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Sample records for discriminating power psychometric

  1. Psychometric function of jittered rate pitch discrimination.

    PubMed

    Bahmer, Andreas; Baumann, Uwe

    2014-07-01

    The impact of jitter on rate pitch discrimination (JRPD) is still a matter of debate. Previous studies have used adaptive procedures to assess pitch discrimination abilities of jittered rate pulses (Dobie and Dillier, 1985; Chen et al., 2005) or have used jitter detection thresholds (Fearn, 2001). Previous studies were conducted in a relatively small number of subjects using either a single-electrode cochlear implant (Dobie and Dillier, 1985, n = 2) or the Nucleus multi-channel devices (Fearn, 2001, n = 3; Chen et al., 2005, n = 5). The successful application of an adaptive procedure requires a monotone psychometric function to achieve asymptotic results. The underlying psychometric function of rate jitter has not been investigated so far. In order to close this knowledge gap, the present study determines psychometric functions by measuring of JRPD with a fixed stimulus paradigm. A rather large range of temporal, Gaussian distributed jitter standard deviation 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 ms was applied to electrical pulse patterns. Since the shape of the underlying probability density function (PDF) may also effect JRPD, a uniform PDF was alternatively applied. 7 CI users (8 ears, high-level performers with open-speech perception, MED-EL Pulsar/Sonata devices, Innsbruck, Austria) served as subjects for the experiment. JRPD was assessed with a two-stage forced choice procedure. Gross results showed decreasing JRPD with increasing amounts of jitter independent of the applied jitter distribution. In conclusion, pulse rate jitter affects JRPD and therefore should be considered in current coding strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Psychometric functions for detection and discrimination with and without flankers

    PubMed Central

    García-Pérez, Miguel A.; Alcalá-Quintana, Rocío; Woods, Russell L.; Peli, Eli

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies reported that flanking stimuli broaden the psychometric function and lower detection thresholds. We measured psychometric functions for detection and discrimination with and without flankers to investigate whether these effects occur throughout the contrast continuum. Our results confirm that lower detection thresholds with flankers are accompanied by broader psychometric functions. Psychometric functions for discrimination reveal that discrimination thresholds with and without flankers are similar across standard levels, and that the broadening of psychometric functions with flankers disappears as standard contrast increases, to the point that psychometric functions at high standard levels are virtually identical with or without flankers. Threshold-versus-contrast (TvC) curves with flankers only differ from TvC curves without flankers in occasional shallower dippers and lower branches on the left of the dipper, but they run virtually superimposed at high standard levels. We discuss differences between our results and other results in the literature, and how they are likely attributed to the differential vulnerability of alternative psychophysical procedures to the effects of presentation order. We show that different models of flanker facilitation can fit the data equally well, which stresses that succeeding at fitting a model does not validate it in any sense. PMID:21264745

  3. A Psychometric Review of Measures Assessing Discrimination Against Sexual Minorities.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Todd G; Bishop, C J; Morrison, Melanie A; Parker-Taneo, Kandice

    2016-08-01

    Discrimination against sexual minorities is widespread and has deleterious consequences on victims' psychological and physical wellbeing. However, a review of the psychometric properties of instruments measuring lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) discrimination has not been conducted. The results of this review, which involved evaluating 162 articles, reveal that most have suboptimal psychometric properties. Specifically, myriad scales possess questionable content validity as (1) items are not created in collaboration with sexual minorities; (2) measures possess a small number of items and, thus, may not sufficiently represent the domain of interest; and (3) scales are "adapted" from measures designed to examine race- and gender-based discrimination. Additional limitations include (1) summed scores are computed, often in the absence of scale score reliability metrics; (2) summed scores operate from the questionable assumption that diverse forms of discrimination are necessarily interrelated; (3) the dimensionality of instruments presumed to consist of subscales is seldom tested; (4) tests of criterion-related validity are routinely omitted; and (5) formal tests of measures' construct validity are seldom provided, necessitating that one infer validity based on the results obtained. The absence of "gold standard" measures, the attendant difficulty in formulating a coherent picture of this body of research, and suggestions for psychometric improvements are noted.

  4. Tailoring a psychophysical discrimination experiment upon assessment of the psychometric function: Predictions and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilardi, Andrea; Tabarelli, Davide; Ricci, Leonardo

    2015-02-01

    Decision making is a widespread research topic and plays a crucial role in neuroscience as well as in other research and application fields of, for example, biology, medicine and economics. The most basic implementation of decision making, namely binary discrimination, is successfully interpreted by means of signal detection theory (SDT), a statistical model that is deeply linked to physics. An additional, widespread tool to investigate discrimination ability is the psychometric function, which measures the probability of a given response as a function of the magnitude of a physical quantity underlying the stimulus. However, the link between psychometric functions and binary discrimination experiments is often neglected or misinterpreted. Aim of the present paper is to provide a detailed description of an experimental investigation on a prototypical discrimination task and to discuss the results in terms of SDT. To this purpose, we provide an outline of the theory and describe the implementation of two behavioural experiments in the visual modality: upon the assessment of the so-called psychometric function, we show how to tailor a binary discrimination experiment on performance and decisional bias, and to measure these quantities on a statistical base. Attention is devoted to the evaluation of uncertainties, an aspect which is also often overlooked in the scientific literature.

  5. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Discrimination and Stigma Scale (DISC).

    PubMed

    Brohan, Elaine; Clement, Sarah; Rose, Diana; Sartorius, Norman; Slade, Mike; Thornicroft, Graham

    2013-06-30

    Mental illness is associated with unfair treatment in a number of areas of life. There is currently no psychometrically validated measure that has been developed to specifically focus on such experienced discrimination. This study aimed to finalise the Discrimination and Stigma Scale (DISC) and establish its psychometric properties. The DISC was further developed using (1) service user and interviewer focus groups; (2) reading ease testing; and (3) cognitive debriefing interviews. The revised scale then underwent psychometric testing to establish the following properties: reliability; validity; precision; acceptability; and feasibility. The final 22-item DISC demonstrated good psychometric properties (n=86) including inter-rater reliability (weighted kappa range: 0.62-0.95), internal consistency (α=0.78) and test-retest reliability (n=46) (weighted kappa range: 0.56-0.89). Feasibility, validity and acceptability were also established. In conclusion, the 22-item DISC is recommended for use in measuring experienced stigma and discrimination. Additional work to develop a measure of anticipated stigma is recommended. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Joint entropy for space and spatial frequency domains estimated from psychometric functions of achromatic discrimination.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Vladímir de Aquino; Souza, Givago da Silva; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Rodrigues, Anderson Raiol; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima

    2014-01-01

    We used psychometric functions to estimate the joint entropy for space discrimination and spatial frequency discrimination. Space discrimination was taken as discrimination of spatial extent. Seven subjects were tested. Gábor functions comprising unidimensionalsinusoidal gratings (0.4, 2, and 10 cpd) and bidimensionalGaussian envelopes (1°) were used as reference stimuli. The experiment comprised the comparison between reference and test stimulithat differed in grating's spatial frequency or envelope's standard deviation. We tested 21 different envelope's standard deviations around the reference standard deviation to study spatial extent discrimination and 19 different grating's spatial frequencies around the reference spatial frequency to study spatial frequency discrimination. Two series of psychometric functions were obtained for 2%, 5%, 10%, and 100% stimulus contrast. The psychometric function data points for spatial extent discrimination or spatial frequency discrimination were fitted with Gaussian functions using the least square method, and the spatial extent and spatial frequency entropies were estimated from the standard deviation of these Gaussian functions. Then, joint entropy was obtained by multiplying the square root of space extent entropy times the spatial frequency entropy. We compared our results to the theoretical minimum for unidimensional Gábor functions, 1/4π or 0.0796. At low and intermediate spatial frequencies and high contrasts, joint entropy reached levels below the theoretical minimum, suggesting non-linear interactions between two or more visual mechanisms. We concluded that non-linear interactions of visual pathways, such as the M and P pathways, could explain joint entropy values below the theoretical minimum at low and intermediate spatial frequencies and high contrasts. These non-linear interactions might be at work at intermediate and high contrasts at all spatial frequencies once there was a substantial decrease in joint

  7. Joint Entropy for Space and Spatial Frequency Domains Estimated from Psychometric Functions of Achromatic Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Vladímir de Aquino; Souza, Givago da Silva; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Rodrigues, Anderson Raiol; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima

    2014-01-01

    We used psychometric functions to estimate the joint entropy for space discrimination and spatial frequency discrimination. Space discrimination was taken as discrimination of spatial extent. Seven subjects were tested. Gábor functions comprising unidimensionalsinusoidal gratings (0.4, 2, and 10 cpd) and bidimensionalGaussian envelopes (1°) were used as reference stimuli. The experiment comprised the comparison between reference and test stimulithat differed in grating's spatial frequency or envelope's standard deviation. We tested 21 different envelope's standard deviations around the reference standard deviation to study spatial extent discrimination and 19 different grating's spatial frequencies around the reference spatial frequency to study spatial frequency discrimination. Two series of psychometric functions were obtained for 2%, 5%, 10%, and 100% stimulus contrast. The psychometric function data points for spatial extent discrimination or spatial frequency discrimination were fitted with Gaussian functions using the least square method, and the spatial extent and spatial frequency entropies were estimated from the standard deviation of these Gaussian functions. Then, joint entropy was obtained by multiplying the square root of space extent entropy times the spatial frequency entropy. We compared our results to the theoretical minimum for unidimensional Gábor functions, 1/4π or 0.0796. At low and intermediate spatial frequencies and high contrasts, joint entropy reached levels below the theoretical minimum, suggesting non-linear interactions between two or more visual mechanisms. We concluded that non-linear interactions of visual pathways, such as the M and P pathways, could explain joint entropy values below the theoretical minimum at low and intermediate spatial frequencies and high contrasts. These non-linear interactions might be at work at intermediate and high contrasts at all spatial frequencies once there was a substantial decrease in joint

  8. Psychometric curve and behavioral strategies for whisker-based texture discrimination in rats.

    PubMed

    Morita, Takeshi; Kang, Heejae; Wolfe, Jason; Jadhav, Shantanu P; Feldman, Daniel E

    2011-01-01

    The rodent whisker system is a major model for understanding neural mechanisms for tactile sensation of surface texture (roughness). Rats discriminate surface texture using the whiskers, and several theories exist for how texture information is physically sensed by the long, moveable macrovibrissae and encoded in spiking of neurons in somatosensory cortex. However, evaluating these theories requires a psychometric curve for texture discrimination, which is lacking. Here we trained rats to discriminate rough vs. fine sandpapers and grooved vs. smooth surfaces. Rats intermixed trials at macrovibrissa contact distance (nose >2 mm from surface) with trials at shorter distance (nose <2 mm from surface). Macrovibrissae were required for distant contact trials, while microvibrissae and non-whisker tactile cues were used for short distance trials. A psychometric curve was measured for macrovibrissa-based sandpaper texture discrimination. Rats discriminated rough P150 from smoother P180, P280, and P400 sandpaper (100, 82, 52, and 35 µm mean grit size, respectively). Use of olfactory, visual, and auditory cues was ruled out. This is the highest reported resolution for rodent texture discrimination, and constrains models of neural coding of texture information.

  9. Psychometric properties of the benton visual form discrimination test.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Michael N; Charter, Richard A; Oh, Sindy; Lazar, Michael D; Imperio, Shellah M

    2005-01-01

    Coefficient alpha and an item analysis were calculated for the 16-item Benton Visual Form Discrimination Test (VFDT) using a heterogeneous sample (N = 293) of mostly elderly medical patients who were suspected of having cognitive impairment. The total score reliability was .74. An item analysis found that 15 of the items were within established criteria for item difficulty, however, 5 items were found to be poor discriminators. Through the use of confidence intervals around observed scores, it was shown that the current classification criterion for the VFDT demands a higher reliability coefficient than what was found. Also, evidence for the test's insufficient level of difficulty is presented. It is difficult to recommend this test for clinical use.

  10. DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOMETRIC TESTING OF A MULTIDIMENSIONAL INSTRUMENT OF PERCEIVED DISCRIMINATION AMONG AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE JACKSON HEART STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Mario; Wyatt, Sharon B.; Gutierrez, Mary Lou; Taylor, Herman A.; Williams, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Assessing the discrimination-health disparities hypothesis requires psychometrically sound, multidimensional measures of discrimination. Among the available discrimination measures, few are multidimensional and none have adequate psychometric testing in a large, African American sample. We report the development and psychometric testing of the multidimensional Jackson Heart Study Discrimination (JHSDIS) Instrument. Methods A multidimensional measure assessing the occurrence, frequency, attribution, and coping responses to perceived everyday and lifetime discrimination; lifetime burden of discrimination; and effect of skin color was developed and tested in the 5302-member cohort of the Jackson Heart Study. Internal consistency was calculated by using Cronbach α. coefficient. Confirmatory factor analysis established the dimensions, and intercorrelation coefficients assessed the discriminant validity of the instrument. Setting Tri-county area of the Jackson, MS metropolitan statistical area. Results The JHSDIS was psychometrically sound (overall α=.78, .84 and .77, respectively, for the everyday and lifetime subscales). Confirmatory factor analysis yielded 11 factors, which confirmed the a priori dimensions represented. Conclusions The JHSDIS combined three scales into a single multidimensional instrument with good psychometric properties in a large sample of African Americans. This analysis lays the foundation for using this instrument in research that will examine the association between perceived discrimination and CVD among African Americans. PMID:19341164

  11. Development and psychometric testing of a multidimensional instrument of perceived discrimination among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Sims, Mario; Wyatt, Sharon B; Gutierrez, Mary Lou; Taylor, Herman A; Williams, David R

    2009-01-01

    Assessing the discrimination-health disparities hypothesis requires psychometrically sound, multidimensional measures of discrimination. Among the available discrimination measures, few are multidimensional and none have adequate psychometric testing in a large, African American sample. We report the development and psychometric testing of the multidimensional Jackson Heart Study Discrimination (JHSDIS) Instrument. A multidimensional measure assessing the occurrence, frequency, attribution, and coping responses to perceived everyday and lifetime discrimination; lifetime burden of discrimination; and effect of skin color was developed and tested in the 5302-member cohort of the Jackson Heart Study. Internal consistency was calculated by using Cronbach alpha coefficient. Confirmatory factor analysis established the dimensions, and intercorrelation coefficients assessed the discriminant validity of the instrument. Tri-county area of the Jackson, MS metropolitan statistical area. The JHSDIS was psychometrically sound (overall alpha = .78, .84 and .77, respectively, for the everyday and lifetime subscales). Confirmatory factor analysis yielded 11 factors, which confirmed the a priori dimensions represented. The JHSDIS combined three scales into a single multidimensional instrument with good psychometric properties in a large sample of African Americans. This analysis lays the foundation for using this instrument in research that will examine the association between perceived discrimination and CVD among African Americans.

  12. Psychometric properties of the mobility inventory for agoraphobia: convergent, discriminant, and criterion-related validity.

    PubMed

    Chambless, Dianne L; Sharpless, Brian A; Rodriguez, Dianeth; McCarthy, Kevin S; Milrod, Barbara L; Khalsa, Shabad-Ratan; Barber, Jacques P

    2011-12-01

    Aims of this study were (a) to summarize the psychometric literature on the Mobility Inventory for Agoraphobia (MIA), (b) to examine the convergent and discriminant validity of the MIA's Avoidance Alone and Avoidance Accompanied rating scales relative to clinical severity ratings of anxiety disorders from the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (ADIS), and (c) to establish a cutoff score indicative of interviewers' diagnosis of agoraphobia for the Avoidance Alone scale. A meta-analytic synthesis of 10 published studies yielded positive evidence for internal consistency and convergent and discriminant validity of the scales. Participants in the present study were 129 people with a diagnosis of panic disorder. Internal consistency was excellent for this sample, α=.95 for AAC and .96 for AAL. When the MIA scales were correlated with interviewer ratings, evidence for convergent and discriminant validity for AAL was strong (convergent r with agoraphobia severity ratings=.63 vs. discriminant rs of .10-.29 for other anxiety disorders) and more modest but still positive for AAC (.54 vs. .01-.37). Receiver operating curve analysis indicated that the optimal operating point for AAL as an indicator of ADIS agoraphobia diagnosis was 1.61, which yielded sensitivity of .87 and specificity of .73. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Psychometric Properties of the Mobility Inventory for Agoraphobia: Convergent, Discriminant, and Criterion-Related Validity

    PubMed Central

    Chambless, Dianne L.; Sharpless, Brian A.; Rodriguez, Dianeth; McCarthy, Kevin S.; Milrod, Barbara L.; Khalsa, Shabad-Ratan; Barber, Jacques P.

    2012-01-01

    Aims of this study were (a) to summarize the psychometric literature on the Mobility Inventory for Agoraphobia (MIA), (b) to examine the convergent and discriminant validity of the MIA’s Avoidance Alone and Avoidance Accompanied rating scales relative to clinical severity ratings of anxiety disorders from the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (ADIS), and (c) to establish a cutoff score indicative of interviewers’ diagnosis of agoraphobia for the Avoidance Alone scale. A meta-analytic synthesis of 10 published studies yielded positive evidence for internal consistency and convergent and discriminant validity of the scales. Participants in the present study were 129 people with a diagnosis of panic disorder. Internal consistency was excellent for this sample, α = .95 for AAC and .96 for AAL. When the MIA scales were correlated with interviewer ratings, evidence for convergent and discriminant validity for AAL was strong (convergent r with agoraphobia severity ratings = .63 vs. discriminant rs of .10-.29 for other anxiety disorders) and more modest but still positive for AAC (.54 vs. .01-.37). Receiver operating curve analysis indicated that the optimal operating point for AAL as an indicator of ADIS agoraphobia diagnosis was 1.61, which yielded sensitivity of .87 and specificity of .73. PMID:22035997

  14. Discriminative power of visual attributes in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Giotis, Ioannis; Visser, Margaretha; Jonkman, Marcel; Petkov, Nicolai

    2013-02-01

    Visual characteristics such as color and shape of skin lesions play an important role in the diagnostic process. In this contribution, we quantify the discriminative power of such attributes using an information theoretical approach. We estimate the probability of occurrence of each attribute as a function of the skin diseases. We use the distribution of this probability across the studied diseases and its entropy to define the discriminative power of the attribute. The discriminative power has a maximum value for attributes that occur (or do not occur) for only one disease and a minimum value for those which are equally likely to be observed among all diseases. Verrucous surface, red and brown colors, and the presence of more than 10 lesions are among the most informative attributes. A ranking of attributes is also carried out and used together with a naive Bayesian classifier, yielding results that confirm the soundness of the proposed method. proposed measure is proven to be a reliable way of assessing the discriminative power of dermatological attributes, and it also helps generate a condensed dermatological lexicon. Therefore, it can be of added value to the manual or computer-aided diagnostic process. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Psychometric functions for level discrimination in cochlearly impaired and normal listeners with equivalent-threshold masking.

    PubMed

    Buus, S; Florentine, M; Zwicker, T

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the form of the psychometric functions for level discrimination (also known as intensity discrimination) measured in a two-interval, two-alternative forced-choice paradigm changes with hearing impairment. Measurements of sensitivity, d', as a function of delta L (= 20 log[(p+delta p)lp], where p is pressure) were obtained in six listeners with cochlear impairments, five normal listeners tested in the quiet, and two masked-normal listeners. Stimuli were chosen to encompass a wide range of conditions and difference limens. Results show that the d' is nearly proportional to delta L over the entire range of stimuli. This simple relationship is not changed by cochlear impairments or masking noise. These findings indicate that if the transformation from stimulus intensity to decision variable is affected by hearing impairment or masking, the change affects both the mean and the standard deviation in the same manner--i.e., the standard deviation may be proportional to the derivative of the transformation as was suggested by Zwislocki and Jordan [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 79, 772-780 (1986)]. The results also lend support to the notion that delta L--plotted on a logarithmic scale--is an appropriate representation of level-discrimination performance.

  16. Visual metrics: discriminative power through flexibility.

    PubMed

    Janssen, T J; Blommaert, F J

    2000-01-01

    An important stage in visual processing is the quantification of optical attributes of the outside world. We argue that the metrics used for this quantification are flexible, and that this flexibility is exploited to optimise the discriminative power of the metrics. We derive mathematical expressions for such optimal metrics and show that they exhibit properties resembling well-known visual phenomena. To conclude, we discuss some of the implications of flexible metrics for visual identification.

  17. Effects of measurement errors on psychometric measurements in ergonomics studies: Implications for correlations, ANOVA, linear regression, factor analysis, and linear discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2009-05-01

    This paper aims to demonstrate the effects of measurement errors on psychometric measurements in ergonomics studies. A variety of sources can cause random measurement errors in ergonomics studies and these errors can distort virtually every statistic computed and lead investigators to erroneous conclusions. The effects of measurement errors on five most widely used statistical analysis tools have been discussed and illustrated: correlation; ANOVA; linear regression; factor analysis; linear discriminant analysis. It has been shown that measurement errors can greatly attenuate correlations between variables, reduce statistical power of ANOVA, distort (overestimate, underestimate or even change the sign of) regression coefficients, underrate the explanation contributions of the most important factors in factor analysis and depreciate the significance of discriminant function and discrimination abilities of individual variables in discrimination analysis. The discussions will be restricted to subjective scales and survey methods and their reliability estimates. Other methods applied in ergonomics research, such as physical and electrophysiological measurements and chemical and biomedical analysis methods, also have issues of measurement errors, but they are beyond the scope of this paper. As there has been increasing interest in the development and testing of theories in ergonomics research, it has become very important for ergonomics researchers to understand the effects of measurement errors on their experiment results, which the authors believe is very critical to research progress in theory development and cumulative knowledge in the ergonomics field.

  18. Power of the Independent Samples t Test under a Prevalent Psychometric Measure Distribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawilowsky, Shlomo S.; Hillman, Stephen B.

    1992-01-01

    Notes that studies in psychology often have low power because of inadequate sample size and that prevalent psychometric distributions are sometimes radically nonnormal. Demonstrates robustness of independent samples t-test with respect to Type I error. Shows that researchers may use power tables based on population normality without modification…

  19. Using the MMPI-2-RF to discriminate psychometrically identified schizotypic college students from a matched comparison sample.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Helen K; Bolinskey, P Kevin; Novi, Jonathan H; Hudak, Daniel V; James, Alison V; Myers, Kevin R; Schuder, Kelly M

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the extent to which the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) profiles of 52 individuals making up a psychometrically identified schizotypes (SZT) sample could be successfully discriminated from the protocols of 52 individuals in a matched comparison (MC) sample. Replication analyses were performed with an additional 53 pairs of SZT and MC participants. Results showed significant differences in mean T-score values between these 2 groups across a variety of MMPI-2-RF scales. Results from discriminant function analyses indicate that schizotypy can be predicted effectively using 4 MMPI-2-RF scales and that this method of classification held up on replication. Additional results demonstrated that these MMPI-2-RF scales nominally outperformed MMPI-2 scales suggested by previous research as being indicative of schizophrenia liability. Directions for future research with the MMPI-2-RF are suggested.

  20. Discrimination Power Control for Adaptive Target Tracking Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    Discriminat ion power cont ro l fo r adaptive target tracking applications A. Benaskeur F. Rhéaume DRDC Valcartier Defence R&D Canada – Valcartier...Technical Report DRDC Valcartier TR 2008-016 July 2008 Discrimination power control for adaptive target tracking applications A. Benaskeur F...nationale, 2008 Abstract This report addresses the problem of discrimination power in target tracking applications . More specifically, a closed-loop

  1. The Influence of Temporal Resolution Power and Working Memory Capacity on Psychometric Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troche, Stefan J.; Rammsayer, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    According to the temporal resolution power (TRP) hypothesis, higher TRP as reflected by better performance on psychophysical timing tasks accounts for faster speed of information processing and increased efficiency of information processing leading to better performance on tests of psychometric intelligence. An alternative explanation of…

  2. Psychometric properties of the gaze anxiety rating scale: convergent, discriminant, and factorial validity.

    PubMed

    Langer, Julia K; Rodebaugh, Thomas L; Menatti, Andrew R; Weeks, Justin W; Schneier, Franklin R

    2014-01-01

    Fear and avoidance of gaze are two features thought to be associated with problematic social anxiety. Avoidance of eye contact has been linked with such undesirable traits as deceptiveness, insincerity, and lower self-esteem. The Gaze Anxiety Rating Scale (GARS) is a self-report measure designed to assess gaze anxiety and avoidance, but its psychometric properties have only been assessed in one preliminary study. We further investigated psychometric properties of the GARS by assessing convergent and factorial validity. We obtained a two-factor solution: gaze anxiety and avoidance across situations (1) in general (GARS-General) and (2) related to dominance communication (GARS-Dominance). The GARS-General factor related more strongly to social anxiety than the GARS-Dominance, and convergent validity of the factors was supported by expected relationships with personality and social anxiety variables. Our results indicate that the GARS subscales are psychometrically valid measures of gaze aversion, supporting their use in future study of the relationship between social anxiety and eye contact behavior.

  3. Trial-dependent psychometric functions accounting for perceptual learning in 2-AFC discrimination tasks.

    PubMed

    Kattner, Florian; Cochrane, Aaron; Green, C Shawn

    2017-09-01

    The majority of theoretical models of learning consider learning to be a continuous function of experience. However, most perceptual learning studies use thresholds estimated by fitting psychometric functions to independent blocks, sometimes then fitting a parametric function to these block-wise estimated thresholds. Critically, such approaches tend to violate the basic principle that learning is continuous through time (e.g., by aggregating trials into large "blocks" for analysis that each assume stationarity, then fitting learning functions to these aggregated blocks). To address this discrepancy between base theory and analysis practice, here we instead propose fitting a parametric function to thresholds from each individual trial. In particular, we implemented a dynamic psychometric function whose parameters were allowed to change continuously with each trial, thus parameterizing nonstationarity. We fit the resulting continuous time parametric model to data from two different perceptual learning tasks. In nearly every case, the quality of the fits derived from the continuous time parametric model outperformed the fits derived from a nonparametric approach wherein separate psychometric functions were fit to blocks of trials. Because such a continuous trial-dependent model of perceptual learning also offers a number of additional advantages (e.g., the ability to extrapolate beyond the observed data; the ability to estimate performance on individual critical trials), we suggest that this technique would be a useful addition to each psychophysicist's analysis toolkit.

  4. A Study on Mental Tasks Discriminative Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrea, Dan Marius; Dobrea, Monica-Claudia

    The present study was done as part of a more complex project whose final aim is to design and implement an autonomic self-organizing system, mentally commanded by an user giving one of the 4 possible commands: forth, back, left, right. For this, we used the most studied method for designing non-invasive brain-computer interface (BCI), namely, the electroencephalogram (EEG) signals acquired during mental tasks. To command, in real-time, the system requires very discriminative mental tasks to be used to trigger the corresponding device commands. The novelty of our paper consists in revealing the great importance the preliminary selecting process of subject-specific set of tasks plays within the implementation of any particular BCI application. In this idea, our research focuses on an extensive analysis of twelve mental tasks; the processing and classification approaches used by us are classical ones.

  5. Psychometrics for the Cost Conscious: Using Discriminant Analysis to Refine Estimates of Program Cost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Raymond J.

    This presentation uses data from a long-term juvenile diversion counseling program to illustrate a sample method of estimating program cost. Several problems in using average cost figures are first presented. Then a method is described in which discriminant analysis can be used to refine cost comparisons. This makes it possible to produce…

  6. Teaching for Change: The Difference, Power, and Discrimination Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xing, Jun, Ed.; Li, Judith, Ed.; Roper, Larry D., Ed.; Shaw, Susan M., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past three decades, American higher education has witnessed a shift in demographics which has created a more diverse student body. However, many university campuses remain unsupportive or even hostile to minority faculty and students. This anthology introduces to readers the Difference, Power, and Discrimination (DPD) Program, a…

  7. Teaching for Change: The Difference, Power, and Discrimination Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xing, Jun, Ed.; Li, Judith, Ed.; Roper, Larry D., Ed.; Shaw, Susan M., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past three decades, American higher education has witnessed a shift in demographics which has created a more diverse student body. However, many university campuses remain unsupportive or even hostile to minority faculty and students. This anthology introduces to readers the Difference, Power, and Discrimination (DPD) Program, a…

  8. Fixed vs. variable noise in 2AFC contrast discrimination: lessons from psychometric functions.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Miguel A; Alcalá-Quintana, Rocío

    2009-01-01

    Recent discussion regarding whether the noise that limits 2AFC discrimination performance is fixed or variable has focused either on describing experimental methods that presumably dissociate the effects of response mean and variance or on reanalyzing a published data set with the aim of determining how to solve the question through goodness-of-fit statistics. This paper illustrates that the question cannot be solved by fitting models to data and assessing goodness-of-fit because data on detection and discrimination performance can be indistinguishably fitted by models that assume either type of noise when each is coupled with a convenient form for the transducer function. Thus, success or failure at fitting a transducer model merely illustrates the capability (or lack thereof) of some particular combination of transducer function and variance function to account for the data, but it cannot disclose the nature of the noise. We also comment on some of the issues that have been raised in recent exchange on the topic, namely, the existence of additional constraints for the models, the presence of asymmetric asymptotes, the likelihood of history-dependent noise, and the potential of certain experimental methods to dissociate the effects of response mean and variance.

  9. Improving the estimation of psychometric functions in 2AFC discrimination tasks.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Miguel A; Alcalá-Quintana, Rocío

    2011-01-01

    Ulrich and Vorberg (2009) presented a method that fits distinct functions for each order of presentation of standard and test stimuli in a two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) discrimination task, which removes the contaminating influence of order effects from estimates of the difference limen. The two functions are fitted simultaneously under the constraint that their average evaluates to 0.5 when test and standard have the same magnitude, which was regarded as a general property of 2AFC tasks. This constraint implies that physical identity produces indistinguishability, which is valid when test and standard are identical except for magnitude along the dimension of comparison. However, indistinguishability does not occur at physical identity when test and standard differ on dimensions other than that along which they are compared (e.g., vertical and horizontal lines of the same length are not perceived to have the same length). In these cases, the method of Ulrich and Vorberg cannot be used. We propose a generalization of their method for use in such cases and illustrate it with data from a 2AFC experiment involving length discrimination of horizontal and vertical lines. The resultant data could be fitted with our generalization but not with the method of Ulrich and Vorberg. Further extensions of this method are discussed.

  10. A systematic review of the psychometric properties of the Sexual Relationship Power Scale in HIV/AIDS research.

    PubMed

    McMahon, James M; Volpe, Ellen M; Klostermann, Keith; Trabold, Nicole; Xue, Ying

    2015-02-01

    The Sexual Relationship Power Scale (SRPS) was developed over a decade ago to address the lack of reliable and valid measures of relationship power in social, behavioral and medical research. The SRPS and its two subscales (relationship control [RC], decision-making dominance [DMD]) have been used extensively in the field of HIV prevention and sexual risk behavior. We performed a systematic review of the psychometric properties of the SRPS and subscales as reported in the HIV/AIDS literature from 2000 to 2012. A total of 54 published articles were identified, which reported reliability or construct validity estimates of the scales. Description of the psychometric properties of the SRPS and subscales is reported according to study population, and several cross-population trends were identified. In general, the SRPS and RC subscale exhibited sound psychometric properties across multiple study populations and research settings. By contrast, the DMD subscale had relatively weak psychometric properties, especially when used with specific populations and research settings. Factors that influenced the psychometric properties of the various scales and subscales included the study population, mean age of the sample, number of items retained in the scale, and modifications to the original scales. We conclude with recommendations for (1) the application and use of the SRPS and subscales, (2) reporting of psychometric properties of the scales in the literature, and (3) areas for future research.

  11. A Systematic Review of the Psychometric Properties of the Sexual Relationship Power Scale in HIV/AIDS Research

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, James M.; Volpe, Ellen M.; Klostermann, Keith; Trabold, Nicole; Xue, Ying

    2014-01-01

    The Sexual Relationship Power Scale (SRPS) was developed over a decade ago to address the lack of reliable and valid measures of relationship power in social, behavioral and medical research. The SRPS and its two subscales (relationship control [RC], decision-making dominance [DMD]) have been used extensively in the field of HIV prevention and sexual risk behavior. We performed a systematic review of the psychometric properties of the SRPS and subscales as reported in the HIV/AIDS literature from 2000 to 2012. A total of 54 published articles were identified that reported reliability or construct validity estimates of the scales. Description of the psychometric properties of the SRPS and subscales are reported according to study population, and several cross-population trends were identified. In general, the SRPS and RC subscale exhibited sound psychometric properties across multiple study populations and research settings. By contrast, the DMD subscale had relatively weak psychometric properties, especially when used with specific populations and research settings. Factors that influenced the psychometric properties of the various scales and subscales included the study population, mean age of the sample, number of items retained in the scale, and modifications to the original scales. We conclude with recommendations for (a) the application and use of the SRPS and subscales, (b) reporting of psychometric properties of the scales in the literature, and (c) areas for future research. PMID:25331613

  12. Evaluating Item Discrimination Power of WHOQOL-BREF from an Item Response Model Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Ting Hsiang; Yao, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has become an important component of health. By using the methodology of psychometric theory, we examine the item properties of the WHOQOL-BRIEF. Samejima's graded response model with natural metrics of the logistic response function was fitted. The results showed items with negative natures were less discriminating. Items…

  13. Evaluating Item Discrimination Power of WHOQOL-BREF from an Item Response Model Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Ting Hsiang; Yao, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has become an important component of health. By using the methodology of psychometric theory, we examine the item properties of the WHOQOL-BRIEF. Samejima's graded response model with natural metrics of the logistic response function was fitted. The results showed items with negative natures were less discriminating. Items…

  14. Discriminant power analyses of non-linear dimension expansion methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Seongyoun; Lee, Chulhee

    2016-05-01

    Most non-linear classification methods can be viewed as non-linear dimension expansion methods followed by a linear classifier. For example, the support vector machine (SVM) expands the dimensions of the original data using various kernels and classifies the data in the expanded data space using a linear SVM. In case of extreme learning machines or neural networks, the dimensions are expanded by hidden neurons and the final layer represents the linear classification. In this paper, we analyze the discriminant powers of various non-linear classifiers. Some analyses of the discriminating powers of non-linear dimension expansion methods are presented along with a suggestion of how to improve separability in non-linear classifiers.

  15. Choice ball: a response interface for two-choice psychometric discrimination in head-fixed mice.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Joshua I; Kepecs, Adam

    2012-12-01

    The mouse is an important model system for investigating the neural circuits mediating behavior. Because of advances in imaging and optogenetic methods, head-fixed mouse preparations provide an unparalleled opportunity to observe and control neural circuits. To investigate how neural circuits produce behavior, these methods need to be paired with equally well-controlled and monitored behavioral paradigms. Here, we introduce the choice ball, a response device that enables two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) tasks in head-fixed mice based on the readout of lateral paw movements. We demonstrate the advantages of the choice ball by training mice in the random-click task, a two-choice auditory discrimination behavior. For each trial, mice listened to binaural streams of Poisson-distributed clicks and were required to roll the choice ball laterally toward the side with the greater click rate. In this assay, mice performed hundreds of trials per session with accuracy ranging from 95% for easy stimuli (large interaural click-rate contrast) to near chance level for low-contrast stimuli. We also show, using the record of individual paw strokes, that mice often reverse decisions they have already initiated and that decision reversals correlate with improved performance. The choice ball enables head-fixed 2AFC paradigms, facilitating the circuit-level analysis of sensory processing, decision making, and motor control in mice.

  16. Brief version of the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI) scale: psychometric properties and relationship to depression, self esteem, recovery orientation, empowerment, and perceived devaluation and discrimination.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Jennifer E; Otilingam, Poorni G; Deforge, Bruce R

    2014-03-01

    The internalized stigma of mental illness impedes recovery and is associated with increased depression, reduced self-esteem, reduced recovery orientation, reduced empowerment, and increased perceived devaluation and discrimination. The Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI) scale is a 29-item self-report questionnaire developed with consumer input that includes the following subscales: Alienation, Discrimination Experience, Social Withdrawal, Stereotype Endorsement, and Stigma Resistance. Here we present a 10-item version of the ISMI containing the two strongest items from each subscale. Participants were all outpatient veterans with serious mental illness. Following the rigorous scale-reduction methods set forth by Stanton and colleagues (2002), we selected the 10 items, tested the psychometrics of the shortened scale in the original validation sample (N = 127), and cross-checked the results in a second dataset (N = 760). As expected, the ISMI-10 retained the essential properties of the ISMI-29, including adequate internal consistency reliability and external validity in relation to depression, self-esteem, recovery orientation, perceived devaluation and discrimination, and empowerment. The ISMI-10 scores are normally distributed and have similar descriptive statistics to the ISMI-29. The reliability and depression findings were replicated in a cross-validation sample. We conclude that the ISMI-10 has strong psychometric properties and is a practical, reliable, and valid alternative to the original ISMI-29. Future work should test the ISMI-10 in more diverse samples. This shorter version should reduce respondent burden in program evaluation projects that seek to determine whether participation in psychosocial rehabilitation programming reduces internalized stigma.

  17. Forging Harmony in the Social Organism: Industry and the Power of Psychometric Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses the initiating role of the steel industry in educational selection by means of psychometric techniques used in the psycho-physiological laboratory associated with a vocational school in Luxembourg founded in 1914. It first considers the origins of, and initial meanings bestowed upon, this first (and perhaps also last)…

  18. Forging Harmony in the Social Organism: Industry and the Power of Psychometric Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses the initiating role of the steel industry in educational selection by means of psychometric techniques used in the psycho-physiological laboratory associated with a vocational school in Luxembourg founded in 1914. It first considers the origins of, and initial meanings bestowed upon, this first (and perhaps also last)…

  19. Four Theorems on the Psychometric Function

    PubMed Central

    May, Keith A.; Solomon, Joshua A.

    2013-01-01

    In a 2-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) discrimination task, observers choose which of two stimuli has the higher value. The psychometric function for this task gives the probability of a correct response for a given stimulus difference, . This paper proves four theorems about the psychometric function. Assuming the observer applies a transducer and adds noise, Theorem 1 derives a convenient general expression for the psychometric function. Discrimination data are often fitted with a Weibull function. Theorem 2 proves that the Weibull “slope” parameter, , can be approximated by , where is the of the Weibull function that fits best to the cumulative noise distribution, and depends on the transducer. We derive general expressions for and , from which we derive expressions for specific cases. One case that follows naturally from our general analysis is Pelli's finding that, when , . We also consider two limiting cases. Theorem 3 proves that, as sensitivity improves, 2AFC performance will usually approach that for a linear transducer, whatever the actual transducer; we show that this does not apply at signal levels where the transducer gradient is zero, which explains why it does not apply to contrast detection. Theorem 4 proves that, when the exponent of a power-function transducer approaches zero, 2AFC performance approaches that of a logarithmic transducer. We show that the power-function exponents of 0.4–0.5 fitted to suprathreshold contrast discrimination data are close enough to zero for the fitted psychometric function to be practically indistinguishable from that of a log transducer. Finally, Weibull reflects the shape of the noise distribution, and we used our results to assess the recent claim that internal noise has higher kurtosis than a Gaussian. Our analysis of for contrast discrimination suggests that, if internal noise is stimulus-independent, it has lower kurtosis than a Gaussian. PMID:24124456

  20. Discrimination Power of Polynomial-Based Descriptors for Graphs by Using Functional Matrices.

    PubMed

    Dehmer, Matthias; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Shi, Yongtang; Stefu, Monica; Tripathi, Shailesh

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the discrimination power of graph measures that are based on graph-theoretical matrices. The paper generalizes the work of [M. Dehmer, M. Moosbrugger. Y. Shi, Encoding structural information uniquely with polynomial-based descriptors by employing the Randić matrix, Applied Mathematics and Computation, 268(2015), 164-168]. We demonstrate that by using the new functional matrix approach, exhaustively generated graphs can be discriminated more uniquely than shown in the mentioned previous work.

  1. Prestimulus Alpha Power Influences Tactile Temporal Perceptual Discrimination and Confidence in Decisions.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Thomas J; Schnitzler, Alfons; Lange, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that prestimulus alpha-band activity substantially influences perception of near-threshold stimuli. Here, we studied the influence of prestimulus alpha power fluctuations on temporal perceptual discrimination of suprathreshold tactile stimuli and subjects' confidence regarding their perceptual decisions. We investigated how prestimulus alpha-band power influences poststimulus decision-making variables. We presented electrical stimuli with different stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) to human subjects, and determined the SOA for which temporal perceptual discrimination varied on a trial-by-trial basis between perceiving 1 or 2 stimuli, prior to recording brain activity with magnetoencephalography. We found that low prestimulus alpha power in contralateral somatosensory and occipital areas predicts the veridical temporal perceptual discrimination of 2 stimuli. Additionally, prestimulus alpha power was negatively correlated with confidence ratings in correctly perceived trials, but positively correlated for incorrectly perceived trials. Finally, poststimulus event-related fields (ERFs) were modulated by prestimulus alpha power and reflect the result of a decisional process rather than physical stimulus parameters around ∼150 ms. These findings provide new insights into the link between spontaneous prestimulus alpha power fluctuations, temporal perceptual discrimination, decision making, and decisional confidence. The results suggest that prestimulus alpha power modulates perception and decisions on a continuous scale, as reflected in confidence ratings.

  2. Measure of the impact of future dark energy experiments based on discriminating power among quintessence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Michael; Abrahamse, Augusta; Albrecht, Andreas; Bozek, Brandon; Yashar, Mark

    2008-08-01

    We evaluate the ability of future data sets to discriminate among different quintessence dark energy models. This approach gives an alternative (and complementary) measure for assessing the impact of future experiments, as compared with the large body of literature that compares experiments in abstract parameter spaces (such as the well-known w0-wa parameters) and more recent work that evaluates the constraining power of experiments on individual parameter spaces of specific quintessence models. We use the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) models of future data sets and compare the discriminative power of experiments designated by the DETF as stages 2, 3, and 4 (denoting increasing capabilities). Our work reveals a minimal increase in discriminating power when comparing stage 3 to stage 2, but a very striking increase in discriminating power when going to stage 4 (including the possibility of completely eliminating some quintessence models). We also see evidence that even modest improvements over DETF stage 4 (which many believe are realistic) could result in even more dramatic discriminating power among quintessence dark energy models. We develop and demonstrate the technique of using the independently measured modes of the equation of state (derived from principle component analysis) as a common parameter space in which to compare the different quintessence models, and we argue that this technique is a powerful one. We use the PNGB, Exponential, Albrecht-Skordis, and Inverse Tracker (or inverse power law) quintessence models for this work. One of our main results is that the goal of discriminating among these models sets a concrete measure on the capabilities of future dark energy experiments. Experiments have to be somewhat better than DETF stage 4 simulated experiments to fully meet this goal.

  3. Machine Learning for Power System Disturbance and Cyber-attack Discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, Raymond Charles; Beaver, Justin M; Buckner, Mark A; Morris, Thomas; Adhikari, Uttam; Pan, Shengyi

    2014-01-01

    Power system disturbances are inherently complex and can be attributed to a wide range of sources, including both natural and man-made events. Currently, the power system operators are heavily relied on to make decisions regarding the causes of experienced disturbances and the appropriate course of action as a response. In the case of cyber-attacks against a power system, human judgment is less certain since there is an overt attempt to disguise the attack and deceive the operators as to the true state of the system. To enable the human decision maker, we explore the viability of machine learning as a means for discriminating types of power system disturbances, and focus specifically on detecting cyber-attacks where deception is a core tenet of the event. We evaluate various machine learning methods as disturbance discriminators and discuss the practical implications for deploying machine learning systems as an enhancement to existing power system architectures.

  4. Enhanced discriminability for nonbiological motion violating the two-thirds power law.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Roy; Goldstein, Ariel; Vuillaume, Laurène; Faivre, Nathan; Hassin, Ran R; Blanke, Olaf

    2016-06-01

    The two-thirds power law describes the relationship between velocity and curvature in human motor movements. Interestingly, this motor law also affects visual motion perception, in which stimuli moving according to the two-thirds power law are perceived to have a constant velocity compared to stimuli actually moving at constant velocity. Thus, visual motion adhering to biological motion principles causes a kinematic illusion of smooth and velocity-invariant motion. However, it is yet unclear how this motion law affects the discrimination of visual stimuli and if its encoding requires attention. Here we tested the perceptual discrimination of stimuli following biological (two-thirds power law) or nonbiological movement under conditions in which the stimuli were degraded or masked through continuous flash suppression. Additionally, we tested subjective perception of naturalness and velocity consistency. Our results show that the discriminability of a visual target is inversely related to the perceived "naturalness" of its movement. Discrimination of stimuli following the two-thirds power law required more time than the same stimuli moving at constant velocity or nonecological variants of the two-thirds power law and was present for both masked and degraded stimuli.

  5. A Discriminant Analysis of Attitudes Related to the Nuclear Power Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girondi, Alfred J.

    1983-01-01

    This study was designed to develop a test instrument for measuring selected attitudes toward nuclear power, determine if attitudinal differences existed between selected groups of individuals, describe group differences in attitude, and classify group members as either anti- or pronuclear. Results, based on discriminant analysis, are reported and…

  6. Psychometric properties of a Power Mobility Caregiver Assistive Technology Outcome Measure.

    PubMed

    Mortenson, W Ben; Demers, Louise; Rushton, Paula W; Auger, Claudine; Routhier, François; Miller, William C

    2017-01-01

    Caregiver burnout is a serious concern among informal caregivers, especially for those who provide care to individuals with more severe limitations such as power mobility users. The Power Wheelchair Caregiver Assistive Technology Outcome Measure tool measures device specific and overall burden experienced by informal caregivers of power mobility users. A one-month, test-retest study was conducted to examine the reliability, internal consistency, and construct validity of the Power Wheelchair Caregiver Assistive Technology Outcome Measure. Two construct validity measures were administered: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Late Life Disability Index. The test-retest-reliabilities of part 1 (power wheelchair specific burden) and part 2 (general caregiving burden) were 0.769 and 0.843 respectively. Scores on part 1 were moderately and positively correlated with part 2 and with frequency of participation. Scores on part 2 were moderately and negatively correlated with anxiety, depression, and positively with perceived limitation of participation. The strength and direction of these correlations provide support for the construct validity of the measure and suggest part 1 and part 2 provide complementary information. Further testing is needed to assess the clinical utility and responsiveness of the measure.

  7. Four theorems on the psychometric function.

    PubMed

    May, Keith A; Solomon, Joshua A

    2013-01-01

    In a 2-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) discrimination task, observers choose which of two stimuli has the higher value. The psychometric function for this task gives the probability of a correct response for a given stimulus difference, Δx. This paper proves four theorems about the psychometric function. Assuming the observer applies a transducer and adds noise, Theorem 1 derives a convenient general expression for the psychometric function. Discrimination data are often fitted with a Weibull function. Theorem 2 proves that the Weibull "slope" parameter, β, can be approximated by β(Noise) x β(Transducer), where β(Noise) is the β of the Weibull function that fits best to the cumulative noise distribution, and β(Transducer) depends on the transducer. We derive general expressions for β(Noise) and β(Transducer), from which we derive expressions for specific cases. One case that follows naturally from our general analysis is Pelli's finding that, when d' ∝ (Δx)(b), β ≈ β(Noise) x b. We also consider two limiting cases. Theorem 3 proves that, as sensitivity improves, 2AFC performance will usually approach that for a linear transducer, whatever the actual transducer; we show that this does not apply at signal levels where the transducer gradient is zero, which explains why it does not apply to contrast detection. Theorem 4 proves that, when the exponent of a power-function transducer approaches zero, 2AFC performance approaches that of a logarithmic transducer. We show that the power-function exponents of 0.4-0.5 fitted to suprathreshold contrast discrimination data are close enough to zero for the fitted psychometric function to be practically indistinguishable from that of a log transducer. Finally, Weibull β reflects the shape of the noise distribution, and we used our results to assess the recent claim that internal noise has higher kurtosis than a Gaussian. Our analysis of β for contrast discrimination suggests that, if internal noise is stimulus

  8. Prestimulus alpha-band power biases visual discrimination confidence, but not accuracy.

    PubMed

    Samaha, Jason; Iemi, Luca; Postle, Bradley R

    2017-09-01

    The magnitude of power in the alpha-band (8-13Hz) of the electroencephalogram (EEG) prior to the onset of a near threshold visual stimulus predicts performance. Together with other findings, this has been interpreted as evidence that alpha-band dynamics reflect cortical excitability. We reasoned, however, that non-specific changes in excitability would be expected to influence signal and noise in the same way, leaving actual discriminability unchanged. Indeed, using a two-choice orientation discrimination task, we found that discrimination accuracy was unaffected by fluctuations in prestimulus alpha power. Decision confidence, on the other hand, was strongly negatively correlated with prestimulus alpha power. This finding constitutes a clear dissociation between objective and subjective measures of visual perception as a function of prestimulus cortical excitability. This dissociation is predicted by a model where the balance of evidence supporting each choice drives objective performance but only the magnitude of evidence supporting the selected choice drives subjective reports, suggesting that human perceptual confidence can be suboptimal with respect to tracking objective accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Discrimination power of Investigator DIPplex loci in Finnish and Somali populations.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, Anu M; Palo, Jukka U; Hedman, Minttu; Sajantila, Antti

    2012-07-01

    In this study, the suitability of the Investigator DIPplex insertion/deletion polymorphism (indel) kit for forensic casework was assessed through the genotyping of 151 Finns and 175 Somalis. Allele frequency and heterozygosity (H) of this 30-indel marker set were determined, and forensic efficacy was evaluated through estimation of discrimination power (DP), match probability (MP), typical paternity index (TPI), power of paternity exclusion (PE), and polymorphic information content (PIC). A high level of discrimination power was observed for the marker set in both sample groups (CDP>0.9999). East-west population substructure found previously in uniparental markers within Finland was not evident for this autosomal set (E-W F(ST)=0.003). High exclusion probability and low subdivision together demonstrate that these markers are well-suited for identification of individuals in Finland. However, values for typical paternity index and power of paternity exclusion were low (TPI range Finns=0.750-1.190, PE=0.996; TPI Somalis=0.680-1.090, PE=0.986) in comparison to standard STR sets, and thus indels are not recommended for use in paternity or kinship investigations, except as a supplement to other more powerful tools.

  10. Discriminative power of different nonmotor signs in early Parkinson's disease. A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Nico J; Pieri, Vannina; Hipp, Géraldine; Rufra, Olivier; Blyth, Sara; Vaillant, Michel

    2010-05-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the discriminative power of different nonmotor signs for early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirty patients with PD with discriminated patients with PD from healthy controls. Visual deficits showed the largest area under the ROC curve (0.83), followed by hyposmia (0.81) and dysautonomia (0.80). When combining the DD visual deficits and dysautonomia, the best residual model was obtained; it maximized both sensitivity and specificity for PD at a level of 0.77. At an early disease stage, several nonmotor domains were already able to discriminate patients with PD from healthy controls. Visual deficits had the best discriminatory power. Being brief and inexpensive, visual tests should be further investigated in larger cohorts as potential screening tool for early PD.

  11. Does Spontaneous Favorability to Power (vs. Universalism) Values Predict Spontaneous Prejudice and Discrimination?

    PubMed

    Souchon, Nicolas; Maio, Gregory R; Hanel, Paul H P; Bardin, Brigitte

    2017-10-01

    We conducted five studies testing whether an implicit measure of favorability toward power over universalism values predicts spontaneous prejudice and discrimination. Studies 1 (N = 192) and 2 (N = 86) examined correlations between spontaneous favorability toward power (vs. universalism) values, achievement (vs. benevolence) values, and a spontaneous measure of prejudice toward ethnic minorities. Study 3 (N = 159) tested whether conditioning participants to associate power values with positive adjectives and universalism values with negative adjectives (or inversely) affects spontaneous prejudice. Study 4 (N = 95) tested whether decision bias toward female handball players could be predicted by spontaneous attitude toward power (vs. universalism) values. Study 5 (N = 123) examined correlations between spontaneous attitude toward power (vs. universalism) values, spontaneous importance toward power (vs. universalism) values, and spontaneous prejudice toward Black African people. Spontaneous positivity toward power (vs. universalism) values was associated with spontaneous negativity toward minorities and predicted gender bias in a decision task, whereas the explicit measures did not. These results indicate that the implicit assessment of evaluative responses attached to human values helps to model value-attitude-behavior relations. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Personality Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Geographical origin discrimination of Auricularia auricula using variable selection method of modeling power].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Sun, Guang-ming; He, Yong

    2010-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with variable selection method of modeling power was investigated for the fast and accurate geographical origin discrimination of auricularia auricula. A total of 240 samples of auriculari auricula were collected in the market, and the spectra of all samples were scanned within the spectral region of 1100-2500 nm. The calibration set was composed of 180 (45 samples for each origin) samples, and the remaining 60 samples were employed as the validation set. The optimal partial least squares (PLS) discriminant model was achieved after performance comparison of different preprocessing (Savitzky-Golay smoothing, standard normal variate, 1-derivative, and 2-derivative). The effective wavelengths, which were selected by modeling power (MP) and used as input data matrix of least squares-support vector machine (LS-SVM), were employed for the development of modeling power-least squares-support vector machine (MP-LS-SVM) model. Radial basis function (RBF) kernel was applied as kernel function. Three threshold methods for variable selection by modeling power were applied in MP-LSSVM models, and there were the values of modeling power higher than 0.95, higher than 0.90, and higher than 0.90 combined with peak location (0.90+Peak). The correct recognition ratio in the validation set was used as evaluation standards. The absolute error of prediction was set as 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5, which showed the wrong recognition threshold value. The results indicated that the MP-LS-SVM (0.90+Peak) model could achieve the optimal performance in all three absolute error standards (0.1, 0.2 and 0.5), and the correct recognition ratio was 98.3%, 100% and 100%, respectively. The variable selection threshold (0.90+Peak) was the most suitable one in the application of modeling power. It was concluded that modeling power was an effective variable selection method, and near infrared spectroscopy combined with MP-LS-SVM model was successfully applied for the origin

  13. [Content and form characteristics that predict discriminating power in personality items: an item response theory-based analysis].

    PubMed

    Ferrando Piera, Pere Joan; Demestre Viladevall, Josep

    2008-11-01

    In two personality item pools that measure extraversion and neuroticism, the relations between three groups of itemmetric properties and the estimated discrimination indexes according to the two-parameter model are assessed. The itemmetric properties, which are conceptualized as dimensions, are: verbal complexity, ambiguity, and trait indicativity, and the hypotheses concerning their impact on the discriminating power are derived from a processing-stage model. The dimension of trait indicativity shows the clearest relations with the discriminating power in the expected direction. The implications of the results in the construction of personality measures are discussed.

  14. Coding region SNP analysis to enhance dog mtDNA discrimination power in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Verscheure, Sophie; Backeljau, Thierry; Desmyter, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    The high population frequencies of three control region haplotypes contribute to the low discrimination power of the dog mtDNA control region. It also diminishes the evidential power of a match with one of these haplotypes in forensic casework. A mitochondrial genome study of 214 Belgian dogs suggested 26 polymorphic coding region sites that successfully resolved dogs with the three most frequent control region haplotypes. In this study, three SNP assays were developed to determine the identity of the 26 informative sites. The control region of 132 newly sampled dogs was sequenced and added to the study of 214 dogs. The assays were applied to 58 dogs of the haplotypes of interest, which confirmed their suitability for enhancing dog mtDNA discrimination power. In the Belgian population study of 346 dogs, the set of 26 sites divided the dogs into 25 clusters of mtGenome sequences with substantially lower population frequency estimates than their control region sequences. In case of a match with one of the three control region haplotypes, using these three SNP assays in conjunction with control region sequencing would augment the exclusion probability of dog mtDNA analysis from 92.9% to 97.0%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessing the discriminating power of roughness parameters using a roughness databank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigerelle, M.; Marteau, J.; Blateyron, F.

    2017-06-01

    This article presents a methodology based on the use of a surface databank, which aims at assessing the discriminating power of 3D roughness parameters. The presented databank is composed of fourteen different sets of surfaces belonging to two main tribological categories: integrity and functionality. Each set of surface is composed of two classes, called A and B. These classes are obtained by varying process conditions or study parameters. The proposed methodology is first thoroughly described in the general case of comparing two classes of one set of 3D surfaces. Then, sandblasted surfaces are used as an example before applying the methodology to the entire database.

  16. Robust Pilot Decontamination Based on Joint Angle and Power Domain Discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Haifan; Cottatellucci, Laura; Gesbert, David; Muller, Ralf R.; He, Gaoning

    2016-06-01

    We address the problem of noise and interference corrupted channel estimation in massive MIMO systems. Interference, which originates from pilot reuse (or contamination), can in principle be discriminated on the basis of the distributions of path angles and amplitudes. In this paper we propose novel robust channel estimation algorithms exploiting path diversity in both angle and power domains, relying on a suitable combination of the spatial filtering and amplitude based projection. The proposed approaches are able to cope with a wide range of system and topology scenarios, including those where, unlike in previous works, interference channel may overlap with desired channels in terms of multipath angles of arrival or exceed them in terms of received power. In particular we establish analytically the conditions under which the proposed channel estimator is fully decontaminated. Simulation results confirm the overall system gains when using the new methods.

