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Sample records for disease development depending

  1. Mediator Complex Dependent Regulation of Cardiac Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grueter, Chad E.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The risk factors for CVD include environmental and genetic components. Human mutations in genes involved in most aspects of cardiovascular function have been identified, many of which are involved in transcriptional regulation. The Mediator complex serves as a pivotal transcriptional regulator that functions to integrate diverse cellular signals by multiple mechanisms including recruiting RNA polymerase II, chromatin modifying proteins and non-coding RNAs to promoters in a context dependent manner. This review discusses components of the Mediator complex and the contribution of the Mediator complex to normal and pathological cardiac development and function. Enhanced understanding of the role of this core transcriptional regulatory complex in the heart will help us gain further insights into CVD. PMID:23727265

  2. Long non-coding RNA-dependent transcriptional regulation in neuronal development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Brian S.; Blackshaw, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the mammalian transcriptome has revealed that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) may make up a large fraction of cellular transcripts. Recent years have seen a surge of studies aimed at functionally characterizing the role of lncRNAs in development and disease. In this review, we discuss new findings implicating lncRNAs in controlling development of the central nervous system (CNS). The evolution of the higher vertebrate brain has been accompanied by an increase in the levels and complexities of lncRNAs expressed within the developing nervous system. Although a limited number of CNS-expressed lncRNAs are now known to modulate the activity of proteins important for neuronal differentiation, the function of the vast majority of neuronal-expressed lncRNAs is still unknown. Topics of intense current interest include the mechanism by which CNS-expressed lncRNAs might function in epigenetic and transcriptional regulation during neuronal development, and how gain and loss of function of individual lncRNAs contribute to neurological diseases. PMID:24936207

  3. Interleukin-2-dependent control of disease development in spontaneously diabetic BB rats.

    PubMed Central

    Zielasek, J; Burkart, V; Naylor, P; Goldstein, A; Kiesel, U; Kolb, H

    1990-01-01

    Long-term treatment with recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) of diabetes-prone BB rats had contrasting effects in two different BB rat sublines. Diabetes development was enhanced in the subline with a low intrinsic diabetes risk and suppressed in the subline with a high diabetes risk. IL-2 treatment started between 35 and 42 days of age and lasted for 3 months. In subline 1, diabetes incidence increased from 23% to 53% (P less than 0.01), in subline 2 it decreased from 73% to 32% (P less than 0.01). The two sublines differed in serum levels of factors controlling IL-2 synthesis and activity. Mean IL-2 inhibitory activity was higher in subline 2 (between 140% and 290% of levels in subline 1, P less than 0.01). Conversely, mean concentrations of thymosin alpha 1 and beta 4 were higher in subline 1 (between 140% and 200% of levels in subline 2, P less than 0.01). Thus the two sublines differ in their response to exogenous IL-2 and also in serum levels of mediators affecting availability of IL-2. We conclude that an internal network of hormonal factors, including IL-2, contributes to the control of diabetes development in the BB rat. Images Figure 2 PMID:2307481

  4. Mexican oil and dependent development

    SciTech Connect

    Gentleman, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The developmet of Mexico's enormous hydrocarbon resources during the latter part of the 1970's provides an opportunity to examine the impact of Mexico's dependent-state status upon the use of the resource. Specifically, this study examines the hypothesis, drawn from the dependency literature, that the development of this resource within the context of dependency would lead to a greater internationalization of the Mexican economy and, in general, a deepening of Mexico's dependence rather than a lessening of that dependence as Mexico's political leaders suggest. The study also examines the impact of hydrocarbon development upon the growth of the Mexican state and state capitalism. Finally, the study examines the extent to which Mexico has sought to and has been able to modify the conditions of its dependence at the level of international exchange in the specific areas of trade, labor, and energy. Has the ''oil weapon'' been sufficiently powerful to modify substantially and fundamentally the terms of Mexico's dependence as some would argue should be able to do and as Mexico's leaders believed it would. Essentially, the study finds that Mexico's dependence has been exacerbated by the program of hydrocarbon development. Not only has the specific profile of oil, gas, and petrochemicals development been substantially impacted upon by Mexico's dependence, but the program for general economic development based upon the utilization of new oil revenues initiated a new era of dependent development for Mexico.

  5. Mexican oil and dependent development

    SciTech Connect

    Gentlemen, J.

    1984-01-01

    This study was conceived as an opportunity to examine the impact that the condition of dependency would have upon Mexico's effort to develop its huge petroleum resources in the mid 1970s. It is hardly a pleasant tale and one that provides little encouragement for those searching for solutions to underdevelopment within the contemporary Mexican political setting. Despite the fact that the study details a failed development project, the alternative to the model in place is far from obvious, as painful as that observation may be. Indeed, the failure of the development project and the analysis presented here of that failure is not directly suggestive of a preferable development alternative. While a ''socialist'' model is usually implied by dependence analysis, the socialist alternative frankly provides little guarantee of a prospect of long term viability, self-directed development and essential political and human rights to oppressed people.

  6. Developing Tests of Visual Dependency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindrat, Alexandra N.

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts develop neural adaptive responses to microgravity during space flight. Consequently these adaptive responses cause maladaptive disturbances in balance and gait function when astronauts return to Earth and are re-exposed to gravity. Current research in the Neuroscience Laboratories at NASA-JSC is focused on understanding how exposure to space flight produces post-flight disturbances in balance and gait control and developing training programs designed to facilitate the rapid recovery of functional mobility after space flight. In concert with these disturbances, astronauts also often report an increase in their visual dependency during space flight. To better understand this phenomenon, studies were conducted with specially designed training programs focusing on visual dependency with the aim to understand and enhance subjects ability to rapidly adapt to novel sensory situations. The Rod and Frame test (RFT) was used first to assess an individual s visual dependency, using a variety of testing techniques. Once assessed, subjects were asked to perform two novel tasks under transformation (both the Pegboard and Cube Construction tasks). Results indicate that head position cues and initial visual test conditions had no effect on an individual s visual dependency scores. Subjects were also able to adapt to the manual tasks after several trials. Individual visual dependency correlated with ability to adapt manual to a novel visual distortion only for the cube task. Subjects with higher visual dependency showed decreased ability to adapt to this task. Ultimately, it was revealed that the RFT may serve as an effective prediction tool to produce individualized adaptability training prescriptions that target the specific sensory profile of each crewmember.

  7. Alveolar development and disease.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-07-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. The lack of lung maturation and the associated lack of pulmonary surfactant in preterm infants causes respiratory distress syndrome, a common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. At the time of birth, surfactant homeostasis begins to be established by balanced processes involved in surfactant production, storage, secretion, recycling, and catabolism. Insights from physiology and engineering made in the 20th century enabled survival of newborn infants requiring mechanical ventilation for the first time. Thereafter, advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology led to an understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system that made possible exogenous surfactant replacement for the treatment of preterm infants. Identification of surfactant proteins, cloning of the genes encoding them, and elucidation of their roles in the regulation of surfactant synthesis, structure, and function have provided increasing understanding of alveolar homeostasis in health and disease. This Perspective seeks to consider developmental aspects of the pulmonary surfactant system and its importance in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung diseases related to alveolar homeostasis.

  8. Tendon development and diseases.

    PubMed

    Gaut, Ludovic; Duprez, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Tendon is a uniaxial connective tissue component of the musculoskeletal system. Tendon is involved in force transmission between muscle and bone. Tendon injury is very common and debilitating but tendon repair remains a clinical challenge for orthopedic medicine. In vertebrates, tendon is mainly composed of type I collagen fibrils, displaying a parallel organization along the tendon axis. The tendon-specific spatial organization of type I collagen provides the mechanical properties for tendon function. In contrast to other components of the musculoskeletal system, tendon biology is poorly understood. An important goal in tendon biology is to understand the mechanisms involved in the production and assembly of type I collagen fibrils during development, postnatal formation, and healing processes in order to design new therapies for tendon repair. In this review we highlight the current understanding of the molecular and mechanical signals known to be involved in tenogenesis during development, and how development provides insights into tendon healing processes. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:5-23. doi: 10.1002/wdev.201 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  9. Measuring Spatial Dependence for Infectious Disease Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, M. Kate; Cummings, Derek A. T.

    2016-01-01

    Global spatial clustering is the tendency of points, here cases of infectious disease, to occur closer together than expected by chance. The extent of global clustering can provide a window into the spatial scale of disease transmission, thereby providing insights into the mechanism of spread, and informing optimal surveillance and control. Here the authors present an interpretable measure of spatial clustering, τ, which can be understood as a measure of relative risk. When biological or temporal information can be used to identify sets of potentially linked and likely unlinked cases, this measure can be estimated without knowledge of the underlying population distribution. The greater our ability to distinguish closely related (i.e., separated by few generations of transmission) from more distantly related cases, the more closely τ will track the true scale of transmission. The authors illustrate this approach using examples from the analyses of HIV, dengue and measles, and provide an R package implementing the methods described. The statistic presented, and measures of global clustering in general, can be powerful tools for analysis of spatially resolved data on infectious diseases. PMID:27196422

  10. Parasitic diseases and urban development.

    PubMed Central

    Mott, K. E.; Desjeux, P.; Moncayo, A.; Ranque, P.; de Raadt, P.

    1990-01-01

    The distribution and epidemiology of parasitic diseases in both urban and periurban areas of endemic countries have been changing as development progresses. The following different scenarios involving Chagas disease, lymphatic filariasis, leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis are discussed: (1) infected persons entering nonendemic urban areas without vectors; (2) infected persons entering nonendemic urban areas with vectors; (3) infected persons entering endemic urban areas; (4) non-infected persons entering endemic urban areas; (5) urbanization or domestication of natural zoonotic foci; and (6) vectors entering nonendemic urban areas. Cultural and social habits from the rural areas, such as type of house construction and domestic water usage, are adopted by migrants to urban areas and increase the risk of disease transmission which adversely affects employment in urban populations. As the urban health services must deal with the rise in parasitic diseases, appropriate control strategies for the urban setting must be developed and implemented. PMID:2127380

  11. Drug development to protozoan diseases.

    PubMed

    Monzote, Lianet; Siddiq, Afshan

    2011-01-01

    The diseases caused by protozoan parasite are responsible for considerable mortality and morbidity, affecting more than 500 million of people in the world. The epidemiological control of protozoan is unsatisfactory due to difficulties of vector and reservoir control; while the progress in the development of vaccine tends to be slow and arduous. Currently, the chemotherapy remains essential component of both clinical management and disease control programmer in endemic areas. The drugs in use as anti-protozoan agents were discovered over 50 years and a number of factors limit their utility such as: high cost, poor compliance, drug resistance, low efficacy and poor safety. In the recent years, the searches about the development of new drugs against protozoa parasite have been increased. This special issue of The Open Medicinal Chemistry Journal will present some of developments in this field with the aim to shown the significant advances in the discovery of new anti-protozoan drugs.

  12. The path dependence of deformation texture development

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, T.; Kocks, U.F.; Wenk, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated for the case of three different strain paths, all of which end up with the same, elongated specimen shape, that the texture developed during straining is path dependent. This is true both for experiments on aluminum polycrystals and for simulations using the LApp code.

  13. Management of Alcohol Dependence in Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Addolorato, Giovanni; Mirijello, Antonio; Leggio, Lorenzo; Ferrulli, Anna; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence represents a chronic and relapsing disease affecting nearly 10% of the general population both in the United States and in Europe, with a widespread burden of morbidity and mortality. Alcohol dependence represents the most common cause of liver damage in the Western Countries. Although alcoholic liver disease is associated primarily with heavy drinking, continued alcohol consumption, even in low doses after the onset of liver disease, increases the risk of severe consequences, including mortality. Consequently the ideal treatment of patients affected by alcohol dependence and alcoholic liver disease should aim at achieving long-term total alcohol abstinence and preventing relapse. The aim of the present review is to provide an update on the management of alcohol dependence in patients with alcoholic liver disease. Increasing evidences suggests the usefulness of psychosocial interventions and medications combined in order to reduce alcohol intake, promote abstinence and prevent relapse in alcohol dependent patients. Disulfiram, naltrexone and acamprosate have been approved for this indication; gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is approved in Italy and Austria. However, these drugs have not been tested in patients with advanced liver disease. Amongst other emerging pharmacotherapies for alcoholism, topiramate, ondansetron, and baclofen seem the most promising ones. Both topiramate and ondansetron hold a safe profile in alcoholic patients; however, none of them has been tested in alcoholic patients with advanced liver disease. To date, baclofen represents the only anti-craving medication formally tested in a randomized clinical trial in alcoholic patients affected by liver cirrhosis, although additional confirmatory studies are warranted. PMID:23456576

  14. Graves' disease in a dialysis dependent chronic renal failure patient

    PubMed Central

    Nair, C. G.; Jacob, P.; Menon, R.; Babu, M. J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone level may be altered in chronic renal failure patients. Low levels of thyroxine protect the body from excess protein loss by minimizing catabolism. Hyperthyroidism is rarely encountered in end-stage dialysis dependent patients. Less than 10 well-documented cases of Graves' disease (GD) are reported in literature so far. We report a case of GD in a patient on dialysis. PMID:25484538

  15. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  16. Exposing extinction risk analysis to pathogens: Is disease just another form of density dependence?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerber, L.R.; McCallum, H.; Lafferty, K.D.; Sabo, J.L.; Dobson, A.

    2005-01-01

    In the United States and several other countries, the development of population viability analyses (PVA) is a legal requirement of any species survival plan developed for threatened and endangered species. Despite the importance of pathogens in natural populations, little attention has been given to host-pathogen dynamics in PVA. To study the effect of infectious pathogens on extinction risk estimates generated from PVA, we review and synthesize the relevance of host-pathogen dynamics in analyses of extinction risk. We then develop a stochastic, density-dependent host-parasite model to investigate the effects of disease on the persistence of endangered populations. We show that this model converges on a Ricker model of density dependence under a suite of limiting assumptions, including a high probability that epidemics will arrive and occur. Using this modeling framework, we then quantify: (1) dynamic differences between time series generated by disease and Ricker processes with the same parameters; (2) observed probabilities of quasi-extinction for populations exposed to disease or self-limitation; and (3) bias in probabilities of quasi-extinction estimated by density-independent PVAs when populations experience either form of density dependence. Our results suggest two generalities about the relationships among disease, PVA, and the management of endangered species. First, disease more strongly increases variability in host abundance and, thus, the probability of quasi-extinction, than does self-limitation. This result stems from the fact that the effects and the probability of occurrence of disease are both density dependent. Second, estimates of quasi-extinction are more often overly optimistic for populations experiencing disease than for those subject to self-limitation. Thus, although the results of density-independent PVAs may be relatively robust to some particular assumptions about density dependence, they are less robust when endangered populations are

  17. Scale dependence of disease impacts on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality in the southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Bell, David M; Bradford, John B; Lauenroth, William K

    2015-07-01

    Depending on how disease impacts tree exposure to risk, both the prevalence of disease and disease effects on survival may contribute to patterns of mortality risk across a species' range. Disease may accelerate tree species' declines in response to global change factors, such as drought, biotic interactions, such as competition, or functional traits, such as allometry. To assess the role of disease in mediating mortality risk in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), we developed hierarchical Bayesian models for both disease prevalence in live aspen stems and the resulting survival rates of healthy and diseased aspen near the species' southern range limit using 5088 individual trees on 281 United States Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis plots in the southwestern United States. We found that disease prevalence depended primarily on tree size, tree allometry, and spatial variation in precipitation, while mortality depended on tree size, allometry, competition, spatial variation in summer temperature, and both temporal and spatial variation in summer precipitation. Disease prevalence was highest in large trees with low slenderness found on dry sites. For healthy trees, mortality decreased with diameter, slenderness, and temporal variation in summer precipitation, but increased with competition and spatial variation in summer temperature. Mortality of diseased trees decreased with diameter and aspen relative basal area and increased with mean summer temperature and precipitation. Disease infection increased aspen mortality, especially in trees of intermediate size and trees on plots at climatic extremes (i.e., cool, wet and warm, dry climates). By examining variation in disease prevalence, mortality of healthy trees, and mortality of diseased trees, we showed that the role of disease in aspen tree mortality depended on the scale of inference. For variation among individuals in diameter, disease tended to expose intermediate-size trees experiencing moderate

  18. Vitamin-Dependent Methionine Metabolism and Alcoholic Liver Disease1

    PubMed Central

    Halsted, Charles H.; Medici, Valentina

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that ethanol-induced alterations in hepatic methionine metabolism play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Because malnutrition is a universal clinical finding in this disease and hepatic methionine metabolism is dependent upon dietary folate and vitamins B-6 and B-12, ALD can be considered an induced nutritional disorder that is conditioned by alcohol abuse. The present review describes the etiologies of these 3 vitamin deficiencies in ALD and how they interact with chronic ethanol exposure to alter hepatic methionine metabolism. Subsequent sections focus on molecular mechanisms for the interactions of aberrant methionine metabolism with ethanol in the pathogenesis of ALD, in particular the role of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) in regulating the epigenetic expressions of genes relevant to pathways of liver injury. The review will conclude with descriptions of studies on the efficacy of SAM in the treatment of ALD and with discussion of potentially fruitful future avenues of research. PMID:22332083

  19. Development of Graves' disease following radiation therapy in Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, J.S.; Tarbell, N.J.; Garber, J.R.; Mauch, P.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-related thyroid dysfunction is a common occurrence in patients with Hodgkin's disease treated with mantle field radiation. Although chemical and clinical hypothyroidism are most commonly seen, Graves' disease has also been described. We have examined the records of 437 surgically staged patients who received mantle field irradiation between April 1969 and December 1980 to ascertain the frequency of manifestations of Graves' disease. Within this group, seven patients developed hyperthyroidism accompanied by ophthalmic findings typical of those seen in Graves' disease. The actuarial risk of developing Graves' disease at 10 years following mantle irradiation for Hodgkin's disease was 3.3% in female patients and 1% in male patients in this study. The observed/expected ratios were 5.9 and 5.1 for female and male patients, respectively. This observed risk significantly exceeded that seen in the general population.

  20. Understanding scale dependency of climatic processes with diarrheal disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr Azadani, F.; Jutla, A.; Akanda, A. S. S.; Colwell, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The issue of scales in linking climatic processes with diarrheal diseases is perhaps one of the most challenging aspect to develop any predictive algorithm for outbreaks and to understand impacts of changing climate. Majority of diarrheal diseases have shown to be strongly associated with climate modulated environmental processes where pathogens survive. Using cholera as an example of characteristic diarrheal diseases, this study will provide methodological insights on dominant scale variability in climatic processes that are linked with trigger and transmission of disease. Cholera based epidemiological models use human to human interaction as a main transmission mechanism, however, environmental conditions for creating seasonality in outbreaks is not explicitly modeled. For example, existing models cannot create seasonality, unless some of the model parameters are a-priori chosen to vary seasonally. A systems based feedback approach will be presented to understand role of climatic processes on trigger and transmission disease. In order to investigate effect of changing climate on cholera, a downscaling approach using support vector machine will be used. Our preliminary results using three climate models, ECHAM5, GFDL, and HADCM show that varying modalities in future cholera outbreaks.

  1. Developing disease resistant stone fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stone fruit (Prunus spp.) (peach, nectarine, plum, apricot, cherry) and almonds are susceptible to a number of pathogens. These pathogens can cause extensive losses in the field, during transport and storage, and in the market. Breeding for disease resistance requires an extensive knowledge of the...

  2. Nanotechnology in dentistry: drug delivery systems for the control of biofilm-dependent oral diseases.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Francisco Fabio Oliveira; Ferraz, Camila; Rodrigues, Lidiany K Arla de Azevedo; Nojosa, Jacqueline de Santiago; Yamauti, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Dental disorders, such as caries, periodontal and endodontic diseases are major public health issues worldwide. In common, they are biofilm-dependent oral diseases, and the specific conditions of oral cavity may develop infectious foci that could affect other physiological systems. Efforts have been made to develop new treatment routes for the treatment of oral diseases, and therefore, for the prevention of some systemic illnesses. New drugs and materials have been challenged to prevent and treat these conditions, especially by means of bacteria elimination. "Recent progresses in understanding the etiology, epidemiology and microbiology of the microbial flora in those circumstances have given insight and motivated the innovation on new therapeutic approaches for the management of the oral diseases progression". Some of the greatest advances in the medical field have been based in nanosized systems, ranging from the drug release with designed nanoparticles to tissue scaffolds based on nanotechnology. These systems offer new possibilities for specific and efficient therapies, been assayed successfully in preventive/curative therapies to the oral cavity, opening new challenges and opportunities to overcome common diseases based on bacterial biofilm development. The aim of this review is to summarize the recent nanotechnological developments in the drug delivery field related to the prevention and treatment of the major biofilm-dependent oral diseases and to identify those systems, which may have higher potential for clinical use.

  3. Disease management: program design, development, and implementation.

    PubMed

    Harvey, N; DePue, D M

    1997-06-01

    Disease management is an emerging approach to patient management, customer satisfaction, and cost containment that comprises disease modeling; patient segmentation and risk assessment; clinical protocols; and wellness, self-management, and education. Implementing a disease management program poses significant challenges to healthcare organizations. To successfully implement a disease management program, a tightly integrated continuum of care, sophisticated information systems, and disease management support systems must be in place. Strategic partnerships with outside vendors may speed program implementation and provide opportunities to develop risk-sharing relationships. PMID:10167840

  4. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and skin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, D.A.; Lee, L.A.

    1985-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a recently described mechanism of immunologic lysis in which cellular targets sensitized by specific antibodies are efficiently and selectively lysed by Fc receptor (FcR) bearing nonspecific effectors. Immunoglobulins of various classes (IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE) and various cellular effectors (large granular lymphocytes, monocyte/macrophages, T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils) can induce ADCC in vitro, and the importance of ADCC in vivo is being tested experimentally in resistance to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infection, in tumor surveillance, in allograft rejection, and in inflammatory diseases. There is much indirect evidence that ADCC may be the mechanism of damage of different cellular targets in skin diseases, but the best direct evidence concerns immunologic keratinocyte damage, especially in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). The authors have shown that keratinocytes of several species are highly susceptible to lymphocyte and monocyte-mediated ADCC, but not to neutrophil or eosinophil ADCC in vitro using two different cytotoxicity assays. In contrast, complement was a relatively ineffective mediator of lysis of metabolically intact keratinocyte targets. Patients with certain cutaneous lupus syndromes have serum antibodies capable of inducing monocyte and lymphocyte ADCC of targets coated with extractable nuclear antigens. The authors have shown that these antigens apparently move to the cell membrane of keratinocytes in vitro following ultraviolet irradiation. In an animal model, they have shown that antibodies to SSA/Ro bind to human keratinocytes in vivo, especially after ultraviolet irradiation.

  5. Context-dependent effects of cellular senescence in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Lecot, Pacome; Alimirah, Fatouma; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith; Wiley, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is an established tumour-suppressive mechanism that prevents the proliferation of premalignant cells. However, several lines of evidence show that senescent cells, which often persist in vivo, can also promote tumour progression in addition to other age-related pathologies via the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Moreover, new insights suggest the SASP can facilitate tissue repair. Here, we review the beneficial and detrimental roles of senescent cells, highlighting conditions under which the senescence response does and does not promote pathology, particularly cancer. By better understanding the context-dependent effects of cellular senescence, it may be feasible to limit its detrimental properties while preserving its beneficial effects, and develop novel therapeutic strategies to prevent or treat cancer and possibly other age-associated diseases. PMID:27140310

  6. Epigenetic mechanisms in heart development and disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Shannalee R; Gay, Maresha S; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-07-01

    Suboptimal intrauterine development has been linked to predisposition to cardiovascular disease in adulthood, a concept termed 'developmental origins of health and disease'. Although the exact mechanisms underlying this developmental programming are unknown, a growing body of evidence supports the involvement of epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA confer added levels of gene regulation without altering DNA sequences. These modifications are relatively stable signals, offering possible insight into the mechanisms underlying developmental origins of health and disease. This review will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms in heart development as well as aberrant epigenetic regulation contributing to cardiovascular disease. Additionally, we will address recent advances targeting epigenetic mechanisms as potential therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease.

  7. Epigenetic mechanisms in cardiac development and disease.

    PubMed

    Vallaster, Marcus; Vallaster, Caroline Dacwag; Wu, Sean M

    2012-01-01

    During mammalian development, cardiac specification and ultimately lineage commitment to a specific cardiac cell type is accomplished by the action of specific transcription factors (TFs) and their meticulous control on an epigenetic level. In this review, we detail how cardiac-specific TFs function in concert with nucleosome remodeling and histone-modifying enzymes to regulate a diverse network of genes required for processes such as cell growth and proliferation, or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), for instance. We provide examples of how several cardiac TFs, such as Nkx2.5, WHSC1, Tbx5, and Tbx1, which are associated with developmental and congenital heart defects, are required for the recruitment of histone modifiers, such as Jarid2, p300, and Ash2l, and components of ATP-dependent remodeling enzymes like Brg1, Baf60c, and Baf180. Binding of these TFs to their respective sites at cardiac genes coincides with a distinct pattern of histone marks, indicating that the precise regulation of cardiac gene networks is orchestrated by interactions between TFs and epigenetic modifiers. Furthermore, we speculate that an epigenetic signature, comprised of TF occupancy, histone modifications, and overall chromatin organization, is an underlying mechanism that governs cardiac morphogenesis and disease.

  8. Autobiographical Memory Performance in Alzheimer's Disease Depends on Retrieval Frequency.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stephan; Mychajliw, Christian; Reichert, Carolin; Melcher, Tobias; Leyhe, Thomas

    2016-04-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory disturbances primarily caused by pathogenic mechanisms affecting medial temporal lobe structures. As proposed by current theories of memory formation, this decrease is mediated by the age of the acquired knowledge. However, they cannot fully explain specific patterns of retrograde amnesia in AD. In the current study we examined an alternative approach and investigated whether the extent and severity of retrograde amnesia in AD is mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval or whether it depends on the mere age of knowledge. We compared recall of autobiographical incidents from three life periods in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), patients with early dementia of Alzheimer type (eDAT), and healthy control (HC) individuals using the Autobiographical Memory Interview. Retrieval frequency was operationalized by a paired comparison analysis. In contrast to HC individuals, recall of autobiographical incidents was impaired in patients with aMCI and eDAT following Ribot's gradient, with a reduced memory loss for remote compared to more recent life events. However, there was a strong effect of retrieval frequency on memory performance with frequently retrieved incidents memorized in more detail than less frequently retrieved episodes. Remote memories were recalled more often than recent ones. These findings suggest that more frequently retrieved autobiographical memories generally become more independent of the hippocampal complex and might thus be better protected against early hippocampal damage related to AD. Hence, the extent of retrograde amnesia in AD appears mainly mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval, which could plausibly explain why cognitive activity can effectively delay the onset of memory decline in AD.

  9. Autobiographical Memory Performance in Alzheimer's Disease Depends on Retrieval Frequency.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stephan; Mychajliw, Christian; Reichert, Carolin; Melcher, Tobias; Leyhe, Thomas

    2016-04-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory disturbances primarily caused by pathogenic mechanisms affecting medial temporal lobe structures. As proposed by current theories of memory formation, this decrease is mediated by the age of the acquired knowledge. However, they cannot fully explain specific patterns of retrograde amnesia in AD. In the current study we examined an alternative approach and investigated whether the extent and severity of retrograde amnesia in AD is mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval or whether it depends on the mere age of knowledge. We compared recall of autobiographical incidents from three life periods in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), patients with early dementia of Alzheimer type (eDAT), and healthy control (HC) individuals using the Autobiographical Memory Interview. Retrieval frequency was operationalized by a paired comparison analysis. In contrast to HC individuals, recall of autobiographical incidents was impaired in patients with aMCI and eDAT following Ribot's gradient, with a reduced memory loss for remote compared to more recent life events. However, there was a strong effect of retrieval frequency on memory performance with frequently retrieved incidents memorized in more detail than less frequently retrieved episodes. Remote memories were recalled more often than recent ones. These findings suggest that more frequently retrieved autobiographical memories generally become more independent of the hippocampal complex and might thus be better protected against early hippocampal damage related to AD. Hence, the extent of retrograde amnesia in AD appears mainly mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval, which could plausibly explain why cognitive activity can effectively delay the onset of memory decline in AD. PMID:27104895

  10. Epigenetic mechanisms in heart development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Shannalee R.; Gay, Maresha S.; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-01-01

    Suboptimal intrauterine development has been linked to predisposition to cardiovascular disease in adulthood, a concept termed ‘developmental origins of health and disease’. Although the exact mechanisms underlying this developmental programming are unknown, a growing body of evidence supports the involvement of epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA confer added levels of gene regulation without altering DNA sequences. These modifications are relatively stable signals, offering possible insight into the mechanisms underlying developmental origins of health and disease. This review will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms in heart development as well as aberrant epigenetic regulation contributing to cardiovascular disease. Additionally, we will address recent advances targeting epigenetic mechanisms as potential therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease. PMID:25572405

  11. Rituximab is an efficient and safe treatment in adults with steroid-dependent minimal change disease.

    PubMed

    Munyentwali, Helene; Bouachi, Khedidja; Audard, Vincent; Remy, Philippe; Lang, Philippe; Mojaat, Rachid; Deschênes, Georges; Ronco, Pierre M; Plaisier, Emmanuelle M; Dahan, Karine Y

    2013-03-01

    Development of steroid dependency in patients with nephrotic syndrome may require a long-term multi-drug therapy at risk of drug toxicity and renal failure. Rituximab treatment reduces the steroid dosage and the need for immunosuppressive therapy in pediatric patients. Here we retrospectively analyze the efficacy and safety of rituximab in adult patients with steroid-dependent minimal change disease. To do this, we analyzed the outcome of all adult patients treated with rituximab for steroid-dependent minimal change nephrotic syndrome over a mean follow-up of 29.5 months (range 5.1-82 months). Seventeen patients with steroid-dependent or frequently relapsing minimal change nephrotic syndrome, unresponsive to several immunosuppressive medications, were treated with rituximab. Eleven patients had no relapses after rituximab infusion (mean follow-up 26.7 months, range 5.1-82 months) and nine of them were able to come off all other immunosuppressive drugs and steroids during follow-up. Six patients relapsed at least once after a mean time of 11.9 months (mean follow-up 34.5 months, range 16.9-50.1 months), but their immunosuppressive drug treatment could be stopped or markedly reduced during this time. No adverse events were recorded. Thus, rituximab is efficient and safe in adult patients suffering from severe steroid-dependent minimal change disease. Prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm this study.

  12. Age-dependent branching processes for surveillance of vaccine-preventable diseases with incubation period.

    PubMed

    Slavtchova-Bojkova, Maroussia N; González, Miguel; Martìnez, Rodrigo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the recent results of the authors in the area of infectious disease modeling by means of branching stochastic processes. This is a new approach involving age-dependent branching models, which turned out to be more appropriate and flexible for describing the spread of an infection in a given population, than discrete time ones. Concretely, Bellman-Harris and Sevast'yanov's branching processes are investigated. It is justified that the proposed models are proper candidates as models of infectious diseases with incubation period like measles, mumps, avian flu, etc. It is worth to notice that in general the developed methodology is applicable to the diseases that follow the so-called SIR (susceptible-infected-removed) scheme in terms of epidemiological models. Two policies of extra-vaccination level are proposed and compared on the ground of simulation examples. PMID:21423438

  13. Drug Development for Alzheimer's Disease: Recent Progress

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wonjin

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia, is characterized by two major pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Based on these two indicators, an amyloid cascade hypothesis was proposed, and accordingly, most current therapeutic approaches are now focused on the removal of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ from the brain. Additionally, strategies for blocking tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation have been suggested, including the development of drugs that can block the formation of tangles. However, there are no true disease-modifying drugs in the current market, though many drugs based on theories other than Aβ and tau pathology are under development. The purpose of this review was to provide information on the current development of AD drugs and to discuss the issues related to drug development. PMID:22110351

  14. Developing disease resistance in CP-Cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance is an important selection criterion in the Canal Point (CP) Sugarcane Cultivar Development Program. Ratoon stunt (RSD, caused by Leifsonia xyli subsp. Xyli Evtsuhenko et al.), leaf scald (caused by Xanthomonas albilineans Ashby, Dowson), mosaic (caused by Sugarcane mosaic virus st...

  15. Alzheimer's disease drug development: translational neuroscience strategies.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Banks, Sarah J; Gary, Ronald K; Kinney, Jefferson W; Lombardo, Joseph M; Walsh, Ryan R; Zhong, Kate

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an urgent public health challenge that is rapidly approaching epidemic proportions. New therapies that defer or prevent the onset, delay the decline, or improve the symptoms are urgently needed. All phase 3 drug development programs for disease-modifying agents have failed thus far. New approaches to drug development are needed. Translational neuroscience focuses on the linkages between basic neuroscience and the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic products that will improve the lives of patients or prevent the occurrence of brain disorders. Translational neuroscience includes new preclinical models that may better predict human efficacy and safety, improved clinical trial designs and outcomes that will accelerate drug development, and the use of biomarkers to more rapidly provide information regarding the effects of drugs on the underlying disease biology. Early translational research is complemented by later stage translational approaches regarding how best to use evidence to impact clinical practice and to assess the influence of new treatments on the public health. Funding of translational research is evolving with an increased emphasis on academic and NIH involvement in drug development. Translational neuroscience provides a framework for advancing development of new therapies for AD patients.

  16. Stomach development, stem cells and disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2016-02-15

    The stomach, an organ derived from foregut endoderm, secretes acid and enzymes and plays a key role in digestion. During development, mesenchymal-epithelial interactions drive stomach specification, patterning, differentiation and growth through selected signaling pathways and transcription factors. After birth, the gastric epithelium is maintained by the activity of stem cells. Developmental signals are aberrantly activated and stem cell functions are disrupted in gastric cancer and other disorders. Therefore, a better understanding of stomach development and stem cells can inform approaches to treating these conditions. This Review highlights the molecular mechanisms of stomach development and discusses recent findings regarding stomach stem cells and organoid cultures, and their roles in investigating disease mechanisms.

  17. [Development of Disease-modifying Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-04-01

    The development of disease-modifying therapy (DMT) that can arrest the pathological processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has emerged as one of the highest priorities of medical research. Two pathological hallmarks, amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein deposition and tau accumulation, are the major targets of DMT. Immunotherapy for Abeta removal and secretase inhibitors/modulators that reduce total or accumulation-prone Abeta are candidate DMTs against Abeta. Compounds that prevent tau aggregation are also under development. Clinical trials that test the efficacy of these DMT candidates are in preparation or ongoing. Recent studies of biomarkers of AD brain lesions have indicated that Abeta and tau accumulation appears 10 to 30 years before the occurrence of dementia and gradually propagate to reach the level that causes symptoms. Therefore, efficacy of DMT has to be evaluated in the preclinical stage of AD. The incidence of preclinical AD in the cognitively normal, aged population are estimated to be around 19%. Thus, currently available biomarkers, amyloid/tau PET imaging and cerebrospinal fluid measurements of Abeta and tau, are, perhaps, too invasive and costly. An international collaborative effort is needed to overcome this issue. PMID:27056864

  18. PLP-dependent enzymes as potential drug targets for protozoan diseases.

    PubMed

    Kappes, Barbara; Tews, Ivo; Binter, Alexandra; Macheroux, Peter

    2011-11-01

    The chemical properties of the B(6) vitamers are uniquely suited for wide use as cofactors in essential reactions, such as decarboxylations and transaminations. This review addresses current efforts to explore vitamin B(6) dependent enzymatic reactions as drug targets. Several current targets are described that are found amongst these enzymes. The focus is set on diseases caused by protozoan parasites. Comparison across a range of these organisms allows insight into the distribution of potential targets, many of which may be of interest in the development of broad range anti-protozoan drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pyridoxal Phosphate Enzymology.

  19. New and Developing Therapies for Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Suzanne K.; Green, Peter H. R.

    2009-01-01

    The treatment for celiac disease, a removal of gluten in the diet, is safe and effective for the vast majority of patients. There is a large body of evidence that the diagnosis and treatment of those with celiac disease ensures considerable health benefits. Although a gluten-free diet is the principal treatment for celiac disease, it is relatively expensive, inconvenient and difficult to adhere to. For these reasons, there is interest in developing alternative therapies. Emerging research for the treatment of celiac disease has focused on three areas: to decrease gluten exposure, to modify intestinal permeability and to modulate immune activation. Therapies developed thus far consist of enzymes designed to digest gluten and the use of inhibitors of paracellular permeability to decrease the migration of gluten peptides into the lamina propria. Other potential therapeutic maneuvers include the binding of gluten by polymers, the use of tissue transglutaminase (TTG) inhibitors and DQ2 or DQ8 blockers, or modulation of cytokine production. While all represent new and exciting therapies, an ideal therapy should have virtually no side effects similar to a gluten-free diet. A pharmaceutical agent may be used on an intermittent basis, such as following occasional gluten exposure or on a chronic basis to mitigate the effects of potential inadvertent ingestion of gluten. PMID:21180558

  20. Biomarkers for the Development of New Medications for Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Bough, Kristopher J; Amur, Shashi; Lao, Guifang; Hemby, Scott E; Tannu, Nilesh S; Kampman, Kyle M; Schmitz, Joy M; Martinez, Diana; Merchant, Kalpana M; Green, Charles; Sharma, Jyoti; Dougherty, Anne H; Moeller, F Gerard

    2014-01-01

    There has been significant progress in personalized drug development. In large part, this has taken place in the oncology field and been due to the ability of researchers/clinicians to discover and develop novel drug development tools (DDTs), such as biomarkers. In cancer treatment research, biomarkers have permitted a more accurate pathophysiological characterization of an individual patient, and have enabled practitioners to target mechanistically the right drug, to the right patient, at the right time. Similar to cancer, patients with substance use disorders (SUDs) present clinically with heterogeneous symptomatology and respond variably to therapeutic interventions. If comparable biomarkers could be identified and developed for SUDs, significant diagnostic and therapeutic advances could be made. In this review, we highlight current opportunities and difficulties pertaining to the identification and development of biomarkers for SUDs. We focus on cocaine dependence as an example. Putative diagnostic, pharmacodynamic (PD), and predictive biomarkers for cocaine dependence are discussed across a range of methodological approaches. A possible cocaine-dependent clinical outcome assessment (COA)—another type of defined DDT—is also discussed. At present, biomarkers for cocaine dependence are in their infancy. Much additional research will be needed to identify, validate, and qualify these putative tools prior to their potential use for medications development and/or application to clinical practice. However, with a large unmet medical need and an estimated market size of several hundred million dollars per year, if developed, biomarkers for cocaine dependence will hold tremendous value to both industry and public health. PMID:23979119

  1. Aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease depending on different glucose concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Kirichuk, Vyacheslav F.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2002-07-01

    The aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease comparing to practically healthy persons and patients with coronary heart disease combined with non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus depending on different glucose concentration in unguentums of blood incubates with the help of computer microphotometer - visual analyzer was studied. Two-phase behavior of erythrocytes size changing of practically healthy persons depending on glucose concentration in an incubation medium and instability erythrocyte systems of a whole blood to the influence of high glucose concentration were revealed. Influence of high glucose concentration on aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease and its combination with non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was revealed.

  2. Scale dependence of disease impacts on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, David M.; Bradford, John B.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2015-01-01

    By examining variation in disease prevalence, mortality of healthy trees, and mortality of diseased trees, we showed that the role of disease in aspen tree mortality depended on the scale of inference. For variation among individuals in diameter, disease tended to expose intermediate-size trees experiencing moderate risk to greater risk. For spatial variation in summer temperature, disease exposed lower risk populations to greater mortality probabilities, but the magnitude of this exposure depended on summer precipitation. Furthermore, the importance of diameter and slenderness in mediating responses to climate supports the increasing emphasis on trait variation in studies of ecological responses to global change.

  3. Gaucher disease: clinical profile and therapeutic developments

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Timothy M

    2010-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a rare inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficiency of lysosomal acid β-glucocerebrosidase; the condition has totemic significance for the development of orphan drugs. A designer therapy, which harnesses the mannose receptor to complement the functional defect in macrophages, ameliorates the principal clinical manifestations in hematopoietic bone marrow and viscera. While several aspects of Gaucher disease (particularly those affecting the skeleton and brain) are refractory to treatment, enzyme (replacement) therapy has become a pharmaceutical blockbuster. Human β-glucocerebrosidase was originally obtained from placenta and the Genzyme Corporation (Allston, MA) subsequently developed a recombinant product. After purification, the enzyme is modified to reveal terminal mannose residues which facilitate selective uptake of the protein, imiglucerase (Cerezyme®), in macrophage-rich tissues. The unprecedented success of Cerezyme has attracted fierce competition: two biosimilar agents, velaglucerase-alfa, VPRIV® (Shire Human Genetic Therapies, Dublin, Ireland) and taliglucerase-alfa (Protalix, Carmiel, Israel), are now approved or in late-phase clinical development as potential ‘niche busters’. Oral treatments have advantages over biological agents for disorders requiring lifelong therapy and additional stratagems which utilize small, orally active molecules have been introduced; these include two chemically distinct compounds which inhibit uridine diphosphate glucose: N-acylsphingosine glucosyltransferase, the first step in the biosynthesis of glucosylceramide – a key molecular target in Gaucher disease and other glycosphingolipidoses. Academic and commercial enterprises in biotechnology have combined strategically to expand the therapeutic repertoire in Gaucher disease. The innovative potential of orphan drug legislation has been realized – with prodigious rewards for companies embracing its humanitarian precepts. In the

  4. Developing Cellular Therapies for Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Kapil; Rao, Mahendra; Hull, Sara Chandros; Stroncek, David; Brooks, Brian P.; Feigal, Ellen; van Meurs, Jan C.; Huang, Christene A.; Miller, Sheldon S.

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical advances in vision research have been greatly facilitated by the clinical accessibility of the visual system, its ease of experimental manipulation, and its ability to be functionally monitored in real time with noninvasive imaging techniques at the level of single cells and with quantitative end-point measures. A recent example is the development of stem cell–based therapies for degenerative eye diseases including AMD. Two phase I clinical trials using embryonic stem cell–derived RPE are already underway and several others using both pluripotent and multipotent adult stem cells are in earlier stages of development. These clinical trials will use a variety of cell types, including embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cell–derived RPE, bone marrow– or umbilical cord–derived mesenchymal stem cells, fetal neural or retinal progenitor cells, and adult RPE stem cells–derived RPE. Although quite distinct, these approaches, share common principles, concerns and issues across the clinical development pipeline. These considerations were a central part of the discussions at a recent National Eye Institute meeting on the development of cellular therapies for retinal degenerative disease. At this meeting, emphasis was placed on the general value of identifying and sharing information in the so-called “precompetitive space.” The utility of this behavior was described in terms of how it could allow us to remove road blocks in the clinical development pipeline, and more efficiently and economically move stem cell–based therapies for retinal degenerative diseases toward the clinic. Many of the ocular stem cell approaches we discuss are also being used more broadly, for nonocular conditions and therefore the model we develop here, using the precompetitive space, should benefit the entire scientific community. PMID:24573369

  5. Wnt signaling in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Freese, Jennifer L.; Pino, Darya; Pleasure, Samuel J.

    2009-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is one of the central morphogenic signaling pathways regulating early vertebrate development. In recent years it’s become clear that the Wnt pathway also regulates many aspects of nervous system development from the patterning stage through the regulation of neural plasticity. In this review, we first present an overview of the components of the Wnt-signaling pathway and then go on to discuss the literature describing the multitude of roles of Wnts in nervous system. In the latter portion of the review we turn to the ways that defects in Wnt signaling lead to neurologic disease. PMID:19765659

  6. The melanocyte lineage in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Mort, Richard L.; Jackson, Ian J.; Patton, E. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Melanocyte development provides an excellent model for studying more complex developmental processes. Melanocytes have an apparently simple aetiology, differentiating from the neural crest and migrating through the developing embryo to specific locations within the skin and hair follicles, and to other sites in the body. The study of pigmentation mutations in the mouse provided the initial key to identifying the genes and proteins involved in melanocyte development. In addition, work on chicken has provided important embryological and molecular insights, whereas studies in zebrafish have allowed live imaging as well as genetic and transgenic approaches. This cross-species approach is powerful and, as we review here, has resulted in a detailed understanding of melanocyte development and differentiation, melanocyte stem cells and the role of the melanocyte lineage in diseases such as melanoma. PMID:25670789

  7. The melanocyte lineage in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Mort, Richard L; Jackson, Ian J; Patton, E Elizabeth

    2015-02-15

    Melanocyte development provides an excellent model for studying more complex developmental processes. Melanocytes have an apparently simple aetiology, differentiating from the neural crest and migrating through the developing embryo to specific locations within the skin and hair follicles, and to other sites in the body. The study of pigmentation mutations in the mouse provided the initial key to identifying the genes and proteins involved in melanocyte development. In addition, work on chicken has provided important embryological and molecular insights, whereas studies in zebrafish have allowed live imaging as well as genetic and transgenic approaches. This cross-species approach is powerful and, as we review here, has resulted in a detailed understanding of melanocyte development and differentiation, melanocyte stem cells and the role of the melanocyte lineage in diseases such as melanoma.

  8. Matrix-Dependent Perturbation of TGFβ Signaling and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Jefferson J.; Gerber, Elizabeth E.; Dietz, Harry C.

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) is a multipotent cytokine that is sequestered in the extracellular matrix (ECM) through interactions with a number of ECM proteins. The ECM serves to concentrate latent TGFβ at sites of intended function, to influence the bioavailability and/or function of TGFβ activators, and perhaps to regulate the intrinsic performance of cell surface effectors of TGFβ signal propagation. The downstream consequences of TGFβ signaling cascades in turn provide feedback modulation of the ECM. This review covers recent examples of how genetic mutations in constituents of the ECM or TGFβ signaling cascade result in altered ECM homeostasis, cellular performance and ultimately disease, with an emphasis on emerging therapeutic strategies that seek to capitalize on this refined mechanistic understanding. PMID:22641039

  9. von Willebrand disease in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Alok

    2005-01-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD) is considered to be the most common inherited bleeding disorder. Data on its epidemiology and impact in developing countries are limited. The biologic heterogeneity and variable presentation of VWD make diagnosis difficult. Although there is no accurate estimate of the prevalence of VWD in developing countries, available data suggest that the proportion of diagnosed cases is lower than the expected number, often accounting for only 6% to 13% of patients with hereditary bleeding disorders. Although accurate subtyping is often not possible, the number with severe disease tends to be much higher, particularly in those parts of the world where consanguinity is common. Agents used to treat patients with VWD range from plasma to purified factor concentrates. Desmopressin (DDAVP) is commonly used. Preliminary data on molecular genetics suggests that there are significant population differences. There is inadequate awareness of this condition and lack of support for these patients from the health care system in many developing countries. Concerted efforts are needed at the scientific and social levels to improve this situation. PMID:15662614

  10. BMP SIGNALING IN VASCULAR DEVELOPMENT AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Jonathan W.; deCaestecker, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic and functional studies indicate that common components of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling pathway play critical roles in regulating vascular development in the embryo, and in promoting vascular homeostasis and disease in the adult. However, discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo findings, and distinct functional properties of the BMP signaling pathway in different vascular beds have led to controversies in the field that have been difficult to reconcile. This review attempts to clarify some of these issues by providing an up to date overview of the biology and genetics of BMP signaling relevant to the intact vasculature. PMID:20674464

  11. The development of the disease activity score (DAS) and the disease activity score using 28 joint counts (DAS28).

    PubMed

    van Riel, P L C M

    2014-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity cannot be measured using a single variable. The Disease Activity Score (DAS) has been developed as a quantitative index to be able to measure, study and manage disease activity in RA in daily clinical practice, clinical trials, and long term observational studies. The DAS is a continuous measure of RA disease activity that combines information from swollen joints, tender joints, acute phase response and patient self-report of general health. Cut points were developed to classify patients in remission, as well as low, moderate, and severe disease activity in the 1990s. DAS-based EULAR response criteria were primarily developed to be used in clinical trials to classify individual patients as non-, moderate, or good responders, depending on the magnitude of change and absolute level of disease activity at the conclusion of the test.

  12. The Development of Visual Areas Depends Differently on Visual Experience

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tianzi; Yu, Chunshui

    2013-01-01

    Visual experience plays an important role in the development of the visual cortex; however, recent functional imaging studies have shown that the functional organization is preserved in several higher-tier visual areas in congenitally blind subjects, indicating that maturation of visual areas depend unequally on visual experience. In this study, we aim to validate this hypothesis using a multimodality MRI approach. We found increased cortical thickness in the congenitally blind was present in the early visual areas and absent in the higher-tier ones, suggesting that the structural development of the visual cortex depends hierarchically on visual experience. In congenitally blind subjects, the decreased resting-state functional connectivity with the primary somatosensory cortex was more prominent in the early visual areas than in the higher-tier ones and were more pronounced in the ventral stream than in the dorsal one, suggesting that the development of functional organization of the visual cortex also depends differently on visual experience. Moreover, congenitally blind subjects showed normal or increased functional connectivity between ipsilateral higher-tier and early visual areas, suggesting an indirect corticocortical pathway through which somatosenroy information can reach the early visual areas. These findings support our hypothesis that the development of visual areas depends differently on visual experience. PMID:23308283

  13. Investigation of temperature dependence of development and aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacher, G. A.

    1969-01-01

    Temperature dependence of maturation and metabolic rates in insects, and the failure of vital processes during development were investigated. The paper presented advances the general hypothesis that aging in biological systems is a consequence of the production of entropy concomitant with metabolic activity.

  14. Obesity dependent metabolic signatures associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Barr, J.; Caballería, J.; Martínez-Arranz, I.; Domínguez-Díez, A.; Alonso, C.; Muntané, J.; Pérez-Cormenzana, M.; García-Monzón, C.; Mayo, R.; Martín-Duce, A.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Iacono, O. Lo; Tordjman, J.; Andrade, R.J.; Pérez-Carreras, M.; Le Marchand-Brustel, Y.; Tran, A.; Fernández-Escalante, C.; Arévalo, E.; García–Unzueta, M.; Clement, K.; Crespo, J.; Gual, P.; Gómez-Fleitas, M.; Martínez-Chantar, M.L.; Castro, A.; Lu, S.C.; Vázquez-Chantada, M.; Mato, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the mechanisms by which nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) progresses from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis (NASH) is still very limited. Despite the growing number of studies linking the disease with altered serum metabolite levels, an obstacle to the development of metabolome-based NAFLD predictors has been the lack of large cohort data from biopsy-proven patients matched for key metabolic features such as obesity. We studied 467 biopsied individuals with normal liver histology (n=90) or diagnosed with NAFLD (steatosis, n=246; NASH, n=131), randomly divided into estimation (80% of all patients) and validation (20% of all patients) groups. Qualitative determinations of 540 serum metabolite variables were performed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). The metabolic profile was dependent on patient body-mass index (BMI), suggesting that the NAFLD pathogenesis mechanism may be quite different depending on an individual’s level of obesity. A BMI-stratified multivariate model based on the NAFLD serum metabolic profile was used to separate patients with and without NASH. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.87 in the estimation and 0.85 in the validation group. The cutoff (0.54) corresponding to maximum average diagnostic accuracy (0.82) predicted NASH with a sensitivity of 0.71 and a specificity of 0.92 (negative/positive predictive values = 0.82/0.84). The present data, indicating that a BMI-dependent serum metabolic profile may be able to reliably distinguish NASH from steatosis patients, have significant implications for the development of NASH biomarkers and potential novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22364559

  15. Diversity in Mechanisms of Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilation in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Matthew J.; Gutterman, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Small arterioles (40–150 μm) contribute to the majority of vascular resistance within organs and tissues. Under resting conditions, the basal tone of these vessels is determined by a delicate balance between vasodilator and vasoconstrictor influences. Cardiovascular homeostasis and regional tissue perfusion is largely a function of the ability of these small blood vessels to constrict or dilate in response to the changing metabolic demands of specific tissues. The endothelial cell layer of these microvessels is a key modulator of vasodilation through the synthesis and release of vasoactive substances. Beyond their vasomotor properties, these compounds importantly modulate vascular cell proliferation, inflammation, and thrombosis. Thus the balance between local regulation of vascular tone and vascular pathophysiology can vary depending upon which factors are released from the endothelium. This review will focus on the dynamic nature of the endothelial released dilator factors depending on species, anatomic site, and presence of disease, with a focus on the human coronary microcirculation. Knowledge how endothelial signaling changes with disease may provide insights into the early stages of developing vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis, or related vascular pathologies. PMID:23311975

  16. Development of the PROMIS® Nicotine Dependence Item Banks

    PubMed Central

    Edelen, Maria Orlando; Tucker, Joan S.; Stucky, Brian D.; Hansen, Mark; Cai, Li

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Nicotine dependence is a core construct important for understanding cigarette smoking and smoking cessation behavior. This article describes analyses conducted to develop and evaluate item banks for assessing nicotine dependence among daily and nondaily smokers. Methods: Using data from a sample of daily (N = 4,201) and nondaily (N =1,183) smokers, we conducted a series of item factor analyses, item response theory analyses, and differential item functioning analyses (according to gender, age, and race/ethnicity) to arrive at a unidimensional set of nicotine dependence items for daily and nondaily smokers. We also evaluated performance of short forms (SFs) and computer adaptive tests (CATs) to efficiently assess dependence. Results: A total of 32 items were included in the Nicotine Dependence item banks; 22 items are common across daily and nondaily smokers, 5 are unique to daily smokers, and 5 are unique to nondaily smokers. For both daily and nondaily smokers, the Nicotine Dependence item banks are strongly unidimensional, highly reliable (reliability = 0.97 and 0.97, respectively), and perform similarly across gender, age, and race/ethnicity groups. SFs common to daily and nondaily smokers consist of 8 and 4 items (reliability = 0.91 and 0.81, respectively). Results from simulated CATs showed that dependence can be assessed with very good precision for most respondents using fewer than 6 items adaptively selected from the item banks. Conclusions: Nicotine dependence on cigarettes can be assessed on the basis of these item banks via one of the SFs, by using CATs, or through a tailored set of items selected for a specific research purpose. PMID:25118226

  17. [Research Development of Diagnostic Techniques for Tropical Infectious Diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-mei

    2015-12-01

    Tropical infectious diseases remain predominant among emerging infectious diseases, and some of those are showing a spreading trend worldwide. Improvement of diagnostic techniques is a key to the control of tropical diseases. In this review, we provide an overview on research development of diagnostic techniques for the diseases, especially the development of immunological and molecular detection techniques.

  18. PRKX, a Novel cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Member, Plays an Important Role in Development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sizhou; Li, Qian; Alberts, Ian; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-03-01

    The human protein kinase X gene (PRKX) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are both c-AMP-dependent serine/threonine protein kinases within the protein kinase AGC subgroup. Of all the protein kinases in this group, PRKX is the least studied. PRKX has been isolated from patients with chondrodysplasia punctate and is involved in numerous processes, including sexual differentiation and fertilization, normal kidney development and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), blood maturation, neural development, and angiogenesis in vitro. Although the role of PRKX in development and disease has been reported recently, the underlying mechanism of PRKX activity is largely unknown. In addition, based on the expression pattern of PRKX and the extensive role of PKA in disease and development, PRKX might have additional crucial functions that have not been addressed in the literature. In this review, we summarize the characteristics and developmental functions of PRKX that have been reported by recent studies. In particular, we elucidate the structural and functional differences between PRKX and PKA, as well as the possible roles of PRKX in development and related diseases. Finally, we propose future studies that could lead to important discoveries of more PRKX functions and the underlying mechanisms involved. PMID:26252946

  19. Chronic kidney disease induced in mice by reversible unilateral ureteral obstruction is dependent on genetic background.

    PubMed

    Puri, Tipu S; Shakaib, Mohammed I; Chang, Anthony; Mathew, Liby; Olayinka, Oladunni; Minto, Andrew W M; Sarav, Menaka; Hack, Bradley K; Quigg, Richard J

    2010-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) begins with renal injury; the progression thereafter depends upon a number of factors, including genetic background. Unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) is a well-described model of renal fibrosis and as such is considered a model of CKD. We used an improved reversible unilateral ureteral obstruction (rUUO) model in mice to study the strain dependence of development of CKD after obstruction-mediated injury. C57BL/6 mice developed CKD after reversal of three or more days of ureteral obstruction as assessed by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) measurements (>40 mg/dl). In contrast, BALB/c mice were resistant to CKD with up to 10 days ureteral obstruction. During rUUO, C57BL/6 mice exhibited pronounced inflammatory and intrinsic proliferative cellular responses, disruption of renal architecture, and ultimately fibrosis. By comparison, BALB/c mice had more controlled and measured extrinsic and intrinsic responses to injury with a return to normal within several weeks after release of ureteral obstruction. Our findings provide a model that allows investigation of the genetic basis of events during recovery from injury that contribute to the development of CKD.

  20. Development of disease-resistant rice using regulatory components of induced disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases cause huge crop losses annually. In response to pathogen attacks, plants activate defense systems that are mediated through various signaling pathways. The salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway is the most powerful of these pathways. Several regulatory components of the SA signaling pathway have been identified, and are potential targets for genetic manipulation of plants’ disease resistance. However, the resistance associated with these regulatory components is often accompanied by fitness costs; that is, negative effects on plant growth and crop yield. Chemical defense inducers, such as benzothiadiazole and probenazole, act on the SA pathway and induce strong resistance to various pathogens without major fitness costs, owing to their ‘priming effect.’ Studies on how benzothiadiazole induces disease resistance in rice have identified WRKY45, a key transcription factor in the branched SA pathway, and OsNPR1/NH1. Rice plants overexpressing WRKY45 were extremely resistant to rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae and bacterial leaf blight disease caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the two major rice diseases. Disease resistance is often accompanied by fitness costs; however, WRKY45 overexpression imposed relatively small fitness costs on rice because of its priming effect. This priming effect was similar to that of chemical defense inducers, although the fitness costs were amplified by some environmental factors. WRKY45 is degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome system, and the dual role of this degradation partly explains the priming effect. The synergistic interaction between SA and cytokinin signaling that activates WRKY45 also likely contributes to the priming effect. With a main focus on these studies, I review the current knowledge of SA-pathway-dependent defense in rice by comparing it with that in Arabidopsis, and discuss potential strategies to develop disease-resistant rice using signaling components

  1. Thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzymes: from enzymology to metabolic regulation, drug design and disease models.

    PubMed

    Bunik, Victoria I; Tylicki, Adam; Lukashev, Nikolay V

    2013-12-01

    Bringing a knowledge of enzymology into research in vivo and in situ is of great importance in understanding systems biology and metabolic regulation. The central metabolic significance of thiamin (vitamin B1 ) and its diphosphorylated derivative (thiamin diphosphate; ThDP), and the fundamental differences in the ThDP-dependent enzymes of metabolic networks in mammals versus plants, fungi and bacteria, or in health versus disease, suggest that these enzymes are promising targets for biotechnological and medical applications. Here, the in vivo action of known regulators of ThDP-dependent enzymes, such as synthetic structural analogs of the enzyme substrates and thiamin, is analyzed in light of the enzymological data accumulated during half a century of research. Mimicking the enzyme-specific catalytic intermediates, the phosphonate analogs of 2-oxo acids selectively inhibit particular ThDP-dependent enzymes. Because of their selectivity, use of these compounds in cellular and animal models of ThDP-dependent enzyme malfunctions improves the validity of the model and its predictive power when compared with the nonselective and enzymatically less characterized oxythiamin and pyrithiamin. In vitro studies of the interaction of thiamin analogs and their biological derivatives with potential in vivo targets are necessary to identify and attenuate the analog selectivity. For both the substrate and thiamin synthetic analogs, in vitro reactivities with potential targets are highly relevant in vivo. However, effective concentrations in vivo are often higher than in vitro studies would suggest. The significance of specific inihibition of the ThDP-dependent enzymes for the development of herbicides, antibiotics, anticancer and neuroprotective strategies is discussed.

  2. Motor Sequence Learning Performance in Parkinson's Disease Patients Depends on the Stage of Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephan, Marianne A.; Meier, Beat; Zaugg, Sabine Weber; Kaelin-Lang, Alain

    2011-01-01

    It is still unclear, whether patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are impaired in the incidental learning of different motor sequences in short succession, although such a deficit might greatly impact their daily life. The aim of this study was thus to clarify the relation between disease parameters of PD and incidental motor learning of two…

  3. Epigenetics in Kidney Development and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dressler, Gregory R.; Patel, Sanjeevkumar R.

    2014-01-01

    The study of Epigenetics is intimately linked and inseparable from developmental biology. Many of the genes that imprint epigenetic information on chromatin, function during the specification of cell lineages in the developing embryo. These include the histone methyltransferases and their co-factors of the Polycomb and Trithorax gene families. How histone methylation is established and what regulates the tissue and locus specificity of histone methylation is an emerging area of research. The embryonic kidney is used as a model to understand how DNA binding proteins can specify cell lineages and how such proteins interact directly with the histone methylation machinery to generate a unique epigenome for particular tissues and cell types. In adult tissues, histone methylation marks must be maintained for normal gene expression patterns. In chronic and acute renal disease, epigenetic marks are being characterized and correlated with the establishment of metabolic memory, in part to explain the persistence of pathologies even when optimal treatment modalities are utilized. Thus, the state of the epigenome in adult cells must be considered when attempting to alleviate or alter gene expression patterns in disease. PMID:24958601

  4. Lyme disease: pathogenesis and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Simon, M M; Bauer, Y; Zhong, W; Hofmann, H; Wallich, R

    1999-12-01

    Research of recent years on Lyme disease has greatly increased our understanding on antigenic structures and genotypic variability of the aetiological agent, Borrelia (B.) burgdorferi sensu lato, as well as on mechanisms underlying host-parasite interactions and induction/mode of action of protective immune responses. A vaccine formula on the basis of the outer surface lipoprotein A (OspA), previously developed in our laboratory, has successfully been tested in a clinical trial involving nearly 10,000 subjects in the USA. The OspA vaccine is unique in that it protects the mammalian host from infection by eliminating spirochaetes from the vector, but does not cure an established disease. This is because spirochaetes express OspA exclusively in the tick, but not when transmitted into the vertebrate host. For Europe, a more complex vaccine formula is required in order to achieve full protection. This is due to the higher degree of heterogeneity of OspA molecules among isolates of B. burgdorferi in Europe and the inability of the monovalent vaccine to convey complete cross-protection.

  5. Atg4b-Dependent Autophagic Flux Alleviates Huntington’s Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Proenca, Catia C.; Stoehr, Natacha; Bernhard, Mario; Seger, Shanon; Genoud, Christel; Roscic, Ana; Paganetti, Paolo; Liu, Shanming; Murphy, Leon O.; Kuhn, Rainer; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Galimberti, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of aggregated mutant huntingtin (mHtt) inclusion bodies is involved in Huntigton’s disease (HD) progression. Medium sized-spiny neurons (MSNs) in the corpus striatum are highly vulnerable to mHtt aggregate accumulation and degeneration, but the mechanisms and pathways involved remain elusive. Here we have developed a new model to study MSNs degeneration in the context of HD. We produced organotypic cortico-striatal slice cultures (CStS) from HD transgenic mice mimicking specific features of HD progression. We then show that induction of autophagy using catalytic inhibitors of mTOR prevents MSNs degeneration in HD CStS. Furthermore, disrupting autophagic flux by overexpressing Atg4b in neurons and slice cultures, accelerated mHtt aggregation and neuronal death, suggesting that Atg4b-dependent autophagic flux influences HD progression. Under these circumstances induction of autophagy using catalytic inhibitors of mTOR was inefficient and did not affect mHtt aggregate accumulation and toxicity, indicating that mTOR inhibition alleviates HD progression by inducing Atg4b-dependent autophagic flux. These results establish modulators of Atg4b-dependent autophagic flux as new potential targets in the treatment of HD. PMID:23861892

  6. Trophic macrophages in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Specialized phagocytes are found in the most primitive multicellular organisms. Their roles in homeostasis and in distinguishing self from non-self have evolved with the complexity of organisms and their immune systems. Equally important, but often overlooked, are the roles of macrophages in tissue development. As discussed in this Review, these include functions in branching morphogenesis, neuronal patterning, angiogenesis, bone morphogenesis and the generation of adipose tissue. In each case, macrophage depletion impairs the formation of the tissue and compromises its function. I argue that in several diseases, the unrestrained acquisition of these developmental macrophage functions exacerbates pathology. For example, macrophages enhance tumour progression and metastasis by affecting tumour-cell migration and invasion, as well as angiogenesis. PMID:19282852

  7. Development of context dependency in human space perception.

    PubMed

    Sciutti, Alessandra; Burr, David; Saracco, Alice; Sandini, Giulio; Gori, Monica

    2014-12-01

    Perception is a complex process, where prior knowledge exerts a fundamental influence over what we see. The use of priors is at the basis of the well-known phenomenon of central tendency: Judgments of almost all quantities (such as length, duration, and number) tend to gravitate toward their mean magnitude. Although such context dependency is universal in adult perceptual judgments, how it develops with age remains unknown. We asked children from 7 to 14 years of age and adults to reproduce lengths of stimuli drawn from different distributions and evaluated whether judgments were influenced by stimulus context. All participants reproduced the presented length differently depending on the context: The same stimulus was reproduced as shorter, when on average stimuli were short, and as longer, when on average stimuli were long. Interestingly, the relative importance given to the current sensory signal and to priors was almost constant during childhood. This strategy, which in adults is optimal in Bayesian terms, is apparently successful in holding the sensory noise at bay even during development. Hence, the influence of previous knowledge on perception is present already in young children, suggesting that context dependency is established early in the developing brain.

