Science.gov

Sample records for discrete choice transport

  1. Protective Behaviour of Citizens to Transport Accidents Involving Hazardous Materials: A Discrete Choice Experiment Applied to Populated Areas nearby Waterways

    PubMed Central

    de Bekker-Grob, Esther W.; Bergstra, Arnold D.; Bliemer, Michiel C. J.; Trijssenaar-Buhre, Inge J. M.; Burdorf, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Background To improve the information for and preparation of citizens at risk to hazardous material transport accidents, a first important step is to determine how different characteristics of hazardous material transport accidents will influence citizens’ protective behaviour. However, quantitative studies investigating citizens’ protective behaviour in case of hazardous material transport accidents are scarce. Methods A discrete choice experiment was conducted among subjects (19–64 years) living in the direct vicinity of a large waterway. Scenarios were described by three transport accident characteristics: odour perception, smoke/vapour perception, and the proportion of people in the environment that were leaving at their own discretion. Subjects were asked to consider each scenario as realistic and to choose the alternative that was most appealing to them: staying, seeking shelter, or escaping. A panel error component model was used to quantify how different transport accident characteristics influenced subjects’ protective behaviour. Results The response was 44% (881/1,994). The predicted probability that a subject would stay ranged from 1% in case of a severe looking accident till 62% in case of a mild looking accident. All three transport accident characteristics proved to influence protective behaviour. Particularly a perception of strong ammonia or mercaptan odours and visible smoke/vapour close to citizens had the strongest positive influence on escaping. In general, ‘escaping’ was more preferred than ‘seeking shelter’, although stated preference heterogeneity among subjects for these protective behaviour options was substantial. Males were less willing to seek shelter than females, whereas elderly people were more willing to escape than younger people. Conclusion Various characteristics of transport accident involving hazardous materials influence subjects’ protective behaviour. The preference heterogeneity shows that information needs

  2. Choice-Based Conjoint Analysis: Classification vs. Discrete Choice Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesen, Joachim; Mueller, Klaus; Taneva, Bilyana; Zolliker, Peter

    Conjoint analysis is a family of techniques that originated in psychology and later became popular in market research. The main objective of conjoint analysis is to measure an individual's or a population's preferences on a class of options that can be described by parameters and their levels. We consider preference data obtained in choice-based conjoint analysis studies, where one observes test persons' choices on small subsets of the options. There are many ways to analyze choice-based conjoint analysis data. Here we discuss the intuition behind a classification based approach, and compare this approach to one based on statistical assumptions (discrete choice models) and to a regression approach. Our comparison on real and synthetic data indicates that the classification approach outperforms the discrete choice models.

  3. Discrete choice experiments of pharmacy services: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vass, Caroline; Gray, Ewan; Payne, Katherine

    2016-06-01

    Background Two previous systematic reviews have summarised the application of discrete choice experiments to value preferences for pharmacy services. These reviews identified a total of twelve studies and described how discrete choice experiments have been used to value pharmacy services but did not describe or discuss the application of methods used in the design or analysis. Aims (1) To update the most recent systematic review and critically appraise current discrete choice experiments of pharmacy services in line with published reporting criteria and; (2) To provide an overview of key methodological developments in the design and analysis of discrete choice experiments. Methods The review used a comprehensive strategy to identify eligible studies (published between 1990 and 2015) by searching electronic databases for key terms related to discrete choice and best-worst scaling (BWS) experiments. All healthcare choice experiments were then hand-searched for key terms relating to pharmacy. Data were extracted using a published checklist. Results A total of 17 discrete choice experiments eliciting preferences for pharmacy services were identified for inclusion in the review. No BWS studies were identified. The studies elicited preferences from a variety of populations (pharmacists, patients, students) for a range of pharmacy services. Most studies were from a United Kingdom setting, although examples from Europe, Australia and North America were also identified. Discrete choice experiments for pharmacy services tended to include more attributes than non-pharmacy choice experiments. Few studies reported the use of qualitative research methods in the design and interpretation of the experiments (n = 9) or use of new methods of analysis to identify and quantify preference and scale heterogeneity (n = 4). No studies reported the use of Bayesian methods in their experimental design. Conclusion Incorporating more sophisticated methods in the design of pharmacy

  4. Reconceptualising the external validity of discrete choice experiments.

    PubMed

    Lancsar, Emily; Swait, Joffre

    2014-10-01

    External validity is a crucial but under-researched topic when considering using discrete choice experiment (DCE) results to inform decision making in clinical, commercial or policy contexts. We present the theory and tests traditionally used to explore external validity that focus on a comparison of final outcomes and review how this traditional definition has been empirically tested in health economics and other sectors (such as transport, environment and marketing) in which DCE methods are applied. While an important component, we argue that the investigation of external validity should be much broader than a comparison of final outcomes. In doing so, we introduce a new and more comprehensive conceptualisation of external validity, closely linked to process validity, that moves us from the simple characterisation of a model as being or not being externally valid on the basis of predictive performance, to the concept that external validity should be an objective pursued from the initial conceptualisation and design of any DCE. We discuss how such a broader definition of external validity can be fruitfully used and suggest innovative ways in which it can be explored in practice.

  5. Air Cargo Transportation Route Choice Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obashi, Hiroshi; Kim, Tae-Seung; Oum, Tae Hoon

    2003-01-01

    Using a unique feature of air cargo transshipment data in the Northeast Asian region, this paper identifies the critical factors that determine the transshipment route choice. Taking advantage of the variations in the transport characteristics in each origin-destination airports pair, the paper uses a discrete choice model to describe the transshipping route choice decision made by an agent (i.e., freight forwarder, consolidator, and large shipper). The analysis incorporates two major factors, monetary cost (such as line-haul cost and landing fee) and time cost (i.e., aircraft turnaround time, including loading and unloading time, custom clearance time, and expected scheduled delay), along with other controls. The estimation method considers the presence of unobserved attributes, and corrects for resulting endogeneity by use of appropriate instrumental variables. Estimation results find that transshipment volumes are more sensitive to time cost, and that the reduction in aircraft turnaround time by 1 hour would be worth the increase in airport charges by more than $1000. Simulation exercises measures the impacts of alternative policy scenarios for a Korean airport, which has recently declared their intention to be a future regional hub in the Northeast Asian region. The results suggest that reducing aircraft turnaround time at the airport be an effective strategy, rather than subsidizing to reduce airport charges.

  6. A deterministic discrete ordinates transport proxy application

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-03

    Kripke is a simple 3D deterministic discrete ordinates (Sn) particle transport code that maintains the computational load and communications pattern of a real transport code. It is intended to be a research tool to explore different data layouts, new programming paradigms and computer architectures.

  7. Using discrete choice experiments to understand preferences in health care.

    PubMed

    Pfarr, Christian; Schmid, Andreas; Schneider, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Whenever processes are reconfigured or new products are designed the needs and preferences of patients and consumers have to be considered. Although at times neglected, this becomes more and more relevant in health care settings: Which modes of health care delivery will be accepted? What are the patients' priorities and what is the willingness to pay? To which degree are patients mobile and for which kind of services are they willing to travel? Preferences, however, are difficult to measure, as they are latent constructs. This becomes even more difficult, when no past choices can be analyzed either as the service or the product is yet to be developed or as in the past there has not been free choice for patients. In such cases, preferences cannot be surveyed directly. Asking individuals openly for their attitudes towards certain services and products, the results are likely biased as individuals are not confronted with budget constraints and trade-offs. For this reason, discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are frequently used to elicit patient preferences. This approach confronts patients with hypothetical scenarios of which only one can be chosen. Over the past few years, this tool to reveal patients' preferences for health care has become very popular in health economics. This contribution aims at introducing the principles of DCEs, highlighting the underlying theory and giving practical guidance for conducting a discrete choice experiment in health economics. Thereby we focus on three major fields of patient demand: designing health insurance, assessing patient utility of new pharmaceuticals and analyzing provider choice. By having a closer look at selected international studies, we discuss the application of this technique for the analysis of the supply and the demand of health care as well as the implications for assessing patient mobility across different health care systems.

  8. A review of the application and contribution of discrete choice experiments to inform human resources policy interventions.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, Mylene; Blaauw, Duane

    2009-07-24

    Although the factors influencing the shortage and maldistribution of health workers have been well-documented by cross-sectional surveys, there is less evidence on the relative determinants of health workers' job choices, or on the effects of policies designed to address these human resources problems. Recently, a few studies have adopted an innovative approach to studying the determinants of health workers' job preferences. In the absence of longitudinal datasets to analyse the decisions that health workers have actually made, authors have drawn on methods from marketing research and transport economics and used Discrete Choice Experiments to analyse stated preferences of health care providers for different job characteristics. We carried out a literature review of studies using discrete choice experiments to investigate human resources issues related to health workers, both in developed and developing countries. Several economic and health systems bibliographic databases were used, and contacts were made with practitioners in the field to identify published and grey literature. Ten studies were found that used discrete choice experiments to investigate the job preferences of health care providers. The use of discrete choice experiments techniques enabled researchers to determine the relative importance of different factors influencing health workers' choices. The studies showed that non-pecuniary incentives are significant determinants, sometimes more powerful than financial ones. The identified studies also emphasized the importance of investigating the preferences of different subgroups of health workers. Discrete choice experiments are a valuable tool for informing decision-makers on how to design strategies to address human resources problems. As they are relatively quick and cheap survey instruments, discrete choice experiments present various advantages for informing policies in developing countries, where longitudinal labour market data are seldom

  9. Preferred choice of work setting among nurses in Thailand: A discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Kunaviktikul, Wipada; Chitpakdee, Bunpitcha; Srisuphan, Wichit; Bossert, Thomas

    2014-05-08

    The shortage of health personnel and nurses is an important issue in many developed and developing countries. Understanding preferred choice of work setting is an important strategy for retaining nurses in their work. The purpose of this study was to determine choices made by nurses in Thailand relative to their preferences for a work setting. A discrete choice experiment was conducted to elicit attributes and levels of job characteristics expected to contribute to work-place preferences. The sample included 921 nurses and was selected using stratified random sampling. A random effects probit model was used to identify factors contributing to work-setting preferences. The results showed that nurses' first work-place preference was a high level of work setting. The second preference was to work in a hospital in the same province as their families. The results provide information for hospital and nurse administrators and policymakers seeking to address the nursing shortage.

  10. Personal Traits Underlying Environmental Preferences: A Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Soliño, Mario; Farizo, Begoña A.

    2014-01-01

    Personality plays a role in human behavior, and thus can influence consumer decisions on environmental goods and services. This paper analyses the influence of the big five personality dimensions (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness) in a discrete choice experiment dealing with preferences for the development of an environmental program for forest management in Spain. For this purpose, a reduced version of the Big Five Inventory survey (the BFI-10) is implemented. Results show a positive effect of openness and extraversion and a negative effect of agreeableness and neuroticism in consumers' preferences for this environmental program. Moreover, results from a latent class model show that personal traits help to explain preference heterogeneity. PMID:24586905

  11. Best-worst scaling vs. discrete choice experiments: an empirical comparison using social care data.

    PubMed

    Potoglou, Dimitris; Burge, Peter; Flynn, Terry; Netten, Ann; Malley, Juliette; Forder, Julien; Brazier, John E

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents empirical findings from the comparison between two principal preference elicitation techniques: discrete choice experiments and profile-based best-worst scaling. Best-worst scaling involves less cognitive burden for respondents and provides more information than traditional "pick-one" tasks asked in discrete choice experiments. However, there is lack of empirical evidence on how best-worst scaling compares to discrete choice experiments. This empirical comparison between discrete choice experiments and best-worst scaling was undertaken as part of the Outcomes of Social Care for Adults project, England, which aims to develop a weighted measure of social care outcomes. The findings show that preference weights from best-worst scaling and discrete choice experiments do reveal similar patterns in preferences and in the majority of cases preference weights--when normalised/rescaled--are not significantly different.

  12. Multiple Choice Knapsack Problem: example of planning choice in transportation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Tao; Young, Rhonda

    2010-05-01

    Transportation programming, a process of selecting projects for funding given budget and other constraints, is becoming more complex as a result of new federal laws, local planning regulations, and increased public involvement. This article describes the use of an integer programming tool, Multiple Choice Knapsack Problem (MCKP), to provide optimal solutions to transportation programming problems in cases where alternative versions of projects are under consideration. In this paper, optimization methods for use in the transportation programming process are compared and then the process of building and solving the optimization problems is discussed. The concepts about the use of MCKP are presented and a real-world transportation programming example at various budget levels is provided. This article illustrates how the use of MCKP addresses the modern complexities and provides timely solutions in transportation programming practice. While the article uses transportation programming as a case study, MCKP can be useful in other fields where a similar decision among a subset of the alternatives is required.

  13. Energy-pointwise discrete ordinates transport methods

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.L.; Asgari, M.; Tashakorri, R.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief description is given of a one-dimensional code, CENTRM, which computes a detailed, space-dependent flux spectrum in a pointwise-energy representation within the resolved resonance range. The code will become a component in the SCALE system to improve computation of self-shielded cross sections, thereby enhancing the accuracy of codes such as KENO. CENTRM uses discrete-ordinates transport theory with an arbitrary angular quadrature order and a Legendre expansion of scattering anisotropy for moderator materials and heavy nuclides. The CENTRM program provides capability to deterministically compute full energy range, space-dependent angular flux spectra, rigorously accounting for resonance fine-structure and scattering anisotropy effects.

  14. The Role of Qualitative Research Methods in Discrete Choice Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Vass, Caroline; Rigby, Dan; Payne, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Background. The use of qualitative research (QR) methods is recommended as good practice in discrete choice experiments (DCEs). This study investigated the use and reporting of QR to inform the design and/or interpretation of healthcare-related DCEs and explored the perceived usefulness of such methods. Methods. DCEs were identified from a systematic search of the MEDLINE database. Studies were classified by the quantity of QR reported (none, basic, or extensive). Authors (n = 91) of papers reporting the use of QR were invited to complete an online survey eliciting their views about using the methods. Results. A total of 254 healthcare DCEs were included in the review; of these, 111 (44%) did not report using any qualitative methods; 114 (45%) reported “basic” information; and 29 (11%) reported or cited “extensive” use of qualitative methods. Studies reporting the use of qualitative methods used them to select attributes and/or levels (n = 95; 66%) and/or pilot the DCE survey (n = 26; 18%). Popular qualitative methods included focus groups (n = 63; 44%) and interviews (n = 109; 76%). Forty-four studies (31%) reported the analytical approach, with content (n = 10; 7%) and framework analysis (n = 5; 4%) most commonly reported. The survey identified that all responding authors (n = 50; 100%) found that qualitative methods added value to their DCE study, but many (n = 22; 44%) reported that journals were uninterested in the reporting of QR results. Conclusions. Despite recommendations that QR methods be used alongside DCEs, the use of QR methods is not consistently reported. The lack of reporting risks the inference that QR methods are of little use in DCE research, contradicting practitioners’ assessments. Explicit guidelines would enable more clarity and consistency in reporting, and journals should facilitate such reporting via online supplementary materials. PMID:28061040

  15. Acceptance of Vaccinations in Pandemic Outbreaks: A Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Determann, Domino; Korfage, Ida J.; Lambooij, Mattijs S.; Bliemer, Michiel; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; de Bekker-Grob, Esther W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preventive measures are essential to limit the spread of new viruses; their uptake is key to their success. However, the vaccination uptake in pandemic outbreaks is often low. We aim to elicit how disease and vaccination characteristics determine preferences of the general public for new pandemic vaccinations. Methods In an internet-based discrete choice experiment (DCE) a representative sample of 536 participants (49% participation rate) from the Dutch population was asked for their preference for vaccination programs in hypothetical communicable disease outbreaks. We used scenarios based on two disease characteristics (susceptibility to and severity of the disease) and five vaccination program characteristics (effectiveness, safety, advice regarding vaccination, media attention, and out-of-pocket costs). The DCE design was based on a literature review, expert interviews and focus group discussions. A panel latent class logit model was used to estimate which trade-offs individuals were willing to make. Results All above mentioned characteristics proved to influence respondents’ preferences for vaccination. Preference heterogeneity was substantial. Females who stated that they were never in favor of vaccination made different trade-offs than males who stated that they were (possibly) willing to get vaccinated. As expected, respondents preferred and were willing to pay more for more effective vaccines, especially if the outbreak was more serious (€6–€39 for a 10% more effective vaccine). Changes in effectiveness, out-of-pocket costs and in the body that advises the vaccine all substantially influenced the predicted uptake. Conclusions We conclude that various disease and vaccination program characteristics influence respondents’ preferences for pandemic vaccination programs. Agencies responsible for preventive measures during pandemics can use the knowledge that out-of-pocket costs and the way advice is given affect vaccination uptake to improve

  16. Discrete Choice Modeling (DCM): An Exciting Marketing Research Survey Method for Educational Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berdie, Doug R.

    Discrete Choice Marketing (DCM), a research technique that has become more popular in recent marketing research, is described. DCM is a method that forces people to look at the combination of relevant variables within each choice domain and, with each option fully defined in terms of the values for those variables, make a choice of options. DCM…

  17. Segmenting patients and physicians using preferences from discrete choice experiments.

    PubMed

    Deal, Ken

    2014-01-01

    People often form groups or segments that have similar interests and needs and seek similar benefits from health providers. Health organizations need to understand whether the same health treatments, prevention programs, services, and products should be applied to everyone in the relevant population or whether different treatments need to be provided to each of several segments that are relatively homogeneous internally but heterogeneous among segments. Our objective was to explain the purposes, benefits, and methods of segmentation for health organizations, and to illustrate the process of segmenting health populations based on preference coefficients from a discrete choice conjoint experiment (DCE) using an example study of prevention of cyberbullying among university students. We followed a two-level procedure for investigating segmentation incorporating several methods for forming segments in Level 1 using DCE preference coefficients and testing their quality, reproducibility, and usability by health decision makers. Covariates (demographic, behavioral, lifestyle, and health state variables) were included in Level 2 to further evaluate quality and to support the scoring of large databases and developing typing tools for assigning those in the relevant population, but not in the sample, to the segments. Several segmentation solution candidates were found during the Level 1 analysis, and the relationship of the preference coefficients to the segments was investigated using predictive methods. Those segmentations were tested for their quality and reproducibility and three were found to be very close in quality. While one seemed better than others in the Level 1 analysis, another was very similar in quality and proved ultimately better in predicting segment membership using covariates in Level 2. The two segments in the final solution were profiled for attributes that would support the development and acceptance of cyberbullying prevention programs among university

  18. Modeling the Bullying Prevention Program Preferences of Educators: A Discrete Choice Conjoint Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Charles E.; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Rimas, Heather; Deal, Ken; Cunningham, Lesley; Short, Kathy; Chen, Yvonne

    2009-01-01

    We used discrete choice conjoint analysis to model the bullying prevention program preferences of educators. Using themes from computerized decision support lab focus groups (n = 45 educators), we composed 20 three-level bullying prevention program design attributes. Each of 1,176 educators completed 25 choice tasks presenting experimentally…

  19. Health system choice: a pilot discrete-choice experiment eliciting the preferences of British and Australian citizens.

    PubMed

    Scuffham, Paul A; Whitty, Jennifer A; Taylor, Matthew; Saxby, Ruth C

    2010-01-01

    Citizen preferences surrounding desirable health system characteristics should be considered when undertaking health system reform. The objective of this study was to pilot test a discrete-choice instrument designed to elicit preference weights surrounding health system attributes. A discrete-choice experiment was designed and administered to two convenience samples (n=50 each) recruited from the UK and Australia. The impact of eight health system attributes representing level of health, equity, responsiveness and healthcare financing on the choice between hypothetical health systems was analysed utilizing mixed logit analysis. All characteristics affected the likelihood a health system would be preferred, with the exception of the additional tax contribution levels required to finance the system. There were very few missing or inconsistent responses. The direction of preferences was consistent with expectations for both samples; that is, an improvement in attributes describing level of health, equity or responsiveness increased the likelihood that a health system would be preferred. A number of potential improvements to the preference instrument are suggested. The discrete-choice technique used in this study offers a feasible method for eliciting health system preferences, and its use in a larger-scale study to elicit and compare the preferences of representative population samples is supported.

  20. Discrete energy transport in collagen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alain, Mvogo; Germain, H. Ben-Bolie; Timoléon, C. Kofané

    2014-09-01

    The modulational instability in the three coupled α-polypeptide chains of a collagen molecule is investigated. Choosing symmetric and asymmetric solutions, and applying the so-called rotating-wave approximation, we describe the dynamics of the system by the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS) equation. The linear stability analysis of the continuous wave solution is performed. The numerical simulations show the generation of trains of solitonic structures in the lattice with increasing amplitude as time progresses. The effect of damping and noise forces of the physiological temperature (T = 300 K) introduces an erratic behavior to the formed patterns, reinforcing the idea that the energy used in metabolic processes is confined to specific regions for efficiency.

  1. Hospital sector choice and support for public hospital care in New Zealand: Results from a labeled discrete choice survey.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul; Panattoni, Laura; Cameron, Linda; Knox, Stephanie; Ashton, Toni; Tenbensel, Tim; Windsor, John

    2015-09-01

    This study uses a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to measure patients' preferences for public and private hospital care in New Zealand. A labeled DCE was administered to 583 members of the general public, with the choice between a public and private hospital for a non-urgent surgery. The results suggest that cost of surgery, waiting times for surgery, option to select a surgeon, convenience, and conditions of the hospital ward are important considerations for patients. The most important determinant of hospital choice was whether it was a public or private hospital, with respondents far more likely to choose a public hospital than a private hospital. The results have implications for government policy toward using private hospitals to clear waiting lists in public hospitals, with these results suggesting the public might not be indifferent to policies that treat private hospitals as substitutes for public hospitals.

  2. Modelling the Preferences of Students for Alternative Assignment Designs Using the Discrete Choice Experiment Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennelly, Brendan; Flannery, Darragh; Considine, John; Doherty, Edel; Hynes, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines how a discrete choice experiment (DCE) can be used to learn more about how students are willing to trade off various features of assignments such as the nature and timing of feedback and the method used to submit assignments. A DCE identifies plausible levels of the key attributes of a good or service and then presents the…

  3. Estimation of Dynamic Discrete Choice Models by Maximum Likelihood and the Simulated Method of Moments

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhauer, Philipp; Heckman, James J.; Mosso, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We compare the performance of maximum likelihood (ML) and simulated method of moments (SMM) estimation for dynamic discrete choice models. We construct and estimate a simplified dynamic structural model of education that captures some basic features of educational choices in the United States in the 1980s and early 1990s. We use estimates from our model to simulate a synthetic dataset and assess the ability of ML and SMM to recover the model parameters on this sample. We investigate the performance of alternative tuning parameters for SMM. PMID:26494926

  4. A discrete-continuous choice model of climate change impacts on energy

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, W.N.; Mendelsohn, R.

    1998-09-01

    This paper estimates a discrete-continuous fuel choice model in order to explore climate impacts on the energy sector. The model is estimated on a national data set of firms and households. The results reveal that actors switch from oil in cold climates to electricity and natural gas in warm climates and that fuel-specific expenditures follow a U-shaped relationship with respect to temperature. The model implies that warming will increase American energy expenditures, reflecting a sizable welfare damage.

  5. Urban transportation: Perspectives on mobility and choice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sincoff, M. Z. (Editor); Dajani, J. S. (Editor); Arnold, G. R.; Bird, J. W.; Brooks, C. M. (Editor); Cobb, W. E.; Cross, J. E.; Darby, L. F.; Erb, N. H.; Ficht, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A study of urban transportation systems are presented characterized by intensive scrutiny of many ideas, philosophies, and academic perspectives. This report is intended to communicate some dimensions of the urban transportation problem to the general public.

  6. Benefit–risk assessment of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins): a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Sornlertlumvanich, Korn; Ngorsuraches, Surachat

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To conduct the benefit–risk assessment of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl (HMG) coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) using a discrete choice experiment, based on 3 major stakeholders’ perspectives including patients, experts and policymakers in Thailand. Design A discrete choice experiment questionnaire survey in three stakeholders’ perspectives. Setting Public hospitals in Thailand. Participants A total of 353 policymakers, experts and patients. Outcomes Stakeholders’ preferences for assessment criteria (stroke reduction, myocardial infarction reduction, myalgia and hepatotoxicity). Statins’ ranking and maximum acceptable risk in all perspectives were also calculated. Results For any perspective, the most and least important criteria were the risk of hepatotoxicity and the benefit of myocardial infarction reduction, respectively. Patients and experts agreed on the order of importance for myalgia and stroke reduction, but policymakers had different order of importance in these criteria. Overall, results showed that the highest and lowest chances of being chosen were atorvastatin and rosuvastatin, respectively. Only patients’ ranking order was different from others. Maximum acceptable risk of hepatotoxicity was lower than that of myalgia, reflecting the greater concern of all perspectives to statin consequence on liver. Conclusions The results of benefit–risk assessment from every perspective were somewhat consistent. This study demonstrated the feasibility of applying a discrete choice experiment in the benefit–risk assessment of drugs and encouraged the engagement of multiple stakeholders in the decision-making process. PMID:26916689

  7. Patient preferences for managing asthma: results from a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    King, Madeleine T; Hall, Jane; Lancsar, Emily; Fiebig, Denzil; Hossain, Ishrat; Louviere, Jordan; Reddel, Helen K; Jenkins, Christine R

    2007-07-01

    Effective control of asthma requires regular preventive medication. Poor medication adherence suggests that patient preferences for medications may differ from the concerns of the prescribing clinicians. This study investigated patient preferences for preventive medications across symptom control, daily activities, medication side-effects, convenience and costs, using a discrete choice experiment embedded in a randomized clinical trial involving patients with mild-moderate persistent asthma. The present data were collected after patients had received 6 weeks' treatment with one of two drugs. Three choice options were presented, to continue with the current drug, to change to an alternative, hypothetical drug, or to take no preventive medication. Analysis used random parameter multinomial logit. Most respondents chose to continue with their current drug in most choice situations but this tendency differed depending on which medication they had been allocated. Respondents valued their ability to participate in usual daily activities and sport, preferred minimal symptoms, and were less likely to choose drugs with side-effects. Cost was also significant, but other convenience attributes were not. Demographic characteristics did not improve the model fit. This study illustrates how discrete choice experiments may be embedded in a clinical trial to provide insights into patient preferences.

  8. Exactly solvable potentials with finitely many discrete eigenvalues of arbitrary choice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Ryu

    2014-06-01

    We address the problem of possible deformations of exactly solvable potentials having finitely many discrete eigenvalues of arbitrary choice. As Kay and Moses showed in 1956, reflectionless potentials in one dimensional quantum mechanics are exactly solvable. With an additional time dependence these potentials are identified as the soliton solutions of the Korteweg de Vries (KdV) hierarchy. An N-soliton potential has the time t and 2N positive parameters, k1 < ⋯ < kN and {cj}, j = 1, …, N, corresponding to N discrete eigenvalues lbrace -k_j^2rbrace. The eigenfunctions are elementary functions expressed by the ratio of determinants. The Darboux-Crum-Krein-Adler transformations or the Abraham-Moses transformations based on eigenfunction deletions produce lower soliton number potentials with modified parameters lbrace c^' }_jrbrace. We explore various identities satisfied by the eigenfunctions of the soliton potentials, which reflect the uniqueness theorem of Gel'fand-Levitan-Marchenko equations for separable (degenerate) kernels.

  9. Discrete-time dynamic user-optimal departure time/route choice model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.K.; Hsueh, C.F.

    1998-05-01

    This paper concerns a discrete-time, link-based, dynamic user-optimal departure time/route choice model using the variational inequality approach. The model complies with a dynamic user-optimal equilibrium condition in which for each origin-destination pair, the actual route travel times experienced by travelers, regardless the departure time, is equal and minimal. A nested diagonalization procedure is proposed to solve the model. Numerical examples are then provided for demonstration and detailed elaboration for multiple solutions and Braess`s paradox.

  10. Modelling Discrete Choice Variables in Assessment of Teaching Staff Work Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Levels of self-reported job satisfaction and motivation were measured by survey in a sample of 286 teachers. Using the discrete choice framework, the paper tries to assess the relevance of the considered indicators (demographic, social, motivational) in overall teaching work satisfaction. The findings provide evidence that job satisfaction is correlated significantly with level of university degree held by the teacher, type of secondary school where the teacher is enrolled, revenues, and salary-tasks adequacy. This is important for the Romanian economy, since the education system is expected to provide future human resources with enhanced skills and abilities. PMID:25849295

  11. Testing Ecological Theories of Offender Spatial Decision Making Using a Discrete Choice Model

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Research demonstrates that crime is spatially concentrated. However, most research relies on information about where crimes occur, without reference to where offenders reside. This study examines how the characteristics of neighborhoods and their proximity to offender home locations affect offender spatial decision making. Using a discrete choice model and data for detected incidents of theft from vehicles (TFV), we test predictions from two theoretical perspectives—crime pattern and social disorganization theories. We demonstrate that offenders favor areas that are low in social cohesion and closer to their home, or other age-related activity nodes. For adult offenders, choices also appear to be influenced by how accessible a neighborhood is via the street network. The implications for criminological theory and crime prevention are discussed. PMID:25866412

  12. Which incentive package will retain regionalized health personnel in Burkina Faso: a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The lack of motivation of health workers to practice in rural areas remains a crucial problem for decision-makers, as it deprives the majority of access to health care. To solve the problem, many countries have implemented health worker retention strategies. However, the development of such strategies requires an understanding of the preferences of health workers. The objective of the study was to identify a package for attracting and retaining health workers in underserved areas. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in three health regions of Burkina Faso in 2012. A discrete choice experiment was used to investigate preferences for incentive packages among health workers recruited under the regionalized policy. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions with health workers currently working in the East and Sahel regions and policy makers, and a literature review on attraction and retention in low income countries, were performed to identify the attributes and levels. These attributes were: the regionalized recruitment policy, health insurance, work equipment, housing, and specific incentive compensation. The final design resulted in 16 choice sets. A multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the influence of socio-demographic characteristics on choice of a given option. A probit logistic regression model was then used to analyze the effect of these difference variables on choice, to identify the incentive package best suited to health workers. In total, questionnaires were administered to 315 regional health workers. Results For all participants, choice of package was strongly influenced by length of commitment under the policy and provision of housing. Sex, number of years in profession, and location also influenced the choice of package. Women are twice more likely to choose a package with free housing and the cancellation of the policy. Conclusion It is important that governments consider health worker preferences in

  13. Percolation assisted excitation transport in discrete-time quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štefaňák, M.; Novotný, J.; Jex, I.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent transport of excitations along chains of coupled quantum systems represents an interesting problem with a number of applications ranging from quantum optics to solar cell technology. A convenient tool for studying such processes are quantum walks. They allow us to determine all the process features in a quantitative way. We study the survival probability and the transport efficiency on a simple, highly symmetric graph represented by a ring. The propagation of excitation is modeled by a discrete-time (coined) quantum walk. For a two-state quantum walk, where the excitation (walker) has to leave its actual position to the neighboring sites, the survival probability decays exponentially and the transport efficiency is unity. The decay rate of the survival probability can be estimated using the leading eigenvalue of the evolution operator. However, if the excitation is allowed to stay at its present position, i.e. the propagation is modeled by a lazy quantum walk, then part of the wave-packet can be trapped in the vicinity of the origin and never reaches the sink. In such a case, the survival probability does not vanish and the excitation transport is not efficient. The dependency of the transport efficiency on the initial state is determined. Nevertheless, we show that for some lazy quantum walks dynamical, percolations of the ring eliminate the trapping effect and efficient excitation transport can be achieved.

  14. A Discrete Choice Conjoint Experiment to Evaluate Parent Preferences for Treatment of Young, Medication Naive Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Cunningham, Charles E.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Rimas, Heather L.; Greiner, Andrew R.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Waxmonsky, James; Fabiano, Gregory A.; Robb, Jessica A.; Burrows-MacLean, Lisa; Scime, Mindy; Hoffman, Martin T.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined treatment preferences of 183 parents of young (average age = 5.8 years, SD = 0.6), medication naive children with ADHD. Preferences were evaluated using a discrete choice experiment in which parents made choices between different combinations of treatment characteristics, outcomes, and costs. Latent class analysis…

  15. Providing Information to Parents of Children with Mental Health Problems: A Discrete Choice Conjoint Analysis of Professional Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Charles E.; Deal, Ken; Rimas, Heather; Chen, Yvonne; Buchanan, Don H.; Sdao-Jarvie, Kathie

    2009-01-01

    We used discrete choice conjoint analysis to model the ways 645 children's mental health (CMH) professionals preferred to provide information to parents seeking CMH services. Participants completed 20 choice tasks presenting experimentally varied combinations of the study's 14 4-level CMH information transfer attributes. Latent class analysis…

  16. Eliciting preferences for medical devices in South Korea: A discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Jae; Bae, Eun-Young

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to identify the attributes that contribute to the value of medical devices and quantify the relative importance of them using a discrete choice experiment. Based on a literature review and expert consultation, seven attributes and their levels were identified-severity of disease (2), availability of substitutes (2), improvement in procedure (3), improvement in clinical outcomes (2), increase in survival (2), improvement in quality of life (3), and cost (4). Among 576 hypothetical profiles, optimal choice sets with 20 choices were developed and experts experienced in health technology assessment and reimbursement decision making in South Korea were surveyed. A total of 102 respondents participated in the survey. The results of the random-effect probit model showed that among the seven attributes, six, except for improvement in procedure, had a significant impact on respondents' choices on medical devices. Respondents were willing to pay the highest amount for devices that provided substantial improvements in quality of life, followed by increased survival, improved clinical outcome, treatment without substitutes, and technology for treating severe diseases. The findings of this experiment will inform decision-makers of the relative importance of the criteria and help them in reimbursement decision making of medical devices.

  17. Human group choice: discrete-trial and free-operant tests of the ideal free distribution.

    PubMed

    Madden, Gregory J; Peden, Blaine F; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo

    2002-07-01

    Ideal free distribution theory predicts that foragers will form groups proportional in number to the resources available in alternative resource sites or patches, a phenomenon termed habitat matching. Three experiments tested this prediction with college students in discrete-trial simulations and a free-operant simulation. Sensitivity to differences in programmed reinforcement rates was quantified by using the sensitivity parameter of the generalized matching law (s). The first experiment, replicating prior published experiments, produced a greater degree of undermatching for the initial choice (s = 0.59) compared to final choices (s = 0.86). The second experiment, which extended prior findings by allowing only one choice per trial, produced comparable undermatching (s = 0.82). The third experiment used free-operant procedures more typical of laboratory studies of habitat matching with other species and produced the most undermatching (s = 0.71). The results of these experiments replicated previous results with human groups, supported predictions of the ideal free distribution, and suggested that undermatching represents a systematic deviation from the ideal free distribution. These results are consistent with a melioration account of individual behavior as the basis for group choice.

  18. Discrete strategies to reduce intake of discretionary food choices: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Grieger, Jessica A; Wycherley, Thomas P; Johnson, Brittany J; Golley, Rebecca K

    2016-05-06

    On a population level, dietary improvement strategies have had limited success in preventing the surge in overweight and obesity or reducing risk factors for chronic disease. While numerous multi-component studies have examined whole-of-diet strategies, and single component (i.e. discrete) dietary intervention strategies have targeted an increase in core foods (e.g. fruits, vegetables, dairy), there is a paucity of evidence on the effectiveness of dietary intervention strategies targeting a decrease in discretionary choices. The aim of this review was to identify dietary intervention strategies that are potentially relevant to reducing intake of discretionary choices in 2-65 year olds. A scoping review was carried out to map the literature on key discrete dietary intervention strategies that are potentially applicable to reducing discretionary choices, and to identify the targeted health/nutrition effects (e.g. improve nutrient intake, decrease sugar intake, and reduce body weight) of these strategies. Studies conducted in participants aged 2-65 years and published in English by July 20, 2015, were located through electronic searches including the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and Scopus. Three thousand two hundred and eighty three studies were identified from the search, of which 44 met the selection criteria. The dietary intervention strategies included reformulation (n = 13), substitution (n = 5), restriction/elimination (n = 9), supplementation (n = 13), and nutrition education/messages (n = 4). The key findings of the review were: restricting portion size was consistently beneficial for reducing energy intake in the acute setting; reformulating foods from higher fat to lower fat could be useful to reduce saturated fat intake; substituting discretionary choices for high fibre snacks, fruit, or low/no-calorie beverages may be an effective strategy for reducing energy intake; supplementing nutrient dense foods such as nuts and

  19. The theory of planned behaviour and discrete food choices: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Máirtín S; Oliver, Madalyn; Svenson, Alexander; Simnadis, Thomas; Beck, Eleanor J; Coltman, Tim; Iverson, Don; Caputi, Peter; Sharma, Rajeev

    2015-12-30

    The combination of economic and social costs associated with non-communicable diseases provide a compelling argument for developing strategies that can influence modifiable risk factors, such as discrete food choices. Models of behaviour, such as the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) provide conceptual order that allows program designers and policy makers to identify the substantive elements that drive behaviour and design effective interventions. The primary aim of the current review was to examine the association between TPB variables and discrete food choice behaviours. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify relevant studies. Calculation of the pooled mean effect size (r(+)) was conducted using inverse-variance weighted, random effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity across studies was assessed using the Q- and I(2)-statistics. Meta-regression was used to test the impact of moderator variables: type of food choice behaviour; participants' age and gender. A total of 42 journal articles and four unpublished dissertations met the inclusion criteria. TPB variables were found to have medium to large associations with both intention and behaviour. Attitudes had the strongest association with intention (r(+)  = 0.54) followed by perceived behavioural control (PBC, r(+)  = 0.42) and subjective norm (SN, r(+)  = 0.37). The association between intention and behaviour was r(+)  = 0.45 and between PBC and behaviour was r(+)  = 0.27. Moderator analyses revealed the complex nature of dietary behaviour and the factors that underpin individual food choices. Significantly higher PBC-behaviour associations were found for choosing health compromising compared to health promoting foods. Significantly higher intention-behaviour and PBC-behaviour associations were found for choosing health promoting foods compared to avoiding health compromising foods. Participant characteristics were also found to moderate associations within the model. Higher

  20. Investigating consumers' and informal carers' views and preferences for consumer directed care: A discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Kaambwa, Billingsley; Lancsar, Emily; McCaffrey, Nicola; Chen, Gang; Gill, Liz; Cameron, Ian D; Crotty, Maria; Ratcliffe, Julie

    2015-09-01

    Consumer directed care (CDC) is currently being embraced internationally as a means to promote autonomy and choice for consumers (people aged 65 and over) receiving community aged care services (CACSs). CDC involves giving CACS clients (consumers and informal carers of consumers) control over how CACSs are administered. However, CDC models have largely developed in the absence of evidence on clients' views and preferences. We explored CACS clients' preferences for a variety of CDC attributes and identified factors that may influence these preferences and potentially inform improved design of future CDC models. Study participants were clients of CACSs delivered by five Australian providers. Using a discrete choice experiment (DCE) approach undertaken in a group setting between June and December 2013, we investigated the relative importance to CACS consumers and informal (family) carers of gradations relating to six salient features of CDC (choice of service provider(s), budget management, saving unused/unspent funds, choice of support/care worker(s), support-worker flexibility and level of contact with service coordinator). The DCE data were analysed using conditional, mixed and generalised logit regression models, accounting for preference and scale heterogeneity. Mean ages for 117 study participants were 80 years (87 consumers) and 74 years (30 informal carers). All participants preferred a CDC approach that allowed them to: save unused funds from a CACS package for future use; have support workers that were flexible in terms of changing activities within their CACS care plan and; choose the support workers that provide their day-to-day CACSs. The CDC attributes found to be important to both consumers and informal carers receiving CACSs will inform the design of future CDC models of service delivery. The DCE approach used in this study has the potential for wide applicability and facilitates the assessment of preferences for elements of potential future aged care

  1. Energy Transport in Quantum Systems with Discrete Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, George; Jones, Wesley; Walczak, Kamil; Yerkes, Kirk

    2012-02-01

    Energy transport in quantum system driven by stochastic perturbations is examined. One of the goals of this study is to determine how the Landauer channels can be defined in a system with discrete energy spectrum. A model describes a particle trapped in a confining potential and subjected to a stochastic perturbation localized off-center of the potential well. The perturbation pumps energy into the system which results in non-zero average energy flux between different regions of the confining potential. The energy flux can be defined in terms of quantum advection modes, where each mode is associated with an off-diagonal element of the density matrix and carries a finite, quantized amount of energy per unit of the probability flux. Statistical correlations between different modes and the net energy flux will be discussed.

  2. The use of alternative preference elicitation methods in complex discrete choice experiments.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hong Il; Doiron, Denise

    2013-12-01

    We analyse stated preference data over nursing jobs collected from two different discrete choice experiments: a multi-profile case best-worst scaling experiment (BWS) prompting selection of the best and worst among alternative jobs, and a profile case BWS wherein the respondents choose the best and worst job attributes. The latter allows identification of additional utility parameters and is believed to be cognitively easier. Results suggest that respondents place greater value on pecuniary over non-pecuniary gains in the multi-profile case. There is little evidence that this discrepancy is induced by the extra cognitive burden of processing several profiles at once in the multi-profile case. We offer thoughts on other likely mechanisms.

  3. A discrete-choice experiment to determine patient preferences for injectable multiple sclerosis treatments in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Poulos, Christine; Kinter, Elizabeth; Yang, Jui-Chen; Bridges, John F. P.; Posner, Joshua; Gleißner, Erika; Mühlbacher, Axel; Kieseier, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the relative importance of features of a hypothetical injectable disease-modifying treatment for patients with multiple sclerosis using a discrete-choice experiment. Methods: German residents at least 18 years of age with a self-reported physician diagnosis of multiple sclerosis completed a 25–30 minute online discrete-choice experiment. Patients were asked to choose one of two hypothetical injectable treatments for multiple sclerosis, defined by different levels of six attributes (disability progression, the number of relapses in the next 4 years, injection time, frequency of injections, presence of flu-like symptoms, and presence of injection-site reactions). The data were analyzed using a random-parameters logit model. Results: Of 202 adults who completed the survey, results from 189 were used in the analysis. Approximately 50% of all patients reported a diagnosis of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, and 31% reported secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Approximately 71% of patients had current or prior experience with injectable multiple sclerosis medication. Approximately 53% had experienced flu-like symptoms caused by their medication, and 47% had experienced mild injection-site reactions. At least one significant difference was seen between levels in all attributes, except injection time. The greatest change in relative importance between levels of an attribute was years until symptoms get worse from 1 to 4 years. The magnitude of this difference was about twice that of relapses in the next 4 years, frequency of injections, and flu-like symptoms. Conclusions: Most attributes examined in this experiment had an influence on patient preference. Patients placed a significant value on improvements in the frequency of dosing and disability progression. Results suggest that changes in injection frequency can be as important as changes in efficacy and safety attributes. Understanding which attributes of

  4. Women’s Preferences for Treatment of Perinatal Depression and Anxiety: A Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Ride, Jemimah; Lancsar, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal depression and anxiety (PNDA) are an international healthcare priority, associated with significant short- and long-term problems for women, their children and families. Effective treatment is available but uptake is suboptimal: some women go untreated whilst others choose treatments without strong evidence of efficacy. Better understanding of women’s preferences for treatment is needed to facilitate uptake of effective treatment. To address this issue, a discrete choice experiment (DCE) was administered to 217 pregnant or postnatal women in Australia, who were recruited through an online research company and had similar sociodemographic characteristics to Australian data for perinatal women. The DCE investigated preferences regarding cost, treatment type, availability of childcare, modality and efficacy. Data were analysed using logit-based models accounting for preference and scale heterogeneity. Predicted probability analysis was used to explore relative attribute importance and policy change scenarios, including how these differed by women’s sociodemographic characteristics. Cost and treatment type had the greatest impact on choice, such that a policy of subsidising effective treatments was predicted to double their uptake compared with the base case. There were differences in predicted uptake associated with certain sociodemographic characteristics: for example, women with higher educational attainment were more likely to choose effective treatment. The findings suggest policy directions for decision makers whose goal is to reduce the burden of PNDA on women, their children and families. PMID:27258096

  5. Exploring the social value of health-care interventions: a stated preference discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Green, Colin; Gerard, Karen

    2009-08-01

    Much of the literature on distributive preferences covers specific considerations in isolation, and recent reviews have suggested that research is required to inform on the relative importance of various key considerations. Responding to this research recommendation, we explore the distributive preferences of the general public using a set of generic social value judgments. We report on a discrete choice experiment (DCE) survey, using face-to-face interviews, in a sample of the general population (n=259). The context for the survey was resource allocation decisions in the UK National Health Service, using the process of health technology appraisal as an example. The attributes used covered health improvement, value for money, severity of health, and availability of other treatments, and it is the first such survey to use cost-effectiveness in scenarios described to the general public. Results support the feasibility and acceptability of the DCE approach for the elicitation of public preferences. Choice data are used to consider the relative importance of changes across attribute levels, and to model utility scores and relative probabilities for the full set of combinations of attributes and levels in the experimental design used (n=64). Results allow the relative social value of health technology scenarios to be explored. Findings add to a sparse literature on 'social' preferences, and show that DCE data can be used to consider the strength of preference over alternative scenarios in a priority-setting context.

  6. Modeling the bullying prevention program preferences of educators: a discrete choice conjoint experiment.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Charles E; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Rimas, Heather; Deal, Ken; Cunningham, Lesley; Short, Kathy; Chen, Yvonne

    2009-10-01

    We used discrete choice conjoint analysis to model the bullying prevention program preferences of educators. Using themes from computerized decision support lab focus groups (n = 45 educators), we composed 20 three-level bullying prevention program design attributes. Each of 1,176 educators completed 25 choice tasks presenting experimentally varied combinations of the study's attribute levels. Latent class analysis yielded three segments with different preferences. Decision Sensitive educators (31%) preferred that individual schools select bullying prevention programs. In contrast, Support Sensitive educators (51%) preferred that local school boards chose bullying prevention programs. This segment preferred more logistical and social support at every stage of the adoption, training, implementation, and long term maintenance processes. Cost Sensitive educators (16%) showed a stronger preference for programs minimizing costs, training, and implementation time demands. They felt prevention programs were less effective and that the time and space in the curriculum for bullying prevention was less adequate. They were less likely to believe that bullying prevention was their responsibility and more likely to agree that prevention was the responsibility of parents. All segments preferred programs supported by the anecdotal reports of colleagues from other schools rather than those based on scientific evidence. To ensure that the bullying prevention options available reflect the complex combination of attributes influencing real world adoption decisions, program developers need to accommodate the differing views of the Decision, Support, and Cost Sensitive segments while maximizing the support of parents and students.

  7. Using stated preference discrete choice modelling to evaluate the introduction of varicella vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jane; Kenny, Patricia; King, Madeleine; Louviere, Jordan; Viney, Rosalie; Yeoh, Angela

    2002-07-01

    Applications of stated preference discrete choice modelling (SPDCM) in health economics have been used to estimate consumer willingness to pay and to broaden the range of consequences considered in economic evaluation. This paper demonstrates how SPDCM can be used to predict participation rates, using the case of varicella (chickenpox) vaccination. Varicella vaccination may be cost effective compared to other public health programs, but this conclusion is sensitive to the proportion of the target population immunised. A choice experiment was conducted on a sample of Australian parents to predict uptake across a range of hypothetical programs. Immunisation rates would be increased by providing immunisation at no cost, by requiring it for school entry, by increasing immunisation rates in the community and decreasing the incidence of mild and severe side effects. There were two significant interactions; price modified the effect of both support from authorities and severe side effects. Country of birth was the only significant demographic characteristic. Depending on aspects of the immunisation program, the immunisation rates of children with Australian-born parents varied from 9% to 99% while for the children with parents born outside Australia they varied from 40% to 99%. This demonstrates how SPDCM can be used to understand the levels of attributes that will induce a change in the decision to immunise, the modification of the effect of one attribute by another, and subgroups in the population. Such insights can contribute to the optimal design and targeting of health programs.

  8. Wettability-gradient-driven micropump for transporting discrete liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardaweel, Hamzeh K.; Zamuruyev, Konstantin; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre; Davis, Cristina E.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we report our efforts toward building a microelectromechanical system-based micropump. The micropump is driven by a wettability gradient and used to transport discrete drops. The gradient in wettability is distributed axisymmetrically, with hydrophobicity of the micropump surface decreasing radially toward the center. Both physical and chemical properties of the surface are altered to obtain the wettability gradient needed for driving the drops. The surface of the micropump is, first, patterned with pre-designed micro-features that define the roughness of the surface and, then, coated with a low-energy interface film. Results show that drops deposited on the surface of the micropump move, in a directional way, along the wettability gradient. The average velocity of the deposited drops is 5 mm s-1. Measured contact angles decrease gradually from 157.0° to 124.2° toward the center of the micropump surface. Maximum driving force exerted by the solid surface on the drops is 12.82 µN. The average size of the drops transported on the surface of the micropump is 2 µL.

  9. Eliciting preferences for social health insurance in Ethiopia: a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Obse, Amarech; Ryan, Mandy; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Normand, Charles; Hailemariam, Damen

    2016-12-01

    As low-income countries are initiating health insurance schemes, Ethiopia is also planning to move away from out-of-pocket private payments to health insurance. The success of such a policy depends on understanding and predicting preferences of potential enrolees. This is because a scarce health care budget forces providers and consumers to make trade-offs between potential benefits within a health insurance. An assessment of preferences of potential enrolees can therefore add important information to optimal resource allocation in the design of health insurance. We used a discrete choice experiment to elicit preferences for social health insurance (SHI) among formal sector employees in Ethiopia. Respondents were presented with 18 binary hypothetical choices of SHI. Each insurance package was described by eight policy relevant attributes: premium, enrolment, exclusions, providers and coverage of inpatient services, outpatient services, drugs and tests. A mixed logit model was estimated to determine respondents' willingness to pay (WTP) for the different health insurance attributes. We also predicted probabilities of uptake for alternative SHI scenarios. Health insurance packages with 'no exclusions', 'public and private' providers, low rate of premium and full coverage of tests and drugs were highly valued and had greatest impact on the choices . Other things being equal, respondents were willing to contribute 1.52% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.71, 2.32) of their salary to a SHI package with no service exclusions having public and private service providers. This is substantially lower than the proposed 3% premium in the draft SHI strategy. For the typical SHI package proposed by the SHI strategy at the time, the uptake probability was predicted to be 29% (95% CI: 0.25, 0.33). The low uptake probability and WTP for the proposed SHI package suggests considering preferences of the potential enrolees' in revisions of the draft SHI strategy for introduction of

  10. Conducting discrete choice experiments to inform healthcare decision making: a user's guide.

    PubMed

    Lancsar, Emily; Louviere, Jordan

    2008-01-01

    Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are regularly used in health economics to elicit preferences for healthcare products and programmes. There is growing recognition that DCEs can provide more than information on preferences and, in particular, they have the potential to contribute more directly to outcome measurement for use in economic evaluation. Almost uniquely, DCEs could potentially contribute to outcome measurement for use in both cost-benefit and cost-utility analysis. Within this expanding remit, our intention is to provide a resource for current practitioners as well as those considering undertaking a DCE, using DCE results in a policy/commercial context, or reviewing a DCE. We present the fundamental principles and theory underlying DCEs. To aid in undertaking and assessing the quality of DCEs, we discuss the process of carrying out a choice study and have developed a checklist covering conceptualizing the choice process, selecting attributes and levels, experimental design, questionnaire design, pilot testing, sampling and sample size, data collection, coding of data, econometric analysis, validity, interpretation and welfare and policy analysis. In this fast-moving area, a number of issues remain on the research frontier. We therefore outline potentially fruitful areas for future research associated both with DCEs in general, and with health applications specifically, paying attention to how the results of DCEs can be used in economic evaluation. We also discuss emerging research trends. We conclude that if appropriately designed, implemented, analysed and interpreted, DCEs offer several advantages in the health sector, the most important of which is that they provide rich data sources for economic evaluation and decision making, allowing investigation of many types of questions, some of which otherwise would be intractable analytically. Thus, they offer viable alternatives and complements to existing methods of valuation and preference elicitation.

  11. Rural Clinician Scarcity and Job Preferences of Doctors and Nurses in India: A Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Krishna D.; Ryan, Mandy; Shroff, Zubin; Vujicic, Marko; Ramani, Sudha; Berman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The scarcity of rural doctors has undermined the ability of health systems in low and middle-income countries like India to provide quality services to rural populations. This study examines job preferences of doctors and nurses to inform what works in terms of rural recruitment strategies. Job acceptance of different strategies was compared to identify policy options for increasing the availability of clinical providers in rural areas. In 2010 a Discrete Choice Experiment was conducted in India. The study sample included final year medical and nursing students, and in-service doctors and nurses serving at Primary Health Centers. Eight job attributes were identified and a D-efficient fractional factorial design was used to construct pairs of job choices. Respondent acceptance of job choices was analyzed using multi-level logistic regression. Location mattered; jobs in areas offering urban amenities had a high likelihood of being accepted. Higher salary had small effect on doctor, but large effect on nurse, acceptance of rural jobs. At five times current salary levels, 13% (31%) of medical students (doctors) were willing to accept rural jobs. At half this level, 61% (52%) of nursing students (nurses) accepted a rural job. The strategy of reserving seats for specialist training in exchange for rural service had a large effect on job acceptance among doctors, nurses and nursing students. For doctors and nurses, properly staffed and equipped health facilities, and housing had small effects on job acceptance. Rural upbringing was not associated with rural job acceptance. Incentivizing doctors for rural service is expensive. A broader strategy of substantial salary increases with improved living, working environment, and education incentives is necessary. For both doctors and nurses, the usual strategies of moderate salary increases, good facility infrastructure, and housing will not be effective. Non-physician clinicians like nurse-practitioners offer an affordable

  12. Rural clinician scarcity and job preferences of doctors and nurses in India: a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Rao, Krishna D; Ryan, Mandy; Shroff, Zubin; Vujicic, Marko; Ramani, Sudha; Berman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The scarcity of rural doctors has undermined the ability of health systems in low and middle-income countries like India to provide quality services to rural populations. This study examines job preferences of doctors and nurses to inform what works in terms of rural recruitment strategies. Job acceptance of different strategies was compared to identify policy options for increasing the availability of clinical providers in rural areas. In 2010 a Discrete Choice Experiment was conducted in India. The study sample included final year medical and nursing students, and in-service doctors and nurses serving at Primary Health Centers. Eight job attributes were identified and a D-efficient fractional factorial design was used to construct pairs of job choices. Respondent acceptance of job choices was analyzed using multi-level logistic regression. Location mattered; jobs in areas offering urban amenities had a high likelihood of being accepted. Higher salary had small effect on doctor, but large effect on nurse, acceptance of rural jobs. At five times current salary levels, 13% (31%) of medical students (doctors) were willing to accept rural jobs. At half this level, 61% (52%) of nursing students (nurses) accepted a rural job. The strategy of reserving seats for specialist training in exchange for rural service had a large effect on job acceptance among doctors, nurses and nursing students. For doctors and nurses, properly staffed and equipped health facilities, and housing had small effects on job acceptance. Rural upbringing was not associated with rural job acceptance. Incentivizing doctors for rural service is expensive. A broader strategy of substantial salary increases with improved living, working environment, and education incentives is necessary. For both doctors and nurses, the usual strategies of moderate salary increases, good facility infrastructure, and housing will not be effective. Non-physician clinicians like nurse-practitioners offer an affordable

  13. Using discrete choice modeling to evaluate the preferences and willingness to pay for leptospirosis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Arbiol, Joseph; Yabe, Mitsuyasu; Nomura, Hisako; Borja, Maridel; Gloriani, Nina; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is highly endemic in the Philippines and a serious concern to public health. Local research on candidate vaccine is moving through the development pipeline. The availability of vaccines alone does not guarantee acceptance because individuals' vaccination choice decision is influenced by several factors. This study assessed how vaccine attributes and socio-demographic factors affect the acceptability of leptospirosis vaccine; and estimated individuals' willingness to pay for leptospirosis vaccine. A discrete choice experiment was conducted among leptospirosis and non-leptospirosis case respondents (n = 342) living in Metro Manila. Random Parameters Logit model was used to estimate the relative importance of vaccine attributes and socio-demographic variables on respondents' leptospirosis vaccination choice decision. The estimated model coefficients were used to derive implicit prices and willingness to pay for leptospirosis vaccine. Both case respondents preferred leptospirosis vaccine with 70-100% efficacy, mild to moderate risk of side-effects, given in a single shot, and at a lower price. Non-leptospirosis case respondents preferred a vaccine with 7 to 10 y of protection, while leptospirosis case respondents preferred a vaccine with 10 y protection. The probability of leptospirosis vaccination acceptance was affected by respondents' age, education, family size and income, proximity of home to rivers and sewers, and leptospirosis awareness level. Respondents' willingness to pay for leptospirosis vaccine (US$ 31.14-US$ 65.89) was higher than the Japanese retail price (US$ 21.60-US$ 24.00). Our findings indicated significant potential for introducing leptospirosis vaccine in the Philippine vaccine market. Delivery strategies to ensure equitable access to future leptospirosis vaccine are recommended.

