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Sample records for disease esrd patients

  1. Dyslipidemia and progression of cardiovascular calcification (CVC) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

    PubMed

    Qunibi, Wajeh Y

    2005-06-01

    Dyslipidemia and progression of cardiovascular calcification (CVC) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Cardiovascular calcification (CVC) is commonly encountered both in the general population as well as in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The etiology of CVC in patients with ESRD is multifactorial. Despite that, current debate remains narrowly focused on the role of calcium loading from calcium-based phosphate binders (CBPB) in the pathogenesis and progression of CVC. Yet, the alleged link between these binders and CVC has not been substantiated in well-designed controlled trials. In contrast, the purported role of sevelamer, a non-calcium-based phosphate binder, in slowing the progression of CVC in dialysis patients has attracted widespread attention. The beneficial effect of sevelamer on progression of calcification was thought to be due to lower calcium loading during its use. However, an alternative and possibly more likely mechanism involves sevelamer-induced lowering of LDL cholesterol. In this context, previous studies in individuals with normal renal function have documented amelioration of coronary artery calcification (CAC) with reduction of LDL-cholesterol by treatment with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Given that CAC is a well-accepted marker of atherosclerosis, and that high plasma cholesterol concentration is one of the main risk factors for atherosclerosis, then it is not unreasonable to suspect that CAC may be halted or even reversed by lowering of LDL cholesterol level with statin therapy. Unfortunately, the effect of lowering the LDL-cholesterol level on CAC has not been studied in patients with ESRD. Therefore, conclusions about this important topic should await the results of well-designed clinical studies that control for all factors potentially implicated in the CVC burden of patients with ESRD. In this review, I will discuss the role of various potential mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of CVC in

  2. Nephrology care prior to end-stage renal disease and outcomes among new ESRD patients in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Brenda W.; Morgenstern, Hal; Hedgeman, Elizabeth; Tilea, Anca; Scholz, Natalie; Shearon, Tempie; Burrows, Nilka Rios; Shahinian, Vahakn B.; Yee, Jerry; Plantinga, Laura; Powe, Neil R.; McClellan, William; Robinson, Bruce; Williams, Desmond E.; Saran, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Background Longer nephrology care before end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has been linked with better outcomes. Methods We investigated whether longer pre-end-stage renal disease (ESRD) nephrology care was associated with lower mortality at both the patient and state levels among 443 761 incident ESRD patients identified in the USA between 2006 and 2010. Results Overall, 33% of new ESRD patients had received no prior nephrology care, while 28% had received care for >12 months. At the patient level, predictors of >12 months of nephrology care included having health insurance, white race, younger age, diabetes, hypertension and US region. Longer pre-ESRD nephrology care was associated with lower first-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.58 for >12 months versus no care; 95% confidence interval 0.57–0.59), higher albumin and hemoglobin, choice of peritoneal dialysis and native fistula and discussion of transplantation options. Living in a state with a 10% higher proportion of patients receiving >12 months of pre-ESRD care was associated with a 9.3% lower relative mortality rate, standardized for case mix (R2 = 0.47; P < 0.001). Conclusions This study represents the largest cohort of incident ESRD patients to date. Although we did not follow patients before ESRD onset, our findings, both at the individual patient and state levels, reflect the importance of early nephrology care among those with chronic kidney disease. PMID:26613038

  3. The epidemiology and control of anaemia among pre-ESRD patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McClellan, W M; Jurkovitz, C; Abramson, J

    2005-12-01

    Anaemia is a common condition among pre-end-stage renal disease (pre-ESRD) patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, data from clinical studies indicate that anaemia may be present in as many as two-thirds of such patients. Use of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) provides an effective means of correcting anaemia in CKD patients and helps to reduce the risk of renal disease progression and related problems. Unfortunately, EPO therapy is underutilized in these persons. Consequently, anaemia remains a major problem in the pre-ESRD CKD population. Evidence suggests that anaemia in the presence of CKD can lead to an increased risk of a number of adverse outcomes, including mortality, progression of kidney disease, coronary heart disease, stroke, hospitalization, and decreases in quality of life. Anaemia's association with these adverse outcomes suggests that effective treatment of anaemia in pre-ESRD CKD patients is of great importance and that substantial efforts should be made to ensure that these patients receive appropriate therapy to correct anaemia.

  4. Disease management improves ESRD outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sands, J J

    2006-02-01

    Renal disease management organizations have reported achieving significant decreases in mortality and hospitalization in conjunction with cost savings, improved patient satisfaction and quality of life. Disease management organizations strive to fill existing gaps in care delivery through the standardized use of risk assessment, predictive modeling, evidence based guidelines and process and outcomes measurement. Patient self-management education and the provision of individual nurse care managers are also key program components. As we more fully measure clinical outcomes and total health-care costs including payments from all insurance and government entities, pharmacy costs and out-of-pocket expenditures, the full implications of disease management can be better defined. The results of this analysis will have a profound influence on United States healthcare policy. At present, current data suggests that the promise of disease management, improved care at reduced cost, can and is being realized in ESRD.

  5. Hypogonadism and testosterone replacement therapy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Hypogonadism is a common problem in the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and renal transplant population. It has widespread systemic effects and has been linked with mortality in dialysis patients and at the time of renal transplant. The etiology is likely multifactorial and most patients are afflicted by various comorbidities that can contribute to hypogonadism. Clinical manifestations are mostly nonspecific. We review the approach to the diagnosis of hypogonadism, focusing on both laboratory values and clinical signs and symptoms. We review treatment with testosterone replacement in this population and highlight various studies that tend to have small sample sizes. Though these studies provide insight into testosterone replacement, the need for larger studies is emphasized to better understand the effects and safety of therapy. PMID:28078220

  6. Pleuritic chest pain from portal hypertensive gastropathy in ESRD patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease misdiagnosed as pericarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma; Achebe, Jennifer; Odenigbo, Charles; Oguejiofor, Fidelis

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) is a gastric mucosal lesion complicating portal hypertension, with higher prevalence in decompensated cirrhosis. PHG can sometimes complicate autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) due to the presence of multiple liver cysts. Besides, PHG is known to present as chest pain, with or without hematemesis. Other causes of chest pain in ADPKD include referred chest pain from progressively enlarging kidney cysts, and rare pericardial cysts. Chest pain, especially if pleuritic, in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, is often ascribed to uremic pericarditis. We present recurrent pleuritic chest pain in a 24-year old ESRD patient with ADPKD that was initially misdiagnosed as uremic pericarditis. It was ultimately shown to represent symptomatic PHG with excellent therapeutic response to proton pump inhibitors. PMID:27069969

  7. Effectiveness of Topical Chia Seed Oil on Pruritus of End-stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Patients and Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Se Kyoo; Park, Hyun Jung; Park, Byeong Deog

    2010-01-01

    Background Several studies have been performed to evaluate the efficacy of dietary n-3 fatty acid for patients with renal dysfunction. While about 40% to 80% of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) complain about pruritus and xerosis, there are few reports on the effects of topical n-3 fatty acid on these symptoms. Objective In order to investigate the possible beneficial effects of topical n-3 fatty acid, oils extracted from chia (Salvia hispanica) seed were formulated into topical products, the effects of which were measured. Methods Five healthy volunteers having xerotic pruritus symptoms and 5 patients with pruritus caused by either ESRD or diabetes were involved in this study. A topical formulation containing 4% chia seed oils were applied for an 8-week duration. Subjective itching symptoms were assessed on a 6-point scale, as were other skin functions, namely transepidermal water loss and skin capacitance. Results After the 8 weeks of application, significant improvements in skin hydration, lichen simplex chronicus, and prurigo nodularis were observed in all patients. A similar improvement was also observed among healthy volunteers with xerotic pruritus. Improvement of epidermal permeability barrier function and skin hydration, represented by trans-epidermal water loss and skin capacitance, respectively, were also observed. No adverse effects were observed in all the tested patients and volunteers. Conclusion Chia seed oil can be used as an adjuvant moisturizing agent for pruritic skin, including that of ESRD patients. PMID:20548903

  8. How do We Manage Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with CKD and ESRD?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon Young; Park, Hyeong Cheon

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been shown to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events. In addition, patients with pre-dialysis CKD appear to be more likely to die of heart disease than of kidney disease. CKD accelerates coronary artery atherosclerosis by several mechanisms, notably hypertension and dyslipidemia, both of which are known risk factors for coronary artery disease. In addition, CKD alters calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, resulting in hypercalcemia and vascular calcification, including the coronary arteries. Mortality of patients on long-term dialysis therapy is high, with age-adjusted mortality rates of about 25% annually. Because the majority of deaths are caused by cardiovascular disease, routine cardiac catheterization of new dialysis patients was proposed as a means of improving the identification and treatment of high-risk patients. However, clinicians may be uncomfortable exposing asymptomatic patients to such invasive procedures like cardiac catheterization, thus noninvasive cardiac risk stratification was investigated widely as a more palatable alternative to routine diagnostic catheterization. The effective management of coronary artery disease is of paramount importance in uremic patients. The applicability of diagnostic, preventive, and treatment modalities developed in nonuremic populations to patients with kidney failure cannot necessarily be extrapolated from clinical studies in non-kidney failure populations. Noninvasive diagnostic testing in uremic patients is less accurate than in nonuremic populations. Initial data suggest that dobutamine echocardiography may be the preferred diagnostic method. PCI with stenting is a less favorable alternative to CABG, however, it has a faster recovery time, reduced invasiveness, and no overall mortality difference in nondiabetic and non-CKD patients compared with CABG. CABG is associated with reduced repeat revascularizations, greater relief of angina, and increased long term

  9. Patient Characteristics and Outcomes by GN Subtype in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Montez-Rath, Maria E.; Lafayette, Richard A.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Outcomes-based research rarely focuses on patients with ESRD caused by GN. The hypotheses were that the GN subtype would clinically discriminate patient groups and independently associate with survival after ESRD therapy initiation. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Data were extracted from the US Renal Data System for adult patients with incident (1996–2011) ESRD attributed to six GN subtypes: FSGS, IgA nephropathy (IgAN), membranous nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomeruonephritis, lupus nephritis (LN), and vasculitis. ESRD attributed to diabetes and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease served as non-GN comparators. Unadjusted and adjusted mortality hazard ratios (aHRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox regression (reference, IgAN). Models sequentially adjusted for sociodemographic (model 2), comorbidity/laboratory (model 3), and ESRD treatment modality (model 4) variables. Results Among 84,301 patients with ESRD attributed to GN, the median age ranged from 39 (LN) to 66 (vasculitis) years, male sex ranged from 18% (LN) to 68% (IgAN), and black race ranged from 7% (IgAN) to 49% (LN). Patients with IgAN had the fewest comorbidities and lowest use of hemodialysis (70.1%). After a median follow-up of 2.5 (interquartile range, 1.0–4.9) years, crude mortality was lowest in IgAN (3.7 deaths/100 person years). Compared to IgAN, adjusted mortality was highest in LN (model 4 aHR=1.75; 95% CI, 1.68 to 1.83) and in diabetes (aHR=1.73; 95% CI, 1.67 to 1.79), and was also higher in all other GN subtypes (membranous nephropathy: aHR=1.23; 95% CI, 1.17 to 1.29; FSGS: aHR=1.37; 95% CI, 1.32 to 1.42; membranoproliferative GN: aHR=1.38; 95% CI, 1.31 to 1.45; vasculitis: aHR=1.51; 95% CI, 1.45 to 1.58) and in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (aHR=1.22; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.27). Conclusions This study exposes substantial heterogeneity across GN subtypes at ESRD therapy initiation and

  10. Improved hepatitis B vaccination rates in ESRD patients in California.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Peters, V

    2000-10-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Survey of Dialysis Associated Diseases, California, which includes Network 17 and 18, had one of the lowest hepatitis B vaccination rates in the country for 1994, 1995, and 1996. With 3 outbreaks of hepatitis B (HBV) in California in 1994, hepatitis B vaccination was chosen as a quality improvement project in both Network 17 and 18. With input from both Medical Review Boards and HCFA Region X, a project was formulated which focused on the improvement of the number of facilities which had hepatitis B vaccination rates which are greater than 50%. The overall purpose of both projects was to: (1) achieve access to preventative services for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) Medicare beneficiaries; (2) increase the number of ESRD patients in California who are vaccinated for HBV; (3) eliminate dialysis in California as an independent risk factor for contracting HBV; (4) decrease the number of ESRD facilities with HBV vaccination rates of 0%; and (5) increase the number of ESRD facilities with HBV vaccination rates greater than 50%. In 1998, both Network 17 and 18 denominators were adjusted to reflect the population which is eligible for vaccination. Because of historically low vaccination rate in California, the 1998 data collection sought to ascertain precise numbers for the ESRD patient population. Data were used from the 1996 and 1997 CDC Survey of Dialysis Associated Diseases from baseline measurements of HBV vaccination rates for all facilities in both Network 17 and 18. The CDC did not conduct a survey in 1998, however, Network 17 and 18 conducted a survey of dialysis associated diseases for all of California ESRD facilities. A data collection tool was designed to gather information on processes and outcomes in each facility. This allowed a continuous quality improvement (CQI)-based approach to analyze the problem, where tools like cause/effect and Pareto diagrams provided information on factors and issues affecting

  11. Latent learning in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD).

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel J W; Butler, Laurie T; Harris, John P; Vaux, Emma C

    2015-04-01

    Cognitive functions such as attention and memory are known to be impaired in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), but the sites of the neural changes underlying these impairments are uncertain. Patients and controls took part in a latent learning task, which had previously shown a dissociation between patients with Parkinson's disease and those with medial temporal damage. ESRD patients (n=24) and age and education-matched controls (n=24) were randomly assigned to either an exposed or unexposed condition. In Phase 1 of the task, participants learned that a cue (word) on the back of a schematic head predicted that the subsequently seen face would be smiling. For the exposed (but not unexposed) condition, an additional (irrelevant) colour cue was shown during presentation. In Phase 2, a different association, between colour and facial expression, was learned. Instructions were the same for each phase: participants had to predict whether the subsequently viewed face was going to be happy or sad. No difference in error rate between the groups was found in Phase 1, suggesting that patients and controls learned at a similar rate. However, in Phase 2, a significant interaction was found between group and condition, with exposed controls performing significantly worse than unexposed (therefore demonstrating learned irrelevance). In contrast, exposed patients made a similar number of errors to unexposed in Phase 2. The pattern of results in ESRD was different from that previously found in Parkinson's disease, suggesting a different neural origin.

  12. Stereopsis in end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel J W; Harris, John P; Butler, Laurie T; Vaux, Emma C

    2017-03-15

    We investigated an effect of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on the visual system by measuring the ability of 21 patients to perceive depth in the random dot stereograms and circles of the Randot Test. To control for other factors which might influence performance on the tests of stereopsis, patients were compared with healthy controls matched for age, years of education, IQ, and general cognitive ability. Vernier acuity (thought to reflect mainly central processing) and Landolt acuity (more sensitive to retinal and optical abnormalities) were also measured, but the study did not include a formal ophthalmological examination. All controls could perceive depth in random dot stereograms, whereas 9/21 patients could not. Patients who could perceive depth had worse stereoacuity than did their matched controls. The patient group as a whole had worse Vernier and Landolt acuities than the controls. The stereoblind patient subgroup had similar Vernier acuity to the stereoscopic subgroup, but worse Landolt acuity, and was more likely to have peripheral vascular disease. We conclude that ESRD had affected structures both within the eye, and within the visual brain. However, the similarity of Vernier acuity and difference of Landolt acuity in the stereoblind and stereoscopic patient subgroups suggest that the differences in stereoscopic ability arise from abnormalities in the eyes rather than in the brain.

  13. Effect of Sertraline on Uremic Pruritus Improvement in ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shakiba, Mansor; Sanadgol, Hoshang; Azmoude, Hamid Reza; Mashhadi, Mohamad Ali; Sharifi, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Background. Although uremic pruritus is a common and upsetting problem of chronic kidney disease, there is no approved treatment for it. This study was undertaken to find the efficiency of sertraline as a possible treatment for uremic pruritus. Methods. 19 ESRD patients under hemodialysis with severe chronic pruritus were randomly selected to participate in this before-after clinical trial. Before and after starting treatment with sertraline, a detailed pruritus history was obtained and pruritus graded by the 30-item inventory of pruritus that patients based on priorities grade allocated to 3 classes. Subjects were treated with sertraline 50 mg oral daily for four months, with monthly assessments of pruritus symptoms. Results. Before treatment with sertraline, the grade of pruritus in 9 (47.4%) patients was moderate and severe in 10 (52.6%) patients. After treatment, grade of pruritus in 11 (57.8%) patients was weak, 6 (31.5%) have moderate and only 2 (10.7%) patients have severe pruritus. Of 10 patients with severe pruritus, 5 (50%) patients experiencing weak pruritus, and 4 (40%) patients have moderate pruritus after treatment. Based on Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the difference between the grade of pruritus before and after treatment with sertraline was significant (P = 0.001). Conclusions. Although no definitive recommendation can be made regarding treatment of uremic pruritus, we found an increased antipruritic effect of sertraline in ESRD patients. PMID:22973512

  14. Morbidity and mortality in ESRD patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Al Wakeel, Jamal S; Mitwalli, Ahmed H; Al Mohaya, S; Abu-Aisha, Hassan; Tarif, Nauman; Malik, Ghulam H; Hammad, D

    2002-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD), due to its high morbidity and mortality as well as social and financial implications, is a major public health problem. Outcome depends not only on different modalities of treatment like hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, but also on existing co-morbidities, age, duration on dialysis, supportive therapies and infection control strategies. Thus, a detailed study becomes necessary to improve health care delivery, provide medical care and to establish a geographical reference. The present study was undertaken to characterize the ESRD patients by their demographic and co-morbid conditions and relate this to the morbidity and mortality trends. The medical records of 110 ESRD patients seen over a five-year period (June 1995 to December 1999) in two tertiary-care hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia were studied retrospectively. There were 79 (64.5%) males and 31 (35.5%) females; their age ranged from 17 to 92 years (mean age 53.8 +/- 17.8 years). Diabetes was the commonest cause of ESRD seen in 26 (26.6%) followed by nephrosclerosis, unknown etiology, lupus nephritis, pyelonephritis and primary glomerulonephritis. Diabetes mellitus was the most prevalent co-morbidity seen during the study period and occurred in 65 patients (59%) followed by heart disease in 36 (32.7%), liver disease in 30 (27.3%), cerebrovascular accidents in 13 (11.8%) and neoplasm in 11 (10%). Seven (6.3%) patients only were smokers. Hemodialysis was the most frequent treatment choice as renal replacement therapy. Among the causes of hospitalization, cardiovascular conditions were the leading single cause (19.1%), followed by access related reasons and infections (11.5% each). The overall hospitalization rate was 11.2 days/year. The overall mortality rate was 8.07 deaths/year. The leading cause of death was cardiovascular in 15 (51.7%) followed by unknown/sudden death in eight (27.5%). Other causes of death included fluid overload, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, septicemia

  15. Competing-risk analysis of ESRD and death among patients with type 1 diabetes and macroalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Thorn, Lena M; Wadén, Johan; Tolonen, Nina; Saraheimo, Markku; Gordin, Daniel; Moran, John L; Thomas, Merlin C; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2011-03-01

    Patients with both type 1 diabetes and CKD have an increased risk of adverse outcomes. The competing risks of death and ESRD may confound the estimates of risk for each outcome. Here, we sought to determine the major predictors of the cumulative incidence of ESRD and pre-ESRD mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes and macroalbuminuria while incorporating the competing risk for the alternate outcome into a Fine-Gray competing-risks analysis. We followed 592 patients with macroalbuminuria for a median of 9.9 years. During this time, 56 (9.5%) patients died and 210 (35.5%) patients developed ESRD. Predictors of incident ESRD, taking baseline renal function and the competing risk for death into account, included an elevated HbA(1c), elevated LDL cholesterol, male sex, weight-adjusted insulin dose, and a shorter duration of diabetes. By contrast, predictors of pre-ESRD death, taking baseline renal function and the competing risk for ESRD into account, included only age, the presence of established macrovascular disease, and elevated cholesterol levels. This competing-risks approach has potential to highlight the appropriate targets and strategies for preventing premature mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  16. Maintenance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific T cell responses in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) and implications for diagnostic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Juno, Jennifer A; Waruk, Jillian L M; Mesa, Christine; Lopez, Carmen; Bueti, Joe; Ball, T Blake; Kiazyk, Sandra A

    2016-07-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients exhibit elevated risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation, but current diagnostics, including the interferon gamma release assay (IGRA), exhibit poor sensitivity in ESRD. We tested 80 ESRD patients and found an 18.75% prevalence of IGRA positivity. A subset of patients was assessed for Mtb-specific expression of 44 cytokines/chemokines, and CD4+ T cell phenotype and function. Similar to non-ESRD IGRA+ individuals, Mtb-specific IFNγ, IL-1RA, IP-10, MCP-3 and IL-2 responses were identified in the ESRD IGRA+ group. 27% of the ESRD IGRA- group exhibited MCP-3 or IL-2 Mtb-specific responses, which may identify cases of latent TB infection in ESRD. Stimulation of PBMC with PPD demonstrated similar CD4+ T cell production of IFNγ, TNFα and GM-CSF by ESRD patients. The reported low sensitivity of the IGRA in ESRD cohorts is therefore unlikely to be due to poor T cell cytokine secretion, and may instead reflect defects in antigen presentation.

  17. Polymorphisms in NADPH oxidase CYBA gene modify the risk of ESRD in patients with chronic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Chen, Min; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Bing; Liu, Xiao-ning; Zuo, Zhi; Tang, Feng-Ying

    2016-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) was defined as start of renal replacement therapy or death due to kidney disease. However, death due to acute kidney injury was not included. It typically occurs when chronic renal failure progresses to a point where the kidneys are permanently functioning at less than 10% of their capacity. Oxidative stress (OS) plays a crucial role in ESRD. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) is one of the most important enzymes during oxidative stress. Cytochrome b light chain (CYBA), encoded by a polymorphic gene, which is a critical component of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)/NADPH oxidase system and plays an important role in electron transport and superoxide anion production, is located on chromosome band 16q24 and has six exons spanning almost 7.76 kb of genomic DNA. CYBA gene polymorphisms can influence the activity of NADPH oxidase. To evaluate the association between CYBA gene polymorphisms and ESRD, we genotyped five CYBA polymorphisms using TaqMan allelic discrimination assay on DNA samples from 306 healthy controls and 332 patients with ESRD. Our results suggested that rs1049255 polymorphism of CYBA modified the risk of ESRD (p  =  0.019; OR  =  0.625; 95%CI  =  0.424-0.921). GG genotype and G allele might be a protective factor against the risk of ESRD, especially in patients with chronic glomerulonephritis.

  18. Catheter-Related Mortality among ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wasse, Haimanot

    2010-01-01

    Hemodialysis access-related complications remain one of the most important sources of morbidity and cost among persons with end-stage renal disease, with total annual costs exceeding $1 billion annually. In this context, the creation and maintenance of an effective hemodialysis vascular access is essential for safe and adequate hemodialysis therapy. Multiple reports have documented the type of vascular access used for dialysis and associated risk of infection and mortality. Undoubtedly, the central venous catheter (CVC) is associated with the greatest risk of infection-related and all-cause mortality compared with the autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or synthetic graft (AVG). The AVF has the lowest risk of infection, longer patency rates, greater quality of life, and lower all-cause mortality compared with the AVG or CVC. It is for these reasons that the National Kidney Foundation’s Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Access recommend the early placement and use of the AVF among at least 50% of incident hemodialysis patients. This report presents catheter-related mortality and calls for heightened awareness of catheter-related complications. PMID:19000119

  19. 77 FR 34047 - Medicare Program; Proposal Evaluation Criteria and Standards for End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... and Standards for End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network Organizations AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... procedures we will use to evaluate an End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network Organization's capabilities to perform, and actual performance of, the duties and functions under the ESRD Network Statement of Work...

  20. Urgent-Start Peritoneal Dialysis and Hemodialysis in ESRD Patients: Complications and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wei; Zhu, Mingli; Yu, Zanzhe; Fang, Yan; Yan, Hao; Zhang, Minfang; Wang, Qin; Che, Xiajing; Xie, Yuanyuan; Huang, Jiaying; Hu, Chunhua; Zhang, Haifen; Mou, Shan; Ni, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Background Several studies have suggested that urgent-start peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a feasible alternative to hemodialysis (HD) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but the impact of the dialysis modality on outcome, especially on short-term complications, in urgent-start dialysis has not been directly evaluated. The aim of the current study was to compare the complications and outcomes of PD and HD in urgent-start dialysis ESRD patients. Methods In this retrospective study, ESRD patients who initiated dialysis urgently without a pre-established functional vascular access or PD catheter at a single center from January 2013 to December 2014 were included. Patients were grouped according to their dialysis modality (PD and HD). Each patient was followed for at least 30 days after catheter insertion (until January 2016). Dialysis-related complications and patient survival were compared between the two groups. Results Our study enrolled 178 patients (56.2% male), of whom 96 and 82 patients were in the PD and HD groups, respectively. Compared with HD patients, PD patients had more cardiovascular disease, less heart failure, higher levels of serum potassium, hemoglobin, serum albumin, serum pre-albumin, and lower levels of brain natriuretic peptide. There were no significant differences in gender, age, use of steroids, early referral to a nephrologist, prevalence of primary renal diseases, prevalence of co-morbidities, and other laboratory characteristics between the groups. The incidence of dialysis-related complications during the first 30 days was significantly higher in HD than PD patients. HD patients had a significantly higher probability of bacteremia compared to PD patients. HD was an independent predictor of short-term (30-day) dialysis-related complications. There was no significant difference between PD and HD patients with respect to patient survival rate. Conclusion In an experienced center, PD is a safe and feasible dialysis alternative to HD

  1. Improving outcomes for ESRD patients: shifting the quality paradigm.

    PubMed

    Nissenson, Allen R

    2014-02-01

    The availability of life-saving dialysis therapy has been one of the great successes of medicine in the past four decades. Over this time period, despite treatment of hundreds of thousands of patients, the overall quality of life for patients with ESRD has not substantially improved. A narrow focus by clinicians and regulators on basic indicators of care, like dialysis adequacy and anemia, has consumed time and resources but not resulted in significantly improved survival; also, frequent hospitalizations and dissatisfaction with the care experience continue to be seen. A new quality paradigm is needed to help guide clinicians, providers, and regulators to ensure that patients' lives are improved by the technically complex and costly therapy that they are receiving. This paradigm can be envisioned as a quality pyramid: the foundation is the basic indicators (outstanding performance on these indicators is necessary but not sufficient to drive the primary outcomes). Overall, these basics are being well managed currently, but there remains an excessive focus on them, largely because of publically reported data and regulatory requirements. With a strong foundation, it is now time to focus on the more complex intermediate clinical outcomes-fluid management, infection control, diabetes management, medication management, and end-of-life care among others. Successfully addressing these intermediate outcomes will drive improvements in the primary outcomes, better survival, fewer hospitalizations, better patient experience with the treatment, and ultimately, improved quality of life. By articulating this view of quality in the ESRD program (pushing up the quality pyramid), the discussion about quality is reframed, and also, clinicians can better target their facilities in the direction of regulatory oversight and requirements about quality. Clinicians owe it to their patients, as the ESRD program celebrates its 40th anniversary, to rekindle the aspirations of the creators of

  2. Cultural Sensitivity and Challenges in Management of the Transgender Patient With ESRD in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Deborah Ann; Bulman, Maya; McMahon, Dorn W

    2016-03-01

    Transgender patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) present with specific challenges during the transplant evaluation, perioperative management, and postoperative phase of care. Demographic information, health-care records, chosen name, and gender identity along with documentation of specific health-care needs can become a challenge when gender assigned at birth is incongruent with the patients gender identity. Medical care involves addressing the end-organ disease as well as addressing those aspects of care specific to the transgender patient. This review article provides information on defining transgender, the impact of ESRD, and transgender in the transplant process and considerations in the throughout phases of care. Current recommendations for management of this unique population are provided.

