, globulin, HA (AGH) were used as lubrication media. The surface irregularities usually observed in SEM studies were not apparent under AFM. The articular cartilage surface was resistant to hyaluronidase and also to chondroitinase ABC, but a fibrous structure was exhibited in alkaline protease enzymes-digested specimens. AFM analysis revealed that the thickness of the uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage was between 800 nm and 2 μm in adult pig articular cartilage. The coefficient of friction (c.f.) was significantly higher in chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease enzymes digested specimens. Generally, in normal saline lubrication medium, c.f. was higher in comparison to HA and AGH lubrication media. The role of the uppermost, superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints is discussed. PMID:11554503

  17. Role of uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Oka, M; Toguchida, J; Kobayashi, M; Uchida, E; Nakamura, T; Tanaka, K

    2001-09-01

    The uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage, the 'lamina splendens' which provides a very low friction lubrication surface in articular joints, was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Complementary specimens were also observed under SEM at -10 degrees C without dehydration or sputter ion coating. Fresh adult pig osteochondral specimens were prepared from the patellas of pig knee joints and digested with the enzymes, hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease. Friction coefficients between a pyrex glass plate and the osteochondral specimens digested by enzymes as well as natural (undigested) specimens were measured, using a thrust collar apparatus. Normal saline, hyaluronic acid (HA) and a mixture of albumin, globulin, HA (AGH) were used as lubrication media. The surface irregularities usually observed in SEM studies were not apparent under AFM. The articular cartilage surface was resistant to hyaluronidase and also to chondroitinase ABC, but a fibrous structure was exhibited in alkaline protease enzymes-digested specimens. AFM analysis revealed that the thickness of the uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage was between 800 nm and 2 microm in adult pig articular cartilage. The coefficient of friction (c.f.) was significantly higher in chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease enzymes digested specimens. Generally, in normal saline lubrication medium, c.f. was higher in comparison to HA and AGH lubrication media. The role of the uppermost, superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints is discussed. PMID:11554503

  18. Diagnosis and Management of Extra-articular Causes of Pain After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manning, Blaine T; Lewis, Natasha; Tzeng, Tony H; Saleh, Jamal K; Potty, Anish G R; Dennis, Douglas A; Mihalko, William M; Goodman, Stuart B; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain, which has been attributed to poor outcomes after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), remains problematic for many patients. Although the source of TKA pain can often be delineated, establishing a precise diagnosis can be challenging. It is often classified as intra-articular or extra-articular pain, depending on etiology. After intra-articular causes, such as instability, aseptic loosening, infection, or osteolysis, have been ruled out, extra-articular sources of pain should be considered. Physical examination of the other joints may reveal sources of localized knee pain, including diseases of the spine, hip, foot, and ankle. Additional extra-articular pathologies that have potential to instigate pain after TKA include vascular pathologies, tendinitis, bursitis, and iliotibial band friction syndrome. Patients with medical comorbidities, such as metabolic bone disease and psychological illness, may also experience prolonged postoperative pain. By better understanding the diagnosis and treatment options for extra-articular causes of pain after TKA, orthopaedic surgeons may better treat patients with this potentially debilitating complication. PMID:25745922

  19. Chondrocyte death in mechanically injured articular cartilage--the influence of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Amin, Anish K; Huntley, James S; Bush, Peter G; Simpson, A Hamish R W; Hall, Andrew C

    2009-06-01

    Calcium is thought to be an important regulator of chondrocyte death associated with articular cartilage injury. Our objective was to determine the influence of extracellular calcium on chondrocyte death following mechanical injury. Using a surgically relevant model of sharp mechanical injury (with a scalpel) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), in situ chondrocyte death was quantified within the full thickness of articular cartilage as a function of medium calcium concentration and time (2.5 h and 7 days). Exposure of articular cartilage to calcium-free media (approximately 0 mM) significantly reduced superficial zone chondrocyte death after mechanical injury compared with exposure to calcium-rich media (2-20 mM, ANOVA at 2.5 h, p = 0.002). In calcium-rich media, although the extent of chondrocyte death increased with increasing medium calcium concentration, cell death remained localized to the superficial zone of articular cartilage over 7 days (ANOVA, p < 0.05). However, in calcium-free media, there was an increase in chondrocyte death within deeper zones of articular cartilage over 7 days. The early (within hours) chondroprotective effect in calcium-free media suggests that the use of joint irrigation solutions without added calcium may decrease chondrocyte death from mechanical injury during articular surgery. The delayed (within days) increase in chondrocyte death in calcium-free media supports the use of calcium supplementation in media used during cartilage culture for tissue engineering or transplantation.

  20. Elastin fibers display a versatile microfibril network in articular cartilage depending on the mechanical microenvironments.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Wu, Jian Ping; Chen, Hong Hui; Kirk, Thomas Brett; Xu, Jiake

    2013-09-01

    Elastin fibers are major extracellular matrix macromolecules that are critical in maintaining the elasticity and resilience of tissues such as blood vessels, lungs and skins. However, the role of elastin in articular cartilage is poorly defined. The present study investigated the organization of elastin fiber in articular cartilage, its relationship to collagen fibers and the architecture of elastin fibers from different mechanical environments by using a kangaroo model. Five morphologies of elastin fibers were identified: Straight fiber, straight fiber with branches, branching fibers directly associated with chondrocyte, wave fiber and fine elastin. The architecture of the elastin network varied significantly with cartilage depth. In the most superficial layer of tibial plateau articular cartilage, dense elastin fibers formed a distinctive cobweb-like meshwork which was parallel to the cartilage surface. In the superficial zone, elastin fibers were well organized in a preferred orientation which was parallel to collagen fibers. In the deep zone, no detectable elastin fiber was found. Moreover, differences in the organization of elastin fibers were also observed between articular cartilage from the tibial plateau, femoral condyle, and distal humerus. This study unravels the detailed microarchitecture of elastin fibers which display a well-organized three-dimensional versatile network in articular cartilage. Our findings imply that elastin fibers may play a crucial role in maintaining the integrity, elasticity, and the mechanical properties of articular cartilage, and that the local mechanical environment affects the architectural development of elastin fibers. PMID:23649803

  1. Characterization of Chondrocyte Scaffold Carriers for Cell-based Gene Therapy in Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Wei; Yin, Liangjun; Luo, Jeffrey; Li, Ruidong; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhang, Jiye; Huang, Wei; Hu, Ning; Liang, Xi; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Hu, Zhenming; Shi, Lewis; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; He, Tong-Chuan; Ho, Sherwin

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions in the knee are common injuries. Chondrocyte transplant represents a promising therapeutic modality for articular cartilage injuries. Here, we characterize the viability and transgene expression of articular chondrocytes cultured in 3-D scaffolds provided by four types of carriers. Articular chondrocytes are isolated from rabbit knees and cultured in four types of scaffolds: type I collagen sponge, fibrin glue, hyaluronan, and Open-cell PolyLactic Acid (OPLA). The cultured cells are transduced with adenovirus expressing green fluorescence protein (AdGFP) and luciferase (AdGL3-Luc). The viability and gene expression in the chondrocytes are determined with fluorescence microscopy and luciferase assay. Cartilage matrix production is assessed by Alcian blue staining. Rabbit articular chondrocytes are effectively infected by AdGFP and exhibited sustained GFP expression. All tested scaffolds support the survival and gene expression of the infected chondrocytes. However, the highest transgene expression is observed in the OPLA carrier. At four weeks, Alcian blue-positive matrix materials are readily detected in OPLA cultures. Thus, our results indicate that, while all tested carriers can support the survival of chondrocytes, OPLA supports the highest transgene expression and is the most conductive scaffold for matrix production, suggesting that OPLA may be a suitable scaffold for cell-based gene therapy of articular cartilage repairs. PMID:23629940

  2. Comparison of friction and wear of articular cartilage on different length scales.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Sandra; Boettcher, Kathrin; Wiegleb, Lorenz; Urban, Joanna; Burgkart, Rainer; Lieleg, Oliver; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-09-18

    The exceptional tribological properties of articular cartilage are still far from being fully understood. Articular cartilage is able to withstand high loads and provide exceptionally low friction. Although the regeneration abilities of the tissue are very limited, it can last for many decades. These biomechanical properties are realized by an interplay of different lubrication and wear protection mechanisms. The deterioration of cartilage due to aging or injury leads to the development of osteoarthritis. A current treatment strategy focuses on supplementing the intra-articular fluid with a saline solution containing hyaluronic acid. In the work presented here, we investigated how changing the lubricating fluid affects friction and wear of articular cartilage, focusing on the boundary and mixed lubrication as well as interstitial fluid pressurization mechanisms. Different length and time scales were probed by atomic force microscopy, tribology and profilometry. We compared aqueous solutions with different NaCl concentrations to a viscosupplement containing hyaluronic acid (HA). In particular, we found that the presence of ions changes the frictional behavior and the wear resistance. In contrast, hyaluronic acid showed no significant impact on the friction coefficient, but considerably reduced wear. This study confirms the previous notion that friction and wear are not necessarily correlated in articular cartilage tribology and that the main role of HA might be to provide wear protection for the articular surface.

  3. Morphological and functional interrelationships of articular cartilage matrices.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, C A; Flint, M H; Beaumont, B W

    1984-01-01

    The pericellular, territorial and interterritorial matrices of canine tibial cartilage have been identified ultrastructurally on the basis of their collagen fibre density and organisation, proteoglycan distribution and their structural response to experimentally applied compressive loads. In addition, a discrete pericellular capsule composed of fine, faintly banded fibrils is described which surrounds and encloses the pericellular matrix and chondrocytes of the middle and deep layers but not of the superficial layer. It is suggested that the fine fibrils which comprise this pericellular capsule represent some of the new minor collagen species recently localised in a similar position in hyaline cartilages. The densely compacted cupola which forms the articular pole of the capsule is frequently penetrated by a clearly defined pericellular channel, consistently orientated in the direction of the articular surface. Membrane-bound vesicles are observed in the pericellular matrix, within the lumen of the pericellular channel and accumulated in the territorial matrix immediately beyond the pericellular channel. The constancy of this distribution pattern strongly suggests a flow of material through the pericellular channel from the pericellular matrix to the territorial matrix and beyond, possibly in response to minute pressure gradients generated during compressive deformation of the non-distensible capsule. Furthermore, it is suggested that the random dispersal and subsequent rupture of matrix vesicles may represent a mechanism whereby chondrocytes, with limited mobility, could exercise homeostatic control over the cartilage matrix at some distance from the cell. Chondrocytes in the deeper layers of canine tibial cartilage are each surrounded by three distinct compartments, a pericellular matrix and capsule, a territorial matrix and an interterritorial matrix. The response of each of these concentric compartments to experimental load suggests that they function

  4. Rice Body Formation Within a Peri-Articular Shoulder Mass

    PubMed Central

    Caram, Anthony; Flores, Miguel; Scherer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Most commonly associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, rice bodies represent an uncommon, nonspecific, often intra-articular inflammatory process. Presumably, rice bodies represent the sequelae of microvascular infarcts of the joint synovium. However, rice bodies have been seen in pleural fluid, in the setting of bursitis, and within the tendon sheath. The etiology and prognostic significance of rice bodies are not clear. MRI is the diagnostic imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of rice body formation. Here we present a case of a 28-year-old female with a history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who presented to her primary care physician with a palpable mass around her right shoulder which was presumed to be a lipoma. An initial ultrasound showed a fluid filled structure with internal debris. Subsequent MRI evaluation was confirmatory for subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis with rice body formation. The salient point of this report is to highlight the importance of patient-specific differential diagnosis. While lipomas are a very common benign soft tissue tumor, patients with RA often have disease-specific sequelae that should be included in the diagnostic deliberation. Thus, when ordering diagnostic testing for patients with a palpable mass and rheumatoid arthritis, MRI--possibly preceded by conventional radiography--is the most appropriate diagnostic algorithm. PMID:27625904

  5. Extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis: An update.

    PubMed

    Prete, Marcella; Racanelli, Vito; Digiglio, Liboria; Vacca, Angelo; Dammacco, Franco; Perosa, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an immune-mediated disease involving chronic low-grade inflammation that may progressively lead to joint destruction, deformity, disability and even death. Despite its predominant osteoarticular and periarticular manifestations, RA is a systemic disease often associated with cutaneous and organ-specific extra-articular manifestations (EAM). Despite the fact that EAM have been studied in numerous RA cohorts, there is no uniformity in their definition or classification. This paper reviews current knowledge about EAM in terms of frequency, clinical aspects and current therapeutic approaches. In an initial attempt at a classification, we separated EAM from RA co-morbidities and from general, constitutional manifestations of systemic inflammation. Moreover, we distinguished EAM into cutaneous and visceral forms, both severe and not severe. In aggregated data from 12 large RA cohorts, patients with EAM, especially the severe forms, were found to have greater co-morbidity and mortality than patients without EAM. Understanding the complexity of EAM and their management remains a challenge for clinicians, especially since the effectiveness of drug therapy on EAM has not been systematically evaluated in randomized clinical trials. PMID:21939785

  6. Rice Body Formation Within a Peri-Articular Shoulder Mass.

    PubMed

    Edison, Michele N; Caram, Anthony; Flores, Miguel; Scherer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Most commonly associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, rice bodies represent an uncommon, nonspecific, often intra-articular inflammatory process. Presumably, rice bodies represent the sequelae of microvascular infarcts of the joint synovium. However, rice bodies have been seen in pleural fluid, in the setting of bursitis, and within the tendon sheath. The etiology and prognostic significance of rice bodies are not clear. MRI is the diagnostic imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of rice body formation. Here we present a case of a 28-year-old female with a history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who presented to her primary care physician with a palpable mass around her right shoulder which was presumed to be a lipoma. An initial ultrasound showed a fluid filled structure with internal debris. Subsequent MRI evaluation was confirmatory for subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis with rice body formation. The salient point of this report is to highlight the importance of patient-specific differential diagnosis. While lipomas are a very common benign soft tissue tumor, patients with RA often have disease-specific sequelae that should be included in the diagnostic deliberation. Thus, when ordering diagnostic testing for patients with a palpable mass and rheumatoid arthritis, MRI--possibly preceded by conventional radiography--is the most appropriate diagnostic algorithm. PMID:27625904

  7. Localization of hyaluronic acid in human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Asari, A; Miyauchi, S; Kuriyama, S; Machida, A; Kohno, K; Uchiyama, Y

    1994-04-01

    To demonstrate localization of hyaluronic acid (HA) in articular cartilage of the human femur, biotinylated HA-binding region, which specifically binds HA molecules, was applied to the tissue. In sections fixed by 2% paraformaldehyde-2% glutaraldehyde, HA staining was detected in lamina splendens and chondrocytes in the middle zone. By pretreatment with trypsin, intense HA staining appeared in the extracellular matrix of the deep zone and weak staining in the superficial and middle zones. Moreover, pre-treatment with chondroitinase ABC (CHase ABC) intensely enhanced the stainability for HA in the superficial and middle zones and weakly in the deeper zone. Combined pre-treatment of trypsin with CHase ABC abolished intra- and extracellular staining for HA in all zones. By microbiochemical study, the concentrations of HA and dermatan sulfate were high in the middle zone, whereas those of chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate were high in the deep zone. These results suggest that HA is abundantly synthesized in and secreted from the chondrocytes, particularly in the middle zone, whereas it is largely masked by proteoglycan constituents in the extracellular matrix. PMID:8126377

  8. Pannocytes: distinctive cells found in rheumatoid arthritis articular cartilage erosions.

    PubMed Central

    Zvaifler, N. J.; Tsai, V.; Alsalameh, S.; von Kempis, J.; Firestein, G. S.; Lotz, M.

    1997-01-01

    A distinctive cell was identified from sites of rheumatoid arthritis cartilage injury. Similar cells are not found in lesions of osteoarthritis cartilage. We have designated them as pannocytes (PCs). Their rhomboid morphology differs from the bipolar shape of fibroblast-like synoviocytes or the spherical configuration of primary human articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes are short-lived, whereas the original PC line grew for 25 passages before becoming senescent. Features in common with cultured primary chondrocytes include maximal proliferation in response to transforming growth factor-beta a catabolic response to interleukin-1 beta, collagenase production, and mRNA for the induced lymphocyte antigen and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Despite the presence of the inducible nitric oxide synthase message, PCs do not produce NO either constitutively or when cytokine stimulated. Each of the mesenchymal cells, fibroblast-like synoviocytes, primary chondrocytes, and PCs have the gene for type I collagen, but the type II collagen gene is detected only in primary chondrocytes. PCs can be distinguished from fibroblast-like synoviocytes and primary chondrocytes by their morphology, bright VCAM-1 staining, and growth response to cytokines and growth factors. Their prolonged life span in vitro suggests that PCs might represent an earlier stage of mesenchymal cell differentiation, and they could have a heretofore unrecognized role in rheumatoid arthritis joint destruction. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 PMID:9060847

  9. Imaging articular cartilage using second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Jessica C.; Winlove, C. Peter; Knapp, Karen; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-02-01

    Sub cellular resolution images of equine articular cartilage have been obtained using both second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM) and two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPFM). The SHGM images clearly map the distribution of the collagen II fibers within the extracellular matrix while the TPFM images show the distribution of endogenous two-photon fluorophores in both the cells and the extracellular matrix, highlighting especially the pericellular matrix and bright 2-3μm diameter features within the cells. To investigate the source of TPF in the extracellular matrix experiments have been carried out to see if it may originate from the proteoglycans. Pure solutions of the following proteoglycans hyaluronan, chondroitin sulfate and aggrecan have been imaged, only the aggrecan produced any TPF and here the intensity was not great enough to account for the TPF in the extracellular matrix. Also cartilage samples were subjected to a process to remove proteoglycans and cellular components. After this process the TPF from the samples had decreased by a factor of two, with respect to the SHG intensity.

  10. Articular cartilage repair with autologous bone marrow mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okabe, Takahiro; Ikawa, Tesshu; Iida, Takahiro; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Wakitani, Shigeyuki

    2010-11-01

    Articular cartilage defects that do not repair spontaneously induce osteoarthritic changes in joints over a long period of observation. In this study, we examined the usefulness of transplanting culture-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal cells into osteochondral defects of joints with cartilage defects. First, we performed experiments on rabbits and up on obtaining good results proceeded to perform the experiments on humans. Macroscopic and histological repair with this method was good, and good clinical results were obtained although there was no significant difference with the control group. Recent reports have indicated that this procedure is comparable to autologous chondrocyte implantation, and concluded that it was a good procedure because it required one step less than that required by surgery, reduced costs for patients, and minimized donor site morbidity. Although some reports have previously shown that progenitor cells formed a tumor when implanted into immune-deficient mice after long term in vitro culture, the safety of the cell transplantation was confirmed by our clinical experience. Thus, this procedure is useful, effective, and safe, but the repaired tissues were not always hyaline cartilage. To obtain better repair with this procedure, treatment approaches using some growth factors during in vitro culture or gene transfection are being explored.

  11. Donor site morbidity after articular cartilage repair procedures: a review.

    PubMed

    Matricali, Giovanni A; Dereymaeker, Greta Ph E; Luyten, Frank P

    2010-10-01

    In order to perform an Osteochondral Autologous Transplantation (OAT) or an Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI), the integrity of healthy intact articular cartilage at a second location needs to be violated. This creates the possibility for donor site morbidity. Only recently have any publications addressed this issue. The aim of this manuscript is to review the current knowledge on donor site morbidity after an OAT or an ACI. Reports were identified by searching Medline and Pubmed up to March 2010. Donor site morbidity was described mostly considering a clinical outcome, both in a qualitative (parameters in history or physical examination) and/or quantitative way (knee status reported by means of a numerical score). An increasing rate of problems is noted when using quantitative instead of qualitative parameters, and when donor site morbidity is the focus of attention, affecting up to more than half of the patients, in particular for an OAT procedure. The decision to harvest an osteochondral or cartilage biopsy to perform a repair procedure should therefore be taken with caution. This also underscores the need for further research to identify safe donor sites or to develop techniques that eliminate the need for a formal biopsy ccompletely.

  12. Rice Body Formation Within a Peri-Articular Shoulder Mass

    PubMed Central

    Caram, Anthony; Flores, Miguel; Scherer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Most commonly associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, rice bodies represent an uncommon, nonspecific, often intra-articular inflammatory process. Presumably, rice bodies represent the sequelae of microvascular infarcts of the joint synovium. However, rice bodies have been seen in pleural fluid, in the setting of bursitis, and within the tendon sheath. The etiology and prognostic significance of rice bodies are not clear. MRI is the diagnostic imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of rice body formation. Here we present a case of a 28-year-old female with a history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who presented to her primary care physician with a palpable mass around her right shoulder which was presumed to be a lipoma. An initial ultrasound showed a fluid filled structure with internal debris. Subsequent MRI evaluation was confirmatory for subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis with rice body formation. The salient point of this report is to highlight the importance of patient-specific differential diagnosis. While lipomas are a very common benign soft tissue tumor, patients with RA often have disease-specific sequelae that should be included in the diagnostic deliberation. Thus, when ordering diagnostic testing for patients with a palpable mass and rheumatoid arthritis, MRI--possibly preceded by conventional radiography--is the most appropriate diagnostic algorithm.

  13. Combined Intra- and Extra-articular Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament: The Reconstruction of the Knee Anterolateral Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2015-01-01

    We present a new technique for the combined intra- and extra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Intra-articular reconstruction is performed in an outside-in manner according to the precepts of the anatomic femoral tunnel technique. Extra-articular reconstruction is performed with the gracilis tendon while respecting the anatomic parameters of the origin and insertion points and the path described for the knee anterolateral ligament. PMID:26258037

  14. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset still's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes. PMID:26834930

  15. Effects of freezing rates and cryoprotectant on thermal expansion of articular cartilage during freezing process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Sun, H J; Lv, Y; Zou, J C; Lin, B L; Hua, T C

    2013-01-01

    The intact articular cartilage has not yet been successfully preserved at low temperature most likely due to the volume expansion from water to ice during freezing. The objective of this current study focuses on examining thermal expansion behavior of articular cartilage (AC) during freezing from 0 degree C to -100 degree C. Thermo Mechanical Analysis (TMA) was used to investigate the effects of different concentrations of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) (0%, 10%, 30% and 60% v/v) and different freezing rates (1 C/min, 3 C/min and 5 C/min). The results showed that: (1) the inhomogeneous thermal expansion (or contraction) presents due to inhomogeneous water distributions in articular cartilage during freezing, which also may be the most likely reason that the matrix has been damaged in cryopreserved intact articular cartilage; (2) at the phase transition temperature range, the maximum thermal strain change value for 5C/min is approximately 1.45 times than that for 1 C/min, but the maximum thermal expansion coefficient of the later is about six times than that of the former; (3) the thermal expansion coefficient decreases with increasing cooling rate at the unfrozen temperature region, but some opposite results are obtained at the frozen temperature region; (4) the higher the DMSO concentration is, at the phase change temperature region, the smaller the thermal strain change as well as the maximum thermal expansion coefficient are, but DMSO concentration exhibits little effect on the thermal expansion coefficient at both unfrozen and frozen region. Once the DMSO concentration increasing enough, e.g. 60% v/v, the thermal strain decreases linearly and smoothly without any abrupt change due to little or no ice crystal forms (i.e. vitrification) in frozen articular cartilage. This study may improve our understanding of the thermal expansion (or contraction) behavior of cryopreserved articular cartilage and it may be useful for the future study on cryopreservation of intact

  16. Modeling the biomechanics of articular eminence function in anthropoid primates

    PubMed Central

    Terhune, Claire E

    2011-01-01

    One of the most prominent features of the cranial component of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the articular eminence (AE). This bar of bone is the primary surface upon which the condyle translates and rotates during movements of the mandible, and is therefore the primary point at which forces are transmitted from the mandible to the cranium during loading of the masticatory apparatus. The shape of the AE is highly variable across primates, and the raised eminence of humans has often been considered a defining feature of the human TMJ, yet few data exist to address whether this variation is functionally significant. This study used a broad interspecific sample of anthropoid primates to elaborate upon and test the predictions of a previously proposed model of AE function. This model suggests that AE inclination acts to resist non-normal forces at the TMJ, thereby maximizing bite forces (BFs). AE inclination was predicted to covary with two specific features of the masticatory apparatus: height of the TMJ above the occlusal plane; and inclination of the masticatory muscles. A correlate of this model is that taxa utilizing more resistant food objects should also exhibit relatively more inclined AEs. Results of the correlation analyses found that AE inclination is strongly correlated with height of the TMJ above the occlusal plane, but less so with inclination of the masticatory muscles. Furthermore, pairwise comparisons of closely related taxa with documented dietary differences found that the AE is consistently more inclined in taxa that utilize more resistant food items. These data preliminarily suggest that variation in AE morphology across anthropoid primates is functionally related to maximizing BFs, and add to the growing dataset of masticatory morphologies linked to feeding behavior. PMID:21923720

  17. Stick-slip friction and wear of articular joints

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2013-01-01

    Stick-slip friction was observed in articular cartilage under certain loading and sliding conditions and systematically studied. Using the Surface Forces Apparatus, we show that stick-slip friction can induce permanent morphological changes (a change in the roughness indicative of wear/damage) in cartilage surfaces, even under mild loading and sliding conditions. The different load and speed regimes can be represented by friction maps—separating regimes of smooth and stick-slip sliding; damage generally occurs within the stick-slip regimes. Prolonged exposure of cartilage surfaces to stick-slip sliding resulted in a significant increase of surface roughness, indicative of severe morphological changes of the cartilage superficial zone. To further investigate the factors that are conducive to stick-slip and wear, we selectively digested essential components of cartilage: type II collagen, hyaluronic acid (HA), and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Compared with the normal cartilage, HA and GAG digestions modified the stick-slip behavior and increased surface roughness (wear) during sliding, whereas collagen digestion decreased the surface roughness. Importantly, friction forces increased up to 2, 10, and 5 times after HA, GAGs, and collagen digestion, respectively. Also, each digestion altered the friction map in different ways. Our results show that (i) wear is not directly related to the friction coefficient but (ii) more directly related to stick-slip sliding, even when present at small amplitudes, and that (iii) the different molecular components of joints work synergistically to prevent wear. Our results also suggest potential noninvasive diagnostic tools for sensing stick-slip in joints. PMID:23359687

  18. Adaptive mechanically controlled lubrication mechanism found in articular joints.

    PubMed

    Greene, George W; Banquy, Xavier; Lee, Dong Woog; Lowrey, Daniel D; Yu, Jing; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2011-03-29

    Articular cartilage is a highly efficacious water-based tribological system that is optimized to provide low friction and wear protection at both low and high loads (pressures) and sliding velocities that must last over a lifetime. Although many different lubrication mechanisms have been proposed, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the tribological performance of cartilage cannot be attributed to a single mechanism acting alone but on the synergistic action of multiple "modes" of lubrication that are adapted to provide optimum lubrication as the normal loads, shear stresses, and rates change. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is abundant in cartilage and synovial fluid and widely thought to play a principal role in joint lubrication although this role remains unclear. HA is also known to complex readily with the glycoprotein lubricin (LUB) to form a cross-linked network that has also been shown to be critical to the wear prevention mechanism of joints. Friction experiments on porcine cartilage using the surface forces apparatus, and enzymatic digestion, reveal an "adaptive" role for an HA-LUB complex whereby, under compression, nominally free HA diffusing out of the cartilage becomes mechanically, i.e., physically, trapped at the interface by the increasingly constricted collagen pore network. The mechanically trapped HA-LUB complex now acts as an effective (chemically bound) "boundary lubricant"--reducing the friction force slightly but, more importantly, eliminating wear damage to the rubbing/shearing surfaces. This paper focuses on the contribution of HA in cartilage lubrication; however, the system as a whole requires both HA and LUB to function optimally under all conditions.

  19. Multi-parametric MRI characterization of enzymatically degraded articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Nissi, Mikko J; Salo, Elli-Noora; Tiitu, Virpi; Liimatainen, Timo; Michaeli, Shalom; Mangia, Silvia; Ellermann, Jutta; Nieminen, Miika T

    2016-07-01

    Several laboratory and rotating frame quantitative MRI parameters were evaluated and compared for detection of changes in articular cartilage following selective enzymatic digestion. Bovine osteochondral specimens were subjected to 44 h incubation in control medium or in collagenase or chondroitinase ABC to induce superficial collagen or proteoglycan (glycosaminoglycan) alterations. The samples were scanned at 9.4 T for T1 , T1 Gd (dGEMRIC), T2 , adiabatic T1 ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , TRAFF2 , and T1 sat relaxation times and for magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). For reference, glycosaminoglycan content, collagen fibril orientation and biomechanical properties were determined. Changes primarily in the superficial cartilage were noted after enzymatic degradation. Most of the studied parameters were sensitive to the destruction of collagen network, whereas glycosaminoglycan depletion was detected only by native T1 and T1 Gd relaxation time constants throughout the tissue and by MTR superficially. T1 , adiabatic T1 ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , and T1 sat correlated significantly with the biomechanical properties while T1 Gd correlated with glycosaminoglycan staining. The findings indicated that most of the studied MRI parameters were sensitive to both glycosaminoglycan content and collagen network integrity, with changes due to enzymatic treatment detected primarily in the superficial tissue. Strong correlation of T1 , adiabatic T1ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , and T1 sat with the altered biomechanical properties, reflects that these parameters were sensitive to critical functional properties of cartilage. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1111-1120, 2016. PMID:26662555

  20. Sources of Variability in Musculo-Articular Stiffness Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Watsford, Mark; Murphy, Aron; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of musculo-articular stiffness (MAS) with the free-oscillation technique is a popular method with a variety of applications. This study examined the sources of variability (load applied and frequency of oscillation) when MAS is assessed. Over two testing occasions, 14 healthy men (27.7±5.2 yr, 1.82±0.04 m, 79.5±8.4 kg) were measured for isometric maximum voluntary contraction and MAS of the knee flexors using submaximal loads relative to the individual's maximum voluntary contraction (MAS%MVC) and a single absolute load (MASABS). As assessment load increased, MAS%MVC (coefficient of variation (CV)  =  8.1–12.1%; standard error of measurement (SEM)  =  51.6–98.8 Nm−1) and frequency (CV  =  4.8–7.0%; SEM  =  0.060–0.075 s−1) variability increased consequently. Further, similar levels of variability arising from load (CV  =  6.7%) and frequency (CV  =  4.8–7.0%) contributed to the overall MAS%MVC variability. The single absolute load condition yielded better reliability scores for MASABS (CV  =  6.5%; SEM  =  40.2 Nm−1) and frequency (CV  =  3.3%; SEM  =  0.039 s−1). Low and constant loads for MAS assessment, which are particularly relevant in the clinical setting, exhibited superior reliability compared to higher loads expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, which are more suitable for sporting situations. Appropriate sample size and minimum detectable change can therefore be determined when prospective studies are carried out. PMID:23667662

  1. Modeling the biomechanics of articular eminence function in anthropoid primates.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Claire E

    2011-11-01

    One of the most prominent features of the cranial component of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the articular eminence (AE). This bar of bone is the primary surface upon which the condyle translates and rotates during movements of the mandible, and is therefore the primary point at which forces are transmitted from the mandible to the cranium during loading of the masticatory apparatus. The shape of the AE is highly variable across primates, and the raised eminence of humans has often been considered a defining feature of the human TMJ, yet few data exist to address whether this variation is functionally significant. This study used a broad interspecific sample of anthropoid primates to elaborate upon and test the predictions of a previously proposed model of AE function. This model suggests that AE inclination acts to resist non-normal forces at the TMJ, thereby maximizing bite forces (BFs). AE inclination was predicted to covary with two specific features of the masticatory apparatus: height of the TMJ above the occlusal plane; and inclination of the masticatory muscles. A correlate of this model is that taxa utilizing more resistant food objects should also exhibit relatively more inclined AEs. Results of the correlation analyses found that AE inclination is strongly correlated with height of the TMJ above the occlusal plane, but less so with inclination of the masticatory muscles. Furthermore, pairwise comparisons of closely related taxa with documented dietary differences found that the AE is consistently more inclined in taxa that utilize more resistant food items. These data preliminarily suggest that variation in AE morphology across anthropoid primates is functionally related to maximizing BFs, and add to the growing dataset of masticatory morphologies linked to feeding behavior.

  2. Telomerase Activity in Articular Chondrocytes Is Lost after Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brooke; Novakofski, Kira D.; Donocoff, Rachel Sacher; Liang, Yan-Xiang Amber

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Telomere length and telomerase activity are important indicators of cellular senescence and replicative ability. Loss of telomerase is associated with ageing and the development of osteoarthritis. Implantation of telomerase-positive cells, chondrocytes, or stem cells expressing a normal chondrocyte phenotype is desired for cartilage repair procedures. The objective of this study was to identify at what age chondrocytes and at what passage bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) become senescent based on telomerase activity. The effect of osteogenic protein–1 (OP-1) or interleukin-1α (IL-1α) treatment on telomerase activity in chondrocytes was also measured to determine the response to anabolic or catabolic stimuli. Methods: Articular cartilage was collected from horses (n = 12) aged 1 month to 18 years. Chondrocytes from prepubescent horses (<15 months) were treated with OP-1 or IL-1α. Bone marrow aspirate from adult horses was collected and cultured for up to 10 days to isolate MSCs. Telomerase activity was measured using the TeloTAGGG Telomerase PCR ELISA kit. Results: Chondrocytes from prepubescent horses were positive for telomerase activity. Treatment with IL-1α resulted in a decrease in chondrocyte telomerase activity; however, treatment with OP-1 did not change telomerase activity. One MSC culture sample was positive for telomerase activity on day 2; all samples were negative for telomerase activity on day 10. Conclusions: These results suggest that chondrocytes from prepubescent donors are potentially more suitable for cartilage repair procedures and that telomerase activity is diminished by anabolic and catabolic cytokine stimulation. If MSCs are utilized in cartilage repair, minimal passaging should be performed prior to implantation. PMID:26069700

  3. Stick-slip friction and wear of articular joints.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-02-12

    Stick-slip friction was observed in articular cartilage under certain loading and sliding conditions and systematically studied. Using the Surface Forces Apparatus, we show that stick-slip friction can induce permanent morphological changes (a change in the roughness indicative of wear/damage) in cartilage surfaces, even under mild loading and sliding conditions. The different load and speed regimes can be represented by friction maps--separating regimes of smooth and stick-slip sliding; damage generally occurs within the stick-slip regimes. Prolonged exposure of cartilage surfaces to stick-slip sliding resulted in a significant increase of surface roughness, indicative of severe morphological changes of the cartilage superficial zone. To further investigate the factors that are conducive to stick-slip and wear, we selectively digested essential components of cartilage: type II collagen, hyaluronic acid (HA), and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Compared with the normal cartilage, HA and GAG digestions modified the stick-slip behavior and increased surface roughness (wear) during sliding, whereas collagen digestion decreased the surface roughness. Importantly, friction forces increased up to 2, 10, and 5 times after HA, GAGs, and collagen digestion, respectively. Also, each digestion altered the friction map in different ways. Our results show that (i) wear is not directly related to the friction coefficient but (ii) more directly related to stick-slip sliding, even when present at small amplitudes, and that (iii) the different molecular components of joints work synergistically to prevent wear. Our results also suggest potential noninvasive diagnostic tools for sensing stick-slip in joints.

  4. Pediatric and adolescent intra-articular fractures of the calcaneus.

    PubMed

    Dudda, Marcel; Kruppa, Christiane; Geßmann, Jan; Seybold, Dominik; Schildhauer, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    Calcaneal fractures in childhood are very rare, whereas particularly intra-articular displaced fractures are not typical in skeletally immature children. Various techniques of osteosynthesis have been described. This study aimed to determine clinical and radiological outcome after surgical treatment of intraarticular calcaneal fractures. Fourteen intraarticular fractures of the calcaneus were included in this retrospective study. Eleven children (2 girls and 9 boys) aged 6-16 years (average age 11.5 years) underwent surgical treatment. One child sustained a Type II open fracture of both calcanei. All injuries occurred after a high-energy trauma; 3 patients had multiple additional fractures. The clinical and radiological postoperative follow up was an average 44 months. In 4 cases, a reduction through a minimally invasive approach and fixation with K-wires or screws could be achieved. Eleven fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation with plate osteosynthesis, K-wires or screws. In one case with open fractures of both heel bones, an additional external fixator was applied. The surgical treatment approach adopted enabled the pre-operative Böhler's angle (average 16°) to be improved to an average 30°. In all cases, except for the patient with open fractures, a good functional result and outcome could be achieved. In calcaneal fractures in childhood, anatomical reduction is the determining factor, as in fractures in adults, whereas the surgical technique seems to have no influence on clinical outcome in children. The wound healing problems that have often been described were not observed in this age group.

  5. Pediatric and Adolescent Intra-Articular Fractures of the Calcaneus

    PubMed Central

    Dudda, Marcel; Kruppa, Christiane; Geßmann, Jan; Seybold, Dominik; Schildhauer, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Calcaneal fractures in childhood are very rare, whereas particularly intra-articular displaced fractures are not typical in skeletally immature children. Various techniques of osteosynthesis have been described. This study aimed to determine clinical and radiological outcome after surgical treatment of intraarticular calcaneal fractures. Fourteen intraarticular fractures of the calcaneus were included in this retrospective study. Eleven children (2 girls and 9 boys) aged 6-16 years (average age 11.5 years) underwent surgical treatment. One child sustained a Type II open fracture of both calcanei. All injuries occurred after a high-energy trauma; 3 patients had multiple additional fractures. The clinical and radiological postoperative follow up was an average 44 months. In 4 cases, a reduction through a minimally invasive approach and fixation with K-wires or screws could be achieved. Eleven fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation with plate osteosynthesis, K-wires or screws. In one case with open fractures of both heel bones, an additional external fixator was applied. The surgical treatment approach adopted enabled the pre-operative Böhler’s angle (average 16°) to be improved to an average 30°. In all cases, except for the patient with open fractures, a good functional result and outcome could be achieved. In calcaneal fractures in childhood, anatomical reduction is the determining factor, as in fractures in adults, whereas the surgical technique seems to have no influence on clinical outcome in children. The wound healing problems that have often been described were not observed in this age group. PMID:23888207

  6. Arthroscopic laser in intra-articular knee cartilage disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1996-12-01

    Different assemblies have endeavored to develop arthroscopic laser surgery. Various lasers have been tried in the treatment of orthopaedic problems, and the most useful has turned out to be the Hol-YAG laser 2.1 nm which is a near- contact laser. By using the laser as a powerful tool, and cutting back on the power level, one is able to better achieve the desired treatment effect. Clinical studies to evaluating the role of the laser in different arthroscopic knee procedures, comparing to conventional techniques, showed that the overall outcome attains a momentous confidence level which is shifted to the side of the laser versus the conventional for all maneuvers, barring meniscectomy where there is not perceiving disparity between laser versus the conventional. Meniscectomy continues to be one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Laser provides a single tool which can ablate and debride meniscal rims with efficiency and safety. Chondroplasty can also be accomplished with ease using defocused laser energy. Both lateral release and soft tissue cermilization benefit from the cutting effect of laser along with its hemostatic effect. Synovial reduction with a defocused laser is also easily accomplished. By one gadget, one can cut, ablate, smooth, coagulate, congeal and with authentic tissue depth control The future of laser arthroscopic surgery lies in its ability to weld or repair tissues. Our research study has shown that laser activated photoactive dyes can produce a molecular bonding of collagen fibers, and therefore a repair 'weld' can be achieved with both meniscal tissues and with articular cartilage lesions.

  7. Modeling IL-1 induced degradation of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Kar, Saptarshi; Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Li, Yang; Wang, Yang; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2016-03-15

    In this study, we develop a computational model to simulate the in vitro biochemical degradation of articular cartilage explants sourced from the femoropatellar grooves of bovine calves. Cartilage explants were incubated in culture medium with and without the inflammatory cytokine IL-1α. The spatio-temporal evolution of the cartilage explant's extracellular matrix components is modelled. Key variables in the model include chondrocytes, aggrecan, collagen, aggrecanase, collagenase and IL-1α. The model is first calibrated for aggrecan homeostasis of cartilage in vivo, then for data on (explant) controls, and finally for data on the IL-1α driven proteolysis of aggrecan and collagen over a 4-week period. The model was found to fit the experimental data best when: (i) chondrocytes continue to synthesize aggrecan during the cytokine challenge, (ii) a one to two day delay is introduced between the addition of IL-1α to the culture medium and subsequent aggrecanolysis, (iii) collagen degradation does not commence until the total concentration of aggrecan (i.e. both intact and degraded aggrecan) at any specific location within the explant becomes ≤ 1.5 mg/ml and (iv) degraded aggrecan formed due to the IL-1α induced proteolysis of intact aggrecan protects the collagen network while collagen degrades in a two-step process which, together, significantly modulate the collagen network degradation. Under simulated in vivo conditions, the model predicts increased aggrecan turnover rates in the presence of synovial IL-1α, consistent with experimental observations. Such models may help to infer the course of events in vivo following traumatic joint injury, and may also prove useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficiency of various therapeutic molecules that could be employed to avoid or modify the course of cartilage disease states. PMID:26874194

  8. Interspecific scaling patterns of talar articular surfaces within primates and their closest living relatives

    PubMed Central

    Yapuncich, Gabriel S; Boyer, Doug M

    2014-01-01

    The articular facets of interosseous joints must transmit forces while maintaining relatively low stresses. To prevent overloading, joints that transmit higher forces should therefore have larger facet areas. The relative contributions of body mass and muscle-induced forces to joint stress are unclear, but generate opposing hypotheses. If mass-induced forces dominate, facet area should scale with positive allometry to body mass. Alternatively, muscle-induced forces should cause facets to scale isometrically with body mass. Within primates, both scaling patterns have been reported for articular surfaces of the femoral and humeral heads, but more distal elements are less well studied. Additionally, examination of complex articular surfaces has largely been limited to linear measurements, so that ‘true area' remains poorly assessed. To re-assess these scaling relationships, we examine the relationship between body size and articular surface areas of the talus. Area measurements were taken from microCT scan-generated surfaces of all talar facets from a comprehensive sample of extant euarchontan taxa (primates, treeshrews, and colugos). Log-transformed data were regressed on literature-derived log-body mass using reduced major axis and phylogenetic least squares regressions. We examine the scaling patterns of muscle mass and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) to body mass, as these relationships may complicate each model. Finally, we examine the scaling pattern of hindlimb muscle PCSA to talar articular surface area, a direct test of the effect of mass-induced forces on joint surfaces. Among most groups, there is an overall trend toward positive allometry for articular surfaces. The ectal (= posterior calcaneal) facet scales with positive allometry among all groups except ‘sundatherians', strepsirrhines, galagids, and lorisids. The medial tibial facet scales isometrically among all groups except lemuroids. Scaling coefficients are not correlated with sample

  9. [Basophilic line of the articular cartilage in normal and various pathological states].

    PubMed

    Gongadze, L R

    1987-04-01

    Epiphyses of long tubular bones in the man and animals of various age, as well as experimental material of the adjuvant arthritis, with special reference to the basal part of the articular cartilage have been studied by means of histological, histochemical and histometrical methods. The structural-chemical organization of the basophilic line (tidemark) of the articular cartilage ensures its barrier role and participation in regulating selective permeability. Reconstruction of the tidemark in the process of physiological ageing and in cases of the articular pathology is aimed to preserve its integrity and in this way a complete differentiation of the noncalcified and calcified structures is secured. Disturbance of the basophilic line results in changes of the articular selective permeability, in invasion of vessels and structural elements of the bone marrow, and in development of profound distrophic and destructive changes of the cartilage--in deforming artrosis. Deflations in the structural-chemical organization of the tidemark indicate certain disturbances in the state of the system articular cartilage--subchondral bone. These data can be of prognostic importance.

  10. Intra-Articular Synovial Sarcomas: Incidence and Differentiating Features from Localized Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis

    PubMed Central

    Nordemar, D.; Öberg, J.; Brosjö, O.; Skorpil, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and investigate if any radiological variables can differentiate them from localized (unifocal) pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) and if multivariate data analysis could be used as a complementary clinical tool. Methods. Magnetic resonance images and radiographs of 7 cases of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and 14 cases of localized PVNS were blindedly reviewed. Variables analyzed were size, extra-articular growth, tumor border, blooming, calcification, contrast media enhancement, effusion, bowl of grapes sign, triple signal intensity sign, synovial low signal intensity, synovitis, age, and gender. Univariate and multivariate data analysis, the method of partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), were used. Register data on all synovial sarcomas were extracted for comparison. Results. The incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas was 3%. PLS-DA showed that age, effusion, size, and gender were the most important factors for discrimination between sarcomas and localized PVNS. No sarcomas were misclassified as PVNS with PLS-DA, while some PVNS were misclassified as sarcomas. Conclusions. The most important variables in differentiating intra-articular sarcomas from localized PVNS were age, effusion, size, and gender. Multivariate data analysis can be helpful as additive information to avoid a biopsy, if the tumor is classified as most likely being PVNS. PMID:26819567

  11. Lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Minami, Shinji; Miyake, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint is extremely rare. We describe an 11-year-old boy who complained of a gradual swelling mass of the lateral knee joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a high signal intensity tumor on T1- and T2-weighted images with a thickened septa and nodular lesion that showed low signal intensity. The radiologist suggested the possible differential diagnosis of well-differentiated liposarcoma. At operation, the tumor was found under the iliotibial tract and was not in contact with the knee joint. Histopathologically, this lesion was diagnosed as lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint. On MRI, the appearance of lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint differed from that of conventional intra-articular lipoma arborescens. In this report, we describe a case of extra-articular lipoma arborescens of the knee joint bursa and discuss the diagnosis and etiology. PMID:27382924

  12. Expression of novel extracellular sulfatases Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 in normal and osteoarthritic articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Otsuki, Shuhei; Taniguchi, Noboru; Grogan, Shawn P; D'Lima, Darryl; Kinoshita, Mitsuo; Lotz, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Changes in sulfation of cartilage glycosaminoglycans as mediated by sulfatases can regulate growth factor signaling. The aim of this study was to analyze expression patterns of recently identified extracellular sulfatases Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 in articular cartilage and chondrocytes. Methods Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 expressions in human articular cartilage from normal donors and patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and in normal and aged mouse joints were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Results In normal articular cartilage, Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 mRNAs and proteins were expressed predominantly in the superficial zone. OA cartilage showed significantly higher Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 mRNA expression as compared with normal human articular cartilage. Sulf protein expression in OA cartilage was prominent in the cell clusters. Western blotting revealed a profound increase in Sulf protein levels in human OA cartilage. In normal mouse joints, Sulf expression was similar to human cartilage, and with increasing age, there was a marked upregulation of Sulf. Conclusion The results show low levels of Sulf expression, restricted to the superficial zone in normal articular cartilage. Sulf mRNA and protein levels are increased in aging and OA cartilage. This increased Sulf expression may change the sulfation patterns of heparan sulfate proteoglycans and growth factor activities and thus contribute to abnormal chondrocyte activation and cartilage degradation in OA. PMID:18507859

  13. Heterotopic autologous chondrocyte transplantation--a realistic approach to support articular cartilage repair?

    PubMed

    El Sayed, Karym; Haisch, Andreas; John, Thilo; Marzahn, Ulrike; Lohan, Anke; Müller, Riccarda D; Kohl, Benjamin; Ertel, Wolfgang; Stoelzel, Katharina; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2010-12-01

    Injured articular cartilage is limited in its capacity to heal. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is a suitable technique for cartilage repair, but it requires articular cartilage biopsies for sufficient autologous chondrocyte expansion in vitro. Hence, ACT is restricted by donor-site morbidity and autologous articular chondrocytes availability. The use of nonarticular heterotopic chondrocytes such as auricular, nasoseptal, or costal chondrocytes for ACT might overcome these limitations: heterotopic sources show lesser donor-site morbidity and a comparable extracellular cartilage matrix synthesis profile to articular cartilage. However, heterotopic (h)ACT poses a challenge. Particular tissue characteristics of heterotopic cartilage, divergent culturing peculiarities of heterotopic chondrocytes, and the advantages and drawbacks related to these diverse cartilage sources were critically discussed. Finally, available in vitro and in vivo experimental (h)ACT approaches were summarized. The quality of the cartilage engineered using heterotopic chondrocytes remains partly controversy due to the divergent methodologies and culture conditions used. While some encouraging in vivo results using (h)ACT have been demonstrated, standardized culturing protocols are strongly required. However, whether heterotopic chondrocytes implanted into joint cartilage defects maintain their particular tissue properties or can be adapted via tissue engineering strategies to fulfill regular articular cartilage functions requires further studies.