  14. Using discrete choice modeling to evaluate the preferences and willingness to pay for leptospirosis vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Arbiol, Joseph; Yabe, Mitsuyasu; Nomura, Hisako; Borja, Maridel; Gloriani, Nina; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is highly endemic in the Philippines and a serious concern to public health. Local research on candidate vaccine is moving through the development pipeline. The availability of vaccines alone does not guarantee acceptance because individuals’ vaccination choice decision is influenced by several factors. This study assessed how vaccine attributes and socio-demographic factors affect the acceptability of leptospirosis vaccine; and estimated individuals’ willingness to pay for leptospirosis vaccine. A discrete choice experiment was conducted among leptospirosis and non-leptospirosis case respondents (n = 342) living in Metro Manila. Random Parameters Logit model was used to estimate the relative importance of vaccine attributes and socio-demographic variables on respondents’ leptospirosis vaccination choice decision. The estimated model coefficients were used to derive implicit prices and willingness to pay for leptospirosis vaccine. Both case respondents preferred leptospirosis vaccine with 70–100% efficacy, mild to moderate risk of side-effects, given in a single shot, and at a lower price. Non-leptospirosis case respondents preferred a vaccine with 7 to 10 y of protection, while leptospirosis case respondents preferred a vaccine with 10 y protection. The probability of leptospirosis vaccination acceptance was affected by respondents’ age, education, family size and income, proximity of home to rivers and sewers, and leptospirosis awareness level. Respondents’ willingness to pay for leptospirosis vaccine (US$ 31.14–US$ 65.89) was higher than the Japanese retail price (US$ 21.60-US$ 24.00). Our findings indicated significant potential for introducing leptospirosis vaccine in the Philippine vaccine market. Delivery strategies to ensure equitable access to future leptospirosis vaccine are recommended. PMID:25764105

  15. Eliciting preferences for waterpipe tobacco smoking using a discrete choice experiment: implications for product regulation

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Ramzi G; Maziak, Wasim; Hammond, David; Nakkash, Rima; Islam, Farahnaz; Cheng, Xi; Thrasher, James F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Waterpipe smoking is highly prevalent among university students, and has been increasing in popularity despite mounting evidence showing it is harmful to health. The aim of this study was to measure preferences for waterpipe smoking and determine which product characteristics are most important to smokers. Setting A large university in the Southeastern USA. Participants Adult waterpipe smokers attending the university (N=367). Design Participants completed an Internet-based discrete choice experiment to reveal their preferences for, and trade-offs between, the attributes of hypothetical waterpipe smoking sessions. Participants were presented with waterpipe lounge menus, each with three fruit-flavoured options and one tobacco flavoured option, in addition to an opt out option. Nicotine content and price were provided for each choice. Participants were randomised to either receive menus with a text-only health-warning message or no message. Outcome measures Multinomial and nested logit models were used to estimate the impact on consumer choice of attributes and between-subject assignment of health warnings respectively. Results On average, participants preferred fruit-flavoured varieties to tobacco flavour. They were averse to options labelled with higher nicotine content. Females and non-smokers of cigarettes were more likely than their counterparts to prefer flavoured and nicotine-free varieties. Participants exposed to a health warning were more likely to opt out. Conclusions Fruit-flavoured tobacco and lower nicotine content labels, two strategies widely used by the industry, increase the demand for waterpipe smoking among young adults. Waterpipe-specific regulation should limit the availability of flavoured waterpipe tobacco and require accurate labelling of constituents. Waterpipe-specific tobacco control regulation, along with research to inform policy, is required to curb this emerging public health threat. PMID:26353876

  16. Projected discrete ordinates methods for numerical transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, E.W.

    1985-01-01

    A class of Projected Discrete-Ordinates (PDO) methods is described for obtaining iterative solutions of discrete-ordinates problems with convergence rates comparable to those observed using Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA). The spatially discretized PDO solutions are generally not equal to the DSA solutions, but unlike DSA, which requires great care in the use of spatial discretizations to preserve stability, the PDO solutions remain stable and rapidly convergent with essentially arbitrary spatial discretizations. Numerical results are presented which illustrate the rapid convergence and the accuracy of solutions obtained using PDO methods with commonplace differencing methods.

  17. Preferences for long-term care services: willingness to pay estimates derived from a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Nieboer, Anna P; Koolman, Xander; Stolk, Elly A

    2010-05-01

    Ageing populations increase pressure on long-term care. Optimal resource allocation requires an optimal mix of care services based on costs and benefits. Contrary to costs, benefits remain largely unknown. This study elicits preferences in the general elderly population for long-term care services for varying types of patients. A discrete choice experiment was conducted in a general population subsample aged 50-65 years (N = 1082) drawn from the Dutch Survey Sampling International panel. To ascertain relative preferences for long-term care and willingness to pay for these, participants were asked to choose the best of two care scenarios for four groups of hypothetical patients: frail and demented elderly, with and without partner. The scenarios described long-term care using ten attributes based on Social Production Function theory: hours of care, organized social activities, transportation, living situation, same person delivering care, room for individual preferences, coordination of services, punctuality, time on waiting list, and co-payments. We found the greatest value was attached to same person delivering care and transportation services. Low value was attached to punctuality and room for individual preferences. Nursing homes were generally considered to be detrimental for well-being except for dementia patients without a partner. Overall, long-term care services were thought to produce greatest well-being for the patients 'without a partner' and those 'with dementia'. Individuals combining these two risk factors would benefit the most from all services except transportation which was considered more important for the frail elderly. The results support the notion that long-term care services represent different value for different types of patients and that the value of a service depends upon the social context. Examination of patient profiles confirmed the notion that physical, mental and social vulnerability affect valuation of the services. Policy

  18. Rural practice preferences among medical students in Ghana: a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer C; Gyakobo, Mawuli; Agyei-Baffour, Peter; Asabir, Kwesi; Kotha, S Rani; Kwansah, Janet; Nakua, Emmanuel; Snow, Rachel C; Dzodzomenyo, Mawuli

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine how specific job attributes influenced fourth year medical students’ stated preference for hypothetical rural job postings in Ghana. Methods Based on discussions with medical student focus groups and physicians in practice and in the Ministry of Health, we created a discrete choice experiment (DCE) that assessed how students’ stated preference for certain rural postings was influenced by various job attributes: a higher salary, free superior housing, an educational allowance for children, improved equipment, supportive management, shorter contracts before study leave and a car. We conducted the DCE among all fourth year medical students in Ghana using a brief structured questionnaire and used mixed logit models to estimate the utility of each job attribute. Findings Complete data for DCE analysis were available for 302 of 310 (97%) students. All attribute parameter estimates differed significantly from zero and had the expected signs. In the main effects mixed logit model, improved equipment and supportive management were most strongly associated with job preference (β = 1.42; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.17 to 1.66, and β = 1.17; 95% CI: 0.96 to 1.39, respectively), although shorter contracts and salary bonuses were also associated. Discontinuing the provision of basic housing had a large negative influence (β = −1.59; 95% CI: −1.88 to −1.31). In models including gender interaction terms, women’s preferences were more influenced by supportive management and men’s preferences by superior housing. Conclusion Better working conditions were strongly associated with the stated choice of hypothetical rural postings among fourth year Ghanaian medical students. Studies are needed to find out whether job attributes determine the actual uptake of rural jobs by graduating physicians. PMID:20458371

  19. Modeling the hospital safety partnership preferences of patients and their families: a discrete choice conjoint experiment

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Charles E; Hutchings, Tracy; Henderson, Jennifer; Rimas, Heather; Chen, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients and their families play an important role in efforts to improve health service safety. Objective The objective of this study is to understand the safety partnership preferences of patients and their families. Method We used a discrete choice conjoint experiment to model the safety partnership preferences of 1,084 patients or those such as parents acting on their behalf. Participants made choices between hypothetical safety partnerships composed by experimentally varying 15 four-level partnership design attributes. Results Participants preferred an approach to safety based on partnerships between patients and staff rather than a model delegating responsibility for safety to hospital staff. They valued the opportunity to participate in point of service safety partnerships, such as identity and medication double checks, that might afford an immediate risk reduction. Latent class analysis yielded two segments. Actively engaged participants (73.3%) comprised outpatients with higher education, who anticipated more benefits to safety partnerships, were more confident in their ability to contribute, and were more intent on participating. They were more likely to prefer a personal engagement strategy, valued scientific evidence, preferred a more active approach to safety education, and advocated disclosure of errors. The passively engaged segment (26.7%) anticipated fewer benefits, were less confident in their ability to contribute, and were less intent on participating. They were more likely to prefer an engagement strategy based on signage. They preferred that staff explain why they thought patients should help make care safer and decide whether errors were disclosed. Inpatients, those with immigrant backgrounds, and those with less education were more likely to be in this segment. Conclusion Health services need to communicate information regarding risks, ask about partnership preferences, create opportunities respecting individual differences, and

  20. Patients’ preferences for osteoporosis drug treatment: a discrete-choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The patient’s perspective is becoming increasingly important in clinical and policy decisions. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the preferences of patients with, or at risk of, osteoporosis for medication attributes, and to establish how patients trade between these attributes. Methods A discrete choice experiment survey was designed and patients were asked to choose between two hypothetical unlabelled drug treatments (and an opt-out option) that vary in five attributes: efficacy in reducing the risk of fracture, type of potential common side-effects, mode and frequency of administration and out-of-pocket costs. An efficient experimental design was used to construct the treatment option choice sets and a mixed logit panel data model was used to estimate patients’ preferences and trade-offs between attributes. Results A total of 257 patients with, or at risk of, osteoporosis completed the experiment. As expected, patients preferred treatment with higher effectiveness and lower cost. They also preferred either an oral monthly tablet or 6-month subcutaneous injection above weekly oral tablets, 3-month subcutaneous, 3-month intravenous or yearly intravenous injections. Patients disliked being at risk of gastro-intestinal disorders more than being at risk of skin reactions and flu-like symptoms. There was significant variation in preferences across the sample for all attributes except subcutaneous injection. Conclusions This study revealed that osteoporotic patients preferred 6-month subcutaneous injection and oral monthly tablet, and disliked gastro-intestinal disorders. Moreover, patients were willing to pay a personal contribution or to trade treatment efficacy for better levels of other attributes. Preferences for treatment attributes varied across patients and this highlights the importance of clinical decision-making taking individual preferences into account to improve osteoporosis care. PMID:24479410

  1. The use of specialty training to retain doctors in Malawi: A discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Kate L; Ulaya, Godwin; Lagarde, Mylène; Muula, Adamson S; Dzowela, Titha; Hanson, Kara

    2016-11-01

    Emigration has contributed to a shortage of doctors in many sub-Saharan African countries. Specialty training is highly valued by doctors and a potential tool for retention. Yet not all types of training may be valued equally. In the first study to examine preferences for postgraduate training in depth, we carried out a discrete choice experiment as part of a cross-sectional survey of all Malawian doctors within seven years of graduation and not yet in specialty training. Over August 2012 to March 2013, 148 doctors took part out of 153 eligible in Malawi. Despite evidence that specialty training is highly sought after, Malawian junior doctors would not accept all types of training. Doctors preferred timely training outside of Malawi in core specialties (internal medicine, general surgery, paediatrics, obstetrics & gynaecology). Specialty preferences are particularly strong, with most junior doctors requiring nearly double their monthly salary to accept training all in Malawi and over six-fold to accept training in ophthalmology (representing a bundle of unpopular but priority specialties). In contrast, the location of work before training did not significantly influence most doctors' choices when guaranteed specialty training. Using a latent class model, we identified four subgroups of junior doctors with distinct preferences. Policy simulations showed that these preferences could be leveraged by policymakers to improve retention in exchange for guaranteed specialty training, however incentivising the uptake of training in priority specialties will only be effective in those with more flexible preferences. These results indicate that indiscriminate expansion of postgraduate training to slow emigration of doctors from sub-Saharan African countries may not be effective unless doctors' preferences are taken into account.

  2. Developing attributes and attribute-levels for a discrete choice experiment on micro health insurance in rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are attribute-driven experimental techniques used to elicit stakeholders’ preferences to support the design and implementation of policy interventions. The validity of a DCE, therefore, depends on the appropriate specification of the attributes and their levels. There have been recent calls for greater rigor in implementing and reporting on the processes of developing attributes and attribute-levels for discrete choice experiments (DCEs). This paper responds to such calls by carefully reporting a systematic process of developing micro health insurance attributes and attribute-levels for the design of a DCE in rural Malawi. Methods Conceptual attributes and attribute-levels were initially derived from a literature review which informed the design of qualitative data collection tools to identify context specific attributes and attribute-levels. Qualitative data was collected in August-September 2012 from 12 focus group discussions with community residents and 8 in-depth interviews with health workers. All participants were selected according to stratified purposive sampling. The material was tape-recorded, fully transcribed, and coded by three researchers to identify context-specific attributes and attribute-levels. Expert opinion was used to scale down the attributes and levels. A pilot study confirmed the appropriateness of the selected attributes and levels for a DCE. Results First, a consensus, emerging from an individual level analysis of the qualitative transcripts, identified 10 candidate attributes. Levels were assigned to all attributes based on data from transcripts and knowledge of the Malawian context, derived from literature. Second, through further discussions with experts, four attributes were discarded based on multiple criteria. The 6 remaining attributes were: premium level, unit of enrollment, management structure, health service benefit package, transportation coverage and copayment levels. A final

  3. An Australian discrete choice experiment to value eq-5d health states.

    PubMed

    Viney, Rosalie; Norman, Richard; Brazier, John; Cronin, Paula; King, Madeleine T; Ratcliffe, Julie; Street, Deborah

    2014-06-01

    Conventionally, generic quality-of-life health states, defined within multi-attribute utility instruments, have been valued using a Standard Gamble or a Time Trade-Off. Both are grounded in expected utility theory but impose strong assumptions about the form of the utility function. Preference elicitation tasks for both are complicated, limiting the number of health states that each respondent can value and, therefore, that can be valued overall. The usual approach has been to value a set of the possible health states and impute values for the remainder. Discrete Choice Experiments (DCEs) offer an attractive alternative, allowing investigation of more flexible specifications of the utility function and greater coverage of the response surface. We designed a DCE to obtain values for EQ-5D health states and implemented it in an Australia-representative online panel (n = 1,031). A range of specifications investigating non-linear preferences with respect to time and interactions between EQ-5D levels were estimated using a random-effects probit model. The results provide empirical support for a flexible utility function, including at least some two-factor interactions. We then constructed a preference index such that full health and death were valued at 1 and 0, respectively, to provide a DCE-based algorithm for Australian cost-utility analyses.

  4. Discrete choice modeling of shovelnose sturgeon habitat selection in the Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonnot, T.W.; Wildhaber, M.L.; Millspaugh, J.J.; DeLonay, A.J.; Jacobson, R.B.; Bryan, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Substantive changes to physical habitat in the Lower Missouri River, resulting from intensive management, have been implicated in the decline of pallid (Scaphirhynchus albus) and shovelnose (S. platorynchus) sturgeon. To aid in habitat rehabilitation efforts, we evaluated habitat selection of gravid, female shovelnose sturgeon during the spawning season in two sections (lower and upper) of the Lower Missouri River in 2005 and in the upper section in 2007. We fit discrete choice models within an information theoretic framework to identify selection of means and variability in three components of physical habitat. Characterizing habitat within divisions around fish better explained selection than habitat values at the fish locations. In general, female shovelnose sturgeon were negatively associated with mean velocity between them and the bank and positively associated with variability in surrounding depths. For example, in the upper section in 2005, a 0.5 m s-1 decrease in velocity within 10 m in the bank direction increased the relative probability of selection 70%. In the upper section fish also selected sites with surrounding structure in depth (e.g., change in relief). Differences in models between sections and years, which are reinforced by validation rates, suggest that changes in habitat due to geomorphology, hydrology, and their interactions over time need to be addressed when evaluating habitat selection. Because of the importance of variability in surrounding depths, these results support an emphasis on restoring channel complexity as an objective of habitat restoration for shovelnose sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River.

  5. Discrete choice modeling of shovelnose sturgeon habitat selection in the Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonnot, T.W.; Wildhaber, M.L.; Millspaugh, J.J.; DeLonay, A.J.; Jacobson, R.B.; Bryan, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Substantive changes to physical habitat in the Lower Missouri River, resulting from intensive management, have been implicated in the decline of pallid (Scaphirhynchus albus) and shovelnose (S. platorynchus) sturgeon. To aid in habitat rehabilitation efforts, we evaluated habitat selection of gravid, female shovelnose sturgeon during the spawning season in two sections (lower and upper) of the Lower Missouri River in 2005 and in the upper section in 2007. We fit discrete choice models within an information theoretic framework to identify selection of means and variability in three components of physical habitat. Characterizing habitat within divisions around fish better explained selection than habitat values at the fish locations. In general, female shovelnose sturgeon were negatively associated with mean velocity between them and the bank and positively associated with variability in surrounding depths. For example, in the upper section in 2005, a 0.5ms-1 decrease in velocity within 10m in the bank direction increased the relative probability of selection 70%. In the upper section fish also selected sites with surrounding structure in depth (e.g., change in relief). Differences in models between sections and years, which are reinforced by validation rates, suggest that changes in habitat due to geomorphology, hydrology, and their interactions over time need to be addressed when evaluating habitat selection. Because of the importance of variability in surrounding depths, these results support an emphasis on restoring channel complexity as an objective of habitat restoration for shovelnose sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River. ?? 2011 Blackwell Verlag, Berlin.

  6. Is Best-Worst Scaling Suitable for Health State Valuation? A Comparison with Discrete Choice Experiments.

    PubMed

    Krucien, Nicolas; Watson, Verity; Ryan, Mandy

    2016-12-04

    Health utility indices (HUIs) are widely used in economic evaluation. The best-worst scaling (BWS) method is being used to value dimensions of HUIs. However, little is known about the properties of this method. This paper investigates the validity of the BWS method to develop HUI, comparing it to another ordinal valuation method, the discrete choice experiment (DCE). Using a parametric approach, we find a low level of concordance between the two methods, with evidence of preference reversals. BWS responses are subject to decision biases, with significant effects on individuals' preferences. Non parametric tests indicate that BWS data has lower stability, monotonicity and continuity compared to DCE data, suggesting that the BWS provides lower quality data. As a consequence, for both theoretical and technical reasons, practitioners should be cautious both about using the BWS method to measure health-related preferences, and using HUI based on BWS data. Given existing evidence, it seems that the DCE method is a better method, at least because its limitations (and measurement properties) have been extensively researched. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Using discrete choice experiments within a cost-benefit analysis framework: some considerations.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Emma

    2006-01-01

    A great advantage of the stated preference discrete choice experiment (SPDCE) approach to economic evaluation methodology is its immense flexibility within applied cost-benefit analyses (CBAs). However, while the use of SPDCEs in healthcare has increased markedly in recent years there has been a distinct lack of equivalent CBAs in healthcare using such SPDCE-derived valuations. This article outlines specific issues and some practical suggestions for consideration relevant to the development of CBAs using SPDCE-derived benefits. The article shows that SPDCE-derived CBA can adopt recent developments in cost-effectiveness methodology including the cost-effectiveness plane, appropriate consideration of uncertainty, the net-benefit framework and probabilistic sensitivity analysis methods, while maintaining the theoretical advantage of the SPDCE approach. The concept of a cost-benefit plane is no different in principle to the cost-effectiveness plane and can be a useful tool for reporting and presenting the results of CBAs.However, there are many challenging issues to address for the advancement of CBA methodology using SPCDEs within healthcare. Particular areas for development include the importance of accounting for uncertainty in SPDCE-derived willingness-to-pay values, the methodology of SPDCEs in clinical trial settings and economic models, measurement issues pertinent to using SPDCEs specifically in healthcare, and the importance of issues such as consideration of the dynamic nature of healthcare and the resulting impact this has on the validity of attribute definitions and context.

  8. Rationalising the 'irrational': a think aloud study of discrete choice experiment responses.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Mandy; Watson, Verity; Entwistle, Vikki

    2009-03-01

    Stated preference methods assume respondents' preferences are consistent with utility theory, but many empirical studies report evidence of preferences that violate utility theory. This evidence is often derived from quantitative tests that occur naturally within, or are added to, stated preference tasks. In this study, we use qualitative methods to explore three axioms of utility theory: completeness, monotonicity, and continuity. We take a novel approach, adopting a 'think aloud' technique to identify violations of the axioms of utility theory and to consider how well the quantitative tests incorporated within a discrete choice experiment are able to detect these. Results indicate that quantitative tests classify respondents as being 'irrational' when qualitative statements would indicate they are 'rational'. In particular, 'non-monotonic' responses can often be explained by respondents inferring additional information beyond what is presented in the task, and individuals who appear to adopt non-compensatory decision-making strategies do so because they rate particular attributes very highly (they are not attempting to simplify the task). The results also provide evidence of 'cost-based responses': respondents assumed tests with higher costs would be of higher quality. The value of including in-depth qualitative validation techniques in the development of stated preference tasks is shown.

  9. Parents’ preferences for vaccinating daughters against human papillomavirus in the Netherlands: a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To generate knowledge about potential improvements to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination information and organization strategies, we assessed how aspects of HPV vaccination are associated with parents’ preferences for their daughters’ uptake, and which trade-offs parents are willing to make between these aspects. Methods A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was conducted among parents with a daughter aged 10–12 years. Panel mixed logit regression models were used to determine parents’ preferences for vaccination. Trade-offs were quantified between four vaccination programme aspects: degree of protection against cervical cancer, duration of protection, risk of serious side-effects, and age of vaccination. Results Total response rate was 302/983 (31%). All aspects influenced respondents’ preferences for HPV vaccination (p < 0.05). Respondents preferred vaccination at age 14 years instead of at a younger age. Respondents were willing to trade-off 11% of the degree of protection to obtain life-time protection instead of 25 years. To obtain a vaccination with a risk of serious side-effects of 1/750,000 instead of 1/150,000, respondents were willing to trade-off 21%. Conclusions Uptake may rise if the age ranges for free HPV vaccinations are broadened. Based on the trade-offs parents were willing to make, we conclude that uptake would increase if new evidence indicated outcomes are better than are currently understood, particularly for degree and duration of protection. PMID:24885861

  10. Using discrete choice experiments to value informal care tasks: exploring preference heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Mentzakis, Emmanouil; Ryan, Mandy; McNamee, Paul

    2011-08-01

    While informal care is a significant part of non-market economic activity, its value is rarely acknowledged, perhaps reflecting a lack of market data. Traditional methods to value such care include opportunity and replacement cost. This study is the first to employ the discrete choice experiment methodology to value informal care tasks. A monetary value is estimated for three tasks (personal care, supervising and household tasks). The relationship between time spent on formal and informal care is also modelled and preference heterogeneity investigated using the Latent Class Model. Complementarity between supervising tasks and formal care is observed. Monetary compensation is important, with willingness to accept per hour values ranging from £0.38 to £0.83 for personal care, £0.75 for supervising and £0.31 to £0.6 for household tasks. Heterogeneity in preferences is observed, with monetary compensation being important for younger people, but insignificant for older individuals. Such heterogeneity is important at the policy level. Values are lower than those generated by opportunity cost and replacement cost methods, perhaps because of the limited ability of revealed preference methods to capture broader aspect of utility. Differences with contingent valuation methods are also observed, suggesting future research should investigate the external validity of the different methods.

  11. A Bayesian random effects discrete-choice model for resource selection: Population-level selection inference

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, D.L.; Johnson, D.; Griffith, B.

    2006-01-01

    Bayesian hierarchical discrete-choice model for resource selection can provide managers with 2 components of population-level inference: average population selection and variability of selection. Both components are necessary to make sound management decisions based on animal selection.

  12. Examining patient preferences in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using a discrete-choice approach

    PubMed Central

    Alten, Rieke; Krüger, Klaus; Rellecke, Julian; Schiffner-Rohe, Julia; Behmer, Olaf; Schiffhorst, Guido; Nolting, Hans-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Background Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) used in second-line treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are administered parenterally. However, so-called targeted synthetic DMARDs (tsDMARDs) – developed more recently – offer alternative (ie, oral) administration forms in second-line treatment. Since bDMARDs and tsDMARDs can be regarded as equal in terms of efficacy, the present study examines whether such characteristics as route of administration drive RA patients’ treatment choice. This may ultimately suggest superiority of some second-line DMARDs over equally effective options, at least according to RA-patient preferences. Objective The current study assessed the importance of oral administration among other treatment characteristics differing between available second-line DMARDs for RA patients’ preferences using a discrete-choice experiment (DCE). Materials and methods The DCE involved scenarios of three hypothetical treatment options in a d-efficient design with varying levels of key attributes (route and frequency of administration, time till onset of drug effect, combination therapy, possible side effects), as defined by focus groups. Further patient characteristics were recorded by an accompanying questionnaire. In the DCE, patients were asked to choose best and worst options (best–worst scaling). Results were analyzed by count analysis and adjusted regression analysis. Results A total of 1,588 subjects completed the DCE and were eligible for final analyses. Across all characteristics included in the DCE, “oral administration” was most desired and “intravenous infusion” was most strongly rejected. This was followed by “no combination with methotrexate” being strongly preferred and “intake every 1–2 weeks” being strongly rejected. On average, levels of route of administration showed strongest influences on patients’ decisions in post hoc bootstrapping analysis. Conclusion According to the results, an

  13. Health worker preferences for community-based health insurance payment mechanisms: a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2004, a community-based health insurance scheme (CBI) was introduced in Nouna health district, Burkina Faso. Since its inception, coverage has remained low and dropout rates high. One important reason for low coverage and high dropout is that health workers do not support the CBI scheme because they are dissatisfied with the provider payment mechanism of the CBI. Methods A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was used to examine CBI provider payment attributes that influence health workers’ stated preferences for payment mechanisms. The DCE was conducted among 176 health workers employed at one of the 34 primary care facilities or the district hospital in Nouna health district. Conditional logit models with main effects and interactions terms were used for analysis. Results Reimbursement of service fees (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.49, p < 0.001) and CBI contributions for medical supplies and equipment (aOR 1.47, p < 0.001) had the strongest effect on whether the health workers chose a given provider payment mechanism. The odds of selecting a payment mechanism decreased significantly if the mechanism included (i) results-based financing (RBF) payments made through the local health management team (instead of directly to the health workers (aOR 0.86, p < 0.001)) or (ii) RBF payments based on CBI coverage achieved in the health worker’s facility relative to the coverage achieved at other facilities (instead of payments based on the numbers of individuals or households enrolled at the health worker’s facility (aOR 0.86, p < 0.001)). Conclusions Provider payment mechanisms can crucially determine CBI performance. Based on the results from this DCE, revised CBI payment mechanisms were introduced in Nouna health district in January 2011, taking into consideration health worker preferences on how they are paid. PMID:22697498

  14. Acceptability of Financial Incentives for Health Behaviours: A Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Emma L.; Becker, Frauke; Ternent, Laura; Sniehotta, Falko F.; McColl, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthy behaviours are important determinants of health and disease, but many people find it difficult to perform these behaviours. Systematic reviews support the use of personal financial incentives to encourage healthy behaviours. There is concern that financial incentives may be unacceptable to the public, those delivering services and policymakers, but this has been poorly studied. Without widespread acceptability, financial incentives are unlikely to be widely implemented. We sought to answer two questions: what are the relative preferences of UK adults for attributes of financial incentives for healthy behaviours? Do preferences vary according to the respondents’ socio-demographic characteristics? Methods We conducted an online discrete choice experiment. Participants were adult members of a market research panel living in the UK selected using quota sampling. Preferences were examined for financial incentives for: smoking cessation, regular physical activity, attendance for vaccination, and attendance for screening. Attributes of interest (and their levels) were: type of incentive (none, cash, shopping vouchers or lottery tickets); value of incentive (a continuous variable); schedule of incentive (same value each week, or value increases as behaviour change is sustained); other information provided (none, written information, face-to-face discussion, or both); and recipients (all eligible individuals, people living in low-income households, or pregnant women). Results Cash or shopping voucher incentives were preferred as much as, or more than, no incentive in all cases. Lower value incentives and those offered to all eligible individuals were preferred. Preferences for additional information provided alongside incentives varied between behaviours. Younger participants and men were more likely to prefer incentives. There were no clear differences in preference according to educational attainment. Conclusions Cash or shopping voucher

  15. Public acceptability of population-level interventions to reduce alcohol consumption: a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Pechey, Rachel; Burge, Peter; Mentzakis, Emmanouil; Suhrcke, Marc; Marteau, Theresa M

    2014-07-01

    Public acceptability influences policy action, but the most acceptable policies are not always the most effective. This discrete choice experiment provides a novel investigation of the acceptability of different interventions to reduce alcohol consumption and the effect of information on expected effectiveness, using a UK general population sample of 1202 adults. Policy options included high, medium and low intensity versions of: Minimum Unit Pricing (MUP) for alcohol; reducing numbers of alcohol retail outlets; and regulating alcohol advertising. Outcomes of interventions were predicted for: alcohol-related crimes; alcohol-related hospital admissions; and heavy drinkers. First, the models obtained were used to predict preferences if expected outcomes of interventions were not taken into account. In such models around half of participants or more were predicted to prefer the status quo over implementing outlet reductions or higher intensity MUP. Second, preferences were predicted when information on expected outcomes was considered, with most participants now choosing any given intervention over the status quo. Acceptability of MUP interventions increased by the greatest extent: from 43% to 63% preferring MUP of £1 to the status quo. Respondents' own drinking behaviour also influenced preferences, with around 90% of non-drinkers being predicted to choose all interventions over the status quo, and with more moderate than heavy drinkers favouring a given policy over the status quo. Importantly, the study findings suggest public acceptability of alcohol interventions is dependent on both the nature of the policy and its expected effectiveness. Policy-makers struggling to mobilise support for hitherto unpopular but promising policies should consider giving greater prominence to their expected outcomes.

  16. Understanding Health Workers’ Job Preferences to Improve Rural Retention in Timor-Leste: Findings from a Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Smitz, Marc-Francois; Witter, Sophie; Lemiere, Christophe; Eozenou, Patrick Hoang-Vu; Lievens, Tomas; Zaman, Rashid U.; Engelhardt, Kay; Hou, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Background Timor-Leste built its health workforce up from extremely low levels after its war of independence, with the assistance of Cuban training, but faces challenges as the first cohorts of doctors will shortly be freed from their contracts with government. Retaining doctors, nurses and midwives in remote areas requires a good understanding of health worker preferences. Methods The article reports on a discrete choice experiment (DCE) carried out amongst 441 health workers, including 173 doctors, 150 nurses and 118 midwives. Qualitative methods were conducted during the design phase. The attributes which emerged were wages, skills upgrading/specialisation, location, working conditions, transportation and housing. Findings One of the main findings of the study is the relative lack of importance of wages for doctors, which could be linked to high intrinsic motivation, perceptions of having an already highly paid job (relative to local conditions), and/or being in a relatively early stage of their career for most respondents. Professional development provides the highest satisfaction with jobs, followed by the working conditions. Doctors with less experience, males and the unmarried are more flexible about location. For nurses and midwives, skill upgrading emerged as the most cost effective method. Conclusions The study is the first of its kind conducted in Timor-Leste. It provides policy-relevant information to balance financial and non-financial incentives for different cadres and profiles of staff. It also augments a thin literature on the preferences of working doctors (as opposed to medical students) in low and middle income countries and provides insights into the ability to instil motivation to work in rural areas, which may be influenced by rural recruitment and Cuban-style training, with its emphasis on community service. PMID:27846242

  17. A Piecewise Bi-Linear Discontinuous Finite Element Spatial Discretization of the Sn Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Chang, J H; Warsa, J S; Adams, M L

    2010-12-22

    We present a new spatial discretization of the discrete-ordinates transport equation in two-dimensional Cartesian (X-Y) geometry for arbitrary polygonal meshes. The discretization is a discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) that utilizes piecewise bi-linear (PWBL) basis functions, which are formally introduced in this paper. We also present a series of numerical results on quadrilateral and polygonal grids and compare these results to a variety of other spatial discretizations that have been shown to be successful on these grid types. Finally, we note that the properties of the PWBL basis functions are such that the leading-order piecewise bi-linear discontinuous finite element (PWBLD) solution will satisfy a reasonably accurate diffusion discretization in the thick diffusion limit, making the PWBLD method a viable candidate for many different classes of transport problems.

  18. Patient preferences for treatment of multiple sclerosis with disease-modifying therapies: a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Dominguez, José Manuel; Muñoz, Delicias; Comellas, Marta; Gonzalbo, Irmina; Lizán, Luis; Polanco Sánchez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess disease-modifying therapy (DMT) preferences in a population of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to estimate the association between sociodemographic and clinical factors and these preferences. Methods Preferences for DMTs attributes were measured using a discrete choice experiment. Analysis of preferences was assessed using mixed-logit hierarchical Bayes regression. A multilinear regression was used to evaluate the association between the preferences for each attribute and patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics. A Student’s t-test or Welch’s t-test was used for subgroup comparisons. Results A total of 125 patients were included in the final analysis (62.9% female, mean age 44.5 years, 71.5% with relapsing-remitting MS diagnosis). The most important factor for patients was the possibility of suffering from the side effects of the treatment (relative importance [RI] =50%), followed by a delay in disease progression (RI =19.4%), and route and frequency of administration (RI =14.3%). According to maximum acceptable risk, patients were willing to accept an increase of 3.8% in severity of side effects, for a delay of 1 year in disease progression. Treatment duration was the most prevalent factor affecting preferences, followed by the age of patients, type of MS, level of education, and the type of current treatment. Patients treated orally were significantly more concerned about the route and frequency of administration (P=0.026) than patients on injectable therapy. Naïve patients stated significantly less importance to prevention of relapses (P=0.021) and deterioration of the capacity for performing usual daily life activities (P=0.015). Finally, patients with >5 years since diagnosis were significantly less concerned about preventing disease progression (P=0.021), and more concerned about treatment side effects (P=0.052) than compared with patients with <5 years of MS history. Conclusion The most important attribute for

  19. Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage, individual wealth status and patterns of delivery care utilization in Nigeria: a multilevel discrete choice analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aremu, Olatunde; Lawoko, Stephen; Dalal, Koustuv

    2011-01-01

    Background High maternal mortality continues to be a major public health problem in most part of the developing world, including Nigeria. Understanding the utilization pattern of maternal healthcare services has been accepted as an important factor for reducing maternal deaths. This study investigates the effect of neighborhood and individual socioeconomic position on the utilization of different forms of place of delivery among women of reproductive age in Nigeria. Methods A population-based multilevel discrete choice analysis was performed using the most recent population-based 2008 Nigerian Demographic and Health Surveys data of women aged between 15 and 49 years. The analysis was restricted to 15,162 ever-married women from 888 communities across the 36 states of the federation including the Federal Capital Territory of Abuja. Results The choice of place to deliver varies across the socioeconomic strata. The results of the multilevel discrete choice models indicate that with every other factor controlled for, the household wealth status, women’s occupation, women’s and partner’s high level of education attainment, and possession of health insurance were associated with use of private and government health facilities for child birth relative to home delivery. The results also show that higher birth order and young maternal age were associated with use of home delivery. Living in a highly socioeconomic disadvantaged neighborhood is associated with home birth compared with the patronage of government health facilities. More specifically, the result revealed that choice of facility-based delivery is clustered around the neighborhoods. Conclusion Home delivery, which cuts across all socioeconomic strata, is a common practice among women in Nigeria. Initiatives that would encourage the appropriate use of healthcare facilities at little or no cost to the most disadvantaged should be accorded the utmost priority. PMID:21792338

  20. Incorporating environmental attitudes in discrete choice models: an exploration of the utility of the awareness of consequences scale.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, David; Mariel, Petr; Hess, Stephane

    2015-02-01

    Environmental economists are increasingly interested in better understanding how people cognitively organise their beliefs and attitudes towards environmental change in order to identify key motives and barriers that stimulate or prevent action. In this paper, we explore the utility of a commonly used psychometric scale, the awareness of consequences (AC) scale, in order to better understand stated choices. The main contribution of the paper is that it provides a novel approach to incorporate attitudinal information into discrete choice models for environmental valuation: firstly, environmental attitudes are incorporated using a reinterpretation of the classical AC scale recently proposed by Ryan and Spash (2012); and, secondly, attitudinal data is incorporated as latent variables under a hybrid choice modelling framework. This novel approach is applied to data from a survey conducted in the Basque Country (Spain) in 2008 aimed at valuing land-use policies in a Natura 2000 Network site. The results are relevant to policy-making because choice models that are able to accommodate underlying environmental attitudes may help in designing more effective environmental policies.

  1. Simulation study to determine the impact of different design features on design efficiency in discrete choice experiments

    PubMed Central

    Vanniyasingam, Thuva; Cunningham, Charles E; Foster, Gary; Thabane, Lehana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are routinely used to elicit patient preferences to improve health outcomes and healthcare services. While many fractional factorial designs can be created, some are more statistically optimal than others. The objective of this simulation study was to investigate how varying the number of (1) attributes, (2) levels within attributes, (3) alternatives and (4) choice tasks per survey will improve or compromise the statistical efficiency of an experimental design. Design and methods A total of 3204 DCE designs were created to assess how relative design efficiency (d-efficiency) is influenced by varying the number of choice tasks (2–20), alternatives (2–5), attributes (2–20) and attribute levels (2–5) of a design. Choice tasks were created by randomly allocating attribute and attribute level combinations into alternatives. Outcome Relative d-efficiency was used to measure the optimality of each DCE design. Results DCE design complexity influenced statistical efficiency. Across all designs, relative d-efficiency decreased as the number of attributes and attribute levels increased. It increased for designs with more alternatives. Lastly, relative d-efficiency converges as the number of choice tasks increases, where convergence may not be at 100% statistical optimality. Conclusions Achieving 100% d-efficiency is heavily dependent on the number of attributes, attribute levels, choice tasks and alternatives. Further exploration of overlaps and block sizes are needed. This study's results are widely applicable for researchers interested in creating optimal DCE designs to elicit individual preferences on health services, programmes, policies and products. PMID:27436671

  2. Choice.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Jay

    2008-09-01

    Understanding how and why analysands make the choices they do is central to both the clinical and the theoretical projects of psychoanalysis. And yet we know very little about the process of choice or about the relationship between choices and motives. A striking parallel is to be found between the ways choice is narrated in ancient Greek texts and the experience of analysts as they observe patients making choices in everyday clinical work. Pursuing this convergence of classical and contemporary sensibilities will illuminate crucial elements of the various meanings of choice, and of the way that these meanings change over the course of psychoanalytic treatment.

  3. The effect of traffic lights and regulatory statements on the choice between complementary and conventional medicines in Australia: results from a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Spinks, Jean; Mortimer, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that complementary medicines are currently 'under-regulated' in some countries due to their potential for harm as a direct result from side-effects or interactions; from delaying more effective care; or from the economic cost of purchasing an ineffective or inappropriate treatment. The requirement of additional labelling on complementary medicine products has been suggested in Australia and may provide additional information to consumers at the point of purchase. This paper details a unique way of testing the potential effects on consumer behaviour of including either a traffic light logo or regulatory statement on labels. Using a discrete choice experiment, data were collected in 2012 in a sample of 521 Australians with either type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease. We find that additional labelling can affect consumer behaviour, but in unpredictable ways. The results of this experiment are informative to further the dialogue concerning possible regulatory mechanisms.

  4. Colloid facilitated transport of lanthanides through discrete fractures in chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Emily; Klein Ben-David, Ofra; Teutsch, Nadya; Weisbrod, Noam

    2015-04-01

    Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste is the internationally agreed-upon, long term solution for the disposal of long lived radionuclides and spent fuel. Eventually, corrosion of the waste canisters may lead to leakage of their hazardous contents, and the radionuclides can ultimately make their way into groundwater and pose a threat to the biosphere. Engineered bentonite barriers placed around nuclear waste repositories are generally considered sufficient to impede the transport of radionuclides from their storage location to the groundwater. However, colloidal-sized mobile bentonite particles eroding from these barriers have come under investigation as a potential transport vector for radionuclides sorbed to them. In addition, the presence of organic matter in groundwater has been shown to additionally facilitate the uptake of radionuclides by the clay colloids. This study aims to evaluate the transport behaviors of radionuclides in colloid-facilitated transport through a fractured chalk matrix and under geochemical conditions representative of the Negev desert, Israel. Lanthanides are considered an acceptable substitute to actinides for research on radionuclide transportation due to their similar chemical behavior. In this study, the migration of Ce both with and without colloidal particles was explored and compared to the migration of a conservative tracer (bromide). Tracer solutions containing known concentrations of Ce, bentonite colloids, humic acid and bromide were prepared in a matrix solution containing salt concentrations representative of that of the average rain water found in the Negev. These solutions were then injected into a flow system constructed around a naturally fractured chalk core. Samples were analyzed for Ce and Br using ICP-MS, and colloid concentrations were determined using spectrophotographic analysis. Breakthrough curves comparing the rates of transportation of each tracer were obtained, allowing for comparison of

  5. Constrained Latent Class Analysis: Simultaneous Classification and Scaling of Discrete Choice Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockenholt, Ulf; Bockenholt, Ingo

    1991-01-01

    A reparameterization of a latent class model is presented to classify and scale nomial and ordered categorical choice data simultaneously. The model extension represents a nonhomogeneous population as a mixture of homogeneous subpopulations. Simulated data and data from a magazine preference survey of 347 college students illustrate the model.…

  6. Spatial and Angular Moment Analysis of Continuous and Discretized Particle Transport Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, Patrick Shawn

    1998-08-01

    A spatial and angular moment analysis of the linear Boltzmann transport equation is used to compute exact flux-weighted average spatial quantities such as the 'center of mass' and 'radius of gyration' of the flux distribution. This moment analysis is valid for multidimensional general-geometry analytic transport problems, posed in an infinite homogeneous medium, with multiple energy groups and anisotropic scattering. The results from the analysis are used in this thesis to assess how accurately approximations to the transport equation compute these flux-weighted average spatial quantities. The first part of this thesis addresses the theoretical analysis of spatial differencing schemes used to discretize the discrete ordinates approximation of the linear Boltzmann transport equation. Discrete ordinates methods have been utilized for many years to obtain numerical solutions of neutron transport problems in which the optical width of the spatial cells is small. The traditional truncation analysis can be used to assess the accuracy of spatial differencing schemes for these problems. The same discrete ordinates methods have in recent years been utilized for radiative transfer problems characterized by optically thick spatial cells and scattering ratios near unity. In this case, an asymptotic diffusion limit analysis has been applied to discretized transport problems in order to assess the accuracy of spatial differencing schemes. At present, theoretical methods for analyzing discretized transport problems with optically intermediate and thick spatial cells and arbitrary scattering ratios are not available. We develop a moment analysis method for theoretically analyzing discrete ordinates spatial differencing schemes that makes no assumptions on the optical thickness of the spatial cells or on the value of the scattering ratio. The second part of this thesis concerns the Simplified PN (SPN) approximation, a multidimensional generalization of the one-dimensional planar

  7. The Suppression of Energy Discretization Errors in Multigroup Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Edward

    2013-06-17

    The Objective of this project is to develop, implement, and test new deterministric methods to solve, as efficiently as possible, multigroup neutron transport problems having an extremely large number of groups. Our approach was to (i) use the standard CMFD method to "coarsen" the space-angle grid, yielding a multigroup diffusion equation, and (ii) use a new multigrid-in-space-and-energy technique to efficiently solve the multigroup diffusion problem. The overall strategy of (i) how to coarsen the spatial an energy grids, and (ii) how to navigate through the various grids, has the goal of minimizing the overall computational effort. This approach yields not only the fine-grid solution, but also coarse-group flux-weighted cross sections that can be used for other related problems.

  8. Influence of injection mode on transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    DOE PAGES

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H.; ...

    2015-09-12

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident and flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large-scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high-performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt a Lagrangian approachmore » to simulate transport therein. Results show that after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region, both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than 2. Lastly, the physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures, which offer reduced resistance to flow, and in-fracture channeling, which results from the topology of the DFN.« less

  9. Influence of injection mode on transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H.; Makedonska, N.; Karra, S.

    2015-09-12

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident and flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large-scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high-performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt a Lagrangian approach to simulate transport therein. Results show that after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region, both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than 2. Lastly, the physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures, which offer reduced resistance to flow, and in-fracture channeling, which results from the topology of the DFN.

  10. Qualitative Assessment of the Application of a Discrete Choice Experiment With Community Health Workers in Uganda: Aligning Incentives With Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Brunie, Aurélie; Chen, Mario; Akol, Angela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Maximizing the benefits of community health worker (CHW) programs requires strategies for improving motivation, performance, and retention. Discrete choice experiments (DCE) are increasingly used to inform policy response to health workforce shortages in rural areas, and may be of value in the context of CHW programs. Participants are presented with pairs of hypothetical jobs that are described by job attributes with varying levels and are asked what their preferred job is within each pair. Responses are then analyzed quantitatively to obtain information on what attributes are important to participants. We conducted a qualitative assessment to examine the appropriateness and validity of applying a DCE to a new population of CHWs with lower literacy. Methods: In 2011, we conducted a mixed-method study with CHWs in Uganda, consisting of 183 surveys and 43 in-depth interviews (IDIs). The DCE was administered to both survey and IDI participants. This article reports on the qualitative assessment of the implementation of the DCE. We compare DCE responses between survey and IDI participants to determine whether administering the DCE in a qualitative (IDI) context altered responses. We then present additional information collected on CHWs' decision-making processes and their experiences with the DCE in the IDIs. Results: Choices made by IDI participants were consistent with the choices made by survey participants. In-depth exploration of CHWs' observations in answering the DCE suggest that, overall, CHWs comprehended the DCE exercise and made reasoned choices. However, the data revealed some level of cognitive difficulty and highlighted some design and implementation challenges that are important to consider, particularly when applying a DCE to populations with lower literacy. These include the need to keep the number of attributes small; to choose levels that are realistic yet show sufficient range; and to clearly define attributes and their levels

  11. The Australian public's preferences for emergency care alternatives and the influence of the presenting context: a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Paul; Whitty, Jennifer A; Kendall, Elizabeth; Ratcliffe, Julie; Wilson, Andrew; Littlejohns, Peter; Scuffham, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The current study seeks to quantify the Australian public's preferences for emergency care alternatives and determine if preferences differ depending on presenting circumstances. Setting Increasing presentations to emergency departments have led to overcrowding, long waiting times and suboptimal health system performance. Accordingly, new service models involving the provision of care in alternative settings and delivered by other practitioners continue to be developed. Participants A stratified sample of Australian adults (n=1838), 1382 from Queensland and 456 from South Australia, completed the survey. This included 951 females and 887 males from the 2045 people who met the screening criteria out of the 4354 people who accepted the survey invitation. Interventions A discrete choice experiment was used to elicit preferences in the context of one of four hypothetical scenarios: a possible concussion, a rash/asthma-related problem involving oneself or one's child and an anxiety-related presentation. Mixed logit regression was used to analyse the dependent variable choice and identify the relative importance of care attributes and the propensity to access care in each context. Results Results indicated a preference for treatment by an emergency physician in hospital for possible concussion and treatment by a doctor in ambulatory settings for rash/asthma-related and anxiety-related problems. Participants were consistently willing to wait longer before making trade-offs in the context of the rash/asthma-related scenario compared with when the same problem affected their child. Results suggest a clear preference for lower costs, shorter wait times and strong emphasis on quality care; however, significant preference heterogeneity was observed. Conclusions This study has increased awareness that the public's emergency care choices will differ depending on the presenting context. It has further demonstrated the importance of service quality as a determinant of

  12. A discrete choice experiment investigating preferences for funding drugs used to treat orphan diseases: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Mentzakis, Emmanouil; Stefanowska, Patricia; Hurley, Jeremiah

    2011-07-01

    Policy debate about funding criteria for drugs used to treat rare, orphan diseases is gaining prominence. This study presents evidence from a discrete choice experiment using a convenience sample of university students to investigate individual preferences regarding public funding for drugs used to treat rare diseases and common diseases. This pilot study finds that: other things equal, the respondents do not prefer to have the government spend more for drugs used to treat rare diseases; that respondents are not willing to pay more per life year gained for a rare disease than a common disease; and that respondents weigh relevant attributes of the coverage decisions (e.g. costs, disease severity and treatment effectiveness) similarly for both rare and common diseases. The results confirm the importance of severity and treatment effectiveness in preferences for public funding. Although this is the first study of its kind, the results send a cautionary message regarding the special treatment of orphan drugs in coverage decision-making.

  13. Probability and delay of reinforcement as factors in discrete-trial choice.

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, J E

    1985-01-01

    Pigeons chose between two alternatives that differed in the probability of reinforcement and the delay to reinforcement. A peck on the red key always produced a delay of 5 s and then a possible reinforcer. The probability of reinforcement for responding on this key varied from .05 to 1.0 in different conditions. A response on the green key produced a delay of adjustable duration and then a possible reinforcer, with the probability of reinforcement ranging from .25 to 1.0 in different conditions. The green-key delay was increased or decreased many times per session, depending on a subject's previous choices. The purpose of these adjustments was to estimate an indifference point, or a delay that resulted in a subject's choosing each alternative about equally often. In conditions where the probability of reinforcement was five times higher on the green key, the green-key delay averaged about 12 s at the indifference point. In conditions where the probability of reinforcement was twice as high on the green key, the green-key delay at the indifference point was about 8 s with high probabilities and about 6 s with low probabilities. An analysis based on these results and those from studies on delay of reinforcement suggests that pigeons' choices are relatively insensitive to variations in the probability of reinforcement between .2 and 1.0, but quite sensitive to variations in probability between .2 and 0. PMID:4020322

  14. Analysis of discrete reaction-diffusion equations for autocatalysis and continuum diffusion equations for transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chi-Jen

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we analyze both the spatiotemporal behavior of: (A) non-linear “reaction” models utilizing (discrete) reaction-diffusion equations; and (B) spatial transport problems on surfaces and in nanopores utilizing the relevant (continuum) diffusion or Fokker-Planck equations. Thus, there are some common themes in these studies, as they all involve partial differential equations or their discrete analogues which incorporate a description of diffusion-type processes. However, there are also some qualitative differences, as shall be discussed below.

  15. Modeling the information preferences of parents of children with mental health problems: a discrete choice conjoint experiment.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Charles E; Deal, Ken; Rimas, Heather; Buchanan, Don H; Gold, Michelle; Sdao-Jarvie, Katherine; Boyle, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Although materials informing parents about children's mental health (CMH) problems can improve outcomes, we know relatively little about the design factors that might influence their utilization of available resources. We used a discrete choice conjoint experiment to model the information preferences of parents seeking mental health services for 6 to 18 year olds. Parents completed 30 choice tasks presenting experimentally varied combinations of 20 four-level CMH information content, transfer process, and outcome attributes. Latent class analysis revealed three segments with different preferences. Parents in the Action segment (43%) chose materials providing step-by-step solutions to behavioral or emotional problems. They preferred weekly meetings with other parents and coaching calls from a therapist. The Information segment (41%) chose materials helping them understand rather than solve their child's problems. These parents were more sensitive to logistical factors such as receiving information in groups, the location where information was available, the modality in which the information was presented, and the time required to obtain and use the information. The Overwhelmed segment (16%) reported more oppositional and conduct problems, felt their children's difficulties exerted a greater adverse impact on family functioning, and reported higher personal depression scores than those in the Action or Information segments. Nonetheless, they did not choose information about, or solutions to, the problems their children presented. Simulations predicted that maximizing utilization and realizing the potential benefits of CMH information would require knowledge transfer strategies consistent with each segment's preferences.

  16. A systematic review of the reliability and validity of discrete choice experiments in valuing non-market environmental goods.

    PubMed

    Rakotonarivo, O Sarobidy; Schaafsma, Marije; Hockley, Neal

    2016-12-01

    While discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are increasingly used in the field of environmental valuation, they remain controversial because of their hypothetical nature and the contested reliability and validity of their results. We systematically reviewed evidence on the validity and reliability of environmental DCEs from the past thirteen years (Jan 2003-February 2016). 107 articles met our inclusion criteria. These studies provide limited and mixed evidence of the reliability and validity of DCE. Valuation results were susceptible to small changes in survey design in 45% of outcomes reporting reliability measures. DCE results were generally consistent with those of other stated preference techniques (convergent validity), but hypothetical bias was common. Evidence supporting theoretical validity (consistency with assumptions of rational choice theory) was limited. In content validity tests, 2-90% of respondents protested against a feature of the survey, and a considerable proportion found DCEs to be incomprehensible or inconsequential (17-40% and 10-62% respectively). DCE remains useful for non-market valuation, but its results should be used with caution. Given the sparse and inconclusive evidence base, we recommend that tests of reliability and validity are more routinely integrated into DCE studies and suggest how this might be achieved.

  17. Modeling the bullying prevention program design recommendations of students from grades five to eight: a discrete choice conjoint experiment.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Charles E; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Cunningham, Lesley J; Chen, Yvonne; Ratcliffe, Jenna

    2011-01-01

    We used a discrete choice conjoint experiment to model the bullying prevention recommendations of 845 students from grades 5 to 8 (aged 9-14). Students made choices between experimentally varied combinations of 14 four-level prevention program attributes. Latent class analysis yielded three segments. The high impact segment (27.1%) recommended uniforms, mandatory recess activities, four playground supervisors, surveillance cameras, and 4-day suspensions when students bully. The moderate impact segment (49.5%) recommended discretionary uniforms and recess activities, four playground supervisors, and 3-day suspensions. Involvement as a bully or bully-victim was associated with membership in a low impact segment (23.4%) that rejected uniforms and surveillance cameras. They recommended fewer anti-bullying activities, discretionary recess activities, fewer playground supervisors, and the 2-day suspensions. Simulations predicted most students would recommend a program maximizing student involvement combining prevention with moderate consequences. The simulated introduction of mandatory uniforms, surveillance cameras, and long suspensions reduced overall support for a comprehensive program, particularly among students involved as bullies or bully-victims.

  18. Modeling Mental Health Information Preferences During the Early Adult Years: A Discrete Choice Conjoint Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Charles E.; Walker, John R.; Eastwood, John D.; Westra, Henny; Rimas, Heather; Chen, Yvonne; Marcus, Madalyn; Swinson, Richard P.; Bracken, Keyna

    2013-01-01

    Although most young adults with mood and anxiety disorders do not seek treatment, those who are better informed about mental health problems are more likely to use services. The authors used conjoint analysis to model strategies for providing information about anxiety and depression to young adults. Participants (N = 1,035) completed 17 choice tasks presenting combinations of 15 four-level attributes of a mental health information strategy. Latent class analysis yielded 3 segments. The virtual segment (28.7%) preferred working independently on the Internet to obtain information recommended by young adults who had experienced anxiety or depression. Self-assessment options and links to service providers were more important to this segment. Conventional participants (30.1%) preferred books or pamphlets recommended by a doctor, endorsed by mental health professionals, and used with a doctor's support. They would devote more time to information acquisition but were less likely to use Internet social networking options. Brief sources of information were more important to the low interest segment (41.2%). All segments preferred information about alternative ways to reduce anxiety or depression rather than psychological approaches or medication. Maximizing the use of information requires active and passive approaches delivered through old-media (e.g. books) and new-media (e.g., Internet) channels. PMID:24266450

  19. Generation of discrete scattering cross sections and demonstration of Monte Carlo charged particle transport in the Milagro IMC code package

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J. A.; Palmer, T. S.; Urbatsch, T. J.

    2013-07-01

    A new method for generating discrete scattering cross sections to be used in charged particle transport calculations is investigated. The method of data generation is presented and compared to current methods for obtaining discrete cross sections. The new, more generalized approach allows greater flexibility in choosing a cross section model from which to derive discrete values. Cross section data generated with the new method is verified through a comparison with discrete data obtained with an existing method. Additionally, a charged particle transport capability is demonstrated in the time-dependent Implicit Monte Carlo radiative transfer code package, Milagro. The implementation of this capability is verified using test problems with analytic solutions as well as a comparison of electron dose-depth profiles calculated with Milagro and an already-established electron transport code. An initial investigation of a preliminary integration of the discrete cross section generation method with the new charged particle transport capability in Milagro is also presented. (authors)

  20. Different spatial discretization methods of fault systems on heat transport processes in hard rock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruppa, Lisa; König, Christoph M.; Becker, Martin; Seidel, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Most hard rock aquifers, which are important for geothermal use, contain fractures of different type and scale. These fault systems are of major significance for heat flow in the groundwater. The hydrogeological characterization of fault systems must therefore be part of any site investigation in hard rock aquifers and hydraulically important fault systems need to be appropriately represented in associated numerical models. This contribution discusses different spatial discretization methods of fault systems in three-dimensional groundwater models and their impact on the simulated groundwater flow field as well as density and viscosity dependent heat transport. The analysis includes a comparison of the convergence behavior and numerical stability of the different discretization methods. To ensure defendable results, the utilized numerical model SPRING was first verified against data from the Hydrocoin Level 1 Case 2 project. After verification, the software was used to evaluate the impact of different discretization strategies on steady-state and transient groundwater flow and transport model results. The results show a significant influence of the spatial discretization strategy on predicted flow rates and subsequent mass fluxes as well as energy balances.

  1. The three-dimensional, discrete ordinates neutral particle transport code TORT: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The centerpiece of the Discrete Ordinates Oak Ridge System (DOORS), the three-dimensional neutral particle transport code TORT is reviewed. Its most prominent features pertaining to large applications, such as adjustable problem parameters, memory management, and coarse mesh methods, are described. Advanced, state-of-the-art capabilities including acceleration and multiprocessing are summarized here. Future enhancement of existing graphics and visualization tools is briefly presented.