  8. MBT domain proteins in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonasio, Roberto; Lecona, Emilio; Reinberg, Danny

    2013-01-01

    The Malignant Brain Tumor (MBT) domain is a “chromatin reader”, a protein module that binds to post-translational modifications on histone tails that are thought to affect a variety of chromatin processes, including transcription. More specifically, MBT domains recognize mono- and di-methylated lysines at a number of different positions on histone H3 and H4 tails. Three Drosophila proteins, SCM, L(3)MBT and SFMBT contain multiple adjacent MBT repeats and have critical roles in development, maintenance of cell identity, and tumor suppression. Although they function in different pathways, these proteins all localize to chromatin in vivo and repress transcription by a currently unknown molecular mechanism that requires the MBT domains. The human genome contains several homologues of these MBT proteins, some of which have been linked to important gene regulatory pathways, such as E2F/Rb- and Polycomb-mediated repression, and to the insurgence of certain neurological tumors. Here, we review the genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology of MBT proteins and their role in development and disease. PMID:19778625

  9. Parasitic diarrheal disease: drug development and targets

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Amir; Peerzada, Mudasir N.; Ahmad, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea is the manifestation of gastrointestinal infection and is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity specifically among the children of less than 5 years age worldwide. Moreover, in recent years there has been a rise in the number of reports of intestinal infections continuously in the industrialized world. These are largely related to waterborne and food borne outbreaks. These occur by the pathogenesis of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms like bacteria and parasites. The parasitic intestinal infection has remained mostly unexplored and under assessed in terms of therapeutic development. The lack of new drugs and the risk of resistance have led us to carry out this review on drug development for parasitic diarrheal diseases. The major focus has been depicted on commercially available drugs, currently synthesized active heterocyclic compounds and unique drug targets, that are vital for the existence and growth of the parasites and can be further exploited for the search of therapeutically active anti-parasitic agents. PMID:26617574

  10. Scale dependency of biocapacity and the fallacy of unsustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YUE, Dongxia; MENG, Xingmin; MA, Jinhui

    2014-05-01

    Since the concept of sustainable development was put forward (WCED, 1987), it has become an ideal development mode and a common policy goal, and many indicators have been developed to assess the status of sustainable development. However, among these large numbers of indicators of sustainable development, the EF methodology has gain popularity due to its compatibility with the data format commonly derived from economic and social surveys. To date, area-based information obtained from remote sensing and aerial photography is often used in studies on ecological footprint and sustainability, especially in calculating biocapacity. Given the importance of the modifiable areal unit problem (MAUP; i.e. the scale dependency of area-based information), a comprehensive understanding of how the changes of biocapacity across scales (i.e. the resolution of data) is pivotal for regional sustainable development. To this end, based on the Monte Carlo simulation and the GIS technology, we chose two typical river basins in Northwest China (Jinghe River Watershed and Shiyang River Basin) and calculated the biocapacity at different spatial scales based on remote sensing data, with a nominal resolution of 30m at the scale of 1:100,000. The analysis demonstrated that the area sizes of major land covers and subsequently biocapacity showed strong signals of scale dependency, with minor land covers in the region shrinking while major land covers expanding when using large-grain (low resolution) data. The relationship between land cover sizes and their change ratio across scales was shown to follow a logarithm function. The biocapacity estimated at 10×10 km resolution is 10% lower than the one estimated at 1×1 km resolution, casting doubts on many regional and global studies which often rely on coarse scale datasets. Our results not only suggest that fine-scale biocapacity estimates can be extrapolated from coarse-scale ones according to the specific scale-dependent patterns of land

  11. Super-enhancer lncs to cardiovascular development and disease.

    PubMed

    Ounzain, Samir; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac development, function and pathological remodelling in response to stress depend on the dynamic control of tissue specific gene expression by distant acting transcriptional enhancers. Recently, super-enhancers (SEs), also known as stretch or large enhancer clusters, are emerging as sentinel regulators within the gene regulatory networks that underpin cellular functions. It is becoming increasingly evident that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) associated with these sequences play fundamental roles for enhancer activity and the regulation of the gene programs hardwired by them. Here, we review this emerging landscape, focusing on the roles of SEs and their derived lncRNAs in cardiovascular development and disease. We propose that exploration of this genomic landscape could provide novel therapeutic targets and approaches for the amelioration of cardiovascular disease. Ultimately we envisage a future of ncRNA therapeutics targeting the SE landscape to alleviate cardiovascular disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  12. Epitranscriptional regulation of cardiovascular development and disease.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Gerald W; Matkovich, Scot J

    2015-04-15

    Development, homeostasis and responses to stress in the heart all depend on appropriate control of mRNA expression programmes, which may be enacted at the level of DNA sequence, DNA accessibility and RNA-mediated control of mRNA output. Diverse mechanisms underlie promoter-driven transcription of coding mRNAs and their translation into protein, and the ways in which sequence alteration of DNA can make an impact on these processes have been studied for some time. The field of epigenetics explores changes in DNA structure that influence its accessibility by transcriptional machinery, and we are continuing to develop our understanding of how these processes modify cardiac RNA production. In this topical review, we do not focus on how DNA sequence and methylation, and histone interactions, may alter its accessibility, but rather on newly described mechanisms by which some transcribed RNAs may alter initial transcription or downstream processing of other RNAs, involving both short non-coding RNAs (microRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Here we present examples of how these two classes of non-coding RNAs mediate widespread effects on cardiac transcription and protein output in processes for which we use the broad term 'epitranscriptional regulation' and that are complementary to the DNA methylation and histone modification events studied by classical epigenetics.

  13. Context-dependent symbioses and their potential roles in wildlife diseases

    PubMed Central

    Daskin, Joshua H.; Alford, Ross A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known in ecology, evolution and medicine that both the nature (commensal, parasitic and mutualistic) and outcome (symbiont fitness, survival) of symbiotic interactions are often context-dependent. Less is known about the importance of context-dependence in symbioses involved in wildlife disease. We review variable symbioses, and use the amphibian disease chytridiomycosis to demonstrate how understanding context-dependence can improve the understanding and management of wildlife diseases. In chytridiomycosis, the host–pathogen interaction is context-dependent; it is strongly affected by environmental temperature. Skin bacteria can also modify the interaction; some bacteria reduce amphibians' susceptibility to chytridiomycosis. Augmentation of protective microbes is being considered as a possible management tool, but informed application of bioaugmentation requires understanding of how the interactions between host, beneficial bacteria and pathogen depend upon environmental context. The community-level response of the amphibian skin microbiota to environmental conditions may explain the relatively narrow range of environmental conditions in which past declines have occurred. Environmental context affects virulence and the protection provided by mutualists in other host–pathogen systems, including threatened bats and corals. Increased focus on context-dependence in interactions between wildlife and their symbionts is likely to be crucial to the future investigation and management of emerging diseases of wildlife. PMID:22237907

  14. Chagas Heart Disease: Report on Recent Developments

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Shirani, Jamshid; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Mukherjee, Shankar; Nelson, Randin; Coyle, Christina M.; Spray, David C.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Guan, Fangxia; Prado, Cibele M.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiac disease in endemic areas of Latin America. It is now being diagnosed in non-endemic areas due to immigration. Typical cardiac manifestations of Chagas disease include dilated cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, cardioembolism and stroke. Clinical and laboratory-based research to define the pathology resulting from T. cruzi infection has shed light on many of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these manifestations. Antiparasitic treatment may not be appropriate for patients with advanced cardiac disease. Clinical management of Chagas heart disease is similar to that used for cardiomyopathies due to other processes. Cardiac transplantation has been successfully performed in a small number of patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:22293860

  15. Does childhood immunization against infectious diseases protect from the development of atopic disease?

    PubMed

    Martignon, Gilles; Oryszczyn, Marie-Pierre; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella

    2005-05-01

    The argument of whether early immunization against infections promotes allergy or protects from it is presently under debate. The relationship between childhood immunization and the development of atopic diseases (asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema) was examined in a population-based sample of 718 adolescents by taking individual data drawn from personal paediatric records on the schedule and the type of vaccination into account. Atopic diseases were determined using a standardized questionnaire. After adjustment for sex, age, father's socioeconomic status and active smoking, adolescents having been vaccinated (n = 694) had a significant lower risk to suffer from asthma or atopic diseases than non-vaccinated adolescents did (n = 24) [odds ratio (OR) = 0.30; 95% CI: 0.10, 0.92]. The relationship did not depend on the disease against which the vaccine was used as prophylaxis, the observance of the vaccination schedule or the number of inoculations. A higher protection was observed in the case of live attenuated vaccines (oral poliomyelitis and bacilli Camille-Guerin; OR = 0.26; 95% CI: 0.08, 0.83). These results, in agreement with previous ecological data, support the hypothesis that early vaccines could promote Th1 proliferation in response to the infectious agent contained in it, which inhibits the enhancement of atopic manifestations. Further studies are needed to confirm the phenomenon.

  16. Bilateral Activity-Dependent Interactions in the Developing Corticospinal System

    PubMed Central

    Friel, Kathleen M.; Martin, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Activity-dependent competition between the corticospinal (CS) systems in each hemisphere drives postnatal development of motor skills and stable CS tract connections with contralateral spinal motor circuits. Unilateral restriction of motor cortex (M1) activity during an early postnatal critical period impairs contralateral visually guided movements later in development and in maturity. Silenced M1 develops aberrant connections with the contralateral spinal cord whereas the initially active M1, in the other hemisphere, develops bilateral connections. In this study, we determined whether the aberrant pattern of CS tract terminations and motor impairments produced by early postnatal M1 activity restriction could be abrogated by reducing activity-dependent synaptic competition from the initially active M1 later in development. We first inactivated M1 unilaterally between postnatal weeks 5–7. We next inactivated M1 on the other side from weeks 7–11 (alternate inactivation), to reduce the competitive advantage that this side may have over the initially inactivated side. Alternate inactivation redirected aberrant contralateral CS tract terminations from the initially silenced M1 to their normal spinal territories and reduced the density of aberrant ipsilateral terminations from the initially active side. Normal movement endpoint control during visually guided locomotion was fully restored. This reorganization of CS terminals reveals an unsuspected late plasticity after the critical period for establishing the pattern of CS terminations in the spinal cord. Our findings show that robust bilateral interactions between the developing CS systems on each side are important for achieving balance between contralateral and ipsilateral CS tract connections and visuomotor control. PMID:17928450

  17. Activity-dependent survival of developing neocortical neurons depends on PI3K signalling.

    PubMed

    Wagner-Golbs, Antje; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2012-02-01

    Spontaneous electrical network activity plays a major role in the control of cell survival in the developing brain. Several intracellular pathways are implicated in transducing electrical activity into gene expression dependent and independent survival signals. These include activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream effector Akt, activation of Ras and subsequently MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and signalling via calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK). In the present study, we analyzed the role of these pathways for the control of neuronal survival in different extracellular potassium concentrations ([K(+) ](ex) ). Organotypic neocortical slice cultures prepared from newborn mice were kept in 5.3, 8.0 and 25.0mM [K(+) ](ex) and treated with specific inhibitors of PI3K, MEK1, CaMKK and a broad spectrum CaMK inhibitor. After 6h of incubation, slices were immunostained for activated caspase 3 (a-caspase 3) and the number of apoptotic cells was quantified by computer based analysis. We found that in 5.3 and 8.0mM [K(+) ](ex) only PI3K was important for neuronal survival. When [K(+) ](ex) was raised to 25.0mM, a concentration above the depolarization block, we found no influence of PI3K on neuronal survival. Our data demonstrate that only the PI3K pathway, and not the MEK1, CaMKK or CaMKs pathway, plays a central role in the regulation of activity-dependent neuronal survival in the developing cerebral cortex.

  18. Neurotoxicity of the Parkinson Disease-Associated Pesticide Ziram Is Synuclein-Dependent in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lulla, Aaron; Barnhill, Lisa; Bitan, Gal; Ivanova, Magdalena I.; Nguyen, Binh; O’Donnell, Kelley; Stahl, Mark C.; Yamashiro, Chase; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Sagasti, Alvaro; Bronstein, Jeff M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to the commonly used dithiocarbamate (DTC) pesticides is associated with an increased risk of developing Parkinson disease (PD), although the mechanisms by which they exert their toxicity are not completely understood. Objective: We studied the mechanisms of ziram’s (a DTC fungicide) neurotoxicity in vivo. Methods: Zebrafish (ZF) embryos were utilized to determine ziram’s effects on behavior, neuronal toxicity, and the role of synuclein in its toxicity. Results: Nanomolar-range concentrations of ziram caused selective loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons and impaired swimming behavior. Because ziram increases α-synuclein (α-syn) concentrations in rat primary neuronal cultures, we investigated the effect of ziram on ZF γ-synuclein 1 (γ1). ZF express 3 synuclein isoforms, and ZF γ1 appears to be the closest functional homologue to α-syn. We found that recombinant ZF γ1 formed fibrils in vitro, and overexpression of ZF γ1 in ZF embryos led to the formation of neuronal aggregates and neurotoxicity in a manner similar to that of α-syn. Importantly, knockdown of ZF γ1 with morpholinos and disruption of oligomers with the molecular tweezer CLR01 prevented ziram’s DA toxicity. Conclusions: These data show that ziram is selectively toxic to DA neurons in vivo, and this toxicity is synuclein-dependent. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms by which pesticides may cause PD. Citation: Lulla A, Barnhill L, Bitan G, Ivanova MI, Nguyen B, O’Donnell K, Stahl MC, Yamashiro C, Klärner FG, Schrader T, Sagasti A, Bronstein JM. 2016. Neurotoxicity of the Parkinson disease-associated pesticide ziram is synuclein-dependent in zebrafish embryos. Environ Health Perspect 124:1766–1775; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP141 PMID:27301718

  19. Dependability modeling and assessment in UML-based software development.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Simona; Merseguer, José; Petriu, Dorina C

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of software nonfunctional properties (NFP) is an important problem in software development. In the context of model-driven development, an emerging approach for the analysis of different NFPs consists of the following steps: (a) to extend the software models with annotations describing the NFP of interest; (b) to transform automatically the annotated software model to the formalism chosen for NFP analysis; (c) to analyze the formal model using existing solvers; (d) to assess the software based on the results and give feedback to designers. Such a modeling→analysis→assessment approach can be applied to any software modeling language, be it general purpose or domain specific. In this paper, we focus on UML-based development and on the dependability NFP, which encompasses reliability, availability, safety, integrity, and maintainability. The paper presents the profile used to extend UML with dependability information, the model transformation to generate a DSPN formal model, and the assessment of the system properties based on the DSPN results.

  20. Dependability Modeling and Assessment in UML-Based Software Development

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Simona; Merseguer, José; Petriu, Dorina C.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of software nonfunctional properties (NFP) is an important problem in software development. In the context of model-driven development, an emerging approach for the analysis of different NFPs consists of the following steps: (a) to extend the software models with annotations describing the NFP of interest; (b) to transform automatically the annotated software model to the formalism chosen for NFP analysis; (c) to analyze the formal model using existing solvers; (d) to assess the software based on the results and give feedback to designers. Such a modeling→analysis→assessment approach can be applied to any software modeling language, be it general purpose or domain specific. In this paper, we focus on UML-based development and on the dependability NFP, which encompasses reliability, availability, safety, integrity, and maintainability. The paper presents the profile used to extend UML with dependability information, the model transformation to generate a DSPN formal model, and the assessment of the system properties based on the DSPN results. PMID:22988428

  1. Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Dependence Upon Texture Development in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Loftus, Ryan J.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2016-01-01

    The atomic oxygen erosion yield (volume of a polymer that is lost due to oxidation per incident atom) of polymers is typically assumed to be reasonably constant with increasing fluence. However polymers containing ash or inorganic pigments, tend to have erosion yields that decrease with fluence due to an increasing presence of protective particles on the polymer surface. This paper investigates two additional possible causes for erosion yields of polymers that are dependent upon atomic oxygen. These are the development of surface texture which can cause the erosion yield to change with fluence due to changes in the aspect ratio of the surface texture that develops and polymer specific atomic oxygen interaction parameters. The surface texture development under directed hyperthermal attack produces higher aspect ratio surface texture than isotropic thermal energy atomic oxygen attack. The fluence dependence of erosion yields is documented for low Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) effective fluences for a variety of polymers under directed hyperthermal and isotropic thermal energy attack.

  2. Lower urinary tract development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Rasouly, Hila Milo; Lu, Weining

    2013-01-01

    Congenital Anomalies of the Lower Urinary Tract (CALUT) are a family of birth defects of the ureter, the bladder and the urethra. CALUT includes ureteral anomalies such as congenital abnormalities of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) and ureterovesical junction (UVJ), and birth defects of the bladder and the urethra such as bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), prune belly syndrome (PBS), and posterior urethral valves (PUV). CALUT is one of the most common birth defects and is often associated with antenatal hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infections (UTI), chronic kidney disease and renal failure in children. Here, we discuss the current genetic and molecular knowledge about lower urinary tract development and genetic basis of CALUT in both human and mouse models. We provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the formation of the ureter, bladder, and urethra, and different genes and signaling pathways controlling these developmental processes. Human genetic disorders that affect the ureter, bladder and urethra and associated gene mutations are also presented. As we are entering the post-genomic era of personalized medicine, information in this article may provide useful interpretation for the genetic and genomic test results collected from patients with lower urinary tract birth defects. With evidence-based interpretations, clinicians may provide more effective personalized therapies to patients and genetic counseling for their families. PMID:23408557

  3. SOCS proteins in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Trengove, Monique C; Ward, Alister C

    2013-01-01

    Cytokine and growth factor signaling mediates essential roles in the differentiation, proliferation, survival and function of a number of cell lineages. This is achieved via specific receptors located on the surface of target cells, with ligand binding activating key intracellular signal transduction cascades to mediate the requisite cellular outcome. Effective resolution of receptor signaling is also essential, with excessive signaling having the potential for pathological consequences. The Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family of proteins represent one important mechanism to extinguish cytokine and growth factor receptor signaling. There are 8 SOCS proteins in mammals; SOCS1-7 and the alternatively named Cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CISH). SOCS1-3 and CISH are predominantly associated with the regulation of cytokine receptor signaling, while SOCS4-7 are more commonly involved in the control of Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Individual SOCS proteins are typically induced by specific cytokines and growth factors, thereby generating a negative feedback loop. As a consequence of their regulatory properties, SOCS proteins have important functions in development and homeostasis, with increasing recognition of their role in disease, particularly their tumor suppressor and anti-inflammatory functions. This review provides a synthesis of our current understanding of the SOCS family, with an emphasis on their immune and hematopoietic roles. PMID:23885323

  4. Allelic Spectra of Risk SNPs Are Different for Environment/Lifestyle Dependent versus Independent Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated sufficient data to assess the role of selection in shaping allelic diversity of disease-associated SNPs. Negative selection against disease risk variants is expected to reduce their frequencies making them overrepresented in the group of minor (<50%) alleles. Indeed, we found that the overall proportion of risk alleles was higher among alleles with frequency <50% (minor alleles) compared to that in the group of major alleles. We hypothesized that negative selection may have different effects on environment (or lifestyle)-dependent versus environment (or lifestyle)-independent diseases. We used an environment/lifestyle index (ELI) to assess influence of environmental/lifestyle factors on disease etiology. ELI was defined as the number of publications mentioning “environment” or “lifestyle” AND disease per 1,000 disease-mentioning publications. We found that the frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with strong environmental/lifestyle components follow the distribution expected under a selectively neutral model, while frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with weak environmental/lifestyle influences is shifted to the lower values indicating effects of negative selection. We hypothesized that previously selectively neutral variants become risk alleles when environment changes. The hypothesis of ancestrally neutral, currently disadvantageous risk-associated alleles predicts that the distribution of risk alleles for the environment/lifestyle dependent diseases will follow a neutral model since natural selection has not had enough time to influence allele frequencies. The results of our analysis suggest that prediction of SNP functionality based on the level of evolutionary conservation may not be useful for SNPs associated with environment/lifestyle dependent diseases. PMID:26201053

  5. Social Cognition in Alzheimer’s disease: A separate construct contributing to dependence

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Stephanie; Zahodne, Laura B.; Brandt, Jason; Blacker, Deborah; Albert, Marilyn; Dubois, Bruno; Stern, Yaakov

    2014-01-01

    The extent to which social cognitive changes reflect a discrete constellation of symptoms dissociable from general cognitive changes in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is unclear. Moreover, whether social cognitive symptoms contribute to disease severity and progression is unknown. The current multicenter study investigated cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between social cognition, general cognition, and dependence in 517 participants with Probable AD. Participants were followed every 6-months for 5.5 years. Results from multivariate latent growth curve models adjusted for sex, age, education, depression, and recruitment site revealed that social cognition and general cognition were unrelated cross-sectionally and over time. However, baseline levels of each were independently related to dependence, and change values of each were independently related to change in dependence. These findings highlight the separability of social and general cognition in AD. Results underscore the relevance of considering social cognition when modeling disease and estimating clinical outcomes related to patient disability. PMID:24656839

  6. Activity-dependent FMRP requirements in development of the neural circuitry of learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Caleb A.; Broadie, Kendal

    2015-01-01

    The activity-dependent refinement of neural circuit connectivity during critical periods of brain development is essential for optimized behavioral performance. We hypothesize that this mechanism is defective in fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading heritable cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. Here, we use optogenetic tools in the Drosophila FXS disease model to test activity-dependent dendritogenesis in two extrinsic neurons of the mushroom body (MB) learning and memory brain center: (1) the input projection neuron (PN) innervating Kenyon cells (KCs) in the MB calyx microglomeruli and (2) the output MVP2 neuron innervated by KCs in the MB peduncle. Both input and output neuron classes exhibit distinctive activity-dependent critical period dendritic remodeling. MVP2 arbors expand in Drosophila mutants null for fragile X mental retardation 1 (dfmr1), as well as following channelrhodopsin-driven depolarization during critical period development, but are reduced by halorhodopsin-driven hyperpolarization. Optogenetic manipulation of PNs causes the opposite outcome – reduced dendritic arbors following channelrhodopsin depolarization and expanded arbors following halorhodopsin hyperpolarization during development. Importantly, activity-dependent dendritogenesis in both neuron classes absolutely requires dfmr1 during one developmental window. These results show that dfmr1 acts in a neuron type-specific activity-dependent manner for sculpting dendritic arbors during early-use, critical period development of learning and memory circuitry in the Drosophila brain. PMID:25804740

  7. Benznidazole Shortage Makes Chagas Disease a Neglected Tropical Disease in Developed Countries: Data from Spain

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Miriam; Norman, Francesca F.; Pérez-Molina, José Antonio; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease endemic in Latin America. The first-line treatment option is benznidazole, but stocks are expected to run out in the coming months. Spain would need around 5 million benznidazole tablets. This drug shortage could make Chagas disease a neglected tropical disease also in developed countries. PMID:22826485

  8. Recent developments in metabolic bone diseases: a gnathic perspective.

    PubMed

    Raubenheimer, Erich J; Noffke, Claudia E; Hendrik, Hilde D

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic bone diseases often are asymptomatic and progress sub clinically. Many patients present at a late stage with catastrophic skeletal and extra skeletal complications. In this article, we provide an overview of normal bone remodeling and a synopsis of recent developments in the following conditions: osteoporosis, rickets/osteomalacia, endocrine-induced bone disease, chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder and Paget's disease of bone. Our discussion will emphasize the clinical and microscopic manifestations of these diseases in the jaws.

  9. Noncoding RNAs, Emerging Regulators of Skeletal Muscle Development and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Mao; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Liu, Jianming; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    A healthy and independent life requires skeletal muscles to maintain optimal function throughout the lifespan, which is in turn dependent on efficient activation of processes that regulate muscle development, homeostasis, and metabolism. Thus, identifying mechanisms that modulate these processes is of crucial priority. Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), have emerged as a class of previously unrecognized transcripts whose importance in a wide range of biological processes and human disease is only starting to be appreciated. In this review, we summarize the roles of recently identified miRNAs and lncRNAs during skeletal muscle development and pathophysiology. We also discuss several molecular mechanisms of these noncoding RNAs. Undoubtedly, further systematic understanding of these noncoding RNAs' functions and mechanisms will not only greatly expand our knowledge of basic skeletal muscle biology, but also significantly facilitate the development of therapies for various muscle diseases, such as muscular dystrophies, cachexia, and sarcopenia. PMID:26258142

  10. Dependence as a unifying construct in defining Alzheimer’s disease severity

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Trent; Feldman, Howard; Fillit, Howard; Sano, Mary; Schmitt, Frederick; Aisen, Paul; Leibman, Christopher; Mucha, Lisa; Ryan, J. Michael; Sullivan, Sean D.; Spackman, D. Eldon; Neumann, Peter J.; Cohen, Joshua; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews measures of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression in relation to patient dependence and offers a unifying conceptual framework for dependence in AD. Clinicians typically characterize AD by symptomatic impairments in three domains: cognition, function, and behavior. From a patient’s perspective, changes in these domains, individually and in concert, ultimately lead to increased dependence and loss of autonomy. Examples of dependence in AD range from a need for reminders (early AD) to requiring safety supervision and assistance with basic functions (late AD). Published literature has focused on the clinical domains as somewhat separate constructs and has given limited attention to the concept of patient dependence as a descriptor of AD progression. This article presents the concept of dependence on others for care needs as a potential method for translating the effect of changes in cognition, function, and behavior into a more holistic, transparent description of AD progression. PMID:21044778

  11. [Effectiveness of radiotherapy in patients with lymphogranulomatosis depending on the stage of the disease].

    PubMed

    Mendeleev, I M; Miasnikov, A A; Oleĭnik, V A

    1984-01-01

    The authors review variants of radiotherapy of patients with lymphogranulomatosis. Regard the method of irradiation with broad fields of complicated configuration as preferable. Point to the advisability of using one or another method depending on the disease stage. Describe the conditions necessary, in their opinion, for successful radiotherapy of lymphogranulomatosis patients.

  12. Path dependence in energy systems and economic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouquet, Roger

    2016-08-01

    Energy systems are subject to strong and long-lived path dependence, owing to technological, infrastructural, institutional and behavioural lock-ins. Yet, with the prospect of providing accessible cheap energy to stimulate economic development and reduce poverty, governments often invest in large engineering projects and subsidy policies. Here, I argue that while these may achieve their objectives, they risk locking their economies onto energy-intensive pathways. Thus, particularly when economies are industrializing, and their energy systems are being transformed and are not yet fully locked-in, policymakers should take care before directing their economies onto energy-intensive pathways that are likely to be detrimental to their long-run prosperity.

  13. Dependence scale for Alzheimer's disease: relationship with other clinical indicators and psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Garre-Olmo, Josep; Vilalta-Franch, Joan; Calvó-Perxas, Laia; Monserrat-Vila, Sílvia; López-Pousa, Secundino

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional and multicenter study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Dependence Scale (DS) and to assess the relationship between dependence and clinical measures according to disease severity. Medical comorbidities, cognitive status and functional status, behavior, dependence, caregiver burden, and medical and social resources were assessed using standardized instruments. The sample consisted of 343 patients (32.1% mild, 36.7% moderate, and 31.2% severe), the mean age was 78.9 years (standard deviation=7.4), and 67.0% were women. Criterion and construct validity index of DS were appropriate. The DS standard error of measurement was ±1.23. The explained variance in DS ranged between 0.598 and 0.731, and the relative contribution of clinical measures depended on disease severity. Current findings confirm that the Spanish version of the DS has appropriate psychometric indices and suggest that clinical indicators have different contribution to dependence according to disease severity.

  14. The retromer complex in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiuan; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2015-01-01

    The retromer complex is a multimeric protein complex involved in recycling proteins from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network or plasma membrane. It thus regulates the abundance and subcellular distribution of its cargo within cells. Studies using model organisms show that the retromer complex is involved in specific developmental processes. Moreover, a number of recent studies implicate aberrant retromer function in photoreceptor degeneration, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of retromer-mediated protein trafficking, highlighting key examples of retromer function in vivo. PMID:26199408

  15. Development of a Comprehensive Heart Disease Knowledge Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Hannah E.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Moser, Richard P.; Scholl, Sarah; Klein, William M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the United States, yet a comprehensive and evidence-based heart disease knowledge assessment is currently not available. Purpose: This paper describes the two-phase development of a novel heart disease knowledge questionnaire. Methods: After review and critique of the…

  16. Psychological Perspectives on the Development of Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Karen A.

    2005-01-01

    Psychological science has new opportunities to have major input into the understanding of the development of coronary heart disease. This article provides an overview of advances in understanding the etiology of heart disease, recently applied technologies for measuring early stages of heart disease, and an accumulating base of evidence on the…

  17. Fungal disease incidence along tree diversity gradients depends on latitude in European forests.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Diem; Castagneyrol, Bastien; Bruelheide, Helge; Bussotti, Filippo; Guyot, Virginie; Jactel, Hervé; Jaroszewicz, Bogdan; Valladares, Fernando; Stenlid, Jan; Boberg, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    European forests host a diversity of tree species that are increasingly threatened by fungal pathogens, which may have cascading consequences for forest ecosystems and their functioning. Previous experimental studies suggest that foliar and root pathogen abundance and disease severity decrease with increasing tree species diversity, but evidences from natural forests are rare. Here, we tested whether foliar fungal disease incidence was negatively affected by tree species diversity in different forest types across Europe. We measured the foliar fungal disease incidence on 16 different tree species in 209 plots in six European countries, representing a forest-type gradient from the Mediterranean to boreal forests. Forest plots of single species (monoculture plots) and those with different combinations of two to five tree species (mixed species plots) were compared. Specifically, we analyzed the influence of tree species richness, functional type (conifer vs. broadleaved) and phylogenetic diversity on overall fungal disease incidence. The effect of tree species richness on disease incidence varied with latitude and functional type. Disease incidence tended to increase with tree diversity, in particular in northern latitudes. Disease incidence decreased with tree species richness in conifers, but not in broadleaved trees. However, for specific damage symptoms, no tree species richness effects were observed. Although the patterns were weak, susceptibility of forests to disease appears to depend on the forest site and tree type. PMID:27066232

  18. Fungal disease incidence along tree diversity gradients depends on latitude in European forests.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Diem; Castagneyrol, Bastien; Bruelheide, Helge; Bussotti, Filippo; Guyot, Virginie; Jactel, Hervé; Jaroszewicz, Bogdan; Valladares, Fernando; Stenlid, Jan; Boberg, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    European forests host a diversity of tree species that are increasingly threatened by fungal pathogens, which may have cascading consequences for forest ecosystems and their functioning. Previous experimental studies suggest that foliar and root pathogen abundance and disease severity decrease with increasing tree species diversity, but evidences from natural forests are rare. Here, we tested whether foliar fungal disease incidence was negatively affected by tree species diversity in different forest types across Europe. We measured the foliar fungal disease incidence on 16 different tree species in 209 plots in six European countries, representing a forest-type gradient from the Mediterranean to boreal forests. Forest plots of single species (monoculture plots) and those with different combinations of two to five tree species (mixed species plots) were compared. Specifically, we analyzed the influence of tree species richness, functional type (conifer vs. broadleaved) and phylogenetic diversity on overall fungal disease incidence. The effect of tree species richness on disease incidence varied with latitude and functional type. Disease incidence tended to increase with tree diversity, in particular in northern latitudes. Disease incidence decreased with tree species richness in conifers, but not in broadleaved trees. However, for specific damage symptoms, no tree species richness effects were observed. Although the patterns were weak, susceptibility of forests to disease appears to depend on the forest site and tree type.

  19. Dependence of gait parameters on height in typically developing children.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Valentina; Nascimbeni, Alberto; Di Nardo, Francesco; Fioretti, Sandro; Burattini, Laura; Knaflitz, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In clinical gait analysis is fundamental to have access to normative data, to be used as a reference in the interpretation of pathological walking. In a paediatric population this may be complicated by the dependence of gait parameters on child growth. The aim of this work is to provide the correlations of spatial-temporal gait parameters with children's height. We obtained the regression lines of cadence, double support, and gait phases, with respect to height, from a sample of 85 normally typically developing children aged 6 to 11. Our analysis of gait phases was not limited to the traditional analysis of stance and swing, but rather focused on the sub-phases of stance - heel contact, flat foot contact, push off - which proved to be an innovative approach to gait analysis. Heel contact decreased, flat foot contact increased and push off remained essentially unchanged with respect to children's height. These results may be useful in the interpretation of gait data in developing children, and the regression lines obtained may be used to normalize their gait parameters.

  20. Dependence of gait parameters on height in typically developing children.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Valentina; Nascimbeni, Alberto; Di Nardo, Francesco; Fioretti, Sandro; Burattini, Laura; Knaflitz, Marco

    2015-08-01

    In clinical gait analysis is fundamental to have access to normative data, to be used as a reference in the interpretation of pathological walking. In a paediatric population this may be complicated by the dependence of gait parameters on child growth. The aim of this work is to provide the correlations of spatial-temporal gait parameters with children's height. We obtained the regression lines of cadence, double support, and gait phases, with respect to height, from a sample of 85 normally typically developing children aged 6 to 11. Our analysis of gait phases was not limited to the traditional analysis of stance and swing, but rather focused on the sub-phases of stance - heel contact, flat foot contact, push off - which proved to be an innovative approach to gait analysis. Heel contact decreased, flat foot contact increased and push off remained essentially unchanged with respect to children's height. These results may be useful in the interpretation of gait data in developing children, and the regression lines obtained may be used to normalize their gait parameters. PMID:26738051

  1. Sarcolemmal dependence of cardiac protection and stress-resistance: roles in aged or diseased hearts.

    PubMed

    See Hoe, Louise E; May, Lauren T; Headrick, John P; Peart, Jason N

    2016-10-01

    Disruption of the sarcolemmal membrane is a defining feature of oncotic death in cardiac ischaemia-reperfusion (I-R), and its molecular makeup not only fundamentally governs this process but also affects multiple determinants of both myocardial I-R injury and responsiveness to cardioprotective stimuli. Beyond the influences of membrane lipids on the cytoprotective (and death) receptors intimately embedded within this bilayer, myocardial ionic homeostasis, substrate metabolism, intercellular communication and electrical conduction are all sensitive to sarcolemmal makeup, and critical to outcomes from I-R. As will be outlined in this review, these crucial sarcolemmal dependencies may underlie not only the negative effects of age and common co-morbidities on myocardial ischaemic tolerance but also the on-going challenge of implementing efficacious cardioprotection in patients suffering accidental or surgically induced I-R. We review evidence for the involvement of sarcolemmal makeup changes in the impairment of stress-resistance and cardioprotection observed with ageing and highly prevalent co-morbid conditions including diabetes and hypercholesterolaemia. A greater understanding of membrane changes with age/disease, and the inter-dependences of ischaemic tolerance and cardioprotection on sarcolemmal makeup, can facilitate the development of strategies to preserve membrane integrity and cell viability, and advance the challenging goal of implementing efficacious 'cardioprotection' in clinically relevant patient cohorts. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v173.20/issuetoc.

  2. [The spread of ecology-dependent diseases of the genitourinary system in bioclimatic zones of the Primorskiĭ region].

    PubMed

    Kiku, P F; Gorborukova, T V; Anan'ev, V Iu

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of the prevalence of a class of diseases of the genitourinary system (ICD-10) of the population in the bioclimatic zones of the Primorsky Krai, with taking into account the environmental situation has been performed. The study of the prevalence of diseases of the genitourinary system was carried out with the use of the classical method of data analysis--descriptive statistics. To determine the impact of water quality correlation and regression analysis of the statistical software package SPP has been applied. The study revealed that the diseases of the genitourinary system occupy in the structure of ecology-dependent morbidity in adults--14.9%, in adolescents--13.1% and in children--5.2%, respectively. During the period of 2000-2011 there is noted a trend of the growth of the level of pathology of the genitourinary system. Over the past 5 years, the number of uronefrological patients doubled. Using the a chi-square test for independence, we found that there is a statistically significant correlation (p < or = 0.001) between the level of diseases of the genitourinary system, the bio-climatic zones and zones of ecological situation in all age groups. The use of regression analysis (multiple regression equation) allowed to determine the main parameters of the water module affecting the rate of spread of diseases of the genitourinary system in different bioclimatic zones. The prevalence level of diseases of the genitourinary system in each age group and bioclimatic zone is affected by a certain combination of parameters of the chemical composition of drinking water. The priority of them are by microbial number, Cl-, Fe sum, NO3-, HCO3-, PH, Mg2+, Ca2+. Ranking of the territory in terms of morbidity permitted to determine the problematic situation in the administrative bodies that was taken into account in the development of the program on the prevention of the ecology-dependent diseases of the genitourinary system.

  3. Congenital Heart Disease Genetics Uncovers Context-Dependent Organization and Function of Nucleoporins at Cilia.

    PubMed

    Del Viso, Florencia; Huang, Fang; Myers, Jordan; Chalfant, Madeleine; Zhang, Yongdeng; Reza, Nooreen; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Lusk, C Patrick; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2016-09-12

    Human genomics is identifying candidate genes for congenital heart disease (CHD), but discovering the underlying mechanisms remains challenging. In a patient with CHD and heterotaxy (Htx), a disorder of left-right patterning, we previously identified a duplication in Nup188. However, a mechanism to explain how a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) could cause Htx/CHD was undefined. Here, we show that knockdown of Nup188 or its binding partner Nup93 leads to a loss of cilia during embryonic development while leaving NPC function largely intact. Many data, including the localization of endogenous Nup188/93 at cilia bases, support their direct role at cilia. Super-resolution imaging of Nup188 shows two barrel-like structures with dimensions and organization incompatible with an NPC-like ring, arguing against a proposed "ciliary pore complex." We suggest that the nanoscale organization and function of nucleoporins are context dependent in a way that is required for the structure of the heart. PMID:27593162

  4. Memory for past public events depends on retrieval frequency but not memory age in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stephan; Mychajliw, Christian; Hautzinger, Martin; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Saur, Ralf; Leyhe, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by retrograde memory deficits primarily caused by dysfunction of the hippocampal complex. Unresolved questions exist concerning the time course of hippocampal involvement in conscious recollection of declarative knowledge, as reports of temporal gradients of retrograde amnesia have been inconclusive. The aim of this study was to examine whether the extent and severity of retrograde amnesia is mediated by retrieval frequency or, in contrast, whether it depends on the age of the memory according to the assumptions of the main current theories of memory formation. We compared recall of past public events in patients with AD and healthy control (HC) individuals using the Historic Events Test (HET). The HET assesses knowledge about famous public events of the past 60 years divided into four time segments and consists of subjective memory rating, dating accuracy, and contextual memory tasks. Although memory for public events was impaired in AD patients, there was a strong effect of retrieval frequency across all time segments and both groups. As AD and HC groups derived similar benefits from greater retrieval frequency, cortical structures other than the hippocampal complex may mediate memory retrieval. These findings suggest that more frequently retrieved events and facts become more independent of the hippocampal complex and thus better protected against early damage of AD. This could explain why cognitive activity may delay the onset of memory decline in persons who develop AD.

  5. Congenital Heart Disease Genetics Uncovers Context-Dependent Organization and Function of Nucleoporins at Cilia.

    PubMed

    Del Viso, Florencia; Huang, Fang; Myers, Jordan; Chalfant, Madeleine; Zhang, Yongdeng; Reza, Nooreen; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Lusk, C Patrick; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2016-09-12

    Human genomics is identifying candidate genes for congenital heart disease (CHD), but discovering the underlying mechanisms remains challenging. In a patient with CHD and heterotaxy (Htx), a disorder of left-right patterning, we previously identified a duplication in Nup188. However, a mechanism to explain how a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) could cause Htx/CHD was undefined. Here, we show that knockdown of Nup188 or its binding partner Nup93 leads to a loss of cilia during embryonic development while leaving NPC function largely intact. Many data, including the localization of endogenous Nup188/93 at cilia bases, support their direct role at cilia. Super-resolution imaging of Nup188 shows two barrel-like structures with dimensions and organization incompatible with an NPC-like ring, arguing against a proposed "ciliary pore complex." We suggest that the nanoscale organization and function of nucleoporins are context dependent in a way that is required for the structure of the heart.

  6. Memory for past public events depends on retrieval frequency but not memory age in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stephan; Mychajliw, Christian; Hautzinger, Martin; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Saur, Ralf; Leyhe, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by retrograde memory deficits primarily caused by dysfunction of the hippocampal complex. Unresolved questions exist concerning the time course of hippocampal involvement in conscious recollection of declarative knowledge, as reports of temporal gradients of retrograde amnesia have been inconclusive. The aim of this study was to examine whether the extent and severity of retrograde amnesia is mediated by retrieval frequency or, in contrast, whether it depends on the age of the memory according to the assumptions of the main current theories of memory formation. We compared recall of past public events in patients with AD and healthy control (HC) individuals using the Historic Events Test (HET). The HET assesses knowledge about famous public events of the past 60 years divided into four time segments and consists of subjective memory rating, dating accuracy, and contextual memory tasks. Although memory for public events was impaired in AD patients, there was a strong effect of retrieval frequency across all time segments and both groups. As AD and HC groups derived similar benefits from greater retrieval frequency, cortical structures other than the hippocampal complex may mediate memory retrieval. These findings suggest that more frequently retrieved events and facts become more independent of the hippocampal complex and thus better protected against early damage of AD. This could explain why cognitive activity may delay the onset of memory decline in persons who develop AD. PMID:23969995

  7. Current status of orphan disease drug development.

    PubMed

    Thoene, J G

    1994-04-01

    The Orphan Drug Act has successfully stimulated the production of many orphan products for a number of orphan diseases. The success of its exclusive marketing provision in bringing otherwise unprofitable products to market has attracted the attention of manufacturers who use this provision to gain a monopoly for products with much larger annual sales than were contemplated by the original legislation. Corrective legislation to close this loophole is being prepared for introduction to Congress.

  8. [Distribution iodine deficiency diseases in coastal areas depending on geochemical conditions].

    PubMed

    Kiku, P F; Andryukov, B G

    2014-01-01

    In the Primorsky Krai there was performed a population ecological and hygienic analysis of the relationship between the content of chemical elements in the soil and thyroid morbidity in the population of the region. The assessment of the prevalence of iodine deficiency and iodine deficiency diseases was carried out on the basis of the impact of the priority environmental toxic (strontium, nickel, cadmium, lead, arsenic, tin) and essential (nickel, iron, germanium, molybdenum, zinc, selenium) trace elements on the level of iodine deficiency diseases. The level of thyroid pathology in the territory of Primorye was established to be the highest one in areas characterized by the severe iodine deficiency (Northwest geochemical zones), where the structure of thyroid diseases is presented mainly by diffuse nontoxic goiter. Thyroid diseases associated with iodine deficiency in the population of different age groups are the result of multiple and combined imbalance of trace elements, which causes a relative (secondary) iodine deficiency. Thyroid disease in Primorye are environmentally caused diseases of technogenic origin, they are a consequence of the relative iodine deficiency, when on the background of normal iodine supply an imbalance of zinc, iron, cobalt, manganese with excess of such toxic trace elements as lead, strontium, nickel and chromium takes place. Thyroid pathology associated with iodine deficiency, along with other environmentally dependent diseases can be considered as a marker of ecological environment trouble. PMID:25831939

  9. [Distribution iodine deficiency diseases in coastal areas depending on geochemical conditions].

    PubMed

    Kiku, P F; Andryukov, B G

    2014-01-01

    In the Primorsky Krai there was performed a population ecological and hygienic analysis of the relationship between the content of chemical elements in the soil and thyroid morbidity in the population of the region. The assessment of the prevalence of iodine deficiency and iodine deficiency diseases was carried out on the basis of the impact of the priority environmental toxic (strontium, nickel, cadmium, lead, arsenic, tin) and essential (nickel, iron, germanium, molybdenum, zinc, selenium) trace elements on the level of iodine deficiency diseases. The level of thyroid pathology in the territory of Primorye was established to be the highest one in areas characterized by the severe iodine deficiency (Northwest geochemical zones), where the structure of thyroid diseases is presented mainly by diffuse nontoxic goiter. Thyroid diseases associated with iodine deficiency in the population of different age groups are the result of multiple and combined imbalance of trace elements, which causes a relative (secondary) iodine deficiency. Thyroid disease in Primorye are environmentally caused diseases of technogenic origin, they are a consequence of the relative iodine deficiency, when on the background of normal iodine supply an imbalance of zinc, iron, cobalt, manganese with excess of such toxic trace elements as lead, strontium, nickel and chromium takes place. Thyroid pathology associated with iodine deficiency, along with other environmentally dependent diseases can be considered as a marker of ecological environment trouble.

  10. Alterations in cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 (CDK5) protein levels, activity and immunocytochemistry in canine motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Green, S L; Vulliet, P R; Pinter, M J; Cork, L C

    1998-11-01

    Hereditary canine spinal muscular atrophy (HCSMA) is a dominantly inherited motor neuron disease in Brittany spaniels that is clinically characterized by progressive muscle weakness leading to paralysis. Histopathologically, degeneration is confined to motor neurons with accumulation of phosphorylated neurofilaments in axonal internodes. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a kinase related to the cell cycle kinase cdc2, phosphorylates neurofilaments and regulates neurofilament dynamics. We examined CDK5 activity, protein levels, and cellular immunoreactivity in nervous tissue from dogs with HCSMA, from closely age-matched controls and from dogs with other neurological diseases. On immunoblot analysis, CDK5 protein levels were increased in the HCSMA dogs (by approximately 1.5-fold in both the cytosolic and the particulate fractions). CDK5 activity was significantly increased (by approximately 3-fold) in the particulate fractions in the HCSMA dogs compared to all controls. The finding that CDK5 activity was increased in the young HCSMA homozygotes with the accelerated form of the disease, who do not show axonal swellings histologically, suggests that alterations in CDK5 occurs early in the pathogenesis, prior to the development of significant neurofilament pathology. Immunocytochemically, there was strong CDK5 staining of the nuclei, cytoplasm and axonal processes of the motor neurons in both control dogs and dogs with HCSMA. Further immunocytochemical studies demonstrated CDK5 staining where neurofilaments accumulated, in axonal swellings in the dogs with HCSMA. Our observations suggest phosphorylation-dependent events mediated by CDK5 occur in canine motor neuron disease.

  11. New Developments in Understanding and Treating Adolescent Marijuana Dependence1

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit substance in the United States and worldwide. Marijuana use is a problem of increasing magnitude among adolescents. Use typically begins in adolescence and is associated with a variety of adverse outcomes. Method This article will present an overview of trends in marijuana use, and will review the endocannabinoid system and marijuana. It will discuss recent policy developments in US and their implications, especially for adolescents. Existing treatments will be reviewed, including findings from a recent randomized double-blind trial of N-acetylcysteine, a compound that reverses the dysregulation of the glutamate system that occurs in substance dependence. Conclusions The core treatment approaches include psychosocial interventions, sometimes in combination with each other. While a reduction in days of use is often achieved with most of these approaches, abstinence is a much more elusive goal. The evidence base for effective treatments remains inadequate especially with regard to adolescents, and there is an urgent need for more research in this area. Promising new treatments include N-acetylcysteine in conjunction with contingency management. PMID:25289370

  12. Ontogenetic, gravity-dependent development of rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohira, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Yoshinaga, T.; Kawano, F.; Nomura, T.; Nonaka, I.; Allen, D. L.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that rat soleus muscle fiber growth and changes in myosin phenotype during the postnatal, preweaning period would be largely independent of weight bearing. The hindlimbs of one group of pups were unloaded intermittently from postnatal day 4 to day 21: the pups were isolated from the dam for 5 h during unloading and returned for nursing for 1 h. Control pups were either maintained with the dam as normal or put on an alternating feeding schedule as described above. The enlargement of mass (approximately 3 times), increase in myonuclear number (approximately 1.6 times) and myonuclear domain (approximately 2.6 times), and transformation toward a slow fiber phenotype (from 56 to 70% fibers expressing type I myosin heavy chain) observed in controls were inhibited by hindlimb unloading. These properties were normalized to control levels or higher within 1 mo of reambulation beginning immediately after the unloading period. Therefore, chronic unloading essentially stopped the ontogenetic developmental processes of 1) net increase in DNA available for transcription, 2) increase in amount of cytoplasm sustained by that DNA pool, and 3) normal transition of myosin isoforms that occur in some fibers from birth to weaning. It is concluded that normal ontogenetic development of a postural muscle is highly dependent on the gravitational environment even during the early postnatal period, when full weight-bearing activity is not routine.

  13. The basics of preclinical drug development for neurodegenerative disease indications

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Karen L; Spack, Edward G

    2009-01-01

    Preclinical development encompasses the activities that link drug discovery in the laboratory to initiation of human clinical trials. Preclinical studies can be designed to identify a lead candidate from several hits; develop the best procedure for new drug scale-up; select the best formulation; determine the route, frequency, and duration of exposure; and ultimately support the intended clinical trial design. The details of each preclinical development package can vary, but all have some common features. Rodent and nonrodent mammalian models are used to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile and general safety, as well as to identify toxicity patterns. One or more species may be used to determine the drug's mean residence time in the body, which depends on inherent absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. For drugs intended to treat Alzheimer's disease or other brain-targeted diseases, the ability of a drug to cross the blood brain barrier may be a key issue. Toxicology and safety studies identify potential target organs for adverse effects and define the Therapeutic Index to set the initial starting doses in clinical trials. Pivotal preclinical safety studies generally require regulatory oversight as defined by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Good Laboratory Practices and international guidelines, including the International Conference on Harmonisation. Concurrent preclinical development activities include developing the Clinical Plan and preparing the new drug product, including the associated documentation to meet stringent FDA Good Manufacturing Practices regulatory guidelines. A wide range of commercial and government contract options are available for investigators seeking to advance their candidate(s). Government programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer grants and the National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development Pilot Program provide funding and

  14. The basics of preclinical drug development for neurodegenerative disease indications.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Karen L; Spack, Edward G

    2009-01-01

    Preclinical development encompasses the activities that link drug discovery in the laboratory to initiation of human clinical trials. Preclinical studies can be designed to identify a lead candidate from several hits; develop the best procedure for new drug scale-up; select the best formulation; determine the route, frequency, and duration of exposure; and ultimately support the intended clinical trial design. The details of each preclinical development package can vary, but all have some common features. Rodent and nonrodent mammalian models are used to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile and general safety, as well as to identify toxicity patterns. One or more species may be used to determine the drug's mean residence time in the body, which depends on inherent absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. For drugs intended to treat Alzheimer's disease or other brain-targeted diseases, the ability of a drug to cross the blood brain barrier may be a key issue. Toxicology and safety studies identify potential target organs for adverse effects and define the Therapeutic Index to set the initial starting doses in clinical trials. Pivotal preclinical safety studies generally require regulatory oversight as defined by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Good Laboratory Practices and international guidelines, including the International Conference on Harmonization. Concurrent preclinical development activities include developing the Clinical Plan and preparing the new drug product, including the associated documentation to meet stringent FDA Good Manufacturing Practices regulatory guidelines. A wide range of commercial and government contract options are available for investigators seeking to advance their candidate(s). Government programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer grants and the National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development Pilot Program provide funding and

  15. p47phox-Nox2-dependent ROS signaling inhibits early bone development in mice but protects against skeletal aging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone remodeling is age-dependently regulated and changes dramatically during the course of development. Progressive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been suspected to be the leading cause of many inflammatory and degenerative diseases, as well as an important factor underlying many ...

  16. Chemicals and environmentally caused diseases in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Jamall, I.S.; Davis, B. )

    1991-06-01

    This chapter discusses international aspects of diseases resulting from exposure to chemical pollutants in the environment, with an emphasis on developing countries. These countries share many of the same problems of air, water, and pesticide pollution that face the more industrialized countries. In developing countries, however, the problems are compounded by a number of unique situations, viz., economic priorities, high burden of infectious diseases, impoverishment, and absence of a regulatory framework for the disposal of toxic chemicals. This discussion emphasizes the importance of interactions among toxicants, malnutrition, and infectious diseases for both urban and rural populations insofar as these interactions contribute to disease. Toxicants not only produce disease directly but also exacerbate diseases with other causes. Specific examples from developing countries demonstrate how human health effects from exposures to environmental chemicals can be assessed. While they do not strictly fall under the rubric of developing countries, the public health consequences of inadequate control of environmental pollution in the East European countries should demonstrate the magnitude of the problem, except that in developing countries the public health consequence of environmental chemicals will be aggravated by the widespread malnutrition and high prevalence of infectious diseases. Much needs to be done before we can adequately quantify the contribution of environmental chemicals to morbidity and mortality in developing countries with the level of sophistication now evident in the charting of infectious diseases in these countries. 52 references.

  17. Development and application of chronic disease risk prediction models.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sun Min; Stefani, Katherine M; Kim, Hyeon Chang

    2014-07-01

    Currently, non-communicable chronic diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and a large proportion of chronic diseases are preventable through risk factor management. However, the prevention efficacy at the individual level is not yet satisfactory. Chronic disease prediction models have been developed to assist physicians and individuals in clinical decision-making. A chronic disease prediction model assesses multiple risk factors together and estimates an absolute disease risk for the individual. Accurate prediction of an individual's future risk for a certain disease enables the comparison of benefits and risks of treatment, the costs of alternative prevention strategies, and selection of the most efficient strategy for the individual. A large number of chronic disease prediction models, especially targeting cardiovascular diseases and cancers, have been suggested, and some of them have been adopted in the clinical practice guidelines and recommendations of many countries. Although few chronic disease prediction tools have been suggested in the Korean population, their clinical utility is not as high as expected. This article reviews methodologies that are commonly used for developing and evaluating a chronic disease prediction model and discusses the current status of chronic disease prediction in Korea.

  18. [Views for research development of control of parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin-Ping; Dong, Hui-Fen; Jiang, Ming-Sen

    2013-12-01

    With the social and technological development, new understandings have been emerged for the research development of the control of parasitic diseases. The present review argues that: the traditional point of view for the control of parasitic diseases, eliminating parasites/media, should be updated. For the long-term interests of science and human perspective, biological diversity, including the parasite biodiversity, and ecological environment should be paid much more attention during the control of parasitic diseases. The leading role of society, economy and culture should be fully developed in the control of parasitic diseases with the progress of scientific and technology, to find a final way of sustainable development in the control of parasitic diseases. PMID:24490386

  19. Impairment of PARK14-dependent Ca2+ signalling is a novel determinant of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qingde; Yen, Allen; Rymarczyk, Grzegorz; Asai, Hirohide; Trengrove, Chelsea; Aziz, Nadine; Kirber, Michael T.; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Wolozin, Benjamin; Bolotina, Victoria M.

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (idPD) remains enigmatic despite recent successes in identification of genes (PARKs) that underlie familial PD. To find new keys to this incurable neurodegenerative disorder we focused on the poorly understood PARK14 disease locus (Pla2g6 gene) and the store-operated Ca2+ signalling pathway. Analysis of the cells from idPD patients reveals a significant deficiency in store-operated PLA2g6-dependent Ca2+ signalling, which we can mimic in a novel B6.Cg-Pla2g6ΔEx2-VB (PLA2g6 ex2KO) mouse model. Here we demonstrate that genetic or molecular impairment of PLA2g6-dependent Ca2+ signalling is a trigger for autophagic dysfunction, progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta and age-dependent L-DOPA-sensitive motor dysfunction. Discovery of this previously unknown sequence of pathological events, its association with idPD and our ability to mimic this pathology in a novel genetic mouse model opens new opportunities for finding a cure for this devastating neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26755131

  20. Disease and development: ciguatera fish poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lewis, N D

    1986-01-01

    Ciguatera, a form of fish poisoning with a pantropical distribution, has been a recognized health problem in the Caribbean and the Pacific for centuries (in the decade from 1973 to 1983 for the island Pacific region as a whole, reported incidence, conservatively 20% of actual incidence, was 97/100,000). Island peoples in subsistence communities have developed strategies to minimize its impact. These strategies are less effective when people move to towns, cities and wage labor. The existence of ciguatoxic fish, which are indistinguishable from those that are not, has serious implications for development in island states. Furthermore, development activities which result in disruption of the marine environment increase the potential for ciguatoxic biotopes. The distribution of this health risk in the Pacific region is presented, adaptive strategies discussed, and implications for health, nutrition, resource development and tourism explored.

  1. Stroma in Breast Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Lisa M.; Rudnick, Jenny A.; Keller, Patricia J.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    It is increasingly apparent that normal and malignant breast tissues require complex local and systemic stromal interactions for development and progression. During development, mammary cell fate specification and differentiation require highly regulated contextual signals derived from the stroma. Likewise, during breast carcinoma development, the tissue stroma can provide tumor suppressing and tumor-promoting environments that serve to regulate neoplastic growth of the epithelium. This review focuses on the role of the stroma as a mediator of normal mammary development, as well as a critical regulator of malignant conversion and progression in breast cancer. Recognition of the important role of the stroma during the progression of breast cancers leads to the possibility of new targets for treatment of the initial breast cancer lesion as well as prevention of recurrence. PMID:19857593

  2. Developing countries and neglected diseases: challenges and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Boutayeb, Abdesslam

    2007-01-01

    It is now commonly admitted that the so-called (most) neglected tropical diseases have been given little attention. According to World Health Organization, neglected diseases are hidden diseases as they affect almost exclusively extremely poor populations living in remote areas beyond the reach of health service. The European Parliament recognised that, to our shame, Neglected Diseases have not received the attention they deserve from EU actions. In the Millennium Development Goals they were given very little attention and mentioned just as other disease. Investing in drugs for these diseases is thought to be not marketable or profitable. However, despite their low mortality, neglected diseases are causing severe and permanent disabilities and deformities affecting approximately 1 billion people in the world, yielding more than 20 millions of Disability Adjusted Life Years (56.6 million according to Lancet's revised estimates) and important socio-economic losses. Urgent pragmatic and efficient measures are needed both at international and national levels. PMID:18036265

  3. A Drug-Centric View of Drug Development: How Drugs Spread from Disease to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Drugs are often seen as ancillary to the purpose of fighting diseases. Here an alternative view is proposed in which they occupy a spearheading role. In this view, drugs are technologies with an inherent therapeutic potential. Once created, they can spread from disease to disease independently of the drug creator’s original intentions. Through the analysis of extensive literature and clinical trial records, it can be observed that successful drugs follow a life cycle in which they are studied at an increasing rate, and for the treatment of an increasing number of diseases, leading to clinical advancement. Such initial growth, following a power law on average, has a degree of momentum, but eventually decelerates, leading to stagnation and decay. A network model can describe the propagation of drugs from disease to disease in which diseases communicate with each other by receiving and sending drugs. Within this model, some diseases appear more prone to influence other diseases than be influenced, and vice versa. Diseases can also be organized into a drug-centric disease taxonomy based on the drugs that each adopts. This taxonomy reflects not only biological similarities across diseases, but also the level of differentiation of existing therapies. In sum, this study shows that drugs can become contagious technologies playing a driving role in the fight against disease. By better understanding such dynamics, pharmaceutical developers may be able to manage drug projects more effectively. PMID:27124390

  4. Dependent Narcissism, Organizational Learning, and Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godkin, Lynn; Allcorn, Seth

    2009-01-01

    Narcissistic leadership can benefit organizational performance. Aberrant narcissism can destroy the psychosocial health of groups, limiting performance. This article examines Dependent Organizational Disorder, a common form of narcissism, which infects leadership, thwarts performance, and interrupts organizational learning. Dependent…

  5. Connexins in skeletal muscle development and disease.

    PubMed

    Merrifield, Peter A; Laird, Dale W

    2016-02-01

    Gap junctions consist of clusters of intercellular channels composed of connexins that connect adjacent cells and allow the exchange of small molecules. While the 21 member multi-gene family of connexins are ubiquitously found in humans, only Cx39, Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45 have been documented in developing myoblasts and injured adult skeletal muscle while healthy adult skeletal muscle is devoid of connexins. The use of gap junctional blockers and cultured myoblast cell lines have suggested that these connexins play a critical role in myotube formation and muscle regeneration. More recent genetically-modified mouse models where Cx43 function is greatly compromized or ablated have further supported a role for Cx43 in regulating skeletal muscle development. In the last decade, we have become aware of a cohort of patients that have a development disorder known as oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD). These patients harbor either gain or loss of Cx43 function gene mutations that result in many organ anomalies raising questions as to whether they suffer from defects in skeletal muscle formation or regeneration upon injury. Interesting, some ODDD patients report muscle weakness and loss of limb control but it is not clear if this is neurogenic or myogenic in origin. This review will focus on the role connexins play in muscle development and repair and discuss the impact of Cx43 mutants on muscle function. PMID:26688333

  6. Drug-usage evaluation by disease state: developing protocols.

    PubMed

    Enlow, M L

    1996-07-01

    The Joint Commission definition of drug-usage evaluation (DUE) also applies to DUE by disease state. The criteria for disease process selection, key processes being evaluated, methods to develop initial DUE protocols, and DUE validation and approval processes are reviewed. The treatment of community-acquired pneumonia is a disease state DUE performed at Saint Joseph Health Center in Kansas City, Missouri. The preliminary protocol was developed by a collaborative network of clinical pharmacists in the metropolitan area. Outcome measures were included in the evaluation. The results were used as baseline data in the development of a pneumonia clinical pathway.

  7. Contamination sensitivity and the development of disease-avoidant behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Siegal, Michael; Fadda, Roberta; Overton, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Owing to their developing cognitive abilities and their limited knowledge about the biological basis of illness, children often have less expertise at disease avoidance than adults. However, affective reactions to contaminants through the acquisition of disgust and the social and cultural transmissions of knowledge about contamination and contagion provide impetus for children to learn effective disease-avoidant behaviours early in their development. In this article, we review the ontogenetic development of knowledge about contamination and contagion with particular attention to the role of socialization and culture. Together with their emerging cognitive abilities and affective reactions to contaminants, informal and formal cultural learning shape children's knowledge about disease. Through this process, the perceptual cues of contamination are linked to threats of disease outcomes and can act as determinants of disease-avoidant behaviours. PMID:22042919

  8. New developments in the pharmacotherapy of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Harting, J W

    1992-08-21

    In this article the clinical features and aetiology of inflammatory bowel diseases are described and current pharmacotherapeutic possibilities are explored. Also reviewed are recent developments and future prospects for the pharmacotherapy of inflammatory bowel diseases, including aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, lipoxygenase inhibitors, fish oil, sucralfate, bismuth compounds, free radical scavengers, (hydroxy)chloroquine, sodium cromoglycate and methotrexate. PMID:1437510

  9. The Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale: Development and Psychometric Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Brian D.; Balsis, Steve; Otilingam, Poorni G.; Hanson, Priya K.; Gatz, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study provides preliminary evidence for the acceptability, reliability, and validity of the new Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale (ADKS), a content and psychometric update to the Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Test. Design and Methods: Traditional scale development methods were used to generate items and evaluate their psychometric…

  10. Novel approaches to foot-and-mouth disease vaccine development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need for better Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines is not new, a report from the Research Commission on FMD, authored by F. Loeffler and P. Frosch in 1897, highlighted the need for developing a vaccine against FMD and qualified this as a devastating disease causing “severe economic damage to ...

  11. Modeling Development and Disease with Organoids.

    PubMed

    Clevers, Hans

    2016-06-16

    Recent advances in 3D culture technology allow embryonic and adult mammalian stem cells to exhibit their remarkable self-organizing properties, and the resulting organoids reflect key structural and functional properties of organs such as kidney, lung, gut, brain and retina. Organoid technology can therefore be used to model human organ development and various human pathologies 'in a dish." Additionally, patient-derived organoids hold promise to predict drug response in a personalized fashion. Organoids open up new avenues for regenerative medicine and, in combination with editing technology, for gene therapy. The many potential applications of this technology are only beginning to be explored.

  12. Pharmacological targeting of actin-dependent dynamin oligomerization ameliorates chronic kidney disease in diverse animal models

    PubMed Central

    Schiffer, Mario; Teng, Beina; Gu, Changkyu; Shchedrina, Valentina A.; Kasaikina, Marina; Pham, Vincent A.; Hanke, Nils; Rong, Song; Gueler, Faikah; Schroder, Patricia; Tossidou, Irini; Park, Joon-Keun; Staggs, Lynne; Haller, Hermann; Erschow, Sergej; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Wei, Changli; Chen, Chuang; Tardi, Nicholas; Hakroush, Samy; Selig, Martin K.; Vasilyev, Aleksandr; Merscher, Sandra; Reiser, Jochen; Sever, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton in podocytes represents a common pathway in the pathogenesis of proteinuria across a spectrum of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). The GTPase dynamin has been implicated in the maintenance of cellular architecture in podocytes through its direct interaction with actin. Furthermore, the propensity of dynamin to oligomerize into higher-order structures in an actin-dependent manner and to crosslink actin microfilaments into higher order structures have been correlated with increased actin polymerization and global organization of the actin cytoskeleton in the cell. We found that use of the small molecule Bis-T-23, which promotes actin-dependent dynamin oligomerization and thus increased actin polymerization in injured podocytes, was sufficient to improve renal health in diverse models of both transient kidney disease and of CKD. In particular, administration of Bis-T-23 in these renal disease models restored the normal ultrastructure of podocyte foot processes, lowered proteinuria, lowered collagen IV deposits in the mesangial matrix, diminished mesangial matrix expansion and extended lifespan. These results further establish that alterations in the actin cytoskeleton of kidney podocytes is a common hallmark of CKD, while also underscoring the significant regenerative potential of injured glomeruli and that targeting the oligomerization cycle of dynamin represents an attractive potential therapeutic target to treat CKD. PMID:25962121

  13. Zebrafish Models of Human Liver Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The liver performs a large number of essential synthetic and regulatory functions that are acquired during fetal development and persist throughout life. Their disruption underlies a diverse group of heritable and acquired diseases that affect both pediatric and adult patients. Although experimental analyses used to study liver development and disease are typically performed in cell culture models or rodents, the zebrafish is increasingly used to complement discoveries made in these systems. Forward and reverse genetic analyses over the past two decades have shown that the molecular program for liver development is largely conserved between zebrafish and mammals, and that the zebrafish can be used to model heritable human liver disorders. Recent work has demonstrated that zebrafish can also be used to study the mechanistic basis of acquired liver diseases. Here, we provide a comprehensive summary of how the zebrafish has contributed to our understanding of human liver development and disease. PMID:23897685

  14. Impact of perinatal environmental tobacco smoke on the development of childhood allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and food allergy, are most common chronic, noncommunicable diseases in childhood. In the past few decades, the prevalence has increased abruptly worldwide. There are 2 possible explanations for the rising prevalence of allergic diseases worldwide, that an increased disease-awareness of physician, patient, or caregivers, and an abrupt exposure to unknown hazards. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Despite the continuing efforts worldwide, the etiologies and rising prevalence remain unclear. Thus, it is important to identify and control risk factors in the susceptible individual for the best prevention and management. Genetic susceptibility or environments may be a potential background for the development of allergic disease, however they alone cannot explain the rising prevalence worldwide. There is growing evidence that epigenetic change depends on the gene, environment, and their interactions, may induce a long-lasting altered gene expression and the consequent development of allergic diseases. In epigenetic mechanisms, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure during critical period (i.e., during pregnancy and early life) are considered as a potential cause of the development of childhood allergic diseases. However, the causal relationship is still unclear. This review aimed to highlight the impact of ETS exposure during the perinatal period on the development of childhood allergic diseases and to propose a future research direction. PMID:27610180

  15. Impact of perinatal environmental tobacco smoke on the development of childhood allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyeon-Jong

    2016-08-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and food allergy, are most common chronic, noncommunicable diseases in childhood. In the past few decades, the prevalence has increased abruptly worldwide. There are 2 possible explanations for the rising prevalence of allergic diseases worldwide, that an increased disease-awareness of physician, patient, or caregivers, and an abrupt exposure to unknown hazards. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Despite the continuing efforts worldwide, the etiologies and rising prevalence remain unclear. Thus, it is important to identify and control risk factors in the susceptible individual for the best prevention and management. Genetic susceptibility or environments may be a potential background for the development of allergic disease, however they alone cannot explain the rising prevalence worldwide. There is growing evidence that epigenetic change depends on the gene, environment, and their interactions, may induce a long-lasting altered gene expression and the consequent development of allergic diseases. In epigenetic mechanisms, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure during critical period (i.e., during pregnancy and early life) are considered as a potential cause of the development of childhood allergic diseases. However, the causal relationship is still unclear. This review aimed to highlight the impact of ETS exposure during the perinatal period on the development of childhood allergic diseases and to propose a future research direction. PMID:27610180

  16. Impact of perinatal environmental tobacco smoke on the development of childhood allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and food allergy, are most common chronic, noncommunicable diseases in childhood. In the past few decades, the prevalence has increased abruptly worldwide. There are 2 possible explanations for the rising prevalence of allergic diseases worldwide, that an increased disease-awareness of physician, patient, or caregivers, and an abrupt exposure to unknown hazards. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Despite the continuing efforts worldwide, the etiologies and rising prevalence remain unclear. Thus, it is important to identify and control risk factors in the susceptible individual for the best prevention and management. Genetic susceptibility or environments may be a potential background for the development of allergic disease, however they alone cannot explain the rising prevalence worldwide. There is growing evidence that epigenetic change depends on the gene, environment, and their interactions, may induce a long-lasting altered gene expression and the consequent development of allergic diseases. In epigenetic mechanisms, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure during critical period (i.e., during pregnancy and early life) are considered as a potential cause of the development of childhood allergic diseases. However, the causal relationship is still unclear. This review aimed to highlight the impact of ETS exposure during the perinatal period on the development of childhood allergic diseases and to propose a future research direction.