  14. Role of computer aided detection (CAD) integration: case study with meniscal and articular cartilage CAD applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdar, Nabile; Ramakrishna, Bharath; Saiprasad, Ganesh; Siddiqui, Khan; Siegel, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    Knee-related injuries involving the meniscal or articular cartilage are common and require accurate diagnosis and surgical intervention when appropriate. With proper techniques and experience, confidence in detection of meniscal tears and articular cartilage abnormalities can be quite high. However, for radiologists without musculoskeletal training, diagnosis of such abnormalities can be challenging. In this paper, the potential of improving diagnosis through integration of computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithms for automatic detection of meniscal tears and articular cartilage injuries of the knees is studied. An integrated approach in which the results of algorithms evaluating either meniscal tears or articular cartilage injuries provide feedback to each other is believed to improve the diagnostic accuracy of the individual CAD algorithms due to the known association between abnormalities in these distinct anatomic structures. The correlation between meniscal tears and articular cartilage injuries is exploited to improve the final diagnostic results of the individual algorithms. Preliminary results from the integrated application are encouraging and more comprehensive tests are being planned.

  15. Lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Shinji; Miyake, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint is extremely rare. We describe an 11-year-old boy who complained of a gradual swelling mass of the lateral knee joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a high signal intensity tumor on T1- and T2-weighted images with a thickened septa and nodular lesion that showed low signal intensity. The radiologist suggested the possible differential diagnosis of well-differentiated liposarcoma. At operation, the tumor was found under the iliotibial tract and was not in contact with the knee joint. Histopathologically, this lesion was diagnosed as lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint. On MRI, the appearance of lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint differed from that of conventional intra-articular lipoma arborescens. In this report, we describe a case of extra-articular lipoma arborescens of the knee joint bursa and discuss the diagnosis and etiology. PMID:27382924

  16. Directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells into chondrogenic lineages for articular cartilage treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lach, Michał; Richter, Magdalena; Pawlicz, Jarosław; Suchorska, Wiktoria M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, increases in the number of articular cartilage injuries caused by environmental factors or pathological conditions have led to a notable rise in the incidence of premature osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis, considered a disease of civilization, is the leading cause of disability. At present, standard methods for treating damaged articular cartilage, including autologous chondrocyte implantation or microfracture, are short-term solutions with important side effects. Emerging treatments include the use of induced pluripotent stem cells, a technique that could provide a new tool for treatment of joint damage. However, research in this area is still early, and no optimal protocol for transforming induced pluripotent stem cells into chondrocytes has yet been established. Developments in our understanding of cartilage developmental biology, together with the use of modern technologies in the field of tissue engineering, provide an opportunity to create a complete functional model of articular cartilage. PMID:25383175

  17. What can biophotonics tell us about the 3D microstructure of articular cartilage?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Connective tissues such as articular cartilage have been the subject of study using novel optical techniques almost since the invention of polarized light microscopy (PLM). Early studies of polarized light micrographs were the main evidential basis for the establishment of quantitative models of articular cartilage collagen structure by Benninghoff and others. Even now, state of the art optical techniques including quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM), optical coherence tomography (OCT), polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT), second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy, Raman and optical hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence imaging are providing new insights into articular cartilage structure from the nanoscale through to the mesoscale. New insights are promised by emerging modalities such as optical elastography. This short review highlights some key recent results from modern optical techniques. PMID:25694964

  18. Effects of altered afferent articular input on sensation, proprioception, muscle tone and sympathetic reflex responses.

    PubMed

    Slosberg, M

    1988-10-01

    The influence of afferent articular and periarticular input on muscle tone, joint mobility, proprioception and pain is of considerable interest to practitioners using manipulation. It has long been hypothesized that dysfunctional articulations may generate altered patterns of afferent input. This article reviews the relevant studies that have investigated the impact of articular input on efferent activity under normal conditions and under conditions of altered joint function. The findings suggest that sensory input does have a substantial effect on efferent function and sensation. Furthermore, the studies indicate that the pattern of articular input may be significantly modified by joint inflammation, trauma and effusion and result in changes of muscle tone, joint mobility, proprioception and pain. PMID:3069947

  19. Irrigating solutions used in arthroscopy and their effect on articular cartilage. An in vivo study

    SciTech Connect

    Arciero, R.A.; Little, J.S.; Liebenberg, S.P.; Parr, T.J.

    1986-11-01

    The effect of arthroscopic irrigating solutions on articular cartilage was determined by the use of an animal model. Rabbit knee joints were irrigated continuously for two hours with either normal saline, Ringer's lactate, or sterile water. Subsequently, the rate of incorporation of /sup 35/SO/sub 4/ by articular cartilage was used to measure the effect of the irrigants on chondrocyte metabolism. In addition, the irrigated groups were compared to an unirrigated control group. There was no significant difference in /sup 35/SO/sub 4/ incorporation between the groups. This suggested that none of the irrigating solutions used in this study adversely affected articular cartilage function. On the basis of these findings, it appears that normal saline, Ringer's lactate, and sterile water can be safely used as irrigating solutions during most arthroscopic procedures.

  20. Intra-Articular Giant Heterotopic Ossification following Total Knee Arthroplasty for Charcot Arthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tsuge, Shintaro; Aoki, Yasuchika; Sonobe, Masato; Shibata, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Yu; Nakagawa, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Although the Charcot arthropathy may be associated with serious complications, total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the preferred choice of treatment by patients. This case report presents an 80-year-old man with intra-articular giant heterotopic ossification following loosening of femoral and tibial implants and femoral condylar fracture. He had undergone TKA because of Charcot neuropathy seven years ago and had been doing well since. Immediately after a left knee sprain, he became unable to walk. Because he had developed a skin ulcer on his left calf where methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was detected, we postponed revision surgery until the ulcer was completely healed. While waiting, intra-articular bony fragments grew larger and formed giant heterotopic ossified masses. Eventually, the patient underwent revision surgery, and two major ossified masses were carefully and successfully extirpated. It should be noted that intra-articular heterotopic giant ossification is a significant complication after TKA for neuropathic arthropathy. PMID:24151574

  1. What can biophotonics tell us about the 3D microstructure of articular cartilage?

    PubMed

    Matcher, Stephen J

    2015-02-01

    Connective tissues such as articular cartilage have been the subject of study using novel optical techniques almost since the invention of polarized light microscopy (PLM). Early studies of polarized light micrographs were the main evidential basis for the establishment of quantitative models of articular cartilage collagen structure by Benninghoff and others. Even now, state of the art optical techniques including quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM), optical coherence tomography (OCT), polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT), second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy, Raman and optical hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence imaging are providing new insights into articular cartilage structure from the nanoscale through to the mesoscale. New insights are promised by emerging modalities such as optical elastography. This short review highlights some key recent results from modern optical techniques. PMID:25694964

  2. Articular-cartilage matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing protein. Characterization and immunolocalization.

    PubMed Central

    Loeser, R; Carlson, C S; Tulli, H; Jerome, W G; Miller, L; Wallin, R

    1992-01-01

    Matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla)-containing protein (MGP) was found to be present in articular cartilage by Western-blot analysis of guanidinium chloride extracts of human and bovine cartilage and was further localized by immunohistochemical studies on human and monkey specimens. In newborn articular cartilage MGP was present diffusely throughout the matrix, whereas in growth-plate cartilage it was seen mainly in late hypertrophic and calcifying-zone chondrocytes. In adult articular cartilage MGP was present primarily in chondrocytes and the pericellular matrix. Immunoelectron microscopy studies revealed an association between MGP and vesicular structures with an appearance consistent with matrix vesicles. MGP may be an important regulator of cartilage calcification because of its localization in cartilage and the known affinity of Gla-containing proteins for Ca2+ and hydroxyapatite. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1540125

  3. Morphological, genetic and phenotypic comparison between human articular chondrocytes and cultured chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mata-Miranda, Mónica Maribel; Martinez-Martinez, Claudia María; Noriega-Gonzalez, Jesús Emmanuel; Paredes-Gonzalez, Luis Enrique; Vázquez-Zapién, Gustavo Jesús

    2016-08-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular and aneural tissue with limited capacity for regeneration. On large articular lesions, it is recommended to use regenerative medicine strategies, like autologous chondrocyte implantation. There is a concern about morphological changes that chondrocytes suffer once they have been isolated and cultured. Due to the fact that there is little evidence that compares articular cartilage chondrocytes with cultured chondrocytes, in this research we proposed to obtain chondrocytes from human articular cartilage, compare them with themselves once they have been cultured and characterize them through genetic, phenotypic and morphological analysis. Knee articular cartilage samples of 10 mm were obtained, and each sample was divided into two fragments; a portion was used to determine gene expression, and from the other portion, chondrocytes were obtained by enzymatic disaggregation, in order to be cultured and expanded in vitro. Subsequently, morphological, genetic and phenotypic characteristics were compared between in situ (articular cartilage) and cultured chondrocytes. Obtained cultured chondrocytes were rounded in shape, possessing a large nucleus with condensed chromatin and a clear cytoplasm; histological appearance was quite similar to typical chondrocyte. The expression levels of COL2A1 and COL10A1 genes were higher in cultured chondrocytes than in situ chondrocytes; moreover, the expression of COL1A1 was almost undetectable on cultured chondrocytes; likewise, COL2 and SOX9 proteins were detected by immunofluorescence. We concluded that chondrocytes derived from adult human cartilage cultured for 21 days do not tend to dedifferentiate, maintaining their capacity to produce matrix and also retaining their synthesis capacity and morphology.

  4. Indicators of Walking Speed in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Relative Influence of Articular, Psychosocial, and Body Composition Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Lusa, Amanda L; Amigues, Isabelle; Kramer, Henry R; Dam, Thuy-Tien; Giles, Jon T

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the contributions from and interactions between articular swelling and damage, psychosocial factors, and body composition characteristics on walking speed in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods RA patients underwent the timed 400 meter long-corridor walk. Demographics, self-reported levels of depressive symptoms and fatigue, RA characteristics, and body composition [using whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and abdominal and thigh computed tomography (CT)] were assessed and their associations with walking speed explored. Results A total of 132 RA patients had data for the 400 meter walk, among whom 107 (81%) completed the full 400 meters. Significant multivariable indicators of slower walking speed were older age, higher depression scores, higher reported pain and fatigue, higher swollen and replaced joint counts, higher cumulative prednisone exposure, non-treatment with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and worse body composition. These features accounted for 60% of the modeled variability in walking speed. Among specific articular features, slower walking speed was primarily correlated with large/medium lower-extremity joint involvement. However, these articular features accounted for only 21% of the explainable variability in walking speed. Having any relevant articular characteristics was associated with a 20% lower walking speed among those with worse body composition (p<0.001) compared with only a 6% lower speed among those with better body composition (p-value for interaction=0.010). Conclusions Psychosocial factors and body composition are potentially reversible contributors to walking speed in RA. Relative to articular disease activity and damage, non-articular indicators were collectively more potent indicators of an individual's mobility limitations. PMID:25155859

  5. Identification of a Prg4-positive articular cartilage progenitor cell population

    PubMed Central

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Zhang, Minjie; Ionescu, Andreia; Ayturk, Ugur M.; Ono, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Akio; Kronenberg, Henry; Warman, Matthew L.; Lassar, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We generated knock-in mice that express a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase from the Prg4 locus (Prg4GFPCreERt2), and used these animals to fate-map the progeny of Prg4-positive articular cartilage cells at various ages. Methods We crossed Prg4GFPCreERt2 mice to Rosa26floxlacZ or Rosa26mTmG reporter strains, administered tamoxifen to the double heterozygous offspring at different ages, and assayed Cre-mediated recombination by histochemistry and/or fluorescence microscopy. Results In 1-month-old mice, the expression of the Prg4GFPCreERt2 allele mirrors expression of endogenous Prg4 and, when tamoxifen is given for 10 days, causes Cre-mediated recombination in ~70% of the superficial-most chondrocytes. Prg4GFPCreERt2 expressing cells are mostly confined to the top three cell layers of the articular cartilage in 1-month-old mice, but descendants of these cells are located in deeper regions of the articular cartilage in aged mice. At embryonic day 17.5, Prg4GFPCreERt2 expressing cells are largely restricted to the superficial-most cell layer of the forming joint, yet at approximately 1 year, progeny of these cells span the depth of the articular cartilage. Conclusions Our results indicate that Prg4-expressing cells located at the joint surface in the embryo serve as a progenitor population for all deeper layers of the mature articular cartilage. Also, our data reveal that Prg4GFPCreERt2 is expressed by superficial chondrocytes in young mice, but expands into deeper regions of the articular cartilage as the animals age. The Prg4GFPCreERt2 allele should be a useful tool for inducing efficient Cre-mediated recombination of floxed alleles at sites of Prg4 expression. PMID:25603997

  6. Caudal vertebral body articular surface morphology correlates with functional tail use in anthropoid primates.

    PubMed

    Deane, Andrew S; Russo, Gabrielle A; Muchlinski, Magdalena N; Organ, Jason M

    2014-11-01

    Prehensile tails, capable of suspending the entire body weight of an animal, have evolved in parallel in New World monkeys (Platyrrhini): once in the Atelinae (Alouatta, Ateles, Brachyteles, Lagothrix), and once in the Cebinae (Cebus, Sapajus). Structurally, the prehensile tails of atelines and cebines share morphological features that distinguish them from nonprehensile tails, including longer proximal tail regions, well-developed hemal processes, robust caudal vertebrae resistant to higher torsional and bending stresses, and caudal musculature capable of producing higher contractile forces. The functional significance of shape variation in the articular surfaces of caudal vertebral bodies, however, is relatively less well understood. Given that tail use differs considerably among prehensile and nonprehensile anthropoids, it is reasonable to predict that caudal vertebral body articular surface area and shape will respond to use-specific patterns of mechanical loading. We examine the potential for intervertebral articular surface contour curvature and relative surface area to discriminate between prehensile-tailed and nonprehensile-tailed platyrrhines and cercopithecoids. The proximal and distal intervertebral articular surfaces of the first (Ca1), transitional and longest caudal vertebrae were examined for individuals representing 10 anthropoid taxa with differential patterns of tail-use. Study results reveal significant morphological differences consistent with the functional demands of unique patterns of tail use for all vertebral elements sampled. Prehensile-tailed platyrrhines that more frequently use their tails in suspension (atelines) had significantly larger and more convex intervertebral articular surfaces than all nonprehensile-tailed anthropoids examined here, although the intervertebral articular surface contour curvatures of large, terrestrial cercopithecoids (i.e., Papio sp.) converge on the ateline condition. Prehensile-tailed platyrrhines that more

  7. Alterations in periarticular bone and cross talk between subchondral bone and articular cartilage in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The articular cartilage and the subchondral bone form a biocomposite that is uniquely adapted to the transfer of loads across the diarthrodial joint. During the evolution of the osteoarthritic process biomechanical and biological processes result in alterations in the composition, structure and functional properties of these tissues. Given the intimate contact between the cartilage and bone, alterations of either tissue will modulate the properties and function of the other joint component. The changes in periarticular bone tend to occur very early in the development of OA. Although chondrocytes also have the capacity to modulate their functional state in response to loading, the capacity of these cells to repair and modify their surrounding extracellular matrix is relatively limited in comparison to the adjacent subchondral bone. This differential adaptive capacity likely underlies the more rapid appearance of detectable skeletal changes in OA in comparison to the articular cartilage. The OA changes in periarticular bone include increases in subchondral cortical bone thickness, gradual decreases in subchondral trabeular bone mass, formation of marginal joint osteophytes, development of bone cysts and advancement of the zone of calcified cartilage between the articular cartilage and subchondral bone. The expansion of the zone of calcified cartilage contributes to overall thinning of the articular cartilage. The mechanisms involved in this process include the release of soluble mediators from chondrocytes in the deep zones of the articular cartilage and/or the influences of microcracks that have initiated focal remodeling in the calcified cartilage and subchondral bone in an attempt to repair the microdamage. There is the need for further studies to define the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the interaction between subchondral bone and articular cartilage and for applying this information to the development of therapeutic interventions to improve the

  8. Single cell sorting identifies progenitor cell population from full thickness bovine articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yin; Zheng, Hongjun; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To date, no approved clinical intervention successfully prevents the progressive degradation of injured articular cartilage that leads to osteoarthritis (OA). Stem/progenitor cell populations within tissues of diarthrodial joint have shown their therapeutic potential in treating OA. However, this potential has not been fully realized due in part to the heterogeneity of these subpopulations. Characterization of clonal populations derived from a single cell may help identify more homogenous stem/progenitor populations within articular cartilage. Moreover, chondrogenic potential of clonal populations from different zones could be further examined to elucidate their differential roles in maintaining articular cartilage homeostasis. Method We combined FACS (Fluorescence-activated cell sorting) and clonogenicity screening to identify stem/progenitor cells cloned from single cells. High-efficiency colony-forming cells (HCCs) were isolated, and evaluated for stem/progenitor cell characteristics. HCCs were also isolated from different zones of articular cartilage. Their function was compared by lineage-specific gene expression, and differentiation potential. Results A difference in colony-forming efficiency was observed in terms of colony sizes. HCCs were highly clonogenic and multipotent, and overexpressed stem/progenitor cell markers. Also, proliferation and migration associated genes were over-expressed in HCCs. HCCs showed zonal differences with deep HCCs more chondrogenic and osteogenic than superficial HCCs. Conclusion Our approach is a simple yet practical way to identify homogeneous stem/progenitor cell populations with clonal origin. The discovery of progenitor cells demonstrates the intrinsic self-repairing potential of articular cartilage. Differences in differentiation potential may represent the distinct roles of superficial and deep zone stem/progenitor cells in the maintenance of articular cartilage homeostasis. PMID:25038490

  9. Dual effect of nitric oxide in articular inflammatory pain in zymosan-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    da S Rocha, José C; Peixoto, Magno E B; Jancar, Sônia; de Q Cunha, Fernando; de A Ribeiro, Ronaldo; da Rocha, Francisco A C

    2002-06-01

    The contribution of nitric oxide (NO) to articular pain in arthritis induced by zymosan (1 mg, intra articular) in rats was assessed by measuring articular incapacitation (AI). Systemic treatment with the non-selective NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME (10 - 100 mg kg(-1) i.p.) or with the selective iNOS inhibitors aminoguanidine (AG; 10 - 100 mg kg(-1) i.p.) or 1400W (0.5 - 1 mg kg(-1) s.c.) inhibited the AI induced by injection of zymosan 30 min later. Local (intra articular) treatment with the NOS inhibitors (L-NAME or AG, 0.1 - 1 micromol; 1400W, 0.01 (micromol) 30 min before zymosan also inhibited the AI. Systemic or local treatment with the NOS inhibitors (L-NAME; AG, 100 mg kg(-1) i.p. or 0.1 micromol joint(-1); 1400W, 1 mg kg(-1) s.c. or 0.01 micromol joint(-1)), 2 h after zymosan did not affect the subsequent AI. Local treatment with the NO donors SNP or SIN-1, 2 h after zymosan did inhibit AI. L-NAME and AG, given i.p. inhibited nitrite but not prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) levels in the joints. L-NAME (100 mg kg(-1)) but not AG (100 mg kg(-1)) increased mean arterial blood pressure. Neither L-NAME, AG nor the NO donor SIN-1 altered articular oedema induced by zymosan. In conclusion, inhibitors of iNOS decrease pain in zymosan arthritis only when given before the zymosan. This was not due to inhibition of articular PGE(2) release or oedema. NO donors also promoted antinociception in zymosan arthritis without affecting oedema.

  10. Autoradiographic evidence of sup 125 I-. beta. -endorphin binding sites in the articular cartilage of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Castano, M.T.; Freire-Garabal, M.; Giraldez, M.; Nunez, M.J.; Belmonte, A.; Couceiro, J.; Jorge, J. )

    1991-01-01

    After {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin was intravenously injected to rats, an autoradiographic study of distal femur articular cartilage was performed. Results show a specific binding of {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin to chondrocytes, suggesting the possible existence of an opiate modulation of articular cartilage.

  11. Mapping the Articular Contact Area of the Long Head of the Biceps Tendon on the Humeral Head

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Brent J.; Byram, Ian R.; Lathrop, Ray A.; Dunn, Warren R.; Kuhn, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to calculate the contact surface area of the long head of the biceps (LHB) in neutral position and abduction. We sought to determine whether the LHB articulates with the humeral head in a consistent pattern comparing articular contact area in neutral position and abduction. Eleven fresh frozen matched cadaveric shoulders were analyzed. The path of the biceps tendon on the articular surface of the humeral head and the total articular surface were digitized using a MicronTracker 2 H3-60 three-dimensional optical tracker. Contact surface area was significantly less in abduction than in neutral position (P = 0.002) with a median ratio of 41% (36%, 47.5%). Ratios of contact area in neutral position to full articular surface area were consistent between left and right shoulders (rho = 1, P = 0.017) as were ratios of abduction area to full articular surface area (rho = 0.97, P = 0.005). The articular contact surface area is significantly greater in neutral position than abduction. The ratios of articular contact surface areas to total humeral articular surface areas have a narrow range and are consistent between left and right shoulders of the same cadaver. PMID:25210631

  12. Therapy for spondyloarthritis: the role of extra-articular manifestations (eye, skin).

    PubMed

    Carron, Philippe; Van Praet, Liesbet; Jacques, Peggy; Elewaut, Dirk; Van den Bosch, Filip

    2012-08-01

    Spondyloarthritis can be considered one of the prototypes (besides rheumatoid arthritis) of an inflammatory rheumatic disease. The locomotor system is prominently involved with arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, sacroiliitis, and/or axial disease; but besides the rheumatologic component, other body systems are frequently affected. Extra-articular manifestations are all the medical conditions and symptoms that are not directly related to the locomotor system. Besides inflammatory bowel diseases, the major concept-related extra-articular manifestations are located in the eye (acute anterior uveitis) and the skin (psoriasis). This review focuses on the possible implications of these nonrheumatologic manifestations regarding the treatment of spondyloarthritis.

  13. Arthroscopic Excision of Intra-Articular Hip Osteoid Osteoma: A Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Nehme, Alexandre H.; Bou Ghannam, Alaa G.; Imad, Joseph P.; Jabbour, Fouad C.; Moucharafieh, Ramzi; Wehbe, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Intra-articular osteoid osteoma is uncommon accounting for approximately 12% of all osteoid osteomas. It presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges since several traumatic or degenerative pathologies of the joint can be simulated with delay in the diagnosis. We report the clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings in 2 cases of intra-articular osteoid osteoma of the femoral neck and of the acetabulum. Technical aspects of arthroscopic excision and results of surgery are discussed. Arthroscopy allowed complete excision of the osteoid osteomas, with a short postoperative rehabilitation and excellent functional results. PMID:23304593

  14. The potential role of Chinese medicine in ameliorating extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Liu, Rui-lian

    2011-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease chiefly affecting synovial membranes of multiple joints. The clinical manifestations are highly variable. Besides joint affection, extra-articular manifestations always occur in RA patients, such as lung, blood vessel, heart, endocrine glands, hematological system, and nervous system affections. In addition to Western medicine therapy, Chinese medicine also plays a significant role in the treatment of RA with good efficacy and less adverse reactions. This paper summarizes the effects of xinfeng capsule, a Chinese medicine, and the mechanisms of its action in ameliorating the extra-articular manifestations based on a series of clinical and experimental researches.

  15. Time-dependent processes in stem cell-based tissue engineering of articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Gadjanski, Ivana; Spiller, Kara; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC), situated in diarthrodial joints at the end of the long bones, is composed of a single cell type (chondrocytes) embedded in dense extracellular matrix comprised of collagens and proteoglycans. AC is avascular and alymphatic and is not innervated. At first glance, such a seemingly simple tissue appears to be an easy target for the rapidly developing field of tissue engineering. However, cartilage engineering has proven to be very challenging. We focus on time-dependent processes associated with the development of native cartilage starting from stem cells, and the modalities for utilizing these processes for tissue engineering of articular cartilage. PMID:22016073

  16. Actions of Two Bi-Articular Muscles of the Lower Extremity: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Landin, Dennis; Thompson, Melissa; Reid, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    The extremities of the human body contain several bi-articular muscles. The actions produced by muscles at the joints they cross are greatly influenced by joint moment arms and muscle length. These factors are dynamic and subject to change as joint angles are altered. Therefore, to more completely understand the actions of such muscles, the angles of both joints must be manipulated. This report reviews investigations, which have explored the actions of two bi-articular muscles of the lower extremities (gastrocnemius and rectus femoris) as the joints they cross are moved into various combinations of angles. The findings have both clinical and physical performance ramifications. PMID:27298656

  17. Prolonged effect of iodoacetate on articular cartilage and its modification by an anti-rheumatic drug.

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, J.; Hoedt-Schmidt, S.; Kalbhen, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The intra-articular injection of iodoacetate into the knee joint of rats produced changes in the articular cartilage which resembled those of osteoarthritis. It caused virtually total loss of many of the oxidative enzymes, indicating inhibition of the main oxidative pathways. Treatment with an anti-rheumatic drug had little early effect but ultimately led to partial restoration of these pathways. The reduced progression of cartilage degradation induced by this drug was accompanied by some unusual histological features. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8334078

  18. Extra-Articular Diffuse Giant Cell Tumor of the Tendon Sheath: A Report of 2 Cases.

    PubMed

    Savvidou, Olga D; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Sakellariou, Vasilios I; Chloros, George D; Sarlikiotis, Thomas; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2016-06-01

    Two rare cases of extra-articular diffuse variant giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath are presented, at the elbow of a 68-year-old female and the foot of a 56-year-old male. Both patients presented with a palpable masses and marginal excision was performed; histological sections confirmed the diagnosis of extra-articular giant cell tumor. No adjuvant therapy was administered. At the latest follow-up, minimum 24 months after excision both patients were disease-free. PMID:27517076

  19. Extra- and intra-articular synovial chondromatosis and malignant transformation to chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Bertrana, C; Durall, I; Rial, J M; Franch, J; Fontecha, P; Ramis, A

    2010-01-01

    Intra- and extra-articular primary synovial chondromatosis (SC) was observed in a five-year-old, entire male German Shepherd. Thousands of small cartilaginous nodules were removed from the stifle joint as well as from several adjacent muscles. Diagnosis of SC was established based on clinical, radiographic and biopsy results. The owner declined to have a new surgery performed for complete nodule removal and partial synovectomy. Nine months after the initial presentation, a proximal pathological intra- articular tibial fracture was observed and malignant transformation to chondrosarcoma was diagnosed after limb amputation. No metastasis was observed after 1.5 years of follow-up.

  20. Extra-Articular Diffuse Giant Cell Tumor of the Tendon Sheath: A Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Savvidou, Olga D.; Mavrogenis, Andreas F.; Sakellariou, Vasilios I.; Chloros, George D.; Sarlikiotis, Thomas; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J.

    2016-01-01

    Two rare cases of extra-articular diffuse variant giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath are presented, at the elbow of a 68-year-old female and the foot of a 56-year-old male. Both patients presented with a palpable masses and marginal excision was performed; histological sections confirmed the diagnosis of extra-articular giant cell tumor. No adjuvant therapy was administered. At the latest follow-up, minimum 24 months after excision both patients were disease-free. PMID:27517076

  1. Intra-articular fractures of the distal radius: bridging external fixation in slight flexion and ulnar deviation along articular surface instead of radial shaft.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Jupiter, Jess B

    2014-03-01

    Forty-one patients with intra-articular fracture of the distal radius (AO Type C) were treated with a double joint-bridging external fixator placed radial side of the fracture site and the wrist placed in slight flexion and ulnar deviation equal to the palmar tilt and radial inclination of the uninjured wrist. The patients were evaluated according to the system of Gartland and Werley an average of 43 months (range, 34 to 53 mo) after surgery. There were 14 excellent, 18 good, 7 fair, and 2 poor results. The average flexion was 94% of the normal side, extension 91%, pronation 95%, and supination 84%. The average radial inclination was 22 ± 10 degrees, palmar tilt 8 ± 14 degrees, and maximum articular step or gap was 2 mm. Bridging external fixation with slight wrist flexion and ulnar deviation equal to preinjured palmar tilt and radial inclination provides acceptable clinical and radiologic results.

  2. Poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel as a biocompatible viscoelastic mimetic for articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Grant, Colin; Twigg, Pete; Egan, Alex; Moody, Alexandra; Smith, Annie; Eagland, Donald; Crowther, Nicholas; Britland, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of suboptimal outcome for surgical interventions in the treatment of full-thickness articular cartilage damage suggests that there is scope for a materials-based strategy to deliver a more durable repair. Given that the superficial layer of articular cartilage creates and sustains the tribological function of synovial joints, it is logical that candidate materials should have surface viscoelastic properties that mimic native articular cartilage. The present paper describes force spectroscopy analysis by nano-indentation to measure the elastic modulus of the surface of a novel poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel with therapeutic potential as a joint implant. More than 1 order of magnitude decrease in the elastic modulus was detected after adsorption of a hyaluronic acid layer onto the hydrogel, bringing it very close to previously reported values for articular cartilage. Covalent derivatization of the hydrogel surface with fibronectin facilitated the adhesion and growth of cultured rat tibial condyle chondrocytes as evidenced morphologically and by the observance of metachromatic staining with toluidine blue dye. The present results indicate that hydrogel materials with potential therapeutic benefit for injured and diseased joints can be engineered with surfaces with biomechanical properties similar to those of native tissue and are accepted as such by their constituent cell type. PMID:17022680

  3. Preliminary investigation of intrinsic UV fluorescence spectroscopic changes associated with proteolytic digestion of bovine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, William; Padilla-Martinez, Juan-Pablo; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Franco, Walfre

    2016-03-01

    Degradation and destruction of articular cartilage is the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA), an entity second only to cardiovascular disease as a cause of disability in the United States. Joint mechanics and cartilage biochemistry are believed to play a role in OA; an optical tool to detect structural and chemical changes in articular cartilage might offer benefit for its early detection and treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the spectral changes in intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of cartilage that occur after proteolytic digestion of cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in varying concentrations of collagenase ranging from 10ug/mL up to 5mg/mL for 18 hours at 37°C, a model of OA. Pre- and post-incubation measurements were taken of the UV excitation-emission spectrum of each cartilage sample. Mechanical tests were performed to determine the pre- and post-digestion force/displacement ratio associated with indentation of each sample. Spectral changes in intrinsic cartilage fluorescence and stiffness of the cartilage were associated with proteolytic digestion. In particular, changes in the relative intensity of fluorescence peaks associated with pentosidine crosslinks (330 nm excitation, 390 nm emission) and tryptophan (290 nm excitation, 340 nm emission) were found to correlate with different degrees of cartilage digestion and cartilage stiffness. In principle, it may be possible to use UV fluorescence spectral data for early detection of damage to articular cartilage, and as a surrogate measure for cartilage stiffness.

  4. The effects of intra-articular resiniferatoxin on monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngkyung; Kim, Eun-hye; Lee, Kyu Sang; Lee, Koeun; Park, Sung Ho; Na, Sook Hyun; Ko, Cheolwoong; Yooon, Young Wook

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether an intra-articular injection of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor agonist, resiniferatoxin (RTX) would alleviate behavioral signs of arthritic pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA). We also sought to determine the effect of RTX treatment on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in the spinal cord. Knee joint inflammation was induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 8 mg/50 µl) and weight bearing percentage on right and left hindpaws during walking, paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation, and paw withdrawal latency to heat were measured to evaluate pain behavior. Intra-articular administration of RTX (0.03, 0.003 and 0.0003%) at 2 weeks after the induction of knee joint inflammation significantly improved reduction of weight bearing on the ipsilateral hindlimb and increased paw withdrawal sensitivity to mechanical and heat stimuli. The reduction of pain behavior persisted for 3~10 days according to each behavioral test. The MIA-induced increase in CGRP immunoreactivity in the spinal cord was decreased by RTX treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The present study demonstrated that a single intra-articular administration of RTX reduced pain behaviors for a relatively long time in an experimental model of OA and could normalize OA-associated changes in peptide expression in the spinal cord. PMID:26807032

  5. [Indirect articular lymphography using Tc 99m-labeled Dextran in animals].

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, M; Pedroso de Lima, J; Cardoso, A; Mendes, F; Pires, J; Canha, N; Branco, R

    1990-01-01

    Looking for a standardization of the articular lymphoscintigraphy, an experimental research was conducted on 14 dogs injected in the ankle, with 2.5 mCi of 99m Tc-labeled dextran (P.M. = 70,000). Good scintigraphic images of the lymphatic system have been obtained. After having collected blood samples during the experimentation as well as aliquots of organs and of tissues, after the necropsy of the animal, it was verified that the 99m Tc-labeled dextran was useful for quantitative studies of the articular lymphatic drainage. The activities attained, in the drainage lymph nodes of injected articulation, are 152 times superior to those obtained in the kidney and one gramma of popliteal ganglion was 8929 times more active than one gramma of blood. The dextran 70,000, widely used in our clinical routine, can be injected to the human being, without any risk, and it may be the tracer which permits studies of the articular lymphatic drainage and the usage of the lymphoscintigraphy, already in expansion in many other Medicine branches, in the articular studies, nowadays.

  6. The effects of intra-articular resiniferatoxin on monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngkyung; Kim, Eun-Hye; Lee, Kyu Sang; Lee, Koeun; Park, Sung Ho; Na, Sook Hyun; Ko, Cheolwoong; Kim, Junesun; Yooon, Young Wook

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether an intra-articular injection of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor agonist, resiniferatoxin (RTX) would alleviate behavioral signs of arthritic pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA). We also sought to determine the effect of RTX treatment on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in the spinal cord. Knee joint inflammation was induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 8 mg/50 µl) and weight bearing percentage on right and left hindpaws during walking, paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation, and paw withdrawal latency to heat were measured to evaluate pain behavior. Intra-articular administration of RTX (0.03, 0.003 and 0.0003%) at 2 weeks after the induction of knee joint inflammation significantly improved reduction of weight bearing on the ipsilateral hindlimb and increased paw withdrawal sensitivity to mechanical and heat stimuli. The reduction of pain behavior persisted for 3~10 days according to each behavioral test. The MIA-induced increase in CGRP immunoreactivity in the spinal cord was decreased by RTX treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The present study demonstrated that a single intra-articular administration of RTX reduced pain behaviors for a relatively long time in an experimental model of OA and could normalize OA-associated changes in peptide expression in the spinal cord. PMID:26807032

  7. Immunohistochemical demonstration of fibronectin in the most superficial layer of normal rabbit articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, K; Inoue, H; Murakami, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To locate fibronectin ultrastructurally in the most superficial layer of normal articular cartilage of rabbits, in order to clarify its role in joint physiology. METHODS--Articular cartilage was obtained from the femoral condyle of seven normal adult rabbits and prepared by a method that included tannic acid fixation. Polyclonal antibodies against rabbit fibronectin were used in an immunohistochemical electron microscopic study, without any enzymic digestion but with a pre-embedding method for the transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS--The cartilage surface was successfully preserved by tannic acid fixation. The most superficial layer in electron photomicrographs was approximately 200-300 nm thick, cell free, and appeared to have two parallel components: the more superficial lamina and the deeper lamina. Gold labelled fibronectin lined this layer in immunohistochemical electron photomicrographs. CONCLUSIONS--Fibronectin covering the surface of the articular cartilage may have a role in joint lubrication and protection of the cartilage by binding with the collagenous matrix and hyaluronic acid in synovial fluid. Chondroitin sulphates may act as a charge barrier in close relationship with the collagen fibrils in the deeper lamina. Significant alteration in these functions may be one of the first causal steps leading to destruction of the articular cartilage. Images PMID:8546534

  8. Demonstration of fibronectin in human articular cartilage by an indirect immunoperoxidase technique.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, I; Hølund, B; Johansen, N; Andersen, R B

    1982-01-01

    Fresh frozen tissue sections of human articular cartilage was treated without and with human testicular hyaluronidase (2 x 10(6) units/l) for 60 min at 37 degrees C and stained by the indirect immunoperoxidase technique with rabbit antihuman fibronectin. The rabbit antihuman fibronectin was purified by affinity chromatography on human fibronectin-Sepharose. Fibronectin was only found on the acellular surface of the articular cartilage in tissue sections not treated with hyaluronidase. In this surface layer, probably identical to "lamina splendens", the arrangement of fibronectin was as a membrane. No collagen was seen in this area by van Gieson staining. No staining for fibronectin was found in the cartilage matrix or in the chondrocytes. Treatment of the cartilage tissue with hyaluronidase resulted in visualization of high amount of fibronectin in the cartilage matrix, with the highest intensity around the chondrocytes. The staining of the acellular surface layer of the articular cartilage was identical with the results obtained without hyaluronidase treatment. These results indicate that articular cartilage is rich in fibronectin probably in complex with hyaluronic acid, and that the chondrocytes produce fibronectin in situ. It also demonstrates the steric hindrance of hyaluronic acid aggregates in diffusion of the antibody and the value of hyaluronidase treatment of tissue before demonstration of fibronectin. PMID:6757202

  9. The lamina splendens of articular cartilage is an artefact of phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Aspden, R M; Hukins, D W

    1979-11-30

    The so-called lamina splendens of articular cartilage is shown to be a characteristic of phase contrast microscopy; this technique provides no evidence for an anatomically distinct surface layer. Fresnel diffraction occurs at edges separating regions of different refractive indices. These diffraction effects, when viewed under phase contrast, lead to the appearance of a bright line along the edge. PMID:42065

  10. Synovial fluid bupivacaine concentrations following single intra-articular injection in normal and osteoarthritic canine stifles.

    PubMed

    Barry, S L; Martinez, S A; Davies, N M; Remsberg, C M; Sayre, C L; Bachelez, A

    2015-02-01

    Intra-articular bupivacaine helps alleviate pain in animals receiving joint surgery, but its use has become controversial as ex vivo studies have illuminated the potential for chondrotoxicity. Such studies typically involve cell cultures incubated in solutions containing high bupivacaine concentrations for long durations. The aim of this study was to measure the actual synovial fluid bupivacaine concentrations after intra-articular injection. Eight healthy beagles with normal stifles and 22 large and giant-breed dogs with stifle osteoarthritis (OA) were treated with a single intra-articular injection of bupivacaine (1 mg/kg) into a stifle. Joint fluid samples were taken from the treated stifle immediately after injection and 30 min after injection and analyzed for bupivacaine concentrations. Immediately after injection, the median bupivacaine concentrations in normal and OA stifles were 3.6 and 2.5 mg/mL, respectively. Thirty minutes after injection, bupivacaine concentrations in normal and OA stifles were 0.4 and 0.6 mg/mL, respectively. These results provide insight into the pharmacokinetics of bupivacaine after injection into a joint. Given its immediate dilution and rapid drop in synovial fluid concentration, bupivacaine is unlikely to damage chondrocytes when administered as a single intra-articular injection.

  11. Septic arthritis of both knees following intra-articular injection of petrol.

    PubMed

    Janbakhsh, Alireza; Mansouri, Feizollah; Vaziri, Siavash; Sayad, Babak; Afsharian, Mandana; Ghaffari, Parviz

    2015-01-01

    A 70 years old man was referred to our center with bilateral knee arthritis following intra-articular petrol injection. Because of previous antibiotics use gram stain and culture were negative. Septic arthritis was diagnosed and antibiotics and drainage were started. After 2 years he improved eventually and was able to walk. But, some movement limitation remained.

  12. Loss of decorin from the surface zone of articular cartilage in a chick model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Massé, P G; Carrino, D A; Morris, N; Wenger, L; Mahuren, J D; Howell, D S

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this study was to immunolocalize decorin and to assess changes as a result of pyridoxine (PN) deficiency in chick articular cartilage from femoral condyles. After maintenance on a normal diet for the first two weeks after hatching, 15 broiler chickens were deprived of this vitamin for 6 weeks. It was previously shown that the ankle joints of PN-deficient animals are swollen with effusions. They also present an abnormal gait, enlarged bony margins, and fissuring of the articular cartilages. Milder changes (no fissures) were also shown in the knee joints. Data from a previous study were suggestive that sulfated glycosaminoglycans are lost from the knee cartilage surface into synovial fluid. The current study was focused on the small proteoglycan, decorin, which coats the surface of collagen fibrils and may regulate their morphology. To examine decorin in normal and PN-deficient articular cartilage, a monoclonal antibody to an epitope on the protein core of decorin was used for immunohistochemical staining of tissue sections and for Western Blot analysis of cartilage extracts. Reduction of staining with the antibody was demonstrated in the tangential surface zone of PN-deficient cartilage, and Western Blot analysis showed reduced intensity of decorin bands compared to normal controls. These data suggest that a lack of decorin may play a role in the enlargement of collagen bundles in the tangential zone of PN-deficient articular cartilage as observed in a previous electron microscopic study.

  13. Glucosamine:chondroitin or ginger root extract have little effect on articular cartilage in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sows are culled at a high rate from breeding herds due to musclo-skeletal problems and lameness. Research in our laboratory has shown that even first-parity sows have significant amounts of osteochondritic lesions of their articular cartilage. Glusoamine chondroitin and ginger root extract have both...

  14. The effects of joint immobilization on articular cartilage of the knee in previously exercised rats

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Diogo Correa; da Silva, Marcelo Cavenaghi Pereira; Neto, Semaan El-Razi; Souza, Mônica Rodrigues; Souza, Romeu Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Studies have determined the effects of joint immobilization on the articular cartilage of sedentary animals, but we are not aware of any studies reporting the effects of joint immobilization in previously trained animals. The objective of the present study was to determine whether exercise could prevent degeneration of the articular cartilage that accompanies joint immobilization. We used light microscopy to study the thickness, cell density, nuclear size, and collagen density of articular cartilage of the femoral condyle of Wistar rats subjected to aerobic physical activity on an adapted treadmill five times per week. Four groups of Wistar rats were used: a control group (C), an immobilized group (I), an exercised group (E), and an exercised and then immobilized group (EI). The right knee joints from rats in groups I and EI were immobilized at 90 °C of flexion using a plastic cast for 8 weeks. Cartilage thickness decreased significantly in group I (mean, 120.14 ± 15.6 μm, P < 0.05), but not in group EI (mean, 174 ± 2.25), and increased significantly in group E (mean, 289.49 ± 9.15) compared with group C (mean, 239.20 ± 6.25). The same results were obtained for cell density, nuclear size, and collagen density (in all cases, P < 0.05). We concluded that exercise can prevent degenerative changes in femoral articular cartilage caused by immobilization of the knee joint. PMID:23480127

  15. Optimal 3-D culture of primary articular chondrocytes for use in the Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, Liliana F.; Baker, Travis L.; Brown, Raquel J.; Catlin, Lindsey W.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Reliable culturing methods for primary articular chondrocytes are essential to study the effects of loading and unloading on joint tissue at the cellular level. Due to the limited proliferation capacity of primary chondrocytes and their tendency to dedifferentiate in conventional culture conditions, long-term culturing conditions of primary chondrocytes can be challenging. The goal of this study was to develop a suspension culturing technique that not only would retain the cellular morphology but also maintain gene expression characteristics of primary articular chondrocytes. METHODS Three-dimensional culturing methods were compared and optimized for primary articular chondrocytes in the rotating wall vessel bioreactor, which changes the mechanical culture conditions to provide a form of suspension culture optimized for low shear and turbulence. We performed gene expression analysis and morphological characterization of cells cultured in alginate beads, Cytopore-2 microcarriers, primary monolayer culture, and passaged monolayer cultures using reverse transcription-PCR and laser scanning confocal microscopy. RESULTS Primary chondrocytes grown on Cytopore-2 microcarriers maintained the phenotypical morphology and gene expression pattern observed in primary bovine articular chondrocytes, and retained these characteristics for up to 9 days. DISCUSSION Our results provide a novel and alternative culturing technique for primary chondrocytes suitable for studies that require suspension such as those using the rotating wall vessel bioreactor. In addition, we provide an alternative culturing technique for primary chondrocytes that can impact future mechanistic studies of osteoarthritis progression, treatments for cartilage damage and repair, and cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25199120

  16. Anti-nociceptive effect of thalidomide on zymosan-induced experimental articular incapacitation.

    PubMed

    Vale, Mariana L; Cunha, Fernando Q; Brito, Gerly A C; Benevides, Verônica M; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Poole, Stephen; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A

    2006-05-01

    The anti-nociceptive effect of thalidomide on zymosan-induced articular knee joint incapacitation in rats was investigated. Thalidomide (5-45 mg/kg), given 30 min before but not 2 h after the intra-articular injection of zymosan, inhibited the nociceptive response in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, thalidomide pretreatment significantly reduced the concentration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, -68.4%) in the exudate of zymosan-injected joints, but not those of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, CINC-1 or interleukin-10. The expression of TNF-alpha, determined by immunohistochemical staining, in synovial tissues obtained from articular joints injected with zymosan was also inhibited by thalidomide pretreatment. The anti-nociceptive effect of thalidomide was not reversed by the co-administration of an opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, suggesting that endogenous opioids do not mediate the anti-nociceptive effect of thalidomide in this model. In conclusion, the anti-nociceptive activity of thalidomide in zymosan-induced articular incapacitation is associated with the inhibition of TNF-alpha by resident synovial cells.

  17. The role of BKCa channels on hyperpolarization mediated by hyperosmolarity in human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julio C; López-Zapata, Diego F

    2011-03-01

    Chondrocytes, the only cell in cartilage, are subjected to hyperosmotic challenges continuously since extracellular osmolarity in articular cartilage increases in response to mechanical loads during joint movement. Hyperosmolarity can affect membrane transport, and it is possible that load modulates matrix synthesis through alterations in intracellular composition. In the present study, the effects of hyperosmotic challenges were evaluated using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, whole cell mode on freshly isolated human and bovine articular chondrocytes. In human chondrocytes, hypertonicity induced the activation of outward Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) currents, which were inhibited by iberiotoxin and TEA-Cl. The current induced by hypertonic switching (osmolarity from 300 to 400 mOsm/l) caused cell hyperpolarization (from -39 mV to -70 mV) with a reversal potential of -96 ± 7 mV. These results suggest a role for Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in human articular chondrocytes, leading to hyperpolarization as a consequence of K(+) efflux through these channels. These channels could have a role in the articular chondrocyte's response to a hyperosmotic challenge and matrix metabolism regulation by load.

  18. Arteriovenous Fistula Formation After Intra-articular Injection Following Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kane, Ian; Post, Zachary; Ong, Alvin; Orozco, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Intra-articular joint capsule injection is a common method used to control postoperative pain as a result of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is generally considered a safe practice and is highly effective in reducing the need for postoperative opioid administration as well as decreasing recovery time through early mobilization. However, any injection into the posterior knee space has the potential to injure the vascular structures surrounding the knee. Iatrogenic formation of an arteriovenous fistula is a rare complication after TKA, and there are no reported cases of arteriovenous fistula formation as a direct result of intra-articular injection. This case report describes this complication that occurred several days after TKA. The patient had acute pain and swelling in the treated leg. An arteriovenous fistula of the popliteal artery and vein was identified with bilateral Doppler ultrasound and confirmed by angiogram. The most likely inciting event for the formation of the arteriovenous fistula was intra-articular injection of bupivacaine, which likely pierced the popliteal artery and vein, allowing the formation of the patent channel. The patient was treated successfully with stent placement through interventional radiology. Orthopedic surgeons performing intra-articular injections of the knee should refamiliarize themselves with the anatomy and location of the popliteal artery, use smaller-gauge needles, and aspirate the syringe before the injection to decrease the risk of iatrogenic damage to the vasculature or fistula formation. [Orthopedics.2016; 39(5):e976-e979.].