  2. A flexible nonlinear diffusion acceleration method for the SN transport equations discretized with discontinuous finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunert, Sebastian; Wang, Yaqi; Gleicher, Frederick; Ortensi, Javier; Baker, Benjamin; Laboure, Vincent; Wang, Congjian; DeHart, Mark; Martineau, Richard

    2017-06-01

    This work presents a flexible nonlinear diffusion acceleration (NDA) method that discretizes both the SN transport equation and the diffusion equation using the discontinuous finite element method (DFEM). The method is flexible in that the diffusion equation can be discretized on a coarser mesh with the only restriction that it is nested within the transport mesh and the FEM shape function orders of the two equations can be different. The consistency of the transport and diffusion solutions at convergence is defined by using a projection operator mapping the transport into the diffusion FEM space. The diffusion weak form is based on the modified incomplete interior penalty (MIP) diffusion DFEM discretization that is extended by volumetric drift, interior face, and boundary closure terms. In contrast to commonly used coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) methods, the presented NDA method uses a full FEM discretized diffusion equation for acceleration. Suitable projection and prolongation operators arise naturally from the FEM framework. Via Fourier analysis and numerical experiments for a one-group, fixed source problem the following properties of the NDA method are established for structured quadrilateral meshes: (1) the presented method is unconditionally stable and effective in the presence of mild material heterogeneities if the same mesh and identical shape functions either of the bilinear or biquadratic type are used, (2) the NDA method remains unconditionally stable in the presence of strong heterogeneities, (3) the NDA method with bilinear elements extends the range of effectiveness and stability by a factor of two when compared to CMFD if a coarser diffusion mesh is selected. In addition, the method is tested for solving the C5G7 multigroup, eigenvalue problem using coarse and fine mesh acceleration. While NDA does not offer an advantage over CMFD for fine mesh acceleration, it reduces the iteration count required for convergence by almost a factor of two in

  3. Alternative-Specific and Case-Specific Factors Involved in the Decisions of Islamic School Teachers Affecting Teacher Retention: A Discrete Choice Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abd-El-Hafez, Alaa Karem

    2015-01-01

    Teacher retention is a concern in all educational sectors in America. It is of special importance to Islamic schools, which tend to lack the resources necessary in recruiting and training new teachers. This dissertation addressed this problem in full-time Islamic schools in New York State by conducting a discrete choice experiment, which reflects…

  4. Electrodiffusion of molecules in aqueous media: a robust, discretized description for electroporation and other transport phenomena.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle C; Weaver, James C

    2012-06-01

    Electrically driven transport of molecules and ions within aqueous electrolytes is of long-standing interest, with direct relevance to applications that include the delivery/release of biologically active solutes to/from cells and tissues. Examples include iontophoretic and electroporation-mediated drug delivery. Here, we describe a robust method for characterizing electrodiffusive transport in physiologic aqueous media. Specifically, we treat the case of solute present in sufficiently low concentration as to negligibly contribute to the total ionic current within the system. In this limiting case, which applies to many systems of interest, the predominant electrical behavior due to small ions is decoupled from solute transport. Thus, electrical behavior may be characterized using existing methods and treated as known in characterizing electrodiffusive molecular transport. First, we present traditional continuum equations governing electrodiffusion of charged solutes within aqueous electrolytes and then adapt them to discretized systems. Second, we examine the time-dependent and steady-state interfacial concentration gradients that result from the combination of diffusion and electrical drift. Third, we show how interfacial concentration gradients are related to electric field strength and duration. Finally, we examine how discretization size affects the accuracy of these methods. Overall these methods are motivated by and well suited to addressing an outstanding goal: estimation of the net ionic and molecular transport facilitated by electroporation in biological systems.

  5. Job Preferences of Nurses and Midwives for Taking Up a Rural Job in Peru: A Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Huicho, Luis; Miranda, J. Jaime; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Lema, Claudia; Lescano, Andrés G.; Lagarde, Mylene; Blaauw, Duane

    2012-01-01

    Background Robust evidence on interventions to improve the shortage of health workers in rural areas is needed. We assessed stated factors that would attract short-term contract nurses and midwives to work in a rural area of Peru. Methods and Findings A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was conducted to evaluate the job preferences of nurses and midwives currently working on a short-term contract in the public sector in Ayacucho, Peru. Job attributes, and their levels, were based on literature review, qualitative interviews and focus groups of local health personnel and policy makers. A labelled design with two choices, rural community or Ayacucho city, was used. Job attributes were tailored to these settings. Multiple conditional logistic regressions were used to assess the determinants of job preferences. Then we used the best-fitting estimated model to predict the impact of potential policy incentives on the probability of choosing a rural job or a job in Ayacucho city. We studied 205 nurses and midwives. The odds of choosing an urban post was 14.74 times than that of choosing a rural one. Salary increase, health center-type of facility and scholarship for specialization were preferred attributes for choosing a rural job. Increased number of years before securing a permanent contract acted as a disincentive for both rural and urban jobs. Policy simulations showed that the most effective attraction package to uptake a rural job included a 75% increase in salary plus scholarship for a specialization, which would increase the proportion of health workers taking a rural job from 36.4% up to 60%. Conclusions Urban jobs were more strongly preferred than rural ones. However, combined financial and non-financial incentives could almost double rural job uptake by nurses and midwifes. These packages may provide meaningful attraction strategies to rural areas and should be considered by policy makers for implementation. PMID:23284636

  6. Discrete particle model for sheet flow sediment transport in the nearshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Thomas G.; Calantoni, Joseph

    2001-09-01

    Fully three-dimensional discrete particle computer simulations of high-concentration sheet flow transport in oscillatory flows quantify the effect of fluid acceleration on bed load transport in highly unsteady flows typical of nearshore marine environments. A simple impulse-momentum approach explains simulation results and forms the basis for adding an acceleration-related term to widely used energetics sediment transport formulae. Transport predicted by the acceleration term becomes increasingly significant as wave shape approaches the sawtooth profile characteristic of surf zone bores. Simulations integrate F = ma and a corresponding set of equations for the torques for each sphere. Normal and tangential forces between contacting particles are linear functions of the distance between sphere centers and the relative tangential displacement at the contact point, respectively; particle interactions are both inelastic and frictional. Pressure gradient forces generated by the passage of surface gravity waves drive fluid and particle motion in a stack of thin horizontal fluid layers that exchange momentum and exert fluid drag, added mass, and buoyancy forces on particles. Transport properties of the simulated granular-fluid assemblage are robust to large variations in material properties of the particles. Simulated transport rates agree with available experimental data for unsteady transport of coarse sands; the mode of bed load motion, dispersion of bed load particles, and particle segregation by size and density are qualitatively consistent with available particle-scale observations of bed load transport of natural particles.

  7. Discrete ordinates transport methods for problems with highly forward-peaked scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pautz, S.D.

    1998-04-01

    The author examines the solutions of the discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) method for problems with highly forward-peaked scattering kernels. He derives conditions necessary to obtain reasonable solutions in a certain forward-peaked limit, the Fokker-Planck (FP) limit. He also analyzes the acceleration of the iterative solution of such problems and offer improvements to it. He extends the analytic Fokker-Planck limit analysis to the S{sub N} equations. This analysis shows that in this asymptotic limit the S{sub N} solution satisfies a pseudospectral discretization of the FP equation, provided that the scattering term is handled in a certain way (which he describes) and that the analytic transport solution satisfies an analytic FP equation. Similar analyses of various spatially discretized S{sub N} equations reveal that they too produce solutions that satisfy discrete FP equations, given the same provisions. Numerical results agree with these theoretical predictions. He defines a multidimensional angular multigrid (ANMG) method to accelerate the iterative solution of highly forward-peaked problems. The analyses show that a straightforward application of this scheme is subject to high-frequency instabilities. However, by applying a diffusive filter to the ANMG corrections he is able to stabilize this method. Fourier analyses of model problems show that the resulting method is effective at accelerating the convergence rate when the scattering is forward-peaked. The numerical results demonstrate that these analyses are good predictors of the actual performance of the ANMG method.

  8. Farmers' valuation of incentives to produce genetically modified organism-free milk: Insights from a discrete choice experiment in Germany.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, J A; Latacz-Lohmann, U

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates farmers' willingness to participate in a genetically modified organism (GMO)-free milk production scheme offered by some German dairy companies. The empirical analysis is based upon discrete choice experiments with 151 dairy farmers from 2 regions in Germany. A conditional logit estimation reveals a strong positive effect of the price premium on offer. Reliable feed monitoring and free technical support increase the likelihood of scheme adoption, the latter however only in farms that have been receiving technical support in other fields. By contrast, any interference with the entrepreneurial autonomy of farmers, through pre-arranged feed procurement or prescriptive advice on the part of the dairy company, lowers acceptance probabilities. Farmers' attitudes toward cultivation of genetically modified soy, their assessment of the market potential of GMO-free milk and future feed prices were found to be significant determinants of adoption, as are farmer age, educational status, and current feeding regimens. Respondents requested on average a mark-up of 0.80 eurocents per kilogram of milk to accept a contract. Comparison of the estimates for the 2 regions suggests that farmers in northern Germany are, on average, more likely to convert to genetically modified-free production; however, farmers in the south are, ceteris paribus, more responsive to an increase in the price premium offered. A latent class model reveals significant differences in the valuation of scheme attributes between 2 latent classes of adopters and nonadopters.

  9. Developing attributes for discrete choice experiments in health: a systematic literature review and case study of alcohol misuse interventions

    PubMed Central

    Helter, Timea Mariann; Boehler, Christian Ernst Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) become increasingly popular to value outcomes for health economic studies and gradually gain acceptance as an input into policy decisions. Developing attributes is a key aspect for the design of DCEs, as their results may misguide decision-makers if they are based on an inappropriate set of attributes. However, the area lacks guidance, and current health-related DCE studies vary considerably in their methods of attribute development, with the consequent danger of providing an unreliable input for policy decisions. The aim of this article is to inform the progress toward a more systematic approach to attribute development for DCE studies in health. A systematic review of the published health-related DCE literature was conducted to lay the foundations for a generic framework which was tested in a case study of alcohol misuse interventions. Four stages of a general attribute development process emerged: (i) raw data collection; (ii) data reduction; (iii) removing inappropriate attributes; and (iv) wording. The case study compared and contrasted a qualitative and mixed-methods approach for the development of attributes for DCEs in the area of alcohol misuse interventions. This article provides a reference point for the design of future DCE experiments in health. PMID:27695386

  10. Deriving welfare measures from discrete choice experiments: inconsistency between current methods and random utility and welfare theory.

    PubMed

    Lancsar, Emily; Savage, Elizabeth

    2004-09-01

    Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are being used increasingly in health economics to elicit preferences for products and programs. The results of such experiments have been used to calculate measures of welfare or more specifically, respondents' 'willingness to pay' (WTP) for products and programs and their 'marginal willingness to pay' (MWTP) for the attributes that make up such products and programs. In this note we show that the methods currently used to derive measures of welfare from DCEs in the health economics literature are not consistent with random utility theory (RUT), or with microeconomic welfare theory more generally. The inconsistency with welfare theory is an important limitation on the use of such WTP estimates in cost-benefit analyses. We describe an alternative method of deriving measures of welfare (compensating variation) from DCEs that is consistent with RUT and is derived using welfare theory. We demonstrate its use in an empirical application to derive the WTP for asthma medication and compare it to the results elicited from the method currently used in the health economics literature.

  11. Do Financial Incentives Influence GPs' Decisions to Do After-hours Work? A Discrete Choice Labour Supply Model.

    PubMed

    Broadway, Barbara; Kalb, Guyonne; Li, Jinhu; Scott, Anthony

    2017-02-20

    This paper analyses doctors' supply of after-hours care (AHC), and how it is affected by personal and family circumstances as well as the earnings structure. We use detailed survey data from a large sample of Australian General Practitioners (GPs) to estimate a structural, discrete choice model of labour supply and AHC. This allows us to jointly model GPs' decisions on the number of daytime-weekday working hours and the probability of providing AHC. We simulate GPs' labour supply responses to an increase in hourly earnings, both in a daytime-weekday setting and for AHC. GPs increase their daytime-weekday working hours if their hourly earnings in this setting increase, but only to a very small extent. GPs are somewhat more likely to provide AHC if their hourly earnings in that setting increase, but again, the effect is very small and only evident in some subgroups. Moreover, higher earnings in weekday-daytime practice reduce the probability of providing AHC, particularly for men. Increasing GPs' earnings appears to be at best relatively ineffective in encouraging increased provision of AHC and may even prove harmful if incentives are not well targeted. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Is the value of a life or life-year saved context specific? Further evidence from a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Duncan; Segal, Leonie

    2008-01-01

    Background A number of recent findings imply that the value of a life saved, life-year (LY) saved or quality-adjusted life year (QALY) saved varies depending on the characteristics of the life, LY or QALY under consideration. Despite these findings, budget allocations continue to be made as if all healthy life-years are equivalent. This continued focus on simple health maximisation is partly attributable to gaps in the available evidence. The present study attempts to close some of these gaps. Methods Discrete choice experiment to estimate the marginal rate of substitution between cost, effectiveness and various non-health arguments. Odds of selecting profile B over profile A estimated via binary logistic regression. Marginal rates of substitution between attributes (including cost) then derived from estimated regression coefficients. Results Respondents were more likely to select less costly, more effective interventions with a strong evidence base where the beneficiary did not contribute to their illness. Results also suggest that respondents preferred prevention over cure. Interventions for young children were most preferred, followed by interventions for young adults, then interventions for working age adults and with interventions targeted at the elderly given lowest priority. Conclusion Results confirm that a trade-off exists between cost, effectiveness and non-health arguments when respondents prioritise health programs. That said, it is true that respondents were more likely to select less costly, more effective interventions – confirming that it is an adjustment to, rather than an outright rejection of, simple health maximisation that is required. PMID:18489787

  13. A discrete choice experiment to assess people living with HIV's (PLWHIV's) preferences for GP or HIV clinic appointments

    PubMed Central

    Miners, A H; Llewellyn, C D; Cooper, V L; Youssef, E; Pollard, A J; Lagarde, M; Sabin, C; Nixon, E; Sachikonye, M; Perry, N; Fisher, M

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To understand which aspects of general practitioner (GP) and HIV clinic appointments people living with HIV (PLWHIV) most value when seeking advice for new health problems. Methods A discrete choice experiment using a convenience sample of people diagnosed with HIV. Participants were recruited from 14 general HIV clinics in the South East of England between December 2014 and April 2015. ORs were calculated using conditional logit (CLOGIT) and latent class models (LCMs). Results A total of 1106 questionnaires were returned. Most participants were male (85%), white (74%) and were men who have sex with men (69%). The CLOGIT analysis showed people particularly valued shorter appointment waiting times (ORs between 1.52 and 3.62, p<0.001 in all instances). The LCM analysis showed there were two distinct classes, with 59% and 41% of respondents likely to be in each. The first class generally preferred GP to HIV clinic appointments and particularly valued ‘being seen quickly’. For example, they had strong preferences for shorter appointment waiting times and longer GP opening hours. People in the second class also valued shorter waiting times, but they had a strong general preference for HIV clinic rather than GP appointments. Conclusions PLWHIV value many aspects of care for new health problems, particularly short appointment waiting times. However, they appear split in their general willingness to engage with GPs. PMID:27535762

  14. A Spatial Discretization Scheme for Solving the Transport Equation on Unstructured Grids of Polyhedra

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Kelly Glen

    2000-11-01

    In this work, we develop a new spatial discretization scheme that may be used to numerically solve the neutron transport equation. This new discretization extends the family of corner balance spatial discretizations to include spatial grids of arbitrary polyhedra. This scheme enforces balance on subcell volumes called corners. It produces a lower triangular matrix for sweeping, is algebraically linear, is non-negative in a source-free absorber, and produces a robust and accurate solution in thick diffusive regions. Using an asymptotic analysis, we design the scheme so that in thick diffusive regions it will attain the same solution as an accurate polyhedral diffusion discretization. We then refine the approximations in the scheme to reduce numerical diffusion in vacuums, and we attempt to capture a second order truncation error. After we develop this Upstream Corner Balance Linear (UCBL) discretization we analyze its characteristics in several limits. We complete a full diffusion limit analysis showing that we capture the desired diffusion discretization in optically thick and highly scattering media. We review the upstream and linear properties of our discretization and then demonstrate that our scheme captures strictly non-negative solutions in source-free purely absorbing media. We then demonstrate the minimization of numerical diffusion of a beam and then demonstrate that the scheme is, in general, first order accurate. We also note that for slab-like problems our method actually behaves like a second-order method over a range of cell thicknesses that are of practical interest. We also discuss why our scheme is first order accurate for truly 3D problems and suggest changes in the algorithm that should make it a second-order accurate scheme. Finally, we demonstrate 3D UCBL's performance on several very different test problems. We show good performance in diffusive and streaming problems. We analyze truncation error in a 3D problem and demonstrate robustness in a

  15. A spatial discretization scheme for solving the transport equation on unstructured grids of polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Kelly Glen

    In this work, we develop a new spatial discretization scheme that may be used to numerically solve the neutron transport equation. This new discretization extends the family of corner balance spatial discretizations to include spatial grids of arbitrary polyhedra. This scheme enforces balance on subcell volumes called corners. It produces a lower triangular matrix for sweeping, is algebraically linear, is non-negative in a source-free absorber, and produces a robust and accurate solution in thick diffusive regions. Using an asymptotic analysis, we design the scheme so that in thick diffusive regions it will attain the same solution as an accurate polyhedral diffusion discretization. We then refine the approximations in the scheme to reduce numerical diffusion in vacuums, and we attempt to capture a second order truncation error. After we develop this Upstream Comer Balance Linear (UCBL) discretization we analyze its characteristics in several limits. We complete a full diffusion limit analysis showing that we capture the desired diffusion discretization in optically thick and highly scattering media. We review the upstream and linear properties of our discretization and then demonstrate that our scheme captures strictly non-negative solutions in source-free purely absorbing media. We then demonstrate the minimization of numerical diffusion of a beam and then demonstrate that the scheme is, in general, first order accurate. We also note that for slab-like problems our method actually behaves like a second-order method over a range of cell thicknesses that are of practical interest. We also discuss why our scheme is first order accurate for truly 3D problems and suggest changes in the algorithm that should make it a second-order accurate scheme. Finally, we demonstrate 3D UCBL's performance on several very different test problems. We show good performance in diffusive and streaming problems. We analyze truncation error in a 3D problem and demonstrate robustness in a

  16. Three Dimensional Flow, Transport and Geomechanical Simulations in Discrete Fracture Network Under Condition of Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryerson, F. J.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Glascoe, L. G.; Antoun, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principle pathways for migration of water, heat and mass in enhanced geothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, CO2 leakage from saline aquifers, and radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Data collected are often reduced to probability distribution functions for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable probabilistic assessment of flow, transport and geomechanical phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, we investigate the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions that characterize discrete fracture networks on the flow, heat and mass transport and geomechanics. Numerical results of first, second and third moments, normalized to a base case scenario, are presented and compared to theoretical results extended from percolation theory. (Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344)

  17. Understanding transporter specificity and the discrete appearance of channel-like gating domains in transporters

    PubMed Central

    Diallinas, George

    2014-01-01

    Transporters are ubiquitous proteins mediating the translocation of solutes across cell membranes, a biological process involved in nutrition, signaling, neurotransmission, cell communication and drug uptake or efflux. Similarly to enzymes, most transporters have a single substrate binding-site and thus their activity follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Substrate binding elicits a series of structural changes, which produce a transporter conformer open toward the side opposite to the one from where the substrate was originally bound. This mechanism, involving alternate outward- and inward-facing transporter conformers, has gained significant support from structural, genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches. Most transporters are specific for a given substrate or a group of substrates with similar chemical structure, but substrate specificity and/or affinity can vary dramatically, even among members of a transporter family that show high overall amino acid sequence and structural similarity. The current view is that transporter substrate affinity or specificity is determined by a small number of interactions a given solute can make within a specific binding site. However, genetic, biochemical and in silico modeling studies with the purine transporter UapA of the filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus nidulans have challenged this dogma. This review highlights results leading to a novel concept, stating that substrate specificity, but also transport kinetics and transporter turnover, are determined by subtle intramolecular interactions between a major substrate binding site and independent outward- or cytoplasmically-facing gating domains, analogous to those present in channels. This concept is supported by recent structural evidence from several, phylogenetically and functionally distinct transporter families. The significance of this concept is discussed in relationship to the role and potential exploitation of transporters in drug action. PMID:25309439

  18. GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Chunye; Liu Jie; Chi Lihua; Huang Haowei; Fang Jingyue; Gong Zhenghu

    2011-07-01

    Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, inhomogeneous Boltzmann transport equation. The numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation involves the discrete ordinates (S{sub n}) method and the procedure of source iteration. In this paper, we present a GPU accelerated simulation of one energy group time-independent deterministic discrete ordinates particle transport in 3D Cartesian geometry (Sweep3D). The performance of the GPU simulations are reported with the simulations of vacuum boundary condition. The discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the GPU implementation, the simulation on multi GPUs, the programming effort and code portability are also reported. The results show that the overall performance speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU ranges from 2.56 compared with one Intel Xeon X5670 chip to 8.14 compared with one Intel Core Q6600 chip for no flux fixup. The simulation with flux fixup on one M2050 is 1.23 times faster than on one X5670.

  19. Built Environment Influences on Healthy Transportation Choices: Bicycling versus Driving

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, Michael; Setton, Eleanor M.; Teschke, Kay

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence links the built environment to physical activity levels, health outcomes, and transportation behaviors. However, little of this research has focused on cycling, a sustainable transportation option with great potential for growth in North America. This study examines associations between decisions to bicycle (versus drive) and the built environment, with explicit consideration of three different spatial zones that may be relevant in travel behavior: trip origins, trip destinations, and along the route between. We analyzed 3,280 utilitarian bicycle and car trips in Metro Vancouver, Canada made by 1,902 adults, including both current and potential cyclists. Objective measures were developed for built environment characteristics related to the physical environment, land use patterns, the road network, and bicycle-specific facilities. Multilevel logistic regression was used to model the likelihood that a trip was made by bicycle, adjusting for trip distance and personal demographics. Separate models were constructed for each spatial zone, and a global model examined the relative influence of the three zones. In total, 31% (1,023 out of 3,280) of trips were made by bicycle. Increased odds of bicycling were associated with less hilliness; higher intersection density; less highways and arterials; presence of bicycle signage, traffic calming, and cyclist-activated traffic lights; more neighborhood commercial, educational, and industrial land uses; greater land use mix; and higher population density. Different factors were important within each spatial zone. Overall, the characteristics of routes were more influential than origin or destination characteristics. These findings indicate that the built environment has a significant influence on healthy travel decisions, and spatial context is important. Future research should explicitly consider relevant spatial zones when investigating the relationship between physical activity and urban form. PMID

  20. Built environment influences on healthy transportation choices: bicycling versus driving.

    PubMed

    Winters, Meghan; Brauer, Michael; Setton, Eleanor M; Teschke, Kay

    2010-12-01

    A growing body of evidence links the built environment to physical activity levels, health outcomes, and transportation behaviors. However, little of this research has focused on cycling, a sustainable transportation option with great potential for growth in North America. This study examines associations between decisions to bicycle (versus drive) and the built environment, with explicit consideration of three different spatial zones that may be relevant in travel behavior: trip origins, trip destinations, and along the route between. We analyzed 3,280 utilitarian bicycle and car trips in Metro Vancouver, Canada made by 1,902 adults, including both current and potential cyclists. Objective measures were developed for built environment characteristics related to the physical environment, land use patterns, the road network, and bicycle-specific facilities. Multilevel logistic regression was used to model the likelihood that a trip was made by bicycle, adjusting for trip distance and personal demographics. Separate models were constructed for each spatial zone, and a global model examined the relative influence of the three zones. In total, 31% (1,023 out of 3,280) of trips were made by bicycle. Increased odds of bicycling were associated with less hilliness; higher intersection density; less highways and arterials; presence of bicycle signage, traffic calming, and cyclist-activated traffic lights; more neighborhood commercial, educational, and industrial land uses; greater land use mix; and higher population density. Different factors were important within each spatial zone. Overall, the characteristics of routes were more influential than origin or destination characteristics. These findings indicate that the built environment has a significant influence on healthy travel decisions, and spatial context is important. Future research should explicitly consider relevant spatial zones when investigating the relationship between physical activity and urban form.

  1. A Polar Discrete Ordinate Radiation Transport Method for 2D ALE Meshes in HYDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Britton; Marinak, Marty; Weber, Chris; Peterson, Luc

    2016-10-01

    The Polar Discrete Ordinate Radiation Transport Method in HYDRA has been extended to handle general 2D r-z meshes. Previously the method was only for orthogonal 2D meshes. The new method can be employed with the ALE methodology for managing mesh motion that is used to simulate Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities on NIF capsule implosions. The results of an examination of this kind will be compared to those obtained by the corresponding diffusion method. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Generalized perturbation theory using two-dimensional, discrete ordinates transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, R.L.

    1980-06-01

    Perturbation theory for changes in linear and bilinear functionals of the forward and adjoint fluxes in a critical reactor has been implemented using two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport theory. The computer program DOT IV was modified to calculate the generalized functions GAMMA and GAMMA*. Demonstration calculations were performed for changes in a reaction-rate ratio and a reactivity worth caused by system perturbations. The perturbation theory predictions agreed with direct calculations to within about 2%. A method has been developed for calculating higher lambda eigenvalues and eigenfunctions using techniques similar to those developed for generalized functions. Demonstration calculations have been performed to obtain these eigenfunctions.

  3. Low-energy electron transport with the method of discrete ordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartine, D. E.; Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Mynatt, F. R.; Engle, W. W., Jr.; Barish, J.

    1972-01-01

    The one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN was adapted to transport low energy (a few MeV) electrons. Calculated results obtained with ANISN were compared with experimental data for transmitted electron energy and angular distribution data for electrons normally incident on aluminum slabs of various thicknesses. The calculated and experimental results are in good agreement for a thin slab (0.2 of the electron range), but not for the thicker slabs (0.6 of the electron range). Calculated results obtained with ANISN were also compared with results obtained using Monte Carlo methods.

  4. An exploration of parents’ preferences for foot care in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a possible role for the discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An increased awareness of patients’ and parents’ care preferences regarding foot care is desirable from a clinical perspective as such information may be utilised to optimise care delivery. The aim of this study was to examine parents’ preferences for, and valuations of foot care and foot-related outcomes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods A discrete choice experiment (DCE) incorporating willingness-to-pay (WTP) questions was conducted by surveying 42 parents of children with JIA who were enrolled in a randomised-controlled trial of multidisciplinary foot care at a single UK paediatric rheumatology outpatients department. Attributes explored were: levels of pain; mobility; ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL); waiting time; referral route; and footwear. The DCE was administered at trial baseline. DCE data were analysed using a multinomial-logit-regression model to estimate preferences and relative importance of attributes of foot care. A stated-preference WTP question was presented to estimate parents’ monetary valuation of health and service improvements. Results Every attribute in the DCE was statistically significant (p < 0.01) except that of cost (p = 0.118), suggesting that all attributes, except cost, have an impact on parents’ preferences for foot care for their child. The magnitudes of the coefficients indicate that the strength of preference for each attribute was (in descending order): improved ability to perform ADL, reductions in foot pain, improved mobility, improved ability to wear desired footwear, multidisciplinary foot care route, and reduced waiting time. Parents’ estimated mean annual WTP for a multidisciplinary foot care service was £1,119.05. Conclusions In terms of foot care service provision for children with JIA, parents appear to prefer improvements in health outcomes over non-health outcomes and service process attributes. Cost was relatively less important than other attributes

  5. Prescriber preferences for behavioural economics interventions to improve treatment of acute respiratory infections: a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Cynthia L; Hay, Joel W; Meeker, Daniella; Doctor, Jason N

    2016-01-01

    Objective To elicit prescribers' preferences for behavioural economics interventions designed to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, and compare these to actual behaviour. Design Discrete choice experiment (DCE). Setting 47 primary care centres in Boston and Los Angeles. Participants 234 primary care providers, with an average 20 years of practice. Main outcomes and measures Results of a behavioural economic intervention trial were compared to prescribers' stated preferences for the same interventions relative to monetary and time rewards for improved prescribing outcomes. In the randomised controlled trial (RCT) component, the 3 computerised prescription order entry-triggered interventions studied included: Suggested Alternatives (SA), an alert that populated non-antibiotic treatment options if an inappropriate antibiotic was prescribed; Accountable Justifications (JA), which prompted the prescriber to enter a justification for an inappropriately prescribed antibiotic that would then be documented in the patient's chart; and Peer Comparison (PC), an email periodically sent to each prescriber comparing his/her antibiotic prescribing rate with those who had the lowest rates of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. A DCE study component was administered to determine whether prescribers felt SA, JA, PC, pay-for-performance or additional clinic time would most effectively reduce their inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. Willingness-to-pay (WTP) was calculated for each intervention. Results In the RCT, PC and JA were found to be the most effective interventions to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, whereas SA was not significantly different from controls. In the DCE however, regardless of treatment intervention received during the RCT, prescribers overwhelmingly preferred SA, followed by PC, then JA. WTP estimates indicated that each intervention would be significantly cheaper to implement than pay-for-performance incentives of $200/month

  6. The interim service preferences of parents waiting for children's mental health treatment: a discrete choice conjoint experiment.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Charles E; Chen, Yvonne; Deal, Ken; Rimas, Heather; McGrath, Patrick; Reid, Graham; Lipman, Ellen; Corkum, Penny

    2013-08-01

    Parents seeking help for children with mental health problems are often assigned to a waiting list. We used a discrete choice conjoint experiment to model preferences for interim services that might be used while waiting for the formal assessment and treatment process to begin. A sample of 1,059 parents (92 % mothers) seeking mental health services for 4 to 16 year olds chose between hypothetical interim services composed by experimentally varying combinations of the levels of 13 interim service attributes. Latent Class analysis yielded a four-segment solution. All segments preferred interim options helping them understand how agencies work, enhancing their parenting knowledge and skill, and providing an opportunity to understand or begin dealing with their own difficulties. The Group Contact segment (35.1 %) preferred interim services in meetings with other parents, supported by phone contacts, frequent checkup calls, and wait-time updates. Virtual Contact parents (29.2 %) preferred to meet other parents in small internet chat groups supported by e-mail contact. Membership in this segment was linked to higher education and computer skills. Frequent Contact parents (24.4 %) preferred face-to-face interim services supported by weekly progress checks and wait time updates. Limited Contact parents (11.3 %) were less intent on using interim services. They preferred to pursue interim services alone, with contacts by phone, supported by fewer check-up calls and less frequent wait time updates. All segments were more likely to enroll in interim services involving their child.

  7. Application of discrete choice experiment to assess farmers' willingness to report swine diseases in the Red River Delta region, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hoa T T; Peyre, Marisa; Trinh, Tuyen Quang; Nguyen, Oanh Cong; Vu, Ton Dinh; Rukkwamsuk, Theera; Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    A discrete choice experiment (DCE) is carried out to value socio-economic factors influencing the farmer's decision to report swine diseases and to assess the willingness of farmers to report swine diseases. Data were collected between March and July 2015 in two provinces in the Red River Delta, Northern Vietnam, from 196 pig producers by face-to face interview. A conditional logit model is used to measure the relative importance of the socio-economic factors and calculate the expected probability of disease reporting under changes of levels of these factors. Results of the study indicated that the likelihood of compensation and the type of culling implemented (all or only unrecovered pigs) are the two most important factors influencing farmer reporting. Compensation level, movement restriction and delay in compensation payment also have significant impacts on farmer's decision to report animal disease but they are not as important as the above factors. Three different scenarios including changes in six different factors (attributes) are tested to predict probability of animal disease reporting. Under the current situation (uncertainty of being compensated), only 4% of the farmers would report swine disease outbreak to the official surveillance system if the culling policy involves all pigs in affected farms. This number is increased to 26% if culling in affected farms is restricted to unrecovered pigs only. Ensuring certainty of compensation increases reporting probability by up to 50% and 90% if all or only unrecovered pigs are destroyed, respectively. The results of this study are important for improving the performance and sustainability of swine disease surveillance system in Vietnam.

  8. Stated Preferences of Doctors for Choosing a Job in Rural Areas of Peru: A Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, J. Jaime; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Lema, Claudia; Lescano, Andrés G.; Lagarde, Mylene; Blaauw, Duane; Huicho, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Background Doctors’ scarcity in rural areas remains a serious problem in Latin America and Peru. Few studies have explored job preferences of doctors working in underserved areas. We aimed to investigate doctors’ stated preferences for rural jobs. Methods and Findings A labelled discrete choice experiment (DCE) was performed in Ayacucho, an underserved department of Peru. Preferences were assessed for three locations: rural community, Ayacucho city (Ayacucho’s capital) and other provincial capital city. Policy simulations were run to assess the effect of job attributes on uptake of a rural post. Multiple conditional logistic regressions were used to assess the relative importance of job attributes and of individual characteristics. A total of 102 doctors participated. They were five times more likely to choose a job post in Ayacucho city over a rural community (OR 4.97, 95%CI 1.2; 20.54). Salary increases and bonus points for specialization acted as incentives to choose a rural area, while increase in the number of years needed to get a permanent post acted as a disincentive. Being male and working in a hospital reduced considerably chances of choosing a rural job, while not living with a partner increased them. Policy simulations showed that a package of 75% salary increase, getting a permanent contract after two years in rural settings, and getting bonus points for further specialisation increased rural job uptake from 21% to 77%. A package of 50% salary increase plus bonus points for further specialisation would also increase the rural uptake from 21% to 52%. Conclusions Doctors are five times more likely to favour a job in urban areas over rural settings. This strong preference needs to be overcome by future policies aimed at improving the scarcity of rural doctors. Some incentives, alone or combined, seem feasible and sustainable, whilst others may pose a high fiscal burden. PMID:23272065

  9. Distribution Iteration: A Robust Alternative to Source Iteration for Solving the Discrete Ordinates Radiation Transport Equations in Slab and XY - Geometries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-15

    differential equation that is coupled in space and angle. The discrete ordinates method discretizes the BTE in space and angle and the resulting...RADIATION TRANSPORT EQUATIONS IN SLAB AND XY - GEOMETRIES DISSERTATION Nicholas J. Prins, Lieutenant Colonel, USA AFIT/DS/ENP/08-S04...SOLVING THE DISCRETE ORDINATES RADIATION TRANSPORT EQUATIONS IN SLAB AND XY - GEOMETRIES DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty Graduate

  10. Numerical Experiments on Advective Transport in Large Three-Dimensional Discrete Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Karra, S.; Gable, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of flow and solute transport in discrete fracture networks is an important approach for understanding the migration of contaminants in impermeable hard rocks such as granite, where fractures provide dominant flow and transport pathways. The discrete fracture network (DFN) model attempts to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. An integrated DFN meshing [1], flow, and particle tracking [2] simulation capability that enables accurate flow and particle tracking simulation on large DFNs has recently been developed. The new capability has been used in numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs with tens of thousands of fractures and millions of computational cells. The modeling procedure starts from the fracture network generation using a stochastic model derived from site data. A high-quality computational mesh is then generated [1]. Flow is then solved using the highly parallel PFLOTRAN [3] code. PFLOTRAN uses the finite volume approach, which is locally mass conserving and thus eliminates mass balance problems during particle tracking. The flow solver provides the scalar fluxes on each control volume face. From the obtained fluxes the Darcy velocity is reconstructed for each node in the network [4]. Velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest, thus enabling random walk particle tracking. In order to describe the flow field on fractures intersections, the control volume cells on intersections are split into four planar polygons, where each polygon corresponds to a piece of a fracture near the intersection line. Thus

  11. dfnWorks: A discrete fracture network framework for modeling subsurface flow and transport

    DOE PAGES

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; ...

    2015-11-01

    DFNWORKS is a parallelized computational suite to generate three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN) and simulate flow and transport. Developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past five years, it has been used to study flow and transport in fractured media at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. The networks are created and meshed using DFNGEN, which combines FRAM (the feature rejection algorithm for meshing) methodology to stochastically generate three-dimensional DFNs with the LaGriT meshing toolbox to create a high-quality computational mesh representation. The representation produces a conforming Delaunay triangulation suitable for high performance computing finite volume solvers in anmore » intrinsically parallel fashion. Flow through the network is simulated in dfnFlow, which utilizes the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport finite volume code PFLOTRAN. A Lagrangian approach to simulating transport through the DFN is adopted within DFNTRANS to determine pathlines and solute transport through the DFN. Example applications of this suite in the areas of nuclear waste repository science, hydraulic fracturing and CO2 sequestration are also included.« less

  12. dfnWorks: A discrete fracture network framework for modeling subsurface flow and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Gable, Carl W.; Painter, Scott L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-11-01

    DFNWORKS is a parallelized computational suite to generate three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN) and simulate flow and transport. Developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past five years, it has been used to study flow and transport in fractured media at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. The networks are created and meshed using DFNGEN, which combines FRAM (the feature rejection algorithm for meshing) methodology to stochastically generate three-dimensional DFNs with the LaGriT meshing toolbox to create a high-quality computational mesh representation. The representation produces a conforming Delaunay triangulation suitable for high performance computing finite volume solvers in an intrinsically parallel fashion. Flow through the network is simulated in dfnFlow, which utilizes the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport finite volume code PFLOTRAN. A Lagrangian approach to simulating transport through the DFN is adopted within DFNTRANS to determine pathlines and solute transport through the DFN. Example applications of this suite in the areas of nuclear waste repository science, hydraulic fracturing and CO2 sequestration are also included.

  13. Comparing discrete fracture and continuum models to predict contaminant transport in fractured porous media.

    PubMed

    Blessent, Daniela; Jørgensen, Peter R; Therrien, René

    2014-01-01

    We used the FRAC3Dvs numerical model (Therrien and Sudicky 1996) to compare the dual-porosity (DP), equivalent porous medium (EPM), and discrete fracture matrix diffusion (DFMD) conceptual models to predict field-scale contaminant transport in a fractured clayey till aquitard. The simulations show that the DP, EPM, and DFMD models could be equally well calibrated to reproduce contaminant breakthrough in the till aquitard for a base case. In contrast, when groundwater velocity and degradation rates are modified with respect to the base case, the DP method simulated contaminant concentrations up to three orders of magnitude different from those calculated by the DFMD model. In previous simulations of well-characterized column experiments, the DFMD method reproduced observed changes in solute transport for a range of flow and transport conditions comparable to those of the field-scale simulations, while the DP and EPM models required extensive recalibration to avoid high magnitude errors in predicted mass transport. The lack of robustness with respect to variable flow and transport conditions suggests that DP models and effective porosity EPM models have limitations for predicting cause-effect relationships in environmental planning. The study underlines the importance of obtaining well-characterized experimental data for further studies and evaluation of model key process descriptions and model suitability.

  14. Designing a Text Messaging Intervention to Improve Physical Activity Behavior Among Low-Income Latino Patients With Diabetes: A Discrete-Choice Experiment, Los Angeles, 2014–2015

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shinyi; Beale, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Automated text messaging can deliver self-management education to activate self-care behaviors among people with diabetes. We demonstrated how a discrete-choice experiment was used to determine the features of a text-messaging intervention that are important to urban, low-income Latino patients with diabetes and that could support improvement in their physical activity behavior. Methods In a discrete-choice experiment from December 2014 through August 2015 we conducted a survey to elicit information on patient preferences for 5 features of a text-messaging intervention. We described 2 hypothetical interventions and in 7 pairwise comparisons asked respondents to indicate which they preferred. Respondents (n = 125) were recruited in person from a diabetes management program of a safety-net ambulatory care clinic in Los Angeles; clinicians referred patients to the research assistant after routine clinic visits. Data were analyzed by using conditional logistic regression. Results We found 2 intervention features that were considered by the survey respondents to be important: 1) the frequency of text messaging and 2) physical activity behavior-change education (the former being more important than the latter). Physical activity goal setting, feedback on physical activity performance, and social support were not significantly important. Conclusion A discrete-choice experiment is a feasible way to elicit information on patient preferences for a text-messaging intervention designed to support behavior change. However, discrepancies may exist between patients’ stated preferences and their actual behavior. Future research should validate and expand our findings. PMID:28005532

  15. A Comprehensive Flow, Heat and Mass Transport Uncertainty Quantification in Discrete Fracture Network Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principle pathways for migration of water, heat and mass in enhanced geothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, CO2 leakage from saline aquifers, and radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Geological characterization data include measurements of fracture density, orientation, extent, and aperture, and are based on analysis of outcrops, borehole optical and acoustic televiewer logs, aerial photographs, and core samples among others. All of these measurements are taken at the field scale through a very sparse limited number of deep boreholes. These types of data are often reduced to probability distributions function for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable, through Monte Carlo realizations and simulations, for probabilistic assessment of flow and transport phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we present the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions that characterize discrete fracture networks on the flow, heat and mass transport. Numerical results of first, second and third moments, normalized to a base case scenario, are presented and compared to theoretical results extended from percolation theory.

  16. Going Places, Making Choices: Transportation and the Environment. Curriculum Designed for Grades 9-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National 4-H Council, Chevy Chase, MD.

    This curriculum packet includes a teacher's introduction and five curriculum units that explore how transportation needs affect the environment, including the quality of air and water, habitat, and global climate. These materials encourage teens to apply wisdom, ingenuity, and sound science to the choices they make. Units are: (1)…

  17. 34 CFR 200.48 - Funding for choice-related transportation and supplemental educational services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Funding for choice-related transportation and supplemental educational services. 200.48 Section 200.48 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE...

  18. 34 CFR 200.48 - Funding for choice-related transportation and supplemental educational services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Funding for choice-related transportation and supplemental educational services. 200.48 Section 200.48 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE...

  19. 34 CFR 200.48 - Funding for choice-related transportation and supplemental educational services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Funding for choice-related transportation and supplemental educational services. 200.48 Section 200.48 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE...

  20. 34 CFR 200.48 - Funding for choice-related transportation and supplemental educational services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Funding for choice-related transportation and supplemental educational services. 200.48 Section 200.48 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE...

  1. 34 CFR 200.48 - Funding for choice-related transportation and supplemental educational services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Funding for choice-related transportation and supplemental educational services. 200.48 Section 200.48 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE...

  2. Genomic testing to determine drug response: measuring preferences of the public and patients using Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The extent to which a genomic test will be used in practice is affected by factors such as ability of the test to correctly predict response to treatment (i.e. sensitivity and specificity of the test), invasiveness of the testing procedure, test cost, and the probability and severity of side effects associated with treatment. Methods Using discrete choice experimentation (DCE), we elicited preferences of the public (Sample 1, N = 533 and Sample 2, N = 525) and cancer patients (Sample 3, N = 38) for different attributes of a hypothetical genomic test for guiding cancer treatment. Samples 1 and 3 considered the test/treatment in the context of an aggressive curable cancer (scenario A) while the scenario for sample 2 was based on a non-aggressive incurable cancer (scenario B). Results In aggressive curable cancer (scenario A), everything else being equal, the odds ratio (OR) of choosing a test with 95% sensitivity was 1.41 (versus a test with 50% sensitivity) and willingness to pay (WTP) was $1331, on average, for this amount of improvement in test sensitivity. In this scenario, the OR of choosing a test with 95% specificity was 1.24 times that of a test with 50% specificity (WTP = $827). In non-aggressive incurable cancer (scenario B), the OR of choosing a test with 95% sensitivity was 1.65 (WTP = $1344), and the OR of choosing a test with 95% specificity was 1.50 (WTP = $1080). Reducing severity of treatment side effects from severe to mild was associated with large ORs in both scenarios (OR = 2.10 and 2.24 in scenario A and B, respectively). In contrast, patients had a very large preference for 95% sensitivity of the test (OR = 5.23). Conclusion The type and prognosis of cancer affected preferences for genomically-guided treatment. In aggressive curable cancer, individuals emphasized more on the sensitivity rather than the specificity of the test. In contrast, for a non-aggressive incurable cancer, individuals put similar

  3. Acupuncture or Low Frequency Infrared Treatment for Low Back Pain in Chinese Patients: A Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Chia; Cheng, Li-Jen; Zhang, Yan; He, Xin; Knaggs, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is a popular but controversial treatment option for low back pain. In China, it is practised as traditional Chinese medicine; other treatment strategies for low back pain are commonly practised as Western medicine. Research on patient preference for low back-pain treatment options has been mainly conducted in Western countries and is limited to a willingness-to-pay approach. A stated-preference, discrete choice experiment was conducted to determine Chinese patient preferences and trade-offs for acupuncture and low frequency infrared treatment in low back pain from September 2011 to August 2012 after approval from the Department of Scientific Research in the study settings. Eight-six adult outpatients who visited the ‘traditional medicine department’ at a traditional Chinese medicine hospital and the ‘rehabilitation department’ at a Western medicine hospital in Guangdong Province of China for chronic low back pain during study period participated in an interview survey. A questionnaire containing 10 scenarios (5 attributes in each scenario) was used to ask participants' preference for acupuncture, low frequency infrared treatment or neither option. Validated responses were analysed using a nested-logit model. The decision on whether to receive a therapy was not associated with the expected utility of receiving therapy, female gender and higher out-of-pocket payment significantly decreased chance to receive treatments. Of the utility of receiving either acupuncture or low frequency infrared treatment, the treatment sensation was the most important attribute as an indicator of treatment efficacy, followed by the maximum efficacy, maintenance duration and onset of efficacy, and the out-of-pocket payment. The willingness-to-pay for acupuncture and low frequency infrared treatment were about $618.6 and $592.4 USD per course respectively, demonstrated patients' demand of pain management. The treatment sensation was regarded as an indicator of treatment

  4. Acupuncture or low frequency infrared treatment for low back pain in Chinese patients: a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Chia; Cheng, Li-Jen; Zhang, Yan; He, Xin; Knaggs, Roger D

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is a popular but controversial treatment option for low back pain. In China, it is practised as traditional Chinese medicine; other treatment strategies for low back pain are commonly practised as Western medicine. Research on patient preference for low back-pain treatment options has been mainly conducted in Western countries and is limited to a willingness-to-pay approach. A stated-preference, discrete choice experiment was conducted to determine Chinese patient preferences and trade-offs for acupuncture and low frequency infrared treatment in low back pain from September 2011 to August 2012 after approval from the Department of Scientific Research in the study settings. Eight-six adult outpatients who visited the 'traditional medicine department' at a traditional Chinese medicine hospital and the 'rehabilitation department' at a Western medicine hospital in Guangdong Province of China for chronic low back pain during study period participated in an interview survey. A questionnaire containing 10 scenarios (5 attributes in each scenario) was used to ask participants' preference for acupuncture, low frequency infrared treatment or neither option. Validated responses were analysed using a nested-logit model. The decision on whether to receive a therapy was not associated with the expected utility of receiving therapy, female gender and higher out-of-pocket payment significantly decreased chance to receive treatments. Of the utility of receiving either acupuncture or low frequency infrared treatment, the treatment sensation was the most important attribute as an indicator of treatment efficacy, followed by the maximum efficacy, maintenance duration and onset of efficacy, and the out-of-pocket payment. The willingness-to-pay for acupuncture and low frequency infrared treatment were about $618.6 and $592.4 USD per course respectively, demonstrated patients' demand of pain management. The treatment sensation was regarded as an indicator of treatment

  5. Patients’ and physicians’ preferences for type 2 diabetes mellitus treatments in Spain and Portugal: a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Morillas, Carlos; Feliciano, Rosa; Catalina, Pablo Fernández; Ponte, Carla; Botella, Marta; Rodrigues, João; Esmatjes, Enric; Lafita, Javier; Lizán, Luis; Llorente, Ignacio; Morales, Cristóbal; Navarro-Pérez, Jorge; Orozco-Beltran, Domingo; Paz, Silvia; Ramirez de Arellano, Antonio; Cardoso, Cristina; Tribaldos Causadias, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess Spanish and Portuguese patients’ and physicians’ preferences regarding type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treatments and the monthly willingness to pay (WTP) to gain benefits or avoid side effects. Methods An observational, multicenter, exploratory study focused on routine clinical practice in Spain and Portugal. Physicians were recruited from multiple hospitals and outpatient clinics, while patients were recruited from eleven centers operating in the public health care system in different autonomous communities in Spain and Portugal. Preferences were measured via a discrete choice experiment by rating multiple T2DM medication attributes. Data were analyzed using the conditional logit model. Results Three-hundred and thirty (n=330) patients (49.7% female; mean age 62.4 [SD: 10.3] years, mean T2DM duration 13.9 [8.2] years, mean body mass index 32.5 [6.8] kg/m2, 41.8% received oral + injected medication, 40.3% received oral, and 17.6% injected treatments) and 221 physicians from Spain and Portugal (62% female; mean age 41.9 [SD: 10.5] years, 33.5% endocrinologists, 66.5% primary-care doctors) participated. Patients valued avoiding a gain in bodyweight of 3 kg/6 months (WTP: €68.14 [95% confidence interval: 54.55–85.08]) the most, followed by avoiding one hypoglycemic event/month (WTP: €54.80 [23.29–82.26]). Physicians valued avoiding one hypoglycemia/week (WTP: €287.18 [95% confidence interval: 160.31–1,387.21]) the most, followed by avoiding a 3 kg/6 months gain in bodyweight and decreasing cardiovascular risk (WTP: €166.87 [88.63–843.09] and €154.30 [98.13–434.19], respectively). Physicians and patients were willing to pay €125.92 (73.30–622.75) and €24.28 (18.41–30.31), respectively, to avoid a 1% increase in glycated hemoglobin, and €143.30 (73.39–543.62) and €42.74 (23.89–61.77) to avoid nausea. Conclusion Both patients and physicians in Spain and Portugal are willing to pay for the health benefits

  6. Impact of Geological Characterization Uncertainties on Subsurface Flow & Transport Using a Stochastic Discrete Fracture Network Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principal pathways for transport of water and contaminants in groundwater systems, enhanced geothermal system fluids, migration of oil and gas, carbon dioxide leakage from carbon sequestration sites, and of radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Geological characterization data include measurements of fracture density, orientation, extent, and aperture, and are based on analysis of outcrops, borehole optical and acoustic televiewer logs, aerial photographs, and core samples, among other techniques. All of these measurements are taken at the field scale through a very sparse limited number of deep boreholes. These types of data are often reduced to probability distribution functions for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as a stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable, through Monte Carlo realizations and simulations, probabilistic assessment of flow and transport phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we present the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions of fracture density, orientation, aperture and size on the flow and transport using topological measures such as fracture connectivity, physical characteristics such as effective hydraulic conductivity tensors, and

  7. A Piecewise Linear Discontinuous Finite Element Spatial Discretization of the Transport Equation in 2D Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Adams, M L; Chang, J H

    2008-10-01

    We present a new spatial discretization of the discrete-ordinates transport equation in two-dimensional cylindrical (RZ) geometry for arbitrary polygonal meshes. This discretization is a discontinuous finite element method that utilizes the piecewise linear basis functions developed by Stone and Adams. We describe an asymptotic analysis that shows this method to be accurate for many problems in the thick diffusion limit on arbitrary polygons, allowing this method to be applied to radiative transfer problems with these types of meshes. We also present numerical results for multiple problems on quadrilateral grids and compare these results to the well-known bi-linear discontinuous finite element method.

  8. Transport of phase space densities through tetrahedral meshes using discrete flow mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajars, Janis; Chappell, David J.; Søndergaard, Niels; Tanner, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Discrete flow mapping was recently introduced as an efficient ray based method determining wave energy distributions in complex built up structures. Wave energy densities are transported along ray trajectories through polygonal mesh elements using a finite dimensional approximation of a ray transfer operator. In this way the method can be viewed as a smoothed ray tracing method defined over meshed surfaces. Many applications require the resolution of wave energy distributions in three-dimensional domains, such as in room acoustics, underwater acoustics and for electromagnetic cavity problems. In this work we extend discrete flow mapping to three-dimensional domains by propagating wave energy densities through tetrahedral meshes. The geometric simplicity of the tetrahedral mesh elements is utilised to efficiently compute the ray transfer operator using a mixture of analytic and spectrally accurate numerical integration. The important issue of how to choose a suitable basis approximation in phase space whilst maintaining a reasonable computational cost is addressed via low order local approximations on tetrahedral faces in the position coordinate and high order orthogonal polynomial expansions in momentum space.

  9. Unidirectional transport of wave packets through tilted discrete breathers in nonlinear lattices with asymmetric defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiao-Dong; Malomed, Boris A.; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-09-01

    We consider the transfer of lattice wave packets through a tilted discrete breather (TDB) in opposite directions in the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger model with asymmetric defects, which may be realized as a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a deep optical lattice, or as optical beams in a waveguide array. A unidirectional transport mode is found, in which the incident wave packets, whose energy belongs to a certain interval between full reflection and full passage regions, pass the TDB only in one direction, while in the absence of the TDB, the same lattice admits bidirectional propagation. The operation of this mode is accurately explained by an analytical consideration of the respective energy barriers. The results suggest that the TDB may emulate the unidirectional propagation of atomic and optical beams in various settings. In the case of the passage of the incident wave packet, the scattering TDB typically shifts by one lattice unit in the direction from which the wave packet arrives, which is an example of the tractor-beam effect, provided by the same system, in addition to the rectification of incident waves.

  10. Finger-powered electrophoretic transport of discrete droplets for portable digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Wang, Yide; Sungtaek Ju, Y

    2016-07-07

    We report a finger-powered digital microfluidic device based on the electrophoretic transport of discrete droplets (EPD). An array of piezoelectric elements is connected in parallel to metal electrodes immersed in dielectric fluids. When deflected in a controlled sequence via human finger power, the piezoelectric elements charge and actuate droplets across each electrode pair through electrophoretic force. Successful droplet transportation requires the piezoelectric elements to provide both sufficient charge and voltage pulse duration. We quantify these requirements using numerical models to predict the electrical charges induced on the droplets and the corresponding electrophoretic forces. The models are experimentally validated by comparing the predicted and measured droplet translational velocities. We successfully demonstrated transport and merging of aqueous droplets over a range of droplet radii (0.6-0.9 mm). We further showed direct manipulation of body fluids, including droplets of saliva and urine, using our finger-powered EPD device. To facilitate practical implementation of multistep assays based on the approach, a hand/finger-rotated drum system with a programmable pattern of protrusions is designed to induce deflections of multiple piezoelectric elements and demonstrate programmable fluidic functions. An electrode-to-piezoelectric element connection scheme to minimize the number of piezoelectric elements necessary for a sequence of microfluidic functions is also explored. The present work establishes an engineering foundation to enable design and implementation of finger-powered portable EPD microfluidic devices.

  11. Development of perturbation Monte Carlo methods for polarized light transport in a discrete particle scattering model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K; Mourant, Judith R; Venugopalan, Vasan; Spanier, Jerome

    2016-05-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive, transport-rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) method to model the impact of optical property changes on reflectance measurements within a discrete particle scattering model. The model consists of three log-normally distributed populations of Mie scatterers that approximate biologically relevant cervical tissue properties. Our method provides reflectance estimates for perturbations across wavelength and/or scattering model parameters. We test our pMC model performance by perturbing across number densities and mean particle radii, and compare pMC reflectance estimates with those obtained from conventional Monte Carlo simulations. These tests allow us to explore different factors that control pMC performance and to evaluate the gains in computational efficiency that our pMC method provides.

  12. Development of perturbation Monte Carlo methods for polarized light transport in a discrete particle scattering model

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Mourant, Judith R.; Venugopalan, Vasan; Spanier, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive, transport-rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) method to model the impact of optical property changes on reflectance measurements within a discrete particle scattering model. The model consists of three log-normally distributed populations of Mie scatterers that approximate biologically relevant cervical tissue properties. Our method provides reflectance estimates for perturbations across wavelength and/or scattering model parameters. We test our pMC model performance by perturbing across number densities and mean particle radii, and compare pMC reflectance estimates with those obtained from conventional Monte Carlo simulations. These tests allow us to explore different factors that control pMC performance and to evaluate the gains in computational efficiency that our pMC method provides. PMID:27231642

  13. Analysis of Massively Parallel Discrete-Ordinates Transport Sweep Algorithms with Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Falgout, R D

    2008-10-14

    We present theoretical scaling models for a variety of discrete-ordinates sweep algorithms. In these models, we pay particular attention to the way each algorithm handles collisions. A collision is defined as a processor having multiple angles with ready to be swept during one stage of the sweep. The models also take into account how subdomains are assigned to processors and how angles are grouped during the sweep. We describe a data driven algorithm that resolves collisions efficiently during the sweep as well as other algorithms that have been designed to avoid collisions completely. Our models are validated using the ARGES and AMTRAN transport codes. We then use the models to study and predict scaling trends in all of the sweep algorithms.

  14. Flux extrapolation models used in the DOT IV discrete ordinates neutron transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, E.T.; Rhoades, W.A.; Engle, W.W. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    The DOT IV code solves the Boltzmann transport equation in two dimensions using the method of discrete ordinates. Special techniques have been incorporated in this code to mitigate the effects of flux extrapolation error in space meshes of practical size. This report presents the flux extrapolation models as they appear in DOT IV. A sample problem is also presented to illustrate the effects of the various models on the resultant flux. Convergence of the various models to a single result as the mesh is refined is also examined. A detailed comparison with the widely used TWOTRAN II code is reported. The features which cause DOT and TWOTRAN to differ in the converged results are completely observed and explained.