  17. Environmental dependency of amphibian-ranavirus genotypic interactions: evolutionary perspectives on infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Echaubard, Pierre; Leduc, Joel; Pauli, Bruce; Chinchar, V Gregory; Robert, Jacques; Lesbarrères, David

    2014-08-01

    The context-dependent investigations of host-pathogen genotypic interactions, where environmental factors are explicitly incorporated, allow the assessment of both coevolutionary history and contemporary ecological influences. Such a functional explanatory framework is particularly valuable for describing mortality trends and identifying drivers of disease risk more accurately. Using two common North American frog species (Lithobates pipiens and Lithobates sylvaticus) and three strains of frog virus 3 (FV3) at different temperatures, we conducted a laboratory experiment to investigate the influence of host species/genotype, ranavirus strains, temperature, and their interactions, in determining mortality and infection patterns. Our results revealed variability in host susceptibility and strain infectivity along with significant host-strain interactions, indicating that the outcome of an infection is dependent on the specific combination of host and virus genotypes. Moreover, we observed a strong influence of temperature on infection and mortality probabilities, revealing the potential for genotype-genotype-environment interactions to be responsible for unexpected mortality in this system. Our study thus suggests that amphibian hosts and ranavirus strains genetic characteristics should be considered in order to understand infection outcomes and that the investigation of coevolutionary mechanisms within a context-dependent framework provides a tool for the comprehensive understanding of disease dynamics.

  18. Environmental dependency of amphibian–ranavirus genotypic interactions: evolutionary perspectives on infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Echaubard, Pierre; Leduc, Joel; Pauli, Bruce; Chinchar, V Gregory; Robert, Jacques; Lesbarrères, David

    2014-01-01

    The context-dependent investigations of host–pathogen genotypic interactions, where environmental factors are explicitly incorporated, allow the assessment of both coevolutionary history and contemporary ecological influences. Such a functional explanatory framework is particularly valuable for describing mortality trends and identifying drivers of disease risk more accurately. Using two common North American frog species (Lithobates pipiens and Lithobates sylvaticus) and three strains of frog virus 3 (FV3) at different temperatures, we conducted a laboratory experiment to investigate the influence of host species/genotype, ranavirus strains, temperature, and their interactions, in determining mortality and infection patterns. Our results revealed variability in host susceptibility and strain infectivity along with significant host–strain interactions, indicating that the outcome of an infection is dependent on the specific combination of host and virus genotypes. Moreover, we observed a strong influence of temperature on infection and mortality probabilities, revealing the potential for genotype–genotype–environment interactions to be responsible for unexpected mortality in this system. Our study thus suggests that amphibian hosts and ranavirus strains genetic characteristics should be considered in order to understand infection outcomes and that the investigation of coevolutionary mechanisms within a context-dependent framework provides a tool for the comprehensive understanding of disease dynamics. PMID:25469155

  19. Abnormal Thiamine-Dependent Processes in Alzheimer’s Disease. Lessons from Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Gary E.; Hirsch, Joseph A.; Cirio, Rosanna T.; Jordan, Barry D.; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Elder, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Reduced glucose metabolism is an invariant feature of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and an outstanding biomarker of disease progression. Glucose metabolism may be an attractive therapeutic target, whether the decline initiates AD pathophysiology or is a critical component of a cascade. The cause of cerebral regional glucose hypometabolism remains unclear. Thiamine-dependent processes are critical in glucose metabolism and are diminished in brains of AD patients at autopsy. Further, the reductions in thiamine-dependent processes are highly correlated to the decline in clinical dementia rating scales. In animal models, thiamine deficiency exacerbates plaque formation, promotes phosphorylation of tau and impairs memory. In contrast, treatment of mouse models of AD with the thiamine derivative benfotiamine diminishes plaques, decreases phosphorylation of tau and reverses memory deficits. Diabetes predisposes to AD, which suggests they may share some common mechanisms. Benfotiamine diminishes peripheral neuropathy in diabetic humans and animals. In diabetes, benfotiamine induces key thiamine-dependent enzymes of the pentose shunt to reduce accumulation of toxic metabolites including advanced glycation end products (AGE). Related mechanisms may lead to reversal of plaque formation by benfotiamine in animals. If so, the use of benfotiamine could provide a safe intervention to reverse biological and clinical processes of AD progression. PMID:22982063

  20. Acute diarrhoeal disease in less developed countries

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, John E.; Guzmán, Miguel A.; Ascoli, Werner; Scrimshaw, Nevin S.

    1964-01-01

    A number of primary epidemiological characteristics are recognized as common to members of a syndrome designated “acute undifferentiated diarrhoeal disease”. This syndrome includes both specific and non-specific diarrhoeal disorders. Within the existing knowledge and with the facilities available in less developed countries, an epidemiological basis for control, directed against the syndrome as a whole, is presented as the practical approach to community management. Clinical and microbiological distinctions do not extend to the main bulk of the problem. Individual epidemiological patterns exist according to age and varying social and ecological conditions. Field study by periodic home visits over four years has defined these patterns in highland rural villages in Guatemala. The chief problem was weanling diarrhoea. PMID:14230899

  1. Development and validation of techniques for improving software dependability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    1992-01-01

    A collection of document abstracts are presented on the topic of improving software dependability through NASA grant NAG-1-1123. Specific topics include: modeling of error detection; software inspection; test cases; Magnetic Stereotaxis System safety specifications and fault trees; and injection of synthetic faults into software.

  2. Cardiovascular disease in the developing world: prevalences, patterns, and the potential of early disease detection.

    PubMed

    Celermajer, David S; Chow, Clara K; Marijon, Eloi; Anstey, Nicholas M; Woo, Kam S

    2012-10-01

    Over the past decade or more, the prevalence of traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases has been increasing in the major populous countries of the developing world, including China and India, with consequent increases in the rates of coronary and cerebrovascular events. Indeed, by 2020, cardiovascular diseases are predicted to be the major causes of morbidity and mortality in most developing nations around the world. Techniques for the early detection of arterial damage have provided important insights into disease patterns and pathogenesis and especially the effects of progressive urbanization on cardiovascular risk in these populations. Furthermore, certain other diseases affecting the cardiovascular system remain prevalent and important causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in developing countries, including the cardiac effects of rheumatic heart disease and the vascular effects of malaria. Imaging and functional studies of early cardiovascular changes in those disease processes have also recently been published by various groups, allowing consideration of screening and early treatment opportunities. In this report, the authors review the prevalences and patterns of major cardiovascular diseases in the developing world, as well as potential opportunities provided by early disease detection.

  3. The effect of sprout and disease control products on disease development and weight loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato industry utilizes various sprout and disease control products prior to storage and/or packing. Some of these products have not been tested for interference of wound healing and whether effects observed equate to greater disease development or weight loss. The objectives of this study we...

  4. Herbal therapeutics that block the oncogenic kinase PAK1: a practical approach towards PAK1-dependent diseases and longevity.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    Over 35 years research on PAKs, RAC/CDC42(p21)-activated kinases, comes of age, and in particular PAK1 has been well known to be responsible for a variety of diseases such as cancer (mainly solid tumors), Alzheimer's disease, acquired immune deficiency syndrome and other viral/bacterial infections, inflammatory diseases (asthma and arthritis), diabetes (type 2), neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, learning disability, autism, etc. Although several distinct synthetic PAK1-blockers have been recently developed, no FDA-approved PAK1 blockers are available on the market as yet. Thus, patients suffering from these PAK1-dependent diseases have to rely on solely a variety of herbal therapeutics such as propolis and curcumin that block PAK1 without affecting normal cell growth. Furthermore, several recent studies revealed that some of these herbal therapeutics significantly extend the lifespan of nematodes (C. elegans) and fruit flies (Drosophila), and PAK1-deficient worm lives longer than the wild type. Here, I outline mainly pathological phenotypes of hyper-activated PAK1 and a list of herbal therapeutics that block PAK1, but cause no side (harmful) effect on healthy people or animals.

  5. Herbal therapeutics that block the oncogenic kinase PAK1: a practical approach towards PAK1-dependent diseases and longevity.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    Over 35 years research on PAKs, RAC/CDC42(p21)-activated kinases, comes of age, and in particular PAK1 has been well known to be responsible for a variety of diseases such as cancer (mainly solid tumors), Alzheimer's disease, acquired immune deficiency syndrome and other viral/bacterial infections, inflammatory diseases (asthma and arthritis), diabetes (type 2), neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, learning disability, autism, etc. Although several distinct synthetic PAK1-blockers have been recently developed, no FDA-approved PAK1 blockers are available on the market as yet. Thus, patients suffering from these PAK1-dependent diseases have to rely on solely a variety of herbal therapeutics such as propolis and curcumin that block PAK1 without affecting normal cell growth. Furthermore, several recent studies revealed that some of these herbal therapeutics significantly extend the lifespan of nematodes (C. elegans) and fruit flies (Drosophila), and PAK1-deficient worm lives longer than the wild type. Here, I outline mainly pathological phenotypes of hyper-activated PAK1 and a list of herbal therapeutics that block PAK1, but cause no side (harmful) effect on healthy people or animals. PMID:23943274

  6. Matrix Metalloproteinases Contribute to Neuronal Dysfunction in Animal Models of Drug Dependence, Alzheimer's Disease, and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) remodel the pericellular environment by regulating the cleavage of extracellular matrix proteins, cell surface components, neurotransmitter receptors, and growth factors that mediate cell adhesion, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and long-term potentiation. Interestingly, increased MMP activity and dysregulation of the balance between MMPs and TIMPs have also been implicated in various pathologic conditions. In this paper, we discuss various animal models that suggest that the activation of the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 is involved in pathogenesis of drug dependence, Alzheimer's disease, and epilepsy. PMID:22235372

  7. Context Dependence of Protein Misfolding and Structural Strains in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anil K.; Rosen, Rebecca F.; Childers, W. Seth; Gehman, John D.; Walker, Lary C.; Lynn, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Vast arrays of structural forms are accessible to simple amyloid peptides and environmental conditions can direct assembly into single phases. These insights are now being applied to the aggregation of the Aβ peptide of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and the identification of causative phases. We extend use of the imaging agent Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) to discriminate among Aβ phases and begin to define conditions of relevance to the disease state. And we specifically highlight the development of methods for defining the structures of these more complex phases. PMID:23893572

  8. The RenTg Mice: A Powerful Tool to Study Renin-Dependent Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huby, Anne-Cecile; Kavvadas, Panagiotis; Alfieri, Carlo; Abed, Ahmed; Toubas, Julie; Rastaldi, Maria-Pia; Dussaule, Jean-Claude; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Chadjichristos, Christos E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that activation of the renin-angiotensin system may lead to hypertension, a major risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The existing hypertension-induced CDK mouse models are quite fast and consequently away from the human pathology. Thus, there is an urgent need for a mouse model that can be used to delineate the pathogenic process leading to progressive renal disease. The objective of this study was dual: to investigate whether mice overexpressing renin could mimic the kinetics and the physiopathological characteristics of hypertension-induced renal disease and to identify cellular and/or molecular events characterizing the different steps of the progression of CKD. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a novel transgenic strain, the RenTg mice harboring a genetically clamped renin transgene. At 3 months, heterozygous mice are hypertensive and slightly albuminuric. The expression of adhesion markers such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 are increased in the renal vasculature indicating initiation of endothelial dysfunction. At 5 months, perivascular and periglomerular infiltrations of macrophages are observed. These early renal vascular events are followed at 8 months by leukocyte invasion, decreased expression of nephrin, increased expression of KIM-1, a typical protein of tubular cell stress, and of several pro-fibrotic agents of the TGFβ family. At 12 months, mice display characteristic structural alterations of hypertensive renal disease such as glomerular ischemia, glomerulo- and nephroangio-sclerosis, mesangial expansion and tubular dilation. Conclusions/Significance The RenTg strain develops CKD progressively. In this model, endothelial dysfunction is an early event preceding the structural and fibrotic alterations which ultimately lead to the development of CKD. This model can provide new insights into the mechanisms of chronic renal

  9. 76 FR 52958 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Neglected Tropical Diseases of the Developing World: Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... development program for the treatment or prevention of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), including clinical trial designs and internal review standards to support approval of drugs. DATES: Although you...

  10. Arginase-1-dependent promotion of TH17 differentiation and disease progression by MDSCs in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Zhen, Yu; Ma, Zhanchuan; Li, Huimin; Yu, Jinyu; Xu, Zhong-Gao; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Yi, Huanfa; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-03-23

    Expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) has been documented in some murine models and patients with autoimmune diseases, but the exact role of MDSCs in this process remains largely unknown. The current study investigates this question in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Patients with active SLE showed a significant increase in HLA-DR(-)CD11b(+)CD33(+)MDSCs, including both CD14(+)CD66b(-)monocytic and CD14(-)CD66b(+)granulocytic MDSCs, in the peripheral blood compared to healthy controls (HCs). The frequency of MDSCs was positively correlated with the levels of serum arginase-1 (Arg-1) activity, T helper 17 (TH17) responses, and disease severity in SLE patients. Consistently, in comparison with MDSCs from HCs, MDSCs from SLE patients exhibited significantly elevated Arg-1 production and increased potential to promote TH17 differentiation in vitro in an Arg-1-dependent manner. Moreover, in a humanized SLE model, MDSCs were essential for the induction of TH17 responses and the associated renal injuries, and the effect of MDSCs was Arg-1-dependent. Our data provide direct evidence demonstrating a pathogenic role for MDSCs in human SLE. This study also provides a molecular mechanism of the pathogenesis of SLE by demonstrating an Arg-1-dependent effect of MDSCs in the development of TH17 cell-associated autoimmunity, and suggests that targeting MDSCs or Arg-1 may offer potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of SLE and other TH17 cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:27009269

  11. Age-Dependent Myeloid Dendritic Cell Responses Mediate Resistance to La Crosse Virus-Induced Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Katherine G.; Woods, Tyson A.; Winkler, Clayton W.; Carmody, Aaron B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT La Crosse virus (LACV) is the major cause of pediatric viral encephalitis in the United States; however, the mechanisms responsible for age-related susceptibility in the pediatric population are not well understood. Our current studies in a mouse model of LACV infection indicated that differences in myeloid dendritic cell (mDC) responses between weanling and adult mice accounted for susceptibility to LACV-induced neurological disease. We found that type I interferon (IFN) responses were significantly stronger in adult than in weanling mice. Production of these IFNs required both endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and cytoplasmic RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs). Surprisingly, IFN expression was not dependent on plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) but rather was dependent on mDCs, which were found in greater number and induced stronger IFN responses in adults than in weanlings. Inhibition of these IFN responses in adults resulted in susceptibility to LACV-induced neurological disease, whereas postinfection treatment with type I IFN provided protection in young mice. These studies provide a definitive mechanism for age-related susceptibility to LACV encephalitis, where mDCs in young mice are insufficiently activated to control peripheral virus replication, thereby allowing virus to persist and eventually cause central nervous system (CNS) disease. IMPORTANCE La Crosse virus (LACV) is the primary cause of pediatric viral encephalitis in the United States. Although the virus infects both adults and children, over 80% of the reported neurological disease cases are in children. To understand why LACV causes neurological disease primarily in young animals, we used a mouse model where weanling mice, but not adult mice, develop neurological disease following virus infection. We found that an early immune response cell type, myeloid dendritic cells, was critical for protection in adult animals and that these cells were reduced in young animals. Activation of these cells during

  12. Transcriptional profiling of Meq-dependent genes in Marek’s disease resistant and susceptible inbred chicken lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is an economically significant disease in chickens caused by the highly oncogenic Marek’s disease virus (MDV). Understanding the genes and biological pathways that confer MD genetic resistance should lead towards the development of more disease resistant commercial poultry flock...

  13. Experience-dependent development of spinal motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inglis, F. M.; Zuckerman, K. E.; Kalb, R. G.; Walton, K. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Locomotor activity in many species undergoes pronounced alterations in early postnatal life, and environmental cues may be responsible for modifying this process. To determine how these events are reflected in the nervous system, we studied rats reared under two different conditions-the presence or absence of gravity-in which the performance of motor operations differed. We found a significant effect of rearing environment on the size and complexity of dendritic architecture of spinal motor neurons, particularly those that are likely to participate in postural control. These results provide evidence that neurons subserving motor function undergo activity-dependent maturation in early postnatal life in a manner analogous to sensory systems.

  14. SIRT3 regulates progression and development of diseases of aging

    PubMed Central

    Bomze, Howard M.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT3 is a protein deacylase that regulates almost every major aspect of mitochondrial biology, including nutrient oxidation, ATP generation, reactive oxygen species detoxification, mitochondrial dynamics, and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Interestingly, mice lacking SIRT3 (SIRT3KO), either spontaneously or when crossed with mouse models of disease, develop several diseases of aging at an accelerated pace, such as cancer, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative diseases, and thus might be a valuable model of accelerated aging. In this review we discuss SIRT3 functions in pathways involved in diseases of aging, how lack of SIRT3 might accelerate the aging process, and suggest that further studies on SIRT3 might help uncover important new pathways driving the aging process. PMID:26138757

  15. Developing neural stem cell-based treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Byrne, James A

    2014-05-30

    Owing to the aging of the population, our society now faces an impending wave of age-related neurodegenerative pathologies, the most significant of which is Alzheimer's disease. Currently, no effective therapies for Alzheimer's disease have been developed. However, recent advances in the fields of neural stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells now provide us with the first real hope for a cure. The recent discovery by Blurton-Jones and colleagues that neural stem cells can effectively deliver disease-modifying therapeutic proteins throughout the brains of our best rodent models of Alzheimer's disease, combined with recent advances in human nuclear reprogramming, stem cell research, and highly customized genetic engineering, may represent a potentially revolutionary personalized cellular therapeutic approach capable of effectively curing, ameliorating, and/or slowing the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Combined development of thyroid gland and reproductive system benign diseases.

    PubMed

    Makaridze, T; Mardaleishvili, K

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the study is to establish the role of endocrine disturbances in development of malignant tumors in patients with thyroid gland and reproductive system pathology. We studied 207 patients with synchronic and metachronic development of thyroid gland and reproductive system benign tumors. The patients' average age was 35-58 years. According to study the following aspects were determined: clinical and hormonal aspect of thyroid gland and reproductive system benign tumor disease coincidence, analyses of thyroid gland and reproductive system pre-cancer disease pathogenesis, neuroendocrine relations-like increased thyrotrophic hormone secretion causes strengthening of prolactin secretion, which depresses luteinizing hormone release and increases production of follicular stimulating hormone. It has been proved that fibromyomas absolute hyperestrogenemia which develops during hypersecretion of follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) plays a role in etiology of uterine Gonadoliberin hypersecretion, especially follicular stimulating hormone FSH and corpus luteum deficiency is very important in development of ovarian pre-cancer and cancer diseases.

  17. A cholesterol and actinide dependent shadow biosphere of archaea and viroids in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Ravikumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2012-03-01

    Endogenous digoxin has been related to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosis and rheumatoid arthritis. The possibility of endogenous digoxin synthesis by archaea with a mevalonate pathway and cholesterol catabolism was considered. 10 cases each of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosis and rheumatoid arthritis before starting treatment and 10 age and sex matched healthy controls from general population were chosen for the study. Cholesterol substrate was added to the plasma of the patients and the generation of cytochrome F420, free RNA, free DNA, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, hydrogen peroxide, serotonin, pyruvate, ammonia, glutamate, cytochrome C, hexokinase, ATP synthase, HMG CoA reductase, digoxin and bile acids were studied. The changes with the addition of antibiotics and cerium to the patient's plasma were also studied. The statistical analysis was done by ANOVA. The parameters mentioned above were increased the patient's plasma with addition of cholesterol substrate. The addition of antibiotics to the patient's plasma caused a decrease in all the parameters while addition of cerium increased their levels. An actinide dependent shadow biosphere of archaea and viroids is described in multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosis and rheumatoid arthritis contributing to their pathogenesis.

  18. Dispelling myths about rare disease registry system development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Rare disease registries (RDRs) are an essential tool to improve knowledge and monitor interventions for rare diseases. If designed appropriately, patient and disease related information captured within them can become the cornerstone for effective diagnosis and new therapies. Surprisingly however, registries possess a diverse range of functionality, operate in different, often-times incompatible, software environments and serve various, and sometimes incongruous, purposes. Given the ambitious goals of the International Rare Diseases Research Consortium (IRDiRC) by 2020 and beyond, RDRs must be designed with the agility to evolve and efficiently interoperate in an ever changing rare disease landscape, as well as to cater for rapid changes in Information Communication Technologies. In this paper, we contend that RDR requirements will also evolve in response to a number of factors such as changing disease definitions and diagnostic criteria, the requirement to integrate patient/disease information from advances in either biotechnology and/or phenotypying approaches, as well as the need to adapt dynamically to security and privacy concerns. We dispel a number of myths in RDR development, outline key criteria for robust and sustainable RDR implementation and introduce the concept of a RDR Checklist to guide future RDR development. PMID:24131574

  19. HLA-G and susceptibility to develop celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Catamo, Eulalia; Zupin, Luisa; Segat, Ludovica; Celsi, Fulvio; Crovella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen-G has immunomodulatory function and its expression has been associated with several diseases. In our study we analyzed HLA-G polymorphisms in order to evaluate their possible association with susceptibility to celiac disease development. A total of 420 celiac patients and 509 controls were genotyped for HLA-G polymorphisms. We sequenced 800bp upstream the ATG codon (5' upstream regulatory region) and the whole 3' untranslated region of the HLA-G gene, whereas the ΔC deletion at exon 3 was detected by RFLP-PCR. Five polymorphisms (namely -477 C>G, -369 C>A, 14bp del/ins, 3187 A>G, 3196 C>G) and one haplotype (TCGGTACGAAITCCCGAG) were significantly more frequent in celiac patients than controls and associated with increased disease susceptibility. The 14bp I/I, 3187 G/G, 3196 G/G genotypes and TCGGTACGAAITCCCGAG haplotype, were still significantly associated with increased disease susceptibility (and in addition also the 3003 C/C genotype) when the analysis was restricted to patients and controls presenting the DQ2.5 or DQ8 HLA-DQ celiac disease risk haplotypes. Our findings indicate an association between HLA-G gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to celiac disease development, suggesting that HLA-G molecule is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  20. [Current Trend of Drug Development for Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs)].

    PubMed

    Kita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    EBOLA hemorrhagic fever, a typical emerging infectious disease, began in December 2013 in the southern part of Guinea, and killed more than 11000 people by the end of June, 2015. In addition to emerging/re-emerging diseases and the 3 major infectious diseases i.e. HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) have recently become important tropical diseases of the poor. It is remarkable that Japan succeeded in the eradication of malaria and other tropical diseases, which include lymphatic filariasis and schistosomiasis. However, despite these achievements, it is important to sustain our efforts when we consider global health. This review highlights the significance of elimination and/or control of NTDs, and then introduces the current situation of drug development activities in Japan, which are aimed towards combating tropical infectious diseases. They include studies on a novel drug target, the "mitochondrial NADH-fumarate reductase system (Fumarate respiration)" composed of complex I, rhodoquinone and complex II, which plays an important role in the anaerobic energy metabolism of many helminths such as Ascaris suum. An additional interesting finding highlighted herein is that ascofuranone, a recently developed anti-African trypanosome drug, shows specific inhibition of fumarate respiration in Echinococcus multilocularis mitochondria. PMID:26831795

  1. Roles for RNA-binding proteins in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Brinegar, Amy E; Cooper, Thomas A

    2016-09-15

    RNA-binding protein activities are highly regulated through protein levels, intracellular localization, and post-translation modifications. During development, mRNA processing of specific gene sets is regulated through manipulation of functional RNA-binding protein activities. The impact of altered RNA-binding protein activities also affects human diseases in which there are either a gain-of-function or loss-of-function causes pathogenesis. We will discuss RNA-binding proteins and their normal developmental RNA metabolism and contrast how their function is disrupted in disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:RNA Metabolism in Disease.

  2. Apolipoprotein E receptors: linking brain development and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Herz, J; Beffert, U

    2000-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder that afflicts an increasing part of our ageing population. An isoform of apolipoprotein E, a protein that mediates the transport of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system, predisposes carriers of this allele to the common late-onset form of the disease. How this protein is related to a neurodegenerative disorder is an enigma. Mounting evidence indicates that apolipoprotein E receptors, which are abundantly expressed in most neurons in the central nervous system, also fulfill critical functions during brain development and may profoundly influence the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Development of and Access to Products for Neglected Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Joshua; Dibner, Maria Staroselsky; Wilson, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Prior research on neglected disease drug development suggested inadequate funding was responsible for relatively few new approvals. In response, significantly more resources have been allocated towards development of drugs targeting neglected diseases. Our objective was to reassess drug development between1975 and 1999, evaluate progress in neglected disease drug development since 2000, and explain how increased numbers of approvals are a necessary but insufficient condition to improving access. Methods To assess numbers of approvals targeting neglected diseases, we employed two distinct methodologies: First, to revisit numbers published in Trouiller et al. (2002) we used their method to count marketed new chemical entities (NCEs) between 1975 and 1999. Second, using the G-Finder report as a benchmark, we identified which diseases are currently considered “neglected” to tally approvals in the 1975–1999 and 2000–2009 periods. Searching PharmaProjects and IMS R&D Focus databases as well as websites from numerous drug regulatory agencies, we identified new drug approvals and indications. Also, we examined the World Health Organization's (WHO) Essential Drug List (EDL) to see which drugs and indications were on the list. Findings Upon recount, using Trouiller et al. methodology, we found that between 1975 and 1999 more NCEs (n = 32) targeting tropical diseases and tuberculosis were approved than reported in Trouiller et al. (n = 16). Using the G-Finder method of defining neglected diseases, we found 46 new drug approvals between 1975 and 1999. WHO included 85% of these drugs on the EDL. In the period 2000 to May 2009, despite much greater funding, only 26 new drugs and vaccines for neglected diseases were marketed. Of these, WHO placed 50% on the EDL. Conclusions Product approvals for neglected diseases have increased, though progress has been uneven, with malaria appearing to benefit most in the short run from increased funding, while less

  4. The Indispensable Role of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1 in Skeletal Development

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masanori; Mulati, Mieradili; Talib, S. Zakiah A.; Kaldis, Philipp; Takeda, Shu; Okawa, Atsushi; Inose, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal development is tightly regulated through the processes of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Although the involvement of transcription and growth factors on the regulation of skeletal development has been extensively studied, the role of cell cycle regulatory proteins in this process remains elusive. To date, through cell-specific loss-of-function experiments in vivo, no cell cycle regulatory proteins have yet been conclusively shown to regulate skeletal development. Here, we demonstrate that cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) regulates skeletal development based on chondrocyte-specific loss-of-function experiments performed in a mouse model. Cdk1 is highly expressed in columnar proliferative chondrocytes and is greatly downregulated upon differentiation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Cdk1 is essential for proper chondrocyte proliferation and deletion of Cdk1 resulted in accelerated differentiation of chondrocytes. In vitro and ex vivo analyses revealed that Cdk1 is an essential cell cycle regulatory protein for parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) signaling pathway, which is critical to chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. These results demonstrate that Cdk1 functions as a molecular switch from proliferation to hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and thus is indispensable for skeletal development. Given the availability of inhibitors of Cdk1 activity, our results could provide insight for the treatment of diseases involving abnormal chondrocyte proliferation, such as osteoarthritis. PMID:26860366

  5. Animal disease surveillance: prospects for development in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, S; White, F

    2003-12-01

    Surveillance is a continuous and systematic process of collection, consolidation, analysis, interpretation and dissemination of relevant information on the occurrence of health problems. Data from surveillance can be used to calculate the incidence and prevalence of events, to categorise disease distribution by relevant characteristics, to guide investigations into the occurrence of epidemic and endemic disease, and to contribute essential information for the design and evaluation of effective disease prevention and control programmes. Disease surveillance systems should also respond to the information needs of government agencies, agribusiness, academia, producers and consumers. However, in most developing countries, including Pakistan, animal disease surveillance systems are not well developed, and do not produce a desirable quality of information on disease status and trends. In this paper, the authors describe various facets of a generic surveillance system and propose a structure for a surveillance system at district level. Such systems have been designed and implemented for public health surveillance in a number of countries, and may be developed to meet the needs of veterinary public health.

  6. Boron dependent membrane glycoproteins in symbiosome development and nodule organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Reguera, María; Bonilla, Ildefonso

    2008-01-01

    During the last two decades, we have analyzed the roles of boron (B) in the development of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis and nodule organogenesis. As in other plant tissues, B is needed for the maintenance of nodule cell wall structure. Moreover, several symbiotic events including rhizobial infection, nodule cell invasion and symbiosome development that involve membrane related functions (i.e., vesicle targeting, secretion, or cell surface interactions) are affected by B deficiency. Using anti-rhamnogalacturonan II (anti-RGII) antiserum and immunological techniques, we recently described membrane glycoproteins (RGII-glycoproteins) developmentally regulated in Pisum sativum nodules, which are not detected by the antibody in B-deficient nodules. RGII-glycoproteins appeared related with development processes involving extensive membrane synthesis, like symbiosome maturation or cell growth, both of them negatively affected by B deficiency. Here, we suggest that, besides maintaining cell wall structure, B is both stabilizing components of the membrane glycocalyx and promoting interactions between cell surfaces glycoconjugates that are important during the establishment of the symbiosis and during nodule development. Moreover, we hypothesize that B is playing a similar role during plant or animal embryogenesis and development. PMID:19841651

  7. Extent of illicit drug use and dependence, and their contribution to the global burden of disease.

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Louisa; Hall, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarises data for the prevalence, correlates, and probable adverse health consequences of problem use of amphetamines, cannabis, cocaine, and opioids. We discuss findings from systematic reviews of the prevalence of illicit drug use and dependence, remission from dependence, and mortality in illicit drug users, and evidence for acute and chronic effects of illicit drug use. We outline the regional and global distribution of use and estimated health burden from illicit drugs. These distributions are likely to be underestimates because they have not included all adverse outcomes of drug use and exclude those of cannabis--the mostly widely used illicit drug. In high-income countries, illicit drug use contributes less to the burden of disease than does tobacco but a substantial proportion of that due to alcohol. The major adverse health effects of cannabis use are dependence and probably psychotic disorders and other mental disorders. The health-related harms of cannabis use differ from those of amphetamine, cocaine, and opioid use, in that cannabis contributes little to mortality. Intelligent policy responses to drug problems need better data for the prevalence of different types of illicit drug use and the harms that their use causes globally. This need is especially urgent in high-income countries with substantial rates of illicit drug use and in low-income and middle-income countries close to illicit drug production areas.

  8. From Dependence to Autonomy. The Development of Asian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G., Ed.; Selvaratnam, Viswanathan, Ed.

    A collection of works on the development of Asian universities is presented, focusing on an aspect of higher education not previously analyzed: the contemporary impact of Western academic systems in Asia. Eleven papers fall into three sections following the introduction, "Twisted Roots: The Western Impact on Asian Higher Education," (P. Altabach).…

  9. Somatic development disorders of children with non specific inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Pawłowska, Katarzyna; Iwańczak, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Frequency of inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) tends to increase in developing countries. Nearly 25% of cases affects pediatric patients. Inflammatory bowel diseases are often associated with weight loss and stunting in children. Moreover, weight and height deficiencies are often early symptoms. Initially, nonspecific or latent course of disease delays the diagnostic process. Malnutrition in inflammatory bowel diseases can be caused by disorders of digestion and nutrients' absorption, intestinal loss, increased energy expenditure and appetite impairment. Nutritional deficiencies and inflammatory agents lead to disturbance of tissue metabolism - muscle and bone - and retardation of somatic development of affected children. Thus, deficiencies of muscle mass, bone mineral density and body height are observed. Insufficient normalization of somatic features may be the consequence of recurrent nature of disease and specificity of pharmacological treatment. Present work deals with the current state of knowledge concerning the somatic development disorders of children with inflammatory bowel diseases. Abnormal nutritional status, bone mineral density deficits and growth failure of patients have been discussed in the context of their relations and dependencies on inflammatory, nutritional and therapeutic factors. PMID:25182396

  10. Development of a disease registry for autoimmune bullous diseases: initial analysis of the pemphigus vulgaris subset.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit Aakash; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sirois, David; Werth, Victoria P; Rengarajan, Badri; Zrnchik, William; Attwood, Kristopher; Sinha, Animesh A

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare, potentially life threatening, autoimmune blistering skin disease. The International Pemphigus and Pemphigoid Foundation (IPPF) has recently developed a disease registry with the aim to enhance our understanding of autoimmune bullous diseases with the long-term goal of acquiring information to improve patient care. Patients were recruited to the IPPF disease registry through direct mail, e-mail, advertisements, and articles in the IPPF-quarterly, -website, -Facebook webpage, and IPPF Peer Health Coaches to complete a 38-question survey. We present here the initial analysis of detailed clinical information collected on 393 PV patients. We report previously unrecognized gender differences in terms of lesion location, autoimmune comorbidity, and delay in diagnosis. The IPPF disease registry serves as a useful resource and guide for future clinical investigation. PMID:24691863

  11. Surveillance for Occupational Respiratory Diseases in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Antao, Vinicius C.; Pinheiro, Germania A.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic diseases, including occupational respiratory diseases (ORDs), is increasing worldwide. Nevertheless, epidemiological data on these conditions are scarce in most countries. Therefore, it is important to conduct surveillance to monitor ORDs, particularly in developing countries, where the working population is especially vulnerable and the health system infrastructure is usually weak. This article provides a general framework for the implementation of ORD surveillance in developing countries. The main objectives of surveillance are to describe incidence and prevalence of ORDs, as well as to identify sentinel events and new associations between occupational exposures and health outcomes. Diseases with high morbidity and mortality and those in which early diagnosis with standardized tests are available are especially suitable for surveillance activities. Simple strategies, preferably using existing resources and technology, are the best option for surveillance in developing countries. This article offers examples of specific surveillance systems that are in place in Brazil, China, Cuba, India, and South Africa. PMID:26024351

  12. [Eenie, Meenie, Miney, Moe, who is responsible for the antibody-dependent enhancement of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus infection?].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Wei; Xing, Xiu-Mei; Wen, Yong-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (AMDV) causes a persistent infection associated with immune complex disease, hypergammaglobulinemia, and high levels of antiviral antibodies. Despite the presence of an antibody, the virus is not cleared in vivo. Pre-existing antibodies may enhance viral infections, by Fc-receptor-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), but the mechanism that underlies ADE has not been fully defined. Three models have been proposed, including: (1) interactions between antibody and FcR, complement C3 fragment and CR, or between C1q and C1qR, which promotes viral attachment to cells; (2) suppression of IFN-gamma-mediated host-cell antiviral gene expression by the upregulation of negative regulators of pathogen pattern recognition; and (3) the promotion of early IL-10 secretion. In addition, the role of cytokine IL-6 in ADE mediated disease development is discussed, to facilitate a better understanding of the pathogenesis of AMDV infection, as well as give insights into rational vaccine design approaches. PMID:25272602

  13. Proprioceptor pathway development is dependent on Math1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bermingham, N. A.; Hassan, B. A.; Wang, V. Y.; Fernandez, M.; Banfi, S.; Bellen, H. J.; Fritzsch, B.; Zoghbi, H. Y.

    2001-01-01

    The proprioceptive system provides continuous positional information on the limbs and body to the thalamus, cortex, pontine nucleus, and cerebellum. We showed previously that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Math1 is essential for the development of certain components of the proprioceptive pathway, including inner-ear hair cells, cerebellar granule neurons, and the pontine nuclei. Here, we demonstrate that Math1 null embryos lack the D1 interneurons and that these interneurons give rise to a subset of proprioceptor interneurons and the spinocerebellar and cuneocerebellar tracts. We also identify three downstream genes of Math1 (Lh2A, Lh2B, and Barhl1) and establish that Math1 governs the development of multiple components of the proprioceptive pathway.

  14. Development of a molecular test of Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Guay-Bélanger, Sabrina; Simonyan, David; Bureau, Alexandre; Gagnon, Edith; Albert, Caroline; Morissette, Jean; Siris, Ethel S; Orcel, Philippe; Brown, Jacques P; Michou, Laëtitia

    2016-03-01

    Depending on populations, 15 to 40% of patients have a familial form of Paget's disease of bone (PDB), which is transmitted in an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance with incomplete penetrance. To date, only SQSTM1 gene mutations have been linked to the disease. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with PDB in patient non-carriers of SQSTM1 mutations, but they have minor size effects. The current clinical practice guidelines still recommend to measure total serum alkaline phosphatase (sALP) for PDB screening. However, genetic or bone biomarkers alone may lack sensitivity to detect PDB. Thus, the objective of this study was to develop a molecular test of PDB, combining genetic and bone biomarkers, in order to detect PDB, which is frequently asymptomatic. We genotyped 35 SNPs previously associated with PDB in 305 patients, and 292 healthy controls. In addition, serum levels of 14 bone biomarkers were assayed in 51 patients and 151 healthy controls. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models with adjustment for age and sex were fitted to search for a combination of SNPs and/or bone biomarkers that could best detect PDB in patient non-carriers of SQSTM1 mutations. First, a combination of five genetic markers gave rise to the highest area under the ROC curve (AUC) with 95% confidence interval [95% CI] of 0.731 [0.688; 0.773], which allowed us to detect 81.5% of patients with PDB. Second, a combination of two bone biomarkers had an AUC of 0.822 [0.726; 0.918], and was present in 81.5% of patients with PDB. Then, the combination of the five genetic markers and the two bone biomarkers increased the AUC up to 0.892 [0.833; 0.951], and detected 88.5% of patients with PDB. These results suggested that an algorithm integrating first a screen for SQSTM1 gene mutations, followed by either a genetic markers combination or a combined genetic and biochemical markers test in patients non-carrier of any SQSTM1 mutation, may detect the PDB

  15. Potential for Developing Purinergic Drugs for Gastrointestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Cortes, Fernando; Liñán-Rico, Andromeda; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Christofi, Fievos L.

    2014-01-01

    Treatments for IBD, IBS, FD or motility disorders are not adequate, and purinergic drugs offer exciting new possibilities. GI symptoms that could be targeted for therapy include visceral pain, inflammatory pain, dysmotility, constipation and diarrhea. The focus of this review is on potential for developing purinergic drugs for clinical trials to treat GI symptoms. Purinergic receptors are divided into adenosine P1 (A1,A2A,A2B,A3), ionotropic ATP-gated P2X ion channel (P2X1–7) or metabotropic P2Y1,2,4,6,11–14 receptors. There is good experimental evidence for targeting A2A, A2B, A3, P2X7, P2X3 receptors or increasing endogenous adenosine levels to treat IBD, inflammatory pain, IBS/visceral pain, inflammatory-diarrhea and motility disorders. Purine genes are also potential biomarkers of disease. Advances in medicinal-chemistry have an accelerated pace toward clinical trials: Methotrexate and sulfasalazine, used to treat IBD, act by stimulating CD73-dependent adenosine production. ATP protects against NSAID-induced enteropathy and has pain-relieving properties in humans. A P2X7R antagonist AZD9056 is in clinical trials for CD. A3 AR drugs target inflammatory diseases (e.g. CF101; CF102). Dipyridamole, a nucleoside uptake-inhibitor, is in trials for endotoxemia. Drugs for pain in clinical-trials include P2X3/P2X2/3(AF-219) and P2X7(GSK1482160) antagonists and A1(GW493838) or A2A(BVT.115959) agonists. IberogastR is a phytopharmacon targeting purine-mechanisms with efficacy in IBS and FD. Purinergic drugs have excellent safety/efficacy profile for prospective clinical trials in IBD, IBS, FD and inflammatory-diarrhea. Genetic polymorphisms and caffeine consumption may affect susceptibility to treatment. Further studies in animals can clarify mechanisms and test new-generation drugs. Finally, there is still a huge gap in our knowledge of human pathophysiology of purinergic signaling. PMID:24859298

  16. Infectious diseases in paediatric pathology: experience from a developing country.

    PubMed

    Peres, Luiz Cesar; Saggioro, Fabiano Pinto; Dias, Leonidas Braga; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Brasil, Roosecelis Araújo; Luiz, Veridiana Ester Dias de Barros; Neder, Luciano; Rosman, Fernando Colonna; Fleury, Raul Negrão; Ura, Somei; Orsi, Ana Tereza; Talhari, Carolina; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Rey, Luís Carlos; Martinez-Espinosa, Flor E; Sim, Franklin; Filho, Otilde Es de Satana; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Lambertucci, José Roberto; Chimelli, Leila M Cardão; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Belone, Andrea de Faria Fernandes

    2008-02-01

    Infectious and parasitic diseases have always challenged man. Although many of them are typically seen in some areas of the world and can be adequately managed by just improving socioeconomic status and sanitary conditions, they are still quite prevalent and may sometimes be seen outside their original geographical areas. Human migration due to different reasons, tourism, blood transfusion and solid organ transplantation has created new concerns for health professionals all over the world. If not for diagnostic purposes, at least these tropical and infectious diseases should be largely known because their epidemiology, pathogenesis, host/parasite interaction, inflammatory and reparative responses are quite interesting and teach us about human biology. Curiosity is inherent to pathology practice and so we are compelled to look for things other than tumours or degenerative diseases. This review focuses on infectious and parasitic diseases found in a developing country and brings up-to-date information on diseases caused by viruses (dengue, yellow fever), bacteria (typhoid fever, leprosy), parasites (Chagas' disease, cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis, amoebiasis, Capillaria hepatica, schistosomiasis, cysticercosis) and caused by fungi (paracoccidioidomycosis, cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis) that may be useful for pathologists when facing somewhat strange cases from developing countries.

  17. Disease models for the development of therapies for lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miao; Motabar, Omid; Ferrer, Marc; Marugan, Juan J; Zheng, Wei; Ottinger, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of rare diseases in which the function of the lysosome is disrupted by the accumulation of macromolecules. The complexity underlying the pathogenesis of LSDs and the small, often pediatric, population of patients make the development of therapies for these diseases challenging. Current treatments are only available for a small subset of LSDs and have not been effective at treating neurological symptoms. Disease-relevant cellular and animal models with high clinical predictability are critical for the discovery and development of new treatments for LSDs. In this paper, we review how LSD patient primary cells and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cellular models are providing novel assay systems in which phenotypes are more similar to those of the human LSD physiology. Furthermore, larger animal disease models are providing additional tools for evaluation of the efficacy of drug candidates. Early predictors of efficacy and better understanding of disease biology can significantly affect the translational process by focusing efforts on those therapies with the higher probability of success, thus decreasing overall time and cost spent in clinical development and increasing the overall positive outcomes in clinical trials. PMID:27144735

  18. Impaired learning-dependent cortical plasticity in Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Cybulska-Klosowicz, Anita; Mazarakis, Nektarios K; Van Dellen, Anton; Blakemore, Colin; Hannan, Anthony J; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2004-12-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetically transmitted neurodegenerative disorder. The neuropathology in HD is a selective neuronal cell death in several brain regions including cortex. Although changes in synaptic plasticity were shown within the hippocampus and striatum of HD transgenic mice, there are no studies considering neocortical synaptic plasticity abnormalities in HD. We examined the impact of the HD transgene upon learning-dependent plasticity of cortical representational maps. The effect of associative learning, in which stimulation of a row of vibrissae was paired with appetitive stimulus, upon functional representations of vibrissae in the barrel cortex, was investigated with 2-deoxyglucose brain mapping in presymptomatic R6/1 HD mice. In wild-type mice, cortical representation of the row of vibrissae involved in the training was expanded, while in HD mice the representation of this row was not expanded. The results suggest that presymptomatic R6/1 HD transgenic mice show deficits in plasticity of primary somatosensory cortex.

  19. Muscle activity pattern dependent pain development and alleviation.

    PubMed

    Sjøgaard, Gisela; Søgaard, Karen

    2014-12-01

    Muscle activity is for decades considered to provide health benefits irrespectively of the muscle activity pattern performed and whether it is during e.g. sports, transportation, or occupational work tasks. Accordingly, the international recommendations for public health-promoting physical activity do not distinguish between occupational and leisure time physical activity. However, in this body of literature, attention has not been paid to the extensive documentation on occupational physical activity imposing a risk of impairment of health - in particular musculoskeletal health in terms of muscle pain. Focusing on muscle activity patterns and musculoskeletal health it is pertinent to elucidate the more specific aspects regarding exposure profiles and body regional pain. Static sustained muscle contraction for prolonged periods often occurs in the neck/shoulder area during occupational tasks and may underlie muscle pain development in spite of rather low relative muscle load. Causal mechanisms include a stereotype recruitment of low threshold motor units (activating type 1 muscle fibers) characterized by a lack of temporal as well as spatial variation in recruitment. In contrast during physical activities at leisure and sport the motor recruitment patterns are more dynamic including regularly relatively high muscle forces - also activating type 2 muscles fibers - as well as periods of full relaxation even of the type 1 muscle fibers. Such activity is unrelated to muscle pain development if adequate recovery is granted. However, delayed muscle soreness may develop following intensive eccentric muscle activity (e.g. down-hill skiing) with peak pain levels in thigh muscles 1-2 days after the exercise bout and a total recovery within 1 week. This acute pain profile is in contrast to the chronic muscle pain profile related to repetitive monotonous work tasks. The painful muscles show adverse functional, morphological, hormonal, as well as metabolic characteristics. Of

  20. Progress and prospects: gene therapy for genetic diseases with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, P

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical studies in small and large animal models using helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) have generated promising results for the treatment of genetic diseases. However, clinical translation is complicated by the dose-dependent, capsid-mediated acute toxic response following systemic vector injection. With the advancements in vectorology, a better understanding of vector-mediated toxicity, and improved delivery methods, HDAds may emerge as an important vector for gene therapy of genetic diseases and this report highlights recent progress and prospects in this field. In briefProgressHDAds provide stable, long-term transgene expression in small and large animal models without chronic toxicity for liver-directed gene therapy.High vector doses are required for efficient hepatocyte transduction by systemic administration.Strategies to improve the therapeutic index of HDAd are available or currently under investigation for liver-directed gene therapy.High-efficiency pulmonary transduction and clinically relevant end points can be achieved delivering HDAd in conjunction with tight junction opening agents for CF gene therapy.HDAd delivered with an intracorporeal nebulizing catheter results in high-efficiency transduction of the respiratory epithelium in large animals.Encouraging results have been obtained with HDAd for brain- and muscle-directed gene therapy in animal models.ProspectsA better understanding of the acute innate response will provide new targets for pharmacological blockade to improve the therapeutic index of the vector.Further optimization of preferential liver targeting by HDAd through balloon catheter delivery has the potential of providing a clinically attractive method of vector delivery.Further assessment of Ad PEGylation and modulation of the liver fenestrations may provide attractive strategies to increase the therapeutic index of the vector.Capsid modification to increase the affinity of Ad for hepatocytes has the potential to improve

  1. The Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Protects Against Alcoholic Liver Disease Via a Macrophage Autophagy-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Denaës, Timothé; Lodder, Jasper; Chobert, Marie-Noële; Ruiz, Isaac; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Lotersztajn, Sophie; Teixeira-Clerc, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Kupffer cells, the resident macrophages of the liver, play a major role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. We have previously demonstrated that CB2 receptor protects against alcoholic liver disease by inhibiting alcohol-induced inflammation and steatosis via the regulation of Kupffer cell activation. Here, we explored the mechanism underlying these effects and hypothesized that the anti-inflammatory properties of CB2 receptor in Kupffer cells rely on activation of autophagy. For this purpose, mice invalidated for CB2 receptor (CB2Mye−/− mice) or for the autophagy gene ATG5 (ATG5Mye−/− mice) in the myeloid lineage, and their littermate wild-type mice were subjected to chronic-plus-binge ethanol feeding. CB2Mye−/− mice showed exacerbated alcohol-induced pro-inflammatory gene expression and steatosis. Studies in cultured macrophages demonstrated that CB2 receptor activation by JWH-133 stimulated autophagy via a heme oxygenase-1 dependent pathway. Moreover, JWH-133 reduced the induction of inflammatory genes by lipopolysaccharide in wild-type macrophages, but not in ATG5-deficient cells. The CB2 agonist also protected from alcohol-induced liver inflammation and steatosis in wild-type mice, but not in ATG5Mye−/− mice demonstrating that macrophage autophagy mediates the anti-inflammatory and anti-steatogenic effects of CB2 receptor. Altogether these results demonstrate that CB2 receptor activation in macrophages protects from alcohol-induced steatosis by inhibiting hepatic inflammation through an autophagy-dependent pathway. PMID:27346657

  2. Development of a Pressure-Dependent Constitutive Model with Combined Multilinear Kinematic and Isotropic Hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

    2003-01-01

    The development of a pressure-dependent constitutive model with combined multilinear kinematic and isotropic hardening is presented. The constitutive model is developed using the ABAQUS user material subroutine (UMAT). First the pressure-dependent plasticity model is derived. Following this, the combined bilinear and combined multilinear hardening equations are developed for von Mises plasticity theory. The hardening rule equations are then modified to include pressure dependency. The method for implementing the new constitutive model into ABAQUS is given.

  3. Small molecule mediated inhibition of RORγ-dependent gene expression and autoimmune disease pathology in vivo.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Daliya; Zhao, Linlin; Wu, Lan; Palanichamy, Arumugam; Ergun, Ayla; Peng, Liaomin; Quigley, Catherine; Hamann, Stefan; Dunstan, Robert; Cullen, Patrick; Allaire, Norm; Guertin, Kevin; Wang, Tao; Chao, Jianhua; Loh, Christine; Fontenot, Jason D

    2016-04-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor γ (RORγ) orchestrates a pro-inflammatory gene expression programme in multiple lymphocyte lineages including T helper type 17 (Th17) cells, γδ T cells, innate lymphoid cells and lymphoid tissue inducer cells. There is compelling evidence that RORγ-expressing cells are relevant targets for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Unlike Th17 cells, where RORγ expression is induced under specific pro-inflammatory conditions, γδ T cells and other innate-like immune cells express RORγ in the steady state. Small molecule mediated disruption of RORγ function in cells with pre-existing RORγ transcriptional complexes represents a significant and challenging pharmacological hurdle. We present data demonstrating that a novel, selective and potent small molecule RORγ inhibitor can block the RORγ-dependent gene expression programme in both Th17 cells and RORγ-expressing γδ T cells as well as a disease-relevant subset of human RORγ-expressing memory T cells. Importantly, systemic administration of this inhibitor in vivo limits pathology in an innate lymphocyte-driven mouse model of psoriasis. PMID:26694902

  4. Schizophrenia: A Pathogenetic Autoimmune Disease Caused by Viruses and Pathogens and Dependent on Genes

    PubMed Central

    Carter, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Many genes have been implicated in schizophrenia as have viral prenatal or adult infections and toxoplasmosis or Lyme disease. Several autoantigens also target key pathology-related proteins. These factors are interrelated. Susceptibility genes encode for proteins homologous to those of the pathogens while the autoantigens are homologous to pathogens' proteins, suggesting that the risk-promoting effects of genes and risk factors are conditional upon each other, and dependent upon protein matching between pathogen and susceptibility gene products. Pathogens' proteins may act as dummy ligands, decoy receptors, or via interactome interference. Many such proteins are immunogenic suggesting that antibody mediated knockdown of multiple schizophrenia gene products could contribute to the disease, explaining the immune activation in the brain and lymphocytes in schizophrenia, and the preponderance of immune-related gene variants in the schizophrenia genome. Schizophrenia may thus be a “pathogenetic” autoimmune disorder, caused by pathogens, genes, and the immune system acting together, and perhaps preventable by pathogen elimination, or curable by the removal of culpable antibodies and antigens. PMID:22567321

  5. Transcriptional Regulatory Cascades in Runx2-Dependent Bone Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The development of the musculoskeletal system is a complex process that involves very precise control of bone formation and growth as well as remodeling during postnatal life. Although the understanding of the transcriptional mechanisms of osteogenesis has increased considerably, the molecular regulatory basis, especially the gene regulatory network of osteogenic differentiation, is still poorly understood. This review provides the reader with an overview of the key transcription factors that govern bone formation, highlighting their function and regulation linked to Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). Runx2 as the master transcription factor of osteoblast differentiation, Twist, Msh homeobox 2 (Msx2), and promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger protein (PLZF) acting upstream of Runx2, Osterix (Osx) acting downstream of Runx2, and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and zinc-finger protein 521 (ZFP521) acting as cofactors of Runx2 are discussed, and their relevance for tissue engineering is presented. References are provided for more in-depth personal study. PMID:23150948

  6. Mitochondrial metabolism in Parkinson's disease impairs quality control autophagy by hampering microtubule-dependent traffic.

    PubMed

    Arduíno, Daniela M; Esteves, A Raquel; Cortes, Luísa; Silva, Diana F; Patel, Bindi; Grazina, Manuela; Swerdlow, Russell H; Oliveira, Catarina R; Cardoso, Sandra M

    2012-11-01

    Abnormal presence of autophagic vacuoles is evident in brains of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), in contrast to the rare detection of autophagosomes in a normal brain. However, the actual cause and pathological significance of these observations remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate a role for mitochondrial metabolism in the regulation of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway in ex vivo and in vitro models of PD. We show that transferring mitochondria from PD patients into cells previously depleted of mitochondrial DNA is sufficient to reproduce the alterations in the autophagic system observed in PD patient brains. Although the initial steps of this pathway are not compromised, there is an increased accumulation of autophagosomes associated with a defective autophagic activity. We prove that this functional decline was originated from a deficient mobilization of autophagosomes from their site of formation toward lysosomes due to disruption in microtubule-dependent trafficking. This contributed directly to a decreased proteolytic flux of α-synuclein and other autophagic substrates. Our results lend strong support for a direct impact of mitochondria in autophagy as defective autophagic clearance ability secondary to impaired microtubule trafficking is driven by dysfunctional mitochondria. We uncover mitochondria and mitochondria-dependent intracellular traffic as main players in the regulation of autophagy in PD. PMID:22843496

  7. Mitochondrial metabolism in Parkinson's disease impairs quality control autophagy by hampering microtubule-dependent traffic.

    PubMed

    Arduíno, Daniela M; Esteves, A Raquel; Cortes, Luísa; Silva, Diana F; Patel, Bindi; Grazina, Manuela; Swerdlow, Russell H; Oliveira, Catarina R; Cardoso, Sandra M

    2012-11-01

    Abnormal presence of autophagic vacuoles is evident in brains of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), in contrast to the rare detection of autophagosomes in a normal brain. However, the actual cause and pathological significance of these observations remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate a role for mitochondrial metabolism in the regulation of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway in ex vivo and in vitro models of PD. We show that transferring mitochondria from PD patients into cells previously depleted of mitochondrial DNA is sufficient to reproduce the alterations in the autophagic system observed in PD patient brains. Although the initial steps of this pathway are not compromised, there is an increased accumulation of autophagosomes associated with a defective autophagic activity. We prove that this functional decline was originated from a deficient mobilization of autophagosomes from their site of formation toward lysosomes due to disruption in microtubule-dependent trafficking. This contributed directly to a decreased proteolytic flux of α-synuclein and other autophagic substrates. Our results lend strong support for a direct impact of mitochondria in autophagy as defective autophagic clearance ability secondary to impaired microtubule trafficking is driven by dysfunctional mitochondria. We uncover mitochondria and mitochondria-dependent intracellular traffic as main players in the regulation of autophagy in PD.

  8. Mitochondrial metabolism in Parkinson's disease impairs quality control autophagy by hampering microtubule-dependent traffic

    PubMed Central

    Arduíno, Daniela M.; Raquel Esteves, A.; Cortes, Luísa; Silva, Diana F.; Patel, Bindi; Grazina, Manuela; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Oliveira, Catarina R.; Cardoso, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal presence of autophagic vacuoles is evident in brains of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), in contrast to the rare detection of autophagosomes in a normal brain. However, the actual cause and pathological significance of these observations remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate a role for mitochondrial metabolism in the regulation of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway in ex vivo and in vitro models of PD. We show that transferring mitochondria from PD patients into cells previously depleted of mitochondrial DNA is sufficient to reproduce the alterations in the autophagic system observed in PD patient brains. Although the initial steps of this pathway are not compromised, there is an increased accumulation of autophagosomes associated with a defective autophagic activity. We prove that this functional decline was originated from a deficient mobilization of autophagosomes from their site of formation toward lysosomes due to disruption in microtubule-dependent trafficking. This contributed directly to a decreased proteolytic flux of α-synuclein and other autophagic substrates. Our results lend strong support for a direct impact of mitochondria in autophagy as defective autophagic clearance ability secondary to impaired microtubule trafficking is driven by dysfunctional mitochondria. We uncover mitochondria and mitochondria-dependent intracellular traffic as main players in the regulation of autophagy in PD. PMID:22843496

  9. Histone methylations in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Heart development comprises myocyte specification, differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. These processes are regulated by a group of core cardiac transcription factors in a coordinated temporal and spatial manner. Histone methylation is an emerging epigenetic mechanism for regulating gene transcription. Interplay among cardiac transcription factors and histone lysine modifiers plays important role in heart development. Aberrant expression and mutation of the histone lysine modifiers during development and in adult life can cause either embryonic lethality or congenital heart diseases, and influences the response of adult hearts to pathological stresses. In this review, we describe current body of literature on the role of several common histone methylations and their modifying enzymes in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases.

  10. De novo development of artistic creativity in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Ambar

    2011-01-01

    The case of an 82-year-old female with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD), who developed unusual artistic creativity after development of her disease, is described. The possible pathogenetic mechanism is discussed. The patient showed no inclination toward visual arts during her premorbid years. However, 4 years after development of AD suggestive symptoms she started painting beautiful pictures rather impulsively. Some such paintings have been appreciated even by a qualified art expert. Such de novo development of artistic creativity had been described earlier in subjects with the semantic form of fronto-temporal dementia (FTD), but not in AD. The prevailing concept of lateralized compromise and paradoxical functional facilitation, proposed in connection with FTD subjects, may not be applicable in AD subjects where the affection is more diffuse and more posterior in the brain. Hence, the likely pathogenetic mechanism involved in the case described may remain uncertain. Possibilities are discussed. PMID:22346020

  11. Histone methylations in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Heart development comprises myocyte specification, differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. These processes are regulated by a group of core cardiac transcription factors in a coordinated temporal and spatial manner. Histone methylation is an emerging epigenetic mechanism for regulating gene transcription. Interplay among cardiac transcription factors and histone lysine modifiers plays important role in heart development. Aberrant expression and mutation of the histone lysine modifiers during development and in adult life can cause either embryonic lethality or congenital heart diseases, and influences the response of adult hearts to pathological stresses. In this review, we describe current body of literature on the role of several common histone methylations and their modifying enzymes in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases. PMID:25942538

  12. Roles of FGF Signals in Heart Development, Health, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Nobuyuki; Ohta, Hiroya; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika

    2016-01-01

    The heart provides the body with oxygen and nutrients and assists in the removal of metabolic waste through the blood vessels of the circulatory system. It is the first organ to form during embryonic morphogenesis. FGFs with diverse functions in development, health, and disease are signaling proteins, mostly as paracrine growth factors or endocrine hormones. The human/mouse FGF family comprises 22 members. Findings obtained from mouse models and human diseases with FGF signaling disorders have indicated that several FGFs are involved in heart development, health, and disease. Paracrine FGFs including FGF8, FGF9, FGF10, and FGF16 act as paracrine signals in embryonic heart development. In addition, paracrine FGFs including FGF2, FGF9, FGF10, and FGF16 play roles as paracrine signals in postnatal heart pathophysiology. Although FGF15/19, FGF21, and FGF23 are typical endocrine FGFs, they mainly function as paracrine signals in heart development or pathophysiology. In heart diseases, serum FGF15/19 levels or FGF21 and FGF23 levels decrease or increase, respectively, indicating their possible roles in heart pathophysiology. FGF2 and FGF10 also stimulate the cardiac differentiation of cultured stem cells and cardiac reprogramming of cultured fibroblasts. These findings provide new insights into the roles of FGF signaling in the heart and potential therapeutic strategies for cardiac disorders. PMID:27803896

  13. Professional development implications of Ebola virus disease education: part II.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elaine L; Kerner, Robert L; Schindler, Jaclyn S; DeVoe, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series that explores how one large, integrated health care system swiftly responded to the emerging threat of Ebola virus disease. In this second article, the educational and training activities that were developed are described.

  14. Development and Coherence of Beliefs Regarding Disease Causality and Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2014-01-01

    Guided by a naïve theories perspective on the development of thinking about disease, this study of 188 children aged 6 to 18 examined knowledge of HIV/AIDS causality and prevention using parallel measures derived from open-ended and structured interviews. Knowledge of both risk factors and prevention rules, as well as conceptual understanding of…

  15. Mitochondrial-dependent Ca2+ handling in Huntington's disease striatal cells: effect of histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jorge M A; Chen, Sylvia; Almeida, Sandra; Riley, Rebeccah; Gonçalves, Jorge; Oliveira, Catarina R; Hayden, Michael R; Nicholls, David G; Ellerby, Lisa M; Rego, A Cristina

    2006-10-25

    Evidence suggests that neuronal dysfunction in Huntington's disease (HD) striatum involves deficits in mitochondrial function and in Ca2+ handling. However, the relationship between mitochondria and Ca2+ handling has been incompletely studied in intact HD striatal cells. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors reduces cell death in HD models, but the effects of this promising therapy on cellular function are mostly unknown. Here, we use real-time functional imaging of intracellular Ca2+ and mitochondrial membrane potential to explore the role of in situ HD mitochondria in Ca2+ handling. Immortalized striatal (STHdh) cells and striatal neurons from transgenic mice, expressing full-length mutant huntingtin (Htt), were used to model HD. We show that (1) active glycolysis in STHdh cells occludes the mitochondrial role in Ca2+ handling as well as the effects of mitochondrial inhibitors, (2) STHdh cells and striatal neurons in the absence of glycolysis are critically dependent on oxidative phosphorylation for energy-dependent Ca2+ handling, (3) expression of full-length mutant Htt is associated with deficits in mitochondrial-dependent Ca2+ handling that can be ameliorated by treatment with HDAC inhibitors (treatment with trichostatin A or sodium butyrate decreases the proportion of STHdh cells losing Ca2+ homeostasis after Ca2+-ionophore challenging, and accelerates the restoration of intracellular Ca2+ in striatal neurons challenged with NMDA), and (4) neurons with different response patterns to NMDA receptor activation exhibit different average somatic areas and are differentially affected by treatment with HDAC inhibitors, suggesting subpopulation or functional state specificity. These findings indicate that neuroprotection induced by HDAC inhibitors involves more efficient Ca2+ handling, thus improving the neuronal ability to cope with excitotoxic stimuli.

  16. [What useful developments for my inflammatory bowel disease practice have come from Digestive Disease Week 2014?].

    PubMed

    Chaparro, María

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this article is to summarize reports presented at Digestive Disease Week 2014 that relate to fertility and pregnancy, inflammatory bowel disease in elderly patients, the risk of cancer and its relationship to treatment and finally, developments regarding psychological aspects that may affect patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Studies were selected at the discretion of the author, mainly considering those with conclusions that can be applied immediately to clinical practice. Using anti-TNF drugs during pregnancy is safe in the short term. This currently seems to be true for the medium and the long term. To limit fetal exposure, the mother can safely stop taking the anti-TNF drugs in the second trimester of the pregnancy if she is in remission. Elderly patients with inflammatory bowel disease require stricter monitoring than younger patients due to the risk of complications, especially infections associated with the disease and treatments. The effect of inflammatory bowel disease and the drugs for its treatment on the risk of development is still not well established, but the magnitude of the effect seems possibly lower than previously described. The causal link between psychological factors and the occurrence of IBD relapse is by no means established. PMID:25294263

  17. Health innovation networks to help developing countries address neglected diseases.

    PubMed

    Morel, Carlos M; Acharya, Tara; Broun, Denis; Dangi, Ajit; Elias, Christopher; Ganguly, N K; Gardner, Charles A; Gupta, R K; Haycock, Jane; Heher, Anthony D; Hotez, Peter J; Kettler, Hannah E; Keusch, Gerald T; Krattiger, Anatole F; Kreutz, Fernando T; Lall, Sanjaya; Lee, Keun; Mahoney, Richard; Martinez-Palomo, Adolfo; Mashelkar, R A; Matlin, Stephen A; Mzimba, Mandi; Oehler, Joachim; Ridley, Robert G; Senanayake, Pramilla; Singer, Peter; Yun, Mikyung

    2005-07-15

    Gross inequities in disease burden between developed and developing countries are now the subject of intense global attention. Public and private donors have marshaled resources and created organizational structures to accelerate the development of new health products and to procure and distribute drugs and vaccines for the poor. Despite these encouraging efforts directed primarily from and funded by industrialized countries, sufficiency and sustainability remain enormous challenges because of the sheer magnitude of the problem. Here we highlight a complementary and increasingly important means to improve health equity: the growing ability of some developing countries to undertake health innovation.

  18. Developments in the management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Amirali; Reed-Gitomer, Berenice; Kelleher, Catherine; Bekheirnia, Mir Reza; Schrier, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent life- threatening, hereditary disease. ADPKD is more common than sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy, hemophilia, Down’s syndrome, and Huntington’s disease combined. ADPKD is a multisystemic disorder characterized by the progressive development of renal cysts and marked renal enlargement. Structural and functional renal deterioration occurs in ADPKD patients and is the fourth leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in adults. Aside from the renal manifestations, extrarenal structural abnormalities, such as liver cysts, cardiovascular abnormalities, and intracranial aneurysms may lead to morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have identified prognostic factors for progressive renal impairment including gender, race, age, proteinuria, hematuria, hypertension and increased left ventricular mass index (LVMI). Early diagnosis and better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease provides the opportunity to aggressivly treat hypertension with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors and thereby potentially reduce LVMI, prevent cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and slow progression of the renal disease. PMID:18728845

  19. Cdh1 regulates craniofacial development via APC-dependent ubiquitination and activation of Goosecoid.

    PubMed

    Shao, Rui; Liu, Jia; Yan, Guang; Zhang, Jinfang; Han, Yujiao; Guo, Jianfeng; Xu, Zhan; Yuan, Zhu; Liu, Jiankang; Malumbres, Marcos; Wan, Lixin; Wei, Wenyi; Zou, Weiguo

    2016-06-01

    Craniofacial anomalies (CFAs) characterized by birth defects of skull and facial bones are the most frequent congenital disease. Genomic analysis has identified multiple genes responsible for CFAs; however, the underlying genetic mechanisms for the majority of CFAs remain largely unclear. Our previous study revealed that the Wwp2 E3 ubiquitin ligase facilitates craniofacial development in part through inducing monoubiquitination and activation of the paired-like homeobox transcription factor, Goosecoid (Gsc). Here we report that Gsc is also ubiquitinated and activated by the APC(Cdh1) E3 ubiquitin ligase, leading to transcriptional activation of various Gsc target genes crucial for craniofacial development. Consistenly, neural crest-specific Cdh1-knockout mice display similar bone malformation as Wwp2-deficient mice in the craniofacial region, characterized by a domed skull, a short snout and a twisted nasal bone. Mechanistically, like Wwp2-deficient mice, mice with Cdh1 deficiency in neural crest cells exhibit reduced Gsc/Sox6 transcriptional activities. Simultaneous deletion of Cdh1 and Wwp2 results in a more severe craniofacial defect compared with single gene deletion, suggesting a synergistic augmentation of Gsc activity by these two E3 ubiquitin ligases. Hence, our study reveals a novel role for Cdh1 in craniofacial development through promoting APC-dependent non-proteolytic ubiquitination and activation of Gsc.