  17. Gait characteristics and their discriminative power in geriatric patients with and without cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Kikkert, Lisette H J C; Vuillerme, Nicolas; van Campen, Jos P; Appels, Bregje A; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Lamoth, Claudine J

    2017-08-15

    A detailed gait analysis (e.g., measures related to speed, self-affinity, stability, and variability) can help to unravel the underlying causes of gait dysfunction, and identify cognitive impairment. However, because geriatric patients present with multiple conditions that also affect gait, results from healthy old adults cannot easily be extrapolated to geriatric patients. Hence, we (1) quantified gait outcomes based on dynamical systems theory, and (2) determined their discriminative power in three groups: healthy old adults, geriatric patients with- and geriatric patients without cognitive impairment. For the present cross-sectional study, 25 healthy old adults recruited from community (65 ± 5.5 years), and 70 geriatric patients with (n = 39) and without (n = 31) cognitive impairment from the geriatric dayclinic of the MC Slotervaart hospital in Amsterdam (80 ± 6.6 years) were included. Participants walked for 3 min during single- and dual-tasking at self-selected speed while 3D trunk accelerations were registered with an IPod touch G4. We quantified 23 gait outcomes that reflect multiple gait aspects. A multivariate model was built using Partial Least Square- Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) that best modelled participant group from gait outcomes. For single-task walking, the PLS-DA model consisted of 4 Latent Variables that explained 63 and 41% of the variance in gait outcomes and group, respectively. Outcomes related to speed, regularity, predictability, and stability of trunk accelerations revealed with the highest discriminative power (VIP > 1). A high proportion of healthy old adults (96 and 93% for single- and dual-task, respectively) was correctly classified based on the gait outcomes. The discrimination of geriatric patients with and without cognitive impairment was poor, with 57% (single-task) and 64% (dual-task) of the patients misclassified. While geriatric patients vs. healthy old adults walked slower, and less regular, predictable, and

  18. The discriminant power of RNA features for pre-miRNA recognition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Computational discovery of microRNAs (miRNA) is based on pre-determined sets of features from miRNA precursors (pre-miRNA). Some feature sets are composed of sequence-structure patterns commonly found in pre-miRNAs, while others are a combination of more sophisticated RNA features. In this work, we analyze the discriminant power of seven feature sets, which are used in six pre-miRNA prediction tools. The analysis is based on the classification performance achieved with these feature sets for the training algorithms used in these tools. We also evaluate feature discrimination through the F-score and feature importance in the induction of random forests. Results Small or non-significant differences were found among the estimated classification performances of classifiers induced using sets with diversification of features, despite the wide differences in their dimension. Inspired in these results, we obtained a lower-dimensional feature set, which achieved a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 95%. These estimates are within 0.1% of the maximal values obtained with any feature set (SELECT, Section “Results and discussion”) while it is 34 times faster to compute. Even compared to another feature set (FS2, see Section “Results and discussion”), which is the computationally least expensive feature set of those from the literature which perform within 0.1% of the maximal values, it is 34 times faster to compute. The results obtained by the tools used as references in the experiments carried out showed that five out of these six tools have lower sensitivity or specificity. Conclusion In miRNA discovery the number of putative miRNA loci is in the order of millions. Analysis of putative pre-miRNAs using a computationally expensive feature set would be wasteful or even unfeasible for large genomes. In this work, we propose a relatively inexpensive feature set and explore most of the learning aspects implemented in current ab-initio pre-miRNA prediction

  19. Awareness in the crowd: Beta power and alpha phase of prestimulus oscillations predict object discrimination in visual crowding.

    PubMed

    Ronconi, Luca; Bellacosa Marotti, Rosilari

    2017-09-01

    Visual crowding is among the factors that most hamper conscious object perception. However, we currently ignore the neural states that predispose to an accurate perception within different crowding regimes. Here, we performed single-trial analyses of the electroencephalographical (EEG) oscillations, evaluating the prestimulus power and phase differences between correct and incorrect discrimination during a letter-crowding task, where irrelevant letters were placed nearby (strong crowding) or far (mid crowding) relative to the target. Results show that prestimulus alpha (8-12Hz) power was related to target discrimination in the mid, but not in the strong, crowding condition. Importantly, accurate discrimination in the strong crowding condition was predicted by the phase of alpha and by the power of beta (13-20Hz) oscillations. These evidence suggest that both periodic visual sampling mechanisms, reflected in the alpha phase, and network predisposition to extract local information, reflected in the beta power, predispose to object discrimination in a crowded scene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characteristics of alpha power event-related desynchronization in the discrimination of spontaneous deceptive responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sujin; Jung, Kyu Hee; Lee, Jang-Han

    2012-08-01

    Event-related desynchronization (ERD) occurs in the alpha frequency band when individuals are mentally active, and reflects increasing task demands. Lying involves a relatively greater cognitive load, and should be indicated by an increase of alpha power ERD. This study aimed to examine whether ERD discriminates deceptive responses from truthful responses. In the deception task, subjects made their own decision or were instructed either to type the presented numbers on the dice or input different numbers. Based on a subject's response and rule of the task, the type of response was determined. There were four types of responses: spontaneous deceptive, spontaneous truth, instructed deceptive, instructed truth. The findings of this study suggest that spontaneous deceptions produced significantly greater ERD than spontaneous truths, whereas ERD did not distinguish instructed deception from instructed truth. Different patterns between spontaneous and instructed deceptions may be due to different levels of cognitive load. Spontaneous lies require a greater cognitive load than other types of deceptions. The results of this study suggest that ERD has the potential to detect spontaneous deceptive responses. That is, ERD can detect deceptions that require cognitive effort in natural situations.

  1. Dog mitochondrial genome sequencing to enhance dog mtDNA discrimination power in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Verscheure, Sophie; Backeljau, Thierry; Desmyter, Stijn

    2014-09-01

    A Belgian dog population sample and several population studies worldwide have confirmed that only a limited number of mtDNA control region haplotypes is observed in the majority of dogs. The high population frequency of these haplotypes negatively impacts both the exclusion probability of dog mtDNA analysis and the evidential value of a match with one of these haplotypes in casework. Variation within the mtDNA coding region was explored to improve the discrimination power of dog mtDNA analysis. In the current study, the entire mitochondrial genome of 161 dogs was sequenced applying a quality assured strategy and resulted in a total of 119 different mitochondrial genome sequences. Our research was focused on those dogs with the six most common control region haplotypes from a previous Belgian population study. We identified 33 informative SNPs that successfully divide the six most common control region haplotypes into 32 clusters of mitochondrial genome sequences. Determining the identity of these 33 polymorphic sites in addition to control region sequencing in case of a match with one of these 6 control region haplotypes could augment the exclusion probability of forensic dog mtDNA analysis from 92.5% to 97.5%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. UV-visible microscope spectrophotometric polarization and dichroism with increased discrimination power in forensic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, Dale Kevin

    merit investigated included: 1) wavelength accuracy, 2) wavelength precision, 3) wavelength resolution stability, 4) photometric accuracy, 5) photometric precision, 6) photometric linearity, 7) photometric noise, and 8) short-term baseline stability. In addition, intrinsic instrument polarization effects were investigated to determine the impact of these properties on spectral interpretation and data quality. Finally, a set of recommendations were developed which describe instrument performance characteristics for microscope and spectrometer features and functions, and specific instrument parameters that must be controlled in order to acquire high quality data from an ultraviolet-visible forensic microscope spectrophotometer system for increased discrimination power.

  3. Gabor filter based optical image recognition using Fractional Power Polynomial model based common discriminant locality preserving projection with kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun-Bao

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents Gabor filter based optical image recognition using Fractional Power Polynomial model based Common Kernel Discriminant Locality Preserving Projection. This method tends to solve the nonlinear classification problem endured by optical image recognition owing to the complex illumination condition in practical applications, such as face recognition. The first step is to apply Gabor filter to extract desirable textural features characterized by spatial frequency, spatial locality and orientation selectivity to cope with the variations in illumination. In the second step we propose Class-wise Locality Preserving Projection through creating the nearest neighbor graph guided by the class labels for the textural features reduction. Finally we present Common Kernel Discriminant Vector with Fractional Power Polynomial model to reduce the dimensions of the textural features for recognition. For the performance evaluation on optical image recognition, we test the proposed method on a challenging optical image recognition problem, face recognition.

  4. The Response to Conflict Scale: Psychometric Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birchler, Gary R.; Fals-Stewart, William

    1994-01-01

    The Response to Conflict Scale, a 24-item measure of maladaptive responses to marital conflict, was evaluated psychometrically with 420 couples. The inventory showed high internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct and discriminant validity, and classification efficiency. Clinical utility is discussed. (SLD)

  5. Mutation Rates and Discriminating Power for 13 Rapidly-Mutating Y-STRs between Related and Unrelated Individuals.

    PubMed

    Boattini, Alessio; Sarno, Stefania; Bini, Carla; Pesci, Valeria; Barbieri, Chiara; De Fanti, Sara; Quagliariello, Andrea; Pagani, Luca; Ayub, Qasim; Ferri, Gianmarco; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata; Pelotti, Susi

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly Mutating Y-STRs (RM Y-STRs) were recently introduced in forensics in order to increase the differentiation of Y-chromosomal profiles even in case of close relatives. We estimate RM Y-STRs mutation rates and their power to discriminate between related individuals by using samples extracted from a wide set of paternal pedigrees and by comparing RM Y-STRs results with those obtained from the Y-filer set. In addition, we tested the ability of RM Y-STRs to discriminate between unrelated individuals carrying the same Y-filer haplotype, using the haplogroup R-M269 (reportedly characterised by a strong resemblance in Y-STR profiles) as a case study. Our results, despite confirming the high mutability of RM Y-STRs, show significantly lower mutation rates than reference germline ones. Consequently, their power to discriminate between related individuals, despite being higher than the one of Y-filer, does not seem to improve significantly the performance of the latter. On the contrary, when considering R-M269 unrelated individuals, RM Y-STRs reveal significant discriminatory power and retain some phylogenetic signal, allowing the correct classification of individuals for some R-M269-derived sub-lineages. These results have important implications not only for forensics, but also for molecular anthropology, suggesting that RM Y-STRs are useful tools for exploring subtle genetic variability within Y-chromosomal haplogroups.

  6. Mutation Rates and Discriminating Power for 13 Rapidly-Mutating Y-STRs between Related and Unrelated Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bini, Carla; Pesci, Valeria; Barbieri, Chiara; De Fanti, Sara; Quagliariello, Andrea; Pagani, Luca; Ayub, Qasim; Ferri, Gianmarco; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata; Pelotti, Susi

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly Mutating Y-STRs (RM Y-STRs) were recently introduced in forensics in order to increase the differentiation of Y-chromosomal profiles even in case of close relatives. We estimate RM Y-STRs mutation rates and their power to discriminate between related individuals by using samples extracted from a wide set of paternal pedigrees and by comparing RM Y-STRs results with those obtained from the Y-filer set. In addition, we tested the ability of RM Y-STRs to discriminate between unrelated individuals carrying the same Y-filer haplotype, using the haplogroup R-M269 (reportedly characterised by a strong resemblance in Y-STR profiles) as a case study. Our results, despite confirming the high mutability of RM Y-STRs, show significantly lower mutation rates than reference germline ones. Consequently, their power to discriminate between related individuals, despite being higher than the one of Y-filer, does not seem to improve significantly the performance of the latter. On the contrary, when considering R-M269 unrelated individuals, RM Y-STRs reveal significant discriminatory power and retain some phylogenetic signal, allowing the correct classification of individuals for some R-M269-derived sub-lineages. These results have important implications not only for forensics, but also for molecular anthropology, suggesting that RM Y-STRs are useful tools for exploring subtle genetic variability within Y-chromosomal haplogroups. PMID:27802306

  7. Psychometric evaluation of the depressive personality disorder inventory.

    PubMed

    Huprich, Steven K; Sanford, Keith; Smith, Marinell

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Depressive Personality Disorder Inventory (DPDI; Huprich, Margrett, Barthelemy, & Fine, 1996). The DPDI was found to have strong internal consistency in both an undergraduate and a veteran, psychiatric outpatient population. The DPDI had significant, positive correlations with other measures of depressive personality, supporting its convergent validity. These relationships remained even after controlling for state-like depression, suggesting that the DPDI has incremental validity. The DPDI also significantly predicted scores on measures of interpersonal loss, even after controlling for state-like depression, suggesting that the DPDI has good construct validity. In support of discriminant validity, the DPDI was more correlated with another measure of depressive personality than it was with measures of other personality disorders. Finally, the DPDI had strong diagnostic efficiency statistics: (a) Sensitivity = .82, (b) Specificity = .80, (c) Positive Predictive Power = .75, (d) Negative Predictive Power = .86, and (e) Overall Diagnostic Power = .81. It appears that the DPDI has good psychometric properties.

  8. Mapping hidden potential identity elements by computing the average discriminating power of individual tRNA positions.

    PubMed

    Szenes, Aron; Pál, Gábor

    2012-06-01

    The recently published discrete mathematical method, extended consensus partition (ECP), identifies nucleotide types at each position that are strictly absent from a given sequence set, while occur in other sets. These are defined as discriminating elements (DEs). In this study using the ECP approach, we mapped potential hidden identity elements that discriminate the 20 different tRNA identities. We filtered the tDNA data set for the obligatory presence of well-established tRNA features, and then separately for each identity set, the presence of already experimentally identified strictly present identity elements. The analysis was performed on the three kingdoms of life. We determined the number of DE, e.g. the number of sets discriminated by the given position, for each tRNA position of each tRNA identity set. Then, from the positional DE numbers obtained from the 380 pairwise comparisons of the 20 identity sets, we calculated the average excluding value (AEV) for each tRNA position. The AEV provides a measure on the overall discriminating power of each position. Using a statistical analysis, we show that positional AEVs correlate with the number of already identified identity elements. Positions having high AEV but lacking published identity elements predict hitherto undiscovered tRNA identity elements.

  9. Mapping Hidden Potential Identity Elements by Computing the Average Discriminating Power of Individual tRNA Positions

    PubMed Central

    Szenes, Áron; Pál, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    The recently published discrete mathematical method, extended consensus partition (ECP), identifies nucleotide types at each position that are strictly absent from a given sequence set, while occur in other sets. These are defined as discriminating elements (DEs). In this study using the ECP approach, we mapped potential hidden identity elements that discriminate the 20 different tRNA identities. We filtered the tDNA data set for the obligatory presence of well-established tRNA features, and then separately for each identity set, the presence of already experimentally identified strictly present identity elements. The analysis was performed on the three kingdoms of life. We determined the number of DE, e.g. the number of sets discriminated by the given position, for each tRNA position of each tRNA identity set. Then, from the positional DE numbers obtained from the 380 pairwise comparisons of the 20 identity sets, we calculated the average excluding value (AEV) for each tRNA position. The AEV provides a measure on the overall discriminating power of each position. Using a statistical analysis, we show that positional AEVs correlate with the number of already identified identity elements. Positions having high AEV but lacking published identity elements predict hitherto undiscovered tRNA identity elements. PMID:22378766

  10. Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire-Body Image: Psychometric Properties and Its Incremental Power in the Prediction of Binge Eating Severity.

    PubMed

    Lucena-Santos, Paola; Trindade, Inês A; Oliveira, Margareth; Pinto-Gouveia, José

    2017-05-19

    Given the clinical usefulness of the CFQ-BI (Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire-Body Image; the only existing measure to assess the body-image-related cognitive fusion), the present study aimed to confirm its one-factor structure, to verify its measurement invariance between clinical and non-clinical samples, to analyze its internal consistency and sensitivity to detect differences between samples, as well as to explore the incremental and convergent validities of the CFQ-BI scores in Brazilian samples.  This was a cross-sectional study, which was conducted in clinical (women with overweight or obesity in treatment for weight loss) and non-clinical samples (women from the general population). The one-factor structure was confirmed showing factorial measurement invariance across clinical and non-clinical samples. The CFQ-BI scores presented an excellent internal consistency, were able to discriminate clinical and non-clinical samples, and were positively associated with binge eating severity, general cognitive fusion, and psychological inflexibility. Furthermore, body-image-related cognitive fusion scores (CFQ-BI) presented incremental validity over a general measure of cognitive fusion in the prediction of binge eating symptoms. This study demonstrated that CFQ-BI is a short scale with reliable and robust scores in Brazilian samples, presenting incremental and convergent validities, measurement invariance, and sensitivity to detect differences between clinical and non-clinical groups of women, enabling comparative studies between them.

  11. The Context of Workplace Sex Discrimination: Sex Composition, Workplace Culture and Relative Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stainback, Kevin; Ratliff, Thomas N.; Roscigno, Vincent J.

    2011-01-01

    Building on prior work surrounding negative work-related experiences, such as workplace bullying and sexual harassment, we examine the extent to which organizational context is meaningful for the subjective experience of sex discrimination. Data draw on the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, which provides a key indicator of…

  12. The Context of Workplace Sex Discrimination: Sex Composition, Workplace Culture and Relative Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stainback, Kevin; Ratliff, Thomas N.; Roscigno, Vincent J.

    2011-01-01

    Building on prior work surrounding negative work-related experiences, such as workplace bullying and sexual harassment, we examine the extent to which organizational context is meaningful for the subjective experience of sex discrimination. Data draw on the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, which provides a key indicator of…

  13. Sex differences in discriminative power of volleyball game-related statistics.

    PubMed

    João, Paulo Vicente; Leite, Nuno; Mesquita, Isabel; Sampaio, Jaime

    2010-12-01

    To identify sex differences in volleyball game-related statistics, the game-related statistics of several World Championships in 2007 (N=132) were analyzed using the software VIS from the International Volleyball Federation. Discriminant analysis was used to identify the game-related statistics which better discriminated performances by sex. Analysis yielded an emphasis on fault serves (SC = -.40), shot spikes (SC = .40), and reception digs (SC = .31). Specific robust numbers represent that considerable variability was evident in the game-related statistics profile, as men's volleyball games were better associated with terminal actions (errors of service), and women's volleyball games were characterized by continuous actions (in defense and attack). These differences may be related to the anthropometric and physiological differences between women and men and their influence on performance profiles.

  14. Quality indicators for palliative care services: mixed-method study testing for face validity, feasibility, discriminative power and usefulness.

    PubMed

    Leemans, Kathleen; Deliens, Luc; Francke, Anneke L; Vander Stichele, Robert; Van den Block, Lieve; Cohen, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    In the absence of a standardized, comprehensive and valid set of quality indicators for palliative care, we developed one for palliative care services in Belgium. This study evaluates its face validity, feasibility, discriminative power and usefulness. We combined a quantitative analysis evaluating the answers with qualitative interviews with the contact persons of all participating services. The quality indicator set was implemented in nine palliative care services in Belgium involving a measurement procedure with questionnaires to the patients of the services, their professional caregivers, family carers and physicians. The response rate was 56% for patients, 97% for caregivers, 56% for family carers and 65% for physicians, indicating good feasibility of the measurement procedure. During the interviews, caregivers found the indicator scores valid and none was extremely skewed, confirming their discriminative power. Still, 20 of the 80 indicators showed problems of feasibility and 5 of usefulness. One was discarded and the others were improved by changing either the formulation of the indicator or the questions used. Most participants expressed a desire for a smaller but still comprehensive set. Based on the results, minor adjustments were made to individual indicators, to the measurement tools and to the procedure used; the quality indicators are now ready for further evaluation and use across palliative care services in Belgium. As soon as these indicators are being used systematically, it will be possible to demonstrate and compare quality at the national and international levels and to evaluate improvement initiatives. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Genotyping-by-sequencing provides the discriminating power to investigate the subspecies of Daucus carota (Apiaceae).

    PubMed

    Arbizu, Carlos I; Ellison, Shelby L; Senalik, Douglas; Simon, Philipp W; Spooner, David M

    2016-10-28

    The majority of the subspecies of Daucus carota have not yet been discriminated clearly by various molecular or morphological methods and hence their phylogeny and classification remains unresolved. Recent studies using 94 nuclear orthologs and morphological characters, and studies employing other molecular approaches were unable to distinguish clearly many of the subspecies. Fertile intercrosses among traditionally recognized subspecies are well documented. We here explore the utility of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) generated by genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) to serve as an effective molecular method to discriminate the subspecies of the D. carota complex. We used GBS to obtain SNPs covering all nine Daucus carota chromosomes from 162 accessions of Daucus and two related genera. To study Daucus phylogeny, we scored a total of 10,814 or 38,920 SNPs with a maximum of 10 or 30 % missing data, respectively. To investigate the subspecies of D. carota, we employed two data sets including 150 accessions: (i) rate of missing data 10 % with a total of 18,565 SNPs, and (ii) rate of missing data 30 %, totaling 43,713 SNPs. Consistent with prior results, the topology of both data sets separated species with 2n = 18 chromosome from all other species. Our results place all cultivated carrots (D. carota subsp. sativus) in a single clade. The wild members of D. carota from central Asia were on a clade with eastern members of subsp. sativus. The other subspecies of D. carota were in four clades associated with geographic groups: (1) the Balkan Peninsula and the Middle East, (2) North America and Europe, (3) North Africa exclusive of Morocco, and (4) the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco. Daucus carota subsp. maximus was discriminated, but neither it, nor subsp. gummifer (defined in a broad sense) are monophyletic. Our study suggests that (1) the morphotypes identified as D. carota subspecies gummifer (as currently broadly circumscribed), all confined to areas near the

  16. Testing LMC Microlensing Scenarios: The Discrimination Power of the SuperMACHO Microlensing Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, A; Stubbs, C; Becker, A C; Miknaitis, G A; Miceli, A; Covarrubias, R; Hawley, S L; Smith, C; Suntzeff, N B; Olsen, K; Prieto, J; Hiriart, R; Welch, D L; Cook, K; Nikolaev, S; Proctor, G; Clocchiatti, A; Minniti, D; Garg, A; Challis, P; Keller, S C; Scmidt, B P

    2004-05-27

    Characterizing the nature and spatial distribution of the lensing objects that produce the observed microlensing optical depth toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) remains an open problem. They present an appraisal of the ability of the SuperMACHO Project, a next-generation microlensing survey pointed toward the LMC, to discriminate between various proposed lensing populations. they consider two scenarios: lensing by a uniform foreground screen of objects and self-lensing of LMC stars. The optical depth for ''screen-lensing'' is essentially constant across the face of the LMC; whereas, the optical depth for self-lensing shows a strong spatial dependence. they have carried out extensive simulations, based upon actual data obtained during the first year of the project, to assess the SuperMACHO survey's ability to discriminate between these two scenarios. In the simulations they predict the expected number of observed microlensing events for each of their fields by adding artificial stars to the images and estimating the spatial and temporal efficiency of detecting microlensing events using Monte-Carlo methods. They find that the event rate itself shows significant sensitivity to the choice of the LMC luminosity function shape and other parameters, limiting the conclusions which can be drawn from the absolute rate. By instead determining the differential event rate across the LMC, they can decrease the impact of these systematic uncertainties rendering the conclusions more robust. With this approach the SuperMACHO Project should be able to distinguish between the two categories of lens populations and provide important constraints on the nature of the lensing objects.

  17. Corrected Article: Measure of the impact of future dark energy experiments based on discriminating power among quintessence models [Phys. Rev. D 78, 043528 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Michael; Abrahamse, Augusta; Albrecht, Andreas; Bozek, Brandon; Yashar, Mark

    2009-12-01

    We evaluate the ability of future data sets to discriminate among different quintessence dark energy models. This approach gives an alternative (and complementary) measure for assessing the impact of future experiments, as compared with the large body of literature that compares experiments in abstract parameter spaces (such as the well-known w0-wa parameters) and more recent work that evaluates the constraining power of experiments on individual parameter spaces of specific quintessence models. We use the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) models of future data sets and compare the discriminative power of experiments designated by the DETF as stages 2, 3, and 4 (denoting increasing capabilities). Our work reveals a minimal increase in discriminating power when comparing stage 3 to stage 2, but a very striking increase in discriminating power when going to stage 4 (including the possibility of completely eliminating some quintessence models). We also see evidence that even modest improvements over DETF stage 4 (which many believe are realistic) could result in even more dramatic discriminating power among quintessence dark energy models. We develop and demonstrate the technique of using the independently measured modes of the equation of state (derived from principle component analysis) as a common parameter space in which to compare the different quintessence models, and we argue that this technique is a powerful one. We use the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson, exponential, Albrecht-Skordis, and inverse tracker (or inverse power law) quintessence models for this work. One of our main results is that the goal of discriminating among these models sets a concrete measure on the capabilities of future dark energy experiments. Experiments have to be somewhat better than DETF stage 4 simulated experiments to fully meet this goal.

  18. On the model discriminating power of mu to e conversion in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Kitano, Ryuichiro; Okada, Yashuiro; Tuzon, Paulo

    2009-01-01

    Lepton Flavor Violating (LFV) charged lepton decays provide a highly sensitive probe of physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), due to the un-observably small branching fractions ({approx}10{sup -50}) predicted for these modes in the SM (minimally extended to include massive neutrinos). Searches for SM forbidden muon processes, such as {mu} {yields} e{gamma}, {mu} {yields} e{bar e}e, and {mu} {yields} e conversion in nuclei, have provided so far the strongest constraints on LFV new physics. This statement can be characterized in a model-independent way as a lower bound on the scale associated to a set of dimension six effective operators parameterizing new physics beyond the SM. It is a well known fact that while the decay {mu} {yields} e{gamma} is only sensitive to a transition magnetic dipole operator, both {mu} {yields} e{bar e}e and {mu} {yields} e conversion in nuclei are sensitive to transition charge radii operators as well as purely contact four-fermion interactions induced by physics beyond the SM. In other words, different LFV decays have different sensitivities to underlying LFV mechanisms (effective operators). This leads naturally to ask the question whether one could infer the relative strength of these different operators in a completely phenomenological and model-independent way. This would allow one to discriminate among different underlying models of LFV and thus would provide valuable input for model building. In Ref. [1] it was pointed out that in principle, by combining the rates of {mu} {yields} e{gamma} and {mu} {yields} e conversion on different target nuclei, one could discriminate underlying models. In this work we go back to this issue with the aim to: quantify the theoretical uncertainty induced by the hadronization process; and quantify the experimental precision required to realistically infer useful information on the underlying LFV mechanisms. We organize our discussion as follows: in Section 2 we review the derivation of the {mu

  19. Discriminating power of microsatellites in cranberry organelles for taxonomic studies in Vaccinium and Ericaceae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA, which have not been previously developed or explored in the Ericaceae family or Vaccinium genus, can be powerful tools for determining evolutionary relationships between taxa. In this study, 30 chloroplast and 23 mitochondria, and ...

  20. Wages and Unequal Access to Organizational Power: An Empirical Test of Gender Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hultin, Mia; Szulkin, Ryszard

    1999-01-01

    A study of Swedish workers investigated whether earnings are affected by the gender composition of firms' managerial staff. Gender-differentiated access to organizational power structures proved essential to explaining women's relatively low wages. Women working in male-dominated establishments had lower wages than firms with more women managers.…

  1. Psychometrics: An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furr, Mike; Bacharach, Verne R.

    2007-01-01

    The authors center their presentation of material around a conceptual understanding of psychometric issues, such as validity and reliability, and on purpose rather than procedure, the "why" rather than the "how to." Their goal is to introduce psychometric principles at a level that is deeper and more focused than found in introductory…

  2. Psychometrics: An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furr, Mike; Bacharach, Verne R.

    2007-01-01

    The authors center their presentation of material around a conceptual understanding of psychometric issues, such as validity and reliability, and on purpose rather than procedure, the "why" rather than the "how to." Their goal is to introduce psychometric principles at a level that is deeper and more focused than found in introductory…

  3. EEG biomarkers in major depressive disorder: discriminative power and prediction of treatment response.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, Sebastian; Arns, Martijn

    2013-10-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has high population prevalence and is associated with substantial impact on quality of life, not least due to an unsatisfactory time span of sometimes several weeks from initiation of treatment to clinical response. Therefore extensive research focused on the identification of cost-effective and widely available electroencephalogram (EEG)-based biomarkers that not only allow distinguishing between patients and healthy controls but also have predictive value for treatment response for a variety of treatments. In this comprehensive overview on EEG research on MDD, biomarkers that are either assessed at baseline or during the early course of treatment and are helpful in discriminating patients from healthy controls and assist in predicting treatment outcome are reviewed, covering recent decades up to now. Reviewed markers include quantitative EEG (QEEG) measures, connectivity measures, EEG vigilance-based measures, sleep-EEG-related measures and event-related potentials (ERPs). Further, the value and limitations of these different markers are discussed. Finally, the need for integrated models of brain function and the necessity for standardized procedures in EEG biomarker research are highlighted to enhance future research in this field.

  4. Revealing discriminating power of the elements in edible sea salts: Line-intensity correlation analysis from laser-induced plasma emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yonghoon; Ham, Kyung-Sik; Han, Song-Hee; Yoo, Jonghyun; Jeong, Sungho

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated the discriminating power of the elements in edible sea salts using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). For the ten different sea salts from South Korea, China, Japan, France, Mexico and New Zealand, LIBS spectra were recorded in the spectral range between 190 and 1040 nm, identifying the presence of Na, Cl, K, Ca, Mg, Li, Sr, Al, Si, Ti, Fe, C, O, N, and H. Intensity correlation analysis of the observed emission lines provided a valuable insight into the discriminating power of the different elements in the sea salts. The correlation analysis suggests that the elements with independent discrimination power can be categorized into three groups; those that represent dissolved ions in seawater (K, Li, and Mg), those that are associated with calcified particles (Ca and Sr), and those that are present in soils contained in the sea salts (Al, Si, Ti, and Fe). Classification models using a few emission lines selected based on the results from intensity correlation analysis and full broadband LIBS spectra were developed based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) and their performances were compared. Our results indicate that effective combination of a few emission lines can provide a dependable model for discriminating the edible sea salts and the performance is not much degraded from that based on the full broadband spectra. This can be rationalized by the intensity correlation results.

  5. Temporal information processing and pitch discrimination as predictors of general intelligence.

    PubMed

    Helmbold, Nadine; Troche, Stefan; Rammsayer, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    In the present study, the relationship between performance on temporal and pitch discrimination and psychometric intelligence was investigated in a sample of 164 participants by means of an experimental dissociation paradigm. Performance on both temporal and pitch discrimination was substantially related to psychometric intelligence (r=.43 and r =.39). Regression analysis and structural equation modeling suggested that both psychophysical domains can be considered as valid predictors of psychometric intelligence. Both predictor variables contributed substantial portions of both shared and unique variance to the prediction of individual differences in psychometric intelligence. Thus, the present study yielded further evidence for a functional relationship between psychometric intelligence and temporal as well as pitch discrimination acuity. Eventually, findings are consistent with the notion that temporal discrimination - in addition to general aspects of sensory discrimination shared with pitch discrimination reflects specific intelligence-related aspects of neural information processing.

  6. Discriminating harmonicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Gerald; Mason, Christine R.; Brughera, Andrew; Chiu, Chung-Yiu Peter

    2003-08-01

    Simultaneous tones that are harmonically related tend to be grouped perceptually to form a unitary auditory image. A partial that is mistuned stands out from the other tones, and harmonic complexes with different fundamental frequencies can readily be perceived as separate auditory objects. These phenomena are evidence for the strong role of harmonicity in perceptual grouping and segregation of sounds. This study measured the discriminability of harmonicity directly. In a two interval, two alternative forced-choice (2I2AFC) paradigm, the listener chose which of two sounds, signal or foil, was composed of tones that more closely matched an exact harmonic relationship. In one experiment, the signal was varied from perfectly harmonic to highly inharmonic by adding frequency perturbation to each component. The foil always had 100% perturbation. Group mean performance decreased from greater than 90% correct for 0% signal perturbation to near chance for 80% signal perturbation. In the second experiment, adding a masker presented simultaneously with the signals and foils disrupted harmonicity. Both monaural and dichotic conditions were tested. Signal level was varied relative to masker level to obtain psychometric functions from which slopes and midpoints were estimated. Dichotic presentation of these audible stimuli improved performance by 3-10 dB, due primarily to a release from ``informational masking'' by the perceptual segregation of the signal from the masker.

  7. Target and nontarget discrimination of herbicides applied to vegetation in a power-line corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luken, James O.; Beiting, Steven W.; Kareth, Scott K.; Kumler, Robyn L.; Liu, Jun H.; Seither, Craig A.

    1994-03-01

    We tested two cutting regimens (cut/spray and cut/delay spray) and four radiarc-applied herbicides (Garlon + Tordon, Accord, Accord + Escort, and Krenite) in an Ohio power-line corridor to determine which management combination best eliminated target species (i.e., trees) and preserved nontarget species (i.e., low shrubs, vines, perennial herbs, and grasses). When spraying was delayed after cutting, the herbicide with the least impact on nontarget species (Krenite) also was least efficient at killing target trees. Spraying soon after cutting improved tree-killing efficiency of several herbicides, but it also increased the negative impact on nontarget species. The herbicide with the most consistent tree-killing ability (Accord + Escort) had the most impact on nontarget species. Because none of the herbicide/cutting treatments performed ideally, resource managers must decide the acceptable impact on nontarget species when considering herbicide use. Future success of herbicides as part of an integrated succession management approach requires more selective application methods and formulations so that target effects can be maximized and nontarget effects can be minimized.

  8. A Longitudinal Assessment of Perceived Discrimination and Maladaptive Expressions of Anger Among Older Adults: Does Subjective Social Power Buffer the Association?

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonjung; Bierman, Alex

    2016-09-02

    We examine whether perceived discrimination in older adults is associated with external conflict (anger-out) and internally directed anger (anger-in), as well as how subjective social power-as indicated by a sense of personal control and subjective social status-modifies these associations while holistically controlling for time-stable confounds and the five major dimensions of personality. The 2006 and 2008 psychosocial subsamples of the Health and Retirement Study were combined to create baseline observations, and the 2010 and 2012 waves were combined to create follow-up observations. Responses were analyzed with random-effects models that adjust for repeated observations and fixed-effects models that additionally control for all time-stable confounds. Discrimination was significantly associated with anger-in and anger-out. Fixed-effects models and controls for personality reduced these associations by more than 60%, although they remained significant. Measures of subjective social power weaken associations with anger-out but not anger-in. The mental health consequences of perceived discrimination for older adults may be over-estimated if time-stable confounds and personality are not taken into account. Subjective social power can protect victims of discrimination from reactions that may escalate conflict, but not from internalized anger that is likely to be wearing and cause further health problems. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The discriminant power of simultaneous monitoring of spontaneous electroencephalogram and evoked potentials as a predictor of different clinical states of general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Jeleazcov, Christian; Schneider, Gerhard; Daunderer, Michael; Scheller, Bertram; Schüttler, Jürgen; Schwilden, Helmut

    2006-10-01

    Spontaneous or evoked electrical brain activity is increasingly used to monitor general anesthesia. Previous studies investigated the variables from spontaneous electroencephalogram (EEG), acoustic (AEP), or somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP). But, by monitoring them separately, the available information from simultaneous gathering could be missed. We investigated whether the combination of simultaneous information from EEG, AEP, and SSEP shows a more discriminant power to differentiate between anesthesia states than from information derived from each measurement alone. Therefore, we assessed changes of 30 EEG, 21 SSEP, and 29 AEP variables recorded from 59 patients during four clinical states of general anesthesia: "awake," "light anesthesia," "surgical anesthesia," and "deep surgical anesthesia." The single and combined discriminant powers of EEG, AEP, and SSEP variables as predictors of these states were investigated by discriminant analysis. EEG variables showed a higher discriminant power than AEP or SSEP variables: 85%, 46%, and 32% correctly classified cases, respectively. The frequency of correctly classified cases increased to 90% and 91% with information from EEG + AEP and EEG + AEP + SSEP, respectively. Thus, future anesthesia monitoring should consider combined information simultaneously distributed on different electrophysiological measurements, rather than single variables or their combination from EEG or AEP or SSEP.

  10. Numerical Cognition: On the Convergence of Componential and Psychometric Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geary, David C.; Widaman, Keith F.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between elementary operations underlying processing of numerical information and performance on psychometrically derived ability measures requiring processing of numbers but defining separate ability factors was studied for 102 Air Force recruits (54 males and 48 females). Patterns of convergent and discriminate relationships for…

  11. Psychometric Properties of Teacher SKAMP Ratings from a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Desiree W.; Bussing, Regina; Fernandez, Melanie; Hou, Wei; Garvan, Cynthia Wilson; Swanson, James M.; Eyberg, Sheila M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the basic psychometric properties of the Swanson, Kotkin, Agler, M-Flynn, and Pelham Scale (SKAMP), a measure intended to assess functional impairment related to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, in a sample of 1,205 elementary students. Reliability, factor structure, and convergent, discriminant and predictive validity…

  12. The Role of the Unit in Physics and Psychometrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphry, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the role of the unit in physics in order to clarify the role of the unit in psychometrics. Based on this examination, metrological conventions are used to formulate the relationship between discrimination and the unit of a scale in item response theory. Seminal literature in two lines of item response…

  13. The Role of the Unit in Physics and Psychometrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphry, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the role of the unit in physics in order to clarify the role of the unit in psychometrics. Based on this examination, metrological conventions are used to formulate the relationship between discrimination and the unit of a scale in item response theory. Seminal literature in two lines of item response…

  14. Psychometric Properties of Teacher SKAMP Ratings from a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Desiree W.; Bussing, Regina; Fernandez, Melanie; Hou, Wei; Garvan, Cynthia Wilson; Swanson, James M.; Eyberg, Sheila M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the basic psychometric properties of the Swanson, Kotkin, Agler, M-Flynn, and Pelham Scale (SKAMP), a measure intended to assess functional impairment related to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, in a sample of 1,205 elementary students. Reliability, factor structure, and convergent, discriminant and predictive validity…

  15. Three-dimensional ultrasonography and power Doppler for discrimination between benign and malignant endometrium in premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Mohamed; El-Mazny, Akmal; Ramadan, Wafaa; Hatem, Dina; Abdel-Hafiz, Aly; Hammam, Mohamed; Nada, Adel

    2016-03-16

    Ultrasonography has been extensively used in women suspected of having a gynecological malignancy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of 3D ultrasonography and power Doppler for discrimination between benign and malignant endometrium in premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding. This cross-sectional study included 78 premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding scheduled for hysteroscopy and endometrial curettage. The endometrial thickness (ET), uterine artery pulsatility index (PI) and resistance index (RI), and endometrial volume (EV) and 3D power Doppler vascularization index (VI), flow index (FI), and vascularization flow index (VFI) were measured and compared with hysteroscopic and histopathologic findings. The ET (P <0.001), EV (P <0.001), and endometrial VI (P <0.001) and VFI (P = 0.043) were significantly increased in patients with atypical endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial carcinoma (n = 10) than those with benign endometrium (n = 68); whereas, the uterine artery PI and RI and endometrial FI were not significantly different between the two groups. The best marker for discrimination between benign and malignant endometrium was the VI with an area under the ROC curve of 0.88 at a cutoff value of 0.81%. 3D ultrasonography and power Doppler, especially endometrial VI, may be useful for discrimination between benign and malignant endometrium in premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding.

  16. Psychometric properties of the Pyramids and Palm Trees Test.

    PubMed

    Klein, Liesa A; Buchanan, Jeffrey A

    2009-10-01

    The Pyramids and Palm Trees Test (PPT) is a nonverbal measure of semantic memory that has been frequently used in previous aphasia, agnosia, and dementia research. Very little psychometric information regarding the PPT is available. The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the PPT in a population of healthy college students. Results indicated that the PPT achieved poor test-retest reliability, failed to obtain adequate internal consistency, and demonstrated poor convergent validity, but showed acceptable discriminant validity. The results of this study suggest that the PPT lacks acceptable reliability and validity for use with a college student population.

  17. Psychometric Research in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Frederick B.

    This review of psychometric research in reading analyzes the factors which seem related to reading comprehension skills. Experimental analysis of reading comprehension by L. E. Thorndike revealed two major components: knowledge of word meanings and verbal reasoning abilities. Subsequent analysis of experimental studies of reading comprehension…

  18. Acculturation: A Psychometric Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmedo, Esteban L.

    1979-01-01

    Traditional measurement models based on cultural group or generational typologies do not adequately address conceptual and methodological problems in the psychometric approach to acculturation. A model is proposed that provides for the examination of relationships between multidimensional sets of quantitatively defined cultural variables.…

  19. Measuring Anhedonia in Adolescents: A Psychometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Adam M.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Audrain-McGovern, Janet; Sussman, Steve; Volk, Healther E.; Strong, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Anhedonia—the reduced capacity to experience pleasure—is a trait implicated in mental and physical health. Yet, psychometric data on anhedonia measures in adolescents are absent. We conducted an in-depth psychometric analysis of the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS; Snaith et al., 1995)—a self-report measure of anticipated pleasure response to 14 pleasant experiences—in adolescents. Adolescents (N=585; M age=14.5) completed the SHAPS and other paper-and-pencil surveys. Item response theory models were used to evaluate the psychometric performance of each SHAPS item. Correlations of the SHAPS with other personality and psychopathology measures were calculated to evaluate construct validity. Results showed that: (1) certain items (e.g., reported pleasure from basic experiences like “seeing smiling faces” or “smelling flowers”) provided more information about latent anhedonia than others; and (2) SHAPS scales exhibited construct-consistent convergent and discriminant validity (i.e., stronger correlations with low positive affect constructs; weaker correlations with negative affect). Reporting diminished pleasure from basic pleasant experiences accurately indicates adolescent anhedonia, which is important for future scale development and understanding the phenomenology of anhedonia in teens. These data support using the SHAPS for assessing anhedonia in epidemiological research and school-based universal prevention programming in general adolescent populations. PMID:25893676

  20. Measuring Anhedonia in Adolescents: A Psychometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Unger, Jennifer B; Audrain-McGovern, Janet; Sussman, Steve; Volk, Heather E; Strong, David R

    2015-01-01

    Anhedonia-the reduced capacity to experience pleasure-is a trait implicated in mental and physical health. Yet, psychometric data on anhedonia measures in adolescents are absent. We conducted an in-depth psychometric analysis of the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS; Snaith et al., 1995 )-a self-report measure of anticipated pleasure response to 14 pleasant experiences-in adolescents. Adolescents (N = 585, M age = 14.5) completed the SHAPS and other paper-and-pencil surveys. Item response theory models were used to evaluate the psychometric performance of each SHAPS item. Correlations of the SHAPS with other personality and psychopathology measures were calculated to evaluate construct validity. Results showed that (a) certain items (e.g., reported pleasure from basic experiences like "seeing smiling faces" or "smelling flowers") provided more information about latent anhedonia than others; and (b) SHAPS scales exhibited construct-consistent convergent and discriminant validity (i.e., stronger correlations with low positive affect constructs, weaker correlations with negative affect). Reporting diminished pleasure from basic pleasant experiences accurately indicates adolescent anhedonia, which is important for future scale development and understanding the phenomenology of anhedonia in teens. These data support using the SHAPS for assessing anhedonia in epidemiological research and school-based universal prevention programming in general adolescent populations.

  1. [Discriminating power of socio-demographic and psychological variables on addictive use of cellular phones among middle school students].

    PubMed

    Lee, Haejung; Kim, Myoung Soo; Son, Hyun Kyung; Ahn, Sukhee; Kim, Jung Soon; Kim, Young Hae

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the degrees of cellular phone usage among middle school students and to identify discriminating factors of addictive use of cellular phones among sociodemographic and psychological variables. From 123 middle schools in Busan, potential participants were identified through stratified random sampling and 747 middle school students participated in the study. The data was collected from December 1, 2004 to December 30, 2004. Descriptive and discriminant analyses were used. Fifty seven percent of the participants were male and 89.7% used cellular phones at school. The participants were grouped into three groups depending on the levels of the cellular phone usage: addicted (n=117), dependent (n=418), non-addicted (n=212). Within the three groups, two functions were produced and only one function was significant, discriminating the addiction group from non-addiction group. Additional discriminant analysis with only two groups produced one function that classified 81.2% of the participants correctly into the two groups. Impulsiveness, anxiety, and stress were significant discriminating factors. Based on the findings of this study, developing intervention programs focusing on impulsiveness, anxiety and stress to reduce the possible addictive use of cellular phones is suggested.

  2. Development and examination of the psychometric properties of the Learning Experience Scale in nursing.

    PubMed

    Takase, Miyuki; Imai, Takiko; Uemura, Chizuru

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines the psychometric properties of the Learning Experience Scale. A survey method was used to collect data from a total of 502 nurses. Data were analyzed by factor analysis and the known-groups technique to examine the construct validity of the scale. In addition, internal consistency was evaluated by Cronbach's alpha, and stability was examined by test-retest correlation. Factor analysis showed that the Learning Experience Scale consisted of five factors: learning from practice, others, training, feedback, and reflection. The scale also had the power to discriminate between nurses with high and low levels of nursing competence. The internal consistency and the stability of the scale were also acceptable. The Learning Experience Scale is a valid and reliable instrument, and helps organizations to effectively design learning interventions for nurses.

  3. Relationships between the threshold and slope of psychometric and neurometric functions during perceptual learning: implications for neuronal pooling.

    PubMed

    Gold, Joshua I; Law, Chi-Tat; Connolly, Patrick; Bennur, Sharath

    2010-01-01

    Perceptual learning involves long-lasting improvements in the ability to perceive simple sensory stimuli. Some forms of perceptual learning are thought to involve an increasingly selective readout of sensory neurons that are most sensitive to the trained stimulus. Here we report novel changes in the relationship between the threshold and slope of the psychometric function during learning that are consistent with such changes in readout and can provide insights into the underlying neural mechanisms. In monkeys trained on a direction-discrimination task, perceptual improvements corresponded to lower psychometric thresholds and slightly shallower slopes. However, this relationship between threshold and slope was much weaker in comparable, ideal-observer "neurometric" functions of neurons in the middle temporal (MT) area, which represent sensory information used to perform the task and whose response properties did not change with training. We propose a linear/nonlinear pooling scheme to account for these results. According to this scheme, MT responses are pooled via linear weights that change with training to more selectively read out responses from the most sensitive neurons, thereby reducing predicted thresholds. An additional nonlinear (power-law) transformation does not change with training and causes the predicted psychometric function to become shallower as uninformative neurons are eliminated from the pooled signal. We show that this scheme is consistent with the measured changes in psychometric threshold and slope throughout training. The results suggest that some forms of perceptual learning involve improvements in a process akin to selective attention that pools the most informative neural signals to guide behavior.

  4. Relationships Between the Threshold and Slope of Psychometric and Neurometric Functions During Perceptual Learning: Implications for Neuronal Pooling

    PubMed Central

    Law, Chi-Tat; Connolly, Patrick; Bennur, Sharath

    2010-01-01

    Perceptual learning involves long-lasting improvements in the ability to perceive simple sensory stimuli. Some forms of perceptual learning are thought to involve an increasingly selective readout of sensory neurons that are most sensitive to the trained stimulus. Here we report novel changes in the relationship between the threshold and slope of the psychometric function during learning that are consistent with such changes in readout and can provide insights into the underlying neural mechanisms. In monkeys trained on a direction-discrimination task, perceptual improvements corresponded to lower psychometric thresholds and slightly shallower slopes. However, this relationship between threshold and slope was much weaker in comparable, ideal-observer “neurometric” functions of neurons in the middle temporal (MT) area, which represent sensory information used to perform the task and whose response properties did not change with training. We propose a linear/nonlinear pooling scheme to account for these results. According to this scheme, MT responses are pooled via linear weights that change with training to more selectively read out responses from the most sensitive neurons, thereby reducing predicted thresholds. An additional nonlinear (power-law) transformation does not change with training and causes the predicted psychometric function to become shallower as uninformative neurons are eliminated from the pooled signal. We show that this scheme is consistent with the measured changes in psychometric threshold and slope throughout training. The results suggest that some forms of perceptual learning involve improvements in a process akin to selective attention that pools the most informative neural signals to guide behavior. PMID:19864439

  5. Price Discrimination: Lessons for Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynes, E. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Explains price and product discrimination, showing how intelligent consumers can achieve increased purchasing power of their income and discusses how consumer educators can explain this discrimination. Evaluates the pros and cons of price/product discrimination from the social viewpoint. (Author/JOW)

  6. Price Discrimination: Lessons for Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynes, E. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Explains price and product discrimination, showing how intelligent consumers can achieve increased purchasing power of their income and discusses how consumer educators can explain this discrimination. Evaluates the pros and cons of price/product discrimination from the social viewpoint. (Author/JOW)

  7. Psychometric Properties of the Sexual Excitation/Sexual Inhibition Inventory for Women in a German Sample.

    PubMed

    Velten, Julia; Scholten, Saskia; Graham, Cynthia A; Margraf, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    The Sexual Excitation Sexual/Inhibition Inventory for Women (SESII-W) is a self-report questionnaire for assessing propensities of sexual excitation (SE) and sexual inhibition (SI) in women. According to the dual control model of sexual response, these two factors differ between individuals and influence the occurrence of sexual arousal in given situations. Extreme levels of SE and SI are postulated to be associated with sexual problems or risky sexual behaviors. Psychometric evaluation of the original scale yielded two higher order and eight lower order factors as well as satisfactory to good construct validity and reliability. The present study was designed to assess the psychometric properties of a German version of the SESII-W utilizing a large convenience sample of 2206 women. Confirmatory factor analysis showed a satisfactory overall model fit, with support for the five lower order factors of SE (Arousability, Sexual Power Dynamics, Smell, Partner Characteristics, Setting) and the three lower order factors of SI (Relationship Importance, Arousal Contingency, and Concerns about Sexual Function). Additionally, the scale demonstrated good convergent and discriminant validity, internal consistency, and test-retest-reliability. The German SESII-W is a sufficiently reliable and valid measure for assessing SE and SI in women. Hence, its use can be recommended for future research in Germany that investigates women's sexual behaviors and experiences.

  8. Future of Psychometrics: Ask What Psychometrics Can Do for Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sijtsma, Klaas

    2012-01-01

    I address two issues that were inspired by my work on the Dutch Committee on Tests and Testing (COTAN). The first issue is the understanding of problems test constructors and researchers using tests have of psychometric knowledge. I argue that this understanding is important for a field, like psychometrics, for which the dissemination of…

  9. Future of Psychometrics: Ask What Psychometrics Can Do for Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sijtsma, Klaas

    2012-01-01

    I address two issues that were inspired by my work on the Dutch Committee on Tests and Testing (COTAN). The first issue is the understanding of problems test constructors and researchers using tests have of psychometric knowledge. I argue that this understanding is important for a field, like psychometrics, for which the dissemination of…

  10. Psychometric evaluation of the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scales.

    PubMed

    Piredda, Michela; Vellone, Ercole; Piras, Giovanni; Fida, Roberta; Latour, Jos M; Matarese, Maria; Alvaro, Rosaria; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-01

    This study tested the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scales through factor analysis with 659 medical and surgical inpatients. One factor was found for the Scale Satisfaction and 4 factors for the Scale Experiences: Carelessness, Emotional support, Relationship/information, and Caring times. This validation makes available to nurses and managers a multidimensional tool able to discriminate between different care experiences and to identify areas for care improvement.

  11. Do item-writing flaws reduce examinations psychometric quality?

    PubMed

    Pais, João; Silva, Artur; Guimarães, Bruno; Povo, Ana; Coelho, Elisabete; Silva-Pereira, Fernanda; Lourinho, Isabel; Ferreira, Maria Amélia; Severo, Milton

    2016-08-11

    The psychometric characteristics of multiple-choice questions (MCQ) changed when taking into account their anatomical sites and the presence of item-writing flaws (IWF). The aim is to understand the impact of the anatomical sites and the presence of IWF in the psychometric qualities of the MCQ. 800 Clinical Anatomy MCQ from eight examinations were classified as standard or flawed items and according to one of the eight anatomical sites. An item was classified as flawed if it violated at least one of the principles of item writing. The difficulty and discrimination indices of each item were obtained. 55.8 % of the MCQ were flawed items. The anatomical site of the items explained 6.2 and 3.2 % of the difficulty and discrimination parameters and the IWF explained 2.8 and 0.8 %, respectively. The impact of the IWF was heterogeneous, the Writing the Stem and Writing the Choices categories had a negative impact (higher difficulty and lower discrimination) while the other categories did not have any impact. The anatomical site effect was higher than IWF effect in the psychometric characteristics of the examination. When constructing MCQ, the focus should be in the topic/area of the items and only after in the presence of IWF.

  12. Differential growth inhibition as a tool to increase the discriminating power of killer toxin sensitivity in fingerprinting of yeasts.

    PubMed

    Buzzini, P; Martini, A

    2000-12-01

    A panel of 27 cell-free crude killer toxin preparations were used in fingerprinting 45 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 11 Saccharomyces exiguus strains. The differential sensitivity to different mycocins was evaluated both as binary data matrix (presence-absence of killing effect), and by considering the growth inhibition areas (measured by agar diffusion well bioassay). The first approach gave an individual fingerprinting of 68% of sensitive strains, whereas the second gave a total and reproducible (P<0.01) discrimination of all tested strains.

  13. Object discrimination reversal as a method to assess cognitive impairment in nonhuman primate enhanced pre- and postnatal developmental (ePPND) studies: statistical power analysis.

    PubMed

    Cappon, Gregg D; Bowman, Christopher J; Hurtt, Mark E; Grantham, Lonnie E

    2012-10-01

    An important aspect of the enhanced pre- and postnatal developmental (ePPND) toxicity study in nonhuman primates (NHP) is that it combines in utero and postnatal assessments in a single study. However, it is unclear if NHP ePPND studies are suitable to perform all of the evaluations incorporated into rodent PPND studies. To understand the value of including cognitive assessment in a NHP ePPND toxicity study, we performed a power analysis of object discrimination reversal task data using a modified Wisconsin General Testing Apparatus (ODR-WGTA) from two NHP ePPND studies. ODR-WGTA endpoints evaluated were days to learning and to first reversal, and number of reversals. With α = 0.05 and a one-sided t-test, a sample of seven provided 80% power to predict a 100% increase in all three of the ODR-WGTA endpoints; a sample of 25 provided 80% power to predict a 50% increase. Similar power analyses were performed with data from the Cincinnati Water Maze (CWM) and passive avoidance tests from three rat PPND toxicity studies. Groups of 5 and 15 in the CWM and passive avoidance test, respectively, provided 80% power to detect a 100% change. While the power of the CWM is not far superior to the NHP ODR-WGTA, a clear advantage is the routine use of larger sample size, with a group of 20 rats the CWM provides ~90% power to detect a 50% change. Due to the limitations on the number of animals, the ODR-WGTA may not be suitable for assessing cognitive impairment in NHP ePPND studies.

  14. High-Resolution Melting Analysis as a Powerful Tool to Discriminate and Genotype Pseudomonas savastanoi Pathovars and Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Andrea; Cerboneschi, Matteo; Tegli, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas savastanoi is a serious pathogen of Olive, Oleander, Ash, and several other Oleaceae. Its epiphytic or endophytic presence in asymptomatic plants is crucial for the spread of Olive and Oleander knot disease, as already ascertained for P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi (Psv) on Olive and for pv. nerii (Psn) on Oleander, while no information is available for pv. fraxini (Psf) on Ash. Nothing is known yet about the distribution on the different host plants and the real host range of these pathovars in nature, although cross-infections were observed following artificial inoculations. A multiplex Real-Time PCR assay was recently developed to simultaneously and quantitatively discriminate in vitro and in planta these P. savastanoi pathovars, for routine culture confirmation and for epidemiological and diagnostical studies. Here an innovative High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA)-based assay was set up to unequivocally discriminate Psv, Psn and Psf, according to several single nucleotide polymorphisms found in their Type Three Secretion System clusters. The genetic distances among 56 P. savastanoi strains belonging to these pathovars were also evaluated, confirming and refining data previously obtained by fAFLP. To our knowledge, this is the first time that HRMA is applied to a bacterial plant pathogen, and one of the few multiplex HRMA-based assays developed so far. This protocol provides a rapid, sensitive, specific tool to differentiate and detect Psv, Psn and Psf strains, also in vivo and against other related bacteria, with lower costs than conventional multiplex Real-Time PCR. Its application is particularly suitable for sanitary certification programs for P. savastanoi, aimed at avoiding the spreading of this phytopathogen through asymptomatic plants. PMID:22295075

  15. Psychometric Properties of the HEXACO-100.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kibeom; Ashton, Michael C

    2016-07-13

    Psychometric properties of the 100-item English-language HEXACO Personality Inventory-Revised (HEXACO-PI-R) were examined using samples of online respondents (N = 100,318 self-reports) and of undergraduate students (N = 2,868 self- and observer reports). The results were as follows: First, the hierarchical structure of the HEXACO-100 was clearly supported in two principal components analyses: each of the six factors was defined by its constituent facets and each of the 25 facets was defined by its constituent items. Second, the HEXACO-100 factor scales showed fairly low intercorrelations, with only one pair of scales (Honesty-Humility and Agreeableness) having an absolute correlation above .20 in self-report data. Third, the factor and facet scales showed strong self/observer convergent correlations, which far exceeded the self/observer discriminant correlations.

  16. Children's Separation Anxiety Scale (CSAS): Psychometric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Xavier; Espada, José P.; Orgilés, Mireia; Llavona, Luis M.; García-Fernández, José M.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the psychometric properties of the Children's Separation Anxiety Scale (CSAS), which assesses separation anxiety symptoms in childhood. Participants in Study 1 were 1,908 schoolchildren aged between 8 and 11. Exploratory factor analysis identified four factors: worry about separation, distress from separation, opposition to separation, and calm at separation, which explained 46.91% of the variance. In Study 2, 6,016 children aged 8–11 participated. The factor model in Study 1 was validated by confirmatory factor analysis. The internal consistency (α = 0.82) and temporal stability (r = 0.83) of the instrument were good. The convergent and discriminant validity were evaluated by means of correlations with other measures of separation anxiety, childhood anxiety, depression and anger. Sensitivity of the scale was 85% and its specificity, 95%. The results support the reliability and validity of the CSAS. PMID:25072402

  17. The claustrophobia scale: a psychometric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ost, Lars-Göran

    2007-05-01

    This article presents a psychometric evaluation of the Claustrophobia Scale (CS), consisting of one subscale for measuring anxiety (20 items, 0-4) and one for avoidance (18 items, 0-2). Participants were 87 claustrophobic patients and 200 normal controls randomly selected from the community. The results show that CS has excellent internal consistency, high test-retest reliability, concurrent and discriminant validity. The patients and controls differ significantly on the total scores of anxiety and avoidance, as well as on each individual item scores. The CS was also found to be sensitive to change after cognitive behavioral treatment. Preliminary factor analyses yielded two factors for each subscale; "Being in small enclosed spaces" and "Other people present", accounting for large proportions of the variance. The CS is useful both as a state, and as an outcome self-report measure of claustrophobia.

  18. Literacy affected ability to adequately discriminate among categories in multipoint Likert Scales.

    PubMed

    Chachamovich, Eduardo; Fleck, Marcelo P; Power, Mick

    2009-01-01

    To assess the effect of inability to read on a five-point Likert scale, using the WHOQOL-BREF response scale. It is hypothesized that inability to read is related to loss of discriminant power among the five-category response scale. In a cross-sectional design, nonreaders (n=141) and subjects educated at a graduate level (n-907) were assessed. Statistical analyses combined classic and modern psychometric approaches (Confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch analysis). There is a remarkable difference in the psychometric performance of items across the two subgroups. Fit indexes proved to be closer to the ideal for the graduate group, but not for the nonreader group. Reducing the number of response categories improved the model exclusively for the nonreader sample. Nonreaders do not interpret the scale as a true five-category scale, but exhibit a response pattern indicative that only three categories are in fact considered. These results confirm the hypothesis that a multiple-category response scale is not suitable for nonreaders. They suggest that a simpler response scale should be adopted to achieve a more reliable and satisfactory psychometric performance in this population. This effect seems to be stronger when more abstract and subjective constructs are involved.