  15. Are Health State Valuations from the General Public Biased? A Test of Health State Reference Dependency Using Self-assessed Health and an Efficient Discrete Choice Experiment.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Marcel F; Attema, Arthur E; Donkers, Bas; Stolk, Elly A; Versteegh, Matthijs M

    2016-10-27

    Health state valuations of patients and non-patients are not the same, whereas health state values obtained from general population samples are a weighted average of both. The latter constitutes an often-overlooked source of bias. This study investigates the resulting bias and tests for the impact of reference dependency on health state valuations using an efficient discrete choice experiment administered to a Dutch nationally representative sample of 788 respondents. A Bayesian discrete choice experiment design consisting of eight sets of 24 (matched pairwise) choice tasks was developed, with each set providing full identification of the included parameters. Mixed logit models were used to estimate health state preferences with respondents' own health included as an additional predictor. Our results indicate that respondents with impaired health worse than or equal to the health state levels under evaluation have approximately 30% smaller health state decrements. This confirms that reference dependency can be observed in general population samples and affirms the relevance of prospect theory in health state valuations. At the same time, the limited number of respondents with severe health impairments does not appear to bias social tariffs as obtained from general population samples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Time dependent discrete ordinates neutron transport using distribution iteration in XYZ geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dishaw, James R.

    The distribution iteration (DI) algorithm, developed by Wager [32] and Prins [28], for solving the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) has proven, with further development, to be a robust alternative to von Neumann iteration on the scattering source, aka source iteration (SI). Previous work with DI was based on the time-independent form of the transport equation. In this research, the DI algorithm was (1) Improved to provide faster, more efficient, robust convergence; (2) Extended to XYZ geometry; (3) Extended to Multigroup Energy treatment; (4) Extended to solve the time-dependent form of the Boltzmann Transport Equation. The discrete ordinates equations for approximating the BTE have been solved using SI since the discrete ordinates method was developed at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory by 1953. However, SI is often inefficient by itself and requires an accelerator in order to produce results efficiently and reliably. The acceleration schemes that are in use in production codes are Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) and Transport Synthetic Acceleration (TSA). DSA is ineffective for some problems, and cannot be extended to high-performance spatial quadratures. TSA is less effective than DSA and fails for some problems. Krylov acceleration has been explored in recent years, but has many parameters that require problem-dependent tuning for efficiency and effectiveness. The DI algorithm is an alternative to source iteration that, in our testing, does not require an accelerator. I developed a formal verification plan and executed it to verify the results produced by my code that implemented DI with the above features. A new, matrix albedo, boundary condition treatment was developed and implemented so that infinite-medium benchmarks could be included in the verification test suite. The DI algorithm was modified for parallel efficiency and the prior instability of the refinement sweep was corrected. The testing revealed that DI performed as well or faster than

  17. Evaluating the effect of internal aperture variability on transport in kilometer scale discrete fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Painter, Scott L.; Gable, Carl W.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2016-08-01

    The apertures of natural fractures in fractured rock are highly heterogeneous. However, in-fracture aperture variability is often neglected in flow and transport modeling and individual fractures are assumed to have uniform aperture distribution. The relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling within kilometer18 scale field–scale fracture networks has been under a matter of debate for a long time because the flow in each single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. Computational limitations have previously prohibited researchers from investigating the relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling within large-scale fracture networks. We address this question by incorporating internal heterogeneity of individual fractures into 23 flow simulations within kilometer scale three-dimensional fracture networks, where fracture intensity, P32 (ratio between total fracture area and domain volume) is between 0.027 and 0.031 [1/m]. A recently developed discrete fracture network (DFN) simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate DFNs that include in-fracture aperture variability represented by a stationary log-normal stochastic field with various correlation lengths and variances. The Lagrangian transport parameters, non-reacting travel time and cumulative retention, are calculated along particles streamlines. It is observed that due to local flow channeling early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture variability than the tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the in-fracture transmissivity variations and spatial correlation length is observed.

  18. Evaluating the effect of internal aperture variability on transport in kilometer scale discrete fracture networks

    DOE PAGES

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; ...

    2016-08-01

    The apertures of natural fractures in fractured rock are highly heterogeneous. However, in-fracture aperture variability is often neglected in flow and transport modeling and individual fractures are assumed to have uniform aperture distribution. The relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling within kilometer18 scale field–scale fracture networks has been under a matter of debate for a long time because the flow in each single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. Computational limitations have previously prohibited researchers from investigating the relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling withinmore » large-scale fracture networks. We address this question by incorporating internal heterogeneity of individual fractures into 23 flow simulations within kilometer scale three-dimensional fracture networks, where fracture intensity, P32 (ratio between total fracture area and domain volume) is between 0.027 and 0.031 [1/m]. A recently developed discrete fracture network (DFN) simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate DFNs that include in-fracture aperture variability represented by a stationary log-normal stochastic field with various correlation lengths and variances. The Lagrangian transport parameters, non-reacting travel time and cumulative retention, are calculated along particles streamlines. It is observed that due to local flow channeling early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture variability than the tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the in-fracture transmissivity variations and spatial correlation length is observed.« less

  19. C5 Benchmark Problem with Discrete Ordinate Radiation Transport Code DENOVO

    SciTech Connect

    Yesilyurt, Gokhan; Clarno, Kevin T; Evans, Thomas M; Davidson, Gregory G; Fox, Patricia B

    2011-01-01

    The C5 benchmark problem proposed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency was modeled to examine the capabilities of Denovo, a three-dimensional (3-D) parallel discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) radiation transport code, for problems with no spatial homogenization. Denovo uses state-of-the-art numerical methods to obtain accurate solutions to the Boltzmann transport equation. Problems were run in parallel on Jaguar, a high-performance supercomputer located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Both the two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D configurations were analyzed, and the results were compared with the reference MCNP Monte Carlo calculations. For an additional comparison, SCALE/KENO-V.a Monte Carlo solutions were also included. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was performed for the optimal angular quadrature and mesh resolution for both the 2-D and 3-D infinite lattices of UO{sub 2} fuel pin cells. Denovo was verified with the C5 problem. The effective multiplication factors, pin powers, and assembly powers were found to be in good agreement with the reference MCNP and SCALE/KENO-V.a Monte Carlo calculations.

  20. The TORT three-dimensional discrete ordinates neutron/photon transport code (TORT version 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, W.A.; Simpson, D.B.

    1997-10-01

    TORT calculates the flux or fluence of neutrons and/or photons throughout three-dimensional systems due to particles incident upon the system`s external boundaries, due to fixed internal sources, or due to sources generated by interaction with the system materials. The transport process is represented by the Boltzman transport equation. The method of discrete ordinates is used to treat the directional variable, and a multigroup formulation treats the energy dependence. Anisotropic scattering is treated using a Legendre expansion. Various methods are used to treat spatial dependence, including nodal and characteristic procedures that have been especially adapted to resist numerical distortion. A method of body overlay assists in material zone specification, or the specification can be generated by an external code supplied by the user. Several special features are designed to concentrate machine resources where they are most needed. The directional quadrature and Legendre expansion can vary with energy group. A discontinuous mesh capability has been shown to reduce the size of large problems by a factor of roughly three in some cases. The emphasis in this code is a robust, adaptable application of time-tested methods, together with a few well-tested extensions.

  1. A Discrete Choice Conjoint Experiment to Evaluate Parent Preferences for Treatment of Young, Medication Naïve Children with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Cunningham, Charles E.; Pelham, William E.; Rimas, Heather L.; Greiner, Andrew R.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Waxmonsky, James; Fabiano, Gregory A.; Robb, Jessica A.; Burrows-MacLean, Lisa; Scime, Mindy; Hoffman, Martin T.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined treatment preferences of 183 parents of young (average age = 5.8 years; SD = 0.6), medication naïve children with ADHD. Preferences were evaluated using a discrete choice experiment in which parents made choices between different combinations of treatment characteristics, outcomes, and costs. Latent class analysis yielded two segments of parents: (1) Medication Avoidant parents constituted 70.5% of the sample whose treatment decisions were strongly influenced by a desire to avoid medication; (2) Outcome Oriented parents constituted 29.5% of the sample whose treatment decisions were most influenced by a desire for positive treatment outcomes. Parents in the Outcome Oriented segment were more stressed and depressed, had lower socioeconomic status and education, were more likely to be single parents, and had more disruptive and impaired children. Simulations predicted that parents would prefer treatments with behavior therapy over treatments with stimulant medication only. PMID:21722027

  2. Continuous energy, multi-dimensional discrete ordinates transport calculations for problem dependent resonance treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhaopeng

    In the past twenty 20 years considerable progress has been made in developing new methods for solving the multi-dimensional transport problem. However the effort devoted to the resonance self-shielding calculation has lagged, and much less progress has been made in enhancing resonance-shielding techniques for generating problem-dependent multi-group cross sections (XS) for the multi-dimensional transport calculations. In several applications, the error introduced by self-shielding methods exceeds that due to uncertainties in the basic nuclear data, and often they can be the limiting factor on the accuracy of the final results. This work is to improve the accuracy of the resonance self-shielding calculation by developing continuous energy multi-dimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. A new method has been developed, it can calculate the continuous-energy neutron fluxes for the whole two-dimensional domain, which can be utilized as weighting function to process the self-shielded multi-group cross sections for reactor analysis and criticality calculations, and during this process, the two-dimensional heterogeneous effect in the resonance self-shielding calculation can be fully included. A new code, GEMINEWTRN (Group and Energy-Pointwise Methodology Implemented in NEWT for Resonance Neutronics) has been developed in the developing version of SCALE [1], it combines the energy pointwise (PW) capability of the CENTRM [2] with the two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport capability of lattice physics code NEWT [14]. Considering the large number of energy points in the resonance region (typically more than 30,000), the computational burden and memory requirement for GEMINEWTRN is tremendously large, some efforts have been performed to improve the computational efficiency, parallel computation has been implemented into GEMINEWTRN, which can save the computation and memory requirement a lot; some energy points reducing

  3. Anomalous transport in discrete arcs and simulation of double layers in a model auroral circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution and long-time stability of a double layer in a discrete auroral arc requires that the parallel current in the arc, which may be considered uniform at the source, be diverted within the arc to charge the flanks of the U-shaped double-layer potential structure. A simple model is presented in which this current re-distribution is effected by anomalous transport based on electrostatic lower hybrid waves driven by the flank structure itself. This process provides the limiting constraint on the double-layer potential. The flank charging may be represented as that of a nonlinear transmission. A simplified model circuit, in which the transmission line is represented by a nonlinear impedance in parallel with a variable resistor, is incorporated in a 1-d simulation model to give the current density at the DL boundaries. Results are presented for the scaling of the DL potential as a function of the width of the arc and the saturation efficiency of the lower hybrid instability mechanism.

  4. Anomalous transport in discrete arcs and simulation of double layers in a model auroral circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution and long-time stability of a double layer (DL) in a discrete auroral arc requires that the parallel current in the arc, which may be considered uniform at the source, be diverted within the arc to charge the flanks of the U-shaped double layer potential structure. A simple model is presented in which this current redistribution is effected by anomalous transport based on electrostatic lower hybrid waves driven by the flank structure itself. This process provides the limiting constraint on the double layer potential. The flank charging may be represented as that of a nonlinear transmission line. A simplified model circuit, in which the transmission line is represented by a nonlinear impedance in parallel with a variable resistor, is incorporated in a one-dimensional simulation model to give the current density at the DL boundaries. Results are presented for the scaling of the DL potential as a function of the width of the arc and the saturation efficiency of the lower hybrid instability mechanism.

  5. Characterization of high order spatial discretizations and lumping techniques for discontinuous finite element SN transport

    SciTech Connect

    Maginot, P. G.; Ragusa, J. C.; Morel, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    We examine several possible methods of mass matrix lumping for discontinuous finite element discrete ordinates transport using a Lagrange interpolatory polynomial trial space. Though positive outflow angular flux is guaranteed with traditional mass matrix lumping in a purely absorbing 1-D slab cell for the linear discontinuous approximation, we show that when used with higher degree interpolatory polynomial trial spaces, traditional lumping does yield strictly positive outflows and does not increase in accuracy with an increase in trial space polynomial degree. As an alternative, we examine methods which are 'self-lumping'. Self-lumping methods yield diagonal mass matrices by using numerical quadrature restricted to the Lagrange interpolatory points. Using equally-spaced interpolatory points, self-lumping is achieved through the use of closed Newton-Cotes formulas, resulting in strictly positive outflows in pure absorbers for odd power polynomials in 1-D slab geometry. By changing interpolatory points from the traditional equally-spaced points to the quadrature points of the Gauss-Legendre or Lobatto-Gauss-Legendre quadratures, it is possible to generate solution representations with a diagonal mass matrix and a strictly positive outflow for any degree polynomial solution representation in a pure absorber medium in 1-D slab geometry. Further, there is no inherent limit to local truncation error order of accuracy when using interpolatory points that correspond to the quadrature points of high order accuracy numerical quadrature schemes. (authors)

  6. A new transport discretization scheme for arbitrary spatial meshes in XY geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.L.

    1991-01-18

    We introduce a new spatial discretization scheme for transport on arbitrary spatial grids in XY geometry. Our arbitrary'' spatial grid is composed of arbitrarily-connected polygons, each of which may have an arbitrary number of sides. We begin our derivation by imposing particle balance on every corner'' of each cell (Consequently, we call our scheme the corner-balance (CB) method.) We complete the derivation by introducing simple closure formulas that relate volume-averaged unknowns to surface-averaged unknowns in each corner. We discuss the relationship of the new scheme to discontinuous finite-element methods and to multiple-balance methods. We demonstrate that on simple grids, the method reduces to very robust schemes that have been studied previously. We discuss the theoretical performance of the method in the thick diffusion limit, and provide numerical results for that limit. We present additional numerical results from simple problems that test the new scheme in other limits. Finally, we offer some concluding remarks about the method. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Outer magnetospheric resonances and transport: discrete and turbulent cascades in the dynamic pressure and plasma flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Sergey; Büchner, Jörg; Zelenyi, Lev; Kronberg, Elena; Kozak, Lyudmila; Blecki, Jan; Lezhen, Liudmila; Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana; Skalsky, Alexander; Budaev, Vyacheslav; Amata, Ermanno

    We explore interactions of Supersonic Plasma Streams (SPS) with the Earth magnetosphere in the context of the planetary and astrophysical magnetospheres and of that of laboratory plasmas. The interactions can be inherently non-local and non-equilibrium, and even explosive due to both solar wind (SW) induced and self-generated coherent structures in the multiscale system with the scales ranging from the micro to global scales. We concentrate on the main fundamental processes arising from the SPS cascading and interactions with surface and cavity resonances in the Earth’s magnetosphere, using multi-spacecraft data (SPECTR-R, DOUBLE STAR, CLUSTER, GEOTAIL, ACE, WIND etc.). We will address the following key problems to advance our understanding of anomalous transport and boundary dynamics: - generalizations of the SPS generation mechanisms, e.g., by bow shock (BS) surface or magnetosheath (MSH) cavity resonances, triggering by interplanetary shocks, solar wind (SW) dynamic pressure jumps, foreshock nonlinear structures, etc. - the clarification of BS rippling mechanisms requires base on the relevant databases from the CLUSTER/ DOUBLE STAR/ GEOTAIL/SPECTR-R/ ACE/ WIND spacecraft, which will be used for a statistical analysis targeting the SPS statistical features as extreme events. - substantial part of the SW kinetic energy can be pumped into the BS membrane and MSH cavity modes and initiate further cascades towards higher frequencies. Accordingly we present the multipoint studies of the SPS and of related nonlinear discrete cascades (carried generally by the SPS), along with the transformation of discrete cascades of the dynamic pressure into turbulent cascades. - investigation of spectral and bi-spectral cross-correlations in SW, foreshock, MSH and in vicinity of BS and magnetopause (MP) would demonstrate that both inflow and outflow into/ from magnetosphere can be modulated by the SPS and by the related outer magnetospheric resonances as well. We demonstrate in

  8. Bedload Transport on Steep Slopes with Coupled Modeling Based on the Discrete Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauchat, J.; Maurin, R.; Chareyre, B.; Frey, P.

    2014-12-01

    After more than a century of research, a clear understanding of the physical processes involved in sediment transport problems is still lacking. In particular, modeling of intergranular interactions and fluid-particle interactions in bedload transport need to be improved. In this contribution, we propose a simple numerical model coupling a Discrete Element Method (DEM) for the grain dynamics with a simple 1D vertical fluid phase model inspired from the two-phase approach [1] in order to contribute to this open question. The Reynolds stress is parameterized by a mixing length model which depends on the integral of the grain volume fraction. The coupling between the grains and the fluid phase is essentially achieved through buoyancy and drag forces. The open source DEM code Yade [2] is used with a linear spring-dashpot contact law that allows the description of the behavior of the particles from the quasi-static to the dynamical state. The model is compared with classical results [3] and with particle-scale experimental results obtained in the quasi-2D flume at IRSTEA, Grenoble [4]. We discuss the closures of the model and the sensitivity to the different physical and numerical parameters. [1] Revil-Baudard, T. and J. Chauchat. A two-phase model for sheet flow regime based on dense granular flow rheology. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 118(2):619-634, 2013. [2] Šmilauer V. , E. Catalano, B. Chareyre, S. Dorofeenko, J. Duriez, A. Gladky, J. Kozicki, C . Modenese, L. Scholtès, L. Sibille, J. Str.nský, and K. Thoeni. Yade Documentation (V. Šmilauer, ed.), The Yade Project, 1st ed., http://yade-dem.org/doc/., 2010. [3] Meyer-Peter, E. and R. Müller. Formulas for bed-load transport. In Proc. 2nd Meeting, pages 39-64. IAHR, 1948. [4] Frey, P. Particle velocity and concentration profiles in bedload experiments on a steep slope. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 39(5):646-655, 2014.

  9. How Can the Health System Retain Women in HIV Treatment for a Lifetime? A Discrete Choice Experiment in Ethiopia and Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Kruk, Margaret E.; Riley, Patricia L.; Palma, Anton M.; Adhikari, Sweta; Ahoua, Laurence; Arnaldo, Carlos; Belo, Dercio F.; Brusamento, Serena; Cumba, Luisa I. G.; Dziuban, Eric J.; El-Sadr, Wafaa M.; Gutema, Yoseph; Habtamu, Zelalem; Heller, Thomas; Kidanu, Aklilu; Langa, Judite; Mahagaja, Epifanio; McCarthy, Carey F.; Melaku, Zenebe; Shodell, Daniel; Tsiouris, Fatima; Young, Paul R.; Rabkin, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Option B+, an approach that involves provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) to all HIV-infected pregnant women for life, is the preferred strategy for prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV. Lifelong retention in care is essential to its success. We conducted a discrete choice experiment in Ethiopia and Mozambique to identify health system characteristics preferred by HIV-infected women to promote continuity of care. Methods Women living with HIV and receiving care at hospitals in Oromia Region, Ethiopia and Zambézia Province, Mozambique were shown nine choice cards and asked to select one of two hypothetical health facilities, each with six varying characteristics related to the delivery of HIV services for long term treatment. Mixed logit models were used to estimate the influence of six health service attributes on choice of clinics. Results 2,033 women participated in the study (response rate 97.8% in Ethiopia and 94.7% in Mozambique). Among the various attributes of structure and content of lifelong ART services, the most important attributes identified in both countries were respectful provider attitude and ability to obtain non-HIV health services during HIV-related visits. Availability of counseling support services was also a driver of choice. Facility type, i.e., hospital versus health center, was substantially less important. Conclusions Efforts to enhance retention in HIV care and treatment for pregnant women should focus on promoting respectful care by providers and integrating access to non-HIV health services in the same visit, as well as continuing to strengthen counseling. PMID:27551785

  10. Role of serotonin transporter function in rat orbitofrontal cortex in impulsive choice.

    PubMed

    Darna, Mahesh; Chow, Jonathan J; Yates, Justin R; Charnigo, Richard J; Beckmann, Joshua S; Bardo, Michael T; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2015-10-15

    Impulsivity is a multi-faceted personality construct that plays a prominent role in drug abuse vulnerability. Dysregulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) systems in subregions of the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in impulsivity. Extracellular 5-HT concentrations are regulated by 5-HT transporters (SERTs), indicating that these transporters may be important molecular targets underlying individual differences in impulsivity and drug abuse vulnerability. The present study evaluated the role of SERT in mediating individual differences in impulsivity. Rats were tested for both impulsive action using the cued go/no-go task and for impulsive choice using a delay discounting task in a counterbalanced design. Following behavioral evaluation, Km and Vmax were obtained from kinetic analysis of [(3)H]5-HT uptake by SERT using synaptosomes prepared from both orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) obtained from each individual rat. Vmax for SERT in OFC, but not mPFC, was negatively correlated with mean adjusted delay scores in the delay discounting task. In contrast, Vmax for SERT in OFC and mPFC was not correlated with performance in the cued go/no-go task. To further evaluate the relationship between SERT function and impulsive choice, a selective SERT inhibitor, fluoxetine (0, 15, 50 and 150pmol/side) was microinjected bilaterally into OFC and effects on the delay discounting task determined. Following stabilization of behavior, fluoxetine increased mean adjusted delay scores (decreased impulsivity) in high impulsive rats compared to saline microinjection, but had no effect in low impulsive rats. These ex vivo and in vivo results suggest that enhanced SERT function in OFC underlies high impulsive choice behavior.

  11. Choice of scalar measure for crystal curvature to image dislocation substructure in terms of discrete orientation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zisman, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Starting from Nye's tensor, alternative characteristics of crystal curvature indicative of dislocation content are considered subject to very low thickness of investigated matter under the free surface and discreteness of orientation sampling. Analysis within the framework of continuum mechanics, undertaken to allow for such conditions peculiar to the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique, has shown the variable part of orientations expressed in a vector form to be most sensitive to lattice defects when projected to the free surface plane. Hence, as verified with EBSD data on a grain junction in a low deformed IF steel, magnitude of the projected field allows one to map plastic strains inhomogeneous within grains whereas divergence of this field distinctly images and quantifies low-angle dislocation boundaries formed at low strains.

  12. Using choice experiments to assess people's preferences for railway transports of hazardous materials.

    PubMed

    Winslott Hiselius, Lena

    2005-10-01

    This article investigates whether the choice experiment approach can be used to assess people's preferences and the determinants of these preferences in order to estimate the costs and benefits of different configurations of the transport of hazardous materials by rail. Changes in the exposure to hazardous materials that people are subjected to are used rather than changes in accident risk. To the best knowledge of the author, this has not been done before in a study of people's preferences toward hazardous materials. A mail survey, carried out in two cities in Sweden, is used to obtain tentative estimates of the willingness to pay for a reduction in exposure as well as the willingness to accept an increase in exposure. Special attention is given to viability, since the complexity of the activity studied, transport of hazardous materials, and the method used pose particular challenges. The response rate and tests of validity and consistency indicate that this method can be applied. Moreover, the results suggest that studies of this kind may provide guidance on changes in the transport of hazardous materials, especially because policymakers may influence the attributes presented here. Referring to the exposure of hazardous materials highlights the importance of providing the respondents with adequate information regarding hazardous transports. An important finding is that the amount of background information may have some effect on the stated preferences.

  13. Reimagining cost recovery in Pakistan's irrigation system through willingness-to-pay estimates for irrigation water from a discrete choice experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Andrew Reid; Shah, M. Azeem Ali; Ward, Patrick S.

    2014-08-01

    It is widely argued that farmers are unwilling to pay adequate fees for surface water irrigation to recover the costs associated with maintenance and improvement of delivery systems. In this paper, we use a discrete choice experiment to study farmer preferences for irrigation characteristics along two branch canals in Punjab Province in eastern Pakistan. We find that farmers are generally willing to pay well in excess of current surface water irrigation costs for increased surface water reliability and that the amount that farmers are willing to pay is an increasing function of their existing surface water supply as well as location along the main canal branch. This explicit translation of implicit willingness-to-pay (WTP) for water (via expenditure on groundwater pumping) to WTP for reliable surface water demonstrates the potential for greatly enhanced cost recovery in the Indus Basin Irrigation System via appropriate setting of water user fees, driven by the higher WTP of those currently receiving reliable supplies.

  14. Reimagining cost recovery in Pakistan's irrigation system through willingness-to-pay estimates for irrigation water from a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Andrew Reid; Shah, M Azeem Ali; Ward, Patrick S

    2014-01-01

    It is widely argued that farmers are unwilling to pay adequate fees for surface water irrigation to recover the costs associated with maintenance and improvement of delivery systems. In this paper, we use a discrete choice experiment to study farmer preferences for irrigation characteristics along two branch canals in Punjab Province in eastern Pakistan. We find that farmers are generally willing to pay well in excess of current surface water irrigation costs for increased surface water reliability and that the amount that farmers are willing to pay is an increasing function of their existing surface water supply as well as location along the main canal branch. This explicit translation of implicit willingness-to-pay (WTP) for water (via expenditure on groundwater pumping) to WTP for reliable surface water demonstrates the potential for greatly enhanced cost recovery in the Indus Basin Irrigation System via appropriate setting of water user fees, driven by the higher WTP of those currently receiving reliable supplies. PMID:25552779

  15. A posteriori error estimators for the discrete ordinates approximation of the one-speed neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, S.; Azmy, Y. Y.

    2013-07-01

    When calculating numerical solutions of the neutron transport equation it is important to have a measure of the accuracy of the solution. As the true solution is generally not known, a suitable estimation of the error must be made. The steady state transport equation possesses discretization errors in all its independent variables: angle, energy and space. In this work only spatial discretization errors are considered. An exact transport solution, in which the degree of regularity of the exact flux across the singular characteristic is controlled, is manufactured to determine the numerical solutions true discretization error. This solution is then projected onto a Legendre polynomial space in order to form an exact solution on the same basis space as the numerical solution, Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method (DGFEM), to enable computation of the true error. Over a series of test problems the true error is compared to the error estimated by: Ragusa and Wang (RW), residual source (LER) and cell discontinuity estimators (JD). The validity and accuracy of the considered estimators are primarily assessed by considering the effectivity index and global L2 norm of the error. In general RW excels at approximating the true error distribution but usually under-estimates its magnitude; the LER estimator emulates the true error distribution but frequently over-estimates the magnitude of the true error; the JD estimator poorly captures the true error distribution and generally under-estimates the error about singular characteristics but over-estimates it elsewhere. (authors)

  16. Evaluating consumer preferences for healthy eating from Community Kitchens in low-income urban areas: A discrete choice experiment of Comedores Populares in Peru.

    PubMed

    Buttorff, Christine; Trujillo, Antonio J; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Miranda, J Jaime

    2015-09-01

    Many low-income individuals from around the world rely on local food vendors for daily sustenance. These small vendors quickly provide convenient, low-priced, tasty foods, however, they may be low in nutritional value. These vendors serve as an opportunity to use established delivery channels to explore the introduction of healthier products, e.g. fresh salad and fruits, to low-income populations. We sought to understand preferences for items prepared in Comedores Populares (CP), government-supported food vendors serving low-income Peruvians, to determine whether it would be feasible to introduce healthier items, specifically fruits and vegetables. We used a best-worst discrete choice experiment (DCE) that allowed participants to select their favorite and least favorite option from a series of three hypothetical menus. The characteristics were derived from a series of formative qualitative interviews conducted previously in the CPs. We examined preferences for six characteristics: price, salad, soup, sides, meat and fruit. A total of 432 individuals, from two districts in Lima, Peru responded to a discrete choice experiment and demographic survey in 2012. For the DCE, price contributed the most to individual's utility relative to the other attributes, with salad and soup following closely. Sides (e.g. rice and beans) were the least important. The willingness to pay for a meal with a large main course and salad was 2.6 Nuevos Soles, roughly a 1 Nuevo Sol increase from the average menu price, or USD $0.32 dollars. The willingness to pay for a meal with fruit was 1.6 Nuevo Soles. Overall, the perceived quality of service and food served in the CPs is high. The willingness to pay indicates that healthier additions to meals are feasible. Understanding consumer preferences can help policy makers design healthier meals in an organization with the potential to scale up to reach a considerable number of low-income families.

  17. Men’s preferences for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia: a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mankowski, Colette; Ikenwilo, Divine; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Ryan, Mandy; Nazir, Jameel; Newman, Cathy; Watson, Verity

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore and quantify men’s preferences and willingness to pay (WTP) for attributes of medications for lower urinary tract symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia using a discrete choice experiment. Subjects and methods Men in the UK aged ≥45 years with moderate-to-severe lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia (based on self-reported International Prostate Symptom Score ≥8) were recruited. An online discrete choice experiment survey was administered. Eligible men were asked to consider different medication scenarios and select their preferred medication according to seven attributes: daytime and nighttime (nocturia) urinary frequency, urinary urgency, sexual and nonsexual side effects, number of tablets/day, and cost/month. A mixed-logit model was used to estimate preferences and WTP for medication attributes. Results In all, 247 men completed the survey. Men were willing to trade-off symptom improvements and treatment side effects. Men preferred medications that reduced urinary urgency and reduced day- and nighttime urinary frequency. Men preferred medications without side effects (base-case level), but did not care about the number of tablets per day. WTP for symptomatic improvement was £25.33/month for reduced urgency (urge incontinence to mild urgency), and £6.65/month and £1.39/month for each unit reduction in night- and daytime urination frequency, respectively. The sexual and nonsexual side effects reduced WTP by up to £30.07/month. There was significant heterogeneity in preferences for most attributes, except for reduced urinary urgency from urge incontinence to mild urgency and no fluid during ejaculation (dry orgasm). Conclusion To compensate for side effects, a medicine for lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia must provide a combination of benefits, such as reduced urgency of urination plus reduced nighttime and/or reduced daytime urination. PMID:27920507

  18. Discontinuous Galerkin discretization of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the shear-stress transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenawa, Stefan; Hartmann, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    In this article we consider the development of Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods for the numerical approximation of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the shear-stress transport (SST) model by Menter. This turbulence model is based on a blending of the Wilcox k-ω model used near the wall and the k-ɛ model used in the rest of the domain where the blending functions depend on the distance to the nearest wall. For the computation of the distance of each quadrature point in the domain to the nearest of the curved, piecewise polynomial wall boundaries, we propose a stabilized continuous finite element (FE) discretization of the eikonal equation. Furthermore, we propose a new wall boundary condition for the dissipation rate ω based on the projection of the analytic near-wall behavior of ω onto the discrete ansatz space of the DG discretization. Finally, we introduce an artificial viscosity to the discretization of the turbulence kinetic energy (k-)equation to suppress oscillations of k near the underresolved boundary layer edge. The wall distance computation based on the continuous FE discretization of the eikonal equation is demonstrated for an internal and three external/aerodynamic flow geometries including a three-element high-lift configuration. The DG discretization of the RANS equations with the SST model is demonstrated for turbulent flows past a flat plate and the RAE2822 airfoil (Cases 9 and 10). The results are compared to the underlying k-ω model and experimental data.

  19. Acceptability and Preferences for Hypothetical Rectal Microbicides among a Community Sample of Young Men Who Have Sex with Men and Transgender Women in Thailand: A Discrete Choice Experiment.

    PubMed

    Newman, Peter A; Cameron, Michael P; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Tepjan, Suchon; Scarpa, Riccardo

    2016-11-01

    Rectal microbicides (RMs) may offer substantial benefits in expanding HIV prevention options for key populations. From April to August 2013, we conducted Tablet-Assisted Survey Interviewing, including a discrete choice experiment, with participants recruited from gay entertainment venues and community-based organizations in Chiang Mai and Pattaya, Thailand. Among 408 participants, 74.5 % were young men who have sex with men, 25.5 % transgender women, with mean age = 24.3 years. One-third (35.5 %) had ≤9th grade education; 63.4 % engaged in sex work. Overall, 83.4 % reported they would definitely use a RM, with more than 2-fold higher odds of choice of a RM with 99 versus 50 % efficacy, and significantly higher odds of choosing gel versus suppository, intermittent versus daily dosing, and prescription versus over-the-counter. Sex workers were significantly more likely to use a RM immediately upon availability, with greater tolerance for moderate efficacy and daily dosing. Engaging key populations in assessing RM preferences may support biomedical research and evidence-informed interventions to optimize the effectiveness of RMs in HIV prevention.

  20. Determining Preferences Related to HIV Counselling and Testing Services Among High School Learners in KwaZulu-Natal: A Discrete Choice Experiment.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Michael; George, Gavin L; Rhodes, Bruce D

    2016-11-16

    A key strategy of the South African national response to HIV is the scale-up of HIV counselling and testing (HCT) in the 15-49 years age group. The integrated school health policy aims to guide the roll out of youth-friendly health services including the provision of HCT in schools. Using a discrete choice experiment to examine preferences regarding the attributes of HCT service packages, this study identifies barriers to and facilitators of HCT among high school learners. Monetary considerations were found to have the strongest effect of any attribute on choice, whilst confidentiality was found to be a primary concern for learners considering HCT. Policy makers and service providers must ensure that confidentiality is maintained, and could consider using monetary incentives as a way of increasing uptake of HCT. Programmes designed to reduce social stigma and improve education and knowledge dissemination around HCT and HIV, are vital in creating demand for HCT and changing attitudes among young people.

  1. Using qualitative research to facilitate the interpretation of quantitative results from a discrete choice experiment: insights from a survey in elderly ophthalmologic patients

    PubMed Central

    Vennedey, Vera; Danner, Marion; Evers, Silvia MAA; Fauser, Sascha; Stock, Stephanie; Dirksen, Carmen D; Hiligsmann, Mickaël

    2016-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual impairment and blindness in industrialized countries. Currently, mainly three treatment options are available, which are all intravitreal injections, but differ with regard to the frequency of injections needed, their approval status, and cost. This study aims to estimate patients’ preferences for characteristics of treatment options for neovascular AMD. Methods An interviewer-assisted discrete choice experiment was conducted among patients suffering from AMD treated with intravitreal injections. A Bayesian efficient design was used for the development of 12 choice tasks. In each task patients indicated their preference for one out of two treatment scenarios described by the attributes: side effects, approval status, effect on visual function, injection and monitoring frequency. While answering the choice tasks, patients were asked to think aloud and explain the reasons for choosing or rejecting specific characteristics. Quantitative data were analyzed with a mixed multinomial logit model. Results Eighty-six patients completed the questionnaire. Patients significantly preferred treatments that improve visual function, are approved, are administered in a pro re nata regimen (as needed), and are accompanied by bimonthly monitoring. Patients significantly disliked less frequent monitoring visits (every 4 months) and explained this was due to fear of deterioration being left unnoticed, and in turn experiencing disease deterioration. Significant preference heterogeneity was found for all levels except for bimonthly monitoring visits and severe, rare eye-related side effects. Patients gave clear explanations of their individual preferences during the interviews. Conclusion Significant preference trends were discernible for the overall sample, despite the preference heterogeneity for most treatment characteristics. Patients like to be monitored and treated regularly, but not too frequently

  2. Toward Patient-Centered Telerehabilitation Design: Understanding Chronic Pain Patients’ Preferences for Web-Based Exercise Telerehabilitation Using a Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina GM; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam MR; IJzerman, Maarten J

    2017-01-01

    Background Patient-centered design that addresses patients’ preferences and needs is considered an important aim for improving health care systems. At present, within the field of pain rehabilitation, patients’ preferences regarding telerehabilitation remain scarcely explored and little is known about the optimal combination between human and electronic contact from the patients’ perspective. In addition, limited evidence is available about the best way to explore patients’ preferences. Therefore, the assessment of patients’ preferences regarding telemedicine is an important step toward the design of effective patient-centered care. Objective To identify which telerehabilitation treatment options patients with chronic pain are most likely to accept as alternatives to conventional rehabilitation and assess which treatment attributes are most important to them. Methods A discrete choice experiment with 15 choice tasks, combining 6 telerehabilitation treatment characteristics, was designed. Each choice task consisted of 2 hypothetical treatment scenarios and 1 opt-out scenario. Relative attribute importance was estimated using a bivariate probit regression analysis. One hundred and thirty surveys were received, of which 104 were usable questionnaires; thus, resulting in a total of 1547 observations. Results Physician communication mode, the use of feedback and monitoring technology (FMT), and exercise location were key drivers of patients’ treatment preferences (P<.001). Patients were willing to accept less frequent physician consultation offered mainly through video communication, provided that they were offered FMT and some face-to-face consultation and could exercise outside their home environment at flexible exercise hours. Home-based telerehabilitation scenarios with minimal physician supervision were the least preferred. A reduction in health care premiums would make these telerehabilitation scenarios as attractive as conventional clinic

  3. Nonlinear diffusion acceleration for the multigroup transport equation discretized with S{sub N} and continuous FEM with rattlesnake

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Nonlinear diffusion acceleration (NDA) can improve the performance of a neutron transport solver significantly especially for the multigroup eigenvalue problems. The high-order transport equation and the transport-corrected low-order diffusion equation form a nonlinear system in NDA, which can be solved via a Picard iteration. The consistency of the correction of the low-order equation is important to ensure the stabilization and effectiveness of the iteration. It also makes the low-order equation preserve the scalar flux of the high-order equation. In this paper, the consistent correction for a particular discretization scheme, self-adjoint angular flux (SAAF) formulation with discrete ordinates method (S{sub N}) and continuous finite element method (CFEM) is proposed for the multigroup neutron transport equation. Equations with the anisotropic scatterings and a void treatment are included. The Picard iteration with this scheme has been implemented and tested with RattleS{sub N}ake, a MOOSE-based application at INL. Convergence results are presented. (authors)

  4. Multi-choice stochastic transportation problem involving general form of distributions.

    PubMed

    Quddoos, Abdul; Ull Hasan, Md Gulzar; Khalid, Mohammad Masood

    2014-01-01

    Many authors have presented studies of multi-choice stochastic transportation problem (MCSTP) where availability and demand parameters follow a particular probability distribution (such as exponential, weibull, cauchy or extreme value). In this paper an MCSTP is considered where availability and demand parameters follow general form of distribution and a generalized equivalent deterministic model (GMCSTP) of MCSTP is obtained. It is also shown that all previous models obtained by different authors can be deduced with the help of GMCSTP. MCSTP with pareto, power function or burr-XII distributions are also considered and equivalent deterministic models are obtained. To illustrate the proposed model two numerical examples are presented and solved using LINGO 13.0 software package.

  5. Solution of the within-group multidimensional discrete ordinates transport equations on massively parallel architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerr, Robert Joseph

    2011-12-01

    The integral transport matrix method (ITMM) has been used as the kernel of new parallel solution methods for the discrete ordinates approximation of the within-group neutron transport equation. The ITMM abandons the repetitive mesh sweeps of the traditional source iterations (SI) scheme in favor of constructing stored operators that account for the direct coupling factors among all the cells and between the cells and boundary surfaces. The main goals of this work were to develop the algorithms that construct these operators and employ them in the solution process, determine the most suitable way to parallelize the entire procedure, and evaluate the behavior and performance of the developed methods for increasing number of processes. This project compares the effectiveness of the ITMM with the SI scheme parallelized with the Koch-Baker-Alcouffe (KBA) method. The primary parallel solution method involves a decomposition of the domain into smaller spatial sub-domains, each with their own transport matrices, and coupled together via interface boundary angular fluxes. Each sub-domain has its own set of ITMM operators and represents an independent transport problem. Multiple iterative parallel solution methods have investigated, including parallel block Jacobi (PBJ), parallel red/black Gauss-Seidel (PGS), and parallel GMRES (PGMRES). The fastest observed parallel solution method, PGS, was used in a weak scaling comparison with the PARTISN code. Compared to the state-of-the-art SI-KBA with diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA), this new method without acceleration/preconditioning is not competitive for any problem parameters considered. The best comparisons occur for problems that are difficult for SI DSA, namely highly scattering and optically thick. SI DSA execution time curves are generally steeper than the PGS ones. However, until further testing is performed it cannot be concluded that SI DSA does not outperform the ITMM with PGS even on several thousand or tens of

  6. Transport in simple networks described by an integrable discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Sobirov, Z A; Matrasulov, D U; Sawada, S

    2011-08-01

    We elucidate the case in which the Ablowitz-Ladik (AL)-type discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) on simple networks (e.g., star graphs and tree graphs) becomes completely integrable just as in the case of a simple one-dimensional (1D) discrete chain. The strength of cubic nonlinearity is different from bond to bond, and networks are assumed to have at least two semi-infinite bonds with one of them working as an incoming bond. The present work is a nontrivial extension of our preceding one [Sobirov et al., Phys. Rev. E 81, 066602 (2010)] on the continuum NLSE to the discrete case. We find (1) the solution on each bond is a part of the universal (bond-independent) AL soliton solution on the 1D discrete chain, but it is multiplied by the inverse of the square root of bond-dependent nonlinearity; (2) nonlinearities at individual bonds around each vertex must satisfy a sum rule; and (3) under findings 1 and 2, there exist an infinite number of constants of motion. As a practical issue, with the use of an AL soliton injected through the incoming bond, we obtain transmission probabilities inversely proportional to the strength of nonlinearity on the outgoing bonds.

  7. Factors that influence clinicians' decisions to offer intravenous alteplase in acute ischemic stroke patients with uncertain treatment indication: Results of a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    De Brún, Aoife; Flynn, Darren; Ternent, Laura; Price, Christopher I; Rodgers, Helen; Ford, Gary A; Rudd, Matthew; Lancsar, Emily; Simpson, Stephen; Teah, John; Thomson, Richard G

    2017-01-01

    Background Treatment with intravenous alteplase for eligible patients with acute ischemic stroke is underused, with variation in treatment rates across the UK. This study sought to elucidate factors influencing variation in clinicians' decision-making about this thrombolytic treatment. Methods A discrete choice experiment using hypothetical patient vignettes framed around areas of clinical uncertainty was conducted with UK-based clinicians. Mixed logit regression analyses were conducted on the data. Results A total of 138 clinicians completed the discrete choice experiment. Seven patient factors were individually predictive of increased likelihood of immediately offering IV alteplase (compared to reference levels in brackets): stroke onset time 2 h 30 min [50 min]; pre-stroke dependency mRS 3 [mRS 4]; systolic blood pressure 185 mm/Hg [140 mm/Hg]; stroke severity scores of NIHSS 5 without aphasia, NIHSS 14 and NIHSS 23 [NIHSS 2 without aphasia]; age 85 [68]; Afro-Caribbean [white]. Factors predictive of withholding treatment with IV alteplase were: age 95 [68]; stroke onset time of 4 h 15 min [50 min]; severe dementia [no memory problems]; SBP 200 mm/Hg [140 mm/Hg]. Three clinician-related factors were predictive of an increased likelihood of offering IV alteplase (perceived robustness of the evidence for IV alteplase; thrombolyzing more patients in the past 12 months; and high discomfort with uncertainty) and one with a decreased likelihood (high clinician comfort with treating patients outside the licensing criteria). Conclusions Both patient- and clinician-related factors have a major influence on the use of alteplase to treat patients with acute ischemic stroke. Clinicians' views of the evidence, comfort with uncertainty and treating patients outside the license criteria are important factors to address in programs that seek to reduce variation in care quality regarding treatment with IV alteplase. Further research is needed to further understand

  8. Verification of Three Dimensional Triangular Prismatic Discrete Ordinates Transport Code ENSEMBLE-TRIZ by Comparison with Monte Carlo Code GMVP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Yuto; Moriwaki, Hiroyuki; Ohki, Shigeo; Ikeda, Kazumi

    2014-06-01

    This paper deals with verification of three dimensional triangular prismatic discrete ordinates transport calculation code ENSEMBLE-TRIZ by comparison with multi-group Monte Carlo calculation code GMVP in a large fast breeder reactor. The reactor is a 750 MWe electric power sodium cooled reactor. Nuclear characteristics are calculated at beginning of cycle of an initial core and at beginning and end of cycle of equilibrium core. According to the calculations, the differences between the two methodologies are smaller than 0.0002 Δk in the multi-plication factor, relatively about 1% in the control rod reactivity, and 1% in the sodium void reactivity.

  9. An analytical discrete ordinates solution for a nodal model of a two-dimensional neutron transport problem

    SciTech Connect

    Filho, J. F. P.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, an analytical discrete ordinates method is used to solve a nodal formulation of a neutron transport problem in x, y-geometry. The proposed approach leads to an important reduction in the order of the associated eigenvalue systems, when combined with the classical level symmetric quadrature scheme. Auxiliary equations are proposed, as usually required for nodal methods, to express the unknown fluxes at the boundary introduced as additional unknowns in the integrated equations. Numerical results, for the problem defined by a two-dimensional region with a spatially constant and isotropically emitting source, are presented and compared with those available in the literature. (authors)

  10. The Role of Patients’ Age on Their Preferences for Choosing Additional Blood Pressure-Lowering Drugs: A Discrete Choice Experiment in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Sieta T.; de Vries, Folgerdiena M.; Dekker, Thijs; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Denig, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether patients’ willingness to add a blood pressure-lowering drug and the importance they attach to specific treatment characteristics differ among age groups in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods Patients being prescribed at least an oral glucose-lowering and a blood pressure-lowering drug completed a questionnaire including a discrete choice experiment. This experiment contained choice sets with hypothetical blood pressure-lowering drugs and a no additional drug alternative, which differed in their characteristics (i.e. effects and intake moments). Differences in willingness to add a drug were compared between patients <75 years (non-aged) and ≥75 years (aged) using Pearson χ2-tests. Multinomial logit models were used to assess and compare the importance attached to the characteristics. Results Of the 161 patients who completed the questionnaire, 151 (72%) could be included in the analyses (mean age 68 years; 42% female). Aged patients were less willing to add a drug than non-aged patients (67% versus 84% respectively; P = 0.017). In both age groups, the effect on blood pressure was most important for choosing a drug, followed by the risk of adverse drug events and the risk of death. The effect on limitations due to stroke was only significant in the non-aged group. The effect on blood pressure was slightly more important in the non-aged than the aged group (P = 0.043). Conclusions Aged patients appear less willing to add a preventive drug than non-aged patients. The importance attached to various treatment characteristics does not seem to differ much among age groups. PMID:26445349

  11. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  12. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    DOE PAGES

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; ...

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  13. Bayesian methods for model choice and propagation of model uncertainty in groundwater transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, B. S.; Draper, D.

    2008-12-01

    The issue of model uncertainty and model choice is central in any groundwater modeling effort [Neuman and Wierenga, 2003]; among the several approaches to the problem we favour using Bayesian statistics because it is a method that integrates in a natural way uncertainties (arising from any source) and experimental data. In this work, we experiment with several Bayesian approaches to model choice, focusing primarily on demonstrating the usefulness of the Reversible Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) simulation method [Green, 1995]; this is an extension of the now- common MCMC methods. Standard MCMC techniques approximate posterior distributions for quantities of interest, often by creating a random walk in parameter space; RJMCMC allows the random walk to take place between parameter spaces with different dimensionalities. This fact allows us to explore state spaces that are associated with different deterministic models for experimental data. Our work is exploratory in nature; we restrict our study to comparing two simple transport models applied to a data set gathered to estimate the breakthrough curve for a tracer compound in groundwater. One model has a mean surface based on a simple advection dispersion differential equation; the second model's mean surface is also governed by a differential equation but in two dimensions. We focus on artificial data sets (in which truth is known) to see if model identification is done correctly, but we also address the issues of over and under-paramerization, and we compare RJMCMC's performance with other traditional methods for model selection and propagation of model uncertainty, including Bayesian model averaging, BIC and DIC.References Neuman and Wierenga (2003). A Comprehensive Strategy of Hydrogeologic Modeling and Uncertainty Analysis for Nuclear Facilities and Sites. NUREG/CR-6805, Division of Systems Analysis and Regulatory Effectiveness Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  14. Eliciting preferences for priority setting in genetic testing: a pilot study comparing best-worst scaling and discrete-choice experiments

    PubMed Central

    Severin, Franziska; Schmidtke, Jörg; Mühlbacher, Axel; Rogowski, Wolf H

    2013-01-01

    Given the increasing number of genetic tests available, decisions have to be made on how to allocate limited health-care resources to them. Different criteria have been proposed to guide priority setting. However, their relative importance is unclear. Discrete-choice experiments (DCEs) and best-worst scaling experiments (BWSs) are methods used to identify and weight various criteria that influence orders of priority. This study tests whether these preference eliciting techniques can be used for prioritising genetic tests and compares the empirical findings resulting from these two approaches. Pilot DCE and BWS questionnaires were developed for the same criteria: prevalence, severity, clinical utility, alternatives to genetic testing available, infrastructure for testing and care established, and urgency of care. Interview-style experiments were carried out among different genetics professionals (mainly clinical geneticists, researchers and biologists). A total of 31 respondents completed the DCE and 26 completed the BWS experiment. Weights for the levels of the six attributes were estimated by conditional logit models. Although the results derived from the DCE and BWS experiments differed in detail, we found similar valuation patterns in the DCE and BWS experiments. The respondents attached greatest value to tests with high clinical utility (defined by the availability of treatments that reduce mortality and morbidity) and to testing for highly prevalent conditions. The findings from this study exemplify how decision makers can use quantitative preference eliciting methods to measure aggregated preferences in order to prioritise alternative clinical interventions. Further research is necessary to confirm the survey results. PMID:23486538

  15. Preferences for end-of-life care among community-dwelling older adults and patients with advanced cancer: A discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Eric A; Bilger, Marcel; Flynn, Terry N; Malhotra, Chetna

    2015-11-01

    Singapore is in the midst of several healthcare reforms in efforts to finance and deliver health services for a rapidly aging population. The primary focus of these reforms is to make healthcare services, including those at the end of life (EOL), affordable. Given the increasingly high health care costs at the EOL, policy makers need to consider how best to allocate resources. One strategy is to allocate resources based on the preferences of sub-populations most likely to be affected. This paper thus aims to quantify preferences for EOL care both among community dwelling older adults (CDOAs) and among patients with a life-limiting illness. A discrete choice experiment was administered to CDOAs and advanced cancer patients in Singapore and willingness to pay (WTP) for specific EOL improvements was estimated. We find that patients have a higher WTP for nearly all EOL attributes compared with CDOAs. We also show that, for both groups, moderate life extension is not the most important consideration; WTP for one additional life year is lower than common thresholds for cost-effectiveness. Irrespective of whose preference are considered, the results highlight the importance of pain management and supporting home deaths at the EOL, perhaps at the expense of public funding for costly but only marginally effective treatments.

  16. [Fertility behavior in Quebec, family allowances, and taxes: results and simulations with a discrete choice model for the years 1975-1987].

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, P; Brouillette, L; Felteau, C

    1994-12-01

    "We suppose that women (couples), who are less than 40 years old, are faced with three types of sequential decisions: the fertility decision, the decision relative to the number of children to have and the decision concerning labour force participation.... We use a nested polychotomous discrete choice model to estimate the responsiveness of the behaviour of 'married' women in Quebec to variations in the expected flow of revenue resulting from changes in the parameters of the personal income tax and in the level of public monetary transfers conditional on the number of children. The model is estimated with micro-data from 9 repeated cross-sections for the years 1975 to 1987 with a full information maximum likelihood method.... This empirical setting is used to simulate the effects of changes made to the fiscal and transfer policies in favor of families with dependent children on fertility, [women's] labor force participation and the importance of spending costs for the two levels of government." (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  17. Public preferences for vaccination programmes during pandemics caused by pathogens transmitted through respiratory droplets - a discrete choice experiment in four European countries, 2013.

    PubMed

    Determann, Domino; Korfage, Ida J; Fagerlin, Angela; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Bliemer, Michiel C; Voeten, Helene A; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Lambooij, Mattijs S; de Bekker-Grob, Esther W

    2016-06-02

    This study aims to quantify and compare preferences of citizens from different European countries for vaccination programme characteristics during pandemics, caused by pathogens which are transmitted through respiratory droplets. Internet panel members, nationally representative based on age, sex, educational level and region, of four European Union Member States (Netherlands, Poland, Spain, and Sweden, n = 2,068) completed an online discrete choice experiment. These countries, from different geographical areas of Europe, were chosen because of the availability of high-quality Internet panels and because of the cooperation between members of the project entitled Effective Communication in Outbreak Management: development of an evidence-based tool for Europe (ECOM). Data were analysed using panel latent class regression models. In the case of a severe pandemic scenario, vaccine effectiveness was the most important characteristic determining vaccination preference in all countries, followed by the body that advises on vaccination. In Sweden, the advice of family and/or friends and the advice of physicians strongly affected vaccine preferences, in contrast to Poland and Spain, where the advice of (international) health authorities was more decisive. Irrespective of pandemic scenario or vaccination programme characteristics, the predicted vaccination uptakes were lowest in Sweden, and highest in Poland. To increase vaccination uptake during future pandemics, the responsible authorities should align with other important stakeholders in the country and communicate in a coordinated manner.

  18. Discrete-event simulation of nuclear-waste transport in geologic sites subject to disruptive events. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, S.; Ryland, S.; Peck, R.

    1980-06-19

    This report outlines a methodology to study the effects of disruptive events on nuclear waste material in stable geologic sites. The methodology is based upon developing a discrete events model that can be simulated on the computer. This methodology allows a natural development of simulation models that use computer resources in an efficient manner. Accurate modeling in this area depends in large part upon accurate modeling of ion transport behavior in the storage media. Unfortunately, developments in this area are not at a stage where there is any consensus on proper models for such transport. Consequently, our work is directed primarily towards showing how disruptive events can be properly incorporated in such a model, rather than as a predictive tool at this stage. When and if proper geologic parameters can be determined, then it would be possible to use this as a predictive model. Assumptions and their bases are discussed, and the mathematical and computer model are described.

  19. Time Dependent Discrete Ordinates Neutron Transport Using Distribution Iteration in XYZ Geometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    The integro - differential form of the BTE makes it particularly difficult to solve and analytic solutions are only possible for the simplest of problems... equation is transformed into a coupled system of ordinary differential equations . My research is based on fully discretized methods. The means of...a truncated Taylor series expansion as du dt ∣∣∣ tj = uj+1 − uj ∆t . (2.4) The differential equation can be solved for each time step by uj+1 = uj

  20. Hybrid Upwind Discretization for the Implicit Simulation of Three-Phase Coupled Flow and Transport with Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamon, F. P.; Mallison, B.; Tchelepi, H.

    2015-12-01

    The systems of algebraic equations arising from implicit (backward-Euler) finite-volume discretization of the conservation laws governing multiphase flow in porous media are quite challenging for nonlinear solvers. In the presence of counter-current flow due to buoyancy, the coupling between flow (pressure) and transport (saturations) is often the cause of nonlinear problems when single-point Phase-Potential Upwinding (PPU) is used. To overcome such convergence problems in practice, the time step is reduced and Newton's method is restarted from the solution at the previous converged time step. Here, we generalize the work of Lee, Efendiev and Tchelepi [Advances in Water Resources, 2015] to propose an Implicit Hybrid Upwinding (IHU) scheme for coupled flow and transport. In the pure transport problem, we show that the numerical flux obtained with IHU is differentiable, monotone and consistent for two and three-phase flow. For coupled flow and transport, we prove saturation physical bounds as well as the existence of a solution to our scheme. Challenging two- and three-phase heterogeneous multi-dimensional numerical tests confirm that the new scheme is non-oscillatory and convergent, and illustrate the superior convergence rate of our IHU-based Newton solver for large time steps.

  1. Three-dimensional discrete fracture network simulations of flow and particle transport based on Laxemar site data (Sweden).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, A.; Cvetkovic, V.

    2008-12-01

    Implementing site characterization data to models for simulating flow and transport still remains a formidable challenge, in particular for sparsely fracture rock environments. We present advective flow and particle transport simulations in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks based on Laxemar site characterisation data in Sweden, which is a candidate repository site for high level radioactive waste in the Swedish nuclear waste management program. Field measurements have revealed at least five background fracture sets based on statistically significant orientation data, exhibiting power-law behaviour for fracture size and inferred transmissivity distributions. We study the effect of various interpretations of these background fracture populations, all consistent with the field data, and expose their impact on the behaviour of small scale advective particle transport. In particular, we analyse the inferred correlation between fracture size and transmissivity, together with implications on particle injection mode (flux and resident) and transport law. Furthermore, a fundamental aspect towards understanding tracer migration in subsurface sparsely fractured rock formations is the relationship between the Eulerian flow distribution at a sub-fracture scale with the Lagrangian flow distribution at a characteristic model domain scale. We present a novel approach of accurately inferring the segment-scale Lagrangian distributions from Eulerian distributions obtained from flow simulations. Also, we discuss the potential link to field measurements of fracture specific flow, and how such approaches can be used to improve confidence in model assessment.

  2. Analytical Tests for Ray Effect Errors in Discrete Ordinate Methods for Solving the Neutron Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B

    2004-03-22

    This paper contains three analytical solutions of transport problems which can be used to test ray-effect errors in the numerical solutions of the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). We derived the first two solutions and the third was shown to us by M. Prasad. Since this paper is intended to be an internal LLNL report, no attempt was made to find the original derivations of the solutions in the literature in order to cite the authors for their work.

  3. Constructing experimental designs for discrete-choice experiments: report of the ISPOR Conjoint Analysis Experimental Design Good Research Practices Task Force.