  3. 42 CFR 405.2110 - Designation of ESRD networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... (a) Effect on patient choice of facility. The designation of networks does not require an ESRD... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designation of ESRD networks. 405.2110 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2110 Designation of ESRD networks. CMS designated...

  4. ESRD in the geriatric population: the crisis of managed care and the opportunity of disease management.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Theodore I

    2002-01-01

    The geriatric population with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is placed at risk with regards to the quality and extent of medical coverage because of the rapidly changing financial environment. Managed care organizations (MCOs) are generally for-profit companies that must focus on the bottom line. While the verbal commitment to quality care is voiced, the financial pressures on MCOs have led to a decrease in coverage of many services and outright denial for some necessary treatments. While denying services, the MCOs have also reduced payments to providers for services rendered. The coverage crisis is compounded by health maintenance organizations (HMOs) quitting Medicare because the reimbursement from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) is less than their costs. Because of the above issues which can potentially impact on the quality of care delivered to the ESRD geriatric population, a new approach to disease management has created the opportunity to improve total patient care to a level not yet achieved in the United States. Disease management encompasses integrated care across all disciplines. Every component of care can be tracked by a dedicated information system. Improvement in outcomes has far exceeded the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) benchmark performance measurements with a disease management model approach. The key to success is the health service coordinator (HSC), a senior nurse with many years of ESRD experience. This individual coordinates care across all disciplines and expedites necessary referrals. With rapid attention to patient needs there has been a significant reduction in hospital admissions, hospital length of stay, and emergency room visits. Patient care will steadily improve as the disease management system matures as a consequence of understanding the patients total physical and psychosocial needs.

  5. Clinical outcomes in pediatric hemodialysis patients in the USA: lessons from CMS' ESRD CPM Project.

    PubMed

    Neu, Alicia M; Frankenfield, Diane L

    2009-07-01

    Although prospective randomized trials have provided important information and allowed the development of evidence-based guidelines in adult hemodialysis (HD) patients, with approximately 800 prevalent pediatric HD patients in the United States, such studies are difficult to perform in this population. Observational data obtained through the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS') End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Clinical Performance Measures (CPM) Project have allowed description of the clinical care provided to pediatric HD patients as well as identification of risk factors for failure to reach adult targets for clinical parameters such as hemoglobin, single-pool Kt/V (spKt/V) and serum albumin. In addition, studies linking data from the ESRD CPM Project and the United States Renal Data System have allowed evaluation of associations between achievement of those targets and the outcomes of hospitalization and death. The results of those studies, while unable to prove cause and effect, suggest that the adult ESRD CPM targets may assist in identifying pediatric HD patients at risk for poor outcomes.

  6. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.210 Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment...

  7. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.210 Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment...

  8. Fiberglass or silica exposure and increased nephritis or ESRD (end-stage renal disease).

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J R; Goldsmith, D F

    1993-06-01

    The U.S. multiplant cohort mortality study of workers producing manufactured mineral fibers is finding increasing mortality from nephritis and/or nephrosis. We examine other data sets to see if similar effects can be identified. In a case-referent study among Michigan patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), men with exposures to silica have elevated odds ratio for ESRD. In a California occupational mortality study based on 1979-81 data, a number of the construction trades, farmers, and farm laborers show excess mortality for renal disease. The highest mortality ratio is found in the category including insulation workers. This ratio remains significantly elevated when adjusted for estimated exposures to smoking, alcohol, and for socio-economic status. California mortality data from 20 years earlier (1959-61) fail to show much excess renal disease in construction workers, but do for farmers. In Singapore, granite workers with a long-term exposure to silica have excess excretion of albumin and similar compounds compared to less exposed controls, leading to the presumption that silica exposure can lead to silica nephrotoxicity. Balkan nephropathy has been associated with consumption of well water high in silica. In the Negev of Israel, dust storms are a vehicle for increasing respiratory uptake of silica. The Beduin, thought to be a population with maximal exposures, have higher rates of ESRD than do Jews in the age groups over 60 years. Although high blood concentrations of silica are found in persons with renal failure, the close association with elevated creatinine has been interpreted as evidence that the buildup of silica is due to renal failure, rather than vice-versa.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Increased Risk of Urinary Tract Cancer in ESRD Patients Associated with Usage of Chinese Herbal Products Suspected of Containing Aristolochic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo-Meng; Lai, Ming-Nan; Wei, Alan; Chen, Ya-Yin; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Chen, Pau-Chung; Wang, Jung-Der

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Both end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and urothelial cancer (UC) are associated with the consumption of Chinese herbal products containing aristolochic acid (AA) by the general population. The objective of this study was to determine the risk of UC associated with AA-related Chinese herbal products among ESRD patients. Methods We conducted a cohort study using the National Health Insurance reimbursement database to enroll all ESRD patients in Taiwan from 1998–2002. Cox regression models were constructed and hazard ratios and confidence intervals were estimated after controlling for potential confounders, including age, sex, residence in region with endemic black foot disease, urinary tract infection, and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen. Results A total of 38,995 ESRD patients were included in the final analysis, and 320 patients developed UC after ESRD. Having been prescribed Mu Tong that was adulterated with Guan Mu Tong (Aristolochia manshuriensis) before 2004, or an estimated consumption of more than 1–100 mg of aristolochic acid, were both associated with an increased risk of UC in the multivariable analyses. Analgesic consumption of more than 150 pills was also associated with an increased risk of UC, although there was little correlation between the two risk factors. Conclusion Consumption of aristolochic acid-related Chinese herbal products was associated with an increased risk of developing UC in ESRD patients. Regular follow-up screening for UC in ESRD patients who have consumed Chinese herbal products is thus necessary. PMID:25170766

  10. Dysregulated Chemokine Receptor Expression and Chemokine-Mediated Cell Trafficking in Pediatric Patients with ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Barbara; Dai, Wei Wei; Lesser, Martin L.; Trachtman, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Children and adolescents with ESRD on dialysis are susceptible to serious bacterial infections (SBI). Chemokines and chemokine receptors play a critical role in modulating macrophage and neutrophil function. This study examined the hypothesis that expression and/or function of these molecules is dysregulated in patients with ESRD, contributing to leukocyte dysfunction. Design setting, participants, & measurements: Pediatric patients, age 6 mo to 18 yr, with ESRD treated with either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis were enrolled in this prospective, nontherapeutic study. Blood was collected for plasma chemokine levels, chemokine receptor profiling by flow cytometry, and functional chemotaxis studies on neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Results: ESRD in children was associated with reduced expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR1 and chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) on circulating neutrophils and monocytes, respectively. When ESRD patients were divided into two subgroups, those who were infection-free and those who had three or more SBI in the preceding year, the differences in chemokine receptor expression were statistically significant compared with control subjects only in those with recurrent infection. In addition to the effects of ESRD on baseline chemokine receptor expression, the hemodialysis procedure itself acutely lowered neutrophil CXCR1 and monocyte CCR2 expression. Furthermore, neutrophil and monocyte responsiveness to chemokine-mediated trafficking signals was impaired in all ESRD patients studied. This abnormality was independent of the level of chemokine receptor expression on the leukocytes. Conclusions: The data presented in this study suggest that chemokine receptor dysregulation contributes to leukocyte dysfunction in patients with ESRD. This alteration is especially prominent in ESRD patients with recurrent infection. PMID:18235145

  11. Hypokalemia associated with acute colonic pseudo-obstruction in an ESRD patient.

    PubMed

    Boobés, Khaled; Rosa, Robert M; Batlle, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Ogilvie's syndrome, or acute colonic pseudo-obstruction, is characterized by massive dilation of the colon without mechanical obstruction. Water and electrolytes often can be sequestered in the dilated intestinal loops resulting in profuse and watery diarrhea as well as hypokalemia. We report an anuric, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patient undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) who developed acute colonic pseudo-obstruction causing a prolonged hospitalization. He also developed severe hypokalemia with a serum potassium (K+) as low as 2.4 mEq/L and required 180 - 240 mEq of potassium chloride per day for more than a month to correct it. While PD K+ losses often contribute to hypokalemia, the PD K+ loss was estimated to be only 39 mEq/day. Therefore, PD could only contribute modestly to the recalcitrant hypokalemia observed during the episode of pseudo-obstruction. It has been shown, however, that patients with colonic pseudo-obstruction have enhanced colonic K+ secretion. In addition, experimental studies in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have demonstrated that colonic K+ excretion can be up to 3 times greater than in individuals with normal renal function. This increase may involve an upregulation of the large conductance K+ channel (maxi-K), also known as the BK channel, in the apical border of the colonocytes. We suggest that ESRD may have placed our patient at a greater risk of developing hypokalemia as his colon may have already adapted to secrete more K+. Clinicians should be aware of this extrarenal K+ wasting etiology in patients with colonic pseudo-obstruction, particularly in those with CKD where such a severe K+ deficit is not anticipated and, therefore, may inhibit more rigorous K+ replacement.

  12. Optimal management of bone mineral disorders in chronic kidney disease and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Lundquist, Andrew L.; Nigwekar, Sagar U.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes recent studies on chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders, with a focus on new developments in disease management. Recent findings The term chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder has come to describe an increasingly complex network of alterations in minerals and skeletal disorders that contribute to the significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in patients with chronic kidney disease and ESRD. Clinical studies continue to suggest associations with clinical outcomes, yet current clinical trials have failed to support causality. Variability in practice exists as current guidelines for management of bone-mineral disorders are often based on weak evidence. Recent studies implicate novel pathways for therapeutic intervention in clinical trials. Summary Mineral-bone disorders in chronic kidney disease arise from alterations in a number of molecules in an increasingly complex physiological network interconnecting bone and the cardiovascular system. Despite extensive associations with improved outcomes in a number of molecules, clinical trials have yet to prove causality and there is an absence of new therapies available to improve patient outcomes. Additional clinical trials that can incorporate the complexity of mineral bone disorders and with the ability to intervene on more than one pathway are needed to advance patient care. PMID:26785065

  13. Association of Left Atrial Volume With Mortality Among ESRD Patients With Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Referred for Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajan K.; Jardine, Alan G.M.; Mark, Patrick B.; Cunningham, Anthony F.; Steedman, Tracey; Powell, Joanna R.; McQuarrie, Emily P.; Stevens, Kathryn K.; Dargie, Henry J.; Jardine, Alan G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and an independent risk factor for premature cardiovascular death. Left atrial volume (LAV), measured using echocardiography, predicts death in patients with ESRD. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a volume-independent method of accurately assessing cardiac structure and function in patients with ESRD. Study Design Single-center prospective observational study to assess the determinants of all-cause mortality, particularly LAV, in a cohort of ESRD patients with LVH, defined using CMR imaging. Setting & Participants 201 consecutive ESRD patients with LVH (72.1% men; mean age, 51.6 ± 11.7 years) who had undergone pretransplant cardiovascular assessment were identified using CMR imaging between 2002-2008. LVH was defined as left ventricular mass index >84.1 g/m2 (men) or >74.6 g/m2 (women) based on published normal left ventricle dimensions for CMR imaging. Maximal LAV was calculated using the biplane area-length method at the end of left ventricle systole and corrected for body surface area. Predictors CMR abnormalities, including LAV. Outcome All-cause mortality. Results 54 patients died (11 after transplant) during a median follow-up of 3.62 years. Median LAV was 30.4 mL/m2 (interquartile range, 26.2-58.1). Patients were grouped into high (median or higher) or low (less than median) LAV. There were no significant differences in heart rate and mitral valve Doppler early to late atrial peak velocity ratio. Increased LAV was associated with higher mortality. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed poorer survival in patients with higher LAV (log rank P = 0.01). High LAV and left ventricular systolic dysfunction conferred similar risk and were independent predictors of death using multivariate analysis. Limitations Only patients undergoing pretransplant cardiac assessment are included. Limited assessment of left ventricular diastolic function

  14. 42 CFR 417.423 - Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... patients. A Medicare beneficiary who elects hospice care under § 418.24 of this chapter is not eligible to... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients. 417.423... PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Enrollment, Entitlement, and Disenrollment under...

  15. 42 CFR 417.423 - Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... patients. A Medicare beneficiary who elects hospice care under § 418.24 of this chapter is not eligible to... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients. 417.423... PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Enrollment, Entitlement, and Disenrollment under...

  16. 42 CFR 417.423 - Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... patients. A Medicare beneficiary who elects hospice care under § 418.24 of this chapter is not eligible to... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients. 417.423... PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Enrollment, Entitlement, and Disenrollment under...

  17. 42 CFR 417.423 - Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... beneficiary who elects hospice care under § 418.24 of this chapter is not eligible to enroll in an HMO or CMP... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients. 417.423... HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Enrollment, Entitlement, and Disenrollment under Medicare Contract §...

  18. 42 CFR 417.423 - Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... beneficiary who elects hospice care under § 418.24 of this chapter is not eligible to enroll in an HMO or CMP... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients. 417.423... HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Enrollment, Entitlement, and Disenrollment under Medicare Contract §...

  19. Anthropometric and Metabolic Risk Factors for ESRD Are Disease-Specific: Results from a Large Population-Based Cohort Study in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Zitt, Emanuel; Pscheidt, Constanze; Concin, Hans; Kramar, Reinhard; Lhotta, Karl; Nagel, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Background Anthropometric and metabolic risk factors for all-cause end-stage renal disease (ESRD) may vary in their impact depending on the specific primary renal disease. Methods In this Austrian population-based prospective cohort study (n = 185,341; 53.9% women) the following data were collected between 1985 and 2005: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose (FBG) from 1988, blood pressure, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and smoking status. These data were merged with the Austrian Dialysis and Transplant Registry to identify ESRD patients. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for all-cause ESRD as well as for cause-specific ESRD due to the following primary renal diseases: autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), vascular nephropathy (VN), diabetic nephropathy (DN) and other diseases (OD). Results During a mean follow-up of 17.5 years 403 participants developed ESRD (ADPKD 36, VN 97, DN 86, and OD 184). All parameters except TG and GGT were significantly associated with all-cause ESRD risk. Particular cause-specific ESRD risk factor patterns were found: for ADPKD increased risk from hypertension (HR 11.55); for VN from smoking (HR 1.81), hypertension (HR 2.37), TG (≥5.70 vs. <1.17 mmol/L: HR 9.27); for DN from smoking (HR 1.77), BMI (≥30 vs. 18.5–24.9 kg/m2: HR 7.55), FBG (≥6.94 vs. <5.55 mmol/L: HR 7.67), hypertension (HR 1.08), TG (≥5.70 vs. <1.17 mmol/L: HR 2.02), GGT (HR 2.14); and for OD from hypertension (HR 2.29), TG (≥5.70 vs. <1.17 mmol/L: HR 6.99) and TC (≥6.22 vs. <5.18 mmol/L: HR 1.56). Conclusions Particular anthropometric and metabolic ESRD risk factors differ in importance depending on the primary renal disease. This needs to be considered for future preventive and therapeutic strategies addressing cause-specific ESRD. PMID:27537361

  20. Predictors of Incident ESRD among Patients with Primary Hyperoxaluria Presenting Prior to Kidney Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fang; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Mehta, Ramila A.; Vaughan, Lisa E.; Olson, Julie B.; Seide, Barbara M.; Meek, Alicia M.; Cogal, Andrea G.; Lieske, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Overproduction of oxalate in patients with primary hyperoxaluria (PH) leads to calcium oxalate deposition in the kidney and ESRD in a substantial number of cases. However, the key determinants for renal outcome remain unclear. Thus, we performed a retrospective analysis to identify predictors for renal outcome among patients with PH participating in the Rare Kidney Stone Consortium (RKSC) PH Registry. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We characterized clinical and laboratory features of patients enrolled in the RKSC PH Registry. We assessed correlation between urinary measures and eGFR at diagnosis by Spearman rank correlation and estimated renal survival using the Kaplan–Meier method. We determined factors associated with renal survival by Cox proportional hazard models. Results Of 409 patients enrolled in the RKSC Registry as of March 2014, we excluded 112 patients who had ESRD at PH diagnosis from analysis. Among the remaining 297 patients, 65% had PH type 1, 12% had type 2, 13% had type 3, and 11% had unclassified PH. Median (25th, 75th percentile) age at PH diagnosis was 8.1 (4.0, 18.2) years with an eGFR of 73.0 (56.4, 97.5) ml/min per 1.73 m2 and urinary oxalate excretion rate of 1.64 (1.11, 2.44) mmol/1.73 m2 per 24 hours. During a median follow-up of 3.9 (1.0, 12.8) years, 59 (20%) patients developed ESRD. Urinary oxalate excretion at diagnosis stratified by quartile was strongly associated with incident ESRD (hazard ratio [HR], 3.4; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.4 to 7.9). During follow-up there was a significant association between urinary oxalate quartile (Q) and incident ESRD (Q4 versus Q1: HR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.2 to 9.3). This association remained even when adjusted for sex, age, and baseline eGFR (HR, 4.2; 95% CI, 1.6 to 10.8). Conclusions Among patients with PH, higher urinary oxalate excretion is predictive of poor renal outcome. PMID:26656319

  1. The Beneficial Effects of Renal Transplantation on Altered Oxidative Status of ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cerrillos-Gutiérrez, José Ignacio; Preciado-Rojas, Priscila; Gómez-Navarro, Benjamín; Sifuentes-Franco, Sonia; Carrillo-Ibarra, Sandra; Andrade-Sierra, Jorge; Rojas-Campos, Enrique; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso Martín

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation (RT), has been considered the best therapeutic option for end stage renal disease (ESRD). Objective. To determine the effect of RT on the evolution of oxidative DNA status. Methods. Prospective cohort (N = 50 receptors of RT); genotoxic damage, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and DNA repair enzyme, human 8-oxoguanine-DNA-N- glycosylase-1 (hOGG1); and antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), were evaluated. Results. Before RT, 8-OHdG were significantly elevated (11.04 ± 0.90 versus 4.73 ± 0.34 ng/mL) compared to healthy controls (p = 0.001), with normalization after 6 months of 4.78 ± 0.34 ng/mL (p < 0.001). The same phenomenon was observed with hOGG1 enzyme before RT with 2.14 ± 0.36 ng/mL (p = 0.01) and decreased significantly at the end of the study to 1.20 ng/mL (p < 0.001) but was higher than controls, 0.51 ± 0.07 ng/mL (p < 0.03). Antioxidant SOD was elevated at 24.09 ± 1.6 IU/mL versus healthy controls (p = 0.001) before RT; however, 6 months after RT it decreased significantly to 16.9 ± 1.6 IU/mL (p = 0.002), without achieving the levels of healthy controls (p = 0.01). The GPx, before RT, was significantly diminished with 24.09 ± 1.6 IU/mL versus healthy controls (39.0 ± 1.58) (p = 0.01), while, in the final results, levels increased significantly to 30.38 ± 3.16 IU/mL (p = 0.001). Discussion. Patients with ESRD have important oxidative damage before RT. The RT significantly reduces oxidative damage and partially regulates the antioxidant enzymes (SOD and GPx). PMID:27547292

  2. Cutaneous Manifestations of ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Antonia J.; Leslie, Kieron S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A broad range of skin diseases occurs in patients with ESRD: from the benign and asymptomatic to the physically disabling and life-threatening. Many of them negatively impact on quality of life. Their early recognition and treatment are essential in reducing morbidity and mortality. The cutaneous manifestations can be divided into two main categories: nonspecific and specific. The nonspecific manifestations are commonly seen and include skin color changes, xerosis, half-and-half nails, and pruritus. The specific disorders include acquired perforating dermatosis, bullous dermatoses, metastatic calcification, and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. This review article describes these conditions and considers the underlying pathophysiology, clinical presentations, diagnosis, and treatment options. PMID:24115194

  3. Variation in Cancer Incidence among Patients with ESRD during Kidney Function and Nonfunction Intervals.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Clarke, Christina A; Snyder, Jon J; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Engels, Eric A

    2016-05-01

    Among patients with ESRD, cancer risk is affected by kidney dysfunction and by immunosuppression after transplant. Assessing patterns across periods of dialysis and kidney transplantation may inform cancer etiology. We evaluated 202,195 kidney transplant candidates and recipients from a linkage between the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients and cancer registries, and compared incidence in kidney function intervals (time with a transplant) with incidence in nonfunction intervals (waitlist or time after transplant failure), adjusting for demographic factors. Incidence of infection-related and immune-related cancer was higher during kidney function intervals than during nonfunction intervals. Incidence was most elevated for Kaposi sarcoma (hazard ratio [HR], 9.1; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 4.7 to 18), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (HR, 3.2; 95% CI, 2.8 to 3.7), Hodgkin's lymphoma (HR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7 to 5.3), lip cancer (HR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.0 to 6.0), and nonepithelial skin cancers (HR, 3.8; 95% CI, 2.5 to 5.8). Conversely, ESRD-related cancer incidence was lower during kidney function intervals (kidney cancer: HR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.7 to 0.8 and thyroid cancer: HR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6 to 0.8). With each successive interval, incidence changed in alternating directions for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, melanoma, and lung, pancreatic, and nonepithelial skin cancers (higher during function intervals), and kidney and thyroid cancers (higher during nonfunction intervals). For many cancers, incidence remained higher than in the general population across all intervals. These data indicate strong short-term effects of kidney dysfunction and immunosuppression on cancer incidence in patients with ESRD, suggesting a need for persistent cancer screening and prevention.

  4. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  5. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  6. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  7. Bidirectional association between ESRD dialysis and diabetes: National cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yeh-Wen; Wu, Wen-Shiann; Hsu, Chen-Fang; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chien, Chih-Chiang

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetes is associated with development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) dialysis, but it is not clear whether ESRD dialysis is a risk factor for new-onset diabetes (NODM). Methods Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we designed two cohort studies to determine the association between dialysis and diabetes. Analysis 1 estimated the hazard ratios (HR) of ESRD dialysis in 20,585 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and 82,340 gender- and age- matched controls without diabetes. Analysis 2 estimated the HRs of NODM in 18,489 ESRD patients undergoing dialysis and 73,956 gender- and age- matched controls without ESRD dialysis. The follow-up period was from 2000 to date of endpoint, the date of death, or December 31, 2008. Cox proportional models were used to estimate the relative hazards. Results In analysis 1, the incidence of ESRD dialysis was higher in the T2DM cohort than in the non-diabetes cohort (6.78 vs. 0.61 per 1,000 person-years; HR: 7.97; 95%CI: 7.05–8.00). In analysis 2, the incidence of NODM was higher in the ESRD dialysis cohort than in the without-ESRD dialysis cohort (22.84 vs. 13.99 per 1,000 person-years; HR: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.34–1.47). Conclusions ESRD dialysis and diabetes were bidirectionally associated. The relationship between T2DM and incident ESRD dialysis was much stronger than between ESRD dialysis and NODM. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism of ESRD dialysis-related NODM. PMID:28296932

  8. Protein Nutrition and Malnutrition in CKD and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Yan; Qian, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Elevated protein catabolism and protein malnutrition are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The underlying etiology includes, but is not limited to, metabolic acidosis intestinal dysbiosis; systemic inflammation with activation of complements, endothelin-1 and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAAS) axis; anabolic hormone resistance; energy expenditure elevation; and uremic toxin accumulation. All of these derangements can further worsen kidney function, leading to poor patient outcomes. Many of these CKD-related derangements can be prevented and substantially reversed, representing an area of great potential to improve CKD and ESRD care. This review integrates known information and recent advances in the area of protein nutrition and malnutrition in CKD and ESRD. Management recommendations are summarized. Thorough understanding the pathogenesis and etiology of protein malnutrition in CKD and ESRD patients will undoubtedly facilitate the design and development of more effective strategies to optimize protein nutrition and improve outcomes. PMID:28264439

  9. Methionine cycle kinetics and arginine supplementation in endothelial dysfunction of ESRD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the effect of arginine supplementation on metabolic pathways involved in endothelial dysfunction of end stage renal disease (ESRD), we conducted a study on 11 ESRD patients age 49+/-16; wt 93+/-26 kg receiving an adequate protein and energy intake for 1 week, followed by a primed, con...

  10. Death Does Matter--Cancer Risk in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Study With Competing Risk Analyses.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shih-Feng; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Jan, Ren-Long; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chu, Chin-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a high mortality rate. We hypothesized that not accounting for death as a competing risk overestimates the event rate caused by ESRD. Thus, we examined the cancer risk for patients with ESRD (ESRD) after death as a competing risk event had been adjusted for. Patients with newly diagnosed ESRD (n = 64,299) between 1999 and 2007, together with age- and sex-matched controls without ESRD (ESRD) (n = 128,592) were enrolled (1:2). In a Cox proportional hazards model that included death as a competing risk, ESRD patients in Taiwan had a lower overall incidence (subdistribution hazard ratio [sdHR] = 1.29) of cancer than did ESRD patients in a Cox model that did not include death as a competing risk (HR = 1.70). After competing mortality had been adjusted for, ESRD patients ≥70 (sdHR = 0.82) and ESRD patients on long-term dialysis (> 5 follow-up years, sdHR = 0.62), had a lower risk for developing cancer than did ESRD patients. This finding supported our hypothesis that standard survival analyses overestimate the event rate, especially when the mortality rate is high. It also showed that ESRD patients, when they grow older, were far less likely to develop cancer and far more likely to die because of underlying illnesses that might also affect the risk of death because of ESRD.

  11. 42 CFR 405.2112 - ESRD network organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2112 ESRD network organizations. CMS will designate an... services, and renal disease facilities in vocational rehabilitation programs. (c) Developing criteria...

  12. 42 CFR 405.2112 - ESRD network organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2112 ESRD network organizations. CMS will designate an... services, and renal disease facilities in vocational rehabilitation programs. (c) Developing criteria...

  13. 42 CFR 405.2112 - ESRD network organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2112 ESRD network organizations. CMS will designate an... services, and renal disease facilities in vocational rehabilitation programs. (c) Developing criteria...

  14. 42 CFR 405.2112 - ESRD network organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2112 ESRD network organizations. CMS will designate an... services, and renal disease facilities in vocational rehabilitation programs. (c) Developing criteria...

  15. Patient-centered care: an opportunity to accomplish the "Three Aims" of the National Quality Strategy in the Medicare ESRD program.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Ann M; Armistead, Nancy; Schrag, Wendy L Funk; Diamond, Louis; Moss, Alvin H

    2014-12-05

    In light of mounting federal government debt and levels of Medicare spending that are widely viewed as unsustainable, commentators have called for a transformation of the United States health care system to deliver better care at lower costs. This article presents the priorities of the Coalition for Supportive Care of Kidney Patients for how clinicians might achieve this transformation for patients with advanced CKD and their families. The authors suspect that much of the high-intensity, high-cost care currently delivered to patients with advanced kidney disease may be unwanted and that the "Three Aims" put forth by the National Quality Strategy of better care for the individual, better health for populations, and reduced health care costs may be within reach for patients with CKD and ESRD. This work describes the coalition's vision for a more patient-centered approach to the care of patients with kidney disease and argues for more concerted efforts to align their treatments with their goals, values, and preferences. Key priorities to achieve this vision include using improved prognostic models and decision science to help patients, their families, and their providers better understand what to expect in the future; engaging patients and their families in shared decision-making before the initiation of dialysis and during the course of dialysis treatment; and tailoring treatment strategies throughout the continuum of their care to address what matters most to individual patients.