  19. Is Mandibular Fossa Morphology and Articular Eminence Inclination Associated with Temporomandibular Dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Akhlaghian, Marzieh; Abolvardi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Finding a significant relationship between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) morphology and the incidence of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) may help early prediction and prevention of these problems. Purpose The purpose of the present study was to determine the morphology of mandibular fossa and the articular eminence inclination in patients with TMD and in control group using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Method The CBCT data of bilateral TMJs of 40 patients with TMD and 23 symptom-free cases were evaluated. The articular eminence inclination, as well as the glenoid fossa depth and width of the mandibular fossa were measured. The paired t-test was used to compare these values between two groups. Results The articular eminence inclination and glenoid fossa width and depth were significantly higher in patients with TMD than in the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion The articular eminence inclination was steeper in patients with TMD than in the control group. Glenoid fossa width and depth were higher in patients with TMD than that in the control group. This information may shed light on the relationship between TMJ morphology and the incidence of TMD. PMID:27284559

  20. Differences in articular-eminence inclination between medieval and contemporary human populations.

    PubMed

    Kranjčić, Josip; Vojvodić, Denis; Žabarović, Domagoj; Vodanović, Marin; Komar, Daniel; Mehulić, Ketij

    2012-08-01

    The articular-eminence inclination is an important element in the biomechanics of the temporomandibular joint and the entire masticatory system; however, very little is known about this inclination in archaeological human populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the values of, in addition to the differences between, the articular-eminence inclination in medieval and contemporary human populations. The study was carried out on two dry skull groups. The first group consisted of 14 dry skulls from the medieval culture group Bijelo Brdo (BB) of East Croatia, and the other consisted of 137 recent dry skulls from the osteologic collection of the Institute of Anatomy (IA) in Zagreb. All BB skulls were dentulous, whereas the IA skulls were divided into dentulous and edentulous groups. The articular-eminence inclination was measured in relation to the Frankfurt horizontal plane on digital images of the skull's two lateral views using AutoCAD computer software. The mean value of the articular-eminence inclination in the BB sample group (49.57°) was lower, with a statistical significance (p<0.01), than those of the IA dentulous (61.56°), the IA edentulous (62.54°), and all the combined IA (61.99°) specimens. Because the values of the articular-eminence inclination can vary a lot with reference to the number of specimens and the different methods used for measuring, the obtained values yield only orientational information. Further investigations including a larger number of medieval specimens are needed to confirm the results obtained from this study. PMID:22721644

  1. Investigation of the friction and surface degradation of innovative chondroplasty materials against articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Northwood, E; Fisher, J; Kowalski, R

    2007-04-01

    Understanding the wear of the biomaterial-cartilage interface is vital for the development of innovative chondroplasty. The aim of this study was to investigate a number of biphasic materials as potential chondroplasty biomaterials. Simple geometry friction and wear studies were conducted using bovine articular cartilage pins loaded against a range of single-phase and biphasic materials. The frictions of each biomaterial was compared within simple and protein-containing lubricants. Longer-term continuous sliding tests within a protein containing lubricant were also conducted at various loading conditions to evaluate the friction and degradation for each surface. All single-phase materials showed a steady rise in friction, which was dependent on the loss of interstitial fluid load support from the opposing cartilage pin. All biphasic materials demonstrated a marked reduction in friction when compared with the single-phase materials. It is postulated that the biphasic nature of each material allowed an element of fluid load support to be maintained by fluid rehydration and expulsion. In the longer-term study, significant differences in the articular cartilage pin (surface damage) between the positive control (stainless steel) and the negative control (articular cartilage) was found. The potential biphasic chondroplasty materials produced a reduction in articular cartilage pin damage when compared with the single-phase materials. The changes in surface topography of the cartilage pin were associated with increased levels of friction achieved during the continuous wear test. The study illustrated the importance of the biphasic properties of potential chondroplasty materials, and future work will focus on the optimization of biphasic properties as well as long-term durability, such that materials will more closely mimic the biotribology of natural articular cartilage.

  2. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage in Lizard Knee from Resident Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    The epiphysis of femur and tibia in the lizard Podarcis muralis can extensively regenerate after injury. The process involves the articular cartilage and metaphyseal (growth) plate after damage. The secondary ossification center present between the articular cartilage and the growth plate is replaced by cartilaginous epiphyses after about one month of regeneration at high temperature. The present study analyzes the origin of the chondrogenic cells from putative stem cells located in the growing centers of the epiphyses. The study is carried out using immunocytochemistry for the detection of 5BrdU-labeled long retaining cells and for the localization of telomerase, an enzyme that indicates stemness. The observations show that putative stem cells retaining 5BrdU and positive for telomerase are present in the superficial articular cartilage and metaphyseal growth plate located in the epiphyses. This observation suggests that these areas represent stem cell niches lasting for most of the lifetime of lizards. In healthy long bones of adult lizards, the addition of new chondrocytes from the stem cells population in the articular cartilage and the metaphyseal growth plate likely allows for slow, continuous longitudinal growth. When the knee is injured in the adult lizard, new populations of chondrocytes actively producing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan are derived from these stem cells to allow for the formation of completely new cartilaginous epiphyses, possibly anticipating the re-formation of secondary centers in later stages. The study suggests that in this lizard species, the regenerative ability of the epiphyses is a pre-adaptation to the regeneration of the articular cartilage.

  3. Differences in articular-eminence inclination between medieval and contemporary human populations.

    PubMed

    Kranjčić, Josip; Vojvodić, Denis; Žabarović, Domagoj; Vodanović, Marin; Komar, Daniel; Mehulić, Ketij

    2012-08-01

    The articular-eminence inclination is an important element in the biomechanics of the temporomandibular joint and the entire masticatory system; however, very little is known about this inclination in archaeological human populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the values of, in addition to the differences between, the articular-eminence inclination in medieval and contemporary human populations. The study was carried out on two dry skull groups. The first group consisted of 14 dry skulls from the medieval culture group Bijelo Brdo (BB) of East Croatia, and the other consisted of 137 recent dry skulls from the osteologic collection of the Institute of Anatomy (IA) in Zagreb. All BB skulls were dentulous, whereas the IA skulls were divided into dentulous and edentulous groups. The articular-eminence inclination was measured in relation to the Frankfurt horizontal plane on digital images of the skull's two lateral views using AutoCAD computer software. The mean value of the articular-eminence inclination in the BB sample group (49.57°) was lower, with a statistical significance (p<0.01), than those of the IA dentulous (61.56°), the IA edentulous (62.54°), and all the combined IA (61.99°) specimens. Because the values of the articular-eminence inclination can vary a lot with reference to the number of specimens and the different methods used for measuring, the obtained values yield only orientational information. Further investigations including a larger number of medieval specimens are needed to confirm the results obtained from this study.

  4. Articular capsule repair in initial artificial hip replacement via anterolateral approach to the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B L; Wang, F; Tian, M B; Yin, W L; You, X Y; Li, D; Ma, L G; Xing, L Q

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore articular capsule repair in first artificial hip replacement (AHR) via anterolateral approach and its influence on postoperative dislocation. A total of 292 patients who received AHR via anterolateral approach and had the articular capsule repaired in People’s Hospital of Zhengzhou (Henan, China) from February 2008 to February 2014 were selected and divided into total hip replacement (THR) group (group A1) and artificial femoral head replacement (AFHR) group (group A2). Five hundred and five cases in the control group treated using the same approach but receiving no articular capsule repair were divided into THR group (group B1) and AFHR group (group B2). Condition of postoperative dislocation was compared between the two groups. All cases were followed up for 6 months to 5 years (average: 3.75 years); it was noted that the difference in average age, gender, disease constitution and follow-up time in the two groups was not significant (P>0.05). Moreover, groups A1 and B1 were found with 1 case of early hip joint dislocation (0.73%) and 13 cases of hip joint dislocation (5.24%) respectively post-operatively, and the comparison between the two groups was statistically significant (P less than 0.05). One case of hip joint dislocation (0.65%) was found in group A2 and 5 cases (1.95%) in group B2 in early post operation and the difference between two groups had no statistical significance (P>0.05). Neither the repair group nor the control group developed late-onset dislocation after the operation. Thus, we can state that articular capsule repair is feasible during the first AHR via anterolateral approach, which decreases the occurrence of early hip joint dislocation after operation and proves that repairing articular capsule during AFHR via anterolateral approach is unnecessary. PMID:27358130

  5. Low-intensity infrared laser effects on zymosan-induced articular inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januária dos Anjos, Lúcia Mara; da Fonseca, Adenilson d. S.; Gameiro, Jacy; de Paoli, Flávia

    2015-03-01

    Low-level therapy laser is a phototherapy treatment that involves the application of low power light in the red or infrared wavelengths in various diseases such as arthritis. In this work, we investigated whether low-intensity infrared laser therapy could cause death by caspase-6 apoptosis or DNA damage pathways in cartilage cells after zymosaninduced articular inflammatory process. Inflammatory process was induced in C57BL/6 mouse by intra-articular injection of zymosan into rear tibio-tarsal joints. Thirty animals were divided in five groups: (I) control, (II) laser, (III) zymosan-induced, (IV) zymosan-induced + laser and (V). Laser exposure was performed after zymosan administration with low-intensity infrared laser (830 nm), power 10 mW, fluence 3.0 J/cm2 at continuous mode emission, in five doses. Twenty-four hours after last irradiation, the animals were sacrificed and the right joints fixed and demineralized. Morphological analysis was observed by hematoxylin and eosin stain, pro-apoptotic (caspase-6) was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and DNA fragmentation was performed by TUNEL assay in articular cartilage cells. Inflammatory process was observed in connective tissue near to articular cartilage, in IV and V groups, indicating zymosan effect. This process was decreased in both groups after laser treatment and dexamethasone. Although groups III and IV presented higher caspase-6 and DNA fragmentation percentages, statistical differences were not observed when compared to groups I and II. Our results suggest that therapies based on low-intensity infrared lasers could reduce inflammatory process and could not cause death by caspase-6 apoptosis or DNA damage pathways in cartilage cells after zymosan-induced articular inflammatory process.

  6. Modeling the transport of cryoprotective agents in articular cartilage for cryopreservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torqabeh, Alireza Abazari

    Loading vitrifiable concentrations of cryoprotective agents is an important step for cryopreservation of biological tissues by vitrification for research and transplantation purposes. This may be done by immersing the tissue in a cryoprotective agent (CPA) solution, and increasing the concentration, continuously or in multiple steps, and simultaneously decreasing the temperature to decrease the toxicity effects of the cryoprotective agent on the tissue cellular system. During cryoprotective agent loading, osmotic water movement from the tissue to the surrounding solution, and the resultant tissue shrinkage and stress-strain in the tissue matrix as well as on the cellular system can significantly alter the outcome of the cryopreservation protocol. In this thesis, a biomechanical model for articular cartilage is developed to account for the transport of the cryoprotective agent, the nonideal-nondilute properties of the vitrifiable solutions, the osmotic water movement and the resultant tissue shrinkage and stress-strain in the tissue matrix, and the osmotic volume change of the chondrocytes, during cryoprotective agent loading in the cartilage matrix. Four essential transport parameters needed for the model were specified, the values of which were obtained uniquely by fitting the model to experimental data from porcine articular cartilage. Then, it was shown that using real nonuniform initial distributions of water and fixed charges in cartilage, measured separately in this thesis using MRI, in the model can significantly affect the model predictions. The model predictions for dimethyl sulfoxide diffusion in porcine articular cartilage were verified by comparing to spatially and temporally resolved measurements of dimethyl sulfoxide concentration in porcine articular cartilage using a spectral MRI technique, developed for this purpose and novel to the field of cryobiology. It was demonstrated in this thesis that the developed mathematical model provides a novel tool

  7. Arthroscopic Assessment of Intra-Articular Lesion after Surgery for Rotational Ankle Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Seung-Do; Gwak, Heui-Chul; Ha, Dong-Jun; Kim, Jong-Yup; Kim, Ui-Cheol; Jang, Yue-Chan

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to report findings of exploratory arthroscopic assessment performed in conjunction with removal of internal fixation device placed in the initial surgery for rotational ankle fracture. Methods A total of 53 patients (33 male, 20 female) who underwent surgery for rotational ankle fracture between November 2002 and February 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients gave consent to the exploratory arthroscopic surgery for the removal of internal fixation devices placed in the initial surgery. Lauge-Hansen classification system of ankle fractures was assessed for all patients. Intra-articular lesions (osteochondral lesion, loose body, and fibrosis) were evaluated via ankle arthroscopy. Comparative analysis was then performed between radiological classification of ankle fracture/patient's symptoms and arthroscopic findings. Results Lauge-Hansen classification system of ankle fractures included supination-external rotation type (n = 35), pronation-external rotation type (n = 9), and pronation-abduction type (n = 9). A total of 33 patients exhibited symptoms of pain or discomfort while walking whereas 20 exhibited no symptoms. Arthroscopic findings included abnormal findings around the syndesmosis area (n = 35), intra-articular fibrosis (n = 51), osteochondral lesions of the talus (n = 33), loose bodies (n = 6), synovitis (n = 13), and anterior bony impingement syndrome (n = 3). Intra-articular fibrosis was seen in 31 of symptomatic patients (93.9%). Pain or discomfort with activity caused by soft tissue impingement with meniscus-like intra-articular fibrosis were found in 19 patients. There was statistical significance (p = 0.02) between symptoms (pain and discomfort) and the findings of meniscus-like fibrosis compared to the group without any symptom. Conclusions Arthroscopic examination combined with treatment of intra-articular fibrosis arising from ankle fracture surgery may help improve surgical outcomes. PMID:26640633

  8. Effects of Chondroitinase ABC-Mediated Proteoglycan Digestion on Decellularization and Recellularization of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Catherine A.; Park, Hee Jun; Mazur, Courtney M.; Aaron, Roy K.

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has a limited capacity to heal itself and thus focal defects often result in the development of osteoarthritis. Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies seek to regenerate injured tissue by creating scaffolds that aim to mimic the unique structure and composition of native articular cartilage. Decellularization is a novel strategy that aims to preserve the bioactive factors and 3D biophysical environment of the native extracellular matrix while removing potentially immunogenic factors. The purpose of this study was to develop a procedure that can enable decellularization and recellularization of intact articular cartilage matrix. Full-thickness porcine articular cartilage plugs were decellularized with a series of freeze-thaw cycles and 0.1% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate detergent cycles. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) was applied before the detergent cycles to digest glycosaminoglycans in order to enhance donor chondrocyte removal and seeded cell migration. Porcine synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded onto the decellularized cartilage scaffolds and cultured for up to 28 days. The optimized decellularization protocol removed 94% of native DNA per sample wet weight, while collagen content and alignment were preserved. Glycosaminoglycan depletion prior to the detergent cycles increased removal of nuclear material. Seeded cells infiltrated up to 100 μm into the cartilage deep zone after 28 days in culture. ChABC treatment enhances decellularization of the relatively dense, impermeable articular cartilage by reducing glycosaminoglycan content. ChABC treatment did not appear to affect cell migration during recellularization under static, in vitro culture, highlighting the need for more dynamic seeding methods. PMID:27391810

  9. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage in Lizard Knee from Resident Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The epiphysis of femur and tibia in the lizard Podarcis muralis can extensively regenerate after injury. The process involves the articular cartilage and metaphyseal (growth) plate after damage. The secondary ossification center present between the articular cartilage and the growth plate is replaced by cartilaginous epiphyses after about one month of regeneration at high temperature. The present study analyzes the origin of the chondrogenic cells from putative stem cells located in the growing centers of the epiphyses. The study is carried out using immunocytochemistry for the detection of 5BrdU-labeled long retaining cells and for the localization of telomerase, an enzyme that indicates stemness. The observations show that putative stem cells retaining 5BrdU and positive for telomerase are present in the superficial articular cartilage and metaphyseal growth plate located in the epiphyses. This observation suggests that these areas represent stem cell niches lasting for most of the lifetime of lizards. In healthy long bones of adult lizards, the addition of new chondrocytes from the stem cells population in the articular cartilage and the metaphyseal growth plate likely allows for slow, continuous longitudinal growth. When the knee is injured in the adult lizard, new populations of chondrocytes actively producing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan are derived from these stem cells to allow for the formation of completely new cartilaginous epiphyses, possibly anticipating the re-formation of secondary centers in later stages. The study suggests that in this lizard species, the regenerative ability of the epiphyses is a pre-adaptation to the regeneration of the articular cartilage. PMID:26340619

  10. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage in Lizard Knee from Resident Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The epiphysis of femur and tibia in the lizard Podarcis muralis can extensively regenerate after injury. The process involves the articular cartilage and metaphyseal (growth) plate after damage. The secondary ossification center present between the articular cartilage and the growth plate is replaced by cartilaginous epiphyses after about one month of regeneration at high temperature. The present study analyzes the origin of the chondrogenic cells from putative stem cells located in the growing centers of the epiphyses. The study is carried out using immunocytochemistry for the detection of 5BrdU-labeled long retaining cells and for the localization of telomerase, an enzyme that indicates stemness. The observations show that putative stem cells retaining 5BrdU and positive for telomerase are present in the superficial articular cartilage and metaphyseal growth plate located in the epiphyses. This observation suggests that these areas represent stem cell niches lasting for most of the lifetime of lizards. In healthy long bones of adult lizards, the addition of new chondrocytes from the stem cells population in the articular cartilage and the metaphyseal growth plate likely allows for slow, continuous longitudinal growth. When the knee is injured in the adult lizard, new populations of chondrocytes actively producing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan are derived from these stem cells to allow for the formation of completely new cartilaginous epiphyses, possibly anticipating the re-formation of secondary centers in later stages. The study suggests that in this lizard species, the regenerative ability of the epiphyses is a pre-adaptation to the regeneration of the articular cartilage. PMID:26340619

  11. A biphasic finite element study on the role of the articular cartilage superficial zone in confined compression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongqiang; Maher, Suzanne A.; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the superficial zone on the mechanical behavior of articular cartilage. Confined compression of articular cartilage was modeled using a biphasic finite element analysis to calculate the one-dimensional deformation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and movement of the interstitial fluid through the ECM and articular surface. The articular cartilage was modeled as an inhomogeneous, nonlinear hyperelastic biphasic material with depth and strain-dependent material properties. Two loading conditions were simulated, one where the superficial zone was loaded with a porous platen (normal test) and the other where the deep zone was loaded with the porous platen (upside down test). Compressing the intact articular cartilage with 0.2 MPa stress reduced the surface permeability by 88%. Removing the superficial zone increased the rate of change for all mechanical parameters and decreased the fluid support ratio of the tissue, resulting in increased tissue deformation. Apparent permeability linearly increased after superficial removal in the normal test, yet it did not change in the upside down test. Orientation of the specimen affected the time-dependent biomechanical behavior of the articular cartilage, but not equilibrium behavior. The two tests with different specimen orientations resulted in very different apparent permeabilities, suggesting that in an experimental study which quantifies material properties of an inhomogeneous material, the specimen orientation should be stated along with the permeability result. The current study provides new insights into the role of the superficial zone on mechanical behavior of the articular cartilage. PMID:25465194

  12. Diagnostic Value of T-cell Interferon-γ Release Assays on Synovial Fluid for Articular Tuberculosis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xin-He; Bian, Sai-Nan; Zhang, Yue-Qiu; Zhang, Li-Fan; Shi, Xiao-Chun; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Feng-Chun; Liu, Xiao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global public health challenge. Articular TB is an important form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and its diagnosis is difficult because of the low sensitivity of traditional methods. The aim of this study was to analyze the diagnostic value of T-SPOT.TB on synovial fluid for the diagnosis of articular TB. Methods: Patients with suspected articular TB were enrolled consecutively between August 2011 and December 2015. T-SPOT.TB was performed on both synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The final diagnosis of articular TB was independent of the T-SPOT.TB result. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, and likelihood ratio of T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs and PBMCs were analyzed. Results: Twenty patients with suspected articular TB were enrolled. Six were diagnosed with articular TB, and 14 patients were diagnosed with other diseases. Sensitivity and specificity were 83% and 86% for T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs, and 67% and 69% for T-SPOT.TB on PBMCs, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs were 71% and 92%, respectively. The PPV and NPV were 50% and 82% for T-SPOT.TB on PBMCs. Conclusion: Sensitivity, specificity, and NPV of T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs appeared higher than that on PBMCs, indicating that T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs might be a rapid and accurate diagnostic test for articular TB. PMID:27174325

  13. Disco Dancing and Kinetic Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakas, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an example of an innovative science activity used in a science methods course for future elementary teachers at a small university in northeastern Turkey. The activity aims to help prospective elementary teachers understand kinetic-molecular theory in a simple way and to expose these preservice teachers to an innovative…

  14. Collar-type osteophyte of the femur in young adults: is it a harbinger of intra-articular osteoid osteoma?

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Bozkurt, Yalcin

    2013-09-01

    Variable clinical and radiological findings for intra-articular osteoid osteoma (OO) of the hip joint make its diagnosis difficult. Because radiographs commonly do not identify the nidus, MR imaging becomes the second line of study. However, because the appearance varies, findings on MR images can be confusing. We found "collar type osteophyte" of the femur i.e. an osteophyte rim around the femoral neck, to be a conspicuous finding of intra-articular OO. Here, this feature will be emphasized and intra-articular OOs will be discussed, with a review of the literature.

  15. Arthroscopic Implantation of a Bio-Inductive Collagen Scaffold for Treatment of an Articular-Sided Partial Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Richard K.N.; Ryu, Jessica H.J.; Abrams, Jeffrey S.; Savoie, Felix H.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of articular-sided partial rotator cuff tears remains a challenge to the treating orthopaedic surgeon. Treatment algorithms have included nonoperative management, debridement alone, and debridement and subacromial decompression, as well as articular-sided rotator cuff repair and completion of the tear on the bursal side followed by a traditional arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Implantation of a bio-inductive collagen scaffold on the bursal side of the rotator cuff to potentially heal an articular-sided tear represents a novel approach to this difficult clinical entity. PMID:26697308

  16. Quantitative MRI Evaluation of Articular Cartilage Using T2 Mapping Following Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Wagner, Naomi; Fields, Kara G.; Wentzel, Catherine; Burge, Alissa; Potter, Hollis G.; Lyman, Stephen; Kelly, Bryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) causes a shearing and delamination injury to the acetabular articular cartilage due to a mismatch between the size of the femoral head and the acetabulum. This mechanism is thought to lead to early osteoarthritis in this population. Cam decompression has been advocated to eliminate impingement, with the ultimate goal of halting the progression of articular cartilage delamination. Although outcomes following this procedure in the young adult population have been favorable at short and medium term follow up, it is not known whether the articular cartilage itself is protected from further injury by changing the biomechanics of the joint with decompression of the cam morphology. The purpose of this study is to compare the pre- and post-operative integrity of the acetabular articular cartilage using T2 mapping to determine if hip arthroscopy is protective of the articular cartilage at short- to medium term follow up. Methods: Males between 18 and 35 years of age who had pre-operative T2 mapping MRIs, underwent hip arthroscopy for cam or mixed-type FAI with an alpha angle greater than 50°, and had at least 2 year follow-up were identified. Post-operative MRIs were performed and T2 relaxation times in the transition zone and weight bearing articular cartilage in the anterosuperior acetabulum at deep and superficial chondral layers were recorded at nine points on three sagittal sequences on pre and post-operative MRIs. A paired t-test was used to compare T2 relaxation values between pre-operative and post-operative scans. Results: Eleven hips were evaluated. Mean age was 26.3 years (range 21 - 35). Mean follow up time to post-operative T2 mapping MRI was 2.6 years (range 2.4 - 2.7). The change in T2 relaxation time was not significantly different between pre- and post-operative MRI scans for any of the nine regions in the deep zone of the acetabular cartilage (p=0.065 - 0.969) or the superficial zone of the

  17. Relationship between intraosseous pressures and intra-articular pressure in arthritis of the knee. An experimental study in immature dogs.

    PubMed

    Bünger, C; Harving, S; Hjermind, J; Bünger, E H

    1983-04-01

    The influence of chronic synovial inflammation and effusion on the juxta-articular bone haemodynamics in the juvenile knee was studied in 12 immature dogs with Carragheenin-induced unilateral arthritis. Using a fluid filled electromanometric pressure recording system simultaneous pressure measurements were taken from the distal femoral metaphysis, juxta-articular epiphyses and knee joint cavity in general anaesthesia followed by intraosseous phlebographies. During resting conditions the intraosseous pressure of the distal femoral epiphysis and the intra-articular pressure was significantly elevated. The phlebographies showed increased accumulation of contrast in arthritic femoral epiphyses with decreased contrast clearance rate. During increasing intra-articular pressure an augmented vulnerability of the blood supply of the arthritic femoral epiphyses was demonstrated. The results suggests that joint effusion may play an important role in the bone changes in juvenile degenerative arthritis of the knee. PMID:6845993

  18. A survey of European and Canadian rheumatologists regarding the treatment of patients with ankylosing spondylitis and extra-articular manifestations.

    PubMed

    Van den Bosch, Filip

    2010-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a disabling inflammatory disease accompanied by a variety of extra-articular manifestations in a significant number of patients. These manifestations, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, psoriasis, and uveitis, share a similar inflammatory mechanism with one another and with AS. Extra-articular manifestations are observed in a larger percentage of patients with AS and spondyloarthritides (SpAs) than the normal population; therefore, it is important to identify these and other inflammatory-mediated conditions and consider them when treating SpAs. How rheumatologists approach patients with both AS and extra-articular manifestations may lead to a better understanding of what treatment approaches could be taken to optimize patient outcomes. Rheumatologists (N = 453) from five European countries and Canada who treat AS were surveyed to determine treatment practices and management of both AS and its associated extra-articular manifestations. Most rheumatologists (93%) believe AS could be diagnosed earlier as the average time between symptom onset and diagnosis was approximately 4 years. In total, 60% routinely screen patients with AS for extra-articular manifestations, although this varied considerably across countries. The majority (97%) agrees that controlling inflammation is critical during treatment, and patients with extra-articular manifestations tend to have poorer prognoses than those patients with only axial AS. Treatment considerations varied depending on whether patients presented with only axial AS or had extra-articular manifestations, where use of biologics became more common. Rheumatologists agree that patients with both AS and extra-articular manifestations require a different treatment strategy than patients with AS alone. Results of this survey highlight areas where rheumatologists differ in their clinical management of patients with AS including tools used for disease assessment and the routine screening, or

  19. Relative volume measured with magnetic resonance imaging is an articular collapse predictor in hematological pediatric patients with femoral head osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Davide; Masetto, Alessandro; Talei Franzesi, Cammillo; Bonaffini, Pietro A; Casiraghi, Alessandra; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the potential value of femoral head (FH) volume measurements to predict joint collapse, as compared to articular surface involvement, in post-treatment osteonecrosis (ON) in pediatric patients affected by lymphoproliferative diseases. METHODS Considering 114 young patients with lymphoproliferative diseases undergone a lower-limbs magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination between November 2006 and August 2012 for a suspected post-treatment ON, we finally considered a total of 13 cases (7 males, mean age 15.2 ± 4.8 years), which developed a FH ON lesions (n = 23). The MRI protocol included coronal short tau inversion recovery and T1-weighted sequences, from the hips to the ankles. During the follow-up (elapsed time: 9.2 ± 2 mo), 13/23 FH articular surface (FHS) developed articular deformity. The first MRI studies with diagnosis of ON were retrospectively analyzed, measuring FH volume (FHV), FHS, ON volume (ONV) and the articular surface involved by ON (ONS). The relative involvement of FHS, in terms of volume [relative volume (RV): ONV/FHV] and articular surface [relative surface (RS): ONS/FHS], was then calculated. RESULTS By using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis (threshold of 23% of volume involvement), RV predicted articular deformity in 13/13 FHS [sensitivity 100%, specificity 90%, accuracy 95%, positive predictive value (PPV) 93%, negative predictive value (NPV) 100%]. Considering a threshold of 50% of articular involvement, RS predicted articular deformity in 10/13 femoral heads (sensitivity 77%, specificity 100%, accuracy 87%, PPV 100%, NPV 77%). CONCLUSION RV might be a more reliable parameter than RS in predicting FH deformity and could represent a potential complementary diagnostic tool in the follow-up of femoral heads ON lesions. PMID:27648169

  20. Relative volume measured with magnetic resonance imaging is an articular collapse predictor in hematological pediatric patients with femoral head osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Davide; Masetto, Alessandro; Talei Franzesi, Cammillo; Bonaffini, Pietro A; Casiraghi, Alessandra; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the potential value of femoral head (FH) volume measurements to predict joint collapse, as compared to articular surface involvement, in post-treatment osteonecrosis (ON) in pediatric patients affected by lymphoproliferative diseases. METHODS Considering 114 young patients with lymphoproliferative diseases undergone a lower-limbs magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination between November 2006 and August 2012 for a suspected post-treatment ON, we finally considered a total of 13 cases (7 males, mean age 15.2 ± 4.8 years), which developed a FH ON lesions (n = 23). The MRI protocol included coronal short tau inversion recovery and T1-weighted sequences, from the hips to the ankles. During the follow-up (elapsed time: 9.2 ± 2 mo), 13/23 FH articular surface (FHS) developed articular deformity. The first MRI studies with diagnosis of ON were retrospectively analyzed, measuring FH volume (FHV), FHS, ON volume (ONV) and the articular surface involved by ON (ONS). The relative involvement of FHS, in terms of volume [relative volume (RV): ONV/FHV] and articular surface [relative surface (RS): ONS/FHS], was then calculated. RESULTS By using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis (threshold of 23% of volume involvement), RV predicted articular deformity in 13/13 FHS [sensitivity 100%, specificity 90%, accuracy 95%, positive predictive value (PPV) 93%, negative predictive value (NPV) 100%]. Considering a threshold of 50% of articular involvement, RS predicted articular deformity in 10/13 femoral heads (sensitivity 77%, specificity 100%, accuracy 87%, PPV 100%, NPV 77%). CONCLUSION RV might be a more reliable parameter than RS in predicting FH deformity and could represent a potential complementary diagnostic tool in the follow-up of femoral heads ON lesions.

  1. Characterization of a macroporous polyvinyl alcohol scaffold for the repair of focal articular cartilage defects.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenneth W; Torzilli, Peter A; Warren, Russell F; Maher, Suzanne A

    2014-02-01

    Focal cartilage defects reduce the ability of articular cartilage to resist mechanical loading and provide lubrication during joint motion. The limitations in current surgical treatments have motivated the use of biocompatible scaffolds as a future treatment option. Here we describe a second generation macroporous, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffold with independently tunable morphological and mechanical properties. The compressive moduli of the PVA scaffold increased with increasing polymer concentration and applied compressive strain, with values in the range for human articular cartilage (HA  > 1000 kPa, EY  > 500 kPa). Scaffolds also possessed strain-dependent permeability and Poisson's ratio. The interconnected macroporous network was found to facilitate chondrocyte seeding and proliferation through the scaffold over one week in culture. Overall, these promising characteristics demonstrate the potential of this macroporous scaffold for future studies in focal cartilage defect repair.

  2. A comparison of radiographic, arthroscopic and histological measures of articular pathology in the canine elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Goldhammer, Marc A; Smith, Sionagh H; Fitzpatrick, Noel; Clements, Dylan N

    2010-10-01

    Validation of radiographic and arthroscopic scoring of joint pathology requires their comparison with histological measures of disease from the same joint. Fragmentation of the medial coronoid process (FMCP) is a naturally occurring disease of the canine elbow joint that results in osteoarthritis, and the objectives of this study were to compare the severity of histopathological changes in the medial coronoid process (MCP) and medial articular synovial membrane with gross radiographic scoring of elbow joint osteophytosis and the arthroscopic assessment of the MCP articular cartilage surface. Radiographic scoring of osteophytosis and the arthroscopic scoring of visual cartilage pathology of the MCP correlated moderately well with the histopathological evaluation of cartilage damage on the MCP and synovial inflammation in the medial part of the joint, but not with bone pathology in the MCP. Marked cartilage pathology on the MCP was identified in joints with either no radiographic evidence of osteophytosis or with mild cartilage damage that was evident arthroscopically.

  3. Effect of Heterotheca inuloides essential oil on rat cytoskeleton articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Flores-San Martin, Denise; Perea-Flores, María de Jesús; Morales-López, Javier; Centeno-Alvarez, Mónica María; Pérez-Ishiwara, Guillermo; Pérez-Hernández, Nury; Pérez-Hernández, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is characterised by progressive loss of articular cartilage through the increase of catabolic metalloproteinases, and chondrocyte cytoskeleton disruption has also been reported. In this regard, we studied the effect of Heterotheca inuloides essential oil (HIEO) on the distribution and immunolocalisation of actin, vimentin and tubulin of chondrocytes from cultured rat articular cartilage explants in the presence of the cytoskeleton disassembly agent acrylamide. After 48 h, chondrocytes treated with acrylamide showed changes in actin immunolocalisation and shrinkage, loss of tubulin compartmentalisation and vimentin collapse and redistribution. However, the immunostaining pattern of these three proteins in acrylamide- and HIEO-treated chondrocytes simultaneously retained their typical characteristics. These results suggest that HIEO promotes protein cytoskeleton reorganisation without providing a preventive effect of acrylamide-associated disassembly. However, it is also possible that HIEO prevents vimentin disorganisation by chemical interaction with acrylamide.

  4. [Cutaneous atrophy and hypopigmentation secondary to intra-articular corticosteroid injection].

    PubMed

    Loarte Pasquel, E P; Cabal García, A A

    2014-04-01

    Epicondylitis is the most common disease of the elbow. It is a tendinitis caused, in most cases, by repetitive motion of the forearm extensor muscles, and belongs to the group of occupational diseases that are related to work activity or sport. Intra-articular injections of glucocorticoids are often used by dermatologists, rheumatologists, orthopaedic surgeons, and primary care due to their ease of administration. However, this procedure has potential side effects. There are a limited number of case reports describing atrophy and hypopigmentation of the skin as a side effect. The general indications for glucocorticoid injections are monofocal and multifocal inflammatory disease, multifocal articular or soft tissue disease. It is more often used in more severe monofocal or multifocal inflammation, failure of drug treatment and/or rehabilitatory when other treatments are contraindicated.

  5. Modeling and Simulation of the Effects of Cyclic Loading on Articular Cartilage Lesion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiayi; Ayati, Bruce P.; Brouillete, Marc J.; Graham, Jason M.; Ramakrishnan, Prem S.; Martin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a model of articular cartilage lesion formation to simulate the effects of cyclic loading. This model extends and modifies the reaction-diffusion-delay model by Graham et al. [20] for the spread of a lesion formed though a single traumatic event. Our model represents “implicitly” the effects of loading, meaning through a cyclic sink term in the equations for live cells. Our model forms the basis for in silico studies of cartilage damage relevant to questions in osteoarthritis, for example, that may not be easily answered through in vivo or in vitro studies. Computational results are presented that indicate the impact of differing levels of EPO on articular cartilage lesion abatement. PMID:24753483

  6. Extra-articular extraosseous migration of a bioabsorbable femoral interference screw after ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Curtis, Christine; Micheli, Lyle

    2008-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is quite commonly used to treat anterior knee instability. Surgeon preference and patient functional goals determine graft selection and graft fixation techniques. Interference screws are considered a safe and effective device for graft fixation in surgical ACL reconstruction. Poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) bioabsorbable interference screws are becoming increasingly popular in ACL reconstruction surgery. There are several reasons why they may be more advantageous than metallic screws, including reduced graft laceration during insertion, ease of performance of revision procedures, avoidance of graft injury encountered with aperture fixation using metallic screws, and fewer artifacts on magnetic resonance images (MRI). Few studies describe complications associated with PLLA bioabsorbable screws, particularly extra-articular screw migration. This article presents a case of an extra-articular extraosseous migration of the femoral bioabsorbable interference screw. This case further demonstrates the problem of the femoral bioabsorbable interference screw.

  7. Changes in permeability of rabbit articular cartilage caused by joint contracture as revealed by the peroxidase method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Ohta, N; Kawaji, W; Takata, K; Hirano, H

    1984-11-01

    Changes in permeability of adult rabbit articular cartilage caused by joint contracture were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy, employing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as an indicator. The knee joint was plaster-immobilized for 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8 weeks in the flexion position. One ml of 4% HRP was administered in the articular cavity of the knee joint and allowed to diffuse and permeate into the articular cartilage. Distribution of the permeated HRP was visualized in the cartilage taken from the lateral condyle of the femur, utilizing the DAB-H2O2 reaction. In the normal and the non-immobilized joints, the permeated HRP reached to the matrix and chondrocytes situated in the deep layer of the articular cartilage. HRP was heavily deposited in the intercellular matrices, particularly around the chondrocytes, and was actively endocytosed by these cells. In the plaster-immobilized joints, especially after 4 weeks or longer of immobilization, the administered HRP had not permeated well and was restricted to the surface (lamina splendens) and the superficial layer of the cartilage. These results show that administered HRP diffuses into the deep layer of the articular cartilage and is actively endocytosed by chondrocytes and that the permeability of articular cartilage is remarkably reduced by joint contracture. PMID:6532371

  8. Direct chemotherapeutic dual drug delivery through intra-articular injection for synergistic enhancement of rheumatoid arthritis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Reum Son, A; Kim, Da Yeon; Hun Park, Seung; Yong Jang, Ja; Kim, Kyungsook; Ju Kim, Byoung; Yun Yin, Xiang; Ho Kim, Jae; Hyun Min, Byoung; Keun Han, Dong; Suk Kim, Moon

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of systemic rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatments is limited by difficulties in achieving therapeutic doses within articular joints. We evaluated the ability of intra-articular administration of injectable formulations to synergistically enhance repair of RA joints. Methotrexate-loaded hyaluronic acid (Met-HA), dexamethasone-loaded microcapsules (Dex-M), and Dex-M dispersed inside Met-HA were prepared as viscous emulsions and injected into articular joints using a needle to form a drug depot. By near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging, we confirmed the local release of NIR from the depot injected into the articular joint over an extended period. In comparison with the subjects treated with Met-HA or Dex-M alone, subjects treated simultaneously with Met-HA and Dex-M exhibited faster and more significant RA repair. Collectively, these results indicated that the drug depot formed after intra-articular injection of Met-HA/Dex-M induced long-lasting drug release and allowed Met and Dex to effectively act in the articular joint, resulting in enhanced RA repair. PMID:26424611

  9. Innervation and functional characteristics of connective tissues, especially elastic fibers, in human fetal thoracic intervertebral articular capsule and its surroundings.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Miya; Yasui, Masaya; Ozaki, Noriyuki; Sugiura, Yasuo

    2003-05-01

    The articular capsules between the thoracic vertebrae, which have physiologically different functions from those of other levels of the vertebrae, have yet to be subjected to neuro-anatomical and fine structural analysis. In the present study, we analyzed serial frozen sections of decalcified thoracic vertebrae in human fetuses, and identified the articular capsule tissue with its unique distribution of elastic fibers. The fine structure of the elastic fibers was studied by transmission electron microscopy. In the early-stage fetus, the fibrous membrane forming the lateral intervertebral articular capsule contained abundant thin elastic fibers consisting of microfibrils. In the late-stage fetus, the lateral capsule of fibrous membrane was occupied by thick elastic fibers. A medial articular capsule, namely the ligamenta flava, contained numerous thick elastic fibers in both early and late-stage fetuses. The distributional differences in nerve fibers between early and late-stage fetuses were determined by immunostaining, using antibodies raised against protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5; ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase). Innervation by PGP 9.5 immunoreactive fibers was limited to the areas of the articular capsules near the blood vessels, which may indicate their functional relation with blood flow. No PGP 9.5 immunoreactive fibers were found in the ligamenta flava of the late-stage fetus. Innervation might be directly involved in the development of the intervertebral articular capsules in normal human fetuses.

  10. Effect of low-level helium-neon laser therapy on histological and ultrastructural features of immobilized rabbit articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Mohammad; Ansari, Enayatallah; Gholami, Narges; Bayat, Aghdas

    2007-05-25

    The present study investigates whether low-level helium-neon laser therapy can increase histological parameters of immobilized articular cartilage in rabbits or not. Twenty five rabbits were divided into three groups: the experiment group, which received low-level helium-neon laser therapy with 13J/cm(2) three times a week after immobilization of their right knees; the control group which did not receive laser therapy after immobilization of their knees; and the normal group which received neither immobilization nor laser therapy. Histological and electron microscopic examinations were performed at 4 and 7 weeks after immobilization. Depth of the chondrocyte filopodia in four-week immobilized experiment group, and depth of articular cartilage in seven-week immobilized experiment group were significantly higher than those of relevant control groups (exact Fisher test, p=0.001; student's t-test, p=0.031, respectively). The surfaces of articular cartilages of the experiment group were relatively smooth, while those of the control group were unsmooth. It is therefore concluded that low-level helium-neon laser therapy had significantly increased the depth of the chondrocyte filopodia in four-week immobilized femoral articular cartilage and the depth of articular cartilage in seven-week immobilized knee in comparison with control immobilized articular cartilage.

  11. Effects of Fiber Orientation on the Frictional Properties and Damage of Regenerative Articular Cartilage Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Accardi, Mario Alberto; McCullen, Seth D.; Callanan, Anthony; Chung, Sangwon; Cann, Philippa M.

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage provides a low-friction, wear-resistant surface for diarthrodial joints. Due to overloading and overuse, articular cartilage is known to undergo significant wear and degeneration potentially resulting in osteoarthritis (OA). Regenerative medicine strategies offer a promising solution for the treatment of articular cartilage defects and potentially localized early OA. Such strategies rely on the development of materials to restore some aspects of cartilage. In this study, microfibrous poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds of varying fiber orientations (random and aligned) were cultured with bovine chondrocytes for 4 weeks in vitro, and the mechanical and frictional properties were evaluated. Mechanical properties were quantified using unconfined compression and tensile testing techniques. Frictional properties were investigated at physiological compressive strains occurring in native articular cartilage. Scaffolds were sheared along the fiber direction, perpendicular to the fiber direction and in random orientation. The evolution of damage as a result of shear was evaluated via white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy. As expected, the fiber orientation strongly affected the tensile properties as well as the compressive modulus of the scaffolds. Fiber orientation did not significantly affect the equilibrium frictional coefficient, but it was, however, a key factor in dictating the evolution of surface damage on the surface. Scaffolds shear tested perpendicular to the fiber orientation displayed the highest surface damage. Our results suggest that the fiber orientation of the scaffold implanted in the joint could strongly affect its resistance to damage due to shear. Scaffold fiber orientation should thus be carefully considered when using microfibrous scaffolds. PMID:23688110

  12. Finite element simulation of articular contact mechanics with quadratic tetrahedral elements.

    PubMed

    Maas, Steve A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Rawlins, David S; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2016-03-21

    Although it is easier to generate finite element discretizations with tetrahedral elements, trilinear hexahedral (HEX8) elements are more often used in simulations of articular contact mechanics. This is due to numerical shortcomings of linear tetrahedral (TET4) elements, limited availability of quadratic tetrahedron elements in combination with effective contact algorithms, and the perceived increased computational expense of quadratic finite elements. In this study we implemented both ten-node (TET10) and fifteen-node (TET15) quadratic tetrahedral elements in FEBio (www.febio.org) and compared their accuracy, robustness in terms of convergence behavior and computational cost for simulations relevant to articular contact mechanics. Suitable volume integration and surface integration rules were determined by comparing the results of several benchmark contact problems. The results demonstrated that the surface integration rule used to evaluate the contact integrals for quadratic elements affected both convergence behavior and accuracy of predicted stresses. The computational expense and robustness of both quadratic tetrahedral formulations compared favorably to the HEX8 models. Of note, the TET15 element demonstrated superior convergence behavior and lower computational cost than both the TET10 and HEX8 elements for meshes with similar numbers of degrees of freedom in the contact problems that we examined. Finally, the excellent accuracy and relative efficiency of these quadratic tetrahedral elements was illustrated by comparing their predictions with those for a HEX8 mesh for simulation of articular contact in a fully validated model of the hip. These results demonstrate that TET10 and TET15 elements provide viable alternatives to HEX8 elements for simulation of articular contact mechanics.