    PubMed

    Reed Johnson, F; Lancsar, Emily; Marshall, Deborah; Kilambi, Vikram; Mühlbacher, Axel; Regier, Dean A; Bresnahan, Brian W; Kanninen, Barbara; Bridges, John F P

    2013-01-01

    Stated-preference methods are a class of evaluation techniques for studying the preferences of patients and other stakeholders. While these methods span a variety of techniques, conjoint-analysis methods-and particularly discrete-choice experiments (DCEs)-have become the most frequently applied approach in health care in recent years. Experimental design is an important stage in the development of such methods, but establishing a consensus on standards is hampered by lack of understanding of available techniques and software. This report builds on the previous ISPOR Conjoint Analysis Task Force Report: Conjoint Analysis Applications in Health-A Checklist: A Report of the ISPOR Good Research Practices for Conjoint Analysis Task Force. This report aims to assist researchers specifically in evaluating alternative approaches to experimental design, a difficult and important element of successful DCEs. While this report does not endorse any specific approach, it does provide a guide for choosing an approach that is appropriate for a particular study. In particular, it provides an overview of the role of experimental designs for the successful implementation of the DCE approach in health care studies, and it provides researchers with an introduction to constructing experimental designs on the basis of study objectives and the statistical model researchers have selected for the study. The report outlines the theoretical requirements for designs that identify choice-model preference parameters and summarizes and compares a number of available approaches for constructing experimental designs. The task-force leadership group met via bimonthly teleconferences and in person at ISPOR meetings in the United States and Europe. An international group of experimental-design experts was consulted during this process to discuss existing approaches for experimental design and to review the task force's draft reports. In addition, ISPOR members contributed to developing a consensus

  4. Have Preferences of Girls Changed Almost 3 Years after the Much Debated Start of the HPV Vaccination Program in the Netherlands? A Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Hofman, Robine; de Bekker-Grob, Esther W.; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; de Koning, Harry J.; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Korfage, Ida J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess how girls' preferences have changed almost 3 years after the much debated start of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program. Methods A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was conducted among girls aged 11–15 years who were invited, or were not yet invited, to get vaccinated. A panel latent class model was used to determine girls' preferences for vaccination based on five characteristics: degree of protection against cervical cancer; duration of protection; risk of mild side-effects; age of vaccination; and the number of required doses of the vaccine. Results The response rate was 85% (500/592). Most girls preferred vaccination at age 14 years (instead of at age 9 years) and a 2-dose scheme (instead of the current 3-dose scheme). Girls were willing to trade-off 7% (CI: 3.2% to 10.8%) of the degree of protection to have 10% less risk of mild side-effects, and 4% (CI: 1.2% to 5.9%) to receive 2 doses instead of 3 doses. Latent class analyses showed that there was preference heterogeneity among girls, i.e., higher educated girls and HPV vaccinated girls had a higher probability to opt for HPV vaccination at a higher age than lower educated girls or non-vaccinated girls. Conclusions Three years after the start of HPV vaccination program the risk of mild side-effects and age at vaccination seem to have become less important. For the Dutch national immunization program, we recommend not to lower the current target age of 12 years. A 2-dose scheme may result in a higher uptake and we recommend that if this scheme is introduced, it needs to receive adequate publicity. PMID:25136919

  5. Least-squares finite element discretizations of neutron transport equations in 3 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Manteuffel, T.A; Ressel, K.J.; Starkes, G.

    1996-12-31

    The least-squares finite element framework to the neutron transport equation introduced in is based on the minimization of a least-squares functional applied to the properly scaled neutron transport equation. Here we report on some practical aspects of this approach for neutron transport calculations in three space dimensions. The systems of partial differential equations resulting from a P{sub 1} and P{sub 2} approximation of the angular dependence are derived. In the diffusive limit, the system is essentially a Poisson equation for zeroth moment and has a divergence structure for the set of moments of order 1. One of the key features of the least-squares approach is that it produces a posteriori error bounds. We report on the numerical results obtained for the minimum of the least-squares functional augmented by an additional boundary term using trilinear finite elements on a uniform tesselation into cubes.

  6. Emittance growth of an nonequilibrium intense electron beam in a transport channel with discrete focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-02-01

    The author analyzes the emittance growth mechanisms for a continuous, intense electron beam in a focusing transport channel, over distances short enough that the beam does not reach equilibrium. The emittance grows from the effect of nonlinear forces arising from (1) current density nonuniformities, (2) energy variations leading to nonlinearities in the space-charge force even if the current density is uniform, (3) axial variations in the radial vector potential, (4) an axial velocity shear along the beam, and (5) an energy redistribution of the beam as the beam compresses or expands. The emittance growth is studied analytically and numerically for the cases of balanced flow, tight focusing, and slight beam scalloping, and is additionally studied numerically for an existing 6-MeV induction linear accelerator. Rules for minimizing the emittance along a beamline are established. Some emittance growth will always occur, both from current density nonuniformities that arise along the transport and from beam radius changes along the transport.

  7. Improvements of the boundary projection acceleration technique applied to the discrete-ordinates transport solver in XYZ geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Masiello, E.; Rossi, T.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we discuss the latest upgrades of the Boundary Projection Acceleration (BPA) applied to the XYZ transport solver of APOLLO3, namely IDT. The acceleration method is a well-known effective technique for the speed-up of the source iterations of the discrete-ordinates method. The BPA in IDT has been improved in three aspects: the taking into account of the residue on boundary conditions as a boundary source for the acceleration problem, the extension of the method to higher order angular moments in the case of anisotropic scattering and, finally, the application of the method to the multigroup iterations for the acceleration of the fission source and k-effective. The spectrum of the method has been Fourier-analyzed to explore the effectiveness. The 3D mock-up geometry of the ZPPR is presented as final study to test the performances of the acceleration on a realistic whole-core 3D calculation. (authors)

  8. Phase retrieval with the transport-of-intensity equation in an arbitrarily-shaped aperture by iterative discrete cosine transforms

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Lei; Zuo, Chao; Idir, Mourad; ...

    2015-04-21

    A novel transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) based phase retrieval method is proposed with putting an arbitrarily-shaped aperture into the optical wavefield. In this arbitrarily-shaped aperture, the TIE can be solved under non-uniform illuminations and even non-homogeneous boundary conditions by iterative discrete cosine transforms with a phase compensation mechanism. Simulation with arbitrary phase, arbitrary aperture shape, and non-uniform intensity distribution verifies the effective compensation and high accuracy of the proposed method. Experiment is also carried out to check the feasibility of the proposed method in real measurement. Comparing to the existing methods, the proposed method is applicable for any types of phasemore » distribution under non-uniform illumination and non-homogeneous boundary conditions within an arbitrarily-shaped aperture, which enables the technique of TIE with hard aperture become a more flexible phase retrieval tool in practical measurements.« less

  9. Phase retrieval with the transport-of-intensity equation in an arbitrarily-shaped aperture by iterative discrete cosine transforms

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lei; Zuo, Chao; Idir, Mourad; Qu, Weijuan; Asundi, Anand

    2015-04-21

    A novel transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) based phase retrieval method is proposed with putting an arbitrarily-shaped aperture into the optical wavefield. In this arbitrarily-shaped aperture, the TIE can be solved under non-uniform illuminations and even non-homogeneous boundary conditions by iterative discrete cosine transforms with a phase compensation mechanism. Simulation with arbitrary phase, arbitrary aperture shape, and non-uniform intensity distribution verifies the effective compensation and high accuracy of the proposed method. Experiment is also carried out to check the feasibility of the proposed method in real measurement. Comparing to the existing methods, the proposed method is applicable for any types of phase distribution under non-uniform illumination and non-homogeneous boundary conditions within an arbitrarily-shaped aperture, which enables the technique of TIE with hard aperture become a more flexible phase retrieval tool in practical measurements.

  10. Intrinsic and Carrier Colloid-facilitated transport of lanthanides through discrete fractures in chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, N.; Tran, E. L.; Klein-BenDavid, O.; Teutsch, N.

    2015-12-01

    Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste is the long term solution for the disposal of long lived radionuclides and spent fuel. However, some radionuclides might be released from these repositories into the subsurface as a result of leakage, which ultimately make their way into groundwater. Engineered bentonite barriers around nuclear waste repositories are generally considered sufficient to impede the transport of radionuclides from their source to the groundwater. However, colloidal-sized mobile bentonite particles ("carrier" colloids) originating from these barriers have come under investigation as a potential transport vector for radionuclides sorbed to them. As lanthanides are generally accepted to have the same chemical behaviors as their more toxic actinide counterparts, lanthanides are considered an acceptable substitute for research on radionuclide transportation. This study aims to evaluate the transport behaviors of lanthanides in colloid-facilitated transport through a fractured chalk matrix and under geochemical conditions representative the Negev desert, Israel. The migration of Ce both with and without colloidal particles was explored and compared to the migration of a conservative tracer (bromide) using a flow system constructed around a naturally fractured chalk core. Results suggest that mobility of Ce as a solute is negligible. In experiments conducted without bentonite colloids, the 1% of the Ce that was recovered migrated as "intrinsic" colloids in the form of carbonate precipitates. However, the total recovery of the Ce increased to 9% when it was injected into the core in the presence of bentonite colloids and 13% when both bentonite and precipitate colloids were injected. This indicates that lanthanides are essentially immobile in chalk as a solute but may be mobile as carbonate precipitates. Bentonite colloids, however, markedly increase the mobility of lanthanides through fractured chalk matrices.

  11. Discrete and continuum links to a nonlinear coupled transport problem of interacting populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, M. H.; Muntean, A.; Richardson, O. M.

    2017-02-01

    We are interested in exploring interacting particle systems that can be seen as microscopic models for a particular structure of coupled transport flux arising when different populations are jointly evolving. The scenarios we have in mind are inspired by the dynamics of pedestrian flows in open spaces and are intimately connected to cross-diffusion and thermo-diffusion problems holding a variational structure. The tools we use include a suitable structure of the relative entropy controlling TV-norms, the construction of Lyapunov functionals and particular closed-form solutions to nonlinear transport equations, a hydrodynamics limiting procedure due to Philipowski, as well as the construction of numerical approximates to both the continuum limit problem in 2D and to the original interacting particle systems.

  12. Effect of Internal Aperture Variability on Tracer Transport in Large Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Hyman, J.; Karra, S.; Gable, C. W.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Aperture variability within individual fractures is usually neglected in modeling flow and transport through fractured media. Typically, individual fractures are assumed to be homogeneous. However, in reality, individual fractures are heterogeneous, which may affect flow and transport in fractured media. The relative importance of including in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling has been under debate for a long time. Previous studies have shown flow channeling on an individual fracture with internal variability, where the fracture is considered isolated from the rest of the fracture network. Although these studies yield some clear insights into the process, the boundary conditions are impractical for field-scale networks, where the realistic boundary conditions are determined by fracture connections in the network. Therefore, flow in a single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. In order to address the question of the importance of in-fracture variability, the internal heterogeneity of every individual fracture is incorporated into a three-dimensional fracture network, represented by a composition of intersecting fractures. The new DFN simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate a kilometer scale DFNs similar to the Forsmark, Sweden site. In our DFN model, the in-fracture aperture variability is scattered over each cell of the computational mesh along the fracture, representing by a stationary Gaussian random field with various correlation lengths. The Lagrangian particle tracking is conducted in multiple DFN realizations and the flow-dependent Lagrangian parameters, non-reacting travel time, τ, and cumulative reactivity parameter, β, are obtained along particles streamlines. It is shown that early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture aperture variability than tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the aperture variations and spatial

  13. Investigating the preferences of older people for telehealth as a new model of health care service delivery: A discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Kaambwa, Billingsley; Ratcliffe, Julie; Shulver, Wendy; Killington, Maggie; Taylor, Alan; Crotty, Maria; Carati, Colin; Tieman, Jennifer; Wade, Victoria; Kidd, Michael R

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Telehealth approaches to health care delivery can potentially improve quality of care and clinical outcomes, reduce mortality and hospital utilisation, and complement conventional treatments. However, substantial research into the potential for integrating telehealth within health care in Australia, particularly in the provision of services relevant to older people, including palliative care, aged care and rehabilitation, is lacking. Furthermore, to date, no discrete choice experiment (DCE) studies internationally have sought the views and preferences of older people about the basic features that should make up a telehealth approach to these services. Methods Using a DCE, we investigated the relative importance of six salient features of telehealth (what aspects of care are to be pursued during telehealth sessions, distance to the nearest hospital or clinic, clinicians' attitude to telehealth, patients' experience of using technology, what types of assessments should be conducted face-to-face versus via telehealth sessions and the costs associated with receiving telehealth). Data were obtained from an online panel of older people aged 65 years and above, drawn from the Australian general population. Results The mean age for 330 study participants was 69 years. In general, individuals expressed strong preferences for telehealth services that offered all aspects of care, were relatively inexpensive and targeted specifically at individuals living in remote regions without easy access to a hospital or clinic. Participants also preferred telehealth services to be offered to individuals with some prior experience of using technology, provided by clinicians who were positive about telehealth but wanted all or some pre-telehealth health assessments to take place in a hospital or clinic. Preferences only differed by gender. Additionally, respondents did not feel that telehealth led to loss of privacy and confidentiality. Discussion Our findings indicate a

  14. Multigroup discrete ordinates solution of Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equations and cross section library development of ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Prinja, A.K.

    1995-08-01

    We have developed and successfully implemented a two-dimensional bilinear discontinuous in space and time, used in conjunction with the S{sub N} angular approximation, to numerically solve the time dependent, one-dimensional, one-speed, slab geometry, (ion) transport equation. Numerical results and comparison with analytical solutions have shown that the bilinear-discontinuous (BLD) scheme is third-order accurate in the space ad time dimensions independently. Comparison of the BLD results with diamond-difference methods indicate that the BLD method is both quantitavely and qualitatively superior to the DD scheme. We note that the form of the transport operator is such that these conclusions carry over to energy dependent problems that include the constant-slowing-down-approximation term, and to multiple space dimensions or combinations thereof. An optimized marching or inversion scheme or a parallel algorithm should be investigated to determine if the increased accuracy can compensate for the extra overhead required for a BLD solution, and then could be compared to other discretization methods such as nodal or characteristic schemes.

  15. A fully coupled Monte Carlo/discrete ordinates solution to the neutron transport equation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Filippone, W.L.; Baker, R.S.

    1990-12-31

    The neutron transport equation is solved by a hybrid method that iteratively couples regions where deterministic (S{sub N}) and stochastic (Monte Carlo) methods are applied. Unlike previous hybrid methods, the Monte Carlo and S{sub N} regions are fully coupled in the sense that no assumption is made about geometrical separation or decoupling. The hybrid method provides a new means of solving problems involving both optically thick and optically thin regions that neither Monte Carlo nor S{sub N} is well suited for by themselves. The fully coupled Monte Carlo/S{sub N} technique consists of defining spatial and/or energy regions of a problem in which either a Monte Carlo calculation or an S{sub N} calculation is to be performed. The Monte Carlo region may comprise the entire spatial region for selected energy groups, or may consist of a rectangular area that is either completely or partially embedded in an arbitrary S{sub N} region. The Monte Carlo and S{sub N} regions are then connected through the common angular boundary fluxes, which are determined iteratively using the response matrix technique, and volumetric sources. The hybrid method has been implemented in the S{sub N} code TWODANT by adding special-purpose Monte Carlo subroutines to calculate the response matrices and volumetric sources, and linkage subrountines to carry out the interface flux iterations. The common angular boundary fluxes are included in the S{sub N} code as interior boundary sources, leaving the logic for the solution of the transport flux unchanged, while, with minor modifications, the diffusion synthetic accelerator remains effective in accelerating S{sub N} calculations. The special-purpose Monte Carlo routines used are essentially analog, with few variance reduction techniques employed. However, the routines have been successfully vectorized, with approximately a factor of five increase in speed over the non-vectorized version.

  16. dfnWorks: A HPC Workflow for Discrete Fracture Network Modeling with Subsurface Flow and Transport Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gable, C. W.; Hyman, J.; Karra, S.; Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    dfnWorks generates discrete fracture networks (DFN) of planar polygons, creates a high quality conforming Delaunay triangulation of the intersecting DFN polygons, assigns properties (aperture, permeability) using geostatistics, sets boundary and initial conditions, solves pressure/flow in single or multi-phase fluids (water, air, CO2) using the parallel PFLOTRAN or serial FEHM, and solves for transport using Lagrangian particle tracking. We outline the dfnWorks workflow and present applications from a range of fractured rock systems. dfnWorks (http://www.lanl.gov/expertise/teams/view/dfnworks) is composed of three main components, all of which are freely available. dfnGen generates a distribution of fracture polygons from site characterization data (statistics or deterministic fractures) and utilizes the FRAM (Feature Rejection Algorithm for Meshing) to guarantee the mesh generation package LaGriT (lagrit.lanl.gov) will generate a high quality conforming Delaunay triangular mesh. dfnWorks links the mesh to either PFLOTRAN (pflotran.org) or FEHM (fehm.lanl.gov) for solving flow and transport. The various physics options available in FEHM and PFLOTRAN such as single and multi-phase flow and reactive transport are all available with appropriate initial and boundary conditions and material property models. dfnTrans utilizes explicit Lagrangian particle tracking on the DFN using a velocity field reconstructed from the steady state pressure/flow field solution obtained in PFLOTRAN or FEHM. Applications are demonstrated for nuclear waste repository in fractured granite, CO2 sequestration and extraction of unconventional hydrocarbon resources.

  17. A cell-local finite difference discretization of the low-order quasidiffusion equations for neutral particle transport on unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Wieselquist, William A.; Anistratov, Dmitriy Y.; Morel, Jim E.

    2014-09-15

    We present a quasidiffusion (QD) method for solving neutral particle transport problems in Cartesian XY geometry on unstructured quadrilateral meshes, including local refinement capability. Neutral particle transport problems are central to many applications including nuclear reactor design, radiation safety, astrophysics, medical imaging, radiotherapy, nuclear fuel transport/storage, shielding design, and oil well-logging. The primary development is a new discretization of the low-order QD (LOQD) equations based on cell-local finite differences. The accuracy of the LOQD equations depends on proper calculation of special non-linear QD (Eddington) factors from a transport solution. In order to completely define the new QD method, a proper discretization of the transport problem is also presented. The transport equation is discretized by a conservative method of short characteristics with a novel linear approximation of the scattering source term and monotonic, parabolic representation of the angular flux on incoming faces. Analytic and numerical tests are used to test the accuracy and spatial convergence of the non-linear method. All tests exhibit O(h{sup 2}) convergence of the scalar flux on orthogonal, random, and multi-level meshes.

  18. Global Error Bounds for the Petrov-Galerkin Discretization of the Neutron Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B; Brown, P; Greenbaum, A; Machorro, E

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we prove that the numerical solution of the mono-directional neutron transport equation by the Petrov-Galerkin method converges to the true solution in the L{sup 2} norm at the rate of h{sup 2}. Since consistency has been shown elsewhere, the focus here is on stability. We prove that the system of Petrov-Galerkin equations is stable by showing that the 2-norm of the inverse of the matrix for the system of equations is bounded by a number that is independent of the order of the matrix. This bound is equal to the length of the longest path that it takes a neutron to cross the domain in a straight line. A consequence of this bound is that the global error of the Petrov-Galerkin approximation is of the same order of h as the local truncation error. We use this result to explain the widely held observation that the solution of the Petrov-Galerkin method is second accurate for one class of problems, but is only first order accurate for another class of problems.

  19. Mode choice between private and public transport in Klang Valley, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chiu Chuen, Onn; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Yusoff, Sumiani

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, Klang Valley has only 17% trips each day were completed using public transport, with the rest of the 83% trips were made through private transport. The inclination towards private car usage will only get worse if the transport policy continues to be inefficient and ineffective. Under the National Key Economic Area, the priority aimed to stimulate the increase of modal share of public transport in the Klang Valley to 50% by 2020. In the 10th Malaysia Plan, the Klang Valley Mass Rapid Transit was proposed, equipped with 141 km of MRT system, and will integrate with the existing rail networks. Nevertheless, adding kilometers into the rail system will not help, if people do not make the shift from private into public transport. This research would like to assess the possible mode shift of travellers in the Klang Valley towards using public transport, based on the utility function of available transport modes. It intends to identify the criteria that will trigger their willingness to make changes in favour of public transport as targeted by the NKEA.

  20. Mode Choice between Private and Public Transport in Klang Valley, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Yusoff, Sumiani

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, Klang Valley has only 17% trips each day were completed using public transport, with the rest of the 83% trips were made through private transport. The inclination towards private car usage will only get worse if the transport policy continues to be inefficient and ineffective. Under the National Key Economic Area, the priority aimed to stimulate the increase of modal share of public transport in the Klang Valley to 50% by 2020. In the 10th Malaysia Plan, the Klang Valley Mass Rapid Transit was proposed, equipped with 141 km of MRT system, and will integrate with the existing rail networks. Nevertheless, adding kilometers into the rail system will not help, if people do not make the shift from private into public transport. This research would like to assess the possible mode shift of travellers in the Klang Valley towards using public transport, based on the utility function of available transport modes. It intends to identify the criteria that will trigger their willingness to make changes in favour of public transport as targeted by the NKEA. PMID:24701165

  1. Molecular valves for controlling gas phase transport made from discrete ångström-sized pores in graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luda; Drahushuk, Lee W; Cantley, Lauren; Koenig, Steven P; Liu, Xinghui; Pellegrino, John; Strano, Michael S; Bunch, J Scott

    2015-09-01

    An ability to precisely regulate the quantity and location of molecular flux is of value in applications such as nanoscale three-dimensional printing, catalysis and sensor design. Barrier materials containing pores with molecular dimensions have previously been used to manipulate molecular compositions in the gas phase, but have so far been unable to offer controlled gas transport through individual pores. Here, we show that gas flux through discrete ångström-sized pores in monolayer graphene can be detected and then controlled using nanometre-sized gold clusters, which are formed on the surface of the graphene and can migrate and partially block a pore. In samples without gold clusters, we observe stochastic switching of the magnitude of the gas permeance, which we attribute to molecular rearrangements of the pore. Our molecular valves could be used, for example, to develop unique approaches to molecular synthesis that are based on the controllable switching of a molecular gas flux, reminiscent of ion channels in biological cell membranes and solid-state nanopores.

  2. Experimental investigation of transport of discrete solids with surge flows in a 10.0 cm diameter partially filled pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, B. M.

    1982-01-01

    The transport of discrete solids with surge flows in a partially filled slightly pitched horizontal pipe was investigated. The experimental apparatus, instrumentation, and procedures are described. The experiments were conducted using a cylindrical solid in a 10.0 cm (4 in) diameter pipe. The water surge flows were obtained by discharging different volumes of water into the pipe from a falling head open container which simulated a water closet. Flow induced solid velocities and stream depth histories at various locations along the length of the pipe were measured. The effects of water volume used, pipe slope, and size of the solid on the solid velocities were examined. Solid velocities were compared with the maximum water velocities estimated from the stream depth histories. Also, the distance traversed by the solids in the pipe were measured for those cases in which the solids did not clear the pipe. The solid velocity increased with an increase in water volume used, a decrease in the size of the solid, and an increase in the pipe slope. The solid velocity in the initial reach of the pipe was less than the maximum water velocity; and the solid velocity approaches the maximum water velocity as the solid traveled downstream, except for some experiments with small water volumes.

  3. Policy Choice for Urban Low-carbon transportation in Beijing: Scenario Analysis Based on LEAP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Beijing is a fast developing megacity with serious traffic problems, such as high energy consumption, high CO2 emission and traffic congestion. The coming 13th Five-Year Plan for Beijing economic and social development will focus on the low-carbon transportation policy to achieve the urban traffic sustainable development. In order to improve the feasibility of urban low-carbon transportation policies, this paper analyzes the future trends of CO2 emissions from transportation of Beijing. Firstly, five policies scenarios are developed according to the coming Beijing 13th Five-Year Plan, including the "Business As Usual (BAU)", the "Public Transportation Priority(PTP)", the "New Energy Vehicle(NEV)", the "Active Transportation(AT)", the "Private Car Regulation(PCR)" and the "Hybrid Policy(HP)". Then the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System(LEAP model) framework is adopted to estimate CO2 emission under given policies scenarios up to year 2020 and analyze the implications. The results demonstrate that the low-carbon transportation policies can reduce CO2 emission effectively. Specifically, the "Hybrid Policy(HP)" has the best performance. In terms of single policy effect, the "Private Car Regulation(PCR)" comes first followed by the "Public Transportation Priority(PTP)".

  4. Recreacion/Transporte. Libro del Profesor (Recreation/Transportation. Teacher's Guide). B3. CHOICE (Challenging Options in Career Education).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Hudson Migrant Education Center, New Paltz, NY.

    Written in Spanish, this guide for the grade 2 career education unit for migrant children focuses on the fields of recreation and transportation. Like the English version, the guide covers 11 jobs--travel agent, tour guide, camp counselor, coach, usher, school bus driver, airplane pilot, trucker, mover, railroad conductor, and astronaut. Student…

  5. The effectiveness of policy on consumer choices for private road passenger transport emissions reductions in six major economies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercure, J.-F.; Lam, A.

    2015-06-01

    The effectiveness of fiscal policy to influence vehicle purchases for emissions reductions in private passenger road transport depends on its ability to incentivise consumers to make choices oriented towards lower emissions vehicles. However, car purchase choices are known to be strongly socially determined, and this sector is highly diverse due to significant socio-economic differences between consumer groups. Here, we present a comprehensive dataset and analysis of the structure of the 2012 private passenger vehicle fleet-years in six major economies across the World (UK, USA, China, India, Japan and Brazil) in terms of price, engine size and emissions distributions. We argue that choices and aggregate elasticities of substitution can be predicted using this data, enabling us to evaluate the effectiveness of potential fiscal and technological change policies on fleet-year emissions reductions. We provide tools to do so based on the distributive structure of prices and emissions in segments of a diverse market, both for conventional as well as unconventional engine technologies. We find that markets differ significantly between nations, and that correlations between engine sizes, emissions and prices exist strongly in some markets and not strongly in others. We furthermore find that markets for unconventional engine technologies have patchy coverages of varying levels. These findings are interpreted in terms of policy strategy.

  6. Recreation/Transportation. B3. CHOICE: Challenging Options in Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam and Northern Westchester Counties Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Yorktown Heights, NY.

    The documents aggregated here comprise the second grade unit of a career education curriculum for migrant children. The unit for grade 2 foucses on the fields of recreation and transportation. Travel agent, tour guide, camp counselor, coach, usher, school bus driver, airplane pilot, trucker, mover, railroad engineer, and astronaut are the 11 jobs…

  7. An expected consequence approach to route choice in the maritime transportation of crude oil.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Atiq; Verma, Manish

    2013-11-01

    Maritime transportation is the major conduit of international trade, and the primary link for global crude oil movement. Given the volume of oil transported on international maritime links, it is not surprising that oil spills of both minor and major types result, although most of the risk-related work has been confined to the local settings. We propose an expected consequence approach for assessing oil-spill risk from intercontinental transportation of crude oil that not only adheres to the safety guidelines specified by the International Maritime Organization but also outlines a novel technique that makes use of coarse global data to estimate accident probabilities. The proposed estimation technique, together with four of the most popular cost-of-spill models from the literature, were applied to study and analyze a realistic size problem instance. Numerical analyses showed that: a shorter route may not necessarily be less risky; an understanding of the inherent oil-spill risk of different routes could potentially facilitate tanker routing decisions; and the associated negotiations over insurance premium between the transport company and the not-for-profit prevention and indemnity clubs. Finally, we note that only the linear model should be used with one of the three nonlinear cost-of-spill models for evaluating tanker routes.

  8. SEARCH AND CHOICE IN TRANSPORT SYSTEMS PLANNING. VOLUME XVIII. PREDICTIVE MODELS FOR VEHICLE OPERATING CONSEQUENCES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    variables are transformed into useful output - travel time, fuel consumption, and maintenance cost. This output may then be used in evaluating cost and...service performance measures, eventually relating technology properly to the broader questions raised in transportation systems analysis. Travel time... travel time model. Actual power expended is the independent predictive variable, and thus a true casual relationship is used for estimating. Maintenance costs are predicted by a third model. (Author)

  9. Discrete Fracture Network Modeling and Simulation of Subsurface Transport for the Topopah Springs and Lava Flow Aquifers at Pahute Mesa, FY 15 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Kwicklis, Edward Michael; Birdsell, Kay Hanson; Harrod, Jeremy Ashcraft; Karra, Satish

    2016-10-18

    This progress report for fiscal year 2015 (FY15) describes the development of discrete fracture network (DFN) models for Pahute Mesa. DFN models will be used to upscale parameters for simulations of subsurface flow and transport in fractured media in Pahute Mesa. The research focuses on modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport using DFNs generated according to fracture characteristics observed in the Topopah Spring Aquifer (TSA) and the Lava Flow Aquifer (LFA). This work will improve the representation of radionuclide transport processes in large-scale, regulatory-focused models with a view to reduce pessimistic bounding approximations and provide more realistic contaminant boundary calculations that can be used to describe the future extent of contaminated groundwater. Our goal is to refine a modeling approach that can translate parameters to larger-scale models that account for local-scale flow and transport processes, which tend to attenuate migration.

  10. Alpha adrenergic modulation on effects of norepinephrine transporter inhibitor reboxetine in five-choice serial reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yia-Ping; Lin, Yu-Lung; Chuang, Chia-Hsin; Kao, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Shang-Tang; Tung, Che-Se

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the effects of a norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor reboxetine (RBX) on an attentional performance test. Adult SD rats trained with five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) were administered with RBX (0, 3.0 and 10 mg/kg) in the testing day. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist PRA and alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist RX821002 were used to clarify the RBX effect. Results revealed that rat received RBX at 10 mg/kg had an increase in the percentage of the correct response and decreases in the numbers of premature response. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist Prazosin (PRA) at 0.1 mg/kg reversed the RBX augmented correct responding rate. However, alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist RX821002 at 0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg dose dependently reversed the RBX reduced impulsive responding. Our results suggested that RBX as a norepinephrine transporter inhibitor can be beneficial in both attentional accuracy and response control and alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenergic receptors might be involved differently. PMID:19678962

  11. Walk Score, Transportation Mode Choice, and Walking Among French Adults: A GPS, Accelerometer, and Mobility Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Dustin T.; Méline, Julie; Kestens, Yan; Day, Kristen; Elbel, Brian; Trasande, Leonardo; Chaix, Basile

    2016-01-01

    Background: Few studies have used GPS data to analyze the relationship between Walk Score, transportation choice and walking. Additionally, the influence of Walk Score is understudied using trips rather than individuals as statistical units. The purpose of this study is to examine associations at the trip level between Walk Score, transportation mode choice, and walking among Paris adults who were tracked with GPS receivers and accelerometers in the RECORD GPS Study. Methods: In the RECORD GPS Study, 227 participants were tracked during seven days with GPS receivers and accelerometers. Participants were also surveyed with a GPS-based web mapping application on their activities and transportation modes for all trips (6969 trips). Walk Score, which calculates neighborhood walkability, was assessed for each origin and destination of every trip. Multilevel logistic and linear regression analyses were conducted to estimate associations between Walk Score and walking in the trip or accelerometry-assessed number of steps for each trip, after adjustment for individual/neighborhood characteristics. Results: The mean overall Walk Scores for trip origins were 87.1 (SD = 14.4) and for trip destinations 87.1 (SD = 14.5). In adjusted trip-level associations between Walk Score and walking only in the trip, we found that a walkable neighborhood in the trip origin and trip destination was associated with increased odds of walking in the trip assessed in the survey. The odds of only walking in the trip were 3.48 (95% CI: 2.73 to 4.44) times higher when the Walk Score for the trip origin was “Walker’s Paradise” compared to less walkable neighborhoods (Very/Car-Dependent or Somewhat Walkable), with an identical independent effect of trip destination Walk Score on walking. The number of steps per 10 min (as assessed with accelerometry) was cumulatively higher for trips both originating and ending in walkable neighborhoods (i.e., “Very Walkable”). Conclusions: Walkable

  12. How Combined Trip Purposes Are Associated with Transport Choice for Short Distance Trips. Results from a Cross-Sectional Study in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Scheepers, Eline; Slinger, Minke; Wendel-Vos, Wanda; Schuit, Jantine

    2014-01-01

    Background One way to increase physical activity is to stimulate a shift from car use to walking or cycling. In single-purpose trips, purpose was found to be an important predictor of transport choice. However, as far as known, no studies have been conducted to see how trips with combined purposes affect this decision. This study was designed to provide insight into associations between combined purposes and transport choice. Methods An online questionnaire (N = 3,663) was used to collect data concerning transport choice for four primary purposes: shopping, going to public natural spaces, sports, and commuting. Per combination of primary trip purpose and transport choice, participants were asked to give examples of secondary purposes that they combine with the primary purpose. Logistic regression analyses were used to model the odds of both cycling and walking versus car use. Results Primary trip purposes combined with commuting, shopping, visiting private contacts or medical care were more likely to be made by car than by cycling or walking. Combinations with visiting catering facilities, trips to social infrastructure facilities, recreational outings, trips to facilities for the provision of daily requirements or private contacts during the trip were more likely to be made by walking and/or cycling than by car. Conclusion Combined trip purposes were found to be associated with transport choice. When stimulating active transport focus should be on the combined-trip purposes which were more likely to be made by car, namely trips combined with commuting, other shopping, visiting private contacts or medical care. PMID:25474653

  13. Lindblad-driven discretized leads for nonequilibrium steady-state transport in quantum impurity models: Recovering the continuum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, F.; Goldstein, M.; Dorda, A.; Arrigoni, E.; Weichselbaum, A.; von Delft, J.

    2016-10-01

    The description of interacting quantum impurity models in steady-state nonequilibrium is an open challenge for computational many-particle methods: the numerical requirement of using a finite number of lead levels and the physical requirement of describing a truly open quantum system are seemingly incompatible. One possibility to bridge this gap is the use of Lindblad-driven discretized leads (LDDL): one couples auxiliary continuous reservoirs to the discretized lead levels and represents these additional reservoirs by Lindblad terms in the Liouville equation. For quadratic models governed by Lindbladian dynamics, we present an elementary approach for obtaining correlation functions analytically. In a second part, we use this approach to explicitly discuss the conditions under which the continuum limit of the LDDL approach recovers the correct representation of thermal reservoirs. As an analytically solvable example, the nonequilibrium resonant level model is studied in greater detail. Lastly, we present ideas towards a numerical evaluation of the suggested Lindblad equation for interacting impurities based on matrix product states. In particular, we present a reformulation of the Lindblad equation, which has the useful property that the leads can be mapped onto a chain where both the Hamiltonian dynamics and the Lindblad driving are local at the same time. Moreover, we discuss the possibility to combine the Lindblad approach with a logarithmic discretization needed for the exploration of exponentially small energy scales.

  14. FRACVAL: Validation (nonlinear least squares method) of the solution of one-dimensional transport of decaying species in a discrete planar fracture with rock matrix diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Gureghian, A.B.

    1990-08-01

    Analytical solutions based on the Laplace transforms are presented for the one-dimensional, transient, advective-dispersive transport of a reacting radionuclide through a discrete planar fracture with constant aperture subject to diffusion in the surrounding rock matrix where both regions of solute migration display residual concentrations. The dispersion-free solutions, which are of closed form, are also reported. The solution assumes that the ground-water flow regime is under steady-state and isothermal conditions and that the rock matrix is homogeneous, isotropic, and saturated with stagnant water. The verification of the solution was performed by means of related analytical solutions dealing with particular aspects of the transport problem under investigation on the one hand, and a numerical solution capable of handling the complete problem on the other. The integrals encountered in the general solution are evaluated by means of a composite Gauss-Legendre quadrature scheme. 9 refs., 8 figs., 32 tabs.

  15. Fracture size and transmissivity correlations: Implications for transport simulations in sparse three-dimensional discrete fracture networks following a truncated power law distribution of fracture size

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Aldrich, Garrett Allen; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Makedonska, Nataliia; Karra, Satish

    2016-08-01

    We characterize how different fracture size-transmissivity relationships influence flow and transport simulations through sparse three-dimensional discrete fracture networks. Although it is generally accepted that there is a positive correlation between a fracture's size and its transmissivity/aperture, the functional form of that relationship remains a matter of debate. Relationships that assume perfect correlation, semicorrelation, and noncorrelation between the two have been proposed. To study the impact that adopting one of these relationships has on transport properties, we generate multiple sparse fracture networks composed of circular fractures whose radii follow a truncated power law distribution. The distribution of transmissivities are selected so that the mean transmissivity of the fracture networks are the same and the distributions of aperture and transmissivity in models that include a stochastic term are also the same. We observe that adopting a correlation between a fracture size and its transmissivity leads to earlier breakthrough times and higher effective permeability when compared to networks where no correlation is used. While fracture network geometry plays the principal role in determining where transport occurs within the network, the relationship between size and transmissivity controls the flow speed. Lastly, these observations indicate DFN modelers should be aware that breakthrough times and effective permeabilities can be strongly influenced by such a relationship in addition to fracture and network statistics.

  16. Fracture size and transmissivity correlations: Implications for transport simulations in sparse three-dimensional discrete fracture networks following a truncated power law distribution of fracture size

    DOE PAGES

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Aldrich, Garrett Allen; Viswanathan, Hari S.; ...

    2016-08-01

    We characterize how different fracture size-transmissivity relationships influence flow and transport simulations through sparse three-dimensional discrete fracture networks. Although it is generally accepted that there is a positive correlation between a fracture's size and its transmissivity/aperture, the functional form of that relationship remains a matter of debate. Relationships that assume perfect correlation, semicorrelation, and noncorrelation between the two have been proposed. To study the impact that adopting one of these relationships has on transport properties, we generate multiple sparse fracture networks composed of circular fractures whose radii follow a truncated power law distribution. The distribution of transmissivities are selected somore » that the mean transmissivity of the fracture networks are the same and the distributions of aperture and transmissivity in models that include a stochastic term are also the same. We observe that adopting a correlation between a fracture size and its transmissivity leads to earlier breakthrough times and higher effective permeability when compared to networks where no correlation is used. While fracture network geometry plays the principal role in determining where transport occurs within the network, the relationship between size and transmissivity controls the flow speed. Lastly, these observations indicate DFN modelers should be aware that breakthrough times and effective permeabilities can be strongly influenced by such a relationship in addition to fracture and network statistics.« less

  17. The Discrete Wavelet Transform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Split- Band Coding," Proc. ICASSP, May 1977, pp 191-195. 12. Vetterli, M. "A Theory of Multirate Filter Banks ," IEEE Trans. ASSP, 35, March 1987, pp 356...both special cases of a single filter bank structure, the discrete wavelet transform, the behavior of which is governed by one’s choice of filters . In...B-1 ,.iii FIGURES 1.1 A wavelet filter bank structure ..................................... 2 2.1 Diagram illustrating the dialation and

  18. Determination of neutron flux distribution by using ANISN, a one-dimensional discrete S sub n ordinates transport code with anisotropic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghorai, S. K.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to use a one-dimensional discrete coordinates transport code called ANISN in order to determine the energy-angle-spatial distribution of neutrons in a 6-feet cube rock box which houses a D-T neutron generator at its center. The project was two-fold. The first phase of the project involved adaptation of the ANISN code written for an IBM 360/75/91 computer to the UNIVAC system at JSC. The second phase of the project was to use the code with proper geometry, source function and rock material composition in order to determine the neutron flux distribution around the rock box when a 14.1 MeV neutron generator placed at its center is activated.

  19. Three-dimensional discrete fracture network simulations of flow and particle transport based on the Laxemar site data (Sweden).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, A.

    2007-12-01

    We study particle transport in a 3D DFN scenario based on the Laxemar site characterisation data in Sweden, which is a candidate repository site for high level radioactive waste in the Swedish nuclear waste management program. The site characterisation data has revealed several interesting geometric and hydraulic fracture properties, such as power-law distributed fracture sizes and transmissivities. Our study involves investigating the relationship between the resulting Eulerian flow field at a segment (sub- fracture) scale with Lagrangian trajectories at the characteristic (model domain) transport scale. We present results from a new technique for upscaling particle transitions obtained from Eulerian flow statistics to predictions of tracer discharge at the characteristic transport scale, based on previously developed methods used for 2D DFN's. This includes a mapping algorithm for transforming Eulerian into Lagrangian flow statistics without a priori knowledge of network connectivity, and by retaining the correlation between the water residence time τ and the hydrodynamic control of retention β we present accurate tracer discharge predictions. These results are illustrated using the unlimited diffusion model, and for some hypothetical tracers with properties designed to capture the behaviour of many common radionuclides. Finally we emphasise the importance of capturing the early arrival and peak of tracer breakthrough curves, i.e. to capture the bulk of the tracer mass arrival, in order to make accurate and conservative predictions.

  20. A Novel Multigrid Method for Sn Discretizations of the Mono-Energetic Boltzmann Transport Equation in the Optically Thick and Thin Regimes with Anisotropic Scattering, Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Barry

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a new multigrid method applied to the most common Sn discretizations (Petrov-Galerkin, diamond-differenced, corner-balanced, and discontinuous Galerkin) of the mono-energetic Boltzmann transport equation in the optically thick and thin regimes, and with strong anisotropic scattering. Unlike methods that use scalar DSA diffusion preconditioners for the source iteration, this multigrid method is applied directly to an integral equation for the scalar flux. Thus, unlike the former methods that apply a multigrid strategy to the scalar DSA diffusion operator, this method applies a multigrid strategy to the integral source iteration operator, which is an operator for 5 independent variables in spatial 3-d (3 in space and 2 in angle) and 4 independent variables in spatial 2-d (2 in space and 2 in angle). The core smoother of this multigrid method involves applications of the integral operator. Since the kernel of this integral operator involves the transport sweeps, applying this integral operator requires a transport sweep (an inversion of an upper triagular matrix) for each of the angles used. As the equation is in 5-space or 4-space, the multigrid approach in this paper coarsens in both angle and space, effecting efficient applications of the coarse integral operators. Although each V-cycle of this method is more expensive than a V-cycle for the DSA preconditioner, since the DSA equation does not have angular dependence, the overall computational efficiency is about the same for problems where DSA preconditioning {\\it is} effective. This new method also appears to be more robust over all parameter regimes than DSA approaches. Moreover, this new method is applicable to a variety of Sn spatial discretizations, to problems involving a combination of optically thick and thin regimes, and more importantly, to problems with anisotropic scattering cross-sections, all of which DSA approaches perform poorly or not applicable at all. This multigrid approach

  1. What sort of follow-up services would Australian breast cancer survivors prefer if we could no longer offer long-term specialist-based care? A discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Bessen, T; Chen, G; Street, J; Eliott, J; Karnon, J; Keefe, D; Ratcliffe, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis and improved treatment outcomes have increased breast cancer survival rates that, in turn, have led to increased numbers of women undergoing follow-up after completion of primary treatment. The current workload growth is unsustainable for breast cancer specialists who also provide care for women newly diagnosed or with a recurrence. Appropriate and acceptable follow-up care is important; yet, currently we know little about patient preferences. The aim of this study was to explore the preferences of Australian breast cancer survivors for alternative modes of delivery of follow-up services. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire (online or paper) was developed. The questionnaire contained a discrete choice experiment (DCE) designed to explore patient preferences with respect to provider, location, frequency and method of delivery of routine follow-up care in years 3, 4 and 5 after diagnosis, as well as the perceived value of ‘drop-in' clinics providing additional support. Participants were recruited throughout Australia over a 6-month period from May to October 2012. Preference scores and choice probabilities were used to rank the top 10 most preferred follow-up scenarios for respondents. Results: A total of 836 women participated in the study, of whom 722 (86.4%) completed the DCE. In the absence of specialist follow-up, the 10 most valued surveillance scenarios all included a Breast Physician as the provider of follow-up care. The most preferred scenario is a face-to-face local breast cancer follow-up clinic held every 6 months and led by a Breast Physician, where additional clinics focused on the side effects of treatment are also provided. Conclusion: Beyond the first 2 years from diagnosis, in the absence of a specialist led follow-up, women prefer to have their routine breast cancer follow-up by a Breast Physician (or a Breast Cancer Nurse) in a dedicated local breast cancer clinic, rather than with their local General

  2. Discrete breathers in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, S. V.; Korznikova, E. A.; Baimova, Yu A.; Velarde, M. G.

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that periodic discrete defect-containing systems, in addition to traveling waves, support vibrational defect-localized modes. It turned out that if a periodic discrete system is nonlinear, it can support spatially localized vibrational modes as exact solutions even in the absence of defects. Since the nodes of the system are all on equal footing, it is only through the special choice of initial conditions that a group of nodes can be found on which such a mode, called a discrete breather (DB), will be excited. The DB frequency must be outside the frequency range of the small-amplitude traveling waves. Not resonating with and expending no energy on the excitation of traveling waves, a DB can theoretically conserve its vibrational energy forever provided no thermal vibrations or other perturbations are present. Crystals are nonlinear discrete systems, and the discovery in them of DBs was only a matter of time. It is well known that periodic discrete defect-containing systems support both traveling waves and vibrational defect-localized modes. It turns out that if a periodic discrete system is nonlinear, it can support spatially localized vibrational modes as exact solutions even in the absence of defects. Because the nodes of the system are all on equal footing, only a special choice of the initial conditions allows selecting a group of nodes on which such a mode, called a discrete breather (DB), can be excited. The DB frequency must be outside the frequency range of small-amplitude traveling waves. Not resonating with and expending no energy on the excitation of traveling waves, a DB can theoretically preserve its vibrational energy forever if no thermal vibrations or other perturbations are present. Crystals are nonlinear discrete systems, and the discovery of DBs in them was only a matter of time. Experimental studies of DBs encounter major technical difficulties, leaving atomistic computer simulations as the primary investigation tool. Despite

  3. Preferences for ARV-based HIV prevention methods among men and women, adolescent girls and female sex workers in Gauteng Province, South Africa: a protocol for a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Eakle, Robyn; Cabrera, Maria; Vickerman, Peter; Tsepe, Motlalepule; Cianci, Fiona; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Terris-Prestholt, Fern

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For the past few decades, condoms have been the main method of HIV prevention. Recent advances in antiretroviral (ARV)-based prevention products have substantially changed the prevention landscape, yet little is known about how popular these products will be among potential users, or whether new methods might be used in conjunction with, or instead of, condoms. This study will use a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to (1) explore potential users' preferences regarding HIV prevention products, (2) quantify the importance of product attributes and (3) predict the uptake of products to inform estimates of their potential impact on the HIV epidemic in South Africa. We consider preferences for oral pre-exposure prophylaxis; a vaginal microbicide gel; a long-acting vaginal ring; a SILCS diaphragm used in concert with gel; and a long-acting ARV-based injectable. Methods and analysis This study will gather data from 4 populations: 200 women, 200 men, 200 adolescent girls (aged 16–17 years) and 200 female sex workers. The DCE attributes and design will be developed through a literature review, supplemented by a thematic analysis of qualitative focus group discussions. Extensive piloting will be carried out in each population through semistructured interviews. The final survey will be conducted using computer tablets via a household sample (for women, men and adolescents) and respondent-driven sampling (for female sex workers), and DCE data analysed using a range of multinomial logit models. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the University of the Witwatersrand Human Research Ethics Committee and the Research Ethics Committee at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Findings will be presented to international conferences and peer-reviewed journals. Meetings will be held with opinion leaders in South Africa, while results will be disseminated to participants in Ekurhuleni through a public meeting or newsletter. PMID:27354071

  4. A WENO-solver combined with adaptive momentum discretization for the Wigner transport equation and its application to resonant tunneling diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dorda, Antonius Schürrer, Ferdinand

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel numerical scheme for the deterministic solution of the Wigner transport equation, especially suited to deal with situations in which strong quantum effects are present. The unique feature of the algorithm is the expansion of the Wigner function in local basis functions, similar to finite element or finite volume methods. This procedure yields a discretization of the pseudo-differential operator that conserves the particle density on arbitrarily chosen grids. The high flexibility in refining the grid spacing together with the weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for the advection term allows for an accurate and well-resolved simulation of the phase space dynamics. A resonant tunneling diode is considered as test case and a detailed convergence study is given by comparing the results to a non-equilibrium Green's functions calculation. The impact of the considered domain size and of the grid spacing is analyzed. The obtained convergence of the results towards a quasi-exact agreement of the steady state Wigner and Green's functions computations demonstrates the accuracy of the scheme, as well as the high flexibility to adjust to different physical situations.

  5. A WENO-solver combined with adaptive momentum discretization for the Wigner transport equation and its application to resonant tunneling diodes.

    PubMed

    Dorda, Antonius; Schürrer, Ferdinand

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel numerical scheme for the deterministic solution of the Wigner transport equation, especially suited to deal with situations in which strong quantum effects are present. The unique feature of the algorithm is the expansion of the Wigner function in local basis functions, similar to finite element or finite volume methods. This procedure yields a discretization of the pseudo-differential operator that conserves the particle density on arbitrarily chosen grids. The high flexibility in refining the grid spacing together with the weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for the advection term allows for an accurate and well-resolved simulation of the phase space dynamics. A resonant tunneling diode is considered as test case and a detailed convergence study is given by comparing the results to a non-equilibrium Green's functions calculation. The impact of the considered domain size and of the grid spacing is analyzed. The obtained convergence of the results towards a quasi-exact agreement of the steady state Wigner and Green's functions computations demonstrates the accuracy of the scheme, as well as the high flexibility to adjust to different physical situations.

  6. A WENO-solver combined with adaptive momentum discretization for the Wigner transport equation and its application to resonant tunneling diodes

    PubMed Central

    Dorda, Antonius; Schürrer, Ferdinand

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel numerical scheme for the deterministic solution of the Wigner transport equation, especially suited to deal with situations in which strong quantum effects are present. The unique feature of the algorithm is the expansion of the Wigner function in local basis functions, similar to finite element or finite volume methods. This procedure yields a discretization of the pseudo-differential operator that conserves the particle density on arbitrarily chosen grids. The high flexibility in refining the grid spacing together with the weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for the advection term allows for an accurate and well-resolved simulation of the phase space dynamics. A resonant tunneling diode is considered as test case and a detailed convergence study is given by comparing the results to a non-equilibrium Green's functions calculation. The impact of the considered domain size and of the grid spacing is analyzed. The obtained convergence of the results towards a quasi-exact agreement of the steady state Wigner and Green's functions computations demonstrates the accuracy of the scheme, as well as the high flexibility to adjust to different physical situations. PMID:25892748

  7. Discontinuous isogeometric analysis methods for the first-order form of the neutron transport equation with discrete ordinate (SN) angular discretisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, A. R.; Welch, J. A.; Kópházi, J.; Eaton, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper two discontinuous Galerkin isogeometric analysis methods are developed and applied to the first-order form of the neutron transport equation with a discrete ordinate (SN) angular discretisation. The discontinuous Galerkin projection approach was taken on both an element level and the patch level for a given Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) patch. This paper describes the detailed dispersion analysis that has been used to analyse the numerical stability of both of these schemes. The convergence of the schemes for both smooth and non-smooth solutions was also investigated using the method of manufactured solutions (MMS) for multidimensional problems and a 1D semi-analytical benchmark whose solution contains a strongly discontinuous first derivative. This paper also investigates the challenges posed by strongly curved boundaries at both the NURBS element and patch level with several algorithms developed to deal with such cases. Finally numerical results are presented both for a simple pincell test problem as well as the C5G7 quarter core MOX/UOX small Light Water Reactor (LWR) benchmark problem. These numerical results produced by the isogeometric analysis (IGA) methods are compared and contrasted against linear and quadratic discontinuous Galerkin finite element (DGFEM) SN based methods.

  8. School Choice in Less Populated Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Tom; Dennison, Bill

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a parental choice case involving a rural (British) school with a 13+ transfer age to determine parents' use of the open enrollment system, effects of transport policy on exercising parental choice, quality of information provided, and factors influencing choice. Transportation was problematic. Four choice factors stood out: teacher…

  9. How to characterize thermal transport capability of 2D materials fairly? - Sheet thermal conductance and the choice of thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xufei; Varshney, Vikas; Lee, Jonghoon; Pang, Yunsong; Roy, Ajit K.; Luo, Tengfei

    2017-02-01

    Thermal transport capability of monolayer 2D materials has been under constant spotlight. However, different definitions of thickness in literature have led to ambiguity towards predicting thermal conductivity values and thus in understanding the heat transfer capability of different monolayer 2D materials. We argue that the same thickness should be used and a 'sheet thermal conductance' should be defined as an intensive 2D material property when characterizing the heat transfer capability of 2D materials. When converting literature thermal conductivity values of monolayer materials to this new property, some new features that were not displayed when using different thicknesses show up.

  10. TH-E-BRE-01: A 3D Solver of Linear Boltzmann Transport Equation Based On a New Angular Discretization Method with Positivity for Photon Dose Calculation Benchmarked with Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X; Gao, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Linear Boltzmann Transport Equation (LBTE) solved through statistical Monte Carlo (MC) method provides the accurate dose calculation in radiotherapy. This work is to investigate the alternative way for accurately solving LBTE using deterministic numerical method due to its possible advantage in computational speed from MC. Methods: Instead of using traditional spherical harmonics to approximate angular scattering kernel, our deterministic numerical method directly computes angular scattering weights, based on a new angular discretization method that utilizes linear finite element method on the local triangulation of unit angular sphere. As a Result, our angular discretization method has the unique advantage in positivity, i.e., to maintain all scattering weights nonnegative all the time, which is physically correct. Moreover, our method is local in angular space, and therefore handles the anisotropic scattering well, such as the forward-peaking scattering. To be compatible with image-guided radiotherapy, the spatial variables are discretized on the structured grid with the standard diamond scheme. After discretization, the improved sourceiteration method is utilized for solving the linear system without saving the linear system to memory. The accuracy of our 3D solver is validated using analytic solutions and benchmarked with Geant4, a popular MC solver. Results: The differences between Geant4 solutions and our solutions were less than 1.5% for various testing cases that mimic the practical cases. More details are available in the supporting document. Conclusion: We have developed a 3D LBTE solver based on a new angular discretization method that guarantees the positivity of scattering weights for physical correctness, and it has been benchmarked with Geant4 for photon dose calculation.

  11. Household Mobility, School Choices, and School Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Patrick J.

    This paper summarizes work from a dissertation, the main contribution of which was to develop and estimate a new empirical framework for analyzing the equilibrium outcomes of families' choices for choosing a particular residence. The principal component of the framework is a random-coefficients discrete-choice model of the residential location…

  12. Reduced discretization error in HZETRN

    SciTech Connect

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tweed, John

    2013-02-01

    The deterministic particle transport code HZETRN is an efficient analysis tool for studying the effects of space radiation on humans, electronics, and shielding materials. In a previous work, numerical methods in the code were reviewed, and new methods were developed that further improved efficiency and reduced overall discretization error. It was also shown that the remaining discretization error could be attributed to low energy light ions (A < 4) with residual ranges smaller than the physical step-size taken by the code. Accurately resolving the spectrum of low energy light particles is important in assessing risk associated with astronaut radiation exposure. In this work, modifications to the light particle transport formalism are presented that accurately resolve the spectrum of low energy light ion target fragments. The modified formalism is shown to significantly reduce overall discretization error and allows a physical approximation to be removed. For typical step-sizes and energy grids used in HZETRN, discretization errors for the revised light particle transport algorithms are shown to be less than 4% for aluminum and water shielding thicknesses as large as 100 g/cm{sup 2} exposed to both solar particle event and galactic cosmic ray environments.

  13. On the consistency between nearest-neighbor peridynamic discretizations and discretized classical elasticity models

    SciTech Connect

    Seleson, Pablo; Du, Qiang; Parks, Michael L.

    2016-08-16

    The peridynamic theory of solid mechanics is a nonlocal reformulation of the classical continuum mechanics theory. At the continuum level, it has been demonstrated that classical (local) elasticity is a special case of peridynamics. Such a connection between these theories has not been extensively explored at the discrete level. This paper investigates the consistency between nearest-neighbor discretizations of linear elastic peridynamic models and finite difference discretizations of the Navier–Cauchy equation of classical elasticity. While nearest-neighbor discretizations in peridynamics have been numerically observed to present grid-dependent crack paths or spurious microcracks, this paper focuses on a different, analytical aspect of such discretizations. We demonstrate that, even in the absence of cracks, such discretizations may be problematic unless a proper selection of weights is used. Specifically, we demonstrate that using the standard meshfree approach in peridynamics, nearest-neighbor discretizations do not reduce, in general, to discretizations of corresponding classical models. We study nodal-based quadratures for the discretization of peridynamic models, and we derive quadrature weights that result in consistency between nearest-neighbor discretizations of peridynamic models and discretized classical models. The quadrature weights that lead to such consistency are, however, model-/discretization-dependent. We motivate the choice of those quadrature weights through a quadratic approximation of displacement fields. The stability of nearest-neighbor peridynamic schemes is demonstrated through a Fourier mode analysis. Finally, an approach based on a normalization of peridynamic constitutive constants at the discrete level is explored. This approach results in the desired consistency for one-dimensional models, but does not work in higher dimensions. The results of the work presented in this paper suggest that even though nearest

  14. Safer Choice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Safer Choice is a voluntary program that works to advance the mission of EPA to protect human health and the environment by helping product manufacturers choose the safest chemical ingredients possible.

  15. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  16. On equivalence of discrete-discrete and continuum-discrete design sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Kyung K.; Twu, Sung-Ling

    1989-01-01

    Developments in design sensitivity analysis (DSA) method have been made using two fundamentally different approaches as shown. In the first approach, a discretized structural finite element model is used to carry out DSA. There are three different methods in the discrete DSA approach: finite difference, semi-analytical, and analytical methods. The finite difference method is a popular one due to its simplicity, but a serious shortcoming of the method is the uncertainty in the choice of a perturbation step size of design variables. In the semi-analytical method, the derivatives of stiffness matrix is computed by finite differences, whereas in the analytical method, the derivatives are obtained analytically. For the shape design variable, computation of analytical derivative of stiffness matrix is quite costly. Because of this, the semi-analytical method is a popular choice in discrete shape DSA approach. However, recently, Barthelemy and Haftka presented that the semi-analytical method can have serious accuracy problems for shape design variables in structures modeled by beam, plate, truss, frame, and solid elements. They found that accuracy problems occur even for a simple cantilever beam. In the second approach, a continuum model of the structure is used to carry out DSA.