  16. P-Cresyl Sulfate Is a Valuable Predictor of Clinical Outcomes in Pre-ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Jui; Pan, Chi-Feng; Chuang, Chih-Kuang; Sun, Fang-Ju; Wang, Duen-Jen; Chen, Han-Hsiang; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Wu, Chih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims. Previous studies have reported p-cresyl sulfate (PCS) was related to endothelial dysfunction and adverse clinical effect. We investigate the adverse effects of PCS on clinical outcomes in a chronic kidney disease (CKD) cohort study. Methods. 72 predialysis patients were enrolled from a single medical center. Serum biochemistry data and PCS were measured. The clinical outcomes including cardiovascular event, all-cause mortality, and dialysis event were recorded during a 3-year follow-up. Results. After adjusting other independent variables, multivariate Cox regression analysis showed age (HR: 1.12, P = 0.01), cardiovascular disease history (HR: 6.28, P = 0.02), and PCS (HR: 1.12, P = 0.02) were independently associated with cardiovascular event; age (HR: 0.91, P < 0.01), serum albumin (HR: 0.03, P < 0.01), and PCS level (HR: 1.17, P < 0.01) reached significant correlation with dialysis event. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with higher serum p-cresyl sulfate (>6 mg/L) were significantly associated with cardiovascular and dialysis event (log rank P = 0.03, log rank P < 0.01, resp.). Conclusion. Our study shows serum PCS could be a valuable marker in predicting cardiovascular event and renal function progression in CKD patients without dialysis. PMID:24592393

  17. Coexistent Pseudogout and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Septic Arthritis in a Patient with HIV and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Omer M.; Cervellione, Kelly L.; Singh, Bhupinder B.; Bagheri, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Pseudogout is a crystal-induced arthropathy characterized by the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals in synovial fluid, menisci, or articular cartilage. Although not very common, this entity can be seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Septic arthritis due to Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) is a rare entity that can affect immunocompromised patients such as those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or those who are on immunosuppressive drugs. Here, we describe a 51-year-old female who presented with fever, right knee pain, swelling, warmth, and decreased range of motion for several days. The initial assessment was consistent with pseudogout, with negative bacterial and fungal cultures. However, due to high white blood cell (WBC) count in the synovial fluid analysis, she was empirically started on intravenous (IV) vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam and discharged on IV vancomycin and cefepime, while acid-fast bacilli (AFB) culture was still in process. Seventeen days later, AFB culture grew Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI), and she was readmitted for relevant management. This case illustrates that septic arthritis due to MAI should be considered in the differential diagnosis of septic arthritis in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27803833

  18. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products and chronic complications in ESRD treated by dialysis.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Zeebregts, Clark J; Navis, Gerjan; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Lefrandt, Joop D; Smit, Andries J

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular and connective tissue disorders are very common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is significantly increased in these patients. Accumulation of AGEs is believed to have a role in tissue protein aging and the pathogenesis of such age-related diseases as diabetes and ESRD. AGEs accumulate in patients with ESRD as a result of nonenzymatic glycation, oxidative stress, and diminished clearance of AGE precursors. Some AGEs show characteristic brown pigmentation and fluorescence, form protein-protein cross-links, and may ligate with AGE-specific receptors, inducing oxidative stress and cytokine production. This review focuses on the clinical relevance of AGE accumulation in patients with ESRD treated by dialysis for the development of long-term complications. The formation and accumulation of AGEs in patients with ESRD are discussed, as well as the relationship between AGE accumulation and such major complications of ESRD as cardiovascular and connective tissue disorders.

  19. Serious Illness Conversations in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Ernest I; Bernacki, Rachelle E; Block, Susan D

    2016-12-28

    Dialysis-dependent ESRD is a serious illness with high disease burden, morbidity, and mortality. Mortality in the first year on dialysis for individuals over age 75 years old approaches 40%, and even those with better prognoses face multiple hospitalizations and declining functional status. In the last month of life, patients on dialysis over age 65 years old experience higher rates of hospitalization, intensive care unit admission, procedures, and death in hospital than patients with cancer or heart failure, while using hospice services less. This high intensity of care is often inconsistent with the wishes of patients on dialysis but persists due to failure to explore or discuss patient goals, values, and preferences in the context of their serious illness. Fewer than 10% of patients on dialysis report having had a conversation about goals, values, and preferences with their nephrologist, although nearly 90% report wanting this conversation. Many nephrologists shy away from these conversations, because they do not wish to upset their patients, feel that there is too much uncertainty in their ability to predict prognosis, are insecure in their skills at broaching the topic, or have difficulty incorporating the conversations into their clinical workflow. In multiple studies, timely discussions about serious illness care goals, however, have been associated with enhanced goal-consistent care, improved quality of life, and positive family outcomes without an increase in patient distress or anxiety. In this special feature article, we will (1) identify the barriers to serious illness conversations in the dialysis population, (2) review best practices in and specific approaches to conducting serious illness conversations, and (3) offer solutions to overcome barriers as well as practical advice, including specific language and tools, to implement serious illness conversations in the dialysis population.

  20. Variation in infection prevention practices in dialysis facilities: results from the national opportunity to improve infection control in ESRD (End-Stage Renal Disease) project.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Carol E; Hines, Stephen C; Hall, Kendall K; Saran, Rajiv; Kalbfleisch, John D; Spencer, Teri; Frank, Kelly M; Carlson, Diane; Deane, Jan; Roys, Erik; Scholz, Natalie; Parrotte, Casey; Messana, Joseph M

    2015-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe patient care across hemodialysis facilities enrolled in the National Opportunity to Improve Infection Control in ESRD (end-stage renal disease) (NOTICE) project in order to evaluate adherence to evidence-based practices aimed at prevention of infection. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Thirty-four hemodialysis facilities were randomly selected from among 772 facilities in 4 end-stage renal disease participating networks. Facility selection was stratified on dialysis organization affiliation, size, socioeconomic status, and urban/rural status. MEASUREMENTS Trained infection control evaluators used an infection control worksheet to observe 73 distinct infection control practices at the hemodialysis facilities, from October 1, 2011, through January 31, 2012. RESULTS There was considerable variation in infection control practices across enrolled facilities. Overall adherence to recommended practices was 68% (range, 45%-92%) across all facilities. Overall adherence to expected hand hygiene practice was 72% (range, 10%-100%). Compliance to hand hygiene before and after procedures was high; however, during procedures hand hygiene compliance averaged 58%. Use of chlorhexidine as the specific agent for exit site care was 19% overall but varied from 0% to 35% by facility type. The 8 checklists varied in the frequency of perfect performance from 0% for meeting every item on the checklist for disinfection practices to 22% on the arteriovenous access practices at initiation. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that there are many areas for improvement in hand hygiene and other infection prevention practices in end-stage renal disease. These NOTICE project findings will help inform the development of a larger quality improvement initiative at dialysis facilities.

  1. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  2. High prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and nodular thyroid disease in patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Ana Beatriz B A; Pellizzari, Caio; Carvalho, Gisah A; Sant'Anna, Beatriz C; Montenegro, Rafaela L; Zammar Filho, Roberto G; Mesa Junior, Cleo O; Hauck Prante, Patrícia R; Olandoski, Marcia; Carvalho, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease has been known to affect thyroid hormone metabolism. Low serum levels of T3 and T4 are the most remarkable laboratorial findings. A high incidence of goiter and nodules on thyroid ultrasonography has been reported in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Our objective is to evaluate the prevalence of laboratorial and morphologic alterations in the thyroid gland in a cohort of patients with ESRD on hemodialysis (HD). Sixty-one patients with ESRD on HD were selected and compared with 43 healthy subjects matched by age, gender, and weight. Patients were submitted to thyroid ultrasonography. T3, free T4 (FT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone, antithyroglobulin, and antithyroperoxidase antibodies were measured. The mean age of patients with ESRD was 47.4 ± 12.3 and 61% were women. ESRD was mainly caused by hypertensive nephrosclerosis and diabetic nephropathy. Mean thyroid volume, as determined by ultrasonography, was similar in both groups. Patients with ESRD had more hypoechoic nodules when compared with the control group (24.1% vs. 7.9%, P = 0.056). Mean serum FT4 and T3 levels were significantly lower in patients with ESRD, and subclinical hypothyroidism was more prevalent in patients with ESRD (21.82% vs. 7.14% control group, P = 0.04). Titers of antithyroid antibodies were similar in both groups. ESRD was associated with a higher prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and lower levels of T3 and FT4. Almost a quarter of patients showed thyroid nodules >10 mm. Periodic ultrasound evaluation and assessment of thyroid function are recommended in patients with ESRD on HD.

  3. Glycemic management in ESRD and earlier stages of CKD.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark E; Garg, Rajesh

    2014-02-01

    The management of hyperglycemia in patients with kidney failure is complex, and the goals and methods regarding glycemic control in chronic kidney disease (CKD) are not clearly defined. Although aggressive glycemic control seems to be advantageous in early diabetic nephropathy, outcome data supporting tight glycemic control in patients with advanced CKD (including end-stage renal disease [ESRD]) are lacking. Challenges in the management of such patients include therapeutic inertia, monitoring difficulties, and the complexity of available treatments. In this article, we review the alterations in glucose homeostasis that occur in kidney failure, current views on the value of glycemic control and issues with its determination, and more recent approaches to monitor or measure glycemic control. Hypoglycemia and treatment options for patients with diabetes and ESRD or earlier stages of CKD also are addressed, discussing the insulin and noninsulin agents that currently are available, along with their indications and contraindications. The article provides information to help clinicians in decision making in order to provide individualized glycemic goals and appropriate therapy for patients with ESRD or earlier stages of CKD.

  4. Risk of Band Keratopathy in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shih-Feng; Jan, Ren-Long; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Chang, Yuh-Shin

    2016-01-01

    This study is a retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study to investigate the risk of band keratopathy following end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The study cohort included 94,039 ESRD on-dialysis patients identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), code 585 and registered between January 2000 to December 2009 at the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. An age- and sex-matched control group comprised 94,039 patients selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Information for each patient was collected from the index date until December 2011. In total, 230 ESRD patients and 26 controls had band keratopathy (P < 0.0001) during the follow-up period, indicating a significantly elevated risk of band keratopathy in the ESRD patients compared with controls (incidence rate ratio = 12.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.14–18.32). After adjustment for potential confounders including sarcoidosis, hyperparathyroidism, iridocyclitis, and phthisis bulbi, ESRD patients were 11.56 times more likely to develop band keratopathy in the full cohort (adjusted HR = 11.56, 95% CI = 7.70–17.35). In conclusion, ESRD increases the risk of band keratopathy. Close interdisciplinary collaboration between nephrologists and ophthalmologists is important to deal with band keratopathy following ESRD and prevent visual acuity impairments. PMID:27346848

  5. Impact of HLA on the underlying primary diseases in Turkish patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Gonca Emel; Seyhun, Yalcin; Oguz, Fatma Savran; Kekik, Cigdem; Onal, Ayse Emel; Yazici, Halil; Turkmen, Aydin; Aydin, Ali Emin; Sever, Mehmet Sukru; Eldegez, Ulug; Carin, Mahmut Nezih

    2009-01-01

    The number of patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing faster than the number of renal transplantations performed per year worldwide. Of the primary diseases leading to ESRD, diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the association of HLA with the primary diseases leading to ESRD in Turkish patients. A total of 3230 individuals comprising 587 ESRD patients and 2643 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. Class I HLA-A, -B typing was performed by CDC method, while class II HLA-DRB1 typing was performed by low resolution PCR-SSP. We found a significant negative association between almost all A locus antigens and primary disease groups classified as chronic glomerulonephritis and hypertensive nephrosclerosis (p < 0.05). HLA-B58 and HLA-DRB1*03 significantly correlated with amyloidosis and diabetic nephropathy, respectively. Determination of HLAs as risk factors for primary diseases leading to ESRD might be beneficial in preventing progression to ESRD and recurrence of the primary disease post-transplantation.

  6. Management of patients with hepatitis C infection and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Bunchorntavakul, Chalermrat; Maneerattanaporn, Monthira; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2015-02-27

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with more rapid liver disease progression and reduced renal graft and patients' survival following kidney transplantation. Evaluations and management of HCV in patients with renal disease are challenging. The pharmacokinetics of interferons (IFN), ribavirin (RBV) and some direct acting antiviral (DAA), such as sofosbuvir, are altered in patients with ESRD. With dose adjustment and careful monitoring, treatment of HCV in patients with ESRD can be associated with sustained virological response (SVR) rates nearly comparable to that of patients with normal renal function. DAA-based regimens, especially the IFN-free and RBV-free regimens, are theoretically preferred for patients with ESRD and KT in order to increase SVR rates and to reduce treatment side effects. However, based on the data for pharmacokinetics, dosing safety and efficacy of DAA for patients with severe renal impairment are lacking. This review will be focused on the evaluations, available pharmacologic data, and management of HCV in patients with severe renal impairment, patients who underwent KT, and those who suffered from HCV-related renal disease, according to the available treatment options, including DAA.

  7. Pain management in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phuong-Chi T.; Toscano, Edgar; Pham, Phuong-Mai T.; Pham, Phuong-Anh T.; Pham, Son V.; Pham, Phuong-Thu T.

    2009-01-01

    Pain has been reported to be a common problem in the general population and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Although similar data for pre-ESRD patients are lacking, we recently reported that the prevalence of pain is also very high (>70%) among pre-ESRD patients at a Los Angeles County tertiary referral centre. The high prevalence of pain in the CKD population is particularly concerning because pain has been shown to be associated with poor quality of life. Of greater concern, poor quality of life, at least in dialysis patients, has been shown to be associated with poor survival. We herein discuss the pathophysiology of common pain conditions, review a commonly accepted approach to the management of pain in the general population, and discuss analgesic-induced renal complications and therapeutic issues specific for patients with reduced renal function. PMID:25949305

  8. Obese and diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease: Peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis?

    PubMed

    Ekart, Robert; Hojs, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease that is increasingly prevalent around the world and is a well-recognized risk factor for type 2 diabetes and hypertension, leading causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The obese diabetic patient with ESRD is a challenge for the nephrologist with regard to the type of renal replacement therapy that should be suggested and offered to the patient. There is no evidence that either peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis is contraindicated in obese ESRD patients. In the literature, we can find a discrepancy in the impact of obesity on mortality among hemodialysis vs. peritoneal dialysis patients. Several studies in hemodialysis patients suggest that a higher BMI confers a survival advantage - the so-called "reverse epidemiology". In contrast, the literature among obese peritoneal dialysis patients is inconsistent, with various studies reporting an increased risk of death, no difference, or a decreased risk of death. Many of these studies only spanned across a few years, and this is probably too short of a time frame for a realistic assessment of obesity's impact on mortality in ESRD patients. The decision for dialysis modality in an obese diabetic patient with ESRD should be individualized. According to the results of published studies, we cannot suggest PD or HD as a better solution for all obese diabetic patients. The obese patient should be educated about all their dialysis options, including home dialysis therapies. In this review, the available literature related to the dialysis modality in obese patients with diabetes and ESRD was reviewed.

  9. Etiology of End-Stage Renal Disease and Arterial Stiffness among Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    El Ghoul, Balsam; Korjian, Serge; El Alam, Andrew; Samad, Salam; Dahdah, Georges; Blacher, Jacques; Safar, Michel E.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Prior studies have demonstrated that conventional and emerging CV risk factors are associated with worsening arterial stiffness among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis. The present cross-sectional study evaluates the association between the etiology of ESRD and arterial stiffness among a cohort of hemodialysis patients. Methods. Etiology of ESRD was identified from patients' medical records and classified as either vascular renal disease, diabetic nephropathy, nondiabetic glomerulopathy, tubular interstitial nephropathy, hereditary nephropathy, or ESRD of unconfirmed etiology. Results. A total of 82 subjects were enrolled. cfPWV was independently associated with the composite of either diabetic nephropathy or vascular renal disease (p = 0.022), pulse pressure (p = 0.001), and a history of CV events (p = 0.025), but not history of hypertension or diabetes mellitus alone. The median cfPWVs in diabetic nephropathy and vascular renal disease were comparable and significantly higher than median cfPWVs in other etiologies of ESRD. Conclusion. The study suggests that the etiology of ESRD is independently associated with arterial stiffness among hemodialysis patients. Furthermore, arterial stiffness was higher among patients who developed renal sequelae of either diabetes mellitus or hypertension as compared with those who have a history of either diabetes mellitus or hypertension alone. PMID:28299320

  10. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... independent ESRD facilities. 413.174 Section 413.174 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.174 Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities. Link to an...

  11. Addressing cardiovascular disease in patients with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Crook, Errol D; Washington, David O

    2002-01-01

    It is well-established that patients with renal disease are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) death. Despite better understanding of CVD in endstage renal disease (ESRD) patients and more rigid guidelines addressing the major risk factors for CVD in this population, CVD continues to be the number one cause of death in patients with ESRD. Moreover, higher rates of CVD are seen in patients with moderate, and even mild, renal dysfunction and in patients with albuminuria (micro and macroscopic). Few studies with CVD endpoints have included patients with renal disease. There is sufficient evidence to support appropriate blood pressure reduction as having a beneficial effect on CVD morbidity and mortality in patients with renal disease (especially for patients with diabetes). Data supporting the benefit of modification of other CVD risk factors is not as strong, but current recommendations do stress aggressive control of lipids, smoking cessation, and maintenance of adequate nutritional status. Inclusion of patients with renal disease in studies with CVD endpoints is necessary. Until then, it is generally recommended that CVD risk stratification and modification strategies be applied to this high-risk population.

  12. Thyroid functional disease: an under-recognized cardiovascular risk factor in kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Connie M.; Brent, Gregory A.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Soldin, Offie P.; Nguyen, Danh; Budoff, Matthew J.; Brunelli, Steven M.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid functional disease, and in particular hypothyroidism, is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. In the general population, hypothyroidism is associated with impaired cardiac contractility, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and possibly higher cardiovascular mortality. It has been hypothesized that hypothyroidism is an under-recognized, modifiable risk factor for the enormous burden of cardiovascular disease and death in CKD and ESRD, but this has been difficult to test due to the challenge of accurate thyroid functional assessment in uremia. Low thyroid hormone levels (i.e. triiodothyronine) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular sequelae in CKD and ESRD patients, but these metrics are confounded by malnutrition, inflammation and comorbid states, and hence may signify nonthyroidal illness (i.e. thyroid functional test derangements associated with underlying ill health in the absence of thyroid pathology). Thyrotropin is considered a sensitive and specific thyroid function measure that may more accurately classify hypothyroidism, but few studies have examined the clinical significance of thyrotropin-defined hypothyroidism in CKD and ESRD. Of even greater uncertainty are the risks and benefits of thyroid hormone replacement, which bear a narrow therapeutic-to-toxic window and are frequently prescribed to CKD and ESRD patients. In this review, we discuss mechanisms by which hypothyroidism adversely affects cardiovascular health; examine the prognostic implications of hypothyroidism, thyroid hormone alterations and exogenous thyroid hormone replacement in CKD and ESRD; and identify areas of uncertainty related to the interplay between hypothyroidism, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease requiring further investigation. PMID:24574542

  13. Depressive symptoms and dietary nonadherence in patients with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis: a review of quantitative evidence.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Amani Anwar; Frazier, Susan K

    2010-05-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who receive hemodialysis have high rates of psychosocial distress and nonadherence to diet prescription. The purpose of this study was to examine the quantitative research evidence about the effect of depressive symptoms on dietary adherence. A systematic search of the literature using MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycINFO databases was performed for quantitative research studies. Forty-four studies met inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Nearly all studies supported an association between depressive symptoms and dietary adherence in patients with ESRD. Depressive symptoms were associated with dietary nonadherence in patients with ESRD.

  14. Patients with end-stage renal disease were at an increased risk of hospitalization for acute diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Huang, Nicole; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) show a high incidence of bacterial translocation and impaired gastrointestinal motility. The intestinal tract is believed to be the most crucial source of translocated bacteria. To evaluate the risk of colonic diverticulitis in patients with ESRD, we conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study. Patients who met the following 3 criteria were defined as patients with ESRD: patients diagnosed with ESRD who received regular hemodialysis between 2000 and 2005, patients who received hemodialysis for more than 90% of the time during the observation period (2000–2011), and patients with no prior history of hemodialysis between 1997 and 1999. We matched every patient with ESRD with 1 matched control on the basis of propensity scores. The first diagnosis of diverticulitis (ICD-9-CM codes 562.11 and 562.13) within the follow-up period was defined as the primary endpoint. Hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the patients in the control group as the reference. We included 32,547 and 32,547 patients in the ESRD and matched control cohorts, respectively. The 12-year cumulative incidence of acute colonic diverticulitis for patients with ESRD was significantly higher than that for the controls (P < 0.001). After adjustment for age, sex, comorbidities, and medication use, the HR of acute colonic diverticulitis in the ESRD cohort was 11.20 times greater than that in the control cohort (95% CI: 8.14–15.42). The results indicated that patients with ESRD are at an increased risk for acute colonic diverticulitis. PMID:27684821

  15. High risk of ESRD in type 1 diabetes: New strategies are needed to retard progressive renal function decline

    PubMed Central

    Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2012-01-01

    Care of patients with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) has changed during the last 30 years. Tools to control glycemia have improved and it was demonstrated that improvement in glycemic control diminished the risk of late diabetic complications, including nephropathy. Moreover, in patients with impaired renal function, aggressive treatment of hypertension and reno-protective blockade of the renin-angiotensin system were shown to postpone end-stage renal disease (ESRD), albeit for a short while. Despite these achievements, the incidence of ESRD due to T1D in the US population has not decreased but rather has increased over the last 20 years, although it now occurs at slightly older ages. This state of affairs is a call to action. This should begin with adopting a new model of diabetic nephropathy in humans. In that model, instead of microalbuminuria or proteinuria, the focus should be on diagnosis and treatment of progressive renal function decline that leads to ESRD. Such a model has received significant support in clinical and epidemiological studies. Investigation of mechanisms of such progressive renal function decline should help in the identification of new therapeutic targets and the development of new interventions. To evaluate these interventions, accurate diagnostic algorithms are needed so T1D patients will be stratified according to time to onset to ESRD. Consistent with concepts of personalized medicine, the new interventions should be tailored to and evaluated in patients predicted to have rapid, moderate or even slow progression to ESRD. PMID:23062980

  16. Predictors of renal and patient outcomes in atheroembolic renal disease: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro; Pola, Alessandra; Guerini, Simona; Zubani, Roberto; Movilli, Ezio; Savoldi, Silvana; Malberti, Fabio; Maiorca, Rosario

    2003-06-01

    Atheroembolic renal disease (AERD) is part of a multisystemic disease accompanied by high cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality. Interrelationships between traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, vascular comorbidities, precipitating factors, and markers of clinical severity of the disease in determining outcome remain poorly understood. Patients with AERD presenting to a single center between 1996 and 2002 were followed-up with prospective collection of clinical and biochemical data. The major outcomes included end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. Ninety-five patients were identified (81 male). AERD was iatrogenic in 87%. Mean age was 71.4 yr. Twenty-three patients (24%) developed ESRD; 36 patients (37.9%) died. Cox regression analysis showed that significant independent predictors of ESRD were long-standing hypertension (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.1; P < 0.001) and preexisting chronic renal impairment (HR = 2.12; P = 0.02); use of statins was independently associated with decreased risk of ESRD (HR = 0.02; P = 0.003). Age (HR = 1.09; P = 0.009), diabetes (HR = 2.55; P = 0.034), and ESRD (HR = 2.21; P = 0.029) were independent risk factors for patient mortality; male gender was independently associated with decreased risk of death (HR = 0.27; P = 0.007). Cardiovascular comorbidities, precipitating factors, and clinical severity of AERD had no prognostic impact on renal and patient survival. It is concluded that AERD has a strong clinical impact on patient and renal survival. The study clearly shows the importance of preexisting chronic renal impairment in determining both renal and patient outcome, this latter being mediated by the development of ESRD. The protective effect of statins on the development of ESRD should be evaluated in a prospective study.

  17. 75 FR 49029 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ...This final rule implements a case-mix adjusted bundled prospective payment system (PPS) for Medicare outpatient end-stage renal disease (ESRD) dialysis facilities beginning January 1, 2011 (ESRD PPS), in compliance with the statutory requirement of the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act (MIPPA), enacted July 15, 2008. This ESRD PPS also replaces the current basic case-mix......

  18. [Recommendations of the Ethics Committee of the Chilean Society of Nephrology for the management of ethical problems in adult end stage renal disease patients].

    PubMed

    Vukusich, Antonio; Catoni, María Isabel; Salas, Sofía P; Valdivieso, Andrés; Roessler, Emilio

    2014-03-01

    There are different approaches to treat patients with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD): hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, renal transplantation and conservative medical management. The choice of the best therapy for each patient, needs both clinical and ethical skills. The Ethics Committee of the Chilean Society of Nephrology has elaborated recommendations to help health workers to deal with the ethical and clinical problems related to patients suffering ESRD. Its goal is to guide, at a national level, the effective use of minimal standards in the treatment and care of patients with ESRD, including appropriate care and information for patients, therapy selection, management of difficult cases and potential conflicts.

  19. Time trends in the association of ESRD incidence with area-level poverty in the US population.

    PubMed

    Garrity, Bridget H; Kramer, Holly; Vellanki, Kavitha; Leehey, David; Brown, Julia; Shoham, David A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the temporal trends of the association between area-level poverty status and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) incidence. We hypothesized that the association between area-level poverty status and ESRD incidence has increased significantly over time. Patient data from the United States Renal Data System were linked with data from the 2000 and 2010 US census. Area-level poverty was defined as living in a zip code-defined area with ≥20% of households living below the federal poverty line. Negative binomial regression models were created to examine the association between area-level poverty status and ESRD incidence by time period in the US adult population while simultaneously adjusting for the distribution of age, sex, and race/ethnicity within a zip code. Time was categorized as January 1, 1995 through December 31, 2004 (Period 1) and January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2010 (Period 2). The percentage of adults initiating dialysis with area-level poverty increased from 27.4% during Period 1 to 34.0% in Period 2. After accounting for the distribution of age, sex, and race/ethnicity within a zip code, area-level poverty status was associated with a 1.24 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22, 1.25)-fold higher ESRD incidence. However, this association differed by time period with 1.04-fold (95% CI 1.02, 1.05) higher ESRD incidence associated with poverty status for Period 2 compared with the association between ESRD and poverty status in Period 1. Area-level poverty and its association with ESRD incidence is not static over time.

  20. BP Control and Long-Term Risk of ESRD and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Ku, Elaine; Gassman, Jennifer; Appel, Lawrence J; Smogorzewski, Miroslaw; Sarnak, Mark J; Glidden, David V; Bakris, George; Gutiérrez, Orlando M; Hebert, Lee A; Ix, Joachim H; Lea, Janice; Lipkowitz, Michael S; Norris, Keith; Ploth, David; Pogue, Velvie A; Rostand, Stephen G; Siew, Edward D; Sika, Mohammed; Tisher, C Craig; Toto, Robert; Wright, Jackson T; Wyatt, Christina; Hsu, Chi-Yuan

    2017-02-01

    We recently showed an association between strict BP control and lower mortality risk during two decades of follow-up of prior participants in the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) trial. Here, we determined the risk of ESRD and mortality during extended follow-up of the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) trial. We linked 1067 former AASK participants with CKD previously randomized to strict or usual BP control (mean arterial pressure ≤92 mmHg or 102-107 mmHg, respectively) to the US Renal Data System and Social Security Death Index; 397 patients had ESRD and 475 deaths occurred during a median follow-up of 14.4 years from 1995 to 2012. Compared with the usual BP arm, the strict BP arm had unadjusted and adjusted relative risks of ESRD of 0.92 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.75 to 1.12) and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.78 to 1.16; P=0.64), respectively, and unadjusted and adjusted relative risks of death of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.77 to 1.10) and 0.81 (95% CI, 0.68 to 0.98; P=0.03), respectively. In meta-analyses of individual-level data from the MDRD and the AASK trials, unadjusted relative risk of ESRD was 0.88 (95% CI, 0.78 to 1.00) and unadjusted relative risk of death was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.76 to 0.99) for strict versus usual BP arms. Our findings suggest that, during long-term follow-up, strict BP control does not delay the onset of ESRD but may reduce the relative risk of death in CKD.