  20. RNAseq Transcriptional Profiling following Whip Development in Sugarcane Smut Disease.

    PubMed

    Schaker, Patricia D C; Palhares, Alessandra C; Taniguti, Lucas M; Peters, Leila P; Creste, Silvana; Aitken, Karen S; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Kitajima, João P; Vieira, Maria L C; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia B

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane smut disease is caused by the biotrophic fungus Sporisorium scitamineum. The disease is characterized by the development of a whip-like structure from the primary meristems, where billions of teliospores are produced. Sugarcane smut also causes tillering and low sucrose and high fiber contents, reducing cane productivity. We investigated the biological events contributing to disease symptoms in a smut intermediate-resistant sugarcane genotype by examining the transcriptional profiles (RNAseq) shortly after inoculating the plants and immediately after whip emission. The overall picture of disease progression suggests that premature transcriptional reprogramming of the shoot meristem functions continues until the emergence of the whip. The guidance of this altered pattern is potentially primarily related to auxin mobilization in addition to the involvement of other hormonal imbalances. The consequences associated with whip emission are the modulation of typical meristematic functions toward reproductive organ differentiation, requiring strong changes in carbon partitioning and energy production. These changes include the overexpression of genes coding for invertases and trehalose-6P synthase, as well as other enzymes from key metabolic pathways, such as from lignin biosynthesis. This is the first report describing changes in the transcriptional profiles following whip development, providing a hypothetical model and candidate genes to further study sugarcane smut disease progression. PMID:27583836

  1. Congenital Heart Disease and Impacts on Child Development

    PubMed Central

    Mari, Mariana Alievi; Cascudo, Marcelo Matos; Alchieri, João Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the child development and evaluate a possible association with the commitment by biopsychosocial factors of children with and without congenital heart disease. Methods: Observational study of case-control with three groups: Group 1 - children with congenital heart disease without surgical correction; Group 2 - children with congenital heart disease who underwent surgery; and Group 3 - healthy children. Children were assessed by socio-demographic and clinical questionnaire and the Denver II Screening Test. Results: One hundred and twenty eight children were evaluated, 29 in Group 1, 43 in Group 2 and 56 in Group 3. Of the total, 51.56% are girls and ages ranged from two months to six years (median 24.5 months). Regarding the Denver II, the children with heart disease had more "suspicious" and "suspect/abnormal" ratings and in the group of healthy children 53.6% were considered with "normal" development (P≤0.0001). The biopsychosocial variables that were related to a possible developmental delay were gender (P=0.042), child's age (P=0.001) and income per capita (P=0.019). Conclusion: The results suggest that children with congenital heart disease are likely to have a developmental delay with significant difference between children who have undergone surgery and those awaiting surgery under clinical follow-up. PMID:27074272

  2. Mechanisms of axon degeneration: from development to disease.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Smita; Caroni, Pico

    2007-10-01

    Axon degeneration is an active, tightly controlled and versatile process of axon segment self-destruction. Although not involving cell death, it resembles apoptosis in its logics. It involves three distinct steps: induction of competence in specific neurons, triggering of degeneration at defined axon segments of competent neurons, and rapid fragmentation and removal of the segments. The mechanisms that initiate degeneration are specific to individual settings, but the final pathway of pruning is shared; it involves microtubule disassembly, axon swellings, axon fragmentation, and removal of the remnants by locally recruited phagocytes. The tight regulatory properties of axon degeneration distinguish it from passive loss phenomena, and confer significance to processes that involve it. Axon degeneration has prominent roles in development, upon lesions and in disease. In development, it couples the progressive specification of neurons and circuits to the removal of defined axon branches. Competence might involve transcriptional switches, and local triggering can involve axon guidance molecules and synaptic activity patterns. Lesion-induced Wallerian degeneration is inhibited in the presence of Wld(S) fusion protein in neurons; it involves early local, and later, distal degeneration. It has recently become clear that like in other settings, axon degeneration in disease is a rapid and specific process, which should not be confused with a variety of disease-related pathologies. Elucidating the specific mechanisms that initiate axon degeneration should open up new avenues to investigate principles of circuit assembly and plasticity, to uncover mechanisms of disease progression, and to identify ways of protecting synapses and axons in disease.

  3. RNAseq Transcriptional Profiling following Whip Development in Sugarcane Smut Disease.

    PubMed

    Schaker, Patricia D C; Palhares, Alessandra C; Taniguti, Lucas M; Peters, Leila P; Creste, Silvana; Aitken, Karen S; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Kitajima, João P; Vieira, Maria L C; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia B

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane smut disease is caused by the biotrophic fungus Sporisorium scitamineum. The disease is characterized by the development of a whip-like structure from the primary meristems, where billions of teliospores are produced. Sugarcane smut also causes tillering and low sucrose and high fiber contents, reducing cane productivity. We investigated the biological events contributing to disease symptoms in a smut intermediate-resistant sugarcane genotype by examining the transcriptional profiles (RNAseq) shortly after inoculating the plants and immediately after whip emission. The overall picture of disease progression suggests that premature transcriptional reprogramming of the shoot meristem functions continues until the emergence of the whip. The guidance of this altered pattern is potentially primarily related to auxin mobilization in addition to the involvement of other hormonal imbalances. The consequences associated with whip emission are the modulation of typical meristematic functions toward reproductive organ differentiation, requiring strong changes in carbon partitioning and energy production. These changes include the overexpression of genes coding for invertases and trehalose-6P synthase, as well as other enzymes from key metabolic pathways, such as from lignin biosynthesis. This is the first report describing changes in the transcriptional profiles following whip development, providing a hypothetical model and candidate genes to further study sugarcane smut disease progression.

  4. RNAseq Transcriptional Profiling following Whip Development in Sugarcane Smut Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taniguti, Lucas M.; Peters, Leila P.; Creste, Silvana; Aitken, Karen S.; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Kitajima, João P.; Vieira, Maria L. C.; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia B.

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane smut disease is caused by the biotrophic fungus Sporisorium scitamineum. The disease is characterized by the development of a whip-like structure from the primary meristems, where billions of teliospores are produced. Sugarcane smut also causes tillering and low sucrose and high fiber contents, reducing cane productivity. We investigated the biological events contributing to disease symptoms in a smut intermediate-resistant sugarcane genotype by examining the transcriptional profiles (RNAseq) shortly after inoculating the plants and immediately after whip emission. The overall picture of disease progression suggests that premature transcriptional reprogramming of the shoot meristem functions continues until the emergence of the whip. The guidance of this altered pattern is potentially primarily related to auxin mobilization in addition to the involvement of other hormonal imbalances. The consequences associated with whip emission are the modulation of typical meristematic functions toward reproductive organ differentiation, requiring strong changes in carbon partitioning and energy production. These changes include the overexpression of genes coding for invertases and trehalose-6P synthase, as well as other enzymes from key metabolic pathways, such as from lignin biosynthesis. This is the first report describing changes in the transcriptional profiles following whip development, providing a hypothetical model and candidate genes to further study sugarcane smut disease progression. PMID:27583836

  5. First Selective CYP11B1 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Cortisol-Dependent Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Outgoing from an etomidate-based design concept, we succeeded in the development of a series of highly active and selective inhibitors of CYP11B1, the key enzyme of cortisol biosynthesis, as potential drugs for the treatment of Cushing's syndrome and related diseases. Thus, compound 33 (IC50 = 152 nM) is the first CYP11B1 inhibitor showing a rather good selectivity toward the most important steroidogenic CYP enzymes aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2), the androgen-forming CYP17, and aromatase (estrogen synthase, CYP19). PMID:24900247

  6. The effect of parental allergy on childhood allergic diseases depends on the sex of the child

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, S. Hasan; Karmaus, Wilfried; Raza, Abid; Kurukulaaratchy, Ramesh J.; Matthews, Sharon M.; Holloway, John W; Sadeghnejad, Alireza; Zhang, Hongmei; Roberts, Graham; Ewart, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Parent of origin effect is important in understanding the genetic basis of childhood allergic diseases and to improve our ability to identify high risk children. Objective To investigate parent of origin effect in childhood allergic diseases. Methods The Isle of Wight Birth Cohort (n=1,456) has been examined at 1, 2, 4, 10 and 18-years. Information on prevalence of asthma, eczema, rhinitis and environmental factors was obtained using validated questionnaires. Skin prick tests were carried out at ages 4, 10 and 18 year, and total IgE at 10 and 18 years. Parental history of allergic disease was assessed soon after the birth of the child when maternal IgE was also measured. Prevalence ratios (PR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated, applying log-linear models, adjusted for confounding variables. Results When stratified for sex of the child, maternal asthma was associated with asthma in girls [PR:1.91 (CI:1.34–2.72), p=0.0003], but not in boys [PR:1.29 (CI:0.85–1.96), p=0.23), while paternal asthma was associated with asthma in boys [PR:1.99 (CI:1.42–2.79), p<0.0001], but not in girls [PR: 1.03 (0.59–1.80) p=0.92). Maternal eczema increased the risk of eczema in girls [PR: 1.92 (CI: 1.37–2.68); p=0.0001] only, while paternal eczema did the same for boys (PR: 2.07 (CI:1.32–3.25); P=0.002). Similar trends were observed when the effect of maternal and paternal allergic disease was assessed for childhood atopy and when maternal total IgE was related to total IgE in children at age 10 and 18 years. Conclusions The current study indicates a sex dependent association of parental allergic conditions with childhood allergies; maternal allergy increasing the risk in girls and paternal allergy in boys. This has implications for childhood allergy prediction and prevention. PMID:22607991

  7. Non-coding RNAs in Mammary Gland Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gurveen K; Milevskiy, Michael J G; Wilson, Wesley; Shewan, Annette M; Brown, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are untranslated RNA molecules that function to regulate the expression of numerous genes and associated biochemical pathways and cellular functions. NcRNAs include small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). They participate in the regulation of all developmental processes and are frequently aberrantly expressed or functionally defective in disease. This Chapter will focus on the role of ncRNAs, in particular miRNAs and lncRNAs, in mammary gland development and disease.

  8. Non-coding RNAs in Mammary Gland Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gurveen K; Milevskiy, Michael J G; Wilson, Wesley; Shewan, Annette M; Brown, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are untranslated RNA molecules that function to regulate the expression of numerous genes and associated biochemical pathways and cellular functions. NcRNAs include small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). They participate in the regulation of all developmental processes and are frequently aberrantly expressed or functionally defective in disease. This Chapter will focus on the role of ncRNAs, in particular miRNAs and lncRNAs, in mammary gland development and disease. PMID:26659490

  9. [Human adjuvant disease which developed after silicone augumentation mammoplasty].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Yoko; Sugino, Keishi; Kikuchi, Naoshi; Sano, Go; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Takai, Yujiro; Takagi, Keigo; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Homma, Sakae

    2009-03-01

    A 73-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital to evaluate mediastinal lymphadenopathy found on a chest CT scan. She had undergone mammoplasty with silicone augmentation 50 years previously and had the implants removed 5 years previously. Biopsied specimens of a mediastinal lymph node under video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) revealed multiple hyalinized non-caseating epithelioid cell granulomas and multinucleated giant cells and foamy macrophages containing some vacuoles. According to these clinicopathological findings, we diagnosed human adjuvant disease which developed after mammoplasty with silicone augmentation. In cases of mammoplasty, we should pay attention to the complication of chronic thoracic disorder as a human adjuvant disease.

  10. Immune Development and Intestinal Microbiota in Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pozo-Rubio, Tamara; Olivares, Marta; Nova, Esther; De Palma, Giada; Mujico, Jorge R.; Ferrer, Maria Desamparados; Marcos, Ascensión; Sanz, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy, triggered by dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins of barley and rye in genetically susceptible individuals. The etiology of this disorder is complex, involving both environmental and genetic factors. The major genetic risk factor for CD is represented by HLA-DQ genes, which account for approximately 40% of the genetic risk; however, only a small percentage of carriers develop the disease. Gluten is the main environmental factor responsible for the signs and symptoms of the disease, but exposure to gluten does not fully explain the manifestation of CD. Epidemiological and clinical data suggest that environmental factors other than gluten might play a role in disease development, including early feeding practices (e.g., breast milk versus formula and duration of breastfeeding), infections, and alterations in the intestinal microbiota composition. Herein, we review what is known about the influence of dietary factors, exposure to infectious agents, and intestinal microbiota composition, particularly in early life, on the risk of developing CD, as well as the possible dietary strategies to induce or increase gluten tolerance. PMID:23008734

  11. Tet family proteins and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Shi, Yujiang Geno

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few decades, DNA methylation at the 5-position of cytosine (5-methylcytosine, 5mC) has emerged as an important epigenetic modification that plays essential roles in development, aging and disease. However, the mechanisms controlling 5mC dynamics remain elusive. Recent studies have shown that ten-eleven translocation (Tet) proteins can catalyze 5mC oxidation and generate 5mC derivatives, including 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). The exciting discovery of these novel 5mC derivatives has begun to shed light on the dynamic nature of 5mC, and emerging evidence has shown that Tet family proteins and 5hmC are involved in normal development as well as in many diseases. In this Primer we provide an overview of the role of Tet family proteins and 5hmC in development and cancer. PMID:22569552

  12. Lncing epigenetic control of transcription to cardiovascular development and disease.

    PubMed

    Rizki, Gizem; Boyer, Laurie A

    2015-07-01

    Transcriptional and epigenetic regulation is critical for proper heart development, cardiac homeostasis, and pathogenesis. Long noncoding RNAs have emerged as key components of the transcriptional regulatory pathways that govern cardiac development as well as stress response, signaling, and remodeling in cardiac pathologies. Within the past few years, studies have identified many long noncoding RNAs in the context of cardiovascular biology and have begun to reveal the key functions of these transcripts. In this review, we discuss the growing roles of long noncoding RNAs in different aspects of cardiovascular development as well as pathological responses during injury or disease. In addition, we discuss diverse mechanisms by which long noncoding RNAs orchestrate cardiac transcriptional programs. Finally, we explore the exciting potential of this novel class of transcripts as biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets for cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Tissue stiffness dictates development, homeostasis, and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Handorf, Andrew M; Zhou, Yaxian; Halanski, Matthew A; Li, Wan-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Tissue development is orchestrated by the coordinated activities of both chemical and physical regulators. While much attention has been given to the role that chemical regulators play in driving development, researchers have recently begun to elucidate the important role that the mechanical properties of the extracellular environment play. For instance, the stiffness of the extracellular environment has a role in orienting cell division, maintaining tissue boundaries, directing cell migration, and driving differentiation. In addition, extracellular matrix stiffness is important for maintaining normal tissue homeostasis, and when matrix mechanics become imbalanced, disease progression may ensue. In this article, we will review the important role that matrix stiffness plays in dictating cell behavior during development, tissue homeostasis, and disease progression.

  14. Tissue Stiffness Dictates Development, Homeostasis, and Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Handorf, Andrew M; Zhou, Yaxian; Halanski, Matthew A; Li, Wan-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tissue development is orchestrated by the coordinated activities of both chemical and physical regulators. While much attention has been given to the role that chemical regulators play in driving development, researchers have recently begun to elucidate the important role that the mechanical properties of the extracellular environment play. For instance, the stiffness of the extracellular environment has a role in orienting cell division, maintaining tissue boundaries, directing cell migration, and driving differentiation. In addition, extracellular matrix stiffness is important for maintaining normal tissue homeostasis, and when matrix mechanics become imbalanced, disease progression may ensue. In this article, we will review the important role that matrix stiffness plays in dictating cell behavior during development, tissue homeostasis, and disease progression. PMID:25915734

  15. Sex-dependent Pathophysiology as Predictors of Comorbidity of Major Depressive Disorder and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tobet, SA; Handa, RJ; Goldstein, JM

    2013-01-01

    There is a strong and growing literature showing that key aspects of brain development may be critical antecedents of adult physiology and behavior, or lead to physiological and psychiatric disorders in adulthood. Many are significantly influenced by sex-dependent factors. Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) occupy a key position in regulating homeostatic, neuroendocrine, and behavioral functions. This brain area is a critical link for our understanding of the etiology of a number of disorders with components ranging from mood, to feeding and energy balance, and autonomic nervous system regulation. Thus based on common brain circuitry, the PVN may be a critical anatomical intersection for understanding comorbidities among depression, obesity, and cardiovascular risk. Historically, the majority of approaches to brain development examine neuronal, glial, and vascular factors independently, with notably less emphasis on vascular contributions. The realization that the PVN undergoes a unique vascular developmental process places added value on discerning the cellular and molecular mechanisms that drive its late onset angiogenesis and further implications for neuronal differentiation and function. This has ramifications in humans for understanding chronic, and sometimes fatal, comorbidities that share sex-dependent biological bases in development through functional and anatomical intersections with the hypothalamus. PMID:23503726

  16. Drug development in Alzheimer's disease: the path to 2025.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Aisen, Paul S; DuBois, Bruno; Frölich, Lutz; Jack, Clifford R; Jones, Roy W; Morris, John C; Raskin, Joel; Dowsett, Sherie A; Scheltens, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The global impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD) continues to increase, and focused efforts are needed to address this immense public health challenge. National leaders have set a goal to prevent or effectively treat AD by 2025. In this paper, we discuss the path to 2025, and what is feasible in this time frame given the realities and challenges of AD drug development, with a focus on disease-modifying therapies (DMTs). Under the current conditions, only drugs currently in late Phase 1 or later will have a chance of being approved by 2025. If pipeline attrition rates remain high, only a few compounds at best will meet this time frame. There is an opportunity to reduce the time and risk of AD drug development through an improvement in trial design; better trial infrastructure; disease registries of well-characterized participant cohorts to help with more rapid enrollment of appropriate study populations; validated biomarkers to better detect disease, determine risk and monitor disease progression as well as predict disease response; more sensitive clinical assessment tools; and faster regulatory review. To implement change requires efforts to build awareness, educate and foster engagement; increase funding for both basic and clinical research; reduce fragmented environments and systems; increase learning from successes and failures; promote data standardization and increase wider data sharing; understand AD at the basic biology level; and rapidly translate new knowledge into clinical development. Improved mechanistic understanding of disease onset and progression is central to more efficient AD drug development and will lead to improved therapeutic approaches and targets. The opportunity for more than a few new therapies by 2025 is small. Accelerating research and clinical development efforts and bringing DMTs to market sooner would have a significant impact on the future societal burden of AD. As these steps are put in place and plans come to fruition, e.g., approval

  17. Advances in pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma characterization and disease model development.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, D; Jacob, A G; Qualman, S J; Chandler, D S

    2012-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a form of soft tissue sarcoma, is one of the most common pediatric malignancies. A complex disease with at least three different subtypes, it is characterized by perturbations in a number of signaling pathways and genetic abnormalities. Extensive clinical studies have helped classify these tumors into high and low risk groups to facilitate different treatment regimens. Research into the etiology of the disease has helped uncover numerous potential therapeutic intervention points which can be tested on various animal models of RMS; both genetically modified models and tumor xenograft models. Taken together, there has been a marked increase in the survival rate of RMS patients but the highly invasive, metastatic forms of the disease continue to baffle researchers. This review aims to highlight and summarize some of the most important developments in characterization and in vivo model generation for RMS research, in the last few decades.

  18. Oxidative Stress and Therapeutic Development in Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Leah; Stidham, Timothy; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has many implications in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species and antioxidants, how they relate to normal physiological function and the pathophysiology of different lung diseases, and therapeutic strategies. The production of ROS/RNS from endogenous and exogenous sources is first discussed, followed by antioxidant systems that restore oxidative balance and cellular homeostasis. The contribution of oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in lung disease pathogenesis is also discussed. An overview of therapeutic strategies is provided, such as augmenting NO bioactivity, blocking the production of ROS/RNS and replacement of deficient antioxidants. The limitations of current strategies and failures of clinical trials are then addressed, followed by discussion of novel experimental approaches for the development of improved antioxidant therapies. PMID:27019769

  19. Advances in pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma characterization and disease model development

    PubMed Central

    Brien, Dennis O’; Jacob, Aishwarya G.; Qualman, Stephen J.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a form of soft tissue sarcoma, is one of the most common pediatric malignancies. A complex disease with at least three different subtypes, it is characterized by perturbations in a number of signaling pathways and genetic abnormalities. Extensive clinical studies have helped classify these tumors into high and low risk groups to facilitate different treatment regimens. Research into the etiology of the disease has helped uncover numerous potential therapeutic intervention points which can be tested on various animal models of RMS; both genetically modified models and tumor Xenograft models. Taken together, there has been a marked increase in the survival rate of RMS patients but the highly invasive, metastatic forms of the disease continue to baffle researchers. This review aims to highlight and summarize some of the most important developments in characterization and in vivo model generation for RMS research, in the last few decades. PMID:22127592

  20. North American experience with Low protein diet for Non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Moore, Linda W; Tortorici, Amanda R; Chou, Jason A; St-Jules, David E; Aoun, Arianna; Rojas-Bautista, Vanessa; Tschida, Annelle K; Rhee, Connie M; Shah, Anuja A; Crowley, Susan; Vassalotti, Joseph A; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2016-07-19

    Whereas in many parts of the world a low protein diet (LPD, 0.6-0.8 g/kg/day) is routinely prescribed for the management of patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD), this practice is infrequent in North America. The historical underpinnings related to LPD in the USA including the non-conclusive results of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study may have played a role. Overall trends to initiate dialysis earlier in the course of CKD in the US allowed less time for LPD prescription. The usual dietary intake in the US includes high dietary protein content, which is in sharp contradistinction to that of a LPD. The fear of engendering or worsening protein-energy wasting may be an important handicap as suggested by a pilot survey of US nephrologists; nevertheless, there is also potential interest and enthusiasm in gaining further insight regarding LPD's utility in both research and in practice. Racial/ethnic disparities in the US and patients' adherence are additional challenges. Adherence should be monitored by well-trained dietitians by means of both dietary assessment techniques and 24-h urine collections to estimate dietary protein intake using urinary urea nitrogen (UUN). While keto-analogues are not currently available in the USA, there are other oral nutritional supplements for the provision of high-biologic-value proteins along with dietary energy intake of 30-35 Cal/kg/day available. Different treatment strategies related to dietary intake may help circumvent the protein- energy wasting apprehension and offer novel conservative approaches for CKD management in North America.

  1. North American experience with Low protein diet for Non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Moore, Linda W; Tortorici, Amanda R; Chou, Jason A; St-Jules, David E; Aoun, Arianna; Rojas-Bautista, Vanessa; Tschida, Annelle K; Rhee, Connie M; Shah, Anuja A; Crowley, Susan; Vassalotti, Joseph A; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2016-01-01

    Whereas in many parts of the world a low protein diet (LPD, 0.6-0.8 g/kg/day) is routinely prescribed for the management of patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD), this practice is infrequent in North America. The historical underpinnings related to LPD in the USA including the non-conclusive results of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study may have played a role. Overall trends to initiate dialysis earlier in the course of CKD in the US allowed less time for LPD prescription. The usual dietary intake in the US includes high dietary protein content, which is in sharp contradistinction to that of a LPD. The fear of engendering or worsening protein-energy wasting may be an important handicap as suggested by a pilot survey of US nephrologists; nevertheless, there is also potential interest and enthusiasm in gaining further insight regarding LPD's utility in both research and in practice. Racial/ethnic disparities in the US and patients' adherence are additional challenges. Adherence should be monitored by well-trained dietitians by means of both dietary assessment techniques and 24-h urine collections to estimate dietary protein intake using urinary urea nitrogen (UUN). While keto-analogues are not currently available in the USA, there are other oral nutritional supplements for the provision of high-biologic-value proteins along with dietary energy intake of 30-35 Cal/kg/day available. Different treatment strategies related to dietary intake may help circumvent the protein- energy wasting apprehension and offer novel conservative approaches for CKD management in North America. PMID:27435088

  2. Development of CAD prototype system for Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Osamu; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi; Mori, Kensaku

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a CAD prototype system for Crohn's disease. Crohn's disease causes inflammation or ulcers of the gastrointestinal tract. The number of patients of Crohn's disease is increasing in Japan. Symptoms of Crohn's disease include intestinal stenosis, longitudinal ulcers, and fistulae. Optical endoscope cannot pass through intestinal stenosis in some cases. We propose a new CAD system using abdominal fecal tagging CT images for efficient diagnosis of Crohn's disease. The system displays virtual unfolded (VU), virtual endoscopic, curved planar reconstruction, multi planar reconstruction, and outside views of both small and large intestines. To generate the VU views, we employ a small and large intestines extraction method followed by a simple electronic cleansing method. The intestine extraction is based on the region growing process, which uses a characteristic that tagged fluid neighbor air in the intestine. The electronic cleansing enables observation of intestinal wall under tagged fluid. We change the height of the VU views according to the perimeter of the intestine. In addition, we developed a method to enhance the longitudinal ulcer on views of the system. We enhance concave parts on the intestinal wall, which are caused by the longitudinal ulcer, based on local intensity structure analysis. We examined the small and the large intestines of eleven CT images by the proposed system. The VU views enabled efficient observation of the intestinal wall. The height change of the VU views helps finding intestinal stenosis on the VU views. The concave region enhancement made longitudinal ulcers clear on the views.

  3. TAP1 alleles in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: a newly defined centromeric boundary of disease susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D G; Capra, J D

    1993-01-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that individuals with certain DR alleles have an increased relative risk of developing insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). The disease association is even stronger with certain DQ alleles but there is little association with DP providing a boundary of disease association to the 430 kb between DQ and DP. The recently described TAP (transporter associated with antigen processing) genes have been mapped approximately midway between DP and DQ. Therefore, it was of interest to determine if any TAP alleles were associated with IDDM. In addition to the alleles of TAP1 that have been described, others were identified during this study. Diabetics and normal controls were screened for TAP1 using single-stranded conformational polymorphism and relative risk was determined. In the same population group we have studied extensively in the past, we found a higher association of a TAP1 allele with IDDM than with any single HLA-DP allele but the risk was lower than with HLA-DQB1*0302. These data provide new limits for IDDM susceptibility to the 190-kb interval between TAP1 and HLA-DQB1. PMID:8248212

  4. Autophagy-dependent regulatory T cells are critical for the control of graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Le Texier, Laëtitia; Lineburg, Katie E.; Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Nicholls, Jemma; Melino, Michelle; Nalkurthi, Blessy C.; Alexander, Kylie A.; Teal, Bianca; Blake, Stephen J.; Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Engwerda, Christian R.; Kuns, Rachel D.; Lane, Steven W.; Teh, Charis; Gray, Daniel; Clouston, Andrew D.; Nilsson, Susan K.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Hill, Geoffrey R.; MacDonald, Kelli P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Quantitative and/or qualitative defects in Tregs result in diseases such as autoimmunity, allergy, malignancy, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a serious complication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). We recently reported increased expression of autophagy-related genes (Atg) in association with enhanced survival of Tregs after SCT. Autophagy is a self-degradative process for cytosolic components that promotes cell homeostasis and survival. Here, we demonstrate that the disruption of autophagy within FoxP3+ Tregs (B6.Atg7fl/fl-FoxP3cre+) resulted in a profound loss of Tregs, particularly within the bone marrow (BM). This resulted in dysregulated effector T cell activation and expansion, and the development of enterocolitis and scleroderma in aged mice. We show that the BM compartment is highly enriched in TIGIT+ Tregs and that this subset is differentially depleted in the absence of autophagy. Moreover, following allogeneic SCT, recipients of grafts from B6.Atg7fl/fl-FoxP3cre+ donors exhibited reduced Treg reconstitution, exacerbated GVHD, and reduced survival compared with recipients of B6.WT-FoxP3cre+ grafts. Collectively, these data indicate that autophagy-dependent Tregs are critical for the maintenance of tolerance after SCT and that the promotion of autophagy represents an attractive immune-restorative therapeutic strategy after allogeneic SCT.

  5. Autophagy-dependent regulatory T cells are critical for the control of graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Le Texier, Laëtitia; Lineburg, Katie E.; Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Nicholls, Jemma; Melino, Michelle; Nalkurthi, Blessy C.; Alexander, Kylie A.; Teal, Bianca; Blake, Stephen J.; Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Engwerda, Christian R.; Kuns, Rachel D.; Lane, Steven W.; Teh, Charis; Gray, Daniel; Clouston, Andrew D.; Nilsson, Susan K.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Hill, Geoffrey R.; MacDonald, Kelli P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Quantitative and/or qualitative defects in Tregs result in diseases such as autoimmunity, allergy, malignancy, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a serious complication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). We recently reported increased expression of autophagy-related genes (Atg) in association with enhanced survival of Tregs after SCT. Autophagy is a self-degradative process for cytosolic components that promotes cell homeostasis and survival. Here, we demonstrate that the disruption of autophagy within FoxP3+ Tregs (B6.Atg7fl/fl-FoxP3cre+) resulted in a profound loss of Tregs, particularly within the bone marrow (BM). This resulted in dysregulated effector T cell activation and expansion, and the development of enterocolitis and scleroderma in aged mice. We show that the BM compartment is highly enriched in TIGIT+ Tregs and that this subset is differentially depleted in the absence of autophagy. Moreover, following allogeneic SCT, recipients of grafts from B6.Atg7fl/fl-FoxP3cre+ donors exhibited reduced Treg reconstitution, exacerbated GVHD, and reduced survival compared with recipients of B6.WT-FoxP3cre+ grafts. Collectively, these data indicate that autophagy-dependent Tregs are critical for the maintenance of tolerance after SCT and that the promotion of autophagy represents an attractive immune-restorative therapeutic strategy after allogeneic SCT. PMID:27699243

  6. End-stage renal disease in Indonesia: treatment development.

    PubMed

    Prodjosudjadi, Wiguno; Suhardjono, A

    2009-01-01

    The number of cases of chronic kidney disease is growing rapidly, especially in the developing world. At a certain level of renal function, progression of chronic kidney disease to endstage renal disease (ESRD) is inevitable. ESRD has become a major health problem because it is a devastating medical condition, and the cost of treatment is a huge economic burden. This article presents data collected from 13 nephrology centers in response to specifically designed questionnaires. These centers were divided into 7 groups on the basis of geographic location. Previous data had given the impression that the incidence and prevalence of ESRD had increased, and the results of this study support these previous data. Since a national registry of ESRD has just been developed for Indonesia and we can present only limited data in this study, the numbers in this article underestimate the true incidence and prevalence rates. Although hemodialysis facilities have been developed rapidly, further development is still required. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis as an alternative renal replacement therapy (RRT) is only now being introduced. Kidney transplantation programs expand very slowly. RRT still imposes a high cost of treatment for ESRD; therefore, these treatments are unaffordable for most patients. Recently, government health insurance has covered financially strained families requiring RRT. Since the cost of RRT for ESRD has significantly increased over time, the management approach should be shifted from treatment to prevention. PMID:19484872

  7. Recent Advances in Drug Design and Drug Discovery for Androgen- Dependent Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Marisa; Sánchez-Márquez, Araceli; Garrido, Mariana; Silva, Aylín; Bratoeff, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes the importance of different targets such as 5α-reductase, 17β-HSD, CYP17A, androgen receptor and protein kinase A for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. It is a well known fact that dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is associated with the development of androgen-dependent afflictions. At the present time, several research groups are attempting to develop new steroidal and non-steroidal molecules with the purpose of inhibiting the synthesis and biological response of DHT. This review also discusses the most recent studies reported in the literature that describe the therapeutic potential of novel compounds, as well as the new drugs, principally inhibitors of 5α-reductase. PMID:26861003

  8. Effects of ultraviolet-B radiation on fungal disease development in Cucumis sativus

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, A.B.; Teramura, A.H.; Sisler, H.D. )

    1990-09-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion due to increased atmospheric pollutants has received considerable attention because of the potential increase in ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280-320 nm) radiation that will reach the earth's surface. Three cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) cultivars were exposed to a daily dose of 11.6 kJ m{sup {minus}2} biologically effective ultraviolet-B (UV-B{sub BE}) radiation in an unshaded greenhouse before and/or after injection by Colletotrichum lagenarium (Pass.) Ell. and Halst. or Cladosporium cucumerinum Ell. and Arth. and analyzed for disease development. Two of these cultivars, Poinsette and Calypso Hybrid, were disease resistant, while the third cultivar, Straight-8, was disease susceptible. Preinfectional treatment of 1 to 7 days with UV-B{sub BE} in Straight-8 led to greater severity of both diseases. Postinfectional UV treatment did not lead to increased disease severity caused by C. lagenarium, while preinfectional UV treatment in both Straight-8 and Poinsette substantially increased disease severity. Although resistant cultivars Poinsette and Calypso Hybrid showed increased anthracnose disease severity when exposed to UV-B, this effect was apparent only on the cotyledons. Both higher spore concentration and exposure to UV-B radiation resulted in greater disease severity. Of the cucumber cultivars tested for UV-B sensitivity, growth in Poinsette was most sensitive and Calypso Hybrid was least sensitive. These preliminary results indicate that the effects of UV-B radiation on disease development in cucumber vary depending on cultivar, timing and duration of UV-B exposure, inoculation level, and plant age.

  9. Women, drug dependency and consequences: a study from a developing country.

    PubMed

    Khajedaluee, Mohammad; Dadgarmoghaddam, Maliheh; Erfanian, Majidreza; Alipourtabrizi, Arash; Khadem-Rezaiyan, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Addiction in women can expose them to malnutrition, high blood pressure, cancer, and some other dangerous diseases like hepatitis, AIDS, or other sexual transmitted diseases. The aim of this study was to assess illegal sexual relations in three groups of women. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study that was done on 236 girls and young women aged 16-25 years in 2012 in three groups: vulnerable women who have substance dependency (crimes that had made women incarcerated were considered as vulnerability in this study), invulnerable women who have substance dependency (substance dependent women without a history of incarceration), and a control group (women with no history of substance dependency or being in prison). Results. 43.8% of vulnerable women who have substance dependency had extramarital sexual relations; this percentage was 55.8% in invulnerable women who have substance dependency and 1.4% in the control group. Crystal and methamphetamine abuse was higher in addicts who had extramarital sexual relations and alcohol abuse was correlated with unsafe sexual intercourse (r = 0.36, P = 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in extramarital sexual relation based on marital status (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Poverty, drug dependency, divorce, and alcohol consumption make women prone to other high risk behaviors that need more attention.

  10. Women, Drug Dependency and Consequences: A Study from a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Khajedaluee, Mohammad; Dadgarmoghaddam, Maliheh; Erfanian, Majidreza; Alipourtabrizi, Arash; Khadem-Rezaiyan, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Addiction in women can expose them to malnutrition, high blood pressure, cancer, and some other dangerous diseases like hepatitis, AIDS, or other sexual transmitted diseases. The aim of this study was to assess illegal sexual relations in three groups of women. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study that was done on 236 girls and young women aged 16–25 years in 2012 in three groups: vulnerable women who have substance dependency (crimes that had made women incarcerated were considered as vulnerability in this study), invulnerable women who have substance dependency (substance dependent women without a history of incarceration), and a control group (women with no history of substance dependency or being in prison). Results. 43.8% of vulnerable women who have substance dependency had extramarital sexual relations; this percentage was 55.8% in invulnerable women who have substance dependency and 1.4% in the control group. Crystal and methamphetamine abuse was higher in addicts who had extramarital sexual relations and alcohol abuse was correlated with unsafe sexual intercourse (r = 0.36, P = 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in extramarital sexual relation based on marital status (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Poverty, drug dependency, divorce, and alcohol consumption make women prone to other high risk behaviors that need more attention. PMID:25802797

  11. Vitamin-K-Dependent Protection of the Renal Microvasculature: Histopathological Studies in Normal and Diseased Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fang-Fei; Drummen, Nadja E.A.; Thijs, Lutgarde; Jacobs, Lotte; Herfs, Marjolein; van't Hoofd, Cynthia; Vermeer, Cees; Staessen, Jan A.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin-K-dependent carboxylation of matrix Gla protein (MGP) protects the macrocirculation against calcification. We recently reported in a multiethnic population study that the estimated glomerular filtration rate, a microvascular trait, decreased and the risk of chronic kidney disease increased with higher circulating levels of inactive dephospho-uncarboxylated MGP, a marker of vitamin K deficiency. These findings highlighted the possibility that vitamin K might have a beneficial effect on the renal microcirculation. To substantiate these epidemiological findings, we undertook a pilot study, in which we stained renal tissue samples obtained by biopsy from 2 healthy kidney donors and 4 patients with nephropathy for carboxylated and uncarboxylated MGP and calcium deposits. Three patients had renal calcifications, which were consistently associated with carboxylated and uncarboxylated MGP. Normal renal tissue was devoid of microcalcifications and staining for carboxylated and uncarboxylated MGP. Pending confirmation in a larger study covering a wider range of renal pathologies, these histopathological findings suggest that MGP might inhibit calcification not only in large arteries, as was known before, but in renal tissue as well, thereby highlighting potentially new avenues for promoting renal health, for instance by vitamin K supplementation. PMID:27752480

  12. Aneurysm miRNA Signature Differs, Depending on Disease Localization and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Albert; Busch, Martin; Scholz, Claus-Jürgen; Kellersmann, Richard; Otto, Christoph; Chernogubova, Ekaterina; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zernecke, Alma; Lorenz, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Limited comprehension of aneurysm pathology has led to inconclusive results from clinical trials. miRNAs are key regulators of post-translational gene modification and are useful tools in elucidating key features of aneurysm pathogenesis in distinct entities of abdominal and popliteal aneurysms. Here, surgically harvested specimens from 19 abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and 8 popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA) patients were analyzed for miRNA expression and histologically classified regarding extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and inflammation. DIANA-based computational target prediction and pathway enrichment analysis verified our results, as well as previous ones. miRNA-362, -19b-1, -194, -769, -21 and -550 were significantly down-regulated in AAA samples depending on degree of inflammation. Similar or inverse regulation was found for miR-769, 19b-1 and miR-550, -21, whereas miR-194 and -362 were unaltered in PAA. In situ hybridization verified higher expression of miR-550 and -21 in PAA compared to AAA and computational analysis for target genes and pathway enrichment affirmed signal transduction, cell-cell-interaction and cell degradation pathways, in line with previous results. Despite the vague role of miRNAs for potential diagnostic and treatment purposes, the number of candidates from tissue signature studies is increasing. Tissue morphology influences subsequent research, yet comparison of distinct entities of aneurysm disease can unravel core pathways. PMID:26771601

  13. Intrinsic antibody-dependent enhancement of microbial infection in macrophages: disease regulation by immune complexes

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Scott B; Mahalingam, Prof Suresh; Marovich, Mary A; Ubol, Sukathida; Mosser, Prof David M

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of microorganisms can replicate in macrophages, and cell entry of these pathogens via non-neutralising IgG antibody complexes can result in increased intracellular infection through idiosyncratic Fcγ-receptor signalling. The activation of Fcγ receptors usually leads to phagocytosis. Paradoxically, the ligation of monocyte or macrophage Fcγ receptors by IgG immune complexes, rather than aiding host defences, can suppress innate immunity, increase production of interleukin 10, and bias T-helper-1 (Th1) responses to Th2 responses, leading to increased infectious output by infected cells. This intrinsic antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection modulates the severity of diseases as disparate as dengue haemorrhagic fever and leishmaniasis. Intrinsic ADE is distinct from extrinsic ADE, whereby complexes of infectious agents with non-neutralising antibodies lead to an increased number of infected cells. Intrinsic ADE might be involved in many protozoan, bacterial, and viral infections. We review insights into intracellular mechanisms and implications of enhanced pathogenesis after ligation of macrophage Fcγ receptors by infectious immune complexes. PMID:20883967

  14. Metal-dependent gene regulation in the causative agent of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Bryan; Yang, X Frank

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) is the causative agent of Lyme disease transmitted to humans by ticks of the Ixodes spp. Bb is a unique bacterial pathogen because it does not require iron (Fe(2+)) for its metabolism. Bb encodes a ferritin-like Dps homolog called NapA (also called BicA), which can bind Fe or copper (Cu(2+)), and a manganese (Mn(2+)) transport protein, Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA); both proteins are required for colonization of the tick vector, but BmtA is also required for the murine host. This demonstrates that Bb's metal homeostasis is a critical facet of the complex enzootic life cycle between the arthropod and murine hosts. Although metals are known to influence the expression of virulence determinants during infection, it is unknown how or if metals regulate virulence in Bb. Recent evidence demonstrates that Bb modulates the intracellular Mn(2+) and zinc (Zn(2+)) content and, in turn, these metals regulate gene expression through influencing the Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) homolog Borrelia Oxidative Stress Regulator (BosR). This mini-review focuses on the burgeoning study of metal-dependent gene regulation within Bb.

  15. VP1 of infectious bursal disease virus is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    von Einem, Ursula I; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Schirrmeier, Horst; Behrens, Sven-Erik; Letzel, Tobias; Mundt, Egbert

    2004-08-01

    Segment B of the bisegmented, double-stranded RNA genome of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) encodes the viral protein VP1. This has been presumed to represent the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) as it contains motifs that are typical for the RdRp of plus-strand RNA viruses. Here it is demonstrated that baculovirus-expressed wild-type but not motif A mutated VP1 acts as an RdRp on IBDV-specific RNA templates. Thus, on a plus-strand IBDV segment A cRNA template, minus-strand synthesis occurred in such a way that a covalently linked double-stranded RNA product was generated (by a 'copy-back' mechanism). Importantly, enzyme activity was observed only with templates that comprised the 3' non-coding region of plus-strand RNAs transcribed from IBDV segments A and B, indicating template specificity. RdRp activity was shown to have a temperature optimum of 37 degrees C and required magnesium ions for enzyme activity. Thus, it has been demonstrated unequivocally that VP1 represents the RdRp of IBDV.

  16. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in skeletal development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Ornitz, David M.; Marie, Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathways are essential regulators of vertebrate skeletal development. FGF signaling regulates development of the limb bud and formation of the mesenchymal condensation and has key roles in regulating chondrogenesis, osteogenesis, and bone and mineral homeostasis. This review updates our review on FGFs in skeletal development published in Genes & Development in 2002, examines progress made on understanding the functions of the FGF signaling pathway during critical stages of skeletogenesis, and explores the mechanisms by which mutations in FGF signaling molecules cause skeletal malformations in humans. Links between FGF signaling pathways and other interacting pathways that are critical for skeletal development and could be exploited to treat genetic diseases and repair bone are also explored. PMID:26220993

  17. [Clinical study on development of nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease].

    PubMed

    Kurashima, Atsuyuki

    2004-12-01

    DEVELOPEMENT OF MAC LUNG DISEASE: An increase of nodular bronchiectatic type of MAC lung disease becomes a problem among respiratory physician today. The reason is still unknown, but it seems to be globally recognized that this type of MAC disease is developing particularly in middle-aged woman. Some papers mentioned the existence of such type of MAC lung disease already early in the 70s, in Japan. Yamamoto described that 17 cases of middle lobe type lung disease out of 154 non-photochoromogen cases, and 76.5% were female, in 1970. Shimoide also pointed such type of 39 cases out of 240 MAC lung disease and 84.6% were female, in 1980. Prince reported MAC lung disease seen in old and middle age female of 21 cases including lethality example of 4 cases without a precedent disease in 1989. After his report, the international consensus of this peculiar type of MAC lung disease seems to be spread. In 1989, we compared 72 cases of nodular bronchiectatic type of MAC lung disease and 56 cases of diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) that was a most typical chronic airway disease at that time in Japan. The average age of disease onset of DPB group was 37.0 +/- 16.3 years old and that of MAC group was 54.5 +/- 16.3 years old. The percentage of female was 32% in DPB group and 87.5% in MAC group. It was highly possible that two groups belong different parent population. We could grasp that nodular bronchiectatic type of MAC lung disease patients is a unique group. We observed the serial films of 21 cases of nodular bronchiectatic MAC lung disease, and divide the progression of the disease to sequential 7 steps as Fig. 1. Small nodules progress to cavities in mean about 10 years. However, why is MAC which is opportunistic pathogen with weak virulence, able to form a lesion at unimpaired lung parenchyma? Is there really normal site? Why dose it start from lingula? Why is MAC seen a lot in woman? While it is extremely pathognomonic clinical picture, and, is an extremely interesting

  18. Tachycardia-dependent bilateral bundle branch block in ischemic heart disease with systolic dysfunction: case report and review of prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Ferrando-Castagnetto, Federico; Vidal, Alejandro; Ricca-Mallada, Roberto; Nogara, Romina; Marichal, Pablo; Martínez, Fabián

    2015-10-16

    A proper characterization of frequency-dependent bundle branch blocks can provide useful prognostic information in some clinical situations. Often, this physiological event may be due to an extensive damage of infrahisian system, which poses a high risk of developing advanced atrioventricular block requiring pacemaker implantation. We describe the case of a 62 year-old man with chronic ischemic heart disease who exhibited alternating tachycardia-dependent bundle branch block during stress test. We discuss the main prognostic implications of this unusual event in the context of systolic dysfunction.

  19. Lymphatic vascular morphogenesis in development, physiology, and disease.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Sabine, Amélie; Petrova, Tatiana V

    2011-05-16

    The lymphatic vasculature constitutes a highly specialized part of the vascular system that is essential for the maintenance of interstitial fluid balance, uptake of dietary fat, and immune response. Recently, there has been an increased awareness of the importance of lymphatic vessels in many common pathological conditions, such as tumor cell dissemination and chronic inflammation. Studies of embryonic development and genetically engineered animal models coupled with the discovery of mutations underlying human lymphedema syndromes have contributed to our understanding of mechanisms regulating normal and pathological lymphatic morphogenesis. It is now crucial to use this knowledge for the development of novel therapies for human diseases.

  20. The Norwegian Voice Handicap Index (VHI-N) patient scores are dependent on voice-related disease group.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Tom; Heimdal, John-Helge; Grieg, Anne Rita Hella; Aarstad, Hans Jørgen

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to determine to what extent the Voice Handicap Index-Norwegian (VHI-N) is scored depending on specific laryngological disease. In a multi-center study, 126 healthy subjects and 355 patients with different voice-related diseases answered the VHI-N. The VHI-N scores showed high Cronbach's alpha. Analyses of variance were performed with VHI-N dependent and specific voice-related disease as independent variable, and showed highly significant dependence by group allocation (F(7,461) = 28.0; p < 0.001). When studying post hoc analyses secondary to this ANOVA analysis, we have shown that the control group scored lower than the entire patient groups (all p < 0.001) except the dysplasia group. Aphonic patients scored higher than all the other groups (all p < 0.001) except those with spasmodic dysphonia. The cancer patient group furthermore scored lower than patient groups with recurrent palsy, dysfunctional disease or spasmodic dysphonia (all p < 0.001). In addition, patients with recurrent palsy scored higher than patients with degenerative/inflammatory disease (p < 0.001). No influences of patient age, gender, or smoking were observed in the VHI-N scores. The VHI-N is a psychometrically well-functioning instrument, also at disease-specific levels and discriminates well between health and voice diseases, as well as between different voice-related diseases. The VHI-N may be recommended to be used when monitoring voice-related disease treatment.

  1. Develop Anti-Inflammatory Nanotherapies to Treat Cardiovascular Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jun

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of disease-related death in the world, accounting for 30 % global mortality. The majority of CVD is caused by atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of major arteries featured by the deposition of lipids and cholesterol. Inflammation of atherosclerosis is mainly promoted by the pathological macrophages and monocytes, and modulating their functions has been proposed as a promising therapeutic target. This dissertation first presents the development of a novel simvastatin-loaded high-density lipoprotein (HDL) based nanoparticle ([S]-rHDL), which was able to deliver anti-inflammatory simvastatin preferentially to inflammatory monocytes in the blood and to macrophages in advanced atherosclerotic plaques, leading to the reduced inflammation in the tissue. Second, extensive in vivo characterization of [S]-rHDL in a mouse atherosclerosis model revealed that the anti-inflammatory capability of [S]-rHDL derived from its effects on blood monocytes, endothelial layer, monocyte recruitment, and plaque macrophage function. Third, a translational study that integrated the use of [S]-rHDL into oral statin treatment demonstrated a great potential for this nanomedicine as an attractive addition to the current high-dose oral statin standard-of-care for acute coronary syndrome. Finally, preliminary results suggested potential applications of the rHDL platform to other macrophage-implicated diseases.

  2. Insight into dopamine-dependent planning deficits in Parkinson's disease: A sharing of cognitive & sensory resources.

    PubMed

    Pieruccini-Faria, F; Jones, J A; Almeida, Q J

    2016-03-24

    Cognitive and sensorimotor processes are both needed for successful planning of footsteps during complex gait situations, but the interaction between these factors during motor planning, as well as their response to dopaminergic treatment is poorly understood in Parkinson's disease (PD). In the current study, we evaluated walking and gaze behaviors of individuals with PD while planning an approach toward an obstacle to be stepped over. The obstacle clearance task was completed both ON and OFF dopaminergic medication by individuals with Parkinson's disease (n=20) and compared to healthy age-matched control participants (n=19), as well as with and without an auditory digit monitoring dual task. In this novel protocol of synchronized gaze and gait data collection, each trial was split into an early and late phase prior to the obstacle, providing a unique opportunity to examine dopamine-dependent planning deficits in PD. Interestingly, only patients in the OFF medication state showed greater deceleration in the late phase (i.e., just before the obstacle) (F(1,37)=45.42, p<0.001), as well as an increase in step time variability (also in this late phase) with the additional demands of a dual task (F(2,74)=3.49, p=0.035). Only gait deceleration between approaching phases improved with dopaminergic treatment (F(1,18)=59.20; p<0.001). Although groups showed different walking behaviors, gaze behaviors were the same for all participants, in that they planned for the obstacle more so in the early phase (p<0.05), and fixations were reduced across participants with the presence of the dual task (p<0.001). Surprisingly, the gaze behavior of the PD OFF group showed no interactions with phase or condition suggesting that the deceleration and increased variability when approaching an obstacle is the result of a greater demand for online sensory feedback that cannot be compensated for with visual strategies. We conclude that dopamine influences planning by limiting sensorimotor

  3. [Effect of comorbid depression on the development and course of alcohol dependence].

    PubMed

    Rybakova, K V; Rybakova, T G; Neznanov, N G; Eryshev, O F

    2013-01-01

    It was compared 72 patients with alcohol dependence (AD) and endogenous depression (ED) and 30 patients with AD without comorbid affective pathology. It has been shown that the development of alcohol dependence in individuals with ED is slower than in patients without ED. A lack of a family history of addictive pathology was noted to be a predictor of a more favorable course of alcohol dependence in patients with ED.

  4. Technology innovation for infectious diseases in the developing world.

    PubMed

    So, Anthony D; Ruiz-Esparza, Quentin

    2012-01-01

    Enabling innovation and access to health technologies remains a key strategy in combating infectious diseases in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, a gulf between paying markets and the endemicity of such diseases has contributed to the dearth of R&D in meeting these public health needs. While the pharmaceutical industry views emerging economies as potential new markets, most of the world's poorest bottom billion now reside in middle-income countries--a fact that has complicated tiered access arrangements. However, product development partnerships--particularly those involving academic institutions and small firms--find commercial opportunities in pursuing even neglected diseases; and a growing pharmaceutical sector in BRICS countries offers hope for an indigenous base of innovation. Such innovation will be shaped by 1) access to building blocks of knowledge; 2) strategic use of intellectual property and innovative financing to meet public health goals; 3) collaborative norms of open innovation; and 4) alternative business models, some with a double bottom line. Facing such resource constraints, LMICs are poised to develop a new, more resource-effective model of innovation that holds exciting promise in meeting the needs of global health. PMID:23849080

  5. Technology innovation for infectious diseases in the developing world.

    PubMed

    So, Anthony D; Ruiz-Esparza, Quentin

    2012-10-25

    Enabling innovation and access to health technologies remains a key strategy in combating infectious diseases in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, a gulf between paying markets and the endemicity of such diseases has contributed to the dearth of R&D in meeting these public health needs. While the pharmaceutical industry views emerging economies as potential new markets, most of the world's poorest bottom billion now reside in middle-income countries--a fact that has complicated tiered access arrangements. However, product development partnerships--particularly those involving academic institutions and small firms--find commercial opportunities in pursuing even neglected diseases; and a growing pharmaceutical sector in BRICS countries offers hope for an indigenous base of innovation. Such innovation will be shaped by 1) access to building blocks of knowledge; 2) strategic use of intellectual property and innovative financing to meet public health goals; 3) collaborative norms of open innovation; and 4) alternative business models, some with a double bottom line. Facing such resource constraints, LMICs are poised to develop a new, more resource-effective model of innovation that holds exciting promise in meeting the needs of global health.

  6. Mimicking Retinal Development and Disease With Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Divya; Phillips, Jenny; Joseph Phillips, M; Gamm, David M

    2016-04-01

    As applications of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) continue to be refined and pursued, it is important to keep in mind that the strengths and weaknesses of this technology lie with its developmental origins. The remarkable capacity of differentiating hPSCs to recapitulate cell and tissue genesis has provided a model system to study stages of human development that were not previously amenable to investigation and experimentation. Furthermore, demonstration of developmentally appropriate, stepwise differentiation of hPSCs to specific cell types offers support for their authenticity and their suitability for use in disease modeling and cell replacement therapies. However, limitations to farming cells and tissues in an artificial culture environment, as well as the length of time required for most cells to mature, are some of the many issues to consider before using hPSCs to study or treat a particular disease. Given the overarching need to understand and modulate the dynamics of lineage-specific differentiation in stem cell cultures, this review will first examine the capacity of hPSCs to serve as models of retinal development. Thereafter, we will discuss efforts to model retinal disorders with hPSCs and present challenges that face investigators who aspire to use such systems to study disease pathophysiology and/or screen for therapeutics. We also refer readers to recent publications that provide additional insight and details on these rapidly evolving topics. PMID:27116663

  7. Technology innovation for infectious diseases in the developing world

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Enabling innovation and access to health technologies remains a key strategy in combating infectious diseases in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, a gulf between paying markets and the endemicity of such diseases has contributed to the dearth of R&D in meeting these public health needs. While the pharmaceutical industry views emerging economies as potential new markets, most of the world’s poorest bottom billion now reside in middle-income countries--a fact that has complicated tiered access arrangements. However, product development partnerships--particularly those involving academic institutions and small firms--find commercial opportunities in pursuing even neglected diseases; and a growing pharmaceutical sector in BRICS countries offers hope for an indigenous base of innovation. Such innovation will be shaped by 1) access to building blocks of knowledge; 2) strategic use of intellectual property and innovative financing to meet public health goals; 3) collaborative norms of open innovation; and 4) alternative business models, some with a double bottom line. Facing such resource constraints, LMICs are poised to develop a new, more resource-effective model of innovation that holds exciting promise in meeting the needs of global health. PMID:23849080

  8. The development of a disease oriented eFolder for multiple sclerosis decision support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kevin; Jacobs, Colin; Fernandez, James; Amezcua, Lilyana; Liu, Brent

    2010-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The chronic nature of MS necessitates multiple MRI studies to track disease progression. Currently, MRI assessment of multiple sclerosis requires manual lesion measurement and yields an estimate of lesion volume and change that is highly variable and user-dependent. In the setting of a longitudinal study, disease trends and changes become difficult to extrapolate from the lesions. In addition, it is difficult to establish a correlation between these imaged lesions and clinical factors such as treatment course. To address these clinical needs, an MS specific e-Folder for decision support in the evaluation and assessment of MS has been developed. An e-Folder is a disease-centric electronic medical record in contrast to a patient-centric electronic health record. Along with an MS lesion computer aided detection (CAD) package for lesion load, location, and volume, clinical parameters such as patient demographics, disease history, clinical course, and treatment history are incorporated to make the e-Folder comprehensive. With the integration of MRI studies together with related clinical data and informatics tools designed for monitoring multiple sclerosis, it provides a platform to improve the detection of treatment response in patients with MS. The design and deployment of MS e-Folder aims to standardize MS lesion data and disease progression to aid in decision making and MS-related research.

  9. Influence of crop management on take-all development and disease cycles on winter wheat.

    PubMed

    Colbach, N; Lucas, P; Meynard, J M

    1997-01-01

    ABSTRACT Wheat was assessed at four crop growth stages for take-all (Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici) in a series of field trials that studied the effects of five wheat management practices: sowing date, plant density, nitrogen fertilizer dose and form, and removal/burial of cereal straw. An equation expressing disease level as a function of degree days was fitted to the observed disease levels. This equation was based on take-all epidemiology and depended on two parameters reflecting the importance of the primary and secondary infection cycles, respectively. Early sowing always increased disease frequency via primary infection cycle; its influence on the secondary cycle was variable. Primary infection and earliness of disease onset were increased by high density; however, at mid-season take-all was positively correlated to the root number per plant, which was itself negatively correlated to plant density. At late stages of development, neither plant density nor root number per plant had any influence on disease. A high nitrogen dose increased both take-all on seminal roots and severity of primary infection cycle but decreased take-all on nodal roots and secondary infection cycle. Ammonium (versus ammonium nitrate) fertilizer always decreased disease levels and infection cycles, whereas straw treatment (burial versus removal of straw from the previous cereal crop) had no influence.

  10. Sirtuins: Novel targets for metabolic disease in drug development

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Weijian

    2008-08-29

    Calorie restriction extends lifespan and produces a metabolic profile desirable for treating diseases such as type 2 diabetes. SIRT1, an NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylase, is a principal modulator of pathways downstream of calorie restriction that produces beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Activation of SIRT1 leads to enhanced activity of multiple proteins, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) and FOXO which helps to mediate some of the in vitro and in vivo effects of sirtuins. Resveratrol, a polyphenolic SIRT1 activator, mimics the effects of calorie restriction in lower organisms and in mice fed a high-fat diet ameliorates insulin resistance. In this review, we summarize recent research advances in unveiling the molecular mechanisms that underpin sirtuin as therapeutic candidates and discuss the possibility of using resveratrol as potential drug for treatment of diabetes.

  11. Does Vitamin C Deficiency Promote Fatty Liver Disease Development?

    PubMed Central

    Ipsen, David Højland; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and the subsequent reprogramming of the white adipose tissue are linked to human disease-complexes including metabolic syndrome and concurrent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The dietary imposed dyslipidemia promotes redox imbalance by the generation of excess levels of reactive oxygen species and induces adipocyte dysfunction and reprogramming, leading to a low grade systemic inflammation and ectopic lipid deposition, e.g., in the liver, hereby promoting a vicious circle in which dietary factors initiate a metabolic change that further exacerbates the negative consequences of an adverse life-style. Large epidemiological studies and findings from controlled in vivo animal studies have provided evidence supporting an association between poor vitamin C (VitC) status and propagation of life-style associated diseases. In addition, overweight per se has been shown to result in reduced plasma VitC, and the distribution of body fat in obesity has been shown to have an inverse relationship with VitC plasma levels. Recently, a number of epidemiological studies have indicated a VitC intake below the recommended daily allowance (RDA) in NAFLD-patients, suggesting an association between dietary habits, disease and VitC deficiency. In the general population, VitC deficiency (defined as a plasma concentration below 23 μM) affects around 10% of adults, however, this prevalence is increased by an adverse life-style, deficiency potentially playing a broader role in disease progression in specific subgroups. This review discusses the currently available data from human surveys and experimental models in search of a putative role of VitC deficiency in the development of NAFLD and NASH. PMID:25533004

  12. Ageing, lifestyle modifications, and cardiovascular disease in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, L J; Galioto, A; Ferlisi, A; Pineo, A; Putignano, E; Belvedere, M; Costanza, G; Barbagallo, M

    2006-01-01

    Developing countries face the double menace of still prevalent infectious diseases and increasing cardiovascular disease (CVD) with epidemic proportions in the near future, linked to demographic changes (expansion and ageing), and to urbanisation and lifestyle modifications. It is estimated that the elderly population will increase globally (over 80% during the next 25 years), with a large share of this rise in the developing world because of expanding populations. Increasing longevity prolongs the time exposure to risk factors, resulting in a greater probability of CVD. As a paradox, increased longevity due to improved social and economical conditions associated with lifestyle changes in the direction of a rich diet and sedentary habits in the last century, is one of the main contributors to the incremental trend in CVD. The variable increase rate of CVD in different nations may reflect different stages of "epidemiological transition" and it is probable that the relatively slow changes seen in developing populations through the epidemiological transition may occur at an accelerated pace in individuals migrating from nations in need to affluent societies (i.e. Hispanics to the USA, Africans to Europe). Because of restrained economic conditions in the developing world, the greatest gains in controlling the CVD epidemic lies in its prevention. Healthy foods should be widely available and affordable, and healthy dietary practices such as increased consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables, reduced consumption of saturated fat, salt, and simple sugars, may be promoted in all populations. Specific strategies for smoking and overweight control may be regulation of marketed tobacco and unhealthy fast food and promotion of an active lifestyle. Greater longevity and economic progress are accompanied by an increasing burden of CVD and other chronic diseases with an important decrease in quality of life, which should question the benefit of these additional years without

  13. Chronic kidney disease hotspots in developing countries in South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Georgi; Varughese, Santosh; Thandavan, Thiagarajan; Iyengar, Arpana; Fernando, Edwin; Naqvi, S. A. Jaffar; Sheriff, Rezvi; Ur-Rashid, Harun; Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Kafle, Rishi Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In many developing countries in the South Asian region, screening for chronic diseases in the community has shown a widely varying prevalence. However, certain geographical regions have shown a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) of unknown etiology. This predominantly affects the young and middle-aged population with a lower socioeconomic status. Here, we describe the hotspots of CKD of undiagnosed etiology in South Asian countries including the North, Central and Eastern provinces of Sri Lanka and the coastal region of the state of Andhra Pradesh in India. Screening of these populations has revealed cases of CKD in various stages. Race has also been shown to be a factor, with a much lower prevalence of CKD in whites compared to Asians, which could be related to the known influence of ethnicity on CKD development as well as environmental factors. The difference between developed and developing nations is most stark in the realm of healthcare, which translates into CKD hotspots in many regions of South Asian countries. Additionally, the burden of CKD stage G5 remains unknown due to the lack of registry reports, poor access to healthcare and lack of an organized chronic disease management program. The population receiving various forms of renal replacement therapy has dramatically increased in the last decade due to better access to point of care, despite the disproportionate increase in nephrology manpower. In this article we will discuss the nephrology care provided in various countries in South Asia, including India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka and Afghanistan. PMID:26798474

  14. Chronic kidney disease hotspots in developing countries in South Asia.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Georgi; Varughese, Santosh; Thandavan, Thiagarajan; Iyengar, Arpana; Fernando, Edwin; Naqvi, S A Jaffar; Sheriff, Rezvi; Ur-Rashid, Harun; Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Kafle, Rishi Kumar

    2016-02-01

    In many developing countries in the South Asian region, screening for chronic diseases in the community has shown a widely varying prevalence. However, certain geographical regions have shown a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) of unknown etiology. This predominantly affects the young and middle-aged population with a lower socioeconomic status. Here, we describe the hotspots of CKD of undiagnosed etiology in South Asian countries including the North, Central and Eastern provinces of Sri Lanka and the coastal region of the state of Andhra Pradesh in India. Screening of these populations has revealed cases of CKD in various stages. Race has also been shown to be a factor, with a much lower prevalence of CKD in whites compared to Asians, which could be related to the known influence of ethnicity on CKD development as well as environmental factors. The difference between developed and developing nations is most stark in the realm of healthcare, which translates into CKD hotspots in many regions of South Asian countries. Additionally, the burden of CKD stage G5 remains unknown due to the lack of registry reports, poor access to healthcare and lack of an organized chronic disease management program. The population receiving various forms of renal replacement therapy has dramatically increased in the last decade due to better access to point of care, despite the disproportionate increase in nephrology manpower. In this article we will discuss the nephrology care provided in various countries in South Asia, including India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka and Afghanistan. PMID:26798474

  15. Mapping cortical change in Alzheimer's disease, brain development, and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Paul M; Hayashi, Kiralee M; Sowell, Elizabeth R; Gogtay, Nitin; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Janke, Andrew L; Rose, Stephen E; Semple, James; Doddrell, David M; Wang, Yalin; van Erp, Theo G M; Cannon, Tyrone D; Toga, Arthur W

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes algorithms that can identify patterns of brain structure and function associated with Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, normal aging, and abnormal brain development based on imaging data collected in large human populations. Extraordinary information can be discovered with these techniques: dynamic brain maps reveal how the brain grows in childhood, how it changes in disease, and how it responds to medication. Genetic brain maps can reveal genetic influences on brain structure, shedding light on the nature-nurture debate, and the mechanisms underlying inherited neurobehavioral disorders. Recently, we created time-lapse movies of brain structure for a variety of diseases. These identify complex, shifting patterns of brain structural deficits, revealing where, and at what rate, the path of brain deterioration in illness deviates from normal. Statistical criteria can then identify situations in which these changes are abnormally accelerated, or when medication or other interventions slow them. In this paper, we focus on describing our approaches to map structural changes in the cortex. These methods have already been used to reveal the profile of brain anomalies in studies of dementia, epilepsy, depression, childhood- and adult-onset schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, fetal alcohol syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Williams syndrome, and in methamphetamine abusers. Specifically, we describe an image analysis pipeline known as cortical pattern matching that helps compare and pool cortical data over time and across subjects. Statistics are then defined to identify brain structural differences between groups, including localized alterations in cortical thickness, gray matter density (GMD), and asymmetries in cortical organization. Subtle features, not seen in individual brain scans, often emerge when population-based brain data are averaged in this way. Illustrative examples are presented to show the profound

  16. Dose-dependent effects of mTOR inhibition on weight and mitochondrial disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Simon C.; Yanos, Melana E.; Bitto, Alessandro; Castanza, Anthony; Gagnidze, Arni; Gonzalez, Brenda; Gupta, Kanav; Hui, Jessica; Jarvie, Conner; Johnson, Brittany M.; Letexier, Nicolas; McCanta, Lanny; Sangesland, Maya; Tamis, Oliver; Uhde, Lauren; Van Den Ende, Alex; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Suh, Yousin; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin extends lifespan and attenuates age-related pathologies in mice when administered through diet at 14 parts per million (PPM). Recently, we reported that daily intraperitoneal injection of rapamycin at 8 mg/kg attenuates mitochondrial disease symptoms and progression in the Ndufs4 knockout mouse model of Leigh Syndrome. Although rapamycin is a widely used pharmaceutical agent dosage has not been rigorously examined and no dose-response profile has been established. Given these observations we sought to determine if increased doses of oral rapamycin would result in more robust impact on mTOR driven parameters. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of dietary rapamycin at doses ranging from 14 to 378 PPM on developmental weight in control and Ndufs4 knockout mice and on health and survival in the Ndufs4 knockout model. High dose rapamycin was well tolerated, dramatically reduced weight gain during development, and overcame gender differences. The highest oral dose, approximately 27-times the dose shown to extend murine lifespan, increased survival in Ndufs4 knockout mice similarly to daily rapamycin injection without observable adverse effects. These findings have broad implications for the effective use of rapamycin in murine studies and for the translational potential of rapamycin in the treatment of mitochondrial disease. This data, further supported by a comparison of available literature, suggests that 14 PPM dietary rapamycin is a sub-optimal dose for targeting mTOR systemically in mice. Our findings suggest that the role of mTOR in mammalian biology may be broadly underestimated when determined through treatment with rapamycin at commonly used doses. PMID:26257774

  17. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) in Vascular Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Siew T.; Yung, Yun C.; Herr, Deron R.; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a small signaling lipid that is capable of stimulating a plethora of different cellular responses through the activation of its family of cognate G protein-coupled receptors. LPA mediates a wide range of biological effects in many tissue types that have been recently reviewed, however its effects on vasculature development and function have received comparatively less examination. In this review, literature on the actions of LPA in three main aspects of vascular development (vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, and vascular maturation) is discussed. In addition, evidence for the roles of LPA signaling in the formation of secondary vascular structures, such as the blood brain barrier, is considered, consistent with significant roles for LPA signaling in vascular development, function, and disease. PMID:19621353

  18. Nontyphoidal salmonella disease: Current status of vaccine research and development.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; MacLennan, Calman A; Simon, Raphael; Martin, Laura B; Khan, M Imran

    2016-06-01

    Among more than 2500 nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica (NTS) serovars, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis account for approximately fifty percent of all human isolates of NTS reported globally. The global incidence of NTS gastroenteritis in 2010 was estimated to be 93 million cases, approximately 80 million of which were contracted via food-borne transmission. It is estimated that 155,000 deaths resulted from NTS in 2010. NTS also causes severe, extra-intestinal, invasive bacteremia, referred to as invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease. iNTS disease usually presents as a febrile illness, frequently without gastrointestinal symptoms, in both adults and children. Symptoms of iNTS are similar to malaria, often including fever (>90%) and splenomegaly (>40%). The underlying reasons for the high rates of iNTS disease in Africa are still being elucidated. Evidence from animal and human studies supports the feasibility of developing a safe and effective vaccine against iNTS. Both antibodies and complement can kill Salmonella species in vitro. Proof-of-principle studies in animal models have demonstrated efficacy for live attenuated and subunit vaccines that target the O-antigens, flagellin proteins, and other outer membrane proteins of serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. More recently, a novel delivery strategy for NTS vaccines has been developed: the Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) technology which presents surface polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins in their native conformation. GMMA technology is self-adjuvanting, as it delivers multiple pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules. GMMA may be particularly relevant for low- and middle-income countries as it has the potential for high immunologic potency at a low cost and involves a relatively simple production process without the need for complex conjugation. Several vaccines for the predominant NTS serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, are

  19. Nontyphoidal salmonella disease: Current status of vaccine research and development.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; MacLennan, Calman A; Simon, Raphael; Martin, Laura B; Khan, M Imran

    2016-06-01

    Among more than 2500 nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica (NTS) serovars, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis account for approximately fifty percent of all human isolates of NTS reported globally. The global incidence of NTS gastroenteritis in 2010 was estimated to be 93 million cases, approximately 80 million of which were contracted via food-borne transmission. It is estimated that 155,000 deaths resulted from NTS in 2010. NTS also causes severe, extra-intestinal, invasive bacteremia, referred to as invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease. iNTS disease usually presents as a febrile illness, frequently without gastrointestinal symptoms, in both adults and children. Symptoms of iNTS are similar to malaria, often including fever (>90%) and splenomegaly (>40%). The underlying reasons for the high rates of iNTS disease in Africa are still being elucidated. Evidence from animal and human studies supports the feasibility of developing a safe and effective vaccine against iNTS. Both antibodies and complement can kill Salmonella species in vitro. Proof-of-principle studies in animal models have demonstrated efficacy for live attenuated and subunit vaccines that target the O-antigens, flagellin proteins, and other outer membrane proteins of serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. More recently, a novel delivery strategy for NTS vaccines has been developed: the Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) technology which presents surface polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins in their native conformation. GMMA technology is self-adjuvanting, as it delivers multiple pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules. GMMA may be particularly relevant for low- and middle-income countries as it has the potential for high immunologic potency at a low cost and involves a relatively simple production process without the need for complex conjugation. Several vaccines for the predominant NTS serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, are

  20. Development of Regional Models that Use Meteorological Variables for Predicting Stripe Rust Disease on Winter Wheat.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melugin Coakley, Stella; Boyd, William S.; Line, Roland F.