  17. Choice Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Darcy

    2001-01-01

    Describes how the author allows the children to make choices about their art and writing, enabling them to make connections between their own lives and work. Suggests that educators need to provide doorways to the things that give students ideas: books, music, objects, pictures, smells, sounds, and textures. (SG)

  18. Project Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, Kansas City, MO.

    Project Choice was begun with the goal of increasing the number of inner-city students who graduate on time. Ewing M. Kauffman and his business and foundation associates designed and elected to test a model that used the promise of postsecondary education or training as the incentive to stay in school. This report details the evolution of Project…

  19. 5 CFR 572.102 - Agency discretion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and transportation or interview expenses in filling any position, the agency should consider such factors as availability of funds as well as the desirability of conducting interviews for a particular job... TRANSPORTATION EXPENSES; NEW APPOINTEES AND INTERVIEWS § 572.102 Agency discretion. Payment of travel...

  20. Modeling biological tissue growth: discrete to continuum representations.

    PubMed

    Hywood, Jack D; Hackett-Jones, Emily J; Landman, Kerry A

    2013-09-01

    There is much interest in building deterministic continuum models from discrete agent-based models governed by local stochastic rules where an agent represents a biological cell. In developmental biology, cells are able to move and undergo cell division on and within growing tissues. A growing tissue is itself made up of cells which undergo cell division, thereby providing a significant transport mechanism for other cells within it. We develop a discrete agent-based model where domain agents represent tissue cells. Each agent has the ability to undergo a proliferation event whereby an additional domain agent is incorporated into the lattice. If a probability distribution describes the waiting times between proliferation events for an individual agent, then the total length of the domain is a random variable. The average behavior of these stochastically proliferating agents defining the growing lattice is determined in terms of a Fokker-Planck equation, with an advection and diffusion term. The diffusion term differs from the one obtained Landman and Binder [J. Theor. Biol. 259, 541 (2009)] when the rate of growth of the domain is specified, but the choice of agents is random. This discrepancy is reconciled by determining a discrete-time master equation for this process and an associated asymmetric nonexclusion random walk, together with consideration of synchronous and asynchronous updating schemes. All theoretical results are confirmed with numerical simulations. This study furthers our understanding of the relationship between agent-based rules, their implementation, and their associated partial differential equations. Since tissue growth is a significant cellular transport mechanism during embryonic growth, it is important to use the correct partial differential equation description when combining with other cellular functions.

  1. An Empirical Analysis of Interspersal Research Evidence, Implications, and Applications of the Discrete Task Completion Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Christopher H.

    2002-01-01

    Researchers have posited that when students work on assignments with many discrete tasks, that each completed discrete task may be a conditioned reinforcer. If the discrete task completion hypothesis is accurate, then relative task completion rates should influence choice behavior in the same manner as relative rates of reinforcement. Results of a…

  2. Principles of Discrete Time Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroszkiewicz, George

    2014-04-01

    1. Introduction; 2. The physics of discreteness; 3. The road to calculus; 4. Temporal discretization; 5. Discrete time dynamics architecture; 6. Some models; 7. Classical cellular automata; 8. The action sum; 9. Worked examples; 10. Lee's approach to discrete time mechanics; 11. Elliptic billiards; 12. The construction of system functions; 13. The classical discrete time oscillator; 14. Type 2 temporal discretization; 15. Intermission; 16. Discrete time quantum mechanics; 17. The quantized discrete time oscillator; 18. Path integrals; 19. Quantum encoding; 20. Discrete time classical field equations; 21. The discrete time Schrodinger equation; 22. The discrete time Klein-Gordon equation; 23. The discrete time Dirac equation; 24. Discrete time Maxwell's equations; 25. The discrete time Skyrme model; 26. Discrete time quantum field theory; 27. Interacting discrete time scalar fields; 28. Space, time and gravitation; 29. Causality and observation; 30. Concluding remarks; Appendix A. Coherent states; Appendix B. The time-dependent oscillator; Appendix C. Quaternions; Appendix D. Quantum registers; References; Index.

  3. Central San Francisco Bay suspended-sediment transport processes and comparison of continuous and discrete measurements of suspended-solids concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    1996-01-01

    Sediments are an important component of the San Francisco Bay estuarine system. Potentially toxic substances, such as metals and pesticides, adsorb to sediment particles (Kuwabara and others, 1989; Domagalski and Kuivila, 1993). Sediments on the bottom of the bay provide the habitat for benthic communities that can ingest these substances and introduce them into the food web (Luoma and others, 1985). Nutrients, metals, and other substances are stored in bottom sediments and pore water in which chemical reactions occur and which provide an important source and/or sink to the water column (Hammond and others, 1985; Flegal and others, 1991). The transport and fate of suspended sediment is an important factor in determining the transport and fate of the constituents adsorbed on the sediment. Seasonal changes in sediment erosion and deposition patterns contribute to seasonal changes in the abundance of benthic macroinvertebrates (Nichols and Thompson, 1985). Tidal marshes are an ecologically important habitat that were created and are maintained by sedimentation processes (Atwater and others, 1979). In Suisun Bay, the maximum suspended-sediment concentration marks the position of the turbidity maximum, which is a crucial ecological region in which suspended sediment, nutrients, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larvae, and juvenile fish accumulate (Peterson and others, 1975; Arthur and Ball, 1979; Kimmerer, 1992; Jassby and Powell, 1994). Suspended sediments confine the photic zone to the upper part of the water column, and this limitation on light availability is a major control on phytoplankton production in San Francisco Bay (Cloern, 1987; Cole and Cloern, 1987). Suspended sediments also deposit in ports and shipping channels, which must be dredged to maintain navigation (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1992).

  4. Hard choices.

    PubMed

    Furedi, A

    1999-01-01

    The cultural discourse that frames the abortion debate has changed and become more complex over the years. To date, concerns about the need to defend the choice have shifted to moral and ethical issues surrounding abortion. The right of women to abortion can be situated in the context of ethical principles, which are basic to what we hold valuable in the modern society. The ethical principle of "procreative autonomy", the right of humans to control their own role in procreation has an unusually significant place in modern political culture in which human dignity was an important feature. Central to human dignity was the principle that "people possess the moral right and responsibility to answer the basic questions about the value and meaning of their own lives." Another crucial issue is the need to defend the "bodily autonomy" of women. Forcing women to support the fetus against her will flies against such principles as the need for voluntary consent to medical treatment. These arguments do not suggest for a moral indifference towards abortion choices, but as Ronald Dworkin argues, "tolerance is a cost we must pay for our adventure in liberty."

  5. Discretization of continuous features in clinical datasets

    PubMed Central

    Maslove, David M; Podchiyska, Tanya; Lowe, Henry J

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing availability of clinical data from electronic medical records (EMRs) has created opportunities for secondary uses of health information. When used in machine learning classification, many data features must first be transformed by discretization. Objective To evaluate six discretization strategies, both supervised and unsupervised, using EMR data. Materials and methods We classified laboratory data (arterial blood gas (ABG) measurements) and physiologic data (cardiac output (CO) measurements) derived from adult patients in the intensive care unit using decision trees and naïve Bayes classifiers. Continuous features were partitioned using two supervised, and four unsupervised discretization strategies. The resulting classification accuracy was compared with that obtained with the original, continuous data. Results Supervised methods were more accurate and consistent than unsupervised, but tended to produce larger decision trees. Among the unsupervised methods, equal frequency and k-means performed well overall, while equal width was significantly less accurate. Discussion This is, we believe, the first dedicated evaluation of discretization strategies using EMR data. It is unlikely that any one discretization method applies universally to EMR data. Performance was influenced by the choice of class labels and, in the case of unsupervised methods, the number of intervals. In selecting the number of intervals there is generally a trade-off between greater accuracy and greater consistency. Conclusions In general, supervised methods yield higher accuracy, but are constrained to a single specific application. Unsupervised methods do not require class labels and can produce discretized data that can be used for multiple purposes. PMID:23059731

  6. On the consistency between nearest-neighbor peridynamic discretizations and discretized classical elasticity models

    DOE PAGES

    Seleson, Pablo; Du, Qiang; Parks, Michael L.

    2016-08-16

    The peridynamic theory of solid mechanics is a nonlocal reformulation of the classical continuum mechanics theory. At the continuum level, it has been demonstrated that classical (local) elasticity is a special case of peridynamics. Such a connection between these theories has not been extensively explored at the discrete level. This paper investigates the consistency between nearest-neighbor discretizations of linear elastic peridynamic models and finite difference discretizations of the Navier–Cauchy equation of classical elasticity. While nearest-neighbor discretizations in peridynamics have been numerically observed to present grid-dependent crack paths or spurious microcracks, this paper focuses on a different, analytical aspect of suchmore » discretizations. We demonstrate that, even in the absence of cracks, such discretizations may be problematic unless a proper selection of weights is used. Specifically, we demonstrate that using the standard meshfree approach in peridynamics, nearest-neighbor discretizations do not reduce, in general, to discretizations of corresponding classical models. We study nodal-based quadratures for the discretization of peridynamic models, and we derive quadrature weights that result in consistency between nearest-neighbor discretizations of peridynamic models and discretized classical models. The quadrature weights that lead to such consistency are, however, model-/discretization-dependent. We motivate the choice of those quadrature weights through a quadratic approximation of displacement fields. The stability of nearest-neighbor peridynamic schemes is demonstrated through a Fourier mode analysis. Finally, an approach based on a normalization of peridynamic constitutive constants at the discrete level is explored. This approach results in the desired consistency for one-dimensional models, but does not work in higher dimensions. The results of the work presented in this paper suggest that even though nearest

  7. Discrete Wavelet Transforms: The Relationship of the a Trous and Mallat Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    single filter bank structure, the discrete wavelet transform, the behavior of which is governed by one’s choice of filters . In fact, the a trous algorithm...particulierSd’une unique structure banc de filtres, both special cases of a single filter bank structure, the appel6e transforme d’ondelettes discrete, dont le com...tie literature has been devoted to linking discrete implemen- filter bank output will be referred to as the Discrete tations to the continuous

  8. On the definition of discrete hydrodynamic variables.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Zúñiga, Ignacio

    2009-10-28

    The Green-Kubo formula for discrete hydrodynamic variables involves information about not only the fluid transport coefficients but also about discrete versions of the differential operators that govern the evolution of the discrete variables. This gives an intimate connection between discretization procedures in fluid dynamics and coarse-graining procedures used to obtain hydrodynamic behavior of molecular fluids. We observed that a natural definition of discrete hydrodynamic variables in terms of Voronoi cells leads to a Green-Kubo formula which is divergent, rendering the full coarse-graining strategy useless. In order to understand this subtle issue, in the present paper we consider the coarse graining of noninteracting Brownian particles. The discrete hydrodynamic variable for this problem is the number of particles within Voronoi cells. Thanks to the simplicity of the model we spot the origin of the singular behavior of the correlation functions. We offer an alternative definition, based on the concept of a Delaunay cell that behaves properly, suggesting the use of the Delaunay construction for the coarse graining of molecular fluids at the discrete hydrodynamic level.

  9. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  10. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-17

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2{pi} in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step {delta}t. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/{delta}t is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is ''blue shifted'' relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval {delta}t. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  11. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-01

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2π in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step Δt. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/Δt is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is "blue shifted" relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval Δt. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  12. Junior doctors' preferences for specialty choice.

    PubMed

    Sivey, Peter; Scott, Anthony; Witt, Julia; Joyce, Catherine; Humphreys, John

    2012-12-01

    A number of studies suggest that there is an over-supply of specialists and an under-supply of general practitioners in many developed countries. Previous econometric studies of specialty choice from the US suggest that although income plays a role, other non-pecuniary factors may be important. This paper presents a novel application of a choice experiment to identify the effects of expected future earnings and other attributes on specialty choice. We find the implied marginal wage estimated from our discrete choice model is close to the actual wages of senior specialists, but much higher than those of senior GPs. In a policy simulation we find that increasing GPs' earnings by $50,000, or increasing opportunities for procedural or academic work can increase the number of junior doctors choosing general practice by between 8 and 13 percentage points. The simulation implies an earnings elasticity of specialty choice of 0.95.

  13. A discrete choice model of drug abuse treatment location.

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, A C; Nishiura, E; Hankin, J R

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify short-term drug abuse treatment location risk factors for ten large, self-insured firms starting January 1, 1989 and ending December 31, 1991. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Study population selected from a large database of health insurance claims for all treatment events starting January 1, 1989 and ending December 31, 1991. STUDY DESIGN: A nested binomial logit method is used to estimate firm-specific patterns of treatment location. The differences in treatment location patterns among firms are then decomposed into firm effects (holding explanatory variables constant among firms) and variable effects (holding firm-specific parameters constant). PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Probability of inpatient drug treatment is directly related to the type of drug diagnosis. The most important factors are diagnoses of drug dependence (versus drug abuse) and/or a cocaine dependence. Firm-specific factors also make a substantive difference. Controlling for patient risk factors, firm-specific probabilities of inpatient treatment vary by as much as 87 percent. Controlling for practices of firms and their insurance carriers, differing patient risk profiles cause probabilities of inpatient treatment to vary by as much as 69 percent among firms. Use of the outpatient setting increased over the three-year period. CONCLUSIONS: There are two plausible explanations for the findings. First, people beginning treatment later in the three-year period had less severe conditions than earlier cases and therefore had less need of inpatient treatment. Second, drug abuse treatment experienced the same trend toward the increased use of outpatient care that characterized treatment for other illnesses in the 1980s and early 1990s. PMID:9566181

  14. Formulating the Brogden Classification Framework as a Discrete Choice Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    that satisfy the job quota constraints using an MMNL parameter estimation algorithm. Biogeme ( Bierle , 2003) model files for carrying out the...demand. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Bierle , M. (2003). An introduction to BIOGEME (Version 1.3) http://roso.epfl.ch/biogeme. Brogden, H. E. (1954). A

  15. Discrete choice modeling of environmental security. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, K.S.

    1998-10-01

    The presence of overpopulation or unsustainable population growth may place pressure on the food and water supplies of countries in sensitive areas of the world. Severe air or water pollution may place additional pressure on these resources. These pressures may generate both internal and international conflict in these areas as nations struggle to provide for their citizens. Such conflicts may result in United States intervention, either unilaterally, or through the United Nations. Therefore, it is in the interests of the United States to identify potential areas of conflict in order to properly train and allocate forces. The purpose of this research is to forecast the probability of conflict in a nation as a function of it s environmental conditions. Probit, logit and ordered probit models are employed to forecast the probability of a given level of conflict. Data from 95 countries are used to estimate the models. Probability forecasts are generated for these 95 nations. Out-of sample forecasts are generated for an additional 22 nations. These probabilities are then used to rank nations from highest probability of conflict to lowest. The results indicate that the dependence of a nation`s economy on agriculture, the rate of deforestation, and the population density are important variables in forecasting the probability and level of conflict. These results indicate that environmental variables do play a role in generating or exacerbating conflict. It is unclear that the United States military has any direct role in mitigating the environmental conditions that may generate conflict. A more important role for the military is to aid in data gathering to generate better forecasts so that the troops are adequntely prepared when conflicts arises.

  16. On the origin of turbulent cascades in the dynamic pressure and plasma flux from the discrete nonlinear ones: the role of outer magnetospheric resonances and their possible input into the trans-boundary transport.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Sergey; Büchner, Jörg; Zelenyi, Lev; Kronberg, Elena; Klimov, Stanislav; Kozak, Lyudmila; Blecki, Jan; Budaev, Viacheslav; Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana; Skalsky, Alexander; Amata, Ermanno

    The identification of the role of the Supersonic Plasma Streams (SPS) interactions with the Earth magnetosphere should be interesting in the context of the planetary and astrophysical magnetospheres and of that of laboratory plasmas. The interactions can be inherently non-local and non-equilibrium, and even explosive due to both solar wind (SW) induced and self-generated coherent structures in the multiscale system with the scales ranging from the micro to global scales. We study the main fundamental processes arising from the SPS cascading and interactions with surface and cavity resonances in the Earth’s magnetosphere, using multi-spacecraft data (SPECTR-R, DOUBLE STAR, CLUSTER, GEOTAIL, ACE, WIND etc.). We will address the following key problems to advance our understanding of anomalous transport and boundary dynamics: - the BS disturbances role in the SPS production; it requires to base on the relevant databases from the CLUSTER/ DOUBLE STAR/ GEOTAIL/SPECTR-R/ ACE/ WIND spacecraft, which will be used for a statistical analysis targeting the SPS statistical features as extreme events. - analysis of the SPS generation mechanisms, e.g., by bow shock (BS) surface or magnetosheath (MSH) cavity resonances, triggering by interplanetary shocks, solar wind (SW) dynamic pressure jumps, foreshock nonlinear structures, etc. - pumping of substantial part of the SW kinetic energy into the BS membrane and MSH cavity modes and initiate further cascades towards higher frequencies. Accordingly we present the multipoint studies of the SPS and of related nonlinear discrete cascades (carried generally by the SPS), along with the transformation of discrete cascades of the dynamic pressure into turbulent cascades. - explorations of spectral and bi-spectral cross-correlations in SW, foreshock, MSH and in vicinity of BS and magnetopause (MP) would demonstrate that both inflow and outflow into/ from magnetosphere can be modulated by the SPS and by the related outer magnetospheric

  17. Discrete dislocations in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariza, M. P.; Ortiz, M.

    2010-05-01

    In this work, we present an application of the theory of discrete dislocations of Ariza and Ortiz (2005) to the analysis of dislocations in graphene. Specifically, we discuss the specialization of the theory to graphene and its further specialization to the force-constant model of Aizawa et al. (1990). The ability of the discrete-dislocation theory to predict dislocation core structures and energies is critically assessed for periodic arrangements of dislocation dipoles and quadrupoles. We show that, with the aid of the discrete Fourier transform, those problems are amenable to exact solution within the discrete-dislocation theory, which confers the theory a distinct advantage over conventional atomistic models. The discrete dislocations exhibit 5-7 ring core structures that are consistent with observation and result in dislocation energies that fall within the range of prediction of other models. The asymptotic behavior of dilute distributions of dislocations is characterized analytically in terms of a discrete prelogarithmic energy tensor. Explicit expressions for this discrete prelogarithmic energy tensor are provided up to quadratures.

  18. Constraint analysis for variational discrete systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Bianca; Höhn, Philipp A.

    2013-09-15

    A canonical formalism and constraint analysis for discrete systems subject to a variational action principle are devised. The formalism is equivalent to the covariant formulation, encompasses global and local discrete time evolution moves and naturally incorporates both constant and evolving phase spaces, the latter of which is necessary for a time varying discretization. The different roles of constraints in the discrete and the conditions under which they are first or second class and/or symmetry generators are clarified. The (non-) preservation of constraints and the symplectic structure is discussed; on evolving phase spaces the number of constraints at a fixed time step depends on the initial and final time step of evolution. Moreover, the definition of observables and a reduced phase space is provided; again, on evolving phase spaces the notion of an observable as a propagating degree of freedom requires specification of an initial and final step and crucially depends on this choice, in contrast to the continuum. However, upon restriction to translation invariant systems, one regains the usual time step independence of canonical concepts. This analysis applies, e.g., to discrete mechanics, lattice field theory, quantum gravity models, and numerical analysis.

  19. Discrete density of states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Alhun; Sisman, Altug

    2016-03-01

    By considering the quantum-mechanically minimum allowable energy interval, we exactly count number of states (NOS) and introduce discrete density of states (DOS) concept for a particle in a box for various dimensions. Expressions for bounded and unbounded continua are analytically recovered from discrete ones. Even though substantial fluctuations prevail in discrete DOS, they're almost completely flattened out after summation or integration operation. It's seen that relative errors of analytical expressions of bounded/unbounded continua rapidly decrease for high NOS values (weak confinement or high energy conditions), while the proposed analytical expressions based on Weyl's conjecture always preserve their lower error characteristic.

  20. The PXIE LEBT Design Choices

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Lionel; Shemyakin, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Typical front-ends of modern light-ion high-intensity accelerators typically consist of an ion source, a Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), a Radiofrequency Quadrupole and a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT), which is followed by the main linac accelerating structures. Over the years, many LEBTs have been designed, constructed and operated very successfully. In this paper, we present the guiding principles and compromises that lead to the design choices of the PXIE LEBT, including the rationale for a beam line that allows un-neutralized transport over a significant portion of the LEBT whether the beam is pulsed or DC.

  1. School Choice. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robledo Montecel, Maria, Ed.; Supik, Josie Danini, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter contains five articles on the implications of school choice for minority and disadvantaged students. "School Choice: Choices for Whom? Promises and Panaceas," by Maria Robledo Montecel, discusses some major problems related to school choice and vouchers, particularly who would have the choice (families or schools), who…

  2. The psychopathology of choice.

    PubMed

    Headlee, R; Kalogjera, I J

    1988-10-01

    The important, often neglected factor of choice, learned in childhood, is examined in detail and illustrated by clinical examples. The primary etiological factors in psychopathology of choice are: (1) Too much choice allowed before integration is possible; (2) Too little choice allowed and (3) Distortions of choice due to racial, sexual, and religious prejudices or cognitive distortions.

  3. Discrete Elements Method of Neutral Particle Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    distribution of flux which is strongly peaked along the axis of the duct. If the duct is not aligned along one of the quadrature set directions, the...rule requires knowledge of the flux in three fixed directions distributed in azimuth and three fixed directions distributed polarly, within each element...so that none of the flux would reach cells 3 and 9. However, because the SC method assumes a constant flux distribution along each cell interface

  4. The Discrete Hanging Cable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, James V.

    2004-01-01

    Using the methods of finite difference equations the discrete analogue of the parabolic and catenary cable are analysed. The fibonacci numbers and the golden ratio arise in the treatment of the catenary.

  5. Idea Exchange: On Discrete.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisler, Nancy; Froelich, Gary

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are summary recommendations concerning the integration of some aspects of discrete mathematics into existing secondary mathematics courses. Outlines of course activities are grouped into the three levels of prealgebra, algebra, and geometry. Some sample problems are included. (JJK)

  6. 49 CFR 40.369 - What is the discretion of an initiating official in starting a PIE proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the discretion of an initiating official in starting a PIE proceeding? 40.369 Section 40.369 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Public Interest Exclusions § 40.369 What is the discretion of...

  7. Discrete Driver Assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klette, Reinhard; Jiang, Ruyi; Morales, Sandino; Vaudrey, Tobi

    Applying computer technology, such as computer vision in driver assistance, implies that processes and data are modeled as being discretized rather than being continuous. The area of stereo vision provides various examples how concepts known in discrete mathematics (e.g., pixel adjacency graphs, belief propagation, dynamic programming, max-flow/min-cut, or digital straight lines) are applied when aiming for efficient and accurate pixel correspondence solutions. The paper reviews such developments for a reader in discrete mathematics who is interested in applied research (in particular, in vision-based driver assistance). As a second subject, the paper also discusses lane detection and tracking, which is a particular task in driver assistance; recently the Euclidean distance transform proved to be a very appropriate tool for obtaining a fairly robust solution.

  8. Analysis hierarchical model for discrete event systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciortea, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    The This paper presents the hierarchical model based on discrete event network for robotic systems. Based on the hierarchical approach, Petri network is analysed as a network of the highest conceptual level and the lowest level of local control. For modelling and control of complex robotic systems using extended Petri nets. Such a system is structured, controlled and analysed in this paper by using Visual Object Net ++ package that is relatively simple and easy to use, and the results are shown as representations easy to interpret. The hierarchical structure of the robotic system is implemented on computers analysed using specialized programs. Implementation of hierarchical model discrete event systems, as a real-time operating system on a computer network connected via a serial bus is possible, where each computer is dedicated to local and Petri model of a subsystem global robotic system. Since Petri models are simplified to apply general computers, analysis, modelling, complex manufacturing systems control can be achieved using Petri nets. Discrete event systems is a pragmatic tool for modelling industrial systems. For system modelling using Petri nets because we have our system where discrete event. To highlight the auxiliary time Petri model using transport stream divided into hierarchical levels and sections are analysed successively. Proposed robotic system simulation using timed Petri, offers the opportunity to view the robotic time. Application of goods or robotic and transmission times obtained by measuring spot is obtained graphics showing the average time for transport activity, using the parameters sets of finished products. individually.

  9. Discrete surface solitons.

    PubMed

    Makris, Konstantinos G; Suntsov, Sergiy; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Stegeman, George I; Hache, Alain

    2005-09-15

    It is theoretically shown that discrete nonlinear surface waves are possible in waveguide lattices. These self-trapped states are located at the edge of the array and can exist only above a certain power threshold. The excitation characteristics and stability properties of these surface waves are systematically investigated.

  10. Choosing Choice: School Choice in International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plank, David N., Ed.; Sykes, Gary, Ed.

    The chapters in this book originated as papers for a conference, School Choice and Educational Change, held in March 2000 at Michigan State University. An introductory chapter provides a comparative analysis of the lessons learned from international experience with school-choice policies, based on a review of case studies in several countries. The…

  11. Discrete Variational Optimal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Fernando; Kobilarov, Marin; Martín de Diego, David

    2013-06-01

    This paper develops numerical methods for optimal control of mechanical systems in the Lagrangian setting. It extends the theory of discrete mechanics to enable the solutions of optimal control problems through the discretization of variational principles. The key point is to solve the optimal control problem as a variational integrator of a specially constructed higher dimensional system. The developed framework applies to systems on tangent bundles, Lie groups, and underactuated and nonholonomic systems with symmetries, and can approximate either smooth or discontinuous control inputs. The resulting methods inherit the preservation properties of variational integrators and result in numerically robust and easily implementable algorithms. Several theoretical examples and a practical one, the control of an underwater vehicle, illustrate the application of the proposed approach.

  12. Steerable Discrete Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fracastoro, Giulia; Magli, Enrico

    2017-03-01

    Directional transforms have recently raised a lot of interest thanks to their numerous applications in signal compression and analysis. In this letter, we introduce a generalization of the discrete Fourier transform, called steerable DFT (SDFT). Since the DFT is used in numerous fields, it may be of interest in a wide range of applications. Moreover, we also show that the SDFT is highly related to other well-known transforms, such as the Fourier sine and cosine transforms and the Hilbert transforms.

  13. Discrete minimal flavor violation

    SciTech Connect

    Zwicky, Roman; Fischbacher, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the consequences of replacing the global flavor symmetry of minimal flavor violation (MFV) SU(3){sub Q}xSU(3){sub U}xSU(3){sub D}x{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot} by a discrete D{sub Q}xD{sub U}xD{sub D}x{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot} symmetry. Goldstone bosons resulting from the breaking of the flavor symmetry generically lead to bounds on new flavor structure many orders of magnitude above the TeV scale. The absence of Goldstone bosons for discrete symmetries constitute the primary motivation of our work. Less symmetry implies further invariants and renders the mass-flavor basis transformation observable in principle and calls for a hierarchy in the Yukawa matrix expansion. We show, through the dimension of the representations, that the (discrete) symmetry in principle does allow for additional {delta}F=2 operators. If though the {delta}F=2 transitions are generated by two subsequent {delta}F=1 processes, as, for example, in the standard model, then the four crystal-like groups {sigma}(168){approx_equal}PSL(2,F{sub 7}), {sigma}(72{phi}), {sigma}(216{phi}) and especially {sigma}(360{phi}) do provide enough protection for a TeV-scale discrete MFV scenario. Models where this is not the case have to be investigated case by case. Interestingly {sigma}(216{phi}) has a (nonfaithful) representation corresponding to an A{sub 4} symmetry. Moreover we argue that the, apparently often omitted, (D) groups are subgroups of an appropriate {delta}(6g{sup 2}). We would like to stress that we do not provide an actual model that realizes the MFV scenario nor any other theory of flavor.

  14. A paradigm for discrete physics

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.; McGoveran, D.; Etter, T.; Manthey, M.J.; Gefwert, C.

    1987-01-01

    An example is outlined for constructing a discrete physics using as a starting point the insight from quantum physics that events are discrete, indivisible and non-local. Initial postulates are finiteness, discreteness, finite computability, absolute nonuniqueness (i.e., homogeneity in the absence of specific cause) and additivity.

  15. Privatization and Educational Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Myron

    This book describes how and why educational choice movements will affect public education. It uses a public-choice approach to argue that both the supporters and opponents of private and school choice have failed to address several critical issues. Following an introductory chapter, chapter 2 is devoted to the rationale for contracting out…

  16. Dynamical Properties of Discrete Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Paulevé, Loïc; Craciun, Gheorghe; Koeppl, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Reaction networks are commonly used to model the dynamics of populations subject to transformations that follow an imposed stoichiometry. This paper focuses on the efficient characterisation of dynamical properties of Discrete Reaction Networks (DRNs). DRNs can be seen as modeling the underlying discrete nondeterministic transitions of stochastic models of reaction networks. In that sense, a proof of non-reachability in a given DRN has immediate implications for any concrete stochastic model based on that DRN, independent of the choice of kinetic laws and constants. Moreover, if we assume that stochastic kinetic rates are given by the mass-action law (or any other kinetic law that gives non-vanishing probability to each reaction if the required number of interacting substrates is present), then reachability properties are equivalent in the two settings. The analysis of two types of global dynamical properties of DRNs is addressed: irreducibility, i.e., the ability to reach any discrete state from any other state; and recurrence, i.e., the ability to return to any initial state. Our results consider both the verification of such properties when species are present in a large copy number, and in the general case. The necessary and sufficient conditions obtained involve algebraic conditions on the network reactions which in most cases can be verified using linear programming. Finally, the relationship of DRN irreducibility and recurrence with dynamical properties of stochastic and continuous models of reaction networks is discussed. PMID:23722628

  17. Discretization of the Schwarzian derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Toshiaki

    2016-10-01

    Numerical treatment of the Schwarzian derivatives from the exact discretization point is useful for many applications. Since we found the discrete counterpart of Schwarzian derivative is the Cross-ratio, we can regard the Cross-ratio to the discrete conformal mapping function instead of the Schwarzian derivative. By this approach we found some integrable system of special functions are derived by the classical treatment of 2nd order ODE and difference equations. Such discrete integrable system is composed of simultameous equation of the two Möbius transformations or discrete Riccati's eqautions.

  18. Discrete modelling of drapery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoeni, Klaus; Giacomini, Anna

    2016-04-01

    .L., editors. Rockfall: Characterization and Control. Washington, DC: Transportation Research Board, 554-576. Giacomini, A., Thoeni, K., Lambert, C., Booth, S., Sloan, S.W. (2012) Experimental study on rockfall drapery systems for open pit highwalls. International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 56, 171-181. Šmilauer, V., Catalano, E., Chareyre, B., Dorofenko, S., Duriez, J., Gladky, A., Kozicki, J., Modenese, C., Scholtès, L., Sibille, L., Stránskỳ, J., Thoeni, K. (2010) Yade Documentation. The Yade Project, 1st ed., http://yade-dem.org/doc/. Thoeni, K., Giacomini, A., Lambert, C., Sloan, S.W., Carter, J.P. (2014) A 3D discrete element modelling approach for rockfall analysis with drapery systems. International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 68, 107-119. Thoeni, K., Lambert, C., Giacomini, A., Sloan, S.W. (2013) Discrete modelling of hexagonal wire meshes with a stochastically distorted contact model. Computers and Geotechnics, 49, 158-69.

  19. Manpower Analysis Using Discrete Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    building using Discrete Event Simulation (DES) and experimentation using Design of Experiments (DOE). We derived five metamodels to identify the most...objectives were met. 14. SUBJECT TERMS manpower policy analysis, discrete event simulation, Simkit 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 85 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...using Discrete Event Simulation (DES) and experimentation using Design of Experiments (DOE). We derived five metamodels to identify the most

  20. Integrable discrete PT symmetric model.

    PubMed

    Ablowitz, Mark J; Musslimani, Ziad H

    2014-09-01

    An exactly solvable discrete PT invariant nonlinear Schrödinger-like model is introduced. It is an integrable Hamiltonian system that exhibits a nontrivial nonlinear PT symmetry. A discrete one-soliton solution is constructed using a left-right Riemann-Hilbert formulation. It is shown that this pure soliton exhibits unique features such as power oscillations and singularity formation. The proposed model can be viewed as a discretization of a recently obtained integrable nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  1. Thermodynamics of discrete quantum processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Janet; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2013-03-01

    We define thermodynamic configurations and identify two primitives of discrete quantum processes between configurations for which heat and work can be defined in a natural way. This allows us to uncover a general second law for any discrete trajectory that consists of a sequence of these primitives, linking both equilibrium and non-equilibrium configurations. Moreover, in the limit of a discrete trajectory that passes through an infinite number of configurations, i.e. in the reversible limit, we recover the saturation of the second law. Finally, we show that for a discrete Carnot cycle operating between four configurations one recovers Carnot's thermal efficiency.

  2. Discrete Pearson distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.O.; Shenton, L.R.; Kastenbaum, M.A.

    1991-11-01

    These distributions are generated by a first order recursive scheme which equates the ratio of successive probabilities to the ratio of two corresponding quadratics. The use of a linearized form of this model will produce equations in the unknowns matched by an appropriate set of moments (assumed to exist). Given the moments we may find valid solutions. These are two cases; (1) distributions defined on the non-negative integers (finite or infinite) and (2) distributions defined on negative integers as well. For (1), given the first four moments, it is possible to set this up as equations of finite or infinite degree in the probability of a zero occurrence, the sth component being a product of s ratios of linear forms in this probability in general. For (2) the equation for the zero probability is purely linear but may involve slowly converging series; here a particular case is the discrete normal. Regions of validity are being studied. 11 refs.

  3. Discrete bisoliton fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X. M.; Han, X. X.; Yao, X. K.

    2016-01-01

    Dissipative solitons, which result from the intricate balance between dispersion and nonlinearity as well as gain and loss, are of the fundamental scientific interest and numerous important applications. Here, we report a fiber laser that generates bisoliton – two consecutive dissipative solitons that preserve a fixed separation between them. Deviations from this separation result in its restoration. It is also found that these bisolitons have multiple discrete equilibrium distances with the quantized separations, as is confirmed by the theoretical analysis and the experimental observations. The main feature of our laser is the anomalous dispersion that is increased by an order of magnitude in comparison to previous studies. Then the spectral filtering effect plays a significant role in pulse-shaping. The proposed laser has the potential applications in optical communications and high-resolution optics for coding and transmission of information in higher-level modulation formats. PMID:27767075

  4. Discrete Reliability Projection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Defense, Handbook MIL - HDBK -189C, 2011 Hall, J. B., Methodology for Evaluating Reliability Growth Programs of Discrete Systems, Ph.D. thesis, University...pk,i ] · [ 1− (1− θ̆k) · ( N k · T )]k−m , (2.13) 5 2 Hall’s Model where m is the number of observed failure modes and d∗i estimates di (either based...Mode Failures FEF Ni d ∗ i 1 1 0.95 2 1 0.70 3 1 0.90 4 1 0.90 5 4 0.95 6 2 0.70 7 1 0.80 Using equations 2.1 and 2.2 we can calculate the failure

  5. Discrete anti-gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P. ); Starson, S. )

    1991-03-01

    Discrete physics, because it replaces time evolution generated by the energy operator with a global bit-string generator (program universe) and replaces fields'' with the relativistic Wheeler-Feynman action at a distance,'' allows the consistent formulation of the concept of signed gravitational charge for massive particles. The resulting prediction made by this version of the theory is that free anti-particles near the surface of the earth will fall'' up with the same acceleration that the corresponding particles fall down. So far as we can see, no current experimental information is in conflict with this prediction of our theory. The experiment crusis will be one of the anti-proton or anti-hydrogen experiments at CERN. Our prediction should be much easier to test than the small effects which those experiments are currently designed to detect or bound. 23 refs.

  6. Discrete anti-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyes, H. Pierre; Starson, Scott

    1991-03-01

    Discrete physics, because it replaces time evolution generated by the energy operator with a global bit-string generator (program universe) and replaces fields with the relativistic Wheeler-Feynman action at a distance, allows the consistent formulation of the concept of signed gravitational charge for massive particles. The resulting prediction made by this version of the theory is that free anti-particles near the surface of the earth will fall up with the same acceleration that the corresponding particles fall down. So far as we can see, no current experimental information is in conflict with this prediction of our theory. The experiment crusis will be one of the anti-proton or anti-hydrogen experiments at CERN. Our prediction should be much easier to test than the small effects which those experiments are currently designed to detect or bound.

  7. Discrete bisoliton fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. M.; Han, X. X.; Yao, X. K.

    2016-10-01

    Dissipative solitons, which result from the intricate balance between dispersion and nonlinearity as well as gain and loss, are of the fundamental scientific interest and numerous important applications. Here, we report a fiber laser that generates bisoliton – two consecutive dissipative solitons that preserve a fixed separation between them. Deviations from this separation result in its restoration. It is also found that these bisolitons have multiple discrete equilibrium distances with the quantized separations, as is confirmed by the theoretical analysis and the experimental observations. The main feature of our laser is the anomalous dispersion that is increased by an order of magnitude in comparison to previous studies. Then the spectral filtering effect plays a significant role in pulse-shaping. The proposed laser has the potential applications in optical communications and high-resolution optics for coding and transmission of information in higher-level modulation formats.

  8. Immigration and Prosecutorial Discretion.

    PubMed

    Apollonio, Dorie; Lochner, Todd; Heddens, Myriah

    Immigration has become an increasingly salient national issue in the US, and the Department of Justice recently increased federal efforts to prosecute immigration offenses. This shift, however, relies on the cooperation of US attorneys and their assistants. Traditionally federal prosecutors have enjoyed enormous discretion and have been responsive to local concerns. To consider how the centralized goal of immigration enforcement may have influenced federal prosecutors in regional offices, we review their prosecution of immigration offenses in California using over a decade's worth of data. Our findings suggest that although centralizing forces influence immigration prosecutions, individual US attorneys' offices retain distinct characteristics. Local factors influence federal prosecutors' behavior in different ways depending on the office. Contrary to expectations, unemployment rates did not affect prosecutors' willingness to pursue immigration offenses, nor did local popular opinion about illegal immigration.

  9. Steerable Discrete Cosine Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fracastoro, Giulia; Fosson, Sophie M.; Magli, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    In image compression, classical block-based separable transforms tend to be inefficient when image blocks contain arbitrarily shaped discontinuities. For this reason, transforms incorporating directional information are an appealing alternative. In this paper, we propose a new approach to this problem, namely a discrete cosine transform (DCT) that can be steered in any chosen direction. Such transform, called steerable DCT (SDCT), allows to rotate in a flexible way pairs of basis vectors, and enables precise matching of directionality in each image block, achieving improved coding efficiency. The optimal rotation angles for SDCT can be represented as solution of a suitable rate-distortion (RD) problem. We propose iterative methods to search such solution, and we develop a fully fledged image encoder to practically compare our techniques with other competing transforms. Analytical and numerical results prove that SDCT outperforms both DCT and state-of-the-art directional transforms.

  10. Steerable Discrete Cosine Transform.

    PubMed

    Fracastoro, Giulia; Fosson, Sophie M; Magli, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    In image compression, classical block-based separable transforms tend to be inefficient when image blocks contain arbitrarily shaped discontinuities. For this reason, transforms incorporating directional information are an appealing alternative. In this paper, we propose a new approach to this problem, namely, a discrete cosine transform (DCT) that can be steered in any chosen direction. Such transform, called steerable DCT (SDCT), allows to rotate in a flexible way pairs of basis vectors, and enables precise matching of directionality in each image block, achieving improved coding efficiency. The optimal rotation angles for SDCT can be represented as solution of a suitable rate-distortion (RD) problem. We propose iterative methods to search such solution, and we develop a fully fledged image encoder to practically compare our techniques with other competing transforms. Analytical and numerical results prove that SDCT outperforms both DCT and state-of-the-art directional transforms.

  11. Nonintegrable Schrodinger discrete breathers.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gardeñes, J; Floría, L M; Peyrard, M; Bishop, A R

    2004-12-01

    In an extensive numerical investigation of nonintegrable translational motion of discrete breathers in nonlinear Schrödinger lattices, we have used a regularized Newton algorithm to continue these solutions from the limit of the integrable Ablowitz-Ladik lattice. These solutions are shown to be a superposition of a localized moving core and an excited extended state (background) to which the localized moving pulse is spatially asymptotic. The background is a linear combination of small amplitude nonlinear resonant plane waves and it plays an essential role in the energy balance governing the translational motion of the localized core. Perturbative collective variable theory predictions are critically analyzed in the light of the numerical results.

  12. Immigration and Prosecutorial Discretion

    PubMed Central

    Apollonio, Dorie; Lochner, Todd; Heddens, Myriah

    2015-01-01

    Immigration has become an increasingly salient national issue in the US, and the Department of Justice recently increased federal efforts to prosecute immigration offenses. This shift, however, relies on the cooperation of US attorneys and their assistants. Traditionally federal prosecutors have enjoyed enormous discretion and have been responsive to local concerns. To consider how the centralized goal of immigration enforcement may have influenced federal prosecutors in regional offices, we review their prosecution of immigration offenses in California using over a decade's worth of data. Our findings suggest that although centralizing forces influence immigration prosecutions, individual US attorneys' offices retain distinct characteristics. Local factors influence federal prosecutors' behavior in different ways depending on the office. Contrary to expectations, unemployment rates did not affect prosecutors' willingness to pursue immigration offenses, nor did local popular opinion about illegal immigration. PMID:26146530

  13. Discrete Minimal Surface Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnlind, Joakim; Hoppe, Jens

    2010-05-01

    We consider discrete minimal surface algebras (DMSA) as generalized noncommutative analogues of minimal surfaces in higher dimensional spheres. These algebras appear naturally in membrane theory, where sequences of their representations are used as a regularization. After showing that the defining relations of the algebra are consistent, and that one can compute a basis of the enveloping algebra, we give several explicit examples of DMSAs in terms of subsets of sln (any semi-simple Lie algebra providing a trivial example by itself). A special class of DMSAs are Yang-Mills algebras. The representation graph is introduced to study representations of DMSAs of dimension d ≤ 4, and properties of representations are related to properties of graphs. The representation graph of a tensor product is (generically) the Cartesian product of the corresponding graphs. We provide explicit examples of irreducible representations and, for coinciding eigenvalues, classify all the unitary representations of the corresponding algebras.

  14. Some unsolved problems in discrete mathematics and mathematical cybernetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, Aleksei D.

    2009-10-01

    There are many unsolved problems in discrete mathematics and mathematical cybernetics. Writing a comprehensive survey of such problems involves great difficulties. First, such problems are rather numerous and varied. Second, they greatly differ from each other in degree of completeness of their solution. Therefore, even a comprehensive survey should not attempt to cover the whole variety of such problems; only the most important and significant problems should be reviewed. An impersonal choice of problems to include is quite hard. This paper includes 13 unsolved problems related to combinatorial mathematics and computational complexity theory. The problems selected give an indication of the author's studies for 50 years; for this reason, the choice of the problems reviewed here is, to some extent, subjective. At the same time, these problems are very difficult and quite important for discrete mathematics and mathematical cybernetics. Bibliography: 74 items.

  15. Making School Choice Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeArmond, Michael; Jochim, Ashley; Lake, Robin

    2014-01-01

    School choice is increasingly the new normal in urban education. But in cities with multiple public school options, how can civic leaders create a choice system that works for all families, whether they choose a charter or district public school? To answer this question, the Center on Reinventing Public Education (CRPE) researchers surveyed 4,000…

  16. Tense Choices in Citations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawes, Thomas; Thomas, Sarah

    1997-01-01

    Examines tense, aspect, and voice choices in the reporting verbs in a corpus of research articles from the "Journal of Psychosomatic Medicine." Investigates how such choices correlate with other syntactic elements in the citations, as well as with the discourse functions of the citations in their contexts. (TB)

  17. School Choice Marches forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    One year ago, the "Wall Street Journal" dubbed 2011 "the year of school choice," opining that "this year is shaping up as the best for reformers in a very long time." School-choice laws took great strides in 2011, both in the number of programs that succeeded across states and also in the size and scope of the adopted…

  18. Retirement Choice 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    retirement plans at their 15th year of service.1 Once the final selection is made, the choice is irrevocable. The two options are: 1. High-3 retirement...and examples to help servicemembers.2 We have used a different approach that many have found useful in evalu- ating these retirement choices .3 Here, we

  19. The Illusion of Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitty, Clyde

    2004-01-01

    Both New Labour and the Conservatives are keen to emphasise choice and diversity in crucial areas of public provision--and particularly with regard to education and health. In this article, "FORUM" co-Editor Clyde Chitty concentrates on recent proposals by the two main parties for promoting greater choice in secondary schooling in…

  20. Making Smart Food Choices

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Healthy Aging Making Smart Food Choices Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents Everyday ... NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Making Smart Food Choices To maintain a healthy weight, balance the calories ...

  1. California's Districts of Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronholz, June

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the results of a California state law established in 2010 that created "Districts of Choice." The District of Choice law was meant to encourage districts to compete for students by offering innovative programs and this-school-fits-my-child options that parents wanted. This designation meant that children from any…

  2. Children's Choices for 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Each year 12,500 school children from different regions of the United States read and vote on the newly published children's and young adults' trade books that they like best. The Children's Choices for 2008 list is the 34th in a series that first appeared as "Classroom Choices" in the November 1975 issue of "The Reading Teacher" (RT), a…

  3. More Choice, Less Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dills, Angela K.; Hernandez-Julian, Rey

    2011-01-01

    Previous research debates whether public school choice improves students' academic outcomes, but there is little examination of its effects on their nonacademic outcomes. We use data from a nationally representative sample of high school students, a previously developed Tiebout choice measure, and metropolitan-level data on teenage arrest rates to…

  4. Optical tomography with discretized path integral

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bingzhi; Tamaki, Toru; Kushida, Takahiro; Mukaigawa, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Hiroyuki; Raytchev, Bisser; Kaneda, Kazufumi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We present a framework for optical tomography based on a path integral. Instead of directly solving the radiative transport equations, which have been widely used in optical tomography, we use a path integral that has been developed for rendering participating media based on the volume rendering equation in computer graphics. For a discretized two-dimensional layered grid, we develop an algorithm to estimate the extinction coefficients of each voxel with an interior point method. Numerical simulation results are shown to demonstrate that the proposed method works well. PMID:26839903

  5. Optical tomography with discretized path integral.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bingzhi; Tamaki, Toru; Kushida, Takahiro; Mukaigawa, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Hiroyuki; Raytchev, Bisser; Kaneda, Kazufumi

    2015-07-01

    We present a framework for optical tomography based on a path integral. Instead of directly solving the radiative transport equations, which have been widely used in optical tomography, we use a path integral that has been developed for rendering participating media based on the volume rendering equation in computer graphics. For a discretized two-dimensional layered grid, we develop an algorithm to estimate the extinction coefficients of each voxel with an interior point method. Numerical simulation results are shown to demonstrate that the proposed method works well.

  6. Choice and reinforcement delay

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, G.D.; Marr, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies of choice between two delayed reinforcers have indicated that the relative immediacy of the reinforcer is a major determinant of the relative frequency of responding. Parallel studies of choice between two interresponse times have found exceptions to this generality. The present study looked at the choice by pigeons between two delays, one of which was always four times longer than the other, but whose absolute durations were varied across conditions. The results indicated that choice is not uniquely determined by the relative immediacy of reinforcement, but that absolute delays are also involved. Models for concurrent chained schedules appear to be more applicable to the present data than the matching relation; however, these too failed to predict choice for long delays.

  7. MEDICAL EXPENDITURE RISK AND HOUSEHOLD PORTFOLIO CHOICE

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Medical expenses are an increasingly important contributor to household financial risk. We examine the effect of medical expenditure risk on the willingness of Medicare beneficiaries to hold risky assets. Using a discrete factor maximum likelihood method to address the endogeneity of insurance choices, we find that having a moderately protective Medigap or employer supplemental policy increases risky asset holding by 7.1 percentage points relative to those without supplemental coverage, while participation in a highly protective Medicare HMO increases risky asset holding by 13.0 percentage points. Our results highlight an important link between the availability of health insurance and financial behavior. PMID:23997424

  8. Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The article gives ideas that lecturers of undergraduate Discrete Mathematics courses can use in order to make the subject more interesting for students and encourage them to undertake further studies in the subject. It is possible to teach Discrete Mathematics with little or no reference to computing. However, students are more likely to be…

  9. Uranus - Discrete Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This false-color Voyager picture of Uranus shows a discrete cloud seen as a bright streak near the planet's limb. The picture is a highly processed composite of three images obtained Jan. 14, 1986, when the spacecraft was 12.9 million kilometers (8.0 million miles) from the planet. The cloud visible here is the most prominent feature seen in a series of Voyager images designed to track atmospheric motions. (The occasional donut-shaped features, including one at the bottom, are shadows cast by dust in the camera optics; the processing necessary to bring out the faint features on the planet also brings out these camera blemishes.) Three separate images were shuttered through violet, blue and orange filters. Each color image showed the cloud to a different degree; because they were not exposed at exactly the same time, the images were processed to provide a correction for a good spatial match. In a true-color image, the cloud would be barely discernible; the false color helps bring out additional details. The different colors imply variations in vertical structure, but as yet is not possible to be specific about such differences. One possibility is that the Uranian atmosphere contains smog-like constituents, in which case some color differences may represent differences in how these molecules are distributed. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  10. Discreteness inducing coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Consider two species that diffuse through space. Consider further that they differ only in initial densities and, possibly, in diffusion constants. Otherwise they are identical. What happens if they compete with each other in the same environment? What is the influence of the discrete nature of the interactions on the final destination? And what are the influence of diffusion and additive fluctuations corresponding to random migration and immigration of individuals? This paper aims to answer these questions for a particular competition model that incorporates intra and interspecific competition between the species. Based on mean field theory, the model has a stationary state dependent on the initial density conditions. We investigate how this initial density dependence is affected by the presence of demographic multiplicative noise and additive noise in space and time. There are three main conclusions: (1) Additive noise favors denser populations at the expense of the less dense, ratifying the competitive exclusion principle. (2) Demographic noise, on the other hand, favors less dense populations at the expense of the denser ones, inducing equal densities at the quasi-stationary state, violating the aforementioned principle. (3) The slower species always suffers the more deleterious effects of statistical fluctuations in a homogeneous medium.

  11. PEER REVIEW FOR THE CONSUMER VEHICLE CHOICE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Transportation and Air Quality (OTAQ) has recently sponsored the development of a Consumer Vehicle Choice Model (CVCM) by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The specification by OTAQ to ORNL for consumer choice mod...

  12. Make Better Food Choices

    MedlinePlus

    10 tips Nutrition Education Series make better food choices 10 tips for women’s health Fruits Grains Dairy Vegetables Protein Make yourself a priority and take time to care for yourself. ChooseMyPlate. gov ...

  13. ANALYSIS OF A NUMERICAL SOLVER FOR RADIATIVE TRANSPORT EQUATION.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Zhao, Hongkai

    2013-01-01

    We analyze a numerical algorithm for solving radiative transport equation with vacuum or reflection boundary condition that was proposed in [4] with angular discretization by finite element method and spatial discretization by discontinuous Galerkin or finite difference method.

  14. Stellar photometry and astrometry with discrete point spread functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.

    2005-08-01

    The key features of the MATPHOT algorithm for precise and accurate stellar photometry and astrometry using discrete point spread functions (PSFs) are described. A discrete PSF is a sampled version of a continuous PSF, which describes the two-dimensional probability distribution of photons from a point source (star) just above the detector. The shape information about the photon scattering pattern of a discrete PSF is typically encoded using a numerical table (matrix) or an FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) image file. Discrete PSFs are shifted within an observational model using a 21-pixel-wide damped sinc function, and position-partial derivatives are computed using a five-point numerical differentiation formula. Precise and accurate stellar photometry and astrometry are achieved with undersampled CCD (charge-coupled device) observations by using supersampled discrete PSFs that are sampled two, three or more times more finely than the observational data. The precision and accuracy of the MATPHOT algorithm is demonstrated by using the C-language MPD code to analyse simulated CCD stellar observations; measured performance is compared with a theoretical performance model. Detailed analysis of simulated Next Generation Space Telescope observations demonstrate that millipixel relative astrometry and mmag photometric precision is achievable with complicated space-based discrete PSFs.

  15. Chaos in Periodic Discrete Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuming; Zhang, Lijuan; Yu, Panpan; Huang, Qiuling

    This paper focuses on chaos in periodic discrete systems, whose state space may vary with time. Some close relationships between some chaotic dynamical behaviors of a periodic discrete system and its autonomous induced system are given. Based on these relationships, several criteria of chaos are established and some sufficient conditions for no chaos are given for periodic discrete systems. Further, it is shown that a finite-dimensional linear periodic discrete system is not chaotic in the sense of Li-Yorke or Wiggins. In particular, an interesting problem of whether nonchaotic rules may generate a chaotic system is studied, with some examples provided, one of which surprisingly shows that a composition of globally asymptotically stable maps can be chaotic. In addition, some properties of sign pattern matrices of non-negative square matrices are given for convenience of the study.

  16. Microscopic derivation of discrete hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Anero, Jesús G; Zúñiga, Ignacio

    2009-12-28

    By using the standard theory of coarse graining based on Zwanzig's projection operator, we derive the dynamic equations for discrete hydrodynamic variables. These hydrodynamic variables are defined in terms of the Delaunay triangulation. The resulting microscopically derived equations can be understood, a posteriori, as a discretization on an arbitrary irregular grid of the Navier-Stokes equations. The microscopic derivation provides a set of discrete equations that exactly conserves mass, momentum, and energy and the dissipative part of the dynamics produces strict entropy increase. In addition, the microscopic derivation provides a practical implementation of thermal fluctuations in a way that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is satisfied exactly. This paper points toward a close connection between coarse-graining procedures from microscopic dynamics and discretization schemes for partial differential equations.

  17. Discrete solitons in graphene metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bludov, Yu. V.; Smirnova, D. A.; Kivshar, Yu. S.; Peres, N. M. R.; Vasilevskiy, M. I.

    2015-01-01

    We study nonlinear properties of multilayer metamaterials created by graphene sheets separated by dielectric layers. We demonstrate that such structures can support localized nonlinear modes described by the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation and that its solutions are associated with stable discrete plasmon solitons. We also analyze the nonlinear surface modes in truncated graphene metamaterials being a nonlinear analog of surface Tamm states.

  18. Concurrency and discrete event control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Much of discrete event control theory has been developed within the framework of automata and formal languages. An alternative approach inspired by the theories of process-algebra as developed in the computer science literature is presented. The framework, which rests on a new formalism of concurrency, can adequately handle nondeterminism and can be used for analysis of a wide range of discrete event phenomena.

  19. FK520 interacts with the discrete intrahelical amino acids of multidrug transporter Cdr1 protein and acts as antagonist to selectively chemosensitize azole-resistant clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Nim, Shweta; Rawal, Manpreet K; Prasad, Rajendra

    2014-06-01

    FK520, a homolog of antifungal FK506, displays fungicidal synergism with azoles in Candida albicans and inhibits drug efflux mediated by ABC multidrug transporter. This study establishes the molecular basis of interaction of FK520 with Cdr1 protein, which is one of the major ABC multidrug transporters of C. albicans. For this, we have exploited an in-house library of Cdr1 protein consisting of 252 mutant variants where the entire primary structure of the two transmembrane domains comprising of 12 transmembrane helices was subjected to alanine scanning. With these mutant variants of Cdr1 protein, we could identify the critical amino acids of the transporter protein, which if replaced with alanine, not only abrogated FK520-dependent competitive inhibition of drug efflux but simultaneously decreased susceptibility to azoles. Notably, the replacement of most of the residues with alanine was inconsequential; however, there were close to 13% mutant variants, which showed abrogation of drug efflux and reversal of fungicidal synergy with azoles. Of note, all the intrahelical residues of Cdr1 protein, which abrogated inhibitor's ability to block the efflux and reversed fungicidal synergy, were common. Taken together, our results provide evidence of cross-talk of FK520 with Cdr1 by interacting with the select intrahelical residues of the protein to chemosensitize isolates of Candida.

  20. Hyperbolic value addition and general models of animal choice.

    PubMed

    Mazur, J E

    2001-01-01

    Three mathematical models of choice--the contextual-choice model (R. Grace, 1994), delay-reduction theory (N. Squires & E. Fantino, 1971), and a new model called the hyperbolic value-added model--were compared in their ability to predict the results from a wide variety of experiments with animal subjects. When supplied with 2 or 3 free parameters, all 3 models made fairly accurate predictions for a large set of experiments that used concurrent-chain procedures. One advantage of the hyperbolic value-added model is that it is derived from a simpler model that makes accurate predictions for many experiments using discrete-trial adjusting-delay procedures. Some results favor the hyperbolic value-added model and delay-reduction theory over the contextual-choice model, but more data are needed from choice situations for which the models make distinctly different predictions.

  1. A general gridding, discretization, and coarsening methodology for modeling flow in porous formations with discrete geological features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi-Fard, M.; Durlofsky, L. J.

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive framework for modeling flow in porous media containing thin, discrete features, which could be high-permeability fractures or low-permeability deformation bands, is presented. The key steps of the methodology are mesh generation, fine-grid discretization, upscaling, and coarse-grid discretization. Our specialized gridding technique combines a set of intersecting triangulated surfaces by constructing approximate intersections using existing edges. This procedure creates a conforming mesh of all surfaces, which defines the internal boundaries for the volumetric mesh. The flow equations are discretized on this conforming fine mesh using an optimized two-point flux finite-volume approximation. The resulting discrete model is represented by a list of control-volumes with associated positions and pore-volumes, and a list of cell-to-cell connections with associated transmissibilities. Coarse models are then constructed by the aggregation of fine-grid cells, and the transmissibilities between adjacent coarse cells are obtained using flow-based upscaling procedures. Through appropriate computation of fracture-matrix transmissibilities, a dual-continuum representation is obtained on the coarse scale in regions with connected fracture networks. The fine and coarse discrete models generated within the framework are compatible with any connectivity-based simulator. The applicability of the methodology is illustrated for several two- and three-dimensional examples. In particular, we consider gas production from naturally fractured low-permeability formations, and transport through complex fracture networks. In all cases, highly accurate solutions are obtained with significant model reduction.