  19. Social Cognition Psychometric Evaluation: Results of the Initial Psychometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinkham, Amy E.; Penn, David L.; Green, Michael F.; Harvey, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of social cognition in treatment trials remains problematic due to poor and limited psychometric data for many tasks. As part of the Social Cognition Psychometric Evaluation (SCOPE) study, the psychometric properties of 8 tasks were assessed. One hundred and seventy-nine stable outpatients with schizophrenia and 104 healthy controls completed the battery at baseline and a 2–4-week retest period at 2 sites. Tasks included the Ambiguous Intentions Hostility Questionnaire (AIHQ), Bell Lysaker Emotion Recognition Task (BLERT), Penn Emotion Recognition Task (ER-40), Relationships Across Domains (RAD), Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task (Eyes), The Awareness of Social Inferences Test (TASIT), Hinting Task, and Trustworthiness Task. Tasks were evaluated on: (i) test-retest reliability, (ii) utility as a repeated measure, (iii) relationship to functional outcome, (iv) practicality and tolerability, (v) sensitivity to group differences, and (vi) internal consistency. The BLERT and Hinting task showed the strongest psychometric properties across all evaluation criteria and are recommended for use in clinical trials. The ER-40, Eyes Task, and TASIT showed somewhat weaker psychometric properties and require further study. The AIHQ, RAD, and Trustworthiness Task showed poorer psychometric properties that suggest caution for their use in clinical trials. PMID:25943125

  20. Social Cognition Psychometric Evaluation: Results of the Initial Psychometric Study.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Amy E; Penn, David L; Green, Michael F; Harvey, Philip D

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of social cognition in treatment trials remains problematic due to poor and limited psychometric data for many tasks. As part of the Social Cognition Psychometric Evaluation (SCOPE) study, the psychometric properties of 8 tasks were assessed. One hundred and seventy-nine stable outpatients with schizophrenia and 104 healthy controls completed the battery at baseline and a 2-4-week retest period at 2 sites. Tasks included the Ambiguous Intentions Hostility Questionnaire (AIHQ), Bell Lysaker Emotion Recognition Task (BLERT), Penn Emotion Recognition Task (ER-40), Relationships Across Domains (RAD), Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task (Eyes), The Awareness of Social Inferences Test (TASIT), Hinting Task, and Trustworthiness Task. Tasks were evaluated on: (i) test-retest reliability, (ii) utility as a repeated measure, (iii) relationship to functional outcome, (iv) practicality and tolerability, (v) sensitivity to group differences, and (vi) internal consistency. The BLERT and Hinting task showed the strongest psychometric properties across all evaluation criteria and are recommended for use in clinical trials. The ER-40, Eyes Task, and TASIT showed somewhat weaker psychometric properties and require further study. The AIHQ, RAD, and Trustworthiness Task showed poorer psychometric properties that suggest caution for their use in clinical trials. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Psychometric properties of the Oswestry Disability Index.

    PubMed

    Saltychev, Mikhail; Mattie, Ryan; McCormick, Zachary; Bärlund, Esa; Laimi, Katri

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) in a large cross-sectional cohort of individuals with chronic low back pain by defining its internal consistency, construct structure and validity, and its ability to differentiate between different degrees of functional limitation. A total of 837 consecutive outpatient patients with low back pain were studied. The internal consistency of ODI was assessed by Cronbach's α, construct structure by exploratory factor analysis, construct validity by confirmatory factor analysis, and discrimination was determined by item response theory analysis. The ODI showed good internal consistency (α=0.85). Explanatory factor analysis showed that ODI is a unidimensional test measuring functional level and nothing else. The confirmatory factor analysis showed that the standardized regression weights of all ODI items were relatively high, varying from 0.5 to 0.7. The item response theory analysis suggested that eight out of 10 ODI items have a close to perfect ability to measure functional limitations in accordance with the actual severity of disability experienced by the respondents. Discrimination of all the items was high to perfect (1.08-2.01). The test characteristic and test information curves showed that the discriminative ability of the ODI is superior at higher levels of disability. The present data showed that the ODI is an internally consistent, unidimensional scale with overall excellent construct validity and ability to discriminate the severity of functional disability. The analysis suggests that the ODI may better distinguish between the relative degrees of function at above-average disability levels.

  2. Age discrimination in the workplace: validation of the Nordic Age Discrimination Scale (NADS).

    PubMed

    Furunes, Trude; Mykletun, Reidar J

    2010-02-01

    Due to population ageing, older workers will make up a larger proportion of the workforce. However, recent reports show an increase in perceived age discrimination among older employees. Previous research found that age discrimination may result in negative feelings, such as uselessness, powerlessness and lower self-esteem. This study develops and validates a scale for monitoring age discrimination in the workplace. The validation study draws on three datasets, from Norway, Sweden and Finland respectively. The study provides a psychometric contribution to the study of the behavioral component of ageism.

  3. Stochastic and Historical Resonances of the Unit in Physics and Psychometrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, William P., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Humphry's article, "The Role of the Unit in Physics and Psychometrics," offers fundamental clarifications of measurement concepts that Fisher hopes will find a wide audience. In particular, parameterizing discrimination while preserving statistical sufficiency will indeed provide greater flexibility in accounting "for the effects of empirical…

  4. Psychometric Qualities of the German Version of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PTDS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griesel, Dorothee; Wessa, Michele; Flor, Herta

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, the psychometric properties of the German version of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PTDS; A. Ehlers, R. Steil, H. Winter, & E. B. Foa, 1996) were evaluated in a sample of 143 trauma survivors. To investigate convergent and discriminant validity of this questionnaire, the authors assessed posttraumatic stress disorder…

  5. Psychometric Qualities of the German Version of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PTDS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griesel, Dorothee; Wessa, Michele; Flor, Herta

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, the psychometric properties of the German version of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PTDS; A. Ehlers, R. Steil, H. Winter, & E. B. Foa, 1996) were evaluated in a sample of 143 trauma survivors. To investigate convergent and discriminant validity of this questionnaire, the authors assessed posttraumatic stress disorder…

  6. Conceptualizing Sex Offender Denial from a Multifaceted Framework: Investigating the Psychometric Qualities of a New Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Sandy; Daniels, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined the psychometric properties of a clinician-rated measure of sex offender denial. Convergent and discriminant validity for the measure was supported, and given its relationship to treatment attitudes, the measure demonstrated utility for assessing treatment change and readiness. (Contains 3 tables.)

  7. Psychometric Properties of an Arabic Version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moussa, Miriam Taouk; Lovibond, Peter; Laube, Roy; Megahead, Hamido A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To translate and evaluate the psychometric properties of an Arabic-language version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS). Method: The items were translated, back translated, refined, and tested in an Australian immigrant sample (N = 220). Results: Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the Arabic DASS discriminates between…

  8. A psychometric evaluation of the digital logic concept inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Geoffrey L.; Zilles, Craig; Loui, Michael C.

    2014-10-01

    Concept inventories hold tremendous promise for promoting the rigorous evaluation of teaching methods that might remedy common student misconceptions and promote deep learning. The measurements from concept inventories can be trusted only if the concept inventories are evaluated both by expert feedback and statistical scrutiny (psychometric evaluation). Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory provide two psychometric frameworks for evaluating the quality of assessment tools. We discuss how these theories can be applied to assessment tools generally and then apply them to the Digital Logic Concept Inventory (DLCI). We demonstrate that the DLCI is sufficiently reliable for research purposes when used in its entirety and as a post-course assessment of students' conceptual understanding of digital logic. The DLCI can also discriminate between students across a wide range of ability levels, providing the most information about weaker students' ability levels.

  9. Psychometric evaluation of the Social Interaction Phobia Scale.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Alison R; Carleton, R Nicholas; Weeks, Justin W

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the psychometric properties of a novel measure of social anxiety symptoms, the Social Interaction Phobia Scale (SIPS), as a stand-alone item set, using an undergraduate sample (N=512). The 14-item SIPS has three subscales assessing Social Interaction Anxiety, Fear of Overt Evaluation, and Fear of Attracting Attention. Confirmatory factor analyses replicated the three-factor structure for the SIPS originally reported by Carleton et al. All SIPS scores demonstrated good internal consistency. The convergent validity of the SIPS was supported by strong and positive correlations between all SIPS scores and measures of social anxiety and fear of evaluation; the finding that the relationships between all SIPS scores and a social anxiety measure were stronger than relationships between all SIPS scores and measures of other constructs supported the discriminant validity of the SIPS. Results suggest that the SIPS possesses excellent psychometric properties.

  10. Psychometric properties of 2-minute walk test: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pin, Tamis W

    2014-09-01

    To systematically review the psychometric evidence on the 2-minute walk test (2MWT). Electronic searches of databases including MEDLINE, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and DARE were done until February 2014 using a combination of subject headings and free texts. Studies were included if psychometric properties of the 2MWT were (1) evaluated; (2) written as full reports; and (3) published in English language peer-reviewed journals. A modified consensus-based standard for the selection of health measurement instruments checklist was used to rate the methodological quality of the included studies. A quality assessment for statistical outcomes was used to assess the measurement properties of the 2MWT. Best-evidence synthesis was collated from 25 studies of 14 patient groups. Only 1 study was found that examined the 2MWT in the pediatric population. The testing procedures of the 2MWT varied across the included studies. Reliability, validity (construct and criterion), and responsiveness of the 2MWT also varied across different patient groups. Moderate to strong evidence was found for reliability, convergent validity, discriminative validity, and responsiveness of the 2MWT in frail elderly patients. Moderate to strong evidence for reliability, convergent validity, and responsiveness was found in adults with lower limb amputations. Moderate to strong evidence for validity (convergent and discriminative) was found in adults who received rehabilitation after hip fractures or cardiac surgery. Limited evidence for the psychometric properties of the 2MWT was found in other population groups because of methodological flaws. There is inadequate breadth and depth of psychometric evidence of the 2MWT for clinical and research purposes-specifically, minimal clinically important changes and responsiveness. More good-quality studies are needed, especially in the pediatric population. Consensus on standardized testing procedures of

  11. Fuzzy clustering evaluation of the discrimination power of UV-Vis and (±) ESI-MS detection system in individual or coupled RPLC for characterization of Ginkgo Biloba standardized extracts.

    PubMed

    Medvedovici, Andrei; Albu, Florin; Naşcu-Briciu, Rodica Domnica; Sârbu, Costel

    2014-02-01

    Discrimination power evaluation of UV-Vis and (±) electrospray ionization/mass spectrometric techniques, (ESI-MS) individually considered or coupled as detectors to reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) in the characterization of Ginkgo Biloba standardized extracts, is used in herbal medicines and/or dietary supplements with the help of Fuzzy hierarchical clustering (FHC). Seventeen batches of Ginkgo Biloba commercially available standardized extracts from seven manufacturers were measured during experiments. All extracts were within the criteria of the official monograph dedicated to dried refined and quantified Ginkgo extracts, in the European Pharmacopoeia. UV-Vis and (±) ESI-MS spectra of the bulk standardized extracts in methanol were acquired. Additionally, an RPLC separation based on a simple gradient elution profile was applied to the standardized extracts. Detection was made through monitoring UV absorption at 220 nm wavelength or the total ion current (TIC) produced through (±) ESI-MS analysis. FHC was applied to raw, centered and scaled data sets, for evaluating the discrimination power of the method with respect to the origins of the extracts and to the batch to batch variability. The discrimination power increases with the increase of the intrinsic selectivity of the spectral technique being used: UV-Visdiscriminate between the manufacturing sources of the standardized extracts, and at some extent, to monitor the inter-batch variability. Although the chromatographic dimension sensibly contributes to the discrimination power, spectral MS data may be used as the lone powerful holistic alternative in characterization of standardized Ginkgo Biloba extracts. © 2013 Elsevier B

  12. Tectonic discrimination diagrams revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, Pieter

    2006-06-01

    The decision boundaries of most tectonic discrimination diagrams are drawn by eye. Discriminant analysis is a statistically more rigorous way to determine the tectonic affinity of oceanic basalts based on their bulk-rock chemistry. This method was applied to a database of 756 oceanic basalts of known tectonic affinity (ocean island, mid-ocean ridge, or island arc). For each of these training data, up to 45 major, minor, and trace elements were measured. Discriminant analysis assumes multivariate normality. If the same covariance structure is shared by all the classes (i.e., tectonic affinities), the decision boundaries are linear, hence the term linear discriminant analysis (LDA). In contrast with this, quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) allows the classes to have different covariance structures. To solve the statistical problems associated with the constant-sum constraint of geochemical data, the training data must be transformed to log-ratio space before performing a discriminant analysis. The results can be mapped back to the compositional data space using the inverse log-ratio transformation. An exhaustive exploration of 14,190 possible ternary discrimination diagrams yields the Ti-Si-Sr system as the best linear discrimination diagram and the Na-Nb-Sr system as the best quadratic discrimination diagram. The best linear and quadratic discrimination diagrams using only immobile elements are Ti-V-Sc and Ti-V-Sm, respectively. As little as 5% of the training data are misclassified by these discrimination diagrams. Testing them on a second database of 182 samples that were not part of the training data yields a more reliable estimate of future performance. Although QDA misclassifies fewer training data than LDA, the opposite is generally true for the test data. Therefore LDA is a cruder but more robust classifier than QDA. Another advantage of LDA is that it provides a powerful way to reduce the dimensionality of the multivariate geochemical data in a similar

  13. Psychometric prediction of penitentiary recidivism.

    PubMed

    Medina García, Pedro M; Baños Rivera, Rosa M

    2016-05-01

    Attempts to predict prison recidivism based on the personality have not been very successful. This study aims to provide data on recidivism prediction based on the scores on a personality questionnaire. For this purpose, a predictive model combining the actuarial procedure with a posteriori probability was developed, consisting of the probabilistic calculation of the effective verification of the event once it has already occurred. Cuestionario de Personalidad Situacional (CPS; Fernández, Seisdedos, & Mielgo, 1998) was applied to 978 male inmates classified as recidivists or non-recidivists. High predictive power was achieved, with the area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85 (p <.001; Se = 0.012; 95% CI [0.826, 0.873]. The answers to the CPS items made it possible to properly discriminate 77.3% of the participants. These data indicate the important role of the personality as a key factor in understanding delinquency and predicting recidivism.

  14. Psychometric Analysis of Developmental Stage Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Marcus

    When subjects are given open-ended stimulus situations allowing for responses at all possible stages of a developmental theory, the stage scores of individuals for each situation can be treated as scores on polychotomous items. Extensions of the concepts of difficulty and discriminating power from the dichotomous case to this ordinal category…

  15. Psychometrics of Multiple Choice Questions with Non-Functioning Distracters: Implications to Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Deepak, Kishore K; Al-Umran, Khalid Umran; AI-Sheikh, Mona H; Dkoli, B V; Al-Rubaish, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The functionality of distracters in a multiple choice question plays a very important role. We examined the frequency and impact of functioning and non-functioning distracters on psychometric properties of 5-option items in clinical disciplines. We analyzed item statistics of 1115 multiple choice questions from 15 summative assessments of undergraduate medical students and classified the items into five groups by their number of non-functioning distracters. We analyzed the effect of varying degree of non-functionality ranging from 0 to 4, on test reliability, difficulty index, discrimination index and point biserial correlation. The non-functionality of distracters inversely affected the test reliability and quality of items in a predictable manner. The non-functioning distracters made the items easier and lowered the discrimination index significantly. Three non-functional distracters in a 5-option MCQ significantly affected all psychometric properties (p < 0.5). The corrected point biserial correlation revealed that the items with 3 functional options were psychometrically as effective as 5-option items. Our study reveals that a multiple choice question with 3 functional options provides lower most limit of item format that has adequate psychometric property. The test containing items with less number of functioning options have significantly lower reliability. The distracter function analysis and revision of nonfunctioning distracters can serve as important methods to improve the psychometrics and reliability of assessment.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex CRISPR genotyping: improving efficiency, throughput and discriminative power of 'spoligotyping' with new spacers and a microbead-based hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Abadia, Edgar; Refregier, Guislaine; Tafaj, Silva; Boschiroli, Maria Laura; Guillard, Bertrand; Andremont, Antoine; Ruimy, Raymond; Sola, Christophe

    2010-03-01

    The aims of the present study were to implement a microbead-based 'spoligotyping' technique and to evaluate improvements by the addition of a panel of 25 extra spacers that we expected to provide an increased resolution on principal genetic group 1 (PGG 1) strains. We confirmed the high sensitivity and reproducibility of the classical technique using the 43 spacer panel and we obtained perfect agreement between the membrane-based and the microbead-based techniques. We further demonstrated an increase in the discriminative power of an extended 68 spacer format for differentiation of PGG 1 clinical isolates, in particular for the East African-Indian clade. Finally, we define a limited yet highly informative reduced 10 spacer panel set which could offer a more cost-effective option for implementation in resource-limited countries and that could decrease the need for additional VNTR (variable number of tandem repeats) genotyping work in molecular epidemiological studies. We also present an economic analysis comparing membrane-based and microbead-based techniques.

  17. Evaluation of the resolving power of three different DNA fingerprinting methods to discriminate among isolates of a natural Rhizobium meliloti population.

    PubMed

    Niemann, S; Pühler, A; Tichy, H V; Simon, R; Selbitschka, W

    1997-04-01

    In a comparative study, the PCR-based RAPD and ERIC fingerprint methods were evaluated for their resolving power to discriminate among 21 isolates of a natural Rhizobium meliloti population. PCR fingerprint patterns were analysed by using an automated laser fluorescent (ALF) DNA sequencer, thus allowing the automated on-line storage of data. Results obtained were compared to a classification system using insertion sequence (IS) fingerprinting. Both PCR fingerprint methods were comparable in their ability to resolve differences amongst Rh. meliloti isolates. Grouping of strains on the basis of their RAPD as well as their ERIC fingerprints correlated with grouping of strains according to their IS fingerprints. Moreover, strains displaying identical PCR patterns could be further differentiated according to their IS fingerprints, thus allowing a detailed insight into phylogenetic relationship among strains. The automated evaluation of strain-specific fingerprint patterns has the potential to become a valuable tool for studies of bacterial population genetics. Moreover, the rapid identification of single strains, e.g. pathogens in epidemiological studies seems feasible.

  18. Increasing the discrimination power of forensic STR testing by employing high-performance mass spectrometry, as illustrated in indigenous South African and Central Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Pitterl, Florian; Schmidt, Konrad; Huber, Gabriela; Zimmermann, Bettina; Delport, Rhena; Amory, Sylvain; Ludes, Bertrand; Oberacher, Herbert; Parson, Walther

    2010-11-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) typing has become the standard technique in forensic methodology for the identification of unknown samples. National DNA databases have been established that contain STR genotypes for intelligence purposes. Due to their success, national DNA databases have been growing so fast that the number of advantageous matches may become a logistic problem for the analysts. This is especially true for partial STR profiles as they display reduced discrimination power. To overcome this drawback, modified versions (so-called mini-STRs) of existing loci were introduced as well as new loci to improve the information content of (partial) STR profiles. We pursue an alternative approach that makes use of nucleotide variation within the amplified STR fragments, which can be discerned by mass spectrometry. We have developed an assay that determines molecular masses from crude STR amplicons which were purified and separated by a liquid chromatographic system directly hyphenated to an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer. We present here new population data of forensically relevant STRs in Khoisan and Yakut populations. These autochthonous groups were selected as they may harbor additional STR alleles that are rare or unobserved in modern humans from cosmopolitan areas, especially for the Khoisan, which are known to represent a very ancient human population. The analysis of the molecular mass of STRs offered a widened spectrum of allele variability escorted by enhanced forensic use. Thus, established STR data derived from fragment size analysis can still be used in casework or in the context of intelligence databasing.

  19. Workplace Discrimination, Prejudice, and Diversity Measurement: A Review of Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkard, Alan W.; Boticki, Michael A.; Madson, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Critically reviews diversity measures in terms of item development, psychometric evidence, and utility for counseling and development: Workplace Prejudice/Discrimination Inventory, Attitudes toward Diversity Scale; Organizational Diversity Inventory, Workforce Diversity Questionnaire, Perceived Occupational Opportunity Scale-Form B, and Perceived…

  20. Workplace Discrimination, Prejudice, and Diversity Measurement: A Review of Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkard, Alan W.; Boticki, Michael A.; Madson, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Critically reviews diversity measures in terms of item development, psychometric evidence, and utility for counseling and development: Workplace Prejudice/Discrimination Inventory, Attitudes toward Diversity Scale; Organizational Diversity Inventory, Workforce Diversity Questionnaire, Perceived Occupational Opportunity Scale-Form B, and Perceived…

  1. Psychometric properties and factorial structure of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS) in Spanish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Orgilés, Mireia; Spence, Susan H; Marzo, Juan C; Méndez, Xavier; Espada, José P

    2014-01-01

    The Spence Children's Anxiety Scale is an instrument widely applied in the assessment of the most common anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. This study examines its psychometric properties and the factorial structure in a large community sample of Spanish-speaking adolescents (N = 1,374) aged 13 to 17 years. The scale demonstrated strong internal consistency and good convergent and discriminant validity. Factor analysis confirmed the 6-factor original model, providing a good fit of the data for the Spanish sample. The good psychometric properties support its use by clinicians and researchers, adding evidence to the international empirical support for this measure.

  2. Conducting Simulation Studies in Psychometrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Richard A.; Rubright, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Simulation studies are fundamental to psychometric discourse and play a crucial role in operational and academic research. Yet, resources for psychometricians interested in conducting simulations are scarce. This Instructional Topics in Educational Measurement Series (ITEMS) module is meant to address this deficiency by providing a comprehensive…

  3. Conducting Simulation Studies in Psychometrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Richard A.; Rubright, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Simulation studies are fundamental to psychometric discourse and play a crucial role in operational and academic research. Yet, resources for psychometricians interested in conducting simulations are scarce. This Instructional Topics in Educational Measurement Series (ITEMS) module is meant to address this deficiency by providing a comprehensive…

  4. The Body Appreciation Scale-2: item refinement and psychometric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tylka, Tracy L; Wood-Barcalow, Nichole L

    2015-01-01

    Considered a positive body image measure, the 13-item Body Appreciation Scale (BAS; Avalos, Tylka, & Wood-Barcalow, 2005) assesses individuals' acceptance of, favorable opinions toward, and respect for their bodies. While the BAS has accrued psychometric support, we improved it by rewording certain BAS items (to eliminate sex-specific versions and body dissatisfaction-based language) and developing additional items based on positive body image research. In three studies, we examined the reworded, newly developed, and retained items to determine their psychometric properties among college and online community (Amazon Mechanical Turk) samples of 820 women and 767 men. After exploratory factor analysis, we retained 10 items (five original BAS items). Confirmatory factor analysis upheld the BAS-2's unidimensionality and invariance across sex and sample type. Its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct (convergent, incremental, and discriminant) validity were supported. The BAS-2 is a psychometrically sound positive body image measure applicable for research and clinical settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Discriminant learning analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing; Zhang, Peng; Riedel, Norbert

    2008-12-01

    Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) as a dimension reduction method is widely used in classification such as face recognition. However, it suffers from the small sample size (SSS) problem when data dimensionality is greater than the sample size, as in images where features are high dimensional and correlated. In this paper, we propose to address the SSS problem in the framework of statistical learning theory. We compute linear discriminants by regularized least squares regression, where the singularity problem is resolved. The resulting discriminants are complete in that they include both regular and irregular information. We show that our proposal and its nonlinear extension belong to the same framework where powerful classifiers such as support vector machines are formulated. In addition, our approach allows us to establish an error bound for LDA. Finally, our experiments validate our theoretical analysis results.

  6. 18 CFR 1307.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Discrimination... NONDISCRIMINATION WITH RESPECT TO HANDICAP § 1307.4 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No qualified handicapped... otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity to which this part applies. (b...

  7. 18 CFR 1307.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Discrimination... NONDISCRIMINATION WITH RESPECT TO HANDICAP § 1307.4 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No qualified handicapped... otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity to which this part applies. (b...

  8. 18 CFR 705.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Discrimination... Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No person in the United States shall, on the grounds of race, color, or... discrimination under, any program to which this part applies. (b) Specific discriminatory actions prohibited. (1...

  9. 18 CFR 1302.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Discrimination... § 1302.4 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No person in the United States shall, on the ground of... otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance...

  10. 18 CFR 705.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Discrimination... Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No person in the United States shall, on the grounds of race, color, or... discrimination under, any program to which this part applies. (b) Specific discriminatory actions prohibited. (1...

  11. 18 CFR 705.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Discrimination... Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No person in the United States shall, on the grounds of race, color, or... discrimination under, any program to which this part applies. (b) Specific discriminatory actions prohibited. (1...

  12. 18 CFR 705.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Discrimination... Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No person in the United States shall, on the grounds of race, color, or... discrimination under, any program to which this part applies. (b) Specific discriminatory actions prohibited. (1...

  13. 18 CFR 1307.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Discrimination... NONDISCRIMINATION WITH RESPECT TO HANDICAP § 1307.4 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No qualified handicapped... otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity to which this part applies. (b...

  14. 18 CFR 1302.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Discrimination... § 1302.4 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No person in the United States shall, on the ground of... otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance...

  15. 18 CFR 1302.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Discrimination... § 1302.4 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No person in the United States shall, on the ground of... otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance...

  16. 18 CFR 1307.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Discrimination... NONDISCRIMINATION WITH RESPECT TO HANDICAP § 1307.4 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No qualified handicapped... otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity to which this part applies. (b...

  17. 18 CFR 1302.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Discrimination... § 1302.4 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No person in the United States shall, on the ground of... otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance...

  18. 18 CFR 1307.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discrimination... NONDISCRIMINATION WITH RESPECT TO HANDICAP § 1307.4 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No qualified handicapped... otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity to which this part applies....

  19. 18 CFR 1302.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discrimination... § 1302.4 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No person in the United States shall, on the ground of... otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial...

  20. 18 CFR 705.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discrimination... Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No person in the United States shall, on the grounds of race, color, or... discrimination under, any program to which this part applies. (b) Specific discriminatory actions prohibited....

  1. Psychometric properties of the AQ Aggression Scale in Chilean students.

    PubMed

    Valdivia-Peralta, Maruzzella; Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; González-Bravo, Luis; Lemos-Giráldez, Serafín

    2014-01-01

    The Buss and Perry Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) evaluates aggressive behaviours and is used to assess manifestations of aggression. At different points in time, 346 Chilean university students participated in the validation of the instrument, whose convergent validity was shown in relation to the scales of Psychological Aggression and Physical Aggression of the Conflict Tactics Scale 2 (CTS- 2), and the Salvo Impulsivity Scale. Discriminant validity was found when comparing the scores obtained from a group of students categorized as "Violent" with those of a control group, after a screening test. The AQ scale has appropriate psychometric properties in terms of internal consistency, test-retest reliability, convergent validity and discriminant validity. Four principal factors were obtained in the confirmatory factor analysis. The AQ can be used in Chile to assess aggressive behaviours. Challenges for future research are discussed.

  2. Comparing the psychometric properties of the pediatric outcomes data collection instrument and the activities scales for kids: a review.

    PubMed

    Christakou, Anna; Laiou, Athanasia

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to review and evaluate the psychometric properties of two general musculoskeletal outcome measures focusing on pediatric physical disability, namely, the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) and the Activities Scales for Kids (ASK). Although this review reveals the psychometric superiority of ASK to PODCI, further research should confirm the psychometric properties of both the instruments. A number of psychometric issues need to be further addressed. Specifically, future studies should examine additional types of reliability and validity, for example, content, construct, criterion, and discriminant with more sophisticated statistical analyses, for example, Aiken's item content validity coefficient and confirmatory factor analysis. Until these issues are addressed, researchers should be cautious utilizing these instruments in children with musculoskeletal problems in a clinical setting.

  3. A psychometric analysis of the three gunas.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D B

    1999-06-01

    The Vedic Personality Inventory was devised to assess the validity of the Vedic concept of the three gunas or modes of nature as a psychological categorization system. The sample of 619 subjects included persons of varying ages and occupations from a middle-size city in southeastern United States, and also of subscribers to a magazine focusing on Eastern-style spirituality. The original 90-item inventory was shortened to 56 items on the basis of reliability and validity analyses. Cronbach alpha for the three subscales ranged from .93 to .94, and the corrected item-total correlation of every item score with its subscale score was greater than .50. Three measures of convergent validity and four measures of discriminant validity provide evidence for construct validity. The loading of every item on the scale is stronger for the intended subscale than for any other subscale. Although each subscale contains congeneric items, the factors are not independent. The nonorthogonality is consistent with Vedic theory. This inventory requires psychometric development and testing cross-culturally as well as to be experimentally implemented in group research and individual assessment.

  4. The pornography craving questionnaire: psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Shane; Rosenberg, Harold

    2014-04-01

    Despite the prevalence of pornography use, and recent conceptualization of problematic use as an addiction, we could find no published scale to measure craving for pornography. Therefore, we conducted three studies employing young male pornography users to develop and evaluate such a questionnaire. In Study 1, we had participants rate their agreement with 20 potential craving items after reading a control script or a script designed to induce craving to watch pornography. We dropped eight items because of low endorsement. In Study 2, we revised both the questionnaire and cue exposure stimuli and then evaluated several psychometric properties of the modified questionnaire. Item loadings from a principal components analysis, a high internal consistency reliability coefficient, and a moderate mean inter-item correlation supported interpreting the 12 revised items as a single scale. Correlations of craving scores with preoccupation with pornography, sexual history, compulsive internet use, and sensation seeking provided support for convergent validity, criterion validity, and discriminant validity, respectively. The enhanced imagery script did not impact reported craving; however, more frequent users of pornography reported higher craving than less frequent users regardless of script condition. In Study 3, craving scores demonstrated good one-week test-retest reliability and predicted the number of times participants used pornography during the following week. This questionnaire could be applied in clinical settings to plan and evaluate therapy for problematic users of pornography and as a research tool to assess the prevalence and contextual triggers of craving among different types of pornography users.

  5. Assessing organizational climate: psychometric properties of the CLIOR Scale.

    PubMed

    Peña-Suárez, Elsa; Muñiz, José; Campillo-Álvarez, Angela; Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; García-Cueto, Eduardo

    2013-02-01

    Organizational climate is the set of perceptions shared by workers who occupy the same workplace. The main goal of this study is to develop a new organizational climate scale and to determine its psychometric properties. The sample consisted of 3,163 Health Service workers. A total of 88.7% of participants worked in hospitals, and 11.3% in primary care; 80% were women and 20% men, with a mean age of 51.9 years (SD= 6.28). The proposed scale consists of 50 Likert-type items, with an alpha coefficient of 0.97, and an essentially one-dimensional structure. The discrimination indexes of the items are greater than 0.40, and the items show no differential item functioning in relation to participants' sex. A short version of the scale was developed, made up of 15 items, with discrimination indexes higher than 0.40, an alpha coefficient of 0.94, and its structure was clearly one-dimensional. These results indicate that the new scale has adequate psychometric properties, allowing a reliable and valid assessment of organizational climate.

  6. Psychometric properties of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for children in a large clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Pestle, Sarah L; Chorpita, Bruce F; Schiffman, Jason

    2008-04-01

    The Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children (PSWQ-C; Chorpita, Tracey, Brown, Collica, & Barlow, 1997) is a 14-item self-report measure of worry in children and adolescents. Although the PSWQ-C has demonstrated favorable psychometric properties in small clinical and large community samples, this study represents the first psychometric evaluation of the PSWQ-C in a large clinical sample (N = 491). Factor analysis indicated a two-factor structure, in contrast to all previously published findings on the measure. The PSWQ-C demonstrated favorable psychometric properties in this sample, including high internal consistency, high convergent validity with related constructs, and acceptable discriminative validity between diagnostic categories. The performance of the 3 reverse-scored items was closely examined, and results indicated retaining all 14 items.

  7. Another piece of the puzzle: psychometric properties of the J-SOAP-II.

    PubMed

    Fanniff, Amanda M; Letourneau, Elizabeth J

    2012-08-01

    The authors reviewed nine studies examining psychometric properties of the Juvenile Sex Offender Assessment Protocol-II (J-SOAP-II) and examined the psychometric properties of the J-SOAP-II when items were scored based on probation records obtained at or near disposition and prior to treatment. Data from 73 boys ages 12 to 17 who participated in a larger randomized clinical trial informed this study. Reliability (internal consistency and interrater agreement) and validity (concurrent, discriminant, and predictive) were examined. Scale 1, Sexual Drive/Preoccupation, was characterized by adequate reliability and concurrent validity but did not predict scores on a measure of concerning sexual behavior. This is consistent with seven studies that failed to find evidence of predictive validity using measures of sexual recidivism. Also consistent with the literature, Scale 2, Impulsive/Antisocial Behavior, performed well with respect to nearly all psychometric properties including predictive validity. Review of remaining scales and scores and clinical policy implications are discussed.

  8. Psychometric properties of the Arab Heritage Activity Card Sort.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Razan; Holm, Margo B

    2013-03-01

    The Activity Card Sort is a valid and reliable assessment tool that was created to assess Participation. It has been translated to several languages and adapted to different international cultures. The most recent version of this tool is the Arabic Heritage Activity Card Sort (A-ACS). The purpose of this study was to establish the psychometric properties of the new Arabic version in Jordanian adults. Forty three Jordanian patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 62 healthy adults were recruited to test the psychometric properties of the tool. The A-ACS correlated moderately with the participation index of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (r = -0.458, p < 0.00) (concurrent validity), was able to discriminate between patients and healthy participants on the current and retained levels of participation (F = 5.09, p < 0.03; F = 6.01, p < 0.02, respectively) (discriminative validity), and correlated moderately with the total scores of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (r = -0.458, p < 0.00) and the total score on the Arabic version of the self-report Performance Assessment of Self-care Skills (r = 0.581, p < 0.00) (convergent validity). The tool also showed good test-retest reliability (r = 0.80, p < 0.00) and excellent internal consistency (α = 0.90). The Arabic Heritage of the Activity Card Sort is a valid and reliable tool for Arabic-speaking occupational therapists to use when assessing participation in Jordanian patients with MS or healthy adults. Limitations of this study include using only one diagnostic group from Jordan and examining only the Recovery and Community Versions of the tool. Future studies are needed to examine further psychometric properties for patients with different diagnoses and from different countries in the Arabic region for all three versions of the A-ACS.

  9. On the analysis of psychometric functions: the Spearman-Kärber method.

    PubMed

    Miller, J; Ulrich, R

    2001-11-01

    With computer simulations, we examined the performance of the Spearman-Kärber method for analyzing psychometric functions and compared this method with the standard technique of probit analysis. The Spearman-Kärber method was found to be superior in most cases. It generally yielded less biased and less variable estimates of the location and dispersion of a psychometric function, and it provided more power to detect differences in these parameters across experimental conditions. Moreover, the Spearman-Kärber method provided information about the skewness and higher moments of psychometric functions that is beyond the scope of probit analysis. These advantages of the Spearman-Kärber method suggest that it should often be used in preference to probit analysis for the analysis of observed psychometric functions.

  10. Psychometric properties of alcohol screening tests in the emergency department in Argentina, Mexico and the United States.

    PubMed

    Cremonte, Mariana; Ledesma, Rubén Daniel; Cherpitel, Cheryl J; Borges, Guilherme

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this article is to report psychometric characteristics of the AUDIT, CAGE, RAPS4, and TWEAK and to compare them across three countries: Argentina, Mexico, and the United States which used a similar protocol and methodology. Probability samples of patients 18 years and older were drawn from emergency departments in Mar del Plata, Argentina (n=780), Pachuca, Mexico (n=1624) and Santa Clara, U.S. (n=1220). Concurrent validity was assessed by comparing their performance against a diagnosis of alcohol dependence (DSM-IV) obtained through the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, and for the briefer measures, also by their correlation with the AUDIT. The internal consistency of the CAGE, RAPS4, and TWEAK scores was estimated by the KR-20 formula and by Cronbach's Alpha for the AUDIT. Corrected item-total correlation and D-values were used as item discrimination measures. In Argentina and Mexico the AUDIT and the RAPS4 showed the highest validity. Reliability of all instruments was higher in the US than in Argentina or Mexico. In all three countries, reliability of the TWEAK was lowest, while the AUDIT was highest. With a few exceptions, all items showed good discrimination powers. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF ALCOHOL SCREENING TESTS IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT IN ARGENTINA, MEXICO AND THE UNITED STATES

    PubMed Central

    Ledesma, Rubén Daniel; Cherpitel, Cheryl J.; Borges, Guilherme

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article is to report psychometric characteristics of the AUDIT, CAGE, RAPS4, and TWEAK and to compare them across three countries: Argentina, Mexico, and the United States which used a similar protocol and methodology. Probability samples of patients 18 years and older were drawn from emergency departments in Mar del Plata, Argentina (n=780), Pachuca, Mexico (n=1624) and Santa Clara, U.S. (n=1220). Concurrent validity was assessed by comparing their performance against a diagnosis of alcohol dependence (DSM-IV) obtained through the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, and for the briefer measures, also by their correlation with the AUDIT. The internal consistency of the CAGE, RAPS4, and TWEAK scores was estimated by the KR-20 formula and by Cronbach’s Alpha for the AUDIT. Corrected item-total correlation and D-values were used as item discrimination measures. In Argentina and Mexico the AUDIT and the RAPS4 showed the highest validity. Reliability of all instruments was higher in the US than in Argentina or Mexico. In all three countries, reliability of the TWEAK was lowest, while the AUDIT was highest. With a few exceptions, all items showed good discrimination powers. PMID:20472341

  12. Psychometric Properties of Eating Disorder Instruments in Black and White Young Women: Internal Consistency, Temporal Stability, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardone-Cone, Anna M.; Boyd, Clarissa A.

    2007-01-01

    Most of the major instruments in the eating disorder field have documented psychometric support only in predominantly White samples. The current study examined the internal consistency, temporal stability, and convergent and discriminant validity of a variety of eating disorder measures in Black (n = 97) and White (n = 179) female undergraduates.…

  13. Psychometric Properties of Eating Disorder Instruments in Black and White Young Women: Internal Consistency, Temporal Stability, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardone-Cone, Anna M.; Boyd, Clarissa A.

    2007-01-01

    Most of the major instruments in the eating disorder field have documented psychometric support only in predominantly White samples. The current study examined the internal consistency, temporal stability, and convergent and discriminant validity of a variety of eating disorder measures in Black (n = 97) and White (n = 179) female undergraduates.…

  14. Psychometrics and Validation of a Brief Rating Measure of Parent-Infant Interaction: Manchester Assessment of Caregiver-Infant Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Ming Wai; Brooks, Ami; Green, Jonathan; Abel, Kathryn; Elmadih, Alya

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the psychometrics of a recently developed global rating measure of videotaped parent-infant interaction, the "Manchester Assessment of Caregiver-Infant Interaction" (MACI), in a normative sample. Inter-rater reliability, stability over time, and convergent and discriminant validity were tested. Six-minute play…

  15. Psychometric Properties of the Pain Numeric Rating Scale When Applied to Multiple Body Regions among Professional Musicians

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the broad popularity of a numeric rating scale (NRS) its psychometric properties are not well known. The objective was to determine if there is any difference in the discrimination ability of the NRS when used for measuring pain severity separately in different body regions. Methods Cross-sectional survey study of 630 professional musicians. Item Response Theory (IRT) was used to define the psychometric properties of the NRS. Results The discrimination ability of the pain NRS was dependent on the body area to which it was applied. The discrimination was low 0.5 (95% CI 0.4. to 0.7) for the hand region and perfect for the shoulder and upper part of the neck– 3.2 (95% CI 1.2 to 5.2) and 10.5 (95% CI 10.0 to 10.9), respectively. Both shoulder and neck NRSs showed a great shift towards higher levels of pain severity meaning that the ability of the NRS to discriminate low levels of pain is poor. NRS scores obtained from all other regions did not demonstrate any discrimination ability. Conclusions The pain NRS might have different psychometric properties depending on the body area to which it is applied. Overall, the modest discrimination ability of the pain NRS implies that it should be used in screening questionnaires with some reservations. PMID:27603011

  16. Psychometric Properties of the Pain Numeric Rating Scale When Applied to Multiple Body Regions among Professional Musicians.

    PubMed

    Saltychev, Mikhail; Vastamäki, Heidi; Mattie, Ryan; McCormick, Zachary; Vastamäki, Martti; Laimi, Katri

    2016-01-01

    Despite the broad popularity of a numeric rating scale (NRS) its psychometric properties are not well known. The objective was to determine if there is any difference in the discrimination ability of the NRS when used for measuring pain severity separately in different body regions. Cross-sectional survey study of 630 professional musicians. Item Response Theory (IRT) was used to define the psychometric properties of the NRS. The discrimination ability of the pain NRS was dependent on the body area to which it was applied. The discrimination was low 0.5 (95% CI 0.4. to 0.7) for the hand region and perfect for the shoulder and upper part of the neck- 3.2 (95% CI 1.2 to 5.2) and 10.5 (95% CI 10.0 to 10.9), respectively. Both shoulder and neck NRSs showed a great shift towards higher levels of pain severity meaning that the ability of the NRS to discriminate low levels of pain is poor. NRS scores obtained from all other regions did not demonstrate any discrimination ability. The pain NRS might have different psychometric properties depending on the body area to which it is applied. Overall, the modest discrimination ability of the pain NRS implies that it should be used in screening questionnaires with some reservations.

  17. 18 CFR 8.3 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 8.3 Section 8.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... LICENSED PROJECTS § 8.3 Discrimination prohibited. Every licensee maintaining recreation facilities for the...

  18. 18 CFR 8.3 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 8.3 Section 8.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... LICENSED PROJECTS § 8.3 Discrimination prohibited. Every licensee maintaining recreation facilities for the...

  19. 18 CFR 8.3 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 8.3 Section 8.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... LICENSED PROJECTS § 8.3 Discrimination prohibited. Every licensee maintaining recreation facilities for the...

  20. 18 CFR 8.3 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 8.3 Section 8.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... LICENSED PROJECTS § 8.3 Discrimination prohibited. Every licensee maintaining recreation facilities for the...

  1. 18 CFR 8.3 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 8.3 Section 8.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... LICENSED PROJECTS § 8.3 Discrimination prohibited. Every licensee maintaining recreation facilities for...

  2. Psychometrics in action, science as practice.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Jacob

    2017-07-27

    Practitioners in health sciences education and assessment regularly use a range of psychometric techniques to analyse data, evaluate models, and make crucial progression decisions regarding student learning. However, a recent editorial entitled "Is Psychometrics Science" highlighted some core epistemological and practical problems in psychometrics, and brought its legitimacy into question. This paper attempts to address these issues by applying some key ideas from history and philosophy of science (HPS) discourse. I present some of the conceptual developments in HPS that have bearing on the psychometrics debate. Next, by shifting the focus onto what constitutes the practice of science, I discuss psychometrics in action. Some incorrectly conceptualize science as an assemblage of truths, rather than an assemblage of tools and goals. Psychometrics, however, seems to be an assemblage of methods and techniques. Psychometrics in action represents a range of practices using specific tools in specific contexts. This does not render the practice of psychometrics meaningless or futile. Engaging in debates about whether or not we should regard psychometrics as 'scientific' is, however, a fruitless enterprise. The key question and focus should be whether, on what grounds, and in what contexts, the existing methods and techniques used by psychometricians can be justified or criticized.

  3. Analytic boosted boson discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2016-05-20

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, D2, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits. By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted Z boson from massive QCD background jets. We compare our results with Monte Carlo predictions which allows for a detailed understanding of the extent to which these generators accurately describe the formation of two-prong QCD jets, and informs their usage in substructure analyses. In conclusion, our calculation also provides considerable insight into the discrimination power and calculability of jet substructure observables in general.

  4. Analytic boosted boson discrimination

    DOE PAGES

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2016-05-20

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, D2, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits.more » By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted Z boson from massive QCD background jets. We compare our results with Monte Carlo predictions which allows for a detailed understanding of the extent to which these generators accurately describe the formation of two-prong QCD jets, and informs their usage in substructure analyses. In conclusion, our calculation also provides considerable insight into the discrimination power and calculability of jet substructure observables in general.« less

  5. Psychometric properties of the feedback orientation scale among South African salespersons.

    PubMed

    Lilford, Neil; Caruana, Albert; Pitt, Leyland

    2014-02-01

    Feedback to employees is an important management tool, and the literature demonstrates that it has a positive effect on learning, motivation, and job performance. This study investigates in a non-U.S. context the psychometric properties of the Feedback Orientation Scale. Data were gathered from a sample of 202 salespersons from a large South African firm within the industrial fuels and lubricants sector. Confirmatory Factor Analysis provided evidence for the intended dimensionality, reliability, and convergent and discriminant validity of the scale.

  6. Psychometric Properties of IRT Proficiency Estimates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolen, Michael J.; Tong, Ye

    2010-01-01

    Psychometric properties of item response theory proficiency estimates are considered in this paper. Proficiency estimators based on summed scores and pattern scores include non-Bayes maximum likelihood and test characteristic curve estimators and Bayesian estimators. The psychometric properties investigated include reliability, conditional…

  7. Psychometric Properties of IRT Proficiency Estimates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolen, Michael J.; Tong, Ye

    2010-01-01

    Psychometric properties of item response theory proficiency estimates are considered in this paper. Proficiency estimators based on summed scores and pattern scores include non-Bayes maximum likelihood and test characteristic curve estimators and Bayesian estimators. The psychometric properties investigated include reliability, conditional…

  8. Loosening Psychometric Constraints on Educational Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    In response to an argument by Baird, Andrich, Hopfenbeck and Stobart (2017), Michael Kane states that there needs to be a better fit between educational assessment and learning theory. In line with this goal, Kane will examine how psychometric constraints might be loosened by relaxing some psychometric "rules" in some assessment…

  9. QUEST - A Bayesian adaptive psychometric method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, A. B.; Pelli, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    An adaptive psychometric procedure that places each trial at the current most probable Bayesian estimate of threshold is described. The procedure takes advantage of the common finding that the human psychometric function is invariant in form when expressed as a function of log intensity. The procedure is simple, fast, and efficient, and may be easily implemented on any computer.

  10. Psychometric profiles and facial pain.

    PubMed

    Eversole, L R; Stone, C E; Matheson, D; Kaplan, H

    1985-09-01

    The myofacial pain-dysfunction syndrome and atypical facial pain are the most prevalent chronic pain disorders of the facial region. Previously, the myofacial pain-dysfunction syndrome included all TMJ/masticatory muscle pain, jaw dysfunction, and joint clicking. We have segregated two major subgroups subsumed within this diagnostic classification and have assigned them to a myogenic facial pain (MFP) group and a TMJ internal derangement (TMJID) group. Significant age and personality differences were uncovered when these subpopulations were compared to subjects with atypical facial pain (AFP). Both MFP and TMJID groups are relatively homologous, involving younger persons than AFP subjects. Alternatively, when MFP, TMJID, and AFP subjects were compared for differences in MMPI psychometric scales, MFP and AFP subjects exhibited significantly higher scores, particularly for hypochondriasis, depression, and hysteria, than did TMJID subjects. It is concluded that subcategorization of myofascial pain-dysfunction patients into a myogenic pain group and a TMJ internal derangement group is justified on the basis of psychometric differences. Furthermore, psychopathologic factors are more significant among MFP and AFP subjects than among TMJID patients.

  11. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of an Instrument to Assess Cross-Cultural Competence of Healthcare Professionals (CCCHP).

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Gerda; Knibbe, Ronald A; von Wolff, Alessa; Dingoyan, Demet; Schulz, Holger; Mösko, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Cultural competence of healthcare professionals (HCPs) is recognized as a strategy to reduce cultural disparities in healthcare. However, standardised, valid and reliable instruments to assess HCPs' cultural competence are notably lacking. The present study aims to 1) identify the core components of cultural competence from a healthcare perspective, 2) to develop a self-report instrument to assess cultural competence of HCPs and 3) to evaluate the psychometric properties of the new instrument. The conceptual model and initial item pool, which were applied to the cross-cultural competence instrument for the healthcare profession (CCCHP), were derived from an expert survey (n = 23), interviews with HCPs (n = 12), and a broad narrative review on assessment instruments and conceptual models of cultural competence. The item pool was reduced systematically, which resulted in a 59-item instrument. A sample of 336 psychologists, in advanced psychotherapeutic training, and 409 medical students participated, in order to evaluate the construct validity and reliability of the CCCHP. Construct validity was supported by principal component analysis, which led to a 32-item six-component solution with 50% of the total variance explained. The different dimensions of HCPs' cultural competence are: Cross-Cultural Motivation/Curiosity, Cross-Cultural Attitudes, Cross-Cultural Skills, Cross-Cultural Knowledge/Awareness and Cross-Cultural Emotions/Empathy. For the total instrument, the internal consistency reliability was .87 and the dimension's Cronbach's α ranged from .54 to .84. The discriminating power of the CCCHP was indicated by statistically significant mean differences in CCCHP subscale scores between predefined groups. The 32-item CCCHP exhibits acceptable psychometric properties, particularly content and construct validity to examine HCPs' cultural competence. The CCCHP with its five dimensions offers a comprehensive assessment of HCPs' cultural competence, and has the

  12. Social support for healthy behaviors: Scale psychometrics and prediction of weight loss among women in a behavioral program

    PubMed Central

    Kiernan, Michaela; Moore, Susan D.; Schoffman, Danielle E.; Lee, Katherine; King, Abby C.; Taylor, C. Barr; Kiernan, Nancy Ellen; Perri, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Social support could be a powerful weight-loss treatment moderator or mediator but is rarely assessed. We assessed the psychometric properties, initial levels, and predictive validity of a measure of perceived social support and sabotage from friends and family for healthy eating and physical activity (eight subscales). Overweight/obese women randomized to one of two 6-month, group-based behavioral weight-loss programs (N=267; mean BMI 32.1±3.5; 66.3% White) completed subscales at baseline, and weight loss was assessed at 6 months. Internal consistency, discriminant validity, and content validity were excellent for support subscales and adequate for sabotage subscales; qualitative responses revealed novel deliberate instances not reflected in current sabotage items. Most women (>75%) “never” or “rarely” experienced support from friends or family. Using non-parametric classification methods, we identified two subscales—support from friends for healthy eating and support from family for physical activity—that predicted three clinically meaningful subgroups who ranged in likelihood of losing ≥5% of initial weight at 6 months. Women who “never” experienced family support were least likely to lose weight (45.7% lost weight) whereas women who experienced both frequent friend and family support were more likely to lose weight (71.6% lost weight). Paradoxically, women who “never” experienced friend support were most likely to lose weight (80.0% lost weight), perhaps because the group-based programs provided support lacking from friendships. Psychometrics for support subscales were excellent; initial support was rare; and the differential roles of friend versus family support could inform future targeted weight-loss interventions to subgroups at risk. PMID:21996661

  13. Assessing the Psychometric Properties of Alternative Items for Certification.

    PubMed

    Krogh, Mary Anne; Muckle, Timothy

    Alternative items were added as scored items to the National Certification Examination for Nurse Anesthetists (NCE) in 2010. A common concern related to the new items has been their measurement attributes. This study was undertaken to evaluate the psychometric impact of adding these items to the examination. Candidates had a significantly higher ability estimate in alternative items than in multiple choice questions and 6.7 percent of test candidates performed significantly differently in alternative item formats. The ability estimates of multiple choice questions correlated at r = .58. The alternative items took significantly longer time to answer than standard multiple choice questions and discriminated to a higher degree than MCQs. The alternative items exhibited unidimensionality to the same degree as MCQs and the BIC confirmed the Rasch model as acceptable for scoring. The new item types were found to have acceptable attributes for inclusion in the certification program.

  14. The eight-item modified Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey: psychometric evaluation showed excellent performance.

    PubMed

    Moser, André; Stuck, Andreas E; Silliman, Rebecca A; Ganz, Patricia A; Clough-Gorr, Kerri M

    2012-10-01

    Evaluation and validation of the psychometric properties of the eight-item modified Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey (mMOS-SS). Secondary analyses of data from three populations: Boston breast cancer study (N=660), Los Angeles breast cancer study (N=864), and Medical Outcomes Study (N=1,717). The psychometric evaluation of the eight-item mMOS-SS compared performance across populations and with the original 19-item Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey (MOS-SS). Internal reliability, factor structure, construct validity, and discriminant validity were evaluated using Cronbach's alpha, principal factor analysis (PFA), and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), Spearman and Pearson correlation, t-test and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. mMOS-SS internal reliability was excellent in all three populations. PFA factor loadings were similar across populations; one factor >0.6, well-discriminated two factor (instrumental/emotional social support four items each) >0.5. CFA with a priori two-factor structure yielded consistently adequate model fit (root mean squared errors of approximation 0.054-0.074). mMOS-SS construct and discriminant validity were similar across populations and comparable to MOS-SS. Psychometric properties held when restricted to women aged ≥ 65 years. The psychometric properties of the eight-item mMOS-SS were excellent and similar to those of the original 19-item instrument. Results support the use of briefer mMOS-SS instrument; better suited to multidimensional geriatric assessments and specifically in older women with breast cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Determining optimal medical image compression: psychometric and image distortion analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Storage issues and bandwidth over networks have led to a need to optimally compress medical imaging files while leaving clinical image quality uncompromised. Methods To determine the range of clinically acceptable medical image compression across multiple modalities (CT, MR, and XR), we performed psychometric analysis of image distortion thresholds using physician readers and also performed subtraction analysis of medical image distortion by varying degrees of compression. Results When physician readers were asked to determine the threshold of compression beyond which images were clinically compromised, the mean image distortion threshold was a JPEG Q value of 23.1 ± 7.0. In Receiver-Operator Characteristics (ROC) plot analysis, compressed images could not be reliably distinguished from original images at any compression level between Q = 50 and Q = 95. Below this range, some readers were able to discriminate the compressed and original images, but high sensitivity and specificity for this discrimination was only encountered at the lowest JPEG Q value tested (Q = 5). Analysis of directly measured magnitude of image distortion from subtracted image pairs showed that the relationship between JPEG Q value and degree of image distortion underwent an upward inflection in the region of the two thresholds determined psychometrically (approximately Q = 25 to Q = 50), with 75 % of the image distortion occurring between Q = 50 and Q = 1. Conclusion It is possible to apply lossy JPEG compression to medical images without compromise of clinical image quality. Modest degrees of compression, with a JPEG Q value of 50 or higher (corresponding approximately to a compression ratio of 15:1 or less), can be applied to medical images while leaving the images indistinguishable from the original. PMID:22849336

  16. Determining optimal medical image compression: psychometric and image distortion analysis.

    PubMed

    Flint, Alexander C

    2012-07-31

    Storage issues and bandwidth over networks have led to a need to optimally compress medical imaging files while leaving clinical image quality uncompromised. To determine the range of clinically acceptable medical image compression across multiple modalities (CT, MR, and XR), we performed psychometric analysis of image distortion thresholds using physician readers and also performed subtraction analysis of medical image distortion by varying degrees of compression. When physician readers were asked to determine the threshold of compression beyond which images were clinically compromised, the mean image distortion threshold was a JPEG Q value of 23.1 ± 7.0. In Receiver-Operator Characteristics (ROC) plot analysis, compressed images could not be reliably distinguished from original images at any compression level between Q = 50 and Q = 95. Below this range, some readers were able to discriminate the compressed and original images, but high sensitivity and specificity for this discrimination was only encountered at the lowest JPEG Q value tested (Q = 5). Analysis of directly measured magnitude of image distortion from subtracted image pairs showed that the relationship between JPEG Q value and degree of image distortion underwent an upward inflection in the region of the two thresholds determined psychometrically (approximately Q = 25 to Q = 50), with 75 % of the image distortion occurring between Q = 50 and Q = 1. It is possible to apply lossy JPEG compression to medical images without compromise of clinical image quality. Modest degrees of compression, with a JPEG Q value of 50 or higher (corresponding approximately to a compression ratio of 15:1 or less), can be applied to medical images while leaving the images indistinguishable from the original.

  17. Psychometric Properties of the Nurses Work Functioning Questionnaire (NWFQ)

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Fania R.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; van Dijk, Frank J. H.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The Nurses Work Functioning Questionnaire (NWFQ) is a 50-item self-report questionnaire specifically developed for nurses and allied health professionals. Its seven subscales measure impairments in the work functioning due to common mental disorders. Aim of this study is to evaluate the psychometric properties of the NWFQ, by assessing reproducibility and construct validity. Methods The questionnaire was administered to 314 nurses and allied health professionals with a re-test in 112 subjects. Reproducibility was assessed by the intraclass correlations coefficients (ICC) and the standard error of measurement (SEM). For construct validity, correlations were calculated with a general work functioning scale, the Endicott Work Productivity Scale (EWPS) (convergent validity) and with a physical functioning scale (divergent validity). For discriminative validity, a Mann Whitney U test was performed testing for significant differences between subjects with mental health complaints and without. Results All subscales showed good reliability (ICC: 0.72–0.86), except for one (ICC = 0.16). Convergent validity was good in six subscales, correlations ranged from 0.38–0.62. However, in one subscale the correlation with the EWPS was too low (0.22). Divergent validity was good in all subscales based on correlations ranged from (−0.06)–(−0.23). Discriminative validity was good in all subscales, based on significant differences between subjects with and without mental health complaints (p<0.001–p = 0.003). Conclusion The NWFQ demonstrates good psychometric properties, for six of the seven subscales. Subscale “impaired decision making” needs improvement before further use. PMID:22087231

  18. Adaptation improves face trustworthiness discrimination.

    PubMed

    Keefe, B D; Dzhelyova, M; Perrett, D I; Barraclough, N E

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation to facial characteristics, such as gender and viewpoint, has been shown to both bias our perception of faces and improve facial discrimination. In this study, we examined whether adapting to two levels of face trustworthiness improved sensitivity around the adapted level. Facial trustworthiness was manipulated by morphing between trustworthy and untrustworthy prototypes, each generated by morphing eight trustworthy and eight untrustworthy faces, respectively. In the first experiment, just-noticeable differences (JNDs) were calculated for an untrustworthy face after participants adapted to an untrustworthy face, a trustworthy face, or did not adapt. In the second experiment, the three conditions were identical, except that JNDs were calculated for a trustworthy face. In the third experiment we examined whether adapting to an untrustworthy male face improved discrimination to an untrustworthy female face. In all experiments, participants completed a two-interval forced-choice (2-IFC) adaptive staircase procedure, in which they judged which face was more untrustworthy. JNDs were derived from a psychometric function fitted to the data. Adaptation improved sensitivity to faces conveying the same level of trustworthiness when compared to no adaptation. When adapting to and discriminating around a different level of face trustworthiness there was no improvement in sensitivity and JNDs were equivalent to those in the no adaptation condition. The improvement in sensitivity was found to occur even when adapting to a face with different gender and identity. These results suggest that adaptation to facial trustworthiness can selectively enhance mechanisms underlying the coding of facial trustworthiness to improve perceptual sensitivity. These findings have implications for the role of our visual experience in the decisions we make about the trustworthiness of other individuals.