    1984-08-01

    Meteorological variables can be used to predict stripe rust, a disease of wheat caused by Puccinia striiformis West., at Lind, Pullman, and Walla Walla, Washington and Pendleton, Oregon in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Regional models developed using different methodologies are described and evaluated for accuracy. Disease intensity data, collected from 1968 to 1981, were converted to a 0-9 disease index (DI) and were used as the dependent variable in regression analysis. Meteorological data were expressed as standardized negative degree days (NDDZ) accumulated during December and January, the Julian date of spring (JDS) [defined as the date when 40 or more positive degree days (PDD) accumulated during the subsequent 14 days] and PDD for the 80-day period after the JDS. In one of the regional models, NDDZ was accumulated for adjusted time periods at sites other than Pullman. Mallow's Cp criterion was used to evaluate the regression equations with different numbers of independent variables. The most accurate model uses NDDZ and JDS as the independent variables. The models were cross-validated by randomly removing 2 years' data and reformulating the model based on the remaining data; the new model was then used to compare actual and predicted DI. Predicted DI was within one standard error of the actual DI 60% of the time. Incorrect predictions occurred during years when spring was unusually favorable or unfavorable for disease development. The methodology described is applicable to developing statistical models relating other pest occurrences to meteorological conditions.

  1. Stage-dependent reduction in T colony formation in Hodgkin's disease. Coincidence with monocyte synthesis of prostaglandins.

    PubMed Central

    Bockman, R S

    1980-01-01

    Prostaglandin synthesis and T lymphocyte colony formation have been examined in previously untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease. Mononuclear cells have been isolated from peripheral blood and spleens of these patients. Significant augmentation in prostaglandin E levels were noted in the mononuclear cell cutures from Hodgkin's disease patients compared with controls (1.64 +/- 0.29 vs. 0.39 +/- 0.09 ng/10(6) cells, P < 0.005). Measured prostaglandin E levels increased with advancing stage of disease. Virtually all of the prostaglandins were synthesized by the adherent monocyte cell population. Prostaglandin E was the major product. Clonal expansion of a T lymphocyte precursor cell, which gives rise to colonies > 50 cells, was determined by a layered soft agar method. T colony formation was significantly reduced in patients with stage II, III, and IV disease. There were progressively reduced colony numbers seen with advancing stage of disease (609 +/- 209, 416 +/- 158, 207 +/- 58 compared with normals 2,274 +/- 360 colonies/10(6) cells plated; P < 0.005). The addition of inhibitors of endogenous prostaglandin synthesis resulted in significant augmentation of T colony number. However, a consistent relative decrease in T colony number was seen even when endogenous prostaglandin E synthesis was blocked. It would appear that both the prostaglandin-dependent and independent T colony precursor cells are lost with progressive stage of disease. A causative role of augmented prostaglandin synthesis in this stage-dependent reduction of T colony formation could not be established. PMID:6967491

  2. At new heights - endodermal lineages in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Ober, Elke A; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2015-06-01

    The endoderm gives rise to diverse tissues and organs that are essential for the homeostasis and metabolism of the organism: the thymus, thyroid, lungs, liver and pancreas, and the functionally diverse domains of the digestive tract. Classically, the endoderm, the 'innermost germ layer', was in the shadow of the ectoderm and mesoderm. However, at a recent Keystone meeting it took center stage, revealing astonishing progress in dissecting the mechanisms underlying the development and malfunction of the endodermal organs. In vitro cultures of stem and progenitor cells have become widespread, with remarkable success in differentiating three-dimensional organoids, which - in a new turn for the field - can be used as disease models.

  3. Cation-chloride cotransporters in neuronal development, plasticity and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaila, Kai; Price, Theodore J.; Payne, John A.; Puskarjov, Martin; Voipio, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Electrical activity in neurons requires a seamless functional coupling between plasmalemmal ion channels and ion transporters. Although ion channels have been studied intensively for several decades, research on ion transporters is in its infancy. In recent years, it has become evident that one family of ion transporters, cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs), and in particular K+–Cl− cotransporter 2 (KCC2), have seminal roles in shaping GABAergic signalling and neuronal connectivity. Studying the functions of these transporters may lead to major paradigm shifts in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying brain development and plasticity in health and disease. PMID:25234263

  4. Development and Coherence of Beliefs About Disease Causality and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2014-01-01

    Guided by a naïve theories perspective on the development of thinking about disease, this study of 188 children aged 6 to 18 examined knowledge of HIV/AIDS causality and prevention using parallel measures derived from open-ended and structured interviews. Knowledge of both risk factors and prevention rules, as well as conceptual understanding of AIDS causality, increased with age. Younger children displayed more advanced knowledge in response to structured questions than in response to open-ended questions. Contrary to hypothesis, knowledge of causality was not more advanced than knowledge of prevention in elementary school. Moreover, correlations between the two types of knowledge were often nonsignificant except when the same method was used to assess both. Thus, methodology matters in assessing children's knowledge of disease, children's intuitive thinking is not consistently coherent, and it may be safest to educate children explicitly about sound prevention rules rather than assume they will infer the rules themselves from information about a disease's causes. PMID:25584017

  5. Kelch proteins: emerging roles in skeletal muscle development and diseases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vandana A; Beggs, Alan H

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of genes that cause skeletal muscle disease has increased tremendously over the past three decades. Advances in approaches to genetics and genomics have aided in the identification of new pathogenic mechanisms in rare genetic disorders and have opened up new avenues for therapeutic interventions by identification of new molecular pathways in muscle disease. Recent studies have identified mutations of several Kelch proteins in skeletal muscle disorders. The Kelch superfamily is one of the largest evolutionary conserved gene families. The 66 known family members all possess a Kelch-repeat containing domain and are implicated in diverse biological functions. In skeletal muscle development, several Kelch family members regulate the processes of proliferation and/or differentiation resulting in normal functioning of mature muscles. Importantly, many Kelch proteins function as substrate-specific adaptors for Cullin E3 ubiquitin ligase (Cul3), a core component of the ubiquitin-proteasome system to regulate the protein turnover. This review discusses the emerging roles of Kelch proteins in skeletal muscle function and disease. PMID:24959344

  6. Recent Developments, Utilization, and Spending Trends for Pompe Disease Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Kelton, Christina M.L.; Guo, Jeff J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pompe disease is a rare condition, with an incidence rate estimated to be between 1 in 40,000 and 1 in 300,000 live births worldwide. For an infant who contracts the disease, which is an inherited metabolic myopathy caused by deficiency of the acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) enzyme in lysosomal cells, the survival rate to age 1 year is estimated to be 25.7%. Before 2006, no therapies were available for this disease. Objectives The goals of this study were to review recent developments in therapies for Pompe disease, including the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of 2 biologic drugs, and to describe the associated drug utilization and spending trends in the US Medicaid program for patients with this disease. Methods We reviewed 2 recently approved therapies for Pompe disease and compared their indications, as well as their efficacy and safety profiles. A retrospective analysis was performed using the national Medicaid pharmacy claims database. Quarterly prescriptions and reimbursement amounts were calculated for each drug from 2006 quarter 2 through 2011 quarter 2. Average per-prescription spending was calculated by dividing the drug reimbursement by the number of prescriptions written for that drug. Results Myozyme (alglucosidase alfa, recombinant human GAA) and Lumizyme (alglucosidase alfa), the first 2 enzyme replacement therapies available for Pompe disease, were approved as orphan drugs by the FDA in 2006 and in 2010, respectively. Myozyme is indicated for infantile-onset Pompe disease; Lumizyme is indicated for patients aged ≥8 years. Although both drugs have been shown to improve patient survival rates, they both also have a boxed warning, because of the possibility of life-threatening allergic reactions. Moreover, Lumizyme has a restricted distribution system to ensure it is used by the correct patient population. In 2010, Medicaid spending for Myozyme was $3.6 million. In the first 2 quarters of 2011, Medicaid spending for Lumizyme

  7. Development of Biomarkers for Chronic Beryllium Disease in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2013-01-25

    Beryllium is a strategic metal, indispensable for national defense programs in aerospace, telecommunications, electronics, and weaponry. Exposure to beryllium is an extensively documented occupational hazard that causes irreversible, debilitating granulomatous lung disease in as much as 3 - 5% of exposed workers. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships has been severely limited by a general lack of a sufficient CBD animal model. We have now developed and tested an animal model which can be used for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new diagnostic and treatment paradigms. We have created 3 strains of transgenic mice in which the human antigen-presenting moiety, HLA-DP, was inserted into the mouse genome. Each mouse strain contains HLA-DPB1 alleles that confer different magnitude of risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD): HLA-DPB1*0401 (odds ratio = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (odds ratio = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (odds ratio = 240). Our preliminary work has demonstrated that the *1701 allele, as predicted by human studies, results in the greatest degree of sensitization in a mouse ear swelling test. We have also completed dose-response experiments examining beryllium-induced lung granulomas and identified susceptible and resistant inbred strains of mice (without the human transgenes) as well as quantitative trait loci that may contain gene(s) that modify the immune response to beryllium. In this grant application, we propose to use the transgenic and normal inbred strains of mice to identify biomarkers for the progression of beryllium sensitization and CBD. To achieve this goal, we propose to compare the sensitivity and accuracy of the lymphocyte proliferation test (blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) with the ELISPOT test in the three HLA-DP transgenic mice strains throughout a 6 month treatment with beryllium particles. Because of the availability of high-throughput proteomics, we will also identify

  8. Development of a helper cell-dependent form of peste des petits ruminants virus: a system for making biosafe antigen.

    PubMed

    Baron, Jana; Baron, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a viral disease of sheep and goats that is spreading through many countries in the developing world. Work on the virus is often restricted to studies of attenuated vaccine strains or to work in laboratories that have high containment facilities. We have created a helper cell dependent form of PPR virus by removing the entire RNA polymerase gene and complementing it with polymerase made constitutively in a cell line. The resultant L-deleted virus grows efficiently in the L-expressing cell line but not in other cells. Virus made with this system is indistinguishable from normal virus when used in diagnostic assays, and can be grown in normal facilities without the need for high level biocontainment. The L-deleted virus will thus make a positive contribution to the control and study of this important disease. PMID:26396073

  9. Development of a helper cell-dependent form of peste des petits ruminants virus: a system for making biosafe antigen.

    PubMed

    Baron, Jana; Baron, Michael D

    2015-09-23

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a viral disease of sheep and goats that is spreading through many countries in the developing world. Work on the virus is often restricted to studies of attenuated vaccine strains or to work in laboratories that have high containment facilities. We have created a helper cell dependent form of PPR virus by removing the entire RNA polymerase gene and complementing it with polymerase made constitutively in a cell line. The resultant L-deleted virus grows efficiently in the L-expressing cell line but not in other cells. Virus made with this system is indistinguishable from normal virus when used in diagnostic assays, and can be grown in normal facilities without the need for high level biocontainment. The L-deleted virus will thus make a positive contribution to the control and study of this important disease.

  10. Does Implicit Learning in Non-Demented Parkinson's Disease depend on the Level of Cognitive Functioning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenbossche, Jochen; Deroost, Natacha; Soetens, Eric; Kerckhofs, Eric

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the level of cognitive functioning on sequence-specific learning in Parkinson's disease (PD). This was done by examining the relationship between the scales for outcomes in Parkinson's disease-cognition [SCOPA-COG, Marinus, J., Visser, M., Verwey, N. A., Verhey, F. R. J., Middelkoop, H. A. M.,Stiggelbout, A., et…

  11. Simple Physics in Diseases and Embryonic Development of the Eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirinifard, Abbas

    2011-03-01

    While molecular-level regulation within cells during embryonic development is highly complex, the physical mechanisms which translate this intracellular information into multicellular physical structure at the tissue level are often surprisingly simple. I will discuss an example where regulation of cell-cell contact energies is primarily responsible for robust and evolvable regular patterns, the organization of the ommatidia and supporting cells into the regular tiling characteristic of the Drosophila eye and another example where adhesion failures in the human retina result in choroidal neovascularization leading to blindness. In both cases, simulations based on materials-science techniques can help us understand the patterning mechanisms and the reasons for their robustness and failures. Such simulations are easy to extend to other developmental phenomena and to development-related diseases like cancer. EPA grant ``The Texas-Indiana Virtual STAR Center'' and NIH grants R01 GM76692 and R01 GM077138.

  12. MicroRNAs in neural cell development and brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Feng, Yue

    2011-12-01

    MicroRNAs play important roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by inhibiting protein translation and/or promoting mRNA degradation. Importantly, biogenesis of microRNAs displays specific temporal and spatial profiles in distinct cell and tissue types and hence affects a broad spectrum of biological functions in normal cell growth and tumor development. Recent discoveries have revealed sophisticated mechanisms that control microRNA production and homeostasis in response to developmental and extracellular signals. Moreover, a link between dysregulation of microRNAs and human brain disorders has become increasingly evident. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding the regulation of microRNA biogenesis and function in neuronal and glial development in the mammalian brain, and dysregulation of the microRNA pathway in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Implication of epigenetics in pancreas development and disease.

    PubMed

    Quilichini, Evans; Haumaitre, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    Pancreas development is controlled by a complex interaction of signaling pathways and transcription factor networks that determine pancreatic specification and differentiation of exocrine and endocrine cells. Epigenetics adds a new layer of gene regulation. DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs recently appeared as important epigenetic factors regulating pancreas development. In this review, we report recent findings obtained by analyses in model organisms as well as genome-wide approaches that demonstrate the role of these epigenetic regulators in the control of exocrine and endocrine cell differentiation, identity, function, proliferation and regeneration. We also highlight how altered epigenetic processes contribute to pancreatic disorders: diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Uncovering these epigenetic events can help to better understand these diseases, provide novel therapeutical targets for their treatment, and improve cell-based therapies for diabetes. PMID:26696517

  14. Molecular mechanism of size control in development and human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaolong; Xu, Tian

    2011-01-01

    How multicellular organisms control their size is a fundamental question that fascinated generations of biologists. In the past 10 years, tremendous progress has been made toward our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying size control. Original studies from Drosophila showed that in addition to extrinsic nutritional and hormonal cues, intrinsic mechanisms also play important roles in the control of organ size during development. Several novel signaling pathways such as insulin and Hippo-LATS signaling pathways have been identified that control organ size by regulating cell size and/or cell number through modulation of cell growth, cell division, and cell death. Later studies using mammalian cell and mouse models also demonstrated that the signaling pathways identified in flies are also conserved in mammals. Significantly, recent studies showed that dysregulation of size control plays important roles in the development of many human diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and hypertrophy. PMID:21483452

  15. Programmed Cell Death in Animal Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Yaron; Steller, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Programmed Cell Death (PCD) plays a fundamental role in animal development and tissue homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of this process is associated with a wide variety of human diseases, including immunological and developmental disorders, neuro-degeneration, and cancer. Here, we provide a brief historical overview of the field and reflect on myriad functions carried out by PCD during development and explore how PCD is regulated. We also focus on the function and regulation of apoptotic proteins, including caspases, the key executioners of apoptosis, highlighting the non-lethal functions of these proteins in diverse developmental processes including cell differentiation and tissue remodeling. Finally, we explore a growing body of work about the connections between apoptosis, stem cells and cancer, focusing on how apoptotic cells release a variety of signals to communicate with their cellular environment, including factors that promote cell division, tissue regeneration, and wound healing. PMID:22078876

  16. Pax genes in renal development, disease and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Richa; Sanchez-Ferras, Oraly; Bouchard, Maxime

    2015-08-01

    The execution of developmental programs entails specific spatio-temporal expression of transcriptional regulators that ultimately control tissue morphogenesis and embryo patterning. Pax transcription factors are sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins exerting such regulatory activity in several tissues. In the urogenital system, Pax2 and Pax8 have emerged as crucial players at multiple steps of kidney and urinary tract development. They are involved in important processes such as cell survival, cell lineage decisions and tissue interactions through the regulation of sophisticated gene regulatory networks. Pax2/8 have additionally been directly associated with Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) and renal cancers in human. In this review, we provide an overview of landmark contributions to the understanding of Pax gene function in urinary tract development and disease with an emphasis on recent advances in the field. PMID:26410163

  17. Development assistance for neglected tropical diseases: progress since 2009.

    PubMed

    Liese, Bernhard H; Houghton, Natalia; Teplitskaya, Lyubov

    2014-09-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) is an umbrella term for a diverse group of debilitating infections that represent the most common afflictions for 2.7 billion people living on less than US$2 per day. Major efforts have recently re-focused attention on NTDs, including structured advocacy by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, technical and political support by WHO and large-scale drug donation programs by pharmaceutical companies. An analysis of the Official Development Assistance (ODA) for NTDs in 2009 showed that Development Assistance Committee members and multilateral donors had largely ignored funding NTD control projects. This study reviews the changes since 2009 and finds an increased engagement by pharmaceutical manufacturers through drug donation programs substantially increased by the 'London Declaration' in 2012, a focused effort of 77 public and private partners on control or elimination of the 10 most common NTDs, but no increase in ODA for NTDs between 2008 and 2012. The allocation of ODA still does not reflect the respective importance of these diseases.

  18. Wnt Signaling in Skin Development, Homeostasis, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Xinhong; Nusse, Roel

    2013-01-01

    The skin and its appendages constitute the largest organ of the body. Its stratified epithelia offer protection from environmental stresses such as dehydration, irradiation, mechanical trauma, and pathogenic infection, whereas its appendages, like hair and sebaceous glands, help regulate body temperature as well as influence animal interaction and social behavior through camouflage and sexual signaling. To respond to and function effectively in a dynamic external environment, the skin and its appendages possess a remarkable ability to regenerate in a carefully controlled fashion. When this finely tuned homeostatic process is disrupted, skin diseases such as cancers may result. At present, the molecular signals that orchestrate cell proliferation, differentiation, and patterning in the skin remain incompletely understood. It is increasingly apparent that many morphogenetic pathways with key roles in development are also important in regulating skin biology. Of these, Wnt signaling has emerged as the dominant pathway controlling the patterning of skin and influencing the decisions of embryonic and adult stem cells to adopt the various cell lineages of the skin and its appendages, as well as subsequently controlling the function of differentiated skin cells. Here we will review established concepts and present recent advances in our understanding of the diverse roles that Wnt signaling plays in skin development, homeostasis, and disease. PMID:23209129

  19. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoter polymorphism and coronary artery disease in non-insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, M W; Stickland, M H; Grant, P J

    1995-10-01

    Elevated levels of PAI-1 are found in coronary artery disease (CAD) and non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM). PAI-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of CAD through suppression of fibrinolysis, alternatively the high levels may result from vascular damage. There is evidence that PAI-1 levels are related to genotype at a PAI-1 promoter polymorphism. Genotype at this 4G/5G polymorphism was determined in 160 NIDDM (90 males and 70 females) patients with (n = 38) or without (n = 122) clinical evidence of CAD. Levels of cholesterol were higher (6.5 vs 5.9 mM, p < 0.01) and PAI-1 tended to be higher (PAI-1 activity 23.0 vs 20.4 U/ml) with CAD. The frequency of the 4G/4G genotype was increased and the 5G/5G genotype decreased, in the group CAD compared to those without (p < 0.05). These results suggest that possession of the 4G/4G PAI-1 promoter genotype is a risk factor for the development of CAD in subjects with NIDDM.

  20. Expression of testosterone-dependent enzyme, carbonic anhydrase III, and oxidative stress in experimental alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Parkkila, S; Halsted, C H; Villanueva, J A; Väänänen, H K; Niemelä, O

    1999-11-01

    We studied the sequential immunohistochemical appearance of androgen-dependent carbonic anhydrase (CA III) during the development of ethanol-induced liver injury using liver samples from castrated and noncastrated male micropigs. In castrated micropigs, the baseline expression of CA III was either low or absent, while distinct positive immunoreactions were found in zone 3 hepatocytes at 5 and 12 months after the initiation of the ethanol diet. The CA III enzyme and protein adducts of lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydic products, malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal, appeared together in the perivenous region, suggesting that the enzyme functions in an oxidative environment. The positive staining became more abundant and widespread during the progression of alcoholic liver disease. After 12 months, CA III was significantly more abundant in both the ethanol-fed noncastrated and castrated micropigs than in the control animals (P < 0.001, P < 0.05, respectively). CA III content was strikingly high in the ethanol-fed noncastrated animals, consistent with a potential role of androgens in the regulation of ethanol-induced CA III expression. The strongly positive CA III immunoreactions in the ethanol-fed noncastrated micropigs were associated with scant evidence of aldehydic protein adducts and minimal histopathology. Thus, enhanced expression of CA III during ethanol consumption may also account in part for gender differences in the susceptibility for alcohol-induced liver injury.

  1. Delayed Ego Strength Development in Opioid Dependent Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Abramoff, Benjamin A; Lange, Hannah L H; Matson, Steven C; Cottrill, Casey B; Bridge, Jeffrey A; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; Bonny, Andrea E

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate ego strengths, in the context of Erikson's framework, among adolescents and young adults diagnosed with opioid dependence as compared to non-drug using youth. Methods. Opioid dependent (n = 51) and non-drug using control (n = 31) youth completed the self-administered Psychosocial Inventory of Ego Strengths (PIES). The PIES assesses development in the framework of Erikson's ego strength stages. Multivariate linear regression modeling assessed the independent association of the primary covariate (opioid dependent versus control) as well as potential confounding variables (e.g., psychiatric comorbidities, intelligence) with total PIES score. Results. Mean total PIES score was significantly lower in opioid dependent youth (231.65 ± 30.39 opioid dependent versus 270.67 ± 30.06 control; p < 0.01). Evaluation of the PIES subscores found significant (p < 0.05) delays in all ego strength areas (hope, will, purpose, competence, fidelity, love, care, and wisdom). When adjusting for potential confounders, opioid dependence remained a significant (p < 0.001) independent predictor of total PIES score. Conclusion. Adolescents with opioid dependence demonstrated significant delays in ego strength development. A treatment approach acknowledging this delay may be needed in the counseling and treatment of adolescents with opioid dependence.

  2. Delayed Ego Strength Development in Opioid Dependent Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Abramoff, Benjamin A.; Lange, Hannah L. H.; Matson, Steven C.; Cottrill, Casey B.; Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; Bonny, Andrea E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate ego strengths, in the context of Erikson's framework, among adolescents and young adults diagnosed with opioid dependence as compared to non-drug using youth. Methods. Opioid dependent (n = 51) and non-drug using control (n = 31) youth completed the self-administered Psychosocial Inventory of Ego Strengths (PIES). The PIES assesses development in the framework of Erikson's ego strength stages. Multivariate linear regression modeling assessed the independent association of the primary covariate (opioid dependent versus control) as well as potential confounding variables (e.g., psychiatric comorbidities, intelligence) with total PIES score. Results. Mean total PIES score was significantly lower in opioid dependent youth (231.65 ± 30.39 opioid dependent versus 270.67 ± 30.06 control; p < 0.01). Evaluation of the PIES subscores found significant (p < 0.05) delays in all ego strength areas (hope, will, purpose, competence, fidelity, love, care, and wisdom). When adjusting for potential confounders, opioid dependence remained a significant (p < 0.001) independent predictor of total PIES score. Conclusion. Adolescents with opioid dependence demonstrated significant delays in ego strength development. A treatment approach acknowledging this delay may be needed in the counseling and treatment of adolescents with opioid dependence. PMID:26664819

  3. Development of molecular markers for breeding for disease resistant crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease caused by the filamentous ascomycetes fungus Magnaporthe oryzae and sheath blight disease caused by the soil borne fungus Rhizocotonia solani are the two major rice diseases that threaten stable rice production in the USA and worldwide. These two diseases have been managed with a ...

  4. A Robust Single Primate Neuroepithelial Cell Clonal Expansion System for Neural Tube Development and Disease Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoqing; Li, Bo; Ai, Zongyong; Xiang, Zheng; Zhang, Kunshang; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Yongchang; Li, Yuemin; Rizak, Joshua D.; Niu, Yuyu; Hu, Xintian; Sun, Yi Eve; Ji, Weizhi; Li, Tianqing

    2015-01-01

    Summary Developing a model of primate neural tube (NT) development is important to promote many NT disorder studies in model organisms. Here, we report a robust and stable system to allow for clonal expansion of single monkey neuroepithelial stem cells (NESCs) to develop into miniature NT-like structures. Single NESCs can produce functional neurons in vitro, survive, and extensively regenerate neuron axons in monkey brain. NT formation and NESC maintenance depend on high metabolism activity and Wnt signaling. NESCs are regionally restricted to a telencephalic fate. Moreover, single NESCs can turn into radial glial progenitors (RGPCs). The transition is accurately regulated by Wnt signaling through regulation of Notch signaling and adhesion molecules. Finally, using the “NESC-TO-NTs” system, we model the functions of folic acid (FA) on NT closure and demonstrate that FA can regulate multiple mechanisms to prevent NT defects. Our system is ideal for studying NT development and diseases. PMID:26584544

  5. Development of a three-dimensional time-dependent flow field model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, R. C.; Waldrop, W. R.; Pitts, F. H.; Shah, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time-dependent mathematical model to represent Mobile Bay was developed. Computer programs were developed which numerically solve the appropriate conservation equations for predicting bay and estuary flow fields. The model is useful for analyzing the dispersion of sea water into fresh water and the transport of sediment, and for relating field and physical model data.

  6. A preliminary analysis on the dependence of the human diseases on the relative number of sunspot.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuehua; Song, Yi

    1996-03-01

    On the basis of the solar-terrestrial relations point of view, the paper investigates the influences of solar activities upon the human race. According to the data of Nanjing Hospital for Infectious Diseases, both the curve of the occurrence of various diseases and the relative number of sunspots with time are drawn, and their related coefficients are calculated. The preliminary results show that the incidences of typhus and scarlet fever keep in step with the 11-year cycle of solar activities, they get the maximum at the same year, while other diseases are not definite.

  7. G2019S LRRK2 mutant fibroblasts from Parkinson's disease patients show increased sensitivity to neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium dependent of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yakhine-Diop, Sokhna M S; Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Rodríguez-Arribas, Mario; Climent, Vicente; Aiastui, Ana; López de Munain, Adolfo; Fuentes, José M; González-Polo, Rosa A

    2014-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of unknown etiology. It is considered as a multifactorial disease dependent on environmental and genetic factors. Deregulation in cell degradation has been related with a significant increase in cell damage, becoming a target for studies on the PD etiology. In the present study, we have characterized the parkinsonian toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+))-induced damage in fibroblasts from Parkinson's patients with the mutation G2019S in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 protein (LRRK2) and control individuals without this mutation. The results reveal that MPP(+) induces mTOR-dependent autophagy in fibroblasts. Moreover, the effects of caspase-dependent cell death to MPP(+) were higher in cells with the G2019S LRRK2 mutation, which showed basal levels of autophagy due to the G2019S LRRK2 mutation (mTOR-independent). The inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) treatment reduces these sensitivity differences between both cell types, however, the inhibition of autophagosome-lysosome fusion by bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1) increases these differences. This data confirm the importance of the combination of genetic and environmental factors in the PD etiology. Thereby, the sensitivity to the same damage may be different in function of a genetic predisposition, reason why individuals with certain mutations can develop some early-onset diseases, such as individuals with G2019S LRRK2 mutation and PD.

  8. Mannan induces ROS-regulated, IL-17A–dependent psoriasis arthritis-like disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Khmaladze, Ia; Kelkka, Tiina; Guerard, Simon; Wing, Kajsa; Pizzolla, Angela; Saxena, Amit; Lundqvist, Katarina; Holmdahl, Meirav; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis (Ps) and psoriasis arthritis (PsA) are poorly understood common diseases, induced by unknown environmental factors, affecting skin and articular joints. A single i.p. exposure to mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae induced an acute inflammation in inbred mouse strains resembling human Ps and PsA-like disease, whereas multiple injections induced a relapsing disease. Exacerbation of disease severity was observed in mice deficient for generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, restoration of ROS production, specifically in macrophages, ameliorated both skin and joint disease. Neutralization of IL-17A, mainly produced by γδ T cells, completely blocked disease symptoms. Furthermore, mice depleted of granulocytes were resistant to disease development. In contrast, certain acute inflammatory mediators (C5, Fcγ receptor III, mast cells, and histamine) and adaptive immune players (αβ T and B cells) were redundant in disease induction. Hence, we propose that mannan-induced activation of macrophages leads to TNF-α secretion and stimulation of local γδ T cells secreting IL-17A. The combined action of activated macrophages and IL-17A produced in situ drives neutrophil infiltration in the epidermis and dermis of the skin, leading to disease manifestations. Thus, our finding suggests a new mechanism triggered by exposure to exogenous microbial components, such as mannan, that can induce and exacerbate Ps and PsA. PMID:25136095

  9. Proteomic profiling change during the early development of silicosis disease

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Rongming; Ding, Bangmei; Zhang, Yingyi; Xia, Qian; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background Silicosis is one of several severe occupational diseases for which effective diagnostic tools during early development are currently unavailable. In this study we focused on proteomic profiling during the early stages of silicosis to investigate the pathophysiology and identify the proteins involved. Methods Two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS were used to assess the proteomic differences between healthy individuals (HI), dust-exposed workers without silicosis (DEW) and silicosis patients (SP). Proteins abundances that differed by a factor of two-fold or greater were subjected to more detailed analysis, and enzyme linked to immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to correlate with protein expression data. Results Compared with HI, 42 proteins were more abundant and 8 were less abundant in DEW, and these were also differentially accumulated in SP. Closer inspection revealed that serine protease granzyme A, alpha-1-B-glycoprotein (A1BG) and the T4 surface glycoprotein precursor (TSGP) were among the up-regulated proteins in DEW and SP. Significant changes in serine proteases, glycoproteins and proto-oncogenes may be associated with the response to cytotoxicity and infectious pathogens by activation of T cells, positive regulation of extracellular matrix structural constituents and immune response, and fibroblast proliferation. Up-regulation of cytokines included TNFs, interferon beta precursor, interleukin 6, atypical chemokine receptor 2, TNFR13BV, and mutant IL-17F may be involved in the increased and persistent immune response and fibrosis that occurred during silicosis development. Conclusions Granzymes, glycoproteins, cytokines and immune factors were dramatically involved in the immune response, metabolism, signal regulation and fibrosis during the early development of silicosis. Proteomic profiling has expanded our understanding of the pathogenesis of silicosis, and identified a number of targets that may be potential

  10. Development of the Motor Neuron Disease Carer Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Mockford, Carole; Jenkinson, Crispin; Fitzpatrick, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to develop a validated questionnaire that can measure the extent to which dimensions of caring affect the health of carers of patients with motor neuron disease. An initial 190-item questionnaire was developed from in-depth interviews, focus groups and two pilot studies with carers. Factor analysis was applied to the data obtained from a large survey in the UK that identified the underlying dimensions of caring. The newly formed scales were tested for reliability using Cronbach's alpha, and for construct validity. The SF36-v2 was the benchmark instrument on which correlations were made to ascertain the relationship with carers' health. A 34-item instrument was developed which has demonstrated promising evidence of internal reliability and validity for six scales: emotional well-being, physical well-being, self care, disturbed sleep, carers' support needs and statutory services. High correlations were found with the Mental Component Score summary scale of the SF-36v2 (0.40-0.66). The development and testing of the MNDCQ indicates that as the carers' score on the MNDCQ increases, suggesting a higher level of burden, they are more likely to report poor health. Further longitudinal studies are needed to further test the instruments' ability to detect change over time. PMID:19922141

  11. Tangier's disease: An uncommon cause of facial weakness and non-length dependent demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B.; Mahadevan, Anita; Pooja, M.; Bindu, P. S.; Chickabasaviah, Y. T.; Gayathri, N.; Sinha, Sanjib

    2016-01-01

    Tangier disease is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation of cholesterol esters in various organs secondary to adenotriphosphate binding cassette transporter A-1 (ABCA-1) transporter deficiency and disrupted reverse cholesterol transport. It causes neuropathy in half of the affected individuals. We present the clinical, electrophysiological, and histopathological findings in a middle aged gentleman of Tangier disease who was initially misdiagnosed leprosy and treated with antileprosy drugs. The presence of a demyelinating neuropathy on electrophysiology in a patient with predominant upper limb involvement and facial diplegia should raise the suspicion of Tangier disease. The characteristic lipid profile of Tangier disease was noted in this patient viz. extremely low high density lipoprotein (HDL), elevated triglyceride (TG), and reduced apolipoprotein A1. Estimation of serum lipids should form a part of routine evaluation in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:27011649

  12. Monograph series on aging-related diseases: VIII. Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM)

    PubMed

    Barceló, A

    1996-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycemia and by disturbances of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism. Diabetes mellitus is associated with absolute or relative deficiency in the secretion and/or action of the hormone insulin.

  13. Neglected tropical diseases and the millennium development goals: why the "other diseases" matter: reality versus rhetoric.

    PubMed

    Molyneux, David H; Malecela, Mwele N

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004 there has been an increased recognition of the importance of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) as impediments to development. These diseases are caused by a variety of infectious agents - viruses, bacteria and parasites - which cause a diversity of clinical conditions throughout the tropics. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has defined seventeen of these conditions as core NTDs. The objectives for the control, elimination or eradication of these conditions have been defined in World Health Assembly resolutions whilst the strategies for the control or elimination of individual diseases have been defined in various WHO documents. Since 2005 there has been a drive for the expanded control of these diseases through an integrated approach of mass drug administration referred to as Preventive Chemotherapy via community-based distribution systems and through schools. This has been made possible by donations from major pharmaceutical companies of quality and efficacious drugs which have a proven track record of safety. As a result of the increased commitment of endemic countries, bilateral donors and non-governmental development organisations, there has been a considerable expansion of mass drug administration. In particular, programmes targeting lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, trachoma and soil transmitted helminth infections have expanded to treat 887. 8 million people in 2009. There has been significant progress towards guinea worm eradication, and the control of leprosy and human African trypanosomiasis. This paper responds to what the authors believe are inappropriate criticisms of these programmes and counters accusations of the motives of partners made in recently published papers. We provide a detailed response and update the information on the numbers of global treatments undertaken for NTDs and list the success stories to date.The paper acknowledges that in undertaking any health programme in environments such as post

  14. Efficacy and Safety of Vitamin K-Antagonists (VKA) for Atrial Fibrillation in Non-Dialysis Dependent Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kooiman, Judith; van Rein, Nienke; Spaans, Bas; van Beers, Koen A. J.; Bank, Jonna R.; van de Peppel, Wilke R.; del Sol, Antonio Iglesias; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; Rabelink, Ton J.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Klok, Frederikus A.; Huisman, Menno V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Essential information regarding efficacy and safety of vitamin K-antagonists (VKA) treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) in non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD) is still lacking in current literature. The aim of our study was to compare the risks of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) and major bleeds between patients without CKD (eGFR >60 ml/min), and those with moderate (eGFR 30–60 ml/min), or severe non-dialysis dependent CKD (eGFR <30 ml/min). Methods We included 300 patients without CKD, 294 with moderate, and 130 with severe non-dialysis dependent CKD, who were matched for age and sex. Uni- and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed reporting hazard ratios (HRs) for the endpoint of stroke or TIA and the endpoint of major bleeds as crude values and adjusted for comorbidity and platelet-inhibitor use. Results Overall, 6.2% (45/724, 1.7/100 patient years) of patients developed stroke or TIA and 15.6% (113/724, 4.8/100 patient years) a major bleeding event. Patients with severe CKD were at high risk of stroke or TIA and major bleeds during VKA treatment compared with those without renal impairment, HR 2.75 (95%CI 1.25–6.05) and 1.66 (95%CI 0.97–2.86), or with moderate CKD, HR 3.93(1.71–9.00) and 1.86 (95%CI 1.08–3.21), respectively. These risks were similar for patients without and with moderate CKD. Importantly, both less time spent within therapeutic range and high INR-variability were associated with increased risks of stroke or TIA and major bleeds in severe CKD patients. Conclusions VKA treatment for AF in patients with severe CKD has a poor safety and efficacy profile, likely related to suboptimal anticoagulation control. Our study findings stress the need for better tailored individualised anticoagulant treatment approaches for patients with AF and severe CKD. PMID:24817475

  15. Development of a Targeted Urine Proteome Assay for Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cantley, Lloyd G.; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Stone, Kathryn L.; Chung, Lisa; Belcher, Justin; Abbott, Thomas; Cantley, Jennifer L.; Williams, Kenneth R.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2016-01-01

    Human urine is the least invasive and most readily available bio fluid whose proteome has been shown to change in response to disease or drug treatment. Urine is thus very amenable to quantitative proteomics and is a logical sample choice for identifying protein biomarkers for kidney diseases. In this study potential biomarkers were identified initially by using a multi-proteomics workflow to compare urine proteomes of kidney transplant patients who exhibited immediate versus delayed graft function. To comprehensively interrogate the urine proteome two “bottom up”, mass spectrometric-based discovery approaches, iTRAQ and Label Free Quantitation (LFQ), were complemented by Differential Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) analyses of intact urine proteins from kidney transplant recipients who received a deceased donor kidney. Differentially expressed proteins in the two patient groups were identified, and corresponding stable isotope–labeled internal peptide standard (SIS) peptides were synthesized for scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The Targeted Urine Proteome Assay (TUPA) was then developed by identifying those peptides for which there were at least 2 transitions for which interference in a urine matrix across 156 MRM runs was less than 30%. This resulted in a final assay that monitors 224 peptides corresponding to 167 quantifiable proteins. PMID:26220717

  16. Remodelling the extracellular matrix in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonnans, Caroline; Chou, Jonathan; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a highly dynamic structure that is present in all tissues and continuously undergoes controlled remodelling. This process involves quantitative and qualitative changes in the ECM, mediated by specific enzymes that are responsible for ECM degradation, such as metalloproteinases. The ECM interacts with cells to regulate diverse functions, including proliferation, migration and differentiation. ECM remodelling is crucial for regulating the morphogenesis of the intestine and lungs, as well as of the mammary and submandibular glands. Dysregulation of ECM composition, structure, stiffness and abundance contributes to several pathological conditions, such as fibrosis and invasive cancer. A better understanding of how the ECM regulates organ structure and function and of how ECM remodelling affects disease progression will contribute to the development of new therapeutics. PMID:25415508

  17. At new heights - endodermal lineages in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Ober, Elke A; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2015-06-01

    The endoderm gives rise to diverse tissues and organs that are essential for the homeostasis and metabolism of the organism: the thymus, thyroid, lungs, liver and pancreas, and the functionally diverse domains of the digestive tract. Classically, the endoderm, the 'innermost germ layer', was in the shadow of the ectoderm and mesoderm. However, at a recent Keystone meeting it took center stage, revealing astonishing progress in dissecting the mechanisms underlying the development and malfunction of the endodermal organs. In vitro cultures of stem and progenitor cells have become widespread, with remarkable success in differentiating three-dimensional organoids, which - in a new turn for the field - can be used as disease models. PMID:26015535

  18. Atg7 in development and disease: panacea or Pandora's Box?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jianhua

    2015-10-01

    Macroautophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular degradation system used by life ranging from yeasts to mammals. The core autophagic machinery is composed of ATG (autophagy-related) protein constituents. One particular member of the ATG protein family, Atg7, has been the focus of recent research. Atg7 acts as an E1-like activating enzyme facilitating both microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-phosphatidylethanolamine and ATG12 conjugation. Thus, Atg7 stands at the hub of these two ubiquitin-like systems involving LC3 and Atg12 in autophagic vesicle expansion. In this review, I focus on the pleiotropic function of Atg7 in development, maintenance of health, and alternations of such control in disease.

  19. Development of the Huntington Disease Work Function Scale

    PubMed Central

    Brossman, Bradley; Williams, Janet K.; Downing, Nancy; Mills, James A.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective A work function measure specific for persons with prodromal Huntington disease (HD) was created to assist with workplace accommodations Methods A self-report HD Work Function measure (HDWF) was developed from focus group and expert validation. Results Pilot studies with 238 people with prodromal HD, and 185 companions; and 89 people without prodromal HD, and 70 companions indicate HDWF has acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.77), acceptable inter-rater reliability (r = 0.58), and acceptable convergent validity with selected items from EWPS (r = −0.56), SAS (r = −0.29), and ECog (r = −0.70). The HDWF can distinguish between people with prodromal HD and people with a HD family history who do not have prodromal HD (p < 0.0001). Conclusions The HDWF is a brief self assessment that may be used to monitor work function. PMID:22995807

  20. Diagnosis of Alcoholic Liver Disease: Key Foundations and New Developments.

    PubMed

    Childers, Ryan E; Ahn, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is a spectrum of conditions that include alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic hepatitis, and chronic alcoholic liver disease. The diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease remains founded in an accurate patient history and detailed physical examination. Concurrent with the physical examination, objective data from laboratory, imaging, and histologic studies are helpful to confirm a diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease. Novel biomarkers, scoring systems, and imaging modalities are improving the ability to diagnose and manage alcoholic liver disease, but for most practicing clinicians, these have not been adopted widely because of their cost, but also because of limitations and uncertainty in their performance characteristics. PMID:27373609

  1. Thrombospondin 1 Deficiency Ameliorates the Development of Adriamycin-Induced Proteinuric Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maimaitiyiming, Hasiyeti; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Shuxia

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that thrombospondin 1 (TSP1) is an important player in diabetic nephropathy. However, the role of TSP1 in podocyte injury and the development of non-diabetic proteinuric kidney disease is largely unknown. In the current study, by using a well-established podocyte injury model (adriamycin-induced nephropathy mouse model), we examined the contribution of TSP1 to the development of proteinuric kidney disease. We found that TSP1 was up-regulated in the glomeruli, notably in podocytes, in adriamycin injected mice before the onset of proteinuria. ADR treatment also stimulated TSP1 expression in cultured human podocytes in vitro. Moreover, increased TSP1 mediated ADR-induced podocyte apoptosis and actin cytoskeleton disorganization. This TSP1’s effect was through a CD36-dependent mechanism and involved in the stimulation of p38MAPK pathway. Importantly, in vivo data demonstrated that TSP1 deficiency protected mice from ADR induced podocyte loss and foot process effacement. ADR induced proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis, renal macrophage infiltration and inflammation was also attenuated in TSP1 deficient mice. Taken together, these studies provide new evidence that TSP1 contributes to the development of non-diabetic proteinuric kidney disease by stimulating podocyte injury and the progression of renal inflammation. PMID:27196103

  2. Cardiovascular disease: A global problem extending into the developing world

    PubMed Central

    Aje, Temilolu Olayinka; Miller, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the current status of cardiovascular disease (CVD) on the international scale. Presently viewed as an epidemic that has migrated from westernized societies to developing countries, several important issues are elaborated upon. They include the basis for the increasing prevalence of CVD and the associated societal implications. The challenges related to lack of resources and infrastructure support may also impede successful implementation of proven strategies to reduce CVD. In addition to traditional risk factors such as cigarette smoking, hypertension, obesity, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance, many developing countries must also contend with other risk biomarkers. Included in this grouping are human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and other infectious/inflammatory processes as well as nutritional and vitamin deficiencies that make preventive measures more difficult to prioritize. Taken together, greater partnering between local governments, affiliated hospitals and international societies is needed to enhance and facilitate efforts aimed at optimizing standard of care measures in developing countries in order to reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:21160570

  3. Zebrafish pancreas as a model for development and disease.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, R A; Meyer, D

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate pancreas is composed of acinar tissue that produces digestive enzymes, a ductal system for transporting those enzymes, and the endocrine islets which produce hormones critical for organism glucose homeostasis. Recent studies have highlighted similarities between zebrafish and mammals in organ development, and increasingly reveal that the regulation of metabolic homeostasis is highly conserved as well. Use of zebrafish as a model organism, with its ease of genetic manipulation, high fecundity, and ready access for imaging, has been highly productive for studies of islet cell development. We review the most recent progress in our understanding of how the later forming endocrine cells develop from duct-associated progenitors and new tools available for these studies. We also discuss current approaches and technological advances for addressing beta cell physiology, organism glucose homeostasis, and associated processes within zebrafish. Finally, we describe emerging methods being used to establish new zebrafish models of diabetes and related pathologies, to expand the use of this model organism to discover new therapies and to facilitate studies of disease pathology.

  4. Vitamin K dependent protein activity and incident ischemic cardiovascular disease: The multi ethnic study of atherosclerosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: Vitamin K-dependent proteins (VKDPs), which require post-translational modification to achieve biological activity, seem to contribute to thrombus formation, vascular calcification, and vessel stiffness. Whether VKDP activity is prospectively associated with incident cardiovascular diseas...

  5. Risk Factors for Development and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wan-Chuan; Wu, Hon-Yen; Peng, Yu-Sen; Ko, Mei-Ju; Wu, Ming-Shiou; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Chu, Tzong-Shinn; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The risk factors influencing the natural course of chronic kidney disease (CKD) are complex and heterogeneous, and few systematic reviews to date have focused on this issue. The aim of the study is to identify the risk factors for disease development and progression in each stage of CKD. We conducted electronic literature searches of PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library up to October 15, 2012, for observational studies evaluating the risk factors on the development or progression of CKD. Eligible studies should have collected repeated information that could evaluate changes in renal function. Extracted information from all the included studies was synthesized narratively. Quality assessments were performed using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale. An exploratory random-effects meta-analysis was performed where feasible to pool effect sizes across studies for a specific risk factor in a specific outcome. We identified 38 cohort studies and 2 case-control studies from 40 articles, with a total of 318,898 participants from 14 countries. The follow-up duration ranged from 1.5 to 16 years. The majority of the included studies were of high quality. The baseline CKD stages of the included studies ranged from normal to later stages, and only 19 studies could be classified into a specific range of CKD stages during follow-up. Three risk factors from studies of the same baseline and follow-up CKD stages were eligible for the exploratory meta-analysis, including male sex, substantial proteinuria, and diabetes. The hazard ratios for the progression from CKD stages 3–5 to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were 1.37 (95% confidence interval 1.17–1.62), 1.64 (1.01–2.66), and 1.16 (0.98–1.38) for male sex, substantial proteinuria, and diabetes, respectively. In conclusion, our analyses comprehensively summarize the initiating and perpetuating factors for CKD. Male sex and substantial proteinuria are significant perpetuating factors for the progression from

  6. Functional connectivity of primary motor cortex is dependent on genetic burden in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Katherine A; Lowe, Mark J; Harrington, Deborah L; Lin, Jian; Durgerian, Sally; Mourany, Lyla; Paulsen, Jane S; Rao, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Subtle changes in motor function have been observed in individuals with prodromal Huntington disease (prHD), but the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood nor is the cumulative effect of the disease (disease burden) on functional connectivity. The present study examined the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) connectivity of the primary motor cortex (M1) in 16 gene-negative (NEG) controls and 48 gene-positive prHD participants with various levels of disease burden. The results showed that the strength of the left M1 connectivity with the ipsilateral M1 and somatosensory areas decreased as disease burden increased and correlated with motor symptoms. Weakened M1 connectivity within the motor areas was also associated with abnormalities in long-range connections that evolved with disease burden. In this study, M1 connectivity was decreased with visual centers (bilateral cuneus), but increased with a hub of the default mode network (DMN; posterior cingulate cortex). Changes in connectivity measures were associated with worse performance on measures of cognitive-motor functioning. Short- and long-range functional connectivity disturbances were also associated with volume loss in the basal ganglia, suggesting that weakened M1 connectivity is partly a manifestation of striatal atrophy. Altogether, the results indicate that the prodromal phase of HD is associated with abnormal interhemispheric interactions among motor areas and disturbances in the connectivity of M1 with visual centers and the DMN. These changes may, respectively, contribute to increased motor symptoms, visuomotor integration problems, and deficits in the executive control of movement as individuals approach a manifest diagnosis.

  7. Genetic interrelationship between insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, the autoimmune thyroid diseases, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Torfs, C P; King, M C; Huey, B; Malmgren, J; Grumet, F C

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the possible coinheritance of autoimmune diseases that are associated with the same HLA antigen, we studied 70 families in which at least two siblings had either type I diabetes mellitus (IDDM), autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or a combination of these diseases. HLA-A, B, and C typing was performed on all affected sibs in one generation or more. First, we estimated by sib-pair analysis the disease allele frequency (pD) and the mode of inheritance for each disease. According to the method of ascertainment entered into the analysis, the pD for ATD ranged from .120 to .180, for an additive (dominant) mode of inheritance. For RA, the pD ranged from .254 to .341, also for additive inheritance, although recessive inheritance could not be excluded. For IDDM, the pD ranged from .336 to .337 for recessive inheritance; additive inheritance was rejected. Second, we examined the distribution of shared parental haplotypes in pairs of siblings that were discordant for their autoimmune diseases. The results suggested that the same haplotype may predispose to both IDDM and ATD, or IDDM and RA, but not to both RA and ATD. Analysis of pedigrees supported this hypothesis. In 16 families typed for HLA-DR also, the haplotype predisposing to both IDDM and ATD was assigned from pedigree information to DR3 (44%), DR4 (39%), or DR5, DR6, or DR7 (5.5% each). In some families, these haplotypes segregated over several generations with ATD only (either clinical or subclinical), suggesting that in such families, ATD was a marker for a susceptibility to IDDM. In several families, an IDDM haplotype segregated with RA but not with ATD. This suggests that ATD- and RA-associated susceptibilities to IDDM may be biologically different and thus independently increase the risk of IDDM. PMID:3456197

  8. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Joseph F.; Patel, Tushar; Wong, David; Das, Saumya; Freedman, Jane E.; Laurent, Louise C.; Carter, Bob S.; Hochberg, Fred; Keuren-Jensen, Kendall Van; Huentelman, Matt; Spetzler, Robert; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Arango, Jorge; Adelson, P. David; Weiner, Howard L.; Gandhi, Roopali; Goilav, Beatrice; Putterman, Chaim; Saugstad, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined. PMID:26320940

  9. Pathways to decoding the clinical potential of stress response FOXO-interaction networks for Huntington's disease: of gene prioritization and context dependence

    PubMed Central

    Parmentier, Frédéric; Lejeune, François-Xavier; Neri, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The FOXO family of transcription factors is central to the regulation of organismal longevity and cellular survival. Several studies have indicated that FOXO factors lie at the center of a complex network of upstream pathways, cofactors and downstream targets (FOXO-interaction networks), which may have developmental and post-developmental roles in the regulation of chronic-stress response in normal and diseased cells. Noticeably, FOXO factors are important for the regulation of proteotoxicity and neuron survival in several models of neurodegenerative disease, suggesting that FOXO-interaction networks may have therapeutic potential. However, the status of FOXO-interaction networks in neurodegenerative disease remains largely unknown. Systems modeling is anticipated to provide a comprehensive assessment of this question. In particular, interrogating the context-dependent variability of FOXO-interaction networks could predict the clinical potential of cellular-stress response genes and aging regulators for tackling brain and peripheral pathology in neurodegenerative disease. Using published transcriptomic data obtained from murine models of Huntington's disease (HD) and post-mortem brains, blood samples and induced-pluripotent-stem cells from HD carriers as a case example, this review briefly highlights how the biological status and clinical potential of FOXO-interaction networks for HD may be decoded by developing network and entropy based feature selection across heterogeneous datasets. PMID:23781200

  10. Non-communicable diseases and global health governance: enhancing global processes to improve health development

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, Roger S

    2007-01-01

    This paper assesses progress in the development of a global framework for responding to non-communicable diseases, as reflected in the policies and initiatives of the World Health Organization (WHO), World Bank and the UN: the institutions most capable of shaping a coherent global policy. Responding to the global burden of chronic disease requires a strategic assessment of the global processes that are likely to be most effective in generating commitment to policy change at country level, and in influencing industry behaviour. WHO has adopted a legal process with tobacco (the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control), but a non-legal, advocacy-based approach with diet and physical activity (the Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health). The paper assesses the merits of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the FCTC as distinct global processes for advancing health development, before considering what lessons might be learned for enhancing the implementation of the Global Strategy on Diet. While global partnerships, economic incentives, and international legal instruments could each contribute to a more effective global response to chronic diseases, the paper makes a special case for the development of international legal standards in select areas of diet and nutrition, as a strategy for ensuring that the health of future generations does not become dependent on corporate charity and voluntary commitments. A broader frame of reference for lifestyle-related chronic diseases is needed: one that draws together WHO's work in tobacco, nutrition and physical activity, and that envisages selective use of international legal obligations, non-binding recommendations, advocacy and policy advice as tools of choice for promoting different elements of the strategy. PMID:17519005

  11. Non-communicable diseases and global health governance: enhancing global processes to improve health development.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Roger S

    2007-01-01

    This paper assesses progress in the development of a global framework for responding to non-communicable diseases, as reflected in the policies and initiatives of the World Health Organization (WHO), World Bank and the UN: the institutions most capable of shaping a coherent global policy. Responding to the global burden of chronic disease requires a strategic assessment of the global processes that are likely to be most effective in generating commitment to policy change at country level, and in influencing industry behaviour. WHO has adopted a legal process with tobacco (the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control), but a non-legal, advocacy-based approach with diet and physical activity (the Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health). The paper assesses the merits of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the FCTC as distinct global processes for advancing health development, before considering what lessons might be learned for enhancing the implementation of the Global Strategy on Diet. While global partnerships, economic incentives, and international legal instruments could each contribute to a more effective global response to chronic diseases, the paper makes a special case for the development of international legal standards in select areas of diet and nutrition, as a strategy for ensuring that the health of future generations does not become dependent on corporate charity and voluntary commitments. A broader frame of reference for lifestyle-related chronic diseases is needed: one that draws together WHO's work in tobacco, nutrition and physical activity, and that envisages selective use of international legal obligations, non-binding recommendations, advocacy and policy advice as tools of choice for promoting different elements of the strategy. PMID:17519005

  12. Non-communicable diseases and global health governance: enhancing global processes to improve health development.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Roger S

    2007-05-22

    This paper assesses progress in the development of a global framework for responding to non-communicable diseases, as reflected in the policies and initiatives of the World Health Organization (WHO), World Bank and the UN: the institutions most capable of shaping a coherent global policy. Responding to the global burden of chronic disease requires a strategic assessment of the global processes that are likely to be most effective in generating commitment to policy change at country level, and in influencing industry behaviour. WHO has adopted a legal process with tobacco (the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control), but a non-legal, advocacy-based approach with diet and physical activity (the Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health). The paper assesses the merits of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the FCTC as distinct global processes for advancing health development, before considering what lessons might be learned for enhancing the implementation of the Global Strategy on Diet. While global partnerships, economic incentives, and international legal instruments could each contribute to a more effective global response to chronic diseases, the paper makes a special case for the development of international legal standards in select areas of diet and nutrition, as a strategy for ensuring that the health of future generations does not become dependent on corporate charity and voluntary commitments. A broader frame of reference for lifestyle-related chronic diseases is needed: one that draws together WHO's work in tobacco, nutrition and physical activity, and that envisages selective use of international legal obligations, non-binding recommendations, advocacy and policy advice as tools of choice for promoting different elements of the strategy.

  13. Developing preventive therapies for chronic diseases: lessons learned from Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Selkoe, Dennis J

    2007-12-01

    A remarkable rise in life expectancy during the past century has made Alzheimer's disease (AD) the most common form of progressive intellectual failure in humans. Patients with AD lose their most human qualities-reasoning, abstraction, language, and memory. The brain plaques that Alois Alzheimer first described 100 years ago have inspired the search for genetic alterations that underlie AD. Four genes have been unequivocally implicated to date in inherited forms of AD, where mutations or natural variations in these genes cause excessive accumulation of the amyloid beta-protein, the building block of amyloid plaques. This aggregation leads to subsequent neuronal degeneration in brain regions important for memory and cognition. The discovery of the genes involved in the mechanisms of amyloid beta-protein build-up in AD, coupled with cell culture and animal models of their involved pathways, has led to the development of specific pharmacological strategies to lower amyloid beta-protein levels as a way of treating or preventing all forms of the disease. While hard work lies ahead, the movement from basic research to the clinic in AD represents a triumph of reductionist biology applied to the most complex of all biological systems, the human cerebral cortex.

  14. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II. PMID:20949630

  15. FUS/TLS acts as an aggregation-dependent modifier of polyglutamine disease model mice

    PubMed Central

    Kino, Yoshihiro; Washizu, Chika; Kurosawa, Masaru; Yamada, Mizuki; Doi, Hiroshi; Takumi, Toru; Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Hicks, Geoffrey G.; Hattori, Nobutaka; Shimogori, Tomomi; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    FUS/TLS is an RNA/DNA-binding protein associated with neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Previously, we found that a prion-like domain in the N-terminus of FUS/TLS mediates co-aggregation between FUS/TLS and mutant huntingtin, the gene product of Huntington’s disease (HD). Here, we show that heterozygous knockout of FUS/TLS worsened the phenotypes of model mice of (HD, but not spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). This difference was correlated with the degree of pathological association between disease proteins and FUS/TLS. Co-aggregation between FUS/TLS and mutant huntingtin resulted in the depletion of free FUS/TLS protein in HD mice that was detected as a monomer in SDS-PAGE analysis. Recently, we found that FUS/TLS paralogs, TAF15 and EWS, were up-regulated in homozygous FUS/TLS knockout mice. These two proteins were up-regulated in both HD and FUS/TLS heterozygote mice, and were further elevated in HD-TLS+/− double mutant mice, consistent with the functional impairment of FUS/TLS. These results suggest that FUS/TLS sequestration by co-aggregation is a rate-limiting factor of disease phenotypes of HD and that inclusions may have an adverse aspect, rather than being simply benign or protective. In addition, our results highlight inclusions as repositories of potential modifiers of neurodegeneration. PMID:27739513

  16. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II.

  17. Evidence for evolutionary divergence of activity-dependent gene expression in developing neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jing; McQueen, Jamie; Bilican, Bilada; Dando, Owen; Magnani, Dario; Punovuori, Karolina; Selvaraj, Bhuvaneish T; Livesey, Matthew; Haghi, Ghazal; Heron, Samuel; Burr, Karen; Patani, Rickie; Rajan, Rinku; Sheppard, Olivia; Kind, Peter C; Simpson, T Ian; Tybulewicz, Victor LJ; Wyllie, David JA; Fisher, Elizabeth MC; Lowell, Sally; Chandran, Siddharthan; Hardingham, Giles E

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary differences in gene regulation between humans and lower mammalian experimental systems are incompletely understood, a potential translational obstacle that is challenging to surmount in neurons, where primary tissue availability is poor. Rodent-based studies show that activity-dependent transcriptional programs mediate myriad functions in neuronal development, but the extent of their conservation in human neurons is unknown. We compared activity-dependent transcriptional responses in developing human stem cell-derived cortical neurons with those induced in developing primary- or stem cell-derived mouse cortical neurons. While activity-dependent gene-responsiveness showed little dependence on developmental stage or origin (primary tissue vs. stem cell), notable species-dependent differences were observed. Moreover, differential species-specific gene ortholog regulation was recapitulated in aneuploid mouse neurons carrying human chromosome-21, implicating promoter/enhancer sequence divergence as a factor, including human-specific activity-responsive AP-1 sites. These findings support the use of human neuronal systems for probing transcriptional responses to physiological stimuli or indeed pharmaceutical agents. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20337.001 PMID:27692071

  18. Future Therapeutics in Alzheimer's Disease: Development Status of BACE Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Evin, Genevieve

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the primary cause of dementia in the elderly. It remains incurable and poses a huge socio-economic challenge for developed countries with an aging population. AD manifests by progressive decline in cognitive functions and alterations in behaviour, which are the result of the extensive degeneration of brain neurons. The AD pathogenic mechanism involves the accumulation of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ), an aggregating protein fragment that self-associates to form neurotoxic fibrils that trigger a cascade of cellular events leading to neuronal injury and death. Researchers from academia and the pharmaceutical industry have pursued a rational approach to AD drug discovery and targeted the amyloid cascade. Schemes have been devised to prevent the overproduction and accumulation of Aβ in the brain. The extensive efforts of the past 20 years have been translated into bringing new drugs to advanced clinical trials. The most progressed mechanism-based therapies to date consist of immunological interventions to clear Aβ oligomers, and pharmacological drugs to inhibit the secretase enzymes that produce Aβ, namely β-site amyloid precursor-cleaving enzyme (BACE) and γ-secretase. After giving an update on the development and current status of new AD therapeutics, this review will focus on BACE inhibitors and, in particular, will discuss the prospects of verubecestat (MK-8931), which has reached phase III clinical trials.

  19. Non-coding RNA in Ovarian Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J Browning; George, Jitu; Christenson, Lane K

    2016-01-01

    The ovary's primary function is to produce the mature female gamete, the oocyte that, following fertilization, can develop into an embryo, implant within the uterus and ultimately allow the mother's genetic material to be passed along to subsequent generations. In addition to supporting the generation of the oocyte, the ovary and specific ephemeral tissues within it, follicles and corpora lutea, produce steroids that regulate all aspects of the reproductive system, including the hypothalamic/pituitary axis, the reproductive tract (uterus, oviduct, cervix), secondary sex characteristics all of which are also essential for pregnancy and subsequent nurturing of the offspring. To accomplish these critical roles, ovarian development and function are tightly regulated by a number of exogenous (hypothalamic/pituitary) and endogenous (intraovarian) hormones. Within ovarian cells, intricate signalling cascades and transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulatory networks respond to these hormonal influences to provide the exquisite control over all of the temporal and spatial events that must be synchronized to allow this organ to successfully complete its function. This book chapter will focus specifically on the role of non-coding RNAs, their identification and described functional roles within the ovary with respect to normal function and their possible involvement in diseases, which involve the ovary.

  20. The Hippo pathway in heart development, regeneration, and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Li, Li; Zhao, Bin; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The heart is the first organ formed during mammalian development. A properly sized and functional heart is vital throughout the entire lifespan. Loss of cardiomyocytes due to injury or diseases leads to heart failure, which is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, regenerative potential of the adult heart is very limited. The Hippo pathway is a recently identified signaling cascade that plays an evolutionarily conserved role in organ size control by inhibiting cell proliferation, promoting apoptosis, regulating fates of stem/ progenitor cells, and in some circumstances, limiting cell size. Interestingly, research indicates a key role of this pathway in regulation of cardiomyocyte proliferation and heart size. Inactivation of the Hippo pathway or activation of its downstream effector, the Yes-associated protein (YAP) transcription co-activator, improves cardiac regeneration. Several known upstream signals of the Hippo pathway such as mechanical stress, G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, and oxidative stress, are known to play critical roles in cardiac physiology. In addition, YAP has been shown to regulate cardiomyocyte fate through multiple transcriptional mechanisms. In this review, we summarize and discuss current findings regarding the roles and mechanisms of the Hippo pathway in heart development, injury, and regeneration. PMID:25858067

  1. Quiescent and necrotrophic lifestyle choice during postharvest disease development.

    PubMed

    Prusky, Dov; Alkan, Noam; Mengiste, Tesfaye; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Insidious fungal infections by postharvest pathogens remain quiescent during fruit growth until, at a particular phase during fruit ripening and senescence, the pathogens switch to the necrotrophic lifestyle and cause decay. During ripening, fruits undergo physiological processes, such as activation of ethylene biosynthesis, cuticular changes, and cell-wall loosening-changes that are accompanied by a decline of antifungal compounds, both those that are preformed and those that are inducible secondary metabolites. Pathogen infection of the unripe host fruit initiates defensive signal-transduction cascades, culminating in accumulation of antifungal proteins that limit fungal growth and development. In contrast, development of the same pathogens during fruit ripening and storage activates a substantially different signaling network, one that facilitates aggressive fungal colonization. This review focuses on responses induced by the quiescent pathogens of postharvest diseases in unripe host fruits. New genome-scale experimental approaches have begun to delineate the complex and multiple networks of host and pathogen responses activated to maintain or to facilitate the transition from the quiescent to the necrotrophic lifestyle.