  2. Choice and conditioned reinforcement.

    PubMed Central

    Fantino, E; Freed, D; Preston, R A; Williams, W A

    1991-01-01

    A potential weakness of one formulation of delay-reduction theory is its failure to include a term for rate of conditioned reinforcement, that is, the rate at which the terminal-link stimuli occur in concurrent-chains schedules. The present studies assessed whether or not rate of conditioned reinforcement has an independent effect upon choice. Pigeons responded on either modified concurrent-chains schedules or on comparable concurrent-tandem schedules. The initial link was shortened on only one of two concurrent-chains schedules and on only one of two corresponding concurrent-tandem schedules. This manipulation increased rate of conditioned reinforcement sharply in the chain but not in the tandem schedule. According to a formulation of delay-reduction theory, when the outcomes chosen (the terminal links) are equal, as in Experiment 1, choice should depend only on rate of primary reinforcement; thus, choice should be equivalent for the tandem and chain schedules despite a large difference in rate of conditioned reinforcement. When the outcomes chosen are unequal, however, as in Experiment 2, choice should depend upon both rate of primary reinforcement and relative signaled delay reduction; thus, larger preferences should occur in the chain than in the tandem schedules. These predictions were confirmed, suggesting that increasing the rate of conditioned reinforcement on concurrent-chains schedules may have no independent effect on choice. PMID:2037826

  3. Fuel Assembly Calculations Using the Method of Discrete Ordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Pautz, Andreas; Langenbuch, Siegfried

    2005-02-15

    The discrete ordinates code DORT is employed to treat pin cell and fuel assembly configurations in two spatial dimensions. Despite DORT's restriction to regular (i.e., Cartesian) coordinates, we demonstrate its ability to calculate accurate pin power distributions and eigenvalues of typical reactor fuel lattices. Several numerical experiments have been performed to investigate the effects of spatial, angular, and energy discretization and to quantify their impact on the results. DORT is also used to homogenize and collapse cross-section sets within the framework of the coupled transport/burnup code system KENOREST.

  4. Probabilistic choice models in health-state valuation research: background, theories, assumptions and applications.

    PubMed

    Arons, Alexander M M; Krabbe, Paul F M

    2013-02-01

    Interest is rising in measuring subjective health outcomes, such as treatment outcomes that are not directly quantifiable (functional disability, symptoms, complaints, side effects and health-related quality of life). Health economists in particular have applied probabilistic choice models in the area of health evaluation. They increasingly use discrete choice models based on random utility theory to derive values for healthcare goods or services. Recent attempts have been made to use discrete choice models as an alternative method to derive values for health states. In this article, various probabilistic choice models are described according to their underlying theory. A historical overview traces their development and applications in diverse fields. The discussion highlights some theoretical and technical aspects of the choice models and their similarity and dissimilarity. The objective of the article is to elucidate the position of each model and their applications for health-state valuation.

  5. Investigating attribute non-attendance and its consequences in choice experiments with latent class models.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, Mylene

    2013-05-01

    A growing literature, mainly from transport and environment economics, has started to explore whether respondents violate some of the axioms about individuals' preferences in Discrete Choice Experiments (DCEs) and use simple strategies to make their choices. One of these strategies, termed attribute non-attendance (ANA), consists in ignoring one or more attributes. Using data from a DCE administered to healthcare providers in Ghana to evaluate their potential resistance to changes in clinical guidelines, this study illustrates how latent class models can be used in a step-wise approach to account for all possible ANA strategies used by respondents and explore the consequences of such behaviours. Results show that less than 3% of respondents considered all attributes when choosing between the two hypothetical scenarios proposed, with a majority looking at only one or two attributes. Accounting for ANA strategies improved the goodness-of-fit of the model and affected the magnitude of some of the coefficient and willingness-to-pay estimates. However, there was no difference in the predicted probabilities of the model taking into account ANA and the standard approach. Although the latter result is reassuring about the ability of DCEs to produce unbiased policy guidance, it should be confirmed by other studies.

  6. Discrete solitons in electromechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Syafwan, M; Susanto, H; Cox, S M

    2010-02-01

    We consider a particular type of parametrically driven discrete Klein-Gordon system describing microdevices and nanodevices, with integrated electrical and mechanical functionality. Using a multiscale expansion method we reduce the system to a discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Analytical and numerical calculations are performed to determine the existence and stability of fundamental bright and dark discrete solitons admitted by the Klein-Gordon system through the discrete Schrödinger equation. We show that a parametric driving can not only destabilize onsite bright solitons, but also stabilize intersite bright discrete solitons and onsite and intersite dark solitons. Most importantly, we show that there is a range of values of the driving coefficient for which dark solitons are stable, for any value of the coupling constant, i.e., oscillatory instabilities are totally suppressed. Stability windows of all the fundamental solitons are presented and approximations to the onset of instability are derived using perturbation theory, with accompanying numerical results. Numerical integrations of the Klein-Gordon equation are performed, confirming the relevance of our analysis.

  7. Distributed Relaxation for Conservative Discretizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2001-01-01

    A multigrid method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work that is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in one target-grid residual evaluation. The way to achieve this efficiency is the distributed relaxation approach. TME solvers employing distributed relaxation have already been demonstrated for nonconservative formulations of high-Reynolds-number viscous incompressible and subsonic compressible flow regimes. The purpose of this paper is to provide foundations for applications of distributed relaxation to conservative discretizations. A direct correspondence between the primitive variable interpolations for calculating fluxes in conservative finite-volume discretizations and stencils of the discretized derivatives in the nonconservative formulation has been established. Based on this correspondence, one can arrive at a conservative discretization which is very efficiently solved with a nonconservative relaxation scheme and this is demonstrated for conservative discretization of the quasi one-dimensional Euler equations. Formulations for both staggered and collocated grid arrangements are considered and extensions of the general procedure to multiple dimensions are discussed.

  8. Choices, Frameworks and Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Roy H.; Islam, Nayeem; Johnson, Ralph; Kougiouris, Panos; Madany, Peter

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for designing operating systems using object-oriented frameworks. A framework can be refined into subframeworks. Constraints specify the interactions between the subframeworks. We describe how we used object-oriented frameworks to design Choices, an object-oriented operating system.

  9. A Matter of Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vriend, John

    1973-01-01

    Since the goal of helping the client make wise decisions is at the core of counseling, it is suggested that existentialism as a state of mind may give the contemporary counselor an outlook most conducive to achieving that goal. The entire role of choice must be dealt with by the counselor in light of the reality of current events. (Author)

  10. Deterministic Walks with Choice

    SciTech Connect

    Beeler, Katy E.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Cooper, Joshua N.; Hunter, Meagan N.; Barr, Peter S.

    2014-01-10

    This paper studies deterministic movement over toroidal grids, integrating local information, bounded memory and choice at individual nodes. The research is motivated by recent work on deterministic random walks, and applications in multi-agent systems. Several results regarding passing tokens through toroidal grids are discussed, as well as some open questions.

  11. Project Choice: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, Kansas City, MO.

    Project Choice began with a simple goal: to increase the number of inner-city students who graduate from high school on time and become productive members of society. To that end, Ewing M. Kauffman, his Foundation, and associates designed and implemented a program that promised postsecondary education or training to some students in the Kansas…

  12. Choices, Not Circumstances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Div. of Instruction and Professional Development.

    Following a brief account of the circumstances of migrant workers and the status of migrant education in the United States, this pamphlet describes how the National Education Association (NEA) has impacted and will continue to impact the process of providing educational choices for migrant students. The NEA has consistently testified before…

  13. Too Few Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Meg

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author, who is a scientist, a wife and a mother of two preschool children talks about how these two roles exerted a disproportionate impact on her career choices. She is also an X-Gal, one of a group of nine female biologists who have banded together to offer one another advice and support as they seek careers in academic…

  14. The Choice for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Scott

    2006-01-01

    We are building conventional library space without making the paradigm shift our digital environment requires. The chief obstacles to change lie in our conception of readers as information consumers, in our allegiance to library operations as the drivers of library design, and in the choice made between foundational and non-foundational views of…

  15. Children's Choices for 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents 103 titles for the 2003 Children's Choice grouped by reading levels: beginning, young, intermediate, and advanced readers. Provides the title, author, illustrator, publisher, ISBN, and price for each title as well as a brief annotation prepared by a review team. (SG)

  16. Discrete Element Modelling of Floating Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffey, Samantha; Liang, Qiuhua; Parkin, Geoff; Large, Andy; Rouainia, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Flash flooding is characterised by high velocity flows which impact vulnerable catchments with little warning time and as such, result in complex flow dynamics which are difficult to replicate through modelling. The impacts of flash flooding can be made yet more severe by the transport of both natural and anthropogenic debris, ranging from tree trunks to vehicles, wheelie bins and even storage containers, the effects of which have been clearly evident during recent UK flooding. This cargo of debris can have wide reaching effects and result in actual flood impacts which diverge from those predicted. A build-up of debris may lead to partial channel blockage and potential flow rerouting through urban centres. Build-up at bridges and river structures also leads to increased hydraulic loading which may result in damage and possible structural failure. Predicting the impacts of debris transport; however, is difficult as conventional hydrodynamic modelling schemes do not intrinsically include floating debris within their calculations. Subsequently a new tool has been developed using an emerging approach, which incorporates debris transport through the coupling of two existing modelling techniques. A 1D hydrodynamic modelling scheme has here been coupled with a 2D discrete element scheme to form a new modelling tool which predicts the motion and flow-interaction of floating debris. Hydraulic forces arising from flow around the object are applied to instigate its motion. Likewise, an equivalent opposing force is applied to fluid cells, enabling backwater effects to be simulated. Shock capturing capabilities make the tool applicable to predicting the complex flow dynamics associated with flash flooding. The modelling scheme has been applied to experimental case studies where cylindrical wooden dowels are transported by a dam-break wave. These case studies enable validation of the tool's shock capturing capabilities and the coupling technique applied between the two numerical

  17. Alternative fuels and vehicles choice model

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the theory and implementation of a model of alternative fuel and vehicle choice (AFVC), designed for use with the US Department of Energy`s Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). The AFTM is a static equilibrium model of the world supply and demand for liquid fuels, encompassing resource production, conversion processes, transportation, and consumption. The AFTM also includes fuel-switching behavior by incorporating multinomial logit-type equations for choice of alternative fuel vehicles and alternative fuels. This allows the model to solve for market shares of vehicles and fuels, as well as for fuel prices and quantities. The AFVC model includes fuel-flexible, bi-fuel, and dedicated fuel vehicles. For multi-fuel vehicles, the choice of fuel is subsumed within the vehicle choice framework, resulting in a nested multinomial logit design. The nesting is shown to be required by the different price elasticities of fuel and vehicle choice. A unique feature of the AFVC is that its parameters are derived directly from the characteristics of alternative fuels and vehicle technologies, together with a few key assumptions about consumer behavior. This not only establishes a direct link between assumptions and model predictions, but facilitates sensitivity testing, as well. The implementation of the AFVC model as a spreadsheet is also described.

  18. Integrable structure in discrete shell membrane theory

    PubMed Central

    Schief, W. K.

    2014-01-01

    We present natural discrete analogues of two integrable classes of shell membranes. By construction, these discrete shell membranes are in equilibrium with respect to suitably chosen internal stresses and external forces. The integrability of the underlying equilibrium equations is proved by relating the geometry of the discrete shell membranes to discrete O surface theory. We establish connections with generalized barycentric coordinates and nine-point centres and identify a discrete version of the classical Gauss equation of surface theory. PMID:24808755

  19. Discretization errors in particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmon, G.; Mamman, N.; Feingold, M.

    2007-03-01

    High precision video tracking of microscopic particles is limited by systematic and random errors. Systematic errors are partly due to the discretization process both in position and in intensity. We study the behavior of such errors in a simple tracking algorithm designed for the case of symmetric particles. This symmetry algorithm uses interpolation to estimate the value of the intensity at arbitrary points in the image plane. We show that the discretization error is composed of two parts: (1) the error due to the discretization of the intensity, bD and (2) that due to interpolation, bI. While bD behaves asymptotically like N-1 where N is the number of intensity gray levels, bI is small when using cubic spline interpolation.

  20. Spin flip of multiqubit states in discrete phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, K.; Raghavan, G.

    2017-02-01

    Time reversal and spin flip are discrete symmetry operations of substantial importance to quantum information and quantum computation. Spin flip arises in the context of separability, quantification of entanglement and the construction of universal NOT gates. The present work investigates the relationship between the quantum state of a multiqubit system represented by the discrete Wigner function (DWFs) and its spin-flipped counterpart. The two are shown to be related through a Hadamard matrix that is independent of the choice of the quantum net used for the tomographic reconstruction of the DWF. These results are of interest to cases involving the direct tomographic reconstruction of the DWF from experimental data, and in the analysis of entanglement related properties purely in terms of the DWF.

  1. Discrete cloud structure on Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammel, H. B.

    1989-01-01

    Recent CCD imaging data for the discrete cloud structure of Neptune shows that while cloud features at CH4-band wavelengths are manifest in the southern hemisphere, they have not been encountered in the northern hemisphere since 1986. A literature search has shown the reflected CH4-band light from the planet to have come from a single discrete feature at least twice in the last 10 years. Disk-integrated photometry derived from the imaging has demonstrated that a bright cloud feature was responsible for the observed 8900 A diurnal variation in 1986 and 1987.

  2. Instructing Individuals to Deliver Discrete-Trials Teaching to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Kendra; Martin, Garry L.; Arnal, Lindsay; Fazzio, Daniela; Yu, C. T.

    2009-01-01

    Early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI) has been identified as the treatment of choice for children with autism spectrum disorders. A common strategy for conducting EIBI is discrete-trials teaching (DTT). There is a demand for research-based, economical, rapid training techniques to teach tutors and parents of children with autism to…

  3. Retirement Choice: 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Retirement Choice: 2010 Aline Quester • Lewis G. Lee • Anita Hattiangadi • Robert Shuford CRM D0022180.A1/Final March 2010 Report Documentation Page...824-2123. Copyright  2010 CNA Approved for distribution: March 2010 Anita Hattiangadi Marine Corps Manpower Team Resource Analysis Division Contents...several CNA col- leagues: Gerald Cox, Donald Cymrot, Michael Hansen, and Ann Par- cell. Kathleen Utgoff (former Director of the Pension Benefit

  4. 2014 Retirement Choices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    transferred from another branch of the military. It is called Date of Entry into Armed Forces ( DEAF ), Date of Initial Entry to Military Service...to compensate for inflation (cost-of-living adjustment, or COLA) at the Consumer Price Index (CPI) rate minus 1 percent. Under the High-3 option, a...compensate for the full value of inflation (cost-of-living adjustment) at the CPI rate . 5 Both retirement choices have the following features

  5. On reevaluation rate in discrete time Hogg-Huberman model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toshijiro; Shibata, Junko; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2002-06-01

    The discrete time Hogg-Huberman model is extended to a case with time-dependent reevaluation rate at which agents using one resource decide to evaluate their resource choice. In this paper the time dependence of the reevaluation rate is determined by states of the system. The dynamical behavior of the extended Hogg-Huberman model is discussed. It is found that the change of fraction of agents using resource 1 is suppressed to be smaller than that in the case of constant reevaluation rate.

  6. Discrete tomography in neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuba, Attila; Rodek, Lajos; Kiss, Zoltán; Ruskó, László; Nagy, Antal; Balaskó, Márton

    2005-04-01

    Discrete tomography (DT) is an imaging technique for reconstructing discrete images from their projections using the knowledge that the object to be reconstructed contains only a few homogeneous materials characterized by known discrete absorption values. One of the main reasons for applying DT is that we will hopefully require relatively few projections. Using discreteness and some a priori information (such as an approximate shape of the object) we can apply two DT methods in neutron imaging by reducing the problem to an optimization task. The first method is a special one because it is only suitable if the object is composed of cylinders and sphere shapes. The second method is a general one in the sense that it can be used for reconstructing objects of any shape. Software was developed and physical experiments performed in order to investigate the effects of several reconstruction parameters: the number of projections, noise levels, and complexity of the object to be reconstructed. We give a summary of the experimental results and make a comparison of the results obtained using a classical reconstruction technique (FBP). The programs we developed are available in our DT reconstruction program package DIRECT.

  7. Police Discretion: A Selected Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenner, Robert N.; Kravitz, Marjorie

    This bibliography was compiled with two goals. The first goal is to provide police administrators and officers with an overview of the issues involved in developing guidelines for police discretion and a discussion of the options available. The second goal is to demonstrate the need for continuing dialogue and interaction between lawmakers, law…

  8. COMPARISON OF THE ACCURACY OF VARIOUS SPATIAL DISCRETIZATION SCHEMES OF THE DISCRETE ORDINATES EQUATIONS IN 2D CARTESIAN GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Schunert; Yousry Y. Azmy; Damien Fournier

    2011-05-01

    We present a comprehensive error estimation of four spatial discretization schemes of the two-dimensional Discrete Ordinates (SN) equations on Cartesian grids utilizing a Method of Manufactured Solution (MMS) benchmark suite based on variants of Larsen’s benchmark featuring different orders of smoothness of the underlying exact solution. The considered spatial discretization schemes include the arbitrarily high order transport methods of the nodal (AHOTN) and characteristic (AHOTC) types, the discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element method (DGFEM) and the recently proposed higher order diamond difference method (HODD) of spatial expansion orders 0 through 3. While AHOTN and AHOTC rely on approximate analytical solutions of the transport equation within a mesh cell, DGFEM and HODD utilize a polynomial expansion to mimick the angular flux profile across each mesh cell. Intuitively, due to the higher degree of analyticity, we expect AHOTN and AHOTC to feature superior accuracy compared with DGFEM and HODD, but at the price of potentially longer grind times and numerical instabilities. The latter disadvantages can result from the presence of exponential terms evaluated at the cell optical thickness that arise from the semianalytical solution process. This work quantifies the order of accuracy and the magnitude of the error of all four discretization methods for different optical thicknesses, scattering ratios and degrees of smoothness of the underlying exact solutions in order to verify or contradict the aforementioned intuitive expectation.

  9. Diet Choices to Prevent Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional ...

  10. The malleability of intertemporal choice

    PubMed Central

    Lempert, Karolina M.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Intertemporal choices are ubiquitous: people often have to choose between outcomes realized at different times. Although it is generally believed that people have stable tendencies toward being impulsive or patient, an emerging body of evidence indicates that intertemporal choice is malleable and can be profoundly influenced by context. How the choice is framed, or the state of the decision-maker at the time of choice, can induce a shift in preference. Framing effects are underpinned by: allocation of attention to choice attributes, reference-dependence and time construal. Incidental affective states and prospection also influence intertemporal choice. We advocate that intertemporal choice models account for these context effects, and encourage the use of this knowledge to nudge people toward making more advantageous choices. PMID:26483153

  11. School Choice. Trends and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadderman, Margaret, Comp.

    This document examines many of the issues surrounding school choice. It summarizes the prevalence of school choice and touches on elements of the debate, such as the dilemma in finding the right balance between individual/family freedom and the interests of the community. In looking at school-choice options, the paper divides them into…

  12. Dynamics of Choice: A Tutorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Choice may be defined as the allocation of behavior among activities. Since all activities take up time, choice is conveniently thought of as the allocation of time among activities, even if activities like pecking are most easily measured by counting. Since dynamics refers to change through time, the dynamics of choice refers to change of…

  13. Student Curriculum Choice and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Norris

    This study investigated changes in student curriculum choice at Seminole Junior College (Florida) A code system was developed for 72 curriculum choices (23 in terminal degree areas), grouped into 19 broad clusters. A computerized Student Flow Matrix was then constructed to display the first and second term curriculum choices of 1,391 students who…

  14. Overconfidence and Career Choice

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Jonathan F.; Thöni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    People self-assess their relative ability when making career choices. Thus, confidence in their own abilities is likely an important factor for selection into various career paths. In a sample of 711 first-year students we examine whether there are systematic differences in confidence levels across fields of study. We find that our experimental confidence measures significantly vary between fields of study: While students in business related academic disciplines (Political Science, Law, Economics, and Business Administration) exhibit the highest confidence levels, students of Humanities range at the other end of the scale. This may have important implications for subsequent earnings and professions students select themselves in. PMID:26808273

  15. Overconfidence and Career Choice.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Jonathan F; Thöni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    People self-assess their relative ability when making career choices. Thus, confidence in their own abilities is likely an important factor for selection into various career paths. In a sample of 711 first-year students we examine whether there are systematic differences in confidence levels across fields of study. We find that our experimental confidence measures significantly vary between fields of study: While students in business related academic disciplines (Political Science, Law, Economics, and Business Administration) exhibit the highest confidence levels, students of Humanities range at the other end of the scale. This may have important implications for subsequent earnings and professions students select themselves in.

  16. Nonlinear Socio-Ecological Dynamics and First Principles ofCollective Choice Behavior of ``Homo Socialis"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonis, M.

    Socio-ecological dynamics emerged from the field of Mathematical SocialSciences and opened up avenues for re-examination of classical problems of collective behavior in Social and Spatial sciences. The ``engine" of this collective behavior is the subjective mental evaluation of level of utilities in the future, presenting sets of composite socio-economic-temporal-locational advantages. These dynamics present new laws of collective multi-population behavior which are the meso-level counterparts of the utility optimization individual behavior. The central core of the socio-ecological choice dynamics includes the following first principle of the collective choice behavior of ``Homo Socialis" based on the existence of ``collective consciousness": the choice behavior of ``Homo Socialis" is a collective meso-level choice behavior such that the relative changes in choice frequencies depend on the distribution of innovation alternatives between adopters of innovations. The mathematical basis of the Socio-Ecological Dynamics includes two complementary analytical approaches both based on the use of computer modeling as a theoretical and simulation tool. First approach is the ``continuous approach" --- the systems of ordinary and partial differential equations reflecting the continuous time Volterra ecological formalism in a form of antagonistic and/or cooperative collective hyper-games between different sub-sets of choice alternatives. Second approach is the ``discrete approach" --- systems of difference equations presenting a new branch of the non-linear discrete dynamics --- the Discrete Relative m-population/n-innovations Socio-Spatial Dynamics (Dendrinos and Sonis, 1990). The generalization of the Volterra formalism leads further to the meso-level variational principle of collective choice behavior determining the balance between the resulting cumulative social spatio-temporal interactions among the population of adopters susceptible to the choice alternatives and the

  17. Spatial data discretization methods for geocomputation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Feng; Ge, Yong; Wang, Jinfeng

    2014-02-01

    Geocomputation provides solutions to complex geographic problems. Continuous and discrete spatial data are involved in the geocomputational process; however, geocomputational methods for discrete spatial data cannot be directly applied to continuous or mixed spatial data. Therefore, discretization methods for continuous or mixed spatial data are involved in the process. Since spatial data has spatial features, such as association, heterogeneity and spatial structure, these features cannot be handled by traditional discretization methods. Therefore, this work develops feature-based spatial data discretization methods that achieve optimal discretization results for spatial data using spatial information implicit in those features. Two discretization methods considering the features of spatial data are presented. One is an unsupervised method considering autocorrelation of spatial data and the other is a supervised method considering spatial heterogeneity. Discretization processes of the two methods are exemplified using neural tube defects (NTD) for Heshun County in Shanxi Province, China. Effectiveness is also assessed.

  18. Systoles in discrete dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sara; Grácio, Clara; Ramos, Carlos Correia

    2013-01-01

    The fruitful relationship between Geometry and Graph Theory has been explored by several authors benefiting also the Theory of discrete dynamical systems seen as Markov chains in graphs. In this work we will further explore the relation between these areas, giving a geometrical interpretation of notions from dynamical systems. In particular, we relate the topological entropy with the systole, here defined in the context of discrete dynamical systems. We show that for continuous interval maps the systole is trivial; however, for the class of interval maps with one discontinuity point the systole acquires relevance from the point of view of the dynamical behavior. Moreover, we define the geodesic length spectrum associated to a Markov interval map and we compute the referred spectrum in several examples.

  19. Dark Energy from Discrete Spacetime

    PubMed Central

    Trout, Aaron D.

    2013-01-01

    Dark energy accounts for most of the matter-energy content of our universe, yet current theories of its origin rely on radical physical assumptions such as the holographic principle or controversial anthropic arguments. We give a better motivated explanation for dark energy, claiming that it arises from a small negative scalar-curvature present even in empty spacetime. The vacuum has this curvature because spacetime is fundamentally discrete and there are more ways for a discrete geometry to have negative curvature than positive. We explicitly compute this effect using a variant of the well known dynamical-triangulations (DT) model for quantum gravity. Our model predicts a time-varying non-zero cosmological constant with a current value, in natural units, in agreement with observation. This calculation is made possible by a novel characterization of the possible DT action values combined with numerical evidence concerning their degeneracies. PMID:24312502

  20. Dark energy from discrete spacetime.

    PubMed

    Trout, Aaron D

    2013-01-01

    Dark energy accounts for most of the matter-energy content of our universe, yet current theories of its origin rely on radical physical assumptions such as the holographic principle or controversial anthropic arguments. We give a better motivated explanation for dark energy, claiming that it arises from a small negative scalar-curvature present even in empty spacetime. The vacuum has this curvature because spacetime is fundamentally discrete and there are more ways for a discrete geometry to have negative curvature than positive. We explicitly compute this effect using a variant of the well known dynamical-triangulations (DT) model for quantum gravity. Our model predicts a time-varying non-zero cosmological constant with a current value, [Formula: see text] in natural units, in agreement with observation. This calculation is made possible by a novel characterization of the possible DT action values combined with numerical evidence concerning their degeneracies.

  1. Observability of discretized partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, Stephen E.; Dee, Dick P.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that complete observability of the discrete model used to assimilate data from a linear partial differential equation (PDE) system is necessary and sufficient for asymptotic stability of the data assimilation process. The observability theory for discrete systems is reviewed and applied to obtain simple observability tests for discretized constant-coefficient PDEs. Examples are used to show how numerical dispersion can result in discrete dynamics with multiple eigenvalues, thereby detracting from observability.

  2. Variation, Repetition, And Choice

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Rodrigues, Josele; Lattal, Kennon A; dos Santos, Cristiano V; Matos, Ricardo A

    2005-01-01

    Experiment 1 investigated the controlling properties of variability contingencies on choice between repeated and variable responding. Pigeons were exposed to concurrent-chains schedules with two alternatives. In the REPEAT alternative, reinforcers in the terminal link depended on a single sequence of four responses. In the VARY alternative, a response sequence in the terminal link was reinforced only if it differed from the n previous sequences (lag criterion). The REPEAT contingency generated low, constant levels of sequence variation whereas the VARY contingency produced levels of sequence variation that increased with the lag criterion. Preference for the REPEAT alternative tended to increase directly with the degree of variation required for reinforcement. Experiment 2 examined the potential confounding effects in Experiment 1 of immediacy of reinforcement by yoking the interreinforcer intervals in the REPEAT alternative to those in the VARY alternative. Again, preference for REPEAT was a function of the lag criterion. Choice between varying and repeating behavior is discussed with respect to obtained behavioral variability, probability of reinforcement, delay of reinforcement, and switching within a sequence. PMID:15828592

  3. Long-time behavior of a finite volume discretization for a fourth order diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Jan; Matthes, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a non-standard finite-volume discretization of a strongly non-linear fourth order diffusion equation on the d-dimensional cube, for arbitrary d≥slant 1 . The scheme preserves two important structural properties of the equation: the first is the interpretation as a gradient flow in a mass transportation metric, and the second is an intimate relation to a linear Fokker-Planck equation. Thanks to these structural properties, the scheme possesses two discrete Lyapunov functionals. These functionals approximate the entropy and the Fisher information, respectively, and their dissipation rates converge to the optimal ones in the discrete-to-continuous limit. Using the dissipation, we derive estimates on the long-time asymptotics of the discrete solutions. Finally, we present results from numerical experiments which indicate that our discretization is able to capture significant features of the complex original dynamics, even with a rather coarse spatial resolution.

  4. Umbral Deformations on Discrete SPACE TIME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachos, Cosmas K.

    Given a minimum measurable length underlying spacetime, the latter may be effectively regarded as discrete, at scales of order the Planck length. A systematic discretization of continuum physics may be effected most efficiently through the umbral deformation. General functionals yielding such deformations at the level of solutions are furnished and illustrated, and broad features of discrete oscillations and wave propagation are outlined.

  5. Application of the discrete ordinates method to compute radiant heat loss in a diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, J.; Magi, V.

    1997-05-09

    A three-dimensional model for computing flows, sprays, and combustion in internal combustion engines is modified to include radiant heat loss. Radiant heat loss is computed by solving the radiative transport equation using a discrete ordinates approximation method. Such a method solves the radiative transport equation for a set of discrete directions spanning the range of 4{pi} solid angle. Angular integrals of intensity are discretized by numerical quadrature. The resulting discrete ordinates equations are numerically solved by using a finite volume approach in contravariant formulation. Computations are made with and without radiant heat loss in a diesel engine, and the effects of the radiant heat loss on the computed temperature and NO and soot concentrations are discussed. Inclusion of radiant heat loss reduces the peak temperature by about 10%. As a result, the predicted frozen NO concentrations are found to be lowered. However, the soot concentrations are not significantly altered.

  6. Incorporating social impact on new product adoption in choice modeing: A case study in green vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lin; Wang, Mingxian; Chen, Wei; Conzelmann, Guenter

    2014-10-01

    While discrete choice analysis is prevalent in capturing consumer preferences and describing their choice behaviors in product design, the traditional choice modeling approach assumes that each individual makes independent decisions, without considering the social impact. However, empirical studies show that choice is social - influenced by many factors beyond engineering performance of a product and consumer attributes. To alleviate this limitation, we propose a new choice modeling framework to capture the dynamic influence from social networks on consumer adoption of new products. By introducing social influence attributes into a choice utility function, social network simulation is integrated with the traditional discrete choice analysis in a three-stage process. Our study shows the need for considering social impact in forecasting new product adoption. Using hybrid electric vehicles as an example, our work illustrates the procedure of social network construction, social influence evaluation, and choice model estimation based on data from the National Household Travel Survey. Our study also demonstrates several interesting findings on the dynamic nature of new technology adoption and how social networks may influence hybrid electric vehicle adoption. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

  7. Genetic Algorithms for Multiple-Choice Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-04-01

    This thesis investigates the use of problem-specific knowledge to enhance a genetic algorithm approach to multiple-choice optimisation problems.It shows that such information can significantly enhance performance, but that the choice of information and the way it is included are important factors for success.Two multiple-choice problems are considered.The first is constructing a feasible nurse roster that considers as many requests as possible.In the second problem, shops are allocated to locations in a mall subject to constraints and maximising the overall income.Genetic algorithms are chosen for their well-known robustness and ability to solve large and complex discrete optimisation problems.However, a survey of the literature reveals room for further research into generic ways to include constraints into a genetic algorithm framework.Hence, the main theme of this work is to balance feasibility and cost of solutions.In particular, co-operative co-evolution with hierarchical sub-populations, problem structure exploiting repair schemes and indirect genetic algorithms with self-adjusting decoder functions are identified as promising approaches.The research starts by applying standard genetic algorithms to the problems and explaining the failure of such approaches due to epistasis.To overcome this, problem-specific information is added in a variety of ways, some of which are designed to increase the number of feasible solutions found whilst others are intended to improve the quality of such solutions.As well as a theoretical discussion as to the underlying reasons for using each operator,extensive computational experiments are carried out on a variety of data.These show that the indirect approach relies less on problem structure and hence is easier to implement and superior in solution quality.

  8. Multipulses in discrete Hamiltonian nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Kevrekidis, P G

    2001-08-01

    In this work, the behavior of multipulses in discrete Hamiltonian nonlinear systems is investigated. The discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation is used as the benchmark system for this study. A singular perturbation methodology as well as a variational approach are implemented in order to identify the dominant factors in the discrete problem. The results of the two methodologies are shown to coincide in assessing the interplay of discreteness and exponential tail-tail pulse interaction. They also allow one to understand why, contrary to what is believed for their continuum siblings, discrete systems can sustain (static) multipulse configurations, a conclusion that is subsequently verified by numerical experiment.

  9. A copula-based closed-form binary logit choice model for accommodating spatial correlation across observational units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Chandra R.; Sener, Ipek N.

    2009-09-01

    This study focuses on accommodating spatial dependency in data indexed by geographic location. In particular, the emphasis is on accommodating spatial error correlation across observational units in binary discrete choice models. We propose a copula-based approach to spatial dependence modeling based on a spatial logit structure rather than a spatial probit structure. In this approach, the dependence between the logistic error terms of different observational units is directly accommodated using a multivariate logistic distribution based on the Farlie-Gumbel-Morgenstein (FGM) copula. The approach represents a simple and powerful technique that results in a closed-form analytic expression for the joint probability of choice across observational units, and is straightforward to apply using a standard and direct maximum likelihood inference procedure. There is no simulation machinery involved, leading to substantial computation gains relative to current methods to address spatial correlation. The approach is applied to teenagers’ physical activity participation levels, a subject of considerable interest in the public health, transportation, sociology, and adolescence development fields. The results indicate that failing to accommodate heteroscedasticity and spatial correlation can lead to inconsistent and inefficient parameter estimates, as well as incorrect conclusions regarding the elasticity effects of exogenous variables.

  10. A unified framework for modeling landscape evolution by discrete flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelef, Eitan; Hilley, George E.

    2016-05-01

    Topographic features such as branched valley networks and undissected convex-up hillslopes are observed in disparate physical environments. In some cases, these features are formed by sediment transport processes that occur discretely in space and time, while in others, by transport processes that are uniformly distributed across the landscape. This paper presents an analytical framework that reconciles the basic attributes of such sediment transport processes with the topographic features that they form and casts those in terms that are likely common to different physical environments. In this framework, temporal changes in surface elevation reflect the frequency with which the landscape is traversed by geophysical flows generated discretely in time and space. This frequency depends on the distance to which flows travel downslope, which depends on the dynamics of individual flows, the lithologic and topographic properties of the underlying substrate, and the coevolution of topography, erosion, and the routing of flows over the topographic surface. To explore this framework, we postulate simple formulations for sediment transport and flow runout distance and demonstrate that the conditions for hillslope and channel network formation can be cast in terms of fundamental parameters such as distance from drainage divide and a friction-like coefficient that describes a flow's resistance to motion. The framework we propose is intentionally general, but the postulated formulas can be substituted with those that aim to describe a specific process and to capture variations in the size distribution of such flow events.

  11. An analytical thermohydraulic model for discretely fractured geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Don B.; Koch, Donald L.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    2016-09-01

    In discretely fractured reservoirs such as those found in Enhanced/Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS), knowledge of the fracture network is important in understanding the thermal hydraulics, i.e., how the fluid flows and the resulting temporal evolution of the subsurface temperature. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical model of the fluid flow and heat transport in a discretely fractured network that can be used for a wide range of modeling applications and serve as an alternative analysis tool to more computationally intensive numerical codes. Given the connectivity and structure of a fracture network, the flow in the system was solved using a linear system of algebraic equations for the pressure at the nodes of the network. With the flow determined, the temperature in the fracture was solved by coupling convective heat transport in the fracture with one-dimensional heat conduction perpendicular to the fracture, employing the Green's function derived solution for a single discrete fracture. The predicted temperatures along the fracture surfaces from the analytical solution were compared to numerical simulations using the TOUGH2 reservoir code. Through two case studies, we showed the capabilities of the analytical model and explored the effect of uncertainty in the fracture apertures and network structure on thermal performance. While both sources of uncertainty independently produce large variations in production temperature, uncertainty in the network structure, whenever present, had a predominant influence on thermal performance.

  12. Invariants of broken discrete symmetries.

    PubMed

    Kalozoumis, P A; Morfonios, C; Diakonos, F K; Schmelcher, P

    2014-08-01

    The parity and Bloch theorems are generalized to the case of broken global symmetry. Local inversion or translation symmetries in one dimension are shown to yield invariant currents that characterize wave propagation. These currents map the wave function from an arbitrary spatial domain to any symmetry-related domain. Our approach addresses any combination of local symmetries, thus applying, in particular, to acoustic, optical, and matter waves. Nonvanishing values of the invariant currents provide a systematic pathway to the breaking of discrete global symmetries.

  13. Invariants of Broken Discrete Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalozoumis, P. A.; Morfonios, C.; Diakonos, F. K.; Schmelcher, P.

    2014-08-01

    The parity and Bloch theorems are generalized to the case of broken global symmetry. Local inversion or translation symmetries in one dimension are shown to yield invariant currents that characterize wave propagation. These currents map the wave function from an arbitrary spatial domain to any symmetry-related domain. Our approach addresses any combination of local symmetries, thus applying, in particular, to acoustic, optical, and matter waves. Nonvanishing values of the invariant currents provide a systematic pathway to the breaking of discrete global symmetries.

  14. An Empirical Investigation of Occupational Choice and Human Capital Accumulation at Mid-Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xue, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Individual variation in labor supply can arise from more than just a choice among discrete occupation groups, especially given the joint process of wage determination and time allocation. Other factors can include differential preferences for earnings, the time length of work and other related occupational attributes. Using data from the Wisconsin…

  15. Multiple-Choice versus Constructed-Response Tests in the Assessment of Mathematics Computation Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadalla, Tahany M.

    The equivalence of multiple-choice (MC) and constructed response (discrete) (CR-D) response formats as applied to mathematics computation at grade levels two to six was tested. The difference between total scores from the two response formats was tested for statistical significance, and the factor structure of items in both response formats was…

  16. 76 FR 29135 - National Defense Transportation Day and National Transportation Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... respond to crises or natural disasters at home and abroad with urgency. Maintaining the transportation...-efficient, more environmentally sustainable, and offers more transportation choices to our citizens than...

  17. Alternative reinforcer response cost impacts methamphetamine choice in humans.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J Adam; Stoops, William W; Rush, Craig R

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine use disorders are a persistent public health concern. Behavioral treatments have demonstrated that providing access to non-drug alternative reinforcers reduces methamphetamine use. The purpose of this human laboratory experiment was to determine how changes in response cost for non-drug alternative reinforcers influenced methamphetamine choice. Seven subjects with past year histories of recreational stimulant use completed a placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind protocol in which they first sampled doses of oral methamphetamine (0, 8 or 16 mg) and completed a battery of subject-rated and physiological measures. During subsequent sessions, subjects then made eight discrete choices between 1/8th of the sampled dose and an alternative reinforcer ($0.25). The response cost to earn a methamphetamine dose was always 500 responses (FR500). The response cost for the alternative reinforcer varied across sessions (FR500, FR1000, FR2000, FR3000). Methamphetamine functioned as a positive reinforcer and produced prototypical stimulant-like effects (e.g., elevated blood pressure, increased ratings of Stimulated). Choice for doses over money was sensitive to changes in response cost for alternative reinforcers in that more doses were taken at higher FR values than at lower FR values. Placebo choices changed as a function of alternative reinforcer response cost to a greater degree than active methamphetamine choices. These findings suggest that manipulating the effort necessary to earn alternative reinforcers could impact methamphetamine use.

  18. Connecting cognition and consumer choice.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Daniel M; Johnson, Eric J

    2015-02-01

    We describe what can be gained from connecting cognition and consumer choice by discussing two contexts ripe for interaction between the two fields. The first-context effects on choice-has already been addressed by cognitive science yielding insights about cognitive process but there is promise for more interaction. The second is learning and representation in choice where relevant theories in cognitive science could be informed by consumer choice, and in return, could pose and answer new questions. We conclude by discussing how these two fields of research stand to benefit from more interaction, citing examples of how interfaces of cognitive science with other fields have been illuminating for theories of cognition.

  19. Parental Voucher Enrollment Decisions: Choice within Choice in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beabout, Brian R.; Cambre, Belinda M.

    2013-01-01

    Set in the context of a choice-saturated public school system, this study examines the school choice process of low-income parents who participated in Louisiana's 2008 voucher program. Based on semistructured interviews with 16 parents at 1 Catholic school, we report that spirituality, small class and school size, character/values, familiarity,…

  20. Introduction: What Will Be the Supreme Court's Choice on Choice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces article by Kemerer that takes issue with the conclusions reached by Elizabeth and Andrew Lugg in their article entitled "Vouchers as School Choice: An Analysis of 'Jackson v. Benson': The Milwaukee Parental Choice Program" in the April 2000 issue of "The Journal of Law and Education." (PKP)

  1. Discrete particle noise in a nonlinearly saturated plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Lee, W. W.

    2006-04-01

    Understanding discrete particle noise in an equilibrium plasma has been an important topic since the early days of particle-in- cell (PIC) simulation [1]. In this paper, particle noise in a nonlinearly saturated system is investigated. We investigate the usefulness of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT) in a regime where drift instabilities are nonlinearly saturated. We obtain excellent agreement between the simulation results and our theoretical predictions of the noise properties. It is found that discrete particle noise always enhances the particle and thermal transport in the plasma, in agreement with the second law of thermodynamics. [1] C.K. Birdsall and A.B. Langdon, Plasma Physics via Computer Simulation, McGraw-Hill, New York (1985).

  2. Supervised Discrete Hashing With Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Gui, Jie; Liu, Tongliang; Sun, Zhenan; Tao, Dacheng; Tan, Tieniu

    2016-12-29

    Data-dependent hashing has recently attracted attention due to being able to support efficient retrieval and storage of high-dimensional data, such as documents, images, and videos. In this paper, we propose a novel learning-based hashing method called ''supervised discrete hashing with relaxation'' (SDHR) based on ''supervised discrete hashing'' (SDH). SDH uses ordinary least squares regression and traditional zero-one matrix encoding of class label information as the regression target (code words), thus fixing the regression target. In SDHR, the regression target is instead optimized. The optimized regression target matrix satisfies a large margin constraint for correct classification of each example. Compared with SDH, which uses the traditional zero-one matrix, SDHR utilizes the learned regression target matrix and, therefore, more accurately measures the classification error of the regression model and is more flexible. As expected, SDHR generally outperforms SDH. Experimental results on two large-scale image data sets (CIFAR-10 and MNIST) and a large-scale and challenging face data set (FRGC) demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of SDHR.

  3. Entwinement in discretely gauged theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Bernamonti, A.; Craps, B.; De Jonckheere, T.; Galli, F.

    2016-12-01

    We develop the notion of "entwinement" to characterize the amount of quantum entanglement between internal, discretely gauged degrees of freedom in a quantum field theory. This concept originated in the program of reconstructing spacetime from entanglement in holographic duality. We define entwinement formally in terms of a novel replica method which uses twist operators charged in a representation of the discrete gauge group. In terms of these twist operators we define a non-local, gauge-invariant object whose expectation value computes entwinement in a standard replica limit. We apply our method to the computation of entwinement in symmetric orbifold conformal field theories in 1+1 dimensions, which have an S N gauging. Such a theory appears in the weak coupling limit of the D1-D5 string theory which is dual to AdS3 at strong coupling. In this context, we show how certain kinds of entwinement measure the lengths, in units of the AdS scale, of non-minimal geodesics present in certain excited states of the system which are gravitationally described as conical defects and the M = 0 BTZ black hole. The possible types of entwinement that can be computed define a very large new class of quantities characterizing the fine structure of quantum wavefunctions.

  4. Discreteness effects in population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Hidalgo, Esteban; Lecomte, Vivien

    2016-05-01

    We analyse numerically the effects of small population size in the initial transient regime of a simple example population dynamics. These effects play an important role for the numerical determination of large deviation functions of additive observables for stochastic processes. A method commonly used in order to determine such functions is the so-called cloning algorithm which in its non-constant population version essentially reduces to the determination of the growth rate of a population, averaged over many realizations of the dynamics. However, the averaging of populations is highly dependent not only on the number of realizations of the population dynamics, and on the initial population size but also on the cut-off time (or population) considered to stop their numerical evolution. This may result in an over-influence of discreteness effects at initial times, caused by small population size. We overcome these effects by introducing a (realization-dependent) time delay in the evolution of populations, additional to the discarding of the initial transient regime of the population growth where these discreteness effects are strong. We show that the improvement in the estimation of the large deviation function comes precisely from these two main contributions.

  5. Nonequilibrium discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

    PubMed

    Iubini, Stefano; Lepri, Stefano; Politi, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    We study nonequilibrium steady states of the one-dimensional discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. This system can be regarded as a minimal model for the stationary transport of bosonic particles such as photons in layered media or cold atoms in deep optical traps. Due to the presence of two conserved quantities, namely, energy and norm (or number of particles), the model displays coupled transport in the sense of linear irreversible thermodynamics. Monte Carlo thermostats are implemented to impose a given temperature and chemical potential at the chain ends. As a result, we find that the Onsager coefficients are finite in the thermodynamic limit, i.e., transport is normal. Depending on the position in the parameter space, the "Seebeck coefficient" may be either positive or negative. For large differences between the thermostat parameters, density and temperature profiles may display an unusual nonmonotonic shape. This is due to the strong dependence of the Onsager coefficients on the state variables.

  6. Deafness, culture, and choice.

    PubMed

    Levy, N

    2002-10-01

    The recent controversy surrounding the choice, by a deaf lesbian couple, to have children who were themselves deaf, has focused attention on the ethics of choosing (apparent) disabilities for children. Deaf activists argue that deafness is not a disability, but instead the constitutive condition of access to a rich culture. Being deaf carries disadvantages with it, but these are a product of discrimination, not of the condition itself. It is, however, implausible to think that all the disadvantages which stem from deafness are social in origin. Moreover, though it may be true that being deaf carries with it the important compensation of access to a rich culture, no physical condition is required for such access. Cultures are simply the kind of things to which we are born, and therefore to which the children of deaf parents, hearing or deaf, normally belong. Thus these parents are making a mistake in choosing deafness for their children. Given their own experience of isolation as children, however, it is a mistake which is understandable, and our reaction to them ought to be compassion, not condemnation.

  7. Addiction: Choice or Compulsion?

    PubMed Central

    Henden, Edmund; Melberg, Hans Olav; Røgeberg, Ole Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Normative thinking about addiction has traditionally been divided between, on the one hand, a medical model which sees addiction as a disease characterized by compulsive and relapsing drug use over which the addict has little or no control and, on the other, a moral model which sees addiction as a choice characterized by voluntary behavior under the control of the addict. Proponents of the former appeal to evidence showing that regular consumption of drugs causes persistent changes in the brain structures and functions known to be involved in the motivation of behavior. On this evidence, it is often concluded that becoming addicted involves a transition from voluntary, chosen drug use to non-voluntary compulsive drug use. Against this view, proponents of the moral model provide ample evidence that addictive drug use involves voluntary chosen behavior. In this article we argue that although they are right about something, both views are mistaken. We present a third model that neither rules out the view of addictive drug use as compulsive, nor that it involves voluntary chosen behavior. PMID:23966955

  8. Evidence based contraceptive choices.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alison; Glasier, Anna

    2006-10-01

    People who attend for contraceptive advice have usually formulated an idea of the type of contraceptive that will suit them best. They may wish to use a method that is long, short or medium acting. These are defined as follows: Long-acting method requires renewal no more frequently than every 3 months (e.g. injectable or intrauterine). Short-acting method used daily or with every act of intercourse (e.g. pills, condoms) Medium-acting method requires renewal weekly or monthly (e.g. ring, patch). For men the choice is limited to condoms or vasectomy. Some women do not wish to use hormonal preparations or have an intrauterine device (IUD) or implant inserted. There may also be cultural influences making certain methods of contraception unacceptable. Each of these factors influences the final decision of which method of contraception is decided upon. In addition to taking a full medical and sexual history to identify any risks to the individual's health, which might be increased by a particular contraceptive, time must be spent discussing the options available. It is important to ensure that there is a full understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The most successful contraceptive method is likely to be the one that the woman (or man) chooses, rather than the one the clinician chooses for them. Access for women to contraception can be improved by having convenient clinic times and service developments such as nurse prescribing and Patient Group Directions.

  9. Demand for sanitation in Salvador, Brazil: a hybrid choice approach.

    PubMed

    Santos, Andreia C; Roberts, Jennifer A; Barreto, Mauricio L; Cairncross, Sandy

    2011-04-01

    Funds to promote access to water and sanitation in developing countries are scarce and most of the investments come from the national governments and households sources, not international resources. In many of these countries, mainly in middle income countries, households are paying direct taxes to access these services, and understanding what determines their choice and motivation is fundamental to promote access to them. It has been argued that is not enough to supply a wide range of alternatives unless the individuals can recognise their benefits and sustainability. The objective of this paper is to understand the choice of sanitation technology by residents in the city of Salvador, Brazil. We propose a unique hybrid choice model that incorporates a set of latent attitudinal variables and explains how the demographic factors within a household influence choice. The substantial difference of our hybrid choice model from descriptive frameworks is that it integrates choice and latent variables (such as attitudes and preferences) allowing us to model explicitly the cognitive process that influences sanitation adoption, draw conclusions from cognitive variables associated with individuals' socio-economic and demographic characteristics, and establishes a causal pathway among these variables. The results show that the attributes of health protection, accessibility, privacy, and house modernisation were what households cared about when opting for flush toilet and sewerage connection, rather than the high cost and consequent household socio-economic status associated with them. The hybrid model is statistically consistent with these findings, and seems to fill the gap between behavioural theory and discrete choice models applied to sanitation.

  10. Eye Movements in Risky Choice

    PubMed Central

    Hermens, Frouke; Matthews, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We asked participants to make simple risky choices while we recorded their eye movements. We built a complete statistical model of the eye movements and found very little systematic variation in eye movements over the time course of a choice or across the different choices. The only exceptions were finding more (of the same) eye movements when choice options were similar, and an emerging gaze bias in which people looked more at the gamble they ultimately chose. These findings are inconsistent with prospect theory, the priority heuristic, or decision field theory. However, the eye movements made during a choice have a large relationship with the final choice, and this is mostly independent from the contribution of the actual attribute values in the choice options. That is, eye movements tell us not just about the processing of attribute values but also are independently associated with choice. The pattern is simple—people choose the gamble they look at more often, independently of the actual numbers they see—and this pattern is simpler than predicted by decision field theory, decision by sampling, and the parallel constraint satisfaction model. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27522985

  11. Inside a School of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fizzell, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the benefits individual students experience at the Alternative Learning Center in Evergreen, Washington. An important element in the successful operation of a school of choice is the admissions procedure. To provide a clear and informed decision in school choice this school's admission procedure includes information, screening, and…

  12. The Globalisation of School Choice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsey, Martin, Ed.; Davies, Scott, Ed.; Walford, Geoffrey, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Which school should I choose for my child?" For many parents, this question is one of the most important of their lives. "School choice" is a slogan being voiced around the globe, conjuring images of a marketplace with an abundance of educational options. Those promoting educational choice also promise equality, social…

  13. PATERNAL INFLUENCE ON CAREER CHOICE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WERTS, CHARLES E.

    FATHER'S OCCUPATION WAS COMPARED WITH SON'S CAREER CHOICE FOR A SAMPLE OF 76,015 MALE, COLLEGE FRESHMEN. RESULTS INDICATED THAT CERTAIN TYPES OF FATHERS' OCCUPATIONS WERE ASSOCIATED WITH SIMILAR TYPES OF CAREER CHOICES BY SONS. BOYS WHOSE FATHERS WERE IN SCIENTIFIC OCCUPATIONS (ENGINEERS, MILITARY OFFICERS, ARCHITECTS, BIOLOGISTS, CHEMISTS, AND…

  14. College Choice in the Philippines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Christine Joy

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive and correlational study examined the applicability of major U.S. college choice factors to Philippine high school seniors. A sample of 226 students from a private school in Manila completed the College Choice Survey for High School Seniors. Cronbach's alpha for the survey composite index was 0.933. The purposes of this…

  15. School Choice with Chinese Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Xiaoxin

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the major characteristics of school choice in the Chinese context. It highlights the involvement of cultural and economic capital, such as choice fees, donations, prize-winning certificates and awards in gaining school admission, as well as the use of social capital in the form of "guanxi". The requirement for these…

  16. Preference Reversal in Multiattribute Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Usher, Marius; Chater, Nick

    2010-01-01

    A central puzzle for theories of choice is that people's preferences between options can be reversed by the presence of decoy options (that are not chosen) or by the presence of other irrelevant options added to the choice set. Three types of reversal effect reported in the decision-making literature, the attraction, compromise, and similarity…

  17. School Choice: To What End?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Tony

    1996-01-01

    Debunks two fantasies: the feasibility of a free-market educational system and the idea that greater choice automatically means better schools. Public education is too labor-intensive and undercapitalized to be profitable. Communities need "skunk works" schools of choice to do research and development and smaller, collaboratively managed…

  18. Religious Education and Religious Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    According to the "religious choice case" for compulsory religious education, pupils have a right to be made aware of the religious and irreligious paths open to them and equipped with the wherewithal to choose between them. A familiar objection to this argument is that the idea of religious choice reduces religion to a matter of taste. I…

  19. School: A Matter of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    Measures to improve parent and student choice of school have recently become an important issue for educational reform in a number of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. This book summarizes the school-choice experiences of selected OECD countries. The data, collected by the OECD/Centre for Educational Research…

  20. The Supply Side of Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Paul T.

    2005-01-01

    New school creation is key to success of choice. For the last two decades, the struggle over school choice has focused on freeing up parents to choose. It continues to this day, with growing success in the forms of public and private voucher programs, charter school laws in 40 states and the District of Columbia, and state and federal laws that…

  1. School Choice: Examining the Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasell, Edith, Ed.; Rothstein, Richard, Ed.

    This book presents a summary of school-choice issues, and is organized around a 1992 seminar entitled "Choice: What Role in American Education?" Each part presents a set of conference papers, followed by discussants' remarks and excerpts from audience discussion. The introduction summarizes the papers' positions and conclusions. Participants…

  2. State Regulators Promote Consumer Choice in Retail Gas Markets

    EIA Publications

    1996-01-01

    Restructuring of interstate pipeline companies has created new choices and challenges for local distribution companies (LDCs), their regulators, and their customers. The process of separating interstate pipeline gas sales from transportation service has been completed and has resulted in greater gas procurement options for LDCs.

  3. Ideal shrinking and expansion of discrete sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1986-01-01

    Ideal methods are described for shrinking or expanding a discrete sequence, image, or image sequence. The methods are ideal in the sense that they preserve the frequency spectrum of the input up to the Nyquist limit of the input or output, whichever is smaller. Fast implementations that make use of the discrete Fourier transform or the discrete Hartley transform are described. The techniques lead to a new multiresolution image pyramid.

  4. Resurgence as Choice.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Timothy A; Craig, Andrew R

    2016-10-26

    Resurgence is typically defined as an increase in a previously extinguished target behavior when a more recently reinforced alternative behavior is later extinguished. Some treatments of the phenomenon have suggested that it might also extend to circumstances where either the historic or more recently reinforced behavior is reduced by other non-extinction related means (e.g., punishment, decreases in reinforcement rate, satiation, etc.). Here we present a theory of resurgence suggesting that the phenomenon results from the same basic processes governing choice. In its most general form, the theory suggests that resurgence results from changes in the allocation of target behavior driven by changes in the values of the target and alternative options across time. Specifically, resurgence occurs when there is an increase in the relative value of an historically effective target option as a result of a subsequent devaluation of a more recently effective alternative option. We develop a more specific quantitative model of how extinction of the target and alternative responses in a typical resurgence paradigm might produce such changes in relative value across time using a temporal weighting rule. The example model does a good job in accounting for the effects of reinforcement rate and related manipulations on resurgence in simple schedules where Behavioral Momentum Theory has failed. We also discuss how the general theory might be extended to other parameters of reinforcement (e.g., magnitude, quality), other means to suppress target or alternative behavior (e.g., satiation, punishment, differential reinforcement of other behavior), and other factors (e.g., non- contingent versus contingent alternative reinforcement, serial alternative reinforcement, and multiple schedules).

  5. Preference for free choice over forced choice in pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Catania, A. Charles; Sagvolden, Terje

    1980-01-01

    In a six-key chamber variable-interval initial links of concurrent-chain schedules operated on two lower white keys. Terminal links operated on four upper keys; green keys were correlated with fixed-interval reinforcement and red keys with extinction. Free-choice terminal links arranged three green keys and one red key; forced-choice terminal links arranged one green key and three red keys. Thus, terminal links were equivalent in number, variety, and information value (in bits) of the keylights. Preferences (relative initial-link rates) were studied both with location of the odd key color varying over successive terminal links and with the odd color fixed at key locations that had controlled either relatively high or relatively low terminal-link response rates. Free choice was consistently preferred to forced choice. Magnitude of preference did not vary systematically with terminal-link response rate or stimulus control by green and red keys. The origins of free-choice preference could be ontogenic or phylogenic: organisms may learn that momentarily preferred alternatives are more often available in free than in forced choice, and evolutionary contingencies may favor the survival of organisms that prefer free to forced choice. PMID:16812181

  6. A discrete event method for wave simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a discrete event interpretation of the finite difference time domain (FDTD) and digital wave guide network (DWN) wave simulation schemes. The discrete event method is formalized using the discrete event system specification (DEVS). The scheme is shown to have errors that are proportional to the resolution of the spatial grid. A numerical example demonstrates the relative efficiency of the scheme with respect to FDTD and DWN schemes. The potential for the discrete event scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and attenuation errors is discussed.