  1. High density lipoprotein (HDL) particles from end-stage renal disease patients are defective in promoting reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Josephine L.C.; Gautier, Thomas; Nijstad, Niels; Tölle, Markus; Schuchardt, Mirjam; van der Giet, Markus; Tietge, Uwe J.F.

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the largest cause of mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). CVD in ESRD is not explained by classical CVD risk factors such as HDL cholesterol mass levels making functional alterations of lipoproteins conceivable. HDL functions in atheroprotection by promoting reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), comprising cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells, uptake into hepatocytes and final excretion into the feces. ESRD-HDL (n = 15) were compared to healthy control HDL (n = 15) for their capacity to promote in vitro (i) cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophage foam cells and (ii) SR-BI-mediated selective uptake into ldla[SR-BI] cells as well as (iii) in vivo RCT. Compared with HDL from controls, ESRD-HDL displayed a significant reduction in mediating cholesterol efflux (p < 0.001) and SR-BI-mediated selective uptake (p < 0.01), two key steps in RCT. Consistently, also the in vivo capacity of ESRD-HDL to promote RCT when infused into wild-type mice was significantly impaired (p < 0.01). In vitro oxidation of HDL from healthy controls with hypochloric acid was able to fully mimic the impaired biological activities of ESRD-HDL. In conclusion, we demonstrate that HDL from ESRD patients is dysfunctional in key steps as well as overall RCT, likely due to oxidative modification. PMID:28148911

  2. High density lipoprotein (HDL) particles from end-stage renal disease patients are defective in promoting reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Josephine L C; Gautier, Thomas; Nijstad, Niels; Tölle, Markus; Schuchardt, Mirjam; van der Giet, Markus; Tietge, Uwe J F

    2017-02-02

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the largest cause of mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). CVD in ESRD is not explained by classical CVD risk factors such as HDL cholesterol mass levels making functional alterations of lipoproteins conceivable. HDL functions in atheroprotection by promoting reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), comprising cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells, uptake into hepatocytes and final excretion into the feces. ESRD-HDL (n = 15) were compared to healthy control HDL (n = 15) for their capacity to promote in vitro (i) cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophage foam cells and (ii) SR-BI-mediated selective uptake into ldla[SR-BI] cells as well as (iii) in vivo RCT. Compared with HDL from controls, ESRD-HDL displayed a significant reduction in mediating cholesterol efflux (p < 0.001) and SR-BI-mediated selective uptake (p < 0.01), two key steps in RCT. Consistently, also the in vivo capacity of ESRD-HDL to promote RCT when infused into wild-type mice was significantly impaired (p < 0.01). In vitro oxidation of HDL from healthy controls with hypochloric acid was able to fully mimic the impaired biological activities of ESRD-HDL. In conclusion, we demonstrate that HDL from ESRD patients is dysfunctional in key steps as well as overall RCT, likely due to oxidative modification.

  3. 42 CFR 413.220 - Methodology for calculating the per-treatment base rate under the ESRD prospective payment system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rate under the ESRD prospective payment system effective January 1, 2011. 413.220 Section 413.220... Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.220 Methodology for calculating the per-treatment base rate under the ESRD prospective payment system effective January 1, 2011. (a) Data...

  4. 42 CFR 413.220 - Methodology for calculating the per-treatment base rate under the ESRD prospective payment system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... rate under the ESRD prospective payment system effective January 1, 2011. 413.220 Section 413.220... Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.220 Methodology for calculating the per-treatment base rate under the ESRD prospective payment system effective January 1, 2011. (a) Data...

  5. Near Normalization of Metabolic and Functional Features of the Central Nervous System in Type 1 Diabetic Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease After Kidney-Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fiorina, Paolo; Vezzulli, Paolo; Bassi, Roberto; Gremizzi, Chiara; Falautano, Monica; D’Addio, Francesca; Vergani, Andrea; Chabtini, Lola; Altamura, Erica; Mello, Alessandra; Caldara, Rossana; Scavini, Marina; Magnani, Giuseppe; Falini, Andrea; Secchi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The pathogenesis of brain disorders in type 1 diabetes (T1D) is multifactorial and involves the adverse effects of chronic hyperglycemia and of recurrent hypoglycemia. Kidney-pancreas (KP), but not kidney alone (KD), transplantation is associated with sustained normoglycemia, improvement in quality of life, and reduction of morbidity/mortality in diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The aim of our study was to evaluate with magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) the cerebral morphology and metabolism of 15 ESRD plus T1D patients, 23 patients with ESRD plus T1D after KD (n = 9) and KP (n = 14) transplantation, and 8 age-matched control subjects. RESULTS Magnetic resonance imaging showed a higher prevalence of cerebrovascular disease in ESRD plus T1D patients (53% [95% CI 36–69]) compared with healthy subjects (25% [3–6], P = 0.04). Brain 1H MRS showed lower levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)-to-choline ratio in ESRD plus T1D, KD, and KP patients compared with control subjects (control subjects vs. all, P < 0.05) and of NAA-to-creatine ratio in ESRD plus T1D compared with KP and control subjects (ESRD plus T1D vs. control and KP subjects, P ≤ 0.01). The evaluation of the most common scores of psychological and neuropsychological function showed a generally better intellectual profile in control and KP subjects compared with ESRD plus T1D and KD patients. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes and ESRD are associated with a precocious form of brain impairment, chronic cerebrovascular disease, and cognitive decline. In KP-transplanted patients, most of these features appeared to be near normalized after a 5-year follow-up period of sustained normoglycemia. PMID:22190674

  6. Nitric oxide synthetic pathway and cGMP levels are altered in red blood cells from end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Natalia; Giardinelli, Annalisa; Sirolli, Vittorio; Riganti, Chiara; Di Tomo, Pamela; Gazzano, Elena; Di Silvestre, Sara; Panknin, Christina; Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Csonka, Csaba; Kelm, Malte; Ferdinandy, Péter; Bonomini, Mario; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-06-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) enzymatically produce nitric oxide (NO) by a functional RBC-nitric oxide synthase (RBC-NOS). NO is a vascular key regulatory molecule. In RBCs its generation is complex and influenced by several factors, including insulin, acetylcholine, and calcium. NO availability is reduced in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and associated with endothelial dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that, through increased phosphatidylserine membrane exposure, ESRD-RBCs augmented their adhesion to human cultured endothelium, in which NO bioavailability decreased. Since RBC-NOS-dependent NO production in ESRD is unknown, this study aimed to investigate RBC-NOS levels/activation, NO production/bioavailability in RBCs from healthy control subjects (C, N = 18) and ESRD patients (N = 27). Although RBC-NOS expression was lower in ESRD-RBCs, NO, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), RBC-NOS Serine1177 phosphorylation level and eNOS/Calmodulin (CaM)/Heat Shock Protein-90 (HSP90) interaction levels were higher in ESRD-RBCs, indicating increased enzyme activation. Conversely, following RBCs stimulation with insulin or ionomycin, NO and cGMP levels were significantly lower in ESRD- than in C-RBCs, suggesting that uremia might reduce the RBC-NOS response to further stimuli. Additionally, the activity of multidrug-resistance-associated protein-4 (MRP4; cGMP-membrane transporter) was significantly lower in ESRD-RBCs, suggesting a possible compromised efflux of cGMP across the ESRD-RBCs membrane. This study for the first time showed highest basal RBC-NOS activation in ESRD-RBCs, possibly to reduce the negative impact of decreased NOS expression. It is further conceivable that high NO production only partially affects cell function of ESRD-RBCs maybe because in vivo they are unable to respond to physiologic stimuli, such as calcium and/or insulin.

  7. Sociodemographic and Geographic Predictors of Quality of Care in United States Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease Due to Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Laura C.; Drenkard, Cristina; Patzer, Rachel E.; Klein, Mitchel; Kramer, Michael R.; Pastan, Stephen; Lim, S. Sam; McClellan, William M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe end-stage renal disease (ESRD) quality of care (receipt of pre-ESRD nephrology care, access to kidney transplantation, and placement of permanent vascular access for dialysis) in US patients with ESRD due to lupus nephritis (LN-ESRD) and to examine whether quality measures differ by patient sociodemographic characteristics or US region. Methods National surveillance data on patients in the US in whom treatment for LN-ESRD was initiated between July 2005 and September 2011 (n = 6,594) were analyzed. Odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were determined for each quality measure, according to sociodemographic factors and US region. Results Overall, 71% of the patients received nephrology care prior to ESRD. Black and Hispanic patients were less likely than white patients to receive pre-ESRD care (OR 0.73 [95% CI 0.63–0.85] and OR 0.73 [95% CI 0.60–0.88], respectively) and to be placed on the kidney transplant waitlist within the first year after the start of ESRD (HR 0.78 [95% CI 0.68–0.91] and HR 0.82 [95% CI 0.68–0.98], respectively). Those with Medicaid (HR 0.51 [95% CI 0.44–0.58]) or no insurance (HR 0.36 [95% CI 0.29–0.44]) were less likely than those with private insurance to be placed on the waitlist. Only 24% had a permanent vascular access, and placement was even less likely among the uninsured (OR 0.62 [95% CI 0.49–0.79]). ESRD quality-of-care measures varied 2–3-fold across regions of the US, with patients in the Northeast and Northwest generally having higher probabilities of adequate care. Conclusion LN-ESRD patients have suboptimal ESRD care, particularly with regard to placement of dialysis vascular access. Minority race/ethnicity and lack of private insurance are associated with inadequate ESRD care. Further studies are warranted to examine multilevel barriers to, and develop targeted interventions to improve delivery of, care among patients with LN-ESRD. PMID:25692867

  8. 42 CFR 413.217 - Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413... services are included in the ESRD prospective payment system effective January 1, 2011: (a) Renal...

  9. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.... (5) Effective January 1, 2011, except as provided below, payment to an ESRD facility for...

  10. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.... (5) Effective January 1, 2011, except as provided below, payment to an ESRD facility for...

  11. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413..., payment to an ESRD facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals as defined in §...

  12. Increased risk of atrial fibrillation in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cheng-Huang; Zheng, Cai-Mei; Kiu, Kee-Thai; Chen, Hsin-An; Wu, Chia-Chang; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wang, Yuan-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients commonly have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases than general population. Chronic kidney disease is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF); however, little is known about the AF risk among ESRD patients with various modalities of renal replacement therapy. We used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database to determine the incident AF among peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) patients in Taiwan. Our ESRD cohort include Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 15,947 patients, who started renal replacement therapy between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2003. From the same data source, 47,841 controls without ESRD (3 subjects for each patient) were identified randomly and frequency matched by gender, age (±1 year), and the year of the study patient's index date for ESRD between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2003. During the follow-up period (mean duration: 8–10 years), 3428 individuals developed the new-onset AF. The incidence rate ratios for AF were 2.07 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.93–2.23) and 1.78 (95% CI = 1.30–2.44) in HD and PD groups, respectively. After we adjusted for age, gender, and comorbidities, the hazard ratios for the AF risk were 1.46 (95% CI = 1.32–1.61) and 1.32 (95% CI = 1.00–1.83) in HD and PD groups, respectively. ESRD patients with a history of certain comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have significantly increased risks of AF. This nationwide, population-based study suggests that incidence of AF is increased among dialysis ESRD patients. Furthermore, we have to pay more attention in clinical practice and long-term care for those ESRD patients with a history of certain comorbidities. PMID:27336884

  13. Captopril-induced sialadenitis in a patient with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahdiabadi, Fatemeh Musavi; Nikvarz, Naemeh

    2016-01-01

    Sialadenitis is a rare adverse effect of captopril. We report a case of captopril-induced sialadenitis in a patient with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A 20-year-old man with ESRD encountered parotid and submandibular swelling after receiving two doses of captopril, administered sublingually. Despite of prescribing dexamethasone, resuming hemodialysis, and discontinuing other drugs that also can cause parotitis, he improved later than what was reported in patients with normal renal function. In conclusion recovery from captopril-induced sialadenitis in patients with ESRD may be more prolonged than that of patients with normal renal function; moreover, early hemodialysis which helps in drug removal may be the most effective treatment. PMID:27162811

  14. Income-based disparities in outcomes for patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Garg, P P; Diener-West, M; Powe, N R

    2001-07-01

    The impact of income on outcomes for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), who are largely relieved of structural and financial barriers to care, is poorly understood. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 3,165 patients who developed ESRD in the early 1990s to examine whether low-income patients with ESRD have poorer health outcomes than their socioeconomically advantaged counterparts, and, if so, to determine whether greater health insurance can reduce this disparity. We found that increasing neighborhood income was associated with decreased mortality and an increased likelihood of placement on the renal transplant waiting list. The presence of private insurance coverage in addition to Medicare improved rates of listing for transplantation in a graded manner, with the greatest effect among those living in neighborhoods below the 10th percentile of income, but had no effect on socioeconomic disparities in mortality. Our results suggest that low-income patients with ESRD experience persistent financial barriers to transplantation that can be addressed with greater health benefits. However, they also experience higher mortality that is caused by personal and/or environmental factors that differ by social class. Clinicians, researchers, and policymakers must address these social, cultural, psychologic, and environmental determinants of health to improve the survival of patients with ESRD.

  15. Human leucocyte antigens: their association with end-stage renal disease in Saudi patients awaiting transplantation.

    PubMed

    Almogren, A; Shakoor, Z; Hamam, K D

    2012-01-01

    Most patients with chronic renal failure develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that requires renal transplantation. This study investigates the possible associations between human leucocyte antigen (HLA) Class I and Class II molecules with ESRD. Genotyping data (HLA) obtained between 2005 and 2009 on 235 unrelated Saudi patients (147 males, 88 females; mean age: 58 +/- 7 years) with ESRD awaiting renal transplantation were assessed retrospectively at the King Khalid University Hospital. Data were compared with the results on 60 normal, healthy, unrelated Saudi individuals (37 males and 23 females; mean age: 51 +/- 5 years). HLA Class I and Class II antigens were detected by lymphocytotoxicity and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method using DNA sequence-specific primers. Although present in small numbers, HLA Cw2 was found in significantly fewer patients (n = 11; 4.68%) compared to normal subjects (n = 9; 15%) and was found to confer protection against ESRD (P = 0.005; relative risk [RR]: 3.594, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.415-9.126). Among the HLA Class II antigens, HLA DQB1*03(8) was detected more frequently in the patient group (n = 65; 27.6%) than in the normal controls (n = 9; 15%) and was positively associated with risk of ESRD (P = 0.04; RR: 0.462, 95% CI: 0.215-0.991). No significant differences were observed between the two groups in respect of HLA-A2, HLA-B50(21), HLA-B51(5) and HLA-Cw7 (HLA Class I), and HLA-DRB1*04, HLA-DRB1*07 and HLA-DQB1*02 (HLA Class II). Occurrence of the most frequent HLA alleles was no different between the ESRD group and the controls. The protective role of HLA-Cw2 and the marginal susceptibility associated with HLA-DQBI*03(8) for ESRD requires further investigation.

  16. Imaging of Myocardial Fibrosis in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: Current Limitations and Future Possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Patel, A. S.; Marsh, A.-M.; McAdam, J.; McCann, G. P.; Burton, J. O.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is driven by a different set of processes than in the general population. These processes lead to pathological changes in cardiac structure and function that include the development of left ventricular hypertrophy and left ventricular dilatation and the development of myocardial fibrosis. Reduction in left ventricular hypertrophy has been the established goal of many interventional trials in patients with chronic kidney disease, but a recent systematic review has questioned whether reduction of left ventricular hypertrophy improves cardiovascular mortality as previously thought. The development of novel imaging biomarkers that link to cardiovascular outcomes and that are specific to the disease processes in ESRD is therefore required. Postmortem studies of patients with ESRD on hemodialysis have shown that the extent of myocardial fibrosis is strongly linked to cardiovascular death and accurate imaging of myocardial fibrosis would be an attractive target as an imaging biomarker. In this article we will discuss the current imaging methods available to measure myocardial fibrosis in patients with ESRD, the reliability of the techniques, specific challenges and important limitations in patients with ESRD, and how to further develop the techniques we have so they are sufficiently robust for use in future clinical trials. PMID:28349062

  17. Disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with end-stage renal disease: systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Patrícia; Santiago, Mittermayer B

    2012-06-01

    It is not unusual that patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) progress to terminal renal failure and subsequently require renal replacement therapy. Previous studies have shown that clinical and/or serological remission in patients with SLE is common in those who develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD). On the other hand, the persistence of lupus activity among patients undergoing long-term dialysis is not rare, either. The aim of this study is to define, by means of a systematic review, the course of SLE activity in patients who developed ESRD. Data were obtained through searches for articles in the MEDLINE (1966 to 2011), SCielo, and LILACS databases, using the following keywords: "chronic renal failure", "systemic lupus erythematosus", "end-stage renal disease", "lupus activity", "disease activity", "lupus flare", "hemodialysis", and "renal replacement therapy" and their corresponding translations in Portuguese. Twenty-four articles were found which evaluated the degree of lupus activity in patients with ESRD. Fifteen of these studies spoke of a substantial reduction of clinical and/or serological activity after the development of ESRD, while nine articles found that the amount of clinical and/or serological activity was similar to that of the phase prior to terminal renal failure, or it occurred in at least 50% of the patients studied. Although the majority of studies showed that lupus flares tend to decrease in frequency in patients who develop ESRD, in this scenario, one should be prepared to correctly diagnose a recurrence of the disease, as well as to perform appropriate therapy.

  18. Death Does Matter—Cancer Risk in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shih-Feng; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Jan, Ren-Long; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chu, Chin-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a high mortality rate. We hypothesized that not accounting for death as a competing risk overestimates the event rate caused by ESRD. Thus, we examined the cancer risk for patients with ESRD (ESRDPos) after death as a competing risk event had been adjusted for. Patients with newly diagnosed ESRD (n = 64,299) between 1999 and 2007, together with age- and sex-matched controls without ESRD (ESRDNeg) (n = 128,592) were enrolled (1:2). In a Cox proportional hazards model that included death as a competing risk, ESRDPos patients in Taiwan had a lower overall incidence (subdistribution hazard ratio [sdHR] = 1.29) of cancer than did ESRDNeg patients in a Cox model that did not include death as a competing risk (HR = 1.70). After competing mortality had been adjusted for, ESRDPos patients ≥70 (sdHR = 0.82) and ESRDPos patients on long-term dialysis (> 5 follow-up years, sdHR = 0.62), had a lower risk for developing cancer than did ESRDNeg patients. This finding supported our hypothesis that standard survival analyses overestimate the event rate, especially when the mortality rate is high. It also showed that ESRDPos patients, when they grow older, were far less likely to develop cancer and far more likely to die because of underlying illnesses that might also affect the risk of death because of ESRD. PMID:26817891

  19. 42 CFR 413.217 - Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... payment system. 413.217 Section 413.217 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.217 Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system. The following items...

  20. 42 CFR 413.217 - Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... payment system. 413.217 Section 413.217 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.217 Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system. The following items...

  1. 42 CFR 413.217 - Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... payment system. 413.217 Section 413.217 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.217 Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system. The following items...

  2. 42 CFR 413.217 - Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... payment system. 413.217 Section 413.217 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.217 Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system. The following items...

  3. Acupuncture for treating uremic pruritus in patients with end-stage renal disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun Hyung; Lee, Myeong Soo; Choi, Sun-Mi

    2010-07-01

    Uremic pruritus (UP) is a common and bothersome symptom in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that does not always respond to conventional care. Acupuncture is frequently used for the treatment of a wide range of conditions, but its effects on UP in ESRD patients are unclear. The objective of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture for UP in patients with ESRD. We searched 16 electronic databases from their inception to November 2009. All prospective clinical studies of needle acupuncture for UP in hemodialysis patients with ESRD were included regardless of their design. Risk of bias of the included studies was assessed using the Cochrane criteria. Three randomized controlled trials and three uncontrolled observational studies were included. All of the included trials reported beneficial effects of acupuncture. However, most of the studies showed high risk of bias, which leaves their reports unconvincing. The current evidence is insufficient to show that acupuncture is an effective treatment for UP inpatients with ESRD because of suboptimal quality and lack of methodological rigor of included studies. Future trials should overcome the limitations of the currently available evidence. J Pain Symptom Manage 2010;40:117e125. 2010 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee.

  4. Proposal for a functional classification system of heart failure in patients with end-stage renal disease: proceedings of the acute dialysis quality initiative (ADQI) XI workgroup.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Herzog, Charles A; Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Tumlin, James; Kellum, John A; McCullough, Peter A; Ronco, Claudio

    2014-04-08

    Structural heart disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring dialysis. More than 80% of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are reported to have cardiovascular disease. This observation has enormous clinical relevance because the leading causes of death for patients with ESRD are of cardiovascular disease etiology, including heart failure, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. The 2 systems most commonly used to classify the severity of heart failure are the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification and the American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC) staging system. With rare exceptions, patients with ESRD who do not receive renal replacement therapy (RRT) develop signs and symptoms of heart failure, including dyspnea and edema due to inability of the severely diseased kidneys to excrete sodium and water. Thus, by definition, nearly all patients with ESRD develop a symptomatology consistent with heart failure if fluid removal by RRT is delayed. Neither the AHA/ACC heart failure staging nor the NYHA functional classification system identifies the variable symptomatology that patients with ESRD experience depending upon whether evaluation occurs before or after fluid removal by RRT. Consequently, the incidence, severity, and outcomes of heart failure in patients with ESRD are poorly characterized. The 11th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative has identified this issue as a critical unmet need for the proper evaluation and treatment of heart failure in patients with ESRD. We propose a classification schema based on patient-reported dyspnea assessed both pre- and post-ultrafiltration, in conjunction with echocardiography.

  5. How End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Manage the Medicare Part D Coverage Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Pamela J.; Perkins, Nathan; Nuschke, Elizabeth; Carroll, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Medicare Part D was enacted to help elderly and disabled individuals pay for prescription drugs, but it was structured with a gap providing no coverage in 2010 between $2,830 and $6,440. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are especially likely to be affected due to high costs of dialysis-related drugs and the importance of adherence for…

  6. HLA polymorphisms as incidence factor in the progression to end-stage renal disease in Brazilian patients awaiting kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Crispim, J C; Mendes-Júnior, C T; Wastowski, I J; Palomino, G Martelli; Saber, L T; Rassi, D M; Donadi, E A

    2008-06-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) leads in the majority of instances to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy. Age, gender, genetics, race, hypertension, and smoking among others are factors associated with ESRD. Our interest was to evaluate the possible associations of class I and II HLA antigens with ESRD renal disease independent of other factors, among patients with CRF, having various diagnoses in the Brazilian population of the São Paulo state. So 21 HLA-A, 31 HLA-B, and 13 HLA-DR were detected in 105 patients who were compared with 160 healthy controls of both sexes who were not related to the patients evaluated until 2005. We calculated allelic frequencies, haplotypes frequencies, etiological fractions (EF), preventive fractions, and relative risks (RR). We compared demographic data of patients and controls. The antigens positively associated with ESRD were: HLA-A78 (RR = 30.31 and EF = 0.96) and HLA-DR11 (RR = 18.87 and EF = 0.65). The antigens HLAB14 (RR = 29.90 and EF = 0.75) was present at a significantly lower frequency among patients compared with controls. In contrast, no haplotype frequency showed statically significant associations. Further molecular studies may clarify types and subtypes of alleles involved with ESRD progression.

  7. Association between Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA-A, -B, and -DR) and end-stage renal disease in Kuwaiti patients awaiting transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mosaad, Youssef M; Mansour, Merveet; Al-Muzairai, Ibrahim; Al-Otabi, Turky; Abdul-Moneam, Mohamed; Al-Attiyah, Rajaa; Shahin, Manal

    2014-09-01

    The number of patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing considerably worldwide. Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLAs) are relevant for the expression of many immunological diseases and contribute to the development of different nephropathies. Therefore, we aimed from the present work to investigate the possible association between the frequency of HLA-A, -B, and -DR antigens and ESRD in Kuwaiti patients awaiting renal transplant. HLA-A, -B, and -DR typing was performed by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) method for 334 patients with ESRD awaiting renal transplantation and 191 healthy controls. The frequency of HLA-B8 antigen was significantly higher in ESRD patients (OR = 2.62, p = 0.001, pc = 0.038), and the frequency of HLA-A28, HLA-DR11 antigens was significantly higher in healthy controls (OR 0.42, p = 0.0001; pc = 0.0021, and OR = 0.44, p = 0.0007, pc = 0.01 respectively). While the HLA-B8 antigen may be a susceptibility risk factor for development of ESRD, the HLA-A28, and HLA-DR11 antigens may be protective against development of ESRD in Kuwaiti population.

  8. Association between Helicobacter pylori and end-stage renal disease: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wijarnpreecha, Karn; Thongprayoon, Charat; Nissaisorakarn, Pitchaphon; Lekuthai, Natasorn; Jaruvongvanich, Veeravich; Nakkala, Kiran; Rajapakse, Ridhmi; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prevalence and association of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). METHODS SA comprehensive literature search was completed from inception until October 2016. Studies that reported prevalence, relative risks, odd ratios, hazard ratios or standardized incidence ratio of H. pylori among ESRD patients were included. Participants without H. pylori were used as comparators to assess the association between H. pylori infection and ESRD. Pooled risk ratios and 95%CI was calculated using a random-effect model. Adjusted point estimates from each study were combined by the generic inverse variance method of DerSimonian and Laird. RESULTS Of 4546 relevant studies, thirty-seven observational studies met all inclusion criteria. Thirty-five cross-sectional studies were included in the analyses to assess the prevalence and association of H. pylori with ESRD. The estimated prevalence of H. pylori among ESRD patients was 44% (95%CI: 40%-49%). The pooled RR of H. pylori in patients with ESRD was 0.77 (95%CI: 0.59-1.00) when compared with the patients without ESRD. Subgroup analysis showed significantly reduced risk of H. pylori in adult ESRD patients with pooled RR of 0.71 (95%CI: 0.55-0.94). The data on the risk of ESRD in patients with H. pylori were limited. Two cohort studies were included to assess the risk of ESRD in patients with H. pylori. The pooled risk RR of ESRD in patients with H. pylori was 0.61 (95%CI: 0.03-12.20). CONCLUSION The estimated prevalence of H. pylori in ESRD patients is 44%. Our meta-analysis demonstrates a decreased risk of H. pylori in adult ESRD patients. PMID:28293097

  9. Effects of Cardiovascular Events on End-Stage Renal Disease and Mortality in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Before Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Michio; Takehara, Eriko; Sasaki, Yasunori; Azetsu, Haruna; Kusaka, Keita; Shikuma, Satomi; Akita, Wataru

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular events (CVEs) are major complications in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, few studies have investigated the effects of CVEs on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and mortality of pre-dialysis patients. We followed 377 CKD patients who were at stage ≥G3 at first clinic visit in the Shuuwa General Hospital between April 2005 and July 2014. After taking baseline patient data, we evaluated renal survival rates and all-cause and CVE-related mortality in patients with CVEs [(+)CVEs] and without CVEs [(-)CVEs]. A total of 99 CVEs occurred in 93 study patients (57.0% cardiac events, 43.0% cerebrovascular events, and 6.5% peripheral artery disease events). During the study period, 127 patients reached ESRD over a median of 4.51 years' follow-up. Kaplan-Meier analysis found longer renal survival rates in the (-)CVEs group compared with the (+)CVEs group. Forty patients died during the study period over a median of 5.43 years' follow-up. Survival rates for all-cause and CVE-related mortality of (-)CVEs patients were higher than in (+)CVEs patients. After adjustment for sex, age, current smoking, blood pressure, diabetes, estimated glomerular filtration rate, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, left ventricular hypertrophy, body mass index, albumin, hemoglobin, calcium, phosphate, C-reactive protein, and spot urine protein, the occurrence of CVEs was still a significant risk factor for ESRD (HR 1.516, P = 0.017) and all-cause mortality (HR 7.871, P < 0.001). Our findings suggest that the occurrence of CVEs is a potent risk factor for ESRD and mortality in CKD patients before dialysis.