  2. Future Therapeutics in Alzheimer's Disease: Development Status of BACE Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Evin, Genevieve

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the primary cause of dementia in the elderly. It remains incurable and poses a huge socio-economic challenge for developed countries with an aging population. AD manifests by progressive decline in cognitive functions and alterations in behaviour, which are the result of the extensive degeneration of brain neurons. The AD pathogenic mechanism involves the accumulation of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ), an aggregating protein fragment that self-associates to form neurotoxic fibrils that trigger a cascade of cellular events leading to neuronal injury and death. Researchers from academia and the pharmaceutical industry have pursued a rational approach to AD drug discovery and targeted the amyloid cascade. Schemes have been devised to prevent the overproduction and accumulation of Aβ in the brain. The extensive efforts of the past 20 years have been translated into bringing new drugs to advanced clinical trials. The most progressed mechanism-based therapies to date consist of immunological interventions to clear Aβ oligomers, and pharmacological drugs to inhibit the secretase enzymes that produce Aβ, namely β-site amyloid precursor-cleaving enzyme (BACE) and γ-secretase. After giving an update on the development and current status of new AD therapeutics, this review will focus on BACE inhibitors and, in particular, will discuss the prospects of verubecestat (MK-8931), which has reached phase III clinical trials. PMID:27023706

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genetic evolution in children with different rates of development of disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshan, S; Dickover, R E; Korber, B T; Bryson, Y J; Wolinsky, S M

    1997-01-01

    The rate of development of disease varies considerably among human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected children. The reasons for these observed differences are not clearly understood but most probably depend on the dynamic interplay between the HIV-1 quasispecies virus population and the immune constraints imposed by the host. To study the relationship between disease progression and genetic diversity, we analyzed the evolution of viral sequences within six perinatally infected children by examining proviral sequences spanning the C2 through V5 regions of the viral envelope gene by PCR of blood samples obtained at sequential visits. PCR product DNAs from four sample time points per child were cloned, and 10 to 13 clones from each sample were sequenced. Greater genetic distances relative to the time of infection were found for children with low virion-associated RNA burdens and slow progression to disease relative to those found for children with high virion-associated RNA burdens and rapid progression to disease. The greater branch lengths observed in the phylogenetic reconstructions correlated with a higher accumulation rate of nonsynonymous base substitutions per potential nonsynonymous site, consistent with positive selection for change rather than a difference in replication kinetics. Viral sequences from children with slow progression to disease also showed a tendency to form clusters that associated with different sampling times. These progressive shifts in the viral population were not found in viral sequences from children with rapid progression to disease. Therefore, despite the HIV-1 quasispecies being a diverse, rapidly evolving, and competing population of genetic variants, different rates of genetic evolution could be found under different selective constraints. These data suggest that the evolutionary dynamics exhibited by the HIV-1 quasispecies virus populations are compatible with a Darwinian system evolving under the constraints of

  4. Experience-Dependent Brain Development as a Key to Understanding the Language System.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Gert

    2016-04-01

    An influential view of the nature of the language system is that of an evolved biological system in which a set of rules is combined with a lexicon that contains the words of the language together with a representation of their context. Alternative views, usually based on connectionist modeling, attempt to explain the structure of language on the basis of complex associative processes. Here, I put forward a third view that stresses experience-dependent structural development of the brain circuits supporting language as a core principle of the organization of the language system. In this view, embodied in a recent neuroconstructivist neural network of past tense development and processing, initial domain-general predispositions enable the development of functionally specialized brain structures through interactions between experience-dependent brain development and statistical learning in a structured environment. Together, these processes shape a biological adult language system that appears to separate into distinct mechanism for processing rules and exceptions, whereas in reality those subsystems co-develop and interact closely. This view puts experience-dependent brain development in response to a specific language environment at the heart of understanding not only language development but adult language processing as well.

  5. Opioid receptor types involved in the development of nicotine physical dependence in an invertebrate (Planaria) model.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Baron, Steve; Bhandal, Jaspreet S; Brown, Tevin; Song, Kevin; Tallarida, Christopher S; Rawls, Scott M

    2013-11-01

    Recent data suggest that opioid receptors are involved in the development of nicotine physical dependence in mammals. Evidence in support of a similar involvement in an invertebrate (Planaria) is presented using the selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, and the more receptor subtype-selective antagonists CTAP (D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2) (μ, MOR), naltrindole (δ, DOR), and nor-BNI (norbinaltorphimine) (κ, KOR). Induction of physical dependence was achieved by 60-min pre-exposure of planarians to nicotine and was quantified by abstinence-induced withdrawal (reduction in spontaneous locomotor activity). Known MOR and DOR subtype-selective opioid receptor antagonists attenuated the withdrawal, as did the non-selective antagonist naloxone, but a KOR subtype-selective antagonist did not. An involvement of MOR and DOR, but not KOR, in the development of nicotine physical dependence or in abstinence-induced withdrawal was thus demonstrated in a sensitive and facile invertebrate model.

  6. Bacteriophage T4 development in Escherichia coli is growth rate dependent.

    PubMed

    Rabinovitch, Avinoam; Fishov, Itzhak; Hadas, Hilla; Einav, Monica; Zaritsky, Arieh

    2002-05-01

    Three independent parameters (eclipse and latent periods, and rate of ripening during the rise period) are essential and sufficient to describe bacteriophage development in its bacterial host. A general model to describe the classical "one-step growth" experiment [Rabinovitch et al. (1999a) J. Bacteriol.181, 1687-1683] allowed their calculations from experimental results obtained with T4 in Escherichia coli B/r under different growth conditions [Hadas et al. (1997) Microbiology143, 179-185]. It is found that all three parameters could be described by their dependence solely on the culture doubling time tau before infection. Their functional dependence on tau, derived by a best-fit analysis, was used to calculate burst size values. The latter agree well with the experimental results. The dependence of the derived parameters on growth conditions can be used to predict phage development under other experimental manipulations.

  7. Development of a Brief Multicultural Version of the Test of Mobile Phone Dependence (TMDbrief) Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Chóliz, Mariano; Pinto, Lourdes; Phansalkar, Sukanya S.; Corr, Emily; Mujjahid, Ayman; Flores, Conni; Barrientos, Pablo E.

    2016-01-01

    The Test of Mobile Phone Dependence (TMD) questionnaire (Chóliz, 2012) evaluates the main features of mobile phone dependence: tolerance, abstinence syndrome, impaired impulse control, associated problems, excessive use, etc. Objective: The objective of this study was to develop a multicultural version of the TMD (TMDbrief) adapted to suit the novel communication tools of smartphones. Procedure: In this study, the TMD was completed by 2,028 young respondents in six distinct world regions: Southern Europe, Northwest Europe, South-America, Mesoamerica, Pakistan, and India. Results: Psychometric analysis of the reliability of the instrument and factor analysis were performed to adapt the TMDbrief for use in these regions. Differences among regions with respect to TMD Mobile Phone Dependence scores were obtained. Conclusion: A brief questionnaire for the evaluation of mobile phone addiction in cross-cultural studies was successfully developed. PMID:27252663

  8. The Voltage-dependent Anion Channel 1 Mediates Amyloid β Toxicity and Represents a Potential Target for Alzheimer Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Smilansky, Angela; Dangoor, Liron; Nakdimon, Itay; Ben-Hail, Danya; Mizrachi, Dario; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2015-12-25

    The voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), found in the mitochondrial outer membrane, forms the main interface between mitochondrial and cellular metabolisms, mediates the passage of a variety of molecules across the mitochondrial outer membrane, and is central to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. VDAC1 is overexpressed in post-mortem brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. The development and progress of AD are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from the cytotoxic effects of accumulated amyloid β (Aβ). In this study we demonstrate the involvement of VDAC1 and a VDAC1 N-terminal peptide (VDAC1-N-Ter) in Aβ cell penetration and cell death induction. Aβ directly interacted with VDAC1 and VDAC1-N-Ter, as monitored by VDAC1 channel conductance, surface plasmon resonance, and microscale thermophoresis. Preincubated Aβ interacted with bilayer-reconstituted VDAC1 and increased its conductance ∼ 2-fold. Incubation of cells with Aβ resulted in mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death. However, the presence of non-cell-penetrating VDAC1-N-Ter peptide prevented Aβ cellular entry and Aβ-induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Likewise, silencing VDAC1 expression by specific siRNA prevented Aβ entry into the cytosol as well as Aβ-induced toxicity. Finally, the mode of Aβ-mediated action involves detachment of mitochondria-bound hexokinase, induction of VDAC1 oligomerization, and cytochrome c release, a sequence of events leading to apoptosis. As such, we suggest that Aβ-mediated toxicity involves mitochondrial and plasma membrane VDAC1, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis induction. The VDAC1-N-Ter peptide targeting Aβ cytotoxicity is thus a potential new therapeutic strategy for AD treatment.

  9. Dynamic network communication as a unifying neural basis for cognition, development, aging, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Voytek, Bradley; Knight, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    Perception, cognition, and social interaction depend upon coordinated neural activity. This coordination operates within noisy, overlapping, and distributed neural networks operating at multiple timescales. These networks are built upon a structural scaffolding with intrinsic neuroplasticity that changes with development, aging, disease, and personal experience. In this paper we begin from the perspective that successful interregional communication relies upon the transient synchronization between distinct low frequency (<80 Hz) oscillations, allowing for brief windows of communication via phase-coordinated local neuronal spiking. From this, we construct a theoretical framework for dynamic network communication, arguing that these networks reflect a balance between oscillatory coupling and local population spiking activity, and that these two levels of activity interact. We theorize that when oscillatory coupling is too strong, spike timing within the local neuronal population becomes too synchronous; when oscillatory coupling is too weak, spike timing is too disorganized. Each results in specific disruptions to neural communication. These alterations in communication dynamics may underlie cognitive changes associated with healthy development and aging, in addition to neurological and psychiatric disorders. A number of neurological and psychiatric disorders—including Parkinson’s disease, autism, depression, schizophrenia, and anxiety—are associated with abnormalities in oscillatory activity. Although aging, psychiatric and neurological disease, and experience differ in the biological changes to structural grey or white matter, neurotransmission, and gene expression, our framework suggests that any resultant cognitive and behavioral changes in normal or disordered states, or their treatment, is a product of how these physical processes affect dynamic network communication. PMID:26005114

  10. Dynamic network communication as a unifying neural basis for cognition, development, aging, and disease.

    PubMed

    Voytek, Bradley; Knight, Robert T

    2015-06-15

    Perception, cognition, and social interaction depend upon coordinated neural activity. This coordination operates within noisy, overlapping, and distributed neural networks operating at multiple timescales. These networks are built upon a structural scaffolding with intrinsic neuroplasticity that changes with development, aging, disease, and personal experience. In this article, we begin from the perspective that successful interregional communication relies upon the transient synchronization between distinct low-frequency (<80 Hz) oscillations, allowing for brief windows of communication via phase-coordinated local neuronal spiking. From this, we construct a theoretical framework for dynamic network communication, arguing that these networks reflect a balance between oscillatory coupling and local population spiking activity and that these two levels of activity interact. We theorize that when oscillatory coupling is too strong, spike timing within the local neuronal population becomes too synchronous; when oscillatory coupling is too weak, spike timing is too disorganized. Each results in specific disruptions to neural communication. These alterations in communication dynamics may underlie cognitive changes associated with healthy development and aging, in addition to neurological and psychiatric disorders. A number of neurological and psychiatric disorders-including Parkinson's disease, autism, depression, schizophrenia, and anxiety-are associated with abnormalities in oscillatory activity. Although aging, psychiatric and neurological disease, and experience differ in the biological changes to structural gray or white matter, neurotransmission, and gene expression, our framework suggests that any resultant cognitive and behavioral changes in normal or disordered states or their treatment are a product of how these physical processes affect dynamic network communication.

  11. PERIPUBERTAL DEHP EXPOSURE INHIBITS ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT DEVELOPMENT IN SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peripubertal DEHP exposure inhibits androgen-dependent development in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    N.C. Noriega, J. Furr, C. Lambright, V.S. Wilson and L.E. Gray.

    noriega.nigel@epa.gov

    US EPA, MD-72 RTD, NHEERL, ORD, RTP, NC 27711

    The plasticizer Di (2-ethylhe...

  12. An Exploratory Study of the Role of Task Dependence on Team Captains' Leadership Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandzol, Christian J.

    2011-01-01

    While there is evidence that team captainship in intercollegiate sports can lead to leadership development, there is little evidence about the role that task dependence may play on that effect. The individual or team nature of sports may offer different leadership experiences for team captains, leading to differential outcomes. In this exploratory…

  13. The hemibiotrophic cacao pathogen Moniliophthora perniciosa depends on a mitochondrial alternative oxidase for biotrophic development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) is a non-energy conserving ubiquinol oxidase found in most fungal genomes studied to date. With the development of fungicides containing cytochrome-dependent respiratory chain (CRC) inhibitors, a strong interest in studying AOX functions in phytopathogenic...

  14. Iron-dependent activation of NF-kappaB in Kupffer cells: a priming mechanism for alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shigang; She, Hongyun; Sung, Chin K; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2003-06-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is associated with hepatic iron accumulation, and iron supplementation exacerbates alcoholic liver disease, suggesting the pathogenic role of iron in alcoholic liver disease. We have tested a hypothesis that iron plays a signaling role in activation of redox-sensitive nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) and that increased iron content results in heightened expression of proinflammatory cytokines in Kupffer cells because of this signaling. In cultured Kupffer cells isolated from normal rats, treatment with a lipophilic iron chelator, 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyrid-4-one (L1), markedly reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NF-kappaB activation and expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6. Kupffer cells, isolated from rats with experimentally induced alcoholic liver disease, had significant increases in nonheme iron content, NF-kappaB binding, and mRNA expression for TNF-alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-1. Ex vivo L1 treatment normalized all these parameters. Addition of ferrous iron to cultured normal rat Kupffer cells increased I-kappa B kinase (IKK) activity at 15 min and NF-kappaB binding at 30 min. L1 pretreatment completely abrogated both effects. Moreover, the iron treatment increased TNF-alpha release and TNF-alpha promoter activity in a NF-kappaB-dependent manner. Ferrous iron also transiently decreased cytoplasmic I-kappa B-alpha (IkappaB-alpha), with concomitant increases in nuclear p65 protein and DNA binding of p65/p50. Taken together, these results support the existence of iron-dependent signaling for activation of IKK/NF-kappaB in Kupffer cells, and this iron signaling serves as a target for a potential priming effect for the pathogenesis of experimental alcoholic liver disease.

  15. Mitochondrial-dependent Autoimmunity in Membranous Nephropathy of IgG4-related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Buelli, Simona; Perico, Luca; Galbusera, Miriam; Abbate, Mauro; Morigi, Marina; Novelli, Rubina; Gagliardini, Elena; Tentori, Chiara; Rottoli, Daniela; Sabadini, Ettore; Saito, Takao; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Saeki, Takako; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of glomerular lesions of membranous nephropathy (MN), including seldom-reported IgG4-related disease, is still elusive. Unlike in idiopathic MN where IgG4 prevails, in this patient IgG3 was predominant in glomerular deposits in the absence of circulating anti-phospholipase A2 receptor antibodies, suggesting a distinct pathologic process. Here we documented that IgG4 retrieved from the serum of our propositus reacted against carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) at the podocyte surface. In patient's biopsy, glomerular CAII staining increased and co-localized with subepithelial IgG4 deposits along the capillary walls. Patient's IgG4 caused a drop in cell pH followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, excessive ROS production and cytoskeletal reorganization in cultured podocytes. These events promoted mitochondrial superoxide-dismutase-2 (SOD2) externalization on the plasma membrane, becoming recognizable by complement-binding IgG3 anti-SOD2. Among patients with IgG4-related disease only sera of those with IgG4 anti-CAII antibodies caused low intracellular pH and mitochondrial alterations underlying SOD2 externalization. Circulating IgG4 anti-CAII can cause podocyte injury through processes of intracellular acidification, mitochondrial oxidative stress and neoantigen induction in patients with IgG4 related disease. The onset of MN in a subset of patients could be due to IgG4 antibodies recognizing CAII with consequent exposure of mitochondrial neoantigen in the context of multifactorial pathogenesis of disease. PMID:26137589

  16. Regulated overexpression of interleukin 11 in the lung. Use to dissociate development-dependent and -independent phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Ray, P; Tang, W; Wang, P; Homer, R; Kuhn, C; Flavell, R A; Elias, J A

    1997-01-01

    Standard overexpression transgenic approaches are limited in their ability to model waxing and waning diseases and frequently superimpose development-dependent and -independent phenotypic manifestations. We used the clara cell 10-kD protein (CC10) promoter and the reverse tetracycline transactivator (rtTA) to create a lung-specific, externally regulatable, overexpression transgenic system and used this system to express human interleukin 11 (IL-11) in respiratory structures. Gene induction could be achieved in utero, in neonates and in adult animals. Moreover, gene expression could be turned off by removal of the inducing stimulus. When gene activation was initiated in utero and continued into adulthood, subepithelial airway fibrosis, peribronchiolar mononuclear nodules, and alveolar enlargement (emphysema) were noted. Induction in the mature lung caused airway remodeling and peribronchiolar nodules, but alveolar enlargement was not appreciated. In contrast, induction in utero and during the first 14 d of life caused alveolar enlargement without airway remodeling or peribronchiolar nodules. Thus, IL-11 overexpression causes abnormalities that are dependent (large alveoli) and independent (airway remodeling, peribronchiolar nodules) of lung growth and development, and the CC10-rtTA system can be used to differentiate among these effector functions. The CC10-rtTA transgenic system can be used to model waxing and waning, childhood and growth and development-related biologic processes with enhanced fidelity. PMID:9366564

  17. Amplified temperature dependence in ecosystems developing on the lava flows of Mauna Loa, Hawai'i

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Vitousek, Peter M.; Brown, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Through its effect on individual metabolism, temperature drives biologically controlled fluxes and transformations of energy and materials in ecological systems. Because primary succession involves feedbacks among multiple biological and abiotic processes, we expected it to exhibit complex dynamics and unusual temperature dependence. We present a model based on first principles of chemical kinetics to explain how biologically mediated temperature dependence of “reactant” concentrations can inflate the effective temperature dependence of such processes. We then apply this model to test the hypothesis that the temperature dependence of early primary succession is amplified due to more rapid accumulation of reactants at higher temperatures. Using previously published data from the lava flows of Mauna Loa, HI, we show that rates of vegetation and soil accumulation as well as rates of community compositional change all display amplified temperature dependence (Q10 values of ≈7–50, compared with typical Q10 values of 1.5–3 for the constituent biological processes). Additionally, in young ecosystems, resource concentrations increase with temperature, resulting in inflated temperature responses of biogeochemical fluxes. Mauna Loa's developing ecosystems exemplify how temperature-driven, biologically mediated gradients in resource availability can alter the effective temperature dependence of ecological processes. This mechanistic theory should contribute to understanding the complex effects of temperature on the structure and dynamics of ecological systems in a world where regional and global temperatures are changing rapidly. PMID:18156366

  18. Inflammatory myopathies with anti-Ku antibodies: a prognosis dependent on associated lung disease.

    PubMed

    Rigolet, Aude; Musset, Lucile; Dubourg, Odile; Maisonobe, Thierry; Grenier, Philippe; Charuel, Jean-Luc; Behin, Anthony; Herson, Serge; Amoura, Zahir; Benveniste, Olivier

    2012-03-01

    Anti-Ku antibodies have been reported in a wide spectrum of autoimmune diseases, sometimes in association with inflammatory myopathies (IM). We studied the clinical, laboratory, and muscle histologic features of all anti-Ku-positive patients detected in our hospital during the last 10 years, as well as their treatment and outcomes. Anti-Ku antibodies were found in 34 patients (0.46% of 20,600 sera positive for antinuclear antibodies), and complete data were available for 30 patients; 86.7% were female, mean age was 49 years (range, 20-73 yr). The most frequent clinical manifestations were arthralgia (77%) and Raynaud phenomenon (53%). Eleven (37%) patients had IM, 8 of them as part of an overlap syndrome defined as IM associated with connective autoimmune disease (5 systemic sclerosis [SSc], 2 Sjögren syndrome (SS), and 1 systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE]). Of 21 patients without IM, 19 had autoimmune diseases (including 6 SLE, 2 SSc, 2 SS, and 2 rheumatoid arthritis), 1 had bronchial neoplasia, and 1 had nephroangiosclerosis. Clinical features of the 9 patients with IM were myalgia (91%), proximal muscle weakness (89%), and dysphagia (36%). All had increased creatine kinase (median, 2210 U/L; range, 194-4073 U/L). Muscle biopsy showed necrosis, inflammation, and positive HLA class I immunostaining. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) was detected on computed tomography (CT) scan in 11 patients (37%) and was significantly more frequent in patients with IM (82% vs. 10.5%, p < 0.001). Fourteen (47%) patients required no immunosuppressive treatment or only a low corticosteroid dose (<15 mg/d, n = 3). A high dose of corticosteroids was more frequently administered in patients with IM (10/11 cases, 80% with associated ILD) than in patients without IM (4/19 cases, 0 with ILD). Complete muscle remission after steroids occurred in 73% of patients with IM. Lung disease was corticoresistant in 6 of 8 (75%) treated cases.Anti-Ku antibodies remain rarely detected, but their

  19. Development and infectious disease in hosts with complex life cycles.

    PubMed

    Searle, Catherine L; Xie, Gisselle Yang; Blaustein, Andrew R

    2013-01-01

    Metamorphosis is often characterized by profound changes in morphology and physiology that can affect the dynamics of species interactions. For example, the interaction between a pathogen and its host may differ depending on the life stage of the host or pathogen. One pathogen that infects hosts with complex life cycles is the emerging fungal pathogen of amphibians, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). We sought to determine how conditions at the larval stage can affect variation in development and patterns of Bd infection across amphibian life stages. We used outdoor experimental mesocosms to simulate natural pond habitats and manipulated the presence of Bd, the larval density, and the number of host species in larvae of two co-occurring amphibian species (Rana cascadae and Pseudacris regilla). We found that infection differed between species throughout development; P. regilla consistently had higher infection severity compared to R. cascadae. Additionally, while up to 100% of larvae were infected, only 18.2% of R. cascadae and 81.5% of P. regilla were infected after metamorphosis. This indicates that amphibians have the ability to recover from Bd infection as they undergo metamorphosis. Higher larval densities in P. regilla led to a shorter larval period, and individuals with a shorter larval period had lower infection severity. This led to a trend where P. regilla larvae reared at high densities tended to have lower infection prevalence after metamorphosis. We also found that exposure to Bd increased larval mortality and prolonged the larval period in P. regilla, indicating that P. regilla are susceptible to the negative effects of Bd as larvae. This study demonstrates that host density, species composition, and pathogen exposure may all interact to influence development and infection in hosts with complex life cycles.

  20. Development and Infectious Disease in Hosts with Complex Life Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Searle, Catherine L.; Xie, Gisselle Yang; Blaustein, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    Metamorphosis is often characterized by profound changes in morphology and physiology that can affect the dynamics of species interactions. For example, the interaction between a pathogen and its host may differ depending on the life stage of the host or pathogen. One pathogen that infects hosts with complex life cycles is the emerging fungal pathogen of amphibians, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). We sought to determine how conditions at the larval stage can affect variation in development and patterns of Bd infection across amphibian life stages. We used outdoor experimental mesocosms to simulate natural pond habitats and manipulated the presence of Bd, the larval density, and the number of host species in larvae of two co-occurring amphibian species (Rana cascadae and Pseudacris regilla). We found that infection differed between species throughout development; P. regilla consistently had higher infection severity compared to R. cascadae. Additionally, while up to 100% of larvae were infected, only 18.2% of R. cascadae and 81.5% of P. regilla were infected after metamorphosis. This indicates that amphibians have the ability to recover from Bd infection as they undergo metamorphosis. Higher larval densities in P. regilla led to a shorter larval period, and individuals with a shorter larval period had lower infection severity. This led to a trend where P. regilla larvae reared at high densities tended to have lower infection prevalence after metamorphosis. We also found that exposure to Bd increased larval mortality and prolonged the larval period in P. regilla, indicating that P. regilla are susceptible to the negative effects of Bd as larvae. This study demonstrates that host density, species composition, and pathogen exposure may all interact to influence development and infection in hosts with complex life cycles. PMID:23565288

  1. Cistromic and genetic evidence that the vitamin D receptor mediates susceptibility to latitude-dependent autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Booth, D R; Ding, N; Parnell, G P; Shahijanian, F; Coulter, S; Schibeci, S D; Atkins, A R; Stewart, G J; Evans, R M; Downes, M; Liddle, C

    2016-06-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates gene expression in many cell types, including immune cells. It requires binding of 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D3 (1,25D3) for activation. Many autoimmune diseases show latitude-dependent prevalence and/or association with vitamin D deficiency, and vitamin D supplementation is commonly used in their clinical management. 1,25D3 is regulated by genes associated with the risk of autoimmune diseases and predominantly expressed in myeloid cells. We determined the VDR cistrome in monocytes and monocyte-derived inflammatory (DC1) and tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC2). VDR motifs were highly overrepresented in ChIP-Seq peaks in stimulated monocyte (40%), DC1 (21%) and DC2 (47%), Pdependent autoimmune disease risk polymorphisms were highly overrepresented within 5 kb of the peaks. Several transcription factor recognition motifs were highly overrepresented in the peaks, including those for the autoimmune risk gene, BATF. This evidence indicates that VDR regulates hundreds of myeloid cell genes and that the molecular pathways controlled by VDR in these cells are important in maintaining tolerance.

  2. TLR4-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Hepatic Cytochrome P450 in Mice with Chemically-Induced Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chaluvadi, Madhusudana R.; Nyagode, Beatrice A.; Kinloch, Ryan D.; Morgan, Edward T.

    2010-01-01

    The transcription and protein expression of many cytochrome P450 (P450) genes are down-regulated in animal models of inflammation and infection. We determined previously that hepatic P450 mRNAs are selectively regulated in a mouse model of enteropathogenic bacterial infection, and that this regulation was not dependent on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor protein toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). In the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) model of chemically-induced inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the reduction in activities of several hepatic P450 enzymes were concluded to be partially dependent on LPS from commensal bacteria (Masubuchi Y and Horie T (2004) Drug Metab. Dispos. 32: 437–441). In the present study, we sought to determine whether colitis induced by LPS regulates hepatic P450 mRNA and protein expression similarly to infectious colitis, and to determine the role of TLR4 in the response to DSS colitis. The role of LPS in the response to DSS was further examined by comparison with the effects of injected LPS. We demonstrate that administration of DSS results in the down-regulation of multiple P450 enzymes in mouse liver. However, there are discernable differences in the pattern of P450 expression in the two models. Some effects of DSS-induced colitis are TLR4-dependent, and others are not. In contrast, the effects of injected LPS on hepatic P450 mRNA expression are entirely TLR4-dependent. Thus, our results indicate that the pattern of hepatic P450 expression, and the mechanism of regulation, during inflammation of the bowel depend on the etiology of the disease. PMID:19027721

  3. NEuro COgnitive REhabilitation for Disease of Addiction (NECOREDA) Program: From Development to Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rezapour, Tara; Hatami, Javad; Farhoudian, Ali; Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Noroozi, Alireza; Daneshmand, Reza; Samiei, Ahmadreza; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive evidence for cognitive deficits associated with drug use and multiple publications supporting the efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation treatment (CRT) services for drug addictions, there are a few well-structured tools and organized programs to improve cognitive abilities in substance users. Most published studies on cognitive rehabilitation for drug dependent patients used rehabilitation tools, which have been previously designed for other types of brain injuries such as schizophrenia or traumatic brain injuries and not specifically designed for drug dependent patients. These studies also suffer from small sample size, lack of follow-up period assessments and or comprehensive treatment outcome measures. To address these limitations, we decided to develop and investigate the efficacy of a paper and pencil cognitive rehabilitation package called NECOREDA (Neurocognitive Rehabilitation for Disease of Addiction) to improve neurocognitive deficits associated with drug dependence particularly caused by stimulants (e.g. amphetamine type stimulants and cocaine) and opiates. To evaluate the feasibility of NECOREDA program, we conducted a pilot study with 10 opiate and methamphetamine dependent patients for 3 months in outpatient setting. NECOREDA was revised based on qualitative comments received from clients and treatment providers. Final version of NECOREDA is composed of brain training exercises called “Brain Gym” and psychoeducational modules called “Brain Treasures” which is implemented in 16 training sessions interleaved with 16 review and practice sessions. NECOREDA will be evaluated as an add-on intervention to methadone maintenance treatment in a randomized clinical trial among opiate dependent patients starting from August 2015. We discuss methodological features of NECOREDA development and evaluation in this article. PMID:26649167

  4. NEuro COgnitive REhabilitation for Disease of Addiction (NECOREDA) Program: From Development to Trial.

    PubMed

    Rezapour, Tara; Hatami, Javad; Farhoudian, Ali; Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Noroozi, Alireza; Daneshmand, Reza; Samiei, Ahmadreza; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2015-10-01

    Despite extensive evidence for cognitive deficits associated with drug use and multiple publications supporting the efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation treatment (CRT) services for drug addictions, there are a few well-structured tools and organized programs to improve cognitive abilities in substance users. Most published studies on cognitive rehabilitation for drug dependent patients used rehabilitation tools, which have been previously designed for other types of brain injuries such as schizophrenia or traumatic brain injuries and not specifically designed for drug dependent patients. These studies also suffer from small sample size, lack of follow-up period assessments and or comprehensive treatment outcome measures. To address these limitations, we decided to develop and investigate the efficacy of a paper and pencil cognitive rehabilitation package called NECOREDA (Neurocognitive Rehabilitation for Disease of Addiction) to improve neurocognitive deficits associated with drug dependence particularly caused by stimulants (e.g. amphetamine type stimulants and cocaine) and opiates. To evaluate the feasibility of NECOREDA program, we conducted a pilot study with 10 opiate and methamphetamine dependent patients for 3 months in outpatient setting. NECOREDA was revised based on qualitative comments received from clients and treatment providers. Final version of NECOREDA is composed of brain training exercises called "Brain Gym" and psychoeducational modules called "Brain Treasures" which is implemented in 16 training sessions interleaved with 16 review and practice sessions. NECOREDA will be evaluated as an add-on intervention to methadone maintenance treatment in a randomized clinical trial among opiate dependent patients starting from August 2015. We discuss methodological features of NECOREDA development and evaluation in this article.

  5. NEuro COgnitive REhabilitation for Disease of Addiction (NECOREDA) Program: From Development to Trial.

    PubMed

    Rezapour, Tara; Hatami, Javad; Farhoudian, Ali; Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Noroozi, Alireza; Daneshmand, Reza; Samiei, Ahmadreza; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2015-10-01

    Despite extensive evidence for cognitive deficits associated with drug use and multiple publications supporting the efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation treatment (CRT) services for drug addictions, there are a few well-structured tools and organized programs to improve cognitive abilities in substance users. Most published studies on cognitive rehabilitation for drug dependent patients used rehabilitation tools, which have been previously designed for other types of brain injuries such as schizophrenia or traumatic brain injuries and not specifically designed for drug dependent patients. These studies also suffer from small sample size, lack of follow-up period assessments and or comprehensive treatment outcome measures. To address these limitations, we decided to develop and investigate the efficacy of a paper and pencil cognitive rehabilitation package called NECOREDA (Neurocognitive Rehabilitation for Disease of Addiction) to improve neurocognitive deficits associated with drug dependence particularly caused by stimulants (e.g. amphetamine type stimulants and cocaine) and opiates. To evaluate the feasibility of NECOREDA program, we conducted a pilot study with 10 opiate and methamphetamine dependent patients for 3 months in outpatient setting. NECOREDA was revised based on qualitative comments received from clients and treatment providers. Final version of NECOREDA is composed of brain training exercises called "Brain Gym" and psychoeducational modules called "Brain Treasures" which is implemented in 16 training sessions interleaved with 16 review and practice sessions. NECOREDA will be evaluated as an add-on intervention to methadone maintenance treatment in a randomized clinical trial among opiate dependent patients starting from August 2015. We discuss methodological features of NECOREDA development and evaluation in this article. PMID:26649167

  6. Drosophila provides rapid modeling of renal development, function, and disease.

    PubMed

    Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2010-12-01

    The evolution of specialized excretory cells is a cornerstone of the metazoan radiation, and the basic tasks performed by Drosophila and human renal systems are similar. The development of the Drosophila renal (Malpighian) tubule is a classic example of branched tubular morphogenesis, allowing study of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transitions, stem cell-mediated regeneration, and the evolution of a glomerular kidney. Tubule function employs conserved transport proteins, such as the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and V-ATPase, aquaporins, inward rectifier K(+) channels, and organic solute transporters, regulated by cAMP, cGMP, nitric oxide, and calcium. In addition to generation and selective reabsorption of primary urine, the tubule plays roles in metabolism and excretion of xenobiotics, and in innate immunity. The gene expression resource FlyAtlas.org shows that the tubule is an ideal tissue for the modeling of renal diseases, such as nephrolithiasis and Bartter syndrome, or for inborn errors of metabolism. Studies are assisted by uniquely powerful genetic and transgenic resources, the widespread availability of mutant stocks, and low-cost, rapid deployment of new transgenics to allow manipulation of renal function in an organotypic context.

  7. Bifurcation in epigenetics: Implications in development, proliferation, and diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Cells often exhibit different and stable phenotypes from the same DNA sequence. Robustness and plasticity of such cellular states are controlled by diverse transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms, among them the modification of biochemical marks on chromatin. Here, we develop a stochastic model that describes the dynamics of epigenetic marks along a given DNA region. Through mathematical analysis, we show the emergence of bistable and persistent epigenetic states from the cooperative recruitment of modifying enzymes. We also find that the dynamical system exhibits a critical point and displays, in the presence of asymmetries in recruitment, a bifurcation diagram with hysteresis. These results have deep implications for our understanding of epigenetic regulation. In particular, our study allows one to reconcile within the same formalism the robust maintenance of epigenetic identity observed in differentiated cells, the epigenetic plasticity of pluripotent cells during differentiation, and the effects of epigenetic misregulation in diseases. Moreover, it suggests a possible mechanism for developmental transitions where the system is shifted close to the critical point to benefit from high susceptibility to developmental cues.

  8. Bone development and inflammatory disease is regulated by AP-1 (Fos/Jun).

    PubMed

    Wagner, E F

    2010-01-01

    The Fos and Jun proteins are members of the AP-1 transcription factor complex, which is a central regulator for many cellular functions. This paper summarises the important functions of Fos proteins in bone development, with special emphasis on the Fos-related proteins Fra-1 and Fra-2. These factors determine the functions of osteoblasts and osteoclasts and regulate cytokine signalling during bone development. Likewise, the Jun proteins control the expression of cytokines and chemokines and are probably causally involved in inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis. Investigations into the molecular mechanisms responsible for skin inflammation have revealed that Jun proteins control cytokine expression, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha by transcriptional and posttranscriptional pathways. Finally, the paper discusses the relevance of the Jun-dependent mouse model for psoriasis for preclinical studies in the field of anti-angiogenic therapies.

  9. The genotype-dependent influence of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes on fetal development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinglu; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Xiaolian; Choi, Ki-Young; Niu, Gang; Zhang, Guofeng; Guo, Jinxia; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    In many cases cancer is caused by gene deficiency that is being passed along from generation to generation. Soluble carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promising applications in the diagnosis and therapy of cancer, however, the potential relationship between cancer-prone individuals and response to CNT exposure as a prerequisite for development of personalized nanomedicine, is still poorly understood. Here we report that intravenous injections of multi-walled carbon nanotubes into p53 (a well-known cancer-susceptible gene) heterozygous pregnant mice can induce p53- dependent responses in fetal development. Larger sized multi-walled carbon nanotubes moved across the blood-placenta barrier (BPB), restricted the development of fetuses, and induced brain deformity, whereas single-walled and smaller sized multi-walled carbon nanotubes showed no or less fetotoxicity. A molecular mechanism study found that multi-walled carbon nanotubes directly triggered p53-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. Based on the molecular mechanism, we also incorporated N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an FDA approved antioxidant, to prevent CNTs induced nuclear DNA damage and reduce brain development abnormalities. Our findings suggest that CNTs might have genetic background-dependent toxic effect on the normal development of the embryo, and provide new insights into protection against nanoparticle-induced toxicity in potential clinical applications.

  10. The genotype-dependent influence of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes on fetal development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinglu; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Xiaolian; Choi, Ki-Young; Niu, Gang; Zhang, Guofeng; Guo, Jinxia; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    In many cases cancer is caused by gene deficiency that is being passed along from generation to generation. Soluble carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promising applications in the diagnosis and therapy of cancer, however, the potential relationship between cancer-prone individuals and response to CNT exposure as a prerequisite for development of personalized nanomedicine, is still poorly understood. Here we report that intravenous injections of multi-walled carbon nanotubes into p53 (a well-known cancer-susceptible gene) heterozygous pregnant mice can induce p53- dependent responses in fetal development. Larger sized multi-walled carbon nanotubes moved across the blood-placenta barrier (BPB), restricted the development of fetuses, and induced brain deformity, whereas single-walled and smaller sized multi-walled carbon nanotubes showed no or less fetotoxicity. A molecular mechanism study found that multi-walled carbon nanotubes directly triggered p53-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. Based on the molecular mechanism, we also incorporated N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an FDA approved antioxidant, to prevent CNTs induced nuclear DNA damage and reduce brain development abnormalities. Our findings suggest that CNTs might have genetic background-dependent toxic effect on the normal development of the embryo, and provide new insights into protection against nanoparticle-induced toxicity in potential clinical applications. PMID:24344357

  11. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic syndrome is often accompanied by development of hepatic steatosis and less frequently by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) leading to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Replacement of corn oil with medium chain triacylglycerols (MCT) in the diets of alcohol-fed rats has been show...

  12. Reversible dialysis-dependent renal failure due to undiagnosed renovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Jha, R.; Gude, D.; Narayan, G.; Mandal, S. N.; Gupta, P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Renovascular disease (RVD) can present with resistant hypertension, acute or rapidly progressive renal failure and occasionally nephrotic proteinuria. Revascularization plays an important role in controlling blood pressure and preserving renal function. It is widely believed that delay in revascularization would result in irreversible loss of renal function. However, we report a favorable outcome despite delayed revascularization in two patients of RVD- one presenting with recurrent flash pulmonary edema and other with progressive renal failure. The former's serum creatinine returned to normal despite 3 months of anuria and the latter became dialysis-independent despite 2 months of progressive decline in renal function. Both remain dialysis-free 3 years after surgery. PMID:23162281

  13. Degree of Glutathione Deficiency and Redox Imbalance Depend on Subtype of Mitochondrial Disease and Clinical Status

    PubMed Central

    Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, Tereza; Le, Anthony; Atkuri, Kondala; Shah, Monisha K.; Cusmano-Ozog, Kristina; Niemi, Anna-Kaisa; Cowan, Tina M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are associated with decreased energy production and redox imbalance. Glutathione plays a central role in redox signaling and protecting cells from oxidative damage. In order to understand the consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction on in vivo redox status, and to determine how this varies by mitochondrial disease subtype and clinical severity, we used a sensitive tandem mass spectrometry assay to precisely quantify whole blood reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione levels in a large cohort of mitochondrial disorder patients. Glutathione redox potential was calculated using the Nernst equation. Compared to healthy controls (n = 59), mitochondrial disease patients (n = 58) as a group showed significant redox imbalance (redox potential −251 mV±9.7, p<0.0001) with an increased level of oxidation by ∼9 mV compared to controls (−260 mV±6.4). Underlying this abnormality were significantly lower whole blood GSH levels (p = 0.0008) and GSH/GSSG ratio (p = 0.0002), and significantly higher GSSG levels (p<0.0001) in mitochondrial disease patients compared to controls. Redox potential was significantly more oxidized in all mitochondrial disease subgroups including Leigh syndrome (n = 15), electron transport chain abnormalities (n = 10), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (n = 8), mtDNA deletion syndrome (n = 7), mtDNA depletion syndrome (n = 7), and miscellaneous other mitochondrial disorders (n = 11). Patients hospitalized in metabolic crisis (n = 7) showed the greatest degree of redox imbalance at −242 mV±7. Peripheral whole blood GSH and GSSG levels are promising biomarkers of mitochondrial dysfunction, and may give insights into the contribution of oxidative stress to the pathophysiology of the various mitochondrial disorders. In particular, evaluation of redox potential may be useful in monitoring of clinical status or response to redox

  14. Systemic and renal lipids in kidney disease development and progression.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patricia; Ducasa, Gloria Michelle; Fornoni, Alessia

    2016-03-15

    Altered lipid metabolism characterizes proteinuria and chronic kidney diseases. While it is thought that dyslipidemia is a consequence of kidney disease, a large body of clinical and experimental studies support that altered lipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of kidney disease. In fact, accumulation of renal lipids has been observed in several conditions of genetic and nongenetic origins, linking local fat to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Statins, which target cholesterol synthesis, have not been proven beneficial to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, other therapeutic strategies to reduce cholesterol accumulation in peripheral organs, such as the kidney, warrant further investigation. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have revealed that functional HDL, rather than total HDL per se, may protect from both cardiovascular and kidney diseases, strongly supporting a role for altered cholesterol efflux in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lipid-induced renal damage have yet to be uncovered, several studies suggest novel mechanisms by which cholesterol, free fatty acids, and sphingolipids may affect glomerular and tubular cell function. This review will focus on the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a causative role of lipids in the pathogenesis of proteinuria and kidney disease, with a primary focus on podocytes.

  15. Enhancing blast disease resistance by overexpression of the calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK4 in rice.

    PubMed

    Bundó, Mireia; Coca, María

    2016-06-01

    Rice is the most important staple food for more than half of the human population, and blast disease is the most serious disease affecting global rice production. In this work, the isoform OsCPK4 of the rice calcium-dependent protein kinase family is reported as a regulator of rice immunity to blast fungal infection. It shows that overexpression of OsCPK4 gene in rice plants enhances resistance to blast disease by preventing fungal penetration. The constitutive accumulation of OsCPK4 protein prepares rice plants for a rapid and potentiated defence response, including the production of reactive oxygen species, callose deposition and defence gene expression. OsCPK4 overexpression leads also to constitutive increased content of the glycosylated salicylic acid hormone in leaves without compromising rice yield. Given that OsCPK4 overexpression was known to confer also salt and drought tolerance in rice, the results reported in this article demonstrate that OsCPK4 acts as a convergence component that positively modulates both biotic and abiotic signalling pathways. Altogether, our findings indicate that OsCPK4 is a potential molecular target to improve not only abiotic stress tolerance, but also blast disease resistance of rice crops.

  16. Blood-Borne Activity-Dependent Neuroprotective Protein (ADNP) is Correlated with Premorbid Intelligence, Clinical Stage, and Alzheimer's Disease Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Malishkevich, Anna; Marshall, Gad A; Schultz, Aaron P; Sperling, Reisa A; Aharon-Peretz, Judith; Gozes, Illana

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are vital for disease detection in the clinical setting. Discovered in our laboratory, activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) is essential for brain formation and linked to cognitive functions. Here, we revealed that blood borne expression of ADNP and its paralog ADNP2 is correlated with premorbid intelligence, AD pathology, and clinical stage. Age adjustment showed significant associations between: 1) higher premorbid intelligence and greater serum ADNP, and 2) greater cortical amyloid and lower ADNP and ADNP2 mRNAs. Significant increases in ADNP mRNA levels were observed in patients ranging from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to AD dementia. ADNP2 transcripts showed high correlation with ADNP transcripts, especially in AD dementia lymphocytes. ADNP plasma/serum and lymphocyte mRNA levels discriminated well between cognitively normal elderly, MCI, and AD dementia participants. Measuring ADNP blood-borne levels could bring us a step closer to effectively screening and tracking AD.

  17. Identification of beryllium-dependent peptides recognized by CD4+ T cells in chronic beryllium disease.

    PubMed

    Falta, Michael T; Pinilla, Clemencia; Mack, Douglas G; Tinega, Alex N; Crawford, Frances; Giulianotti, Marc; Santos, Radleigh; Clayton, Gina M; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu; Maier, Lisa A; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-07-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder characterized by an influx of beryllium (Be)-specific CD4⁺ T cells into the lung. The vast majority of these T cells recognize Be in an HLA-DP–restricted manner, and peptide is required for T cell recognition. However, the peptides that stimulate Be-specific T cells are unknown. Using positional scanning libraries and fibroblasts expressing HLA-DP2, the most prevalent HLA-DP molecule linked to disease, we identified mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that bind to MHCII and Be, forming a complex recognized by pathogenic CD4⁺ T cells in CBD. These peptides possess aspartic and glutamic acid residues at p4 and p7, respectively, that surround the putative Be-binding site and cooperate with HLA-DP2 in Be coordination. Endogenous plexin A peptides and proteins, which share the core motif and are expressed in lung, also stimulate these TCRs. Be-loaded HLA-DP2–mimotope and HLA-DP2–plexin A4 tetramers detected high frequencies of CD4⁺ T cells specific for these ligands in all HLADP2+ CBD patients tested. Thus, our findings identify the first ligand for a CD4⁺ T cell involved in metal-induced hypersensitivity and suggest a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of a common antigen specificity in CBD.

  18. [EFFICACY OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF VARICOSE DISEASE, DEPENDING ON ADSORPTION-RHEOLOGIC PROPERTIES OF BLOOD].

    PubMed

    Grihn, V K; Kondratenko, P G; Melekhovets, Yu V; Sinyachenko, Yu O; Sinyachenko, O V

    2015-05-01

    Physico-chemical adsorption-rheological properties of venous blood in patients, suffering varicose disease of the lower extremities, and their impact on efficacy of various methods of surgical treatment were studied. Conduction of endovasal laser coagulation in combination with crossectomy have promoted enhancement of operative treatment efficacy in patients in initial terms of observation (in 1 week), in 1 month a complete occlusion of the vein was noted more rarely. Efficacy of a small--power laser ablation with irradiation power of 10 W and less in 4 weeks postoperatively is higher, than of surgical treatment with a laser irradiation power 15 W. In a varicose disease of the lower extremities there were observed the raising of the blood volume toughness, superficial relaxation and superficial stress on background of reduction of the toughness--elasticity module, superficial toughness and superficial elasticity. Crossectomy conduction did not influence the integral dynamics of adsorption--rheological properties of venous blood, but in 1 month after endovasal laser coagulation a normalization of physicchemical parameters of blood was noted. Application of laser irradiation of the 10 W power and less promotes inhibition of the relaxation properties of venous blood; a prognostic meaning owes initial value of the blood volume toughness.

  19. IL-15-dependent balance between Foxp3 and RORγt expression impacts inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Tosiek, Milena J.; Fiette, Laurence; El Daker, Sary; Eberl, Gérard; Freitas, Antonio A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of CD4+ T cells to change their phenotype and to specialize into different functional subsets may enhance the risk of autoimmune diseases. Here we investigate how a pleiotropic cytokine interleukin (IL)-15 may modify the functional commitment of CD4+ T cells expressing the lineage-associated transcription factors: forkhead box P3 (Foxp3; Treg) and RORγt (Th17) in the context of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We demonstrate in mice that impaired delivery of IL-15 to CD4+ T cells in the colon downmodulates Foxp3 expression (diminishing STAT5 phosphorylation) and enhances RORγt expression (by upregulating the expression of Runx1). In consequence, CD4+ T cells deprived of IL-15 rapidly trigger IBD characterized by enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ, IL-6) and accumulation of Th1/Th17 cells. Overall, our findings indicate a potentially beneficial role of IL-15 in IBD by fine-tuning the balance between Treg and Th17 cells and controlling intestinal inflammation. PMID:26964669

  20. An Evolutionarily Conserved Mechanism for Activity-Dependent Visual Circuit Development

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Kara G.; Hiramoto, Masaki; Cline, Hollis T.

    2016-01-01

    Neural circuit development is an activity-dependent process. This activity can be spontaneous, such as the retinal waves that course across the mammalian embryonic retina, or it can be sensory-driven, such as the activation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) by visual stimuli. Whichever the source, neural activity provides essential instruction to the developing circuit. Indeed, experimentally altering activity has been shown to impact circuit development and function in many different ways and in many different model systems. In this review, we contemplate the idea that retinal waves in amniotes, the animals that develop either in ovo or utero (namely reptiles, birds and mammals) could be an evolutionary adaptation to life on land, and that the anamniotes, animals whose development is entirely external (namely the aquatic amphibians and fish), do not display retinal waves, most likely because they simply don’t need them. We then review what is known about the function of both retinal waves and visual stimuli on their respective downstream targets, and predict that the experience-dependent development of the tadpole visual system is a blueprint of what will be found in future studies of the effects of spontaneous retinal waves on instructing development of retinorecipient targets such as the superior colliculus (SC) and the lateral geniculate nucleus.

  1. Light-independent and dependent phases of proplastid development in Euglena gracilis W3BUL.

    PubMed

    Osafune, T; Schiff, J A; Hase, E

    1987-10-01

    Cells of Euglena gracilis Klebs var. bacillaris Cori mutant W3BUL grown in darkness on Hutner's pH 3.5 medium without agitation accumulate wax ester. These cells have undeveloped proplastid remnants characteristic of this mutant. If these cells are transferred to an inorganic medium and bubbled with 2-3% CO2 in air, the wax disappears and the proplastid expands and develops in darkness to form prolamellar bodies and membrane vessicles within 96 h. No further development takes place in darkness, but if these cultures are illuminated at 96 h formation of prothylakoids is observed. Thus the wax ester accumulated during growth can be used subsequently to support proplastid development up to the prolamellar body stage, but the formation of prothylakoids is strictly light-dependent. Development in this system takes place at a slower rate than in cells grown with shaking and lacking wax which are transferred to resting medium. As previously shown, all of proplastid development requires light under these conditions. It is suggested that the oxygen-requiring utilization of wax in darkness can provide energy and metabolites for a part of proplastid development but the later steps in these cells, or the entire development in cells lacking wax is supported by paramylum degradation which is strictly light-dependent. However, a specific light reaction required for prothylakoid organization is not ruled out.

  2. Lyn- and PLC-beta3-dependent regulation of SHP-1 phosphorylation controls Stat5 activity and myelomonocytic leukemia-like disease.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenbin; Ando, Tomoaki; Wang, Huan-You; Kawakami, Yuko; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2010-12-23

    Hyperactivation of the transcription factor Stat5 leads to various leukemias. Stat5 activity is regulated by the protein phosphatase SHP-1 in a phospholipase C (PLC)-β3-dependent manner. Thus, PLC-β3-deficient mice develop myeloproliferative neoplasm, like Lyn (Src family kinase)- deficient mice. Here we show that Lyn/PLC-β3 doubly deficient lyn(-/-);PLC-β3(-/-) mice develop a Stat5-dependent, fatal myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm, similar to human chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). In hematopoietic stem cells of lyn(-/-);PLC-β3(-/-) mice that cause the CMML-like disease, phosphorylation of SHP-1 at Tyr(536) and Tyr(564) is abrogated, resulting in reduced phosphatase activity and constitutive activation of Stat5. Furthermore, SHP-1 phosphorylation at Tyr(564) by Lyn is indispensable for maximal phosphatase activity and for suppression of the CMML-like disease in these mice. On the other hand, Tyr(536) in SHP-1 can be phosphorylated by Lyn and another kinase(s) and is necessary for efficient interaction with Stat5. Therefore, we identify a novel Lyn/PLC-β3-mediated regulatory mechanism of SHP-1 and Stat5 activities.

  3. The Ca2+ -dependent DNases are involved in secondary xylem development in Eucommia ulmoides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Min; Pang, Yu; Zeng, Jun; Ding, Qi; Yin, Shen-Yi; Liu, Chao; Lu, Meng-Zhu; Cui, Ke-Ming; He, Xin-Qiang

    2012-07-01

    Secondary xylem development has long been recognized as a typical case of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. During PCD, the degradation of genomic DNA is catalyzed by endonucleases. However, to date, no endonuclease has been shown to participate in secondary xylem development. Two novel Ca(2+) -dependent DNase genes, EuCaN1 and EuCaN2, were identified from the differentiating secondary xylem of the tree Eucommia ulmoides Oliv., their functions were studied by DNase activity assay, in situ hybridization, protein immunolocalization and virus-induced gene silencing experiments. Full-length cDNAs of EuCaN1 and EuCaN2 contained an open reading frame of 987 bp, encoding two proteins of 328 amino acids with SNase-like functional domains. The genomic DNA sequence for EuCaN1 had no introns, while EuCaN2 had 8 introns. EuCaN1 and EuCaN2 digested ssDNA and dsDNA with Ca(2+) -dependence at neutral pH. Their expression was confined to differentiating secondary xylem cells and the proteins were localized in the nucleus. Their activity dynamics was closely correlated with secondary xylem development. Secondary xylem cell differentiation is influenced by RNAi of endonuclease genes. The results provide evidence that the Ca(2+) -dependent DNases are involved in secondary xylem development.

  4. Randomised trial of erythromycin on the development of chronic lung disease in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, A; McColm, J; Middlemist, L; Fergusson, S; McIntosh, N; Ross, P

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To determine if erythromycin given from birth reduces the inflammatory response and the incidence and severity of chronic lung disease.
METHODS—Seventy five infants less than 30 weeks of gestation and ventilated from birth for lung disease were randomly assigned to receive erythromycin intravenously for 7 days or to no treatment. Ureaplasma urealyticum was detected in tracheal secretions by culture and polymerase chain reaction. Differential cell counts were obtained from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid collected daily for 5 days and concentrations of the cytokines interluekins IL-1β and IL-8, and tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) were measured. Chronic lung disease (CLD) was defined as oxygen dependency at 36 weeks of gestation.
RESULTS—Nine infants (13%) were positive for U urealyticum. The inflammatory cytokines in the lungs increased over the first 5 days of life in all babies, but no association was found between their concentrations and the development of CLD. Those treated with erythromycin showed no significant differences from the non- treated group in the differential cell counts or concentrations of the cytokines. The two groups had a similar incidence of CLD. Babies infected with U urealyticum did not have a more pronounced cytokine response than those without infection. Chorioamnionitis was associated with significantly higher concentrations of IL-1β and IL-8 on admission: these babies had less severe acute lung disease and developed significantly less CLD.
CONCLUSIONS—U urealyticum in the trachea was not associated with an increased inflammatory response in preterm infants. Erythromycin did not reduce the incidence or severity of CLD.

 PMID:9536833

  5. The development of socio-motivational dependency from early to middle adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Jagenow, Danilo; Raufelder, Diana; Eid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Research on students’ motivation has shown that motivation can be enhanced or undermined by social factors. However, when interpreting such findings, interindividual differences, and intraindividual changes underlying students’ perception of peers and teachers as a source of motivation are often neglected. The aim of the present study was to complement our understanding of socio-motivational dependency by investigating differences in the development of students’ socio-motivational dependency from early to middle adolescence. Data from 1088 students on their perceptions of peers and teachers as positive motivators when students were in seventh and eighth grade were compared with data of the same sample 2 years later. Latent class analysis supported four different motivation types (MT): (1) teacher-dependent MT, (2) peer-dependent MT, (3) teacher-and-peer-dependent MT, and (4) teacher-and-peer-independent MT. Latent transition analysis revealed substantial changes between the groups. The perceived teacher influence on students’ academic motivation increased from early to middle adolescence. Divergent roles of peers and teachers on students’ academic motivation are discussed. PMID:25762966

  6. The concept of dependence as developed by Birtchnell: a critical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cadbury, S

    1991-09-01

    Birtchnell (1988) appeals for an accurate definition of dependence. Such accuracy would help with measurement, prevention and treatment of depression. He describes dependence as a developmental deficiency. In so doing, he presupposes a psychodynamic trait-based, and gender-related development model, but does not acknowledge its influence on his thinking. Birtchnell's analysis has three types of problem. The reasoning may be questioned because of faulty inferential leaps, undue reliance on the concept of 'maturity', the use of a tautology, ('The dependent person is...dependent'), internal contradictions, and a questionable analogy between children's and adults' behaviour. Secondly, he appears to suggest that there is empirical evidence to support his theoretical approach, but he does not provide explicit evidence. He draws conclusions about causal links and neglects alternative interpretations, especially the transactional interpersonal element in social relationships. Finally, the analysis is potentially weakened by what may be described as an androcentric bias and relies upon a 'medical model' of psychological disorder, which fails to consider the impact of social influences on the expression of emotion. The author argues that it is at present premature and inappropriate to define dependence, but appeals for methods of research which would be more helpful in understanding it.

  7. Disease recognition is related to specific autobiographical memory deficits in alcohol-dependence.

    PubMed

    Poncin, Marie; Neumann, Aurore; Luminet, Olivier; Vande Weghe, Noémie; Philippot, Pierre; de Timary, Philippe

    2015-12-15

    The particularly high treatment gap in alcohol-dependence suggests the existence of important barriers to treatment decision and in particular difficulties in problem recognition. This study tested the relation between problem recognition and self-related memories. Forty-one recently detoxified alcohol-dependent individuals (AD) were compared to twenty alcoholic subjects that were abstinent for 6 months or more (recruited among alcoholics-anonymous (AA)), and to twenty controls on autobiographical memories elicited by pictures depicting or not alcohol using the autobiographical memory test. Autonoetic consciousness was measured with the Remember/Know paradigm. We tested whether memories performances were related with data obtained on the readiness to change questionnaire (RCQ) or with consciousness of the severity of drinking. AD subjects provided less specific memories than control and AA subjects, and fewer Remember responses than controls. The deficits in AD subjects were not specific for memories elicited by pictures depicting alcohol, suggesting a global deficit. Autobiographical memories specificity was negatively correlated to scores of consciousness of the severity of drinking but not to RCQ. Our results support potential recovery of autobiographical memory with abstinence. AD's deficits in autobiographical memory were related to capacities to recognize the severity and therefore may be a barrier to treatment decision. PMID:26365688

  8. Stage-dependent agreement between cerebrospinal fluid proteins and FDG-PET findings in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, Igor; Muller, Matthias J; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Lang, Ulrike; Rossmann, Heidi; Hampel, Harald; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Fellgiebel, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral hypometabolism and abnormal levels of amyloid beta (Aβ), total (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (ptau) proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are established biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We examined the agreement between these biomarkers in a single center study of patients with AD of severity extending over a wide range. Forty seven patients (MMSE 21.4 ± 3.6, range 13-28 points) with incipient and probable AD underwent positron emission tomography with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) and lumbar puncture for CSF assays of Aβ1-42, p-tau181, and t-tau. All findings were classified as either positive or negative for AD. Statistical analyses were performed for the whole sample (n=47) and for the subgroups stratified as mild (MMSE > 20 points, n=30) and moderate (MMSE < 21 points, n=17) AD. In the whole patient sample, the agreement with the FDG-PET finding was 77% (chance-corrected kappa [κ]=0.34, p=0.016) for t-tau, 68% (κ=0.10, n.s.) for p-tau181, and 68% (κ=0.04, n.s.) for Aβ1-42. No significant agreement was found in the mild AD subgroup, while there was a strong agreement for t-tau (94%, κ=0.77, p=0.001) and p-tau181 (88%, κ=0.60, p=0.014) in the moderate AD group. A significant agreement between the FDG-PET and CSF tau findings in patients with AD supports the view that both are markers of neurodegeneration. CSF tau proteins and FDG-PET might substitute each other as supportive diagnostic tools in patients with suspected moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's dementia, while this is not the case in subjects at an earlier disease stage. PMID:22044023

  9. Pre-existing Pulmonary Diseases and Survival in Patients With Stage-dependent Lung Adenocarcinoma: A STROBE-compliant Article.

    PubMed

    Jian, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Jing-Yang; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Jhang, Kai-Ming; Ku, Wen-Yuan; Ho, Chien-Chang; Lung, Chia-Chi; Pan, Hui-Hsien; Liang, Yu-Chiu; Wu, Ming-Fang; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2016-03-01

    Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are common lung diseases associated with lung cancer mortality. This study evaluated sex disparities in pre-existing pulmonary diseases and stage-dependent lung adenocarcinoma survival.Patients newly diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma between 2003 and 2008 were identified using the National Health Insurance Research Database and Cancer Registry. Cases with lung adenocarcinoma were followed until the end of 2010. Survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional-hazard regression was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of pre-existing asthma, COPD, and/or TB, and to estimate all-cause mortality risk in patients with different stages of lung adenocarcinoma.A total of 14,518 cases were identified with lung adenocarcinoma. Specifically, among men, the HRs for TB were 1.69 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-2.58), 1.48 (95% CI, 1.14-1.93), and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.08-1.49) for individuals with stage I + II, III, and IV diseases, respectively. The HRs for asthma were 1.41 (95% CI, 1.00-1.99) in women with stage I + II and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.04-1.26) in men with stage IV disease. For pulmonary disease combinations in men, the HRs were 1.45 (95% CI, 1.12-1.89) for asthma + COPD + TB, 1.35 (95% CI, 1.12-1.63) for COPD + TB, 1.28 (95% CI, 1.01-1.63) for TB, and 1.15 (95%CI, 1.04-1.27) for asthma + COPD, respectively. For women with stage I + II disease, the HR was 6.94 (95% CI, 2.72-17.71) for asthma + COPD + TB.Coexistence of pre-existing pulmonary diseases increased mortality risk in men with adenocarcinoma. TB is at elevated risk of mortality among men with different stages of adenocarcinoma. Asthmatic women with early-stage adenocarcinoma had increased risk of mortality.

  10. Pre-existing Pulmonary Diseases and Survival in Patients With Stage-dependent Lung Adenocarcinoma: A STROBE-compliant Article.

    PubMed

    Jian, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Jing-Yang; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Jhang, Kai-Ming; Ku, Wen-Yuan; Ho, Chien-Chang; Lung, Chia-Chi; Pan, Hui-Hsien; Liang, Yu-Chiu; Wu, Ming-Fang; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2016-03-01

    Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are common lung diseases associated with lung cancer mortality. This study evaluated sex disparities in pre-existing pulmonary diseases and stage-dependent lung adenocarcinoma survival.Patients newly diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma between 2003 and 2008 were identified using the National Health Insurance Research Database and Cancer Registry. Cases with lung adenocarcinoma were followed until the end of 2010. Survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional-hazard regression was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of pre-existing asthma, COPD, and/or TB, and to estimate all-cause mortality risk in patients with different stages of lung adenocarcinoma.A total of 14,518 cases were identified with lung adenocarcinoma. Specifically, among men, the HRs for TB were 1.69 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-2.58), 1.48 (95% CI, 1.14-1.93), and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.08-1.49) for individuals with stage I + II, III, and IV diseases, respectively. The HRs for asthma were 1.41 (95% CI, 1.00-1.99) in women with stage I + II and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.04-1.26) in men with stage IV disease. For pulmonary disease combinations in men, the HRs were 1.45 (95% CI, 1.12-1.89) for asthma + COPD + TB, 1.35 (95% CI, 1.12-1.63) for COPD + TB, 1.28 (95% CI, 1.01-1.63) for TB, and 1.15 (95%CI, 1.04-1.27) for asthma + COPD, respectively. For women with stage I + II disease, the HR was 6.94 (95% CI, 2.72-17.71) for asthma + COPD + TB.Coexistence of pre-existing pulmonary diseases increased mortality risk in men with adenocarcinoma. TB is at elevated risk of mortality among men with different stages of adenocarcinoma. Asthmatic women with early-stage adenocarcinoma had increased risk of mortality. PMID:26962806

  11. Regulatory Circuitry Governing Fungal Development, Drug Resistance, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Rebecca S.; Robbins, Nicole; Cowen, Leah E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pathogenic fungi have become a leading cause of human mortality due to the increasing frequency of fungal infections in immunocompromised populations and the limited armamentarium of clinically useful antifungal drugs. Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus are the leading causes of opportunistic fungal infections. In these diverse pathogenic fungi, complex signal transduction cascades are critical for sensing environmental changes and mediating appropriate cellular responses. For C. albicans, several environmental cues regulate a morphogenetic switch from yeast to filamentous growth, a reversible transition important for virulence. Many of the signaling cascades regulating morphogenesis are also required for cells to adapt and survive the cellular stresses imposed by antifungal drugs. Many of these signaling networks are conserved in C. neoformans and A. fumigatus, which undergo distinct morphogenetic programs during specific phases of their life cycles. Furthermore, the key mechanisms of fungal drug resistance, including alterations of the drug target, overexpression of drug efflux transporters, and alteration of cellular stress responses, are conserved between these species. This review focuses on the circuitry regulating fungal morphogenesis and drug resistance and the impact of these pathways on virulence. Although the three human-pathogenic fungi highlighted in this review are those most frequently encountered in the clinic, they represent a minute fraction of fungal diversity. Exploration of the conservation and divergence of core signal transduction pathways across C. albicans, C. neoformans, and A. fumigatus provides a foundation for the study of a broader diversity of pathogenic fungi and a platform for the development of new therapeutic strategies for fungal disease. PMID:21646428

  12. Community-based noncommunicable disease interventions: lessons from developed countries for developing ones.

    PubMed Central

    Nissinen, A.; Berrios, X.; Puska, P.

    2001-01-01

    Community-based programmes for prevention and control of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) started in Europe and the USA in the early 1970s. High mortality from CVD in Finland led to the start of the North Karelia Project. Since then, a vast amount of scientific literature has accumulated to present results and discuss experience. The results indicate that heart health programmes have a high degree of generalizability, are cost-effective and can influence health policy. In the 1980s the focus of programmes expanded from CVD to noncommunicable diseases (NCD), mainly because of the common risk factors. Attention has now turned to promoting this approach in developing countries, where the prevalence of NCD is growing. Theory and experience show that community-based NCD programmes should be planned, run and evaluated according to clear principles and rules, collaborate with all sectors of the community, and maintain close contact with the national authorities. In view of the burden of disease they represent and of globalization, there is a great need for international collaboration. Practical networks with common guidelines but adaptable to local cultures in a flexible way have proved to be very useful. PMID:11693979

  13. Keeping a finger on the pulse: Cardiovascular disease rate as a measure of sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nazeeha

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases have been somewhat neglected as a public health issue in the past, but there is now growing international consensus that they present a significant obstacle to economic development for both high- and low-income countries. Cardiovascular disease accounts for more than half of all non-communicable disease deaths, and presents a promising target for curbing the non-communicable disease epidemic. This article explains the pressing need for non-communicable disease prevention, focusing on strategies that can be employed to decrease cardiovascular disease risk at an individual and population level, and outlines the UK's approaches to cardiovascular disease prevention in particular. Given the mounting burden of non-communicable diseases, responsible health governance and a balanced economic policy could consider the use of low cardiovascular disease rates as a measure of positive and sustainable economic development.

  14. Activity-dependent plasticity of spinal circuits in the developing and mature spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tahayori, Behdad; Koceja, David M

    2012-01-01

    Part of the development and maturation of the central nervous system (CNS) occurs through interactions with the environment. Through physical activities and interactions with the world, an animal receives considerable sensory information from various sources. These sources can be internally (proprioceptive) or externally (such as touch and pressure) generated senses. Ample evidence exists to demonstrate that the sensory information originating from large diameter afferents (Ia fibers) have an important role in inducing essential functional and morphological changes for the maturation of both the brain and the spinal cord. The Ia fibers transmit sensory information generated by muscle activity and movement. Such use or activity-dependent plastic changes occur throughout life and are one reason for the ability to acquire new skills and learn new movements. However, the extent and particularly the mechanisms of activity-dependent changes are markedly different between a developing nervous system and a mature nervous system. Understanding these mechanisms is an important step to develop strategies for regaining motor function after different injuries to the CNS. Plastic changes induced by activity occur both in the brain and spinal cord. This paper reviews the activity-dependent changes in the spinal cord neural circuits during both the developmental stages of the CNS and in adulthood. PMID:22900208

  15. NMDA-Dependent Switch of proBDNF Actions on Developing GABAergic Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Anais; Diabira, Diabe; Ferrand, Nadine; Porcher, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has emerged as an important messenger for activity-dependent development of neuronal network. Recent findings have suggested that a significant proportion of BDNF can be secreted as a precursor (proBDNF) and cleaved by extracellular proteases to yield the mature form. While the actions of proBDNF on maturation and plasticity of excitatory synapses have been studied, the effect of the precursor on developing GABAergic synapses remains largely unknown. Here, we show that regulated secretion of proBDNF exerts a bidirectional control of GABAergic synaptic activity with NMDA receptors driving the polarity of the plasticity. When NMDA receptors are activated during ongoing synaptic activity, regulated Ca2+-dependent secretion of proBDNF signals via p75NTR to depress GABAergic synaptic activity, while in the absence of NMDA receptors activation, secreted proBDNF induces a p75NTR-dependent potentiation of GABAergic synaptic activity. These results revealed a new function for proBDNF-p75NTR signaling in synaptic plasticity and a novel mechanism by which synaptic activity can modulate the development of GABAergic synaptic connections. PMID:22510533

  16. Uterine Development and Fertility Are Dependent on Gene Dosage of the Nuclear Receptor Coregulator REA

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunghee; Yoon, Sangyeon; Zhao, Yuechao; Park, Seong-Eun; Liao, Lan; Xu, Jianming; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; O'Malley, Bert W.; Bagchi, Milan K.