  13. Adverse effects of extra-articular corticosteroid injections: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To estimate the occurrence and type of adverse effects after application of an extra-articular (soft tissue) corticosteroid injection. Methods A systematic review of the literature was made based on a PubMed and Embase search covering the period 1956 to January 2010. Case reports were included, as were prospective and retrospective studies that reported adverse events of corticosteroid injection. All clinical trials which used extra-articular corticosteroid injections were examined. We divided the reported adverse events into major (defined as those needing intervention or not disappearing) and minor ones (transient, not requiring intervention). Results The search yielded 87 relevant studies:44 case reports, 37 prospective studies and 6 retrospective studies. The major adverse events included osteomyelitis and protothecosis; one fatal necrotizing fasciitis; cellulitis and ecchymosis; tendon ruptures; atrophy of the plantar fat was described after injecting a neuroma; and local skin effects appeared as atrophy, hypopigmentation or as skin defect. The minor adverse events effects ranged from skin rash to flushing and disturbed menstrual pattern. Increased pain or steroid flare after injection was reported in 19 studies. After extra-articular injection, the incidence of major adverse events ranged from 0-5.8% and that of minor adverse events from 0-81%. It was not feasible to pool the risk for adverse effects due to heterogeneity of study populations and difference in interventions and variance in reporting. Conclusion In this literature review it was difficult to accurately quantify the incidence of adverse effects after extra-articular corticosteroid injection. The reported adverse events were relatively mild, although one fatal reaction was reported. PMID:20836867

  14. Chondroprotective Effect of Kartogenin on CD44-Mediated Functions in Articular Cartilage and Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Yohei; Ishizuka, Shinya; Knudson, Cheryl B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A recent report identified the small molecule kartogenin as a chondrogenic and chondroprotective agent. Since changes in hyaluronan metabolism occur during cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis, we began studies to determine whether there was a connection between extracellular hyaluronan, CD44–hyaluronan interactions and the effects of kartogenin on articular chondrocytes. Methods: Chondrocytes cultured in monolayers, bioengineered neocartilages, or cartilage explants were treated with kartogenin with or without stimulation by IL-1β. Accumulation of matrix was visualized by a particle exclusion assay or by safranin O staining and release of sulfated glycosaminoglycans was determined. Production of aggrecanases and aggrecan G1-ITEGE neoepitope, fragmentation of CD44 and the SMAD1/5/8 signaling pathway were evaluated by western blotting. Results: Kartogenin treatment enhanced chondrocyte pericellular matrix assembly and retention in the presence of IL-1β. The chondroprotective effects of kartogenin on IL-1β-induced release of sulfated glycosaminoglycans from articular cartilage explants, reduction in safranin O staining of neocartilage discs as well as a reduction in aggrecan G1-ITEGE neoepitope in chondrocyte and explant cartilage cultures were observed. Kartogenin partially blocked the IL-1β-induced increased expression of ADAMTS-5. Additionally, kartogenin-treated articular chondrocytes exhibited a decrease in CD44 proteolytic fragmentation. However, kartogenin treatment did not enhance proteoglycan in control, non-IL-1β-treated cultures. Similarly, kartogenin enhanced the SMAD1 phosphorylation but only following pretreatment with IL-1β. Conclusion: These studies provide novel information on the chondroprotective function of kartogenin in adult articular cartilage. The effects of kartogenin are significant after activation of chondrocytic chondrolysis, which may occur following disruption of homeostasis maintained by hyaluronan–CD44

  15. Frictional Properties of Hartley Guinea Pig Knees With and Without Proteolytic Disruption of the Articular Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Teeple, Erin; Fleming, Braden C.; Mechrefe, Anthony P.; Crisco, Joseph J.; Brady, Mark F.; Jay, Gregory D.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Objective To apply a pendulum technique to detect changes in the coefficient of friction of the articular cartilage of the intact guinea pig tibiofemoral joint after proteolytic disruption. Design 22 hind limbs were obtained from eleven 3-month old Hartley Guinea pigs. 20 knees were block randomized to one of two treatment groups receiving injections of: 1) α-chymotrypsin (to disrupt the superficial layer of the articular surface) or 2) saline (sham; to control for the effects of the intra-articular injection). The legs were mounted in a pendulum where the knee served as the fulcrum. The decay in pendulum amplitude as a function of oscillation number was first recorded and the coefficient of friction of the joint was determined from these data before injection. 10 μL of either isotonic saline or 1 Unit/μL α-chymotrypsin was then injected into the intra-articular joint space and incubated for two hours. The pendulum test was repeated. Changes in the coefficient of friction between the sham and α-chymotrypsin joints were compared. One additional pair of knees was used for histological study of the effects of the injections. Results Treatment with α-chymotrypsin significantly increased the coefficient of friction of the guinea pig knee by 74% while sham treatment decreased it by 8%. Histological sections using Gomori trichrome stain verified that the lamina splendens was damaged following treatment with α-chymotrypsin and not following saline treatment. Conclusions Treatment with α-chymotrypsin induces mild cartilage surface damage and increases the coefficient of friction in the Hartley guinea pig knee. PMID:17010648

  16. The surface lamina of the articular cartilage of human zygapophyseal joints.

    PubMed

    Giles, L G

    1992-07-01

    Literature referring to the conflicting results of investigations into the possible existence and composition of the lamina splendens is reviewed. Two hundred micrometer thick histological sections from 80 human cadaveric lower lumbar zygapophyseal joint articular cartilages were examined by ordinary light and darkfield microscopy. The findings illustrate what appears to be an acellular surface lamina on the opposing cartilaginous surfaces. No speculation is made regarding the possible physiological significance of the lamina based on this anatomical study. PMID:1609968

  17. Clinical Testing for Extra-Articular Lateral Knee Pain. A Modification and Combination of Traditional Tests

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Knee pain is one of the most common problems encountered by recreational and competitive athletes. Pain over the lateral aspect of the knee can be the result of intra or extra articular conditions. The purpose of this clinical suggestion is to present the modification of a traditional clinical test to aide in the differential diagnosis of lateral knee pain. This method has not been described elsewhere and anecdotally has been helpful in the evaluation of patients with lateral knee pain. PMID:21509133

  18. Palmitate has proapoptotic and proinflammatory effects on articular cartilage and synergizes with interleukin-1

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Rogers, Nicole H; Smith, Roy G; Lotz, Martin K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (OA) that is associated with a state of low-grade inflammation, and increased circulating adipokines and free fatty acids (FFA). The aim of this study was to analyze effects of saturated (palmitate) and monounsaturated (oleate) free fatty acids (FFA) on articular chondrocytes and cartilage. Methods Human articular chondrocytes and fibroblast-like synoviocytes obtained from young healthy donors, and OA chondrocytes from patients undergoing total knee replacement were treated with palmitate or oleate alone or with interleukin 1-β (IL-1β). Cell viability, caspase activation, and gene expression of proinflammatory factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and extracellular proteases were studied. In addition, chondrocyte viability, interleukin-6 (IL-6) production and matrix damage were assessed in bovine and human articular cartilage explants cultured with FFA with or without IL-1β. Results Palmitate, but not oleate, induced caspase activation and cell death in IL-1β-stimulated normal chondrocytes, and upregulated il6 and cox2 expression in chondrocytes and fibroblast-like synoviocytes through toll-like receptor-4 signaling. In cartilage explants, palmitate induced chondrocyte death, IL-6 release and extracellular matrix degradation. Palmitate synergized with IL-1β in stimulating proapoptotic and proinflammatory cellular responses. Pharmacological inhibition of caspases or TLR-4 signaling reduced palmitate and IL-1β-induced cartilage damage. Conclusions Palmitate acts as a pro-inflammatory and catabolic factor that, in synergy with IL-1β, induces chondrocyte apoptosis and articular cartilage breakdown. Collectively, our data suggest that elevated levels of saturated FFA often found in obesity may contribute to OA pathogenesis. PMID:24591481

  19. Treatment of ankylosing spondylitis and extra-articular manifestations in everyday rheumatology practice.

    PubMed

    Elewaut, Dirk; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco

    2009-09-01

    The SpAs are a group of overlapping, chronic, inflammatory rheumatic diseases including AS, a chronic inflammatory disease primarily affecting the SI joints. In addition to inflammatory back pain, AS patients are also more likely to experience extra-articular manifestations belonging to the SpA concept which can affect the eyes, the gastrointestinal tract and the skin and other related inflammatory conditions. This review focuses on current progress in treatment options in SpA with special emphasis on extra-articular features. TNF inhibition has demonstrated effectiveness in the treatment of AS symptoms and all currently available anti-TNF agents appear to have similar efficacy. However, the efficacy of anti-TNF agents varies in the treatment of extra-articular manifestations and comorbidities. Analyses of trials of anti-TNF agents in patients with AS have revealed significant reductions in the incidence of flares of uveitis and IBD with infliximab and adalimumab (uveitis only) treatment but not with etanercept. All three anti-TNF agents (infliximab, adalimumab, etanercept) have demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis (not associated with AS). When evaluating as to which agent to use in the treatment of AS, an important consideration is the overall well-being of the patient. This should include any additional inflammatory burden that manifests in other parts of the body, which may currently be subclinical. Based on current evidence, among TNF inhibitors, the monoclonal antibodies (infliximab and adalimumab) are more appropriate than etanercept if extra-articular manifestations or comorbid conditions are present or suspected. To date, infliximab appears to be the best studied agent with a wide spectrum of proven efficacy.

  20. Does Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment repair articular cartilage injury? A rabbit model study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) regiment has been used to treat fractures with non-union and to promote bone union in general. The effect of LIPUS on articular cartilage metabolism has been characterized. Yet, the effect of LIPUS to repair articular cartilage injury remains unclear in vivo. Methods We designed a study to investigate the effect of LIPUS on articular cartilage repairing in a rabbit severe cartilage injury model. Eighteen rabbits were divided into three groups: Sham-operated group, operated group without-LIPUS-treatment, operated group with-LIPUS-treatment (a daily 20-minute treatment for 3 months). Full-thickness cartilage defects were surgically created on the right side distal femoral condyle without intending to penetrate into the subchondral bone, which mimicked severe chondral injury. MR images for experimental joints, morphology grading scale, and histopathological Mankin score were evaluated. Results The preliminary results showed that the operated groups with-LIPUS-treatment and without-LIPUS-treatment had significantly higher Mankin score and morphological grading scale compared with the sham-operated group. However, there was no significant difference between the with-LIPUS-treatment and without-LIPUS-treatment groups. Cartilage defects filled with proliferative tissue were observed in the with-LIPUS-treatment group grossly and under MR images, however which presented less up-take under Alcian blue stain. Furthermore, no new deposition of type II collagen or proliferation of chondrocyte was observed over the cartilage defect after LIPUS treatment. Conclusion LIPUS has no significant therapeutic potential in treating severe articular cartilage injury in our animal study. PMID:24507771

  1. Repair of articular osteochondral defects of the knee joint using a composite lamellar scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Y. M.; Yu, Q. S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The major problem with repair of an articular cartilage injury is the extensive difference in the structure and function of regenerated, compared with normal cartilage. Our work investigates the feasibility of repairing articular osteochondral defects in the canine knee joint using a composite lamellar scaffold of nano-ß-tricalcium phosphate (ß-TCP)/collagen (col) I and II with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) and assesses its biological compatibility. Methods The bone–cartilage scaffold was prepared as a laminated composite, using hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nano-HAP)/collagen I/copolymer of polylactic acid–hydroxyacetic acid as the bony scaffold, and sodium hyaluronate/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) as the cartilaginous scaffold. Ten-to 12-month-old hybrid canines were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. BMSCs were obtained from the iliac crest of each animal, and only those of the third generation were used in experiments. An articular osteochondral defect was created in the right knee of dogs in both groups. Those in the experimental group were treated by implanting the composites consisting of the lamellar scaffold of ß-TCP/col I/col II/BMSCs. Those in the control group were left untreated. Results After 12 weeks of implantation, defects in the experimental group were filled with white semi-translucent tissue, protruding slightly over the peripheral cartilage surface. After 24 weeks, the defect space in the experimental group was filled with new cartilage tissues, finely integrated into surrounding normal cartilage. The lamellar scaffold of ß-TCP/col I/col II was gradually degraded and absorbed, while new cartilage tissue formed. In the control group, the defects were not repaired. Conclusion This method can be used as a suitable scaffold material for the tissue-engineered repair of articular cartilage defects. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:56–64 PMID:25837672

  2. Freeze-thaw treatment effects on the dynamic mechanical properties of articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As a relatively non-regenerative tissue, articular cartilage has been targeted for cryopreservation as a method of mitigating a lack of donor tissue availability for transplant surgeries. In addition, subzero storage of articular cartilage has long been used in biomedical studies using various storage temperatures. The current investigation studies the potential for freeze-thaw to affect the mechanical properties of articular cartilage through direct comparison of various subzero storage temperatures. Methods Both subzero storage temperature as well as freezing rate were compared using control samples (4°C) and samples stored at either -20°C or -80°C as well as samples first snap frozen in liquid nitrogen (-196°C) prior to storage at -80°C. All samples were thawed at 37.5°C to testing temperature (22°C). Complex stiffness and hysteresis characterized load resistance and damping properties using a non-destructive, low force magnitude, dynamic indentation protocol spanning a broad loading rate range to identify the dynamic viscoelastic properties of cartilage. Results Stiffness levels remained unchanged with exposure to the various subzero temperatures. Hysteresis increased in samples snap frozen at -196°C and stored at -80°C, though remained unchanged with exposure to the other storage temperatures. Conclusions Mechanical changes shown are likely due to ice lens creation, where frost heave effects may have caused collagen damage. That storage to -20°C and -80°C did not alter the mechanical properties of articular cartilage shows that when combined with a rapid thawing protocol to 37.5°C, the tissue may successfully be stored at subzero temperatures. PMID:20932309

  3. The study on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hai-Jun; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Li, Ang; Sun, Lian-Wen; Yan, Yan; Fan, Fan; Li, De-Yu; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2012-10-01

    The microgravity environment of a long-term space flight may induce acute changes in an astronaut's musculo-skeletal systems. This study explores the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage. Six rats underwent tail suspension for 14 days and six additional rats were kept under normal earth gravity as controls. Swelling strains were measured using high-frequency ultrasound in all cartilage samples subject to osmotic loading. Site-specific swelling strain data were used in a triphasic theoretical model of cartilage swelling to determine the uniaxial modulus of the cartilage solid matrix. No severe surface irregularities were found in the cartilage samples obtained from the control or tail-suspended groups. For the tail-suspended group, the thickness of the cartilage at a specified site, as determined by ultrasound echo, showed a minor decrease. The uniaxial modulus of articular cartilage at the specified site decreased significantly, from (6.31 ± 3.37)MPa to (5.05 ± 2.98)MPa ( p < 0.05). The histology-stained image of a cartilage sample also showed a reduced number of chondrocytes and decreased degree of matrix staining. These results demonstrated that the 14 d simulated microgravity induced significant effects on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage. This study is the first attempt to explore the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage using an osmotic loading method and a triphasic model. The conclusions may provide reference information for manned space flights and a better understanding of the effects of microgravity on the skeletal system.

  4. Indentation stiffness of young canine knee articular cartilage--influence of strenuous joint loading.

    PubMed

    Jurvelin, J; Kiviranta, I; Säämänen, A M; Tammi, M; Helminen, H J

    1990-01-01

    The indentation stiffness of knee articular cartilage subjected to strenuous physical training (SPT: treadmill running 20 km day-1 for 15 weeks, n = 6) of young Beagles was tested and compared to that obtained from age-matched (55 weeks, n = 9) controls. The mathematical solution for the shear modulus, as determined from indentation of an elastic layer bonded to a rigid half space, was extended to small Poisson's ratios and applied to the analysis of cartilage response after a step stress (0.39 MPa) application. In these measurements with an impervious, plane-ended indenter, the equilibrium deformation was systematically greater than values predicted from the instant response by the linear biphasic theory. Therefore, the accurate determination of Poisson's ratio from the creep curves was not possible. The mean shear modulus (calculated by using the deformation at 900 s after load application and assuming a constant Poisson's ratio of 0.40 for the matrix) of canine knee articular cartilage was 0.37 MPa. While the cartilage thickness was not affected by SPT, the cartilage of the lateral tibial plateau was stiffer (13.3%, p less than 0.05) than that in controls. However, in the femoral condyles, the stiffness was at the control level or even below. Our results on cartilage structure and properties suggest that SPT, in contrast to our previous findings with moderate training, does not necessarily improve the biological properties of articular cartilage in young animals.

  5. In vitro growth factor-induced bio engineering of mature articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ilyas M.; Francis, Lewis; Theobald, Peter S.; Perni, Stefano; Young, Robert D.; Prokopovich, Polina; Conlan, R. Steven; Archer, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage maturation is the postnatal development process that adapts joint surfaces to their site-specific biomechanical demands. Maturation involves gross morphological changes that occur through a process of synchronised growth and resorption of cartilage and generally ends at sexual maturity. The inability to induce maturation in biomaterial constructs designed for cartilage repair has been cited as a major cause for their failure in producing persistent cell-based repair of joint lesions. The combination of growth factors FGF2 and TGFβ1 induces accelerated articular cartilage maturation in vitro such that many molecular and morphological characteristics of tissue maturation are observable. We hypothesised that experimental growth factor-induced maturation of immature cartilage would result in a biophysical and biochemical composition consistent with a mature phenotype. Using native immature and mature cartilage as reference, we observed that growth factor-treated immature cartilages displayed increased nano-compressive stiffness, decreased surface adhesion, decreased water content, increased collagen content and smoother surfaces, correlating with a convergence to the mature cartilage phenotype. Furthermore, increased gene expression of surface structural protein collagen type I in growth factor-treated explants compared to reference cartilages demonstrates that they are still in the dynamic phase of the postnatal developmental transition. These data provide a basis for understanding the regulation of postnatal maturation of articular cartilage and the application of growth factor-induced maturation in vitro and in vivo in order to repair and regenerate cartilage defects. PMID:23182922

  6. Intra-articular pressures and joint mechanics: should we pay attention to effusion in knee osteoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Derek James

    2014-09-01

    What factors play a role to ensure a knee joint does what it should given the demands of moving through the physical environment? This paper aims to probe the hypothesis that intra-articular joint pressures, once a topic of interest, have been left aside in contemporary frameworks in which we now view knee joint function. The focus on ligamentous deficiencies and the chondrocentric view of osteoarthritis, while important, have left little attention to the consideration of other factors that can impair joint function across the lifespan. Dynamic knee stability is required during every step we take. While there is much known about the role that passive structures and muscular activation play in maintaining a healthy knee joint, this framework does not account for the role that intra-articular joint pressures may have in providing joint stability during motion and how these factors interact. Joint injuries invariably result in some form of intra-articular fluid accumulation. Ultimately, it may be how the knee mechanically responds to this fluid, of which pressure plays a significant role that provides the mechanisms for continued function. Do joint pressures provide an important foundation for maintaining knee function? This hypothesis is unique and argues that we are missing an important piece of the puzzle when attempting to understand implications that joint injury and disease have for joint function.

  7. Poroelastic response of articular cartilage by nanoindentation creep tests at different characteristic lengths.

    PubMed

    Taffetani, M; Gottardi, R; Gastaldi, D; Raiteri, R; Vena, P

    2014-07-01

    Nanoindentation is an experimental technique which is attracting increasing interests for the mechanical characterization of articular cartilage. In particular, time dependent mechanical responses due to fluid flow through the porous matrix can be quantitatively investigated by nanoindentation experiments at different penetration depths and/or by using different probe sizes. The aim of this paper is to provide a framework for the quantitative interpretation of the poroelastic response of articular cartilage subjected to creep nanoindentation tests. To this purpose, multiload creep tests using spherical indenters have been carried out on saturated samples of mature bovine articular cartilage achieving two main quantitative results. First, the dependence of indentation modulus in the drained state (at equilibrium) on the tip radius: a value of 500 kPa has been found using the large tip (400 μm radius) and of 1.7 MPa using the smaller one (25 μm). Secon, the permeability at microscopic scale was estimated at values ranging from 4.5×10(-16) m(4)/N s to 0.1×10(-16) m(4)/N s, from low to high equivalent deformation. Consistently with a poroelastic behavior, the size-dependent response of the indenter displacement disappears when characteristic size and permeability are accounted for. For comparison purposes, the same protocol was applied to intrinsically viscoelastic homogeneous samples of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS): both indentation modulus and time response have been found size-independent. PMID:24814573

  8. Absence of the articular disc in the tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Sugisaki, M; Kino, K; Ishikawa, T; Sugisaki, M; Abe, S

    2013-12-01

    The articular disc of the temporomandibular joint is a constant structure in mammals. According to Parsons' report in 1900, however, it is absent in four animals: the armadillo, two kinds of monotremes and the Tasmanian devil. Thereafter, no research was performed to confirm this observation. The aim of this study was to determine by anatomical and histological examination whether the Tasmanian devil has an articular disc in its temporomandibular joint. Six fresh frozen corpses and one dry skull of Tasmanian devils were obtained from the School of Zoology, University of Tasmania. The corpses were dissected and the morphology of the temporomandibular joint was carefully observed by gross anatomical and histological examination. The structure of the temporomandibular joint of the dry skull was examined macroscopically and by micro-computed tomography. In all cases, absence of the articular disc in the Tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint was morphologically confirmed. The surface layer of both the condyle and the glenoid fossa comprised a thick fibrous tissue. Micro-computed tomography revealed dense and fine trabecular bone in the condyle. The thick fibrous tissue covering the condyle and high-density trabecular bone in the condyle might play a role in absorption against powerful mastication and heavy loading of the Tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint. PMID:23438215

  9. Tibial articular cartilage and meniscus geometries combine to influence female risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Sturnick, Daniel R; Van Gorder, Robert; Vacek, Pamela M; DeSarno, Michael J; Gardner-Morse, Mack G; Tourville, Timothy W; Slauterbeck, James R; Johnson, Robert J; Shultz, Sandra J; Beynnon, Bruce D

    2014-11-01

    Tibial plateau subchondral bone geometry has been associated with the risk of sustaining a non-contact ACL injury; however, little is known regarding the influence of the meniscus and articular cartilage interface geometry on risk. We hypothesized that geometries of the tibial plateau articular cartilage surface and meniscus were individually associated with the risk of non-contact ACL injury. In addition, we hypothesized that the associations were independent of the underlying subchondral bone geometry. MRI scans were acquired on 88 subjects that suffered non-contact ACL injuries (27 males, 61 females) and 88 matched control subjects that were selected from the injured subject's teammates and were thus matched on sex, sport, level of play, and exposure to risk of injury. Multivariate analysis of the female data revealed that increased posterior-inferior directed slope of the middle articular cartilage region and decreased height of the posterior horn of the meniscus in the lateral compartment were associated with increased risk of sustaining a first time, non-contact ACL injury, independent of each other and of the slope of the tibial plateau subchondral bone. No measures were independently related to risk of non-contact ACL injury among males.

  10. Structure-Function Relations and Rigidity Percolation in the Shear Properties of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Silverberg, Jesse L.; Barrett, Aliyah R.; Das, Moumita; Petersen, Poul B.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Cohen, Itai

    2014-01-01

    Among mammalian soft tissues, articular cartilage is particularly interesting because it can endure a lifetime of daily mechanical loading despite having minimal regenerative capacity. This remarkable resilience may be due to the depth-dependent mechanical properties, which have been shown to localize strain and energy dissipation. This paradigm proposes that these properties arise from the depth-dependent collagen fiber orientation. Nevertheless, this structure-function relationship has not yet been quantified. Here, we use confocal elastography, quantitative polarized light microscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared imaging to make same-sample measurements of the depth-dependent shear modulus, collagen fiber organization, and extracellular matrix concentration in neonatal bovine articular cartilage. We find weak correlations between the shear modulus |G∗| and both the collagen fiber orientation and polarization. We find a much stronger correlation between |G∗| and the concentration of collagen fibers. Interestingly, very small changes in collagen volume fraction vc lead to orders-of-magnitude changes in the modulus with |G∗| scaling as (vc – v0)ξ. Such dependencies are observed in the rheology of other biopolymer networks whose structure exhibits rigidity percolation phase transitions. Along these lines, we propose that the collagen network in articular cartilage is near a percolation threshold that gives rise to these large mechanical variations and localization of strain at the tissue’s surface. PMID:25296326

  11. Cryoscanning electron microscopic study of the surface amorphous layer of articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, S; Yonekubo, S; Kurogouchi, Y

    1995-01-01

    In order to elucidate the structure near the articular surface, frozen unfixed hydrated articular cartilage with subchondral bone from the pig knee was examined using a cryoscanning electron microscope (cryo-SEM). This method is considered to reduce the introduction of artefacts due to fixation and drying. An amorphous layer, without a collagen-fibril network or chondrocytes, covered most of the surface of the cartilage. This layer was termed the surface amorphous layer. It showed various appearances, which were classified into 4 groups. The average thickness of the layer did not differ among the 8 anatomical regions from which the specimens were taken. The thickness of the layer was found to correlate with the type of appearance of the layer. The 4 appearances associated with thicknesses in descending order are: 'streaked', 'foliate', 'spotted', and 'vestigial'. The surface layer observed in the cryo-SEM was thicker than that observed by a conventional SEM. This difference may be attributable to dehydration of the specimen used in specimen preparation for the latter technique. The layer was also observed in articular cartilage taken from human and rabbit knees. The layer was found to be unstable and to have very variable features. Its thickness and appearance may be influenced by various factors such as dehydration, fluid absorption or mechanical stress. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:7592006

  12. Conservative treatment of temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis: intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, L; Masiero, S; Marioni, G

    2005-10-01

    Promising short-term results in the treatment of temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis with intra-articular injections of sodium hyaluronate (SH) have been reported in preliminary studies. The present prospective study compared long-term outcomes of temporomandibular joint SH injections with those of a conventional non-surgical treatment (bite-plane). Data from three groups of 20 patients with degenerative temporomandibular joint disease were considered. Group A underwent one cycle of five injections of 1 mL SH. Group B underwent a bite-plane treatment for at least 6 months. We considered a control group of 20 patients who refused any treatments. The description of the outcomes was based on objective and subjective parameters after a 6-month follow-up. Sodium hyaluronate and bite-plane treatments significantly improved patients conditions in all considered parameters. No significant differences in outcomes were confirmed by the statistical analysis. The tolerability of SH treatment resulted to be significantly higher. The analysis of results of serial controls in the SH treated group disclosed a significant worsening in pain at rest by comparing 1 and 6 months follow-up. Sodium hyaluronate infiltration resulted a valid non-surgical treatment for temporomandibular joint degenerative disease. Five well-tolerated intra-articular SH injections achieved equivalent results to those of a 6 months bite-plane treatment. We did not diagnose any complications of SH intra-articular injections. Longer time follow-up is necessary to determine the stability of SH properties.

  13. Contact models of repaired articular surfaces: influence of loading conditions and the superficial tangential zone.

    PubMed

    Owen, John R; Wayne, Jennifer S

    2011-07-01

    The superficial tangential zone (STZ) plays a significant role in normal articular cartilage's ability to support loads and retain fluids. To date, tissue engineering efforts have not replicated normal STZ function in cartilage repairs. This finite element study examined the STZ's role in normal and repaired articular surfaces under different contact conditions. Contact area and pressure distributions were allowed to change with time, tension-compression nonlinearity modeled collagen behavior in the STZ, and nonlinear geometry was incorporated to accommodate finite deformation. Responses to loading via impermeable and permeable rigid surfaces were compared to loading via normal cartilage, a more physiologic condition, anticipating the two rigid loading surfaces would bracket that of normal. For models loaded by normal cartilage, an STZ placed over the inferior repair region reduced the short-term axial compression of the articular surface by 15%, when compared to a repair without an STZ. Covering the repair with a normal STZ shifted the flow patterns and strain levels back toward that of normal cartilage. Additionally, reductions in von Mises stress (21%) and an increase in fluid pressure (13%) occurred in repair tissue under the STZ. This continues to show that STZ properties of sufficient quality are likely critical for the survival of transplanted constructs in vivo. However, response to loading via normal cartilage did not always fall within ranges predicted by the rigid surfaces. Use of more physiologic contact models is recommended for more accurate investigations into properties critical to the success of repair tissues.

  14. Hyperosmolarity protects chondrocytes from mechanical injury in human articular cartilage: an experimental report.

    PubMed

    Amin, A K; Huntley, J S; Patton, J T; Brenkel, I J; Simpson, A H R W; Hall, A C

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether exposure of human articular cartilage to hyperosmotic saline (0.9%, 600 mOsm) reduces in situ chondrocyte death following a standardised mechanical injury produced by a scalpel cut compared with the same assault and exposure to normal saline (0.9%, 285 mOsm). Human cartilage explants were exposed to normal (control) and hyperosmotic 0.9% saline solutions for five minutes before the mechanical injury to allow in situ chondrocytes to respond to the altered osmotic environment, and incubated for a further 2.5 hours in the same solutions following the mechanical injury. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we identified a sixfold (p = 0.04) decrease in chondrocyte death following mechanical injury in the superficial zone of human articular cartilage exposed to hyperosmotic saline compared with normal saline. These data suggest that increasing the osmolarity of joint irrigation solutions used during open and arthroscopic articular surgery may reduce chondrocyte death from surgical injury and could promote integrative cartilage repair.

  15. Low-field one-dimensional and direction-dependent relaxation imaging of bovine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Mollova, Ayret; Stapf, Siegfried

    2011-12-01

    The structure of articular cartilage is separated into three layers of differently oriented collagen fibers, which is accompanied by a gradient of increasing glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and decreasing water concentration from the top layer towards the bone interface. The combined effect of these structural variations results in a change of the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times as a function of the distance from the cartilage surface. In this paper, this dependence is investigated at a magnetic field strength of 0.27 T with a one-dimensional depth resolution of 50 μm on bovine hip and stifle joint articular cartilage. By employing this method, advantage is taken of the increasing contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate found at lower magnetic field strengths. Furthermore, evidence for an orientational dependence of relaxation times with respect to an axis normal to the surface plane is given, an observation that has recently been reported using high-field MRI and that was explained by preferential orientations of collagen bundles in each of the three cartilage zones. In order to quantify the extent of a further contrast mechanism and to estimate spatially dependent glycosaminoglycan concentrations, the data are supplemented by proton relaxation times that were acquired in bovine articular cartilage that was soaked in a 0.8 mM aqueous Gd ++ solution.

  16. Articular cartilage friction increases in hip joints after the removal of acetabular labrum.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongnam; Ito, Hiroshi; Kourtis, Lampros; Safran, Marc R; Carter, Dennis R; Giori, Nicholas J

    2012-02-01

    The acetabular labrum is believed to have a sealing function. However, a torn labrum may not effectively prevent joint fluid from escaping a compressed joint, resulting in impaired lubrication. We aimed to understand the role of the acetabular labrum in maintaining a low friction environment in the hip joint. We did this by measuring the resistance to rotation (RTR) of the hip, which reflects the friction of the articular cartilage surface, following focal and complete labrectomy. Five cadaveric hips without evidence of osteoarthritis and impingement were tested. We measured resistance to rotation of the hip joint during 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 times body weight (BW) cyclic loading in the intact hip, and after focal and complete labrectomy. Resistance to rotation, which reflects articular cartilage friction in an intact hip was significantly increased following focal labrectomy at 1-3 BW loading, and following complete labrectomy at all load levels. The acetabular labrum appears to maintain a low friction environment, possibly by sealing the joint from fluid exudation. Even focal labrectomy may result in increased joint friction, a condition that may be detrimental to articular cartilage and lead to osteoarthritis.

  17. Extreme Postinjection Flare in Response to Intra-Articular Triamcinolone Acetonide (Kenalog).

    PubMed

    Young, Porter; Homlar, Kelly C

    2016-01-01

    As intra-articular corticosteroid injections (CSIs) are a common treatment for osteoarthritis, physicians must well understand their potential side effects. Postinjection flares are an acute side effect of intra-articular CSIs, with symptoms ranging from mild joint effusion to disabling pain. The present case involved a severe postinjection flare that occurred after the patient, a 56-year-old woman with moderate osteoarthritis in the left knee, received 2 mL of 1% lidocaine and 2 mL (40 mg) of triamcinolone acetonide (Kenalog). Two hours after injection, she experienced swelling and intense pain in the knee and was unable to ambulate. The knee was aspirated with a return of 25 mL of "butterscotch"-colored fluid. This case is novel in that its acuity of onset, severity of symptoms, and synovial fluid analysis mimicked septic arthritis, which was ultimately ruled out with negative cultures and confirmation of triamcinolone acetonide crystals in the synovial aspirate, viewed by polarized light microscopy. Thus, the patient's reaction represents an acute crystal-induced inflammatory response. Although reactions to an intra-articular CSI of this severity are rare, it is important for treating physicians to inform patients of this potential side effect.

  18. Iron oxide labelling of human mesenchymal stem cells in collagen hydrogels for articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Heymer, Andrea; Haddad, Daniel; Weber, Meike; Gbureck, Uwe; Jakob, Peter M; Eulert, Jochen; Nöth, Ulrich

    2008-04-01

    For the development of new therapeutical cell-based strategies for articular cartilage repair, a reliable cell monitoring technique is required to track the cells in vivo non-invasively and repeatedly. We present a systematic and detailed study on the performance and biological impact of a simple and efficient labelling protocol for human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Commercially available very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOPs) were used as magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Iron uptake via endocytosis was confirmed histologically with prussian blue staining and quantified by mass spectrometry. Compared with unlabelled cells, VSOP-labelling did neither influence the viability nor the proliferation potential of hMSCs. Furthermore, iron incorporation did not affect hMSCs in undergoing adipogenic, osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation, as demonstrated histologically and by gene expression analyses. The efficiency of the labelling protocol was assessed with high-resolution MR imaging at 11.7T. VSOP-labelled hMSCs were visualised in a collagen type I hydrogel, which is in clinical use for matrix-based articular cartilage repair. The presence of VSOP-labelled hMSCs was indicated by distinct hypointense spots in the MR images, as a result of iron specific loss of signal intensity. In summary, this labelling technique has great potential to visualise hMSCs and track their migration after transplantation for articular cartilage repair with MR imaging.

  19. Arthroscopic study of injuries in articular fractures of distal radius extremity

    PubMed Central

    Araf, Marcelo; Mattar, Rames

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the incidence of wrist ligament and cartilage associated fractures of the distal radius, through arthroscopy, correlating with AO/ASIF classification. METHODS: Thirty patients aged between 20 and 50 years old, with closed fracture from groups B and C according to AO/ASIF classification were selected. All of them were submitted to wrist arthroscopy to address intra-articular injuries and reduction and osteosynthesis of the fracture. RESULTS: A high incidence of intra-articular injuries was noticed, and 76.6% of them presented injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, 36.6% of the intrinsic scapholunate ligament, 6.6% of the intrinsic triquetrolunate ligament, and 33% articular cartilage injury larger than three millimeters. Patients with fractures from type C according to AO/ASIF classification presented a higher incidence of ligament injuries. CONCLUSION: There is no relationship between the presence of chondral injury and the AO/ASIF classification of the fractures in the cases reported in this study. Level of Evidence III, Non Randomized Controlled Trial. PMID:25061421

  20. Highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of articular cartilage in indentation: Importance of collagen nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, J T A; Korhonen, R K

    2016-06-14

    Modern fibril-reinforced computational models of articular cartilage can include inhomogeneous tissue composition and structure, and nonlinear mechanical behavior of collagen, proteoglycans and fluid. These models can capture well experimental single step creep and stress-relaxation tests or measurements under small strains in unconfined and confined compression. Yet, it is known that in indentation, especially at high strain velocities, cartilage can express highly nonlinear response. Different fibril reinforced poroelastic and poroviscoelastic models were used to assess measured highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation. Experimentally measured depth-dependent volume fractions of different tissue constituents and their mechanical nonlinearities were taken into account in the models. In particular, the collagen fibril network was modeled using eight separate models that implemented five different constitutive equations to describe the nonlinearity. These consisted of linear elastic, nonlinear viscoelastic and multiple nonlinear elastic representations. The model incorporating the most nonlinearly increasing Young׳s modulus of collagen fibrils as a function of strain captured best the experimental data. Relative difference between the model and experiment was ~3%. Surprisingly, the difference in the peak forces between the experiment and the model with viscoelastic collagen fibrils was almost 20%. Implementation of the measured volume fractions did not improve the ability of the model to capture the measured mechanical data. These results suggest that a highly nonlinear formulation for collagen fibrils is needed to replicate multi-step stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation with high strain rates. PMID:27130474

  1. Significant Incidence of Extra-Articular Tibia Vara Affects Radiological Outcome of Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Saibaba, Balaji; Chouhan, Devendra K.; Kanojia, Rajendra K.; Prakash, Mahesh; Bachhal, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify and quantify the presence of extra-articular tibia vara that might influence the mechanical axis alignment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Materials and Methods A total of 48 TKAs in 30 osteoarthritic Indian patients were prospectively evaluated. The hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA), joint line convergence angle, and varus angulation at the femur and tibia were measured from the preoperative and postoperative standing hip-to-ankle radiographs. Four different methods were used to measure the varus angulation at the tibia: metaphyseo-diaphyseal angle (MDA), the angle between the anatomical axis and mechanical axis of the tibia, the angle between the proximal third and distal third of tibia and the angle between the proximal half and distal half of tibia. Results Extra-articular tibia vara quantified using MDA had the most positive correlation with HKA. Receiver operating characteristic plotting showed that MDA of >4° predicts abnormal postoperative HKA. Twenty-eight out of 48 knees had MDA of >4°, and 78.6% of these had postoperative HKA under-correction and 21.4% had less than ideal tibial component position. Conclusions A significant inherent extra-articular varus angulation best measured using MDA exists in the proximal tibia in osteoarthritic Indian patients undergoing TKA. MDA of >4° is associated with abnormal postoperative HKA. Computer navigation may be useful for achieving ideal correction in such cases. PMID:26389071

  2. Effect of gedunin on acute articular inflammation and hypernociception in mice.

    PubMed

    Conte, Fernando P; Ferraris, Fausto K; Costa, Thadeu E M M; Pacheco, Patricia; Seito, Leonardo N; Verri, Waldiceu A; Cunha, Fernando Q; Penido, Carmen; Henriques, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    Gedunin, a natural limonoid from Meliaceae species, has been previously described as an antiinflammatory compound in experimental models of allergic inflammation. Here, we report the antiinflammatory and antinociceptive effects of gedunin in an acute model of articular inflammation induced by zymosan (500 μg/cavity; intra-articular) in C57BL/6 mice. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment with gedunin (0.005-5 mg/kg) impaired zymosan-induced edema formation, neutrophil accumulation and hypernociception in mouse knee joints, due to decreased expression of preproET-1 mRNA and production of LTB4, PGE2, TNF-α and IL-6. Mouse post-treatment with gedunin (0.05 mg/kg; i.p.) 1 and 6 h after stimulation also impaired articular inflammation, by reverting edema formation, neutrophil accumulation and the production of lipid mediators, cytokines and endothelin. In addition, gedunin directly modulated the functions of neutrophils and macrophages in vitro. The pre-incubation of neutrophil with gedunin (100 µM) impaired shape change, adhesion to endothelial cells, chemotaxis and lipid body formation triggered by different stimuli. Macrophage pretreatment with gedunin impaired intracellular calcium mobilization, nitric oxide production, inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and induced the expression of the antiinflammatory chaperone heat shock protein 70. Our results demonstrate that gedunin presents remarkable antiinflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects on zymosan-induced inflamed knee joints, modulating different cell populations. PMID:25654532

  3. Strategic Design and Fabrication of Engineered Scaffolds for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Chen, Xiongbiao; Kulyk, William

    2012-01-01

    Damage to articular cartilage can eventually lead to osteoarthritis (OA), a debilitating, degenerative joint disease that affects millions of people around the world. The limited natural healing ability of cartilage and the limitations of currently available therapies make treatment of cartilage defects a challenging clinical issue. Hopes have been raised for the repair of articular cartilage with the help of supportive structures, called scaffolds, created through tissue engineering (TE). Over the past two decades, different designs and fabrication techniques have been investigated for developing TE scaffolds suitable for the construction of transplantable artificial cartilage tissue substitutes. Advances in fabrication technologies now enable the strategic design of scaffolds with complex, biomimetic structures and properties. In particular, scaffolds with hybrid and/or biomimetic zonal designs have recently been developed for cartilage tissue engineering applications. This paper reviews critical aspects of the design of engineered scaffolds for articular cartilage repair as well as the available advanced fabrication techniques. In addition, recent studies on the design of hybrid and zonal scaffolds for use in cartilage tissue repair are highlighted. PMID:24955748

  4. Analysis of friction between articular cartilage and polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel artificial cartilage.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Wang, Anmin; Wang, Chengtao

    2016-05-01

    Many biomaterials are being used to repair damaged articular cartilage. In particular, poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel has similar mechanical properties to natural cartilage under compressive and shearing loading. Here, three-factor and two-level friction experiments and long-term tests were conducted to better evaluate its tribological properties. The friction coefficient between articular cartilage and the poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel depended primarily on the three factors of load, speed, and lubrication. When the speed increased from 10 to 20 mm/s under a load of 10 N, the friction coefficient increased from 0.12 to 0.147. When the lubricant was changed from Ringer's solution to a hyaluronic acid solution, the friction coefficient decreased to 0.084 with loads as high as 22 N. The poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel was severely damaged and lost its top surface layers, which were transferred to the articular cartilage surface. Wear was observed in the surface morphologies, which indicated the occurrence of surface adhesion of bovine cartilage. Surface fatigue and adhesive wear was the dominant wear mechanism. PMID:26970769

  5. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA). Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the hypertrophy of MSCs-derived in vitro differentiated chondrocytes and chondrocytes, with an emphasis on the crosstalk between these pathways. Insight into the exact regulation of hypertrophy by the signaling network is necessary for the efficient application of MSCs for articular cartilage repair and for developing novel strategies for curing OA. We focus on articles describing the role of the main signaling pathways in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy-like changes. Most studies report hypertrophic differentiation in chondrogenesis of MSCs, in both human OA and experimental OA. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is not under the strict control of a single pathway but appears to be regulated by an intricately regulated network of multiple signaling pathways, such as WNT, Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ), Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), Indian hedgehog (IHH), Fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Insulin like growth factor (IGF) and Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). This comprehensive review describes how this intricate signaling network influences tissue-engineering applications of MSCs in articular cartilage (AC) repair, and improves understanding of the disease stages and cellular responses within an OA articular joint. PMID:26287176

  6. Intra-articular knee mass in a 51-year-old woman.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Patrick F; Milchteim, Charles; Beaulieu, Gregory P; Brindle, Kathleen A; Schwartz, Arnold M; Faulks, Craig R

    2011-03-01

    A 51-year-old woman presented with moderate knee pain refractory to conservative measures. Radiographs revealed a well-defined, but irregularly-shaped ovoid soft tissue density at the posterior superior aspect of the infrapatellar fat pad of Hoffa. On magnetic resonance imaging, the mass was mildly heterogeneous and had intermediate signal in the proton density series and mixed signal intensity on the T2-weighted images. A low-signal rim could be seen around a portion of the lesion. Arthroscopic resection was performed and a vascular stalk was encountered. The differential diagnosis included: ganglion cyst, meniscal cyst, intra-articular lipoma, villous proliferation of the synovial membrane, Hoffa disease, and intracapsular chondroma. Histologic examination revealed a fibrous capsule partially surrounding a benign lipomatous neoplasm containing an abundance of thin- and thick-walled blood vessels with periadventitial myxoid stroma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an intra-articular angiomyxolipoma in the literature. At 8-month follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with no sign of recurrence. We postulate a low recurrence rate based on the insidious growth rate and benign histological appearance of such lesions. To our knowledge, no other intra-articular lipomatous lesion of the knee has been removed solely with arthroscopic techniques. Further follow-up information is needed to better understand the natural course of these lesions.

  7. Highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of articular cartilage in indentation: Importance of collagen nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, J T A; Korhonen, R K

    2016-06-14

    Modern fibril-reinforced computational models of articular cartilage can include inhomogeneous tissue composition and structure, and nonlinear mechanical behavior of collagen, proteoglycans and fluid. These models can capture well experimental single step creep and stress-relaxation tests or measurements under small strains in unconfined and confined compression. Yet, it is known that in indentation, especially at high strain velocities, cartilage can express highly nonlinear response. Different fibril reinforced poroelastic and poroviscoelastic models were used to assess measured highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation. Experimentally measured depth-dependent volume fractions of different tissue constituents and their mechanical nonlinearities were taken into account in the models. In particular, the collagen fibril network was modeled using eight separate models that implemented five different constitutive equations to describe the nonlinearity. These consisted of linear elastic, nonlinear viscoelastic and multiple nonlinear elastic representations. The model incorporating the most nonlinearly increasing Young׳s modulus of collagen fibrils as a function of strain captured best the experimental data. Relative difference between the model and experiment was ~3%. Surprisingly, the difference in the peak forces between the experiment and the model with viscoelastic collagen fibrils was almost 20%. Implementation of the measured volume fractions did not improve the ability of the model to capture the measured mechanical data. These results suggest that a highly nonlinear formulation for collagen fibrils is needed to replicate multi-step stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation with high strain rates.

  8. How does surgery compare with advanced intra-articular therapies in knee osteoarthritis: current thoughts

    PubMed Central

    Wehling, Peter; Moser, Carsten; Maixner, William

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of osteoarthritis (OA) management are to reduce pain and inflammation, slow cartilage degradation, improve function and reduce disability. Current strategies for managing knee OA include nonpharmacological interventions, oral pharmacological treatments, localized intra-articular injections, and surgery. It has become evident that the inflammatory response is a key contributor to the development and progression of knee OA. Signaling pathways involving growth factors and cytokines are being investigated for the development of new therapies that target the underlying biological processes causing the disease. This concept of ‘molecular orthopedics’ enables more patient-centered diagnostic and treatment strategies. In contrast to other conservative therapies, which ultimately only address OA symptoms, intra-articular injections, in particular autologous conditioned serum (ACS), provide benefits that have the potential to outweigh those of established pharmacological treatments and surgery. Surgery has historically been considered the final solution for treatment of knee OA, both by treating physicians and by patients; however, there are increasing concerns regarding the lack of randomized clinical trials providing evidence to support this opinion. Intra-articular injection of ACS has demonstrated efficacy as a treatment for knee OA in a number of studies, with a very low rate of adverse events and side effects, compared with surgery. Treatment with ACS utilizes the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines and regenerative growth factors to support the natural healing processes in the knee, and has the potential to provide a valuable alternative to surgical intervention. PMID:27247634

  9. In-situ imaging of articular cartilage of the first carpometacarpal joint using co-registered optical coherence tomography and computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernohorsky, Paul; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel; Bras, Johannes; Faber, Dirk J.; Strackee, Simon D.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2012-06-01

    Conventional imaging modalities are unable to depict the early degeneration of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis, especially in small joints. Optical coherence tomography has previously been used successfully in high-resolution imaging of cartilage tissue. This pilot cadaver study demonstrates the use of intra-articular optical coherence tomography in imaging of articular cartilage of the first carpometacarpal joint, producing high resolution images of the articular surface in which cartilage thickness and surface characteristics were assessed. Findings on optical coherence tomography were confirmed with histology. Furthermore, co-registration of optical coherence tomography and computed tomography was used to accurately determine the scanned trajectory and reconstruct a true-scale image overlay.

  10. Activated platelet-rich plasma improves adipose-derived stem cell transplantation efficiency in injured articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have been isolated, expanded, and applied in the treatment of many diseases. ADSCs have also been used to treat injured articular cartilage. However, there is controversy regarding the treatment efficiency. We considered that ADSC transplantation with activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may improve injured articular cartilage compared with that of ADSC transplantation alone. In this study, we determined the role of PRP in ADSC transplantation to improve the treatment efficiency. Methods ADSCs were isolated and expanded from human adipose tissue. PRP was collected and activated from human peripheral blood. The effects of PRP were evaluated in vitro and in ADSC transplantation in vivo. In vitro, the effects of PRP on ADSC proliferation, differentiation into chondrogenic cells, and inhibition of angiogenic factors were investigated at three concentrations of PRP (10%, 15% and 20%). In vivo, ADSCs pretreated with or without PRP were transplanted into murine models of injured articular cartilage. Results PRP promoted ADSC proliferation and differentiation into chondrogenic cells that strongly expressed collagen II, Sox9 and aggrecan. Moreover, PRP inhibited expression of the angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor. As a result, PRP-pretreated ADSCs improved healing of injured articular cartilage in murine models compared with that of untreated ADSCs. Conclusion Pretreatment of ADSCs with PRP is a simple method to efficiently apply ADSCs in cartilage regeneration. This study provides an important step toward the use of autologous ADSCs in the treatment of injured articular cartilage. PMID:23915433

  11. The Biomechanical Effect of Different Denture Base Materials on the Articular Disc in Complete Denture Wearers: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    El-Zawahry, Mohamed M.; El-Ragi, Ahmed A.; El-Anwar, Mohamed I.; Ibraheem, Eman M.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different denture base materials on the stress distribution in TMJ articular disc (AD) in complete denture wearers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A three dimensional Finite Element (FEA) models of an individual temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was built on the basis CT scan. The FEA model consisted of four parts: the condyle, the articular disc, the denture base, and the articular eminence skull. Acrylic resin and chrome-cobalt denture base materials were studied. Static loading of 300N was vertically applied to the central fossa of the mandibular second premolar. Stress and strain were calculated to characterize the stress/strain patterns in the disc. RESULTS: The maximum tensile stresses were observed in the anterior and posterior bands of (AD) on load application with the two denture base materials. The superior boundaries of the glenoid fossa showed lower stress than those on the inferior boundaries facing the condyle. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of the present study it may be concluded that: The denture base material may have an effect in stress-strain pattern in TMJ articular disc. The stiffer denture base material, the better the distribution of the load to the underling mandibular supporting structures & reducing stresses induced in the articular disc. PMID:27275270

  12. High-resolution measurements of the multilayer ultra-structure of articular cartilage and their translational potential

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Current musculoskeletal imaging techniques usually target the macro-morphology of articular cartilage or use histological analysis. These techniques are able to reveal advanced osteoarthritic changes in articular cartilage but fail to give detailed information to distinguish early osteoarthritis from healthy cartilage, and this necessitates high-resolution imaging techniques measuring cells and the extracellular matrix within the multilayer structure of articular cartilage. This review provides a comprehensive exploration of the cellular components and extracellular matrix of articular cartilage as well as high-resolution imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance image, electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, second harmonic generation microscopy, and laser scanning confocal arthroscopy, in the measurement of multilayer ultra-structures of articular cartilage. This review also provides an overview for micro-structural analysis of the main components of normal or osteoarthritic cartilage and discusses the potential and challenges associated with developing non-invasive high-resolution imaging techniques for both research and clinical diagnosis of early to late osteoarthritis. PMID:24946278

  13. Pain from intra-articular NGF or joint injury in the rat requires contributions from peptidergic joint afferents.

    PubMed

    Kras, Jeffrey V; Weisshaar, Christine L; Pall, Parul S; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2015-09-14

    Non-physiological stretch of the cervical facet joint's capsular ligament induces persistent behavioral hypersensitivity and spinal neuronal hyperexcitability via an intra-articular NGF-dependent mechanism. Although that ligament is innervated by nociceptors, it is unknown if a subpopulation is exclusively responsible for the behavioral and spinal neuronal responses to intra-articular NGF and/or facet joint injury. This study ablated joint afferents using the neurotoxin saporin targeted to neurons involved in either peptidergic ([Sar(9),Met (O2)(11)]-substance P-saporin (SSP-Sap)) or non-peptidergic (isolectin B4-saporin (IB4-Sap)) signaling to investigate the contributions of those neuronal populations to facet-mediated pain. SSP-Sap, but not IB4-Sap, injected into the bilateral C6/C7 facet joints 14 days prior to an intra- articular NGF injection prevents NGF-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in the forepaws. Similarly, only SSP- Sap prevents the increase in mechanical forepaw stimulation- induced firing of spinal neurons after intra-articular NGF. In addition, intra-articular SSP-Sap prevents both behavioral hypersensitivity and upregulation of NGF in the dorsal root ganglion after a facet joint distraction that normally induces pain. These findings collectively suggest that disruption of peptidergic signaling within the joint may be a potential treatment for facet pain, as well as other painful joint conditions associated with elevated NGF, such as osteoarthritis.