  10. The Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Vascular Biomarkers in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jeonggeun; Lee, Chan Joo; Lee, Sang-Hak; Kang, Seok-Min; Choi, Donghoon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and an important risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) disease. We investigated the impact of DM on subclinical CV damage by comprehensive screening protocol in ESRD patients. Materials and Methods Echocardiography, coronary computed tomography angiogram, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and central blood pressure with pulse wave velocity (PWV) were performed in 91 ESRD patients from the Cardiovascular and Metabolic disease Etiology Research Center-HIgh risk cohort. Results The DM group (n=38) had higher systolic blood pressure than the non-DM group (n=53), however, other clinical CV risk factors were not different between two groups. Central aortic systolic pressure (148.7±29.8 mm Hg vs. 133.7±27.0 mm Hg, p= 0.014), PWV (12.1±2.7 m/s vs. 9.4±2.1 m/s, p<0.001), and early mitral inflow to early mitral annulus velocity (16.7±6.4 vs. 13.7±5.9, p=0.026) were higher in the DM group. Although the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) was not different between the DM and the non-DM group (95% vs. 84.4%, p=0.471), the severity of CAD was higher in the DM group (p=0.01). In multivariate regression analysis, DM was an independent determinant for central systolic pressure (p=0.011), PWV (p<0.001) and the prevalence of CAD (p=0.046). Conclusion Diabetic ESRD patients have higher central systolic pressure and more advanced arteriosclerosis than the non-DM control group. These findings suggest that screening for subclinical CV damage may be helpful for diabetic ESRD patients. PMID:27873498

  11. Red Meat Intake and Risk of ESRD.

    PubMed

    Lew, Quan-Lan Jasmine; Jafar, Tazeen Hasan; Koh, Hiromi Wai Ling; Jin, Aizhen; Chow, Khuan Yew; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2017-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials suggest that protein restriction may retard the progression of CKD toward ESRD. However, the effects of dietary protein intake level and the food sources of dietary protein on the risk of ESRD in the general population remain unclear. We investigated these effects in the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective population-based cohort that recruited 63,257 Chinese adults aged 45-74 years from 1993 to 1998. We collected habitual diet information via a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire and identified ESRD via record linkage with a nationwide registry. In all, 951 cases of ESRD occurred over a mean follow-up of 15.5 years. Regarding total protein intake, compared with the lowest quartile, the three higher quartiles combined had a hazard ratio for ESRD of 1.24 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.05 to 1.46), but the dose-dependent association across the quartiles was not statistically significant (Ptrend=0.16). Red meat intake strongly associated with ESRD risk in a dose-dependent manner (hazard ratio for highest quartile versus lowest quartile,1.40 [95% CI, 1.15 to 1.71; Ptrend<0.001]). Intake of poultry, fish, eggs, or dairy products did not associate with risk of ESRD. In substitution analysis, replacing one serving of red meat with other food sources of protein associated with a maximum relative risk reduction of 62.4% (95% CI, 33.1 to 78.9; P<0.01). Our study shows that red meat intake may increase the risk of ESRD in the general population and substituting alternative sources of protein may reduce the incidence of ESRD.

  12. Living well with end stage renal disease: patients' narratives interrupted from a virtue perspective.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Wim; Uerz, Inez; Wils, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Over the last few decades there has been a revival of interest in virtue ethics, with the emphasis on the virtuous caregiver. This paper deals with the 'virtuous patient', specifically the patient with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). We believe that a virtue approach provides insights not available to current methods of studying coping styles and coping strategies. Data are derived from seven semi-structured in-depth interviews. The transcripts of the interviews were subjected to an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). The focus of the analysis was on 'living well with chronic illness.' It appears that the moral challenges faced by patients with ESRD are manifold. When they are invited to tell the story of their illness, they do not explicitly speak of virtues, but they often refer to moral qualities, and to attitudes that can be regarded as virtuous. We identify several such concepts in the narratives of patients with ESRD. We conclude that the Aristotelian model of virtue ethics is particularly descriptively (and possibly also normatively) relevant to the explanation of the life narratives and the moral challenges of patients with an ESRD.

  13. Marriage and End-Stage Renal Disease: Implications for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shortridge, Emily F.; James, Cara V.

    2010-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately represented among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD is managed with a strict routine that might include regular dialysis as well as dietary, fluid intake, and other lifestyle changes. In a disease such as this, with such disruptive treatment modalities, marriage, specifically, and its ties…

  14. Applying best practices to designing patient education for patients with end-stage renal disease pursuing kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Stacy L; Waterman, Amy D; Davis, LaShara A; Peipert, John D; Fish, Anne F

    2015-03-01

    Despite the known benefits of kidney transplant, less than 30% of the 615 000 patients living with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States have received a transplant. More than 100 000 people are presently on the transplant waiting list. Although the shortage of kidneys for transplant remains a critical factor in explaining lower transplant rates, another important and modifiable factor is patients' lack of comprehensive education about transplant. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of known best practices from the broader literature that can be used as an evidence base to design improved education for ESRD patients pursuing a kidney transplant. Best practices in chronic disease education generally reveal that education that is individually tailored, understandable for patients with low health literacy, and culturally competent is most beneficial. Effective education helps patients navigate the complex health care process successfully. Recommendations for how to incorporate these best practices into transplant education design are described. Providing more ESRD patients with transplant education that encompasses these best practices may improve their ability to make informed health care decisions and increase the numbers of patients interested in pursuing transplant.

  15. Effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on serum lipids and vascular inflammation in patients with end-stage renal disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tianhua; Sun, Yiting; Sun, Wei; Yao, Li; Sun, Li; Liu, Linlin; Ma, Jianfei; Wang, Lining

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (O3FAs) are associated with lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adults. However, this association in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains controversial prompting the need for investigation into the role of O3FAs on serum lipids and vascular inflammation markers. The present meta-analysis summarized the effects of O3FA supplementation on serum lipids and vascular inflammatory markers in patients with ESRD. PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focused on serum lipids and vascular inflammation markers in patients with ESRD. Standard mean differences (SMD) were used to measure the effect of O3FA supplementation on serum lipids and vascular inflammatory markers. The final pooled analysis included 20 RCTs involving 1,461 patients with ESRD. The results indicated that O3FA supplementation reduced TG by 0.61, LDL by 0.35 and CRP by 0.56. However, O3FA had no significant effect on TC, HDL, albumin, hemoglobin, homocysteine, DBP, glucose, lipoprotein(a), and ferritin. O3FA supplementation is associated with lower several serum lipids and vascular inflammation markers in patients with ESRD. PMID:28008943

  16. End stage renal disease serum contains a specific renal cell growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, L.H.; Kulkarni, C.; Mills, G. )

    1991-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) kidneys display abnormal growth characterized by a continuum of cystic disease, adenoma and carcinoma. This study evaluates the hypothesis that serum of patients with ESRD contains increased amounts of a growth factor which specifically induces proliferation of renal cells. ESRD sera compared to sera from normal controls induced a two to three-fold increase in the proliferative rate of renal cell carcinoma cell lines and normal kidney explants compared to cell lines from other sites. The increased proliferative activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was paralleled by an increase in cytosolic free calcium. The growth factor activity was encoded by a polypeptide of between 15 and 30 kd. The activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was not mimicked or inhibited by epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet derived growth factor indicating that the renal cell specific growth factor activity in ESRD is different from these factors.

  17. Sevelamer carbonate experience in Indian end stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Abraham, G; Kher, V; Saxena, S; Jayakumar, M; Chafekar, D; Pargaonkar, P; Shetty, M; Reddy, Y N V; Reddy, Y N V

    2012-05-01

    This open label, multicentric, comparative clinical trial was done to compare the efficacy and tolerability of two sevelamer formulations, sevelamer carbonate, and sevelamer hydrochloride, in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in Indian end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. A total of 97 ESRD patients on hemodialysis, were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either sevelamer carbonate or sevelamer hydrochloride. All patients were evaluated every week for 6 weeks for efficacy and safety variables. Total 88 patients completed the study. After 6 weeks of therapy, there were similar reductions (P<0.0001) in mean serum phosphorus and the CaxP product both the groups. The responder rates for test and reference groups were 75%, 68.18% respectively (P=0.3474). The adverse events reported were nausea, abdominal pain/discomfort, heartburn, constipation, diarrhea, increased prothrombin time, and severe arthritis. No serious adverse events were reported. There was no significant difference between the groups for adverse events and the laboratory parameters. From the results of this multicentric, comparative, randomized clinical study on sevelamer carbonate we can recommend that sevelamer carbonate may be used as a phosphate binder in Indian chronic kidney disease patients.

  18. Living kidney donors and ESRD.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2015-07-01

    There are more than 325 living kidney donors who have developed end-stage renal disease and have been listed on the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)/United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) deceased donor kidney wait list. The OPTN/UNOS database records where these kidney donors are listed and, if they donated after April 1994, where that donation occurred. These 2 locations are often not the same. In this commentary, I examine whether a national living donor registry should be created and whether transplantation centers should be notified when one of their living kidney donors develops end-stage renal disease. I consider and refute 5 potential objections to center notification. I explain that transplantation centers should look back at these cases and input data into a registry to attempt to identify patterns that could improve donor evaluation protocols. Creating a registry and mining the information it contains is, in my view, our moral and professional responsibility to future patients and the transplantation endeavor. As individuals and as a community, we need to acknowledge the many unknown risks of living kidney donation and take responsibility for identifying these risks. We then must share information about these risks, educate prospective donors about them, and attempt to minimize them.

  19. Applying best practices to designing patient education for patients with end-stage renal disease pursuing kidney transplant

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Stacy L.; Waterman, Amy D.; Davis, LaShara A.; Peipert, John D.; Fish, Anne F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known benefits of kidney transplant, less than 30% of the 615000 patients living with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States have received a transplant. More than 100000 people are presently on the transplant waiting list. Although the shortage of kidneys for transplant remains a critical factor in explaining lower transplant rates, another important and modifiable factor is patients’ lack of comprehensive education about transplant. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of known best practices from the broader literature that can be used as an evidence base to design improved education for ESRD patients pursuing a kidney transplant. Best practices in chronic disease education generally reveal that education that is individually tailored, understandable for patients with low health literacy, and culturally competent is most beneficial. Effective education helps patients navigate the complex health care process successfully. Recommendations for how to incorporate these best practices into transplant education design are described. Providing more ESRD patients with transplant education that encompasses these best practices may improve their ability to make informed health care decisions and increase the numbers of patients interested in pursuing transplant. PMID:25758805

  20. Association of GSTO1 and GSTO2 Polymorphism with Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease Development and Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cimbaljevic, Slavica; Suvakov, Sonja; Matic, Marija; Pljesa-Ercegovac, Marija; Pekmezovic, Tatjana; Radic, Tanja; Coric, Vesna; Damjanovic, Tatjana; Dimkovic, Nada; Markovic, Rodoljub; Savic-Radojevic, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Oxidative stress in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with long-term cardiovascular complications. The cytosolic family of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) is involved in the detoxication of various toxic compounds and antioxidant protection. GST omega class members, GSTO1 and GSTO2 possess, unlike other GSTs, dehydroascorbate reductase and deglutathionylation activities. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of genetic polymorphisms of GSTO1 (rs4925) and GSTO2 (rs156697) as risk determinants for ESRD development, as well as in the survival of these patients. Methods A total of 199 patients and 199 healthy subjects were included in the study and genotyped for both GSTO1 and GSTO2 polymorphism. Protein thiol and carbonyl groups as markers of protein oxidative damage were determined spectrophotometrically. Cox proportional hazard model and Kaplan-Meier analysis were performed to investigate the role of GSTO1 and GSTO2 genetic polymorphism on mortality of ESRD patients during the follow-up period (36 month). Results Individuals carrying the variant GSTO2 GG genotype were at 2.45-fold higher risk of ESRD development compared to the wild type GSTO2 AA genotype (OR=2.45; 95%CI=1.18–5.07; p=0.016). The results of GSTO1/ GSTO2 haplotype analysis showed that the haplotype combination of GSTO1 (*A)/GSTO2 (*A) (GSTO1 variant/GSTO2 wild type allele) was protective for ESRD (OR=0.23 95%CI=0.12-0.44, p=0.001). Patients carrying at least one GSTO1 reference allele have shorter mean overall (Log rank=2.844, p =0.241) and cardiovascular survival probability (Log rank=4.211, p=0.122). Conclusions GSTO polymorphisms have been shown to act as significant markers in assessing the risk of ESRD development and patients’ survival. PMID:28356881

  1. Identifying Depression in South Asian Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: Considerations for Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shivani; Bhui, Kamaldeep; Chilcot, Joseph; Wellsted, David; Farrington, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Depression is a prevalent burden for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and one that is under-recognized and consequently under-treated. Although several studies have explored the association between depression symptoms, treatment adherence and outcomes in Euro-American patient groups, quantitative and qualitative exploration of these issues in patients from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds has been lacking. This review discusses the methodological issues associated with measuring depression in patients of South Asian origin who have a 3- to 5-fold greater risk of developing ESRD. There is a need to advance research into the development of accurate screening practices for this patient group, with an emphasis on studies utilizing rigorous approaches to evaluating the use of both emic (culture-specific) and etic (universal or culture-general) screening instruments. PMID:22470400

  2. APOL1 renal-risk genotypes associate with longer hemodialysis survival in prevalent nondiabetic African American patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijun; Langefeld, Carl D; Comeau, Mary E; Bonomo, Jason A; Rocco, Michael V; Burkart, John M; Divers, Jasmin; Palmer, Nicholette D; Hicks, Pamela J; Bowden, Donald W; Lea, Janice P; Krisher, Jenna O; Clay, Margo J; Freedman, Barry I

    2016-08-01

    Relative to European Americans, evidence supports that African Americans with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) survive longer on dialysis. Renal-risk variants in the apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1), associated with nondiabetic nephropathy and less subclinical atherosclerosis, may contribute to dialysis outcomes. Here, APOL1 renal-risk variants were assessed for association with dialytic survival in 450 diabetic and 275 nondiabetic African American hemodialysis patients from Wake Forest and Emory School of Medicine outpatient facilities. Outcomes were provided by the ESRD Network 6-Southeastern Kidney Council Standardized Information Management System. Dates of death, receipt of a kidney transplant, and loss to follow-up were recorded. Outcomes were censored at the date of transplantation or through 1 July 2015. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were computed separately in patients with nondiabetic and diabetic ESRD, adjusting for the covariates age, gender, comorbidities, ancestry, and presence of an arteriovenous fistula or graft at dialysis initiation. In nondiabetic ESRD, patients with 2 (vs. 0/1) APOL1 renal-risk variants had significantly longer dialysis survival (hazard ratio 0.57), a pattern not observed in patients with diabetes-associated ESRD (hazard ratio 1.29). Thus, 2 APOL1 renal-risk variants are associated with longer dialysis survival in African Americans without diabetes, potentially relating to presence of renal-limited disease or less atherosclerosis.

  3. Comparison of survival in patients with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis versus peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Beladi Mousavi, Seyed Seifollah; Hayati, Fatemeh; Valavi, Ehsan; Rekabi, Fazlollah; Mousavi, Marzieh Beladi

    2015-03-01

    Although the life expectancy of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has improved in recent years, it is still far below that of the general population. In this retrospective study, we compared the survival of patients with ESRD receiving hemodialysis (HD) versus those on peritoneal dialysis (PD). The study was conducted on patients referred to the HD and PD centers of the Emam Khomini Hospital and the Aboozar Children's Hospital from January 2007 to May 2012 in Ahvaz, Iran. All ESRD patients on maintenance HD or PD for more than two months were included in the study. The survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and the differences between HD and PD patients were tested by the log-rank test. Overall, 239 patients, 148 patients on HD (61.92%) and 91 patients on continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) (38.55%) with mean age of 54.1 ± 17 years were enrolled in the study. Regardless of the causes of ESRD and type of renal replacement therapy (RRT), one-, two- and three-year survival of patients was 65%, 51% and 35%, respectively. There was no significant difference between type of RRT in one- (P-value = 0.737), two- (P-value = 0.534) and three- (P-value = 0.867) year survival. There was also no significant difference between diabetic and non-diabetic patients under HD and CAPD in the one-, two- and three-year survival. Although the three-year survival of diabetic patients under CAPD was lower than that of non-diabetic patients (13% vs. 34%), it was not statistically significant (P-value = 0.50). According to the results of the current study, there is no survival advantage of PD during the first years of initiation of dialysis, and the one-, two- and three-year survival of HD and PD patients is also similar.

  4. Bullous Dermatosis in an End-Stage Renal Disease Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Abu Minshar, Marwan; Thompson, Andrew; Malik, Yahya Osman

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease including ESRD patients may present with a wide spectrum of cutaneous abnormalities, ranging from xerosis to hyperpigmentation to severe deforming necrotizing lesions. Skin problems are not uncommon in this population of patients, with a clinical presentation that can be quite bizarre, mandating a long list of differential diagnostic possibilities, and subsequent rise of a puzzling diagnostic challenge. We describe an ESRD patient who presented with blistering, nonhealing ulcerative lesions with a diagnostic skin biopsy revealing a mixed pattern of linear IgA bullous dermatosis and dermatitis herpetiformis. A clinical remission could be achieved with pulse intravenous steroids followed by oral maintenance in combination with dapsone, with no evidence of recurrence. PMID:28003921

  5. Serum hepcidin levels in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Rubab, Zille; Amin, Huma; Abbas, Khizer; Hussain, Shabbir; Ullah, Muhammad Ikram; Mohsin, Shahida

    2015-01-01

    Patients on hemodialysis (HD) are usually anemic because of defective erythropoeisis. Hepcidin is a polypeptide that regulates iron homeostasis and could serve as an indicator of functional iron deficiency in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD); this may also aid in the assessment of patient's response to erythropoietin (EPO). The present study was directed to investigate serum levels of hepcidin, iron status and inflammation markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with ESRD on maintenance HD and to observe the correlation of serum hepcidin with conventional iron and inflammatory markers. A total of 42 patients of both sexes on maintenance HD and EPO therapy were enrolled; 42 ageand sex-matched healthy subjects were included as controls. Laboratory tests including complete blood count, serum hepcidin, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), serum ferritin, serum iron and CRP were performed. Serum hepcidin levels were significantly higher in patients with ESRD than in the control group (18.2 ± 2.8 ng/mL and 8.5 ± 2.3 ng/mL, respectively P = 0.000). The hemoglobin, hematocrit, serum iron, TIBC and transferrin saturation levels in the patient group were significantly lower than in the control group. Higher hepcidin levels were found in EPO non-responders (19.6 ± 2.4 ng/mL) while lower levels (16.9 ± 2.5 ng/mL) were seen in responders (P = 0.001). A positive and significant correlation was observed between the values of serum hepcidin and CRP. Our study indicates that higher hepcidin levels are found in ESRD patients on HD and in those not responding to EPO. Our findings suggest that hepcidin might play a role in the pathophysiology of anemia associated with chronic diseases as well as EPO resistance.

  6. Differences in the treatment of male and female patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Florakas, C; Wilson, R; Toffelmire, E; Godwin, M; Morton, R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is a difference in the allocation of types of dialysis to male and female patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). DESIGN: Descriptive study. SETTING: Canada. PATIENTS: All patients registered with the Canadian Organ Replacement Register (CORR) whose treatment began between 1981 and 1991. Data were obtained for 19,732 patients, of whom 18,010 had sufficiently complete data and were being treated with either peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis 3 months after the diagnosis of ESRD. OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportions of patients receiving peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis according to sex. RESULTS: Significantly more male (58.1%) than female (50.8%) patients were receiving hemodialysis 3 months after diagnosis (p < 0.00001). Multivariate analysis to control for the possible confounding effects of age, province of treatment, diagnosis, concurrent illness and year of diagnosis did not explain the difference. CONCLUSIONS: In Canada from 1981 to 1991 male patients were more likely than female patients to receive hemodialysis for the treatment of ESRD. Additional research is needed to explain this finding. PMID:7954176

  7. Serum Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Predicts End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nien, Feng-Jung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Jiang, Yi-Der; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Kao, Hsien-Li; Lin, Mao-Shin; Wei, Jung-Nan; Lin, Cheng-Hsin; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) participates in inflammation and catalyzes the deamination of primary amines into aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonia, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. We have shown that serum VAP-1 is higher in patients with diabetes and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and can predict cardiovascular mortality in subjects with diabetes. In this study, we investigated if serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD in diabetic subjects. Methods In this prospective cohort study, a total of 604 type 2 diabetic subjects were enrolled between 1996 to 2003 at National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan, and were followed for a median of 12.36 years. The development of ESRD was ascertained by linking our database with the nationally comprehensive Taiwan Society Nephrology registry. Serum VAP-1 concentrations at enrollment were measured by time-resolved immunofluorometric assay. Results Subjects with serum VAP-1 in the highest tertile had the highest incidence of ESRD (p<0.001). Every 1-SD increase in serum VAP-1 was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.55 (95%CI 1.12–2.14, p<0.01) for the risk of ESRD, adjusted for smoking, history of cardiovascular disease, body mass index, hypertension, HbA1c, duration of diabetes, total cholesterol, use of statins, ankle-brachial index, estimated GFR, and proteinuria. We developed a risk score comprising serum VAP-1, HbA1c, estimated GFR, and proteinuria, which could predict ESRD with good performance (area under the ROC curve = 0.9406, 95%CI 0.8871–0.9941, sensitivity = 77.3%, and specificity = 92.8%). We also developed an algorithm based on the stage of CKD and a risk score including serum VAP-1, which can stratify these subjects into 3 categories with an ESRD risk of 0.101%/year, 0.131%/year, and 2.427%/year, respectively. Conclusions In conclusion, serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD

  8. The angiotensin-I converting enzyme gene I/D variation contributes to end-stage renal disease risk in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Ming; Ge, Xiaoxu; Dai, Xu; Zhao, Jiao; Fu, Mingzhou; Wang, Tao; Fang, Xiyao; Li, Can; Zhang, Rong; Zhao, Weijing; Zheng, Taishan; Wang, Feng; Yu, Ming; Lei, Tao; Wang, Niansong; Bao, Yuqian; Liu, Limei; Liu, Yanjun; Jia, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    Whether the DD genotype of the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) I/D variation contributes to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remains controversial. Differences in study design, case and control definition, sample size and ethnicity may contribute to the discrepancies reported in association studies. We performed a case-control study to evaluate the association of the ACE I/D variation with ESRD risk in Chinese patients with T2DM receiving hemodialysis and analyzed the genotype-phenotype interaction. Unrelated Chinese patients (n = 432) were classified into the non-diabetic nephropathy (DN) control group (n = 222, duration of diabetes >10 years, no signs of renal involvement) and the DN-ESRD group (n = 210; ESRD due to T2DM, receiving hemodialysis). Polymerase chain reaction was used to genotype ACE I/D for all 432 subjects. The frequencies of the ID + DD genotypes were higher in the DN-ESRD group than non-DN control group (65.2 vs. 50.9 %; adjusted OR 1.98 (95 % CI, 1.31-3.00; P = 0.001). In the DN-ESRD group, the DD genotypic subgroup had significantly elevated HbA1c and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) compared to the II subgroup (both P < 0.05). The DD genotype of the ACE I/D variation may be associated with more elevated blood pressure and HbA1c, and therefore may predict the development, progression and severity of DN-ESRD in Chinese patients with T2DM undergoing hemodialysis.

  9. Expansion of polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cells in patients with end-stage renal disease may lead to infectious complications.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yan-Fang; Cai, Rui-Ming; Lin, Qu; Ye, Qing-Jian; Ren, Jian-Hua; Yin, Liang-Hong; Li, Xing

    2017-02-16

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are recently identified immune suppressive cells in multiple chronic inflammations. Here, we investigated MDSCs in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and their clinical significance in these patients and healthy individuals (49 each). Polymorphonuclear and mononuclear MDSCs were investigated by flow cytometry. Patients with ESRD before hemodialysis presented a significantly higher level of polymorphonuclear MDSCs. Depletion of polymorphonuclear-MDSCs resolved T cell IFN-γ responses. By co-culture, T cell proliferation and the production of IFN-γ were abrogated by the addition of polymorphonuclear MDSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Both of these effects were reversed by a reactive oxygen species inhibitor. The levels of reactive oxygen species were higher in polymorphonuclear MDSCs derived from patients with ESRD than from normal individuals. The mRNA level of NOX2, the key protein complex responsible for reactive oxygen species production, was higher in ESRD-related polymorphonuclear MDSCs. The phospho-STAT3 level, a key activator of MDSCs, was higher in ESRD-related polymorphonuclear MDSCs. Finally, the polymorphonuclear MDSC level before and after hemodialysis was positively related to infectious diseases. Patients with ESRD were dichotomized into 2 groups by the amount of polymorphonuclear MDSCs. Patients with high levels of polymorphonuclear MDSCs presented with a higher incidence of infectious events. Thus, polymorphonuclear MDSCs were elevated in ESRD patients with strong immune-suppressive capability through a phospho-STAT3/reactive oxygen species pathway. Hence, polymorphonuclear MDSCs might increase the risk of infectious complications.

  10. Adropin and irisin levels in relation to nutrition, body composition, and insulin resistance in patients with end-stage renal disease on chronic hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kałużna, Małgorzata; Hoppe, Krzysztof; Schwermer, Krzysztof; Ibrahim, Aisha Y; Pawlaczyk, Krzysztof; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna

    2016-07-25

    INTRODUCTION    Newly discovered myokines, adropin, and irisin, are regulators of energy homeostasis and metabolism in humans. In end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the significance and role of irisin and adropin as metabolism regulators are still unclear. OBJECTIVES    The aim of this study was to evaluate serum adropin and irisin levels and establish their relation to insulin resistance, nutritional status, and hydration status in patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD) and on peritoneal dialysis (PD). PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study consisted of 71 subjects, including 48 patients (18 women, 30 men; median age, 56.5 years; range, 26-84 years) either on HD (n = 41) or PD (n = 7) and 36 healthy controls matched for age and sex. We measured the serum levels of adropin, irisin, creatinine, albumin, glucose, and insulin, as well as the plasma levels of lipids. The bioimpedance method was used to evaluate the body composition and overhydration in patients with ESRD. RESULTS    Irisin levels were significantly lower in patients with ESRD compared with controls, but there were no differences in adropin levels between both study groups. Adropin levels were inversely correlated with body mass, lean tissue mass, total, intracellular, and extracellular water, and albumin concentrations in patients with ESRD. Irisin levels were positively correlated with glucose levels and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. No significant correlations were observed between adropin and irisin concentrations and overhydration. CONCLUSIONS    Adropin may be considered as a new marker of nutritional status in patients with ESRD. The significance and cause of low irisin levels characteristic for these patients are still unclear. Adropin and irisin should be further investigated as possible markers of cachexia and insulin resistance in patients with ESRD.