    2012-01-01

    Although the effectiveness of nuclear hormone-receptor complexes is known to depend on coregulator partner proteins, relatively little is known about the roles of coregulators in uterine development and early stages of pregnancy and implantation. Because conventional genetic deletion of the coregulator, repressor of estrogen receptor activity (REA), was embryonic lethal, we here study REA conditional knockout mice generated by cre-loxP recombination, in which REA function was abrogated only in progesterone receptor-expressing tissues, to define the roles of REA in postembryonic stages and in a tissue-specific manner. We find that REA has gene dose-dependent activity impacting uterine development and fertility. Conditional homozygous mutant (REAd/d) mice developed to adulthood and showed normal ovarian function, but females were infertile with severely compromised uterine development and function characterized by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and altered adenogenesis (endometrial gland morphogenesis), resulting in failure of implantation and decidualization. By contrast, mice heterozygous for REA (REAf/d) had a very different phenotype, with estradiol treatment resulting in hyperstimulated, large uteri showing increased proliferation of luminal epithelial cells, and enhanced fluid imbibition associated with altered regulation of aquaporins. These REAf/d female mice showed a subfertility phenotype with reduced numbers and sizes of litters. These findings highlight that uterine development and regulation of estrogen receptor activities show a bimodal dependence on the gene dosage of REA. Optimal uterine development and functional activities require the normal gene dosage of REA, with partial or complete deletion resulting in hyperresponsiveness or underresponsiveness to hormone and subfertility or infertility, respectively. PMID:22585830

  17. Inhibition of Rac controls NPM-ALK-dependent lymphoma development and dissemination.

    PubMed

    Colomba, A; Giuriato, S; Dejean, E; Thornber, K; Delsol, G; Tronchère, H; Meggetto, F; Payrastre, B; Gaits-Iacovoni, F

    2011-06-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) is a tyrosine kinase oncogene responsible for the pathogenesis of the majority of human ALK-positive lymphomas. We recently reported that it activated the Rac1 GTPase in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL), leading to Rac-dependent formation of active invadopodia required for invasiveness. Herein, we went further into the study of this pathway and used the inhibitor of Rac, NSC23766, to validate its potential as a molecular target in ALCL in vitro and in vivo in a xenograft model and in a conditional model of NPM-ALK transgenic mice. Our data demonstrate that Rac regulates important effectors of NPM-ALK-induced transformation such as Erk1/2, p38 and Akt. Moreover, inhibition of Rac signaling abrogates NPM-ALK-elicited disease progression and metastasis in mice, highlighting the potential of small GTPases and their regulators as additional therapic targets in lymphomas.

  18. Solution of 3-dimensional time-dependent viscous flows. Part 2: Development of the computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, B. C.; Mcdonald, H.

    1980-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing a numerical scheme for solving the time dependent viscous compressible three dimensional flow equations to aid in the design of helicopter rotors. The development of a computer code to solve a three dimensional unsteady approximate form of the Navier-Stokes equations employing a linearized block emplicit technique in conjunction with a QR operator scheme is described. Results of calculations of several Cartesian test cases are presented. The computer code can be applied to more complex flow fields such as these encountered on rotating airfoils.

  19. Prospective memory performance of patients with Parkinson's disease depends on shifting aptitude: evidence from cognitive rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Costa, Alberto; Peppe, Antonella; Serafini, Francesca; Zabberoni, Silvia; Barban, Francesco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of cognitive training aimed at improving shifting ability on Parkinson's disease (PD) patients' performance of prospective memory (PM) tasks. Using a double-blind protocol, 17 PD patients were randomly assigned to two experimental arms. In the first arm (n=9) shifting training was administered, and in the second (placebo) arm (n=8), language and respiratory exercises. Both treatments consisted of 12 sessions executed over 4 weeks. PM and shifting measures (i.e., Trail Making Test and Alternate Fluency Test) were administered at T0 (before treatment) and T1 (immediately after treatment). A mixed analysis of variance was applied to the data. To evaluate the effects of treatment, the key effect was the interaction between Group (experimental vs. placebo) and Time of Assessment (T0 vs. T1). This interaction was significant for the accuracy indices of the PM procedure (p<.05) and for the performance parameters of the shifting tasks (p ≤.05). Tukey's HSD tests showed that in all cases passing from T0 to T1 performance significantly improved in the experimental group (in all cases p ≤.02) but remained unchanged in the placebo group (all p consistently>.10). The performance change passing from T0 to T1 on the Alternate Fluency test and the PM procedure was significantly correlated (p<.05). Results show that the cognitive training significantly improved PD patients' event-based PM performance and suggest that their poor PM functioning might be related to reduced shifting abilities.

  20. Serotonin-dependent depression in Parkinson's disease: a role for the subthalamic nucleus?

    PubMed

    Tan, Sonny K H; Hartung, Henrike; Sharp, Trevor; Temel, Yasin

    2011-09-01

    Depression is the most common neuropsychiatric co-morbidity in Parkinson's disease (PD). The underlying mechanism of depression in PD is complex and likely involves biological, psychosocial and therapeutic factors. The biological mechanism may involve changes in monoamine systems, in particular the serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system. It is well established that the 5-HT system is markedly affected in the Parkinsonian brain, with evidence including pathological loss of markers of 5-HT axons as well as cell bodies in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei of the midbrain. However, it remains unresolved whether alterations to the 5-HT system alone are sufficient to confer vulnerability to depression. Here we propose low 5-HT combined with altered network activity within the basal ganglia as critically involved in depression in PD. The latter hypothesis is derived from a number of recent findings that highlight the close interaction between the basal ganglia and the 5-HT system, not only in motor but also limbic functions. These findings include evidence that clinical depression is a side effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), a treatment option in advanced PD. Further, it has recently been demonstrated that STN DBS in animal models inhibits 5-HT neurotransmission, and that this change may underpin depressive-like side effects. This review provides an overview of 5-HT alterations in PD and a discussion of how these changes might combine with altered basal ganglia network activity to increase depression vulnerability.

  1. The dependences of osteocyte network on bone compartment, age, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xiaohan; Price, Christopher; Modla, Shannon; Thompson, William R; Caplan, Jeffrey; Kirn-Safran, Catherine B; Wang, Liyun

    2015-01-01

    Osteocytes, the most abundant bone cells, form an interconnected network in the lacunar-canalicular pore system (LCS) buried within the mineralized matrix, which allows osteocytes to obtain nutrients from the blood supply, sense external mechanical signals, and communicate among themselves and with other cells on bone surfaces. In this study, we examined key features of the LCS network including the topological parameter and the detailed structure of individual connections and their variations in cortical and cancellous compartments, at different ages, and in two disease conditions with altered mechanosensing (perlecan deficiency and diabetes). LCS network showed both topological stability, in terms of conservation of connectivity among osteocyte lacunae (similar to the “nodes” in a computer network), and considerable variability the pericellular annular fluid gap surrounding lacunae and canaliculi (similar to the “bandwidth” of individual links in a computer network). Age, in the range of our study (15–32 weeks), affected only the pericellular fluid annulus in cortical bone but not in cancellous bone. Diabetes impacted the spacing of the lacunae, while the perlecan deficiency had a profound influence on the pericellular fluid annulus. The LCS network features play important roles in osteocyte signaling and regulation of bone growth and adaptation. PMID:26213632

  2. Thallium scintigraphy during dobutamine infusion: nonexercise-dependent screening test for coronary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.R.; Palac, R.T.; Freeman, M.L.; Virupannavar, S.; Loeb, H.S.; Kaplan, E.; Gunnar, R.M.

    1984-03-01

    Exercise thallium scintigraphy has proven to be a sensitive method for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD). However, early redistribution of thallium and inadequate exercise can reduce its sensitivity. In this study, dobutamine was infused in incremental doses (5, 10, 15, and 20 micrograms/kg/min) in 24 patients being evaluated for chest pain. Thallium scintigraphy was completed during the maximum dose of dobutamine tolerated and repeated 4 hours later. Significant CAD was present in 16 patients; the remaining eight had normal coronaries. Exercise ECG was obtained in 23 patients. During dobutamine thallium scintigraphy, reversible perfusion defects occurred in 15 of 16 CAD and in one of eight non-CAD patients, resulting in a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 87%. Exercise ECG had a sensitivity of 60% and a specificity of 63%. We conclude that: (1) dobutamine thallium scintigraphy appears to be a sensitive method for detecting significant CAD and provided a more sensitive screening test than exercise ECG; (2) dobutamine thallium scintigraphy is especially useful in patients who cannot exercise; and (3) because imaging occurs during dobutamine infusion, the problem of early redistribution may be mitigated.

  3. Dynamic evaluation of alimentary-dependent risk factors of chronic non-infectious diseases in population survey.

    PubMed

    Agbalyan, E V; Buganov, A A

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to research the incidence of alimentary risk factors (RF) of chronic noninfectious diseases under severe conditions of complex climatoecologic and biogeochemical factors of the Far North. The representative sample of 2,094 Nadym-city non-Natives (Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug) aged 20-59 was examined. In the first cross-sectional study, 1,093 persons (39.1% of men and 60.9% of women)--and in the last screening 1,001 persons (33.9% of men and 66.1% of women)--were examined. The RF presence was established on the basis of the following criteria: arterial hypertension (WHO, ISAH (1999)) was defined at blood pressure levels > or = 140-90 mmHg. Persons who finished antihypertensive treatment no later than two weeks before examination were also referred to this group. Excessive body mass for both men and women was defined at Quetlet index > or = 29.0 kg/m2, hypercholesterolemia at plasma cholesterol level > or = .5 mmol/l, hypertriglyceridemia at triglyceride level > or = 2.26 mmol/ l, hypoalphacholesterolemia at high density lipoproteins cholesterol level < or = 0.88 mmol/l, and hypercholesterolemia of low density lipoproteids at low density lipoproteids cholesterol level > or = 4.1 mmol/l. The results of research revealed high incidence of alimentary-dependent RF of chronic noninfectious diseases. In six-year dynamics, the increase of dislipoproteidemias for 18.1% (31.3% vs. 26.5%), high incidence of arterial hypertension (31.0% vs. 38.5%), and excessive body mass (33.3% vs. 30.6%) were assessed. High incidence of alimentary-dependent RF of chronic noninfectious diseases is the direct consequence of unsatisfactory, misbalanced nutrition. In programs aimed at prevention of alimentary-dependent diseases the priority should be given to non-pharmacological (or non-medicamentous) methods, and, first of all, to dietologic methods aimed at correcting the nutrition structure in the population.

  4. National Priority Setting of Clinical Practice Guidelines Development for Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Jo, Heui-Sug; Kim, Dong Ik; Oh, Moo-Kyung

    2015-12-01

    By November 2013, a total of 125 clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed in Korea. However, despite the high burden of diseases and the clinical importance of CPGs, most chronic diseases do not have available CPGs. Merely 83 CPGs are related to chronic diseases, and only 40 guidelines had been developed in the last 5 yr. Considering the rate of the production of new evidence in medicine and the worsening burden from chronic diseases, the need for developing CPGs for more chronic diseases is becoming increasingly pressing. Since 2011, the Korean Academy of Medical Sciences and the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have been jointly developing CPGs for chronic diseases. However, priorities have to be set and resources need to be allocated within the constraint of a limited funding. This study identifies the chronic diseases that should be prioritized for the development of CPGs in Korea. Through an objective assessment by using the analytic hierarchy process and a subjective assessment with a survey of expert opinion, high priorities were placed on ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, osteoarthritis, neck pain, chronic kidney disease, and cirrhosis of the liver.

  5. Pattern of renal diseases in children: A developing country experience.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shankar Prasad; Shah, Gauri Shankar; Mishra, Om Prakash; Baral, Nirmal

    2016-03-01

    Spectrum of renal disease varies in different ethnic population, geographical location, and by environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to find out the clinical spectrum and occurrence of different pediatric renal diseases at a teaching hospital in the Eastern part of Nepal. All cases of renal diseases from one month to 15 years of age, attending the pediatric renal outpatient department and/or were admitted to the wards during the period of February 2012 to January 2013, were included in the study. Detailed clinical and laboratory evaluations were performed on all patients. Diseases were categorized as per standard definitions and managed with hospital protocols. Renal diseases accounted to be 206 cases (6.9%) of total annual pediatric admissions, of which (58%) were male and (42%) female. Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) was the most common disorder (37.7%) followed by nephrotic syndrome (26.1%), urinary tract infection (21.3%), acute kidney injury (AKI) (17.9%), obstructive uropathy (1.9%), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (1.2%), and others. In AGN group, the most common cause was post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) (32.9%) followed by lupus nephritis (4%) and Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (0.8%). Urine culture was positive in (9.22%) and the most common organism was Escherichia coli (57.9%). The causes of AKI were urosepsis, septicemia, and AGN (18.9%) each, followed by dehydration (13.5%). Mortality was found in 5% of cases and the etiologies were AKI in (72.7%), PIGN (18.1%), and CKD (9%). Renal diseases are a significant problem among children and are one of the common causes of hospital admission. These patients need comprehensive services for early identification and management. PMID:26997393

  6. Pattern of renal diseases in children: A developing country experience.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shankar Prasad; Shah, Gauri Shankar; Mishra, Om Prakash; Baral, Nirmal

    2016-03-01

    Spectrum of renal disease varies in different ethnic population, geographical location, and by environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to find out the clinical spectrum and occurrence of different pediatric renal diseases at a teaching hospital in the Eastern part of Nepal. All cases of renal diseases from one month to 15 years of age, attending the pediatric renal outpatient department and/or were admitted to the wards during the period of February 2012 to January 2013, were included in the study. Detailed clinical and laboratory evaluations were performed on all patients. Diseases were categorized as per standard definitions and managed with hospital protocols. Renal diseases accounted to be 206 cases (6.9%) of total annual pediatric admissions, of which (58%) were male and (42%) female. Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) was the most common disorder (37.7%) followed by nephrotic syndrome (26.1%), urinary tract infection (21.3%), acute kidney injury (AKI) (17.9%), obstructive uropathy (1.9%), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (1.2%), and others. In AGN group, the most common cause was post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) (32.9%) followed by lupus nephritis (4%) and Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (0.8%). Urine culture was positive in (9.22%) and the most common organism was Escherichia coli (57.9%). The causes of AKI were urosepsis, septicemia, and AGN (18.9%) each, followed by dehydration (13.5%). Mortality was found in 5% of cases and the etiologies were AKI in (72.7%), PIGN (18.1%), and CKD (9%). Renal diseases are a significant problem among children and are one of the common causes of hospital admission. These patients need comprehensive services for early identification and management.

  7. Endothelial Small- and Intermediate-Conductance K Channels and Endothelium-Dependent Hyperpolarization as Drug Targets in Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Köhler, R; Oliván-Viguera, A; Wulff, H

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial calcium/calmodulin-gated K channels of small (KCa2.3) and intermediate conductance (KCa3.1) produce membrane hyperpolarization and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH)-mediated vasodilation. Dysfunctions of the two channels and ensuing EDH impairments are found in several cardiovascular pathologies such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, postangioplastic neointima formation, but also inflammatory disease, cancer, and organ fibrosis. Moreover, KCa3.1 plays an important role in endothelial barrier dysfunction, edema formation in cardiac and pulmonary disease, and in ischemic stroke. Concerning KCa2.3, genome-wide association studies revealed an association of KCa2.3 channels with atrial fibrillation in humans. Accordingly, both channels are considered potential drug targets for cardio- and cerebrovascular disease states. In this chapter, we briefly review the function of the two channels in EDH-type vasodilation and systemic circulatory regulation and then highlight their pathophysiological roles in ischemic stroke as well as in pulmonary and brain edema. Finally, the authors summarize recent advances in the pharmacology of the channels and explore potential therapeutic utilities of novel channel modulators. PMID:27451095

  8. The Role of Constraint in the Development of Nicotine, Marijuana, and Alcohol Dependence in Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Vrieze, Scott I.; Vaidyanathan, Uma; Hicks, Brian M.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2014-01-01

    The personality-related construct of behavioral disinhibition is hypothesized to confer a generalized risk for alcohol and drug dependence. On average, rates of substance use and scores on measures of disinhibition peak in adolescence and decline as people mature into adulthood. The present study investigated this developmental change by evaluating the relationship between disinhibition and substance use disorders using a longitudinal study of 2,608 twins assessed at ages 17, 24, and 29. These ages include the period of highest risk for substance use disorders (ages 17-24) as well as when substance dependence symptoms typically decline (ages 24-29). Disinhibition was measured with the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire higher-order scale of Constraint, as well as its constituent facet scales of Harm Avoidance, Control, and Traditionalism. Constraint’s relationship with substance dependence was statistically significant but small and largely genetic, with the genetic relationship declining from adolescence into adulthood. However, this result appeared to be almost entirely driven by Traditionalism, a propensity to hold traditional moral and social values, and not an obvious component of behavioral disinhibition. The results suggest that personality measures of Control and Harm Avoidance play only a small role in the development of substance dependence during late adolescence, and previous findings linking personality measures of disinhibition and substance use may be driven significantly by social and moral values than deficits in impulse control. PMID:24343204

  9. And if the discovery of new drugs for the treatment of brain diseases depends on Asian countries?

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    At the present time, developed countries are making a huge financial effort to support neuroscience research programs, particularly in the fields of advanced research and treatment of brain diseases and mental disorders. A part of this financial support is devoted to drug discovery programs. The purpose of this communication is to focus on the different parameters (economic, social, and scientific) allowing for the prominent belief that the discovery of new efficient drugs to treat brain disease to an increasing extent is likely to emanate from the Asian countries. A special focus on drug research and discovery in France reveals that, due to the current social context, the lack of small pharmaceutical ventures, the Mediator drug scandal, and the economic situation, the potential for discovering and developing new drugs is dramatically declining. PMID:27226835

  10. The Metabolic Role of Gut Microbiota in the Development of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Sanduzzi Zamparelli, Marco; Compare, Debora; Coccoli, Pietro; Rocco, Alba; Nardone, Olga Maria; Marrone, Giuseppe; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Grieco, Antonio; Nardone, Gerardo; Miele, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic disorders, such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which are common risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), has dramatically increased worldwide over the last decades. Although dietary habit is the main etiologic factor, there is an imperfect correlation between dietary habits and the development of metabolic disease. Recently, research has focused on the role of the microbiome in the development of these disorders. Indeed, gut microbiota is implicated in many metabolic functions and an altered gut microbiota is reported in metabolic disorders. Here we provide evidence linking gut microbiota and metabolic diseases, focusing on the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying this association. PMID:27483246

  11. The Metabolic Role of Gut Microbiota in the Development of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanduzzi Zamparelli, Marco; Compare, Debora; Coccoli, Pietro; Rocco, Alba; Nardone, Olga Maria; Marrone, Giuseppe; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Grieco, Antonio; Nardone, Gerardo; Miele, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic disorders, such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which are common risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), has dramatically increased worldwide over the last decades. Although dietary habit is the main etiologic factor, there is an imperfect correlation between dietary habits and the development of metabolic disease. Recently, research has focused on the role of the microbiome in the development of these disorders. Indeed, gut microbiota is implicated in many metabolic functions and an altered gut microbiota is reported in metabolic disorders. Here we provide evidence linking gut microbiota and metabolic diseases, focusing on the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying this association. PMID:27483246

  12. [The role of CC-chemokine ligand 2 in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine].

    PubMed

    Saika, Fumihiro; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kishioka, Shiroh

    2015-10-01

    Addiction is described as a chronic neurological disorder associated with plasticity in the mesolimbic system. Recently, it has been suggested that neuroinflammation plays an important role in the induction of neuronal plasticity and the formation of pathogenesis in chronic neurological disorders. Therefore, we examined the role of CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), a proinflammatory chemokine, in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine. In mice treated with methamphetamine, CCL2 mRNA was significantly increased in prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Moreover, phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase serine40 (pTH Ser40) levels in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were increased by methamphetamine. Similarly, pTH Ser40 levels in the VTA were also increased by the intracerebroventricular administration of recombinant CCL2. The increment of pTH Ser40 levels in the VTA by methamphetamine was attenuated by RS504393, a selective CC-chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) antagonist, indicating that the increased CCL2 activates the brain reward system via CCR2 activation. In the conditioned place preference test, methamphetamine produced place preference in a dose-dependent manner, which was attenuated by RS504393. These results suggest that the activation of the brain reward system via CCL2-CCR2 pathway plays an important role in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine. PMID:26946780

  13. Development of an acceptance-based coping intervention for alcohol dependence relapse prevention.

    PubMed

    Vieten, Cassandra; Astin, John A; Buscemi, Raymond; Galloway, Gantt P

    2010-04-01

    Both psychological and neurobiological findings lend support to the long-standing clinical observation that negative affect is involved in the development and maintenance of alcohol dependence, and difficulty coping with negative affect is a common precipitant of relapse after treatment. Although many current approaches to relapse prevention emphasize change-based strategies for managing negative cognitions and affect, acceptance-based strategies for preventing relapse to alcohol use are intended to provide methods for coping with distress that are fundamentally different from, though in theory complementary to, approaches that emphasize control and change. This paper describes the development of Acceptance-Based Coping for Relapse Prevention (ABCRP), a new intervention for alcohol-dependent individuals who are within 6 months of having quit drinking. Results of preliminary testing indicate that the intervention is feasible with this population; and a small uncontrolled pilot study (N = 23) showed significant (P < .01) improvements in self-reported negative affect, emotional reactivity, perceived stress, positive affect, psychological well-being, and mindfulness level, as well as a trend (P = .06) toward reduction in craving severity between pre- and postintervention assessments. The authors conclude that this acceptance-based intervention seems feasible and holds promise for improving affect and reducing relapse in alcohol-dependent individuals, warranting further research.

  14. [The role of CC-chemokine ligand 2 in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine].

    PubMed

    Saika, Fumihiro; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kishioka, Shiroh

    2015-10-01

    Addiction is described as a chronic neurological disorder associated with plasticity in the mesolimbic system. Recently, it has been suggested that neuroinflammation plays an important role in the induction of neuronal plasticity and the formation of pathogenesis in chronic neurological disorders. Therefore, we examined the role of CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), a proinflammatory chemokine, in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine. In mice treated with methamphetamine, CCL2 mRNA was significantly increased in prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Moreover, phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase serine40 (pTH Ser40) levels in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were increased by methamphetamine. Similarly, pTH Ser40 levels in the VTA were also increased by the intracerebroventricular administration of recombinant CCL2. The increment of pTH Ser40 levels in the VTA by methamphetamine was attenuated by RS504393, a selective CC-chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) antagonist, indicating that the increased CCL2 activates the brain reward system via CCR2 activation. In the conditioned place preference test, methamphetamine produced place preference in a dose-dependent manner, which was attenuated by RS504393. These results suggest that the activation of the brain reward system via CCL2-CCR2 pathway plays an important role in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine.

  15. NOX4 NADPH Oxidase-Dependent Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in Aging-Associated Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vendrov, Aleksandr E.; Vendrov, Kimberly C.; Smith, Alberto; Yuan, Jinling; Sumida, Arihiro; Robidoux, Jacques; Madamanchi, Nageswara R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Increased oxidative stress and vascular inflammation are implicated in increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence with age. We and others demonstrated that NOX1/2 NADPH oxidase inhibition, by genetic deletion of p47phox, in Apoe−/− mice decreases vascular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and atherosclerosis in young age. The present study examined whether NOX1/2 NADPH oxidases are also pivotal to aging-associated CVD. Results: Both aged (16 months) Apoe−/− and Apoe−/−/p47phox−/− mice had increased atherosclerotic lesion area, aortic stiffness, and systolic dysfunction compared with young (4 months) cohorts. Cellular and mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) levels were significantly higher in aortic wall and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from aged wild-type and p47phox−/− mice. VSMCs from aged mice had increased mitochondrial protein oxidation and dysfunction and increased vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression, which was abrogated with (2-(2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl-4-ylamino)-2-oxoethyl)triphenylphosphonium chloride (MitoTEMPO) treatment. NOX4 expression was increased in the vasculature and mitochondria of aged mice and its suppression with shRNA in VSMCs from aged mice decreased mtROS levels and improved function. Increased mtROS levels were associated with enhanced mitochondrial NOX4 expression in aortic VSMCs from aged subjects, and NOX4 expression levels in arterial wall correlated with age and atherosclerotic severity. Aged Apoe−/− mice treated with MitoTEMPO and 2-(2-chlorophenyl)-4-methyl-5-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]pyridine-3,6(2H,5H)-dione had decreased vascular ROS levels and atherosclerosis and preserved vascular and cardiac function. Innovation and Conclusion: These data suggest that NOX4, but not NOX1/2, and mitochondrial oxidative stress are mediators of CVD in aging under hyperlipidemic conditions. Regulating NOX4 activity/expression and using mitochondrial antioxidants are

  16. S-phase-dependent cell cycle disturbances caused by Aleutian mink disease parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Oleksiewicz, M B; Alexandersen, S

    1997-01-01

    We examined replication of the autonomous parvovirus Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) in relation to cell cycle progression of permissive Crandell feline kidney (CRFK) cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that ADV caused a composite, binary pattern of cell cycle arrest. ADV-induced cell cycle arrest occurred exclusively in cells containing de novo-synthesized viral nonstructural (NS) proteins. Production of ADV NS proteins, indicative of ADV replication, was triggered during S-phase traverse. The NS+ cells that were generated during later parts of S phase did not undergo cytokinesis and formed a distinct population, termed population A. Formation of population A was not prevented by VM-26, indicating that these cells were arrested in late S or G2 phase. Cells in population A continued to support high-level ADV DNA replication and production of infectious virus after the normal S phase had ceased. A second, postmitotic, NS+ population (termed population B) arose in G0/G1, downstream of population A. Population B cells were unable to traverse S phase but did exhibit low-level DNA synthesis. Since the nature of this DNA synthesis was not examined, we cannot at present differentiate between G1 and early S arrest in population B. Cells that became NS+ during S phase entered population A, whereas population B cells apparently remained NS- during S phase and expressed high NS levels postmitosis in G0/G1. This suggested that population B resulted from leakage of cells with subthreshold levels of ADV products through the late S/G2 block and, consequently, that the binary pattern of ADV-induced cell cycle arrest may be governed merely by viral replication levels within a single S phase. Flow cytometric analysis of propidium iodide fluorescence and bromodeoxyuridine uptake showed that population A cells sustained significantly higher levels of DNA replication than population B cells during the ADV-induced cell cycle arrest. Therefore, the type of ADV-induced cell

  17. Age-Dependent Biochemical Dysfunction in Skeletal Muscle of Triple-Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer`s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro-Cardoso, Vera F.; Castro, Marisa; Oliveira, M.M.; Moreira, Paula I.; Peixoto, Francisco; A.Videira, Romeu

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of Alzheimer`s disease as a systemic pathology shifted the research paradigm toward a better understanding of the molecular basis of the disease considering the pathophysiological changes in both brain and peripheral tissues. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of disease progression on physiological relevant features of skeletal muscle obtained from 3, 6 and 12 month-old 3xTg-AD mice, a model of Alzheimer`s disease, and respective agematched nonTg mice. Our results showed that skeletal muscle functionality is already affected in 3-month-old 3xTg-AD mice as evidenced by deficient acetylcholinesterase and catalase activities as well as by alterations in fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes. Additionally, an age-dependent accumulation of amyloid-β1-40 peptide occurred in skeletal muscle of 3xTg-AD mice, an effect that preceded bioenergetics mitochondrial dysfunction, which was only detected at 12 months of age, characterized by decreased respiratory control ratio and ADP/O index and by an impairment of complex I activity. HPLC-MS/MS analyses revealed significant changes in phospholipid composition of skeletal muscle tissues from 3xTg-AD mice with 12 months of age when compared with age-matched nonTg mice. Increased levels of lyso-phosphatidylcholine associated with a decrease of phosphatidylcholine molecular species containing arachidonic acid were detected in 3xTg-AD mice, indicating an enhancement of phospholipase A2 activity and skeletal muscle inflammation. Additionally, a decrease of phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogens content and an increase in phosphatidylinositol levels was observed in 3xTg-AD mice when compared with age-matched nonTg mice. Altogether, these observations suggest that the skeletal muscle of 3xTg-AD mice are more prone to oxidative and inflammatory events. PMID:25654504

  18. Dopamine D1 Receptors Regulate the Light Dependent Development of Retinal Synaptic Responses

    PubMed Central

    He, Quanhua; Xu, Hong-ping; Wang, Ping; Tian, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Retinal synaptic connections and function are developmentally regulated. Retinal synaptic activity plays critical roles in the development of retinal synaptic circuitry. Dopamine receptors have been thought to play important roles in the activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in central nervous system. The primary goal of this study is to determine whether dopamine D1 receptor regulates the activity-dependent development of retinal light responsiveness. Accordingly, we recorded electroretinogram from wild type mice and mice with genetic deletion of D1 dopamine receptor (D1−/− mice) raised under cyclic light conditions and constant darkness. Our results demonstrated that D1−/− mice have reduced amplitudes of all three major components of electroretinogram in adulthood. When the relative strength of the responses is considered, the D1−/− mice have selective reduction of the amplitudes of a-wave and oscillatory potentials evoked by low-intermediate intensities of lights. During postnatal development, D1−/− mice have increased amplitude of b-wave at the time of eye-opening but reduced developmental increase of the amplitude of b-wave after eye opening. Light deprivation from birth significantly reduced the amplitudes of b-wave and oscillatory potentials, increased the outer retinal light response gain and altered the light response kinetics of both a- and b-waves of wild type mice. In D1−/− mice, the effect of dark rearing on the amplitude of oscillatory potentials was diminished and dark rearing induced effects on the response gain of outer retina and the kinetics of a-wave were reversed. These results demonstrated roles of dopamine D1 receptor in the activity-dependent functional development of mouse retina. PMID:24260267

  19. Age-dependent development of the splenic marginal zone in human infants is associated with different causes of death.

    PubMed

    Kruschinski, Carsten; Zidan, Mohamed; Debertin, Anette S; von Hörsten, Stephan; Pabst, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    Infants are more susceptible to infections caused by T cell- independent type 2 (TI-2) polysaccharide antigens of certain encapsulated bacteria. Immune responses against this type of antigen are related to the splenic marginal zone (MZ). However, only few data exist on the age-dependent developmental stages of the human spleen in early childhood and on their association with different diseases. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate spleens of a large number of children at very young ages (12 days to 32 months), derived from autopsy cases. Immunohistochemical labeling was performed on paraffin sections of 34 spleens using a panel of monoclonal antibodies. The shape and size of the white pulp compartments were examined and correlated to the cause of death of the children. Results show that the development of the different compartments was statistically age-dependent, but no clear-cut time point for the maturity of each compartment was seen. Furthermore, the MZ was significantly more often missing when sudden infant death (SID) and/or infection were the cause of death, compared with other violent or traumatic reasons that served as controls. This association supports the concept that an immature state of the spleen and especially of the MZ might contribute to the increased susceptibility to bacterial infections in young infants.

  20. Fish Vaccine Development and Use to Prevent Streptococcal Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important pathogen of tilapia, hybrid striped bass and trout raised in intensive aquaculture is Streptococcus sp., a cause of severe economic losses in the fish farming industry. Infected fish experience severe to moderate mortality due to Streptococcus iniae and/or S. agalactiae. The diseased ...

  1. Professional development implications of Ebola virus disease education: part I.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elaine L; Kerner, Robert L; Schindler, Jaclyn S; DeVoe, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This article is the first in a two-part series that explores how one large, integrated health care system swiftly responded to the emerging threat of Ebola virus disease. In this first article, the context and initial steps in planning staff education and training are outlined.

  2. Developments in renal pharmacogenomics and applications in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Padullés, Ariadna; Rama, Inés; Llaudó, Inés; Lloberas, Núria

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has shown an increasing prevalence in the last century. CKD encompasses a poor prognosis related to a remarkable number of comorbidities, and many patients suffer from this disease progression. Once the factors linked with CKD evolution are distinguished, it will be possible to provide and enhance a more intensive treatment to high-risk patients. In this review, we focus on the emerging markers that might be predictive or related to CKD progression physiopathology as well as those related to a different pattern of response to treatment, such as inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers; the vitamin D receptor agonist; salt sensitivity hypertension; and progressive kidney-disease markers with identified genetic polymorphisms). Candidate-gene association studies and genome-wide association studies have analyzed the genetic basis for common renal diseases, including CKD and related factors such as diabetes and hypertension. This review will, in brief, consider genotype-based pharmacotherapy, risk prediction, drug target recognition, and personalized treatments, and will mainly focus on findings in CKD patients. An improved understanding will smooth the progress of switching from classical clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. PMID:25206311

  3. [The gender aspects of diet factors effect on development of diseases of circulatory system among rural population].

    PubMed

    Kamalova, F M; Valeeva, E R

    2014-01-01

    The unhealthy diet is one of important controllable risk factors of development of noninfectious diseases. The gender differences in attitude to one's own health confirm significance of their effect on health condition. The study was carried out to establish the effect of diet factors on the rate of diseases of circulatory system in rural population with consideration of gender distribution. The analysis of results of sampling examination of rural population established that 51% of disease rate in males and 22% of disease rate in females are related to diseases of circulatory system. In males and females rate of diseases of circulatory system is determined by diet factors. The direction of relationship is direct and inverse, differs in males and females and depends on diet factors. The gender differences were manifested not only in conditionality of rate of diseases of circulatory system by diet factors but also by their mutual interaction. The health management of rural population is based on examination and analysis of relationship between health of rural population and factors of their diet.

  4. Calcium-dependent neuroepithelial contractions expel damaged cells from the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Herrgen, Leah; Voss, Oliver P.; Akerman, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Both developing and adult organisms need efficient strategies for wound repair. In adult mammals, wounding triggers an inflammatory response that can exacerbate tissue injury and lead to scarring. In contrast, embryonic wounds heal quickly and with minimal inflammation, but how this is achieved remains incompletely understood. Using in vivo imaging in the developing brain of Xenopus laevis, we show that ATP release from damaged cells and subsequent activation of purinergic receptors induce long-range calcium waves in neural progenitor cells. Cytoskeletal reorganization, and activation of the actomyosin contractile machinery in a Rho kinase-dependent manner, then lead to rapid and pronounced apical-basal contractions of the neuroepithelium. These contractions drive the expulsion of damaged cells into the brain ventricle within seconds. Successful cell expulsion prevents the death of nearby cells and an exacerbation of the injury. Cell expulsion through neuroepithelial contraction represents a novel mechanism for rapid wound healing in the developing brain. PMID:25468753

  5. A model of grid cell development through spatial exploration and spike time-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Widloski, John; Fiete, Ila R

    2014-07-16

    Grid cell responses develop gradually after eye opening, but little is known about the rules that govern this process. We present a biologically plausible model for the formation of a grid cell network. An asymmetric spike time-dependent plasticity rule acts upon an initially unstructured network of spiking neurons that receive inputs encoding animal velocity and location. Neurons develop an organized recurrent architecture based on the similarity of their inputs, interacting through inhibitory interneurons. The mature network can convert velocity inputs into estimates of animal location, showing that spatially periodic responses and the capacity of path integration can arise through synaptic plasticity, acting on inputs that display neither. The model provides numerous predictions about the necessity of spatial exploration for grid cell development, network topography, the maturation of velocity tuning and neural correlations, the abrupt transition to stable patterned responses, and possible mechanisms to set grid period across grid modules. PMID:25033187

  6. Calcium-dependent neuroepithelial contractions expel damaged cells from the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Herrgen, Leah; Voss, Oliver P; Akerman, Colin J

    2014-12-01

    Both developing and adult organisms need efficient strategies for wound repair. In adult mammals, wounding triggers an inflammatory response that can exacerbate tissue injury and lead to scarring. In contrast, embryonic wounds heal quickly and with minimal inflammation, but how this is achieved remains incompletely understood. Using in vivo imaging in the developing brain of Xenopus laevis, we show that ATP release from damaged cells and subsequent activation of purinergic receptors induce long-range calcium waves in neural progenitor cells. Cytoskeletal reorganization and activation of the actomyosin contractile machinery in a Rho kinase-dependent manner then lead to rapid and pronounced apical-basal contractions of the neuroepithelium. These contractions drive the expulsion of damaged cells into the brain ventricle within seconds. Successful cell expulsion prevents the death of nearby cells and an exacerbation of the injury. Cell expulsion through neuroepithelial contraction represents a mechanism for rapid wound healing in the developing brain. PMID:25468753

  7. Globalization of the pharmaceutical industry and the growing dependency of developing countries: the case of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Semin, Semih; Güldal, Dilek

    2008-01-01

    In developing countries, the effect of globalization on the pharmaceutical sector has resulted in a decrease in exportation and domestic production, accompanied by an increase in importation of pharmaceuticals and a rise in prices and expenditures. As an example of a developing country, Turkey has been facing the long-standing and increasing pressure of global regulations placed on its pharmaceutical sector. This has led to an increasing dependency on multinational companies and a gradual deterioration of an already weakened domestic pharmaceutical sector. This case study of Turkey offers points to consider in the world of increasing globalization, as it offers lessons on ways of examining the effects of globalization on the pharmaceutical industry of developing countries.

  8. Aire-dependent thymic development of tumor-associated regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Malchow, Sven; Leventhal, Daniel S; Nishi, Saki; Fischer, Benjamin I; Shen, Lynn; Paner, Gladell P; Amit, Ayelet S; Kang, Chulho; Geddes, Jenna E; Allison, James P; Socci, Nicholas D; Savage, Peter A

    2013-03-01

    Despite considerable interest in the modulation of tumor-associated Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (T(regs)) for therapeutic benefit, little is known about the developmental origins of these cells and the nature of the antigens that they recognize. We identified an endogenous population of antigen-specific T(regs) (termed MJ23 T(regs)) found recurrently enriched in the tumors of mice with oncogene-driven prostate cancer. MJ23 T(regs) were not reactive to a tumor-specific antigen but instead recognized a prostate-associated antigen that was present in tumor-free mice. MJ23 T(regs) underwent autoimmune regulator (Aire)-dependent thymic development in both male and female mice. Thus, Aire-mediated expression of peripheral tissue antigens drives the thymic development of a subset of organ-specific T(regs), which are likely coopted by tumors developing within the associated organ.

  9. Aire-dependent thymic development of tumor-associated regulatory T cells*

    PubMed Central

    Malchow, Sven; Leventhal, Daniel S.; Nishi, Saki; Fischer, Benjamin I.; Shen, Lynn; Paner, Gladell P.; Amit, Ayelet S.; Kang, Chulho; Geddes, Jenna E.; Allison, James P.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Savage, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable interest in the modulation of tumor-associated Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) for therapeutic benefit, little is known about the developmental origins of these cells and the nature of the antigens that they recognize. Here, we identified an endogenous population of antigen-specific Tregs (termed “MJ23” Tregs) found recurrently enriched in the tumors of mice with oncogene-driven prostate cancer. MJ23 Tregs were not reactive to a tumor-specific antigen, but instead recognized a prostate-associated antigen that was present in tumor-free mice. MJ23 Tregs underwent Aire-dependent thymic development in both male and female mice. Thus Aire-mediated expression of peripheral tissue antigens drives the thymic development of a subset of organ-specific Tregs, which are likely co-opted by tumors developing within the associated organ. PMID:23471412

  10. Optochemical dissection of T-box gene-dependent medial floor plate development

    PubMed Central

    Payumo, Alexander Y.; Walker, Whitney J.; McQuade, Lindsey E.; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their cell-autonomous roles in mesoderm development, the zebrafish T-box transcription factors no tail a (ntla) and spadetail (spt/tbx16) are required for medial floor plate (MFP) formation. Posterior MFP cells are completely absent in zebrafish embryos lacking both Ntla and Spt function, and genetic mosaic analyses have shown that the two T-box genes promote MFP development in a non-cell-autonomous manner. Based on these observations, it has been proposed that Ntla/Spt-dependent mesoderm-derived signals are required for the induction of posterior but not anterior MFP cells. To investigate the mechanisms by which Ntla and Spt regulate MFP development, we have used photoactivatable caged morpholinos (cMOs) to silence these T-box genes with spatiotemporal control. We find that posterior MFP formation requires Ntla or Spt activity during early gastrulation, specifically in lateral margin-derived cells that converge toward the midline during epiboly and somitogenesis. Nodal signaling-dependent MFP specification is maintained in the absence of Ntla and Spt function; however midline cells in ntla;spt morphants exhibit aberrant morphogenetic movements, resulting in their anterior mislocalization. Our findings indicate that Ntla and Spt do not differentially regulate MFP induction along the anterior-posterior axis; rather, the T-box genes act redundantly within margin-derived cells to promote the posterior extension of MFP progenitors. PMID:25781211

  11. Development of load-dependent Ritz vector method for structural dynamic analysis of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricles, James M.

    1990-01-01

    The development and preliminary assessment of a method for dynamic structural analysis based on load-dependent Ritz vectors are presented. The vector basis is orthogonalized with respect to the mass and structural stiffness in order that the equations of motion can be uncoupled and efficient analysis of large space structure performed. A series of computer programs was developed based on the algorithm for generating the orthogonal load-dependent Ritz vectors. Transient dynamic analysis performed on the Space Station Freedom using the software was found to provide solutions that require a smaller number of vectors than the modal analysis method. Error norm based on the participation of the mass distribution of the structure and spatial distribution of structural loading, respectively, were developed in order to provide an indication of vector truncation. These norms are computed before the transient analysis is performed. An assessment of these norms through a convergence study of the structural response was performed. The results from this assessment indicate that the error norms can provide a means of judging the quality of the vector basis and accuracy of the transient dynamic solution.

  12. Optochemical dissection of T-box gene-dependent medial floor plate development.

    PubMed

    Payumo, Alexander Y; Walker, Whitney J; McQuade, Lindsey E; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K

    2015-06-19

    In addition to their cell-autonomous roles in mesoderm development, the zebrafish T-box transcription factors no tail a (ntla) and spadetail (spt/tbx16) are required for medial floor plate (MFP) formation. Posterior MFP cells are completely absent in zebrafish embryos lacking both Ntla and Spt function, and genetic mosaic analyses have shown that the two T-box genes promote MFP development in a non-cell-autonomous manner. On the basis of these observations, it has been proposed that Ntla/Spt-dependent mesoderm-derived signals are required for the induction of posterior but not anterior MFP cells. To investigate the mechanisms by which Ntla and Spt regulate MFP development, we have used photoactivatable caged morpholinos (cMOs) to silence these T-box genes with spatiotemporal control. We find that posterior MFP formation requires Ntla or Spt activity during early gastrulation, specifically in lateral margin-derived cells that converge toward the midline during epiboly and somitogenesis. Nodal signaling-dependent MFP specification is maintained in the absence of Ntla and Spt function; however, midline cells in ntla;spt morphants exhibit aberrant morphogenetic movements, resulting in their anterior mislocalization. Our findings indicate that Ntla and Spt do not differentially regulate MFP induction along the anterior-posterior axis; rather, the T-box genes act redundantly within margin-derived cells to promote the posterior extension of MFP progenitors.

  13. Scale-dependent approaches to modeling spatial epidemiology of chronic wasting disease.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conner, Mary M.; Gross, John E.; Cross, Paul C.; Michael R, Ebinger; Gillies, Robert; Samuel, Michael D.; Miller, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    We organized the three chapters by scale and extent for which each method was developed or best suited. The first chapter covers methods appropriate to multi-jurisdictional or multi-state modeling, which we call “regional” scale. The second chapter covers methods appropriate for within state areas such as wildlife management units or metapopulations, which we call “landscape” scale. The third chapter covers methods appropriate for population or individual-based modeling, which we call “fine” scale. We know this rubric is somewhat artificial because many methods work at multiple scales. We hope, however, that this structure addresses some of the challenges faced by managers that work at local, regional, state, and national scales. Further, the resolution of empirical data often changes with spatial scale, which affects the utility of different modeling approaches. For example, individual-based models work best at modeling spread within populations, while risk analysis is most useful for summarizing data over larger scales such as a region. Because some methods are applicable at several scales, however, we included a graphic at the beginning of each method that indicates the range of

  14. Development and Implementation of an Ambulatory Integrated Care Pathway for Major Depressive Disorder and Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Awan, Saima; Samokhvalov, Andriy V; Aleem, Nadia; Hendershot, Christian S; Irving, Julie Anne; Kalvik, Anne; Lefebvre, Lisa; Le Foll, Bernard; Quilty, Lena; Voore, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Integrated care pathways (ICPs) provide an approach for delivering evidence-based treatment in a hospital setting. This column describes the development and pilot implementation in a clinical setting of an ICP for patients with concurrent major depressive disorder and alcohol dependence at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), an academic tertiary care hospital, in Toronto, Canada. The ICP methodology includes evidence reviews, knowledge translation, process reengineering, and change management. Pilot results indicate high patient satisfaction, evidence of symptom improvement, and excellent retention. PMID:26278235

  15. New Developments in Nickel-Hydrogen Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) Cell and Battery Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, Dwight B.; Fox, Chris L.; Miller, Lee E.

    1997-01-01

    THe Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) design is being developed as an advanced battery for military and commercial, aerospace and terrestrial applications. The DPV cell design offers high specific energy and energy density as well as reduced cost, while retaining the established Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) technology flight heritage and database. This advanced DPV design also offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell and battery configuration and a reduced part count. The DPV battery design promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and weight efficiency, and delivers cost and weight savings with minimal design risk.

  16. Development of Novel Pharmacotherapeutics for Tobacco Dependence: Progress and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The vast majority of tobacco smokers seeking to quit will relapse within the first month of abstinence. Currently available smoking cessation agents have limited utility in increasing rates of smoking cessation and in some cases there are notable safety concerns related to their use. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop safer and more efficacious smoking cessation medications. Methods: Here, we provide an overview of current efforts to develop new pharmacotherapeutic agents to facilitate smoking cessation, identified from ongoing clinical trials and published reports. Results: Nicotine is considered the major addictive agent in tobacco smoke, and the vast majority of currently available smoking cessation agents act by modulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) signaling. Accordingly, there is much effort directed toward developing novel small molecule therapeutics and biological agents such as nicotine vaccines for smoking cessation that act by modulating nAChR activity. Our increasing knowledge of the neurobiology of nicotine addiction has revealed new targets for novel smoking cessation therapeutics. Indeed, we highlight many examples of novel small molecule drug development around non-nAChR targets. Finally, there is a growing appreciation that medications already approved for other disease indications could show promise as smoking cessation agents, and we consider examples of such repurposing efforts. Conclusion: Ongoing clinical assessment of potential smoking cessation agents offers the promise of new effective medications. Nevertheless, much of our current knowledge of molecular mechanisms of nicotine addiction derived from preclinical studies has not yet been leveraged for medications development. PMID:23024249

  17. Stimulus dependence of the development of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Moorman, S J; Burress, C; Cordova, R; Slater, J

    1999-02-01

    It has been suggested that stimulus dependence is a general feature of all developing sensory systems. We tested this idea for the developing zebrafish vestibular system using a bioreactor the National Aeronautic and Space Agency designed to simulate microgravity for cells in culture on earth. We replaced the culture medium with aquarium water and maintained zebrafish eggs/hatchlings in the bioreactor for either 72 or 96 h postfertilization. These experimental animals displayed a swimming behavior that was indistinguishable from the control animals when illuminated from above. However, when illuminated from below, experimental animals swam not only dorsal surface up, but also lying on their side; they corkscrewed, swam vertical loops, and occasionally even swam upside down. When incubated in the bioreactor for 96 h, the saccular otolith was significantly smaller than normal, suggesting that otolith development was either delayed or slower than normal. When incubated in the bioreactor for 72 h, some animals were missing one or more otoliths. In contrast, control animals all had two otoliths on each side. This supports the idea that otolith development was delayed. Immediately upon removal from the bioreactor at 96 h, experimental animals showed some signs of compensatory eye rotation, but with a much less clear relationship between the orientation of the eye and the direction of gravity than the age-matched control animals. This difference was still obvious 1 day later. These results support the idea that development of the vestibular system in zebrafish is dependent on the presence of the normal stimulus the system is designed to detect.

  18. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans. PMID:24814483

  19. Dependency, democracy, and infant mortality: a quantitative, cross-national analysis of less developed countries.

    PubMed

    Shandra, John M; Nobles, Jenna; London, Bruce; Williamson, John B

    2004-07-01

    This study presents quantitative, sociological models designed to account for cross-national variation in infant mortality rates. We consider variables linked to four different theoretical perspectives: the economic modernization, social modernization, political modernization, and dependency perspectives. The study is based on a panel regression analysis of a sample of 59 developing countries. Our preliminary analysis based on additive models replicates prior studies to the extent that we find that indicators linked to economic and social modernization have beneficial effects on infant mortality. We also find support for hypotheses derived from the dependency perspective suggesting that multinational corporate penetration fosters higher levels of infant mortality. Subsequent analysis incorporating interaction effects suggest that the level of political democracy conditions the effects of dependency relationships based upon exports, investments from multinational corporations, and international lending institutions. Transnational economic linkages associated with exports, multinational corporations, and international lending institutions adversely affect infant mortality more strongly at lower levels of democracy than at higher levels of democracy: intranational, political factors interact with the international, economic forces to affect infant mortality. We conclude with some brief policy recommendations and suggestions for the direction of future research. PMID:15110423

  20. Dependency, democracy, and infant mortality: a quantitative, cross-national analysis of less developed countries.

    PubMed

    Shandra, John M; Nobles, Jenna; London, Bruce; Williamson, John B

    2004-07-01

    This study presents quantitative, sociological models designed to account for cross-national variation in infant mortality rates. We consider variables linked to four different theoretical perspectives: the economic modernization, social modernization, political modernization, and dependency perspectives. The study is based on a panel regression analysis of a sample of 59 developing countries. Our preliminary analysis based on additive models replicates prior studies to the extent that we find that indicators linked to economic and social modernization have beneficial effects on infant mortality. We also find support for hypotheses derived from the dependency perspective suggesting that multinational corporate penetration fosters higher levels of infant mortality. Subsequent analysis incorporating interaction effects suggest that the level of political democracy conditions the effects of dependency relationships based upon exports, investments from multinational corporations, and international lending institutions. Transnational economic linkages associated with exports, multinational corporations, and international lending institutions adversely affect infant mortality more strongly at lower levels of democracy than at higher levels of democracy: intranational, political factors interact with the international, economic forces to affect infant mortality. We conclude with some brief policy recommendations and suggestions for the direction of future research.

  1. Recent developments of functional magnetic resonance imaging research for drug development in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Harald; Prvulovic, David; Teipel, Stefan J; Bokde, Arun L W

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this review is to evaluate recent advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research in Alzheimer's disease for the development of therapeutic agents. The basic building block underpinning cognition is a brain network. The measured brain activity serves as an integrator of the various components, from genes to structural integrity, that impact the function of networks underpinning cognition. Specific networks can be interrogated using cognitive paradigms such as a learning task or a working memory task. In addition, recent advances in our understanding of neural networks allow one to investigate the function of a brain network by investigating the inherent coherency of the brain networks that can be measured during resting state. The coherent resting state networks allow testing in cognitively impaired patients that may not be possible with the use of cognitive paradigms. In particular the default mode network (DMN) includes the medial temporal lobe and posterior cingulate, two key regions that support episodic memory function and are impaired in the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). By investigating the effects of a prospective drug compound on this network, it could illuminate the specificity of the compound with a network supporting memory function. This could provide valuable information on the methods of action at physiological and behaviourally relevant levels. Utilizing fMRI opens up new areas of research and a new approach for drug development, as it is an integrative tool to investigate entire networks within the brain. The network based approach provides a new independent method from previous ones to translate preclinical knowledge into the clinical domain. PMID:21777651

  2. Recent developments of functional magnetic resonance imaging research for drug development in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Harald; Prvulovic, David; Teipel, Stefan J; Bokde, Arun L W

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this review is to evaluate recent advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research in Alzheimer's disease for the development of therapeutic agents. The basic building block underpinning cognition is a brain network. The measured brain activity serves as an integrator of the various components, from genes to structural integrity, that impact the function of networks underpinning cognition. Specific networks can be interrogated using cognitive paradigms such as a learning task or a working memory task. In addition, recent advances in our understanding of neural networks allow one to investigate the function of a brain network by investigating the inherent coherency of the brain networks that can be measured during resting state. The coherent resting state networks allow testing in cognitively impaired patients that may not be possible with the use of cognitive paradigms. In particular the default mode network (DMN) includes the medial temporal lobe and posterior cingulate, two key regions that support episodic memory function and are impaired in the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). By investigating the effects of a prospective drug compound on this network, it could illuminate the specificity of the compound with a network supporting memory function. This could provide valuable information on the methods of action at physiological and behaviourally relevant levels. Utilizing fMRI opens up new areas of research and a new approach for drug development, as it is an integrative tool to investigate entire networks within the brain. The network based approach provides a new independent method from previous ones to translate preclinical knowledge into the clinical domain.

  3. Retinoic Acid Receptor β Controls Development of Striatonigral Projection Neurons through FGF-Dependent and Meis1-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rataj-Baniowska, Monika; Niewiadomska-Cimicka, Anna; Paschaki, Marie; Szyszka-Niagolov, Monika; Carramolino, Laura; Torres, Miguel; Dollé, Pascal; Krężel, Wojciech

    2015-10-28

    The mammalian striatum controls sensorimotor and psychoaffective functions through coordinated activities of its two striatonigral and striatopallidal output pathways. Here we show that retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ) controls development of a subpopulation of GABAergic, Gad65-positive striatonigral projection neurons. In Rarb(-/-) knock-out mice, concomitant reduction of Gad65, dopamine receptor D1 (Drd1), and substance P expression at different phases of prenatal development was associated with reduced number of Drd1-positive cells at birth, in contrast to normal numbers of striatopallidal projection neurons expressing dopamine receptor D2. Fate mapping using BrdU pulse-chase experiments revealed that such deficits may originate from compromised proliferation of late-born striosomal neurons and lead to decreased number of Drd1-positive cells retaining BrdU in postnatal day (P) 0 Rarb(-/-) striatum. Reduced expression of Fgf3 in the subventricular zone of the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) at embryonic day 13.5 may underlie such deficits by inducing premature differentiation of neuronal progenitors, as illustrated by reduced expression of the proneural gene Ascl1 (Mash1) and increased expression of Meis1, a marker of postmitotic LGE neurons. In agreement with a critical role of FGF3 in this control, reduced number of Ascl1-expressing neural progenitors, and a concomitant increase of Meis1-expressing cells, were observed in primary cell cultures of Rarb(-/-) LGE. This defect was normalized by addition of fibroblast growth factor (FGF). Such data point to role of Meis1 in striatal development, also supported by reduced neuronal differentiation in the LGE of Meis1(-/-) embryos. Our data unveil a novel mechanism of development of striatonigral projection neurons involving retinoic acid and FGF, two signals required for positioning the boundaries of Meis1-expressing cells.

  4. Learning lessons from operational research in infectious diseases: can the same model be used for noncommunicable diseases in developing countries?

    PubMed Central

    Bosu, William K

    2014-01-01

    About three-quarters of global deaths from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) occur in developing countries. Nearly a third of these deaths occur before the age of 60 years. These deaths are projected to increase, fueled by such factors as urbanization, nutrition transition, lifestyle changes, and aging. Despite this burden, there is a paucity of research on NCDs, due to the higher priority given to infectious disease research. Less than 10% of research on cardiovascular diseases comes from developing countries. This paper assesses what lessons from operational research on infectious diseases could be applied to NCDs. The lessons are drawn from the priority setting for research, integration of research into programs and routine service delivery, the use of routine data, rapid-assessment survey methods, modeling, chemoprophylaxis, and the translational process of findings into policy and practice. With the lines between infectious diseases and NCDs becoming blurred, it is justifiable to integrate the programs for the two disease groups wherever possible, eg, screening for diabetes in tuberculosis. Applying these lessons will require increased political will, research capacity, ownership, use of local expertise, and research funding. PMID:25506254

  5. Loss of VGLUT3 Produces Circadian-Dependent Hyperdopaminergia and Ameliorates Motor Dysfunction and l-Dopa-Mediated Dyskinesias in a Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Divito, Christopher B.; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Case, Daniel T.; Williams, Sean-Paul G.; Stancati, Jennifer A.; Zhi, Lianteng; Rubio, Maria E.; Sortwell, Caryl E.; Collier, Timothy J.; Sulzer, David; Edwards, Robert H.; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The striatum is essential for many aspects of mammalian behavior, including motivation and movement, and is dysfunctional in motor disorders such as Parkinson's disease. The vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3) is expressed by striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs) and is thus well positioned to regulate dopamine (DA) signaling and locomotor activity, a canonical measure of basal ganglia output. We now report that VGLUT3 knock-out (KO) mice show circadian-dependent hyperlocomotor activity that is restricted to the waking cycle and is due to an increase in striatal DA synthesis, packaging, and release. Using a conditional VGLUT3 KO mouse, we show that deletion of the transporter from CINs, surprisingly, does not alter evoked DA release in the dorsal striatum or baseline locomotor activity. The mice do, however, display changes in rearing behavior and sensorimotor gating. Elevation of DA release in the global KO raised the possibility that motor deficits in a Parkinson's disease model would be reduced. Remarkably, after a partial 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-mediated DA depletion (∼70% in dorsal striatum), KO mice, in contrast to WT mice, showed normal motor behavior across the entire circadian cycle. l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine-mediated dyskinesias were also significantly attenuated. These findings thus point to new mechanisms to regulate basal ganglia function and potentially treat Parkinson's disease and related disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dopaminergic signaling is critical for both motor and cognitive functions in the mammalian nervous system. Impairments, such as those found in Parkinson's disease patients, can lead to severe motor deficits. Vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3) loads glutamate into secretory vesicles for neurotransmission and is expressed by discrete neuron populations throughout the nervous system. Here, we report that the absence of VGLUT3 in mice leads to an upregulation of the midbrain dopamine system. Remarkably, in a

  6. Development and characterization of an ex-vivo brain slice culture model of chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases have long incubation times in vivo, therefore, modeling the diseases ex-vivo will advance the development of rationale-based therapeutic strategies. An organotypic slice culture assay (POSCA) was recently developed for scrapie prions by inoculating mouse cerebellar brain slices with R...

  7. Donor funding priorities for communicable disease control in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Shiffman, Jeremy

    2006-11-01

    Prior research has considered donor funding for developing world health by recipient and donor country but not by disease. Examining funding by disease is critical since diseases may be in competition with one another for priority and donors may be making allocation decisions in ways that do not correspond to developing world need. In this study I calculate donor funding for 20 historically high-burden communicable diseases for the years 1996 to 2003 and examine factors that may explain variance in priority levels among diseases. I consider funding for developing world health from 42 major donors, classifying grants according to the communicable disease targeted. Data show that funding does not correspond closely with burden. Acute respiratory infections comprise more than a quarter of the burden among these diseases but receive less than 3% of direct aid. Malaria also stands out as a high-burden neglected disease. The evidence indicates that neither developing world need nor industrialized world interests explain all funding patterns, and that donors may be imitating one another in ways that do not take into account problems in the developing world. There is an urgent need for a major increase in funding for communicable disease control in the developing world, and for more balanced allocation of the resources already provided.

  8. Age-dependent roles of peroxisomes in the hippocampus of a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, especially affecting the hippocampus. Impairment of cognitive and memory functions is associated with amyloid β-peptide-induced oxidative stress and alterations in lipid metabolism. In this scenario, the dual role of peroxisomes in producing and removing ROS, and their function in fatty acids β-oxidation, may be critical. This work aims to investigating the possible involvement of peroxisomes in AD onset and progression, as studied in a transgenic mouse model, harboring the human Swedish familial AD mutation. We therefore characterized the peroxisomal population in the hippocampus, focusing on early, advanced, and late stages of the disease (3, 6, 9, 12, 18 months of age). Several peroxisome-related markers in transgenic and wild-type hippocampal formation were comparatively studied, by a combined molecular/immunohistochemical/ultrastructural approach. Results Our results demonstrate early and significant peroxisomal modifications in AD mice, compared to wild-type. Indeed, the peroxisomal membrane protein of 70 kDa and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 are induced at 3 months, possibly reflecting the need for efficient fatty acid β-oxidation, as a compensatory response to mitochondrial dysfunction. The concomitant presence of oxidative damage markers and the altered expression of antioxidant enzymes argue for early oxidative stress in AD. During physiological and pathological brain aging, important changes in the expression of peroxisome-related proteins, also correlating with ongoing gliosis, occur in the hippocampus. These age- and genotype-based alterations, strongly dependent on the specific marker considered, indicate metabolic and/or numerical remodeling of peroxisomal population. Conclusions Overall, our data support functional and biogenetic relationships linking peroxisomes to mitochondria and suggest peroxisomal proteins as biomarkers/therapeutic targets in pre-symptomatic AD. PMID

  9. Identification of novel radiation-induced p53-dependent transcripts extensively regulated during mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Quintens, Roel; Verreet, Tine; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Leysen, Liselotte; Michaux, Arlette; Verslegers, Mieke; Samari, Nada; Pani, Giuseppe; Verheyde, Joris; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a potent activator of the tumor suppressor gene p53, which itself regulates the transcription of genes involved in canonical pathways such as the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis as well as other biological processes like metabolism, autophagy, differentiation and development. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis on gene expression data from different in vivo and in vitro experiments to identify a signature of early radiation-responsive genes which were predicted to be predominantly regulated by p53. Moreover, we found that several genes expressed different transcript isoforms after irradiation in a p53-dependent manner. Among this gene signature, we identified novel p53 targets, some of which have not yet been functionally characterized. Surprisingly, in contrast to genes from the canonical p53-regulated pathways, our gene signature was found to be highly enriched during embryonic and post-natal brain development and during in vitro neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we could show that for a number of genes, radiation-responsive transcript variants were upregulated during development and differentiation, while radiation non-responsive variants were not. This suggests that radiation exposure of the developing brain and immature cortical neurons results in the p53-mediated activation of a neuronal differentiation program. Overall, our results further increase the knowledge of the radiation-induced p53 network of the embryonic brain and provide more evidence concerning the importance of p53 and its transcriptional targets during mouse brain development. PMID:25681390

  10. Temperature-dependent development in Chrysomela vigintipunctata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a stenothermal early-season breeder.

    PubMed

    Kutcherov, Dmitry

    2015-10-01

    Chrysomela vigintipunctata (Scopoli) is a univoltine leaf beetle commonly encountered on willows across the Palearctic forest zone. The preimaginal development in this species takes place during a short time period, from May to June, because larvae are unable to consume mature leaves of the host plant. Therefore, the diet quality imposes a time constraint, and it was expected that the temperature dependence of development in C. vigintipunctata should be adaptively adjusted to the shortness and cool conditions of the favorable season. It was experimentally determined that this leaf beetle was stenothermal at the larval stage, required 275.5 degree-days above the threshold of 9.0°C for total development from oviposition to adult emergence, and attained greater body mass at lower temperatures. However, in all of these aspects, the thermal ecology of C. vigintipunctata was similar to that of two related multivoltine species, C. populi and C. scripta. The interspecific similarity of thermal reaction norms for development rate and body size suggests that these reaction norms in C. vigintipunctata were unlikely to have been shaped by selection favoring faster development or growth early in the season. The results are discussed in terms of the "ecological fitting" concept, which states that a species may be successful in exploiting novel environments while retaining ecophysiological traits evolved elsewhere.

  11. Identification of novel radiation-induced p53-dependent transcripts extensively regulated during mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Quintens, Roel; Verreet, Tine; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Leysen, Liselotte; Michaux, Arlette; Verslegers, Mieke; Samari, Nada; Pani, Giuseppe; Verheyde, Joris; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A

    2015-02-13

    Ionizing radiation is a potent activator of the tumor suppressor gene p53, which itself regulates the transcription of genes involved in canonical pathways such as the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis as well as other biological processes like metabolism, autophagy, differentiation and development. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis on gene expression data from different in vivo and in vitro experiments to identify a signature of early radiation-responsive genes which were predicted to be predominantly regulated by p53. Moreover, we found that several genes expressed different transcript isoforms after irradiation in a p53-dependent manner. Among this gene signature, we identified novel p53 targets, some of which have not yet been functionally characterized. Surprisingly, in contrast to genes from the canonical p53-regulated pathways, our gene signature was found to be highly enriched during embryonic and post-natal brain development and during in vitro neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we could show that for a number of genes, radiation-responsive transcript variants were upregulated during development and differentiation, while radiation non-responsive variants were not. This suggests that radiation exposure of the developing brain and immature cortical neurons results in the p53-mediated activation of a neuronal differentiation program. Overall, our results further increase the knowledge of the radiation-induced p53 network of the embryonic brain and provide more evidence concerning the importance of p53 and its transcriptional targets during mouse brain development.

  12. [The specific features of the development of chronic non-infectious diseases in mechanics at the petrochemical plants].

    PubMed

    Gizatullina, D F; Karimova, L K; Iakhina, R R; Akhmetshina, V T

    2011-01-01

    The present-day petrochemical plant workers, such as 533 process installation repairmen and 332 control instrumentation and automation installation repairmen, were the subjects of the study. The working conditions and the specific features of the formation of non-communicable diseases were examined in the workers of the above occupations. The specific features of the development of musculoskeletal and circulatory diseases and hearing impairments were revealed in the workers depending on the conditions and nature of their work. The data were statistically processed using the correlation coefficient r and the chi2 test at p < 0.05. The parameters were standardized for the examinees' age. During the study, the authors accepted the hypothesis that working conditions affected the prevalence of individual types of chronic non-communicable diseases in process installation repairmen.

  13. Development of a resilience scale for Thai substance-dependent women: A mixed methods approach.

    PubMed

    Sakunpong, Nanchatsan; Choochom, Oraphin; Taephant, Nattasuda

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a resilience scale based on the experiences of substance-dependent women in Thailand and evaluate its validity and reliability. A sequential exploratory mixed methods design was employed as the main methodology to develop the resilience scale according to the results from qualitative data by analyzing focus group discussions of 13 participants. Then, the scale was administered to 252 substance-dependent women from four substance-treatment centers. The psychometric properties were explored with an index of item objective congruence (IOC), Pearson correlation, second-order confirmatory factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha coefficient to estimate the quantitative data. The qualitative results showed that resilience is defined by three themes: individual, family and community factors, consisted of 13 different categories. The quantitative results also revealed that all 71 items in the resilience scale passed the IOC criteria, convergence and construct validity. The goodness-of-fit indices demonstrated that the resilience model was consistent with the empirical data. (Chi-square=74.28, df=59, p-value=0.08, RMSEA=0.03, SRMR=0.04, NNFI=0.99, CFI=0.99, GFI=0.96). The internal consistency, assessed by a Cronbach's alpha score of 0.92, can be interpreted as demonstrating high reliability. Furthermore, the structure of the resilience scale was confirmed by the available resilience literature. This study can help clinicians gain a more comprehensive understanding regarding the complex process of resilience among substance-dependent women and aid them in providing these women with the appropriate interventions.