  14. Local infiltration analgesia is not improved by postoperative intra-articular bolus injections for pain after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Karen V; Nikolajsen, Lone; Daugaard, Henrik; Andersen, Niels T; Haraldsted, Viggo; Søballe, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — The effect of postoperative intra-articular bolus injections after total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that intra-articular bolus injections administered every 6 hours after surgery during the first 24 hours would significantly improve analgesia after THA. Patients and methods — 80 patients undergoing THA received high-volume local infiltration analgesia (LIA; 200 mg ropivacaine and 30 mg ketorolac) followed by 4 intra-articular injections with either ropivacaine (100 mg) and ketorolac (15 mg) (the treatment group) or saline (the control group). The intra-articular injections were combined with 4 intravenous injections of either saline (treatment group) or 15 mg ketorolac (control group). All patients received morphine as patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The primary outcome was consumption of intravenous morphine PCA and secondary outcomes were consumption of oral morphine, pain intensity, side effects, readiness for hospital discharge, length of hospital stay, and postoperative consumption of analgesics at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery. Results — There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups regarding postoperative consumption of intravenous morphine PCA. Postoperative pain scores during walking were higher in the treatment group from 24–72 hours after surgery, but other pain scores were similar between groups. Time to readiness for hospital discharge was longer in the treatment group. Other secondary outcomes were similar between groups. Interpretation — Postoperative intra-articular bolus injections of ropivacaine and ketorolac cannot be recommended as analgesic method after THA. PMID:26312445

  15. Cryoscanning electron microscopy of loaded articular cartilage with special reference to the surface amorphous layer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Yonekubo, S; Kurogouchi, Y

    1996-04-01

    The surface layer (i.e. the surface lamina) of articular cartilage, which is devoid of a collagen fibril network or cells, was investigated in the pig and human. It overlies the collagenous main part of the articular cartilage which contains chondrocytes and is thought to be important biomechanically. In order to examine morphological changes in this layer when under load, knee articular cartilage of the pig, along with the underlying subchondral bone, was compressed with a cylindrical indenter. The specimen was frozen by immersion in liquid nitrogen to maintain the loaded condition and was then freeze-fractured at the indented region. The fracture face was examined with a cryoscanning electron microscope. The surface layer was compressed beneath the indenter regardless of loading pressure or period and was expanded around the indenter to form a triangular bulge in cross section. The height of the bulge was related to the applied pressure and not to the loading period. Recovery of the cartilage from indentation was also examined. Immediately after removal of the indenter, the bulge of the surface layer moved back into the previously indented region. The region was covered by a thick surface layer after 2 s. The response of the surface layer to and recovery from indentation was largely instantaneous and elastic. Under heavy load conditions, the main part of the cartilage under the indenter was observed to have a striped pattern which was made up of bands of densely packed collagen fibrils with fibrillar networks remaining between them. These morphological findings agree well with previously reported biomechanical hypotheses and can be explained by the flow of interstitial fluid provoked by stress application. PMID:8621329

  16. Forearm articular proportions and the antebrachial index in Homo sapiens, Australopithecus afarensis and the great apes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Frank L'Engle; Cunningham, Deborah L; Amaral, Lia Q

    2015-12-01

    When hominin bipedality evolved, the forearms were free to adopt nonlocomotor tasks which may have resulted in changes to the articular surfaces of the ulna and the relative lengths of the forearm bones. Similarly, sex differences in forearm proportions may be more likely to emerge in bipeds than in the great apes given the locomotor constraints in Gorilla, Pan and Pongo. To test these assumptions, ulnar articular proportions and the antebrachial index (radius length/ulna length) in Homo sapiens (n=51), Gorilla gorilla (n=88), Pan troglodytes (n=49), Pongo pygmaeus (n=36) and Australopithecus afarensis A.L. 288-1 and A.L. 438-1 are compared. Intercept-adjusted ratios are used to control for size and minimize the effects of allometry. Canonical scores axes show that the proximally broad and elongated trochlear notch with respect to size in H. sapiens and A. afarensis is largely distinct from G. gorilla, P. troglodytes and P. pygmaeus. A cluster analysis of scaled ulnar articular dimensions groups H. sapiens males with A.L. 438-1 ulna length estimates, while one A.L. 288-1 ulna length estimate groups with Pan and another clusters most closely with H. sapiens, G. gorilla and A.L. 438-1. The relatively low antebrachial index characterizing H. sapiens and non-outlier estimates of A.L. 288-1 and A.L. 438-1 differs from those of the great apes. Unique sex differences in H. sapiens suggest a link between bipedality and forearm functional morphology.

  17. The Topical Application of Rosuvastatin in Preventing Knee Intra-Articular Adhesion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haixiao; Germanov, Alexey V.; Goryaeva, Galina L.; Yachmenev, Alexander N.; Gordienko, Dmitriy I.; Kuzin, Victor V.; Skoroglyadov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Intra-articular adhesion is one of the common complications of post knee surgery and injury. The formation of joint adhesion can lead to serious dysfunction. Rosuvastatin (ROS) is a new 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor, with multiple biological effects. In our study, the object was to evaluate the effectiveness of ROS in the prevention of post-operative knee adhesion in rats. Material/Methods Femoral condyle exposing surgery was performed on 45 healthy Sprague Dawley rats. Gelatin sponges soaked with 20 mg/kg of ROS, 10 mg/kg of ROS, or saline were used to cover the surgical site. The post-operative knee joints were fixed in a flexed position with micro Kirschner wires for four weeks. ROS effectiveness for treating intra-articular adhesion was determined with visual score evaluation, hydroxyproline content, histological analyses, immunohistochemistry, and inflammatory and vascular endothelial growth factors expression. Results The animals’ recovery was stable after surgery. The hydroxyproline content, visual score, and inflammatory vascular growth factors expression levels suggested that, compared with the control group, the ROS treatment groups showed better outcomes. ROS prevented joint adhesion formation, collagen deposition, and vascularization at the surgical site, and also inhibited inflammatory activity post-operatively. Compared with the 10 mg/kg ROS group, the 20 mg/kg ROS group showed significantly better outcomes. Conclusions The local application of ROS reduced intra-articular adhesion formation, collagen deposition, and vascularization at the surgical site, and inhibited inflammatory activity post-operatively. These results suggested optimal concentration of ROS to be 20 mg/kg. PMID:27115197

  18. Temporomandibular Joint Condylar Changes Following Maxillomandibular Advancement and Articular Disc Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Joao Roberto; Wolford, Larry Miller; Cassano, Daniel Serra; da Porciuncula, Guilherme; Paniagua, Beatriz; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate condylar changes 1 year after bimaxillary surgical advancement with or without articular disc repositioning using longitudinal quantitative measurements in 3-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) models. Methods Twenty-seven patients treated with maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) underwent cone-beam computed tomography before surgery immediately after surgery and at 1-year follow-up. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging before surgery to assess disc displacements. Ten patients without disc displacement received MMA only. Seventeen patients with articular disc displacement received MMA with simultaneous TMJ disc repositioning (MMA-Drep). Pre- and postsurgical 3D models were superimposed using a voxel-based registration on the cranial base. Results The location, direction, and magnitude of condylar changes were displayed and quantified by graphic semitransparent overlays and 3D color-coded surface distance maps. Rotational condylar displacements were similar in the 2 groups. Immediately after surgery, condylar translational displacements of at least 1.5 mm occurred in a posterior, superior, or mediolateral direction in patients treated with MMA, whereas patients treated with MMA-Drep presented more marked anterior, inferior, and mediolateral condylar displacements. One year after surgery, more than half the patients in the 2 groups presented condylar resorptive changes of at least 1.5 mm. Patients treated with MMA-Drep presented condylar bone apposition of at least 1.5 mm at the superior surface in 26.4%, the anterior surface in 23.4%, the posterior surface in 29.4%, the medial surface in 5.9%, or the lateral surface in 38.2%, whereas bone apposition was not observed in patients treated with MMA. Conclusions One year after surgery, condylar resorptive changes greater than 1.5 mm were observed in the 2 groups. Articular disc repositioning facilitated bone apposition in localized condylar regions in patients treated with MMA

  19. In Vivo Dynamic Deformation of Articular Cartilage in Intact Joints Loaded by Controlled Muscular Contractions.

    PubMed

    Abusara, Ziad; Von Kossel, Markus; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    When synovial joints are loaded, the articular cartilage and the cells residing in it deform. Cartilage deformation has been related to structural tissue damage, and cell deformation has been associated with cell signalling and corresponding anabolic and catabolic responses. Despite the acknowledged importance of cartilage and cell deformation, there are no dynamic data on these measures from joints of live animals using muscular load application. Research in this area has typically been done using confined and unconfined loading configurations and indentation testing. These loading conditions can be well controlled and allow for accurate measurements of cartilage and cell deformations, but they have little to do with the contact mechanics occurring in a joint where non-congruent cartilage surfaces with different material and functional properties are pressed against each other by muscular forces. The aim of this study was to measure in vivo, real time articular cartilage deformations for precisely controlled static and dynamic muscular loading conditions in the knees of mice. Fifty and 80% of the maximal knee extensor muscular force (equivalent to approximately 0.4N and 0.6N) produced average peak articular cartilage strains of 10.5±1.0% and 18.3±1.3% (Mean ± SD), respectively, during 8s contractions. A sequence of 15 repeat, isometric muscular contractions (0.5s on, 3.5s off) of 50% and 80% of maximal muscular force produced cartilage strains of 3.0±1.1% and 9.6±1.5% (Mean ± SD) on the femoral condyles of the mouse knee. Cartilage thickness recovery following mechanical compression was highly viscoelastic and took almost 50s following force removal in the static tests. PMID:26807930

  20. Arthroscopic optical coherence tomography provides detailed information on articular cartilage lesions in horses.

    PubMed

    te Moller, N C R; Brommer, H; Liukkonen, J; Virén, T; Timonen, M; Puhakka, P H; Jurvelin, J S; van Weeren, P R; Töyräs, J

    2013-09-01

    Arthroscopy enables direct inspection of the articular surface, but provides no information on deeper cartilage layers. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), based on measurement of reflection and backscattering of light, is a diagnostic technique used in cardiovascular surgery and ophthalmology. It provides cross-sectional images at resolutions comparable to that of low-power microscopy. The aim of this study was to determine if OCT is feasible for advanced clinical assessment of lesions in equine articular cartilage during diagnostic arthroscopy. Diagnostic arthroscopy of 36 metacarpophalangeal joints was carried out ex vivo. Of these, 18 joints with varying degrees of cartilage damage were selected, wherein OCT arthroscopy was conducted using an OCT catheter (diameter 0.9 mm) inserted through standard instrument portals. Five sites of interest, occasionally supplemented with other locations where defects were encountered, were arthroscopically graded according to the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) classification system. The same sites were evaluated qualitatively (ICRS classification and morphological description of the lesions) and quantitatively (measurement of cartilage thickness) on OCT images. OCT provided high resolution images of cartilage enabling determination of cartilage thickness. Comparing ICRS grades determined by both arthroscopy and OCT revealed poor agreement. Furthermore, OCT visualised a spectrum of lesions, including cavitation, fibrillation, superficial and deep clefts, erosion, ulceration and fragmentation. In addition, with OCT the arthroscopically inaccessible area between the dorsal MC3 and P1 was reachable in some cases. Arthroscopically-guided OCT provided more detailed and quantitative information on the morphology of articular cartilage lesions than conventional arthroscopy. OCT could therefore improve the diagnostic value of arthroscopy in equine orthopaedic surgery. PMID:23810744

  1. Cell-Based Articular Cartilage Repair: The Link between Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Kenneth L.; Wang, Jinxi

    2014-01-01

    Context Clinical efforts to repair damaged articular cartilage (AC) currently face major obstacles due to limited intrinsic repair capacity of the tissue and unsuccessful biological interventions. This highlights a need for better therapeutic strategies. Evidence Acquisition Relevant articles were identified through a search of the PubMed database from January 1956 to August 2014 using the following keywords: articular cartilage repair, stem cell, cartilage tissue-engineering, synovium, and NFAT. Evidence Synthesis In both animals and humans, AC defects that penetrate into the subchondral bone marrow are mainly filled with fibrocartilaginous tissue through the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), followed by degeneration of repaired cartilage and osteoarthritis. Cell therapy and tissue engineering techniques using culture-expanded chondrocytes, bone marrow MSCs, or pluripotent stem cells with chondroinductive growth factors may generate cartilaginous tissue in AC defects but do not form hyaline cartilage-based articular surface because repair cells often lose chondrogenic activity or result in chondrocyte hypertrophy. The new evidence that AC and synovium develop from the same pool of precursors with similar gene profiles and that synovium-derived chondrocytes have stable chondrogenic activity has promoted use of synovium as a new cell source for AC repair. The recent finding that NFAT1 and NFAT2 transcription factors inhibit chondrocyte hypertrophy and maintain metabolic balance in AC is a significant advance in the field of AC repair. Conclusions The use of synovial MSCs and discovery of upstream transcriptional regulators that help maintain the AC phenotype have opened new avenues to improve the outcome of AC regeneration. PMID:25450846

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis in Spain: occurrence of extra-articular manifestations and estimates of disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, L; Gonzalez-Alvaro, I; Balsa, A; Belmonte, M; Tena, X; Sanmarti, R; EMECAR, S

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Cross sectional analysis of a cohort of patients with RA randomly selected from the clinical databases of 34 centres. Standard definitions and measurements were used, and radiographs read centrally. Estimates and confidence intervals were adjusted to sampling. Results: Data were available for 788 patients. Extra-articular RA was present in 285 (36.2%) patients. Cumulative prevalence and 95% confidence intervals of extra-articular manifestations were estimated: nodules 24.5% (21.5 to 27.5), Sjögren's syndrome 17.0% (14.4 to 19.6), atlantoaxial subluxation 12.1% (9.8 to 14.4), carpal tunnel syndrome 10.7% (7.8 to 13.6), interstitial lung disease 3.7% (2.4 to 5.0), serositis 2.5% (1.4 to 3.5), eye disease 2.5% (1.1 to 3.9), vasculitis 1.3% (0.5 to 2.1), amyloidosis 0.6% (0.1 to 1.2), and Felty's syndrome 0.3% (<0.6). Mean (SD) activity/progression indexes were: DAS28-3 3.4 (1.2), HAQ 1.6 (0.4), Larsen score 54.7 (26.4). Less than 5% of the patients were in remission. 205 (72%) patients were receiving disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Conclusion: Spanish patients with RA ever seen by a rheumatologist have, on average, a moderate degree of activity, despite widespread use of DMARDs. Measures of the degree of progression do not show a benign disease. The proportion of extra-articular manifestations in Spanish patients with RA is similar to that found in other Mediterranean populations, and lower than that reported in Anglo Saxon countries. PMID:12922967

  3. The painful hemiplegic shoulder: effects of intra-articular triamcinolone acetonide.

    PubMed

    Dekker, J H; Wagenaar, R C; Lankhorst, G J; de Jong, B A

    1997-01-01

    Effects of intra-articular triamcinolone acetonide on pain and passive range of motion (ROM) in the painful hemiplegic shoulder were studied. A Multiple baseline (or AB) design across seven subjects was used. The length of the baseline condition (or A phase) was either 2 or 3 wk, and randomized across subjects. Subsequently, a treatment condition (or B phase) of 4 wk was applied during which three intra-articular injections of triamcinolone acetonide were administered at day 1, 8, and 22. Pain and ROM were the primary outcome parameters and were measured three times each week by means of a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a fluid-filled goniometer, respectively. In addition, a number of secondary outcome parameters were assessed, i.e., spastic muscle activity (Ashworth scale), motor function (Fugl-Meyer index), upper limb function (action research arm test) and signs and symptoms of a shoulder hand syndrome (clinical scoring list). Statistical analysis of the combined time series showed significant effects on pain (P = 0.025). Analysis of the individual time series revealed that five out of seven patients had significant reduction of pain. ROM improved significantly in four out of seven patients. However, improvement of ROM did not reach significance at the group level (P = 0.13). None of the secondary parameters showed significant changes. The correlation coefficient between upper limb function (ARA) at intake and size of treatment effect approached a level of significance (P = 0.09). The results indicate that intra-articular triamcinolone may be of benefit in reducing hemiplegic shoulder pain.

  4. STRUCTURE-FUNCTION RELATIONSHIPS IN OSTEOARTHRITIC HUMAN HIP JOINT ARTICULAR CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Mäkelä, Janne T.A.; Huttu, Mari R.J.; Korhonen, Rami K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives It is currently poorly known how different structural and compositional components in human articular cartilage are related to their specific functional properties at different stages of osteoarthritis (OA). The objective of this study was to characterize the structure-function relationships of articular cartilage obtained from osteoarthritic human hip joints. Methods Articular cartilage samples with their subchondral bone (n = 15) were harvested during hip replacement surgeries from human femoral necks. Stress-relaxation tests, Mankin scoring, spectroscopic and microscopic methods were used to determine the biomechanical properties, OA grade, and the composition and structure of the samples. In order to obtain the mechanical material parameters for the samples, a fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic model was fitted to the experimental data obtained from the stress-relaxation experiments. Results The strain-dependent collagen network modulus (Efε) and the collagen orientation angle exhibited a negative linear correlation (r = −0.65, p < 0.01), while the permeability strain-dependency factor (M) and the collagen content exhibited a positive linear correlation (r = 0.56, p < 0.05). The non-fibrillar matrix modulus (Enf) also exhibited a positive linear correlation with the proteoglycan content (r = 0.54, p < 0.05). Conclusion The study suggests that increased collagen orientation angle during OA primarily impairs the collagen network and the tensile stiffness of cartilage in a strain-dependent manner, while the decreased collagen content in OA facilitates fluid flow out of the tissue especially at high compressive strains. Thus, the results provide interesting and important information of the structure-function relationships of human hip joint cartilage and mechanisms during the progression of OA. PMID:22858669

  5. Epidemiology and imaging of the subchondral bone in articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Menetrey, Jacques; Unno-Veith, Florence; Madry, Henning; Van Breuseghem, Iwan

    2010-04-01

    Articular cartilage and the subchondral bone act as a functional unit. Following trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis or osteoarthritis, this intimate connection may become disrupted. Osteochondral defects-the type of defects that extend into the subchondral bone-account for about 5% of all articular cartilage lesions. They are very often caused by trauma, in about one-third of the cases by osteoarthritis and rarely by osteochondritis dissecans. Osteochondral defects are predominantly located on the medial femoral condyle and also on the patella. Frequently, they are associated with lesions of the menisci or the anterior cruciate ligament. Because of the close relationship between the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone, imaging of cartilage defects or cartilage repair should also focus on the subchondral bone. Magnetic resonance imaging is currently considered to be the key modality for the evaluation of cartilage and underlying subchondral bone. However, the choice of imaging technique also depends on the nature of the disease that caused the subchondral bone lesion. For example, radiography is still the golden standard for imaging features of osteoarthritis. Bone scintigraphy is one of the most valuable techniques for early diagnosis of spontaneous osteonecrosis about the knee. A CT scan is a useful technique to rule out a possible depression of the subchondral bone plate, whereas a CT arthrography is highly accurate to evaluate the stability of the osteochondral fragment in osteochondritis dissecans. Particularly for the problem of subchondral bone lesions, image evaluation methods need to be refined for adequate and reproducible analysis. This article highlights recent studies on the epidemiology and imaging of the subchondral bone, with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Computational Wear Simulation of Patellofemoral Articular Cartilage during In Vitro Testing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingmin; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nick; Bae, Won; Temple-Wong, Michele; D'Lima, Darryl D.; Sah, Robert L.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Though changes in normal joint motions and loads (e.g., following anterior cruciate ligament injury) contribute to the development of knee osteoarthritis, the precise mechanism by which these changes induce osteoarthritis remains unknown. As a first step toward identifying this mechanism, this study evaluates computational wear simulations of a patellofemoral joint specimen wear tested on a knee simulator machine. A multi-body dynamic model of the specimen mounted in the simulator machine was constructed in commercial computer-aided engineering software. A custom elastic foundation contact model was used to calculate contact pressures and wear on the femoral and patellar articular surfaces using geometry created from laser scan and MR data. Two different wear simulation approaches were investigated – one that wore the surface geometries gradually over a sequence of 10 one-cycle dynamic simulations (termed the “progressive” approach), and one that wore the surface geometries abruptly using results from a single one-cycle dynamic simulation (termed the “non-progressive” approach). The progressive approach with laser scan geometry reproduced the experimentally measured wear depths and areas for both the femur and patella. The less costly non-progressive approach predicted deeper wear depths, especially on the patella, but had little influence on predicted wear areas. Use of MR data for creating the articular and subchondral bone geometry altered wear depth and area predictions by at most 13%. These results suggest that MR-derived geometry may be sufficient for simulating articular cartilage wear in vivo and that a progressive simulation approach may be needed for the patella and tibia since both remain in continuous contact with the femur. PMID:21453922

  7. Intracellular Na+ and Ca2+ Modulation Increases the Tensile Properties of Developing Engineered Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Natoli, Roman M.; Skaalure, Stacey; Bijlani, Shweta; Chen, Ke X.; Hu, Jerry; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Significant collagen content and tensile properties are difficult to achieve in articular cartilage tissue engineering. This study investigated whether treating developing tissue engineered cartilage constructs with modulators of intracellular Na+ or Ca2+ could increase collagen concentration and tensile properties. Methods Inhibitors of Na+ ion transporters and increasers of intracellular Ca2+ were investigated for their ability to affect articular cartilage development in a scaffold-less, 3D chondrocyte culture. Using a systematic approach, ouabain (Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor), bumetanide (Na+/K+/2Cl− tritransporter inhibitor), histamine (cAMP activator), and ionomycin (a Ca2+ ionophore) were applied to tissue engineered constructs for 1 hr per day on days 10–14 of culture and examined at 2 or 4 wks. Gross morphology, biochemical content, and compressive and tensile mechanical properties of the constructs were assayed. Results Analysis showed that 20 µM ouabain, 0.3 µM ionomycin, or their combination increased the tensile modulus by 40–95% compared to untreated controls and resulted in increased collagen normalized to wet weight. In constructs exposed to ouabain, the increased collagen per wet weight was secondary to decreased GAG production on a per cell basis. Treatment with 20 µM ouabain also increased the neo-tissue’s ultimate tensile strength 56–86% at 4 wks. Other construct properties, such as construct growth and collagen type I production, were affected differently by Na+ modulation with ouabain versus Ca2+ modulation with ionomycin. Conclusions These data are the first to show that treatments known to alter intracellular ion concentrations are a viable method for increasing the mechanical properties of engineered articular cartilage and identify potentially important relationships to hydrostatic pressure mechanotransduction. Ouabain and ionomycin may be useful pharmacological agents for increasing tensile integrity and directing

  8. A new method for evaluating the degeneration of articular cartilage using pulse-echo ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sun, Anyu; Bai, Xiaolong; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel nondestructive ultrasonic technique for measuring the sound speed and acoustic impedance of articular cartilage using the pulsed Vz,t technique. Vz,t data include a series of pulsed ultrasonic echoes collected using different distances between the ultrasonic transducer and the specimen. The 2D Fourier transform is applied to the Vz,t data to reconstruct the 2D reflection spectrum Rθ,ω. To obtain the reflection coefficient of articular cartilage, the Vz,t data from a reference specimen with a well-known reflection coefficient are obtained to eliminate the dependence on the general system transfer function. The ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus (Ha) is computed based on the measured reflection coefficient and the sound speed. In the experiment, 32 cartilage-bone samples were prepared from bovine articular cartilage, and 16 samples were digested using 0.25% trypsin solution. The sound speed and Ha of these cartilage samples were evaluated before and after degeneration. The magnitude of the sound speed decreased with trypsin digestion (from 1663 ± 5.6 m/s to 1613 ± 5.3 m/s). Moreover, the Young's modulus in the corresponding degenerative state was measured and was correlated with the ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus. The ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus was determined to be highly correlated with the Young's modulus (n = 16, r>0.895, p<0.003, Pearson correlation test for each measurement). The results demonstrate the effectiveness of using the proposed method to assess the changes in sound speed and the ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus of cartilage after degeneration. PMID:25832249

  9. The Role of Computed Tomography in Evaluating Intra-Articular Distal Humerus Fractures.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Betsy M; Sweet, Stephan J; Ferkel, Eric; Udofia, Aniebet-Abasi; Itamura, John

    2015-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is often used to evaluate intra-articular distal humerus fracture patterns, but it increases radiation exposure and cost. We conducted a study to determine the effect of adding CT evaluation to plain radiographic evaluation on the classification of, and treatment plans for, intra-articular distal humerus fractures. Nine blinded orthopedic surgeons evaluated 30 consecutive fractures for classification and surgical approach. Evaluations were performed first using plain radiographs and then again using the same radiographs plus CT images. Statistical analysis was performed using the κ correlation coefficient and Cramer V testing. We hypothesized that adding CT images to plain radiographs would change the classification and treatment of these fractures and would improve interobserver agreement on classification and treatment. Intraobserver reliability (Cramer V) was fair (.393) for classification and moderate (.426) for treatment. Interobserver reliability (Cohen κ) did not improve with CT: For classification, κ was .21 without CT and .20 with CT; for treatment, κ was .28 without CT and .27 with CT. When classifying the fractures, attending surgeons chose the multiplanar fracture pattern 25.6% of the time without CT, and remained consistent at 23.3% with CT. Trainees chose this fracture pattern much less often without CT than with CT. Use of CT changed the treatment for multiplanar fractures (73.7% lateral approach vs 51.9% posterior approach with olecranon osteotomy). When added to plain radiographic evaluation, CT evaluation changes classification and treatment plans. Interobserver reliability did not improve. Less experienced surgeons were more likely to identify multiplanar fracture patterns with use of CT. We recommend performing CT for all intra-articular distal humerus fractures.

  10. In vitro evaluation and intra-articular administration of biodegradable microspheres containing naproxen sodium.

    PubMed

    Bozdağ, S; Caliş, S; Kaş, H S; Ercan, M T; Peksoy, I; Hincal, A A

    2001-01-01

    The dispersion of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) into biodegradable polymeric matrices have been accepted as a good approach for obtaining a therapeutic effect in a predetermined period of time meanwhile minimizing the side effects of NSAIDs. In the present study, it was aimed to prepare Naproxen Sodium (NS), (a NSAID) loaded microsphere formulation using natural Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and synthetic biodegradable polymers such as poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (50:50 MW 34,000 and 88,000 Da) for intra-articular administration, and to study the retention of the drug at the site of injection in the knee joint. NS incorporated microspheres were evaluated in vitro for particle size (the mean particle size; for BSA microspheres, 10.0 +/- 0.3 microm, for PLGA microspheres, 9.0 +/- 0.2 and 5.0 +/- 0.1 microm for MW 34,000 and 88,000 Da, respectively), yield value, drug loading, surface morphology and drug release. For in vivo studies, monoarticular arthritis was induced in the left knee joints of rabbits by using ovalbumin and Freund's Complete Adjuvant as antigen and adjuvant. A certain time (4 days) is allowed for the formation of arthritis in the knee joints, then the NS loaded microspheres were injected directly into the articular cavity. At specific time points, gamma scintigrams were obtained to determine the residence time of the microspheres in knee joints, in order to determine the most suitable formulation. This study indicated that PLGA, a synthetic polymer, is more promising than the natural type BSA microspheres for an effective cure of mono-articular arthritis in rabbits.

  11. In Vivo Dynamic Deformation of Articular Cartilage in Intact Joints Loaded by Controlled Muscular Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Abusara, Ziad; Von Kossel, Markus; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    When synovial joints are loaded, the articular cartilage and the cells residing in it deform. Cartilage deformation has been related to structural tissue damage, and cell deformation has been associated with cell signalling and corresponding anabolic and catabolic responses. Despite the acknowledged importance of cartilage and cell deformation, there are no dynamic data on these measures from joints of live animals using muscular load application. Research in this area has typically been done using confined and unconfined loading configurations and indentation testing. These loading conditions can be well controlled and allow for accurate measurements of cartilage and cell deformations, but they have little to do with the contact mechanics occurring in a joint where non-congruent cartilage surfaces with different material and functional properties are pressed against each other by muscular forces. The aim of this study was to measure in vivo, real time articular cartilage deformations for precisely controlled static and dynamic muscular loading conditions in the knees of mice. Fifty and 80% of the maximal knee extensor muscular force (equivalent to approximately 0.4N and 0.6N) produced average peak articular cartilage strains of 10.5±1.0% and 18.3±1.3% (Mean ± SD), respectively, during 8s contractions. A sequence of 15 repeat, isometric muscular contractions (0.5s on, 3.5s off) of 50% and 80% of maximal muscular force produced cartilage strains of 3.0±1.1% and 9.6±1.5% (Mean ± SD) on the femoral condyles of the mouse knee. Cartilage thickness recovery following mechanical compression was highly viscoelastic and took almost 50s following force removal in the static tests. PMID:26807930

  12. Intra-Articular Transplantation of Atsttrin-Transduced Mesenchymal Stem Cells Ameliorate Osteoarthritis Development

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qingqing; Zhu, Shouan; Wu, Yan; Wang, Jiaqiu; Cai, Youzhi; Chen, Pengfei; Li, Jie; Heng, Boon Chin

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) remains an intractable clinical challenge. Few drugs are available for reversing this degenerative disease, although some promising candidates have performed well in preclinical studies. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) has been identified as a crucial effector modulating OA pathogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects of Atsttrin, a novel TNFα blocker, on OA treatment. We developed genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that expressed recombinant Atsttrin (named as MSC-Atsttrin). Expression levels of ADAMTS-5, MMP13, and iNOS of human chondrocytes were analyzed when cocultured with MSC-GFP/Atsttrin. OA animal models were induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection, and MSC-GFP/Atsttrin were injected into the articular cavity 1 week postsurgery. The results showed that MSC-Atsttrin significantly suppressed TNFα-driven up-regulation of matrix proteases and inflammatory factors. Intra-articular injection of MSC-Atsttrin prevented the progression of degenerative changes in the surgically induced OA mouse model. Additionally, levels of detrimental matrix hydrolases were significantly diminished. Compared with nontreated OA samples at 8 weeks postsurgery, the percentages of MMP13- and ADAMTS-5-positive cells were significantly reduced from 91.33% ± 9.87% to 24.33% ± 5.7% (p < .001) and from 91.33% ± 7.1% to 16.67% ± 3.1% (p < .001), respectively. Our results thus indicated that suppression of TNFα activity is an effective strategy for OA treatment and that intra-articular injection of MSCs-Atsttrin could be a promising therapeutic modality. PMID:25824140

  13. Mechanisms of disruption of the articular cartilage surface in inflammation. Neutrophil elastase increases availability of collagen type II epitopes for binding with antibody on the surface of articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Jasin, H E; Taurog, J D

    1991-01-01

    We recently observed that specific antibodies to type II collagen do not bind in appreciable amounts to the intact surface of articular cartilage, whereas antibodies to the minor collagen types V, VI, and IX do. These results suggest that the outermost cartilage surface layer prevented interaction of the antibodies with the major collagen type in articular cartilage. The present studies were designed to investigate the pathogenic mechanisms involved in the disruption of the cartilage surface layer in inflammatory arthritis. Articular cartilage obtained from rabbits undergoing acute antigen-induced arthritis of 72 h duration showed a significant increase in binding of anti-type II antibody to cartilage surfaces compared with normal control cartilage (P less than 0.01). Augmentation of anti-type II binding was also observed upon in vitro incubation of bovine articular slices or intact rabbit patellar cartilage for 1 h with human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), PMN lysates, or purified human PMN elastase. This increase was not inhibited by sodium azide, nor was it enhanced by incubation of cartilage with the strong oxidant hypochlorous acid. Chondrocyte-mediated matrix proteoglycan degradation in cartilage explants cultured in the presence of cytokines failed to increase antibody binding appreciably. The augmentation in antibody binding seen with PMN lysates was inhibited by the nonspecific serine-esterase inhibitor PMSF, but not by the divalent metal chelator EDTA. The elastase-specific inhibitor AAPVCMK also inhibited most of the PMN-induced increase in antibody binding, whereas the cathepsin G-specific inhibitor GLPCMK was much less effective. Incubation of intact cartilage with purified human PMN elastase indicated that this serine esterase could account for the increase in anti-type II collagen antibody binding to intact cartilage surfaces. These studies suggest that in an inflammatory response, PMN-derived elastase degrades the outer layer of articular

  14. Benign osseous and articular abnormalities of the pelvis: a review of CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Belfi, Lily M; Bartolotta, Roger J; Loftus, Michael L; Wladyka, Christopher; Hentel, Keith D

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has become the standard of care for evaluation and follow-up for a wide range of abdominal and pelvic pathology. Many incidental osseous and articular abnormalities of the pelvis are detected on these studies, most of which have a benign etiology. However, most of these studies are interpreted by nonmusculoskeletal radiologists, who may not be familiar with the CT appearances of these benign musculoskeletal abnormalities. Uncertainty often leads to mischaracterization or unnecessary follow-up, resulting in increased health care costs and patient anxiety. This article reviews the CT appearance of the benign musculoskeletal entities that occur in pelvis.

  15. An intra-articular ganglion cyst in a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Donna Y; Yee, Keolamau; Burkhalter, William; Okimoto, Kelley Chinen; Kon, Kevin; Kurahara, David K

    2014-01-01

    We report an intra-articular ganglion cyst (IAGC) presenting as knee pain and a mass in a patient with longstanding Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). We could not find a similar case of an IAGC occurring in the knee of JIA patients in the literature. IAGC may need to be included as a possibility in patients with inflammatory arthritis with new-onset knee pain, especially in those with a palpable mass. MRI was useful in distinguishing IAGC from more worrisome causes of a knee mass. Orthopedic input was helpful in diagnosis and treatment. In addition, methotrexate therapy was effective in bringing about a long-lasting remission.

  16. Functional bracing for comminuted extra-articular fractures of the distal third of the humerus.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, A; Horowitch, A; Aboulafia, A; Vangsness, C T

    1990-03-01

    From 1982 to 1987 we treated 85 extra-articular comminuted distal third humeral fractures in adults with prefabricated plastic braces. Of these, 15% were open fractures and 18% had initial peripheral nerve injury. On average, the sleeve was applied 12 days after injury and used for 10 weeks. There was 96% union, with no infections. All nerve injuries resolved or were improving at the latest examination. At union there was varus deformity averaging 9 degrees in 81% of patients, but loss of range of movement was minimal and functional results were good.

  17. Anterolateral Extra-articular Soft Tissue Reconstruction in Anterolateral Rotatory Instability of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Kernkamp, Willem A; van de Velde, Samuel K; Bakker, Eric W P; van Arkel, Ewoud R A

    2015-12-01

    Anterolateral rotatory instability (ALRI) occurs after injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the anterolateral structures of the knee. We present a technique for anterolateral extra-articular soft-tissue (ALES) reconstruction of the knee that can be used in revision ACL reconstruction cases, cases of persistent ALRI after adequate ACL reconstruction, and cases with severe ALRI after primary ACL rupture. The surgeon performs ALES reconstruction with a strip of iliotibial tract autograft while respecting the anatomic origin and insertion of the anterolateral ligament. The purpose of this reconstruction is to restore the normal anterolateral rotatory stability of the knee in ALES-deficient patients. PMID:27284525

  18. Arthroscopic Excision of Juxta-articular Osteoid Osteoma of the Calcaneum

    PubMed Central

    Tauheed, Mohammed; Korula, Ravi Jacob; Shankarnarayanan, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma of the foot is a rare condition particularly of the calcaneum. This condition is difficult to diagnose and is more difficult to treat particularly if it involves deeper part of the joints. We present an arthroscopic technique to deal with a case of juxta-articular osteoid osteoma of the calcaneum using two portals: the anterolateral portal for instrumentation and the anterior anterolateral portal for visualization of the subtalar joint. Because this approach is minimally invasive, it offers early recovery and reduced morbidity compared with the conventional techniques. PMID:27073769

  19. Failure of articular process (zygaphophyseal) joint development as a cause of vertebral fusion (blocked vertebrae).

    PubMed Central

    Chandraraj, S

    1987-01-01

    Examination of congenitally fused (blocked) vertebrae in this study suggests that non-development of the joint between articular facets results in fusion of the vertebral arches which in turn leads to secondary fusion of the bodies and hypoplasia of the intervertebral discs. The presence of independent pedicles and transverse processes do not favour the concept that such an abnormality is the result of non-segmentation of the sclerotome. The condition is probably linked to a defect of an inductor substance which influences normal morphogenesis of the vertebral arch in the embryonic period. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:3429327

  20. The collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Attenburrow, Don P.; Winlove, C. Peter; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography images of equine articular cartilage are presented. Measurements were made on intact joint surfaces. Significant (e.g. × 2) variations in the intrinsic birefringence were found over spatial scales of a few millimetres, even on samples taken from young (18 month) animals that appeared visually homogeneous. A comparison of data obtained on a control tissue (equine flexor tendon) further suggests that significant variations in the orientation of the collagen fibres relative to the plane of the joint surface exist. Images of visually damaged cartilage tissue show characteristic features both in terms of the distribution of optical scatterers and of the birefringent components.

  1. Intra-articular therapy to treat septic arthritis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Hewes, Christina A; Macintire, Douglass K

    2011-01-01

    A 6 yr old female spayed Labrador retriever was examined for severe pain and a nonweight-bearing right forelimb lameness due to swelling and wounds with direct communication into the elbow joint. The medical management of β hemolytic Streptococcus septic arthritis with needle lavage of the joint, systemic and local antibiotic therapy, and analgesic therapy is described. This case provides information on the need to address septic arthritis in the dog as an emergency situation and the treatment with intra-articular medication. Earlier medical management for septic joints could be considered in dogs to help decrease the long-term complications that can result from septic arthritis.

  2. Intra-articular hyaluronic acid in the treatment of haemophilic chronic arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Palazzi, F; Viso, R; Boadas, A; Ruiz-Sáez, A; Caviglia, H; De Bosch, N Blumenfeld

    2002-05-01

    We report our preliminary experience with the use of hyaluronic acid (Synvisc) in 29 joints from 25 different haemophilic patients (17 knees, six shoulders, four ankles, one elbow and one hip). All the joints were grade III of our classification, characterized by synovial thickening, axial deformities and muscle atrophy (chronic arthropathy). In view of the very satisfactory results obtained with this procedure, we have substituted Synvisc for the previous use of intra-articular long-standing corticosteroids that we had been used for some years. This method is theoretically more physiological and does not destroy the joint cartilage further, as corticosteroids can.

  3. Benign osseous and articular abnormalities of the pelvis: a review of CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Belfi, Lily M; Bartolotta, Roger J; Loftus, Michael L; Wladyka, Christopher; Hentel, Keith D

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has become the standard of care for evaluation and follow-up for a wide range of abdominal and pelvic pathology. Many incidental osseous and articular abnormalities of the pelvis are detected on these studies, most of which have a benign etiology. However, most of these studies are interpreted by nonmusculoskeletal radiologists, who may not be familiar with the CT appearances of these benign musculoskeletal abnormalities. Uncertainty often leads to mischaracterization or unnecessary follow-up, resulting in increased health care costs and patient anxiety. This article reviews the CT appearance of the benign musculoskeletal entities that occur in pelvis. PMID:25433854

  4. [Arthroscopic correction of extra-articular subspinal impingement in the hip joint].

    PubMed

    Hufeland, M; Hartwig, T; Krüger, D; Perka, C; Haas, N P; Schröder, J H

    2013-10-01

    We report the case of symptomatic extra-articular subspinal impingement in the hip joint caused by a pathological contact between the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) and the femoral neck. A 28-year-old patient presented with activity-related inguinal pain on the right side and a positive anterior impingement test in the clinical examination. Radiological examinations revealed a hypertrophic AIIS with caudal extension below the acetabulum. After a positive injection test confirmed the AIIS as the origin of the pain, arthroscopic correction with partial resection of the AIIS was performed resulting in significant pain relief and improved range of motion. PMID:23918293

  5. Intra-articular synovial sarcoma treated with a transfemoral amputation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gresswell, Steven D; Corsini, Anthony A; Balsamo, Luke H; Miles, Edward F

    2013-08-01

    A case of monophasic intra-articular synovial sarcoma in the right knee of a 39-year-old active duty serviceman treated with a transfemoral amputation is presented. The patient was evaluated for right knee pain and fullness. After further workup, the patient underwent computed tomography guided biopsy, with the tissue specimen consistent with intra-articular synovial sarcoma. The patient elected for a transfemoral amputation rather than limb or joint-sparing surgery. The gross specimen measured 3.5 × 3.0 × 1.7 cm in the posteromedial knee. No metastatic lesions were seen on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy have not been utilized. The transfemoral amputation adds to the uniqueness of this report and is discussed with a review of the multimodality treatment toward intra-articular synovial sarcoma in prior published literature.

  6. Quantitative zonal differentiation of articular cartilage by microscopic magnetic resonance imaging, polarized light microscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Xia, Yang

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to synchronize the zonal differentiation of the full-thickness articular cartilage by three micro-imaging techniques, namely microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (µMRI), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and Fourier-transform infrared imaging (FTIRI). Eighteen cartilage-bone blocks from three canine humeral joints were imaged by: (a) µMRI T2 relaxation at 0° and 55° orientations in a 7 T magnetic field, (b) PLM optical retardation and azimuthal angle, and (c) FTIRI amide I and amide II anisotropies at 0° and 90° polarizations relative to the articular surface. In addition, µMRI T1 relaxation was imaged before and after the tissue being immersed in gadolinium (contrast agent) solution, to calculate the proteoglycan concentration. A set of previously established criteria in cartilage imaging was revised. The new criteria could simultaneously correlate the thicknesses of the three consecutive subtissue zones in articular cartilage among these imaging techniques.

  7. Effect of low-power helium-neon laser irradiation on 13-week immobilized articular cartilage of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Mohammad; Ansari, Anayatallah; Hekmat, Hossien

    2004-09-01

    Influence of low-power (632.8 nm, Helium-Neon, 13 J/cm2, three times a week) laser on 13-week immobilized articular cartilage was examined with rabbits knee model. Number of chondrocytes and depth of articular cartilage of experimental group were significantly higher than those of sham irradiated group. Surface morphology of sham-irradiated group had rough prominences, fibrillation and lacunae but surface morphology of experimental group had more similarities to control group than to sham irradiated group. There were marked differences between ultrastructure features of control group and experimental group in comparison with sham irradiated group. Low-power Helium-Neon laser irradiation on 13-week immobilized knee joints of rabbits neutrilized adverse effects of immobilization on articular cartilage.

  8. Assessment of Intraoperative Intra-articular Morphine and Clonidine Injection in the Acute Postoperative Period After Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cogan, Charles J.; Knesek, Michael; Tjong, Vehniah K.; Nair, Rueben; Kahlenberg, Cynthia; Dunne, Kevin F.; Kendall, Mark C.; Terry, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous authors have suggested that intra-articular morphine and clonidine injections after knee arthroscopy have demonstrated equivocal analgesic effect in comparison with bupivacaine while circumventing the issue of chondrotoxicity. There have been no studies evaluating the effect of intra-articular morphine after hip arthroscopy. Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of intra-articular morphine in combination with clonidine on postoperative pain and narcotic consumption after hip arthroscopy surgery for femoroacetabular impingement. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed on 43 patients that underwent hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement at a single institution between September 2014 and May 2015. All patients received preoperative celecoxib and acetaminophen, and 22 patients received an additional intra-articular injection of 10 mg morphine and 100 μg of clonidine at the conclusion of the procedure. Narcotic consumption, duration of anesthesia recovery, and perioperative pain scores were compared between the 2 groups. Results: Patients who received intra-articular morphine and clonidine used significantly less opioid analgesic (mEq) in the postanesthesia recovery (median difference, 17 mEq [95% CI, –32 to –2 mEq]; P = .02) compared with the control group. There were no differences in time spent in recovery before hospital discharge or in visual analog pain scores recorded immediately postoperatively and at 1 hour after surgery. Conclusion: Intraoperative intra-articular injection of morphine and clonidine significantly reduced the narcotic requirement during the postsurgical recovery period after hip arthroscopy. The reduction in postsurgical opioids may decrease adverse effects, improve overall pain management, and lead to better quality of recovery and improved patient satisfaction. PMID:26977421

  9. SUSTAINED INTRA-ARTICULAR DELIVERY OF IL-1RA FROM A THERMALLY-RESPONSIVE ELASTIN-LIKE POLYPEPTIDE AS A THERAPY FOR POST-TRAUMATIC ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Kimmerling, K.A.; Furman, B.D.; Mangiapani, D.S.; Moverman, M.A.; Sinclair, S.M.; Huebner, J.L.; Chilkoti, A.; Kraus, V.B.; Setton, L.A.; Guilak, F.; Olson, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic arthritis (PTA) is a rapidly progressive form of arthritis that develops due to joint injury, including articular fracture. Current treatments are limited to surgical restoration and stabilization of the joint; however, evidence suggests that PTA progression is mediated by the upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Although these cytokines provide potential therapeutic targets for PTA, intra-articular injections of anti-cytokine therapies have proven difficult due to rapid clearance from the joint space. In this study, we examined the ability of a cross-linked elastin-like polypeptide (xELP) drug depot to provide sustained intra-articular delivery of IL-1 and TNF-α inhibitors as a beneficial therapy. Mice sustained a closed intra-articular tibial plateau fracture; treatment groups received a single intra-articular injection of drug encapsulated in xELP. Arthritic changes were assessed 4 and 8 weeks after fracture. Inhibition of IL-1 significantly reduced the severity of cartilage degeneration and synovitis. Inhibition of TNF-α alone or with IL-1 led to deleterious effects in bone morphology, articular cartilage degeneration, and synovitis. These findings suggest that IL-1 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of PTA following articular fracture, and sustained intra-articular cytokine inhibition may provide a therapeutic approach for reducing or preventing joint degeneration following trauma. PMID:25636786

  10. Intra-articular fibroma of tendon sheath in a knee joint associated with iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sunseob; Kim, Soo-Jin; Lih, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome is a common overuse injury typically seen in the active athlete population. A nodular lesion on the inner side of the ITB as an etiology or an accompanying lesion from friction syndrome has been rarely reported. A 45-year-old male presented with recurrent pain and a movable nodule at the lateral joint area, diagnosed as ITB friction syndrome. The nodule was confirmed as a rare intra-articular fibroma of the tendon sheath (FTS) on the basis of histopathologic findings. We describe the MRI findings, arthroscopic and pathologic features, in this case of intra-articular FTS presenting with ITB friction syndrome. PMID:25598686

  11. Horizontal intra-articular patellar dislocation resulting in quadriceps avulsion and medial patellofemoral ligament tear: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Dennis E; Simoni, Michael K

    2013-07-01

    Intra-articular patellar dislocations are rare. We present a 13-year-old boy who sustained a complete horizontal intra-articular patellar dislocation following blunt trauma to the flexed knee. Closed reduction was unsuccessful and open reduction indicated a repairable quadriceps avulsion and medial patellofemoral ligament tear. He is the youngest patient to sustain a quadriceps rupture and the only patient to sustain a medial patellofemoral ligament tear to date. His flexed knee and the horizontally positioned patella (seen on lateral radiograph) were indicative of a complete rotational injury with extensor mechanism involvement. Open reduction allowed for the repair of both injuries and a favorable outcome.