  11. Noninvasive assessment of coronary vasodilation using cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients at high risk for coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Patricia K; Meyer, Craig; Engvall, Jan; Yang, Phillip; McConnell, Michael V

    2008-01-01

    Background Impaired coronary vasodilation to both endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent stimuli have been associated with atherosclerosis. Direct measurement of coronary vasodilation using x-ray angiography or intravascular ultrasound is invasive and, thus, not appropriate for asymptomatic patients or for serial follow-up. In this study, high-resolution coronary cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) was used to investigate the vasodilatory response to nitroglycerine (NTG) of asymptomatic patients at high risk for CAD. Methods A total of 46 asymptomatic subjects were studied: 13 high-risk patients [8 with diabetes mellitus (DM), 5 with end stage renal disease (ESRD)] and 33 age-matched controls. Long-axis and cross-sectional coronary artery images were acquired pre- and 5 minutes post-sublingual NTG using a sub-mm-resolution multi-slice spiral coronary CMR sequence. Coronary cross sectional area (CSA) was measured on pre- and post-NTG images and % coronary vasodilation was calculated. Results Patients with DM and ESRD had impaired coronary vasodilation to NTG compared to age-matched controls (17.8 ± 7.3% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%, p = 0.002). This remained significant for ESRD patients alone (14.8 ± 7.7% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%; p = 0.003) and for DM patients alone (19.8 ± 6.3% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%; p = 0.049), with a non-significant trend toward greater impairment in the ESRD vs. DM patients (14.8 ± 7.7% vs. 19.8 ± 6.3%; p = 0.23). Conclusion Noninvasive coronary CMR demonstrates impairment of coronary vasodilation to NTG in high-risk patients with DM and ESRD. This may provide a functional indicator of subclinical atherosclerosis and warrants clinical follow up to determine prognostic significance. PMID:18513419

  12. Bioprosthetic versus mechanical prostheses for valve replacement in end-stage renal disease patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong Fang; Zhou, Jessie J.; Karagaratnam, Aran; Phan, Steven; Yan, Tristan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) indicated for dialysis are increasingly requiring cardiac valve surgery. The choice of bioprosthetic or mechanic valve prosthesis for such patients requires careful risk assessment. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess current evidence available. Methods A comprehensive search from six electronic databases was performed from their inception to February 2015. Results from patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac surgery for bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement were identified. Results Sixteen studies with 8,483 patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac valve replacement surgery were included. No evidence of publication bias was detected. Prior angioplasty by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery was significantly higher in the bioprosthetic group compared to the mechanical group (16.0% vs. 12.0%, P=0.04); all other preoperative baseline patient characteristics were similar. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality or all-cause mortality between the two comparisons. Compared with the mechanical group, the frequency of bleeding (5.2% vs. 6.4%, P=0.04) and risk of thromboembolism (2.7% vs. 12.8%, P=0.02) were significantly lower in the bioprosthetic group. There were similar rates of reoperation and valve endocarditis. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that patients with ESRD undergoing bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement had similar mid-long term survival. The bioprosthetic group had lower rates of bleeding and thromboembolism. Further studies are required to differentiate the impact of valve location. The presented results may be applicable for ESRD patients requiring prosthetic valve replacement. PMID:27162649

  13. Rationale and design of a patient-centered medical home intervention for patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Porter, Anna C; Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Fischer, Michael J; Gallardo, Rani; Berbaum, Michael L; Lash, James P; Castillo, Sheila; Schiffer, Linda; Sharp, Lisa K; Tulley, John; Arruda, Jose A; Hynes, Denise M

    2015-05-01

    In the U.S., more than 400,000 individuals with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) require hemodialysis (HD) for renal replacement therapy. ESRD patients experience a high burden of morbidity, mortality, resource utilization, and poor quality of life (QOL). Under current care models, ESRD patients receive fragmented care from multiple providers at multiple locations. The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a team approach, providing coordinated care across the healthcare continuum. While this model has shown some early benefits for complex chronic diseases such as diabetes, it has not been applied to HD patients. This study is a non-randomized quasi-experimental intervention trial implementing a Patient-Centered Medical Home for Kidney Disease (PCMH-KD). The PCMH-KD extends the existing dialysis care team (comprised of a nephrologist, dialysis nurse, dialysis technician, social worker, and dietitian) by adding a general internist, pharmacist, nurse coordinator, and a community health worker, all of whom will see the patients together, and separately, as needed. The primary goal is to implement a comprehensive, multidisciplinary care team to improve care coordination, quality of life, and healthcare use for HD patients. Approximately 240 patients will be recruited from two sites; a non-profit university-affiliated dialysis center and an independent for-profit dialysis center. Outcomes include (i) patient-reported outcomes, including QOL and satisfaction; (ii) clinical outcomes, including blood pressure and diet; (iii) healthcare use, including emergency room visits and hospitalizations; and (iv) staff perceptions. Given the significant burden that patients with ESRD on HD experience, enhanced care coordination provides an opportunity to reduce this burden and improve QOL.

  14. Whole body counter assessment of internal radiocontamination in patients with end-stage renal disease living in areas affected by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Shimmura, Hiroaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Akiyama, Junichi; Nomura, Shuhei; Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Tokiwa, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess internal radiocontamination of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who were regularly taking haemodialysis (HD) and living in areas affected by the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant after the Great East Japan earthquake on 11 March 2011. Methods Internal radiocontamination in 111 patients with ESRD regularly taking HD at Jyoban Hospital in Iwaki city, Fukushima from July 2012 to November 2012 was assessed with a whole body counter (WBC). The maximum annual effective dose was calculated from the detected Cs-137 levels. Interviews concerning patient dietary preferences and outdoor activities were also conducted. Results Among the 111 patients tested, internal radiocontamination with Cs-137 was detected in two participants, but the levels were marginal and just exceeded the detection limit (250 Bq/body). The tentatively calculated maximum annual effective dose ranged from 0.008 to 0.009 mSv/year, which is far below the 1 mSv/year limit set by the government of Japan. Relative to 238 non-ESRD participants, patients with ERSD had significantly more opportunities to consume locally grown produce that was not distributed to the market (p<0.01). However, the percentage of patients with ESRD with detectable Cs (1.8%) was lower than that for non-ESRD participants (3.8%), although this difference was not significant (p=0.51). Conclusions These findings suggest that internal radiocontamination levels and the calculated annual additional effective doses were negligible for patients with ESRD taking HD in areas affected by the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant. Although HD is suggested to promote Cs-137 excretion, continuous inspection of locally grown produce together with WBC screening for radiocontamination should be continued for patients with ESRD regularly taking HD. PMID:26644125

  15. Clinical management of restless legs syndrome in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sahli, Zeyad T; Jo, Jae; Mousa, Shaker A; Tarazi, Frank I

    2017-02-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological movement disorder, characterized by restless and unpleasant sensations in the deep inside of legs. The symptoms of RLS are less noticeable during daytime, but more prevalent at night. Therefore, the disorder can induce low quality of life, insomnia, and impairment of daytime activity. RLS in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients is especially problematic due to premature discontinuation of dialysis and increased mortality. The prevalence of RLS among dialysis patients is much higher compared to the prevalence of the same disorder in patients with normal renal functions. Even though there are recommended treatment guidelines for the general population established by Medical Advisory Board of the RLS foundation, which include the use of dopamine agonists, levodopa, gabapentin, benzodiazepines, and opioids, limited information is available on the effects of these therapies in ESRD patients. Since the existing clinical data were extrapolated from small sample sizes in short-term clinical trials, further clinical studies are still needed to better assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of these medications in patients with ESRD.

  16. A systematic review of sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Nina Teixeira; Urbano, Jessica Julioti; Nacif, Sergio Roberto; Silva, Anderson Soares; Peixoto, Roger Andre Oliveira; Urbano, Giovanni Julioti; Oliveira, Ezequiel Fernandes; Santos, Israel Reis; Oliveira, Claudia Santos; Insalaco, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the available evidence on sleep disorders in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing hemodialysis (HD). [Subjects and Methods] Two independent reviewers performed a computer-assisted search of the MEDLINE, SciELO, LILACS, and BIREME Virtual Health Library medical databases from their inception to November 2015. [Results] One thousand one hundred twenty-six articles were found that met the inclusion criteria. Articles were excluded if they were not in English, the patients did not undergo HD, or the studies were not cross-sectional or clinical trials. After reading the full text, a further 300 studies were excluded because they did not use polysomnography. The remaining 18 studies with ESRD patients undergoing HD comprised 8 clinical trials and 10 cross-sectional studies. This systematic review followed the criteria outlined by the PRISMA declaration. [Conclusion] In this systematic review, a high prevalence of sleep disorders was observed in ESRD, including sleep-disordered breathing. This knowledge may enable health professionals to devise new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of these patients, in order to reduce morbidity and mortality and improve their quality of life. PMID:27512289

  17. Kidney Transplant in a 26-Year-Old Nigerian Patient with Sickle Cell Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, U. H.; Wachukwu, C.; Emem-Chioma, P.; Wokoma, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) is a common complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). It has variable presentation, ranging from hyposthenuria to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Management of ESRD in SCD patients is froth with multiple challenges which has potential to impact negatively the outcome of the patient. Kidney transplant is the preferred renal replacement therapy in these patients. The objective of this case study is to report kidney transplant in a Nigerian young man with sickle cell nephropathy and to highlight the outcome and the challenges to kidney transplant in this patient. The index case is a 26-years-old sickle cell disease patient with ESRD complicated with cardiovascular, pulmonary, immunological, and infective challenges. These conditions were controlled, and the patient had a successful live-related kidney transplant. Kidney transplant is a viable option for sickle cell disease patients with ESRD. PMID:24555134

  18. Adiponectin and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Anastasia; Psylinakis, Emmanuel; Spyridaki, Aspasia

    2016-07-01

    Adiponectin (ADPN) is an adipokine with significant anti-inflammatory, insulin-sensitizing and anti-atherogenic properties, which is generally associated with a beneficial cardiometabolic profile. Paradoxically, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is characterized by markedly increased plasma ADPN levels and increased cardiovascular risk. In spite of the cardioprotective properties attributed to adiponectin, cardiovascular complications remain the main cause of mortality in the ESRD population. Furthermore, these patients have enhanced chronic inflammation, increased insulin resistance and persistent protein-energy wasting. Studies of the impact of ADPN on clinical outcomes among ESRD patients have so far yielded contradictory results. This review article summarizes the current knowledge on ADPN functions and explores the role of ADPN in ESRD patients, with specific focus on inflammation, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease and wasting.

  19. Epidemiology of cancer in end-stage renal disease dialysis patients: a national cohort study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Chih-Chiang; Han, Ming-Ming; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chu, Chin-Chen; Hung, Chien-Ya; Sun, Yih-Min; Yeh, Nai-Cheng; Ho, Chung-Han; Lin, Chih-Ching; Kao, Hao-Yun; Weng, Shih-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of site-specific cancers in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on maintenance dialysis have been rarely studied for Asian populations. We tapped Taiwan`s National Health Insurance Research Database to identify and recruit patients starting maintenance dialysis between 1999 and 2004. They were followed from initiation of dialysis until death, discontinuation of dialysis, or the end of 2008. We calculated the survival rate and mortality risk of dialysis patients with cancer. Of 40,833 dialysis patients, 2352 (5.8%) had been newly diagnosed with cancer. Being older, being male, and having chronic liver disease were factors associated with a higher risk for new cancer in ESRD dialysis patients. In men, liver cancer (20.63%) was the most frequent, followed by cancers of the bladder (16.88%) and kidney (11.61%). In women, bladder cancer (25.57%) was the most frequent, followed by cancers of the kidney (16.31%) and breast (11.20%). The 5-year survival rates for kidney and bladder cancer were higher than for other cancers; the survival rates for lung, stomach, and liver cancer were lower. In conclusion, the distribution of site-specific cancer was different between men and women in patients with ESRD on dialysis. More attention should be paid to teaching dialysis patients how to avoid the well-known cancer risks and carcinogens and individualized regular cancer screenings. PMID:28123593

  20. Febuxostat-induced agranulocytosis in an end-stage renal disease patient

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Xue Er; Lee, Chien-Te; Pei, Sung-Nan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Febuxostat, a nonpurine xanthine oxidase inhibitor, is approved as the first-line urate-lowering therapy in gout patients with normal renal function or mild to moderate renal impairment. The most common adverse effects of febuxostat are liver function test abnormalities, diarrhea, and skin rash. However, there is insufficient data in patients with severe renal impairment and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We report the first case, to our knowledge, in which agranulocytosis developed after febuxostat treatment in an ESRD patient. Clinical presentation: A 67-year-old woman with gout and ESRD received febuxostat 40 mg a day for 2.5 months. She subsequently complicated with febrile neutropenia and the absolute neutrophil count was only 14/μL. After broad-spectrum antibiotics treatment and no more exposure to febuxostat for 17 days, her infection and neutrophil count recovered. Bone marrow study during neutropenic period showed myeloid hypoplasia without evidence of hematologic neoplasms. Conclusion: As febuxostat use may become more common in the population of advanced renal failure, clinicians should be aware of this rare but potentially life-threatening adverse effect. Based on our experience, close monitoring hemogram and immediate discontinuation of this medication may prevent serious consequences. PMID:28079821

  1. The effectiveness and safety of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition or receptor blockade in vascular diseases in patients with hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Cheng, Hui-Teng; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who are on hemodialysis have high risk of vascular diseases. Our study sought to examine whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) could reduce the frequencies of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events in patients receiving hemodialysis using the medication possession ratio (MPR) method of analysis. This retrospective cohort study identified cases of ESRD with dialysis from the National Health Insurance Research Database between 1999 and 2006, and used Cox-regression methods to evaluate risk of poor outcomes. Primary outcomes, including death from any cause, and secondary outcomes, including admission for stroke, myocardial infarction, and heart failure, were examined. Compared to the nonuser group, the adjusted HRs for mortality of the nonadherence group and the adherence group were 0.81 (95% CI: 0.76–0.86) and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.86–1.13), respectively. Cardiovascular events were more frequent in patients with ESRD receiving ACEIs /ARBs than in nonusers. Compared with nonusers, the hazard of secondary outcome significantly increased in the nonadherence group or adherence group in 10 years follow-up. Compared with patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease, patients on hemodialysis may not experience the same cardiovascular and cerebrovascular benefits from ACEIs/ARBs use. PMID:28353612

  2. Circulating TGF-β1–Regulated miRNAs and the Risk of Rapid Progression to ESRD in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pezzolesi, Marcus G.; Satake, Eiichiro; McDonnell, Kevin P.; Major, Melissa; Smiles, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether circulating TGF-β1–regulated miRNAs detectable in plasma are associated with the risk of rapid progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a cohort of proteinuric patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and normal eGFR. Plasma specimens obtained at entry to the study were examined in two prospective subgroups that were followed for 7–20 years (rapid progressors and nonprogressors), as well as a reference panel of normoalbuminuric T1D patients. Of the five miRNAs examined in this study, let-7c-5p and miR-29a-3p were significantly associated with protection against rapid progression and let-7b-5p and miR-21-5p were significantly associated with the increased risk of ESRD. In logistic analysis, controlling for HbA1c and other covariates, let-7c-5p and miR-29a-3p were associated with more than a 50% reduction in the risk of rapid progression (P ≤ 0.001), while let-7b-5p and miR-21-5p were associated with a >2.5-fold increase in the risk of ESRD (P ≤ 0.005). This study is the first prospective study to demonstrate that circulating TGF-β1–regulated miRNAs are deregulated early in T1D patients who are at risk for rapid progression to ESRD. PMID:25931475

  3. Sailing between Scylla and Charybdis: oral long-term anticoagulation in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thilo; Brandenburg, Vincent; Schlieper, Georg; Marx, Nikolaus; Floege, Jürgen

    2013-03-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients exhibit an increased risk of bleeding compared with non-chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients due to uraemic platelet dysfunction, altered vessel architecture and other factors. This renders any long-term oral anticoagulation potentially difficult. While there is little doubt that ESRD patients with recurrent thromboembolism or a mechanical cardiac valve should receive vitamin K antagonists (coumarins), the use of coumarins in ESRD patients with atrial fibrillation is a matter of debate. In non-CKD patients, current guidelines strongly recommend the use of oral anticoagulants for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation if certain risk factors are present (CHA2DS2-VASc score). This recommendation is often extrapolated to patients with advanced CKD or ESRD but data supporting this practice are weak to absent. Besides an increased bleeding risk in ESRD patients, coumarins will also accelerate cardiovascular calcification and are potent risk factors for the development of calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (calciphylaxis). Novel coumarin alternatives such as direct thrombin inhibitors are promising but none is currently approved for use in ESRD patients. Whether interventional treatment strategies such as atrial appendage occlusion are safe and effective options in advanced CKD is also as yet unresolved. This review attempts to balance the potential risks and benefits of coumarin usage in ESRD patients and to give the best possible recommendations for everyday patient care.

  4. End-stage renal disease associated with prophylactic lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Aiff, Harald; Attman, Per-Ola; Aurell, Mattias; Bendz, Hans; Schön, Staffan; Svedlund, Jan

    2014-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of lithium associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to compare the relative risk of ESRD in lithium users versus non-lithium users. Second, the role of lithium in the pathogenesis of ESRD was evaluated. We used the Swedish Renal Registry to search for lithium-treated patients with ESRD among 2644 patients with chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT)-either dialysis or transplantation, within two defined geographical areas in Sweden with 2.8 million inhabitants. The prevalence date was December 31, 2010. We found 30 ESRD patients with a history of lithium treatment. ESRD with RRT was significantly more prevalent among lithium users than among non-lithium users (p<0.001). The prevalence of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population was 15.0‰ (95% CI 9.7-20.3), and close to two percent of the RRT population were lithium users. The relative risk of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population compared with the general population was 7.8 (95% CI 5.4-11.1). Out of those 30 patients, lithium use was classified, based on chart reviews, as being the sole (n=14) or main (n=10) cause of ESRD in 24 cases. Their mean age at the start of RRT was 66 years (46-82), their mean time on lithium 27 years (12-39), and 22 of them had been on lithium for 15 years or more. We conclude that lithium-associated ESRD is an uncommon but not rare complication of lithium treatment.

  5. Speckle tracking echocardiography detects uremic cardiomyopathy early and predicts cardiovascular mortality in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Kramann, Rafael; Erpenbeck, Johanna; Schneider, Rebekka K; Röhl, Anna B; Hein, Marc; Brandenburg, Vincent M; van Diepen, Merel; Dekker, Friedo; Marx, Nicolaus; Floege, Jürgen; Becker, Michael; Schlieper, Georg

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular mortality is high in ESRD, partly driven by sudden cardiac death and recurrent heart failure due to uremic cardiomyopathy. We investigated whether speckle-tracking echocardiography is superior to routine echocardiography in early detection of uremic cardiomyopathy in animal models and whether it predicts cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing dialysis. Using speckle-tracking echocardiography in two rat models of uremic cardiomyopathy soon (4-6 weeks) after induction of kidney disease, we observed that global radial and circumferential strain parameters decreased significantly in both models compared with controls, whereas standard echocardiographic readouts, including fractional shortening and cardiac output, remained unchanged. Furthermore, strain parameters showed better correlations with histologic hallmarks of uremic cardiomyopathy. We then assessed echocardiographic and clinical characteristics in 171 dialysis patients. During the 2.5-year follow-up period, ejection fraction and various strain parameters were significant risk factors for cardiovascular mortality (primary end point) in a multivariate Cox model (ejection fraction hazard ratio [HR], 0.97 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.95 to 0.99; P=0.012]; peak global longitudinal strain HR, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.07 to 1.28; P<0.001]; peak systolic and late diastolic longitudinal strain rates HRs, 4.7 [95% CI, 1.23 to 17.64; P=0.023] and 0.25 [95% CI, 0.08 to 0.79; P=0.02], respectively). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed circumferential early diastolic strain rate, among others, as an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality (secondary end point; HR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.74; P=0.002). Together, these data support speckle tracking as a postprocessing echocardiographic technique to detect uremic cardiomyopathy and predict cardiovascular mortality in ESRD.

  6. Red blood cell calcium homeostasis in patients with end-stage renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gafter, U.; Malachi, T.; Barak, H.; Djaldetti, M.; Levi, J. )

    1989-09-01

    Low cell calcium level is essential for preservation of red blood cell (RBC) membrane deformability and survival. RBCs from patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) demonstrate reduction in membrane deformability, possibly as a result of increased RBC cellular calcium level. To evaluate calcium homeostasis in RBCs from patients with ESRD, we measured cell calcium level, basal and calmodulin-stimulated calcium-stimulated Mg-dependent ATPase (CaATPase) activity, and calcium 45 efflux were measured before and after hemodialysis. The in vitro effect of uremic plasma and of urea on CaATPase activity of normal RBCs was tested, and 45Ca influx into RBCs of patients undergoing hemodialysis also was determined. A morphologic evaluation of red cells from patients with ESRD was performed with a scanning electron microscope. RBC calcium level in patients (mean +/- SEM 21.2 +/- 2.8 mumol/L of cells; n = 28) was higher than in controls (4.9 +/- 0.3 mumol/L of cells; n = 24; p less than 0.001). Hemodialysis had no effect on cell calcium level. Both basal and calmodulin-stimulated RBC CaATPase activities in patients with ESRD (n = 9) were reduced by approximately 50% (p less than 0.01), but after hemodialysis, enzyme activity returned to normal. 45Ca efflux from calcium-loaded cells, which was 2574.0 +/- 217.0 mumol/L of cells per 0.5 hours before hemodialysis, increased to 3140.7 +/- 206.8 mumol/L of cells per 0.5 hours after hemodialysis (p less than 0.005). In vitro incubation of normal RBCs with uremic plasma depressed CaATPase activity, but incubation with urea had no effect. RBCs of patients with ESRD revealed increased 45Ca influx, 7.63 +/- 1.15 mumol/L of cells per hour versus 4.61 +/- 0.39 mumol/L of cells per hour (p less than 0.025). RBCs of patients revealed a high incidence of spherocytosis and echynocytosis, which correlated with a high cell calcium level (r = 0.894, p less than 0.01).

  7. Forecasting the Incidence and Prevalence of Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease in Malaysia up to the Year 2040

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Tassha Hilda; Hashim, Nadiah Hanis; Mohan, Kirubashni; Kim Liong, Ang; Ahmad, Ghazali; Bak Leong, Goh; Bavanandan, Sunita; Haniff, Jamaiyah

    2017-01-01

    Background. The incidence of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring dialysis has been growing rapidly in Malaysia from 18 per million population (pmp) in 1993 to 231 pmp in 2013. Objective. To forecast the incidence and prevalence of ESRD patients who will require dialysis treatment in Malaysia until 2040. Methodology. Univariate forecasting models using the number of new and current dialysis patients, by the Malaysian Dialysis and Transplant Registry from 1993 to 2013 were used. Four forecasting models were evaluated, and the model with the smallest error was selected for the prediction. Result. ARIMA (0, 2, 1) modeling with the lowest error was selected to predict both the incidence (RMSE = 135.50, MAPE = 2.85, and MAE = 87.71) and the prevalence (RMSE = 158.79, MAPE = 1.29, and MAE = 117.21) of dialysis patients. The estimated incidences of new dialysis patients in 2020 and 2040 are 10,208 and 19,418 cases, respectively, while the estimated prevalence is 51,269 and 106,249 cases. Conclusion. The growth of ESRD patients on dialysis in Malaysia can be expected to continue at an alarming rate. Effective steps to address and curb further increase in new patients requiring dialysis are urgently needed, in order to mitigate the expected financial and health catastrophes associated with the projected increase of such patients. PMID:28348890

  8. Potential impact of peer mentoring on treatment choice in patients with chronic kidney disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, Nasrollah

    2015-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the resultant end stage renal disease (ESRD) are associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and cost for the individual patient and society. CKD is among the major contributors to years of life lost (YLL) due to premature mortality. Also, while the disability adjusted life years (DALY) for many conditions decreased between 1990 and 2010, the DALY for CKD has increased by 69%. In addition to the physical disability, CKD is associated with high prevalence (27.9%) of major depressive episodes, associated with limitations of employment, and a significant negative effect on quality of life (QOL). A major determinant of QOL is satisfaction with treatment choice. There is consensus among investigators that patients who are actively engaged in their own care experience improved health outcomes. The shared decision making (SDM) approach allows patients and providers the opportunity to work in partnership to make decisions that are congruent with the patient's values, preferences, and distinct situations. SDM has been associated with improved outcomes among patients with various chronic disease states. Mentoring, particularly by trained peers, has been used as an approach to enhance SDM in several chronic conditions, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we will focus on care of patients with CKD as a model for the study of the impact of peer mentoring on SDM and choice of treatment for ESRD.

  9. End Stage Renal Disease as a Potential Risk Factor for Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, San-Ni; Yang, Te-Cheng; Lin, Jian-Teng; Lian, Ie-Bin

    2015-11-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) has been reported to be an important risk factor for systemic vascular disease. Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is closely related with cardiovascular diseases; however, its association with ESRD had not been reported. The aim of the study was to investigate whether ESRD is a risk factor for RVO, including central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). This population-based study is based on the longitudinal data from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The study cohort comprised 5344 patients with diagnosis of ESRD on hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis during the period from January 1996 to December 2011. For each ESRD patient, we selected 20 non-ESRD patients matched on age and sex. Each ESRD patient and his/her controls were followed from the initiation of renal dialysis until either the diagnosis of RVO or censorship. Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare the hazard of RVO between cohorts. Stratified Cox proportional hazard models were applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) adjusted by the comorbidities of RVO including diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension, hypercholesteremia, and hypertriglyceridemia. After stratifying by DM status, the statistics were applied again to examine the associations among the DM cohort and non-DM cohort.The 16-year RVO cumulative incidence for ESRD cohort was 2-fold to the non-ESRD (1.01% vs 0.46%). After matching with age, sex, hypertension, and hypercholesteremia, the adjusted HR was 1.46 (95% confidence interval = 1.07-2.01, P value = 0.018). By further excluding patients with DM, the adjusted HR escalated to 2.43 (95% confidence interval = 1.54-3.83, P < 0.001). In contrast, there was no significant risk of ESRD on RVO in the DM patients (HR = 1.03). We conclude that among the non-DM patients, ESRD cases had significantly higher RVO rate than the non-ESRD, which indicates that ESRD maybe a potential risk factor for the development of RVO in

  10. Association between Vitamin D Deficiency and Anemia in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yung Ly; Kim, Hyunwook; Kwon, Young Eun; Ryu, Dong-Ryeol; Lee, Mi Jung; Park, Kyung Sook; Ryu, Han Jak; Park, Jung Tak; Oh, Hyung Jung; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Despite new treatment strategies, anemia remains the most prevalent complication in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We investigated whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D3] deficiency was associated with anemia in ESRD patients. Materials and Methods We reviewed the medical records of 410 ESRD patients who had undergone renal transplantation (RTx) at Yonsei University Health System and who had 25(OH)D3 levels measured at the time of RTx. Patients were divided into two groups based on baseline 25(OH)D3 concentrations: group 1, 25(OH)D3 levels <10 ng/mL; and group 2, 25(OH)D3 levels ≥10 ng/mL. Results Using multivariate regression models, 25(OH)D3, age, and erythrocyte-stimulating agent (ESA) dose were found to be significantly associated with hemoglobin (Hb) levels [25(OH)D3: β=0.263, p<0.001; age: β=0.122, p=0.010; ESA dose: β=-0.069, p=0.005]. In addition, logistic regression analysis revealed that patients in group 1 had a significantly higher risk for developing anemia (Hb level <10 g/dL) compared to group 2 patients, even after adjusting for potential risk factors for anemia (odds ratio=3.857; confidence interval=1.091–13.632; p=0.036). Conclusion 25(OH)D3 deficiency was significantly associated with anemia in patients with ESRD. Randomized controlled trials are needed to determine whether vitamin D supplementation can improve anemia in these patients. PMID:27401647

  11. End-Stage Renal Disease After Renal Surgery in Patients with Normal Preoperative Kidney Function: Balancing Surgical Strategy and Individual Disorders at Baseline.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, Umberto; Larcher, Alessandro; Terrone, Carlo; Antonelli, Alessandro; Volpe, Alessandro; Fiori, Cristian; Furlan, Maria; Dehò, Federico; Minervini, Andrea; Serni, Sergio; Porpiglia, Francesco; Trevisani, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea; Carini, Marco; Simeone, Claudio; Montorsi, Francesco; Bertini, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Although nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) has demonstrated benefit in terms of renal function preservation, it is unclear whether NSS might also decrease the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) relative to radical nephrectomy (RN). In the current paper, we aimed to report the rate and the predictors of ESRD after surgery, accounting for detailed individual baseline characteristics and comorbidities. A multi-institutional collaboration among five European tertiary care centers allowed study of 2027 patients with normal preoperative renal function and a clinically localized T1abN0M0 renal mass. Cox regression analyses were used to predict the risk of ESRD (defined as the onset of a postoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate <15ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) after adjusting for the individual baseline risk of developing chronic kidney disease. Univariable ESRD rates at 5 and 10 yr of follow-up were virtually equivalent for patients who underwent NSS (1.5% and 2.5%, respectively) versus RN (1.9% and 2.7%, respectively; hazard ratio [HR]: 0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.4-1.6). However, diabetes, smoking, uncontrolled hypertension, and other comorbidities were consistently more frequent in the NSS group relative to their RN counterparts. After adjusting for detailed baseline individual characteristics, NSS was shown to have an independent protective effect relative to RN (HR: 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8; p=0.02) at multivariable analyses.