  19. Adaptation improves face trustworthiness discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, B. D.; Dzhelyova, M.; Perrett, D. I.; Barraclough, N. E.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation to facial characteristics, such as gender and viewpoint, has been shown to both bias our perception of faces and improve facial discrimination. In this study, we examined whether adapting to two levels of face trustworthiness improved sensitivity around the adapted level. Facial trustworthiness was manipulated by morphing between trustworthy and untrustworthy prototypes, each generated by morphing eight trustworthy and eight untrustworthy faces, respectively. In the first experiment, just-noticeable differences (JNDs) were calculated for an untrustworthy face after participants adapted to an untrustworthy face, a trustworthy face, or did not adapt. In the second experiment, the three conditions were identical, except that JNDs were calculated for a trustworthy face. In the third experiment we examined whether adapting to an untrustworthy male face improved discrimination to an untrustworthy female face. In all experiments, participants completed a two-interval forced-choice (2-IFC) adaptive staircase procedure, in which they judged which face was more untrustworthy. JNDs were derived from a psychometric function fitted to the data. Adaptation improved sensitivity to faces conveying the same level of trustworthiness when compared to no adaptation. When adapting to and discriminating around a different level of face trustworthiness there was no improvement in sensitivity and JNDs were equivalent to those in the no adaptation condition. The improvement in sensitivity was found to occur even when adapting to a face with different gender and identity. These results suggest that adaptation to facial trustworthiness can selectively enhance mechanisms underlying the coding of facial trustworthiness to improve perceptual sensitivity. These findings have implications for the role of our visual experience in the decisions we make about the trustworthiness of other individuals. PMID:23801979

  20. Physical capability scale: psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara; Boltz, Marie; Galik, Elizabeth; Wells, Chris

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the psychometric testing of the Basic Physical Capability Scale. The study was a secondary data analysis of combined data sets from three studies. Study participants included 93 older adults, recruited from 2 acute-care settings and 110 older adults living in long-term care facilities. Rasch analysis was used for the testing of the measurement model. There was some support for construct validity based on the fit of the items to the scale across both samples. In addition, there was support for hypothesis testing as physical function was significantly associated with physical capability. There was evidence for internal consistency (Alpha coefficients of .77-.83) and interrater reliability based on an intraclass correlation of .81. This study provided preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the Basic Physical Capability Scale, and guidance for scale revisions and continued use.

  1. Psychometrics behind Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hua-Hua

    2015-03-01

    The paper provides a survey of 18 years' progress that my colleagues, students (both former and current) and I made in a prominent research area in Psychometrics-Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). We start with a historical review of the establishment of a large sample foundation for CAT. It is worth noting that the asymptotic results were derived under the framework of Martingale Theory, a very theoretical perspective of Probability Theory, which may seem unrelated to educational and psychological testing. In addition, we address a number of issues that emerged from large scale implementation and show that how theoretical works can be helpful to solve the problems. Finally, we propose that CAT technology can be very useful to support individualized instruction on a mass scale. We show that even paper and pencil based tests can be made adaptive to support classroom teaching.

  2. Psychometric functions for informational masking

    PubMed Central

    Lutfi, Robert A.; Kistler, Doris J.; Callahan, Michael R.; Wightman, Frederic L.

    2010-01-01

    The term informational masking has traditionally been used to refer to elevations in signal threshold resulting from masker uncertainty. In the present study, the method of constant stimuli was used to obtain complete psychometric functions (PFs) from 44 normal-hearing listeners in conditions known to produce varying amounts of informational masking. The listener’s task was to detect a pure-tone signal in the presence of a broadband noise masker (low masker uncertainty) and in the presence of multitone maskers with frequencies and amplitudes that varied at random from one presentation to the next (high masker uncertainty). Relative to the broadband noise condition, significant reductions were observed in both the slope and the upper asymptote of the PF for multitone maskers producing large amounts of informational masking. Slope was affected more for some listeners and conditions while asymptote was affected more for others; consequently, neither parameter alone was highly predictive of individual thresholds or the amount of informational masking. Mean slopes and asymptotes varied nonmonotonically with the number of masker components in a manner similar to mean thresholds, particularly when the estimated effect of energetic masking on thresholds was subtracted out. As in past studies, the threshold data were well described by a model in which trial-by-trial judgments are based on a weighted sum of levels in dB at the output of independent auditory filters. The psychometric data, however, complicated the model’s interpretation in two ways: First, they suggested that, depending on the listener and condition, the weights can either reflect a fixed influence of masker components on each trial or the effect of occasionally mistaking a masker component for the signal from trial to trial. Second, they indicated that in either case the variance of the underlying decision variable as estimated from PF slope is not by itself great enough to account for the observed

  3. Psychometric functions for informational masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfi, Robert A.; Kistler, Doris J.; Callahan, Michael R.; Wightman, Frederic L.

    2003-12-01

    The term informational masking has traditionally been used to refer to elevations in signal threshold resulting from masker uncertainty. In the present study, the method of constant stimuli was used to obtain complete psychometric functions (PFs) from 44 normal-hearing listeners in conditions known to produce varying amounts of informational masking. The listener's task was to detect a pure-tone signal in the presence of a broadband noise masker (low masker uncertainty) and in the presence of multitone maskers with frequencies and amplitudes that varied at random from one presentation to the next (high masker uncertainty). Relative to the broadband noise condition, significant reductions were observed in both the slope and the upper asymptote of the PF for multitone maskers producing large amounts of informational masking. Slope was affected more for some listeners and conditions while asymptote was affected more for others; consequently, neither parameter alone was highly predictive of individual thresholds or the amount of informational masking. Mean slopes and asymptotes varied nonmonotonically with the number of masker components in a manner similar to mean thresholds, particularly when the estimated effect of energetic masking on thresholds was subtracted out. As in past studies, the threshold data were well described by a model in which trial-by-trial judgments are based on a weighted sum of levels in dB at the output of independent auditory filters. The psychometric data, however, complicated the model's interpretation in two ways: First, they suggested that, depending on the listener and condition, the weights can either reflect a fixed influence of masker components on each trial or the effect of occasionally mistaking a masker component for the signal from trial to trial. Second, they indicated that in either case the variance of the underlying decision variable as estimated from PF slope is not by itself great enough to account for the observed changes

  4. ZEST as a tool for rapid assessment of frequency discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Michael; Buus, Søren; Florentine, Mary

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a rapid and reliable procedure for obtaining discrimination thresholds. ZEST [King-Smith et al., Vision Res. 34, 885-912 (1994)] has been found to be a promising candidate for this purpose. The present study used ZEST to obtain frequency-discrimination thresholds in 30 trials with a 2AFC paradigm. Subsequent analysis allowed calculation of thresholds for any number of trials up to 30. The stimuli were 600-ms tones at seven frequencies, ranging from 250 to 7000 Hz. Data for six normal listeners obtained with three different slopes (beta) of the assumed psychometric function indicate that reliable thresholds can be obtained in 10 to 15 trials. Simulations indicate that threshold estimates have only slight bias ranging from 15% with 9 trials to under 5% with 30 trials. Interestingly, these simulations also show that this bias can be reduced with only a small increase in the variability if the assumed psychometric function used by ZEST is made steeper than the listener's psychometric function (i.e., if beta is increased from 1.23 to 6). Altogether these results suggest ZEST combined with a 2AFC paradigm is a promising candidate for rapid and reliable assessment of listeners' discrimination thresholds.

  5. Difficulty and Discrimination Parameters of Boston Naming Test Items in a Consecutive Clinical Series

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza, Otto; Sachs, Bonnie C.; Ferman, Tanis J.; Rush, Beth K.; Lucas, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The Boston Naming Test is one of the most widely used neuropsychological instruments; yet, there has been limited use of modern psychometric methods to investigate its properties at the item level. The current study used Item response theory to examine each item's difficulty and discrimination properties, as well as the test's measurement precision across the range of naming ability. Participants included 300 consecutive referrals to the outpatient neuropsychology service at Mayo Clinic in Florida. Results showed that successive items do not necessarily reflect a monotonic increase in psychometric difficulty, some items are inadequate to distinguish individuals at various levels of naming ability, multiple items provide redundant psychometric information, and measurement precision is greatest for persons within a low-average range of ability. These findings may be used to develop short forms, improve reliability in future test versions by replacing psychometrically poor items, and analyze profiles of intra-individual variability. PMID:21593059

  6. Difficulty and discrimination parameters of Boston naming test items in a consecutive clinical series.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Otto; Sachs, Bonnie C; Ferman, Tanis J; Rush, Beth K; Lucas, John A

    2011-08-01

    The Boston Naming Test is one of the most widely used neuropsychological instruments; yet, there has been limited use of modern psychometric methods to investigate its properties at the item level. The current study used Item response theory to examine each item's difficulty and discrimination properties, as well as the test's measurement precision across the range of naming ability. Participants included 300 consecutive referrals to the outpatient neuropsychology service at Mayo Clinic in Florida. Results showed that successive items do not necessarily reflect a monotonic increase in psychometric difficulty, some items are inadequate to distinguish individuals at various levels of naming ability, multiple items provide redundant psychometric information, and measurement precision is greatest for persons within a low-average range of ability. These findings may be used to develop short forms, improve reliability in future test versions by replacing psychometrically poor items, and analyze profiles of intra-individual variability.

  7. Assessment of irrational beliefs: the question of discriminant validity.

    PubMed

    Smith, T W; Zurawski, R M

    1983-11-01

    Previous evaluations of the psychometric properties of available measures of irrational beliefs have failed to examine the discriminant validity of these instruments. The present investigation (N = 142) of the relationship between measures of irrational beliefs and trait anxiety provided evidence of discriminant validity for one frequently used measure of irrational beliefs (Rational Behavior Inventory), but failed to provide such evidence for perhaps the most popular measure of irrational beliefs (Irrational Beliefs Test). Both measures of beliefs were correlated more highly with cognitive features of trait anxiety than with somatic aspects.

  8. Quality of care in the intensive care unit from the perspective of patient's relatives: development and psychometric evaluation of the consumer quality index 'R-ICU'.

    PubMed

    Rensen, Ans; van Mol, Margo M; Menheere, Ilse; Nijkamp, Marjan D; Verhoogt, Ellen; Maris, Bea; Manders, Willeke; Vloet, Lilian; Verharen, Lisbeth

    2017-01-24

    involvement in decision-making on the medical treatment of the patient. The CQI 'R-ICU' evaluates quality of care from the perspective of relatives of intensive care patients and provides practical information for quality assurance and improvement programs. The development and psychometric evaluation of the CQI 'R-ICU' led to a draft questionnaire, sufficient to justify further research into the reliability, validity, and the discriminative power of the questionnaire.

  9. Binocular contrast summation--I. Detection and discrimination.

    PubMed

    Legge, G E

    1984-01-01

    Binocular summation was evaluated for contrast detection and discrimination. Monocular and binocular forced-choice psychometric functions were measured for the detection of 0.5-c/deg sine-wave gratings presented alone (simple detection), or superimposed on identical background gratings (discrimination). The dependence of detectability d' on signal contrast C could be described by: d' = (C/C')n. C' is threshold contrast, and n is an index of the steepness of the psychometric function. n was near 2 for simple detection, near 1 for discrimination, and was approximately the same for monocular and binocular viewing. Monocular thresholds were about 1.5 times binocular thresholds for detection, but the ratio dropped for suprathreshold discrimination. These results reveal a dependence of binocular summation on background contrast. For simple detection, binocular detectabilities were at least twice monocular detectabilities . For contrast discrimination, the amount of binocular summation decreased. For a 25%-contrast background, there was little or no binocular summation. It is concluded that binocular contrast summation decreases as background contrast rises.

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Heart Disease Knowledge Scale: Evidence from Item and Confirmatory Factor Analyses.

    PubMed

    Lim, Bee Chiu; Kueh, Yee Cheng; Arifin, Wan Nor; Ng, Kok Huan

    2016-07-01

    Heart disease knowledge is an important concept for health education, yet there is lack of evidence on proper validated instruments used to measure levels of heart disease knowledge in the Malaysian context. A cross-sectional, survey design was conducted to examine the psychometric properties of the adapted English version of the Heart Disease Knowledge Questionnaire (HDKQ). Using proportionate cluster sampling, 788 undergraduate students at Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia, were recruited and completed the HDKQ. Item analysis and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were used for the psychometric evaluation. Construct validity of the measurement model was included. Most of the students were Malay (48%), female (71%), and from the field of science (51%). An acceptable range was obtained with respect to both the difficulty and discrimination indices in the item analysis results. The difficulty index ranged from 0.12-0.91 and a discrimination index of ≥ 0.20 were reported for the final retained 23 items. The final CFA model showed an adequate fit to the data, yielding a 23-item, one-factor model [weighted least squares mean and variance adjusted scaled chi-square difference = 1.22, degrees of freedom = 2, P-value = 0.544, the root mean square error of approximation = 0.03 (90% confidence interval = 0.03, 0.04); close-fit P-value = > 0.950]. Adequate psychometric values were obtained for Malaysian undergraduate university students using the 23-item, one-factor model of the adapted HDKQ.

  11. Intensity discrimination as a function of stimulus level with electric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D A; Schmitz, J L; Donaldson, G S; Viemeister, N F; Javel, E

    1996-10-01

    Difference limens (DLs) for changes in electric current were measured from multiple electrodes in each of eight cochlear-implanted subjects. Stimuli were 200-microseconds/phase biphasic pulse trains delivered at 125 Hz in 300-ms bursts. DLs were measured with an adaptive three-alternative forced-choice procedure. Fixed-level psychometric functions were also obtained in four subjects to validate the adaptive DLs. Relative intensity DLs, specified as Weber fractions in decibels [10 log (delta I/I)] for standards above absolute threshold, decreased as a power function of stimulus intensity relative to absolute threshold [delta I/I = beta (I/I0) alpha] in the same manner as Weber fractions for normal acoustic stimulation reported in previous studies. Exponents (alpha) of the power function for electric stimulation ranged from -0.4 to -3.2, on average, an order of magnitude larger than exponents for acoustic stimulation, which range from -0.07 to -0.11. Normalization of stimulus intensity to the dynamic range of hearing resulted in Weber functions with similar negative slopes for electric and acoustic stimulation, corresponding to an 8-dB average improvement in Weber fractions across the dynamic range. Sensitivity to intensity change ¿10 log beta¿ varied from -0.42 to -13.5 dB compared to +0.60 to -3.34 dB for acoustic stimulation, but on average was better with electric stimulation than with acoustic stimulation. Psychometric functions for intensity discrimination yielded Weber fractions consistent with adaptive procedures and d' was a linear function of delta I. Variability among repeated Weber-fraction estimates was constant across dynamic range. Relatively constant Weber fractions across all or part of the dynamic range, observed in some subjects, were traced to the intensity resolution limits of individual implanted receiver/stimulators. DLs could not be accurately described by constant amplitude changes, expressed as a percentage of dynamic range ¿delta A(% DR

  12. Content Validity and Psychometric Characteristics of the "Knowledge about Older Patients Quiz" for Nurses Using Item Response Theory.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Jeroen; Hoogerduijn, Jita G; Kruitwagen, Cas; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2016-11-01

    To assess the content validity and psychometric characteristics of the Knowledge about Older Patients Quiz (KOP-Q), which measures nurses' knowledge regarding older hospitalized adults and their certainty regarding this knowledge. Cross-sectional. Content validity: general hospitals. Psychometric characteristics: nursing school and general hospitals in the Netherlands. Content validity: 12 nurse specialists in geriatrics. Psychometric characteristics: 107 first-year and 78 final-year bachelor of nursing students, 148 registered nurses, and 20 nurse specialists in geriatrics. Content validity: The nurse specialists rated each item of the initial KOP-Q (52 items) on relevance. Ratings were used to calculate Item-Content Validity Index and average Scale-Content Validity Index (S-CVI/ave) scores. Items with insufficient content validity were removed. Psychometric characteristics: Ratings of students, nurses, and nurse specialists were used to test for different item functioning (DIF) and unidimensionality before item characteristics (discrimination and difficulty) were examined using Item Response Theory. Finally, norm references were calculated and nomological validity was assessed. Content validity: Forty-three items remained after assessing content validity (S-CVI/ave = 0.90). Psychometric characteristics: Of the 43 items, two demonstrating ceiling effects and 11 distorting ability estimates (DIF) were subsequently excluded. Item characteristics were assessed for the remaining 30 items, all of which demonstrated good discrimination and difficulty parameters. Knowledge was positively correlated with certainty about this knowledge. The final 30-item KOP-Q is a valid, psychometrically sound, comprehensive instrument that can be used to assess the knowledge of nursing students, hospital nurses, and nurse specialists in geriatrics regarding older hospitalized adults. It can identify knowledge and certainty deficits for research purposes or serve as a tool in educational

  13. The psychometric properties of the MASC in a pediatric psychiatric sample.

    PubMed

    Rynn, Moira A; Barber, Jacques P; Khalid-Khan, Sarosh; Siqueland, Lynne; Dembiski, Michelle; McCarthy, Kevin S; Gallop, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The goals of this study were twofold: to examine the psychometric properties of the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC) in a clinical sample of 193 children and adolescents who had received a diagnosis of major depressive or anxiety disorder, and to discriminate between these two groups of patients. Participants had volunteered in randomized psychopharmacological clinical trials. The MASC four-factor structure was confirmed and its subscales were found to be reliable. The MASC correlated well with other self-report measures of anxiety, and less so with measures of depressive symptoms. The MASC subscales and two MASC items as well as age differentiated between anxious and depressed pediatric patients. If these results are replicated in an independent study, those items could be used by clinicians to discriminate between these two disorders. The MASC is a clinically useful measure to discriminate between anxious and depressed pediatric patients. Limitations due to the highly selective sample are noted.

  14. The Impact of Escape Alternative Position Change in Multiple-Choice Test on the Psychometric Properties of a Test and Its Items Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamadneh, Iyad Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the impact changing of escape alternative position in multiple-choice test on the psychometric properties of a test and it's items parameters (difficulty, discrimination & guessing), and estimation of examinee ability. To achieve the study objectives, a 4-alternative multiple choice type achievement test…

  15. The Psychometric Toolbox: An Excel Package for Use in Measurement and Psychometrics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Masip-Cabrera, Antoni; Navarro-González, David; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2017-01-01

    The Psychometric Toolbox (PT) is a user-friendly, non-commercial package mainly intended to be used for instructional purposes in introductory courses of educational and psychological measurement, psychometrics and statistics. The PT package is organized in six separate modules or sub-programs: Data preprocessor (descriptive analyses and data…

  16. A computer program for Spearman-Kärber and probit analysis of psychometric function data.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeff; Ulrich, Rolf

    2004-02-01

    PMETRIC is a computer program for the analysis of observed psychometric functions. It can estimate the parameters of these functions, using either probit analysis (a parametric technique) or the Spearman-Kärber method (a nonparametric one). For probit analysis, either a maximum likelihood or a minimum chi 2 criterion may be used for parameter estimation. In addition, standard errors of parameter estimates can be estimated via bootstrapping. The program can be used to analyze data obtained from either yes-no or m-alternative forced-choice tasks. To facilitate the use of PMETRIC in simulation work, an associated program, PMETGEN, is provided for the generation of simulated psychometric function data. Use of PMETRIC is illustrated with data from a duration discrimination task.

  17. Assessing leadership decision-making styles: psychometric properties of the Leadership Judgement Indicator.

    PubMed

    Faraci, Palmira; Lock, Michael; Wheeler, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to validate the Italian version of the Leadership Judgement Indicator, an unconventional instrument devoted to measurement of leaders' judgments and preferred styles, ie, directive, consultative, consensual, or delegative, when dealing with a range of decision-making scenarios. After forward-translation and back-translation, its psychometric properties were estimated for 299 managers at various levels, who were asked to put themselves in the position of leader and to rate the appropriateness of certain ways of responding to challenge. Differences between several groups of managers, ranked in order of seniority, provided evidence for discriminant validity. Internal consistency was adequate. The findings show that the Italian adaptation of the Leadership Judgement Indicator has promising psychometric qualities, suggesting its suitability for use to improve outcomes in both organizational and selection settings.

  18. Assessing leadership decision-making styles: psychometric properties of the Leadership Judgement Indicator

    PubMed Central

    Faraci, Palmira; Lock, Michael; Wheeler, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to validate the Italian version of the Leadership Judgement Indicator, an unconventional instrument devoted to measurement of leaders’ judgments and preferred styles, ie, directive, consultative, consensual, or delegative, when dealing with a range of decision-making scenarios. After forward-translation and back-translation, its psychometric properties were estimated for 299 managers at various levels, who were asked to put themselves in the position of leader and to rate the appropriateness of certain ways of responding to challenge. Differences between several groups of managers, ranked in order of seniority, provided evidence for discriminant validity. Internal consistency was adequate. The findings show that the Italian adaptation of the Leadership Judgement Indicator has promising psychometric qualities, suggesting its suitability for use to improve outcomes in both organizational and selection settings. PMID:24204179

  19. Reliability, validity, and psychometric development of the pornography consumption inventory in a sample of hypersexual men.

    PubMed

    Reid, Rory C; Li, Desiree S; Gilliland, Randy; Stein, Judith A; Fong, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the psychometric evaluation of the Pornography Consumption Inventory (PCI), which was developed to assess motivations for pornography use among hypersexual men. Initial factor structure and item analysis were conducted in a sample of men (N = 105) seeking to reduce their pornography consumption (Study 1), yielding a 4-factor solution. In a second sample of treatment-seeking hypersexual men (N = 107), the authors further investigated the properties of the PCI using confirmatory factor analytic procedures, reliability indices, and explored PCI associations with several other constructs to establish convergent and discriminant validity. These studies demonstrate psychometric evidence for the PCI items that measure tendencies of hypersexual men to use pornography (a) for sexual pleasure; (b) to escape, cope, or avoid uncomfortable emotional experiences or stress; (c) to satisfy sexual curiosity; and (d) to satisfy desires for excitement, novelty, and variety.

  20. Psychometric evaluation of the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue scale for use with pregnant and postpartum women.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Nichole; Hutton, Eileen K; Stoll, Kathrin; Hall, Wendy; Kluka, Sandy

    2008-06-01

    Although fatigue is a common experience for pregnant women and new mothers, few measures of fatigue have been validated for use with this population. To address this gap, the authors assessed psychometric properties of the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue (MAF) scale, which was used in 2 independent samples of pregnant women. Results indicated that the psychometric properties of the scale were very similar across samples and time points. The scale possesses a high level of internal consistency, has good convergent validity with measures of sleep quality and depression, and discriminates well from a measure of social support. Contrary to previous evaluations of the MAF, data strongly suggest that the scale represents a unidimensional construct best represented by a single factor. Results indicate that the MAF is a useful measure of fatigue among pregnant and postpartum women.

  1. Psychometric Evaluation of the MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical Scales in an Israeli Sample.

    PubMed

    Shkalim, Eleanor

    2015-10-01

    The current study cross-culturally evaluated the psychometric properties of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2)/MMPI-2-Restructured Form Restructured Clinical (RC) Scales in psychiatric settings in Israel with a sample of 100 men and 133 women. Participants were administered the MMPI-2 and were rated by their therapists on a 188-item Patient Description Form. Results indicated that in most instances the RC Scales demonstrated equivalent or better internal consistencies and improved intercorrelation patterns relative to their clinical counterparts. Furthermore, external analyses revealed comparable or improved convergent validity (with the exceptions of Antisocial Behavior [RC4] and Ideas of Persecution [RC6] among men), and mostly greater discriminant validity. Overall, the findings indicate that consistent with previous findings, the RC Scales generally exhibit comparable to improved psychometric properties over the Clinical Scales. Implications of the results, limitations, and recommendations for future research are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Fluctuating asymmetry and psychometric intelligence.

    PubMed Central

    Furlow, F B; Armijo-Prewitt, T; Gangestad, S W; Thornhill, R

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic nature of human psychometric intelligence (IQ), but it is widely assumed that IQ's heritability is at loci for intelligence per se. We present evidence consistent with a hypothesis that interindividual IQ differences are partly due to heritable vulnerabilities to environmental sources of developmental stress, an indirect genetic mechanism for the heritability of IQ. Using fluctuating asymmetry (FA) of the body (the asymmetry resulting from errors in the development of normally symmetrical bilateral traits under stressful conditions), we estimated the relative developmental instability of 112 undergraduates and administered to them Cattell's culture fair intelligence test (CFIT). A subsequent replication on 128 students was performed. In both samples, FA correlated negatively and significantly with CFIT scores. We propose two non-mutually exclusive physiological explanations for this correlation. First, external body FA may correlate negatively with the developmental integrity of the brain. Second, individual energy budget allocations and/or low metabolic efficiency in high-FA individuals may lower IQ scores. We review the data on IQ in light of our findings and conclude that improving developmental quality may increase average IQ in future generations. PMID:9265189

  3. Resilience measurement in later life: a systematic review and psychometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Cosco, T D; Kaushal, A; Richards, M; Kuh, D; Stafford, M

    2016-01-28

    To systematically review and examine the psychometric properties of established resilience scales in older adults, i.e. ≥60 years. A systematic review of Scopus and Web of Science databases was undertaken using the search strategy "resilience" AND (ageing OR aging)". Independent title/abstract and fulltext screening were undertaken, identifying original peer-reviewed English articles that conducted psychometric validation studies of resilience metrics in samples aged ≥60 years. Data on the reliability/validity of the included metrics were extracted from primary studies. Five thousand five hundred nine studies were identified by the database search, 426 used resilience psychometrics, and six psychometric analysis studies were included in the final analysis. These studies conducted analyses of the Connor Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) and its shortened 10-item version (CD-RISC10), the Resilience Scale (RS) and its shortened 5- (RS-5) and 11- (RS-11) item versions, and the Brief Resilient Coping Scale (BRCS). All scales demonstrated acceptable levels of internal consistency, convergent/discriminant validity and theoretical construct validity. Factor structures for the RS, RS-11 and CD-RISC diverged from the structures in the original studies. The RS, RS-5, RS-11, CD-RISC, CD-RISC10 and BRCS demonstrate psychometric robustness adequate for continued use in older populations. However, results from the current study and pre-existing theoretical construct validity studies most strongly support the use of the RS, with modest and preliminary support for the CD-RISC and BRCS, respectively. Future studies assessing the validity of these metrics in older populations, particularly with respect to factor structure, would further strengthen the case for the use of these scales.

  4. [Prefrontal Symptoms Inventory for clinical evaluation of addictions in everyday life: development process and psychometric properties].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sánchez de León, José M; Pedrero-Pérez, Eduardo J; Lozoya-Delgado, Paz; Llanero-Luque, Marcos; Rojo-Mota, Gloria; Puerta-García, Carmen

    2012-06-01

    Research has provided evidence of the presence of prefrontal symptoms in addicts, although they are usually evaluated using questionnaires that were created for acquired brain injury. To produce a specific instrument for evaluating those symptoms in subjects with addictions. For the study, 1624 participants were recruited (445 addicts and 1179 from the general population) and were given a 100-item inventory to complete based on the three spheres of human activity (cognition, emotion and behaviour) in relation to the three great prefrontal syndromes (dorsolateral, ventromedial and orbital). The preliminary analyses ruled out those that did not prove to have sufficient discriminating power, which resulted in the Prefrontal Symptoms Inventory (PSI) consisting of 46 items. The Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX-Sp) and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) were administered in order to study the convergent validity. The data show the three-factor structure of the questionnaire: problems with executive control (with three sub-factors: problems with motivation, control and attention), problems with social behaviour and problems with emotional control. The relationships between the scores on the PSI and sociodemographic and consumption variables, as well as with the DEX-Sp and the PSS were analysed. A reduced 20-item version is provided for screening. The PSI relates the ('subject-centred') self-evaluation of persons with the a priori ('brain-centred') theoretical formulation, the results showing adequate psychometric properties. We recommend its use when it comes to exploring the prefrontal symptoms of addicts, as well as other clinical or subclinical populations with similar cognitive profiles.

  5. The quality improvement attitude survey: Development and preliminary psychometric characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dunagan, Pamela B

    2017-08-22

    To report the development of a tool to measure nurse's attitudes about quality improvement in their practice setting and to examine preliminary psychometric characteristics of the Quality Improvement Nursing Attitude Scale. Human factors such as nursing attitudes of complacency have been identified as root causes of sentinel events. Attitudes of nurses concerning use of Quality and Safety Education for nurse's competencies can be most challenging to teach and to change. No tool has been developed measuring attitudes of nurses concerning their role in quality improvement. A descriptive study design with preliminary psychometric evaluation was used to examine the preliminary psychometric characteristics of the Quality Improvement Nursing Attitude Scale. Registered bedside clinical nurses comprised the sample for the study (n = 57). Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and Cronbach's alpha reliability. Total score and individual item statistics were evaluated. Two open-ended items were used to collect statements about nurses' feelings regarding their experience in quality improvement efforts. Strong support for the internal consistency reliability and face validity of the Quality Improvement Nursing Attitude Scale was found. Total scale scores were high indicating nurse participants valued Quality and Safety Education for Nurse competencies in practice. However, item-level statistics indicated nurses felt powerless when other nurses deviate from care standards. Additionally, the sample indicated they did not consistently report patient safety issues and did not have a feeling of value in efforts to improve care. Findings suggested organisational culture fosters nurses' reporting safety issues and feeling valued in efforts to improve care. Participants' narrative comments and item analysis revealed the need to generate new items for the Quality Improvement Nursing Attitude Scale focused on nurses' perception of their importance in quality and

  6. Psychometric evaluation of the HIV symptom distress scale.

    PubMed

    Marc, Linda G; Wang, Ming-Mei; Testa, Marcia A

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to psychometrically validate the HIV symptom distress scale (SDS), an instrument that can be used to measure overall HIV symptom distress or clinically relevant groups of HIV symptoms. A secondary data analysis was conducted using the Collaborations in HIV Outcomes Research US Cohort (CHORUS). Inclusion criteria required study participants (N=5521) to have a valid baseline measure of the AIDS Clinical Trial Group Symptom Distress Module, with an SF-12 or SF-36 completed on the same day. Psychometric testing assessed unidimensionality, internal consistency, and factor structure using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, and structural equation modeling (SEM). Construct validity examined whether the new measure discriminates across clinical significance (CD4 and HIV viral load). Findings show that the SDS has high reliability (α=0.92), and SEM supports a correlated second-order factor model (physical and mental distress) with acceptable fit (GFI=0.88, AGFI=0.85, NFI=0.99, NNFI=0.99; RMSEA=0.06, [90% CI 0.06 - 0.06]; Satorra Bentler scaled, C (2) =3274.20; p=0.0). Construct validity shows significant differences across categories for HIV-1 viral load (p<0.001) and CD4 (p<0.001). Differences in mean SDS scores exist across gender (p<0.001), race/ethnicity (p<0.05), and educational attainment (p<0.001). Hence, the HIV SDS is a reliable and valid instrument, which measures overall HIV symptoms or clinically relevant groups of symptoms.

  7. Psychometric evaluation of the HIV symptom distress scale

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Linda G.; Wang, Ming-Mei; Testa, Marcia A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to psychometrically validate the HIV Symptom Distress Scale (SDS), an instrument that can be used to measure overall HIV symptom distress or clinically relevant groups of HIV symptoms. A secondary data analysis was conducted using the Collaborations in HIV Outcomes Research U.S. Cohort (CHORUS). Inclusion criteria required study participants (N=5,521) to have a valid baseline measure of the AIDS Clinical Trial Group Symptom Distress Module, with an SF-12 or SF-36 completed on the same day. Psychometric testing assessed unidimensionality, internal consistency and factor structure using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, and structural equation modeling (SEM). Construct validity examined whether the new measure discriminates across clinical significance (CD4 and HIV viral load). Findings show that the SDS has high reliability (α=0.92), and SEM supports a correlated second-order factor model (physical and mental distress) with acceptable fit (GFI=0.88, AGFI=0.85, NFI=0.99, NNFI=0.99; RMSEA=0.06, [90% CI 0.06 – 0.06]; Satorra Bentler Scaled, C2 =3274.20; p=0.0). Construct validity shows significant differences across categories for HIV-1 viral load (p< 0.001) and CD4 (p< 0.001). Differences in mean SDS scores exist across gender (p< 0.001), race/ethnicity (p< 0.05) and educational attainment (p < 0.001). Hence, the HIV Symptom Distress Scale is a reliable and valid instrument, which measures overall HIV symptoms or clinically relevant groups of symptoms. PMID:22409246

  8. Clinimetrics vs. psychometrics: an unnecessary distinction.

    PubMed

    Streiner, David L

    2003-12-01

    The term "clinimetrics" was introduced by Feinstein to describe an approach to scale development that ostensibly is different from the more traditional "psychometrics." I argue that, for a number of reasons, it is time for this term to retire from the scene. I show that the clinimetric approach is neither new nor unique, but is rather a subset of psychometrics. Further, because the majority of new developments in scale construction (e.g., new variations of the intraclass correlation, item response theory, structural equation modeling, and cognitive theories) are reported in the psychometric literature, use of the term "clinimetric," especially among people not exposed to traditional test theory, cuts them off from a rich source of information.

  9. Auditory phase and frequency discrimination: a comparison of nine procedures.

    PubMed

    Creelman, C D; Macmillan, N A

    1979-02-01

    Two auditory discrimination tasks were thoroughly investigated: discrimination of frequency differences from a sinusoidal signal of 200 Hz and discrimination of differences in relative phase of mixed sinusoids of 200 Hz and 400 Hz. For each task psychometric functions were constructed for three observers, using nine different psychophysical measurement procedures. These procedures included yes-no, two-interval forced-choice, and various fixed- and variable-standard designs that investigators have used in recent years. The data showed wide ranges of apparent sensitivity. For frequency discrimination, models derived from signal detection theory for each psychophysical procedure seem to account for the performance differences. For phase discrimination the models do not account for the data. We conclude that for some discriminative continua the assumptions of signal detection theory are appropriate, and underlying sensitivity may be derived from raw data by appropriate transformations. For other continua the models of signal detection theory are probably inappropriate; we speculate that phase might be discriminable only on the basis of comparison or change and suggest some tests of our hypothesis.

  10. The Psychometric Evaluation of Human Life Histories.

    PubMed

    Copping, Lee T; Campbell, Anne; Muncer, Steven; Richardson, George B

    2017-01-01

    A recent critique of Copping, Campbell, and Muncer raised several issues concerning the validity of psychometric assessment techniques in the study of life history (LH) strategies. In this reply, some of our key concerns about relying on aggregated psychometric measures are explained, and we raise questions generally regarding the use of higher order factor structures. Responses to some of the statistical issues raised by Figueredo et al. are also detailed. We stand by our original conclusions and call for more careful consideration of instruments used to evaluate hypotheses derived from LH theory.

  11. The Milwaukee Inventory for the Dimensions of Adult Skin Picking (MIDAS): initial development and psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Walther, Michael R; Flessner, Christopher A; Conelea, Christine A; Woods, Douglas W

    2009-03-01

    This article describes the development and initial psychometric properties of the Milwaukee Inventory for the Dimensions of Adult Skin picking (MIDAS), a measure designed to assess "automatic" and "focused" skin picking. Data were collected from 92 participants who completed an anonymous internet-based survey. Results of an exploratory factor analysis revealed a two-factor solution. Factors 1 ("focused" picking scale) and 2 ("automatic" picking scale) each consisted of 6 items, and preliminary data demonstrated adequate internal consistency, good construct validity, and good discriminant validity. The MIDAS provides researchers with a reliable and valid assessment of "automatic" and "focused" skin picking.

  12. Psychometric properties of the Brand Personality Scale: evidence from a business school.

    PubMed

    Caruana, Albert; Pitt, Leyland F; Berthon, Pierre; Berthon, J-P

    2007-06-01

    The Brand Personality Scale has received considerable attention and has been frequently used and cited in the branding literature. This paper describes an investigation of the psychometric characteristics of the Brand Personality Scale in a business school context where umbrella branding is used. A sample (N=262) of students attending the MBA program of a major business school in eastern USA completed the scale. Results indicate problems with the scale's dimensionality, poor reliability, convergent and nomological validity of the Ruggedness dimension, and lack of support for discriminant validity. Managerial and research implications and limitations are noted.

  13. The psychometric properties of the WHOQOL-BREF in Japanese couples.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Naomi; Sun, Yi; Sugawara, Masumi; Matsumoto, Satoko; Sakai, Atsushi; Takaoka, Junko; Goto, Noriko

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Japanese version of the WHOQOL-BREF among 10,693 community-based married Japanese men and women (4376 couples) who were either expecting or raising a child. Analyses of item-response distributions, internal consistency, criterion validity, and discriminant validity indicated that the scale had acceptable reliability and performed well in preliminary tests of validity. Furthermore, dyadic confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the theoretical factor structure was valid and similar across partners, suggesting that men and women define and value quality of life in a similar way.

  14. Inequality, discrimination, and the power of the status quo: Direct evidence for a motivation to see the way things are as the way they should be.

    PubMed

    Kay, Aaron C; Gaucher, Danielle; Peach, Jennifer M; Laurin, Kristin; Friesen, Justin; Zanna, Mark P; Spencer, Steven J

    2009-09-01

    How powerful is the status quo in determining people's social ideals? The authors propose (a) that people engage in injunctification, that is, a motivated tendency to construe the current status quo as the most desirable and reasonable state of affairs (i.e., as the most representative of how things should be); (b) that this tendency is driven, at least in part, by people's desire to justify their sociopolitical systems; and (c) that injunctification has profound implications for the maintenance of inequality and societal change. Four studies, across a variety of domains, provided supportive evidence. When the motivation to justify the sociopolitical system was experimentally heightened, participants injunctified extant (a) political power (Study 1), (b) public funding policies (Study 2), and (c) unequal gender demographics in the political and business spheres (Studies 3 and 4, respectively). It was also demonstrated that this motivated phenomenon increased derogation of those who act counter to the status quo (Study 4). Theoretical implications for system justification theory, stereotype formation, affirmative action, and the maintenance of inequality are discussed. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Assessing personality traits by questionnaire: psychometric properties of the Greek version of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman personality questionnaire and correlations with psychopathology and hostility

    PubMed Central

    Hyphantis, T; Antoniou, K; Floros, DG; Valma, V; Pappas, AI; Douzenis, A; Assimakopoulos, K; Iconomou, G; Kafetzopoulos, E; Garyfallos, G; Kuhlman, M

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ) was developed in an attempt to define the basic factors of personality or temperament. We aimed to assess the factor structure and the psychometric properties of its Greek version and to explore its relation to psychopathological symptoms and hostility features. Methods: ZKPQ was translated into Greek using back-translation and was administered to 1,462 participants (475 healthy participants, 619 medical patients, 177 psychiatric patients and 191 opiate addicts). Confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses were performed. Symptoms Distress Check-List (SCL-90R) and Hostility and Direction of Hostility Questionnaire (HDHQ) were administered to test criterion validity. Results: Five factors were identified, largely corresponding to the original version’s respective factors. Retest reliabilities were acceptable (rli’s: 0.79-0.89) and internal consistency was adequate for Neuroticism-Anxiety (0.87), Impulsive Sensation Seeking (0.80), Aggression-Hostility (0.77) and Activity (0.72), and lower for Sociability (0.64). Most components were able to discriminate psychiatric patients and opiate addicts from healthy participants. Opiate addicts exhibited higher rates on Impulsive Sensation Seeking compared to healthy participants. Neuroticism-Anxiety (p<0.001) and Impulsive Sensation Seeking (p<0.001) were significantly associated with psychological distress and Aggression-Hostility was the most powerful correlate of Total Hostility (p<0.001), and Neuroticism-Anxiety was the stronger correlate of introverted hostility (p<0.001), further supporting the instrument’s concurrent validity. Conclusions: Present findings support the applicability of the Greek version of ZKPQ within the Greek population. Future studies could improve its psychometric properties by finding new items, especially for the Sociability scale. PMID:25031514

  16. Distinct serum proteome profiles associated with collagen-induced arthritis and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation in CD38⁻/⁻ mice: The discriminative power of protein species or proteoforms.

    PubMed

    Rosal-Vela, Antonio; García-Rodríguez, Sonia; Postigo, Jorge; Iglesias, Marcos; Longobardo, Victoria; Lario, Antonio; Merino, Jesús; Merino, Ramón; Zubiaur, Mercedes; Sancho, Jaime

    2015-10-01

    Collagen-type-II-induced arthritis (CIA) is an autoimmune disease, which involves a complex host systemic response including inflammatory and autoimmune reactions. CIA is milder in CD38(-/-) than in wild-type (WT) mice. ProteoMiner-equalized serum samples were subjected to 2D-DiGE and MS-MALDI-TOF/TOF analyses to identify proteins that changed in their relative abundances in CD38(-/-) versus WT mice either with arthritis (CIA(+) ), with no arthritis (CIA(-) ), or with inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated mice). Multivariate analyses revealed that a multiprotein signature (n = 28) was able to discriminate CIA(+) from CIA(-) mice, and WT from CD38(-/-) mice within each condition. Likewise, a distinct multiprotein signature (n = 16) was identified which differentiated CIA(+) CD38(-/-) mice from CIA(+) WT mice, and lastly, a third multiprotein signature (n = 18) indicated that CD38(-/-) and WT mice could be segregated in response to CFA treatment. Further analyses showed that the discriminative power to distinguish these groups was reached at protein species level and not at the protein level. Hence, the need to identify and quantify proteins at protein species level to better correlate proteome changes with disease processes. It is crucial for plasma proteomics at the low-abundance protein species level to apply the ProteoMiner enrichment. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD001788, PXD001799 and PXD002071 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001788, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001799 and http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002071).

  17. 18 CFR 1313.149 - Program accessibility: Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Program accessibility: Discrimination prohibited. 1313.149 Section 1313.149 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY... THE TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY § 1313.149 Program accessibility: Discrimination prohibited. Except as...

  18. 18 CFR 1313.130 - General prohibitions against discrimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false General prohibitions against discrimination. 1313.130 Section 1313.130 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE... CONDUCTED BY THE TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY § 1313.130 General prohibitions against discrimination. (a) No...

  19. 18 CFR 1313.130 - General prohibitions against discrimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false General prohibitions against discrimination. 1313.130 Section 1313.130 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE... CONDUCTED BY THE TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY § 1313.130 General prohibitions against discrimination. (a) No...

  20. Effects of methamphetamine on duration discrimination.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Münire Ozlem

    2003-08-01

    Experiments 1 and 2 address the controversy regarding the reliability of methamphetamine effects on interval timing. A temporal discrimination procedure was used, in which the rats were reinforced for pressing the left or the right levers after short and long signals, respectively. Methamphetamine (0.5 mg/kg sc) severely disrupted operant performance at 20-100 min after injection, which disabled the measurement of drug effects on temporal perception (Experiment 1). The same dose of methamphetamine shifted the psychometric function to the left at 100-180 min after injection, indicating an increase in subjective durations (Experiment 2). Although these results confirm the role of dopamine in interval timing, that a change in the speed of a neural clock mediates the methamphetamine-induced change in temporal perception is still a working hypothesis.

  1. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  2. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  3. Psychometric Measurement Models and Artificial Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sese, Albert; Palmer, Alfonso L.; Montano, Juan J.

    2004-01-01

    The study of measurement models in psychometrics by means of dimensionality reduction techniques such as Principal Components Analysis (PCA) is a very common practice. In recent times, an upsurge of interest in the study of artificial neural networks apt to computing a principal component extraction has been observed. Despite this interest, the…

  4. Psychometrics of the SDQ in Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumert, Heather Marie

    2013-01-01

    With the recent influx of Latinos into the United States, it is essential to understand how their backgrounds and cultures will affect the way they view their children's emotional, social, and educational development. Researchers continue to evaluate the psychometrics of various screening instruments in order to ensure a reliable and valid…

  5. [Testing aphasia by psychometric methods (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lang, C

    1981-04-01

    In a survey of psychometric tests in world-wide use for the examination of aphasia stress is laid on methodological points. Separately for individual tests and tests and test batteries the development and clinical application are delineated, statistical criteria mentioned and diagnostic usefulness evaluated.

  6. Emotional Considerations in Spasmodic Dysphonia: Psychometric Quantification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannito, Michael P.

    1991-01-01

    This study examined emotional characteristics of 18 female spasmodic dysphonic subjects in comparison to matched normal controls across psychometric measures of depression, anxiety, and somatic complaints. Statistically significant differences were noted between groups for all measures and over half of the dysphonic subjects exhibited clinically…

  7. General Mental Ability: From Psychometrics to Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Arthur R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes empirical findings of research on a theory of general mental ability, based on laboratory studies of the relationship between measurements of individual differences on conventional psychometric tests and in speed and efficiency of information processes. The paper covers characteristics of "g" (general mental ability),…

  8. Psychometric Characteristics of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aman, Michael G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Information is presented on the psychometric characteristics of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist, a measure of psychotropic drug effects. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the checklist appeared very good. Interrater reliability was generally in the moderate range. In general, validity was established for most Aberrant Behavior…

  9. Psychometric Analysis of the Appreciative Advising Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crone, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    The Appreciative Advising Inventory is an instrument created for use in academic advising. The inventory helps the advisor get to know and understand the student, which in turn allows the advisor to better assist the student. This research provides a psychometric analysis of the Appreciative Advising Inventory to measure its validity and…

  10. Psychometric Classifications of Learning Disabled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leton, Donald A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Cluster analyzed various psychometric test results of a sample of 100 learning disabled students with severe achievement problems. The first cluster was defined by low scores on attention and concentration subtests; the second by low scores on subtests of verbal-associative intelligence; the third by low scores on visual-spatial and motoric…

  11. What Is Embodiment? A Psychometric Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Matthew R.; Schuur, Friederike; Kammers, Marjolein P. M.; Tsakiris, Manos; Haggard, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    What is it like to have a body? The present study takes a psychometric approach to this question. We collected structured introspective reports of the rubber hand illusion, to systematically investigate the structure of bodily self-consciousness. Participants observed a rubber hand that was stroked either synchronously or asynchronously with their…

  12. Psychometric Evaluation of the Chinese Virtues Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duan, Wenjie; Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Bai, Yu; Tang, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Chinese Virtues Questionnaire (CVQ). The reliability, factor structure, construct validity, and temporal stability of the inventory were examined. Method: A university student sample ("n" = 878) and a working adult sample ("n" = 153) were recruited.…

  13. The Psychometric Evaluation of Educational Intranets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaik, Paul Van; Ling, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    A major determinant of the success of educational intranet sites is their usability. In addition to measures of task performance and navigation behavior, psychometric instruments are used to evaluate usability and the quality of human-computer interaction more generally. However, there is a lack of validated instruments for the evaluation of…

  14. Psychometric Measurement Models and Artificial Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sese, Albert; Palmer, Alfonso L.; Montano, Juan J.

    2004-01-01

    The study of measurement models in psychometrics by means of dimensionality reduction techniques such as Principal Components Analysis (PCA) is a very common practice. In recent times, an upsurge of interest in the study of artificial neural networks apt to computing a principal component extraction has been observed. Despite this interest, the…

  15. Automated Essay Scoring: Psychometric Guidelines and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramineni, Chaitanya; Williamson, David M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview of psychometric procedures and guidelines Educational Testing Service (ETS) uses to evaluate automated essay scoring for operational use. We briefly describe the e-rater system, the procedures and criteria used to evaluate e-rater, implications for a range of potential uses of e-rater, and directions for…

  16. Psychometric Intelligence Dissociates Implicit and Explicit Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebauer, Guido F.; Mackintosh, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that performance on implicit learning tasks is unrelated to psychometric intelligence was examined in a sample of 605 German pupils. Performance in artificial grammar learning, process control, and serial learning did not correlate with various measures of intelligence when participants were given standard implicit instructions.…

  17. What Is Embodiment? A Psychometric Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Matthew R.; Schuur, Friederike; Kammers, Marjolein P. M.; Tsakiris, Manos; Haggard, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    What is it like to have a body? The present study takes a psychometric approach to this question. We collected structured introspective reports of the rubber hand illusion, to systematically investigate the structure of bodily self-consciousness. Participants observed a rubber hand that was stroked either synchronously or asynchronously with their…

  18. Psychometric Evaluation of the Chinese Virtues Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duan, Wenjie; Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Bai, Yu; Tang, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Chinese Virtues Questionnaire (CVQ). The reliability, factor structure, construct validity, and temporal stability of the inventory were examined. Method: A university student sample ("n" = 878) and a working adult sample ("n" = 153) were recruited.…

  19. Occupation and Income Related to Psychometric "g".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyborg, Helmuth; Jensen, Arthur R.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the regressions of occupational status and income on psychometric "g" factor scores in large samples of white (n=3,484) and black (n=493) U.S. armed forces veterans in their late 30s. Results indicate that, for both job status and income, whites were relatively more disadvantaged when the level of "g" is taken into…

  20. The Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory: Measurement Invariance and Psychometric Properties among Portuguese Youths.

    PubMed

    Pechorro, Pedro; Ribeiro da Silva, Diana; Andershed, Henrik; Rijo, Daniel; Abrunhosa Gonçalves, Rui

    2016-08-26

    The aim of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI) among a mixed-gender sample of 782 Portuguese youth (M = 15.87 years; SD = 1.72), in a school context. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed the expected three-factor first-order structure. Cross-gender measurement invariance and cross-sample measurement invariance using a forensic sample of institutionalized males were also confirmed. The Portuguese version of the YPI demonstrated generally adequate psychometric properties of internal consistency, mean inter-item correlation, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and criterion-related validity of statistically significant associations with conduct disorder symptoms, alcohol abuse, drug use, and unprotected sex. In terms of known-groups validity, males scored higher than females, and males from the school sample scored lower than institutionalized males. The use of the YPI among the Portuguese male and female youth population is psychometrically justified, and it can be a useful measure to identify adolescents with high levels of psychopathic traits.

  1. Psychometric properties of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 in older primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Gloster, Andrew T; Rhoades, Howard M; Novy, Diane; Klotsche, Jens; Senior, Ashley; Kunik, Mark; Wilson, Nancy; Stanley, Melinda A

    2008-10-01

    The Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) was designed to efficiently measure the core symptoms of anxiety and depression and has demonstrated positive psychometric properties in adult samples of anxiety and depression patients and student samples. Despite these findings, the psychometric properties of the DASS remain untested in older adults, for whom the identification of efficient measures of these constructs is especially important. To determine the psychometric properties of the DASS 21-item version in older adults, we analyzed data from 222 medical patients seeking treatment to manage worry. Consistent with younger samples, a three-factor structure best fit the data. Results also indicated good internal consistency, excellent convergent validity, and good discriminative validity, especially for the Depression scale. Receiver operating curve analyses indicated that the DASS-21 predicted the diagnostic presence of generalized anxiety disorder and depression as well as other commonly used measures. These data suggest that the DASS may be used with older adults in lieu of multiple scales designed to measure similar constructs, thereby reducing participant burden and facilitating assessment in settings with limited assessment resources.

  2. Psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the child PTSD symptom scale.

    PubMed

    Kadak, Muhammed Tayyib; Boysan, Murat; Ceylan, Nesrin; Ceri, Veysi

    2014-08-01

    Psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS) were examined in a sample of young individuals who experienced a severe earthquake. Subjects were 479 children and adolescents recruited from schools after 18 months of Van earthquake. Mean age was 12.83 (SD±1.88), ranging from 8 to 18. Psychometric features were generally good for the CPSS. The original three-factor structure was replicated in this study. Internal consistency of the scale was good (ranged from α=.70 to α=.89 for total and subscale scores). The CPSS demonstrated good convergent validity with Child Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Reaction Index scores as well as good divergent validity with the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children and Child Depression Inventory. As an evidence for a good discriminant validity, the CPSS successfully distinguished high PTSD individuals from low PTSD individuals. The CPSS had sound psychometric properties in a Turkish youth population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Psychometric Properties of the Greek Version of the Patient Dignity Inventory in Advanced Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Parpa, Efi; Kostopoulou, Sotiria; Tsilika, Eleni; Galanos, Antonis; Katsaragakis, Stylianos; Mystakidou, Kyriaki

    2017-09-01

    The patient dignity inventory (PDI) is an instrument to measure dignity distressing aspects at the end of life. The aims of the present study were the translation of the PDI in Greek language as well as to measure its psychometric aspects in a palliative care unit. A back-translation method was obtained at the Greek version. One hundred twenty advanced cancer patients completed the Greek version of the PDI, the Greek hospital anxiety and depression scale, the Greek schedule of attitudes toward hastened death (SAHD-Gr), and the Greek 12-item short form health survey. Confirmatory factor analysis failed to fit to the original instrument's structure and exploratory factor analysis was conducted revealing five factors ("Psychological Distress," "Body Image and Role Identity," "Self-Esteem," "Physical Distress and Dependency," and "Social Support"). The psychometric analysis of the PDI-Gr demonstrated a good concurrent validity, and the instrument discriminated well between subgroups of patients regarding age differences. Cronbach α were between 0.71 and 0.9 showing a good internal consistency. The Greek version of the PDI showed good psychometric properties in advanced cancer patients, supported the usefulness of the instrument assessing the sense of dignity distressing aspects of the terminally ill cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5): Development and Initial Psychometric Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Christy A; Weathers, Frank W; Davis, Margaret T; Witte, Tracy K; Domino, Jessica L

    2015-12-01

    The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL) is a widely used DSM-correspondent self-report measure of PTSD symptoms. The PCL was recently revised to reflect DSM-5 changes to the PTSD criteria. In this article, the authors describe the development and initial psychometric evaluation of the PCL for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Psychometric properties of the PCL-5 were examined in 2 studies involving trauma-exposed college students. In Study 1 (N = 278), PCL-5 scores exhibited strong internal consistency (α = .94), test-retest reliability (r = .82), and convergent (rs = .74 to .85) and discriminant (rs = .31 to .60) validity. In addition, confirmatory factor analyses indicated adequate fit with the DSM-5 4-factor model, χ2 (164) = 455.83, p < .001, standardized root mean square residual (SRMR) = .07, root mean squared error of approximation (RMSEA) = .08, comparative fit index (CFI) = .86, and Tucker-Lewis index (TLI) = .84, and superior fit with recently proposed 6-factor, χ2 (164) = 318.37, p < .001, SRMR = .05, RMSEA = .06, CFI = .92, and TLI = .90, and 7-factor, χ2 (164) = 291.32, p < .001, SRMR = .05, RMSEA = .06, CFI = .93, and TLI = .91, models. In Study 2 (N = 558), PCL-5 scores demonstrated similarly strong reliability and validity. Overall, results indicate that the PCL-5 is a psychometrically sound measure of PTSD symptoms. Implications for use of the PCL-5 in a variety of assessment contexts are discussed.

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire for DSM-IV Among Four Racial Groups

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christina M.; Klenck, Suzanne C.; Norton, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire-IV (GAD-Q-IV) is a self-report diagnostic measure of generalized anxiety disorder. Previous studies have established the psychometric properties of the GAD-Q-IV revealing excellent diagnostic specificity and sensitivity as well as good test-retest reliability and convergent and discriminant validity (Newman et al., 2002). Recent analyses with other measures of anxiety symptoms have revealed differences across racial or national groups. Given that the GAD-Q-IV was tested primarily on Caucasian (78%) participants, the purpose of this study was to demonstrate the psychometric properties of the GAD-Q-IV across four racial groups: African American, Caucasian, Hispanic/Latino, and Asian. A student sample of 585 undergraduate psychology students completed the GAD-Q-IV as well as other measures of anxiety symptoms. A clinical replication sample was obtained from 188 clinical participants who completed the GAD-Q-IV as part of a larger psychotherapy study. Results indicated excellent and very similar factor structures in the student sample, and similar psychometric properties across both samples across the racial groups. Implications for the use of the GAD-Q-IV across racial groups are discussed. PMID:20830629

  6. Psychometric Properties of the Arabic Version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Instrument.

    PubMed

    Sukkarieh-Haraty, Ola; Howard, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Translation of instruments needs to ensure equivalence between the source and the target language to establish the psychometric properties of the translated version. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Arabic version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA) instrument. The 12-item English version of the SDSCA was translated into Arabic using back translation on a sample of 140 Lebanese participants with Type 2 diabetes. Construct validity was measured using exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation. Multitrait scaling analysis was used to test for item convergent and discriminant validity based on item-scale correlations. Conceptual and content validity were examined by an expert panel in diabetes. Internal consistency reliability R was assessed using interitem correlations. The average interitem correlation for the four subscales ranged between--.05 for Diet and .66 for Glucose Testing. Factor analysis identified four factors which accounted for 60% of the variance. The preliminary results of Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities-Arabic Version (SDSCA-Ar) are comparable to the psychometric properties the original SDSCA. SDSCA-Ar is a valid measure of diabetes self-care in Lebanese patients with diabetes.

  7. Psychometric Properties of the Spanish Adaptation of the Health Care Communication Questionnaire (HCCQ).

    PubMed

    Leal Costa, César; Gómez Sánchez, Rosario; Tirado González, Sonia; Rodríguez Marín, Jesús; van-der Hofstadt Román, Carlos Javier

    2015-11-27

    This study's aim is to adapt the Health Care Communication Questionnaire in a Spanish sample, and then test the psychometric properties of the adapted instrument. To do so, the questionnaire was adapted for the Spanish context and then applied in a pilot study as well as a final study. The final sample consisted of 200 patients at Morales Meseguer Hospital in Murcia, Spain. The results show that this adaptation's psychometric properties were similar to those of the original questionnaire. As for item analysis, all items obtained discriminant indices > .30. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed the same structure as that of the original questionnaire (χ2/df = 1.345; CFI = .983; IFI = .983; TLI = .977; RMSEA = .042), with indices reflecting adequate goodness of fit. Also, results from the analysis of each dimension's internal consistency had coefficients between .71 and .86. We conclude that the Spanish version of the HCCQ has adequate psychometric properties, is useful, and will serve its purpose in the context in which it will be used.