  12. Stimulation of the Superficial Zone Protein and Lubrication in the Articular Cartilage by Human Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Ryosuke; McNary, Sean M.; Miyatake, Kazumasa; Lee, Cassandra A.; Van den Bogaerde, James M.; Marder, Richard A.; Reddi, A. Hari

    2016-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains high concentrations of autologous growth factors that originate from platelets. Intra-articular injections of PRP have the potential to ameliorate the symptoms of osteoarthritis in the knee. Superficial zone protein (SZP) is a boundary lubricant in articular cartilage and plays an important role in reducing friction and wear and therefore is critical in cartilage homeostasis. Purpose To determine if PRP influences the production of SZP from human joint-derived cells and to evaluate the lubricating properties of PRP on normal bovine articular cartilage. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Cells were isolated from articular cartilage, synovium, and the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) from 12 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. The concentrations of SZP in PRP and culture media were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cellular proliferation was quantified by determination of cell numbers. The lubrication properties of PRP from healthy volunteers on bovine articular cartilage were investigated using a pin-on-disk tribometer. Results In general, PRP stimulated proliferation in cells derived from articular cartilage, synovium, and ACL. It also significantly enhanced SZP secretion from synovium- and cartilage-derived cells. An unexpected finding was the presence of SZP in PRP (2.89 ± 1.23 µg/mL before activation and 3.02 ± 1.32 µg/mL after activation). In addition, under boundary mode conditions consisting of high loads and low sliding speeds, nonactivated and thrombin-activated PRP decreased the friction coefficient (μ = 0.012 and μ = 0.015, respectively) compared with saline (μ = 0.047, P < 0.004) and high molecular weight hyaluronan (μ = 0.080, P < 0.006). The friction coefficient of the cartilage with PRP was on par with that of synovial fluid. Conclusion PRP significantly stimulates cell proliferation and SZP secretion by articular cartilage and synovium of the human knee joint

  13. Intra-articular fibroma of tendon sheath in a knee joint associated with iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sunseob; Kim, Soo-Jin; Lih, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome is a common overuse injury typically seen in the active athlete population. A nodular lesion on the inner side of the ITB as an etiology or an accompanying lesion from friction syndrome has been rarely reported. A 45-year-old male presented with recurrent pain and a movable nodule at the lateral joint area, diagnosed as ITB friction syndrome. The nodule was confirmed as a rare intra-articular fibroma of the tendon sheath (FTS) on the basis of histopathologic findings. We describe the MRI findings, arthroscopic and pathologic features, in this case of intra-articular FTS presenting with ITB friction syndrome.

  14. Intra-Articular Fibroma of Tendon Sheath in a Knee Joint Associated with Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sunseob; Kim, Soo-Jin; Lih, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome is a common overuse injury typically seen in the active athlete population. A nodular lesion on the inner side of the ITB as an etiology or an accompanying lesion from friction syndrome has been rarely reported. A 45-year-old male presented with recurrent pain and a movable nodule at the lateral joint area, diagnosed as ITB friction syndrome. The nodule was confirmed as a rare intra-articular fibroma of the tendon sheath (FTS) on the basis of histopathologic findings. We describe the MRI findings, arthroscopic and pathologic features, in this case of intra-articular FTS presenting with ITB friction syndrome. PMID:25598686

  15. Study of the collagen structure in the superficial zone and physiological state of articular cartilage using a 3D confocal imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian P; Kirk, Thomas B; Zheng, Ming H

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The collagen structure in the superficial zone of articular cartilage is critical to the tissue's durability. Early osteoarthritis is often characterized with fissures on the articular surface. This is closely related to the disruption of the collagen network. However, the traditional histology can not offer visualization of the collagen structure in articular cartilage because it uses conventional optical microscopy that does not have insufficient imaging resolution to resolve collagen from proteoglycans in hyaline articular cartilage. This study examines the 3D collagen network of articular cartilage scored from 0 to 2 in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society, and aims to develop a 3D histology for assessing early osteoarthritis. Methods Articular cartilage was visually classified into five physiological groups: normal cartilage, aged cartilage, cartilage with artificial and natural surface disruption, and fibrillated. The 3D collagen matrix of the cartilage was acquired using a 3D imaging technique developed previously. Traditional histology was followed to grade the physiological status of the cartilage in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society. Results Normal articular cartilage contains interwoven collagen bundles near the articular surface, approximately within the lamina splendens. However, its collagen fibres in the superficial zone orient predominantly in a direction spatially oblique to the articular surface. With age and disruption of the articular surface, the interwoven collagen bundles are gradually disappeared, and obliquely oriented collagen fibres change to align predominantly in a direction spatially perpendicular to the articular surface. Disruption of the articular surface is well related to the disappearance of the interwoven collagen bundles. Conclusion A 3D histology has been developed to supplement the traditional histology and study the subtle changes in the collagen network in the

  16. Severe extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis in absence of concomitant joint involvement following long-term spontaneous remission. A case report.

    PubMed

    Lagrutta, Mariana; Alle, Gelsomina; Parodi, Roberto Leandro; Greca, Alcides Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease occasionally associated with severe extra-articular manifestations, mostly in cases of longstanding highly active disease. We report the case of a 56 year-old woman diagnosed with active RA at the age of 40. After 5 years of high activity, her arthritis subsides spontaneously during pregnancy despite the lack of treatment with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. She remains without articular symptoms for 7 years, and then she develops a Felty's syndrome requiring steroid treatment and splenectomy. Following steroid withdrawal she develops pericarditis with massive serohematic pericardial effusion, still in absence of articular activity, and responds to immunosuppressive therapy and colchicine. We emphasize the unusual spontaneous and sustained joint remission without specific treatment, and the development of severe extra-articular manifestations of RA in absence of concomitant articular activity, as well as the importance of controlling inflammation.

  17. Severe extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis in absence of concomitant joint involvement following long-term spontaneous remission. A case report.

    PubMed

    Lagrutta, Mariana; Alle, Gelsomina; Parodi, Roberto Leandro; Greca, Alcides Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease occasionally associated with severe extra-articular manifestations, mostly in cases of longstanding highly active disease. We report the case of a 56 year-old woman diagnosed with active RA at the age of 40. After 5 years of high activity, her arthritis subsides spontaneously during pregnancy despite the lack of treatment with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. She remains without articular symptoms for 7 years, and then she develops a Felty's syndrome requiring steroid treatment and splenectomy. Following steroid withdrawal she develops pericarditis with massive serohematic pericardial effusion, still in absence of articular activity, and responds to immunosuppressive therapy and colchicine. We emphasize the unusual spontaneous and sustained joint remission without specific treatment, and the development of severe extra-articular manifestations of RA in absence of concomitant articular activity, as well as the importance of controlling inflammation. PMID:26316106

  18. A comparison of healthy human and swine articular cartilage dynamic indentation mechanics.

    PubMed

    Ronken, S; Arnold, M P; Ardura García, H; Jeger, A; Daniels, A U; Wirz, D

    2012-05-01

    Articular cartilage is a multicomponent, poroviscoelastic tissue with nonlinear mechanical properties vital to its function. A consequent goal of repair or replacement of injured cartilage is to achieve mechanical properties in the repair tissue similar to healthy native cartilage. Since fresh healthy human articular cartilage (HC) is not readily available, we tested whether swine cartilage (SC) could serve as a suitable substitute for mechanical comparisons. To a first approximation, cartilage tissue and surgical substitutes can be evaluated mechanically as viscoelastic materials. Stiffness measurements (dynamic modulus, loss angle) are vital to function and are also a non-destructive means of evaluation. Since viscoelastic material stiffness is strongly strain rate dependent, stiffness was tested under different loading conditions related to function. Stiffness of healthy HC and SC specimens was determined and compared using two non-destructive, mm-scale indentation test modes: fast impact and slow sinusoidal deformation. Deformation resistance (dynamic modulus) and energy handling (loss angle) were determined. For equivalent anatomic locations, there was no difference in dynamic modulus. However, the HC loss angle was ~35% lower in fast impact and ~12% higher in slow sinusoidal mode. Differences seem attributable to age (young SC, older HC) but also to species anatomy and biology. Test mode-related differences in human-swine loss angle support use of multiple function-related test modes. Keeping loss angle differences in mind, swine specimens could serve as a standard of comparison for mechanical evaluation of e.g. engineered cartilage or synthetic repair materials.

  19. Growth of immature articular cartilage in vitro: correlated variation in tensile biomechanical and collagen network properties.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Amanda K; Masuda, Koichi; Thonar, Eugene J-M A; Sah, Robert L

    2003-08-01

    Articular cartilage biochemical composition and mechanical properties evolve during in utero and in vivo growth, with marked differences between fetus, newborn, and young adult. The objectives of this study were to test whether in vitro growth of bovine fetal and newborn calf articular cartilage explants resulted in changes in biochemical and tensile properties during up to 6 weeks of free-swelling culture in serum-supplemented medium. During this culture period, both fetal and calf cartilage grew markedly in size, increasing in dry and wet mass by 150-270%. This was due in part to increases in sulfated glycosaminoglycan (+248%), collagen (+96%), and pyridinoline cross-link (+133%). This was accompanied by an increase in water content so that the concentration of matrix components decreased, despite the overall net increase in mass. The ratio of pyridinoline cross-link to collagen remained low and characteristic of immature tissue. The equilibrium and dynamic tensile moduli and strength of both fetal and calf cartilage decreased during the culture period. The biochemical and biomechanical properties of the cartilage explants were correlated, such that the low values of modulus and strength were associated with low concentrations of collagen and pyridinoline. Thus, the tested culture conditions supported growth and maintenance cartilage in an immature state, but did not induce biomechanical or collagen network maturation.

  20. Hypoxia Potentiates Anabolic Effects of Exogenous Hyaluronic Acid in Rat Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ichimaru, Shohei; Nakagawa, Shuji; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Shin-Ya, Masaharu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Tsuchida, Shinji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Shimomura, Seiji; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is used clinically to treat osteoarthritis (OA), but its pharmacological effects under hypoxic conditions remain unclear. Articular chondrocytes in patients with OA are exposed to a hypoxic environment. This study investigated whether hypoxia could potentiate the anabolic effects of exogenous HA in rat articular cartilage and whether these mechanisms involved HA receptors. HA under hypoxic conditions significantly enhanced the expression of extracellular matrix genes and proteins in explant culture, as shown by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, and dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assays. Staining with Safranin-O and immunohistochemical staining with antibody to type II collagen were also enhanced in pellet culture. The expression of CD44 was increased by hypoxia and significantly suppressed by transfection with siRNAs targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (siHIF-1α). These findings indicate that hypoxia potentiates the anabolic effects of exogenous HA by a mechanism in which HIF-1α positively regulates the expression of CD44, enhancing the binding affinity for exogenous HA. The anabolic effects of exogenous HA may increase as OA progresses. PMID:27347945

  1. Evaluation of Se-75 BISTAES as a potential articular cartilage imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The potential of Se-75 bis (..beta..-N,N,N-trimethylamino)-ethyl) selenide diiodide (Se-75 BISTAES) as an articular cartilage imaging agent for the early diagnosis of osteoarthritis was evaluated. The compound was synthesized and the identity was established. The radiochemical purity and stability were determined initially and over a two-month period of storage at three temperatures. The biodistribution of Se-75 BISTAES in rabbits and guinea pigs was studied. A high concentration of radioactivity was found in the knee and shoulder cartilage. The radioactivity in the cartilage was the highest at 15 minutes to one hour post-injection. In rabbits, the highest ratio of radioactivity in the cartilage to the surrounding tissues was about 30. A minimal ratio of 10 is required for nuclear medicine imaging. Nuclear medicine imaging conducted on rabbits demonstrated increased radioactivity in the articular cartilage in the knee and shoulder. The impression from the nuclear medicine images and the findings of the biodistribution study indicated that the route of excretion of Se-75 BISTAES was the urine. The in vitro binding between Se-75 BISTAES and chondroitin sulfate was determined by an equilibrium dialysis technique.

  2. Benefit of doxycycline treatment on articular disability caused by dialysis related amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Giovanni; Cazzulani, Benedetta; Obici, Laura; Uggetti, Carla; Giorgetti, Sofia; Porcari, Riccardo; Ruggiero, Rubina; Mangione, P Patrizia; Brambilla, Moreno; Lucchetti, Jacopo; Guiso, Giovanna; Gobbi, Marco; Merlini, Giampaolo; Salmona, Mario; Stoppini, Monica; Villa, Giuseppe; Bellotti, Vittorio

    2013-09-01

    Abstract Doxycycline inhibits amyloid formation in vitro and its therapeutic efficacy is under evaluation in clinical trials for different protein conformational diseases, including prion diseases, Alzheimer's disease and transthyretin amyloidosis. In patients on chronic hemodialysis, a persistently high concentration of β2-microglobulin causes a form of amyloidosis (dialysis-related amyloidosis, DRA) localized in bones and ligaments. Since doxycycline inhibits β2-microglobulin fibrillogenesis in vitro and accumulates in bones, DRA represents an ideal form of amyloidosis where doxycycline may reach a therapeutic concentration at the site of amyloid deposition. Three patients on long-term dialysis with severe articular impairment and uncontrollable pain due to DRA were treated with 100 mg of doxycycline daily. Pharmacokinetics and safety of treatment were conducted. Plasmatic levels of the drug reached a plateau after one week (1.1-2.3 µg/ml). Treatment was well tolerated in two patients for a year, while one was suspended after 5 months due to mild esophagitis. Treatment was associated with a significant reduction in articular pain and with a significant and measurable improvement in passive and active movements in all cases, despite the persistence of unchanged amyloid deposits measured by magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:23734692

  3. Subperiosteal transmission of intra-articular pressure between articulated and stationary joints.

    PubMed

    Pitkin, Mark; Muppavarapu, Raghuveer; Cassidy, Charles; Pitkin, Emil

    2015-01-29

    Hydrostatic pressures can be transmitted between synovial capsules. In each of ten rabbits, we simultaneously measured pressure in two joints, one of which was passively ranged, and the other of which was kept stationary. The intra-articular pressure inside the stationary joint changed every time its companion joint was ranged. But the pressure in the stationary joint did not change when the periosteum was transected above the ranged joint. This phenomenon was observed in all four animals that served as their own controls. The study suggests that the intra-articular pressure was transmitted through the space between the periosteum and the bone surface. Alternative explanations, like measurements of venous blood pressure, did not show correlation with hydrostatic pressure changes in the joints. The Floating Skeleton concept suggests a biomechanical rationale for this newly observed phenomenon: that there exists a subperiosteal hydrostatic connection of synovial joints, and that this "net" distributes excess pressures among joints through the periosteal sheath to sustain the integrity of the joint contacting surfaces over a lifetime.

  4. Load distribution of articular cartilage from MR-images by neural nets.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Peter; Hanke, Göran; Gründer, Wilfried

    2005-01-01

    Artificial neural nets were used to determine the Young's modulus and spatial load distribution in articular cartilage by means of T2-weighted MR imaging. MR images were obtained in vitro (ex vivo?) from the joints of sheep of different ages (3 months, 9 months, 15 months, 1.5 years, 5 years, 5.5 years) and pigs (4 and 6 months) with a Bruker AMX 300 (7 T) spectrometer equipped with a micro-imaging unit. The knee of a 29-year-old male volunteer was studied in vivo under mechanical load using a clinical Siemens Vision MRT (1.5 T). The load of the cartilage is understood as a non-linear image transformation of loaded versus unloaded images. The artificial neural net was used to recognize given reference pixels of the unloaded cartilage within the image of the loaded cartilage. The Young's modulus was calculated from the local strain and the external pressure using the Hooke's law. With this method, the average Young's modulus was obtained in relationship to the biological age of the cartilage. The investigated age interval showed a progressive increase of 0.5 +/- 0.3 MPa per year. These results are consistent with published results. As shown in this pilot study, the method of neural nets allows the visualization of the spatial load distribution within the articular cartilage.

  5. Inhomogeneous Response of Articular Cartilage: A Three-Dimensional Multiphasic Heterogeneous Study

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, Sara; Armengol, Monica; J. Price, Andrew; A. Hulley, Philippa; S. Gill, Harinderjit; Doblaré, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage exhibits complex mechano-electrochemical behaviour due to its anisotropy, inhomogeneity and material non-linearity. In this work, the thickness and radial dependence of cartilage properties are incorporated into a 3D mechano-electrochemical model to explore the relevance of heterogeneity in the behaviour of the tissue. The model considers four essential phenomena: (i) osmotic pressure, (ii) convective and diffusive processes, (iii) chemical expansion and (iv) three-dimensional through-the-thickness heterogeneity of the tissue. The need to consider heterogeneity in computational simulations of cartilage behaviour and in manufacturing biomaterials mimicking this tissue is discussed. To this end, healthy tibial plateaus from pigs were mechanically and biochemically tested in-vitro. Heterogeneous properties were included in the mechano-electrochemical computational model to simulate tissue swelling. The simulation results demonstrated that swelling of the heterogeneous samples was significantly lower than swelling under homogeneous and isotropic conditions. Furthermore, there was a significant reduction in the flux of water and ions in the former samples. In conclusion, the computational model presented here can be considered as a valuable tool for predicting how the variation of cartilage properties affects its behaviour, opening up possibilities for exploring the requirements of cartilage-mimicking biomaterials for tissue engineering. Besides, the model also allows the establishment of behavioural patterns of swelling and of water and ion fluxes in articular cartilage. PMID:27327166

  6. PUVA: A Monte Carlo code for intra-articular PUVA treatment of arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Descalle, M.A.; Laing, T.J.; Martin, W.R.

    1996-12-31

    Current rheumatoid arthritis treatments are only partially successful. Intra-articular psoralen-ultraviolet light (PUVA) phototherapy appears to be a new and valid alternative. Ultraviolet laser light (UVA) delivered in the knee joint through a fiber optic is used in combination with 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), a light-sensitive chemical administered orally. A few hours after ingestion, the psoralen has diffused in all body cells. Once activated by UVA light, it binds to biological molecules, inhabiting cell division and ultimately causing local control of the arthritis. The magnitude of the response is proportional to the number of photoproducts delivered to tissues (i.e., the number of absorbed photons): the PUVA treatment will only be effective if a sufficient and relatively uniform dose is delivered to the diseased synovial tissues, while sparing other tissues such as cartilage. An application is being developed, based on analog Monte Carlo methods, to predict photon densities in tissues and the minimum number of intra-articular catheter positions necessary to ensure proper treatment of the diseased zone. Other interesting aspects of the problem deal with the compexity of the joint geometry, the physics of light scattering in tissues (a relatively new field of research that is not fully understood because of the variety of tissues and tissue components), and, finally, the need to include optic laws (reflection and refraction) at interfaces.

  7. Major biological obstacles for persistent cell-based regeneration of articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Andre F; Ghivizzani, Steven C; Rethwilm, Axel; Tuan, Rocky S; Evans, Christopher H; Nöth, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Hyaline articular cartilage, the load-bearing tissue of the joint, has very limited repair and regeneration capacities. The lack of efficient treatment modalities for large chondral defects has motivated attempts to engineer cartilage constructs in vitro by combining cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors, including growth factors, signaling molecules, and physical influences. Despite promising experimental approaches, however, none of the current cartilage repair strategies has generated long lasting hyaline cartilage replacement tissue that meets the functional demands placed upon this tissue in vivo. The reasons for this are diverse and can ultimately result in matrix degradation, differentiation or integration insufficiencies, or loss of the transplanted cells and tissues. This article aims to systematically review the different causes that lead to these impairments, including the lack of appropriate differentiation factors, hypertrophy, senescence, apoptosis, necrosis, inflammation, and mechanical stress. The current conceptual basis of the major biological obstacles for persistent cell-based regeneration of articular cartilage is discussed, as well as future trends to overcome these limitations. PMID:17561986

  8. Age related changes and osteochondrosis in swine articular and epiphyseal cartilage: light ane electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, R; Christian, R G; Nakano, T; Aherne, F X; Thompson, J R

    1981-04-01

    Age related changes and osteochondrosis in swine were studied using light microscopy and electron microscopy in articular cartilage and light microscopy and epiphyseal cartilage of swine from three days to 30 weeks of age. Thickness, cellularity and vascularity of both the epiphyseal and articular cartilage, decreased as the swine aged. Osteochondrotic changes included formation of "plugs" of cartilage indicating localized failure of ossification and separation and space formation in epiphyseal cartilage. Eosinophilic streaks and space formation in epiphyseal cartilage was observed in relation to epiphyseal separation. Electron microscopy showed a continuous fibrillar layer on the surface of the cartilage corresponding to the lamina splendens of light microscopy. This layer increased in the thickness and showed accumulation of amorphous material between the fibrils with aging. In the matrix, the orientation and distribution of the collagen fibers changed with growth and thicker fibers with clear sub banding were more common in older age groups. Also, necrotic cells, glycogen containing bodies and cellular debris were noticed in the matrix of normal cartilage in old animals. Chondrocytes in the younger cartilage showed accumulation of organelles responsible for protein synthesis; while Golgi bodies, vesicles, lysosomes, well developed foot processes and other inclusions were noticed in older cartilage. Cartilage erosions had a clumped and disrupted lamina splendens on the surface and electron lucent patches in the ground substances of the matrix and chondrocyte cytoplasm. PMID:7260732

  9. An In Vitro Model for the Pathological Degradation of Articular Cartilage in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Stephanie; Bhargava, Madhu M.; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an in vitro cartilage degradation model that emulates the damage seen in early-stage osteoarthritis. To this end, cartilage explants were collagenase-treated to induce enzymatic degradation of collagen fibers and proteoglycans at the articular surface. To assess changes in mechanical properties, intact and degraded cartilage explants were subjected to a series of confined compression creep tests. Changes in extracellular matrix structure and composition were determined using biochemical and histological approaches. Our results show that collagenase-induced degradation increased the amount of deformation experienced by the cartilage explants under compression. An increase in apparent permeability as well as a decrease in instantaneous and aggregate moduli were measured following collagenase treatment. Histological analysis of degraded explants revealed the presence of surface fibrillation, proteoglycan depletion in the superficial and intermediate zones and loss of the lamina splendens. Collagen cleavage was confirmed by the Col II–¾Cshort antibody. Degraded specimens experienced a significant decrease in proteoglycan content but maintained total collagen content. Repetitive testing of degraded samples resulted in the gradual collapse of the articular surface and the compaction of the superficial zone. Taken together, our data demonstrates that enzymatic degradation with collagenase can be used to emulate changes seen in early-stage osteoarthritis. Further, our in vitro model provides information on cartilage mechanics and insights on how matrix changes can affect cartilage’s functional properties. More importantly, our model can be applied to develop and test treatment options for tissue repair. PMID:24360770

  10. Ultrastructure of the condylar articular surface in severe mandibular pain-dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toller, P A

    1977-12-01

    Specimens from articular surfaces of normal human mandibular condyles are compared with very small biopsies from articular surfaces of condyles taken at conservative operations in severe pain-dysfunction syndrome (P.D.S.). Immediate fixation was followed by examination using transmission electron-micrography. Normal surfaces exhibit a nearly structureless layer about 2 micron thick, which corresponds with the lamina splendens described in other diarthrodial joints. This layer surmounts a dense main structure of wavy interlacing bundles of collagen interspersed with fibrocytes. Occasional straight elastic fibres were found. Surfaces of all condyles from P.D.S. patients showed loss of lamina splendens, alteration of collagen fibre size, and tendency to dissociation of both collagen and its surrounding ground substance. Depper levels showed aggregations of bizarre structures which the author terms "vermiform bodies", and which appear to be collections of abnormal amounts and types of elastic tissue. It is suggested that the appearances are those of stress elastosis. Such profound ultrastructural changes may affect the joint sliding properties, and also its mechanical integrity under stress. Examination at this degree of magnification suggests a direct relationship between long-standing pain-dysfunction syndrome and the onset of degenerative disease. PMID:415013

  11. An in vitro model for the pathological degradation of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Stephanie; Bhargava, Madhu M; Torzilli, Peter A

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an in vitro cartilage degradation model that emulates the damage seen in early-stage osteoarthritis. To this end, cartilage explants were collagenase-treated to induce enzymatic degradation of collagen fibers and proteoglycans at the articular surface. To assess changes in mechanical properties, intact and degraded cartilage explants were subjected to a series of confined compression creep tests. Changes in extracellular matrix structure and composition were determined using biochemical and histological approaches. Our results show that collagenase-induced degradation increased the amount of deformation experienced by the cartilage explants under compression. An increase in apparent permeability as well as a decrease in instantaneous and aggregate moduli was measured following collagenase treatment. Histological analysis of degraded explants revealed the presence of surface fibrillation, proteoglycan depletion in the superficial and intermediate zones and loss of the lamina splendens. Collagen cleavage was confirmed by the Col II-3/4Cshort antibody. Degraded specimens experienced a significant decrease in proteoglycan content but maintained total collagen content. Repetitive testing of degraded samples resulted in the gradual collapse of the articular surface and the compaction of the superficial zone. Taken together, our data demonstrates that enzymatic degradation with collagenase can be used to emulate changes seen in early-stage osteoarthritis. Further, our in vitro model provides information on cartilage mechanics and insights on how matrix changes can affect cartilage's functional properties. More importantly, our model can be applied to develop and test treatment options for tissue repair. PMID:24360770

  12. Development of hybrid scaffolds using ceramic and hydrogel for articular cartilage tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Seol, Young-Joon; Park, Ju Young; Jeong, Wonju; Kim, Tae-Ho; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-04-01

    The regeneration of articular cartilage consisting of hyaline cartilage and hydrogel scaffolds has been generally used in tissue engineering. However, success in in vivo studies has been rarely reported. The hydrogel scaffolds implanted into articular cartilage defects are mechanically unstable and it is difficult for them to integrate with the surrounding native cartilage tissue. Therefore, it is needed to regenerate cartilage and bone tissue simultaneously. We developed hybrid scaffolds with hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage tissue and with ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue. For in vivo study, hybrid scaffolds were press-fitted into osteochondral tissue defects in a rabbit knee joints and the cartilage tissue regeneration in blank, hydrogel scaffolds, and hybrid scaffolds was compared. In 12th week after implantation, the histological and immunohistochemical analyses were conducted to evaluate the cartilage tissue regeneration. In the blank and hydrogel scaffold groups, the defects were filled with fibrous tissues and the implanted hydrogel scaffolds could not maintain their initial position; in the hybrid scaffold group, newly generated cartilage tissues were morphologically similar to native cartilage tissues and were smoothly connected to the surrounding native tissues. This study demonstrates hybrid scaffolds containing hydrogel and ceramic scaffolds can provide mechanical stability to hydrogel scaffolds and enhance cartilage tissue regeneration at the defect site.

  13. Dependence of nanoscale friction and adhesion properties of articular cartilage on contact load.

    PubMed

    Chan, S M T; Neu, C P; Komvopoulos, K; Reddi, A H

    2011-04-29

    Boundary lubrication of articular cartilage by conformal, molecularly thin films reduces friction and adhesion between asperities at the cartilage-cartilage contact interface when the contact conditions are not conducive to fluid film lubrication. In this study, the nanoscale friction and adhesion properties of articular cartilage from typical load-bearing and non-load-bearing joint regions were studied in the boundary lubrication regime under a range of physiological contact pressures using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Adhesion of load-bearing cartilage was found to be much lower than that of non-load-bearing cartilage. In addition, load-bearing cartilage demonstrated steady and low friction coefficient through the entire load range examined, whereas non-load-bearing cartilage showed higher friction coefficient that decreased nonlinearly with increasing normal load. AFM imaging and roughness calculations indicated that the above trends in the nanotribological properties of cartilage are not due to topographical (roughness) differences. However, immunohistochemistry revealed consistently higher surface concentration of boundary lubricant at load-bearing joint regions. The results of this study suggest that under contact conditions leading to joint starvation from fluid lubrication, the higher content of boundary lubricant at load-bearing cartilage sites preserves synovial joint function by minimizing adhesion and wear at asperity microcontacts, which are precursors for tissue degeneration.

  14. Wear and Damage of Articular Cartilage with Friction Against Orthopaedic Implant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Oungoulian, Sevan R.; Durney, Krista M.; Jones, Brian K.; Ahmad, Christopher S.; Hung, Clark T.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the wear response of immature bovine articular cartilage tested against glass or alloys used in hemiarthroplasties. Two cobalt chromium alloys and a stainless steel alloy were selected for these investigations. The surface roughness of one of the cobalt chromium alloys was also varied within the range considered acceptable by regulatory agencies. Cartilage disks were tested in a configuration that promoted loss of interstitial fluid pressurization to accelerate conditions believed to occur in hemiarthroplasties. Results showed that considerably more damage occurred in cartilage samples tested against stainless steel (10 nm roughness) and low carbon cobalt chromium alloy (27 nm roughness) compared to glass (10 nm) and smoother low or high carbon cobalt chromium (10 nm). The two materials producing the greatest damage also exhibited higher equilibrium friction coefficients. Cartilage damage occurred primarily in the form of delamination at the interface between the superficial tangential zone and the transitional middle zone, with much less evidence of abrasive wear at the articular surface. These results suggest that cartilage damage from frictional loading occurs as a result of subsurface fatigue failure leading to the delamination. Surface chemistry and surface roughness of implant materials can have a significant influence on tissue damage, even when using materials and roughness values that satisfy regulatory requirements. PMID:25912663

  15. Chromatin protein HMGB2 regulates articular cartilage surface maintenance via β-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Noboru; Caramés, Beatriz; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Amendt, Brad A.; Komiya, Setsuro; Lotz, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The superficial zone (SZ) of articular cartilage is critical in maintaining tissue function and homeostasis and represents the site of the earliest changes in osteoarthritis. Mechanisms that regulate the unique phenotype of SZ chondrocytes and maintain SZ integrity are unknown. We recently demonstrated that expression of the chromatin protein high mobility group box (HMGB) protein 2 is restricted to the SZ in articular cartilage suggesting a transcriptional regulation involving HMGB2 in SZ. Here, we show that an interaction between HMGB2 and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway regulates the maintenance of the SZ. We found that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is active specifically in the SZ in normal mouse knee joints and colocalizes with HMGB2. Both Wnt signaling and HMGB2 expression decrease with aging in mouse joints. Our molecular studies show that HMGB2 enhances the binding of Lef-1 to its target sequence and potentiates transcriptional activation of the Lef-1-β-catenin complex. The HMG domain within HMGB2 is crucial for interaction with Lef-1, suggesting that both HMGB2 and HMGB1 may be involved in this function. Furthermore, conditional deletion of β-catenin in cultured mouse chondrocytes induced apoptosis. These findings define a pathway where protein interactions of HMGB2 and Lef-1 enhance Wnt signaling and promote SZ chondrocyte survival. Loss of the HMGB2-Wnt signaling interaction is a new mechanism in aging-related cartilage pathology. PMID:19805379

  16. In vitro effect of a synthesized sulfonamido-based gallate on articular chondrocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao; Zheng, Li; Liu, Qin; Liu, Buming; Jiang, Bingli; Peng, Xiaoyu; Lin, Cuiwu

    2014-06-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a promising strategy for cartilage repair and reconstitution. However, limited cell numbers and the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes present major difficulties to the success of ACI therapy. Therefore, it is important to find effective pro-chondrogenic agents that restore these defects to ensure a successful therapy. In this study, we synthesized a sulfonamido-based gallate, namely N-[4-(4,6-dimethyl-pyrimidin-2-ylsulfamoyl)-phenyl]-3,4,5-trihydroxy-benzamide (EJTC), and investigated its effects on rabbit articular chondrocytes through an examination of its specific effects on cell proliferation, morphology, viability, GAG synthesis, and cartilage-specific gene expression. The results show that EJTC can effectively promote chondrocyte growth and enhance the secretion and synthesis of cartilage ECM by upregulating the expression levels of the aggrecan, collagen II, and Sox9 genes. The expression of the collagen I gene was effectively downregulated, which indicates that EJTC inhibits chondrocytes dedifferentiation. Chondrocyte hypertrophy, which may lead to chondrocyte ossification, was also undetectable in the EJTC-treated groups. The recommended dose of EJTC ranges from 3.125 μg/mL to 7.8125 μg/mL, and the most profound response was observed with 7.8125 μg/mL. This study may provide a basis for the development of a novel agent for the treatment of articular cartilage defects.

  17. Opiates do not violate the viability and proliferative activity of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chechik, Ofir; Arbel, Ron; Salai, Moshe; Gigi, Roy; Beilin, Mark; Flaishon, Ron; Sever, Ronen; Khashan, Morsi; Ben-Tov, Tomer; Gal-Levy, Ronit; Yayon, Avner; Blumenstein, Sara

    2014-09-01

    Articular cartilage injuries present a challenge for the clinician. Autologous chondrocyte implantation embedded in scaffolds are used to treat cartilage defects with favorable outcomes. Autologous serum is often used as a medium for chondrocyte cell culture during the proliferation phase of the process of such products. A previous report showed that opiate analgesics (fentanyl, alfentanil and diamorphine) in the sera have a significant inhibitory effect on chondrocyte proliferation. In order to determine if opiates in serum inhibit chondrocyte proliferation, twenty two patients who underwent knee arthroscopy and were anesthetized with either fentanyl or remifentanil were studied. Blood was drawn before and during opiate administration and up to 2 h after its discontinuation. The sera were used as medium for in vitro proliferation of both cryopreserved and freshly isolated chondrocytes, and the number and viability of cells were measured. There was no difference in the yield or cell viability between the serum samples of patients anesthetized with fentanyl when either fresh or cryopreserved human articular chondrocytes (hACs) were used. Some non-significant reduction in the yield of cells was observed in the serum samples of patients anesthetized with remifentanil when fresh hAC were used. We conclude that Fentanyl in human autologous serum does not inhibit in vitro hAC proliferation. Remifentanil may show minimal inhibitory effect on in vitro fresh hAC proliferation.

  18. Zn deposition at the bone cartilage interface in equine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D. A.; Moger, C. J.; Winlove, C. P.

    2007-09-01

    In articular cartilage metalloproteinases, a family of enzymes whose function relies on the presence of divalent cations such as Zn and Ca plays a central role in the normal processes of growth and remodelling and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes of arthritis. Another important enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, involved in cartilage mineralisation also relies on metallic cofactors. The local concentration of divalent cations is therefore of considerable interest in cartilage pathophysiology and several authors have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to map metal ion distributions in bone and cartilage. We report use of a bench-top XRF analytical microscope, providing spatial resolution of 10 μm and applicable to histological sections, facilitating correlation of the distribution with structural features. The study seeks to establish the elemental distribution in normal tissue as a precursor to investigation of changes in disease. For six samples prepared from equine metacarpophalangeal joint, we observed increased concentration of Zn and Sr ions around the tidemark between normal and mineralised cartilage. This is believed to be an active site of remodelling but its composition has hitherto lacked detailed characterization. We also report preliminary results on two of the samples using Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). This confirms our previous observations using synchrotron-based XRF of enhanced deposition of Sr and Zn at the surface of the subchondral bone and in articular cartilage.

  19. The role of lubricant entrapment at biological interfaces: reduction of friction and adhesion in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chan, S M T; Neu, C P; Komvopoulos, K; Reddi, A H

    2011-07-28

    Friction and adhesion of articular cartilage from high- and low-load-bearing regions of bovine knee joints were examined with a tribometer under various loads and equilibration times. The effect of trapped lubricants was investigated by briefly unloading the cartilage sample before friction testing, to allow fluid to reflow into the contact interface and boundary lubricants to rearrange. Friction and adhesion of high-load-bearing joint regions were consistently lower than those of low-load-bearing regions. This investigation is the first to demonstrate the regional variation in the friction and adhesion properties of articular cartilage. Friction coefficient decreased with increasing contact pressure and decreasing equilibration time. Briefly unloading cartilage before the onset of sliding resulted in significantly lower friction and adhesion and a loss of the friction dependence on contact pressure, suggesting an enhancement of the cartilage tribological properties by trapped lubricants. The results of this study reveal significant differences in the friction and adhesion properties between high- and low-load-bearing joint regions and elucidate the role of trapped lubricants in cartilage tribology.

  20. Effects of multiple chondroitinase ABC applications on tissue engineered articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Natoli, Roman M.; Responte, Donald J.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Increasing tensile properties and collagen content is a recognized need in articular cartilage tissue engineering. This study tested the hypothesis that multiple applications of chondroitinase ABC (C-ABC), a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) degrading enzyme, could increase construct tensile properties in a scaffold-less approach for articular cartilage tissue engineering. Developing constructs were treated with C-ABC at 2 wks, 4 wks, or both 2 and 4 wks. At 4 and 6 wks, construct sulfated GAG composition, collagen composition, and compressive and tensile biomechanical properties were assessed, along with immunohistochemistry (IHC) for collagens type I, II, and VI, and the proteoglycan decorin. At 6 wks, the tensile modulus and ultimate tensile strength of the group treated at both 2 and 4 wks were significantly increased over controls by 78% and 64%, reaching values of 3.4 and 1.4 MPa, respectively. Collagen concentration also increased 43%. Further, groups treated at either 2 wks or 4 wks alone also had increased tensile stiffness compared to controls. Surprisingly, though GAG was depleted in the treated groups, by 6 wks there were no significant differences in compressive stiffness. IHC showed abundant collagen type II and VI in all groups, with no collagen type I. Further, decorin staining was reduced following C-ABC treatment, but returned during subsequent culture. The results support the use of C-ABC in cartilage tissue engineering for increasing tensile properties. PMID:19123232

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells as a potent cell source for articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza; Malakooty Poor, Elham

    2014-07-26

    Since articular cartilage possesses only a weak capacity for repair, its regeneration potential is considered one of the most important challenges for orthopedic surgeons. The treatment options, such as marrow stimulation techniques, fail to induce a repair tissue with the same functional and mechanical properties of native hyaline cartilage. Osteochondral transplantation is considered an effective treatment option but is associated with some disadvantages, including donor-site morbidity, tissue supply limitation, unsuitable mechanical properties and thickness of the obtained tissue. Although autologous chondrocyte implantation results in reasonable repair, it requires a two-step surgical procedure. Moreover, chondrocytes expanded in culture gradually undergo dedifferentiation, so lose morphological features and specialized functions. In the search for alternative cells, scientists have found mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to be an appropriate cellular material for articular cartilage repair. These cells were originally isolated from bone marrow samples and further investigations have revealed the presence of the cells in many other tissues. Furthermore, chondrogenic differentiation is an inherent property of MSCs noticed at the time of the cell discovery. MSCs are known to exhibit homing potential to the damaged site at which they differentiate into the tissue cells or secrete a wide spectrum of bioactive factors with regenerative properties. Moreover, these cells possess a considerable immunomodulatory potential that make them the general donor for therapeutic applications. All of these topics will be discussed in this review.

  2. Mechanics and crack formation in the extracellular matrix with articular cartilage as a model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, Sarah; Silverberg, Jesse; Bonassar, Lawrence; Cohen, Itai; Das, Moumita

    We investigate the mechanical structure-function relations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) with focus on crack formation and failure. As a model system, our study focuses on the ECM in articular cartilage (AC), the tissue that covers the ends of bones, and distributes load in joints including in the knees, shoulders, and hips. The strength, toughness, and crack resistance of native articular cartilage is unparalleled in materials made by humankind. This mechanical response is mainly due to its ECM. The ECM in AC has two major mechanobiological components: a network of the biopolymer collagen and a flexible aggrecan gel. We model this system as a biopolymer network embedded in a swelling gel, and investigate the conditions for the formation and propagation of cracks using a combination of rigidity percolation theory and energy minimization approaches. Our results may provide useful insights into the design principles of the ECM as well as of biomimetic hydrogels that are mechanically robust and can, at the same time, easily adapt to cues in their surroundings. This work was partially supported by a Cottrell College Science Award.

  3. Sclerostin Immunoreactivity Increases in Cortical Bone Osteocytes and Decreases in Articular Cartilage Chondrocytes in Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michelle L; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2016-03-01

    Sclerostin is a 24-kDa secreted glycoprotein that has been identified as a negative modulator of new bone formation and may play a major role in age-related decline in skeletal function. Although serum levels of sclerostin markedly increase with age, relatively little is known about whether cells in the skeleton change their expression of sclerostin with aging. Using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy, we explored sclerostin immunoreactivity (sclerostin-IR) in the femurs of 4-, 9-, and 24-month-old adult C3H/HeJ male mice. In the femur, the only two cell types that expressed detectable levels of sclerostin-IR were bone osteocytes and articular cartilage chondrocytes. At three different sites along the diaphysis of the femur, only a subset of osteocytes expressed sclerostin-IR and the percentage of osteocytes that expressed sclerostin-IR increased from approximately 36% to 48% in 4- vs. 24-month-old mice. In marked contrast, in the same femurs, there were ~40% fewer hypertrophic chondrocytes of articular cartilage that expressed sclerostin-IR when comparing 24- vs. 4-month-old mice. Understanding the mechanism(s) that drive these divergent changes in sclerostin-IR may provide insight into understanding and treating the age-related decline of the skeleton.

  4. Inhomogeneous Response of Articular Cartilage: A Three-Dimensional Multiphasic Heterogeneous Study.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Sara; Armengol, Monica; J Price, Andrew; A Hulley, Philippa; S Gill, Harinderjit; Doblaré, Manuel; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage exhibits complex mechano-electrochemical behaviour due to its anisotropy, inhomogeneity and material non-linearity. In this work, the thickness and radial dependence of cartilage properties are incorporated into a 3D mechano-electrochemical model to explore the relevance of heterogeneity in the behaviour of the tissue. The model considers four essential phenomena: (i) osmotic pressure, (ii) convective and diffusive processes, (iii) chemical expansion and (iv) three-dimensional through-the-thickness heterogeneity of the tissue. The need to consider heterogeneity in computational simulations of cartilage behaviour and in manufacturing biomaterials mimicking this tissue is discussed. To this end, healthy tibial plateaus from pigs were mechanically and biochemically tested in-vitro. Heterogeneous properties were included in the mechano-electrochemical computational model to simulate tissue swelling. The simulation results demonstrated that swelling of the heterogeneous samples was significantly lower than swelling under homogeneous and isotropic conditions. Furthermore, there was a significant reduction in the flux of water and ions in the former samples. In conclusion, the computational model presented here can be considered as a valuable tool for predicting how the variation of cartilage properties affects its behaviour, opening up possibilities for exploring the requirements of cartilage-mimicking biomaterials for tissue engineering. Besides, the model also allows the establishment of behavioural patterns of swelling and of water and ion fluxes in articular cartilage. PMID:27327166

  5. 3D Hydrogel Scaffolds for Articular Chondrocyte Culture and Cartilage Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is highly susceptible to damage and has limited self-repair and regeneration potential. Cell-based strategies to engineer cartilage tissue offer a promising solution to repair articular cartilage. To select the optimal cell source for tissue repair, it is important to develop an appropriate culture platform to systematically examine the biological and biomechanical differences in the tissue-engineered cartilage by different cell sources. Here we applied a three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogel culture platform to systematically examine cartilage regeneration potential of juvenile, adult, and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The 3D biomimetic hydrogel consisted of synthetic component poly(ethylene glycol) and bioactive component chondroitin sulfate, which provides a physiologically relevant microenvironment for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. In addition, the scaffold may be potentially used for cell delivery for cartilage repair in vivo. Cartilage tissue engineered in the scaffold can be evaluated using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. Utilizing these outcomes, we were able to characterize the differential regenerative potential of chondrocytes of varying age, both at the gene expression level and in the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage tissue. The 3D culture model could be applied to investigate the molecular and functional differences among chondrocytes and progenitor cells from different stages of normal or aberrant development. PMID:26484414

  6. Andrographolide Enhances Proliferation and Prevents Dedifferentiation of Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Li-ke; Wei, Qing-jun; Liu, Lei; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jin-min

    2015-01-01

    As the main active constituent of Andrographis paniculata that was applied in treatment of many diseases including inflammation in ancient China, andrographolide (ANDRO) was found to facilitate reduction of edema and analgesia in arthritis. This suggested that ANDRO may be promising anti-inflammatory agent to relieve destruction and degeneration of cartilage after inflammation. In this study, the effect of ANDRO on rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro was investigated. Results showed that not more than 8 μM ANDRO did no harm to chondrocytes (P < 0.05). DNA content and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) /DNA were, respectively, improved in ANDRO groups comparing to the control (P < 0.05). ANDRO could promote expression of aggrecan, collagen II, and Sox9 genes while downregulating expression of collagen I gene (P < 0.05). Furthermore, hypertrophy that may result in chondrocyte ossification could not be detected in all groups (P > 0.05). The viability assay, hematoxylin-eosin, safranin O, and immunohistochemical staining also showed better performances in ANDRO groups. As to the doses, 3 μM ANDRO showed the best performance. The results indicate that ANDRO can accelerate proliferation of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro and meanwhile maintain the phenotype, which may provide valuable references for further exploration on arthritis. PMID:25802548

  7. The mechanical and material properties of elderly human articular cartilage subject to impact and slow loading.

    PubMed

    Burgin, L V; Edelsten, L; Aspden, R M

    2014-02-01

    The mechanical properties of articular cartilage vary enormously with loading rate, and how these properties derive from the composition and structure of the tissue is still unclear. This study investigates the mechanical properties of human articular cartilage at rapid rates of loading, compares these with measurements at slow rates of loading and explores how they relate to the gross composition of the tissue. Full-depth femoral head cartilage biopsies were subjected to a slow, unconfined compression test followed by an impact at an energy of 78.5mJ and velocity 1.25ms(-1). The modulus was calculated from the slope of the loading curve and the coefficient of restitution from the areas under the loading and unloading curves. Tissue composition was measured as water, collagen and glycosaminoglycan contents. The maximum dynamic modulus ranged from 25 to 150MPa. These values compared with 1-3MPa measured during quasi-static loading. The coefficient of restitution was 0.502 (0.066) (mean (standard deviation)) and showed no site variation. Water loss was not detectable. Composition was not strongly associated with modulus; water and collagen contents together predicted about 25% of the variance in modulus.

  8. New perspectives for articular cartilage repair treatment through tissue engineering: A contemporary review

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Leonardi, Rosalia; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Di Giunta, Angelo; Loreto, Carla; Castorina, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    In this paper review we describe benefits and disadvantages of the established methods of cartilage regeneration that seem to have a better long-term effectiveness. We illustrated the anatomical aspect of the knee joint cartilage, the current state of cartilage tissue engineering, through mesenchymal stem cells and biomaterials, and in conclusion we provide a short overview on the rehabilitation after articular cartilage repair procedures. Adult articular cartilage has low capacity to repair itself, and thus even minor injuries may lead to progressive damage and osteoarthritic joint degeneration, resulting in significant pain and disability. Numerous efforts have been made to develop tissue-engineered grafts or patches to repair focal chondral and osteochondral defects, and to date several researchers aim to implement clinical application of cell-based therapies for cartilage repair. A literature review was conducted on PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar using appropriate keywords, examining the current literature on the well-known tissue engineering methods for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24829869

  9. A biphasic viscohyperelastic fibril-reinforced model for articular cartilage: formulation and comparison with experimental data.