  12. Acute kidney injury and ESRD management in austere environments.

    PubMed

    Raman, Gaurav; Perkins, Robert M; Jaar, Bernard G

    2012-05-01

    Current knowledge about managing acute kidney injury in disaster situations stems mostly from lessons learned while taking care of crush syndrome patients during major earthquakes. More recently, there has been a greater focus on emergency preparedness for ESRD management. Natural or man-made disasters create an "austere environment," wherein resources to administer standard of care are limited. Advance planning and timely coordinated intervention during disasters are paramount to administer effective therapies and save lives. This article reviews the presentation and management of disaster victims with acute kidney injury and those requiring renal replacement therapies. Major contributions of some key national and international organizations in the field of disaster nephrology are highlighted. The article intends to increase awareness about nephrology care of disaster victims, among nephrology and non-nephrology providers alike.

  13. An open-label, non-randomised, phase 1, single-dose study to assess the pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in patients with end-stage renal disease requiring intermittent haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Sunzel, Maria; Learoyd, Maria; Li, Jianguo; Li, Yan; Ngo, Ngoc; Edeki, Timi

    2015-12-01

    For patients with normal renal function, the recommended ceftaroline fosamil dose is a 600 mg 1-h intravenous (i.v.) infusion every 12 h (q12h). In patients with a creatinine clearance of ≤30 mL/min, including those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the recommended dose is a 200 mg 1-h i.v. infusion q12h. This phase 1 study (NCT01664065) evaluated the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of ceftaroline fosamil 200 mg 1-h i.v. infusion in patients with ESRD. Patients with ESRD (n=8) participated in two treatment periods (ceftaroline fosamil 200 mg administered pre- and post-haemodialysis) separated by >1 week. Healthy volunteers (n=7) received a single 600 mg dose of ceftaroline fosamil. Blood (pre- and post-haemodialysis) and dialysate samples were obtained for pharmacokinetic analysis. In patients with ESRD, the geometric mean [coefficient of variation (%CV)] plasma ceftaroline area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC0-∞) following post-haemodialysis ceftaroline fosamil 200 mg infusion was 64.8 (38.9)μg·h/mL, similar to that in volunteers following a 600 mg infusion [62.7 (9.4)μg·h/mL]. Ceftaroline AUC0-∞ decreased by ca. 50% when infusion was initiated pre-haemodialysis. In the pre-haemodialysis treatment period, 80% of the ceftaroline fosamil dose was recovered in dialysate as ceftaroline (73%) and ceftaroline M-1 (7%). The frequency of adverse events was similar across patients with ESRD (pre- and post-haemodialysis) and volunteers (43%, 50% and 43% of subjects, respectively). Ceftaroline fosamil 200 mg 1-h i.v. infusion q12h, administered post-haemodialysis on dialysis days, is an appropriate dosage regimen for ESRD patients.

  14. Lanthanum carbonate: a review of its use in lowering serum phosphate in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Curran, Monique P; Robinson, Dean M

    2009-11-12

    Orally administered lanthanum carbonate (Fosrenol) dissociates in the acid environment of the upper gastrointestinal tract to release the cation lanthanum, which then binds dietary phosphate. Lanthanum carbonate was effective in reducing levels of serum phosphate and serum calcium x phosphate product and then maintaining these levels within target ranges for up to 6 years in adult patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The reduction in serum phosphate levels with lanthanum carbonate was generally similar to that with calcium carbonate or sevelamer hydrochloride. This agent was generally well tolerated, with the most frequently reported adverse events being gastrointestinal in nature and occurring at a similar rate to that with calcium carbonate. However, lanthanum carbonate was associated with fewer episodes of hypercalcaemia than calcium carbonate. Overall, lanthanum carbonate is a valuable option for the reduction of serum phosphate levels in patients with ESRD on haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.

  15. Microscopic Haematuria and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Stage 3-5 Nondiabetic Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    You-Hsien Lin, Hugo; Yen, Chun-Yu; Lim, Lee-Moay; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Tsai, Jer-Chia; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Hung, Chi-Chih; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2015-10-16

    Microscopic haematuria is proposed as a prognostic factor for renal outcomes in patients with glomerulonephritis. However, the role of haematuria in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) or heavy proteinuria has not been investigated. We divided 1799 patients with stage 3-5 nondiabetic CKD into 3 groups according to the results from 3 urinalyses: no haematuria (0-2 red blood cells [RBCs]/hpf ≥2 times), mild haematuria (2-5 RBCs/hpf ≥2 times) and moderate haematuria (≥5-10 RBCs/hpf ≥2 times). The estimated glomerular filtration rate was 25.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2), with a urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (UPCR) of 881 mg/g. The hazard ratios (HRs) of mild and moderate haematuria for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were 1.28 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.56, P = 0.024) and 1.34 (95% CI: 1.03-1.74, P = 0.030), respectively. The HR of moderate haematuria for mortality was 1.56 (95% CI: 1.11-2.20, P = 0.011). According to subgroup analysis, the HR of moderate haematuria for ESRD in patients with a UPCR of <500 mg/g was more prominent than that in patients with a UPCR of ≥500 mg/g. Microscopic haematuria in patients with stage 3-5 nondiabetic CKD is associated with increased risks of ESRD and mortality.

  16. End-stage renal disease in Tunisian infants: Etiology and outcome.

    PubMed

    Jellouli, M; Boussetta, A; Abidi, K; Hammi, Y; Zarrouk, C; Gargah, T

    2016-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) in infants has particular features in terms of etiologies and therapeutic modalities. The aim of our study is to describe the etiologies and the ESRD outcomes among Tunisian infants. This retrospective study was conducted over 15 years (from January 1998 to December 31, 2013) in the Pediatric Department at Charles Nicolle Hospital. In total, 157 pediatric patients had ESRD. The mean incidence was 4.25 million children. The study involved 24 infants; the sex ratio was equal to 2. The mean age at diagnosis of ESRD was 8 months (range, 1-21 months). Growth retardation was noticed in 14 patients. The main causes were Congenital Anomalies of the Kidneys and Urinary Tract (9 infants) and hereditary renal disease (9 infants). All patients were treated with peritoneal dialysis; 16 infants presented peritonitis. Mortality rate was about 28%. The leading causes of death were cardiovascular diseases and infections.

  17. High Dietary Acid Load Predicts ESRD among Adults with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Deidra C.; Wesson, Donald E.; Tilea, Anca M.; Saran, Rajiv; Ríos-Burrows, Nilka; Williams, Desmond E.; Powe, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Small clinical trials have shown that a reduction in dietary acid load (DAL) improves kidney injury and slows kidney function decline; however, the relationship between DAL and risk of ESRD in a population-based cohort with CKD remains unexamined. We examined the association between DAL, quantified by net acid excretion (NAEes), and progression to ESRD in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Among 1486 adults with CKD age≥20 years enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, DAL was determined by 24-h dietary recall questionnaire. The development of ESRD was ascertained over a median 14.2 years of follow-up through linkage with the Medicare ESRD Registry. We used the Fine–Gray competing risks method to estimate the association of high, medium, and low DAL with ESRD after adjusting for demographics, nutritional factors, clinical factors, and kidney function/damage markers and accounting for intervening mortality events. In total, 311 (20.9%) participants developed ESRD. Higher levels of DAL were associated with increased risk of ESRD; relative hazards (95% confidence interval) were 3.04 (1.58 to 5.86) for the highest tertile and 1.81 (0.89 to 3.68) for the middle tertile compared with the lowest tertile in the fully adjusted model. The risk of ESRD associated with DAL tertiles increased as eGFR decreased (P trend=0.001). Among participants with albuminuria, high DAL was strongly associated with ESRD risk (P trend=0.03). In conclusion, high DAL in persons with CKD is independently associated with increased risk of ESRD in a nationally representative population. PMID:25677388

  18. High Dietary Acid Load Predicts ESRD among Adults with CKD.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanushree; Crews, Deidra C; Wesson, Donald E; Tilea, Anca M; Saran, Rajiv; Ríos-Burrows, Nilka; Williams, Desmond E; Powe, Neil R

    2015-07-01

    Small clinical trials have shown that a reduction in dietary acid load (DAL) improves kidney injury and slows kidney function decline; however, the relationship between DAL and risk of ESRD in a population-based cohort with CKD remains unexamined. We examined the association between DAL, quantified by net acid excretion (NAEes), and progression to ESRD in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Among 1486 adults with CKD age≥20 years enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, DAL was determined by 24-h dietary recall questionnaire. The development of ESRD was ascertained over a median 14.2 years of follow-up through linkage with the Medicare ESRD Registry. We used the Fine-Gray competing risks method to estimate the association of high, medium, and low DAL with ESRD after adjusting for demographics, nutritional factors, clinical factors, and kidney function/damage markers and accounting for intervening mortality events. In total, 311 (20.9%) participants developed ESRD. Higher levels of DAL were associated with increased risk of ESRD; relative hazards (95% confidence interval) were 3.04 (1.58 to 5.86) for the highest tertile and 1.81 (0.89 to 3.68) for the middle tertile compared with the lowest tertile in the fully adjusted model. The risk of ESRD associated with DAL tertiles increased as eGFR decreased (P trend=0.001). Among participants with albuminuria, high DAL was strongly associated with ESRD risk (P trend=0.03). In conclusion, high DAL in persons with CKD is independently associated with increased risk of ESRD in a nationally representative population.

  19. Epidemiology of acute infections among patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Lorien S; Go, Alan S

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of this review were (1) to review recent literature on the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infections in patients who had chronic kidney disease (CKD) and did or did not require renal replacement therapy; (2) to review literature on the efficacy and use of selected vaccines for patients with CKD; and (3) to outline a research framework for examining key issues regarding infections in patients with CKD. Infection-related hospitalizations contribute substantially to excess morbidity and mortality in patients with ESRD, and infection is the second leading cause of death in this population. Patients who have CKD and do not require renal replacement therapy seem to be at higher risk for infection compared with patients without CKD; however, data about patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis therapy are very limited. Numerous factors potentially predispose patients with CKD to infection: advanced age, presence of coexisting illnesses, vaccine hyporesponsiveness, immunosuppressive therapy, uremia, dialysis access, and the dialysis procedure. Targeted vaccination seems to have variable efficacy in the setting of CKD and is generally underused in this population. In conclusion, infection is a primary issue when caring for patients who receive maintenance dialysis. Very limited data exist about the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infection in patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis. Future research is needed to delineate accurately the epidemiology of infections in these populations and to develop effective preventive strategies across the spectrum of CKD severity.

  20. Contrast Medium Exposure During Computed Tomography and Risk of Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Shun; Chiu, Chien-Shan; How, Chorng-Kuang; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsuan-Jen; Hsieh, Vivian Chia-Rong; Hu, Sung-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term association between contrast medium exposure during computed tomography (CT) and the subsequent development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We conducted a population-based cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 7100 patients with nonadvanced CKD who underwent contrast medium-enhanced CT were identified and served as the study cohort. To avoid selection bias, we used the propensity score to match 7100 nonadvanced CKD patients, who underwent noncontrast medium-enhanced CT to serve as the comparison cohort. The age, sex, index year, and frequency of undergoing CTs were also matched between the study and comparison cohorts. Participants were followed until a new diagnosis of ESRD or December 31, 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression. Contrast medium exposure was not identified as a risk factor for developing ESRD in nonadvanced CKD patients after confounders adjustment (adjusted HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66–1.26; P = 0.580). We further divided the patients who underwent CTs with contrast medium use into ≤1 exposure per year on average, >1 and <2 exposure per year on average, and ≥2 exposure per year on average. After adjusting for confounders, we identified a much higher risk for developing ESRD in the 2 groups of >1 and <2 exposure per year on average and ≥2 exposure per year on average (adjusted HR = 8.13; 95% CI, 5.57–11.87 and adjusted HR = 12.08; 95% CI, 7.39–19.75, respectively) compared with the patients who underwent CTs without contrast medium use. This long-term follow-up study demonstrated that contrast medium exposure was not associated with an increased risk of ESRD development in nonadvanced CKD patients. PMID:27100424

  1. [Skin diseases in hemodialysis and kidney transplant patients].

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Clarissa Morais Busatto; Gussão, Bruna Calvi; de Matos, Jorge Paulo Strogoff; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo; Pinto, Jane Marcy Neffá

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the world is facing an escalate in the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Databases containing information about patients in end stage renal disease (ESRD), especially in the United States, were the sources of initial information about it. Brazil has the third largest population on dialysis in the world, and there are about 680 dialysis centers, spread across all units of the federation in the present, providing treatment to an estimated population of almost 90,000 patients. Cutaneous involvement in the chronic renal failure is characterized by a number of manifestations, which may be related to three processes: the primary renal disease, the uremic state, or the therapeutic measures used in their handling. The skin changes in these two classes of patients, dialysis and transplant recipients, have been the subject of several studies. n recent years, however, great progress has been achieved in these two therapeutic modalities, which may have changed not only the type of the dermatologic disorders associated with these two conditions, but also their intensity or frequency. This article aims to yield an update as to the topic skin diseases in hemodialysis and kidney transplant patients.

  2. Chromosome 2q31.1 Associates with ESRD in Women with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sandholm, Niina; McKnight, Amy Jayne; Salem, Rany M.; Brennan, Eoin P.; Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; McKay, Gareth J.; Sadlier, Denise M.; Williams, Winfred W.; Martin, Finian; Panduru, Nicolae Mircea; Tarnow, Lise; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tryggvason, Karl; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Comeau, Mary E.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Godson, Catherine; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Maxwell, Alexander P.; Florez, Jose C.

    2013-01-01

    Sex and genetic variation influence the risk of developing diabetic nephropathy and ESRD in patients with type 1 diabetes. We performed a genome-wide association study in a cohort of 3652 patients from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study with type 1 diabetes to determine whether sex-specific genetic risk factors for ESRD exist. A common variant, rs4972593 on chromosome 2q31.1, was associated with ESRD in women (P<5×10−8) but not in men (P=0.77). This association was replicated in the meta-analysis of three independent type 1 diabetes cohorts (P=0.02) and remained significant for women (P<5×10−8; odds ratio, 1.81 [95% confidence interval, 1.47 to 2.24]) upon combined meta-analysis of the discovery and replication cohorts. rs4972593 is located between the genes that code for the Sp3 transcription factor, which interacts directly with estrogen receptor α and regulates the expression of genes linked to glomerular function and the pathogenesis of nephropathy, and the CDCA7 transcription factor, which regulates cell proliferation. Further examination revealed potential transcription factor–binding sites within rs4972593 and predicted eight estrogen-responsive elements within 5 kb of this locus. Moreover, we found sex-specific differences in the glomerular expression levels of SP3 (P=0.004). Overall, these results suggest that rs4972593 is a sex-specific genetic variant associated with ESRD in patients with type 1 diabetes and may underlie the sex-specific protection against ESRD. PMID:24029427

  3. Effect of low dose nicotinic acid on hyperphosphatemia in patients with end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Zahed, N S; Zamanifar, N; Nikbakht, H

    2016-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is a risk factor for ectopic calcification and coronary artery diseases in end stage renal diseases (ESRD). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of low-dose nicotinic acid on hyperphosphatemia in patients with ESRD. This randomized, double-blind clinical trial was done on 70 ESRD patients with serum phosphoure ≥5.5 mg/dl. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups (n = 35) and the intervention group received niacin 25 mg/day as the initial dose. After 4 weeks, in patients who did not respond to treatment, niacin dose was increased up to 50 mg/dl. At the end of week 8, in case there was no treatment effect, the dose was raised to 100 mg/day. The appropriate response to treatment was defined as serum phosphorous level reductions <5.5 mg/dl. The age was 50.5 ± 14.3 years and duration of dialysis 5.1 ± 5.3 months. In the niacin group, mean phosphorus level decreased from 6.7 ± 0.84 mg/dl at the end of the 1(st) month to 5.8 ± 1.0 mg/dl at the end of the 2(nd) month and to 4.4 ± 1.4 mg/dl at the end of the 3(rd) month (P = 0.004). In the placebo group, mean phosphorus level increased from 6.5 ± 1.2 mg/dl to 7.2 ± 0.91 mg/dl at the end of the 3(rd) month (P = 0.006). In the niacin group, high density lipoprotein (HDL) increased significantly from 45.00 ± 14.9 to 47.2 ± 11.6 (P = 0.009). We conclude that niacin (100 mg/day) decreased phosphorus serum level and increased HDL serum level in patients on dialysis.

  4. Improving Hepatitis B Vaccine Efficacy in End-Stage Renal Diseases Patients and Role of Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Hajipour, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a serious global health problem.The prevalence of viral hepatitis is higher in dialysis patients than in the general population because of the opportunity for exposure during the dialysis procedure. Immunization is the most effective way to prevent transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hence the development of acute or chronic hepatitis B. It is well established that patients with end-stage renal disease including dialysis-dependent patients, have an impaired immune response to hepatitis B vaccine. End stage renal diseases (ESRD) patients have lower seroconversion rates compared with the subjects with intact renal function. Moreover, even after the completion of vaccination schedule anti-hepatitis B (anti-HBs) titers of responder dialysis, patients are low and decline logarithmically with time. The impaired efficacy of HBV vaccine in patients with ESRD has been attributed to numerous factors such as immune compromise because of uremia and some other factors. One approach to improve the immunogenicity of existing HBV vaccines is adjuvantation, and it's very important to find more effective adjutants for improving HBV vaccine efficacy. In this paper we have a brief review on recently known new ways for improving HBV vaccine efficacy. PMID:23029621

  5. A quality improvement model for optimizing care of the diabetic end-stage renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Mahnensmith, Rex L; Zorzanello, Mary; Hsu, Yueh-Han; Williams, Mark E

    2010-01-01

    Persons with diabetes mellitus whose kidney disease progresses to end-stage requiring dialysis have poorer outcomes compared to nondiabetic patients who commence maintenance dialysis. In the diabetic patient without renal failure, sustained strict glycemic, lipid, and blood pressure (BP) control can retard or thwart diabetic complications such as retinopathy, neuropathy, coronary disease, and peripheral vascular disease. Achieving these outcomes requires multidisciplinary collaborative care. Best care of the diabetic person requires a dedicated clinician who knows the patient well, who closely follows the course of clinical problems, who provides frequent assessments and interventions, and who also directs care to other agencies, clinics, and specialized clinicians who provide expert focused evaluations and interventions aimed at specific clinical concerns. Diabetic patients who reach end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have even greater clinical need of a dedicated principal care clinician than the diabetic patient who has minimal or moderate kidney disease. The diabetic patient with ESRD exhibits greater fluctuations in glucose and BP due to dialysis-related diet patterns and fluid balances and has more active cardiovascular problems due to the combined influences of calcium, phosphorus, and lipid imbalances. These problems warrant exceptional care that includes frequent surveillance and monitoring with timely interventions if patient outcomes are to be improved. We present here a quality improvement model for optimizing care of the diabetic dialysis patient that relies on a dedicated practitioner who can evaluate and intervene on the multiple variables within and beyond the dialysis clinic that impact the patient's health. We present three detailed clinical care pathways that the dedicated clinician can follow. We believe that patient outcomes can be improved with this approach that provides customized problem-focused care, collaborates with the dialysis

  6. Influence of Type D personality on health-related quality of life among Korean patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Son, Youn-Jung; You, Mi-Ae; Song, Eun Kyeung

    2012-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to explore the prevalence of Type D personality and the impact of Type D personality (the combination of negative affectivity and social inhibition) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and to determine whether this link of Type D personality to HRQOL is mediated by depressive symptoms. Patients (n = 144) from an outpatient nephrology clinic of a university hospital participated in this cross-sectional study. The prevalence of Type D personality using Type D Personality Scale-14 was 26%. After adjustment for patients' characteristics and depressive symptoms in multivariate analysis, Type D personality was an independent predictor of HRQOL. This relation of Type D personality to HRQOL was mediated by depressive symptoms. Our findings underline that intervention should be directed towards reducing depressive symptoms in patients with Type D personality in order to improve HRQOL of ESRD patients.

  7. Mucocutaneous manifestations and nail changes in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Tajbakhsh, Ramin; Dehghan, Mohammad; Azarhoosh, Ramin; Haghighi, Ali Nobakht; Sadani, Somayeh; Zadeh, Soheila Samad; Kabootari, Maryam; Qorbani, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Mucocutaneous manifestations are common among patients on hemodialysis (HD). This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of mucocutaneous manifestations in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who are on HD. In this cross-sectional, descriptive and analytic study conducted in 2009, 100 patients on HD at the Five Azar Hospital in Gorgan city were randomly selected. All the patients underwent detailed examination by a dermatologist to look for lesions in the skin, hair, nail and mucous membranes; if felt necessary, biopsy was obtained from the lesions. The findings were statistically analyzed using SPSS-13 software. For evaluation of normality of distribution, Kolmogorov-Smirnov was used, for quantitative variables Mann-Whitney and T-test (abnormal distribution) were used and for qualitative variables, Chi-2 and Fisher were used. In this study, P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Fifty-one males and 49 females were enrolled. The mean age was 49 ± 12 years. Diabetes was the most common cause of ESRD. In 95% of the patients, at least one mucocutaneous manifestation was present. Xerosis (78.3%) was the most common lesion, followed by pruritus (39.1%), lentigo (34.8%), skin discoloration (32.6%), leukonychia (32%) and thinning of the nail bed (24%). Xerosis, scaling, lentigo, folliculitis, idiopathic guttate hypopigmentation, leukonychia and half and half nail were associated with age. A significant relationship was seen between duration on dialysis and skin discoloration and leukonychia. Clubbing had a significant association with calcium-phosphorus product (Ca × P). There was a significant association between serum ferritin level and pruritus and tinea versicolor lesions. Our study shows that mucocutaneous manifestations are common among patients with ESRD. Identification of these manifestations and their association with causative factors are useful for preventing the lesions.

  8. Erythropoiesis-stimulating Agent Use among Patients with Lupus Nephritis Approaching End-stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Puerta, José A; Waikar, Sushrut S; Solomon, Daniel H; Liu, Jun; Alarcón, Graciela S; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Costenbader, Karen H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) utilization among lupus nephritis (LN) patients with incipient ESRD. We aimed to identify sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with ESA use among incident LN ESRD patients. Methods Among all individuals age ≥18 with incident ESRD from 1995-2008 in the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS), we identified those with systemic lupus erythematosus (ICD-9 code 710.0) as the cause of ESRD. ESA use at ESRD onset was ascertained from the Medical Evidence Report. Year of onset, age, sex, race/ethnicity, medical insurance, employment status, residential region, clinical factors and comorbidities were considered potentially associated with ESA use in multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analyses. Results We identified 12,533 individuals with incident LN ESRD (1% of entire population). Of those, 4,288 (34%) received an ESA preceding ESRD. In multivariable-adjusted models, ESA users had higher serum albumin and hemoglobin concentrations, were more likely to be women, and to live in the Northeast. Conversely, Medicaid beneficiaries, the uninsured, unemployed, African Americans, Hispanics, and those with IV drug use, congestive heart failure and obesity had lower ESA use. Conclusion Among all U.S. patients and those with LN who developed ESRD, approximately one third received ESAs. Patient sex, race, age, medical insurance, residential region and clinical factors were significantly associated with ESA therapy. While there are no guidelines for ESA use in LN patients approaching ESRD, there has been wide sociodemographic variation, raising questions about ESA prescription practices. PMID:24672742

  9. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)--is it a new marker of hyporesponsiveness to recombinant human erythropoietin in patients that are on chronic hemodialysis?