  8. The Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory: Measurement Invariance and Psychometric Properties among Portuguese Youths

    PubMed Central

    Pechorro, Pedro; Ribeiro da Silva, Diana; Andershed, Henrik; Rijo, Daniel; Abrunhosa Gonçalves, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI) among a mixed-gender sample of 782 Portuguese youth (M = 15.87 years; SD = 1.72), in a school context. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed the expected three-factor first-order structure. Cross-gender measurement invariance and cross-sample measurement invariance using a forensic sample of institutionalized males were also confirmed. The Portuguese version of the YPI demonstrated generally adequate psychometric properties of internal consistency, mean inter-item correlation, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and criterion-related validity of statistically significant associations with conduct disorder symptoms, alcohol abuse, drug use, and unprotected sex. In terms of known-groups validity, males scored higher than females, and males from the school sample scored lower than institutionalized males. The use of the YPI among the Portuguese male and female youth population is psychometrically justified, and it can be a useful measure to identify adolescents with high levels of psychopathic traits. PMID:27571095

  9. Color measurement and discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with new results which show that for test lights with slow temporal modulations, and thus little effect on the luminance system, the vector-difference hypothesis represents an adequate characterization of discrimination data. It is pointed out that for certain experimental conditions color measurements can be successfully extended to include a difference measure which predicts the discriminability of pairs of lights. When discrimination depends principally on opponent-channel responses, discrimination thresholds can be predicted from the detection contour alone. Attention is given to discriminations with a 6-Hz Gabor function, the categorization of stimulus regions, and the nature of the visual mechanisms.

  10. Discrimination of gravitational stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, F. C.

    1972-01-01

    The construction and installation of an animal centrifuge and its electronic support system was completed. Experimental procedures for obtaining data on the relationship between the discriminability of g differences and location along the continuum of effective weight were initiated. Data were obtained under two successive discriminations showing discrimination among g levels. In addition, there was some indication that the discriminability of differences between g levels associated with reinforcement was the same at two locations along the g continuum, although there were differences in measures of absolute discrimination at these locations.

  11. A timing discriminator for space flight applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampton, Michael

    1998-08-01

    A timing discriminator design for space flight delay line image systems is presented. This discriminator processes delay line signal pulses having a few ns width and recovers event timing centroids with an accuracy better than 100 ps full width at half maximum. For space flight use, it is important to minimize parts count and power consumption. Because it is difficult or impossible to adjust equipment on orbit, it is very desirable to eliminate all adjustments, yet provide generous timing margins against component aging or drift. The discriminator described here uses a simple linear passive network to produce the required internal waveforms. Performance data are reported for the first flight implementation of this design.

  12. EXTRACTING PRINCIPLE COMPONENTS FOR DISCRIMINANT ANALYSIS OF FMRI IMAGES.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyu; Xu, Lai; Caprihan, Arvind; Calhoun, Vince D

    2008-05-12

    This paper presents an approach for selecting optimal components for discriminant analysis. Such an approach is useful when further detailed analyses for discrimination or characterization requires dimensionality reduction. Our approach can accommodate a categorical variable such as diagnosis (e.g. schizophrenic patient or healthy control), or a continuous variable like severity of the disorder. This information is utilized as a reference for measuring a component's discriminant power after principle component decomposition. After sorting each component according to its discriminant power, we extract the best components for discriminant analysis. An application of our reference selection approach is shown using a functional magnetic resonance imaging data set in which the sample size is much less than the dimensionality. The results show that the reference selection approach provides an improved discriminant component set as compared to other approaches. Our approach is general and provides a solid foundation for further discrimination and classification studies.

  13. Psychometric properties of the cervical smear belief inventory for Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Hou, Su-I; Luh, Wei-Ming

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the reliability and validity of the scores of Cervical Smear Belief Inventory (CSBI) among Chinese women in Taiwan. Women who were nonadherent to cervical screening guidelines were recruited (N = 424). Reliabilities showed good internal consistency for the perceived Pros, Cons, and Susceptibility scales (a ranged from .78 to .87). Factor analysis showed good construct validity of the scores of CSBI that revealed concordant patterns with existing social and behavioral theories, except that the Norms scale was loaded with the Pros scale. Moreover, two items in the Cons scale appeared to be "cultural belief toward virginity." Item-discrimination analysis showed that all items in the CSBI successfully discriminated women with favorable cervical smear beliefs from those with unfavorable beliefs (p < .001). In summary, many psychometric properties of the CSBI showed that the scores of the inventory were reliable and valid to assess belief toward cervical smear among Chinese women.

  14. Temporal and spectral effects in the auditory discrimination of Gaussian noise samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickert, Martin Erhard

    1998-10-01

    This thesis considers the ability of human listeners to discriminate among samples from a particular class of random signals: band-limited Gaussian noise. Two psychophysical experiments were performed to study how discriminability depends on the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise. In Experiment 1, there was within-sample homogeneity with respect to the long-term power spectrum of the noise; each sample was identically band-pass filtered throughout. It was observed that discriminability is better for conditions in which the temporal fine-structures of the waveforms differ near the end rather than at the beginning. The magnitude of this effect depends on the bandwidth of the external noise process but not to the extent predicted by optimal statistical integration across frequency and time. In Experiment 2, there was within- segment homogeneity on either side of a temporal boundary; each sample contained an abrupt transition from one bandwidth to another. There was no direct evidence that listeners could use transitions in bandwidth to perceptually segment the correlated and uncorrelated segments of the noise sample. In fact, the form of the psychometric functions measured using nonstationary samples was similar to that seen in the stationary narrowband conditions. The implication is that, if any part of the waveform is narrowband, listeners listen narrowband. A psychoacoustical model for the discrimination of noise is developed in the second part of the thesis. This model describes the ``effective'' signal processing underlying the ability to discriminate noise. Two stages of processing are assumed. During the first stage, each noise signal is jittered by multiplicative internal noise, band-pass filtered, subjected to a non-linearity, then smoothed using a low-pass filter with a relatively short time constant. During the second stage, the internal representations of the noise signals are compared by subtraction, squared, then passed through a low

  15. Auditory discrimination of frequency ratios: the octave singularity.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Damien; Micheyl, Christophe; Semal, Catherine; Dauman, René; Demany, Laurent

    2013-06-01

    Sensitivity to frequency ratios is essential for the perceptual processing of complex sounds and the appreciation of music. This study assessed the effect of ratio simplicity on ratio discrimination for pure tones presented either simultaneously or sequentially. Each stimulus consisted of four 100-ms pure tones, equally spaced in terms of frequency ratio and presented at a low intensity to limit interactions in the auditory periphery. Listeners had to discriminate between a reference frequency ratio of 0.97 octave (about 1.96:1) and target frequency ratios, which were larger than the reference. In the simultaneous condition, the obtained psychometric functions were nonmonotonic: as the target frequency ratio increased from 0.98 octave to 1.04 octaves, discrimination performance initially increased, then decreased, and then increased again; performance was better when the target was exactly one octave (2:1) than when the target was slightly larger. In the sequential condition, by contrast, the psychometric functions were monotonic and there was no effect of frequency ratio simplicity. A control experiment verified that the non-monotonicity observed in the simultaneous condition did not originate from peripheral interactions between the tones. Our results indicate that simultaneous octaves are recognized as "special" frequency intervals by a mechanism that is insensitive to the sign (positive or negative) of deviations from the octave, whereas this is apparently not the case for sequential octaves. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Auditory Discrimination of Frequency Ratios: The Octave Singularity

    PubMed Central

    Bonnard, Damien; Micheyl, Christophe; Semal, Catherine; Dauman, René; Demany, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity to frequency ratios is essential for the perceptual processing of complex sounds and the appreciation of music. This study assessed the effect of ratio simplicity on ratio discrimination for pure tones presented either simultaneously or sequentially. Each stimulus consisted of four 100-ms pure tones, equally spaced in terms of frequency ratio and presented at a low intensity to limit interactions in the auditory periphery. Listeners had to discriminate between a reference frequency ratio of 0.97 octave (about 1.96:1) and target frequency ratios, which were larger than the reference. In the simultaneous condition, the obtained psychometric functions were nonmonotonic: as the target frequency ratio increased from 0.98 octave to 1.04 octaves, discrimination performance initially increased, then decreased, and then increased again; performance was better when the target was exactly one octave (2:1) than when the target was slightly larger. In the sequential condition, by contrast, the psychometric functions were monotonic and there was no effect of frequency ratio simplicity. A control experiment verified that the nonmonotonicity observed in the simultaneous condition did not originate from peripheral interactions between the tones. Our results indicate that simultaneous octaves are recognized as “special” frequency intervals by a mechanism that is insensitive to the sign (positive or negative) of deviations from the octave, whereas this is apparently not the case for sequential octaves. PMID:23088507

  17. Validation of the Coping with Discrimination Scale in sexual minorities.

    PubMed

    Ngamake, Sakkaphat T; Walch, Susan E; Raveepatarakul, Jirapattara

    2014-01-01

    The Coping With Discrimination Scale (CDS) shows promise as a self-report measure of strategies for coping with racial discrimination. To assess the psychometric properties of the measure for use with sexual minorities (i.e., gay, lesbian, bisexual, or GLB persons), a nonprobability sample of 371 GLB adults completed the instrument along with several standardized, self-report measures. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the five-factor structure of the original scale with the exclusion of five items. Adequate internal consistency reliability was found. Internalization, drug and alcohol use, and detachment subscales were correlated positively with measures of psychological distress and negatively with a measure of life satisfaction, providing evidence of construct validity. The education/advocacy and resistance subscales were largely unrelated to concurrently administered validation measures, consistent with prior findings. Coping strategy use varied as a function of primary sources of social support. The CDS appears to be a psychometrically sound measure of several discrimination coping strategies for use with sexual minorities.

  18. Psychometric Properties of Language Assessments for Children Aged 4–12 Years: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Denman, Deborah; Speyer, Renée; Munro, Natalie; Pearce, Wendy M.; Chen, Yu-Wei; Cordier, Reinie

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Standardized assessments are widely used by speech pathologists in clinical and research settings to evaluate the language abilities of school-aged children and inform decisions about diagnosis, eligibility for services and intervention. Given the significance of these decisions, it is important that assessments have sound psychometric properties. Objective: The aim of this systematic review was to examine the psychometric quality of currently available comprehensive language assessments for school-aged children and identify assessments with the best evidence for use. Methods: Using the PRISMA framework as a guideline, a search of five databases and a review of websites and textbooks was undertaken to identify language assessments and published material on the reliability and validity of these assessments. The methodological quality of selected studies was evaluated using the COSMIN taxonomy and checklist. Results: Fifteen assessments were evaluated. For most assessments evidence of hypothesis testing (convergent and discriminant validity) was identified; with a smaller number of assessments having some evidence of reliability and content validity. No assessments presented with evidence of structural validity, internal consistency or error measurement. Overall, all assessments were identified as having limitations with regards to evidence of psychometric quality. Conclusions: Further research is required to provide good evidence of psychometric quality for currently available language assessments. Of the assessments evaluated, the Assessment of Literacy and Language, the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-5th Edition, the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Preschool: 2nd Edition and the Preschool Language Scales-5th Edition presented with most evidence and are thus recommended for use. PMID:28936189

  19. Workplace nutrition knowledge questionnaire: psychometric validation and application.

    PubMed

    Guadagnin, Simone C; Nakano, Eduardo Y; Dutra, Eliane S; de Carvalho, Kênia M B; Ito, Marina K

    2016-11-01

    Workplace dietary intervention studies in low- and middle-income countries using psychometrically sound measures are scarce. This study aimed to validate a nutrition knowledge questionnaire (NQ) and its utility in evaluating the changes in knowledge among participants of a Nutrition Education Program (NEP) conducted at the workplace. A NQ was tested for construct validity, internal consistency and discriminant validity. It was applied in a NEP conducted at six workplaces, in order to evaluate the effect of an interactive or a lecture-based education programme on nutrition knowledge. Four knowledge domains comprising twenty-three items were extracted in the final version of the NQ. Internal consistency of each domain was significant, with Kuder-Richardson formula values>0·60. These four domains presented a good fit in the confirmatory factor analysis. In the discriminant validity test, both the Expert and Lay groups scored>0·52, but the Expert group scores were significantly higher than those of the Lay group in all domains. When the NQ was applied in the NEP, the overall questionnaire scores increased significantly because of the NEP intervention, in both groups (P<0·001). However, the increase in NQ scores was significantly higher in the interactive group than in the lecture group, in the overall score (P=0·008) and in the healthy eating domain (P=0·009). The validated NQ is a short and useful tool to assess gain in nutrition knowledge among participants of NEP at the workplace. According to the NQ, an interactive nutrition education had a higher impact on nutrition knowledge than a lecture programme.

  20. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of an Instrument to Assess Cross-Cultural Competence of Healthcare Professionals (CCCHP)

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, Gerda; Knibbe, Ronald A.; von Wolff, Alessa; Dingoyan, Demet; Schulz, Holger; Mösko, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Cultural competence of healthcare professionals (HCPs) is recognized as a strategy to reduce cultural disparities in healthcare. However, standardised, valid and reliable instruments to assess HCPs’ cultural competence are notably lacking. The present study aims to 1) identify the core components of cultural competence from a healthcare perspective, 2) to develop a self-report instrument to assess cultural competence of HCPs and 3) to evaluate the psychometric properties of the new instrument. Methods The conceptual model and initial item pool, which were applied to the cross-cultural competence instrument for the healthcare profession (CCCHP), were derived from an expert survey (n = 23), interviews with HCPs (n = 12), and a broad narrative review on assessment instruments and conceptual models of cultural competence. The item pool was reduced systematically, which resulted in a 59-item instrument. A sample of 336 psychologists, in advanced psychotherapeutic training, and 409 medical students participated, in order to evaluate the construct validity and reliability of the CCCHP. Results Construct validity was supported by principal component analysis, which led to a 32-item six-component solution with 50% of the total variance explained. The different dimensions of HCPs’ cultural competence are: Cross-Cultural Motivation/Curiosity, Cross-Cultural Attitudes, Cross-Cultural Skills, Cross-Cultural Knowledge/Awareness and Cross-Cultural Emotions/Empathy. For the total instrument, the internal consistency reliability was .87 and the dimension’s Cronbach’s α ranged from .54 to .84. The discriminating power of the CCCHP was indicated by statistically significant mean differences in CCCHP subscale scores between predefined groups. Conclusions The 32-item CCCHP exhibits acceptable psychometric properties, particularly content and construct validity to examine HCPs’ cultural competence. The CCCHP with its five dimensions offers a comprehensive

  1. Turkish Version of the Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire: Psychometric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Batmaz, Sedat; Kocbiyik, Sibel; Yuncu, Ozgur Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive distortions are interrelated with all layers of cognitions, and they may be part of the treatment once they are accessed, identified, labeled, and changed. From both a research and a clinical perspective, it is of utmost importance to disentangle cognitive distortions from similar constructs. Recently, the Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire (CD-Quest), a brief and comprehensive measure, was developed to assess both the frequency and the intensity of cognitive distortions. The aim of the present study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the CD-Quest in a psychiatric outpatient sample. Demographic and clinical data of the participants were analyzed by descriptive statistics. For group comparisons, Student's t-test was applied. An exploratory principal components factor analysis was performed, followed by an oblique rotation. To assess the internal consistency of the scale Cronbach's α was computed. The correlation coefficient was calculated for test-retest reliability over a 4-week period. For concurrent validity, bivariate Pearson correlation analyses were conducted with the measures of mood severity and negatively biased cognitions. The results revealed that the scale had excellent internal consistency, good test-retest reliability, unidimensional factor structure, and evidence of concurrent and discriminant validity. PMID:26351580

  2. Psychometric validation of the State Scale of Dissociation (SSD).

    PubMed

    Krüger, Christa; Mace, Chris J

    2002-03-01

    Although dissociative phenomena are often transient features of mental states, existing measures of dissociation are designed to measure enduring traits. A new present-state self-report measure, sensitive to changes in dissociative states, was therefore developed and psychometrically validated. Fifty-six items were formulated to measure state features, and sorted according to seven subscales: derealization, depersonalization, identity confusion, identity alteration, conversion, amnesia and hypermnesia. The State Scale of Dissociation (SSD) was administered with other psychiatric scales (DES, BDI, BAI, SCI-PANSS) to 130 participants with DSM-IV major depressive disorder schizophrenia, alcohol withdrawal, dissociative disorders and controls. In these sample populations, the SSD was demonstrated as a valid and reliable measure of changes in and the severity of dissociative states. Discriminant validity, content, concurrent, predictive, internal criterion-related, internal construct and convergent validities, and internal consistency and split-half reliability were confirmed statistically. Clinical observations of dissociative states, and their comorbidity with symptoms of depression and psychotic illness, were confirmed empirically. The SSD, an acceptable, valid and reliable scale measuring state features of dissociation at the time of completion, was obtained. This is a prerequisite for further investigation of correlations between changes in dissociative states and concurrent physiological parameters.

  3. Psychometric characteristics of the Spanish version of the Barthel Index.

    PubMed

    González, Nerea; Bilbao, Amaia; Forjaz, Maria Joao; Ayala, Alba; Orive, Miren; Garcia-Gutierrez, Susana; Hayas, Carlota Las; Quintana, Jose Maria

    2017-08-02

    The Barthel Index is one of the most employed questionnaires for the evaluation of functionality, but there is no information on its psychometric properties. The aim was to evaluate the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the Spanish version of the Barthel Index. The data employed in this paper were obtained from four Spanish cohorts of elderly people of 60 years or older. We collected data on age, gender, education level, comorbidities, and questionnaires regarding functionality, health-related quality of life, depression, and social support. The Cronbach's alpha coefficients were greater than 0.70. The confirmatory factor analysis provided satisfactory fit indexes and factor loadings. The correlation coefficients between the Barthel Index and the other questionnaires were lower than the Cronbach's alpha coefficients. Known-groups validity showed significant differences in the Barthel Index according to age, number of comorbidities, and gender. The standardized effect size and the standardized response mean were between 0.68 and 1.81. This version of the Barthel Index has good reliability, its structural validity has been confirmed, and the questionnaire can discriminate between groups and detect changes at follow-up points. This questionnaire can be used in the evaluation of functionality and basic activities of daily living in elderly people with different conditions.

  4. Psychometric properties of a prostate cancer radiation late toxicity questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, George; Bauman, Glenn; Lock, Michael; D'Souza, David; Mahon, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Background To construct a short prostate cancer radiation late toxicity (PCRT) questionnaire with health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) domains. Methods The PCRT was developed by item generation, questionnaire construction (n = 7 experts, n = 8 focus group patients), pilot testing (n = 37), item reduction (n = 100), reliability testing (n = 237), and validity testing (n = 274). Results Reliability of the three item-reduced subscales demonstrated intraclass correlation coefficients (CC) of 0.811 (GU), 0.842 (GI), and 0.740 (sexual). Discriminant validity demonstrated Pearson CC of 0.449 (GU-GI), 0.200 (sexual-GU), and 0.09 (sexual-GI). Content validity correlations between PCRT-PCQoL were 0.35–0.78, PCRT-FACT-G© were 0.19–0.39, and PCRT-SF-36® were 0.03–0.34. Conclusion We successfully generated a PCRT HRQoL questionnaire including subscales with very good psychometric properties. PMID:17540022

  5. Generative and discriminant feature extraction with supervised learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhir, Chandra S.; Lee, Soo-Young

    2011-06-01

    Standard unsupervised feature extraction methods such as PCA and ICA provide representative features and latent variables which minimizes the data reconstruction error. These generative features may be common to all data, and may not be optimal for classification tasks. The discriminate ICA (dICA) and discriminant NMF (dNMF) had recently been proposed which jointly maximizes Fisher linear discriminant and Negentropy of the extracted features. Motivated by independence among features and modified Fisher linear discriminant, the new algorithm extracts features with both generative and discriminant powers. Then, the features are further fine-tuned by supervised learning. Experimental results show excellent recognition performance with these features.

  6. Psychometric Characteristics of the Postconcussion Symptom Inventory in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sady, Maegan D.; Vaughan, Christopher G.; Gioia, Gerard A.

    2014-01-01

    Psychometric characteristics of the Postconcussion Symptom Inventory (PCSI) were examined in both concussed (n = 633) and uninjured (n = 1,273) 5 to 18 year olds. Parent- and self-report forms were created with developmentally appropriate wording and content. Factor analyses identified physical, cognitive, emotional, and sleep factors; that did not load strongly or discriminate between groups were eliminated. Internal consistency was strong for the total scales (α = 0.8–0.9). Test–retest reliability for the self-report forms was moderate to strong (intraclass coeffecients, ICCs = 0.65–0.89). Parent and self-report concordance was moderate (r = .44–.65), underscoring the importance of both perspectives. Convergent validity with another symptom measure was good (r = .8). Classification analyses indicated greater discriminability from parent report, but caveats to this are presented. With strong psychometric characteristics, the four versions of the PCSI capture important postconcussion symptoms and can be utilized to track recovery from pediatric concussion and guide treatment recommendations. PMID:24739735

  7. A Psychometric Evaluation of an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Clinical Competency Framework

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Randell E.; Nemire, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the psychometric properties of the clinical competency framework known as the System of Universal Clinical Competency Evaluation in the Sunshine State (SUCCESS), including its internal consistency and content, construct, and criterion validity. Methods. Sub-competency items within each hypothesized competency pair were subjected to principal components factor analysis to demonstrate convergent and discriminant validity. Varimax rotation was conducted for each competency pair (eg, competency 1 vs competency 2, competency 1 vs competency 3, competency 2 vs competency 3). Internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach alpha. Results. Of the initial 78 pairings, 44 (56%) demonstrated convergent and discriminant validity. Five pairs of competencies were unidimensional. Of the 34 pairs where at least 1 competency was multidimensional, most (91%) were from competencies 7, 11, and 12, indicating modifications were warranted in those competencies. After reconfiguring the competencies, 76 (94%) of the 81 pairs resulted in 2 factors as required. A unidimensional factor emerged when all 13 of the competencies were entered into a factor analysis. The internal consistency of all of the competencies was satisfactory. Conclusion. Psychometric evaluation shows the SUCCESS framework demonstrates adequate reliability and validity for most competencies. However, it also provides guidance where improvements are needed as part of a continuous quality improvement program. PMID:25861100

  8. Development and psychometric assessment of the Basic Resuscitation Skills Self-Efficacy Scale.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Padilla, Jose; Suthers, Fiona; Fernández-Sola, Cayetano; Granero-Molina, Jose

    2016-04-01

    Nurses are usually the first responders to an in-hospital cardiac arrest. As bystanders, nurses are expected to master some basic resuscitation skills. Self-efficacy levels are a key component in the acquisition of basic resuscitation skills. To develop, test and validate a self-efficacy scale that accurately measures nursing students' confidence levels in their capabilities when responding to a cardiac arrest. This study enrolled a conveniently recruited sample of 768 nursing students from two different universities in Europe. The Basic Resuscitation Skills Self-Efficacy Scale (BRS-SES) was developed and its psychometrics established. Content validity, criterion validity, discriminant validity, and internal consistency were assessed. Performing item-analysis, principal component analysis and known group analysis evaluated construct validity. Principal component analysis revealed the three-subscale structure of the final 18-item BRS-SES. A Cronbach's alpha of 0.96 for the overall measure demonstrated the internal consistency of the BRS-SES. Data also evidenced discriminant ability of the BRS-SES and known-group analysis showed its high sensitivity and specificity. The BRS-SES showed good psychometric properties for measuring self-efficacy in basic resuscitation skills that nursing students, as future first responders to an in-hospital cardiac arrest, will be expected to master. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  9. Gender norms, psychometric properties, and validity for the Eating Pathology Symptoms Inventory.

    PubMed

    Forbush, Kelsie T; Wildes, Jennifer E; Hunt, Tyler K

    2014-01-01

    The Eating Pathology Symptoms Inventory [EPSI; Forbush KT, Wildes JE, Pollack LO, Dunbar D, Luo J, Patterson K, et al. Development and validation of the EPSI. Psychological Assessment, in press] is an empirically derived self-report measure of eating disorder (ED) symptoms. The EPSI is able to capture the majority of variance associated with established ED measures, yet possesses additional content that is not currently represented in any existing multidimensional ED measure. The purpose of this study was to present normative and psychometric data for the EPSI in a large sample of college men (N = 502) and women (N = 625). Participants completed the EPSI and a battery of self-report measures to evaluate convergent and discriminant validity. To provide context as to how normative scores compare to ED psychopathology, undergraduate student scores were compared to scores from individuals with EDs (N = 150). Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the EPSI had a robust eight-factor structure that was replicated in both men and women. Mean scores for most scales were significantly higher in women, except for Excessive Exercise, Muscle Building, and Negative Attitudes toward Obesity, which were significantly higher in men. Most scale scores were significantly lower in college students than in patients with EDs. Results indicated excellent convergent and discriminant validity in both genders. These data provide the first large-scale normative data for the EPSI in young adults, as well as additional evidence supporting the psychometric properties and construct validity of the EPSI. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Psychometric qualities of questionnaires for the assessment of otitis media impact.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, A A; Meesters, C M G; Speyer, R; Anteunis, L J C

    2007-12-01

    The assessment of impact and evaluation of treatment effects in chronic otitis media (OM) calls for a much broader approach than just examining the presence of middle ear effusion or hearing loss. It is increasingly recognised that this condition may result in a comprised quality of life. Several studies have used proxy completed questionnaires to objectify the illness experience associated with chronic OM. To review questionnaires which have been developed to describe the effects of chronic OM on the daily functioning of children. Psychometric properties have been evaluated, in addition to discriminative and evaluative qualities. A systematic review of publications pertaining to developed questionnaires related with chronic OM. Systematic literature searches of PubMed (1966-January 2007) and EMBASE (1989-January 2007) were conducted, supplemented by using free text words to identify publications after January 2005. The included 15 questionnaires were developed for children with recurrent or persistent OM, describing functional health status (FHS), while two questionnaires also evaluate the effect of tympanostomy tubes insertion. The questionnaires generally cover six impact areas (physical symptoms, child development, educational performance, emotional/practical burden and general health status) with physical symptoms being the most prominant. The OM8-30, OMO-22 and OM-6 adequately reflect the multidimensional aspects of FHS in chronic OM. The OMO-22 and OM8-30 show the best psychometric properties for the discrimination of impact severity between children, while the OM-6 was found to have the best qualities for the evaluation of clinical change. Clinical applicability is crucial for the assessment of FHS in chronic OM, but requires a trade-off with necessary psychometric properties.

  11. Psychometric Properties of the Participation Scale among Former Buruli Ulcer Patients in Ghana and Benin

    PubMed Central

    de Zeeuw, Janine; Douwstra, Marlies; Omansen, Till F.; Sopoh, Ghislain E.; Johnson, Christian; Phillips, Richard O.; Alferink, Marike; Saunderson, Paul; Van der Werf, Tjip S.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer is a stigmatising disease treated with antibiotics and wound care, and sometimes surgical intervention is necessary. Permanent limitations in daily activities are a common long term consequence. It is unknown to what extent patients perceive problems in participation in social activities. The psychometric properties of the Participation Scale used in other disabling diseases, such as leprosy, was assessed for use in former Buruli ulcer patients. Methods Former Buruli ulcer patients in Ghana and Benin, their relatives, and healthy community controls were interviewed using the Participation Scale, Buruli Ulcer Functional Limitation Score, and the Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue to measure stigma. The Participation Scale was tested for the following psychometric properties: discrimination, floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency, inter-item correlation, item-total correlation and construct validity. Results In total 386 participants (143 former Buruli ulcer patients with their relatives (137) and 106 community controls) were included in the study. The Participation Scale displayed good discrimination between former Buruli ulcer patients and healthy community controls. No floor and ceiling effects were found. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was 0.88. In Ghana, mean inter-item correlation of 0.29 and item-total correlations ranging from 0.10 to 0.69 were found while in Benin, a mean inter-item correlation of 0.28 was reported with item-total correlations ranging from −0.08 to 0.79. With respect to construct validity, 4 out of 6 hypotheses were not rejected, though correlations between various constructs differed between countries. Conclusion The results indicate the Participation Scale has acceptable psychometric properties and can be used for Buruli ulcer patients in Ghana and Benin. Future studies can use this Participation Scale to evaluate the long term restrictions in participation in daily social activities of former

  12. Psychometric Properties of the Heart Disease Knowledge Scale: Evidence from Item and Confirmatory Factor Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Bee Chiu; Kueh, Yee Cheng; Arifin, Wan Nor; Ng, Kok Huan

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart disease knowledge is an important concept for health education, yet there is lack of evidence on proper validated instruments used to measure levels of heart disease knowledge in the Malaysian context. Methods A cross-sectional, survey design was conducted to examine the psychometric properties of the adapted English version of the Heart Disease Knowledge Questionnaire (HDKQ). Using proportionate cluster sampling, 788 undergraduate students at Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia, were recruited and completed the HDKQ. Item analysis and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were used for the psychometric evaluation. Construct validity of the measurement model was included. Results Most of the students were Malay (48%), female (71%), and from the field of science (51%). An acceptable range was obtained with respect to both the difficulty and discrimination indices in the item analysis results. The difficulty index ranged from 0.12–0.91 and a discrimination index of ≥ 0.20 were reported for the final retained 23 items. The final CFA model showed an adequate fit to the data, yielding a 23-item, one-factor model [weighted least squares mean and variance adjusted scaled chi-square difference = 1.22, degrees of freedom = 2, P-value = 0.544, the root mean square error of approximation = 0.03 (90% confidence interval = 0.03, 0.04); close-fit P-value = > 0.950]. Conclusion Adequate psychometric values were obtained for Malaysian undergraduate university students using the 23-item, one-factor model of the adapted HDKQ. PMID:27660543

  13. Psychometric properties of the positive and negative affect schedule (PANAS) in a heterogeneous sample of substance users

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, Kelly; Malin-Mayor, Bo; Nich, Charla; Hunkele, Karen; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) is a widely used measure of affect, and a comprehensive psychometric evaluation has never been conducted among substance users. Objective To examine the psychometric properties of the PANAS in a sample of outpatient treatment substance users. Methods We used pooled data from four randomized clinical trials (N = 416; 34% female, 48% African American). Results A confirmatory factor analysis indicated adequate support for a two-factor correlated model comprised of Positive Affect and Negative Affect with correlated item errors (Comparative Fit Index = .93, Root Mean Square Error of Approximation = .07, χ2 = 478.93, df = 156). Cronbach’s α indicated excellent internal consistency for both factors (.90 and .91, respectively). The PANAS factors had good convergence and discriminability (Composite Reliability >.7; Maximum Shared Variance < Average Variance Extracted). A comparison from baseline to Week 1 indicated acceptable test-retest reliability (Positive Affect = .80, Negative Affect = .76). Concurrent and discriminant validity were demonstrated with correlations with the Brief Symptom Inventory and Addiction Severity Index. The PANAS scores were also significantly correlated with treatment outcomes (e.g., Positive Affect was associated with the maximum days of consecutive abstinence from primary substance of abuse, r = .16, p = .001). Conclusion Our data suggest that the psychometric properties of the PANAS are retained in substance using populations. Although several studies have focused on the role of Negative Affect, our findings suggest that Positive Affect may also be an important factor in substance use treatment outcomes. PMID:26905228

  14. A pilot evaluation of a computer-based psychometric test battery designed to detect impairment in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Nicola A; Kim, Jin Un; Pasha, Yasmin; Crossey, Mary ME; Schembri, Adrian J; Harel, Brian T; Kimhofer, Torben; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2017-01-01

    Background Psychometric testing is used to identify patients with cirrhosis who have developed hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Most batteries consist of a series of paper-and-pencil tests, which are cumbersome for most clinicians. A modern, easy-to-use, computer-based battery would be a helpful clinical tool, given that in its minimal form, HE has an impact on both patients’ quality of life and the ability to drive and operate machinery (with societal consequences). Aim We compared the Cogstate™ computer battery testing with the Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES) tests, with a view to simplify the diagnosis. Methods This was a prospective study of 27 patients with histologically proven cirrhosis. An analysis of psychometric testing was performed using accuracy of task performance and speed of completion as primary variables to create a correlation matrix. A stepwise linear regression analysis was performed with backward elimination, using analysis of variance. Results Strong correlations were found between the international shopping list, international shopping list delayed recall of Cogstate and the PHES digit symbol test. The Shopping List Tasks were the only tasks that consistently had P values of <0.05 in the linear regression analysis. Conclusion Subtests of the Cogstate battery correlated very strongly with the digit symbol component of PHES in discriminating severity of HE. These findings would indicate that components of the current PHES battery with the international shopping list tasks of Cogstate would be discriminant and have the potential to be used easily in clinical practice. PMID:28919805

  15. Psychometric properties of a novel knowledge assessment tool of mechanical ventilation for emergency medicine residents in the northeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jeremy B; Strout, Tania D; Seigel, Todd A; Wilcox, Susan R

    2016-01-01

    Prior descriptions of the psychometric properties of validated knowledge assessment tools designed to determine Emergency medicine (EM) residents understanding of physiologic and clinical concepts related to mechanical ventilation are lacking. In this setting, we have performed this study to describe the psychometric and performance properties of a novel knowledge assessment tool that measures EM residents' knowledge of topics in mechanical ventilation. Results from a multicenter, prospective, survey study involving 219 EM residents from 8 academic hospitals in northeastern United States were analyzed to quantify reliability, item difficulty, and item discrimination of each of the 9 questions included in the knowledge assessment tool for 3 weeks, beginning in January 2013. The response rate for residents completing the knowledge assessment tool was 68.6% (214 out of 312 EM residents). Reliability was assessed by both Cronbach's alpha coefficient (0.6293) and the Spearman-Brown coefficient (0.6437). Item difficulty ranged from 0.39 to 0.96, with a mean item difficulty of 0.75 for all 9 questions. Uncorrected item discrimination values ranged from 0.111 to 0.556. Corrected item-total correlations were determined by removing the question being assessed from analysis, resulting in a range of item discrimination from 0.139 to 0.498. Reliability, item difficulty and item discrimination were within satisfactory ranges in this study, demonstrating acceptable psychometric properties of this knowledge assessment tool. This assessment indicates that this knowledge assessment tool is sufficiently rigorous for use in future research studies or for assessment of EM residents for evaluative purposes.

  16. Psychometric Function Reconstruction from Adaptive Tracking Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-29

    Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory NSMRL Report 1095 29 November 1988 COC 0pCAL X, D TZ STA PSYC OMERCN TINRC SRUTO D STATES Reserch ork nit...performance. 𔃽 This paper describes a series of computer simulations undertaken to assess the validity of generating psychometric functions from trials in an...would expect that ill-behaved procedures would have been dropped from scientists ’ repertoires. The simulations reported here must be viewed relatively

  17. Identification and discrimination of rise time: is it categorical or noncategorical?

    PubMed

    Kewley-Port, D; Pisoni, D B

    1984-04-01

    Previous studies have reported that rise time of sawtooth waveforms may be discriminated in either a categorical-like manner under some experimental conditions or according to Weber's law under other conditions. In the present experiments, rise time discrimination was examined with two experimental procedures: the traditional labeling and ABX tasks used in speech perception studies and an adaptive tracking procedure used in psychophysical studies. Rise time varied from 0 to 80 ms in 10-ms intervals for sawtooth signals of 1-s duration. Discrimination functions for subjects who simply discriminated the signals on any basis whatsoever as well as functions for subjects who practiced labeling the endpoint stimuli as " pluck " and "bow" before ABX discrimination were not categorical in the ABX task. In the adaptive tracking procedure, the Weber fraction obtained from the jnds of rise time was found to be a constant above 20-ms rise time. The results from the two discrimination paradigms were then compared by predicting a jnd for rise time from the ABX discrimination data by reference to the underlying psychometric function. Using this method of analysis, discrimination results from previous studies were shown to be quite similar to the discrimination results observed in this study. Taken together the results demonstrate clearly that rise time discrimination of sawtooth signals follows predictions derived from Weber's law.

  18. The Alliance Negotiation Scale: A psychometric investigation.

    PubMed

    Doran, Jennifer M; Safran, Jeremy D; Muran, J Christopher

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the utility and psychometric properties of a new measure of psychotherapy process, the Alliance Negotiation Scale (ANS; Doran, Safran, Waizmann, Bolger, & Muran, 2012). The ANS was designed to operationalize the theoretical construct of negotiation (Safran & Muran, 2000), and to extend our current understanding of the working alliance concept (Bordin, 1979). The ANS was also intended to improve upon existing measures such as the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI; Horvath & Greenberg, 1986, 1989) and its short form (WAI-S; Tracey & Kokotovic, 1989) by expanding the emphasis on negative therapy process. The present study investigates the psychometric validity of the ANS test scores and interpretation-including confirming its original factor structure and evaluating its internal consistency and construct validity. Construct validity was examined through the ANS' convergence and divergence with several existing scales that measure theoretically related constructs. The results bolster and extend previous findings about the psychometric integrity of the ANS, and begin to illuminate the relationship between negotiation and other important variables in psychotherapy research. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) among community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Segal, Daniel L; Coolidge, Frederick L; Cahill, Brian S; O'Riley, Alisa A

    2008-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) as a self-administered screening tool for depressive symptoms were examined in a sample of community-dwelling older and younger adults. Participants completed the BDI-II, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, the Coolidge Axis II Inventory, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Short Psychological Well-Being Scale. Internal reliability of the BDI-II was found to be good among older and younger adults. The average BDI-II depression score did not differ between younger and older adults. Solid evidence for convergent and discriminant validity was demonstrated by correlations between the BDI-II with the other measures. The BDI-II appears to have strong psychometric support as a screening measure for depression among older adults in the general population. Implications for using the BDI-II as an assessment instrument in behaviorally based psychotherapy are discussed.

  20. The Functionality Appreciation Scale (FAS): Development and psychometric evaluation in U.S. community women and men.

    PubMed

    Alleva, Jessica M; Tylka, Tracy L; Kroon Van Diest, Ashley M

    2017-08-17

    Body functionality has been identified as an important dimension of body image that has the potential to be useful in the prevention and treatment of negative body image and in the enhancement of positive body image. Specifically, cultivating appreciation of body functionality may offset appearance concerns. However, a scale assessing this construct has yet to be developed. Therefore, we developed the Functionality Appreciation Scale (FAS) and examined its psychometric properties among three online community samples totalling 1042 women and men (ns=490 and 552, respectively). Exploratory factor analyses revealed a unidimensional structure with seven items. Confirmatory factor analysis upheld its unidimensionality and invariance across gender. The internal consistency, test-retest reliability, criterion-related, and construct (convergent, discriminant, incremental) validity of its scores were upheld. The FAS is a psychometrically sound measure that is unique from existing positive body image measures. Scholars will find the FAS applicable within research and clinical settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A psychometric analysis of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form (TEIQue-SF) using item response theory.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Andrew; Petrides, K V

    2010-09-01

    Trait emotional intelligence refers to a constellation of emotional self-perceptions located at the lower levels of personality hierarchies. In 2 studies, we sought to examine the psychometric properties of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form (TEIQue-SF; Petrides, 2009) using item response theory (IRT). Study 1 (N= 1,119, 455 men) showed that most items had good discrimination and threshold parameters and high item information values. At the global level, the TEIQue-SF showed very good precision across most of the latent trait range. Study 2 (N= 866, 432 men) used similar IRT techniques in a new sample based on the latest version of the TEIQue-SF (version 1.50). Results replicated Study 1, with the instrument showing good psychometric properties at the item and global level. Overall, the 2 studies suggest the TEIQue-SF can be recommended when a rapid assessment of trait emotional intelligence is required.

  2. Discrimination against Black Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aloud, Ashwaq; Alsulayyim, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Discrimination is a structured way of abusing people based on racial differences, hence barring them from accessing wealth, political participation and engagement in many spheres of human life. Racism and discrimination are inherently rooted in institutions in the society, the problem has spread across many social segments of the society including…

  3. Microscale acceleration history discriminators

    DOEpatents

    Polosky, Marc A.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of micromechanical acceleration history discriminators is claimed. These discriminators allow the precise differentiation of a wide range of acceleration-time histories, thereby allowing adaptive events to be triggered in response to the severity (or lack thereof) of an external environment. Such devices have applications in airbag activation, and other safety and surety applications.

  4. Flash-Type Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the significant progress made in the flash-type discrimination algorithm development. The contents include: 1) Highlights of Progress for GLM-R3 Flash-Type discrimination Algorithm Development; 2) Maximum Group Area (MGA) Data; 3) Retrieval Errors from Simulations; and 4) Preliminary Global-scale Retrieval.

  5. The "Taste" for Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiswick, Barry R.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses, in terms of consumers, employers, and employees, how a "taste for discrimination," that is, someone's preference for or against association with some group in the labor market, can influence behavior and hence who gets hired. Argues that people with the strongest tastes for discrimination pay the heaviest cost. (RDN)

  6. TGDA: Nonparametric Discriminant Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Norval F.; Bruno, Albert V.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program for two-group nonparametric discriminant analysis is presented. Based on Bayes' Theorem for probability revision, the statistical rationale for this program uses the calculation of maximum likelihood estimates of group membership. The program compares the Bayesian procedure to the standard Linear Discriminant Function.…

  7. PREJUDICE AND DISCRIMINATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NOAR, GERTRUDE

    THE SCHOOL WAS CONFRONTED WITH THE NECESSITY OF TEACHING ABOUT PREJUDICE AND DISCRIMINATION AS FACTS OF LIFE, AS CONDITIONS WHICH PREVENT THE FULL DEVELOPMENT OF EVERY PERSON, AS PROBLEMS THAT SHOULD BE SOLVED, IF DEMOCRACY WAS TO FUNCTION. ONE OF THE APPROACHES TO A UNIT THAT STUDIED PREJUDICE AND DISCRIMINATION CONSISTED OF THE DISCUSSION OF A…

  8. Qubit state discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Deconinck, Matthieu E.

    2010-06-15

    We show how one can solve the problem of discriminating between qubit states. We use the quantum state discrimination duality theorem and the Bloch sphere representation of qubits, which allows for an easy geometric and analytical representation of the optimal guessing strategies.

  9. TGDA: Nonparametric Discriminant Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Norval F.; Bruno, Albert V.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program for two-group nonparametric discriminant analysis is presented. Based on Bayes' Theorem for probability revision, the statistical rationale for this program uses the calculation of maximum likelihood estimates of group membership. The program compares the Bayesian procedure to the standard Linear Discriminant Function.…

  10. Modeling the Discrimination Power of Physics Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesic, Vanes

    2011-01-01

    For the purposes of tailoring physics instruction in accordance with the needs and abilities of the students it is useful to explore the knowledge structure of students of different ability levels. In order to precisely differentiate the successive, characteristic states of student achievement it is necessary to use test items that possess…

  11. Neural networks in seismic discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Dowla, F.U.

    1995-01-01

    Neural networks are powerful and elegant computational tools that can be used in the analysis of geophysical signals. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have developed neural networks to solve problems in seismic discrimination, event classification, and seismic and hydrodynamic yield estimation. Other researchers have used neural networks for seismic phase identification. We are currently developing neural networks to estimate depths of seismic events using regional seismograms. In this paper different types of network architecture and representation techniques are discussed. We address the important problem of designing neural networks with good generalization capabilities. Examples of neural networks for treaty verification applications are also described.

  12. Simple model for spatial-frequency masking and contrast discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barten, Peter G. J.

    1995-04-01

    After some principal considerations about noise and the psychometric function,we present a model for the masking of a spatial frequency patten by nonwhite noise. From threshold elevation measurements by Stromeyer and Julesz, we derive a distribution function for the disturbing effect of one frequency on the detection of another frequency. We apply the resulting formulas on contrast sensitivity measurements with nonwhite noise by van Meeteren and Valeton. Next we use the same principles to derive a simple model for contrast discrimination. We consider the pedestal modulation as a nonwhite noise source of a single spatial frequency that hampers contrast detection. We show that contrast discrimination plots for different spatial frequencies will coincide if they are plotted in a normalized way. After a slight practical correction the model appears to be in very good agreement with measurements of various authors published in literature.

  13. Binocular contrast discrimination needs monocular multiplicative noise

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jian; Levi, Dennis M.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of signal and noise on contrast discrimination are difficult to separate because of a singularity in the signal-detection-theory model of two-alternative forced-choice contrast discrimination (Katkov, Tsodyks, & Sagi, 2006). In this article, we show that it is possible to eliminate the singularity by combining that model with a binocular combination model to fit monocular, dichoptic, and binocular contrast discrimination. We performed three experiments using identical stimuli to measure the perceived phase, perceived contrast, and contrast discrimination of a cyclopean sine wave. In the absence of a fixation point, we found a binocular advantage in contrast discrimination both at low contrasts (<4%), consistent with previous studies, and at high contrasts (≥34%), which has not been previously reported. However, control experiments showed no binocular advantage at high contrasts in the presence of a fixation point or for observers without accommodation. We evaluated two putative contrast-discrimination mechanisms: a nonlinear contrast transducer and multiplicative noise (MN). A binocular combination model (the DSKL model; Ding, Klein, & Levi, 2013b) was first fitted to both the perceived-phase and the perceived-contrast data sets, then combined with either the nonlinear contrast transducer or the MN mechanism to fit the contrast-discrimination data. We found that the best model combined the DSKL model with early MN. Model simulations showed that, after going through interocular suppression, the uncorrelated noise in the two eyes became anticorrelated, resulting in less binocular noise and therefore a binocular advantage in the discrimination task. Combining a nonlinear contrast transducer or MN with a binocular combination model (DSKL) provides a powerful method for evaluating the two putative contrast-discrimination mechanisms. PMID:26982370

  14. Binocular contrast discrimination needs monocular multiplicative noise.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Levi, Dennis M

    2016-01-01

    The effects of signal and noise on contrast discrimination are difficult to separate because of a singularity in the signal-detection-theory model of two-alternative forced-choice contrast discrimination (Katkov, Tsodyks, & Sagi, 2006). In this article, we show that it is possible to eliminate the singularity by combining that model with a binocular combination model to fit monocular, dichoptic, and binocular contrast discrimination. We performed three experiments using identical stimuli to measure the perceived phase, perceived contrast, and contrast discrimination of a cyclopean sine wave. In the absence of a fixation point, we found a binocular advantage in contrast discrimination both at low contrasts (<4%), consistent with previous studies, and at high contrasts (≥34%), which has not been previously reported. However, control experiments showed no binocular advantage at high contrasts in the presence of a fixation point or for observers without accommodation. We evaluated two putative contrast-discrimination mechanisms: a nonlinear contrast transducer and multiplicative noise (MN). A binocular combination model (the DSKL model; Ding, Klein, & Levi, 2013b) was first fitted to both the perceived-phase and the perceived-contrast data sets, then combined with either the nonlinear contrast transducer or the MN mechanism to fit the contrast-discrimination data. We found that the best model combined the DSKL model with early MN. Model simulations showed that, after going through interocular suppression, the uncorrelated noise in the two eyes became anticorrelated, resulting in less binocular noise and therefore a binocular advantage in the discrimination task. Combining a nonlinear contrast transducer or MN with a binocular combination model (DSKL) provides a powerful method for evaluating the two putative contrast-discrimination mechanisms.

  15. Polymorph Discrimination using Low Wavenumber Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Saikat; Chamberlin, Brianna; Matzger, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of crystalline polymorphs and their quantitation has become an integral part of the pre-clinical drug development process. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the rapid identification of phases of pharmaceuticals. In the present work we demonstrate the use of low wavenumber Raman vibrational spectroscopy (including phonon measurement) for discrimination among polymorphs. A total of 10 polymorphic pharmaceuticals were employed to conduct a critical assessment. Raman scattering in the low frequency region (10–400 cm−1), which includes crystal lattice vibrations, has been analyzed and the results indicate lattice phonon Raman scattering can be used for rapid discrimination of polymorphic phases with additional discriminating power compared to conventional collection strategies. Moreover structural insight and conformational changes can be detected with this approach. PMID:27642248

  16. Development of a SNP set for human identification: A set with high powers of discrimination which yields high genetic information from naturally degraded DNA samples in the Thai population.

    PubMed

    Boonyarit, Hathaichanoke; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Chavalvechakul, Nuttama; Aoki, Masayuki; Amitani, Hanae; Hosono, Naoya; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kubo, Michiaki; Lertrit, Patcharee

    2014-07-01

    This study describes the development of a SNP typing system for human identification in the Thai population, in particular for extremely degraded DNA samples. A highly informative SNP marker set for forensic identification was identified, and a multiplex PCR-based Invader assay was developed. Fifty-one highly informative autosomal SNP markers and three sex determination SNP markers were amplified in two multiplex PCR reactions and then detected using Invader assay reactions. The average PCR product size was 71 base pairs. The match probability of the 54-SNP marker set in 124 Thai individuals was 1.48×10(-21), higher than that of STR typing, suggesting that this 54-SNP marker set is beneficial for forensic identification in the Thai population. The selected SNP marker set was also evaluated in 90 artificially degraded samples, and in 128 naturally degraded DNA samples from real forensic casework which had shown no profiles or incomplete profiles when examined using a commercial STR typing system. A total of 56 degraded samples (44%) achieved the matching probability (PM) equivalent to STR gold standard analysis (successful genotyping of 44 SNP markers) for human identification. These data indicated that our novel 54-SNP marker set provides a very useful and valuable approach for forensic identification in the Thai population, especially in the case of highly to extremely degraded DNA. In summary, we have developed a set of 54 Thai-specific SNPs for human identification which have higher discrimination power than STR genotyping. The PCRs for these 54 SNP markers were successfully combined into two multiplex reactions and detected with an Invader assay. This novel SNP genotyping system also yields high levels of genetic information from naturally degraded samples, even though there are much more difficult to recover than artificially degraded samples.

  17. Psychometric Properties of the Self-Report Version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Hyuk; Min, Seongho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the reliability and validity of the self-report Korean version of Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ-Kr) in the community sample. Methods The SDQ-Kr was administered to a large sample of school children and adolescents (n=2814) and youth attendees of a psychiatric clinic (n=385) aged 11-16 years. To examine temporal stability, the same questionnaire was administered to a subsample of 167 school youths five to six weeks after the initial assessment. To examine the reliability, we calculated Cronbach's alpha coefficients for internal consistency and Pearson's correlations for test-retest stability. In order to evaluate the factorial structure of the SDQ-Kr items, we conducted an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) with varimax rotation. Finally, discriminant validity was examined by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves employing the area under the curve (AUC) as an index of discriminant ability. Results Although the internal consistency of some subscales of the SDQ-Kr was somewhat less satisfactory (alpha coefficients; 0.28-0.54) than the English original, coefficients for the total difficulties scores approached sufficient levels (coefficients; 0.69). Other psychometric properties including discriminant validity (AUC for total difficulties and four subscales >0.7) were comparable to those obtained in other language studies. Conclusion The self-report SDQ-Kr exhibited a low level of reliability, indicating that some items need to be further evaluated and revised to improve the psychometric properties. We suggest that the total difficulties score could be used with more confidence for screening possible mental health problems in youths. PMID:26508960

  18. A New Clinical Pain Knowledge Test for Nurses: Development and Psychometric Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bernhofer, Esther I; St Marie, Barbara; Bena, James F

    2017-08-01

    All nurses care for patients with pain, and pain management knowledge and attitude surveys for nurses have been around since 1987. However, no validated knowledge test exists to measure postlicensure clinicians' knowledge of the core competencies of pain management in current complex patient populations. To develop and test the psychometric properties of an instrument designed to measure pain management knowledge of postlicensure nurses. Psychometric instrument validation. Four large Midwestern U.S. hospitals. Registered nurses employed full time and part time August 2015 to April 2016, aged M = 43.25 years; time as RN, M = 16.13 years. Prospective survey design using e-mail to invite nurses to take an electronic multiple choice pain knowledge test. Content validity of initial 36-item test "very good" (95.1% agreement). Completed tests that met analysis criteria, N = 747. Mean initial test score, 69.4% correct (range 27.8-97.2). After revision/removal of 13 unacceptable questions, mean test score was 50.4% correct (range 8.7-82.6). Initial test item percent difficulty range was 15.2%-98.1%; discrimination values range, 0.03-0.50; final test item percent difficulty range, 17.6%-91.1%, discrimination values range, -0.04 to 1.04. Split-half reliability final test was 0.66. A high decision consistency reliability was identified, with test cut-score of 75%. The final 23-item Clinical Pain Knowledge Test has acceptable discrimination, difficulty, decision consistency, reliability, and validity in the general clinical inpatient nurse population. This instrument will be useful in assessing pain management knowledge of clinical nurses to determine gaps in education, evaluate knowledge after pain management education, and measure research outcomes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Perceived experiences of atheist discrimination: Instrument development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Brewster, Melanie E; Hammer, Joseph; Sawyer, Jacob S; Eklund, Austin; Palamar, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    The present 2 studies describe the development and initial psychometric evaluation of a new instrument, the Measure of Atheist Discrimination Experiences (MADE), which may be used to examine the minority stress experiences of atheist people. Items were created from prior literature, revised by a panel of expert researchers, and assessed psychometrically. In Study 1 (N = 1,341 atheist-identified people), an exploratory factor analysis with 665 participants suggested the presence of 5 related dimensions of perceived discrimination. However, bifactor modeling via confirmatory factor analysis and model-based reliability estimates with data from the remaining 676 participants affirmed the presence of a strong "general" factor of discrimination and mixed to poor support for substantive subdimensions. In Study 2 (N = 1,057 atheist-identified people), another confirmatory factor analysis and model-based reliability estimates strongly supported the bifactor model from Study 1 (i.e., 1 strong "general" discrimination factor) and poor support for subdimensions. Across both studies, the MADE general factor score demonstrated evidence of good reliability (i.e., Cronbach's alphas of .94 and .95; omega hierarchical coefficients of .90 and .92), convergent validity (i.e., with stigma consciousness, β = .56; with awareness of public devaluation, β = .37), and preliminary evidence for concurrent validity (i.e., with loneliness β = .18; with psychological distress β = .27). Reliability and validity evidence for the MADE subscale scores was not sufficient to warrant future use of the subscales. Limitations and implications for future research and clinical work with atheist individuals are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Manual discrimination of force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Xiao-Dong; Tan, HONG-Z.; Durlach, Nathaniel I.

    1991-01-01

    Optimal design of human-machine interfaces for teleoperators and virtual-environment systems which involve the tactual and kinesthetic modalities requires knowledge of the human's resolving power in these modalities. The resolution of the interface should be appropriately matched to that of the human operator. We report some preliminary results on the ability of the human hand to distinguish small differences in force under a variety of conditions. Experiments were conducted on force discrimination with the thumb pushing an interface that exerts a constant force over the pushing distance and the index finger pressing against a fixed support. The dependence of the sensitivity index d' on force increment can be fit by a straight line through the origin and the just-noticeable difference (JND) in force can thus be described by the inverse of the slope of this line. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was measured by varying the a priori probabilities of the two alternatives, reference force and reference force plus an increment, in one-interval, two-alternative, forced-choice experiments. When plotted on normal deviate coordinates, the ROC's were roughly straight lines of unit slope, thus supporting the assumption of equal-variance normal distributions and the use of the conventional d' measure. The JND was roughly 6-8 percent for reference force ranging from 2.5 to 10 newtons, pushing distance from 5 to 30 mm, and initial finger-span from 45 to 125 mm. Also, the JND remained the same when the subjects were instructed to change the average speed of pushing from 23 to 153 mm/sec. The pushing was terminated by reaching either a wall or a well, and the JND's were essentially the same in both cases.

  1. Right parietal dominance in spatial egocentric discrimination.

    PubMed

    Loayza, F R; Fernández-Seara, M A; Aznárez-Sanado, M; Pastor, M A

    2011-03-15

    Egocentric tactile perception is crucial for skilled hand motor control. In order to better understand the brain functional underpinnings related to this basic sensorial perception, we performed a tactile perception functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment with two aims. The first aim consisted of characterizing the neural substrate of two types of egocentric tactile discrimination: the spatial localization (SLD) and simultaneity succession discrimination (SSD) in both hands to define hemispheric dominance for these tasks. The second goal consisted of characterizing the brain activation related to the spatial attentional load, the functional changes and their connectivity patterns induced by the psychometric performance (PP) during SLD. We used fMRI in 25 right-handed volunteers, applying pairs of sinusoidal vibratory stimuli on eight different positions in the palmar surface of both hands. Subjects were required either to identify the stimulus location with respect to an imaginary midline (SLD), to discriminate the simultaneity or succession of a stimuli pair (SSD) or to simply respond to stimulus detection. We found a fronto-parietal network for SLD and frontal network for SSD. During SLD we identified right hemispheric dominance with increased BOLD activation and functional interaction of the right supramarginal gyrus with contralateral intra-parietal sulcus for right and left hand independently. Brain activity correlated to spatial attentional load was found in bilateral structures of intra-parietal sulcus, precuneus extended to superior parietal lobule, pre-supplementary motor area, frontal eye fields and anterior insulae for both hands. We suggest that the right supramarginal gyrus and its interaction with intra-parietal lobule may play a pivotal role in the phenomenon of tactile neglect in right fronto-parietal lesions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Metacognition of attention during tactile discrimination.

    PubMed

    Whitmarsh, Stephen; Oostenveld, Robert; Almeida, Rita; Lundqvist, Daniel

    2017-02-15

    The ability to monitor the success of cognitive processing is referred to as metacognition. Studies of metacognition typically probe post-decision judgments of confidence, showing that we can report on the success of wide range of cognitive processes. Much less is known about our ability to monitor and report on the degree of top-down attention, an ability of paramount importance in tasks requiring sustained attention. However, it has been repeatedly shown that the degree and locus of top-down attention modulates alpha (8-14Hz) power in sensory cortices. In this study we investigated whether self-reported ratings of attention are reflected by sensory alpha power, independent from confidence and task difficulty. Subjects performed a stair-cased tactile discrimination task requiring sustained somatosensory attention. Each discrimination response was followed by a rating of their attention at the moment of stimulation, or their confidence in the discrimination response. MEG was used to estimate trial-by-trial alpha power preceding stimulation. Staircasing of task-difficulty successfully equalized performance between conditions. Both attention and confidence ratings reflected subsequent discrimination performance. Task difficulty specifically influenced confidence ratings. As expected, specifically attention ratings, but not confidence ratings, correlated negatively with contralateral somatosensory alpha power preceding tactile stimuli. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the degree of attention can be subjectively experienced and reported accurately, independent from task difficulty and knowledge about task performance.

  3. Modern Psychometrics for Assessing Achievement Goal Orientation: A Rasch Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muis, Krista R.; Winne, Philip H.; Edwards, Ordene V.