    PubMed

    García, José Jaime; Cortés, Daniel Humberto

    2007-01-01

    Experiments in articular cartilage have shown highly nonlinear stress-strain curves under finite deformations, nonlinear tension-compression response as well as intrinsic viscous effects of the proteoglycan matrix and the collagen fibers. A biphasic viscohyperelastic fibril-reinforced model is proposed here, which is able to describe the intrinsic viscoelasticity of the fibrillar and nonfibrillar components of the solid phase, the nonlinear tension-compression response and the nonlinear stress-strain curves under tension and compression. A viscohyperelastic constitutive equation was used for the matrix and the fibers encompassing, respectively, a hyperelastic function used previously for the matrix and a hyperelastic law used before to represent biological connective tissues. This model, implemented in an updated Lagrangian finite element code, displayed good ability to follow experimental stress-strain equilibrium curves under tension and compression for human humeral cartilage. In addition, curve fitting of experimental reaction force and lateral displacement unconfined compression curves showed that the inclusion of viscous effects in the matrix allows the description of experimental data with material properties for the fibers consistent with experimental tensile tests, suggesting that intrinsic viscous effects in the matrix of articular cartilage plays an important role in the mechanical response of the tissue.

  10. Synergy between Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels confers high-strain mechanosensitivity to articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Whasil; Leddy, Holly A; Chen, Yong; Lee, Suk Hee; Zelenski, Nicole A; McNulty, Amy L; Wu, Jason; Beicker, Kellie N; Coles, Jeffrey; Zauscher, Stefan; Grandl, Jörg; Sachs, Frederick; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B

    2014-11-25

    Diarthrodial joints are essential for load bearing and locomotion. Physiologically, articular cartilage sustains millions of cycles of mechanical loading. Chondrocytes, the cells in cartilage, regulate their metabolic activities in response to mechanical loading. Pathological mechanical stress can lead to maladaptive cellular responses and subsequent cartilage degeneration. We sought to deconstruct chondrocyte mechanotransduction by identifying mechanosensitive ion channels functioning at injurious levels of strain. We detected robust expression of the recently identified mechanosensitive channels, PIEZO1 and PIEZO2. Combined directed expression of Piezo1 and -2 sustained potentiated mechanically induced Ca(2+) signals and electrical currents compared with single-Piezo expression. In primary articular chondrocytes, mechanically evoked Ca(2+) transients produced by atomic force microscopy were inhibited by GsMTx4, a PIEZO-blocking peptide, and by Piezo1- or Piezo2-specific siRNA. We complemented the cellular approach with an explant-cartilage injury model. GsMTx4 reduced chondrocyte death after mechanical injury, suggesting a possible therapy for reducing cartilage injury and posttraumatic osteoarthritis by attenuating Piezo-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction of injurious strains.

  11. Induction of vascular endothelial growth factor by nitric oxide in cultured human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Turpaev, K; Litvinov, D; Dubovaya, V; Panasyuk, A; Ivanov, D; Prassolov, V

    2001-06-01

    We investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the control of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) gene expression in cultured human articular chondrocytes. Cell treatment with the NO-generating compound nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) caused a significant accumulation of 4.4 kb VEGF mRNA, a major VEGF mRNA isoform expressing in chondrocytes. This is the first demonstration that NO can induce VEGF mRNA expression in chondrocytes. VEGF mRNA level was not affected in cells exposed to dibutyryl cGMP, a non-hydrolyzable analog of cGMP, suggesting that the cGMP system is not involved in NO-dependent transcriptional activation of VEGF gene. The GSNO-stimulated induction of VEGF mRNA was slightly attenuated by MAP protein kinase inhibitors PD98058 and SB203580, but was completely blocked in cells incubated with GSNO in the presence of catalase and superoxide dismutase, enzymes scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), or in the presence of thiol-containing antioxidants, N-acetyl cysteine and reduced glutathione. These results suggest that in articular chondrocytes the GSNO-induced VEGF gene transcriptional activation is dependent on endogenous ROS production and oxidative thiol modifications.

  12. A biphasic viscohyperelastic fibril-reinforced model for articular cartilage: formulation and comparison with experimental data.

    PubMed

    García, José Jaime; Cortés, Daniel Humberto

    2007-01-01

    Experiments in articular cartilage have shown highly nonlinear stress-strain curves under finite deformations, nonlinear tension-compression response as well as intrinsic viscous effects of the proteoglycan matrix and the collagen fibers. A biphasic viscohyperelastic fibril-reinforced model is proposed here, which is able to describe the intrinsic viscoelasticity of the fibrillar and nonfibrillar components of the solid phase, the nonlinear tension-compression response and the nonlinear stress-strain curves under tension and compression. A viscohyperelastic constitutive equation was used for the matrix and the fibers encompassing, respectively, a hyperelastic function used previously for the matrix and a hyperelastic law used before to represent biological connective tissues. This model, implemented in an updated Lagrangian finite element code, displayed good ability to follow experimental stress-strain equilibrium curves under tension and compression for human humeral cartilage. In addition, curve fitting of experimental reaction force and lateral displacement unconfined compression curves showed that the inclusion of viscous effects in the matrix allows the description of experimental data with material properties for the fibers consistent with experimental tensile tests, suggesting that intrinsic viscous effects in the matrix of articular cartilage plays an important role in the mechanical response of the tissue. PMID:17014853

  13. Wear and damage of articular cartilage with friction against orthopedic implant materials.

    PubMed

    Oungoulian, Sevan R; Durney, Krista M; Jones, Brian K; Ahmad, Christopher S; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2015-07-16

    The objective of this study was to measure the wear response of immature bovine articular cartilage tested against glass or alloys used in hemiarthroplasties. Two cobalt chromium alloys and a stainless steel alloy were selected for these investigations. The surface roughness of one of the cobalt chromium alloys was also varied within the range considered acceptable by regulatory agencies. Cartilage disks were tested in a configuration that promoted loss of interstitial fluid pressurization to accelerate conditions believed to occur in hemiarthroplasties. Results showed that considerably more damage occurred in cartilage samples tested against stainless steel (10 nm roughness) and low carbon cobalt chromium alloy (27 nm roughness) compared to glass (10 nm) and smoother low or high carbon cobalt chromium (10 nm). The two materials producing the greatest damage also exhibited higher equilibrium friction coefficients. Cartilage damage occurred primarily in the form of delamination at the interface between the superficial tangential zone and the transitional middle zone, with much less evidence of abrasive wear at the articular surface. These results suggest that cartilage damage from frictional loading occurs as a result of subsurface fatigue failure leading to the delamination. Surface chemistry and surface roughness of implant materials can have a significant influence on tissue damage, even when using materials and roughness values that satisfy regulatory requirements.

  14. Hypoxia Potentiates Anabolic Effects of Exogenous Hyaluronic Acid in Rat Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ichimaru, Shohei; Nakagawa, Shuji; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Shin-Ya, Masaharu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Tsuchida, Shinji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Shimomura, Seiji; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is used clinically to treat osteoarthritis (OA), but its pharmacological effects under hypoxic conditions remain unclear. Articular chondrocytes in patients with OA are exposed to a hypoxic environment. This study investigated whether hypoxia could potentiate the anabolic effects of exogenous HA in rat articular cartilage and whether these mechanisms involved HA receptors. HA under hypoxic conditions significantly enhanced the expression of extracellular matrix genes and proteins in explant culture, as shown by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, and dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assays. Staining with Safranin-O and immunohistochemical staining with antibody to type II collagen were also enhanced in pellet culture. The expression of CD44 was increased by hypoxia and significantly suppressed by transfection with siRNAs targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (siHIF-1α). These findings indicate that hypoxia potentiates the anabolic effects of exogenous HA by a mechanism in which HIF-1α positively regulates the expression of CD44, enhancing the binding affinity for exogenous HA. The anabolic effects of exogenous HA may increase as OA progresses.

  15. Collagen fibre arrangement in the tibial plateau articular cartilage of man and other mammalian species

    PubMed Central

    KÄÄB, M. J.; AP GWYNN, I.; NÖTZLI, H. P.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental animal models are frequently used to study articular cartilage, but the relevance to man remains problematic. In this study animal models were compared by examination of the collagen fibre arrangement in the medial tibial plateau of human, cow, pig, dog, sheep, rabbit and rat specimens. 24 cartilage samples from each species were prepared and maximum cartilage thickness in the central tibial plateau measured. Samples were fixed, dehydrated, freeze-fractured and imaged by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At low magnification, 2 different arrangements of collagen fibres were observed: leaf-like (human, pig, dog) and columnar (cow, sheep, rabbit, rat). The porcine collagen structure was the most similar to that of man. This arrangement was consistent from the radial to the upper zones. Under higher magnification at the surface of the leaves, the collagen was more randomly oriented, whereas the columns consisted of parallel collagen fibrils. The maximum thickness of cartilage did not correlate with the type of collagen arrangement but was correlated with the body weight of the species (r=0.785). When using animal models for investigating human articular cartilage function or pathology, the differences in arrangement of collagen fibres in tibial plateau cartilage between laboratory animals should be considered especially if morphological evaluation is planned. PMID:9758134

  16. Pulsed CO2 laser for intra-articular cartilage vaporization and subchondral bone perforation in horses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Alan J.; Roth, Jerry E.; Krook, Lennart P.

    1991-05-01

    A pulsed carbon dioxide laser was used to vaporize articular cartilage in four horses, and perforate the cartilage and subchondral bone in four horses. Both intercarpal joints were examined arthroscopically and either a 1 cm cartilage crater or a series of holes was created in the third carpal bone of one joint. The contralateral carpus served as a control. The horses were evaluated clinically for 8 weeks, euthanatized and the joints examined radiographically, grossly, and histologically. Pulsed carbon dioxide laser vaporized cartilage readily but penetrated bone poorly. Cartilage vaporization resulted in no greater swelling, heat, pain on flexion, lameness, or synovial fluid reaction than the sham procedure. Laser drilling resulted in a shallow, charred hole with a tenacious carbon residue, and in combination with the thermal damage to deeper bone, resulted in increased swelling, mild lameness and a low-grade, but persistent synovitis. Cartilage removal by laser vaporization resulted in rapid regrowth with fibrous and fibrovascular tissue and occasional regions of fibrocartilage at week 8. The subchondral bone, synovial membrane, and draining lymph nodes appeared essentially unaffected by the laser cartilage vaporization procedure. Conversely, carbon dioxide laser drilling of subchondral bone resulted in poor penetration, extensive areas of thermal necrosis of bone, and significant secondary damage to the apposing articular surface of the radial carpal bone. The carbon dioxide laser is a useful intraarticular instrument for removal of cartilage and has potential application in inaccessible regions of diarthrodial joints. It does not penetrate bone sufficiently to have application in subchondral drilling.

  17. Protocatechuic acid benefits proliferation and phenotypic maintenance of rabbit articular chondrocytes: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    LUO, LIKE; WEI, QINGJUN; LIU, LEI; LIN, XIAO; LIN, CUIWU; ZHENG, LI; ZHAO, JINMIN

    2015-01-01

    Numerous antioxidants exhibit antiarthritic effects due to their inhibitory effect on inflammatory factors. Certain antioxidants, such as protocatechuic acid (PCA) and its analogs, have been reported to be effective in the treatment of arthritis. However, the effect of PCA on chondro-protection may be alleviated due to the induction of apoptosis, as has been demonstrated in stomatocytes. To clearly determine the effect of PCA on the biological and cellular metabolism of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro, examinations of cytotoxicity, proliferation and morphology were performed, in addition to analyses of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis and the expression of cartilage-specific genes. The results revealed that PCA effectively promoted chondrocyte growth, the synthesis of the extracellular matrix and the mRNA expression of aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9, while downregulating the expression of the collagen I gene, a marker of chondrocyte dedifferentiation. In addition, hypertrophy, which may result in chondrocyte ossification, was not detected in the groups. Among the doses (range, 0.05–0.3 mmol/l) of PCA that promoted the proliferation of chondrocytes, a concentration of 0.125 mmol/l produced the optimum performance. The results indicated that PCA, particularly at a dose of 0.125 mmol/l, accelerated the proliferation of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro and maintained their phenotype. This study may provide a basis for further research concerning the treatment of cartilage defects. PMID:26136906

  18. Effects of osmotic challenges on membrane potential in human articular chondrocytes from healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julio C; López-Zapata, Diego F

    2010-01-01

    Changes in external osmolarity arise from variations in mechanical loads on joints and may affect the homeostasis of chondrocytes, which are the only cell type responsible for matrix turnover. Accordingly, variations in membrane potential may affect cartilage production. The present study assessed the effects of variations in external osmolarity on membrane potential and the possible mechanisms responsible for this response. Membrane potential was measured by the patch clamp whole-cell technique using human articular chondrocytes freshly isolated from healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage. The membrane potential was -39±4 mV in articular human chondrocytes from healthy cartilage and -26±4 mV in those from osteoarthritic cartilage. Increasing the osmolarity produced a reversible hyperpolarization mediated by K+ efflux through BKCa channels in both groups of chondrocytes, but the response in osteoarthritic cells was significantly reduced; no other K+ pathways were involved in this effect. Alternatively, decreasing the osmolarity elicited depolarization in healthy chondrocytes but did not produce any response in chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage. The depolarization was dependent on Na+ influx through Gd3+-sensitive stretch-activated cation channels and was independent of external Ca2+. The differential responses observed in chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage suggest that disregulation on the responses to external osmolarity may be involved in the process that leads to the alterations in the cartilage structure observed in osteoarthritis.

  19. Hypoxia Potentiates Anabolic Effects of Exogenous Hyaluronic Acid in Rat Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Ichimaru, Shohei; Nakagawa, Shuji; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Shin-Ya, Masaharu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Tsuchida, Shinji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Shimomura, Seiji; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is used clinically to treat osteoarthritis (OA), but its pharmacological effects under hypoxic conditions remain unclear. Articular chondrocytes in patients with OA are exposed to a hypoxic environment. This study investigated whether hypoxia could potentiate the anabolic effects of exogenous HA in rat articular cartilage and whether these mechanisms involved HA receptors. HA under hypoxic conditions significantly enhanced the expression of extracellular matrix genes and proteins in explant culture, as shown by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, and dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assays. Staining with Safranin-O and immunohistochemical staining with antibody to type II collagen were also enhanced in pellet culture. The expression of CD44 was increased by hypoxia and significantly suppressed by transfection with siRNAs targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (siHIF-1α). These findings indicate that hypoxia potentiates the anabolic effects of exogenous HA by a mechanism in which HIF-1α positively regulates the expression of CD44, enhancing the binding affinity for exogenous HA. The anabolic effects of exogenous HA may increase as OA progresses. PMID:27347945

  20. Synergy between Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels confers high-strain mechanosensitivity to articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Whasil; Leddy, Holly A.; Chen, Yong; Lee, Suk Hee; Zelenski, Nicole A.; McNulty, Amy L.; Wu, Jason; Beicker, Kellie N.; Coles, Jeffrey; Zauscher, Stefan; Grandl, Jörg; Sachs, Frederick; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2014-01-01

    Diarthrodial joints are essential for load bearing and locomotion. Physiologically, articular cartilage sustains millions of cycles of mechanical loading. Chondrocytes, the cells in cartilage, regulate their metabolic activities in response to mechanical loading. Pathological mechanical stress can lead to maladaptive cellular responses and subsequent cartilage degeneration. We sought to deconstruct chondrocyte mechanotransduction by identifying mechanosensitive ion channels functioning at injurious levels of strain. We detected robust expression of the recently identified mechanosensitive channels, PIEZO1 and PIEZO2. Combined directed expression of Piezo1 and -2 sustained potentiated mechanically induced Ca2+ signals and electrical currents compared with single-Piezo expression. In primary articular chondrocytes, mechanically evoked Ca2+ transients produced by atomic force microscopy were inhibited by GsMTx4, a PIEZO-blocking peptide, and by Piezo1- or Piezo2-specific siRNA. We complemented the cellular approach with an explant-cartilage injury model. GsMTx4 reduced chondrocyte death after mechanical injury, suggesting a possible therapy for reducing cartilage injury and posttraumatic osteoarthritis by attenuating Piezo-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction of injurious strains. PMID:25385580

  1. Articular Cartilage Deformation Determined in an Intact Tibiofemoral Joint by Displacement-Encoded Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Deva D.; Neu, Corey P.; Hull, Maury L.

    2009-01-01

    This study demonstrates the in vitro displacement and strain of articular cartilage in a cyclically-compressed and intact joint using displacement-encoded imaging with stimulated echoes (DENSE) and fast spin echo (FSE). Deformation and strain fields exhibited complex and heterogeneous patterns. The displacements in the loading direction ranged from −1688 to −1481 μm in the tibial cartilage and from −1601 to −764 μm in the femoral cartilage. Corresponding strains ranged from −9.8% to 0.7% and from −4.3% to 0.0%. The displacement and strain precision were determined to be 65 μm and less than 0.2%, respectively. Displacement-encoded magnetic resonance imaging is capable of determining the nonuniform displacements and strains in the articular cartilage of an intact joint to a high precision. Knowledge of these nonuniform strains is critical for the in situ characterization of normal and diseased tissue, as well as the comprehensive evaluation of repair constructs designed using regenerative medicine. PMID:19189290

  2. Misdiagnosed iuxta-articular osteoid osteoma of the calcaneus following an injury.

    PubMed

    Pogliacomi, Francesco; Vaienti, Enrico

    2003-12-01

    The diagnosis of osteoid osteoma, in usual localizations, is generally simple. In iuxta-articular localizations this tumor may be unrecognized and the diagnosis delayed. Injury has been sometimes correlated with the onset of symptoms and this can make the diagnosis even more difficult. We present a case of osteoid osteoma of the calcaneus iuxta-articular to the subtalar joint in a 17-year-old basketball player. He had a history of initial injury, ankle sprain during training, followed by pain and swelling. He was initially treated for lateral ligament lesion of the ankle with unsatisfactory results. After acute trauma the pain changed becoming chronic and mostly nocturnal disappearing when rofecoxib was taken. Standard x-ray didn't show the lesion. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and scintigraphic results were not well interpreted but these clinical changes and Computed Tomography (CT) images supported the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. The complete resection of the bone lesion resolved all the symptoms and the histological report confirmed the suspected diagnosis.

  3. What Lies Beneath: Sub-Articular Long Bone Shape Scaling in Eutherian Mammals and Saurischian Dinosaurs Suggests Different Locomotor Adaptations for Gigantism

    PubMed Central

    Bonnan, Matthew F.; Wilhite, D. Ray; Masters, Simon L.; Yates, Adam M.; Gardner, Christine K.; Aguiar, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs both evolved lineages of huge terrestrial herbivores. Although significantly more saurischian dinosaurs were giants than eutherians, the long bones of both taxa scale similarly and suggest that locomotion was dynamically similar. However, articular cartilage is thin in eutherian mammals but thick in saurischian dinosaurs, differences that could have contributed to, or limited, how frequently gigantism evolved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that sub-articular bone, which supports the articular cartilage, changes shape in different ways between terrestrial mammals and dinosaurs with increasing size. Our sample consisted of giant mammal and reptile taxa (i.e., elephants, rhinos, sauropods) plus erect and non-erect outgroups with thin and thick articular cartilage. Our results show that eutherian mammal sub-articular shape becomes narrow with well-defined surface features as size increases. In contrast, this region in saurischian dinosaurs expands and remains gently convex with increasing size. Similar trends were observed in non-erect outgroup taxa (monotremes, alligators), showing that the trends we report are posture-independent. These differences support our hypothesis that sub-articular shape scales differently between eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs. Our results show that articular cartilage thickness and sub-articular shape are correlated. In mammals, joints become ever more congruent and thinner with increasing size, whereas archosaur joints remained both congruent and thick, especially in sauropods. We suggest that gigantism occurs less frequently in mammals, in part, because joints composed of thin articular cartilage can only become so congruent before stress cannot be effectively alleviated. In contrast, frequent gigantism in saurischian dinosaurs may be explained, in part, by joints with thick articular cartilage that can deform across large areas with increasing load. PMID:24130690

  4. What lies beneath: sub-articular long bone shape scaling in eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs suggests different locomotor adaptations for gigantism.

    PubMed

    Bonnan, Matthew F; Wilhite, D Ray; Masters, Simon L; Yates, Adam M; Gardner, Christine K; Aguiar, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs both evolved lineages of huge terrestrial herbivores. Although significantly more saurischian dinosaurs were giants than eutherians, the long bones of both taxa scale similarly and suggest that locomotion was dynamically similar. However, articular cartilage is thin in eutherian mammals but thick in saurischian dinosaurs, differences that could have contributed to, or limited, how frequently gigantism evolved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that sub-articular bone, which supports the articular cartilage, changes shape in different ways between terrestrial mammals and dinosaurs with increasing size. Our sample consisted of giant mammal and reptile taxa (i.e., elephants, rhinos, sauropods) plus erect and non-erect outgroups with thin and thick articular cartilage. Our results show that eutherian mammal sub-articular shape becomes narrow with well-defined surface features as size increases. In contrast, this region in saurischian dinosaurs expands and remains gently convex with increasing size. Similar trends were observed in non-erect outgroup taxa (monotremes, alligators), showing that the trends we report are posture-independent. These differences support our hypothesis that sub-articular shape scales differently between eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs. Our results show that articular cartilage thickness and sub-articular shape are correlated. In mammals, joints become ever more congruent and thinner with increasing size, whereas archosaur joints remained both congruent and thick, especially in sauropods. We suggest that gigantism occurs less frequently in mammals, in part, because joints composed of thin articular cartilage can only become so congruent before stress cannot be effectively alleviated. In contrast, frequent gigantism in saurischian dinosaurs may be explained, in part, by joints with thick articular cartilage that can deform across large areas with increasing load.

  5. What lies beneath: sub-articular long bone shape scaling in eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs suggests different locomotor adaptations for gigantism.

    PubMed

    Bonnan, Matthew F; Wilhite, D Ray; Masters, Simon L; Yates, Adam M; Gardner, Christine K; Aguiar, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs both evolved lineages of huge terrestrial herbivores. Although significantly more saurischian dinosaurs were giants than eutherians, the long bones of both taxa scale similarly and suggest that locomotion was dynamically similar. However, articular cartilage is thin in eutherian mammals but thick in saurischian dinosaurs, differences that could have contributed to, or limited, how frequently gigantism evolved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that sub-articular bone, which supports the articular cartilage, changes shape in different ways between terrestrial mammals and dinosaurs with increasing size. Our sample consisted of giant mammal and reptile taxa (i.e., elephants, rhinos, sauropods) plus erect and non-erect outgroups with thin and thick articular cartilage. Our results show that eutherian mammal sub-articular shape becomes narrow with well-defined surface features as size increases. In contrast, this region in saurischian dinosaurs expands and remains gently convex with increasing size. Similar trends were observed in non-erect outgroup taxa (monotremes, alligators), showing that the trends we report are posture-independent. These differences support our hypothesis that sub-articular shape scales differently between eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs. Our results show that articular cartilage thickness and sub-articular shape are correlated. In mammals, joints become ever more congruent and thinner with increasing size, whereas archosaur joints remained both congruent and thick, especially in sauropods. We suggest that gigantism occurs less frequently in mammals, in part, because joints composed of thin articular cartilage can only become so congruent before stress cannot be effectively alleviated. In contrast, frequent gigantism in saurischian dinosaurs may be explained, in part, by joints with thick articular cartilage that can deform across large areas with increasing load. PMID:24130690

  6. Prenatal caffeine exposure induces a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring rats via cholesterol accumulation in cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hanwen; Li, Jing; Cao, Hong; Tan, Yang; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations indicate that osteoarthritis is associated with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Our previous studies showed that prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) induced chondrogenesis retardation in IUGR offspring rats. The current study sought to investigate the effects of PCE on male IUGR offspring rats’ articular cartilage, and the mechanisms associated with abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Based on the results from both male fetal and adult fed a high-fat diet (HFD) studies of rats that experienced PCE (120 mg/kg.d), the results showed a poor quality of articular cartilage and cholesterol accumulation in the adult PCE group. Meanwhile, the serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were increased in adult PCE offspring. We also observed lower expression of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF1) and impaired cholesterol efflux in adult articular cartilage. Furthermore, the expression of cartilage functional genes, components of the IGF1 signaling pathway and cholesterol efflux pathway related genes were decreased in PCE fetal cartilage. In conclusion, PCE induced a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring fed a HFD. This finding was shown to be due to cholesterol accumulation in the cartilage, which may have resulted from intrauterine reduced activity of the IGF1 signaling pathway. PMID:26639318

  7. Legionella pneumophila Arthritis: use of medium specific for Mycobacteria for isolation of L. pneumophila in culture of articular fluid specimens.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Pascale; Leautez, Sophie; Ninin, Emmanuelle; Jarraud, Sophie; Raffi, François; Drugeon, Henri

    2002-07-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of acute purulent arthritis due to Legionella pneumophila in an immunosuppressed patient. L. pneumophila was isolated from samples of blood and articular fluid cultured with use of medium specific for mycobacteria (Bactec 13A medium).

  8. Prenatal caffeine exposure induces a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring rats via cholesterol accumulation in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hanwen; Li, Jing; Cao, Hong; Tan, Yang; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-07

    Epidemiological investigations indicate that osteoarthritis is associated with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Our previous studies showed that prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) induced chondrogenesis retardation in IUGR offspring rats. The current study sought to investigate the effects of PCE on male IUGR offspring rats' articular cartilage, and the mechanisms associated with abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Based on the results from both male fetal and adult fed a high-fat diet (HFD) studies of rats that experienced PCE (120 mg/kg.d), the results showed a poor quality of articular cartilage and cholesterol accumulation in the adult PCE group. Meanwhile, the serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were increased in adult PCE offspring. We also observed lower expression of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF1) and impaired cholesterol efflux in adult articular cartilage. Furthermore, the expression of cartilage functional genes, components of the IGF1 signaling pathway and cholesterol efflux pathway related genes were decreased in PCE fetal cartilage. In conclusion, PCE induced a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring fed a HFD. This finding was shown to be due to cholesterol accumulation in the cartilage, which may have resulted from intrauterine reduced activity of the IGF1 signaling pathway.

  9. Total knee arthroplasty in a patient with subcutaneous and intra-articular tophaceous gout--a case report.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Xavier; Gonzalez, Jose Carlos; Celaya, Fernando; Jordan, Marcos; Diaz-Torne, Cesar; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2014-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is a common operation for all types of arthritis, including chronic gouty arthritis. Tophi deposits are a well-known cause of joint destruction, but simultaneous subcutaneous and articular tophaceous gout is exceptional. We report a patient who required bilateral total knee replacement for this rare condition.

  10. The effect of oxygen tension on human articular chondrocyte matrix synthesis: integration of experimental and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Oreffo, R O C; Sengers, B G; Tare, R S

    2014-09-01

    Significant oxygen gradients occur within tissue engineered cartilaginous constructs. Although oxygen tension is an important limiting parameter in the development of new cartilage matrix, its precise role in matrix formation by chondrocytes remains controversial, primarily due to discrepancies in the experimental setup applied in different studies. In this study, the specific effects of oxygen tension on the synthesis of cartilaginous matrix by human articular chondrocytes were studied using a combined experimental-computational approach in a "scaffold-free" 3D pellet culture model. Key parameters including cellular oxygen uptake rate were determined experimentally and used in conjunction with a mathematical model to estimate oxygen tension profiles in 21-day cartilaginous pellets. A threshold oxygen tension (pO2 ≈ 8% atmospheric pressure) for human articular chondrocytes was estimated from these inferred oxygen profiles and histological analysis of pellet sections. Human articular chondrocytes that experienced oxygen tension below this threshold demonstrated enhanced proteoglycan deposition. Conversely, oxygen tension higher than the threshold favored collagen synthesis. This study has demonstrated a close relationship between oxygen tension and matrix synthesis by human articular chondrocytes in a "scaffold-free" 3D pellet culture model, providing valuable insight into the understanding and optimization of cartilage bioengineering approaches.

  11. Brief Communication: Shape analysis of the MT 1 proximal articular surface in fossil hominins and shod and unshod Homo.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Daniel J

    2010-12-01

    As a follow-up study to Proctor et al. (Am J Phys Anthropol 135 (2008) 216-224), this study quantifies the first metatarsal proximal articular surface using three-dimensional morphometrics to test for differences in articular surface shape between habitually shod and habitually unshod humans. In addition, differences in shape between Homo, Pan, Gorilla, and Hylobates are compared to the fossil hominin specimens A. L. 333-54, Stw 562, Stw 573 ("Little Foot"), OH 8, SKX 5017, and SK 1813. No difference in surface shape was found between habitually shod and habitually unshod humans. There is a clear quantitative division in articular surface shape between humans and apes that is more pronounced than a previous study by Proctor et al. (Am J Phys Anthropol 135 (2008) 216-224), due to additional landmarks present in this study. The specimen OH 8 is indistinguishable from modern Homo. The fossils A. L. 333-54, Stw 562, and Stw 573 are intermediate in shape between humans and apes. The specimens SKX 5017 and SK 1813 have a more apelike articular surface. When combined with other characteristics, this trait suggests that Paranthropus used a degree of abduction during locomotion that was much less than that in extant apes, but greater than that in Australopithecus, allowing for some small degree of grasping ability. PMID:20925078

  12. Legionella pneumophila Arthritis: use of medium specific for Mycobacteria for isolation of L. pneumophila in culture of articular fluid specimens.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Pascale; Leautez, Sophie; Ninin, Emmanuelle; Jarraud, Sophie; Raffi, François; Drugeon, Henri

    2002-07-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of acute purulent arthritis due to Legionella pneumophila in an immunosuppressed patient. L. pneumophila was isolated from samples of blood and articular fluid cultured with use of medium specific for mycobacteria (Bactec 13A medium). PMID:12060893

  13. Effects of growth and exercise on composition, structural maturation and appearance of osteoarthritis in articular cartilage of hamsters.

    PubMed

    Julkunen, Petro; Halmesmäki, Esa P; Iivarinen, Jarkko; Rieppo, Lassi; Närhi, Tommi; Marjanen, Juho; Rieppo, Jarno; Arokoski, Jari; Brama, Pieter A; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Helminen, Heikki J

    2010-09-01

    Articular cartilage composition and structure are maintained and remodeled by chondrocytes under the influence of loading. Exercise-induced changes in the composition, structure, mechanical properties and tissue integrity of growing and aging hamster articular cartilage were investigated. Articular cartilage samples (n = 191) were harvested from the proximal tibiae of hamsters aged 1, 3, 6, 12 and 15 months. The hamsters were divided into runners and controls. The runners had free access to a running wheel between 1 and 3 months (runner groups 3-, 12- and 15-month-old hamsters) or 1 and 6 months (runner group 6-month-old hamsters) of age. Control animals were subjected to a sedentary lifestyle. Mechanical indentation tests and depth-wise compositional and structural analyses were performed for the cartilage samples. Furthermore, the integrity of articular cartilage was assessed using histological osteoarthritis grading. Exercise affected the collagen network organization after a 5-month exercise period, especially in the middle and deep zones. However, no effect on the mechanical properties was detected after exercise. Before the age of 12 months, the runners showed less osteoarthritis than the controls, whereas at 15 months of age the situation was reversed. It is concluded that, in hamsters, physical exercise at a young age enhances cartilage maturation and alters the depth-wise cartilage structure and composition. This may be considered beneficial. However, exercise at a young age demonstrated adverse effects on cartilage at a later age with a significant increase in the incidence of osteoarthritis.

  14. A theoretical solution for the frictionless rolling contact of cylindrical biphasic articular cartilage layers.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, G A; Wang, H

    1995-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that interstitial fluid pressurization plays an important role in the load support mechanism of articular cartilage under normal step loading. These studies have demonstrated that interstitial fluid pressurization decreases with time if the applied load is maintained constant. In the present study, a theoretical solution is obtained for another common loading of articular cartilage, namely the contact of surfaces in rolling motion. Pure rolling of symmetrical frictionless cylindrical cartilage layers is analyzed under steady state. The linear biphasic model of Mow et al. [J. Biomech. Engng 102, 73-84 (1980)] is used to describe the mechanical response of articular cartilage. The solution of this contact problem reduces to simultaneously solving a set of four integral equations, akin to the dual integral problem of elastic contact. It is found that the solution is dependent on four non-dimensional parameters: Rh = Vb/HAk, W/2 mu b, R/b, and v, where V is the surface velocity, b the cartilage thickness, HA the aggregate modulus, mu the shear modulus, v Poisson's ratio, k the permeability, R the radius of cylindrical surfaces, and W the applied load per unit cylinder length. For Rh < 1, interstitial fluid pressurization is found to be negligible, and all the applied load is supported by the solid collagen-proteoglycan phase of the tissue, thus causing significant cartilage deformation. As Rh increases to a physiological level (Rh approximately 10(4)), interstitial fluid pressurization may support more than 90% of the total applied load, shielding the solid matrix from high effective stresses and reducing matrix strains and deformation. The protective effect of interstitial fluid pressurization is observed to increase with increasing joint congruence (R/b); similarly, as the applied load (W/2 mu b) is increased, a greater proportion of it is supported by the fluid. In degenerative cartilage, Rh may drop by one or more orders of magnitude

  15. Vulnerability of the Superficial Zone of Immature Articular Cartilage to Compressive Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rolauffs, R.; Muehleman, C; Li, J; Kurz, B; Kuettner, K; Frank, E; Grodzinsky, A

    2010-01-01

    The zonal composition and functioning of adult articular cartilage causes depth-dependent responses to compressive injury. In immature cartilage, shear and compressive moduli as well as collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content also vary with depth. However, there is little understanding of the depth-dependent damage caused by injury. Since injury to immature knee joints most often causes articular cartilage lesions, this study was undertaken to characterize the zonal dependence of biomechanical, biochemical, and matrix-associated changes caused by compressive injury. Disks from the superficial and deeper zones of bovine calves were biomechanically characterized. Injury to the disks was achieved by applying a final strain of 50% compression at 100%/second, followed by biomechanical recharacterization. Tissue compaction upon injury as well as sGAG density, sGAG loss, and biosynthesis were measured. Collagen fiber orientation and matrix damage were assessed using histology, diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging, and texture analysis. Injured superficial zone disks showed surface disruption, tissue compaction by 20.3 {+-} 4.3% (mean {+-} SEM), and immediate biomechanical impairment that was revealed by a mean {+-} SEM decrease in dynamic stiffness to 7.1 {+-} 3.3% of the value before injury and equilibrium moduli that were below the level of detection. Tissue areas that appeared intact on histology showed clear textural alterations. Injured deeper zone disks showed collagen crimping but remained undamaged and biomechanically intact. Superficial zone disks did not lose sGAG immediately after injury, but lost 17.8 {+-} 1.4% of sGAG after 48 hours; deeper zone disks lost only 2.8 {+-} 0.3% of sGAG content. Biomechanical impairment was associated primarily with structural damage. The soft superficial zone of immature cartilage is vulnerable to compressive injury, causing superficial matrix disruption, extensive compaction, and textural alteration, which results

  16. Utility of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI (dGEMRIC) for qualitative evaluation of articular cartilage of patellofemoral joint.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Takehiro; Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Namura, Takehiko; Narita, Wataru; Ikoma, Kazuya; Suginoshita, Takehiko; Takamiya, Hisatake; Komiyama, Hiroto; Ito, Hirotoshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2006-08-01

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) was used for the measurement of relative proteoglycan depletion of articular cartilage in the patellofemoral (PF) joint following a proprietary protocol, which was compared with the X-ray images, proton density weighted MR images (PDWI) and arthroscopic findings. The study examined 30 knees. The ages ranged from 16 to 74 (average 40.3) years. The Gd-DTPA(2-)containing contrast medium was used in a single dose. The subjects were made to exercise the knee joint for 10 min; and MR images were taken 2 h after intravenous injection of contrast medium. T1-calculated images were produced and the region of interest (ROI) was set as follows. (1) ROI1: entire articular cartilage in a slice through the center of the patella. (2) ROI2: low signal region in T1-calculated images, which were set in a blind fashion by two observers. (3) ROI3: articular cartilage on one side that includes ROI2 where low signal region were detected (medial or lateral). ROI3 was set to examine the contrast of ROI2 with surrounding articular cartilage. The average T1 values of ROI1 was 393.5+/-33.6 ms for radiographic grade 0 and 361.3+/-11.1 ms for grade I, which showed a significant difference (P=0.036). The T1 value of ROI2 was 351.6+/-28.2 ms for grade I, 361.9+/-38.3 ms for grade II, 362.1+/-67.7 ms for grade III, and 297.8+/-54.1 ms for grade IV according to arthroscopic Outerbridge classification. All cases, that demonstrated decrease of T1 values on dGEMRIC (ROI2), showed abnormal arthroscopic or direct viewing findings. The ratio (ROI3/ROI2) in cases of only slight damage classified as Outerbridge grade I (6 cases) was an average of 1.04+/-0.02 and was 1.0 or greater in all cases, thereby indicating well-defined contrast with the surrounding cartilage. The diagnosis of damage in articular cartilage was possible in all 16 cases with radiographic K-L grade I on dGEMRIC, while the intensity changes were not found in 10 of 16 cases on PDWI

  17. Comprehensive Genome-Wide Transcriptomic Analysis of Immature Articular Cartilage following Ischemic Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Adapala, Naga Suresh; Kim, Harry K. W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ischemic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) in piglets results in an ischemic injury to the immature articular cartilage. The molecular changes in the articular cartilage in response to ONFH have not been investigated using a transcriptomic approach. The purpose of this study was to perform a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis to identify genes that are upregulated in the immature articular cartilage following ONFH. Methods ONFH was induced in the right femoral head of 6-week old piglets. The unoperated femoral head was used as the normal control. At 24 hours (acute ischemic-hypoxic injury), 2 weeks (avascular necrosis in the femoral head) and 4 weeks (early repair) after surgery (n = 4 piglets/time point), RNA was isolated from the articular cartilage of the femoral head. A microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix Porcine GeneChip Array. An enrichment analysis and functional clustering of the genes upregulated due to ONFH were performed using DAVID and STRING software, respectively. The increased expression of selected genes was confirmed by a real-time qRTPCR analysis. Results Induction of ONFH resulted in the upregulation of 383 genes at 24 hours, 122 genes at 2 weeks and 124 genes at 4 weeks compared to the normal controls. At 24 hours, the genes involved in oxidoreductive, cell-survival, and angiogenic responses were significantly enriched among the upregulated genes. These genes were involved in HIF-1, PI3K-Akt, and MAPK signaling pathways. At 2 weeks, secretory and signaling proteins involved in angiogenic and inflammatory responses, PI3K-Akt and matrix-remodeling pathways were significantly enriched. At 4 weeks, genes that represent inflammatory cytokines and chemokine signaling pathways were significantly enriched. Several index genes (genes that are upregulated at more than one time point following ONFH and are known to be important in various biological processes) including HIF-1A, VEGFA, IL-6, IL6R, IL-8, CCL2, FGF2, TGFB2

  18. Treatment with recombinant lubricin attenuates osteoarthritis by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhuang; Xu, Changpeng; Li, Xue; Song, Jinqi; Yu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a most commonly multifactorial degenerative joint disease along with the aging population, particularly in postmenopausal women. During the onset of OA, articular cartilage and subchondral bone act in concert as a functional unit. This present study is to investigate the effects of early or late treatment with recombinant lubricin on the onset of osteoarthritis (OA) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. We found that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuated the onset of OA by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone, although late treatment contributed to a lesser effect compared with early treatment. Specifically, treatment with recombinant lubricin protected articular cartilage from degeneration, demonstrated by lower proteoglycan loss, lower OARSI scores, less calcification cartilage zone and reduced immunostaining for collagen X (Col X) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13) but increased the expression of lubricin, in comparison with vehicle-treated OVX rat group. Further, chondroprotective effects of lubricin normalized bone remodeling in subchondral bone underneath. It's suggested that treatment with recombinant lubricin inhibited the elevation of TRAP and Osterix positive cells in OVX rats and led to the normalization of subchondral bone microarchitectures with the suppression of subsidence of bone volume ratio (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and the increase of trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) in vehicle-treated OVX rats. What's more, the normalization of subchondral bone in turn attenuated the articular cartilage erosion by inhibiting vascular invasion from subchondral bone to calcified cartilage zone, exemplified by inhibiting the elevation of CD31 positive cells in calcified cartilage and angiography in subchondral bone. Together, these results shed light that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuate the onset of OA by balancing the interplay between articular

  19. Preventing surgical complications: A survey on surgeons' perception of intra-articular malleolar screw misplacement in a cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intra-articular hardware penetration can occur during osteosynthesis of ankle fractures, jeopardizing patients' outcomes. The intraoperative recognition of misplaced screws may be difficult due to the challenge of adequate interpretation of specific radiographic views. The present study was designed to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of standardized radiographic ankle views to determine the accuracy of diagnosis for intra-articular hardware placement of medial malleolar screws in a cadaveric model. Methods Nine preserved human cadaveric lower extremity specimens were used. Under direct visualization, two 4.0 mm cancellous screws were inserted into the medial malleolus. Each specimen was analyzed radiographically using antero-posterior (AP) and mortise views. The X-rays were randomly uploaded on a CD-ROM and included in a survey submitted to ten selected orthopaedic surgeons. The "Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy" (STARD) questionnaire was used to determine the surgeons' perception of accuracy of screw placement in the medial malleolus. The selection of items was based on evidence whenever possible, therefore the "inconclusive" category was added. Inter and intraobserver variations were analyzed by kappa statistics to measure the amount of agreement. Results There was a poor level of agreement (kappa 0.4) both in the AP and in the mortise view among all the examiners. Associating the two x-rays, the agreement remained poor (kappa 0.4). In the cases in which there was a diagnosis of articular penetration, there was a poor agreement related to which of the screws was intra-articular. The number of "inconclusive" responses was low and constant, without a statistically significant difference between the subspecialists Conclusion The routine intraoperative radiographic imaging of the ankle is difficult to interpret and unreliable for detection of intra-articular hardware penetration. We therefore recommend to reposition medial malleolar

  20. Regulation of the friction coefficient of articular cartilage by TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta.

    PubMed

    DuRaine, Grayson; Neu, Corey P; Chan, Stephanie M T; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; June, Ronald K; Reddi, A Hari

    2009-02-01

    Articular cartilage functions to provide a low-friction surface for joint movement for many decades of life. Superficial zone protein (SZP) is a glycoprotein secreted by chondrocytes in the superficial layer of articular cartilage that contributes to effective boundary lubrication. In both cell and explant cultures, TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta have been demonstrated to, respectively, upregulate and downregulate SZP protein levels. It was hypothesized that the friction coefficient of articular cartilage could also be modulated by these cytokines through SZP regulation. The friction coefficient between cartilage explants (both untreated and treated with TGF-beta1 or IL-1beta) and a smooth glass surface due to sliding in the boundary lubrication regime was measured with a pin-on-disk tribometer. SZP was quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and localized by immunohistochemistry. Both TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta treatments resulted in the decrease of the friction coefficient of articular cartilage in a location- and time-dependent manner. Changes in the friction coefficient due to the TGF-beta1 treatment corresponded to increased depth of SZP staining within the superficial zone, while friction coefficient changes due to the IL-1beta treatment were independent of SZP depth of staining. However, the changes induced by the IL-1beta treatment corresponded to changes in surface roughness, determined from the analysis of surface images obtained with an atomic force microscope. These findings demonstrate that the low friction of articular cartilage can be modified by TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta treatment and that the friction coefficient depends on multiple factors, including SZP localization and surface roughness.

  1. 24R,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Protects against Articular Cartilage Damage following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Boyan, Barbara D; Hyzy, Sharon L; Pan, Qingfen; Scott, Kayla M; Coutts, Richard D; Healey, Robert; Schwartz, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in humans is associated with low circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3]. In vitamin D replete rats, radiolabeled 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24R,25(OH)2D3] accumulates in articular cartilage following injection of [3H]-25(OH)D3. Previously, we showed that 24R,25(OH)2D3 blocks chondrocyte apoptosis via phospholipase D and p53, suggesting a role for 24R,25(OH)2D3 in maintaining cartilage health. We examined the ability of 24R,25(OH)2D3 to prevent degenerative changes in articular cartilage in an OA-like environment and the potential mechanisms involved. In vitro, rat articular chondrocytes were treated with IL-1β with and without 24R,25(OH)2D3 or 1α,25(OH)2D3. 24R,25(OH)2D3 but not 1α,25(OH)2D3 blocked the effects of IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner, and its effect was partially mediated through the TGF-β1 signaling pathway. In vivo, unilateral anterior cruciate ligament transections were performed in immunocompetent rats followed by intra-articular injections of 24R,25(OH)2D3 or vehicle (t = 0, 7, 14, 21 days). Tissues were harvested on day 28. Joints treated with vehicle had changes typical of OA whereas joints treated with 24R,25(OH)2D3 had less articular cartilage damage and levels of inflammatory mediators. These results indicate that 24R,25(OH)2D3 protects against OA, and suggest that it may be a therapeutic approach for preventing trauma-induced osteoarthritis. PMID:27575371

  2. The effects of physical activity on apoptosis and lubricin expression in articular cartilage in rats with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Loreto, Carla; Leonardi, Rosalia; Castorina, Sergio; Giunta, Salvatore; Carnazza, Maria Luisa; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Pichler, Karin; Weinberg, Annelie Martina

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids are considered the most powerful anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating drugs. However, a number of side-effects are well documented in different diseases, including articular cartilage, where increases or decreases in the synthesis of hormone-dependent extracellular matrix components are seen. The objective of this study has been to test the effects of procedures or drugs affecting bone metabolism on articular cartilage in rats with prednisolone-induced osteoporosis and to evaluate the outcomes of physical activity with treadmill and vibration platform training on articular cartilage. The animals were divided into 5 groups, and bone and cartilage evaluations were performed using whole-body scans and histomorphometric analysis. Lubricin and caspase-3 expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis and biochemical analysis. These results confirm the beneficial effect of physical activity on the articular cartilage. The effects of drug therapy with glucocorticoids decrease the expression of lubricin and increase the expression of caspase-3 in the rats, while after physical activity the values return to normal compared to the control group. Our findings suggest that it might be possible that mechanical stimulation in the articular cartilage could induce the expression of lubricin, which is capable of inhibiting caspase-3 activity, preventing chondrocyte death. We can assume that the physiologic balance between lubricin and caspase-3 could maintain the integrity of cartilage. Therefore, in certain diseases such as osteoporosis, mechanical stimulation could be a possible therapeutic treatment. With our results we can propose the hypothesis that physical activity could also be used as a therapeutic treatment for cartilage disease such as osteoarthritis.