  7. Discrete gauge symmetry in continuum theories

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, L.M.; Wilczek, F.

    1989-03-13

    We point out that local symmetries can masquerade as discrete global symmetries to an observer equipped with only low-energy probes. The existence of the underlying local gauge invariance can, however, result in observable Aharonov-Bohm-type effects. Black holes can therefore carry discrete gauge charges: a form of nonclassical ''hair.'' Neither black-hole evaporation, wormholes, nor anything else can violate discrete gauge symmetries. In supersymmetric unified theories such discrete symmetries can forbid proton-decay amplitudes that might otherwise be catastrophic.

  8. Scalar discrete nonlinear multipoint boundary value problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jesus; Taylor, Padraic

    2007-06-01

    In this paper we provide sufficient conditions for the existence of solutions to scalar discrete nonlinear multipoint boundary value problems. By allowing more general boundary conditions and by imposing less restrictions on the nonlinearities, we obtain results that extend previous work in the area of discrete boundary value problems [Debra L. Etheridge, Jesus Rodriguez, Periodic solutions of nonlinear discrete-time systems, Appl. Anal. 62 (1996) 119-137; Debra L. Etheridge, Jesus Rodriguez, Scalar discrete nonlinear two-point boundary value problems, J. Difference Equ. Appl. 4 (1998) 127-144].

  9. Discrete wave mechanics: An introduction

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Frederick T.

    1986-01-01

    Discrete wave mechanics is formulated for particles in one-dimensional systems by use of a simple finite difference equation. The solutions involve wave vectors (instead of wave functions) as well as a newly defined “wave vector energy.” In the limit, as c → ∞, the treatment reduces to that of Schrödinger's wave mechanics. Specific calculations are made for completely free particles as well as for particles confined to a one-dimensional box. The results exhibit a striking compatibility with relativistic considerations. The wave vectors show properties that can be identified with particles and anti-particles—each possess identical probability distributions with energies that add up to zero. PMID:16593732

  10. Discrete wave mechanics: Multidimensional systems

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Frederick T.

    1987-01-01

    Discrete wave mechanics is pursued further by extending the one-dimensional treatment to two (or more) dimensions in the light of explicit momentum considerations. Cognizance is taken of the effect of particle motion on mass and hence on the interactions between components of motion in different directions. The overall energy parameter turns out to be a product instead of a sum of parameters identified with each of several orthogonal axes. Accordingly, the separation of variables is most directly accomplished by factoring the principal energy parameter in conjunction with factoring the wave vector expression itself. Wave vector energies, on the other hand, remain additive. Finally, group velocity components are discussed for higher-dimensional systems. PMID:16593833

  11. Structure of random discrete spacetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brightwell, Graham; Gregory, Ruth

    1991-01-01

    The usual picture of spacetime consists of a continuous manifold, together with a metric of Lorentzian signature which imposes a causal structure on the spacetime. A model, first suggested by Bombelli et al., is considered in which spacetime consists of a discrete set of points taken at random from a manifold, with only the causal structure on this set remaining. This structure constitutes a partially ordered set (or poset). Working from the poset alone, it is shown how to construct a metric on the space which closely approximates the metric on the original spacetime manifold, how to define the effective dimension of the spacetime, and how such quantities may depend on the scale of measurement. Possible desirable features of the model are discussed.

  12. Discrete observability and numerical quadrature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Clyde F.; Wang, Xiaochang; Stamp, Mark

    1991-01-01

    The authors consider the problem of approximate observability of a one-dimensional diffusion equation on a finite spatial domain with spatial point measurements. The problem of the optimal selection of the measurement points is considered under three conditions: (1) no preassigned measurement nodes; (2) one preassigned node and; (3) two preassigned nodes. The main observation is that the optimal choice is related to three classical procedures in numerical analysis: (1) Gaussian quadrature; (2) Radau quadrature and; (3) Lobatto quadrature. It is shown that the existence of the Radau and Lobatto quadrature is closely related to classical root locus theory.

  13. Expanded Access to Non-VA Care Through the Veterans Choice Program. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) revises its medical regulations that implement section 101 of the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 (hereafter referred to as "the Choice Act"), which requires VA to establish a program to furnish hospital care and medical services through eligible non-VA health care providers to eligible veterans who either cannot be seen within the wait-time goals of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) or who qualify based on their place of residence (hereafter referred to as the "Veterans Choice Program" or the "Program"). These regulatory revisions are required by the most recent amendments to the Choice Act made by the Construction Authorization and Choice Improvement Act of 2014, and by the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015. The Construction Authorization and Choice Improvement Act of 2014 amended the Choice Act to define additional criteria that VA may use to determine that a veteran's travel to a VA medical facility is an "unusual or excessive burden," and the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015 amended the Choice Act to cover all veterans enrolled in the VA health care system, remove the 60-day limit on an episode of care, modify the wait-time and 40-mile distance eligibility criteria, and expand provider eligibility based on criteria as determined by VA. This interim final rule revises VA regulations consistent with the changes made to the Choice Act as described above.

  14. FUNGIBILITY AND CONSUMER CHOICE: EVIDENCE FROM COMMODITY PRICE SHOCKS*

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Justine S.; Shapiro, Jesse M.

    2015-01-01

    We formulate a test of the fungibility of money based on parallel shifts in the prices of different quality grades of a commodity. We embed the test in a discrete-choice model of product quality choice and estimate the model using panel microdata on gasoline purchases. We find that when gasoline prices rise consumers substitute to lower octane gasoline, to an extent that cannot be explained by income effects. Across a wide range of specifications, we consistently reject the null hypothesis that households treat “gas money” as fungible with other income. We compare the empirical fit of three psychological models of decision-making. A simple model of category budgeting fits the data well, with models of loss aversion and salience both capturing important features of the time series. PMID:26937053

  15. FUNGIBILITY AND CONSUMER CHOICE: EVIDENCE FROM COMMODITY PRICE SHOCKS.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Justine S; Shapiro, Jesse M

    2013-11-01

    We formulate a test of the fungibility of money based on parallel shifts in the prices of different quality grades of a commodity. We embed the test in a discrete-choice model of product quality choice and estimate the model using panel microdata on gasoline purchases. We find that when gasoline prices rise consumers substitute to lower octane gasoline, to an extent that cannot be explained by income effects. Across a wide range of specifications, we consistently reject the null hypothesis that households treat "gas money" as fungible with other income. We compare the empirical fit of three psychological models of decision-making. A simple model of category budgeting fits the data well, with models of loss aversion and salience both capturing important features of the time series.

  16. Dissociation between goal-directed and discrete response localization in a patient with bilateral cortical blindness.

    PubMed

    Buetti, Simona; Tamietto, Marco; Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Kerzel, Dirk; de Gelder, Beatrice; Pegna, Alan J

    2013-10-01

    We investigated localization performance of simple targets in patient TN, who suffered bilateral damage of his primary visual cortex and shows complete cortical blindness. Using a two-alternative forced-choice paradigm, TN was asked to guess the position of left-right targets with goal-directed and discrete manual responses. The results indicate a clear dissociation between goal-directed and discrete responses. TN pointed toward the correct target location in approximately 75% of the trials but was at chance level with discrete responses. This indicates that the residual ability to localize an unseen stimulus depends critically on the possibility to translate a visual signal into a goal-directed motor output at least in certain forms of blindsight.

  17. A Bell-Curved Based Algorithm for Mixed Continuous and Discrete Structural Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.; Weber, Michael; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    2001-01-01

    An evolutionary based strategy utilizing two normal distributions to generate children is developed to solve mixed integer nonlinear programming problems. This Bell-Curve Based (BCB) evolutionary algorithm is similar in spirit to (mu + mu) evolutionary strategies and evolutionary programs but with fewer parameters to adjust and no mechanism for self adaptation. First, a new version of BCB to solve purely discrete optimization problems is described and its performance tested against a tabu search code for an actuator placement problem. Next, the performance of a combined version of discrete and continuous BCB is tested on 2-dimensional shape problems and on a minimum weight hub design problem. In the latter case the discrete portion is the choice of the underlying beam shape (I, triangular, circular, rectangular, or U).

  18. An Improved Manufacturing Approach for Discrete Silicon Microneedle Arrays with Tunable Height-Pitch Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renxin; Wang, Wei; Li, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Silicon microneedle arrays (MNAs) have been widely studied due to their potential in various transdermal applications. However, discrete MNAs, as a preferred choice to fabricate flexible penetrating devices that could adapt curved and elastic tissue, are rarely reported. Furthermore, the reported discrete MNAs have disadvantages lying in uniformity and height-pitch ratio. Therefore, an improved technique is developed to manufacture discrete MNA with tunable height-pitch ratio, which involves KOH-dicing-KOH process. The detailed process is sketched and simulated to illustrate the formation of microneedles. Furthermore, the undercutting of convex mask in two KOH etching steps are mathematically analyzed, in order to reveal the relationship between etching depth and mask dimension. Subsequently, fabrication results demonstrate KOH-dicing-KOH process. {321} facet is figured out as the surface of octagonal pyramid microneedle. MNAs with diverse height and pitch are also presented to identify the versatility of this approach. At last, the metallization is realized via successive electroplating. PMID:27735837

  19. An Improved Manufacturing Approach for Discrete Silicon Microneedle Arrays with Tunable Height-Pitch Ratio.

    PubMed

    Wang, Renxin; Wang, Wei; Li, Zhihong

    2016-10-09

    Silicon microneedle arrays (MNAs) have been widely studied due to their potential in various transdermal applications. However, discrete MNAs, as a preferred choice to fabricate flexible penetrating devices that could adapt curved and elastic tissue, are rarely reported. Furthermore, the reported discrete MNAs have disadvantages lying in uniformity and height-pitch ratio. Therefore, an improved technique is developed to manufacture discrete MNA with tunable height-pitch ratio, which involves KOH-dicing-KOH process. The detailed process is sketched and simulated to illustrate the formation of microneedles. Furthermore, the undercutting of convex mask in two KOH etching steps are mathematically analyzed, in order to reveal the relationship between etching depth and mask dimension. Subsequently, fabrication results demonstrate KOH-dicing-KOH process. {321} facet is figured out as the surface of octagonal pyramid microneedle. MNAs with diverse height and pitch are also presented to identify the versatility of this approach. At last, the metallization is realized via successive electroplating.

  20. Equation-Free Effective Computation for Discrete Systems: a Time Stepper Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, J.; Runborg, O.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Lust, K.; Kevrekidis, I. G.

    We propose a computer-assisted approach to studying the effective continuum behavior of spatially discrete evolution equations. The advantage of the approach is that the "coarse model" (the continuum, effective equation) need not be explicitly constructed. The method only uses a time-integration code for the discrete problem and judicious choices of initial data and integration times; our bifurcation computations are based on the so-called Recursive Projection Method (RPM) with arc-length continuation [Shroff & Keller, 1993]. The technique is used to monitor features of the genuinely discrete problem such as the pinning of coherent structures and its results are compared to quasi-continuum approaches such as the ones based on Padé approximations.

  1. Eye Movements in Strategic Choice

    PubMed Central

    Gächter, Simon; Noguchi, Takao; Mullett, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In risky and other multiattribute choices, the process of choosing is well described by random walk or drift diffusion models in which evidence is accumulated over time to threshold. In strategic choices, level‐k and cognitive hierarchy models have been offered as accounts of the choice process, in which people simulate the choice processes of their opponents or partners. We recorded the eye movements in 2 × 2 symmetric games including dominance‐solvable games like prisoner's dilemma and asymmetric coordination games like stag hunt and hawk–dove. The evidence was most consistent with the accumulation of payoff differences over time: we found longer duration choices with more fixations when payoffs differences were more finely balanced, an emerging bias to gaze more at the payoffs for the action ultimately chosen, and that a simple count of transitions between payoffs—whether or not the comparison is strategically informative—was strongly associated with the final choice. The accumulator models do account for these strategic choice process measures, but the level‐k and cognitive hierarchy models do not. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27513881

  2. Using Discrete Choice Experiment to elicit patient preferences for osteoporosis drug treatments: where to from here?

    PubMed

    Laba, Tracey-Lea

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease that increases skeletal fracture risk and places a significant health and economic burden on patients, families, and health systems. Many treatment options exist, but patient use is suboptimal, thus undermining the potential cost-effectiveness of treatments. In the previous issue of Arthritis Research & Therapy, Hiligsmann and colleagues expanded the findings of previous studies to report, from a sample of 257 patients with osteoporosis, the preference to trade off clinical outcomes for the amenity provided by convenient dosing regimens. This editorial critiques the strengths and limitations of the methods, discusses the potential utility of patient treatment preferences, and suggests avenues for further research.

  3. Patient Preferences for Treatment of Psoriasis with Biologicals: A Discrete Choice Experiment.

    PubMed

    Kromer, Christian; Schaarschmidt, Marthe-Lisa; Schmieder, Astrid; Herr, Raphael; Goerdt, Sergij; Peitsch, Wiebke K

    2015-01-01

    Treatment dissatisfaction and non-adherence are common among patients with psoriasis, partly due to discordance between individual preferences and recommended treatments. However, patients are more satisfied with biologicals than with other treatments. The aim of our study was to assess patient preferences for treatment of psoriasis with biologicals by using computer-based conjoint analysis. Biologicals approved for psoriasis in Germany were decomposed into outcome (probability of 50% and 90% improvement, time until response, sustainability of success, probability of mild and severe adverse events (AE), probability of American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 response) and process attributes (treatment location, frequency, duration and delivery method). Impact of sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics and disease severity on Relative Importance Scores (RIS) of each attribute was assessed with analyses of variance, post hoc tests, and multivariate regression. Averaged across the cohort of 200 participants with moderate-to-severe psoriasis, preferences were highest for avoiding severe AE (RIS = 17.3), followed by 90% improvement (RIS = 14.0) and avoiding mild AE (RIS = 10.5). Process attributes reached intermediate RIS (8.2-8.8). Men were more concerned about efficacy than women (50% improvement: RIS = 6.9 vs. 9.5, p = 0.008; β = -0.191, p = 0.011 in multivariate models; 90% improvement: RIS = 12.1 vs. 15.4, p = 0.002; β = -0.197, p = 0.009). Older participants judged the probability of 50% and 90% improvement less relevant than younger ones (50% improvement: Pearson's Correlation (PC) = -0.161, p = 0.022; β = -0.219, p = 0.017; 90% improvement: PC = -0.155, p = 0.028; β = -0.264, p = 0.004) but worried more about severe AE (PC = 0.175, p = 0.013; β = 0.166, p = 0.082). In summary, participants with moderate-to-severe psoriasis were most interested in safety of biologicals, followed by efficacy, but preferences varied with sociodemographic characteristics and working status. Based on this knowledge, physicians should identify preferences of each individual patient during shared decision-making in order to optimize treatment satisfaction, adherence and outcome.

  4. Smoking in young adolescents: an approach with multilevel discrete choice models

    PubMed Central

    Pinilla, J; Gonzalez, B; Barber, P; Santana, Y

    2002-01-01

    Design: Cross sectional analysis performed by multilevel logistic regression with pupils at the first level and schools at the second level. The data came from a stratified sample of students surveyed on their own, their families' and their friends' smoking habits, their schools, and their awareness of cigarette prices and advertising. Setting: The study was performed in the Island of Gran Canaria, Spain. Participants: 1877 students from 30 secondary schools in spring of 2000 (model's effective sample sizes 1697 and 1738) . Main results: 14.2% of the young teenagers surveyed use tobacco, almost half of them (6.3% of the total surveyed) on a daily basis. According to the ordered logistic regression model, to have a smoker as the best friend increases significantly the probability of smoking (odds ratio: 6.96, 95% confidence intervals (CI) (4.93 to 9.84), and the same stands for one smoker living at home compared with a smoking free home (odds ratio: 2.03, 95% CI 1.22 to 3.36). Girls smoke more (odds ratio: 1.85, 95% CI 1.33 to 2.59). Experience with alcohol, and lack of interest in studies are also significant factors affecting smoking. Multilevel models of logistic regression showed that factors related to the school affect the smoking behaviour of young teenagers. More specifically, whether a school complies with antismoking rules or not is the main factor to predict smoking prevalence in schools. The remainder of the differences can be attributed to individual and family characteristics, tobacco consumption by parents or other close relatives, and peer group. Conclusions: A great deal of the individual differences in smoking are explained by factors at the school level, therefore the context is very relevant in this case. The most relevant predictors for smoking in young adolescents include some factors related to the schools they attend. One variable stood out in accounting for the school to school differences: how well they enforced the no smoking rule. Therefore we can prevent or delay tobacco smoking in adolescents not only by publicising health risks, but also by better enforcing no smoking rules in schools. PMID:11854347

  5. Energy transport in weakly nonlinear wave systems with narrow frequency band excitation.

    PubMed

    Kartashova, Elena

    2012-10-01

    A novel discrete model (D model) is presented describing nonlinear wave interactions in systems with small and moderate nonlinearity under narrow frequency band excitation. It integrates in a single theoretical frame two mechanisms of energy transport between modes, namely, intermittency and energy cascade, and gives the conditions under which each regime will take place. Conditions for the formation of a cascade, cascade direction, conditions for cascade termination, etc., are given and depend strongly on the choice of excitation parameters. The energy spectra of a cascade may be computed, yielding discrete and continuous energy spectra. The model does not require statistical assumptions, as all effects are derived from the interaction of distinct modes. In the example given-surface water waves with dispersion function ω(2)=gk and small nonlinearity-the D model predicts asymmetrical growth of side-bands for Benjamin-Feir instability, while the transition from discrete to continuous energy spectrum, excitation parameters properly chosen, yields the saturated Phillips' power spectrum ~g(2)ω(-5). The D model can be applied to the experimental and theoretical study of numerous wave systems appearing in hydrodynamics, nonlinear optics, electrodynamics, plasma, convection theory, etc.

  6. A space–angle DGFEM approach for the Boltzmann radiation transport equation with local angular refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Kópházi, József Lathouwers, Danny

    2015-09-15

    In this paper a new method for the discretization of the radiation transport equation is presented, based on a discontinuous Galerkin method in space and angle that allows for local refinement in angle where any spatial element can support its own angular discretization. To cope with the discontinuous spatial nature of the solution, a generalized Riemann procedure is required to distinguish between incoming and outgoing contributions of the numerical fluxes. A new consistent framework is introduced that is based on the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. The resulting numerical fluxes for the various possible cases where neighboring elements have an equal, higher or lower level of refinement in angle are derived based on tensor algebra and the resulting expressions have a very clear physical interpretation. The choice of discontinuous trial functions not only has the advantage of easing local refinement, it also facilitates the use of efficient sweep-based solvers due to decoupling of unknowns on a large scale thereby approaching the efficiency of discrete ordinates methods with local angular resolution. The approach is illustrated by a series of numerical experiments. Results show high orders of convergence for the scalar flux on angular refinement. The generalized Riemann upwinding procedure leads to stable and consistent solutions. Further the sweep-based solver performs well when used as a preconditioner for a Krylov method.

  7. Which spatial discretization for which distributed hydrological model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehotin, J.; Braud, I.

    2007-04-01

    Distributed hydrological models are valuable tools to derive distributed estimation of water balance components or to study the impact of land-use or climate change on water resources and water quality. In these models, the choice of an appropriate spatial scale for the modelling units is a crucial issue. It is obviously linked to the available data and their scale, but not only. For a given catchment and a given data set, the "optimal" spatial discretization should be different according to the problem to be solved and the objectives of the modelling. Thus a flexible methodology is needed, especially for large catchments, to derive modelling units by performing suitable trade-off between available data, the dominant hydrological processes, their representation scale and the modelling objectives. In order to represent catchment heterogeneity efficiently according to the modelling goals, and the availability of the input data, we propose to use nested discretization, starting from a hierarchy of sub-catchments, linked by the river network topology. If consistent with the modelling objectives, the active hydrological processes and data availability, sub-catchment variability can be described using a finer nested discretization. The latter takes into account different geophysical factors such as topography, land-use, pedology, but also suitable hydrological discontinuities such as ditches, hedges, dams, etc. For small catchments, the landscape features such as agricultural fields, buildings, hedges, river reaches can be represented explicitly, as well as the water pathways between them. For larger catchments, such a representation is not feasible and simplification is necessary. For the sub-catchments discretization in these large catchments, we propose a flexible methodology based on the principles of landscape classification, using reference zones. These principles are independent from the catchment size. They allow to keep suitable features which are required in

  8. Stokes phenomena in discrete Painlevé I

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, N.; Lustri, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we consider the asymptotic behaviour of the first discrete Painlevé equation in the limit as the independent variable becomes large. Using an asymptotic series expansion, we identify two types of solutions which are pole-free within some sector of the complex plane containing the positive real axis. Using exponential asymptotic techniques, we determine Stokes phenomena effects present within these solutions, and hence the regions in which the asymptotic series expression is valid. From a careful analysis of the switching behaviour across Stokes lines, we find that the first type of solution is uniquely defined, while the second type contains two free parameters, and that the region of validity may be extended for appropriate choice of these parameters. PMID:27547094

  9. Tuned oscillatory behavior in discrete quantum walks on star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, R. F. S.; Souza, A. M. C.

    2015-10-01

    A discrete time quantum walk on the star network is considered, on which the walker has a waiting probability at any time step and for any of the N nodes. This contrasts with a previous continuous time analysis, in which the walker in any of the N -1 leaf nodes is forced to jump back to the central hub. The model amounts to considering two coin operators, one for the hub (with N possible states) and another one for all leaf nodes (with two possible states). The solution depends on N and θ , an angle gauging the action of the coin operator on the leaf nodes. Periodic solutions are identified, which can be represented as superposition of large-period branches, sharing a relative small number of shapes and displaced by a regular interval. It is shown that the large period is very sensitive to the choice of N and θ . The possibility of experimental applications of this property is briefly mentioned.

  10. Current Density and Continuity in Discretized Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boykin, Timothy B.; Luisier, Mathieu; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Discrete approaches have long been used in numerical modelling of physical systems in both research and teaching. Discrete versions of the Schrodinger equation employing either one or several basis functions per mesh point are often used by senior undergraduates and beginning graduate students in computational physics projects. In studying…

  11. Discretization vs. Rounding Error in Euler's Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Carlos F.

    2011-01-01

    Euler's method for solving initial value problems is an excellent vehicle for observing the relationship between discretization error and rounding error in numerical computation. Reductions in stepsize, in order to decrease discretization error, necessarily increase the number of steps and so introduce additional rounding error. The problem is…

  12. 41 CFR 102-117.220 - What choices do I have to ship HHG?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What choices do I have to ship HHG? 102-117.220 Section 102-117.220 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT Shipping Household Goods § 102-117.220 What choices do I have to ship HHG? (a) You...

  13. Extreme events in discrete nonlinear lattices.

    PubMed

    Maluckov, A; Hadzievski, Lj; Lazarides, N; Tsironis, G P

    2009-02-01

    We perform statistical analysis on discrete nonlinear waves generated through modulational instability in the context of the Salerno model that interpolates between the integrable Ablowitz-Ladik (AL) equation and the nonintegrable discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We focus on extreme events in the form of discrete rogue or freak waves that may arise as a result of rapid coalescence of discrete breathers or other nonlinear interaction processes. We find power law dependence in the wave amplitude distribution accompanied by an enhanced probability for freak events close to the integrable limit of the equation. A characteristic peak in the extreme event probability appears that is attributed to the onset of interaction of the discrete solitons of the AL equation and the accompanied transition from the local to the global stochasticity monitored through the positive Lyapunov exponent of a nonlinear map.

  14. Discrete multiscale wavelet shrinkage and integrodifferential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didas, S.; Steidl, G.; Weickert, J.

    2008-04-01

    We investigate the relation between discrete wavelet shrinkage and integrodifferential equations in the context of simplification and denoising of one-dimensional signals. In the continuous setting, strong connections between these two approaches were discovered in 6 (see references). The key observation is that the wavelet transform can be understood as derivative operator after the convolution with a smoothing kernel. In this paper, we extend these ideas to the practically relevant discrete setting with both orthogonal and biorthogonal wavelets. In the discrete case, the behaviour of the smoothing kernels for different scales requires additional investigation. The results of discrete multiscale wavelet shrinkage and related discrete versions of integrodifferential equations are compared with respect to their denoising quality by numerical experiments.

  15. Generalized exponential function and discrete growth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souto Martinez, Alexandre; Silva González, Rodrigo; Lauri Espíndola, Aquino

    2009-07-01

    Here we show that a particular one-parameter generalization of the exponential function is suitable to unify most of the popular one-species discrete population dynamic models into a simple formula. A physical interpretation is given to this new introduced parameter in the context of the continuous Richards model, which remains valid for the discrete case. From the discretization of the continuous Richards’ model (generalization of the Gompertz and Verhulst models), one obtains a generalized logistic map and we briefly study its properties. Notice, however that the physical interpretation for the introduced parameter persists valid for the discrete case. Next, we generalize the (scramble competition) θ-Ricker discrete model and analytically calculate the fixed points as well as their stabilities. In contrast to previous generalizations, from the generalized θ-Ricker model one is able to retrieve either scramble or contest models.

  16. Active control of turbomachine discrete tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeter, Sanford

    This paper was directed at active control of discrete frequency noise generated by subsonic blade rows through cancellation of the blade row interaction generated propagating acoustic waves. First discrete frequency noise generated by a rotor and stator in a duct was analyzed to determine the propagating acoustic pressure waves. Then a mathematical model was developed to analyze and predict the active control of discrete frequency noise generated by subsonic blade rows through cancellation of the propagating acoustic waves, accomplished by utilizing oscillating airfoil surfaces to generate additional control propagating pressure waves. These control waves interact with the propagating acoustic waves, thereby, in principle, canceling the acoustic waves and thus, the far field discrete frequency tones. This model was then applied to a fan exit guide vane to investigate active airfoil surface techniques for control of the propagating acoustic waves, and thus the far field discrete frequency tones, generated by blade row interactions.

  17. The Neuroscience of Consumer Choice

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ming; Yoon, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    We review progress and challenges relating to scientific and applied goals of the nascent field of consumer neuroscience. Scientifically, substantial progress has been made in understanding the neurobiology of choice processes. Further advances, however, require researchers to begin clarifying the set of developmental and cognitive processes that shape and constrain choices. First, despite the centrality of preferences in theories of consumer choice, we still know little about where preferences come from and the underlying developmental processes. Second, the role of attention and memory processes in consumer choice remains poorly understood, despite importance ascribed to them in interpreting data from the field. The applied goal of consumer neuroscience concerns our ability to translate this understanding to augment prediction at the population level. Although the use of neuroscientific data for market-level predictions remains speculative, there is growing evidence of superiority in specific cases over existing market research techniques. PMID:26665152

  18. How do stereotypes influence choice?

    PubMed

    Chaxel, Anne-Sophie

    2015-05-01

    In the study reported here, I tracked one process through which stereotypes affect choice. The Implicit Association Test (IAT) and a measurement of predecisional information distortion were used to assess the influence of the association between male gender and career on the evaluation of information related to the job performance of stereotypical targets (male) and nonstereotypical targets (female). When the IAT revealed a strong association between male gender and career and the installed leader in the choice process was a stereotypical target, decision makers supported the leader with more proleader distortion; when the IAT revealed a strong association between male gender and career and the installed leader in the choice process was a nonstereotypical target, decision makers supported the trailer with less antitrailer distortion. A stronger association between male gender and career therefore resulted in an upward shift of the evaluation related to the stereotypical target (both as a trailer and a leader), which subsequently biased choice.

  19. Moment-Preserving SN Discretizations for the One-Dimensional Fokker-Planck Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Warsa, James S.; Prinja, Anil K.

    2012-06-14

    The Fokker-Planck equation: (1) Describes the transport and interactions of charged particles, (2) Many small-angle scattering collisions, (3) Asymptotic limit of the Boltzmann equation (Pomraning, 1992), and (4) The Boltzmann collision operator becomes the angular Laplacian. SN angular discretization: (1) Angular flux is collocated at the SN quadrature points, (2) The second-order derivatives in the Laplacian term must be discretized, and (3) Weighted finite-difference method preserves zeroth and first moments (Morel, 1985). Moment-preserving methods: (1) Collocate the Fokker-Planck operator at the SN quadrature points, (2) Develop several related and/or equivalent methods, and (3) Motivated by discretizations for the angular derivative appearing in the transport equation in one-dimensional spherical coordinates.

  20. Patient-specific dosimetry using quantitative SPECT imaging and three-dimensional discrete fourier transform convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Hawkins, W.G.; Eckblade, M.B.; Leichner, P.K.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a three-dimensional discrete Fourier transform (3D-DFT) convolution method to perform the dosimetry for {sup 131}I-labeled antibodies in soft tissues. Mathematical and physical phantoms were used to compare 3D-DFT with Monte Carlo transport (MCT) calculations based on the EGS4 code. The mathematical and physical phantoms consisted of a sphere and cylinder, respectively, containing uniform and nonuniform activity distributions. Quantitative SPECT reconstruction was carried out using the circular harmonic transform (CHT) algorithm. The radial dose profile obtained from MCT calculations and the 3D-DFT convolution method for the mathematical phantom were in close agreement. The root mean square error (RMSE) for the two methods was <0.1%, with a maximum difference <21%. Results obtained for the physical phantom gave a RMSE <0.1% and a maximum difference of <13%; isodose contours were in good agreement. SPECT data for two patients who had undergone {sup 131}I radioimmunotherapy (RIT) were used to compare absorbed-dose rates and isodose rate contours with the two methods of calculations. This yielded a RMSE <0.02% and a maximum difference of <13%. Our results showed that the 3D-DFT convolution method compared well with MCT calculations. The 3D-DFT approach is computationally much more efficient and, hence, the method of choice. This method is patient-specific and applicable to the dosimetry of soft-tissue tumors and normal organs. It can be implemented on personal computers. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Three-phase flow simulations in discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, S.; Niessner, J.; Matthai, S. K.; Helmig, R.

    2006-12-01

    Fractures are often the key conduits for fluid flow in otherwise low permeability rocks. Their presence in hydrocarbon reservoirs leads to complex production histories, unpredictable coupling of wells, rapidly changing flow rates, possibly early water breakthrough, and low final recovery. Recently, it has been demonstrated that a combination of finite volume and finite element discretization is well suited to model incompressible, immiscible two-phase flow in 3D discrete fracture networks (DFN) representing complexly fractured rocks. Such an approach has been commercialized in Golder Associates' FracMan Reservoir Edition software. For realistic reservoir simulations, however, it would be desirable if a third compressible gas phase can be included which is often present at reservoir conditions. Here we present the extension of an existing node-centred finite volume - finite element (FEFV) discretization for the efficient and accurate simulations of three-component - three-phase flow in geologically realistic representations of fractured porous media. Two possible types of fracture networks can be used: In 2D, they are detailed geometrical representations of fractured rock masses mapped in field studies. In 3D, they are geologically constrained, stochastically generated discrete fracture networks. Flow and transport can be simulated for fractures only or for fractures and matrix combined. The governing equations are solved decoupled using an implicit-pressure, explicit-saturation (IMPES) approach. Flux and concentration terms can be treated with higher-order accuracy in the finite volume scheme to preserve shock fronts. The method is locally mass conservative and works on unstructured, spatially refined grids. Flash calculations are carried out by a new description of the Black-Oil model. Capillary and gravity effects are included in this formulation. The robustness and accuracy of this formulation is shown in several applications. First, grid convergence is

  2. Discrete vortices on anisotropic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gui-Hua; Wang, Hong-Cheng; Chen, Zi-Fa

    2015-08-01

    We consider the effects of anisotropy on two types of localized states with topological charges equal to 1 in two-dimensional nonlinear lattices, using the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation as a paradigm model. We find that on-site-centered vortices with different propagation constants are not globally stable, and that upper and lower boundaries of the propagation constant exist. The region between these two boundaries is the domain outside of which the on-site-centered vortices are unstable. This region decreases in size as the anisotropy parameter is gradually increased. We also consider off-site-centered vortices on anisotropic lattices, which are unstable on this lattice type and either transform into stable quadrupoles or collapse. We find that the transformation of off-sitecentered vortices into quadrupoles, which occurs on anisotropic lattices, cannot occur on isotropic lattices. In the quadrupole case, a propagation-constant region also exists, outside of which the localized states cannot stably exist. The influence of anisotropy on this region is almost identical to its effects on the on-site-centered vortex case.

  3. MULTISCALE DISCRETIZATION OF SHAPE CONTOURS

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, L.; Rao, R.

    2000-09-01

    We present an efficient multi-scale scheme to adaptively approximate the continuous (or densely sampled) contour of a planar shape at varying resolutions. The notion of shape is intimately related to the notion of contour, and the efficient representation of the contour of a shape is vital to a computational understanding of the shape. Any polygonal approximation of a planar smooth curve is equivalent to a piecewise constant approximation of the parameterized X and Y coordinate functions of a discrete point set obtained by densely sampling the curve. Using the Haar wavelet transform for the piecewise approximation yields a hierarchical scheme in which the size of the approximating point set is traded off against the morphological accuracy of the approximation. Our algorithm compresses the representation of the initial shape contour to a sparse sequence of points in the plane defining the vertices of the shape's polygonal approximation. Furthermore, it is possible to control the overall resolution of the approximation by a single, scale-independent parameter.

  4. Discrete Element Modeling of Triboelectrically Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Weitzman, Peter S.; Curry, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of particles is common in many processes including fine powder handling and mixing, printer toner transport and dust extraction. In a lunar environment with its high vacuum and lack of water, electrostatic forces are an important factor to consider when designing and operating equipment. Dust mitigation and management is critical to safe and predictable performance of people and equipment. The extreme nature of lunar conditions makes it difficult and costly to carry out experiments on earth which are necessary to better understand how particles gather and transfer charge between each other and with equipment surfaces. DEM (Discrete Element Modeling) provides an excellent virtual laboratory for studying tribocharging of particles as well as for design of devices for dust mitigation and for other purposes related to handling and processing of lunar regolith. Theoretical and experimental work has been performed pursuant to incorporating screened Coulombic electrostatic forces into EDEM, a commercial DEM software package. The DEM software is used to model the trajectories of large numbers of particles for industrial particulate handling and processing applications and can be coupled with other solvers and numerical models to calculate particle interaction with surrounding media and force fields. While simple Coulombic force between two particles is well understood, its operation in an ensemble of particles is more complex. When the tribocharging of particles and surfaces due to frictional contact is also considered, it is necessary to consider longer range of interaction of particles in response to electrostatic charging. The standard DEM algorithm accounts for particle mechanical properties and inertia as a function of particle shape and mass. If fluid drag is neglected, then particle dynamics are governed by contact between particles, between particles and equipment surfaces and gravity forces. Consideration of particle charge and any tribocharging and

  5. Advanced Algorithms and Automation Tools for Discrete Ordinates Methods in Parallel Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Alireza Haghighat

    2003-05-07

    This final report discusses major accomplishments of a 3-year project under the DOE's NEER Program. The project has developed innovative and automated algorithms, codes, and tools for solving the discrete ordinates particle transport method efficiently in parallel environments. Using a number of benchmark and real-life problems, the performance and accuracy of the new algorithms have been measured and analyzed.

  6. Depth-discrete sampling port

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, Bradley E.; May, Christopher P.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.; Nichols, Ralph L.

    1999-01-01

    A sampling port is provided which has threaded ends for incorporating the port into a length of subsurface pipe. The port defines an internal receptacle which is in communication with subsurface fluids through a series of fine filtering slits. The receptacle is in further communication through a bore with a fitting carrying a length of tubing there which samples are transported to the surface. Each port further defines an additional bore through which tubing, cables, or similar components of adjacent ports may pass.

  7. Depth-discrete sampling port

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, Bradley E.; May, Christopher P.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.; Nichols, Ralph L.

    1998-07-07

    A sampling port is provided which has threaded ends for incorporating the port into a length of subsurface pipe. The port defines an internal receptacle which is in communication with subsurface fluids through a series of fine filtering slits. The receptacle is in further communication through a bore with a fitting carrying a length of tubing there which samples are transported to the surface. Each port further defines an additional bore through which tubing, cables, or similar components of adjacent ports may pass.

  8. Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Douglas, N, ed.

    2004-11-25

    From May 11--15, 2004, the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications held a hot topics workshop on Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations. The numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDE) is a fundamental task in science and engineering. The goal of the workshop was to bring together a spectrum of scientists at the forefront of the research in the numerical solution of PDEs to discuss compatible spatial discretizations. We define compatible spatial discretizations as those that inherit or mimic fundamental properties of the PDE such as topology, conservation, symmetries, and positivity structures and maximum principles. A wide variety of discretization methods applied across a wide range of scientific and engineering applications have been designed to or found to inherit or mimic intrinsic spatial structure and reproduce fundamental properties of the solution of the continuous PDE model at the finite dimensional level. A profusion of such methods and concepts relevant to understanding them have been developed and explored: mixed finite element methods, mimetic finite differences, support operator methods, control volume methods, discrete differential forms, Whitney forms, conservative differencing, discrete Hodge operators, discrete Helmholtz decomposition, finite integration techniques, staggered grid and dual grid methods, etc. This workshop seeks to foster communication among the diverse groups of researchers designing, applying, and studying such methods as well as researchers involved in practical solution of large scale problems that may benefit from advancements in such discretizations; to help elucidate the relations between the different methods and concepts; and to generally advance our understanding in the area of compatible spatial discretization methods for PDE. Particular points of emphasis included: + Identification of intrinsic properties of PDE models that are critical for the fidelity of numerical

  9. Effects of using a continuum representation of discrete fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, L.C.; Clemo, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    The substitution of matrix or continuum permeability for discrete fracture permeability in the simulation of complex fracture systems requires a radically different treatment of transport in the matrix. The spatial distribution of pressure is reasonably well described by inclusion of only the major fractures. Transport of tracer and heat, however, depends on a detailed knowledge of fluid velocities. Two factors are involved. First, the velocities are dependent on the active porosity of the system. Because fractures channel flow, the active porosity may be much smaller than the total porosity of the system. Secondly, the distribution of velocities is generally not normally distributed precluding the use of a Gaussian dispersion model. Characterization of the active porosity and velocity distribution are necessary to quantify tracer and heat movement.

  10. Modeling one-choice and two-choice driving tasks.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, Roger

    2015-08-01

    An experiment is presented in which subjects were tested on both one-choice and two-choice driving tasks and on non-driving versions of them. Diffusion models for one- and two-choice tasks were successful in extracting model-based measures from the response time and accuracy data. These include measures of the quality of the information from the stimuli that drove the decision process (drift rate in the model), the time taken up by processes outside the decision process and, for the two-choice model, the speed/accuracy decision criteria that subjects set. Drift rates were only marginally different between the driving and non-driving tasks, indicating that nearly the same information was used in the two kinds of tasks. The tasks differed in the time taken up by other processes, reflecting the difference between them in response processing demands. Drift rates were significantly correlated across the two two-choice tasks showing that subjects that performed well on one task also performed well on the other task. Nondecision times were correlated across the two driving tasks, showing common abilities on motor processes across the two tasks. These results show the feasibility of using diffusion modeling to examine decision making in driving and so provide for a theoretical examination of factors that might impair driving, such as extreme aging, distraction, sleep deprivation, and so on.

  11. Discrete symmetries and de Sitter spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Cotăescu, Ion I. Pascu, Gabriel

    2014-11-24

    Aspects of the ambiguity in defining quantum modes on de Sitter spacetime using a commuting system composed only of differential operators are discussed. Discrete symmetries and their actions on the wavefunction in commonly used coordinate charts are reviewed. It is argued that the system of commuting operators can be supplemented by requiring the invariance of the wavefunction to combined discrete symmetries- a criterion which selects a single state out of the α-vacuum family. Two such members of this family are singled out by particular combined discrete symmetries- states between which exists a well-known thermality relation.

  12. Discrete flavour symmetries from the Heisenberg group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floratos, E. G.; Leontaris, G. K.

    2016-04-01

    Non-abelian discrete symmetries are of particular importance in model building. They are mainly invoked to explain the various fermion mass hierarchies and forbid dangerous superpotential terms. In string models they are usually associated to the geometry of the compactification manifold and more particularly to the magnetised branes in toroidal compactifications. Motivated by these facts, in this note we propose a unified framework to construct representations of finite discrete family groups based on the automorphisms of the discrete and finite Heisenberg group. We focus in particular, on the PSL2 (p) groups which contain the phenomenologically interesting cases.

  13. Kinetics of Aggregation with Choice

    DOE PAGES

    Ben-Naim, Eli; Krapivsky, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Here we generalize the ordinary aggregation process to allow for choice. In ordinary aggregation, two random clusters merge and form a larger aggregate. In our implementation of choice, a target cluster and two candidate clusters are randomly selected and the target cluster merges with the larger of the two candidate clusters.We study the long-time asymptotic behavior and find that as in ordinary aggregation, the size density adheres to the standard scaling form. However, aggregation with choice exhibits a number of different features. First, the density of the smallest clusters exhibits anomalous scaling. Second, both the small-size and the large-size tailsmore » of the density are overpopulated, at the expense of the density of moderate-size clusters. Finally, we also study the complementary case where the smaller candidate cluster participates in the aggregation process and find an abundance of moderate clusters at the expense of small and large clusters. Additionally, we investigate aggregation processes with choice among multiple candidate clusters and a symmetric implementation where the choice is between two pairs of clusters.« less

  14. Kinetics of Aggregation with Choice

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Naim, Eli; Krapivsky, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Here we generalize the ordinary aggregation process to allow for choice. In ordinary aggregation, two random clusters merge and form a larger aggregate. In our implementation of choice, a target cluster and two candidate clusters are randomly selected and the target cluster merges with the larger of the two candidate clusters.We study the long-time asymptotic behavior and find that as in ordinary aggregation, the size density adheres to the standard scaling form. However, aggregation with choice exhibits a number of different features. First, the density of the smallest clusters exhibits anomalous scaling. Second, both the small-size and the large-size tails of the density are overpopulated, at the expense of the density of moderate-size clusters. Finally, we also study the complementary case where the smaller candidate cluster participates in the aggregation process and find an abundance of moderate clusters at the expense of small and large clusters. Additionally, we investigate aggregation processes with choice among multiple candidate clusters and a symmetric implementation where the choice is between two pairs of clusters.

  15. PEER REVIEW FOR THE CONSUMER VEHICLE CHOICE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Transportation and Air Quality (OTAQ) has recently sponsored the development of a Consumer Vehicle Choice Model (CVCM) by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The specification by OTAQ to ORNL for consumer choice model development was to develop a Nested Multinomial Logit (NMNL) or other appropriate model capable of estimating the consumer surplus impacts and the sales mix effects of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission standards. The CVCM will use output from the EPA’s Optimization Model for reducing Emissions of Greenhouse gases from Automobiles (OMEGA), including changes in retail price equivalents, changes in fuel economy, and changes in emissions, to estimate these impacts. In addition, the CVCM will accept approximately 60 vehicle types, with the flexibility to function with fewer or more vehicle types, and will use a 15 year planning horizon, matching the OMEGA parameters. It will be calibrated to baseline sales projection data provided by the EPA and will include a buy/no-buy option to simulate the possibility that consumers will choose to keep their old vehicle or to buy a used vehicle. To support EPA's future assessment of potential light duty greenhouse gas standards

  16. Token reinforcement, choice, and self-control in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Jackson, K; Hackenberg, T D

    1996-07-01

    Pigeons were exposed to self-control procedures that involved illumination of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as a form of token reinforcement. In a discrete-trials arrangement, subjects chose between one and three LEDs; each LED was exchangeable for 2-s access to food during distinct posttrial exchange periods. In Experiment 1, subjects generally preferred the immediate presentation of a single LED over the delayed presentation of three LEDs, but differences in the delay to the exchange period between the two options prevented a clear assessment of the relative influence of LED delay and exchange-period delay as determinants of choice. In Experiment 2, in which delays to the exchange period from either alternative were equal in most conditions, all subjects preferred the delayed three LEDs more often than in Experiment-1. In Experiment 3, subjects preferred the option that resulted in a greater amount of food more often if the choices also produced LEDs than if they did not. In Experiment 4, preference for the delayed three LEDs was obtained when delays to the exchange period were equal, but reversed in favor of an immediate single LED when the latter choice also resulted in quicker access to exchange periods. The overall pattern of results suggests that (a) delay to the exchange period is a more critical determinant of choice than is delay to token presentation; (b) tokens may function as conditioned reinforcers, although their discriminative properties may be responsible for the self-control that occurs under token reinforcer arrangements; and (c) previously reported differences in the self-control choices of humans and pigeons may have resulted at least in part from the procedural conventions of using token reinforcers with human subjects and food reinforcers with pigeon subjects.

  17. Choices for Mobility Independence: Transportation Options for Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... a minimal cost. n n Paratransit Service: Public transit, aging organizations, and private agencies provide door-to- ... is available in your area. n n Public Transit/Fixed Route Service: Public transit agencies provide bus ...

  18. Suboptimal choice behavior by pigeons.

    PubMed

    Stagner, Jessica P; Zentall, Thomas R

    2010-06-01

    Contrary to the law of effect and optimal foraging theory, pigeons show suboptimal choice behavior by choosing an alternative that provides 20% reinforcement over another that provides 50% reinforcement. They choose the 20% reinforcement alternative--in which 20% of the time, that choice results in a stimulus that always predicts reinforcement, and 80% of the time, it results in another stimulus that predicts its absence--rather than the 50% reinforcement alternative, which results in one of two stimuli, each of which predicts reinforcement 50% of the time. This choice behavior may be related to suboptimal human monetary gambling behavior, because in both cases, the organism overemphasizes the infrequent occurrence of the winning event and underemphasizes the more frequent occurrence of the losing event.

  19. Does health affect portfolio choice?

    PubMed

    Love, David A; Smith, Paul A

    2010-12-01

    A number of recent studies find that poor health is empirically associated with a safer portfolio allocation. It is difficult to say, however, whether this relationship is truly causal. Both health status and portfolio choice are influenced by unobserved characteristics such as risk attitudes, impatience, information, and motivation, and these unobserved factors, if not adequately controlled for, can induce significant bias in the estimates of asset demand equations. Using the 1992-2006 waves of the Health and Retirement Study, we investigate how much of the connection between health and portfolio choice is causal and how much is due to the effects of unobserved heterogeneity. Accounting for unobserved heterogeneity with fixed effects and correlated random effects models, we find that health does not appear to significantly affect portfolio choice among single households. For married households, we find a small effect (about 2-3 percentage points) from being in the lowest of five self-reported health categories.

  20. Comparing the Discrete and Continuous Logistic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2008-01-01

    The solutions of the discrete logistic growth model based on a difference equation and the continuous logistic growth model based on a differential equation are compared and contrasted. The investigation is conducted using a dynamic interactive spreadsheet. (Contains 5 figures.)

  1. Dynamic discretization method for solving Kepler's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinstein, Scott A.; McLaughlin, Craig A.

    2006-09-01

    Kepler’s equation needs to be solved many times for a variety of problems in Celestial Mechanics. Therefore, computing the solution to Kepler’s equation in an efficient manner is of great importance to that community. There are some historical and many modern methods that address this problem. Of the methods known to the authors, Fukushima’s discretization technique performs the best. By taking more of a system approach and combining the use of discretization with the standard computer science technique known as dynamic programming, we were able to achieve even better performance than Fukushima. We begin by defining Kepler’s equation for the elliptical case and describe existing solution methods. We then present our dynamic discretization method and show the results of a comparative analysis. This analysis will demonstrate that, for the conditions of our tests, dynamic discretization performs the best.

  2. Commutation Relations and Discrete Garnier Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormerod, Christopher M.; Rains, Eric M.

    2016-11-01

    We present four classes of nonlinear systems which may be considered discrete analogues of the Garnier system. These systems arise as discrete isomonodromic deformations of systems of linear difference equations in which the associated Lax matrices are presented in a factored form. A system of discrete isomonodromic deformations is completely determined by commutation relations between the factors. We also reparameterize these systems in terms of the image and kernel vectors at singular points to obtain a separate birational form. A distinguishing feature of this study is the presence of a symmetry condition on the associated linear problems that only appears as a necessary feature of the Lax pairs for the least degenerate discrete Painlevé equations.

  3. Running Parallel Discrete Event Simulators on Sierra

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P. D.; Jefferson, D. R.

    2015-12-03

    In this proposal we consider porting the ROSS/Charm++ simulator and the discrete event models that run under its control so that they run on the Sierra architecture and make efficient use of the Volta GPUs.

  4. A Few Continuous and Discrete Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Rui, Wenjuan

    2016-08-01

    Starting from a 2-unimodular group, we construct its new Lie algebras for which the positive-order Lax pairs and the negative-order Lax pairs are introduced, respectively. With the help of the resulting structure equation of the group we generate some partial differential equations including the well-known MKdV equation, the sine-Gordon equation, the hyperbolic sine-Gordon equation and other new nonlinear evolution equations. With the aid of the Tu scheme combined with the given Lax pairs, we obtain the isospectral and nonisospectral hierarchies of evolution equations, from which we generate two sets of symmetries of a generalized nonlinear Schrödinger (gNLS) equation. Finally, we discretize the Lax pairs to obtain a set of coupled semi-discrete equations. As their reduction, we produce the semi-discrete MKdV equation and semi-discrete NLS equation.

  5. Motion of Discrete Interfaces Through Mushy Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braides, Andrea; Solci, Margherita

    2016-08-01

    We study the geometric motion of sets in the plane derived from the homogenization of discrete ferromagnetic energies with weak inclusions. We show that the discrete sets are composed by a `bulky' part and an external `mushy region' composed only of weak inclusions. The relevant motion is that of the bulky part, which asymptotically obeys to a motion by crystalline mean curvature with a forcing term, due to the energetic contribution of the mushy layers, and pinning effects, due to discreteness. From an analytical standpoint, it is interesting to note that the presence of the mushy layers implies only a weak and not strong convergence of the discrete motions, so that the convergence of the energies does not commute with the evolution. From a mechanical standpoint it is interesting to note the geometrical similarity of some phenomena in the cooling of binary melts.

  6. Vortex chains travelling with discrete velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malishevskii, A. S.; Silin, V. P.; Uryupin, S. A.; Uspenskii, S. G.

    2008-05-01

    It has been shown that Swihart waves slowing down caused by Josephson junction spatial dispersion leads to the new field periodic nonlinear vortex states moving with discrete velocities. Swihart waves trapping by periodic vortex structures is discovered.

  7. Discrete breathers in nonlinear magnetic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Lazarides, N; Eleftheriou, M; Tsironis, G P

    2006-10-13

    Magnetic metamaterials composed of split-ring resonators or U-type elements may exhibit discreteness effects in THz and optical frequencies due to weak coupling. We consider a model one-dimensional metamaterial formed by a discrete array of nonlinear split-ring resonators where each ring interacts with its nearest neighbors. On-site nonlinearity and weak coupling among the individual array elements result in the appearance of discrete breather excitations or intrinsic localized modes, both in the energy-conserved and the dissipative system. We analyze discrete single and multibreather excitations, as well as a special breather configuration forming a magnetization domain wall and investigate their mobility and the magnetic properties their presence induces in the system.

  8. The discrete-time compensated Kalman filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, W. H.; Athans, M.

    1978-01-01

    A suboptimal dynamic compensator to be used in conjunction with the ordinary discrete time Kalman filter was derived. The resultant compensated Kalman Filter has the property that steady state bias estimation errors, resulting from modelling errors, were eliminated.

  9. Radix Representation of Triangular Discrete Grid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, J.; Li, Y. L.; Wang, R.

    2016-11-01

    Discrete Global Grid Systems (DGGSs) are spatial references that use a hierarchical tessellation of cells to partition and address the entire globe. It provides an organizational structure that permits fast integration between multiple sources of large and variable geospatial data. Although many endeavors have been done to describe certain discrete grid systems, there still lack of a uniform mathematical framework for them. This paper simplifies the planar class I aperture 4 triangular discrete grid system into a hierarchical lattice model which is proved to be a radix system in the complex number plane. Mathematical properties of the radix system reveal the discrete grid system is equivalent to the set of complex numbers with special form. The conclusion provides a potential way to build a uniform mathematical framework of DGGS and can be used to design efficient encoding and spatial operation scheme for DGGS.

  10. Foundation doctors career choice and factors influencing career choice.

    PubMed

    Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon; Begg, Drummond; Dixon, Guy

    2015-11-01

    This study is seeking to establish the factors influencing foundation doctors' decision-making when applying for speciality training. A questionnaire was sent to all foundation doctors in Scotland (n = 1602, response rate 34%) asking them about their career intention in relation to General Practice, whether they received career advice and the extent to which certain factors influenced their career choice. For the majority of trainees, General Practice was not their first choice but just under half were considering it as a career. There were significant differences in career choices between the four Scottish regions and between the medical schools, with a greater proportion of those who studied in Aberdeen and Dundee Medical Schools opting for a career in General Practice. Undergraduate GP placement was reported as the strongest influence in favour of a career in General Practice followed by discussion with family and friends and discussion with speciality trainees. There were differences between medical schools in the way hospital placements, General Practice placements and role models influenced career choices. Career advice on General Practice was reported to be less available and more difficult to find.

  11. Discrete mechanics, "time machines" and hybrid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Modifying the discrete mechanics proposed by T.D. Lee, we construct a class of discrete classical Hamiltonian systems, in which time is one of the dynamical variables. This includes a toy model of "time machines" which can travel forward and backward in time and which differ from models based on closed timelike curves (CTCs). In the continuum limit, we explore the interaction between such time reversing machines and quantum mechanical objects, employing a recent description of quantum-classical hybrids.

  12. Discrete Surface Modelling Using Partial Differential Equations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoliang; Pan, Qing; Bajaj, Chandrajit L

    2006-02-01

    We use various nonlinear partial differential equations to efficiently solve several surface modelling problems, including surface blending, N-sided hole filling and free-form surface fitting. The nonlinear equations used include two second order flows, two fourth order flows and two sixth order flows. These nonlinear equations are discretized based on discrete differential geometry operators. The proposed approach is simple, efficient and gives very desirable results, for a range of surface models, possibly having sharp creases and corners.

  13. Terminal Dynamics Approach to Discrete Event Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail; Meyers, Ronald

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses a mathematical formalism for simulation of discrete event dynamic (DED)-a special type of 'man-made' systems to serve specific purposes of information processing. The main objective of this work is to demonstrate that the mathematical formalism for DED can be based upon a terminal model of Newtonian dynamics which allows one to relax Lipschitz conditions at some discrete points.!.

  14. Flooring choices for newborn ICUs.

    PubMed

    White, R D

    2007-12-01

    Floors are a major element of newborn intensive care unit (NICU) construction. They provide visual cues, sound control, and with certain materials, some degree of physical comfort for workers. Flooring materials may entail a significant cost for installation and upkeep and can have substantial ecological impact, both in the choice of the flooring itself, as well as the substances used to clean it. In this article the important aspects to consider for each factor are explored and recommendations are offered for appropriate choices in various NICU areas.

  15. Use of a multiple-choice procedure with college student drinkers.

    PubMed

    Little, Carrie; Correia, Christopher J

    2006-12-01

    The Multiple-Choice Procedure (MCP) was developed to investigate the relationship between drug preferences and alternative reinforcers. The current studies were designed to validate survey and laboratory versions of the MCP with college student drinkers. In Study 1, 320 undergraduates with a recent history of alcohol consumption used a survey version of the MCP to make 120 discrete hypothetical choices between two amounts of alcohol and escalating amounts of money delivered immediately or after a 1-week delay. In Study 2, 21 undergraduates completed a laboratory version of the MCP to make 120 discrete choices involving real alcohol and monetary payments. Responses to both versions of the MCP were related to measures of alcohol use and varied as a function of delay associated with the money choice. Responses to the survey version of the MCP also varied as a function of the amount of alcohol hypothetically available. The results of the 2 studies are consistent with a behavioral choice perspective of alcohol use, which focuses on preferences in the context of competing alternative reinforcers.

  16. More Choice Isn't Always Better

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Choice is important to everyone, for one's identity as well as one's material satisfaction. Everyone has choices, but even the head of state's choices are constrained. In recent years choice has risen up the political agenda in the UK. It has become a key component of the drive to reform public services such as health and education. The…

  17. The Surprising Consensus on School Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jay P.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses whether school choice benefits students who do and do not receive vouchers, noting how choice affects integration and democratic ideals. Overall, there are important benefits for families participating in choice programs. Choice does not cream off the best students. Educational vouchers may influence public schools to improve. Private…

  18. School Choice in an Established Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    This book examines the trend toward markets in UK schools by outlining the varied economic and political arguments both for and against increased parental choice. It describes how choice actually takes place--including when the choice takes place, who has the final say, how many schools are considered, and which choice criteria are reported. One…

  19. The Additive Effects of Choice and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karbowski, Joseph; And Others

    In separate research studies, students who were given a choice of learning materials or who had control over aversive noise, demonstrated higher motivation and better task performance. To investigate the additive effects of choice and control on perception of control, 80 male and female college students participated in a 2 (choice vs. no-choice) X…

  20. Discrete mappings with an explicit discrete Lyapunov function related to integrable mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Hironori; Takahashi, Daisuke; Matsukidaira, Junta

    2006-05-01

    We propose discrete mappings of second order that have a discrete analogue of Lyapunov function. The mappings are extensions of the integrable Quispel-Roberts-Thompson (QRT) mapping, and a discrete Lyapunov function of the mappings is identical to an explicit conserved quantity of the QRT mapping. Moreover we can obtain a differential and an ultradiscrete limit of the mappings preserving the existence of Lyapunov function. We also give applications of a mapping with an adjusted parameter, a probabilistic mapping and coupled mappings.