    2009-01-01

    Background: A program of research is needed that assesses the psychometric properties of instruments designed to quantify students' achievement goal orientations to clarify inconsistencies across previous studies and to provide a stronger basis for future research. Aim: We conducted traditional psychometric and modern Rasch-model analyses of the…

  4. Modified Test Administration Using Assistive Technology: Preliminary Psychometric Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warschausky, Seth; Van Tubbergen, Marie; Asbell, Shana; Kaufman, Jacqueline; Ayyangar, Rita; Donders, Jacobus

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of test presentation and response formats that were modified to be accessible with the use of assistive technology (AT). First, the stability of psychometric properties was examined in 60 children, ages 6 to 12, with no significant physical or communicative impairments. Population-specific…

  5. Psychometric Evaluation and Discussions of English Language Learners' Listening Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Daeryong; Taherbhai, Husein; Frantz, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The importance of listening in the context of English language acquisition is gaining acceptance, but its unique attributes in language performance, while substantively and qualitatively justifiable, are generally not psychometrically defined. This article psychometrically supports listening as a distinct domain among the three other domains of…

  6. Psychometric Evaluation and Discussions of English Language Learners' Listening Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Daeryong; Taherbhai, Husein; Frantz, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The importance of listening in the context of English language acquisition is gaining acceptance, but its unique attributes in language performance, while substantively and qualitatively justifiable, are generally not psychometrically defined. This article psychometrically supports listening as a distinct domain among the three other domains of…

  7. Modern Psychometrics for Assessing Achievement Goal Orientation: A Rasch Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muis, Krista R.; Winne, Philip H.; Edwards, Ordene V.

    2009-01-01

    Background: A program of research is needed that assesses the psychometric properties of instruments designed to quantify students' achievement goal orientations to clarify inconsistencies across previous studies and to provide a stronger basis for future research. Aim: We conducted traditional psychometric and modern Rasch-model analyses of the…

  8. Measuring Mathematics Anxiety: Psychometric Analysis of a Bidimensional Affective Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Haiyan; Wang, LihShing; Pan, Wei; Frey, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a theoretically and methodologically sound bidimensional affective scale measuring mathematics anxiety with high psychometric quality. The psychometric properties of a 14-item Mathematics Anxiety Scale-Revised (MAS-R) adapted from Betz's (1978) 10-item Mathematics Anxiety Scale were empirically analyzed on a…

  9. Psychometric Characteristics of the Gesell School Readiness Screening Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenstein, Robert

    The Gesell School Readiness Screening Test (GSRST) is widely used to identify "developmentally immature" children for placement in extra-year, transition programs in spite of a problematic absence of psychometric evidence and research support. In this study of psychometric characteristics of the GSRST, teacher ratings of classroom…

  10. Modified Test Administration Using Assistive Technology: Preliminary Psychometric Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warschausky, Seth; Van Tubbergen, Marie; Asbell, Shana; Kaufman, Jacqueline; Ayyangar, Rita; Donders, Jacobus

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of test presentation and response formats that were modified to be accessible with the use of assistive technology (AT). First, the stability of psychometric properties was examined in 60 children, ages 6 to 12, with no significant physical or communicative impairments. Population-specific…

  11. Mass discrimination during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment concerned with the ability of astronauts to discriminate between the mass of objects when both the objects and the astronauts are in weightless states is described. The main object of the experiment is to compare the threshold for weight-discrimination on Earth with that for mass-discrimination in orbit. Tests will be conducted premission and postmission and early and late during the mission while the crew is experiencing weightlessness. A comparison of early and late tests inflight and postflight will reveal the rate of adaptation to zero-gravity and 1-g. The mass discrimination box holds 24 balls which the astronaut will compare to one another in a random routine.

  12. Quantity discrimination in salamanders.

    PubMed

    Krusche, Paul; Uller, Claudia; Dicke, Ursula

    2010-06-01

    We investigated discrimination of large quantities in salamanders of the genus Plethodon. Animals were challenged with two different quantities (8 vs 12 or 8 vs 16) in a two-alternative choice task. Stimuli were live crickets, videos of live crickets or images animated by a computer program. Salamanders reliably chose the larger of two quantities when the ratio between the sets was 1:2 and stimuli were live crickets or videos thereof. Magnitude discrimination was not successful when the ratio was 2:3, or when the ratio was 1:2 when stimuli were computer animated. Analysis of the salamanders' success and failure as well as analysis of stimulus features points towards movement as a dominant feature for quantity discrimination. The results are generally consistent with large quantity discrimination investigated in many other animals (e.g. primates, fish), current models of quantity representation (analogue magnitudes) and data on sensory aspects of amphibian prey-catching behaviour (neuronal motion processing).

  13. Entanglement in channel discrimination with restricted measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, William; Piani, Marco; Watrous, John

    2010-09-15

    We study the power of measurements implementable with local quantum operations and classical communication (LOCC) measurements in the setting of quantum channel discrimination. More precisely, we consider discrimination procedures that attempt to identify an unknown channel, chosen uniformly from two known alternatives, that take the following form: (i) the input to the unknown channel is prepared in a possibly entangled state with an ancillary system, (ii) the unknown channel is applied to the input system, and (iii) an LOCC measurement is performed on the output and ancillary systems, resulting in a guess for which of the two channels was given. The restriction of the measurement in such a procedure to be an LOCC measurement is of interest because it isolates the entanglement in the initial input-ancillary systems as a resource in the setting of channel discrimination. We prove that there exist channel discrimination problems for which restricted procedures of this sort can be at either of the two extremes: they may be optimal within the set of all discrimination procedures (and simultaneously outperform all strategies that make no use of entanglement), or they may be no better than unentangled strategies (and simultaneously suboptimal within the set of all discrimination procedures).

  14. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  15. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  16. Waves, Rays and Discriminants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-31

    parts which together form a basis for discrimination. Verv preliminary applications of the method are successful and encouraging, but the full potential...seismic moment tensor into it;, deviatoric and iLolropic parts provides a quantitative, unaml iguous method for discriminating t-etween MrthqtMkM...Hafner, New York. CAPTION 27 Figure 1. The real and imaginary parts of M in dyne-cm/10 Triangles are redrawn from (M; Figure 6). Squares are

  17. The effects of visual degradation on face discrimination.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Daphne L; Loffler, Gunter; Colquhoun, Kirsty; Bruce, Natalie; Dutton, Gordon N; Bach, Michael

    2011-05-01

    People with reduced visual acuity (VA) and/or contrast sensitivity have difficulty recognizing faces and facial expressions. We have quantified these difficulties, using a synthetic face discrimination task employing both normal and artificially degraded vision. VA and contrast thresholds were measured using an optimised staircase procedure [Freiburg acuity Test (FrACT)] in 25 young adults (aged 18-24 years) with corrected visual acuity of 0.0 logMAR or better and with four levels of vision degraded with Bangerter occlusion foils. For face discrimination, male face images were synthesised from 37 cardinal points (position of eyes, width of nose, head shape etc) derived from frontal face photographs and manipulated by altering the points as a fraction of the mean head radius. Face discrimination thresholds (% difference) were measured from a simultaneous four-alternative forced choice of 'odd one out' from three identical faces and one that differed. Psychometric functions were measured for four participants with normal and degraded vision. Subsequently, the difference between faces was fixed at twice the discrimination thresholds and the size of the faces manipulated using the FrACT threshold procedure in 25 participants. Data were converted to equivalent face discrimination distances for realistic face dimensions. With normal vision, face discrimination thresholds ranged from 2.7% to 5.6%; these increased systematically and were more variable with visual degradation. When manipulating face size, face discrimination distance was highly correlated with both acuity and contrast sensitivity (r(2) = 0.77 and 0.80 respectively, p < 0.01). The mean distance with normal vision was 15.3 m (14.5-16.2 ± S.E.M.). With vision degraded to 0.6 logMAR (6/24 Snellen, contrast threshold 15%) the mean face discrimination distance was reduced to 3.9 m (3.7-4.1, ±S.E.M.). Poor face discrimination has a profound impact on real-life social communication. Here we report that artificial

  18. Psychometric properties of Conversion Disorder Scale- Revised (CDS) for children.

    PubMed

    Ijaz, Tazvin; Nasir, Attikah; Sarfraz, Naema; Ijaz, Shirmeen

    2017-05-01

    To revise conversion disorder scale and to establish the psychometric properties of the revised scale. This case-control study was conducted from February to June, 2014, at the Government College University, Lahore, Pakistan, and comprised schoolchildren and children with conversion disorder. In order to generate items for revised version of conversion disorder scale, seven practising mental health professionals were consulted. A list of 42 items was finalised for expert ratings. After empirical validation, a scale of 40 items was administered on the participants and factor analysis was conducted. Of the240 participants, 120(50%) were schoolchildren (controls group) and 120(50%)were children with conversion disorder (clinical group).The results of factor analysis revealed five factors (swallowing and speech symptoms, motor symptoms, sensory symptoms, weakness and fatigue, and mixed symptoms) and retention of all 40 items of revised version of conversion disorder scale. Concurrent validity of the revised scale was found to be 0.81 which was significantly high. Similarly, discriminant validity of the scale was also high as both clinical and control groups had significant difference (p<0.001) in scores. Cronbach's alpha of scale was a=0.91 while item total correlation ranged from 0.50 to 0.80. The sensitivity and specificity analysis indicated that the revised conversion disorder scale was 76% sensitive to predicting conversion disorder while specificity showed that the scale was 73% accurate in specifying participants of the control group. The revised version of conversion disorder scale was a reliable and valid tool to be used for screening of children with conversion disorder.

  19. Psychometric properties of the Young Children's Participation and Environment Measure.

    PubMed

    Khetani, Mary A; Graham, James E; Davies, Patricia L; Law, Mary C; Simeonsson, Rune J

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the psychometric properties of the newly developed Young Children's Participation and Environment Measure (YC-PEM). Cross-sectional study. Data were collected online and by telephone. Convenience and snowball sampling methods were used to survey caregivers of children (N=395, comprising children with [n=93] and without [n=302] developmental disabilities and delays) between the ages of 0 and 5 years (mean age±SD, 35.33±20.29 mo) and residing in North America. Not applicable. The YC-PEM includes 3 participation scales and 1 environment scale. Each scale is assessed across 3 settings: home, daycare/preschool, and community. Data were analyzed to derive estimates of internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity. Internal consistency ranged from .68 to .96 and .92 to .96 for the participation and environment scales, respectively. Test-retest reliability (2-4 wk) ranged from .31 to .93 for participation scales and from .91 to .94 for the environment scale. One of 3 participation scales and the environment scale demonstrated significant group differences by disability status across all 3 settings, and all 4 scales discriminated between disability groups for the daycare/preschool setting. The participation scales exhibited small to moderate positive associations with functional performance scores. Results lend initial support for the use of the YC-PEM in research to assess the participation of young children with disabilities and delays in terms of (1) home, daycare/preschool, and community participation patterns; (2) perceived environmental supports and barriers to participation; and (3) activity-specific parent strategies to promote participation. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Work stress inventory for dental assistants: development and psychometric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Khader, Yousef S; Airan, Dana M; Al-Faouri, Ibrahim

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop a work stress inventory for dental assistants (WSI-DA) in Jordan and examine its psychometric properties and to describe potentially stressful work-related conditions related to the profession of dental assistance in Jordan. A total of 542 dental assistants working in private dental clinics in Jordan participated in this study. The stages of instrument development included selecting an initial item pool, choosing the best items, deciding on the questionnaire format, pretesting the instrument, and determining its reliability and validity. An initial set of 55 items was selected and categorized into nine hypothetical categories. Further testing and using factor analysis ended with a 35-item, nine-scale instrument. The raw score for each scale was calculated by adding the responses for individual items and then transformed to 0-100 scales. The item-level validity, item internal consistency, item discriminant validity, and Cronbach's alpha were assessed. Nine factors had eigenvalues greater than one. The nine factors accounted for 78.7 percent of the total variability in the 35-item questionnaire. All item-scale correlations were greater than the recommended correlation of 0.40. Except patient's suffer scale (Cronbach's alpha = 0.56), all other scales demonstrated acceptable internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha exceeding the minimum standard of 0.7 and ranging from 0.71 to 0.87. Test-retest reliability showed acceptable reliability in all nine scales and ranged from 0.61 to 0.92. The 35-item, nine-scale WSI-DA demonstrated acceptable validity and reliability when used among dental assistants in Jordan.

  1. Development and psychometric testing of the Supportive Supervisory Scale.

    PubMed

    McGilton, Katherine S

    2010-06-01

    To describe the development and psychometric testing of the Supportive Supervisory Scale (SSS). The development of the items of the scale was based on Winnicott's relationship theory and on focus groups with 26 healthcare aides (HCAs) and 30 supervisors from six long-term care (LTC) facilities in Ontario, Canada. Content validity of the 15-item instrument was established by a panel of experts. Based on a secondary analysis of data collected from 222 HCAs in 10 LTC facilities in Ontario, Canada, the SSS was subjected to principal components analysis with oblique rotation. A two-factor solution was accepted, which is consistent with the theoretical conceptualization of the instrument. Factor I was labeled Respects Uniqueness and Factor II was labeled Being Reliable. Internal consistency of Factor I was .95, and that of Factor II was .91. Discriminant validity was also established. The focus groups revealed that "being available to staff" while "recognizing the HCA as an individual, and taking a moment to get to know them" was essential to feeling supported by their supervisor. The SSS is a reliable and valid measure of supervisory support of supervisors working in LTC facilities. At the core of supportive supervision is the supervisor's ability to develop and maintain positive relationships with each HCA. It is through respecting the uniqueness of each HCA and being reliable that supervisor-HCA relationships can flourish. Supportive leadership in LTC settings is a major contributor to HCAs' job satisfaction and retention and to quality of patient care. Therefore, a tool developed and tested to measure supervisors' supportive capacities in LTC is primal to evaluate the effectiveness of supervisors in these environments.

  2. Psychometric evaluation of the altered states of consciousness rating scale (OAV).

    PubMed

    Studerus, Erich; Gamma, Alex; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2010-08-31

    The OAV questionnaire has been developed to integrate research on altered states of consciousness (ASC). It measures three primary and one secondary dimensions of ASC that are hypothesized to be invariant across ASC induction methods. The OAV rating scale has been in use for more than 20 years and applied internationally in a broad range of research fields, yet its factorial structure has never been tested by structural equation modeling techniques and its psychometric properties have never been examined in large samples of experimentally induced ASC. The present study conducted a psychometric evaluation of the OAV in a sample of psilocybin (n = 327), ketamine (n = 162), and MDMA (n = 102) induced ASC that was obtained by pooling data from 43 experimental studies. The factorial structure was examined by confirmatory factor analysis, exploratory structural equation modeling, hierarchical item clustering (ICLUST), and multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) modeling. The originally proposed model did not fit the data well even if zero-constraints on non-target factor loadings and residual correlations were relaxed. Furthermore, ICLUST suggested that the "oceanic boundlessness" and "visionary restructuralization" factors could be combined on a high level of the construct hierarchy. However, because these factors were multidimensional, we extracted and examined 11 new lower order factors. MIMIC modeling indicated that these factors were highly measurement invariant across drugs, settings, questionnaire versions, and sexes. The new factors were also demonstrated to have improved homogeneities, satisfactory reliabilities, discriminant and convergent validities, and to differentiate well among the three drug groups. The original scales of the OAV were shown to be multidimensional constructs. Eleven new lower order scales were constructed and demonstrated to have desirable psychometric properties. The new lower order scales are most likely better suited to assess drug

  3. Psychometric Evaluation of the Altered States of Consciousness Rating Scale (OAV)

    PubMed Central

    Studerus, Erich; Gamma, Alex; Vollenweider, Franz X.

    2010-01-01

    Background The OAV questionnaire has been developed to integrate research on altered states of consciousness (ASC). It measures three primary and one secondary dimensions of ASC that are hypothesized to be invariant across ASC induction methods. The OAV rating scale has been in use for more than 20 years and applied internationally in a broad range of research fields, yet its factorial structure has never been tested by structural equation modeling techniques and its psychometric properties have never been examined in large samples of experimentally induced ASC. Methodology/Principal Findings The present study conducted a psychometric evaluation of the OAV in a sample of psilocybin (n = 327), ketamine (n = 162), and MDMA (n = 102) induced ASC that was obtained by pooling data from 43 experimental studies. The factorial structure was examined by confirmatory factor analysis, exploratory structural equation modeling, hierarchical item clustering (ICLUST), and multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) modeling. The originally proposed model did not fit the data well even if zero-constraints on non-target factor loadings and residual correlations were relaxed. Furthermore, ICLUST suggested that the “oceanic boundlessness” and “visionary restructuralization” factors could be combined on a high level of the construct hierarchy. However, because these factors were multidimensional, we extracted and examined 11 new lower order factors. MIMIC modeling indicated that these factors were highly measurement invariant across drugs, settings, questionnaire versions, and sexes. The new factors were also demonstrated to have improved homogeneities, satisfactory reliabilities, discriminant and convergent validities, and to differentiate well among the three drug groups. Conclusions/Significance The original scales of the OAV were shown to be multidimensional constructs. Eleven new lower order scales were constructed and demonstrated to have desirable

  4. EQ-5D rated by proxy in institutionalized older adults with dementia: psychometric pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Redondo, Alicia; Rodriguez-Blazquez, Carmen; Ayala, Alba; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Forjaz, Maria João

    2014-04-01

    Measurement of health-related quality of life in people with dementia is a challenge, because of their special characteristics and the difficulties that this term entails itself. The present study aimed at assessing the psychometric properties of the EQ-5D rated by a familiar or a professional caregiver of institutionalized older adults with dementia. We analyzed the EQ-5D psychometric properties from 525 questionnaires rated by proxy, in a sample of institutionalized older adults with dementia. The mean EQ-5D index score was 0.11 ± 0.38, and 51.54 ± 21.47 for the visual analog scale. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.72. Regarding internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha was 0.64, and the item-total correlation ranged from 0.33 to 0.53. Exploratory factor analysis identified a functional and a subjective factor, accounting for 67.35% of the variance. Convergent validity of EQ-5D with Quality of Life Alzheimer's Disease by proxy and Quality of Life in Late-stage Dementia scales was satisfactory (r = 0.36-0.58). The EQ-5D showed appropriate discriminative validity among patients grouped into several categories. Multiple linear regression models, using EQ-index and visual analog scale as dependent variables, identified dependence level, proxy characteristics, leisure and comorbidity as determinants of quality of life. Despite some limitations in the more subjective dimensions, the proxy-rated EQ-5D showed satisfactory psychometric properties in the present study, suggesting that it is a valid and alternative instrument to assess quality of life in institutionalized older people with dementia. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. Psychometric properties of the recovery measurement in homeless people with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Girard, Vincent; Tinland, Aurelie; Mohamed, El Had; Boyer, Laurent; Auquier, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    The Recovery Assessment Scale (RAS) is one of the most widely used measurements of recovery in mental health research. To date, no data have been available concerning the psychometric characteristics of the RAS in homeless people with severe mental illness. The aim of this study was to provide new data regarding the psychometric properties of the RAS in homeless people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This multi-center study was conducted in 4 French cities. In addition to the RAS, data on sociodemographic information, disease severity using the Modified Colorado Symptom Index - MCSI, and the number of mental health comorbidities, care characteristics and quality of life (S-QoL-18) were collected. The RAS was tested for construct validity, reliability, external validity, sensitivity to change and acceptability. Six hundred fifty-eight homeless patients participated in this study. The five-factor structure was confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis (RMSEA = 0.043, CFI = 0.95, NFI = 0.94 and SRMR = 0.063). The internal item consistency (from 0.40 to 0.80) and reliability (Cronbach's alpha from 0.79 to 0.87) were satisfactory for all dimensions. External validity testing revealed that the dimension scores were correlated significantly with the MCSI and S-QoL 18 scores. Significant associations with age, disease severity, psychiatric comorbidities and care characteristics showed good discriminant validity. The percentage of missing data (< 14.4%) and sensitivity to change were satisfactory. Our study demonstrated the satisfactory acceptability and psychometric properties of the RAS, supporting its use as a mean of recovery measurement for homeless patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Psychometrics of the Mini-K.

    PubMed

    Richardson, George B; Chen, Ching-Chen; Dai, Chia-Liang; Brubaker, Michael D; Nedelec, Joseph L

    2017-01-01

    Many published studies have employed the Mini-K to measure a single fast-slow life history dimension. However, the internal structure of the Mini-K has not been determined and it is not clear that a single higher order K-factor fits the data. It is also not clear that the Mini-K is measurement invariant across groups such as the sexes. To establish the construct validity of K as well as the broader usefulness of applying life history theory to humans, it is crucial that these psychometric issues are addressed as a part of measure validation efforts. Here we report on three studies that used latent variable modeling and data drawn from two college student samples ( ns = 361 and 300) to elucidate the psychometrics of the Mini-K. We found that (a) the Mini-K had a six dimensional first-order structure, (b) the K-factor provided a parsimonious explanation of the associations among the lower order factors at no significant cost to fit, (c) the Mini-K measured the same K-factor across the sexes, (d) K-factor means did not have the same meaning across the sexes and thus the first-order factors should be used in studies of mean sex differences, and finally, (e) the K-factor was only associated with environment and aspects of mating competition in females. Implications and future directions for life history research are discussed.

  7. Factorial, Convergent, and Discriminant Validity of TIMSS Math and Science Motivation Measures: A Comparison of Arab and Anglo-Saxon Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Abduljabbar, Adel Salah; Abu-Hilal, Maher M.; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Abdelfattah, Faisal; Leung, Kim Chau; Xu, Man K.; Nagengast, Benjamin; Parker, Philip

    2013-01-01

    For the international Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS2007) math and science motivation scales (self-concept, positive affect, and value), we evaluated the psychometric properties (factor structure, method effects, gender differences, and convergent and discriminant validity) in 4 Arab-speaking countries (Saudi Arabia,…

  8. Factorial, Convergent, and Discriminant Validity of TIMSS Math and Science Motivation Measures: A Comparison of Arab and Anglo-Saxon Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Abduljabbar, Adel Salah; Abu-Hilal, Maher M.; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Abdelfattah, Faisal; Leung, Kim Chau; Xu, Man K.; Nagengast, Benjamin; Parker, Philip

    2013-01-01

    For the international Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS2007) math and science motivation scales (self-concept, positive affect, and value), we evaluated the psychometric properties (factor structure, method effects, gender differences, and convergent and discriminant validity) in 4 Arab-speaking countries (Saudi Arabia,…

  9. Max-Margin-Based Discriminative Feature Learning.

    PubMed

    Li, Changsheng; Liu, Qingshan; Dong, Weishan; Wei, Fan; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Lin

    2016-12-01

    In this brief, we propose a new max-margin-based discriminative feature learning method. In particular, we aim at learning a low-dimensional feature representation, so as to maximize the global margin of the data and make the samples from the same class as close as possible. In order to enhance the robustness to noise, we leverage a regularization term to make the transformation matrix sparse in rows. In addition, we further learn and leverage the correlations among multiple categories for assisting in learning discriminative features. The experimental results demonstrate the power of the proposed method against the related state-of-the-art methods.

  10. Sensory discrimination and intelligence: testing Spearman's other hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Deary, Ian J; Bell, P Joseph; Bell, Andrew J; Campbell, Mary L; Fazal, Nicola D

    2004-01-01

    At the centenary of Spearman's seminal 1904 article, his general intelligence hypothesis remains one of the most influential in psychology. Less well known is the article's other hypothesis that there is "a correspondence between what may provisionally be called 'General Discrimination' and 'General Intelligence' which works out with great approximation to one or absoluteness" (Spearman, 1904, p. 284). Studies that do not find high correlations between psychometric intelligence and single sensory discrimination tests do not falsify this hypothesis. This study is the first directly to address Spearman's general intelligence-general sensory discrimination hypothesis. It attempts to replicate his findings with a similar sample of schoolchildren. In a well-fitting structural equation model of the data, general intelligence and general discrimination correlated .92. In a reanalysis of data published byActon and Schroeder (2001), general intelligence and general sensory ability correlated .68 in men and women. One hundred years after its conception, Spearman's other hypothesis achieves some confirmation. The association between general intelligence and general sensory ability remains to be replicated and explained.

  11. Measuring stigma in people with lung cancer: psychometric testing of the cataldo lung cancer stigma scale.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Janine K; Slaughter, Robert; Jahan, Thierry M; Pongquan, Voranan L; Hwang, Won Ju

    2011-01-01

    to develop an instrument to measure the stigma perceived by people with lung cancer based on the HIV Stigma Scale. psychometric analysis. online survey. 186 patients with lung cancer. an exploratory factor analysis with a common factor model using alpha factor extraction. lung cancer stigma, depression, and quality of life. four factors emerged: stigma and shame, social isolation, discrimination, and smoking. Inspection of unrotated first-factor loadings showed support for a general stigma factor. Construct validity was supported by relationships with related constructs: self-esteem, depression, social support, and social conflict. Coefficient alphas ranging from 0.75-0.97 for the subscales (0.96 for stigma and shame, 0.97 for social isolation, 0.9 for discrimination, and 0.75 for smoking) and 0.98 for the 43-item Cataldo Lung Cancer Stigma Scale (CLCSS) provided evidence of reliability. The final version of the CLCSS was 31 items. Coefficient alpha was recalculated for the total stigma scale (0.96) and the four subscales (0.97 for stigma and shame, 0.96 for social isolation, 0.92 for discrimination, and 0.75 for smoking). the CLCSS is a reliable and valid measure of health-related stigma in this sample of people with lung cancer. the CLCSS can be used to identify the presence and impact of lung cancer stigma and allow for the development of effective stigma interventions for patients with lung cancer.

  12. Increased activation of the human cerebellum during pitch discrimination: a positron emission tomography (PET) study.

    PubMed

    Petacchi, Augusto; Kaernbach, Christian; Ratnam, Rama; Bower, James M

    2011-12-01

    Recent years have seen a growing debate concerning the function of the cerebellum. Here we used a pitch discrimination task and PET to test for cerebellar involvement in the active control of sensory data acquisition. Specifically, we predicted greater cerebellar activity during active pitch discrimination compared to passive listening, with the greatest activity when pitch discrimination was most difficult. Ten healthy subjects were trained to discriminate deviant tones presented with a slightly higher pitch than a standard tone, using a Go/No Go paradigm. To ensure that discrimination performance was matched across subjects, individual psychometric curves were assessed beforehand using a two-step psychoacoustic procedure. Subjects were scanned while resting in the absence of any sounds, while passively listening to standard tones, and while detecting deviant tones slightly higher in pitch among these standard tones at four different performance levels. Consistent with our predictions, 1) passive listening alone elicited cerebellar activity (lobule IX), 2) cerebellar activity increased during pitch discrimination as compared to passive listening (crus I and II, lobules VI, VIIB, and VIIIB), and 3) this increase was correlated with the difficulty of the discrimination task (lobules V, VI, and IX). These results complement recent findings showing pitch discrimination deficits in cerebellar patients (Parsons et al., 2009) and further support a role for the cerebellum in sensory data acquisition. The data are discussed in the light of anatomical and physiological evidence functionally connecting auditory system and cerebellum.

  13. Psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Philadelphia Mindfulness Scale.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, Rosa; Feliu-Soler, Albert; Pascual, Juan C; Cebolla, Ausiàs; Portella, Maria J; Trujols, Joan; Soriano, José; Pérez, Víctor; Soler, Joaquim

    2014-01-01

    The Philadelphia Mindfulness Scale (PHLMS) is a brief questionnaire for assessing 2 key components of mindfulness: present moment awareness, and acceptance. This study was aimed at evaluating the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of PHLMS in a sample of participants with and without psychiatric conditions. The Spanish version of the PHLMS was administered to a sample of 395 volunteers (256 of them with a psychiatric condition, and 130 from a student sample). Exploratory factor analysis found a two factor solution, which was also observed in the original version of the scale, with an explained variance of 44.02%. The scale showed good reliability (Cronbach α between 0.81 and 0.86), and an adequate convergent validity with other questionnaires of mindfulness and acceptance. The results also showed a similar discriminant validity to that in the original instrument validation between PHLMS and the clinical symptomatology reported. The Spanish version of the PHLMS is a psychometrically sound measure for assessing two core components of mindfulness (i.e. awareness and acceptance) in clinical and research settings. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Establishing the psychometric properties of constructs in a community-based participatory research conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Oetzel, John G; Zhou, Chuan; Duran, Bonnie; Pearson, Cynthia; Magarati, Maya; Lucero, Julie; Wallerstein, Nina; Villegas, Malia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish the psychometric properties of 22 measures from a community-based participatory research (CBPR) conceptual model. The design of this study was an online, cross-sectional survey of academic and community partners involved in a CPBR project. CPBR projects (294) in the United States with federal funding in 2009. Of the 404 academic and community partners invited, 312 (77.2%) participated. Of the 200 principal investigators/project directors invited, 138 (69.0%) participated. Twenty-two measures of CBPR context, group dynamics, methods, and health-related outcomes were examined. Confirmatory factor analysis to establish factorial validity and Pearson correlations to establish convergent and divergent validity were used. Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated strong factorial validity for the 22 constructs. Pearson correlations (p < .001) supported the convergent and divergent validity of the measures. Internal consistency was strong, with 18 of 22 measures achieving at least a .78 Cronbach α. CBPR is a key approach for health promotion in underserved communities and/or communities of color, yet the basic psychometric properties of CBPR constructs have not been well established. This study provides evidence of the factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity and the internal consistency of 22 measures related to the CBPR conceptual model. Thus, these measures can be used with confidence by both CBPR practitioners and researchers to evaluate their own CBPR partnerships and to advance the science of CBPR.

  15. Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Questionnaire: Psychometric analysis in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Jeremy P.; Carson, Cody S.; Shrestha, Srijana; Kunik, Mark E.; Armento, Maria E.; Stanley, Melinda A.; Amspoker, Amber B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assist researchers and clinicians considering using the Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Questionnaire (SCSRFQ) with older-adult samples, the current study analyzed the psychometrics of SCSRFQ scores in two older-adult samples. Method Adults age 55 or older who had formerly participated in studies of cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety and/or depression were recruited to complete questionnaires. In Study 1 (N = 66), the authors assessed the relations between the SCSRFQ and other measures of religiousness/spirituality, mental health, and demographic variables, using bivariate correlations and nonparametric tests. In Study 2 (N = 223), the authors also conducted confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses of the SCSRFQ, as well as an Item Response Theory analysis. Results The SCSRFQ was moderately to highly positively correlated with all measures of religiousness/spirituality. Relations with mental health were weak and differed across samples. Ethnic minorities scored higher than White participants on the SCSRFQ, but only in Study 2. Factor analyses showed that a single-factor model fit the SCSRFQ best. According to Item Response Theory analysis, SCSRFQ items discriminated well between participants with low-to-moderate levels of the construct but provided little information at higher levels. Conclusion Although the SCSRFQ scores had adequate psychometric characteristics, the measure’s usefulness may be limited in samples of older adults. PMID:24892461

  16. Exploratory Factor Analysis and Psychometric Properties of the Sexual Coercion Inventory.

    PubMed

    French, Bryana H; Suh, Han Na; Arterberry, Brooke

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Sexual Coercion Inventory (SCI; Waldner, Vaden-Goad, & Sikka, 1999), revised by the authors (SCI-R). Overall, 514 high school and college students from a Midwestern state completed the SCI-R. To complete the SCI-R, high school participants completed paper-pencil surveys with those younger than 18 obtaining parental consent; college students older than 18 completed computer-based and paper-pencil surveys. Exploratory factor analysis and reliability analyses were conducted to examine the validity of score interpretation and reliability of scores for the measure. Results suggested that a 13-item multidimensional measure consisting of two factors, Manipulation and Substance Use and Aggression, provided the best parsimony and theoretical fit. Examination of convergent and discriminant validity of scores provided additional psychometric support for the revised SCI-R, specifically pertaining to other measures of sexual victimization. The SCI-R may be a useful tool for researchers to explore manipulation tactics in more depth while also assessing and differentiating between victimization that meets legal definitions of rape and non-criminal sexual victimization.

  17. Establishing the Psychometric Properties of Constructs in a Community-Based Participatory Research Conceptual Model

    PubMed Central

    Oetzel, John; Zhou, Chuan; Duran, Bonnie; Pearson, Cynthia; Magarati, Maya; Lucero, Julie; Wallerstein, Nina; Villegas, Malia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to establish the psychometric properties of 22 measures from a community-based participatory research (CBPR) conceptual model. Design On-line, cross-sectional survey of academic and community partners involved in a CPBR project Setting 294 CPBR projects in the U.S. with federal funding in 2009 Subjects 312 (77.2% of 404 invited) academic and community partners and 138 principal investigators/project directors (69.0% of 200 invited) Measures 22 measures of CBPR context, group dynamics, methods, and health-related outcomes Analysis Confirmatory factor analysis to establish factorial validity and Pearson correlations to establish convergent and divergent validity Results Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated strong factorial validity for the 22 constructs. Pearson correlations (p < .001) supported the convergent and divergent validity of the measures. Internal consistency was strong with 18 of 22 measures achieving at least a .78 Cronbach’s alpha. Conclusion CBPR is a key approach for health promotion in underserved communities and/or communities of color and yet the basic psychometric properties of CBPR constructs have not been well established. This study provides evidence of the factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity, and internal consistency of 22 measures related to the CBPR conceptual model. Thus, these measures can be used with confidence by both CBPR practitioners and researchers to evaluate their own CBPR partnerships and advance the science of CBPR. PMID:24720389

  18. Psychometrics and the neuroscience of individual differences: Internal consistency limits between-subjects effects.

    PubMed

    Hajcak, Greg; Meyer, Alexandria; Kotov, Roman

    2017-08-01

    In the clinical neuroscience literature, between-subjects differences in neural activity are presumed to reflect reliable measures-even though the psychometric properties of neural measures are almost never reported. The current article focuses on the critical importance of assessing and reporting internal consistency reliability-the homogeneity of "items" that comprise a neural "score." We demonstrate how variability in the internal consistency of neural measures limits between-subjects (i.e., individual differences) effects. To this end, we utilize error-related brain activity (i.e., the error-related negativity or ERN) in both healthy and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) participants to demonstrate options for psychometric analyses of neural measures; we examine between-groups differences in internal consistency, between-groups effect sizes, and between-groups discriminability (i.e., ROC analyses)-all as a function of increasing items (i.e., number of trials). Overall, internal consistency should be used to inform experimental design and the choice of neural measures in individual differences research. The internal consistency of neural measures is necessary for interpreting results and guiding progress in clinical neuroscience-and should be routinely reported in all individual differences studies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Identifying vulnerability in grief: psychometric properties of the Adult Attitude to Grief Scale.

    PubMed

    Sim, Julius; Machin, Linda; Bartlam, Bernadette

    2014-05-01

    Grief is a reaction to a significant loss that can profoundly affect all aspects of life and capacity to function well. The consequences can vary from severe psychological distress through to physical disturbances and significant social problems. This study sought to identify a measure of vulnerability in grief, by examining the psychometric properties of the Adult Attitude to Grief (AAG) scale in a sample of 168 people seeking help in their bereavement. The factor structure of the scale, its internal consistency, its construct validity and optimum classification cutoffs were tested. Confirmatory factor analysis broadly supported the factor structure of the AAG, but identified one item that could profitably be reworded. Internal consistency of the three subscales was acceptable. Construct validity and discriminative validity were supported by correlations with allied constructs (depression and anxiety) and a significant difference between scores for clients with Prolonged Grief Disorder and those without. A correlation with counsellors' own clinical ratings of vulnerability demonstrated criterion-related validity of the AAG. Using receiver operating characteristic methods, optimum cutoff scores on the scale were identified for the classification of different levels of vulnerability. The AAG was found to be a psychometrically promising tool for identifying vulnerability in grief.

  20. Preliminary psychometric validation of the Polish version of the EORTC elderly module (QLQ-ELD14).

    PubMed

    Wrazen, Waldemar; Golec, Edward B; Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Walocha, Ewa; Dudkiewicz, Zbigniew; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to report preliminary validation data on the EORTC translated, Polish version of the EORTC QLQ-ELD14 questionnaire to show that this tool is an acceptable and psychometrically robust measure to collect HRQoL data in Polish elderly patients with cancer. Patients with histological confirmation of primary cancer were eligible for the study. All patients filled out the Polish version of the EORTC QLQ-ELD14 module in addition to EORTC QLQ-C30 and a demographic questionnaire. Standardized validity and reliability analyses were performed. Sixty-five patients (41 females - 63.1%) were enrolled into the study, with a mean age of 76.4 ± 5.7 years. Cronbach alpha coefficients, range 0.70-0.84, showed positive internal consistency. Satisfactory convergent and discriminant validity in multi-trait scaling analyses was seen. Strong correlations were observed between the EORTC QLQ-ELD14 (especially mobility and burden of illness), and the EORTC QLQ-C30 (r = -0.30-(-0.83); p <0.001). Basing on the preliminary data from this study, the Polish version of the EORTC QLQ-ELD14 module is a reliable and valid tool for measuring HRQoL in elderly cancer patients. However further research is needed to establish the full psychometric properties of the described module, especially in regards to test-retest and responsiveness over time.

  1. Evaluation of a new computerized psychometric test battery: Effects of zolpidem and caffeine

    PubMed Central

    Pilli, Raveendranadh; Naidu, MUR; Pingali, Usharani; Shobha, JC

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of centrally active drugs using a new indigenously developed automated psychometric test system and compare the results with that obtained using pencil- and paper-based techniques. Materials and Methods: The tests were standardized in 24 healthy participants. Reproducibility of the test procedure was evaluated by performing the tests by a single experimenter on two occasions (interday reproducibility). To evaluate the sensitivity of the tests, the effects of zolpidem (5 mg) and caffeine (500 mg) versus placebo were studied in 24 healthy participants in a randomized, double-blind three-way crossover design. Results: Psychometric tests were performed at baseline and at 1, 2, and 3 h after administration of study medication. The effects of zolpidem and caffeine on the psychomotor performance were most pronounced 1 h after administration. At this time, a significant impairment of performance in the simple reaction test (SRT), choice discrimination test (CDT), digit symbol substitution test (DSST), digit vigilance test (DVT), and card sorting test (CST) was observed with zolpidem. In contrast, caffeine showed a significant improvement in performance in CDT and DVT only. Conclusion: The results suggest that the tests of the computerized system are more sensitive and reliable then the pencil and paper tests in detecting the effects of central acting agents and are suitable for use in clinical areas to conduct studies with patients. PMID:24250201

  2. Learning discriminant face descriptor.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhen; Pietikäinen, Matti; Li, Stan Z

    2014-02-01

    Local feature descriptor is an important module for face recognition and those like Gabor and local binary patterns (LBP) have proven effective face descriptors. Traditionally, the form of such local descriptors is predefined in a handcrafted way. In this paper, we propose a method to learn a discriminant face descriptor (DFD) in a data-driven way. The idea is to learn the most discriminant local features that minimize the difference of the features between images of the same person and maximize that between images from different people. In particular, we propose to enhance the discriminative ability of face representation in three aspects. First, the discriminant image filters are learned. Second, the optimal neighborhood sampling strategy is soft determined. Third, the dominant patterns are statistically constructed. Discriminative learning is incorporated to extract effective and robust features. We further apply the proposed method to the heterogeneous (cross-modality) face recognition problem and learn DFD in a coupled way (coupled DFD or C-DFD) to reduce the gap between features of heterogeneous face images to improve the performance of this challenging problem. Extensive experiments on FERET, CAS-PEAL-R1, LFW, and HFB face databases validate the effectiveness of the proposed DFD learning on both homogeneous and heterogeneous face recognition problems. The DFD improves POEM and LQP by about 4.5 percent on LFW database and the C-DFD enhances the heterogeneous face recognition performance of LBP by over 25 percent.

  3. Reinforcement sensitivity of sex offenders and non-offenders: an experimental and psychometric study of reinforcement sensitivity theory.

    PubMed

    Leue, Anja; Brocke, Burkhard; Hoyer, Jürgen

    2008-08-01

    This study tested predictions of Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) in subgroups of sex offenders and male non-offenders using an experimental choice task consisting of a reward and a non-reward phase. In addition, RST-related psychometric measures were used. Both experimental and psychometric data were of interest to determine whether sex offenders could be reliably differentiated from non-offenders. Paraphilic (N=50) and impulse control-disordered (N=48) sex offenders showed greater sensitivity to continuous reward than male non-offenders (N=51). Impulse control-disordered sex offenders showed less behavioural adaptation under non-reward than both paraphilic sex offenders and male non-offenders. In addition, reward sensitivity, rash-spontaneous impulsivity, and anxiety measures discriminated sex offenders from male non-offenders. The results suggest that reinforcement sensitivity is a promising personality trait for differentiating subgroups of sex offenders from non-offenders. The experimental and psychometric results illustrate that predictive accuracy in forensic settings could be improved by combining several types of data.

  4. Comparative psychometric analyses of the SCL-90-R and its short versions in patients with affective disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the widespread application of Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90-R), its psychometric weaknesses have repeatedly been noted. This study aimed to comparatively assess the psychometric properties of the SCL-90-R scales and the scales of its short versions Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), Symptom Checklist-27 (SCL-27), Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18), Symptom Checklist-14 (SCL-14), and Symptom Checklist short version-9 (SCL-K-9) in patients with affective disorders. Methods The data of 2,727 patients within the main treatment group of affective disorders were assessed according to the DSM-IV. Patients completed the SCL-90-R and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results There were no significant differences regarding the internal consistency of the SCL-90-R scales and the scales of the short versions. The dimensional structure was only supported for the short versions BSI-18, SCL-14 and SCL-K-9. The assessment of convergent validity revealed high correlations. With regard to the discriminant validity, there were medium correlations. With regard to the sensitivity of change, no significant differences between the scales were found. Conclusions In summary, the scales of the short versions show mostly satisfactory psychometric properties in comparison to the scales of the SCL-90-R. The results support the application of the short versions as screening instruments, especially the BSI-18, and more economic variants of the SCL-90-R covering a wide range of psychopathological symptoms. PMID:23537095

  5. The Child Attachment Interview: A Psychometric Study of Reliability and Discriminant Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmueli-Goetz, Yael; Target, Mary; Fonagy, Peter; Datta, Adrian

    2008-01-01

    While well-established attachment measures have been developed for infancy, early childhood, and adulthood, a "measurement gap" has been identified in middle childhood, where behavioral or representational measures are not yet sufficiently robust. This article documents the development of a new measure--the Child Attachment Interview…

  6. Perceiving beauty in all women: Psychometric evaluation of the Broad Conceptualization of Beauty Scale.

    PubMed

    Tylka, Tracy L; Iannantuono, Amy C

    2016-06-01

    Women's ability to broadly conceptualize beauty (i.e., perceive many looks, appearances, body sizes/shapes, and inner characteristics as beautiful) has been identified as a facet of positive body image in qualitative research. A scale is needed to be able to assess this construct within quantitative research. Therefore, we developed the Broad Conceptualization of Beauty Scale (BCBS), which measures the extent women define female beauty widely within external and internal characteristics, and examined its psychometric properties among four community samples totaling 1086 women. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed a unidimensional structure with nine items. The internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct (convergent, discriminant, and incremental) validity of its scores were upheld. Researchers and clinicians can use the BCBS alone to assess women's perceptions of female beauty, or they can use the BCBS alongside women's perceptions of self-beauty to more comprehensively explore women's ability to broadly conceptualize beauty for others and themselves.

  7. Psychometric properties of a Chinese translation of the political skill inventory.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junqi; Chen, Zhuo

    2012-02-01

    Ferris and colleagues defined political skill in organizations as "the ability to effectively understand others at work and to use such knowledge to influence others to act in ways that enhance one's personal and/or organizational objectives." In this study, the psychometric properties of a Chinese translation of the Political Skill Inventory were investigated, supporting construct, convergent, discriminant, and criterion validities. The results suggested that the Chinese translation retained a four-factor structure. Political skill was positively correlated with self-monitoring, conscientiousness, political savvy, emotional intelligence, extraversion, agreeableness, and proactive personality, and was negatively correlated with trait anxiety and external locus of control. After controlling for age, sex, and job tenure, political skill was predictive of task performance, work contribution, and interpersonal help.

  8. [Psychometric properties of the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2) in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Schneider, Nora; Bürger, Arne; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Holzhausen, Martin

    2010-05-01

    The present study examines the psychometric properties of the German version of the Eating Disorder Inventory EDI-2 (1997) in 371 adolescents aged 13 to 18 years. Internal consistency, convergent and divergent validity were examined and a confirmatory factor analysis was conducted. Internal consistency was high for the group of patients and satisfactory for both control groups. Associations with other clinical instruments point in the expected direction and support the external validity of the EDI-2. The EDI-2 differentiated very well between the group of eating disorder patients (n=71) and the female (n=150) and male control groups (n=150). A discriminant analysis demonstrated that 86.0% of the cases were correctly classified, and a confirmatory factor analysis largely supported the six-factor structure generated by the German version of the EDI-2 (Thiel et al., 1997).

  9. Psychometric Properties of the Cyberbullying Test, a Screening Instrument to Measure Cybervictimization, Cyberaggression, and Cyberobservation.

    PubMed

    Garaigordobil, Maite

    2015-08-19

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Cyberbullying Test. The sample included 3,026 participants from the Basque Country (northern Spain), aged 12 to 18 years. Results confirmed high internal consistency and moderate temporal stability. Exploratory factor analysis yielded three moderately correlated factors (cyberobserver, cyberaggressor, and cybervictim). Confirmatory factor analysis ratified adequate model fit of the three factors. Convergent and discriminant validity were confirmed: (a) cybervictims use a variety of conflict resolution strategies, scoring high in neuroticism, openness, antisocial behavior, emotional attention, school-academic problems, shyness-withdrawal, psychopathological disorders, anxiety, and psychosomatic complaints, and low in agreeableness, responsibility, self-esteem, and social adjustment and (b) cyberaggressors use many aggressive conflict resolution strategies, scoring high in neuroticism, antisocial behavior, school-academic problems, psychopathological and psychosomatic disorders, and low in empathy, agreeableness, responsibility, emotion regulation, and social adjustment. The study confirms the test's reliability and validity.

  10. Psychometric properties of the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale among Irish and British men.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Travis A; Morrison, Todd G

    2010-06-01

    The psychometric soundness of the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale (MASS; Mayville, Williamson, White, Netemeyer, & Drab, 2002), a measure of muscle dysmorphia symptoms, was investigated using two independent online samples of Irish and British men (ns=307 and 306, respectively). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses showed that, compared to the original 5-component solution for the 19-item MASS, a 6-item unidimensional version offered better fit to the data. Findings further upheld the internal consistency reliability, construct validity (e.g., via its associations with internalization of the muscular ideal and physical appearance comparisons), and discriminant validity (e.g., via its nonsignificant relationship with social desirability) of the MASS's scores. The limitations associated with the current research are discussed and directions for future research are articulated. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Psychometric properties of an instrument for assessing cyber-sex addiction].

    PubMed

    Ballester Arnal, Rafael; Gil Llario, Ma Dolores; Gómez Martínez, Sandra; Gil Juliá, Beatriz

    2010-11-01

    Psychometric properties of an instrument for assessing cyber-sex addiction. Cyber-sex addiction is a «new pathology» whose prevalence has grown rapidly in recent years. Therefore, it is important to have validated assessment instruments. The aim of this study was the adaptation and validation of the Internet Sex Screening Test (ISST) for its use in a Spanish population. The instrument was administered to 1239 Spanish college students. The results yielded five components that account for 47.5% of the variance. Internal consistency was .88 and temporal stability was .84. Moreover, the instrument had adequate convergent and discriminant validity and was related to other behaviors such as the use of pornography, internet addiction, number of hours online and sexual frequency. Therefore, this tool is proposed as an appropriate measure to assess cyber-sex addiction.

  12. Perceived Research Burden Assessment (PeRBA): Instrument Development and Psychometric Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lingler, Jennifer H; Schmidt, Karen; Gentry, Amanda; Hu, Lu; Terhorst, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Protecting human participants requires consideration and minimization of the burdens imposed by research. Effective conceptualizations of research burden should include appraisals of indirect burdens depending on research duration, intensity, and invasiveness. Introducing the concept of perceived research burden, we developed, tested, and validated a psychometric instrument for measuring burden, using vignettes of research studies presented to research volunteers and family members. We found high internal consistency of the Perceived Research Burden Assessment (PeRBA), across research scenarios (Cronbach’s alpha .87 – .96). We demonstrated convergent validity by correlating research burden with likelihood for enrolling in a research study. Because perceived research burden was largely unrelated to perceived social support, we interpreted PeRBA as demonstrating discriminant validity. PMID:26125079

  13. Psychometric Properties of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale: Parent Report in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Jitlina, Katia; Zumbo, Bruno; Mirenda, Pat; Ford, Laurie; Bennett, Teresa; Georgiades, Stelios; Waddell, Charlotte; Smith, Isabel M; Volden, Joanne; Duku, Eric; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Szatmari, Peter; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Elsabbagh, Mayada

    2017-04-13

    Although anxiety is frequently reported in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), existing anxiety scales are often psychometrically inappropriate for this population. This study examined the internal structure, reliability, convergent and discriminant validity of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale-Parent Report (SCAS-P; Spence 1999) in 238 school-aged children with ASD. While confirmatory factor analysis did not support the original six-correlated-factor structure, structural support as well as acceptable internal consistency and convergent validity was found for Generalized Anxiety, Separation Anxiety, Panic, and Agoraphobia subscales. Use of the SCAS-P in its original form for assessment in children with ASD was not supported. However, four subscales showed viability, and may benefit re-analyses of existing SCAS-P data and future scale adaptations for research and clinical purposes.

  14. Development and psychometric testing of The Care in Obstetrics: Measure for Testing Satisfaction (COMFORTS) scale.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Patricia A; Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Reime, Birgit

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the development and psychometric assessment of a scale to measure satisfaction with intrapartum and postpartum care in hospital: The Care in Obstetrics: A Measure For Testing Satisfaction (COMFORTS) scale. A sample of 415 participants completed the 40-item scale. Cronbach's alpha for the scale was .95. Evaluation of construct validity through principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation yielded six subscales: confidence in newborn care, postpartum nursing care, provision of choice, the physical environment, respect for privacy, and labor/delivery nursing care. The COMFORTS scale was able to discriminate between multiparous versus primiparous women, and between women cared for in single room maternity care versus in separate labor/delivery and postpartum rooms. Pending further validation, the COMFORTS scale has potential to measure women's satisfaction with childbirth care and contribute to an assessment of the quality of care provided. Copyright 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cognitive Change Checklist (3CL): Psychometric Characteristicsin Community Dwelling Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schinka, John A.; Robinson, Diane C.; Mills, Whitney L.; Brown, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To extend the psychometric study of the Cognitive Change Checklist (3CL) by examining the reliability, factor structure, and external correlates of 3CL informant and self-report ratings in community dwelling adults. We also conducted ROC analyses examining rating scores from this normative sample with those of clinical samples. Design Scale reliability and validity study. Setting Community sites. Participants Six hundred and seventy-nine older adults. Results The pattern of scale relationships within and across versions, and the failure to find associations with age and education, were consistent with findings in clinic samples reported previously. Factor analysis replicated the four-factor structure of the informant ratings. All informant version scales significantly discriminated amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) cases and patients with mild dementia from normals. Conclusion These findings provide support for the use of the checklist as a clinical tool to facilitate identification of cases of MCI and early dementia. PMID:23032479

  16. Psychometric properties of the Norwegian version of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (Form A).

    PubMed

    Chioqueta, Andrea P; Stiles, Tore C

    2004-01-01

    The present study reports the reliability and validity of the Norwegian version of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale in non-clinical and clinical populations. The participants were 344 young male military recruits, 41 healthy controls and 142 psychiatric outpatients. All the participants completed the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire. The analysis of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale revealed a Cronbach's alpha of 0.85, indicating satisfactory reliability. Evidence for the construct validity was obtained by the correlation between the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory (r = 0.47) and the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale and the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (r = 0.47). Finally, the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale significantly discriminated between clinically depressed, non-depressed psychiatric patients and healthy controls. The results showed that the Norwegian version of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale possess satisfactory psychometric properties suggesting that this instrument is appropriate for use as a cognitive measure in a Norwegian cultural context.

  17. Tripartite model of anxiety and depression: psychometric evidence and taxonomic implications.

    PubMed

    Clark, L A; Watson, D

    1991-08-01

    We review psychometric and other evidence relevant to mixed anxiety-depression. Properties of anxiety and depression measures, including the convergent and discriminant validity of self- and clinical ratings, and interrater reliability, are examined in patient and normal samples. Results suggest that anxiety and depression can be reliably and validly assessed; moreover, although these disorders share a substantial component of general affective distress, they can be differentiated on the basis of factors specific to each syndrome. We also review evidence for these specific factors, examining the influence of context and scale content on ratings, factor analytic studies, and the role of low positive affect in depression. With these data, we argue for a tripartite structure consisting of general distress, physiological hyperarousal (specific anxiety), and anhedonia (specific depression), and we propose a diagnosis of mixed anxiety-depression.

  18. Illness perception in Polish patients with chronic diseases: Psychometric properties of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Nowicka-Sauer, Katarzyna; Banaszkiewicz, Dorota; Staśkiewicz, Izabela; Kopczyński, Piotr; Hajduk, Adam; Czuszyńska, Zenobia; Ejdys, Mariola; Szostakiewicz, Małgorzata; Sablińska, Agnieszka; Kałużna, Anna; Tomaszewska, Magda; Siebert, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    The study evaluates the psychometric properties of a Polish translation of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. A total of 276 patients with chronic conditions (58.7% women) completed the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The internal consistency of the Polish Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire measured with Cronbach's alpha was satisfactory (α = 0.74). Structural validity was demonstrated by significant inter-correlations between the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire components. Discriminant validity was supported by the fact that the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire enables patients with various conditions to be differentiated. Significant correlations were found between Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and depression and anxiety levels. The Polish Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire thus evaluated is a reliable and valid tool. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. [A short form of the positions on nursing diagnosis scale: development and psychometric testing].

    PubMed

    Romero-Sánchez, José Manuel; Paloma-Castro, Olga; Paramio-Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Pastor-Montero, Sonia María; O'Ferrall-González, Cristina; Gabaldón-Bravo, Eva Maria; González-Domínguez, Maria Eugenia; Castro-Yuste, Cristina; Frandsen, Anna J; Martínez-Sabater, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    The Positions on Nursing Diagnosis (PND) is a scale that uses the semantic differential technique to measure nurses' attitudes towards the nursing diagnosis concept. The aim of this study was to develop a shortened form of the Spanish version of this scale and evaluate its psychometric properties and efficiency. A double theoretical-empirical approach was used to obtain a short form of the PND, the PND-7-SV, which would be equivalent to the original. Using a cross-sectional survey design, the reliability (internal consistency and test-retest reliability), construct (exploratory factor analysis, known-groups technique and discriminant validity) and criterion-related validity (concurrent validity), sensitivity to change and efficiency of the PND-7-SV were assessed in a sample of 476 Spanish nursing students. The results endorsed the utility of the PND-7-SV to measure attitudes toward nursing diagnosis in an equivalent manner to the complete form of the scale and in a shorter time.

  20. Optimal sequential measurements for bipartite state discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croke, Sarah; Barnett, Stephen M.; Weir, Graeme

    2017-05-01

    State discrimination is a useful test problem with which to clarify the power and limitations of different classes of measurement. We consider the problem of discriminating between given states of a bipartite quantum system via sequential measurement of the subsystems, with classical feed-forward of measurement results. Our aim is to understand when sequential measurements, which are relatively easy to implement experimentally, perform as well, or almost as well, as optimal joint measurements, which are in general more technologically challenging. We construct conditions that the optimal sequential measurement must satisfy, analogous to the well-known Helstrom conditions for minimum error discrimination in the unrestricted case. We give several examples and compare the optimal probability of correctly identifying the state via global versus sequential measurement strategies.

  1. Hue discrimination, unique hues and naming.

    PubMed

    Bachy, Romain; Dias, Jérôme; Alleysson, David; Bonnardel, Valérie

    2012-02-01

    The hue discrimination curve (HDC) that characterizes performances over the entire hue circle was determined by using sinusoidally modulated spectral power distributions of 1.5 c/300 nm with fixed amplitude and twelve reference phases. To investigate relationship between hue discrimination and appearance, observers further performed a free color naming and unique hue tasks. The HDC consistently displayed two minima and two maxima; discrimination is optimal at the yellow/orange and blue/magenta boundaries and pessimal in green and in the extra-spectral magenta colors. A linear model based on Müller zone theory correctly predicts a periodical profile but with a phase-opponency (minima/maxima at 180° apart) which is inconsistent with the empirical HDC's profile.

  2. Bias, discrimination, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Puhl, R; Brownell, K D

    2001-12-01

    This article reviews information on discriminatory attitudes and behaviors against obese individuals, integrates this to show whether systematic discrimination occurs and why, and discusses needed work in the field. Clear and consistent stigmatization, and in some cases discrimination, can be documented in three important areas of living: employment, education, and health care. Among the findings are that 28% of teachers in one study said that becoming obese is the worst thing that can happen to a person; 24% of nurses said that they are "repulsed" by obese persons; and, controlling for income and grades, parents provide less college support for their overweight than for their thin children. There are also suggestions but not yet documentation of discrimination occurring in adoption proceedings, jury selection, housing, and other areas. Given the vast numbers of people potentially affected, it is important to consider the research-related, educational, and social policy implications of these findings.

  3. DIFFERENTIAL PULSE HEIGHT DISCRIMINATOR

    DOEpatents

    Test, L.D.

    1958-11-11

    Pulse-height discriminators are described, specifically a differential pulse-height discriminator which is adapted to respond to pulses of a band of amplitudes, but to reject pulses of amplitudes greater or less than tbe preselected band. In general, the discriminator includes a vacuum tube having a plurality of grids adapted to cut off plate current in the tube upon the application of sufficient negative voltage. One grid is held below cutoff, while a positive pulse proportional to the amplltude of each pulse is applled to this grid. Another grid has a negative pulse proportional to the amplitude of each pulse simultaneously applied to it. With this arrangement the tube will only pass pulses which are of sufficlent amplitude to counter the cutoff bias but not of sufficlent amplitude to cutoff the tube.