  3. Chondrocyte-intrinsic Smad3 represses Runx2-inducible MMP-13 expression to maintain articular cartilage and prevent osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Carol G.; Thuillier, Daniel; Chin, Emily N.; Alliston, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify mechanisms by which Smad3 maintains articular cartilage and prevents osteoarthritis. Methods A combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches was used to test the hypothesis that Smad3 represses Runx2-inducible gene expression to prevent articular cartilage degeneration. Col2-Cre;Smad3fl/fl mice allowed study of the chondrocyte-intrinsic role of Smad3, independently of its role in the perichondrium or other tissues. Primary Smad3fl/fl articular chondrocytes and ATDC5 chondroprogenitors were employed to evaluate Smad3 and Runx2 regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) mRNA and protein expression. Results Chondrocyte-specific reduction of Smad3 causes progressive articular cartilage degeneration due to imbalanced cartilage matrix synthesis and degradation. In addition to reduced collagen II mRNA expression, Col2-Cre;Smad3fl/fl articular cartilage is severely deficient in collagen II and aggrecan protein, due to excessive MMP-13-mediated proteolysis of these key cartilage matrix constituents. Normally, TGF-β signals through Smad3 to confer a rapid and dynamic repression of Runx2-inducible MMP-13 expression. However, in the absence of Smad3, TGF-β signals through p38 and Runx2 to induce MMP-13 expression. Conclusion This work elucidates a mechanism by which Smad3 mutations in humans and mice cause cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis. Specifically, Smad3 maintains the balance between cartilage matrix synthesis and degradation by inducing collagen II expression and repressing Runx2-inducible MMP-13 expression. Selective activation of TGF-β signaling through Smad3, rather than p38, may help to restore the balance between matrix synthesis and proteolysis that is lost in osteoarthritis. PMID:22674505

  4. Treatment with recombinant lubricin attenuates osteoarthritis by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhuang; Xu, Changpeng; Li, Xue; Song, Jinqi; Yu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a most commonly multifactorial degenerative joint disease along with the aging population, particularly in postmenopausal women. During the onset of OA, articular cartilage and subchondral bone act in concert as a functional unit. This present study is to investigate the effects of early or late treatment with recombinant lubricin on the onset of osteoarthritis (OA) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. We found that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuated the onset of OA by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone, although late treatment contributed to a lesser effect compared with early treatment. Specifically, treatment with recombinant lubricin protected articular cartilage from degeneration, demonstrated by lower proteoglycan loss, lower OARSI scores, less calcification cartilage zone and reduced immunostaining for collagen X (Col X) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13) but increased the expression of lubricin, in comparison with vehicle-treated OVX rat group. Further, chondroprotective effects of lubricin normalized bone remodeling in subchondral bone underneath. It's suggested that treatment with recombinant lubricin inhibited the elevation of TRAP and Osterix positive cells in OVX rats and led to the normalization of subchondral bone microarchitectures with the suppression of subsidence of bone volume ratio (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and the increase of trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) in vehicle-treated OVX rats. What's more, the normalization of subchondral bone in turn attenuated the articular cartilage erosion by inhibiting vascular invasion from subchondral bone to calcified cartilage zone, exemplified by inhibiting the elevation of CD31 positive cells in calcified cartilage and angiography in subchondral bone. Together, these results shed light that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuate the onset of OA by balancing the interplay between articular

  5. 24R,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Protects against Articular Cartilage Damage following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Boyan, Barbara D.; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Pan, Qingfen; Scott, Kayla M.; Coutts, Richard D.; Healey, Robert; Schwartz, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in humans is associated with low circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3]. In vitamin D replete rats, radiolabeled 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24R,25(OH)2D3] accumulates in articular cartilage following injection of [3H]-25(OH)D3. Previously, we showed that 24R,25(OH)2D3 blocks chondrocyte apoptosis via phospholipase D and p53, suggesting a role for 24R,25(OH)2D3 in maintaining cartilage health. We examined the ability of 24R,25(OH)2D3 to prevent degenerative changes in articular cartilage in an OA-like environment and the potential mechanisms involved. In vitro, rat articular chondrocytes were treated with IL-1β with and without 24R,25(OH)2D3 or 1α,25(OH)2D3. 24R,25(OH)2D3 but not 1α,25(OH)2D3 blocked the effects of IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner, and its effect was partially mediated through the TGF-β1 signaling pathway. In vivo, unilateral anterior cruciate ligament transections were performed in immunocompetent rats followed by intra-articular injections of 24R,25(OH)2D3 or vehicle (t = 0, 7, 14, 21 days). Tissues were harvested on day 28. Joints treated with vehicle had changes typical of OA whereas joints treated with 24R,25(OH)2D3 had less articular cartilage damage and levels of inflammatory mediators. These results indicate that 24R,25(OH)2D3 protects against OA, and suggest that it may be a therapeutic approach for preventing trauma-induced osteoarthritis. PMID:27575371

  6. The organization of collagen in cryofractured rabbit articular cartilage: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Clark, J M

    1985-01-01

    Adult rabbit articular cartilage was prepared for scanning electron microscopy using, in order, glutaraldehyde fixation, enzymatic removal of proteoglycan, dehydration in ethanol, cryofracture in liquid nitrogen, and critical-point drying. Enzymes were effective in fixed material. Fixation, cryofracture, alignment of fracture surfaces with "split lines," and retention of subchondral bone were found to be necessary steps for the preservation of collagen detail. The fibrous framework was found to be similar to that proposed by Benninghoff and favored by more recent phase-contrast microscopic studies. Vertical fibers extending from subchondral bone and a network of tangentially oriented superficial fibrils converge in the transitional zone. No random layer is seen. Pericellular capsules interdigitate with the vertical fibers. When cartilage is prepared in a manner that minimizes tissue damage, scanning electron microscopy provides useful, unique information. PMID:3981292

  7. Hierarchical Structure of Articular Bone-Cartilage Interface and Its Potential Application for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Weiguo; Qin, Lian; Li, Dichen; Wang, Jin; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-09-01

    The artificial biodegradable osteochondral construct is one of mostly promising lifetime substitute in the joint replacement. And the complex hierarchical structure of natural joint is important in developing the osteochondral construct. However, the architecture features of the interface between cartilage and bone, in particular those at the micro-and nano-structural level, remain poorly understood. This paper investigates these structural data of the cartilage-bone interface by micro computerized tomography (μCT) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The result of μCT shows that important bone parameters and the density of articular cartilage are all related to the position in the hierarchical structure. The conjunctions of bone and cartilage were defined by SEM. All of the study results would be useful for the design of osteochondral construct further manufactured by nano-tech. A three-dimensional model with gradient porous structure is constructed in the environment of Pro/ENGINEERING software.

  8. Effects of Balsamodendron mukul Gum Resin Extract on Articular Cartilage in Papain-induced Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Manjhi, Jayanand; Gupta, Maneesh; Sinha, Anvesha; Rawat, Beena; Rai, Durg V

    2016-07-01

    Context • Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of the musculoskeleton, causing functional disability among older adults. Management of OA includes conventional pharmacological treatments consisting primarily of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), acetaminophen, physiotherapy, and surgical procedures. The medications are not ideal therapeutic agents; NSAIDs in particular can cause serious side effects. Objective • The study was conducted to investigate the effects of Balsamodendron mukul (BDM) gum resin extract on cartilage damage and microstructural changes in the subchondral bone of rats with papain-induced, osteoarthritic knee joints. Design • The authors designed a parallel randomized, controlled study to examine the effects of 3 concentrations of BDM on OA in a murine model. Setting • The present study was undertaken at the research laboratory, Faculty of Biological Engineering, Shobhit University (Modipuram, Meerut, India). Intervention • OA was induced by intra-articular injections of 0.2 mL of 4% papain solution and 0.1 mL of 0.03 M cysteine through the patellar ligament using a 26-gauge, 1.27-cm needle. The rats in the sham group received same volume of isotonic sodium chloride solution. The rats were divided into 6 groups : (1) control group-fresh rats, with ages and genders similar to those of the other groups but with no induction of OA and no treatments; (2) sham group-rats receiving a sham induction of OA using an intra-articular injection of saline of the same volume as the papain given to all OA rats but no treatments; (3) OA group-rats induced with OA but receiving no treatments; (4) OA + BDM (10%) group-rats induced with OA that received a 10% dose of BDM; (5) OA + BDM (20%) group-rats induced with OA that received a 20% dose of BDM; and (6) OA + BDM (40%) group-rats induced with OA that received a 40% dose of BDM. Rats in the treatment groups were fed their respective doses of BDM extract for 30 d

  9. Use of intra-articular carbon dioxide and air for MR arthrography: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Maes, Robbert M; Morrison, William B; Lewin, Jonathan S; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Kiewiet, Cunera J M; Wacker, Frank K

    2006-01-01

    During animal experiments, carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and air were used as a novel contrast agent for direct magnetic resonance arthrography (MRAr). MRAr was performed after injection of CO(2) and air in the knee joints of two pigs. MR images of phantoms containing air, CO(2) and nitrogen were compared. After intra-articular injection, both present as a signal void on various sequences and permit sharp delineation of cartilage and other adjacent structures. Despite the potential for artefact generation, only a slight susceptibility artefact was seen after injection of CO(2) and air. In phantom experiments, air, CO(2) and nitrogen demonstrated identical slight regular susceptibility artefacts at the phantom margins. CO(2) MRAr can yield high contrast between cartilage, ligaments and synovium relative to the joint compartment. Therefore, this technique might be useful as an investigational method for the evaluation of cartilage surface lesions and possibly as an alternative contrast agent for clinical use.

  10. Paediatric medial epicondyle fracture without elbow dislocation associated with intra-articular ulnar nerve entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Elbashir, Mohamed; Domos, Peter; Latimer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Elbow fractures are not uncommon in children, and some are associated with neurovascular injuries. Having a nerve injury in an elbow fracture without dislocation is rare and was not described in the literature. Here, we have reported probably the first case of an ulnar nerve injury in an elbow fracture without dislocation. A 9-year-old female presented to the emergency department after falling off a monkey bar. She had a painful, swollen and tender right elbow with no history or clinical signs of an elbow dislocation but had complete ulnar nerve palsy. She was managed initially with analgesia and plaster application and was taken directly to the operating theatre. Examination under anaesthesia revealed no elbow joint instability. The ulnar nerve was found entrapped between the trochlea and proximal ulna, intra-articularly. The medial epicondyle was also found avulsed from the humerus, with an incarcerated medial epicondylar fragment in the elbow joint. PMID:26546588

  11. Biochemical and metabolic abnormalities in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, J.; Treadwell, B.V.; Mankin, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    Incorporation of radioactive precursors into macromolecules was studied with human normal and osteoarthritic articular cartilage organ culture. Analysis of the salt extracted matrix components separated by cesium chloride buoyant density gradient centrifugation showed an increase in the specific activities of all gradient fractions prepared from the osteoarthritic cartilage. Further analysis of these fractions showed the osteoarthritic cartilage contained 5 times as much sulfate incorporated into proteoglycans, and an even greater amount of 3H-glucosamine incorporated into material sedimenting to the middle of the gradient. Greater than half of this radioactive middle fraction appears to be hyaluronate, as judged by the position it elutes from a DEAE column and its susceptibility to hyaluronidase digestion. This study supports earlier findings showing increased rates of macromolecular synthesis in osteoarthritis, and in addition, an even greater synthetic rate for hyaluronic acid is demonstrated.

  12. Identification of link proteins in canine synovial cell cultures and canine articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Link proteins are glycoproteins in cartilage that are involved in the stabilization of aggregates of proteoglycans and hyaluronic acid. We have identified link proteins in synovial cell cultures form normal canine synovium using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunofluorescence, and immunolocation with specific antibodies by electrophoretic transfer. We have also found evidence for the synthesis of link proteins in these cultures by fluorography of radiolabeled synovial cell extracts. We have identified a 70,000 mol-wt protein in canine synovial cell culture extracts that has antigenic cross-reactivity with the 48,000-mol-wt link protein. Three link proteins were identified in normal canine articular cartilage. These results indicate that link proteins are more widely distributed in connective tissues than previously recognized and may have biological functions other than aggregate stabilization. PMID:3980578

  13. THE UPTAKE OF IRON IN RABBIT SYNOVIAL TISSUE FOLLOWING INTRA-ARTICULAR INJECTION OF IRON DEXTRAN

    PubMed Central

    Ball, J.; Chapman, J. A.; Muirden, K. D.

    1964-01-01

    Iron dextran (molecular weight 7,000) diffuses rapidly from the joint cavity through the synovium, along lymphatics and extracellular tissue spaces; articular cartilage is impermeable to iron dextran. There is also rapid cellular uptake by synovial lining cells, particularly of the vacuolar type; endoplasmic reticulum-containing lining cells rarely take up iron dextran. Cellular uptake is probably effected by pseudopodial folds projecting from the cell surface and enclosing extracellular material. Cells containing iron may degenerate and be ingested by phagocytes, and this may account for the concentration of iron in a smaller proportion of cells on or below the synovial surface in the later stages. At 6 to 18 hours after injection there is a mild inflammatory reaction and some synovial proliferation; from this stage onwards intracellular iron occurs in the form of haemosiderin. Granules of haemosiderin are present in the synovium 3 months after injection and possibly longer. PMID:14203385

  14. Chondroblastoma of the femoral head disrupting the articular cartilage. Description of a novel surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Givissis, Panagiotis; Agathangelidis, Filon; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Christodoulou, Anastasios

    2012-06-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare benign tumour. Involvement of the femoral head may often lead to a delayed diagnosis. We present the case of a 15-year-old patient with right hip pain which was first attributed to adductor tendinitis. Following aggravation of the symptoms, thorough investigation including a CT-guided biopsy, revealed the diagnosis of chondroblastoma of the femoral head. Removal of the lesion based on the techniques described in literature was not possible, mainly because the articular cartilage was breached. A novel surgical technique was used in order to address the rare location and behaviour of the tumour. This technique offered the patient pain relief and return to his previous every day and sports activities. No recurrence was seen at two years follow-up.

  15. Fracture of the articular disc in the temporomandibular joint: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    An, S-Y

    2015-01-01

    Disc fracture of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a little-known pathological condition owing to its extreme rarity. We report two cases of elderly patients who were diagnosed with disc fracture of the TMJ based on MRI, and we review related reports. On physical examination, an incomplete bite and mild joint pain were observed on the affected side in both patients. An MRI showed a complete fracture in the intermediate zone of the articular disc in the TMJ; the posterior fragment was displaced posteriorly, causing occlusal change in the closed position of the condyle and an incomplete bite. Conservative treatment including manual manipulation, physical therapy and oral appliance had no effect on the occlusal abnormality. Although the inciting cause of the disc fracture remained unclear, the degenerative changes in the joint may have been a factor by increasing the brittleness and reducing the elasticity of the disc. PMID:25308829

  16. Manual reduction of articular disc after traumatic extraction of mandibular third molar: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Rubens; Manzi, Marcello Roberto; de Carvalho, Matheus Furtado; Luz, João Gualberto de Cerqueira; Pimentel, Angélica Castro; Deboni, Maria Cristina Zindel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Disc displacement without reduction with limited opening is an intracapsular biomechanical disorder involving the condyle-disc complex. With the mouth closed, the disc is in an anterior position in relation to the condylar head and does not reduce with mouth opening. This disorder is associated with persistent limited mandibular opening. Case report: The patient presented severe limitation to fully open the mouth, interfering in her ability to eat. Clinical examination also revealed maximum assisted jaw opening (passive stretch) with less than 40 mm of maximum interincisal opening. Magnetic resonance imaging was the method of choice to identify the temporomandibular disorders. Conclusion: By means of reporting this rare case of anterior disc displacement without reduction with limited opening, after traumatic extraction of a mandibular third molar, in which manual reduction of temporomandibular joint articular disc was performed, it was possible to prove that this technique is effective in the prompt restoration of mandibular movements. PMID:26560828

  17. [The early development of the articular cartilage. IV. The metamorphosing cartilage].

    PubMed

    Knese, K H

    1980-01-01

    The definite articular cartilage originate from 2 anlagen, the primordial tangential layer and the greater part including the joint bone plate from the metamorphosing cartilage. The tangential layer grow by apposition from the perichondrium. Additional the layer becomes also dilatated as a result of the growing volume of the ossification center. In this way the Lamina splendens with residues of cells may be formed. The chondrocytes resemble partly fibroblasts, in older animals possibly even tendocytes. Moreover the cells exhibit a varying different shape. Today it is impossible to interpret the polymorphism of the cells. In the primordial state, the chondrocyts are embedded in a network from thin cartilage fibrils. Later on collagen fibrils from varied thickness (up to 900 A) are formed. The fibrils run only partly parallel to each other, in general they form a network, in which they cross with a low angle. There are great local differences in the fibrillar structure by the same animal. PMID:7461420

  18. Elastoviscous Transitions of Articular Cartilage Reveal a Mechanism of Synergy between Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Bonnevie, Edward D.; Galesso, Devis; Secchieri, Cynthia; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    When lubricated by synovial fluid, articular cartilage provides some of the lowest friction coefficients found in nature. While it is known that macromolecular constituents of synovial fluid provide it with its lubricating ability, it is not fully understood how two of the main molecules, lubricin and hyaluronic acid, lubricate and interact with one another. Here, we develop a novel framework for cartilage lubrication based on the elastoviscous transition to show that lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate by distinct mechanisms. Such analysis revealed nonspecific interactions between these molecules in which lubricin acts to concentrate hyaluronic acid near the tissue surface and promotes a transition to a low friction regime consistent with the theory of viscous boundary lubrication. Understanding the mechanics of synovial fluid not only provides insight into the progression of diseases such as arthritis, but also may be applicable to the development of new biomimetic lubricants. PMID:26599797

  19. Nonlinear mechanical response of the extracellular matrix: learning from articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, Sarah; Das, Moumita

    2015-03-01

    We study the mechanical structure-function relations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) with focus on nonlinear shear and compression response. As a model system, our study focuses on the ECM in articular cartilage tissue which has two major mechanobiological components: a network of the biopolymer collagen that acts as a stiff, reinforcing matrix, and a flexible aggrecan network that facilitates deformability. We model this system as a double network hydrogel made of interpenetrating networks of stiff and flexible biopolymers respectively. We study the linear and nonlinear mechanical response of the model ECM to shear and compression forces using a combination of rigidity percolation theory and energy minimization approaches. Our results may provide useful insights into the design principles of the ECM as well as biomimetic hydrogels that are mechanically robust and can, at the same time, easily adapt to cues in their surroundings.

  20. Intra-articular use of hyaluronic acid in the treatment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Migliore, Alberto; Granata, Mauro

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of disability in the elderly. The changes in the lubricating properties of synovial fluid lead to significant pain and loss of function. More than ten years have passed from the first studies. Up till now many authors have supported intra-articular hyaluronan (HA) therapy as not only a symptom-modifying therapy but also a treatment which may significantly decrease the rate of deterioration of joint structure. In this review we report data relative to knee and hip treatment. The ongoing studies continue to further our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that likely underlie the therapeutic benefits of this treatment but, despite recent progress, many unresolved issues require further study. Large scale double blind controlled studies must be carried out to confirm these promising data and produce meaningful guidelines.

  1. Enzyme studies in the articular cartilage of diabetic rats and of rats bearing transplanted pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, R; Hirshberg, G E; Lesker, P

    1977-08-01

    The articular cartilage of normal rats, of rats made diabetic with streptozotocin, and of rats made diabetic with streptozotocin and subsequently transplanted with isologous pancreatic islets was examined for the activities of enzymes engaged in the synthesis and degradation of glycosaminoglycans (mucopolysaccharides). The activities assayed were those of the degrading enzymes B-glucuronidase, B-acetyglucosaminidase, B-acetylgalactosaminidase, B-galactosidase, and those active in synthesis: uridine diphosphate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehyrogenase, and phosphofructokinase. In the diabetic animals all enzyme activities were increased, thos of the degrading enzymes more than those of the others. Implantation of pancreatic islets reversed the changes produced by diabetes, enzyme activities returning to near-normal levels. PMID:142034

  2. Spatially localized structure-function relations in the elastic properties of sheared articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, Jesse; Bonassar, Lawrence; Cohen, Itai

    2013-03-01

    Contemporary developments in therapeutic tissue engineering have been enabled by basic research efforts in the field of biomechanics. Further integration of technology in medicine requires a deeper understanding of the mechanical properties of soft biological materials and the structural origins of their response under extreme stresses and strains. Drawing on the science generated by the ``Extreme Mechanics'' community, we present experimental results on the mechanical properties of articular cartilage, a hierarchically structured soft biomaterial found in the joints of mammalian long bones. Measurements of the spatially localized structure and mechanical properties will be compared with theoretical descriptions based on networks of deformed rods, poro-visco-elasticity, and standard continuum models. Discrepancies between experiment and theory will be highlighted, and suggestions for how models can be improved will be given.

  3. Operative management of closed intra-articular fractures of distal end of humerus in adults.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Arunangsu; Jha, Amrish Kumar; Chatterjee, Debdutta; Ghosh, Bappaditya; Roy, Sandip Kumar; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2011-06-01

    This is a study of 60 patients with mean age of 30 years having intra-articular fracture of distal humerus of type C (AO classification). We treated these fractures by open reduction and internal fixation through transolecranon approach. Mean duration of operative time with that of injury was 10 days. In all the cases 1st the intracondylar fracture was fixed followed by reconstruction and stabilisation of medial and lateral pillar by 1/3 tubular plate and 3.5 mm dynamic compressent plate (DCP) or recon plate respectively. Minimum follow-up was of 1 year duration with average follow-up of 3 years. We could achieve 100% union with mean range of movement at the and of 1 year was 20 degree to 110 degree. Two fractures had delayed union, 5 patients had skin complications for which extended dressing was required. None of these patients required SSG or secondary suture.

  4. PARTIAL ARTICULAR SUPRASPINATUS TENDON AVULSION (PASTA) LESION. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN REHABILITATION

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotator cuff pathology can contribute to shoulder pain and may affect the performance of sport activities, work, and activities of daily living. The partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion (PASTA) lesion represents a very common type of rotator cuff pathology seen in rehabilitation. When conservative treatment fails, surgery is generally required. Success of recovery depends on several factors, including: repair techniques, healing process related to timing, rehabilitation programs, and patient compliance with home exercises. To date, most treatment modalities and rehabilitation programs are based on clinical experience rather than scientific evidence. Therefore, the purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview on the PASTA lesion, discuss the common treatment approaches adopted to date and to propose a rehabilitation program based on the available scientific evidence. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27274431

  5. Elastoviscous Transitions of Articular Cartilage Reveal a Mechanism of Synergy between Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Bonnevie, Edward D; Galesso, Devis; Secchieri, Cynthia; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2015-01-01

    When lubricated by synovial fluid, articular cartilage provides some of the lowest friction coefficients found in nature. While it is known that macromolecular constituents of synovial fluid provide it with its lubricating ability, it is not fully understood how two of the main molecules, lubricin and hyaluronic acid, lubricate and interact with one another. Here, we develop a novel framework for cartilage lubrication based on the elastoviscous transition to show that lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate by distinct mechanisms. Such analysis revealed nonspecific interactions between these molecules in which lubricin acts to concentrate hyaluronic acid near the tissue surface and promotes a transition to a low friction regime consistent with the theory of viscous boundary lubrication. Understanding the mechanics of synovial fluid not only provides insight into the progression of diseases such as arthritis, but also may be applicable to the development of new biomimetic lubricants.

  6. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengzhen; Zhang, Fengjie; He, Qiling; Wang, Jianqi; Shiu, Hoi Ting; Shu, Yinglan; Tsang, Wing Pui; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Kai; Wan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10-6 M) increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1) and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic marker genes

  7. Chondroblastoma of the femoral head disrupting the articular cartilage. Description of a novel surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Givissis, Panagiotis; Agathangelidis, Filon; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Christodoulou, Anastasios

    2012-06-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare benign tumour. Involvement of the femoral head may often lead to a delayed diagnosis. We present the case of a 15-year-old patient with right hip pain which was first attributed to adductor tendinitis. Following aggravation of the symptoms, thorough investigation including a CT-guided biopsy, revealed the diagnosis of chondroblastoma of the femoral head. Removal of the lesion based on the techniques described in literature was not possible, mainly because the articular cartilage was breached. A novel surgical technique was used in order to address the rare location and behaviour of the tumour. This technique offered the patient pain relief and return to his previous every day and sports activities. No recurrence was seen at two years follow-up. PMID:22822587

  8. Rheumatoid knee synovitis successfully treated with intra-articular rifamycin SV.

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, I; Montrone, F; Fumagalli, M; Patrono, C; Santandrea, S; Gandini, M C

    1982-01-01

    Thirty rheumatoid patients with persistent knee effusion were treated intra-articularly with rifamycin SV, 500 mg weekly, or with saline solution, 10 ml, in a double-blind study. A complete disappearance of effusion and an impressive clinical improvement was observed in the patients on rifamycin. The synovial fluid and membrane underwent some changes. In 2 patients the rifamycin caused a painful local reaction. After a follow-up of 5 years only one patient has experienced effusion relapse, 5 months after the termination of rifamycin SV treatment. The patients on saline showed no significant change. On the basis of the results obtained from the monoarthritis experimental model and from clinical trials it is tempting to consider that rifamycin has an antimitotic effect, impeding the synthesis of RNA and DNA polymerases in immunocompetent cells. PMID:7046652

  9. Design of a chimeric promoter induced by pro-inflammatory mediators in articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Meynier de Salinelles, Véronique; Berenbaum, Francis; Jacques, Claire; Salvat, Colette; Olivier, Jean-Luc; Béréziat, Gilbert; Raymondjean, Michel; Massaad, Charbel

    2002-05-01

    We have designed a chimeric promoter that can be stimulated by various pro-inflammatory mediators and so drive the expression of therapeutic genes under inflammatory conditions. The promoter has two parts, the [-247/+20] fragment of the human type IIA secreted phospholipase A2 gene promoter, which is stimulated by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and a double peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor response element that is activated by some eicosanoids and by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Transfection experiments using rabbit articular chondrocytes in primary culture showed that this chimeric promoter produced a low basal activity and was induced by NSAIDs, WY-14643, IL-1beta, and 15-deoxy Delta12,14 prostaglandin J2. The latter two compounds stimulated the promoter synergistically.

  10. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiling; Wang, Jianqi; Shiu, Hoi Ting; Shu, Yinglan; Tsang, Wing Pui; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Kai; Wan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10−6 M) increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1) and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic marker genes

  11. Management of extra-articular fractures of the distal tibia: intramedullary nailing versus plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Casstevens, Chris; Le, Toan; Archdeacon, Michael T; Wyrick, John D

    2012-11-01

    Intramedullary nailing and plate fixation represent two viable approaches to internal fixation of extra-articular fractures of the distal tibia. Although both techniques have demonstrated success in maintaining reduction and promoting stable union, they possess distinct advantages and disadvantages that require careful consideration during surgical planning. Differences in soft-tissue health and construct stability must be considered when choosing between intramedullary nailing and plating of the distal tibia. Recent advances in intramedullary nail design and plate-and-screw fixation systems have further increased the options for management of these fractures. Current evidence supports careful consideration of the risk of soft-tissue complications, residual knee pain, and fracture malalignment in the context of patient and injury characteristics in the selection of the optimal method of fixation.

  12. Composite three-dimensional woven scaffolds with interpenetrating network hydrogels to create functional synthetic articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Liao, I-Chien; Moutos, Franklin T; Estes, Bradley T; Zhao, Xuanhe; Guilak, Farshid

    2013-12-17

    The development of synthetic biomaterials that possess mechanical properties that mimic those of native tissues remains an important challenge to the field of materials. In particular, articular cartilage is a complex nonlinear, viscoelastic, and anisotropic material that exhibits a very low coefficient of friction, allowing it to withstand millions of cycles of joint loading over decades of wear. Here we show that a three-dimensionally woven fiber scaffold that is infiltrated with an interpenetrating network hydrogel can provide a functional biomaterial that provides the load-bearing and tribological properties of native cartilage. An interpenetrating dual-network "tough-gel" consisting of alginate and polyacrylamide was infused into a porous three-dimensionally woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fiber scaffold, providing a versatile fiber-reinforced composite structure as a potential acellular or cell-based replacement for cartilage repair. PMID:24578679

  13. The organisation of collagen fibrils in the superficial zones of articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, J M

    1990-01-01

    The origin and structure of collagen fibres in the surface of articular cartilage were studied using SEM. Cryofracture was used to create orthogonal fracture surfaces in three planes. Fibres which originated in the radial zone could be traced into the surface where they flattened and overlapped in a common direction. Thick fibres from the periosteum ran into the surface as well, but apparently ended there and did not enter the radial zone. The tangential fibres were covered by a dense, separate layer of small fibrils. The fundamental aspects of the model proposed by Benninghoff are supported by these findings. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:2081698

  14. Composite three-dimensional woven scaffolds with interpenetrating network hydrogels to create functional synthetic articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Liao, I-Chien; Moutos, Franklin T; Estes, Bradley T; Zhao, Xuanhe; Guilak, Farshid

    2013-12-17

    The development of synthetic biomaterials that possess mechanical properties that mimic those of native tissues remains an important challenge to the field of materials. In particular, articular cartilage is a complex nonlinear, viscoelastic, and anisotropic material that exhibits a very low coefficient of friction, allowing it to withstand millions of cycles of joint loading over decades of wear. Here we show that a three-dimensionally woven fiber scaffold that is infiltrated with an interpenetrating network hydrogel can provide a functional biomaterial that provides the load-bearing and tribological properties of native cartilage. An interpenetrating dual-network "tough-gel" consisting of alginate and polyacrylamide was infused into a porous three-dimensionally woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fiber scaffold, providing a versatile fiber-reinforced composite structure as a potential acellular or cell-based replacement for cartilage repair.

  15. Micromechanical response of articular cartilage to tensile load measured using nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bell, J S; Christmas, J; Mansfield, J C; Everson, R M; Winlove, C P

    2014-06-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is a highly anisotropic biomaterial, and its complex mechanical properties have been a topic of intense investigation for over 60 years. Recent advances in the field of nonlinear optics allow the individual constituents of AC to be imaged in living tissue without the need for exogenous contrast agents. Combining mechanical testing with nonlinear microscopy provides a wealth of information about microscopic responses to load. This work investigates the inhomogeneous distribution of strain in loaded AC by tracking the movement and morphological changes of individual chondrocytes using point pattern matching and Bayesian modeling. This information can be used to inform models of mechanotransduction and pathogenesis, and is readily extendable to various other connective tissues.

  16. Effect of nitric oxide on mitochondrial respiratory activity of human articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Maneiro, E; Lopez-Armada, M; de Andres, M C; Carames, B; Martin, M; Bonilla, A; del Hoyo, P; Galdo, F; Arenas, J; Blanco, F

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial activity and its relation with the apoptosis of human articular chondrocytes. Materials and methods: Mitochondrial function was evaluated by analysing respiratory chain enzyme complexes, citrate synthase (CS) activities, and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). The activities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes (complex I: NADH CoQ1 reductase, complex II: succinate dehydrogenase, complex III: ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase, complex IV: cytochrome c oxidase) and CS were measured in human articular chondrocytes isolated from normal cartilage. The Δψm was measured by 5,5',6,6'-tetracholoro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazole carbocyanide iodide (JC-1) using flow cytometry. Apoptosis was analysed by flow cytometry. The mRNA expression of caspases was analysed by ribonuclease protection analysis and the detection of protein synthesis by western blotting. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was used as an NO compound donor. Results: SNP at concentrations higher than 0.5 mmol/l for 24 hours induced cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis. SNP elicited mRNA expression of caspase-3 and caspase-7 and down regulated bcl-2 synthesis in a dose and time dependent manner. Furthermore, 0.5 mM SNP induced depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane at 5, 12, and 24 hours. Analysis of the MRC showed that at 5 hours, 0.5 mM SNP reduced the activity of complex IV by 33%. The individual inhibition of mitochondrial complex IV with azide modified the Δψm and induced apoptosis. Conclusions: This study suggests that the effect of NO on chondrocyte survival is mediated by its effect on complex IV of the MRC. PMID:15708893

  17. Effect of Glutaraldehyde Fixation on the Frictional Response of Immature Bovine Articular Cartilage Explants

    PubMed Central

    Oungoulian, Sevan R.; Hehir, Kristin E.; Zhu, Kaicen; Willis, Callen E.; Marinescu, Anca G.; Merali, Natasha; Ahmad, Christopher S.; Hung, Clark T.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined functional properties and biocompatibility of glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine articular cartilage over several weeks of incubation at body temperature to investigate its potential use as a resurfacing material in joint arthroplasty. In the first experiment, treated cartilage disks were fixed using 0.02, 0.20 and 0.60 percent glutaraldehyde for 24 h then incubated, along with an untreated control group, in saline for up to 28 days at 37 °C. Both the equilibrium compressive and tensile moduli increased nearly twofold in treated samples compared to day 0 control, and remained at that level from day 1 to 28; the equilibrium friction coefficient against glass rose nearly twofold immediately after fixation (day 1) but returned to control values after day 7. Live explants co-cultured with fixed explants showed no quantitative difference in cell viability over 28 days. In general, no significant differences were observed between 0.20 and 0.60 percent groups, so 0.20 percent was deemed sufficient for complete fixation. In the second experiment, cartilage-on-cartilage frictional measurements were performed under a migrating contact configuration. In the treated group, one explant was fixed using 0.20 percent glutaraldehyde while the apposing explant was left untreated; in the control group both explants were left untreated. From day 1 to 28, the treated group exhibited either no significant difference or slightly lower friction coefficient than the untreated group. These results suggest that a properly titrated glutaraldehyde treatment can reproduce the desired functional properties of native articular cartilage and maintain these properties for at least 28 days at body temperature. PMID:24332617

  18. Of Mice, Men and Elephants: The Relation between Articular Cartilage Thickness and Body Mass

    PubMed Central

    Malda, Jos; de Grauw, Janny C.; Benders, Kim E. M.; Kik, Marja J. L.; van de Lest, Chris H. A.; Creemers, Laura B.; Dhert, Wouter J. A.; van Weeren, P. René

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian articular cartilage serves diverse functions, including shock absorption, force transmission and enabling low-friction joint motion. These challenging requirements are met by the tissue’s thickness combined with its highly specific extracellular matrix, consisting of a glycosaminoglycan-interspersed collagen fiber network that provides a unique combination of resilience and high compressive and shear resistance. It is unknown how this critical tissue deals with the challenges posed by increases in body mass. For this study, osteochondral cores were harvested post-mortem from the central sites of both medial and lateral femoral condyles of 58 different mammalian species ranging from 25 g (mouse) to 4000 kg (African elephant). Joint size and cartilage thickness were measured and biochemical composition (glycosaminoclycan, collagen and DNA content) and collagen cross-links densities were analyzed. Here, we show that cartilage thickness at the femoral condyle in the mammalian species investigated varies between 90 µm and 3000 µm and bears a negative allometric relationship to body mass, unlike the isometric scaling of the skeleton. Cellular density (as determined by DNA content) decreases with increasing body mass, but gross biochemical composition is remarkably constant. This however need not affect life-long performance of the tissue in heavier mammals, due to relatively constant static compressive stresses, the zonal organization of the tissue and additional compensation by joint congruence, posture and activity pattern of larger mammals. These findings provide insight in the scaling of articular cartilage thickness with body weight, as well as in cartilage biochemical composition and cellularity across mammalian species. They underscore the need for the use of appropriate in vivo models in translational research aiming at human applications. PMID:23437402

  19. Chondrogenesis, chondrocyte differentiation, and articular cartilage metabolism in health and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Goldring, Mary B

    2012-08-01

    Chondrogenesis occurs as a result of mesenchymal cell condensation and chondroprogenitor cell differentiation. Following chondrogenesis, the chondrocytes remain as resting cells to form the articular cartilage or undergo proliferation, terminal differentiation to chondrocyte hypertrophy, and apoptosis in a process termed endochondral ossification, whereby the hypertrophic cartilage is replaced by bone. Human adult articular cartilage is a complex tissue of matrix proteins that varies from superficial to deep layers and from loaded to unloaded zones. A major challenge to efforts to repair cartilage by stem cell-based and other tissue-engineering strategies is the inability of the resident chondrocytes to lay down a new matrix with the same properties as it had when it was formed during development. Thus, understanding and comparing the mechanisms of cartilage remodeling during development, osteoarthritis (OA), and aging may lead to more effective strategies for preventing cartilage damage and promoting repair. The pivotal proteinase that marks OA progression is matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13), the major type II collagen-degrading collagenase, which is regulated by both stress and inflammatory signals. We and other investigators have found that there are common mediators of these processes in human OA cartilage. We also observe temporal and spatial expression of these mediators in early through late stages of OA in mouse models and are analyzing the consequences of knockout or transgenic overexpression of critical genes. Since the chondrocytes in adult human cartilage are normally quiescent and maintain the matrix in a low turnover state, understanding how they undergo phenotypic modulation and promote matrix destruction and abnormal repair in OA may to lead to identification of critical targets for therapy to block cartilage damage and promote effective cartilage repair. PMID:22859926

  20. Very early osteoarthritis changes sensitively fluid flow properties of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, J T A; Han, S-K; Herzog, W; Korhonen, R K

    2015-09-18

    In this study, fibril-reinforced poroelastic (FRPE) modeling was used for rabbit knee after anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) to assess how the mechanical properties of collagen, proteoglycans, and fluid in articular cartilage change in early osteoarthritis, and how site-specific these changes are. Unilateral ACLT was performed in eight skeletally mature, female New Zealand white rabbits. A separate control (CTRL) group consisted of knee joints of five non-operated rabbits. Animals were sacrificed at four weeks after ACLT and cartilage-on-bone samples from femoral groove, medial and lateral femoral condyles, and tibial plateaus were harvested. A stress-relaxation protocol in indentation geometry was applied and the FRPE model was fitted to the experimental force-time curve by minimizing the mean absolute error between experiment and simulation. The optimized parameters were: fibril network modulus (Ef), representing the collagen network; non-fibrillar matrix modulus (Enf), representing the PG matrix; and permeability (k), representing fluid flow. Permeability was increased significantly in the ACLT group compared to the CTRL group knees at all sites except for the medial tibial plateau. ACLT also caused a decrease in the Ef at all sites except for the medial and lateral tibial plateaus. The Enf of the ACLT group knees was altered only for the lateral femoral condyle. The results of this study suggest that early osteoarthritis primarily affects cartilage permeability and impairs the collagen network stiffness in a site-specific manner. These findings from early osteoarthritis indicate that fluid flow velocity in articular cartilage may change prior to quantifiable structural alterations in the tissue.

  1. T2 Relaxation Time Quantitation Differs Between Pulse Sequences in Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Matzat, Stephen J.; McWalter, Emily J.; Kogan, Feliks; Chen, Weitian; Gold, Garry E.

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare T2 relaxation time measurements between MR pulse sequences at 3 Tesla in agar phantoms and in vivo patellar, femoral, and tibial articular cartilage. Methods T2 relaxation times were quantified in phantoms and knee articular cartilage of eight healthy individuals using a single echo spin echo (SE) as a reference standard and five other pulse sequences: multi-echo SE (MESE), fast SE (2D-FSE), magnetization-prepared spoiled gradient echo (3D-MAPSS), three-dimensional (3D) 3D-FSE with variable refocusing flip angle schedules (3D vfl-FSE), and quantitative double echo steady state (qDESS). Cartilage was manually segmented and average regional T2 relaxation times were obtained for each sequence. A regression analysis was carried out between each sequence and the reference standard, and root-mean-square error (RMSE) was calculated. Results Phantom measurements from all sequences demonstrated strong fits (R2>0.8; P<0.05). For in vivo cartilage measurements, R2 values, slope, and RMSE were: MESE: 0.25/0.42/5.0 ms, 2D-FSE: 0.64/1.31/9.3 ms, 3D-MAPSS: 0.51/0.66/3.8 ms, 3D vfl-FSE: 0.30/ 0.414.2 ms, qDESS: 0.60/0.90/4.6 ms. Conclusion 2D-FSE, qDESS, and 3D-MAPSS demonstrated the best fits with SE measurements as well as the greatest dynamic ranges. The 3D-MAPSS, 3D vfl-FSE, and qDESS demonstrated the closest average measurements to SE. Discrepancies in T2 relaxation time quantitation between sequences suggest that care should be taken when comparing results between studies. PMID:25244647

  2. Deletion of IFT80 Impairs Epiphyseal and Articular Cartilage Formation Due to Disruption of Chondrocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) play important roles in cilia formation and organ development. Partial loss of IFT80 function leads Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) or short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome type III, displaying narrow thoracic cavity and multiple cartilage anomalies. However, it is unknown how IFT80 regulates cartilage formation. To define the role and mechanism of IFT80 in chondrocyte function and cartilage formation, we generated a Col2α1; IFT80f/f mouse model by crossing IFT80f/f mice with inducible Col2α1-CreER mice, and deleted IFT80 in chondrocyte lineage by injection of tamoxifen into the mice in embryonic or postnatal stage. Loss of IFT80 in the embryonic stage resulted in short limbs at birth. Histological studies showed that IFT80-deficient mice have shortened cartilage with marked changes in cellular morphology and organization in the resting, proliferative, pre-hypertrophic, and hypertrophic zones. Moreover, deletion of IFT80 in the postnatal stage led to mouse stunted growth with shortened growth plate but thickened articular cartilage. Defects of ciliogenesis were found in the cartilage of IFT80-deficient mice and primary IFT80-deficient chondrocytes. Further study showed that chondrogenic differentiation was significantly inhibited in IFT80-deficient mice due to reduced hedgehog (Hh) signaling and increased Wnt signaling activities. These findings demonstrate that loss of IFT80 blocks chondrocyte differentiation by disruption of ciliogenesis and alteration of Hh and Wnt signaling transduction, which in turn alters epiphyseal and articular cartilage formation. PMID:26098911

  3. Gold Nanoparticles of Diameter 13 nm Induce Apoptosis in Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hao; Quan, Ying-yao; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been widely used in biomedical science including antiarthritic agents, drug loading, and photothermal therapy. In this report, we studied the effects of AuNPs with diameters of 3, 13, and 45 nm, respectively, on rabbit articular chondrocytes. AuNPs were capped with citrate and their diameter and zeta potential were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cell viability was evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay after the rabbit articular chondrocytes were pre-incubated with 3, 13, and 45 nm AuNPs, respectively, for 24 h. Flow cytometry (FCM) analysis with annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and fluorescence imaging with Hoechst 33258 staining were used to determine the fashion of AuNPs-induced chondrocyte death. Further, 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) significantly induced chondrocyte death accompanying apoptotic characteristics including mitochondrial damage, externalization of phosphatidylserine and nuclear concentration. However, 3 nm AuNPs (2 nM) and 45 nm (0.02 nM) AuNPs did not induce cytotoxicity in chondrocytes. Although 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, pretreatment with Nacetyl cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, did not prevent the cytotoxicity induced by 13 nm AuNPs, indicating that 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) induced ROS-independent apoptosis in chondrocytes. These results demonstrate the size-dependent cytotoxicity of AuNPs in chondrocytes, which must be seriously considered when using AuNPs for treatment of osteoarthritis (OA).

  4. Pneumatized Articular Eminence and Assessment of Its Prevalence and Features on Panoramic Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Khojastepour, Leila; Ezoddini, Fatemeh; Zeighami, Noshafarin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Pneumatized articular eminence or tubercle (PAT) is an air cell cavity in the zygomatic process of the temporal bone. Pneumatization of articular eminence may be seen incidentally on panoramic radiographs (PRs) as a unilocular or multilocular radiolucent defect. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and the pattern of PAT on PR in an Iranian population. Materials and Methods: A total of 3,098 PRs belonging to 1,735 females and 1,363 males were retrospectively investigated for the presence and radiographic features of PAT. All PRs were taken for routine dental examination. Chi-square test, univariate odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI) and binary logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. Results: Overall, PAT was found in 2.1 % of cases including 41 females and 23 males (with a mean age of 33.23±12.43 and 35.64±13.24 years, respectively, range 19–69 years). There were 40 unilateral and 24 bilateral cases (total: 88 PATs) including 49 unilocular and 39 multilocular cases. There was no significant difference in PAT between males and females or different age groups (P>0.05 and all CIs included 1.00). Binary logistic regression indicated that there was no relationship between the presence of PAT and age or sex. Conclusion: Knowledge about this anatomical variation is helpful for clinicians who are planning to perform temporomandibular joint surgery. They should assess the radiographic imaging thoroughly before the surgery. It can also provide valuable information to understand the differential diagnosis of pathological entities in this region. PMID:26622277

  5. Lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and subsequent cell death in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tsutomu; Toyoda, Futoshi; Imai, Shinji; Tanigawa, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Kousuke; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2016-05-01

    Local anesthetics are administered intraarticularly for pain control in orthopedic clinics and surgeries. Although previous studies have shown that local anesthetics can be toxic to chondrocytes, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study investigates acute cellular responses associated with lidocaine-induced toxicity to articular chondrocytes. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were exposed to lidocaine and their morphological changes were monitored with live cell microscopy. The viability of chondrocytes was evaluated using a fluorescence based LIVE/DEAD assay. Acute treatment of chondrocytes with lidocaine (3-30 mM) induced spherical protrusions on the cell surface (so called "membrane blebbing") in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The concentration-response relationship for the lidocaine effect was shifted leftward by elevating extracellular pH, as expected for the non-ionized lidocaine being involved in the bleb formation. ROCK (Rho-kinase) inhibitors Y-27632 and fasudil completely prevented the lidocaine-induced membrane blebbing, suggesting that ROCK activation is required for bleb formation. Caspase-3 levels were unchanged by 10 mM lidocaine (p = 0.325) and a caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not affect the lidocaine-induced blebbing (p = 0.964). GTP-RhoA levels were significantly increased (p < 0.001), but Rho inhibitor-1 failed to suppress the membrane blebbing (p = 0.875). Lidocaine (30 mM) reduced the cell viability of isolated chondrocytes (p < 0.001) and in situ chondrocytes (p < 0.001). The chondrotoxicity was attenuated by pretreatment of cells with ROCK inhibitors or a myosin-II inhibitor blebbistatin (p < 0.001). These findings suggest that lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and thereby produces a cytotoxic effect on chondrocytes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:754-762, 2016.

  6. Adsorption and Distribution of Fluorescent Solutes near the Articular Surface of Mechanically Injured Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Sarah G.A.; Moeini, Mohammad; Chin, Hooi Chuan; Rosenzweig, Derek H.; Quinn, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of cartilage-specific imaging agents supports the improvement of tissue assessment by minimally invasive means. Techniques for highlighting cartilage surface damage in clinical images could provide for sensitive indications of posttraumatic injury and early stage osteoarthritis. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that fluorescent solutes interact with cartilage surfaces strongly enough to affect measurement of their partition coefficients within the tissue bulk. In this study, these findings were extended by examining solute adsorption and distribution near the articular surface of mechanically injured cartilage. Using viable cartilage explants injured by an established protocol, solute distributions near the articular surface of three commonly used fluorophores (fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC), and carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA)) were observed after absorption and subsequent desorption to assess solute-specific matrix interactions and reversibility. Both absorption and desorption processes demonstrated a trend of significantly less solute adsorption at surfaces of fissures compared to adjacent intact surfaces of damaged explants or surfaces of uninjured explants. After adsorption, normalized mean surface intensities of fissured surfaces of injured explants were 6%, 40%, and 32% for FITC, TRITC, and TAMRA, respectively, compared to uninjured surfaces. Similar values were found for sliced explants and after a desorption process. After desorption, a trend of increased solute adsorption at the site of intact damaged surfaces was noted (316% and 238% for injured and sliced explants exposed to FITC). Surface adsorption of solute was strongest for FITC and weakest for TAMRA; no solutes negatively affected cell viability. Results support the development of imaging agents that highlight distinct differences between fissured and intact cartilage surfaces. PMID:24268155

  7. Age related changes and osteochondrosis in swine articular and epiphyseal cartilage: light ane electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, R; Christian, R G; Nakano, T; Aherne, F X; Thompson, J R

    1981-01-01

    Age related changes and osteochondrosis in swine were studied using light microscopy and electron microscopy in articular cartilage and light microscopy and epiphyseal cartilage of swine from three days to 30 weeks of age. Thickness, cellularity and vascularity of both the epiphyseal and articular cartilage, decreased as the swine aged. Osteochondrotic changes included formation of "plugs" of cartilage indicating localized failure of ossification and separation and space formation in epiphyseal cartilage. Eosinophilic streaks and space formation in epiphyseal cartilage was observed in relation to epiphyseal separation. Electron microscopy showed a continuous fibrillar layer on the surface of the cartilage corresponding to the lamina splendens of light microscopy. This layer increased in the thickness and showed accumulation of amorphous material between the fibrils with aging. In the matrix, the orientation and distribution of the collagen fibers changed with growth and thicker fibers with clear sub banding were more common in older age groups. Also, necrotic cells, glycogen containing bodies and cellular debris were noticed in the matrix of normal cartilage in old animals. Chondrocytes in the younger cartilage showed accumulation of organelles responsible for protein synthesis; while Golgi bodies, vesicles, lysosomes, well developed foot processes and other inclusions were noticed in older cartilage. Cartilage erosions had a clumped and disrupted lamina splendens on the surface and electron lucent patches in the ground substances of the matrix and chondrocyte cytoplasm. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2 and 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10 and 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. Fig. 16. Fig. 17. Fig. 18. PMID:7260732