  14. Co-ordinated brain and craniofacial development depend upon Patched1/XIAP regulation of cell survival.

    PubMed

    Aoto, Kazushi; Trainor, Paul A

    2015-02-01

    Congenital brain and craniofacial defects often occur together as a consequence of their developmental dependency on common progenitor tissue interactions and signaling pathways during embryogenesis. A classic example of this is perturbation of midline embryo development, and disruption of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in the pathogenesis of holoprosencephaly. However, our understanding of how Hh signaling governs cell and tissue survival remains incomplete. Patched1 (Ptch1) is a well-known receptor for Hh ligands and Ptch1 overexpression is associated with cell and tissue-specific apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate that the X-linked inhibitory apoptosis protein (XIAP) associates with the C terminus of Ptch1 (Ptch1-C) in primary cilia to inhibit Ptch1-mediated cell death. Consistent with this observation, inhibition of XIAP suppresses cell proliferation, resulting in cell death and pathogenesis of an Hh loss-of-function phenotype. Thus, co-ordinated development of the brain and face is dependent in part upon XIAP mediation of Hh/Ptch1-regulated cell survival and apoptosis during embryogenesis. PMID:25292199

  15. Sugar-dependent modulation of neuronal development, regeneration, and plasticity by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Miller, Gregory M; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C

    2015-12-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) play important roles in the developing and mature nervous system, where they guide axons, maintain stable connections, restrict synaptic plasticity, and prevent axon regeneration following CNS injury. The chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (CS GAG) chains that decorate CSPGs are essential for their functions. Through these sugar chains, CSPGs are able to bind and regulate the activity of a diverse range of proteins. CSPGs have been found both to promote and inhibit neuronal growth. They can promote neurite outgrowth by binding to various growth factors such as midkine (MK), pleiotrophin (PTN), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other neurotrophin family members. CSPGs can also inhibit neuronal growth and limit plasticity by interacting with transmembrane receptors such as protein tyrosine phosphatase σ (PTPσ), leukocyte common antigen-related (LAR) receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, and the Nogo receptors 1 and 3 (NgR1 and NgR3). These CS-protein interactions depend on specific sulfation patterns within the CS GAG chains, and accordingly, particular CS sulfation motifs are upregulated during development, in the mature nervous system, and in response to CNS injury. Thus, spatiotemporal regulation of CS GAG biosynthesis may provide an important mechanism to control the functions of CSPGs and to modulate intracellular signaling pathways. Here, we will discuss these sulfation-dependent processes and highlight how the CS sugars on CSPGs contribute to neuronal growth, axon guidance, and plasticity in the nervous system.

  16. Experience-Dependent Bimodal Plasticity of Inhibitory Neurons in Early Development.

    PubMed

    He, Hai-Yan; Shen, Wanhua; Hiramoto, Masaki; Cline, Hollis T

    2016-06-15

    Inhibitory neurons are heterogeneous in the mature brain. It is unclear when and how inhibitory neurons express distinct structural and functional profiles. Using in vivo time-lapse imaging of tectal neuron structure and visually evoked Ca(2+) responses in tadpoles, we found that inhibitory neurons cluster into two groups with opposite valence of plasticity after 4 hr of dark and visual stimulation. Half decreased dendritic arbor size and Ca(2+) responses after dark and increased them after visual stimulation, matching plasticity in excitatory neurons. Half increased dendrite arbor size and Ca(2+) responses following dark and decreased them after stimulation. At the circuit level, visually evoked excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs were potentiated by visual experience and E/I remained constant. Our results indicate that developing inhibitory neurons fall into distinct functional groups with opposite experience-dependent plasticity and as such, are well positioned to foster experience-dependent synaptic plasticity and maintain circuit stability during labile periods of circuit development. PMID:27238867

  17. Sugar-dependent modulation of neuronal development, regeneration, and plasticity by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Miller, Gregory M; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C

    2015-12-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) play important roles in the developing and mature nervous system, where they guide axons, maintain stable connections, restrict synaptic plasticity, and prevent axon regeneration following CNS injury. The chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (CS GAG) chains that decorate CSPGs are essential for their functions. Through these sugar chains, CSPGs are able to bind and regulate the activity of a diverse range of proteins. CSPGs have been found both to promote and inhibit neuronal growth. They can promote neurite outgrowth by binding to various growth factors such as midkine (MK), pleiotrophin (PTN), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other neurotrophin family members. CSPGs can also inhibit neuronal growth and limit plasticity by interacting with transmembrane receptors such as protein tyrosine phosphatase σ (PTPσ), leukocyte common antigen-related (LAR) receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, and the Nogo receptors 1 and 3 (NgR1 and NgR3). These CS-protein interactions depend on specific sulfation patterns within the CS GAG chains, and accordingly, particular CS sulfation motifs are upregulated during development, in the mature nervous system, and in response to CNS injury. Thus, spatiotemporal regulation of CS GAG biosynthesis may provide an important mechanism to control the functions of CSPGs and to modulate intracellular signaling pathways. Here, we will discuss these sulfation-dependent processes and highlight how the CS sugars on CSPGs contribute to neuronal growth, axon guidance, and plasticity in the nervous system. PMID:26315937

  18. Dynamics of yolk steroid hormones during development in a reptile with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    PubMed

    Elf, P K; Lang, J W; Fivizzani, A J

    2002-06-01

    Many oviparous reptiles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD); i.e., the temperature at which the egg is incubated determines the sex of the offspring. In TSD reptiles, yolk steroids not only may influence sex determination, but also may mediate hormonal effects on subsequent growth and behavior, as in some avian species. We investigated changes in the levels of estradiol (E(2)) and testosterone (T) during development in yolks of snapping turtle eggs, examined how incubation temperature affects hormone levels, and determined how hormones in turtle eggs are influenced by individual females (=clutch effects). Results indicate significant decreases in both hormones (>50% decline) by the end of the sex-determining period, when two-thirds of the development is complete. The declines in both E(2) and T were significantly affected by incubation temperature, but in different ways. Eggs incubated at female-producing temperatures maintained high levels, those incubated at male-producing temperatures had low E(2) values, and eggs incubated at pivotal temperatures had intermediate levels of E(2). At all three temperatures, T values underwent significant but approximately equal declines, except during the developmental stages just after the sex-determining period, when T levels decreased more at the male-producing temperature than at either of the other two temperatures. Initially, there were significant clutch effects in both hormones, but such differences, attributable to individual females, were maintained only for E(2) later in development. Here we report for the first time that incubation temperature significantly affects the hormonal environment of the developing embryo of a turtle with temperature-dependent sex determination. Based on this and related findings, we propose that yolk sex steroids influence sexual differentiation in these TSD species and play a role in sex determination at pivotal temperatures.

  19. Dynamics of yolk steroid hormones during development in a reptile with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    PubMed

    Elf, P K; Lang, J W; Fivizzani, A J

    2002-06-01

    Many oviparous reptiles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD); i.e., the temperature at which the egg is incubated determines the sex of the offspring. In TSD reptiles, yolk steroids not only may influence sex determination, but also may mediate hormonal effects on subsequent growth and behavior, as in some avian species. We investigated changes in the levels of estradiol (E(2)) and testosterone (T) during development in yolks of snapping turtle eggs, examined how incubation temperature affects hormone levels, and determined how hormones in turtle eggs are influenced by individual females (=clutch effects). Results indicate significant decreases in both hormones (>50% decline) by the end of the sex-determining period, when two-thirds of the development is complete. The declines in both E(2) and T were significantly affected by incubation temperature, but in different ways. Eggs incubated at female-producing temperatures maintained high levels, those incubated at male-producing temperatures had low E(2) values, and eggs incubated at pivotal temperatures had intermediate levels of E(2). At all three temperatures, T values underwent significant but approximately equal declines, except during the developmental stages just after the sex-determining period, when T levels decreased more at the male-producing temperature than at either of the other two temperatures. Initially, there were significant clutch effects in both hormones, but such differences, attributable to individual females, were maintained only for E(2) later in development. Here we report for the first time that incubation temperature significantly affects the hormonal environment of the developing embryo of a turtle with temperature-dependent sex determination. Based on this and related findings, we propose that yolk sex steroids influence sexual differentiation in these TSD species and play a role in sex determination at pivotal temperatures. PMID:12161199

  20. Aβ-dependent reduction of NCAM2-mediated synaptic adhesion contributes to synapse loss in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Liew, Heng Tai; Shepherd, Claire; Halliday, Glenda M.; Stevens, Claire H.; Ke, Yazi D.; Ittner, Lars M.; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by synapse loss due to mechanisms that remain poorly understood. We show that the neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2) is enriched in synapses in the human hippocampus. This enrichment is abolished in the hippocampus of AD patients and in brains of mice overexpressing the human amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein carrying the pathogenic Swedish mutation. Aβ binds to NCAM2 at the cell surface of cultured hippocampal neurons and induces removal of NCAM2 from synapses. In AD hippocampus, cleavage of the membrane proximal external region of NCAM2 is increased and soluble extracellular fragments of NCAM2 (NCAM2-ED) accumulate. Knockdown of NCAM2 expression or incubation with NCAM2-ED induces disassembly of GluR1-containing glutamatergic synapses in cultured hippocampal neurons. Aβ-dependent disassembly of GluR1-containing synapses is inhibited in neurons overexpressing a cleavage-resistant mutant of NCAM2. Our data indicate that Aβ-dependent disruption of NCAM2 functions in AD hippocampus contributes to synapse loss. PMID:26611261

  1. Barrier contraceptives and sexually transmitted diseases in women: a comparison of female-dependent methods and condoms.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, M J; Davidson, A J; Chen, J H; Judson, F N; Douglas, J M

    1992-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Most efforts at sexually transmitted disease (STD) protection center on condom use, but little is known about how condoms compare with other barrier methods, particularly those controlled by women. METHODS. To evaluate the effect of different barrier contraceptives on the prevalence of STDs and other vaginal infections, we retrospectively studied 5681 visits by women to an urban STD clinic. RESULTS. As compared with women using no contraceptive or with tubal ligations, women using the contraceptive sponge or diaphragm had at least 65% lower rates of infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Trichomonas vaginalis, while condom users had 34% and 30% lower rates, respectively. For Chlamydia trachomatis, the reduction was 13% among sponge users, 72% among diaphragm users, and 3% among condom users, although these differences were not significant. When compared with women using condoms, women using female-dependent methods (sponge or diaphragm) had significantly lower rates of both gonorrhea and trichomoniasis. Vaginal candidiasis was more common among women using diaphragms but not other barrier methods, while rates of bacterial vaginosis were similar among all groups. CONCLUSIONS. Women using the contraceptive sponge or diaphragm experience protection from STDs to a greater extent than those relying on condoms. Female-dependent barrier contraceptives should receive more attention in STD risk-reduction programs. PMID:1566944

  2. Aβ-dependent reduction of NCAM2-mediated synaptic adhesion contributes to synapse loss in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Liew, Heng Tai; Shepherd, Claire; Halliday, Glenda M; Stevens, Claire H; Ke, Yazi D; Ittner, Lars M; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by synapse loss due to mechanisms that remain poorly understood. We show that the neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2) is enriched in synapses in the human hippocampus. This enrichment is abolished in the hippocampus of AD patients and in brains of mice overexpressing the human amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein carrying the pathogenic Swedish mutation. Aβ binds to NCAM2 at the cell surface of cultured hippocampal neurons and induces removal of NCAM2 from synapses. In AD hippocampus, cleavage of the membrane proximal external region of NCAM2 is increased and soluble extracellular fragments of NCAM2 (NCAM2-ED) accumulate. Knockdown of NCAM2 expression or incubation with NCAM2-ED induces disassembly of GluR1-containing glutamatergic synapses in cultured hippocampal neurons. Aβ-dependent disassembly of GluR1-containing synapses is inhibited in neurons overexpressing a cleavage-resistant mutant of NCAM2. Our data indicate that Aβ-dependent disruption of NCAM2 functions in AD hippocampus contributes to synapse loss. PMID:26611261

  3. Challenges and Opportunities in Rare Disease Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Smith, B P

    2016-10-01

    Each month, Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics focuses on a particular theme. Twice a year, the associate editors, editors, and staff get together to discuss journal business and spend time setting up the calendar of themes. Often, there are no experts among us to take on a particular topic that we have chosen. The consequence is that one or two of us take on the theme and then have a crash course to learn as much as they can about it in order to solicit meaningful articles. This month's theme on rare diseases is such a case. PMID:27612019

  4. Research in congenital heart disease: a comparative bibliometric analysis between developing and developed countries.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Theresa; Abdul-Sater, Zahi; Obeid, Mounir; Arabi, Mariam; Diab, Karim; Masri, Samer; Al Haless, Zohair; Nemer, Georges; Bitar, Fadi

    2013-02-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital anomaly, affecting 1 % of live births. The field of pediatric cardiology has witnessed major advances over the past 25 years triggered by research initiatives focusing on CHD. However, large disparities exist in research capabilities between Arab developing nations and the developed nations. This study used bibliometric analysis to assess the contribution of the Arab countries to CHD research. To identify articles on CHD published in the Arab countries, the United States, and Europe, a systematic search was run on MEDLINE, PubMed, and Scopus. The Arab countries, with an estimated population of 362 million, published 530 research articles addressing CHD in the last 25 years (average, 1.5 articles/10(6) population). This compares with 12,936 research articles published in the United States (average, 41 articles/10(6) population) and 12,260 published in Europe (average, 24.3 articles/10(6) population). Basic research relating to genetics and animal models of CHD is emerging sparsely in the Arab world, with few articles published in high-impact-factor journals. The Arab world research output in the field of CHD per capita is substantially low, estimated to be 29 times less than in developed countries. Despite the minimal increase in published research articles in global periodicals, most of the research relating to CHD continues to be far from innovative. Regional collaborations with international linkage are starting to evolve. The research facilities in the Arab countries need to increase substantially in research and infrastructure funding to keep up with the pace of research in developing countries. PMID:22878810

  5. Latent class model with familial dependence to address heterogeneity in complex diseases: adapting the approach to family-based association studies.

    PubMed

    Bureau, Alexandre; Croteau, Jordie; Tayeb, Arafat; Mérette, Chantal; Labbe, Aurélie

    2011-04-01

    Clinical diagnoses of complex diseases may often encompass multiple genetically heterogeneous disorders. One way of dissecting this heterogeneity is to apply latent class (LC) analysis to measurements related to the diagnosis, such as detailed symptoms, to define more homogeneous disease sub-types, influenced by a smaller number of genes that will thus be more easily detectable. We have previously developed a LC model allowing dependence between the latent disease class status of relatives within families. We have also proposed a strategy to incorporate the posterior probability of class membership of each subject in parametric linkage analysis, which is not directly transferable to genetic association methods. Under the framework of family-based association tests (FBAT), we now propose to make the contribution of an affected subject to the FBAT statistic proportional to his or her posterior class membership probability. Simulations showed a modest but robust power advantage compared to simply assigning each subject to his or her most probable class, and important power gains over the analysis of the disease diagnosis without LC modeling under certain scenarios. The use of LC analysis with FBAT is illustrated using autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms on families from the Autism Genetics Research Exchange, where we examined eight regions previously associated to autism in this sample. The analysis using the posterior probability of membership to an LC detected an association in the JARID2 gene as significant as that for ASD (P = 3 × 10(-5)) but with a larger effect size (odds ratio = 2.17 vs. 1.55).

  6. Vanadium induces dopaminergic neurotoxicity via protein kinase Cdelta dependent oxidative signaling mechanisms: Relevance to etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Song, Chunjuan; Witte, Travis; Houk, Robert; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2009-10-15

    Environmental exposure to neurotoxic metals through various sources including exposure to welding fumes has been linked to an increased incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD). Welding fumes contain many different metals including vanadium typically present as particulates containing vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}). However, possible neurotoxic effects of this metal oxide on dopaminergic neuronal cells are not well studied. In the present study, we characterized vanadium-induced oxidative stress-dependent cellular events in cell culture models of PD. V{sub 2}O{sub 5} was neurotoxic to dopaminergic neuronal cells including primary nigral dopaminergic neurons and the EC{sub 50} was determined to be 37 {mu}M in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cell model. The neurotoxic effect was accompanied by a time-dependent uptake of vanadium and upregulation of metal transporter proteins Tf and DMT1 in N27 cells. Additionally, vanadium resulted in a threefold increase in reactive oxygen species generation, followed by release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytoplasm and subsequent activation of caspase-9 (> fourfold) and caspase-3 (> ninefold). Interestingly, vanadium exposure induced proteolytic cleavage of native protein kinase Cdelta (PKC{delta}, 72-74 kDa) to yield a 41 kDa catalytically active fragment resulting in a persistent increase in PKC{delta} kinase activity. Co-treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK significantly blocked vanadium-induced PKC{delta} proteolytic activation, indicating that caspases mediate PKC{delta} cleavage. Also, co-treatment with Z-VAD-FMK almost completely inhibited V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-induced DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, PKC{delta} knockdown using siRNA protected N27 cells from V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-induced apoptotic cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate that vanadium can exert neurotoxic effects in dopaminergic neuronal cells via caspase-3-dependent PKC{delta} cleavage, suggesting that metal exposure may promote nigral

  7. Vanadium Induces Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity Via Protein Kinase C-Delta Dependent Oxidative Signaling Mechanisms: Relevance to Etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Song, Chunjuan; Witte, Travis; Houk, R. S.; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental exposure to neurotoxic metals through various sources including exposure to welding fumes has been linked to an increased incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD). Welding fumes contain many different metals including vanadium typically present as particulates containing vanadium pentoxide (V2O5). However, possible neurotoxic effects of this metal oxide on dopaminergic neuronal cells are not well studied. In the present study, we characterized vanadium-induced oxidative stress-dependent cellular events in cell culture models of PD. V2O5 was neurotoxic to dopaminergic neuronal cells including primary nigral dopaminergic neurons and the EC50 was determined to be 37 μM in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cell model. The neurotoxic effect was accompanied by a time-dependent uptake of vanadium and upregulation of metal transporter proteins Tf and DMT1 in N27 cells. Additionally, vanadium resulted in a threefold increase in reactive oxygen species generation, followed by release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytoplasm and subsequent activation of caspase-9 (>fourfold) and caspase-3 (>ninefold). Interestingly, vanadium exposure induced proteolytic cleavage of native protein kinase Cdelta (PKCδ, 72-74 kDa) to yield a 41 kDa catalytically active fragment resulting in a persistent increase in PKCδ kinase activity. Co-treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor ZVAD-FMK significantly blocked vanadium-induced PKCδ proteolytic activation, indicating that caspases mediate PKCδ cleavage. Also, co-treatment with Z-VAD-FMK almost completely inhibited V2O5-induced DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, PKCδ knockdown using siRNA protected N27 cells from V2O5-induced apoptotic cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate vanadium can exert neurotoxic effects in dopaminergic neuronal cells via caspase-3-dependent PKCδ cleavage, suggesting that metal exposure may promote nigral dopaminergic degeneration. PMID:19646462

  8. Collection and Characterization of Samples for Establishment of a Serum Repository for Lyme Disease Diagnostic Test Development and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Molins, Claudia R.; Sexton, Christopher; Young, John W.; Ashton, Laura V.; Pappert, Ryan; Beard, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    Serological assays and a two-tiered test algorithm are recommended for laboratory confirmation of Lyme disease. In the United States, the sensitivity of two-tiered testing using commercially available serology-based assays is dependent on the stage of infection and ranges from 30% in the early localized disease stage to near 100% in late-stage disease. Other variables, including subjectivity in reading Western blots, compliance with two-tiered recommendations, use of different first- and second-tier test combinations, and use of different test samples, all contribute to variation in two-tiered test performance. The availability and use of sample sets from well-characterized Lyme disease patients and controls are needed to better assess the performance of existing tests and for development of improved assays. To address this need, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health prospectively collected sera from patients at all stages of Lyme disease, as well as healthy donors and patients with look-alike diseases. Patients and healthy controls were recruited using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. Samples from all included patients were retrospectively characterized by two-tiered testing. The results from two-tiered testing corroborated the need for novel and improved diagnostics, particularly for laboratory diagnosis of earlier stages of infection. Furthermore, the two-tiered results provide a baseline with samples from well-characterized patients that can be used in comparing the sensitivity and specificity of novel diagnostics. Panels of sera and accompanying clinical and laboratory testing results are now available to Lyme disease serological test users and researchers developing novel tests. PMID:25122862

  9. Tensin2-deficient mice on FVB/N background develop severe glomerular disease

    PubMed Central

    UCHIO-YAMADA, Kozue; MONOBE, Yoko; AKAGI, Ken-ichi; YAMAMOTO, Yoshie; OGURA, Atsuo; MANABE, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Tensin2 (Tns2) is an essential component for the maintenance of glomerular basement membrane (GBM) structures. Tns2-deficient mice were previously shown to develop mild glomerular injury on a DBA/2 background, but not on a C57BL/6J or a 129/SvJ background, suggesting that glomerular injury by the deletion of Tns2 was strongly dependent on the genetic background. To further understand the mechanisms for the onset and the progression of glomerular injury by the deletion of Tns2, we generated Tns2-deficient mice on an FVB/N (FVB) strain, which is highly sensitive to glomerular disease. Tns2-deficient mice on FVB (FVBGN) developed severe nephrotic syndrome, and female FVBGN mice died within 8 weeks. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that FVBGN mice exhibited severe glomerular defects with mesangial process invasion of glomerular capillary tufts, lamination and thickening of the GBM and subsequent podocyte foot process effacement soon after birth. Aberrant laminin components containing α1, α2 and β1 chains, which are normally expressed in the mesangium, accumulated in the GBM of FVBGN, suggesting that these components originated from mesangial cells that invaded glomerular capillary tufts. Compared to Tns2-deficient mice on the other backgrounds in previous reports, FVBGN mice developed earlier onset of glomerular defects and rapid progression of renal failure. Thus, this study further extended our understanding of the possible genetic background effect on the deterioration of nephrotic syndrome by Tns2 deficiency. PMID:26854109

  10. Activity-dependent development of cortical axon terminations in the spinal cord and brain stem.

    PubMed

    Martin, J H; Kably, B; Hacking, A

    1999-03-01

    corticocuneate terminations also is activity-dependent but that development of corticorubral terminations is not. Activity-dependent CS development is a plausible mechanism by which early motor experiences could shape the anatomical and functional organization of the motor systems during a critical postnatal period. PMID:10204771

  11. Infiltration with Agrobacterium tumefaciens induces host defense and development-dependent responses in the infiltrated zone.

    PubMed

    Pruss, Gail J; Nester, Eugene W; Vance, Vicki

    2008-12-01

    Despite the widespread use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to transfer genes into plant systems, host responses to this plant pathogen are not well understood. The present study shows that disarmed strains of Agrobacterium induce distinct host responses when infiltrated into leaves of Nicotiana tabacum. The responses are limited to the infiltrated zone and consist of i) induction of pathogenesis-related (PR) gene PR-1 expression and resistance to subsequent infection with tobacco mosaic virus, ii) chlorosis and loss of chloroplast rRNAs, and iii) inhibition of leaf expansion. Induction of the latter two sets of responses depends on the age of the leaf and is most apparent in young leaves. Strains with or without binary vectors induce all the responses, showing that DNA transfer is neither required nor inhibitory. A. tumefaciens cured of the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid is slightly defective for induction of the three responses, showing that Ti plasmid-encoded factors produced by the disarmed strains contribute only slightly. However, T-DNA-encoded factors alter at least one of the host responses, because infiltration with the oncogenic strain C58 induced more pronounced chlorosis than the disarmed control. Auxin is one of the T-DNA products responsible for disease induction by oncogenic A. tumefaciens. We found that C58-infiltrated zones-but not those infiltrated with the disarmed control-have increased levels of miR393, a microRNA that represses auxin signaling and contributes to antibacterial resistance. PMID:18986249

  12. Regulation of microRNAs and their role in liver development, regeneration and disease.

    PubMed

    Finch, Megan L; Marquardt, Jens U; Yeoh, George C; Callus, Bernard A

    2014-09-01

    Since their discovery more than a decade ago microRNAs have been demonstrated to have profound effects on almost every aspect of biology. Numerous studies in recent years have shown that microRNAs have important roles in development and in the etiology and progression of disease. This review is focused on microRNAs and the roles they play in liver development, regeneration and liver disease; particularly chronic liver diseases such as alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, viral hepatitis and primary liver cancer. The key microRNAs identified in liver development and chronic liver disease will be discussed together with, where possible, the target messenger RNAs that these microRNAs regulate to profoundly alter these processes. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: The Non-coding RNA Revolution.

  13. Morphologic Basis for Developing Diverticular Disease, Diverticulitis, and Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Wedel, Thilo; Barrenschee, Martina; Lange, Christina; Cossais, François; Böttner, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Diverticula of the colon are pseudodiverticula defined by multiple outpouchings of the mucosal and submucosal layers penetrating through weak spots of the muscle coat along intramural blood vessels. A complete prolapse consists of a diverticular opening, a narrowed neck, and a thinned diverticular dome underneath the serosal covering. The susceptibility of diverticula to inflammation is explained by local ischemia, translocation of pathogens due to retained stool, stercoral trauma by fecaliths, and microperforations. Local inflammation may lead to phlegmonous diverticulitis, paracolic/mesocolic abscess, bowel perforation, peritonitis, fistula formation, and stenotic strictures. Diverticular bleeding is due to an asymmetric rupture of distended vasa recta at the diverticular dome and not primarily linked to inflammation. Structural and functional changes of the bowel wall in diverticular disease comprise: i) Altered amount, composition, and metabolism of connective tissue; ii) Enteric myopathy with muscular thickening, deranged architecture, and altered myofilament composition; iii) Enteric neuropathy with hypoganglionosis, neurotransmitter imbalance, deficiency of neurotrophic factors and nerve fiber remodeling; and iv) Disturbed intestinal motility both in vivo (increased intraluminal pressure, motility index, high-amplitude propagated contractions) and in vitro (altered spontaneous and pharmacologically triggered contractility). Besides established etiologic factors, recent studies suggest that novel pathophysiologic concepts should be considered in the pathogenesis of diverticular disease. PMID:26989376

  14. Multicentric Castleman's disease developing during follow-up of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sawata, Tetsuro; Bando, Masashi; Nakayama, Masayuki; Mato, Naoko; Takemura, Tamiko; Sugiyama, Yukihiko

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary sarcoidosis is reported to have complication of lymphoproliferative disease such as malignant lymphoma, but the complication of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) is rarely reported. In our case of a 60-year-old woman, bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy was noted in her chest X-ray. We performed a transbronchial lung biopsy. She was diagnosed as having pulmonary sarcoidosis (Stage II). The shadow on chest X-ray disappeared without treatment. However, after 8 years, swelling of the mediastinal and abdominal lymph node, thickened bronchovascular bundle, and multiple nodular shadows were identified, and a thoracoscopic lung biopsy was performed. Based on the histopathological findings and elevated serum interleukin-6 level (75.7 pg/mL), she was diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis complicated by MCD. When a change in chest X-ray findings are found during monitoring of pulmonary sarcoidosis, it is important to proceed with a thoracoscopic lung biopsy, because of the possibility of the rare complication of MCD. PMID:27512568

  15. The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM): a higher oxidative stress and age-dependent degenerative diseases model.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoichi; Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Kumagai, Naoko; Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Ishii, Sanae; Furukawa, Ayako; Takei, Shiro; Sakura, Masaaki; Kawamura, Noriko; Hosokawa, Masanori

    2009-04-01

    The SAM strain of mice is actually a group of related inbred strains consisting of a series of SAMP (accelerated senescence-prone) and SAMR (accelerated senescence-resistant) strains. Compared with the SAMR strains, the SAMP strains show a more accelerated senescence process, a shorter lifespan, and an earlier onset and more rapid progress of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to human geriatric disorders. The higher oxidative stress status observed in SAMP mice is partly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and may be a cause of this senescence acceleration and age-dependent alterations in cell structure and function. Based on our recent observations, we discuss a possible mechanism for mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in the excessive production of reactive oxygen species, and a role for the hyperoxidative stress status in neurodegeneration in SAMP mice. These SAM strains can serve as a useful tool to understand the cellular mechanisms of age-dependent degeneration, and to develop clinical interventions. PMID:18688709

  16. CFTR mediates bicarbonate-dependent activation of miR-125b in preimplantation embryo development

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yong Chao; Chen, Hui; Fok, Kin Lam; Tsang, Lai Ling; Yu, Mei Kuen; Zhang, Xiao Hu; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Xiaohua; Chung, Yiu Wa; Ma, Alvin Chun Hang; Leung, Anskar Yu Hung; Huang, He Feng; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2012-01-01

    Although HCO3− is known to be required for early embryo development, its exact role remains elusive. Here we report that HCO3− acts as an environmental cue in regulating miR-125b expression through CFTR-mediated influx during preimplantation embryo development. The results show that the effect of HCO3− on preimplantation embryo development can be suppressed by interfering the function of a HCO3−-conducting channel, CFTR, by a specific inhibitor or gene knockout. Removal of extracellular HCO3− or inhibition of CFTR reduces miR-125b expression in 2 cell-stage mouse embryos. Knockdown of miR-125b mimics the effect of HCO3− removal and CFTR inhibition, while injection of miR-125b precursor reverses it. Downregulation of miR-125b upregulates p53 cascade in both human and mouse embryos. The activation of miR-125b is shown to be mediated by sAC/PKA-dependent nuclear shuttling of NF-κB. These results have revealed a critical role of CFTR in signal transduction linking the environmental HCO3− to activation of miR-125b during preimplantation embryo development and indicated the importance of ion channels in regulation of miRNAs. PMID:22664907

  17. Tuberous sclerosis 1 (Tsc1)-dependent metabolic checkpoint controls development of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyan; Huang, Gonghua; Zeng, Hu; Yang, Kai; Lamb, Richard F.; Chi, Hongbo

    2013-01-01

    Coordination of cell metabolism and immune signals is crucial for lymphocyte priming. Emerging evidence also highlights the importance of cell metabolism for the activation of innate immunity upon pathogen challenge, but there is little evidence of how this process contributes to immune cell development. Here we show that differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs) from bone marrow precursors is associated with dynamic regulation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and cell metabolism. Unexpectedly, enhancing mTORC1 activity via ablation of its negative regulator tuberous sclerosis 1 (Tsc1) impaired DC development in vivo and in vitro, associated with defective cell survival and proliferation. Moreover, Tsc1 deficiency caused DC spontaneous maturation but a propensity to differentiate into other lineages, and attenuated DC-mediated effector TH1 responses. Mechanistically, Tsc1-deficient DCs exhibited increased glycolysis, mitochondrial respiration, and lipid synthesis that were partly mediated by the transcription factor Myc, highlighting a key role of Tsc1 in modulating metabolic programming of DC differentiation. Further, Tsc1 signaled through Rheb to down-regulate mTORC1 for proper DC development, whereas its effect at modulating mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) activity was largely dispensable. Our results demonstrate that the interplay between Tsc1-Rheb-mTORC1 signaling and Myc-dependent bioenergetic and biosynthetic activities constitutes a key metabolic checkpoint to orchestrate DC development. PMID:24282297

  18. Neuronal and glial purinergic receptors functions in neuron development and brain disease

    PubMed Central

    del Puerto, Ana; Wandosell, Francisco; Garrido, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    Brain development requires the interaction of complex signaling pathways, involving different cell types and molecules. For a long time, most attention has focused on neurons in a neuronocentric conceptualization of central nervous system development, these cells fulfilling an intrinsic program that establishes the brain’s morphology and function. By contrast, glia have mainly been studied as support cells, offering guidance or as the cells that react to brain injury. However, new evidence is appearing that demonstrates a more fundamental role of glial cells in the control of different aspects of neuronal development and function, events in which the influence of neurons is at best weak. Moreover, it is becoming clear that the function and organization of the nervous system depends heavily on reciprocal neuron–glia interactions. During development, neurons are often generated far from their final destination and while intrinsic mechanisms are responsible for neuronal migration and growth, they need support and regulatory influences from glial cells in order to migrate correctly. Similarly, the axons emitted by neurons often have to reach faraway targets and in this sense, glia help define the way that axons grow. Moreover, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells ultimately envelop axons, contributing to the generation of nodes of Ranvier. Finally, recent publications show that astrocytes contribute to the modulation of synaptic transmission. In this sense, purinergic receptors are expressed widely by glial cells and neurons, and recent evidence points to multiple roles of purines and purinergic receptors in neuronal development and function, from neurogenesis to axon growth and functional axonal maturation, as well as in pathological conditions in the brain. This review will focus on the role of glial and neuronal secreted purines, and on the purinergic receptors, fundamentally in the control of neuronal development and function, as well as in diseases of the

  19. Effect of shade on Arabica coffee berry disease development: Toward an agroforestry system to reduce disease impact.

    PubMed

    Mouen Bedimo, J A; Njiayouom, I; Bieysse, D; Ndoumbè Nkeng, M; Cilas, C; Nottéghem, J L

    2008-12-01

    Coffee berry disease (CBD), caused by Colletotrichum kahawae, is a major constraint for Arabica coffee cultivation in Africa. The disease is specific to green berries and can lead to 60% harvest losses. In Cameroon, mixed cropping systems of coffee with other crops, such as fruit trees, are very widespread agricultural practices. Fruit trees are commonly planted at random on coffee farms, providing a heterogeneous shading pattern for coffee trees growing underneath. Based on a recent study of CBD, it is known that those plants can reduce disease incidence. To assess the specific effect of shade, in situ and in vitro disease development was compared between coffee trees shaded artificially by a net and trees located in full sunlight. In the field, assessments confirmed a reduction in CBD on trees grown under shade compared with those grown in full sunlight. Artificial inoculations in the laboratory showed that shade did not have any effect on the intrinsic susceptibility of coffee berries to CBD. Coffee shading mainly acts on environmental parameters in limiting disease incidence. In addition to reducing yield losses, agroforestry system may also be helpful in reducing chemical control of the disease and in diversifying coffee growers' incomes.

  20. THE ROLE OF SON IN SPLICING, DEVELOPMENT AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xinyi; Ng, Huck-Hui; Bubulya, Paula A.

    2014-01-01

    SON is a nuclear protein involved in multiple cellular processes including transcription, pre-mRNA splicing and cell cycle regulation. Although SON was discovered 25 years ago, the importance of SON’s function was only realized recently when its roles in nuclear organization and pre-mRNA splicing as well as the influence of these activities in maintaining cellular health were unveiled. Furthermore, SON was implicated to have a key role in stem cells as well as during the onset of various diseases such as cancer, influenza, and hepatitis. Here we review the progress that has been made in studying this multi-functional protein and discuss questions that remain to be answered about SON. PMID:24789761

  1. Herbal drugs against cardiovascular disease: traditional medicine and modern development.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingjun; Zhou, Xiuwen; Li, Na; Sun, Miao; Lv, Juanxiu; Xu, Zhice

    2015-09-01

    Herbal products have been used as conventional medicines for thousands of years, particularly in Eastern countries. Thousands of clinical and experimental investigations have focused on the effects and mechanisms-of-action of herbal medicine in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Considering the history of clinical practice and the great potentials of herb medicine and/or its ingredients, a review on this topic would be helpful. This article discusses possible effects of herbal remedies in the prevention and treatment of CVDs. Crucially, we also summarize some underlying pharmacological mechanisms for herb products in cardiovascular regulations, which might provide interesting information for further understanding the effects of herbal medicines, and boost the prospect of new herbal products against CVDs.

  2. Herbal drugs against cardiovascular disease: traditional medicine and modern development.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingjun; Zhou, Xiuwen; Li, Na; Sun, Miao; Lv, Juanxiu; Xu, Zhice

    2015-09-01

    Herbal products have been used as conventional medicines for thousands of years, particularly in Eastern countries. Thousands of clinical and experimental investigations have focused on the effects and mechanisms-of-action of herbal medicine in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Considering the history of clinical practice and the great potentials of herb medicine and/or its ingredients, a review on this topic would be helpful. This article discusses possible effects of herbal remedies in the prevention and treatment of CVDs. Crucially, we also summarize some underlying pharmacological mechanisms for herb products in cardiovascular regulations, which might provide interesting information for further understanding the effects of herbal medicines, and boost the prospect of new herbal products against CVDs. PMID:25956424

  3. Elevated galanin may predict the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus for development of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenwen; Fang, Penghua; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia among the elderly and is characterized by progressive loss of memory and cognition. Epidemiological and clinical studies demonstrated that type 2 diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease, i.e., the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are frequently companied with Alzheimer's disease symptoms. Despite many studies recently probed into the comorbid state of both diseases, so far the precise mechanism for this association is poorly understood. Emerging evidences suggest that defects in galanin play a central role on type 2 diabetes mellitus and is considered to be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease development. This review provides a new insight into the multivariate relationship among galanin, type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the effect of galanin system on the cross-talk between both diseases in human and rodent models. The current data support that activating central GalR2 attenuates insulin resistance and Alzheimer's disease feature in animal models. These may help us better understanding the pathogenesis of both diseases and provide useful hints for the development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease.

  4. [Drug development for cardiorenal disease based on oxidative stress control].

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Masaki; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Sakurada, Takumi; Ishizawa, Yuki; Yamano, Noriko; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Ikeda, Yasumasa; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a key factor involved in the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced as a result of redox reactions in various cells, have been recognized as key chemical mediators causing cellular damage and organ dysfunction in CVD and CKD. Nifedipine, a well-known calcium channel blocker, is extremely sensitive to light which gets converted to its nitroso analog, nitrosonifedipine (NO-NIF) in the presence of ultraviolet and visible light. The so formed NO-NIF blocks calcium channel quite weakly compared to that of nifedipine. However, we elucidated for the first time that NO-NIF is converted to NO-NIF radical which acquires extremely strong antioxidant property via reaction with unsaturated fatty acid or endothelial cells. We have already reported that NO-NIF reduces the cytotoxicity of cumene hydroperoxide, which hampers the integrity of cell membrane through oxidative stress, in endothelial cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that NO-NIF restored acetylcholine-responsive vascular relaxation and suppressed intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in the aorta of N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester-treated rats, a model of vascular endothelial dysfunction. Recently, we reported that NO-NIF ameliorates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling via antioxidative effects in vivo and in vitro. These observations point towards the plausible, unique role of NO-NIF as a novel antioxidant which improves vascular dysfunction for overcoming CVD and CKD and the same has been highlighted in this review.

  5. Immune defects in Alzheimer's disease: new medications development.

    PubMed

    Cashman, John R; Ghirmai, Senait; Abel, Kenneth J; Fiala, Milan

    2008-12-03

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the accumulation of intracellular and extracellular aggregates. According to the amyloid beta (Abeta) hypothesis, amyloidosis occurring in the brain is a leading cause of neurodegeneration in AD. Defects in the innate immune system may decrease the clearance of Abeta in the brain. Macrophages of most AD patients do not transport Abeta into endosomes and lysosomes, and monocytes from AD patients do not efficiently clear Abeta from AD brain. After stimulation with Abeta, mononuclear cells of normal subjects display up-regulated transcription of MGAT3, which encodes beta-1,4-mannosyl-glycoprotein 4-beta-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, and Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes. Monocytes of AD patients generally down-regulate these genes. A commonly used, naturally occurring material from a spice that enhances certain key functions defective in cells of innate immunity of many AD patients has shown epidemiologic rationale for use in AD treatment. Bisdemethoxycurcumin, a natural curcumin, is a minor constituent of turmeric (curry), and it enhances phagocytosis and clearance of Abeta in cells from most AD patients. We confirmed the effectiveness of a synthetic version of the same compound. In mononuclear cells of most AD patients, bisdemethoxycurcumin enhanced defective phagocytosis of Abeta and increased the transcription of MGAT3 and TLR genes. The potency of bisdemethoxycurcumin as a highly purified compound in facilitating the clearance of Abeta in mononuclear cells suggests the promise of enhanced effectiveness compared to curcuminoid mixtures. Bisdemethoxycurcumin appears to enhance immune function in mononuclear cells of AD patients and may provide a novel approach to AD immunotherapy.

  6. Study designs for dependent happenings.

    PubMed

    Halloran, M E; Struchiner, C J

    1991-09-01

    In 1916, Sir Ronald Ross defined "dependent happenings" as events where the number affected in a unit of time depends on the number already affected. That is, the incidence depends on the prevalence, a characteristic of many infectious diseases. Because of this dependence, interventions against infectious diseases can have not only direct protective effects for the person receiving an intervention, but also indirect effects resulting from changes in the intensity of transmission in the population. This paper develops the conceptual framework for four types of study designs that differentiate and account for direct and indirect effects of intervention programs in dependent happenings.

  7. Variations in Ischemic Heart Disease Research by Country, Income, Development and Burden of Disease: A Scientometric Approach

    PubMed Central

    Okhovati, Maryam; Zare, Morteza; Bazrafshan, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ischemic heart diseases (IHDs) are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. However the global burden of IHD has been concentrated on developing countries, where limited research efforts have been made to address these needs. This study aimed to understand the global distribution of IHD research activities by looking at the countries’ burden of disease, income and development data. Methods: As a scientometric study, Scopus database was searched for research publications indexed under the medical subject heading (MeSH) ‘myocardial ischemia’ including the following terms: coronary artery disease, coronary heart disease, and ischemic heart disease. The number of research publications in Scopus database was recorded for each individual year 2000-2012, and for each country. Data for estimated IHD disability-adjusted life-year’s (DALY’s), gross domestic product (GDP) per capita and human development index were also included for the analysis. Results: IHD research publications were most likely produced by European and Western pacific countries. High-income countries produced the greatest share of about 81% of the global IHD research. However, no significant association observed between the countries’ GDP and number of research publications worldwide (OR = 0.98, P = 0.939). Global IHD research found to be strongly associated with the burden of disease (P < 0.0001) and the countries’ HDI values worldwide (OR = 16.8, P = 0.016). Conclusion: Our study suggested that global research on IHD were geographically distributed and highly concentrated among the world’s richest countries. Estimated DALYs and HDI were found as important predictors of IHD research and the key drivers of health research disparities across the world. PMID:26702346

  8. Alzheimer's disease research and development: a call for a new research roadmap.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Howard H; Haas, Magali; Gandy, Sam; Schoepp, Darryle D; Cross, Alan J; Mayeux, Richard; Sperling, Reisa A; Fillit, Howard; van de Hoef, Diana L; Dougal, Sonya; Nye, Jeffrey S

    2014-04-01

    Epidemiological projections of the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias, the rapidly expanding population over the age of 65, and the enormous societal consequence on health, economics, and community foretell of a looming global public health crisis. Currently available treatments for AD are symptomatic, with modest effect sizes and limited impact on longer term disease outcomes. There have been no newly approved pharmaceutical treatments in the last decade, despite enormous efforts to develop disease-modifying treatments directed at Alzheimer's-associated pathology. An unprecedented collaborative effort of government, regulators, industry, academia, and the community at-large is needed to address this crisis and to develop an actionable plan for rapid progress toward successfully developing effective treatments. Here, we map out a course of action in four key priority areas, including (1) addressing the fundamental mechanisms of disease, with the goal of developing a core set of research tools, a framework for data sharing, and creation of accessible validated and replicated disease models; (2) developing translational research that emphasizes rapid progress in disease model development and better translation from preclinical to clinical stages, deploying leading technologies to more accurately develop predictive models; (3) preventing AD through the development of robust methods and resources to advance trials and creating fundamental resources such as continuous adaptive trials, registries, data repositories, and instrument development; and (4) innovating public/private partnerships and global collaborations, with mechanisms to incentivize collaborations and investments, develop larger precompetitive spaces, and more rapid data sharing. PMID:24754377

  9. Low hanging fruit in infectious disease drug development.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Carl N

    2008-10-01

    Cost estimates for developing new molecular entities (NME) are reaching non-sustainable levels and coupled with increasing regulatory requirements and oversight have led many pharmaceutical sponsors to divest their anti-microbial development portfolios [Projan SJ: Why is big Pharma getting out of anti-bacterial drug discovery?Curr Opin Microbiol 2003, 6:427-430] [Spellberg B, Powers JH, Brass EP, Miller LG, Edwards JE, Jr: Trends in antimicrobial drug development: implications for the future.Clin Infect Dis 2004, 38:1279-1286]. Operational issues such as study planning and execution are significant contributors to the overall cost of drug development that can benefit from the leveraging of pre-randomization data in an evidence-based approach to protocol development, site selection and patient recruitment. For non-NME products there is even greater benefit from available data resources since these data may permit smaller and shorter study programs. There are now many available open source intelligence (OSINT) resources that are being integrated into drug development programs, permitting an evidence-based or 'operational epidemiology' approach to study planning and execution.

  10. Low hanging fruit in infectious disease drug development.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Carl N

    2008-10-01

    Cost estimates for developing new molecular entities (NME) are reaching non-sustainable levels and coupled with increasing regulatory requirements and oversight have led many pharmaceutical sponsors to divest their anti-microbial development portfolios [Projan SJ: Why is big Pharma getting out of anti-bacterial drug discovery?Curr Opin Microbiol 2003, 6:427-430] [Spellberg B, Powers JH, Brass EP, Miller LG, Edwards JE, Jr: Trends in antimicrobial drug development: implications for the future.Clin Infect Dis 2004, 38:1279-1286]. Operational issues such as study planning and execution are significant contributors to the overall cost of drug development that can benefit from the leveraging of pre-randomization data in an evidence-based approach to protocol development, site selection and patient recruitment. For non-NME products there is even greater benefit from available data resources since these data may permit smaller and shorter study programs. There are now many available open source intelligence (OSINT) resources that are being integrated into drug development programs, permitting an evidence-based or 'operational epidemiology' approach to study planning and execution. PMID:18822387

  11. New developments in the management of opioid dependence: focus on sublingual buprenorphine–naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Soyka, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Opioid maintenance therapy is a well-established first-line treatment approach in opioid dependence. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, has been found by numerous studies to be an effective and safe medication in the treatment of opioid dependence. At present, buprenorphine is available as a monodrug or in a fixed 4:1 ratio combination with naloxone. A diminished risk of diversion and abuse for the buprenorphine–naloxone combination is likely but not firmly established. Conventional formulations are given sublingually to avoid the hepatic first-pass effect. A novel film tablet is available only in the US and Australia. Other novel, sustained-release formulations (implant, depot) are currently being developed and tested. Recent studies, including a Cochrane meta-analysis, suggest that the retention with buprenorphine is lower than for methadone, but that buprenorphine may be associated with less drug use. Higher doses of buprenorphine are associated with better retention rates. Buprenorphine has a ceiling effect at the opioid receptor with regard to respiratory depression, and may cause fewer fatal intoxications than methadone. Possible antidepressant effects of buprenorphine and its use in comorbid psychiatric patients has not been studied in much detail. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25610012

  12. New developments in the management of opioid dependence: focus on sublingual buprenorphine-naloxone.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Opioid maintenance therapy is a well-established first-line treatment approach in opioid dependence. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, has been found by numerous studies to be an effective and safe medication in the treatment of opioid dependence. At present, buprenorphine is available as a monodrug or in a fixed 4:1 ratio combination with naloxone. A diminished risk of diversion and abuse for the buprenorphine-naloxone combination is likely but not firmly established. Conventional formulations are given sublingually to avoid the hepatic first-pass effect. A novel film tablet is available only in the US and Australia. Other novel, sustained-release formulations (implant, depot) are currently being developed and tested. Recent studies, including a Cochrane meta-analysis, suggest that the retention with buprenorphine is lower than for methadone, but that buprenorphine may be associated with less drug use. Higher doses of buprenorphine are associated with better retention rates. Buprenorphine has a ceiling effect at the opioid receptor with regard to respiratory depression, and may cause fewer fatal intoxications than methadone. Possible antidepressant effects of buprenorphine and its use in comorbid psychiatric patients has not been studied in much detail. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25610012

  13. KINATEST-ID: a pipeline to develop phosphorylation-dependent terbium sensitizing kinase assays.

    PubMed

    Lipchik, Andrew M; Perez, Minervo; Bolton, Scott; Dumrongprechachan, Vasin; Ouellette, Steven B; Cui, Wei; Parker, Laurie L

    2015-02-25

    Nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases (NRTKs) are essential for cellular homeostasis and thus are a major focus of current drug discovery efforts. Peptide substrates that can enhance lanthanide ion luminescence upon tyrosine phosphorylation enable rapid, sensitive screening of kinase activity, however design of suitable substrates that can distinguish between tyrosine kinase families is a huge challenge. Despite their different substrate preferences, many NRTKs are structurally similar even between families. Furthermore, the development of lanthanide-based kinase assays is hampered by incomplete understanding of how to integrate sequence selectivity with metal ion binding, necessitating laborious iterative substrate optimization. We used curated proteomic data from endogenous kinase substrates and known Tb(3+)-binding sequences to build a generalizable in silico pipeline with tools to generate, screen, align, and select potential phosphorylation-dependent Tb(3+)-sensitizing substrates that are most likely to be kinase specific. We demonstrated the approach by developing several substrates that are selective within kinase families and amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS) applications. Overall, this strategy represents a pipeline for developing efficient and specific assays for virtually any tyrosine kinase that use HTS-compatible lanthanide-based detection. The tools provided in the pipeline also have the potential to be adapted to identify peptides for other purposes, including other enzyme assays or protein-binding ligands.

  14. Metabolic plasticity during mammalian development is directionally dependent on early nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Gluckman, Peter D; Lillycrop, Karen A; Vickers, Mark H; Pleasants, Anthony B; Phillips, Emma S; Beedle, Alan S; Burdge, Graham C; Hanson, Mark A

    2007-07-31

    Developmental plasticity in response to environmental cues can take the form of polyphenism, as for the discrete morphs of some insects, or of an apparently continuous spectrum of phenotype, as for most mammalian traits. The metabolic phenotype of adult rats, including the propensity to obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperphagia, shows plasticity in response to prenatal nutrition and to neonatal administration of the adipokine leptin. Here, we report that the effects of neonatal leptin on hepatic gene expression and epigenetic status in adulthood are directionally dependent on the animal's nutritional status in utero. These results demonstrate that, during mammalian development, the direction of the response to one cue can be determined by previous exposure to another, suggesting the potential for a discontinuous distribution of environmentally induced phenotypes, analogous to the phenomenon of polyphenism.

  15. Development-dependent modification of the extracellular matrix by a sulphated glycoprotein in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Wenzl, S; Thym, D; Sumper, M

    1984-04-01

    We report the chemical characterization of the highly sulphated glycoprotein SSG 185 from Volvox carteri. SSG 185 is a hydroxyproline-containing, extracellular glycoprotein. The sulphate residues are clustered within the parent saccharide structure of SSG 185, since on mercaptolysis all the sulphate residues are recovered in a small saccharide fragment containing mannose, arabinose and sulphate (in a molar ratio of 112). SSG 185 is a short-lived molecule, serving as a precursor for a high mol. wt. component of the extracellular matrix. Synthesis of SSG 185 is developmentally controlled. Different SSG 185 variants, with unknown modifications in the sulphated saccharide fragment, are synthesized at different developmental stages or under the influence of the sexual inducer. These modifications remain conserved in the aggregated state of SSG 185, indicating the development-dependent modification of the extracellular matrix. PMID:16453512

  16. Nutrition-dependent control of insect development by insulin-like peptides

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Naoki; Yamanaka, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    In metazoans, members of the insulin-like peptide (ILP) family play a role in multiple physiological functions in response to the nutritional status. ILPs have been identified and characterized in a wide variety of insect species. Insect ILPs that are mainly produced by several pairs of medial neurosecretory cells in the brain circulate in the hemolymph and act systemically on target tissues. Physiological and biochemical studies in Lepidoptera and genetic studies in the fruit fly have greatly expanded our knowledge of the physiological functions of ILPs. Here, we outline the recent progress of the structural classification of insect ILPs and overview recent studies that have elucidated the physiological functions of insect ILPs involved in nutrient-dependent growth during development. PMID:26664828

  17. Localization and stretch-dependence of lung elastase activity in development and compensatory growth.

    PubMed

    Young, Sarah Marie; Liu, Sheng; Joshi, Rashika; Batie, Matthew R; Kofron, Matthew; Guo, Jinbang; Woods, Jason C; Varisco, Brian Michael

    2015-04-01

    Synthesis and remodeling of the lung matrix is necessary for primary and compensatory lung growth. Because cyclic negative force is applied to developing lung tissue during the respiratory cycle, we hypothesized that stretch is a critical regulator of lung matrix remodeling. By using quantitative image analysis of whole-lung and whole-lobe elastin in situ zymography images, we demonstrated that elastase activity increased twofold during the alveolar stage of postnatal lung morphogenesis in the mouse. Remodeling was restricted to alveolar walls and ducts and was nearly absent in dense elastin band structures. In the mouse pneumonectomy model of compensatory lung growth, elastase activity increased threefold, peaking at 14 days postpneumonectomy and was higher in the accessory lobe compared with other lobes. Remodeling during normal development and during compensatory lung growth was different with increased major airway and pulmonary arterial remodeling during development but not regeneration, and with homogenous remodeling throughout the parenchyma during development, but increased remodeling only in subpleural regions during compensatory lung growth. Left lung wax plombage prevented increased lung elastin during compensatory lung growth. To test whether the adult lung retains an innate capacity to remodel elastin, we developed a confocal microscope-compatible stretching device. In ex vivo adult mouse lung sections, lung elastase activity increased exponentially with strain and in peripheral regions of lung more than in central regions. Our study demonstrates that lung elastase activity is stretch-dependent and supports a model in which externally applied forces influence the composition, structure, and function of the matrix during periods of alveolar septation.

  18. Rpl22 loss impairs the development of B lymphocytes by activating a p53-dependent checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Fahl, Shawn P.; Harris, Bryan; Coffey, Francis; Wiest, David L.

    2014-01-01

    While ribosomal proteins facilitate the ribosome’s core function of translation, emerging evidence suggests that some ribosomal proteins are also capable of performing tissue restricted functions either from within specialized ribosomes or from outside of the ribosome. In particular, we have previously demonstrated that germline ablation of the gene encoding ribosomal protein Rpl22 causes a selective and p53 dependent arrest of αβ T cell progenitors at the β-selection checkpoint. We have now identified a crucial role for Rpl22 during early B cell development. Germline ablation of Rpl22 results in a reduction in the absolute number of B-lineage progenitors in the bone marrow beginning at the pro-B cell stage. Although Rpl22-deficient proB cells are hyporesponsive to IL-7, a key cytokine required for early B cell development, the arrest of B cell development does not result from disrupted IL-7 signaling. Instead, p53 induction appears to be responsible for the developmental defects, as Rpl22-deficiency causes increased expression of p53 and activation of downstream p53 target genes and p53-deficiency rescues the defect in B cell development in Rpl22-deficient mice. Interestingly, the requirement for Rpl22 in the B cell lineage appears to be developmentally restricted, since Rpl22-deficient splenic B cells proliferate normally in response to antigen receptor and toll receptor stimuli and undergo normal class switch recombination. These results indicate that Rpl22 performs a critical, developmentally restricted role in supporting early B cell development by preventing p53-induction. PMID:25416806

  19. Lifetime-Dependent Effects of Bisphenol A on Asthma Development in an Experimental Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Susanne; Averbeck, Marco; Simon, Jan C.; Lehmann, Irina; Polte, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental factors are thought to contribute significantly to the increase of asthma prevalence in the last two decades. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a xenoestrogen commonly used in consumer products and the plastic industry. There is evidence and an ongoing discussion that endocrine disruptors like BPA may affect human health and also exert alterations on in the immune system. The aim of this study was to investigate age-dependent effects of BPA on the asthma risk using a murine model to explain the controversial results reported till date. Methods BALB/c mice were exposed to BPA via the drinking water for different time periods including pregnancy and breastfeeding. To induce an asthma phenotype, mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA), followed by an intrapulmonary allergen challenge. Results BPA exposure during pregnancy and breastfeeding had no significant effect on asthma development in the offspring. In contrast, lifelong exposure from birth until the last antigen challenge clearly increased eosinophilic inflammation in the lung, airway hyperreactivity and antigen-specific serum IgE levels in OVA-sensitized adult mice compared to mice without BPA exposure. Surprisingly, BPA intake during the sensitization period significantly reduced the development of allergic asthma. This effect was reversed in the presence of a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the impact of BPA on asthma risk is strongly age-dependent and ranges from asthma-promoting to asthma-reducing effects. This could explain the diversity of results from previous studies regarding the observed health impact of BPA. PMID:24950052

  20. Dependence of nodal sodium channel clustering on paranodal axoglial contact in the developing CNS.

    PubMed

    Rasband, M N; Peles, E; Trimmer, J S; Levinson, S R; Lux, S E; Shrager, P

    1999-09-01

    Na(+) channel clustering at nodes of Ranvier in the developing rat optic nerve was analyzed to determine mechanisms of localization, including the possible requirement for glial contact in vivo. Immunofluorescence labeling for myelin-associated glycoprotein and for the protein Caspr, a component of axoglial junctions, indicated that oligodendrocytes were present, and paranodal structures formed, as early as postnatal day 7 (P7). However, the first Na(+) channel clusters were not seen until P9. Most of these were broad, and all were excluded from paranodal regions of axoglial contact. The number of detected Na(+) channel clusters increased rapidly from P12 to P22. During this same period, conduction velocity increased sharply, and Na(+) channel clusters became much more focal. To test further whether oligodendrocyte contact directly influences Na(+) channel distributions, nodes of Ranvier in the hypomyelinating mouse Shiverer were examined. This mutant has oligodendrocyte-ensheathed axons but lacks compact myelin and normal axoglial junctions. During development Na(+) channel clusters in Shiverer mice were reduced in numbers and were in aberrant locations. The subcellular location of Caspr was disrupted, and nerve conduction properties remained immature. These results indicate that in vivo, Na(+) channel clustering at nodes depends not only on the presence of oligodendrocytes but also on specific axoglial contact at paranodal junctions. In rats, ankyrin-3/G, a cytoskeletal protein implicated in Na(+) channel clustering, was detected before Na(+) channel immunoreactivity but extended into paranodes in non-nodal distributions. In Shiverer, ankyrin-3/G labeling was abnormal, suggesting that its localization also depends on axoglial contact. PMID:10460258

  1. Bridging Lung Development with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Relevance of Developmental Pathways in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Boucherat, Olivier; Morissette, Mathieu C; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien; Maltais, François

    2016-02-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic airflow limitation. This generic term encompasses emphysema and chronic bronchitis, two common conditions, each having distinct but also overlapping features. Recent epidemiological and experimental studies have challenged the traditional view that COPD is exclusively an adult disease occurring after years of inhalational insults to the lungs, pinpointing abnormalities or disruption of the pathways that control lung development as an important susceptibility factor for adult COPD. In addition, there is growing evidence that emphysema is not solely a destructive process because it is also characterized by a failure in cell and molecular maintenance programs necessary for proper lung development. This leads to the concept that tissue regeneration required stimulation of signaling pathways that normally operate during development. We undertook a review of the literature to outline the contribution of developmental insults and genes in the occurrence and pathogenesis of COPD, respectively.

  2. Meta-analysis reveals an association of PTPN22 C1858T with autoimmune diseases, which depends on the localization of the affected tissue.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Ibrahim, S; Petersen, F; Yu, X

    2012-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) is a strong susceptibility gene shared by many autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms underlying this relationship. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the association between PTPN22 polymorphism C1858T and autoimmune diseases. The results showed a remarkable pattern; PTPN22 C1858T was strongly associated with type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, immune thrombocytopenia, generalized vitiligo with concomitant autoimmune diseases, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, Graves' disease, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis and Addison's disease. By contrast, PTPN22 C1858T showed a negligible association with systemic sclerosis, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis, pemphigus vulgaris, ulcerative colitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, Crohn's disease and acute anterior uveitis. Further analysis revealed a clear distinction between the two groups of diseases with regard to their targeted tissues: most autoimmune diseases showing an insignificant association with PTPN22 C1858T manifest in skin, the gastrointestinal tract or in immune privileged sites. These results showed that the association of PTPN22 polymorphism with autoimmune diseases depends on the localization of the affected tissue, suggesting a role of targeted organ variation in the disease manifestations. PMID:23076337

  3. Elevated NCX1 and NCKX4 expression in the patent postnatal ductus arteriosus of ductal-dependent congenital heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hong, Haifa; Xia, Yu; Sun, Yanjun; Ye, Lincai; Liu, Jinfen; Bai, Jie; Zhang, Haibo

    2015-04-01

    Patency of the ductus arteriosus (DA) after birth is essential in ductal-dependent congenital heart disease. The Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) has been demonstrated to play a key role in regulating vascular tone. The potassium-dependent Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCKX) is a related family of NCX depending on the K(+) gradients which triggers DA constriction. The present study investigated the comparative expression of NCX and NCKX between a constricted DA and patent DA in human ductal-dependant congenital heart disease. Human DAs, which were patent (n = 10, age = 20.2 ± 4.3 days) or constricted (n = 10, age = 18.3 ± 3.9 days), were excised during surgery from neonates with ductal-dependent congenital heart disease. Western blotting analysis, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunofluorescence studies were performed to detect the protein and mRNA levels of NCX1, NCKX3, and NCKX4. The expressions of NCX1 and NCKX4 were significantly higher in the patent DA group at both the protein and mRNA levels, and expression was localized to the smooth muscle layer. These findings indicate that NCX1 and NCKX4 are up-regulated in human postnatal patent DAs and may represent potential therapeutic targets for maintaining DA patency in ductal-dependent congenital heart disease.

  4. Proresolution Lipid Mediators in Multiple Sclerosis — Differential, Disease Severity-Dependent Synthesis — A Clinical Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brommer, Benedikt; Wengert, Oliver; Gronert, Karsten; Schwab, Jan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The severity and longevity of inflammation is controlled by endogenous counter-regulatory signals. Among them are long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-derived lipid mediators, which promote the resolution of inflammation, an active process for returning to tissue homeostasis. Objective To determine whether endogenous production of lipid-derived resolution agonists is regulated differentially in patients with highly active and less active multiple sclerosis (MS). Design Matched-pairs study in University hospital Neurology department. Patients Based on clinical (relapse frequency) and paraclinical (MRI lesions, contrast enhancement) criteria, 10 pairs of age- and sex-matched patients with relapsing-remitting MS were assigned either to a group with highly active or less active MS. Lipid mediators were quantified in serum and cerebrospinal fluid using LC-MS/MS-based lipidomics. Results Levels of the key arachidonic (ω-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (ω-6)-derived mediators prostaglandins (PG), leukotrienes, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETE) and resolution agonists lipoxin A4 (LXA4), resolvin D1 (RvD1) and neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) were quantified. In the patient group with highly active MS, 15-HETE and PGE2 were increased, which are products of the 15-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. The proresolution mediator RvD1 was significantly upregulated and NPD1 was detected in the highly active group only. LXA4 levels were not increased in patients with highly active MS. Conclusions Lipid mediator pathways are regulated differentially in the cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients, depending on disease severity. Non-exhaustive or possibly ‘delayed’ resolution pathways may suggest a defective resolution program in patients with highly active MS. Longitudinal analyses are required to hetero-typify this differential resolution capacity, which may be associated with disease progression, longevity and eventual termination. PMID:23409068

  5. Dose-dependent deleterious and salutary actions of the Nrf2 inducer dh404 in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Liu, Shuman; Farzaneh, Seyed H; Nazertehrani, Sohrab; Khazaeli, Mahyar; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play a central role in the progression and complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are, in part, due to impairment of the Nrf2 system, which regulates the expression of antioxidant and detoxifying molecules. Natural Nrf2-inducing phytochemicals have been shown to ameliorate kidney disease in experimental animals. However, owing to adverse outcomes a clinical trial of a synthetic Nrf2 activator, bardoxolone methyl (BARD), in CKD patients was terminated. BARD activates Nrf2 via covalent modification of reactive cysteine residues in the Nrf2 repressor molecule, Keap1. In addition to Nrf2, Keap1 suppresses IKKB, the positive regulator of NF-κB. Treatment with a BARD analog, dh404, at 5-20mg/kg/day in diabetic obese Zucker rats exacerbates, whereas its use at 2mg/kg/day in 5/6 nephrectomized rats attenuates, CKD progression. We, therefore, hypothesized that deleterious effects of high-dose BARD are mediated by the activation of NF-κB. CKD (5/6 nephrectomized) rats were randomized to receive dh404 (2 or 10mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 12 weeks. The vehicle-treated group exhibited glomerulosclerosis; interstitial fibrosis and inflammation; activation of NF-κB; upregulation of oxidative, inflammatory, and fibrotic pathways; and suppression of Nrf2 activity and its key target gene products. Treatment with low-dose dh404 restored Nrf2 activity and expression of its target genes, attenuated activation of NF-κB and fibrotic pathways, and reduced glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, and inflammation. In contrast, treatment with a high dh404 dosage intensified proteinuria, renal dysfunction, and histological abnormalities; amplified upregulation of NF-κB and fibrotic pathways; and suppressed the Nrf2 system. Thus therapy with BARD analogs exerts a dose-dependent dimorphic impact on CKD progression.

  6. Nutrition and chronic disease: lessons from the developing and developed world.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    Many features of human susceptibility to chronic noncommunicable diseases can be mapped onto the framework of the match/mismatch hypothesis. From an evolutionary perspective, it is highly likely that the human genome has been under selective pressure to survive and reproduce against a background of seasonal food shortages and frequent episodic famines, leading to the attractive, but unproven, concept of 'a thrifty genotype made deleterious by famine'. From an ontogeny perspective, it has been clearly demonstrated that fetal undernutrition leads to a thrifty phenotype that enhances metabolic risk if the individual is later exposed to an energy-abundant environment. Data from developing and rapidly emerging countries permit insights into both of these pathways. Many populations are rapidly emerging from conditions broadly representative of human history over the past 600 or so generations (i.e. since the dawn of agriculture) and are transitioning within very few generations to a state of dietary abundance and low physical activity. And within this framework, many individuals make an even more rapid personal transition from the womb of a malnourished mother to a state of affluence. These journeys provide exceptional opportunities to interrogate thrifty genotype/phenotype theories, but such prospects are frequently impaired by a lack of robust data.

  7. The evolution of child health programmes in developing countries: from targeting diseases to targeting people.

    PubMed Central

    Claeson, M.; Waldman, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Mortality rates among children and the absolute number of children dying annually in developing countries have declined considerably over the past few decades. However, the gains made have not been distributed evenly: childhood mortality remains higher among poorer people and the gap between rich and poor has grown. Several poor countries, and some poorer regions within countries, have experienced a levelling off of or even an increase in childhood mortality over the past few years. Until now, two types of programmes--short-term, disease-specific initiatives and more general programmes of primary health care--have contributed to the decline in mortality. Both types of programme can contribute substantially to the strengthening of health systems and in enabling households and communities to improve their health care. In order for them to do so, and in order to complete the unfinished agenda of improving child health globally, new strategies are needed. On the one hand, greater emphasis should be placed on promoting those household behaviours that are not dependent on the performance of health systems. On the other hand, more attention should be paid to interventions that affect health at other stages of the life cycle while efforts that have been made to develop interventions that can be used during childhood continue. PMID:11100618

  8. From Geometry Optimization to Time Dependent Molecular Structure Modeling: Method Developments, ab initio Theories and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wenkel

    This dissertation consists of two general parts: (I) developments of optimization algorithms (both nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom) for time-independent molecules and (II) novel methods, first-principle theories and applications in time dependent molecular structure modeling. In the first part, we discuss in specific two new algorithms for static geometry optimization, the eigenspace update (ESU) method in nonredundant internal coordinate that exhibits an enhanced performace with up to a factor of 3 savings in computational cost for large-sized molecular systems; the Car-Parrinello density matrix search (CP-DMS) method that enables direct minimization of the SCF energy as an effective alternative to conventional diagonalization approach. For the second part, we consider the time dependence and first presents two nonadiabatic dynamic studies that model laser controlled molecular photo-dissociation for qualitative understandings of intense laser-molecule interaction, using ab initio direct Ehrenfest dynamics scheme implemented with real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) approach developed in our group. Furthermore, we place our special interest on the nonadiabatic electronic dynamics in the ultrafast time scale, and presents (1) a novel technique that can not only obtain energies but also the electron densities of doubly excited states within a single determinant framework, by combining methods of CP-DMS with RT-TDDFT; (2) a solvated first-principles electronic dynamics method by incorporating the polarizable continuum solvation model (PCM) to RT-TDDFT, which is found to be very effective in describing the dynamical solvation effect in the charge transfer process and yields a consistent absorption spectrum in comparison to the conventional linear response results in solution. (3) applications of the PCM-RT-TDDFT method to study the intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) dynamics in a C60 derivative. Such work provides insights into the