  4. Drugs, discrimination and disability.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Frances

    2009-12-01

    Whether addiction to prohibited drugs should be classified as a disability for the purposes of disability discrimination is a controversial question in Australia. The leading Australian case of Marsden v Human Rights Equal Opportunity Commission & Coffs Harbour & District Ex-Servicemen & Women's Memorial Club Ltd (HREOC, No H98/51, 30 August 1999); [2000] FCA 1619 concerned a disability discrimination complaint brought by Mr Marsden as a result of his treatment by the club. The case was brought as a public interest test case by the New South Wales Legal Aid Commission. Mr Marsden was on a methadone program at the time. The reasoning of the decision at the Federal Court opened the way for a finding that dependence on illegal drugs constituted a disability under disability discrimination legislation. The media reaction to the court's decision led to State and federal governments proposing legislation limiting legal protection from discrimination for people addicted to illegal drugs on the basis of their drug use. While the proposed federal legislation lapsed after objections from a coalition of medical, legal and other advocacy groups, the New South Wales legislation still provides that, in employment matters, it is not unlawful to discriminate against a person on the ground of disability if the disability relates to the person's addiction to a prohibited drug and the person is actually addicted to a prohibited drug at the time of the discrimination. The article details the sequence of events in the Marsden case, reflects on the role of public interest litigation in achieving social justice outcomes and suggests that Australia's recent ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on 17 July 2008 should encourage legislators to review legislation which may have a discriminatory effect on people suffering from addictions.

  5. The psychometric properties of an Iranian translation of the Work Ability Index (WAI) questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Abdolalizadeh, M; Arastoo, A A; Ghsemzadeh, R; Montazeri, A; Ahmadi, K; Azizi, A

    2012-09-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the psychometric properties of an Iranian translation of the Work Ability Index (WAI) questionnaire. In this methodological study, nurses and healthcare workers aged 40 years and older who worked in educational hospitals in Ahvaz (236 workers) in 2010, completed the questionnaire and 60 of the workers filled out the WAI questionnaire for the second time to ensure test-retest reliability. Forward-backward method was applied to translate the questionnaire from English into Persian. The psychometric properties of the Iranian translation of the WAI were assessed using the fallowing tests: Internal consistency (to test reliability), test-retest analysis, exploratory factor analysis (construct validity), discriminate validity by comparing the mean WAI score in two groups of the employees that had different levels of sick leave, criterion validity by determining the correlation between the Persian version of short form health survey (SF-36) and WAI score. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was estimated to be 0.79 and it was concluded that the internal consistency was high enough. The intraclass correlation coefficient was recognized to be 0.92. Factor analysis indicated three factors in the structure of the work ability including self-perceived work ability (24.5% of the variance), mental resources (22.23% of the variance), and presence of disease and health related limitation (18.55% of the variance). Statistical tests showed that this questionnaire was capable of discriminating two groups of employees who had different levels of sick leave. Criterion validity analysis showed that this instrument and all dimensions of the Iranian version of SF-36 were correlated significantly. Item correlation corrective for overlap showed the items tests had a good correlation except for one. The finding of the study showed that the Iranian version of the WAI is a reliable and valid measure of work ability and can be used both in research and practical

  6. Optical fiber phase discriminator.

    PubMed

    Danielson, B L

    1978-11-15

    Phase discriminators are devices widely used at rf and microwave frequencies to convert phase, or frequency, changes to amplitude changes. They find widespread use in generating audio feedback signals for frequency stabilization of oscillators and in angle demodulation applications. This paper demonstrates that similar devices, with similar functions, can be constructed in the visible region using optical fibers as delay-line elements. The operating principles of an optical-fiber delay-line phase discriminator are discussed. The sensitivity is shown to be proportional to the fiber propagation-delay time. A device working at 0.6328 microm is described and compared with predictions.

  7. Assessing metacognitive skills in waking and sleep: a psychometric analysis of the Metacognitive, Affective, Cognitive Experience (MACE) questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Tracey L; Sullivan, Kieran T

    2012-03-01

    The Metacognitive, Affective, Cognitive Experience (MACE) questionnaire was designed to assess metacognition across sleep and waking (Kahan & LaBerge, 1996). The present research evaluates the psychometric properties of the MACE. Data from two recent studies (N=185) were used to assess the inter-item consistency, test-retest reliability, and factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity of the MACE. Results show that the MACE is a reliable measure with good construct validity. Exploratory factor analyses revealed one self-regulation and two monitoring factors. One monitoring factor emphasized monitoring internal conditions; the other emphasized monitoring external conditions. This factor structure is consistent with the Metacognitive Model (Nelson & Narens, 1990). Tests of convergent and discriminant validity suggest that the MACE is assessing metacognition and is appropriately related to similar constructs such as mindfulness and self-consciousness. The implication of these findings as well as suggestions for research and clinical applications of the MACE are discussed.

  8. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of two short forms of the social interaction anxiety scale and the social phobia scale.

    PubMed

    Le Blanc, Allura L; Bruce, Laura C; Heimberg, Richard G; Hope, Debra A; Blanco, Carlos; Schneier, Franklin R; Liebowitz, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    The Social Interaction Anxiety Scale and Social Phobia Scale are widely used measures of social anxiety. Using data from individuals with social anxiety disorder (n = 435) and nonanxious controls (n = 86), we assessed the psychometric properties of two independently developed short forms of these scales. Indices of convergent and discriminant validity, diagnostic specificity, sensitivity to treatment, and readability were examined. Comparisons of the two sets of short forms to each other and the original long forms were conducted. Both sets of scales demonstrated adequate internal consistency in the patient sample, showed expected patterns of correlation with measures of related and unrelated constructs, adequately discriminated individuals with social anxiety disorder from those without, and showed decreases in scores over the course of cognitive-behavioral therapy and/or pharmacotherapy. However, some significant differences in scale performance were noted. Implications for the clinical assessment of social anxiety are discussed.

  9. The psychometric refinement of the Materials Concept Inventory (MCI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corkins, James

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Materials Concept Inventory (MCI) and then recommend revisions. The MCI was administered to a sample of 303 undergraduate engineering students enrolled in a materials engineering course taught by an instructor unrelated to this study. The MCI demonstrated adequate reliability (Cronbach's alpha was .73) and strong discriminatory power (Ferguson's delta was 0.96). A pretest MCI was given only two days into the course and was able to predict the final course grade (r = .30, p < .001). Convergent validity was also established by significantly correlating a post-test version of the MCI with the final course grade (r = .50, p < .001). Nineteen of the thirty items on the MCI met the criterion for index of item congruency, demonstrating somewhat mixed reviews by content experts. A confirmatory factor analysis conducted on the initial MCI structure failed to support a six-factor model. A revision was made to the structure of the MCI, whereby an exploratory and subsequent confirmatory factor analysis yielded a refined six-factor structure that did provide a strong fit by the empirical data [chi-squared (194) = 196.03, p = .426; and root mean square error approximation (RMSEA) was .007; and comparative fit index (CFI) was .996]. The Cronbach's alpha of the refined-MCI was 0.75, suggesting 'good' reliability. The six factors could only be interpreted by an integration of cognitive processes with content. Those six factors were labeled: (1) compare and contrast ductile and brittle material, (2) analyze structure and how it changes due to defects arising from stretching, (3) understand and analyze the structure and properties of glass, (4) analyze structure and how it changes due to defects arising from bending, (5) understand and analyze the structure and properties of metals, and (6) synthesize and apply graphs and proportions with relation to various materials engineering concepts. Results related to

  10. Psychometric intelligence dissociates implicit and explicit learning.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Guido F; Mackintosh, Nicholas J

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that performance on implicit learning tasks is unrelated to psychometric intelligence was examined in a sample of 605 German pupils. Performance in artificial grammar learning, process control, and serial learning did not correlate with various measures of intelligence when participants were given standard implicit instructions. Under an explicit rule discovery instruction, however, a significant relationship between performance on the learning tasks and intelligence appeared. This finding provides support for Reber's hypothesis that implicit learning, in contrast to explicit learning, is independent of intelligence, and confirms thereby the distinction between the 2 modes of learning. However, because there were virtually no correlations among the 3 learning tasks, the assumption of a unitary ability of implicit learning was not supported.

  11. [Psychometric instruments for the diagnosis of tinnitus].

    PubMed

    Seydel, C; Zirke, N; Haupt, H; Szczepek, A; Olze, H; Mazurek, B

    2012-08-01

    Tinnitus is a very complex phenomenon with various mechanisms of origin. Multimodal and interdisciplinary treatment is the most effective form of treatment for patients with chronic tinnitus. In order to assess existing comorbidity in tinnitus patients as well as to treat the patients individually, a comprehensive and differentiated diagnosis is needed. Since standardized guidelines for the use of relevant instruments in the diagnosis of tinnitus have been lacking hitherto, we present here psychometric questionnaires which have already been used effectively in the research, diagnosis and therapy of tinnitus in the present article. The questionnaires measure the severity of tinnitus, depression and anxiety, the perceived stress, personal resources as well as the quality of life of patients.

  12. Development and Validation of a Racial Discrimination Measure for Cambodian American Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sangalang, Cindy C.; Chen, Angela C. C.; Kulis, Stephen S.; Yabiku, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    To date, the majority of studies examining experiences of racial discrimination among youth use measures initially developed for African American and Latino adults or college students. Few studies have attended to the ways in which discrimination experiences may be unique for Asian American youth, particularly subgroups such as Southeast Asians. The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to describe the development of a racial discrimination measure using community-based participatory research with Cambodian American adolescents and (b) to psychometrically test the measure with respect to validity and reliability. This research used mixed-methods and comprised 3 phases. Phase 1 consisted of qualitative focus group research to assess community-identified needs. Phase 2 included quantitative survey development with community members and resulted in an 18-item measure assessing the frequency of ethnicity-based discrimination. Phase 3 involved psychometric testing of the measure’s validity and reliability (n = 423). Exploratory factor analysis procedures yielded a 3-factor structure describing peer, school, and police discrimination from all items, capturing 96% of the combined variance. Using confirmatory factor analysis, the data demonstrated good fit with the 3-factor structure (CFI = .98; RMSEA = .054), with factor loadings ranging from .59 to .96 and all estimates statistically significant at the p < .05 level. Correlational analyses of racial discrimination subfactors and depression supported concurrent validity. In sum, this measure can be used to examine the degree and sources of racial discrimination reported by Cambodian American adolescents and potentially other adolescents of Southeast Asian descent living in diverse urban communities. PMID:26388972

  13. Effects of stimulus order on discrimination processes in comparative and equality judgements: data and models.

    PubMed

    Dyjas, Oliver; Ulrich, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    In typical discrimination experiments, participants are presented with a constant standard and a variable comparison stimulus and their task is to judge which of these two stimuli is larger (comparative judgement). In these experiments, discrimination sensitivity depends on the temporal order of these stimuli (Type B effect) and is usually higher when the standard precedes rather than follows the comparison. Here, we outline how two models of stimulus discrimination can account for the Type B effect, namely the weighted difference model (or basic Sensation Weighting model) and the Internal Reference Model. For both models, the predicted psychometric functions for comparative judgements as well as for equality judgements, in which participants indicate whether they perceived the two stimuli to be equal or not equal, are derived and it is shown that the models also predict a Type B effect for equality judgements. In the empirical part, the models' predictions are evaluated. To this end, participants performed a duration discrimination task with comparative judgements and with equality judgements. In line with the models' predictions, a Type B effect was observed for both judgement types. In addition, a time-order error, as indicated by shifts of the psychometric functions, and differences in response times were observed only for the equality judgement. Since both models entail distinct additional predictions, it seems worthwhile for future research to unite the two models into one conceptual framework.

  14. Discrimination of frequency variance for tonal sequences.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Andrew J; Viemeister, Neal F; Stellmack, Mark A

    2014-12-01

    Real-world auditory stimuli are highly variable across occurrences and sources. The present study examined the sensitivity of human listeners to differences in global stimulus variability. In a two-interval, forced-choice task, variance discrimination was measured using sequences of five 100-ms tone pulses. The frequency of each pulse was sampled randomly from a distribution that was Gaussian in logarithmic frequency. In the non-signal interval, the sampled distribution had a variance of σSTAN (2), while in the signal interval, the variance of the sequence was σSIG (2) (with σSIG (2) >  σSTAN (2)). The listener's task was to choose the interval with the larger variance. To constrain possible decision strategies, the mean frequency of the sampling distribution of each interval was randomly chosen for each presentation. Psychometric functions were measured for various values of σSTAN (2). Although the performance was remarkably similar across listeners, overall performance was poorer than that of an ideal observer (IO) which perfectly compares interval variances. However, like the IO, Weber's Law behavior was observed, with a constant ratio of ( σSIG (2)- σSTAN (2)) to σSTAN (2) yielding similar performance. A model which degraded the IO with a frequency-resolution noise and a computational noise provided a reasonable fit to the real data.

  15. Development and validation of the Brazilian version of the Attitudes to Aging Questionnaire (AAQ): An example of merging classical psychometric theory and the Rasch measurement model.

    PubMed

    Chachamovich, Eduardo; Fleck, Marcelo P; Trentini, Clarissa M; Laidlaw, Ken; Power, Mick J

    2008-01-21

    Aging has determined a demographic shift in the world, which is considered a major societal achievement, and a challenge. Aging is primarily a subjective experience, shaped by factors such as gender and culture. There is a lack of instruments to assess attitudes to aging adequately. In addition, there is no instrument developed or validated in developing region contexts, so that the particularities of ageing in these areas are not included in the measures available. This paper aims to develop and validate a reliable attitude to aging instrument by combining classical psychometric approach and Rasch analysis. Pilot study and field trial are described in details. Statistical analysis included classic psychometric theory (EFA and CFA) and Rasch measurement model. The latter was applied to examine unidimensionality, response scale and item fit. Sample was composed of 424 Brazilian old adults, which was compared to an international sample (n = 5238). The final instrument shows excellent psychometric performance (discriminant validity, confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch fit statistics). Rasch analysis indicated that modifications in the response scale and item deletions improved the initial solution derived from the classic approach. The combination of classic and modern psychometric theories in a complementary way is fruitful for development and validation of instruments. The construction of a reliable Brazilian Attitudes to Aging Questionnaire is important for assessing cultural specificities of aging in a transcultural perspective and can be applied in international cross-cultural investigations running less risk of cultural bias.

  16. Development and validation of the Brazilian version of the Attitudes to Aging Questionnaire (AAQ): An example of merging classical psychometric theory and the Rasch measurement model

    PubMed Central

    Chachamovich, Eduardo; Fleck, Marcelo P; Trentini, Clarissa M; Laidlaw, Ken; Power, Mick J

    2008-01-01

    Background Aging has determined a demographic shift in the world, which is considered a major societal achievement, and a challenge. Aging is primarily a subjective experience, shaped by factors such as gender and culture. There is a lack of instruments to assess attitudes to aging adequately. In addition, there is no instrument developed or validated in developing region contexts, so that the particularities of ageing in these areas are not included in the measures available. This paper aims to develop and validate a reliable attitude to aging instrument by combining classical psychometric approach and Rasch analysis. Methods Pilot study and field trial are described in details. Statistical analysis included classic psychometric theory (EFA and CFA) and Rasch measurement model. The latter was applied to examine unidimensionality, response scale and item fit. Results Sample was composed of 424 Brazilian old adults, which was compared to an international sample (n = 5238). The final instrument shows excellent psychometric performance (discriminant validity, confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch fit statistics). Rasch analysis indicated that modifications in the response scale and item deletions improved the initial solution derived from the classic approach. Conclusion The combination of classic and modern psychometric theories in a complementary way is fruitful for development and validation of instruments. The construction of a reliable Brazilian Attitudes to Aging Questionnaire is important for assessing cultural specificities of aging in a transcultural perspective and can be applied in international cross-cultural investigations running less risk of cultural bias. PMID:18208611

  17. Color measurement and discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Theories of color measurement attempt to provide a quantative means for predicting whether two lights will be discriminable to an average observer. All color measurement theories can be characterized as follows: suppose lights a and b evoke responses from three color channels characterized as vectors, v(a) and v(b); the vector difference v(a) - v(b) corresponds to a set of channel responses that would be generated by some real light, call it *. According to theory a and b will be discriminable when * is detectable. A detailed development and test of the classic color measurement approach are reported. In the absence of a luminance component in the test stimuli, a and b, the theory holds well. In the presence of a luminance component, the theory is clearly false. When a luminance component is present discrimination judgements depend largely on whether the lights being discriminated fall in separate, categorical regions of color space. The results suggest that sensory estimation of surface color uses different methods, and the choice of method depends upon properties of the image. When there is significant luminance variation a categorical method is used, while in the absence of significant luminance variation judgments are continuous and consistant with the measurement approach.

  18. Discrimination Learning in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochocki, Thomas E.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Examined the learning performance of 192 fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-grade children on either a two or four choice simultaneous color discrimination task. Compared the use of verbal reinforcement and/or punishment, under conditions of either complete or incomplete instructions. (Author/SDH)

  19. Airborne particulate discriminator

    DOEpatents

    Creek, Kathryn Louise; Castro, Alonso; Gray, Perry Clayton

    2009-08-11

    A method and apparatus for rapid and accurate detection and discrimination of biological, radiological, and chemical particles in air. A suspect aerosol of the target particulates is treated with a taggant aerosol of ultrafine particulates. Coagulation of the taggant and target particles causes a change in fluorescent properties of the cloud, providing an indication of the presence of the target.

  20. Aptitude Tests and Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coupland, D. E.

    1970-01-01

    Explains why in the United States the feeling is increasing that much of the aptitude testing now being done discriminates against minority group members seeking employment. Skeptical of eliminating the discriminatory aspects of testing, the article raises the question of eliminating testing itself. (DM)

  1. A Lesson in Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chotiner, Barbara; Hameroff-Cohen, Wendy

    1994-01-01

    Public high school students with deafness vividly learned about the realities of discrimination when they were informed of "new rules for deaf students," which required that they wear "deaf badges" in school, follow a strict dress code, and so on. After the "new rules" hoax was revealed, students' feelings and reactions to the situation were…

  2. RISE TIME DELAY DISCRIMINATOR

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1959-09-29

    A pulse-height discriminator for generating an output pulse when the accepted input pulse is approximately at its maximum value is described. A gating tube and a negative bias generator responsive to the derivative of the input pulse and means for impressing the output of the bias generator to at least one control electrode of the gating tube are included.

  3. Education and Gender Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumi, V. S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the status of women education in present education system and some measures to overcome the lags existing. Discrimination against girls and women in the developing world is a devastating reality. It results in millions of individual tragedies, which add up to lost potential for entire countries. Gender bias in education is an…

  4. The Circle of Discrimination:

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Herman D.

    1976-01-01

    Extends previous studies dealing with the socioeconomic subordination of Blacks. Thesis is that within the circle of discrimination there are cycles, within of which is a germinated seed that forms a subsequent cycle, and the process goes on and on; the pattern becomes self-generative. (Author/AM)

  5. Optical linear discriminant functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, David; Song, Jian-Zhong

    1989-01-01

    The use of computer generated holograms to implement feature extraction operations has been achieved. The optical realization and use of multiple linear discriminant functions on a high-dimensionality feature space for large class pattern recognition is described and initial experimental results are provided.

  6. Discrimination and its Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Clarence

    1983-01-01

    Reviews challenges facing Black professionals committed to further promoting civil rights. Focuses on the Federal government role, particularly regarding racial discrimination in employment. Warns against the acceptance of orthodoxies, and calls for new action and the exercising of intellectual freedom. (KH)

  7. Age Discrimination in Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York University Law Review, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Economic, psychological, and social effects of age discrimination in employment are examined. This note analyzes constitutional challenges to hiring-age ceiling and mandatory retirement policies, as well as the constitutional criteria against which those ceilings and policies should be measured. Federal statutory prohibitions and their judicial…

  8. Discrimination in Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abzug, Bella

    1975-01-01

    This testimony, before a public hearing of the New York City Commission on Human Rights in May 1974, expressly focuses on discrimination in employment, asserting that this has had the most direct effect on minorities and women in the country; while legal protections have grown stronger, they have not been used effectively. (Author/JM)

  9. Discrimination. Opposing Viewpoints Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Mary E., Ed.

    Books in the Opposing Viewpoints series challenge readers to question their own opinions and assumptions. By reading carefully balanced views, readers confront new ideas on the topic of interest. The Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibited job discrimination based on age, race, religion, gender, or national origin, provided the groundwork for…

  10. Reversing Discrimination: A Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pati, Gopal; Reilly, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the debate over affirmative action and reverse discrimination, and discusses how and why the present dilemma has developed. Suggests that organizations can best address the problem through an honest, in-depth analysis of their organizational structure and management practices. (JG)

  11. Psychometric and Qualitative Comparison of Four Preschool Screening Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lucy Jane; Sprong, Tracy A.

    1986-01-01

    Ten psychometric criteria (such as item analysis, concurrent validity, and interexaminer reliability) were used to compare four preschool screening tests: "Comprehensive Identification Process", "Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning--Revised" (Dial--R), "Denver Developmental Screening Test", and…

  12. Assessment of the psychometric performance of the WHOQOL-BREF instrument in a sample of Brazilian older adults.

    PubMed

    Chachamovich, Eduardo; Trentini, Clarissa; Fleck, Marcelo P

    2007-08-01

    There has been increasing interest in the measurement of quality of life in cross-sectional investigations and in the assessment of intervention outcomes in elderly adults. Several instruments used in this measurement have not yet been adequately tested. To describe the psychometric properties of the World Health Organization's Quality of Life Instrument-Short Version (WHOQOL-BREF) in a sample of Brazilian elderly. A total of 424 elderly adults selected through convenience sampling completed the instruments WHOQOL-BREF, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) and a sociodemographic data form. Discriminant validity, concurrent validity, criterion validity and internal consistency were analyzed. The sample comprised predominantly women (64.2%), community-dwelling subjects (84.4%) and subjects who consider themselves healthy (67.5%). All domains in the instrument showed the ability to discriminate levels of depressive symptoms and hopelessness, as well as different perceptions of health status. The correlation coefficients among the domains and the BDI and BHS scores were statistically significant. The reliability coefficients present scores ranging from 0.614 to 0.925. The WHOQOL-BREF instrument shows suitable psychometric performance in a sample of Brazilian older adults, becoming a useful alternative in the measurement of quality of life in this population.

  13. A comparison of the psychometric properties of the psychopathic personality inventory full-length and short-form versions.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Rebecca M; Sellbom, Martin; Lilienfeld, Scott O

    2012-03-01

    The Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI) has shown promising construct validity as a measure of psychopathy. Because of its relative efficiency, a short-form version of the PPI (PPI-SF) was developed and has proven useful in many psychopathy studies. The validity of the PPI-SF, however, has not been thoroughly examined, and no studies have directly compared the validity of the short form with that of the full-length version. The current study was designed to compare the psychometric properties of both PPI versions, with an emphasis on convergent and discriminant validity in predicting external criteria conceptually relevant to psychopathy. We used both prison (n = 558) and college samples (n = 322) for this investigation. PPI scale scores were more reliable and more strongly correlated with the conceptually relevant criterion measures compared with the PPI-SF, particularly in the prison sample. There were no differences in relative discriminant validity. Thus, overall, the PPI full-length version showed more evidence of construct validity than did the short form, and the consequences of this psychometric difference should be considered when evaluating the clinical utility of each measure.

  14. Psychometric Properties of a Measure Assessing Attitudes and Norms as Determinants of Intention to Use Oral Contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongwon; Carvallo, Mauricio; Lee, Taehun

    2015-06-01

    Asian immigrant and Asian American women are less likely to use oral contraceptives (OCs) and tend to rely on low-efficacy methods of contraception. This contraceptive pattern remains poorly understood, in part, because no theory-driven measurement exists to assess psychosocial determinants essential in explaining behaviors related to OC use in this population. The current study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of a measure of attitudes and subjective norms toward OC use among Korean American women as a first step to determine whether the measure can be used in this population and, potentially, in other Asian ethnic groups. The sample consisted of 329 Korean immigrant women living in New York City. The theory of reasoned action guided the development of the measure assessing attitudes and norms. Psychometric evaluation included item analysis, internal consistency estimates of reliability, and construct validity (i.e., factorial, discriminant, and predictive). All item-total correlations were above the recommendation of .30. The Cronbach's alpha for the attitudes and subjective norms measure was .88 and .86, respectively. Exploratory factor analyses revealed four interpretable factors, and confirmatory factor analyses confirmed that the factor structures derived from the exploratory factor analyses fit the data well. Discriminant and predictive validity of the measure were also established. The study provides support for the validity and reliability of the measure and its use for determining the degree to which Korean immigrant women intend to use OCs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Psychometric evaluation of the Diabetes Symptom Checklist-Revised (DSC-R)--a measure of symptom distress.

    PubMed

    Arbuckle, Robert A; Humphrey, Louise; Vardeva, Kawitha; Arondekar, Bhakti; Danten-Viala, Muriel; Scott, Jane A; Snoek, Frank J

    2009-01-01

    To assess the psychometric validity, reliability, responsiveness, and minimal important differences of the Diabetes Symptoms Checklist-Revised (DSC-R), a widely used patient-reported outcome measure of diabetes symptom distress. Psychometric validity of the DSC-R was assessed using blinded data from a large-scale trial of approximately 4000 type 2 diabetes patients. Confirmatory factorial analysis (CFA) and multitrait analysis were used to examine the construct validity of the structure of DSC-R. DSC-R internal consistency, discriminative validity, and responsiveness were also assessed. Distribution and anchor-based methods were used to estimate minimal important differences for DSC-R domains. Mean age of the sample was 56 years, 42% were female, 88% were Caucasian. Patients had a mean body mass index (BMI) of 32.2 and mean glucose-fasting level of 151.7 md/dl. CFA and multitrait analysis indicated that the scoring of the DSC-R has acceptable construct validity. Item-scale correlations ranged from 0.44 to 0.78. Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged from 0.69 to 0.87. At baseline, DSC-R scores were higher among patients with higher BMI scores (P < 0.0001), supporting the discriminative validity of the DSC-R. Minimal important difference estimates ranged from 0.39 to 0.60 points when using distribution methods and from 0.00 to 0.33 when estimated using anchor-based methods. The DSC-R demonstrated excellent psychometric properties when tested in a large-scale diabetes clinical trial. Responsiveness and test-retest reliability of the DSC-R warrant further evaluation.

  16. Korean versions of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-14, 10 and 4): psychometric evaluation in patients with chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hyun; Chung, Bok Yae; Suh, Chang-Hee; Jung, Ju-Yang

    2015-03-01

    The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) is a representative instrument used to measure stress. The original PSS comprises 14 items (PSS-14) in two subscales, but 10- and 4-item versions are also available (PSS-10 and 4, respectively). The target populations of psychometric studies using the PSS have far mainly comprised college students, and the underlying constructs of the PSS versions are controversial: one factor vs. two factors and first order vs. second order. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Korean versions of the PSS-14, 10 and 4 (designated KPSS-14, 10 and -4, respectively) in patients with chronic disease. The PSS-14, 10 and 4 were translated into Korean using forward and backward translation. Factorial construct validity was tested using both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Item convergent validity and item discriminant validity were tested. Concurrent validity was examined using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale. Known-groups validity was analysed using t-test and effect size. Reliability was tested using Cronbach's alpha and the intraclass correlation coefficient. Exploratory factor analysis supported a two-factor model for all Korean versions of the PSS, and confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the model fit the KPSS-10 well and the KPSS-4 only marginally. The testing of item convergent and discriminant validity revealed a 100% scaling success. As expected, all scores in the KPSS-14, 10 and 4 were moderately correlated with depression scores and differed significantly according to gender. The Cronbach's alpha for the KPSS-14 and 10 exceeded the criterion of 0.70. The intraclass correlation coefficient values of all three Korean versions were satisfied. The KPSS-10 exhibited a first-order, two-factor construct, and excellent reliability and validity were established for Korean patients with chronic disease. The psychometric properties of the shortest version, KPSS-4, were only

  17. Measurement Error and Equating Error in Power Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gary W.; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Power analysis is a fundamental prerequisite for conducting scientific research. Without power analysis the researcher has no way of knowing whether the sample size is large enough to detect the effect he or she is looking for. This paper demonstrates how psychometric factors such as measurement error and equating error affect the power of…

  18. Measurement Error and Equating Error in Power Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gary W.; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Power analysis is a fundamental prerequisite for conducting scientific research. Without power analysis the researcher has no way of knowing whether the sample size is large enough to detect the effect he or she is looking for. This paper demonstrates how psychometric factors such as measurement error and equating error affect the power of…

  19. Regularized Linear Discriminant Analysis of EEG Features in Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Emanuel; Biessmann, Felix; Aurlien, Harald; Nordby, Helge; Eichele, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores if EEG spectral parameters can discriminate between healthy elderly controls (HC), Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) using. We considered EEG data recorded during normal clinical routine with 114 healthy controls (HC), 114 AD, and 114 VaD patients. The spectral features extracted from the EEG were the absolute delta power, decay from lower to higher frequencies, amplitude, center and dispersion of the alpha power and baseline power of the entire frequency spectrum. For discrimination, we submitted these EEG features to regularized linear discriminant analysis algorithm with a 10-fold cross-validation. To check the consistency of the results obtained by our classifiers, we applied bootstrap statistics. Four binary classifiers were used to discriminate HC from AD, HC from VaD, AD from VaD, and HC from dementia patients (AD or VaD). For each model, we measured the discrimination performance using the area under curve (AUC) and the accuracy of the cross-validation (cv-ACC). We applied this procedure using two different sets of predictors. The first set considered all the features extracted from the 22 channels. For the second set of features, we automatically rejected features poorly correlated with their labels. Fairly good results were obtained when discriminating HC from dementia patients with AD or VaD (AUC = 0.84). We also obtained AUC = 0.74 for discrimination of AD from HC, AUC = 0.77 for discrimination of VaD from HC, and finally AUC = 0.61 for discrimination of AD from VaD. Our models were able to separate HC from dementia patients, and also and to discriminate AD from VaD above chance. Our results suggest that these features may be relevant for the clinical assessment of patients with dementia. PMID:27965568

  20. Regularized Linear Discriminant Analysis of EEG Features in Dementia Patients.

    PubMed

    Neto, Emanuel; Biessmann, Felix; Aurlien, Harald; Nordby, Helge; Eichele, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores if EEG spectral parameters can discriminate between healthy elderly controls (HC), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) using. We considered EEG data recorded during normal clinical routine with 114 healthy controls (HC), 114 AD, and 114 VaD patients. The spectral features extracted from the EEG were the absolute delta power, decay from lower to higher frequencies, amplitude, center and dispersion of the alpha power and baseline power of the entire frequency spectrum. For discrimination, we submitted these EEG features to regularized linear discriminant analysis algorithm with a 10-fold cross-validation. To check the consistency of the results obtained by our classifiers, we applied bootstrap statistics. Four binary classifiers were used to discriminate HC from AD, HC from VaD, AD from VaD, and HC from dementia patients (AD or VaD). For each model, we measured the discrimination performance using the area under curve (AUC) and the accuracy of the cross-validation (cv-ACC). We applied this procedure using two different sets of predictors. The first set considered all the features extracted from the 22 channels. For the second set of features, we automatically rejected features poorly correlated with their labels. Fairly good results were obtained when discriminating HC from dementia patients with AD or VaD (AUC = 0.84). We also obtained AUC = 0.74 for discrimination of AD from HC, AUC = 0.77 for discrimination of VaD from HC, and finally AUC = 0.61 for discrimination of AD from VaD. Our models were able to separate HC from dementia patients, and also and to discriminate AD from VaD above chance. Our results suggest that these features may be relevant for the clinical assessment of patients with dementia.

  1. The CDC AIDS Survey: A Psychometric Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkan, Kevin

    The latent structure, reliability, and item discrimination of 33 items on a Centers for Disease Control (CDC) instrument representing knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) were assessed. The study sample included 311 adolescents ranging from ages 12 to 19 years. Demographic characteristics of the…

  2. Psychometric Properties of a Digital Citizenship Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordin, Mohamad Sahari; Ahmad, Tunku Badariah Tunku; Zubairi, Ainol Madziah; Ismail, Nik Ahmad Hisham; Rahman, Abdul Hamid Abdul; Trayek, Fuad A. A.; Ibrahim, Mohd Burhan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold, i.e. to examine the extent to which students' self-reported use of digital technology constituted meaningful and interpretable dimensions of the digital citizenship construct, and to test the adequacy of the construct in terms of its reliability, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and measurement…

  3. Discriminant Multitaper Component Analysis of EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrholm, Mads; Sajda, Paul

    2011-06-01

    This work extends Bilinear Discriminant Component Analysis to the case of oscillatory activity with allowed phase-variability across trials. The proposed method learns a spatial profile together with a multitaper basis which can integrate oscillatory power in a band-limited fashion. We demonstrate the method for predicting the handedness of a subject's button press given multivariate EEG data. We show that our method learns multitapers sensitive to oscillatory activity in the 8-12 Hz range with spatial filters selective for lateralized motor cortex. This finding is consistent with the well-known mu-rhythm, whose power is known to modulate as a function of which hand a subject plans to move, and thus is expected to be discriminative (predictive) of the subject's response.

  4. The Case for Positive Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses both three basic strategies, preferences, allocational priorities, and incentives--and four principles of positive discrimination--compensation and rectification, appropriate meritocratic criteria, the development of the discriminated, and fairness. (JM)

  5. Stimulus Structure, Discrimination, and Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runquist, Willard N.

    1975-01-01

    The general purpose of this experiment was to determine whether differences in stimulus discrimination, as determined by the MIR (missing-item recognition) test, are correlated with interference in recall, as demanded by the discriminative coding hypothesis. (Author/RK)

  6. The Struggle against Sex Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Jane

    1982-01-01

    Provides overview of laws, policies, and regulations available to women to secure their job rights when faced with sex discrimination. Equal pay, sexual harassment, pregnancy discrimination, and affirmative action are discussed, noting procedures involved in filing a complaint. (EJS)

  7. Genetic discrimination in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Miller, P S

    1998-01-01

    Author argues that the Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination against workers based on their genetic makeup. He also examines state legislation and recently proposed federal legislation prohibiting genetic discrimination.

  8. The Development of the Inventory of Problems-29: A Brief Self-Administered Measure for Discriminating Bona Fide From Feigned Psychiatric and Cognitive Complaints.

    PubMed

    Viglione, Donald J; Giromini, Luciano; Landis, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the development of the Inventory of Problems-29 (IOP-29), a new, short, paper-and-pencil, self-administered measure of feigned mental and cognitive disorders. Four clinical comparison simulation studies were conducted. Study 1 (n = 451) selected the items and produced an index of potential feigning. Study 2 (n = 331) scaled this index to produce a probability score, and examined its psychometric properties. Study 3 tested the generalizability of Study 2's findings with 2 additional samples (ns = 128 and 90). Results supported the utility of the IOP-29 for discriminating bona fide from feigned psychiatric and cognitive complaints. Validity was demonstrated in feigning mild traumatic brain injury, psychosis, posttraumatic stress disorder, and depression. Within the independent samples of Studies 2 and 3, the brief IOP-29 performed similarly to the MMPI-2 and Personality Assessment Inventory, and perhaps better than the Test of Memory Malingering. Classifications within these samples with base rates of .5 produced sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive power, and negative predictive power statistics of about .80. Further research is needed testing the IOP-29 in ecologically valid field studies.

  9. Price Discrimination: A Classroom Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguiló, Paula; Sard, Maria; Tugores, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a classroom experiment aimed at familiarizing students with different types of price discrimination (first-, second-, and third-degree price discrimination). During the experiment, the students were asked to decide what tariffs to set as monopolists for each of the price discrimination scenarios under…

  10. Price Discrimination: A Classroom Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguiló, Paula; Sard, Maria; Tugores, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a classroom experiment aimed at familiarizing students with different types of price discrimination (first-, second-, and third-degree price discrimination). During the experiment, the students were asked to decide what tariffs to set as monopolists for each of the price discrimination scenarios under…

  11. Transgender Discrimination and the Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Richard

    2010-01-01

    An emerging area of law is developing regarding sex/gender identity discrimination, also referred to as transgender discrimination, as distinguished from discrimination based on sexual orientation. A transgendered individual is defined as "a person who has a gender-identity disorder which is a persistent discomfort about one?s assigned sex or…

  12. FET Frequency Discriminator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    conversion . characteristic of the frequency discriminator is significant and :ending upon the specific system - may be the limiting factor in the accu of...the results obtained did not .-" allow for the accurate determinat ion of the change in impedance, addit ional 14 -~ 12V - - Figure 7. Impedance plot...44*. -. 7 ’I -- -..- ,. -, 4., /-.,’ .3 8 V ............... ... .. .$, L- 12v - Figure 9. Impedance plot tor five diodes inl parallel. A circuit was

  13. 18 CFR 358.4 - Non-discrimination requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Non-discrimination requirements. 358.4 Section 358.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... undue preference to any person in matters relating to the sale or purchase of transmission service...

  14. 18 CFR 1313.149 - Program accessibility: Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program accessibility: Discrimination prohibited. 1313.149 Section 1313.149 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY...

  15. 18 CFR 1313.130 - General prohibitions against discrimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General prohibitions against discrimination. 1313.130 Section 1313.130 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES...

  16. 18 CFR 157.35 - Undue discrimination or preference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Undue discrimination or preference. 157.35 Section 157.35 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY AND FOR ORDERS PERMITTING AND APPROVING ABANDONMENT UNDER SECTION 7 OF THE NATURAL...

  17. 18 CFR 157.35 - Undue discrimination or preference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Undue discrimination or preference. 157.35 Section 157.35 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY AND FOR ORDERS PERMITTING AND APPROVING ABANDONMENT UNDER SECTION 7 OF THE NATURAL...

  18. 18 CFR 157.35 - Undue discrimination or preference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Undue discrimination or preference. 157.35 Section 157.35 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY AND FOR ORDERS PERMITTING AND APPROVING ABANDONMENT UNDER SECTION 7 OF THE NATURAL...

  19. 18 CFR 157.35 - Undue discrimination or preference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Undue discrimination or preference. 157.35 Section 157.35 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY AND FOR ORDERS PERMITTING AND APPROVING ABANDONMENT UNDER SECTION 7 OF THE NATURAL...

  20. 18 CFR 157.35 - Undue discrimination or preference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Undue discrimination or preference. 157.35 Section 157.35 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY AND FOR ORDERS PERMITTING AND APPROVING ABANDONMENT UNDER SECTION 7 OF THE NATURAL...

  1. The Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR): validation and psychometric properties

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Robert M; Friend, Ronald; Jones, Kim D; Ward, Rachel; Han, Bobby K; Ross, Rebecca L

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) is a commonly used instrument in the evaluation of fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Over the last 18 years, since the publication of the original FIQ, several deficiencies have become apparent and the cumbersome scoring algorithm has been a barrier to widespread clinical use. The aim of this paper is to describe and validate a revised version of the FIQ: the FIQR. Methods The FIQR was developed in response to known deficiencies of the FIQ with the help of a patient focus group. The FIQR has the same 3 domains as the FIQ (that is, function, overall impact and symptoms). It differs from the FIQ in having modified function questions and the inclusion of questions on memory, tenderness, balance and environmental sensitivity. All questions are graded on a 0–10 numeric scale. The FIQR was administered online and the results were compared to the same patient's online responses to the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the original FIQ. Results The FIQR was completed online by 202 FM patients, 51 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients (31 RA and 20 SLE), 11 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 213 healthy controls (HC). The mean total FIQR score was 56.6 ± 19.9 compared to a total FIQ score of 60.6 ± 17.8 (P < 0.03). The total scores of the FIQR and FIQ were closely correlated (r = 0.88, P < 0.001). Each of the 3 domains of the FIQR correlated well with the 3 related FIQ domains (r = 0.69 to 0.88, P < 0.01). The FIQR showed good correlation with comparable domains in the SF-36, with a multiple regression analysis showing that the three FIQR domain scores predicted the 8 SF-36 subscale scores. The FIQR had good discriminant ability between FM and the 3 other groups; total FIQR scores were HC (12.1 ± 11.6), RA/SLE (28.6 ± 21.2) and MDD (17.3 ± 11.8). The patient completion time was 1.3 minutes; scoring took about 1 minute. Conclusions The FIQR is an updated

  2. [Comment on] Statistical discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, Douglas

    In the December 8, 1981, issue of Eos, a news item reported the conclusion of a National Research Council study that sexual discrimination against women with Ph.D.'s exists in the field of geophysics. Basically, the item reported that even when allowances are made for motherhood the percentage of female Ph.D.'s holding high university and corporate positions is significantly lower than the percentage of male Ph.D.'s holding the same types of positions. The sexual discrimination conclusion, based only on these statistics, assumes that there are no basic psychological differences between men and women that might cause different populations in the employment group studied. Therefore, the reasoning goes, after taking into account possible effects from differences related to anatomy, such as women stopping their careers in order to bear and raise children, the statistical distributions of positions held by male and female Ph.D.'s ought to be very similar to one another. Any significant differences between the distributions must be caused primarily by sexual discrimination.

  3. Discrimination in lexical decision

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Laurie Beth; Ramscar, Michael; Hendrix, Peter; Baayen, R. Harald

    2017-01-01

    In this study we present a novel set of discrimination-based indicators of language processing derived from Naive Discriminative Learning (ndl) theory. We compare the effectiveness of these new measures with classical lexical-distributional measures—in particular, frequency counts and form similarity measures—to predict lexical decision latencies when a complete morphological segmentation of masked primes is or is not possible. Data derive from a re-analysis of a large subset of decision latencies from the English Lexicon Project, as well as from the results of two new masked priming studies. Results demonstrate the superiority of discrimination-based predictors over lexical-distributional predictors alone, across both the simple and primed lexical decision tasks. Comparable priming after masked corner and cornea type primes, across two experiments, fails to support early obligatory segmentation into morphemes as predicted by the morpho-orthographic account of reading. Results fit well with ndl theory, which, in conformity with Word and Paradigm theory, rejects the morpheme as a relevant unit of analysis. Furthermore, results indicate that readers with greater spelling proficiency and larger vocabularies make better use of orthographic priors and handle lexical competition more efficiently. PMID:28235015

  4. Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD)

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperikova, Erika; Smith, J. Torquil; Morrison, H. Frank; Becker, Alex

    2007-01-01

    The Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD) is an optimally designed active electromagnetic system that not only detects but also characterizes UXO. The system incorporates three orthogonal transmitters and eight pairs of differenced receivers. it has two modes of operation: (1) search mode, in which BUD moves along a profile and exclusively detects targets in its vicinity, providing target depth and horizontal location, and (2) discrimination mode, in which BUD, stationary above a target, from a single position, determines three discriminating polarizability responses together with the object location and orientation. The performance of the system is governed by a target size-depth curve. Maximum detection depth is 1.5 m. While UXO objects have a single major polarizability coincident with the long axis of the object and two equal transverse polarizabilities, scrap metal has three different principal polarizabilities. The results clearly show that there are very clear distinctions between symmetric intact UXO and irregular scrap metal, and that BUD can resolve the intrinsic polarizabilities of the target. The field survey at the Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona showed excellent results within the predicted size-depth range.

  5. Symmetry impedes symmetry discrimination.

    PubMed

    Tjan, Bosco S; Liu, Zili

    2005-12-16

    Objects in the world, natural and artificial alike, are often bilaterally symmetric. The visual system is likely to take advantage of this regularity to encode shapes for efficient object recognition. The nature of encoding a symmetric shape, and of encoding any departure from it, is therefore an important matter in visual perception. We addressed this issue of shape encoding empirically, noting that a particular encoding scheme necessarily leads to a specific profile of sensitivity in perceptual discriminations. We studied symmetry discrimination using human faces and random dots. Each face stimulus was a frontal view of a three-dimensional (3-D) face model. The 3-D face model was a linearly weighted average (a morph) between the model of an original face and that of the corresponding mirror face. Using this morphing technique to vary the degree of asymmetry, we found that, for faces and analogously generated random-dot patterns alike, symmetry discrimination was worst when the stimuli were nearly symmetric, in apparent opposition to almost all studies in the literature. We analyzed the previous work and reconciled the old and new results using a generic model with a simple nonlinearity. By defining asymmetry as the minimal difference between the left and right halves of an object, we found that the visual system was disproportionately more sensitive to larger departures from symmetry than to smaller ones. We further demonstrated that our empirical and modeling results were consistent with Weber-Fechner's and Stevens's laws.

  6. Workplace discrimination and cancer.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Maureen A; Fabian, Ellen; Hurley, Jessica E; McMahon, Brian T; West, Steven L

    2007-01-01

    Data from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) Integrated Mission System database were analyzed with specific reference to allegations of workplace discrimination filed by individuals with cancer under ADA Title One. These 6,832 allegations, filed between July 27, 1992 and September 30, 2003, were compared to 167,798 allegations from a general disability population on the following dimensions: type of workplace discrimination; demographic characteristics of the charging parties (CPs); the industry designation, location, and size of employers; and the outcome or resolution of EEOC investigations. Results showed allegations derived from CPs with cancer were more likely than those in the general disability population to include issues involving discharge, terms and conditions of employment, lay-off, wages, and demotion. Compared to the general disability group, CPs with cancer were more likely to be female, older, and White. Allegations derived from CPs with cancer were also more likely to be filed against smaller employers (15-100 workers) or those in service industries. Finally, the resolution of allegations by CPs with cancer were more likely to be meritorious than those filed from the general disability population; that is, actual discrimination is more likely to have occurred.

  7. Fear of progression in chronic diseases: psychometric properties of the Fear of Progression Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Herschbach, Peter; Berg, Petra; Dankert, Andrea; Duran, Gabriele; Engst-Hastreiter, Ursula; Waadt, Sabine; Keller, Monika; Ukat, Robert; Henrich, Gerhard

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was the development and psychometric testing of a new psychological questionnaire to measure the fear of progression (FoP) in chronically ill patients (cancer, diabetes mellitus and rheumatic diseases). The Fear of Progression Questionnaire (FoP-Q) was developed in four phases: (1) generation of items (65 interviews); (2) reduction of items--the initial version of the questionnaire (87 items) was presented to 411 patients, to construct subscales and test the reliability; (3) testing the convergent and discriminative validity of the reduced test version (43 items) within a new sample (n=439); (4) translation--German to English. The scale comprised five factors (Cronbach's alpha >.70): affective reactions (13 items), partnership/family (7), occupation (7), loss of autonomy (7) and coping with anxiety (9). The test-retest reliability coefficients varied between .77 and .94. There was only a medium relationship to traditional anxiety scales. This is an indication of the independence of the FoP. Significant relationships between the FoP-Q and the patient's illness behaviour indicate discriminative validity. The FoP-Q is a new and unique questionnaire developed for the chronically ill. A major problem and source of stress for this patient group has been measuring both specifically and economically the FoP of an illness. The FoP-Q was designed to resolve this problem, fulfill this need and reduce this stress.

  8. Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of Care Dependency Scale in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Gholamreza; Namadmalan, Masoume; Dijkstra, Ate; Ghasemzade, Roya; Foroughan, Mahshid; Zahednejad, Shahla

    2016-04-14

    The purpose of the study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Persian version of the Care Dependency Scale (CDS) in nursing homes. Instrument development. The English version of the CDS was translated into Persian. A convenient sample of 140 (100 older people without dementia and 40 patients with dementia) Persian speaking people were selected from the nursing homes in Ahvaz, Iran. Cronbach's alpha, discriminant validity, and construct validity (exploratory factor analysis) were examined. Exploratory factor analysis indicated that the CDS has two factors, including psycho-social and somatic factors. Discriminant validity showed that the CDS can differentiate patients with dementia from the older adults without dementia. The results of the study showed that the Persian CDS is a reliable and valid scale when used in nursing homes. The Persian version of the CDS can help clinicians and nurses to assess patients' need and the degree of care dependency among older adults in Persian-speaking areas. © 2016 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  9. Psychometric analysis of the Systematic Observation of Red Flags for autism spectrum disorder in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Dow, Deanna; Guthrie, Whitney; Stronach, Sheri T; Wetherby, Amy M

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of the Systematic Observation of Red Flags as an observational level-two screening measure to detect risk for autism spectrum disorder in toddlers when used with a video-recorded administration of the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales. Psychometric properties of the Systematic Observation of Red Flags were examined in a sample of 247 toddlers of 16- to 24 months old: 130 with autism spectrum disorder, 61 with developmental delays, and 56 typically developing. Individual items were examined for performance to create an algorithm with improved sensitivity and specificity, yielding a total Composite score and Domain scores for Social Communication and Restricted Repetitive Behaviors. Codes indicating clear symptom presence were collapsed to yield a count of the number of Red Flags for the overall scale and each symptom domain. Results indicated significant group differences with large effects for the Composite, both Domain scores, and Red Flags score, and good discrimination (area under the curve = 0.84-0.87) between autism spectrum disorder and nonspectrum groups for the Composite, Social Communication Domain, and Social Communication Red Flags score. The Systematic Observation of Red Flags provides an observational screening measure for 16- to 24-month-olds with good discrimination, sensitivity, and specificity. A cutoff of 20 on the Composite is recommended to optimally detect autism spectrum disorder risk.

  10. A threshold theory account of psychometric functions with response confidence under the balance condition.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Fong; Doble, Christopher W

    2015-02-01

    The study of thresholds for discriminability has been of long-standing interest in psychophysics. While threshold theories embrace the concept of discrete-state thresholds, signal detection theory discounts such a concept. In this paper we concern ourselves with the concept of thresholds from the discrete-state modelling viewpoint. In doing so, we find it necessary to clarify some fundamental issues germane to the psychometric function (PF), which is customarily constructed using psychophysical methods with a binary-response format. We challenge this response format and argue that response confidence also plays an important role in the construction of PFs, and thus should have some impact on threshold estimation. We motivate the discussion by adopting a three-state threshold theory for response confidence proposed by Krantz (1969, Psychol. Rev., 76, 308-324), which is a modification of Luce's (1963, Psychol. Rev., 70, 61-79) low-threshold theory. In particular, we discuss the case in which the practice of averaging over order (or position) is enforced in data collection. Finally, we illustrate the fit of the Luce-Krantz model to data from a line-discrimination task with response confidence.

  11. Core dimensions of recovery: a psychometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sarah E; Ellis, Pete M; Siegert, Richard J; Walkey, Frank H

    2014-07-01

    Core recovery dimensions lie between the large general factor of recovery and its underlying components. Identifying these could enhance recovery frameworks, practice and research. In contrast to existing conceptually based taxonomies, we sought to empirically identify the core dimensions of recovery through further psychometric analysis of a robust eleven factor (sub-scale) consumer recovery outcome measure, My Voice, My Life. We subjected the sub-scale scores of 504 consumers to further principal components analyses, beginning with a single unrotated factor and progressing through two to nine factors with varimax rotation. We found the five-factor solution to provide an orderly intermediate configuration with the eleven recovery factors having either aligned and/or disengaged through the process to result in the following core dimensions: (1) Belonging and relating (encompassing the individual factors of spirituality, culture, and relationships); (2) Being and doing (encompassing the individual factors of physical health, day-to-day life, and quality of life); (3) Thinking and feeling (encompassing the individual factors of recovery, mental health, and hope and empowerment); (4) Resources (which maintained its independence); and (5) Satisfaction with Services (which also maintained its independence). We compare this empirical configuration with conceptually based taxonomies.

  12. [Negative symptoms: clinical and psychometric aspects].

    PubMed

    Adida, M; Azorin, J-M; Belzeaux, R; Fakra, E

    2015-12-01

    Recent investigations performing exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis have suggested that negative symptoms are multidimensional, including evidence for at least two distinct negative symptom subdomains: diminished expression and amotivation. Guidance for selection of instruments for measurement of negative symptoms is rapidly evolving. As there are continuing advances in the description of negative symptoms, new instruments are under development, and new data on the performance of instruments emerge from clinical trials. The Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and the Negative Symptom Assessment-16 (NSA-16) are considered to be reliable and valid measures for negative symptom trials but differ with respect to their domain coverage, use of informants, integration of global scores, administration time and comprehensiveness of their structured interviews. In response to the 2005 NIMH - MATRICS consensus statement, work groups are field testing and refining two new measures, the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) and the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS). Both address the five currently recognized domains of negative symptoms, differentiate appetitive from consummatory aspects of anhedonia and address desire for social relationships. Thus far, both have exhibited promising psychometric properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychometric Evaluation of Kingston Caregiver Stress Scale.

    PubMed

    Sadak, Tatiana; Korpak, Anna; Wright, Jacob D; Lee, Mee Kyung; Noel, Margaret; Buckwalter, Kathleen; Borson, Soo

    2017-01-01

    Standardized measurement of caregiver stress is a component of Medicare's new health care benefit supporting care planning for people with dementia. In this article we identify existing measures of caregiver stress, strain and burden and propose specific criteria for choosing tools that may be suitable for wide use in primary care settings. We reviewed 22 measures and identified one, the Kingston Caregiver Stress Scale (KCSS), which met all the proposed criteria but had not been studied in a U.S. We conducted a psychometric evaluation of KCSS to determine its potential usefulness as a care planning tool with a U.S. We examined the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, component structure, and relationship to depression and anxiety in 227 dementia caregivers at two U.S. sites. The KCSS has high internal consistency and test-retest reliability, a strong factor structure, and moderate to high correlations with caregiver depression and anxiety. KCSS is a good candidate for use as part of comprehensive care planning for people with dementia and their caregivers. Routine assessment of caregiver stress in clinical care may facilitate timely intervention and potentially improve both patient and caregiver outcomes.

  14. Psychometric properties of the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Bridger, Robert S; Johnsen, Svein Åge Kjøs; Brasher, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) is used in ergonomics research to measure behavioural problems associated with attentiveness and memory in everyday life. CFQ scores have been related to constructs such as accident proneness and outcomes such as human error and psychological strain. The two-year test-retest reliability of the CFQ is reported together with the findings of factor analyses of CFQ data from 535 respondents. Evidence for the predictive and criterion validity and internal reliability of the CFQ is provided. Psychological strain was measured concurrently with CFQ on both testing occasions, two years apart. The test-retest reliability of the summated CFQ score was found to be 0.71, while for the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) strain measure it was 0.32.The relative variance stability was five times greater for the CFQ than the GHQ, indicating that scores on these questionnaires are not covariates. The use of the CFQ as a measure of cognitive control capacity is also discussed. Ergonomists have long been interested in human error and the role of high work demands due to poor equipment design and excessive workload. The CFQ measures attentiveness in daily life and is shown to have excellent psychometric properties that make it suitable for use in both laboratory and field studies as a trait measure of attentiveness in daily life.

  15. Theory of Mind and psychometric schizotypy.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Diane Carol; Pflum, Madeline Johnson

    2011-07-30

    The extent to which Theory of Mind impairments are a trait associated with schizotypy is unclear. To date, findings have been mixed. We compared two groups of psychometrically identified schizotypes, namely, those characterized by positive schizotypy (perceptual aberrations and magical ideation; n=36) and those characterized by negative schizotypy (social anhedonia; n=30) to a low schizotypy comparison group (n=68) in terms of their Theory of Mind performance. Theory of Mind was assessed in two ways: a composite Hinting Task and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test. The groups were also compared in terms of their self-reported levels of referential thinking. Our results indicate that individuals characterized by positive schizotypy show Theory of Mind deficits, as measured by the Hinting Task. The three groups did not differ in terms of the Eyes Test. Referential thinking was significantly associated with the Eyes Test but not the Hinting Task. Overall these findings suggest that different aspects of schizotypy are associated differentially with Theory of Mind deficits. The results also provide further rationale for the inclusion of multiple tasks when attempting to study multifaceted constructs such as Theory of Mind.

  16. Perceptual learning in maze discriminations.

    PubMed

    Trobalon, J B; Sansa, J; Chamizo, V D; Mackintosh, N J

    1991-11-01

    In Experiment 1, rats were trained on a discrimination between rubber- and sandpaper-covered arms of a maze after one group had been pre-exposed to these intra-maze cues. Pre-exposure facilitated subsequent discrimination learning, unless the discrimination was made easier by adding further discriminative stimuli, when it now significantly retarded learning. In Experiment 2, rats were trained on an extra-maze spatial discrimination, again after one group, but not another, had been pre-exposed to the extra-maze landmarks. Here too, pre-exposure facilitated subsequent discrimination learning, unless the discrimination was made substantially easier by arranging that the two arms between which rats had to choose were always separated by 135 degrees. The results of both experiments can be explained by supposing that perceptual learning depends on the presence of features common to S+ and S-.

  17. Kernel generalized neighbor discriminant embedding for SAR automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yulin; Pei, Jifang; Yang, Jianyu; Wang, Tao; Yang, Haiguang; Wang, Bing

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new supervised feature extraction algorithm in synthetic aperture radar automatic target recognition (SAR ATR), called generalized neighbor discriminant embedding (GNDE). Based on manifold learning, GNDE integrates class and neighborhood information to enhance discriminative power of extracted feature. Besides, the kernelized counterpart of this algorithm is also proposed, called kernel-GNDE (KGNDE). The experiment in this paper shows that the proposed algorithms have better recognition performance than PCA and KPCA.

  18. A compact nonlinear fiber-based optical autocorrelation peak discriminator.

    PubMed

    Fok, M P; Deng, Y; Prucnal, P R

    2009-06-08

    We experimentally demonstrate a nonlinear fiber-based optical autocorrelation peak discriminator. The approach exploits four-wave mixing in a 37-cm highly-nonlinear bismuth-oxide fiber that provides a passive and compact means for rejecting cross-correlation peaks. The autocorrelation peak discriminator plays an important role in improving the detection of optical CDMA signals. Eye diagrams and bit-error rates are measured at different power ratios. Significant receiver sensitivity improvements are obtained and error-floors are removed. The experimental results show that the autocorrelation peak discriminator works well even when the amplitudes of individual cross-correlation peaks are higher than that of the autocorrelation peak.

  19. Psychometric properties of the Medical Student Well-Being Index among medical students in a Malaysian medical school.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Muhamad Saiful Bahri; Yaacob, Mohd Jamil; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Esa, Ab Rahman

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the convergent, discriminant, construct, concurrent and discriminative validity of the Medical Student Wellbeing Index (MSWBI) as well as to evaluate its internal consistency and optimal cut-off total scores to detect at least moderate levels of general psychological distress, stress, anxiety and depression symptoms. A cross sectional study was done on 171 medical students. The MSWBI and DASS-21 were administered and returned immediately upon completion. Confirmatory factor analysis, reliability analysis, ROC analysis and Pearson correlation test were applied to assess psychometric properties of the MSWBI. A total of 168 (98.2%) medical students responded. The goodness of fit indices showed the MSWBI had a good construct (χ(2)=6.14, p=0.803, RMSEA<0.001, RMR=0.004, GFI=0.99, AGFI=0.97, CFI=1.00, IFI=1.02, TLI=1.04). The Cronbach's alpha value was 0.69 indicating an acceptable level of internal consistency. Pearson correlation coefficients and ROC analysis suggested each MSWBI's item showed adequate convergent and discriminant validity. Its optimal cut-off scores to detect at least moderate levels of general psychological distress, stress, anxiety, and depression were 1.5, 2.5, 1.5 and 2.5 respectively with sensitivity and specificity ranged from 62 to 80% and the areas under ROC curve ranged from 0.71 to 0.83. This study showed that the MSWBI had good level of psychometric properties. The MSWBI score more than 2 can be considered as having significant psychological distress. The MSWBI is a valid and reliable screening instrument to assess psychological distress of medical students.

  20. Psychometric properties of Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) in patients diagnosed with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Shah, Hiral Anil; Dritsaki, Melina; Pink, Joshua; Petrou, Stavros

    2016-01-27

    The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the EQ-5D-3 L, the SF-12 v2 and its preference based derivative the SF-6D, and the St Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), in patients diagnosed with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Data from the Oscillation in ARDS (OSCAR) randomised unblinded clinical trial of 795 patients diagnosed with ARDS provided the foundation of this secondary psychometric analysis. The three source patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) (EQ-5D-3 L, SF-12 and SGRQ) were collected at both 6 and 12 months post randomisation. All measures were tested for acceptability, reliability, internal consistency, validity and responsiveness. Data from responders at 6 months was used to test for acceptability, reliability, known groups validity and internal responsiveness. Data from patients who responded at both 6 and 12 months was used to test for convergent validity and external responsiveness. Rates of response at both 6 and 12 months post randomisation were 89.88 % for the EQ-5D-3 L, 77.38 % for the SF-6D, 71.43 % for both the physical and mental components of the SF-12 and 38.10 % for the SGRQ. All measures had a Cronbach's Alpha statistic higher than 0.7. For known group's validity, there was no difference in mean summary or utility scores between known groups for all PROMs with minimal effect sizes. All three source measures showed strong convergent and discriminant validity. There was consistent evidence that the SF-6D is an empirically valid and efficient alternative to the EQ-5D-3 L. The EQ-5D-3 L and SGRQ were more responsive compared to the SF-12 and SF-6D with the EQ-5D-3 L generating greater effect sizes than the SGRQ. The PROMs explored in this study displayed varying psychometric properties in the context of ARDS. Further research should focus on shortening the SGRQ whilst still maintaining its psychometric properties and mapping between the SGRQ and preference-based measures for future application

  1. The development of psychometrically equivalent Cantonese speech audiometry materials.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Shawn L; Harris, Richard W; Channell, Ron W; Conklin, Brooke; Kim, Misty; Wong, Lena

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and psychometrically evaluate speech audiometry materials that can be used to measure word recognition (WR) and speech recognition testing (SRT) in quiet for native speakers of Cantonese. Commonly used bisyllabic and trisyllabic Cantonese words were digitally recorded by native male and female talkers and then evaluated by twenty normal-hearing Cantonese listeners. The recorded bisyllabic words were psychometrically evaluated and arranged into four WR lists and eight half-lists that are relatively homogeneous in audibility. Using logistic regression, SRT materials were developed by selecting 28 trisyllabic words with relatively steep psychometric functions and digitally adjusting their intensity to match the listeners' mean pure-tone average. The mean psychometric slopes for the WR materials were 7.5%/dB for the male talker and 7.6%/dB for the female talker, with no statistically significant differences between the lists or half-lists. At intensity levels required for 50% intelligibility, the mean psychometric slopes of the male and female talker SRT materials were 14.5%/dB and 14.9 %/dB, respectively. High-quality digital recordings of Cantonese speech audiometric WR and SRT materials were developed and validated in this study. These materials are available on compact disc, indexed by talker gender.

  2. The psychometric properties of the persian migraine-specific quality of life questionnaire version 2.1 in episodic and chronic migraines.

    PubMed

    Zandifar, Alireza; Masjedi, Samaneh Sadat; Haghdoost, Faraidoon; Asgari, Fatemeh; Manouchehri, Navid; Banihashemi, Mahboobeh; Najafi, Mohammad Reza; Ghorbani, Abbas; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Gholamrezaei, Ali; Shaygannejad, Vahid; Saadatnia, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Migraine-specific quality of life (MSQ) is a valid and reliable questionnaire. Linguistic validation of Persian MSQ questionnaire, analysis of psychometric properties between chronic and episodic migraine patients, and capability of MSQ to differentiate between chronic and episodic migraines were the aims of this study. Participants were selected from four different neurology clinics that were diagnosed as chronic or episodic migraine patients. Baseline data included information from MSQ v. 2.1, MIGSEV, SF-36, and symptoms questionnaire. At the third week from the baseline, participants filled out MSQ and MIGSEV. Internal consistency (Cronbach alpha) and test-retest reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficients) were used to assess reliability. Convergent and discriminant validities were also assessed. A total of 106 participants were enrolled. Internal consistencies of MSQ among all patients, chronic and episodic migraines, were 0.92, 0.91, and 0.92, respectively. Test-retest correlation of MSQ dimensions between visits 1 and 2 varied from 0.41 to 0.50. Convergent, item discriminant, and discriminant validities were approved. In all visits MSQ scores were lower in chronic migraine than episodic migraine; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Persian translation of MSQ is consistent with original version of MSQ in terms of psychometric properties in both chronic and episodic migraine patients.

  3. Assessment of Psychometric Properties of Various Balance Assessment Tools in Persons With Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alice Y Y; Pang, Marco Y C

    2017-09-01

    Study Design Clinical measurement, cross-sectional, repeated-measures design. Background Persons with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) are known to have balance impairments. The psychometric properties of various balance assessment tools have not been evaluated in this population. Objective To examine the floor and ceiling effects, item difficulty and item discrimination index, internal consistency, reliability, and validity of the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest), Mini-BESTest, Brief BESTest, and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) in persons with CSM. Methods Seventy-two individuals with CSM were evaluated with the above balance scales. Thirty-two were assessed by a second rater on the same day to establish interrater reliability, and by the same rater 1 to 2 days later to assess test-retest reliability. Results Of the 4 balance tools, only the BBS showed a substantial ceiling effect (skewness, γ1<-1.0). The BBS also had the highest proportion (greater than 80%) of easy items. The item discrimination index was greater than 0.4 for all items in the 4 balance scales. All balance tests showed good internal consistency (Cronbach α>0.8), with excellent test-retest (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]2,1>0.80) and interrater reliability (ICC2,1>0.80). In addition, all balance tests were strongly correlated with one another (ie, concurrent validity), and with the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (ie, convergent validity). Their correlations with the Abbreviated Mental Test were low (ie, discriminant validity). All 4 balance tests could adequately identify fallers and users of mobility aids (area under the curve, >0.8) (ie, known-groups validity). Conclusion The Brief BESTest is the most preferred tool for persons with CSM because of its excellent reliability, validity, and short administration time, whereas the BBS is the least preferred due to its substantial ceiling effect. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(9):673-682. Epub 13 Jul 2017. doi:10

  4. Psychometric Properties of a Caregiver Illness Perception Measure for Caries in Children Under 6 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Suchitra; Slusar, Mary Beth; Albert, Jeffrey M.; Liu, Yiying; Riedy, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Based on the Common-Sense Model of Self-Regulation (CSM), the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) was developed to measure patients’ perceptions of their chronic medical illness. Such a measure does not exist for dental conditions. This study describes psychometric properties of the IPQ-R for Dental (IPQ-RD) for parent/caregivers of children under 6 years of age. Methods Parent/caregivers (n=160) of children aged < 6 years attending a pediatric dental clinic completed the IPQ-RD and a questionnaire assessing their socio-demographics, dental anxiety, oral health self-efficacy, and child’s preventive dental visits. Dental charts were abstracted for child’s decayed, missing, filled teeth (dmft) information. The 33-item IPQ-RD was tested for internal (construct, discriminant) and external validity (concurrent, convergent, discriminant) and reliability (internal consistency). Results Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated that the eight-factor model in accordance with the CSM framework (identity, consequences–child, consequences–caregiver, control–child, control–caregiver, timeline, illness coherence, emotional representations) had good construct validity based on significant factor loadings and acceptable to excellent model fit (RMSEA = 0.078, CFI = 0.951). Concurrent validity was demonstrated by significant negative correlations and higher mean factor scores for five constructs for children without dental visits indicating inaccurate caregiver perception of cavities. Discriminant validity was suggested by non-relationship with external measures (dental anxiety, self-efficacy). Internal consistency of six IPQ-RD constructs was excellent (Cronbach’s alpha > 0.74). Conclusion The IPQ-RD is a valid and reliable measure to assess parent/caregivers’ representation of young children’s cavities with potential to be a valuable risk assessment tool for oral health behavioral research. PMID:26800638

  5. Olfactory Psychometric Functions for Homologous 2-Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Cometto-Muñiz, J. Enrique; Abraham, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    We measured concentration-detection (i.e., psychometric) odor functions for the homologous ketones propanone (acetone), 2-pentanone, 2-heptanone, and 2-nonanone. Under a forced-choice procedure, stimuli were presented via an 8-channel air-dilution olfactometer that allowed natural sampling of the odorant and whose output was quantified by gas chromatography. Subjects (17 to 22 per compound) comprised young adults from both genders, all normosmics and nonsmokers. A sigmoid (logistic) equation tightly fitted group and individual functions. The odor detection threshold (ODT) was the concentration detectable at halfway (P=0.5) between chance (P=0.0) and perfect (P=1.0) detection. Odor sensitivity increased (i.e., thresholds decreased) from acetone to heptanone, remaining constant for nonanone. This relative trend was also observed in previous work and in odor thresholds compilations, but the absolute ODTs obtained here were consistently at the lower end of those reported before. Interindividual variability of ODTs was about one order of magnitude. These odor functions measured behaviorally in humans were obtained at vapor concentrations 1,000 times lower than functions measured via activation, with similar 2-ketones, of receptor neurons converging into individual olfactory glomeruli of mice, visualized with calcium sensitive dyes. Odorant concentrations presented as vapors (as in behavioral studies) and those presented as liquids (as in cellular/tissue studies) can be rendered equivalent via liquid-vapor partition coefficients and, then, compared in relative olfactory potency. These comparisons can reveal how sensitivity is progressively shaped across levels of the neural pathway. PMID:19428635

  6. Olfactory psychometric functions for homologous 2-ketones.

    PubMed

    Cometto-Muñiz, J Enrique; Abraham, Michael H

    2009-07-19

    We measured concentration-detection (i.e., psychometric) odor functions for the homologous ketones propanone (acetone), 2-pentanone, 2-heptanone, and 2-nonanone. Under a forced-choice procedure, stimuli were presented via an 8-channel air-dilution olfactometer that allowed natural sampling of the odorant and whose output was quantified by gas chromatography. Subjects (17-22 per compound) comprised young adults from both genders, all normosmics and nonsmokers. A sigmoid (logistic) equation tightly fitted group and individual functions. The odor detection threshold (ODT) was the concentration detectable at halfway (P=0.5) between chance (P=0.0) and perfect (P=1.0) detection. Odor sensitivity increased (i.e., thresholds decreased) from acetone to heptanone, remaining constant for nonanone. This relative trend was also observed in previous work and in odor thresholds compilations, but the absolute ODTs obtained here were consistently at the lower end of those reported before. Interindividual variability of ODTs was about 1 order of magnitude. These odor functions measured behaviorally in humans were obtained at vapor concentrations 1000 times lower than functions measured via activation, with similar 2-ketones, of receptor neurons converging into individual olfactory glomeruli of mice, visualized with calcium sensitive dyes. Odorant concentrations presented as vapors (as in behavioral studies) and those presented as liquids (as in cellular/tissue studies) can be rendered equivalent via liquid-vapor partition coefficients and, then, compared in relative olfactory potency. These comparisons can reveal how sensitivity is progressively shaped across levels of the neural pathway.

  7. Discriminative sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Keith

    2008-10-01

    The typical human vision system is able to discriminate between a million or so different colours, yet is able to do this with a chromatic sensor array that is fundamentally based on three different receptors, sensitive to light in the blue, green and red portions of the visible spectrum. Some biological organisms have extended capabilities, providing vision in the ultra-violet, whilst others, such as some species of mantis shrimp reportedly have sixteen different types of photo-receptors. In general the biological imaging sensor takes a minimalist approach to sensing its environment, whereas current optical engineering approaches follow a 'brute' force solution where the challenge of hyperspectral imaging is addressed by various schemes for spatial and spectral dispersion of radiation across existing detector arrays. This results in a problem for others to solve in the processing and communication of the generated hypercube of data. This paper explores the parallels between some of those biological systems and the various design concepts being developed for discriminative imaging, drawing on activity supported by the UK Electro-Magnetic Remote Sensing Defence Technology Centre (EMRS DTC).

  8. Psychometric properties of the Halstead Category Test.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M N; Charter, R A; Newman, R J

    2000-05-01

    Using the Kuder-Richardson formula 20 (KR-20) corrected for item difficulty, the internal consistency reliability of the Halstead Category Test (HCT) was calculated for a sample (N = 398) of normal patients and volunteers, diffusely brain-damaged patients, and undiagnosed patients sent for neuropsychological assessment. The HCT Total Score reliability was.9716 and the subtest reliabilities ranged from.4587 to.9590. An item analysis found that most of the test items, except for those from Subtests I and II, were within established criteria for item difficulty and the discrimination index.

  9. Psychometric Properties of the Hebrew Translation of the Patient Activation Measure (PAM-13)

    PubMed Central

    Magnezi, Racheli; Glasser, Saralee

    2014-01-01

    Objective “Patient activation” reflects involvement in managing ones health. This cross-sectional study assessed the psychometric properties of the Hebrew translation (PAM-H) of the PAM-13. Methods A nationally representative sample of 203 Hebrew-speaking Israeli adults answered the PAM-H, PHQ-9 depression scale, SF-12, and Self-efficacy Scale via telephone. Results Mean PAM-H scores were 70.7±15.4. Rasch analysis indicated that the PAM-H is a good measure of activation. There were no differences in PAM-H scores based on gender, age or education. Subjects with chronic disease scored lower than those without. Scores correlated with the Self-efficacy Scale (0.47), Total SF-12 (0.39) and PHQ-9 (−0.35, P<0.0001), indicating concurrent validity. Discriminant validity was reflected by a significant difference in the mean PAM-H score of those who scored below 10 (72.1±14.8) on the PHQ-9 (not depressed) compared to those scoring ≥10 (i.e. probable depression) (59.2±15.8; t 3.75; P = 0.001). Conclusion The PAM-H psychometric properties indicate its usefulness with the Hebrew-speaking Israeli population. Practice Implications PAM-H can be useful for assessing programs aimed at effecting changes in patient compliance, health behaviors, etc. Researchers in Israel should use a single translation of the PAM-13 so that findings can be compared, increasing understanding of patient activation. PMID:25411841

  10. The Motivational Value Systems Questionnaire (MVSQ): Psychometric Analysis Using a Forced Choice Thurstonian IRT Model

    PubMed Central

    Merk, Josef; Schlotz, Wolff; Falter, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a new measure of value systems, the Motivational Value Systems Questionnaire (MVSQ), which is based on a theory of value systems by psychologist Clare W. Graves. The purpose of the instrument is to help people identify their personal hierarchies of value systems and thus become more aware of what motivates and demotivates them in work-related contexts. The MVSQ is a forced-choice (FC) measure, making it quicker to complete and more difficult to intentionally distort, but also more difficult to assess its psychometric properties due to ipsativity of FC data compared to rating scales. To overcome limitations of ipsative data, a Thurstonian IRT (TIRT) model was fitted to the questionnaire data, based on a broad sample of N = 1,217 professionals and students. Comparison of normative (IRT) scale scores and ipsative scores suggested that MVSQ IRT scores are largely freed from restrictions due to ipsativity and thus allow interindividual comparison of scale scores. Empirical reliability was estimated using a sample-based simulation approach which showed acceptable and good estimates and, on average, slightly higher test-retest reliabilities. Further, validation studies provided evidence on both construct validity and criterion-related validity. Scale score correlations and associations of scores with both age and gender were largely in line with theoretically- and empirically-based expectations, and results of a multitrait-multimethod analysis supports convergent and discriminant construct validity. Criterion validity was assessed by examining the relation of value system preferences to departmental affiliation which revealed significant relations in line with prior hypothesizing. These findings demonstrate the good psychometric properties of the MVSQ and support its application in the assessment of value systems in work-related contexts. PMID:28979228

  11. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Cardiovascular Risk and Disease Management Knowledge Assessment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Rosneck, James S; Hughes, Joel; Gunstad, John; Josephson, Richard; Noe, Donald A; Waechter, Donna

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This paper describes the systematic construction and psychometric analysis of a knowledge assessment instrument for phase II cardiac rehabilitation (CR) patients measuring risk modification disease management knowledge and behavioral outcomes derived from national standards relevant to secondary prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. METHODS First, using adult curriculum based on disease specific learning outcomes and competencies, a systematic test item development process was completed by clinical staff. Second, a panel of educational and clinical experts used an iterative process to identify test content domain and arrive at consensus in selecting items meeting criteria. Third, the resulting 31 question instrument the Cardiac Knowledge Assessment Tool (CKAT) was piloted in CR patients to insure utility of application. Validity and reliability analysis were performed on 3,638 adult pre test administrations with additional focused analyses on 1,999 individuals completing both pre and post treatment administrations within 6 months. RESULTS Evidence of CKAT content validity was substantiated with 85% agreement among content experts. Evidence of construct validity was demonstrated via factor analysis identifying key underlying factors. Estimates of internal consistency, e.g. Cronbach’s Alpha = .852 and a Spearman-Brown split-half reliability = .817 on pre testing, supports test reliability. Item analysis, using point biserial correlation, measured relationships between performance on single items and total score (p<.01). Analyses utilizing item difficulty and item discrimination indices further verified item stability and validity of the CKAT. CONCLUSIONS A knowledge instrument specifically designed for an adult CR population was systematically developed and tested in a large representative patient population, satisfying psychometric parameters including validity and reliability. PMID:23612037

  12. Psychometric validations and comparisons of schizophrenia-specific health-related quality of life measures.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Yeh; Yang, Tsung-Tsair; Ma, Mi-Chia; Teng, Po-Ren; Cheng, Tsai-Chun

    2015-03-30

    To compare schizophrenia-specific quality of life measures, this study examined an 18-item Chinese version of 41-item Quality of Life Questionnaire in Schizophrenia (S-QoL; S-QoL-18-C) using 41 patients. The S-QoL-18-C was validated and compared with Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale-Revision 4 (SQLS-R4). Index scores of S-QoL-18-C showed nearly identical psychometrics to S-QoL-C and S-QoL-18. No significant ceiling/floor effects were found, except with psychological and selfesteem subscales. Internal consistency was acceptable for whole scale and all subscales, except family relationships and sentimental life. Test-retest reliability was moderate to high (ICC=0.58-87). Score distributions and reliability of S-QoL-18-C were slightly lower than those of S-QoL-C. Convergent validity was supported by satisfactory correlations between subscales/index scores of S-QoL-18-C and similar scales (r=∣-0.35 ∣ to 0.80) and between corresponding subscales in S-QoL-18-C and S-QoL-C (r=0.85-0.97). S-QoL-18-C and SQLS-R4 demonstrated discriminant validity by differentiating among 30 patients with symptom remission, 30 patients without symptom remission, and 30 healthy individuals. Two patient groups were classified by criteria proposed by Remission in Schizophrenia Working Group. Three groups were controlled for five factors. Furthermore SQLS-R4, but not S-QoL-18-C, differentiated between patient groups with different hospitalization frequencies. Overall, S-QoL-18-C and SQLS-R4 show different advantages psychometrically. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychometric properties of the Norwegian version of the Care Process Self-Evaluation Tool.

    PubMed

    Størkson, Sverre; Biringer, Eva; Hartveit, Miriam; Aßmus, Jörg; Vanhaecht, Kris

    2016-11-01

    The Care Process Self-Evaluation Tool (CPSET) assesses key characteristics of well-organised care processes in hospitals from an interprofessional team perspective. The present study investigated the psychometric properties of the CPSET in terms of factor structure, convergent and discriminant validity, and reliability in Norwegian language and context. After a pilot test, the Norwegian version of the questionnaire was administered as a web form to 501 health professionals in public general hospitals and mental health specialist services; 301 completed forms (response rate 60%) were returned, and 268 (54%) forms representing 27 care processes (19 from somatic care and 8 from mental healthcare) were included in the valid sample. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) confirmed the original five-factor structure. All model fit indices, including the standardised root mean square residual (SRMR), which is independent of the χ(2)-test, met the criteria for an acceptable model fit. Internal consistencies within sub-scales as measured by Cronbach's alpha were high (range 0.83-0.94). As expected, some redundancy between factors existed (in particular among the PO (Patient-focused organisation), COR (Coordination of the care process), COM (Communication with patient and family), and PO (Follow-up of the care process) factors). In conclusion, the Norwegian CPSET scale showed acceptable psychometric properties in terms of convergent validity and reliability, and fit indices from the CFA confirmed the original factor structure. Based on these findings, we recommend the Norwegian version of the CPSET for use in the assessment of interprofessional teamwork in care processes in specialist healthcare.

  14. On the psychometric properties of the aggressiveness-IAT for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lemmer, Gunnar; Gollwitzer, Mario; Banse, Rainer

    2014-12-12

    In research on aggression, implicit association tests (IATs) have been constructed to elucidate automatic processes involved in aggressiveness. Despite an increasing number of applications of the "Aggressiveness-IAT" in basic and applied research, the psychometric properties of this method for measuring an automatic aggressive self-concept have not been comprehensively investigated. Although the Aggressiveness-IAT has been used both as a cross-situationally consistent trait measure and as a measure to indicate situational changes, prior studies have not tested to what extent it reliably captures a stable trait vs. an occasion-specific aggressive self-concept. The present research scrutinizes the psychometric properties of the Aggressiveness-IAT by addressing two issues. First, we tested the reliability, consistency, and occasion specificity of the Aggressiveness-IAT in a longitudinal panel study with four waves and 574 Austrian school children/adolescents by applying latent-state trait (LST) theory. Second, we validated latent trait scores of the IAT vis-à-vis other measures either clearly related to aggression or not. Results demonstrate that 20-30% of the variance in children's and adolescents' IAT scores is situation-unspecific (i.e., "stable"), whereas 36-50% are situation-specific. Regarding its construct validity, the Aggressiveness-IAT is correlated with explicit measures of aggression and related constructs, but it is not associated with discriminant variables (e.g., school achievement). Implications for using the Aggressiveness-IAT are discussed in the light of these findings. Aggr. Behav. 9999:1-12, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. On the psychometric properties of the aggressiveness-IAT for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lemmer, Gunnar; Gollwitzer, Mario; Banse, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    In research on aggression, implicit association tests (IATs) have been constructed to elucidate automatic processes involved in aggressiveness. Despite an increasing number of applications of the "Aggressiveness-IAT" in basic and applied research, the psychometric properties of this method for measuring an automatic aggressive self-concept have not been comprehensively investigated. Although the Aggressiveness-IAT has been used both as a cross-situationally consistent trait measure and as a measure to indicate situational changes, prior studies have not tested to what extent it reliably captures a stable trait vs. an occasion-specific aggressive self-concept. The present research scrutinizes the psychometric properties of the Aggressiveness-IAT by addressing two issues. First, we tested the reliability, consistency, and occasion specificity of the Aggressiveness-IAT in a longitudinal panel study with four waves and 574 Austrian school children/adolescents by applying latent-state trait (LST) theory. Second, we validated latent trait scores of the IAT vis-à-vis other measures either clearly related to aggression or not. Results demonstrate that 20-30% of the variance in children's and adolescents' IAT scores is situation-unspecific (i.e., "stable"), whereas 36-50% are situation-specific. Regarding its construct validity, the Aggressiveness-IAT is correlated with explicit measures of aggression and related constructs, but it is not associated with discriminant variables (e.g., school achievement). Implications for using the Aggressiveness-IAT are discussed in the light of these findings. Aggr. Behav. 41:84-95 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Psychometric properties of the Behavioural Outcomes of Anxiety questionnaire in stroke patients with aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, Alicia; Morris, Reg; Kneebone, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of an observational, carer-completed anxiety screen for aphasic stroke patients. Design: Phase 1: A cross-sectional questionnaire design to establish psychometric properties. Phase 2: A randomized longitudinal design with treatment and control to evaluate sensitivity to change and repeatability/reliability. Subjects: Phase 1: 111 patient-carer dyads were recruited through stroke charities: patient mean age 69.7(10. 7), 6.2(5. 2) years since stroke, 76 male; carer mean age 64.7(12. 2), 27 male. Phase 2. A subsample of 50 dyads (29 completed). Measures: All patients completed the Tension Rating Circles and the Frenchay Aphasia Screening Test. Carers completed the Behavioural Outcomes of Anxiety questionnaire, observational versions of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A) and the Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7, and a feedback questionnaire. Intervention: Phase 2: 25 dyads were offered relaxation training and 25 acted as controls. Results: The Behavioural Outcomes of Anxiety questionnaire correlated .77 with the HADS-A and Cronbach’s Alpha was .82 demonstrating validity and internal consistency. Using HADS-A cut-off > 7 as criterion the area under the curve was 0.90 and at cut-off of > 16 sensitivity (0.85) and specificity (0.85) were both good. Scores declined significantly more in a group given anxiety training (n = 12) than in a control group (n = 17), demonstrating sensitivity to change and construct validity. Two-week repeatability/reliability was .92. Feedback suggested the scale was acceptable. Conclusions: The Behavioural Outcomes of Anxiety questionnaire shows promise as an anxiety screen for stroke patients with aphasia and is sensitive to change. Further analysis of dimensionality and discriminant validity is needed. PMID:27121863

  17. Development and psychometric evaluation of a sexual health care knowledge scale for oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue; Park, Eun-young; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a sexual health care knowledge scale for oncology nurses and to evaluate its psychometric properties using Rasch analysis and the known-groups technique. Although sexual oncology has become a popular topic and sexual health care is now promoted, there has been a lack of instruments supported by psychometric evaluations to measure nurses' knowledge of sexual health issues. The initial 72 items were compiled to form the Sexual Health Care Scale - Knowledge (SHCS-K) for oncology nurses using a literature review and analysis of existing research tools. After a specialist panel verified content validity, the questionnaire was shortened to 58 items. The data were analyzed using a Rasch model to investigate the items with respect to unidimensionality of fit and difficulty and reliability distribution. Discriminant validity was examined using the known-groups technique. Two items did not fit with the Rasch model. Person and item separation-index ratios were 3.33 and 9.45, respectively, which confirmed that the SHCS-K functioned well. The reliability was good, at 0.99. Significant differences in marital status, levels of education, and participation in SHC training were observed between groups. The final version of the questionnaire consisted of 55 items, with a total score range of 0-55. The SHCS-K was found to be a valid and reliable measure for evaluating levels of sexual health care knowledge among this sample of oncology nurses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Psychometric evaluation of the Generalized Problematic Internet Use Scale 2 in an Italian sample.

    PubMed

    Fioravanti, Giulia; Primi, Caterina; Casale, Silvia

    2013-10-01

    The 15-item Generalized Problematic Internet Use Scale 2 (GPIUS2) is one of the few theory-driven instruments to measure problematic Internet use (PIU). Since PIU has emerged in several cultural contexts, it seems relevant to evaluate the psychometric properties of the scale across various cultures. The aim of the present study was to test the psychometric properties (i.e., dimensionality, reliability, and validity) of the Italian version of the GPIUS2. The sample consisted of 371 participants (128 males and 243 females), and their age ranged from 14 to 33 years (M=18.07 years, SD=5.58). The GPIUS2 and the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) were administered individually in both high school and college classes. With regard to scale dimensionality, the best-fit measurement model includes four first-order factors: preference for online social interaction, mood regulation, deficient self-regulation, and negative outcomes (Satorra-Bentler scaled chi-square [S-Bχ(2)]/df=2.27; comparative fit index [CFI]=0.94; Tucker-Lewis index [TLI]=0.93; root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA]=0.05). With regard to reliability, internal-consistency Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.78 to 0.89. Convergent validity is demonstrated with significant correlations between GPIUS2 (total score and all the subscale scores) and IAT score. Results showed that GPIUS2 scores significantly discriminated between high school and undergraduate students. The overall findings of the present study provide evidence that the Italian version of the GPIUS2 appears to be an adequate measure of generalized PIU cognitions, behaviors, and outcomes. Suggestions for further research are provided.

  19. Psychometric analysis of the PTSD Checklist-5 (PCL-5) among treatment-seeking military service members.

    PubMed

    Wortmann, Jennifer H; Jordan, Alexander H; Weathers, Frank W; Resick, Patricia A; Dondanville, Katherine A; Hall-Clark, Brittany; Foa, Edna B; Young-McCaughan, Stacey; Yarvis, Jeffrey S; Hembree, Elizabeth A; Mintz, Jim; Peterson, Alan L; Litz, Brett T

    2016-11-01

    The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL-5; Weathers et al., 2013) was recently revised to reflect the changed diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013). We investigated the psychometric properties of PCL-5 scores in a large cohort (N = 912) of military service members seeking PTSD treatment while stationed in garrison. We examined the internal consistency, convergent and discriminant validity, and DSM-5 factor structure of PCL-5 scores, their sensitivity to clinical change relative to PTSD Symptom Scale-Interview (PSS-I; Foa, Riggs, Dancu, & Rothbaum, 1993) scores, and their diagnostic utility for predicting a PTSD diagnosis based on various measures and scoring rules. PCL-5 scores exhibited high internal consistency. There was strong agreement between the order of hypothesized and observed correlations among PCL-5 and criterion measure scores. The best-fitting structural model was a 7-factor hybrid model (Armour et al., 2015), which demonstrated closer fit than all other models evaluated, including the DSM-5 model. The PCL-5's sensitivity to clinical change, pre- to posttreatment, was comparable with that of the PSS-I. Optimally efficient cut scores for predicting PTSD diagnosis were consistent with prior research with service members (Hoge, Riviere, Wilk, Herrell, & Weathers, 2014). The results indicate that the PCL-5 is a psychometrically sound measure of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms that is useful for identifying provisional PTSD diagnostic status, quantifying PTSD symptom severity, and detecting clinical change over time in PTSD symptoms among service members seeking treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of the Social Anxiety - Acceptance and Action Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Esmail; Bahrainian, Seyed Abdolmajid; Masjedi Arani, Abbas; Farhoudian, Ali; Gachkar, Latif

    2016-01-01

    Background Social anxiety disorder is often related to specific impairment or distress in different areas of life, including occupational, social and family settings. Objective The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the persian version of the social anxiety-acceptance and action questionnaire (SA-AAQ) in university students. Materials and Methods In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 324 students from Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences participated via the cluster sampling method during year 2015. Factor analysis by the principle component analysis method, internal consistency analysis, and convergent and divergent validity were conducted to examine the validity of the SA-AAQ. To calculate the reliability of the SA-AAQ, Cronbach’s alpha and test-retest reliability were used. Results The results from factor analysis by principle component analysis method yielded three factors that were named acceptance, action and non-judging of experience. The three-factor solution explained 51.82% of the variance. Evidence for the internal consistency of SA-AAQ was obtained via calculating correlations between SA-AAQ and its subscales. Support for convergent and discriminant validity of the SA-AAQ via its correlations with the acceptance and action questionnaire - II, social interaction anxiety scale, cognitive fusion questionnaire, believability of anxious feelings and thoughts questionnaire, valued living questionnaire and WHOQOL- BREF was obtained. The reliability of the SA-AAQ via calculating Cronbach’s alpha and test-retest coefficients yielded values of 0.84 and 0.84, respectively. Conclusions The Iranian version of the SA-AAQ has acceptable levels of psychometric properties in university students. The SA-AAQ is a valid and reliable measure to be utilized in research investigations and therapeutic interventions. PMID:27803719

  1. The Mini-Social Phobia Inventory: psychometric properties in an adolescent general population sample.

    PubMed

    Ranta, Klaus; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Rantanen, Päivi; Marttunen, Mauri

    2012-07-01

    Onset of social phobia (SP) typically occurs in adolescence. Short screening instruments for its assessment are needed for use in primary health and school settings. The 3-item Mini-Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN) has demonstrated effectiveness in screening for generalized SP (GSP) in adults. This study examined the psychometrics of the Mini-SPIN in an adolescent general population sample. Three hundred fifty adolescents aged 12 to 17 years were clinically interviewed using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version for identification of SP and other Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Axis I disorders, blind to their Mini-SPIN status. Associations between SP; subclinical SP; other anxiety, depressive, and disruptive disorders; and Mini-SPIN scores were examined, and diagnostic efficiency statistics were calculated. The association between Mini-SPIN scores and the generalized subtype of SP was also examined. As in adults, the Mini-SPIN items differentiated subjects with SP from those without. A score of 6 points or greater was found optimal in predicting SP with a sensitivity of 86%, specificity of 84%, and positive and negative predictive values of 26% and 99%. The Mini-SPIN also possessed discriminative validity, as scores were higher for adolescents with SP than they were for those with depressive, disruptive, and other anxiety disorders. The Mini-SPIN was also able to differentiate adolescents with GSP from the rest of the sample. The Mini-SPIN has good psychometrics for screening SP in adolescents from general population and may have value in screening for GSP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Psychometric Evaluation of a Treatment Acceptance Measure for Use in Patients Receiving Treatment via Subcutaneous Injection.

    PubMed

    Tatlock, Sophi; Arbuckle, Rob; Sanchez, Robert; Grant, Laura; Khan, Irfan; Manvelian, Garen; Spertus, John A

    2017-03-01

    Alirocumab, a proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 inhibitor, significantly reduces low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but requires subcutaneous injections rather than oral pills. To measure patients' acceptance of this treatment modality, a new patient-reported outcome, the Injection-Treatment Acceptance Questionnaire (I-TAQ), was developed. To psychometrically evaluate the I-TAQ with patients at high risk of cardiovascular events receiving alirocumab. The 22-item, 5-domain I-TAQ was administered cross-sectionally to 151 patients enrolled in alirocumab clinical trials. Item response distributions, factor and multitrait analyses, interitem correlations, correlations with an existing measure of acceptance (convergent validity), and comparison of known-groups were performed to assess the I-TAQ's psychometric properties. Completion rates were high, with no patients missing more than two items and 91.4% missing no data. All items displayed high ceiling effects (>30%) because of high treatment acceptance. Factor analysis supported the a priori hypothesized item-domain structure with good fit indices (root mean square error approximation = 0.070; comparative fit index = 0.988) and high factor loadings. All items demonstrated item convergent validity (item-scale correlation ≥0.40), except for the side effects domain, which was limited by small numbers (n = 46). Almost all items correlated most highly with the domain to which they were assigned (item discriminant validity). Internal reliability was acceptable for all domains (Cronbach α range 0.72-0.88) and convergent validity was supported by a logical pattern of correlations with the Chronic Treatment Acceptance Questionnaire. These findings provide initial evidence of validity and reliability for the I-TAQ in patients treated with subcutaneous alirocumab. The I-TAQ could prove to be a valuable patient-reported outcome for therapies requiring subcutaneous injection. Copyright © 2017 International Society

  3. Development and Psychometric Properties of the Yoga Self-Efficacy Scale (YSES).

    PubMed

    Birdee, Gurjeet S; Sohl, Stephanie J; Wallston, Ken

    2016-01-06

    Yoga is a behavioral practice that uses physical movement, breathing, and meditation to improve health and promote personal transformation. Ancient yoga philosophy proposed that an individual's confidence about yoga, a concept similar to self-efficacy, will affect the likelihood of improved health from yoga practice. The purpose of this study was to develop and examine the psychometric properties of a self-efficacy measure for yoga practice (the Yoga Self-Efficacy Scale; YSES). Yoga practitioners were recruited to evaluate the psychometric properties of YSES via a secure online survey. We collected data on additional measures to further examine construct validity. After two weeks, participants were invited to complete YSES items again to assess test-retest reliability. A majority of participants (N = 309) were White (85%), female (82%), and yoga instructors (56%). The 12-item YSES is unidimensional with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.93. Test-retest reliability is r = 0.79 (n = 170). YSES scores are positively correlated with health competence, health-related quality of life, and years practicing yoga, supporting construct validity. Also, yoga teachers scored significantly higher on the YSES than non-teachers (p < 0.001). Non-significant relationships with education, income and sex supported discriminant validity. YSES maintained internal consistency and construct validity for all yoga styles surveyed. YSES is a reliable and valid measure of self-efficacy for yoga practice that may provide insight into barriers to adopting and maintaining yoga as a health behavior.

  4. Development and psychometric evaluation of a cardiovascular risk and disease management knowledge assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Rosneck, James S; Hughes, Joel; Gunstad, John; Josephson, Richard; Noe, Donald A; Waechter, Donna

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the systematic construction and psychometric analysis of a knowledge assessment instrument for phase II cardiac rehabilitation (CR) patients measuring risk modification disease management knowledge and behavioral outcomes derived from national standards relevant to secondary prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. First, using adult curriculum based on disease-specific learning outcomes and competencies, a systematic test item development process was completed by clinical staff. Second, a panel of educational and clinical experts used an iterative process to identify test content domain and arrive at consensus in selecting items meeting criteria. Third, the resulting 31-question instrument, the Cardiac Knowledge Assessment Tool (CKAT), was piloted in CR patients to ensure use of application. Validity and reliability analyses were performed on 3638 adults before test administrations with additional focused analyses on 1999 individuals completing both pretreatment and posttreatment administrations within 6 months. Evidence of CKAT content validity was substantiated, with 85% agreement among content experts. Evidence of construct validity was demonstrated via factor analysis identifying key underlying factors. Estimates of internal consistency, for example, Cronbach's α = .852 and Spearman-Brown split-half reliability = 0.817 on pretesting, support test reliability. Item analysis, using point biserial correlation, measured relationships between performance on single items and total score (P < .01). Analyses using item difficulty and item discrimination indices further verified item stability and validity of the CKAT. A knowledge instrument specifically designed for an adult CR population was systematically developed and tested in a large representative patient population, satisfying psychometric parameters, including validity and reliability.

  5. Assessing quality of life in severe obesity: development and psychometric properties of the ORWELL-R.

    PubMed

    Camolas, José; Ferreira, André; Mannucci, Edoardo; Mascarenhas, Mário; Carvalho, Manuel; Moreira, Pedro; do Carmo, Isabel; Santos, Osvaldo

    2016-06-01

    Several health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) dimensions are affected by obesity. Our goal was to characterize the psychometric properties of the ORWELL-R, a new obesity-related quality-of-life instrument for assessing the "individual experience of overweightness". This psychometric assessment included two different samples: one multicenter clinical sample, used for assessing internal consistency, construct validity and temporal reliability; and a community sample (collected through a cross-sectional mailing survey design), used for additional construct validity assessment and model fit confirmation. Overall, 946 persons participated (188 from the clinical sample; 758 from community sample). An alpha coefficient of 0.925 (clinical sample) and 0.934 (community sample) was found. Three subscales were identified (53.2 % of variance): Body environment experience (alpha = 0.875), Illness perception and distress (alpha = 0.864), Physical symptoms (alpha = 0.674). Adequate test-retest reliability has been confirmed (ICC: 0.78 for the overall score). ORWELL-R scores were worse in the clinical sample. Worst HRQoL, as measured by higher ORWELL-R scores, was associated with BMI increases. ORWELL-R scores were associated with IWQOL-Lite and lower scores in happiness. ORWELL-R shows good internal consistency and adequate test-retest reliability. Good construct validity was also observed (for convergent and discriminant validity) and confirmed through confirmatory factor analysis (in both clinical and community samples). Presented data sustain ORWELL-R as a reliable and useful instrument to assess obesity-related QoL, in both research and clinical contexts.

  6. Psychometric Properties of the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale among a Multiethnic Population during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ying; Htun, Tha Pyai; Lim, Peng Im; Ho-Lim, Sarah Su Tin; Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee

    2016-05-01

    The Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale (IIFAS) was developed to measure maternal attitudes toward infant feeding, but a number of validated studies on the IIFAS found that it was subject to methodological limitations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the IIFAS among a multiethnic population in Singapore. A cross-sectional research design was used on a sample of 417 antenatal women. The internal consistency and stability of the IIFAS were evaluated using Cronbach's α and test-retest reliability. Known-group comparisons discriminated certain group differences in a predictable way. A series of exploratory factor analyses (EFAs) was conducted to test the factor structure of the IIFAS using the maximum likelihood and principal axis factoring. The number of factors was selected according to theoretical and statistical considerations. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was further performed to validate the factor structure constructed in the prior EFA. The IIFAS had a Cronbach's α and Pearson correlation of 0.79 and 0.85, respectively. The known-group comparisons among certain groups were supported. The EFA results showed that the 3-factor structure produced the most interpretable and theoretical sense. A second-order CFA was conducted to confirm the construct dimensionality of the 15-item IIFAS, with satisfactory fit indices found. The 15-item IIFAS is a psychometrically sound measurement tool that health care professionals can use to understand the diverse infant feeding attitudes and knowledge among different ethnic groups in order to provide breastfeeding interventions that are culturally sensitive. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Psychometric properties of the hebrew translation of the patient activation measure (PAM-13).

    PubMed

    Magnezi, Racheli; Glasser, Saralee

    2014-01-01

    "Patient activation" reflects involvement in managing ones health. This cross-sectional study assessed the psychometric properties of the Hebrew translation (PAM-H) of the PAM-13. A nationally representative sample of 203 Hebrew-speaking Israeli adults answered the PAM-H, PHQ-9 depression scale, SF-12, and Self-efficacy Scale via telephone. Mean PAM-H scores were 70.7±15.4. Rasch analysis indicated that the PAM-H is a good measure of activation. There were no differences in PAM-H scores based on gender, age or education. Subjects with chronic disease scored lower than those without. Scores correlated with the Self-efficacy Scale (0.47), Total SF-12 (0.39) and PHQ-9 (-0.35, P<0.0001), indicating concurrent validity. Discriminant validity was reflected by a significant difference in the mean PAM-H score of those who scored below 10 (72.1±14.8) on the PHQ-9 (not depressed) compared to those scoring ≥10 (i.e. probable depression) (59.2±15.8; t 3.75; P = 0.001). The PAM-H psychometric properties indicate its usefulness with the Hebrew-speaking Israeli population. PAM-H can be useful for assessing programs aimed at effecting changes in patient compliance, health behaviors, etc. Researchers in Israel should use a single translation of the PAM-13 so that findings can be compared, increasing understanding of patient activation.

  8. The Toronto Obsessive-Compulsive Scale: Psychometrics of a Dimensional Measure of Obsessive-Compulsive Traits.

    PubMed

    Park, Laura S; Burton, Christie L; Dupuis, Annie; Shan, Janet; Storch, Eric A; Crosbie, Jennifer; Schachar, Russell J; Arnold, Paul D

    2016-04-01

    To describe the Toronto Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (TOCS), a novel 21-item parent- or self-report questionnaire that covers wide variation in obsessive-compulsive (OC) traits, and to evaluate its psychometric properties in a community-based pediatric sample. The TOCS was completed for 16,718 children and adolescents between the ages of 6 and 17 years in a community setting. Internal consistency, convergent validity with the Obsessive-Compulsive Scale of the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL-OCS), divergent validity with the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD (Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder) Symptoms and Normal Behaviour Rating Scale (SWAN), interrater reliability, as well as sensitivity and specificity of the TOCS were assessed. The internal consistency of the 21 TOCS items was excellent (Cronbach's α = 0.94). TOCS was moderately correlated with the CBCL-OCS (Spearman correlation = 0.51) and poorly correlated with the SWAN (Pearson correlation = 0.02). Sensitivity and specificity analyses indicated that a TOCS total score of greater than 0 successfully discriminated community-reported obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) cases from noncases. OC traits were continuously distributed both at the total score and dimensional level in our pediatric community sample. TOCS is a multidimensional measure of OC traits in children and adolescents with sound psychometric properties. TOCS reveals that OC traits are common and continuously distributed in a community sample. TOCS may be a useful measure for studies of the characteristics and etiology of OC traits. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Development and psychometric testing of Korean language versions of 4 neck pain and disability questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haejung; Nicholson, Leslie L; Adams, Roger D; Maher, Chris G; Halaki, Mark; Bae, Sung-Soo

    2006-07-15

    Cohort study. To develop and establish the psychometric properties of Korean versions of 4 neck pain and disability questionnaires: the Neck Disability Index, Neck Pain and Disability Scale, Functional Rating Index, and Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SFMPQ). To our knowledge, there are no published Korean language neck pain and disability measures. Versions of each questionnaire in idiomatic modern Korean were developed with a process involving initial independent translation, synthesis of the translations, independent back translation, and review by an expert committee to achieve equivalence with the original English. Psychometric testing of the questionnaires with 261 subjects was undertaken to examine test-retest reliability, internal consistency, discriminative validity, and longitudinal construct validity. Test-retest reliability of the translated versions of the 3 disability questionnaires was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient[2,1] = 0.86-0.90). High internal consistency was found in the 3 disability questionnaires (Cronbach-alpha ranged from alpha = 0.88 for the Functional Rating Index to alpha = 0.96 for the Neck Pain and Disability Scale, and 0.82 for the SFMPQ). The visual analog scale subscale of the SFMPQ was the most responsive of the subscales (effect size = 1.44, standardized response mean = 1.37). The visual analog scale was also the most responsive pain and disability index in internal responsiveness analysis, although disability indexes showed marginally better responsiveness when compared with external standards. No floor or ceiling effects were observed. We conclude that the questionnaires were successfully translated and show acceptable measurement properties, and, as such, are suitable for use in clinical and research applications.

  10. QUEST+: A general multidimensional Bayesian adaptive psychometric method.

    PubMed

    Watson, Andrew B

    2017-03-01

    QUEST+ is a Bayesian adaptive psychometric testing method that allows an arbitrary number of stimulus dimensions, psychometric function parameters, and trial outcomes. It is a generalization and extension of the original QUEST procedure and incorporates many subsequent developments in the area of parametric adaptive testing. With a single procedure, it is possible to implement a wide variety of experimental designs, including conventional threshold measurement; measurement of psychometric function parameters, such as slope and lapse; estimation of the contrast sensitivity function; measurement of increment threshold functions; measurement of noise-masking functions; Thurstone scale estimation using pair comparisons; and categorical ratings on linear and circular stimulus dimensions. QUEST+ provides a general method to accelerate data collection in many areas of cognitive and perceptual science.

  11. A Psychometric Study of the Fear of Sleep Inventory-Short Form (FoSI-SF)

    PubMed Central

    Pruiksma, Kristi E.; Taylor, Daniel J.; Ruggero, Camilo; Boals, Adriel; Davis, Joanne L.; Cranston, Christopher; DeViva, Jason C.; Zayfert, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Fear of sleep may play a significant role in sleep disturbances in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This report describes a psychometric study of the Fear of Sleep Inventory (FoSI), which was developed to measure this construct. Methods: The psychometric properties of the FoSI were examined in a non-clinical sample of 292 college students (Study I) and in a clinical sample of 67 trauma-exposed adults experiencing chronic nightmares (Study II). Data on the 23 items of the FoSI were subjected to exploratory factor analyses (EFA) to identify items uniquely assessing fear of sleep. Next, reliability and validity of a 13-item version of the FoSI was examined in both samples. Results: A 13-item Short-Form version (FoSI-SF) was identified as having a clear 2-factor structure with high internal consistency in both the non-clinical (α = 0.76–0.94) and clinical (α = 0.88-0.91) samples. Both studies demonstrated good convergent validity with measures of PTSD (0.48-0.61) and insomnia (0.39-0.48) and discriminant validity with a measure of sleep hygiene (0.19-0.27). The total score on the FoSI-SF was significantly higher in the clinical sample (mean = 17.90, SD = 12.56) than in the non-clinical sample (mean = 4.80, SD = 7.72); t357 = 8.85 p < 0.001. Conclusions: Although all items are recommended for clinical purposes, the data support the use of the 13-item FoSI-SF for research purposes. Replication of the factor structure in clinical samples is needed. Results are discussed in terms of limitations of this study and directions for further research. Citation: Pruiksma KE, Taylor DJ, Ruggero C, Boals A, Davis JL, Cranston C, DeViva JC, Zayfert C. A psychometric study of the Fear of Sleep Inventory-short form (FoSI-SF). J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(5):551-558. PMID:24812541

  12. Scoring and psychometric validation of the Perception of Anticoagulant Treatment Questionnaire (PACT-Q©)

    PubMed Central

    Prins, MH; Guillemin, I; Gilet, H; Gabriel, S; Essers, B; Raskob, G; Kahn, SR

    2009-01-01

    Background The 'Perception of Anti-Coagulant Treatment Questionnaire' (PACT-Q) was developed to assess patients' expectations of, and satisfaction with their anticoagulant treatment. This questionnaire needs to be finalised and psychometrically validated. Methods The PACT-Q was included in the United States, the Netherlands and France into three phase III multinational clinical trials conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of a new long-acting anticoagulant drug (idraparinux) compared to vitamin K antagonist (VKA). PACT-Q was administered to patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT), atrial fibrillation (AF) or pulmonary embolism (PE) at Day 1, to assess patients' expectations, and at 3 and 6 months to assess patients' satisfaction and treatment convenience and burden. The final structure of the PACT-Q (Principal Component Analysis – PCA – with Varimax Rotation) was first determined and its psychometric properties were then measured with validity of the structure (Multitrait analysis), internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficients) and known-group validity. Results PCA and multitrait analyses showed the multidimensionality of the "Treatment Expectations" dimension, comprising 7 items that had to be scored independently. The "Convenience" and "Burden of Disease and Treatment" dimensions of the hypothesised original structure of the questionnaire were combined, thus resulting in 13 items grouped into the single dimension "Convenience". The "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" dimension remained unchanged and included 7 items. All items of the "Convenience" and "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" dimensions displayed good convergent and discriminant validity. The internal consistency reliability was good, with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.84 for the "Convenience" dimension, and 0.76 for the "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" dimension. Known-group validity was good, especially with regard to occurrence of thromboembolic events within 3

  13. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Military Suicide Attitudes Questionnaire (MSAQ)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-12

    Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Military Suicide Attitudes Questionnaire (MSAQ) by Marcus VanSickle...MEDICAL AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAM Title of Dissertation: "Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Military Suicide Attitudes...hereby certifies that the use of any copyrighted material in the thesis manuscript entitled: "Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Military

  14. Discrimination against Muslim American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Aroian, Karen J

    2012-06-01

    Although there is ample evidence of discrimination toward Muslim Americans in general, there is limited information specific to Muslim American adolescents. The few existing studies specific to this age group suggest that Muslim American adolescents encounter much discrimination from teachers, school administrators, and classmates. This descriptive qualitative study complements the few existing studies on Muslim American adolescents by obtaining in-depth description of the discrimination they encounter. The sample was 14 Muslim American adolescents who participated in one of two gender-specific focus groups about their discrimination experiences. Findings identified school settings as rife with discrimination toward Muslims, portrayed Muslim girls as at risk for harassment by strangers in public places, and illustrated how Muslim youth cope with discrimination. The study findings sensitize school nurses to the nature of the problem and provide direction for intervention.

  15. Psychometric properties of the Spanish Burnout Inventory among staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Gil-Monte, P R; Manzano-García, G

    2015-12-01

    The burnout syndrome contributes to the deterioration in the quality of personal life as well as lower quality practice in healthcare personnel. Researchers have been concerned about the psychometric limitations of some previous questionnaires designed to evaluate burnout. The Spanish Burnout Inventory was developed to address the problems associated with other instruments, but it has not yet been validated in staff nurses. This study provides evidence that the Spanish Burnout Inventory has adequate psychometric properties to estimate burnout in staff nurses. The Spanish Burnout Inventory offers a theoretical proposal to explain the different components of burnout. The Spanish Burnout Inventory provides researchers and practitioners with an expanded conceptualization of the burnout syndrome, which can facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of nursing professionals. Researchers have been concerned about the psychometric limitations of the some previous questionnaires designed to evaluate burnout. To address these problems associated with previous instruments, the Spanish Burnout Inventory (SBI) was developed. The instrument has not yet been validated in staff nurses. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the SBI. The sample consisted of 720 staff nurses from two Spanish general hospitals. The instrument is composed of 20 items distributed in four dimensions: Enthusiasm towards the job (five items), Psychological exhaustion (four items), Indolence (six items) and Guilt (five items). Data were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis. To assess the factorial validity of the SBI, four alternative models were tested. Results show that the four-factor model of the SBI has adequate psychometric properties for the study of burnout in staff nurses. This model fitted the data better than the alternative models. The study provides evidence of the adequate psychometric properties of a measure to evaluate burnout in nursing professionals. The

  16. Neuropathic Pain Assessment with the PainDETECT Questionnaire: Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Evaluation to Hindi.

    PubMed

    Gudala, Kapil; Ghai, Babita; Bansal, Dipika

    2017-02-03

    The contribution of neuropathic pain (NeP) in chronic pain conditions is increasingly emphasized with the development of multiple questionnaire-based measurement scales. The painDETECT questionnaire (PDQ) is a frequently used self-reported outcome measure to assess NeP in patients with chronic pain conditions in research and regular clinical practice. The aim of the study was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the PDQ into Hindi (Hi-PDQ) for use in India and to investigate its psychometric properties. PainDETECT questionnaire translation into the Hindi language was carried out according to standard guidelines. Patients suffering from chronic pain attending a pain clinic were recruited. Patients completed the Hi-PDQ at baseline and were retested was conducted after 3 days Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was carried out to assess the factor structure of the Hi-PDQ. Measurement properties, including floor and ceiling effects, discriminative validity, and psychometric properties, were also assessed. A total of 160 patients with chronic pain were recruited, including 80 in each NeP and non-NeP group. The retest was completed in 82 patients. Mean Hi-PDQ scores were significantly higher in the NeP group compared with the non-NeP group (20.7 [SD 5.9] vs. 9.9 [SD 5.9]; P < 0.01). EFA revealed a 2-factor structure explaining 56.9% variance. The Hi-PDQ was found to have adequate internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.83), test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.94), and excellent discriminant validity (area under the curve = 0.88), with an optimal cutoff value of > 18 (sensitivity and specificity of 82.5% and 91.2%, respectively). The PDQ was successfully translated into the Hindi language. The Hi-PDQ showed good discriminative validity and psychometric properties. The Hi-PDQ is a reliable instrument to assess NeP in chronic pain conditions. © 2017 World Institute of Pain.

  17. Assessing nursing staff's competences in mobility support in nursing-home care: development and psychometric testing of the Kinaesthetics Competence (KC) observation instrument.

    PubMed

    Gattinger, Heidrun; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Hantikainen, Virpi; Köpke, Sascha; Ott, Stefan; Senn, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Between 75 and 89% of residents living in long-term care facilities have limited mobility. Nurses as well as other licensed and unlicensed personnel directly involved in resident care are in a key position to promote and maintain the mobility of care-dependent persons. This requires a certain level of competence. Kinaesthetics is a training concept used to increase nursing staff's interaction and movement support skills for assisting care-dependent persons in their daily activities. This study aims to develop and test an observation instrument for assessing nursing staff's competences in kinaesthetics. The Kinaesthetics Competence (KC) observation instrument was developed between January and June 2015 based on a literature review, a concept analysis and expert meetings (18). The pilot instrument was evaluated with two expert panels (n = 5, n = 4) regarding content validity, usability and inter-rater agreement. Content validity was assessed by determining the content validity index (CVI). The final instrument was tested in a cross-sectional study in three nursing homes in the German-speaking part of Switzerland between July 2015 and February 2016. In this study nursing staff (n = 48) was filmed during mobilization situations. Based on this video data two observers independently assessed nursing staff's competences in kinaesthetics with the KC observation instrument. Inter-rater reliability and inter-rater agreement was evaluated using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and percentage of agreement. Construct validity was assessed by a discriminating power analysis. Internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient and item analysis. The final version of the KC observation instrument comprised of four domains (interaction, movement support of the person, nurses' movement, environment) and 12 items. The final instrument showed an excellent content validity index of 1.0. Video sequences from 40 persons were analysed. Inter

  18. Interpreting past religious discrimination today.

    PubMed

    Schumm, Walter R

    2003-10-01

    Much of modern western law now presupposes opposition to discrimination based on race, religion, sex, national origin, and other factors. However, ancient religious Scriptures may have sanctioned certain types of discrimination. Whether those who are inclined to accept literal interpretations of their Scriptures will condone certain forms of discrimination could be evaluated to contrast the effects of modernization versus religious indoctrination on various kinds of prejudice.

  19. SURE, why not? The SUbstitution-REciprocity method for measurement of odor quality discrimination thresholds: replication and extension to nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Laska, Matthias; Grimm, Nina

    2003-02-01

    Recently, Olsson and Cain (2000, Chem. Senses, 25: 493) introduced a psychometric method which, for the first time, allows the standardized determination of odor quality discrimination (OQD) thresholds. The method defines a threshold value that is an average fraction by which one odorant has to be substituted with another to reach a criterion level of discrimination. This measure of discrimination is reciprocal in the sense that it is a result of two separate psychometric functions involving two different standards but the same comparison stimuli. Using the same odor stimuli as Olsson and Cain, with six human subjects but adopting a slightly different experimental design, we were able to replicate their finding that the proportion of correct discriminations changes monotonically with the proportion of adulterant in mixtures of eugenol and citral. As the SURE (SUbstitution-REciprocity) method is based on discriminative responses, it should also be applicable with nonhuman species which can be trained to give unequivocal discriminative responses at the behavioral level. Using an olfactory conditioning paradigm, we therefore trained four squirrel monkeys to discriminate between exactly the same pairs of odor stimuli as our human subjects. We found the psychometric functions of the monkeys to be similar to those of the human subjects. Our results show that the SURE method can successfully be employed with nonhuman primates and thus offers a new approach to study the odor spaces of nonhuman species. Future studies should elucidate whether the SURE method allows for direct comparisons of OQD thresholds and of similarities and differences between odor quality perception of different species.

  20. Measuring Beneficiary Knowledge of the Medicare Program: A Psychometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bann, Carla M.; Terrell, Sherry A.; McCormack, Lauren A.; Berkman, Nancy D.

    2003-01-01

    Reliable measures of Medicare beneficiaries' program knowledge are necessary for credible program monitoring, evaluation, and public accountability. This study developed and evaluated the psychometric properties of two possible measures of beneficiary knowledge. One measure was based on self-reported knowledge, the other was a true/false quiz which requires beneficiaries to demonstrate their knowledge. We used data from the 1998 and 1999 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) to evaluate the reliability and construct validity of the indices. Overall, based on both content considerations and the psychometric analyses, the true/false quiz proved to be the more accurate and useful measure of beneficiaries' knowledge. PMID:14628404