    PubMed

    Orlic, L; Mikolasevic, I; Lukenda, V; Racki, S; Stimac, D; Milic, S

    2014-12-01

    Anemia is a major consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) that develops early in the course of illness and affects most patients who exhibit some degree of reduced renal function. Erythropoietin (EPO) deficiency is considered the most important cause of anemia in CKD. Renal anemia has serious clinical consequence. In addition to reducing patient physical capacity and quality of life, anemia induces adaptive cardiovascular mechanisms that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and death. Thus, treatment of anemia in CKD is very important. While EPO is effective in correcting anemia in most cases, up to 10% of patients however, have an inadequate response to therapy. The two most common and important reasons why patients become relatively unresponsive to EPO therapy are the development of true iron deficiency and the onset of an inflammatory state that impairs the response to EPO. Indeed, the role of inflammation and pro-inflammatory cytokines in resistance to EPO therapy is gaining increasing recognition. On the other hand, the main organ for C-reactive protein (CRP) synthesis is the liver and it is well known that the synthesis of an acute-phase proteins by the liver is up regulated by inflammation. The main consequence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is sub-chronic liver inflammation that leads and contributes to dyslipidemia, inflammation, enhanced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Considering the recent data about high prevalence of NAFLD in CKD patients, probably due to shared metabolic risk factors, we hypothesized that end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients with NAFLD will need a much higher dose of EPO to achieve the target hemoglobin levels in comparison with ESRD patients without NAFLD. The possible underlying mechanism is sub-chronic liver inflammation in NAFLD patients that leads and contributes to poor response to EPO. Therefore, we believe that NAFLD could be a new clinical marker of poor response to EPO therapy in

  10. IGF-1 and Survival in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ting; Gama Axelsson, Thiane; Heimbürger, Olof; Bárány, Peter; Stenvinkel, Peter; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives IGF-1 deficiency links to malnutrition in CKD patients; however, it is not clear to what extent it associates with survival among these patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Serum IGF-1 and other biochemical, clinical (subjective global assessment), and densitometric (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry) markers of nutritional status and mineral and bone metabolism were measured in a cohort of 365 Swedish clinically stable CKD stage 5 patients (median age of 53 years) initiating dialysis between 1994 and 2009; in 207 patients, measurements were also taken after 1 year of dialysis. Deaths were registered during a median follow-up of 5 years. Associations of mortality with baseline IGF-1 and changes of IGF-1 after 1 year of dialysis were evaluated by Cox models. Results At baseline, IGF-1 concentrations associated negatively with age, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, poor nutritional status, IL-6, and osteoprotegerin and positively with body fat mass, bone mineral density, serum phosphate, calcium, and fibroblast growth factor-23. At 1 year, IGF-1 had increased by 33%. In multivariate regression, low age, diabetes mellitus, and high serum phosphate and calcium associated with IGF-1 at baseline, and in a mixed model, these factors, together with high fat body mass, associated with changes of IGF-1 during the first 1 year of dialysis. Adjusting for calendar year of inclusion, age, sex, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, IL-6, and poor nutritional status, a 1 SD higher level of IGF-1 at baseline associated with lower mortality risk (hazard ratio, 0.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 0.98). Persistently low or decreasing IGF-1 levels during the first 1 year on dialysis predicted worse survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.06 to 4.50). Conclusion In incident dialysis patients, low serum IGF-1 associates with body composition and markers of mineral and bone metabolism, and it

  11. Periodontal disease: a covert source of inflammation in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Gener; Dumitriu, Horia Traian; Dumitriu, Anca Silvia; Ismail, Fidan Bahtiar

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of atherosclerotic complications (myocardial infarction, stroke, and sudden death) is increased in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, especially in haemodialysis patients. Increasing evidence suggests that both in general population and in dialysis patients, systemic inflammation plays a dominant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic complications. In general population, also, evidence shows that moderate to severe periodontitis can contribute to inflammatory burden by increasing serum CRP levels and may increase the prevalence of atherosclerotic events. Moreover, the results of some new interventional studies reveal that effective phase I periodontal therapy may decrease serum CRP levels, the most important acute phase protein, monitored as a systemic marker of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction as well, used as an initial predictor of atherosclerotic events. Considering that moderate to severe periodontal diseases have a higher prevalence in CKD and in dialysis population and that periodontal examination is not part of the standard medical assessment, destructive periodontitis might be an ignored source of systemic inflammation in end-stage renal disease patients and may add to the chronic inflammatory status in CKD.

  12. Circulating Nonphosphorylated Carboxylated Matrix Gla Protein Predicts Survival in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Westenfeld, Ralf; Krüger, Thilo; Cranenburg, Ellen C.; Magdeleyns, Elke J.; Brandenburg, Vincent M.; Djuric, Zivka; Damjanovic, Tatjana; Ketteler, Markus; Vermeer, Cees; Dimkovic, Nada; Floege, Jürgen; Schurgers, Leon J.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms for vascular calcification and its associated cardiovascular mortality in patients with ESRD are not completely understood. Dialysis patients exhibit profound vitamin K deficiency, which may impair carboxylation of the calcification inhibitor matrix gla protein (MGP). Here, we tested whether distinct circulating inactive vitamin K–dependent proteins associate with all-cause or cardiovascular mortality. We observed higher levels of both desphospho-uncarboxylated MGP (dp-ucMGP) and desphospho-carboxylated MGP (dp-cMGP) among 188 hemodialysis patients compared with 98 age-matched subjects with normal renal function. Levels of dp-ucMGP correlated with those of protein induced by vitamin K absence II (PIVKA-II; r = 0.62, P < 0.0001). We found increased PIVKA-II levels in 121 (64%) dialysis patients, indicating pronounced vitamin K deficiency. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with low levels of dp-cMGP had an increased risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Multivariable Cox regression confirmed that low levels of dp-cMGP increase mortality risk (all-cause: HR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.3; cardiovascular: HR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2 to 6.2). Furthermore, patients with higher vascular calcification scores showed lower levels of dp-cMGP. In 17 hemodialysis patients, daily supplementation with vitamin K2 for 6 weeks reduced dp-ucMGP levels by 27% (P = 0.003) but did not affect dp-cMGP levels. In conclusion, the majority of dialysis patients exhibit pronounced vitamin K deficiency. Lower levels of circulating dp-cMGP may serve as a predictor of mortality in dialysis patients. Whether vitamin K supplementation improves outcomes requires further study. PMID:21289218

  13. Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation for projection of end stage renal disease patients in Greece.

    PubMed

    Rodina-Theocharaki, A; Bliznakova, K; Pallikarakis, N

    2012-07-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) treatment methods are considered to be among the most expensive procedures for chronic conditions worldwide which also have severe impact on patients' quality of life. During the last decade, Greece has been among the countries with the highest incidence and prevalence, while at the same time with the lowest kidney transplantation rates. Predicting future patients' number on Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) is essential for health care providers in order to achieve more effective resource management. In this study a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation is presented for predicting the future number of ESRD patients for the period 2009-2020 in Greece. The MCMC model comprises Monte Carlo sampling techniques applied on probability distributions of the constructed Markov Chain. The model predicts that there will be 15,147 prevalent patients on RRT in Greece by 2020. Additionally, a cost-effectiveness analysis was performed on a scenario of gradually reducing the hemodialysis patients in favor of increasing the transplantation number by 2020. The proposed scenario showed net savings of 86.54 million Euros for the period 2009-2020 compared to the base-case prediction.

  14. The ESRD Quality Incentive Program-Can We Bridge the Chasm?

    PubMed

    Weiner, Daniel; Watnick, Suzanne

    2017-03-15

    The ESRD Quality Incentive Program (QIP) is the first mandatory federal pay for performance program launched on January 1, 2012. The QIP is tied to the ESRD prospective payment system and mandated by the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008, which directed the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to expand the payment bundle for renal dialysis services and legislated that payment be tied to quality measures. The QIP links 2% of the payment that a dialysis facility receives for Medicare patients on dialysis to the facility's performance on quality of care measures. Quality measures are evaluated annually for inclusion on the basis of importance, validity, and performance gap. Other quality assessment programs overlap with the QIP; all have substantial effects on provision of care as clinicians, patients, regulators, and dialysis organizations scramble to keep up with the frequent release of wide-ranging regulations. In this review, we provide an overview of quality assessment and quality measures, focusing on the ESRD QIP, its effect on care, and its potential future directions. We conclude that a patient-centered, individualized, and parsimonious approach to quality assessment needs to be maintained to allow the nephrology community to further bridge the quality chasm in dialysis care.

  15. Defining end-stage renal disease in clinical trials: a framework for adjudication.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv

    2016-06-01

    Unlike definition of stroke and myocardial infarction, there is no uniformly agreed upon definition to adjudicate end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD remains the most unambiguous and clinically relevant end point for clinical trialists, regulators, payers and patients with chronic kidney disease. The prescription of dialysis to patients with advanced chronic kidney disease is subjective and great variations exist among physicians and countries. Given the difficulties in diagnosing ESRD, the presence of estimated GFR <15 mL/min/1.7 3m(2) itself has been suggested as an end point. However, this definition is still a surrogate since many patients may live years without being symptomatic or needing dialysis. The purpose of this report is to describe a framework to define when the kidney function ends and when ESRD can be adjudicated. Discussed in this report are (i) the importance of diagnosing symptomatic uremia or advanced asymptomatic uremia thus establishing the need for dialysis; (ii) establishing the chronicity of dialysis so as to distinguish it from acute dialysis; (iii) establishing ESRD when dialysis is unavailable, refused or considered futile and (iv) the adjudication process. Several challenges and ambiguities that emerge in clinical trials and their possible solutions are provided. The criteria proposed herein may help to standardize the definition of ESRD and reduce the variability in adjudicating the most important renal end point in clinical trials of chronic kidney disease.

  16. Risk of Retinal Vein Occlusion Following End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuh-Shin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Jan, Ren-Long

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the risk of retinal vein occlusion (RVO) following end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The study was designed as a retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study. The subjects were ESRD patients identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), code 585. The study cohort included 92,774 ESRD patients registered between January 2000 and December 2009 at the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. An age- and sex-matched control group comprised 92,774 patients (case:control = 1:1) selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Information for each patient was collected from the index date until December 2011. The incidence and risk of RVO were compared between the ESRD and control groups. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for RVO after adjustment for potential confounders was obtained by Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate the RVO cumulative incidence rate. The main outcome measure was the incidence of RVO following ESRD. In total, 904 ESRD patients (0.97%) and 410 controls (0.44%) had RVO (P < 0.0001) during the follow-up period, leading to a significantly elevated risk of RVO in the ESRD patients compared with controls (incidence rate ratio = 3.05, 95% confidence interval = 2.72-3.43). After adjustment for potential confounders including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, congestive heart failure, and coronary artery disease, ESRD patients were 3.05 times more likely to develop RVO in the full cohort (adjusted hazard ratio = 3.05, 95% confidence interval = 2.64-3.51). In addition, hypertension patients showed high incidence rate of RVO in the ESRD group compared with controls (incidence rate ratio = 1.71, 95% confidence interval = 1.44-2.03) and maintained significant risk of RVO after adjustment for other confounders in the cohort (adjusted

  17. ESRD due to Multiple Myeloma in the United States, 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Reule, Scott; Sexton, Donal J; Solid, Craig A; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Foley, Robert N

    2016-05-01

    Although management of multiple myeloma has changed substantially in the last decade, it is unknown whether the burden of ESRD due to multiple myeloma has changed, or whether survival of patients with multiple myeloma on RRT has improved. Regarding ESRD due to multiple myeloma necessitating RRT in the United States, we evaluated temporal trends between 2001 and 2010 for demography-adjusted incidence ratios, relative to rates in 2001-2002, and mortality hazards from RRT initiation, relative to hazards in 2001-2002. In this retrospective cohort study, we used the US Renal Data System database (n=1,069,343), 2001-2010, to identify patients with ESRD due to multiple myeloma treated with RRT (n=12,703). Demography-adjusted incidence ratios of ESRD from multiple myeloma decreased between 2001-2002 and 2009-2010 in the overall population (demography-adjusted incidence ratio 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.79 to 0.86) and in most demographic subgroups examined. Mortality rates were 86.7, 41.4, and 34.4 per 100 person-years in the first 3 years of RRT, respectively, compared with 32.3, 20.6, and 21.3 in matched controls without multiple myeloma. Unadjusted mortality hazards ratios declined monotonically after 2004 to a value of 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.67 to 0.77 in 2009-2010, and declines between 2001-2002 and 2008-2009 were observed (P<0.05) in most demographic subgroups examined. Findings were similar when adjustment was made for demographic characteristics, comorbidity markers, and laboratory test values. These data suggest the incidence of RRT from multiple myeloma in the United States has decreased in the last decade, and clinically meaningful increases in survival have occurred for these patients.

  18. End-stage renal disease and economic incentives: the International Study of Health Care Organization and Financing (ISHCOF).

    PubMed

    Dor, Avi; Pauly, Mark V; Eichleay, Margaret A; Held, Philip J

    2007-09-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a debilitating, costly, and increasingly common condition. Little is known about how different financing approaches affect ESRD outcomes and delivery of care. This paper presents results from a comparative review of 12 countries with alternative models of incentives and benefits, collected under the International Study of Health Care Organization and Financing, a substudy within the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study. Variation in spending per ESRD patient is relatively small, but correlated with overall per capita health care spending. Remaining differences in costs and outcomes do not seem strongly linked to differences in incentives.

  19. Prognosis of CKD Patients Receiving Outpatient Nephrology Care in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Chiodini, Paolo; Zoccali, Carmine; Borrelli, Silvio; Cianciaruso, Bruno; Di Iorio, Biagio; Santoro, Domenico; Giancaspro, Vincenzo; Abaterusso, Cataldo; Gallo, Ciro; Conte, Giuseppe; Minutolo, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Prognosis in nondialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients under regular nephrology care is rarely investigated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We prospectively followed from 2003 to death or June 2010 a cohort of 1248 patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 and previous nephrology care ≥1 year in 25 Italian outpatient nephrology clinics. Cumulative incidence of ESRD or death before ESRD were estimated using the competing-risk approach. Results Estimated rates (per 100 patient-years) of ESRD and death 8.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.4 to 9.2) and 5.9 (95% CI 5.2 to 6.6), respectively. Risk of ESRD and death increased progressively from stages 3 to 5. ESRD was more frequent than death in stage 4 and 5 CKD, whereas the opposite was true in stage 3 CKD. Younger age, lower body mass index, proteinuria, and high phosphate predicted ESRD, whereas older age, diabetes, previous cardiovascular disease, ESRD, proteinuria, high uric acid, and anemia predicted death (P < 0.05 for all). Among modifiable risk factors, proteinuria accounted for the greatest contribution to the model fit for either outcome. Conclusions In patients receiving continuity of care in Italian nephrology clinics, ESRD was a more frequent outcome than death in stage 4 and 5 CKD, but the opposite was true in stage 3. Outcomes were predicted by modifiable risk factors specific to CKD. Proteinuria used in conjunction with estimated GFR refined risk stratification. These findings provide information, specific to CKD patients under regular outpatient nephrology care, for risk stratification that complement recent observations in the general population. PMID:21817127

  20. Beck Depression Inventory-Fast Screen (BDI-FS): an efficient tool for depression screening in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Neitzer, Andrea; Sun, Sumi; Doss, Sheila; Moran, John; Schiller, Brigitte

    2012-04-01

    Depression is common in patients suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Various screening tools for depression in ESRD patients are available. This study aimed to validate the Beck Depression Inventory-Fast Screen (BDI-FS) with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) as depression screening tool in conventional hemodialysis (CHD) patients. One hundred sixty two CHD patients were studied with both screening questionnaires. We used the Pearson Correlation Coefficient to measure the agreement between BDI-II and BDI-FS scores from 134 patients who responded to both questionnaires. Receiver operating characteristics curve and area under the curve were constructed to determine a valid BDI-FS cutoff score to identify ESRD patients at risk for depression. BDI-II and BDI-FS scores strongly correlated (Pearson r = 0.85, p < 0.0001). At a BDI-II cutoff ≥16, receiver operating characteristics showed the best balance between sensitivity and specificity for the BDI-FS cutoff value of ≥4 with a sensitivity of 97.2% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 85.5%, 99.9%) and a specificity of 91.8% (95% CI: 84.5%, 96.4%). When applying the above cutoff scores, prevalence of depressive symptoms in all completed questionnaires was found to be 28.7% (BDI-II) and 30.1% (BDI-FS), respectively. The BDI-FS was found to be an efficient and effective tool for depression screening in ESRD patients which can be easily implemented in routine dialysis care.

  1. Risk factors for mortality in end-stage kidney disease patients under online-hemodiafiltration: three-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Martins, Pedro de; Moura, Alexandra; Madureira, José; Alija, Pablo; Oliveira, José Gerardo; Lopez, Martin; Filgueiras, Madalena; Amado, Leonilde; Sameiro-Faria, Maria; Miranda, Vasco; Mesquita, Edgar; Teixeira, Laetitia; Poveda, Verónica; Lobato, Luísa; Santos-Silva, Alice; Costa, Elísio

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the predictors of mortality in a group of end-stage kidney disease (ESRD) patients under dialysis, by performing a three-year follow-up study. From the 236 patients included in this study, 54 patients died during the three-year follow-up period. Our data showed that the risk of death was higher in patients presenting lower levels of mean cell hemoglobin concentration, transferrin, and albumin. Our study showed that poor nutritional status and an inflammatory-induced iron depleted erythropoiesis are important factors for mortality in these patients.

  2. Role of cytogenetic biomarkers in management of chronic kidney disease patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zeba; Pandey, Manoj; Samartha, Ravindra M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is much more common than people recognize, and habitually goes undetected and undiagnosed until the disease is well advanced or when their kidney functions is down to 25% of normal function. Genetic and non-genetic factors contribute to cause CKD. Non-genetic factors include hypertension, High level of DNA damage due to the production of reactive oxygen species and nucleic acid oxidation has been reported in CKD patients. Main genetic factor which causes CKD is diabetic nephropathy. A three- to nine-fold greater risk of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) is observed in individuals with a family history of ESRD. This greater risk have led researchers to search for genes linked to diabetic and other forms of nephropathy for the management of CKD. Multicenter consortia are currently recruiting large numbers of multiplex diabetic families with index cases having nephropathy for linkage and association analyses using various cytogenetic techniques. In addition, large-scale screening studies are underway, with the goals of better defining the overall prevalence of chronic kidney disease, as well as educating the population about risk factors for nephropathy, including family history. Cytogenetic biomarkers play an imperative role for the linkage study using G banding and detection of genomic instability in CKD patients. Classical and molecular cytogenetic tools with cytogenetic biomarkers provide remarkable findings in CKD patients. The aim of the present review is to draw outline of classical and molecular cytogenetic findings in CKD patients and their possible role in management to reduce genomic instability in CKD patients. PMID:27833523

  3. Effect of Exercise Therapy on Lipid Parameters in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Lorenzo; McGrowder, Donovan A; Pena, Yeiny T; Cabrera, Elsa; Lawrence-Wright, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dyslipidemia has been established as a well-known traditional risk factor for cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients. Aim: This study investigated the impact of Hatha yoga exercise on lipid parameters in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis. Materials and Methods: This prospective randomized study consisted of 33 ESRD patients in the Hatha yoga exercise group that was matched with 35 ESRD patients in the control group. Serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol were determined at baseline (0 month) and after 4 months. Results: Comparing values after 4 months versus baseline in the prehemodialysis Hatha yoga exercise group, there was found a significant decrease in total cholesterol from 5.126 ± 0.092 mmol/l to 4.891 ± 0.072 mmol/l (-4.58%; P = 0.0001), triglycerides from 2.699 ± 0.078 mmol/l to 2.530 ± 0.063 mmol/l (-6.26%; P = 0.0001), LDL-cholesterol from 2.729 ± 0.083 mmol/l to 2.420 ± 0.066 mmol/l (-11.32%; P = 0.0001), and total cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio from 5.593 ± 0.119 mmol/l to 4.907 ± 0.116 mmol/l (-12.26%; P = 0.047). For patients in the Hatha yoga exercise group, 51.5% had normal total cholesterol at 0 month while 70.0% had normal total cholesterol (P < 0.05) after 4 four months and 54.5% of patients had normal LDL-cholesterol at 0 month while 84.9% had normal LDL-cholesterol after 4 months (P < 0.05). Conclusion: These findings suggest that Hatha yoga exercise has preventive and beneficial effects and may be a safe therapeutic modality in ESRD patients. PMID:22923917

  4. Safety and efficacy of liraglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes and end-stage renal disease: protocol for an investigator-initiated prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, parallel intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Idorn, Thomas; Knop, Filip K; Jørgensen, Morten; Jensen, Tonny; Resuli, Marsela; Hansen, Pernille M; Christensen, Karl B; Holst, Jens J; Hornum, Mads; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Owing to renal clearance, several antidiabetic agents cannot be used in patients with ESRD. The present protocol describes an investigator-initiated trial aiming to test safety and efficacy of treatment with the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes and dialysis-dependent ESRD. Methods and analysis Twenty patients with type 2 diabetes and ESRD will be compared with 20 matched patients with type 2 diabetes and normal kidney function in a randomised, parallel, placebo-controlled (1 : 1), double-blinded setting. All participants will receive 12 weeks of daily treatment with liraglutide/placebo in an individually titrated dose of 0.6, 1.2 or 1.8 mg. Over nine visits, plasma liraglutide, glycaemic control, β-cell response, cardiovascular parameters, various biomarkers and adverse events will be assessed. The primary endpoint will be evaluated from dose-corrected plasma trough liraglutide concentration at the final trial visit to determine potential accumulation in the ESRD group. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the Danish Medicines Agency, the Scientific-Ethical Committee of the Capital Region of Denmark and the Danish Data Protection Agency. An external monitoring committee (The Good Clinical Practice Unit at Copenhagen University Hospitals) will oversee the study. The results of the study will be presented at national and international scientific meetings, and publications will be submitted to peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01394341 PMID:23624993

  5. Proton Pump Inhibitors and Risk of Incident CKD and Progression to ESRD.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Bowe, Benjamin; Li, Tingting; Xian, Hong; Balasubramanian, Sumitra; Al-Aly, Ziyad

    2016-10-01

    The association between proton pump inhibitors (PPI) use and risk of acute interstitial nephritis has been described. However, whether exposure to PPI associates with incident CKD, CKD progression, or ESRD is not known. We used Department of Veterans Affairs national databases to build a primary cohort of new users of PPI (n=173,321) and new users of histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2 blockers; n=20,270) and followed these patients over 5 years to ascertain renal outcomes. In adjusted Cox survival models, the PPI group, compared with the H2 blockers group, had an increased risk of incident eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and of incident CKD (hazard ratio [HR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.18 to 1.26; and HR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.34, respectively). Patients treated with PPI also had a significantly elevated risk of doubling of serum creatinine level (HR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.42 to 1.65), of eGFR decline >30% (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.28 to 1.37), and of ESRD (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.21 to 3.18). Furthermore, we detected a graded association between duration of PPI exposure and risk of renal outcomes among those exposed to PPI for 31-90, 91-180, 181-360, and 361-720 days compared with those exposed for ≤30 days. Examination of risk of renal outcomes in 1:1 propensity score-matched cohorts of patients taking H2 blockers versus patients taking PPI and patients taking PPI versus controls yielded consistent results. Our results suggest that PPI exposure associates with increased risk of incident CKD, CKD progression, and ESRD.

  6. Sevelamer hydrochloride: a review of its use for hyperphosphataemia in patients with end-stage renal disease on haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, David R; Scott, Lesley J; Cvetković, Risto S; Plosker, Greg L

    2008-01-01

    Sevelamer (Renagel), an orally administered metal-free cationic hydrogel polymer/resin that binds dietary phosphate in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, is approved for use in the US, Europe and several other countries for the treatment of hyperphosphataemia in adult patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.Clinical evidence shows that sevelamer was at least as effective as calcium acetate and calcium carbonate at controlling serum phosphorus, calcium-phosphorus product (Ca x P) and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels, but generally reduced serum calcium levels to a greater extent and was associated with a lower risk of hypercalcaemic episodes than calcium-based phosphate binders. Sevelamer appeared to slow the progression of cardiovascular calcification in patients with ESRD and also had a beneficial effect on serum low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. In patients receiving chronic haemodialysis, there was no between-group difference in all-cause mortality between sevelamer and calcium-based phosphate binder therapy in the primary efficacy analysis in the large (n >2100), 3-year DCOR trial; in the smaller (n = 109) nonblind RIND trial in patients new to dialysis, data suggest there is an overall survival benefit with sevelamer versus calcium-based phosphate binder treatment. The relative survival benefits and cost effectiveness of these phosphate binder therapies remains to be fully determined. Sevelamer treatment was generally as well tolerated as calcium acetate or calcium carbonate treatment. Overall, sevelamer is a valuable option for the management of hyperphosphataemia in patients with ESRD on haemodialysis.

  7. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of ESRD.... (5) The payment to a hospital equals the average length of stay of ESRD beneficiaries in the...

  8. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of ESRD.... (5) The payment to a hospital equals the average length of stay of ESRD beneficiaries in the...

  9. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of ESRD.... (5) The payment to a hospital equals the average length of stay of ESRD beneficiaries in the...

  10. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of ESRD.... (5) The payment to a hospital equals the average length of stay of ESRD beneficiaries in the...

  11. Brain Microstructural Abnormalities Are Related to Physiological Alterations in End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Junzhang; Dong, Jianwei; He, Jinlong; Zhan, Wenfeng; Xu, Lijuan; Xu, Yikai; Jiang, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study whole-brain microstructural alterations in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and examine the relationship between brain microstructure and physiological indictors in the disease. Materials and Methods Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected from 35 patients with ESRD (28 men, 18–61 years) and 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs, 32 men, 22–58 years). A voxel-wise analysis was then used to identify microstructural alterations over the whole brain in the ESRD patients compared with the HCs. Multiple biochemical measures of renal metabolin, vascular risk factors, general cognitive ability and dialysis duration were correlated with microstructural integrity for the patients. Results Compared to the HCs, the ESRD patients exhibited disrupted microstructural integrity in not only white matter (WM) but also gray matter (GM) regions, as characterized by decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD). Further correlation analyses revealed that the in MD, AD and RD values showed significantly positive correlations with the blood urea nitrogen in the left superior temporal gyrus and significantly negative correlations with the calcium levels in the left superior frontal gyrus (orbital part) in the patients. Conclusion Our findings suggest that ESRD is associated with widespread diffusion abnormalities in both WM and GM regions in the brain, and microstructural integrity of several GM regions are related to biochemical alterations in the disease. PMID:27227649

  12. Natural regulatory T cells from patients with end-stage renal disease can be used for large-scale generation of highly suppressive alloantigen-specific Tregs.

    PubMed

    Litjens, Nicolle H R; Boer, Karin; Zuijderwijk, Joke M; Klepper, Mariska; Peeters, Annemiek M A; Verschoor, Wenda; Kraaijeveld, Rens; Betjes, Michiel G H

    2016-12-14

    Natural occurring regulatory T cells (nTregs) have the potential to offer a targeted approach of immunosuppression and are the cell type of interest for inducing tolerance in kidney transplantation. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) profoundly affects the composition and function of circulating T cells but little is known with respect to how nTreg potential is affected. To address this, nTregs of patients with ESRD (on dialysis or not) and healthy individuals were isolated, expanded using allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells followed by anti-CD3/anti-CD28-coated beads and the different nTregs were extensively characterized by the demethylation status of the Treg-specific demethylated region within FOXP3 and expression of typical nTreg markers. Additionally, the suppressive capacity as well as cytokine producing cells were analyzed for allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cell-expanded nTregs. Compared to age- and gender-matched healthy individuals, similar frequencies of nTregs were present within the circulation of patients with ESRD either on dialysis or not. The isolated nTregs could be equally well or even better expanded using allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells and extensive characterization did not reveal significant differences. The demethylation status of the Treg-specific demethylated region was maintained or even further promoted as was the expression of markers characteristic for nTregs. Moreover, suppressive capacity and the cytokine profile of allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cell-expanded nTregs was similar to that of healthy individuals. Thus, circulating nTregs of patients with ESRD can effectively be expanded to stable allo antigen-specific nTregs with potential clinical applicability.

  13. The PROPKD Score: A New Algorithm to Predict Renal Survival in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Audrézet, Marie-Pierre; Rousseau, Annick; Hourmant, Maryvonne; Renaudineau, Eric; Charasse, Christophe; Morin, Marie-Pascale; Moal, Marie-Christine; Dantal, Jacques; Wehbe, Bassem; Perrichot, Régine; Frouget, Thierry; Vigneau, Cécile; Potier, Jérôme; Jousset, Philippe; Guillodo, Marie-Paule; Siohan, Pascale; Terki, Nazim; Sawadogo, Théophile; Legrand, Didier; Menoyo-Calonge, Victorio; Benarbia, Seddik; Besnier, Dominique; Longuet, Hélène; Férec, Claude; Le Meur, Yannick

    2016-03-01

    The course of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) varies among individuals, with some reaching ESRD before 40 years of age and others never requiring RRT. In this study, we developed a prognostic model to predict renal outcomes in patients with ADPKD on the basis of genetic and clinical data. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1341 patients from the Genkyst cohort and evaluated the influence of clinical and genetic factors on renal survival. Multivariate survival analysis identified four variables that were significantly associated with age at ESRD onset, and a scoring system from 0 to 9 was developed as follows: being male: 1 point; hypertension before 35 years of age: 2 points; first urologic event before 35 years of age: 2 points; PKD2 mutation: 0 points; nontruncating PKD1 mutation: 2 points; and truncating PKD1 mutation: 4 points. Three risk categories were subsequently defined as low risk (0-3 points), intermediate risk (4-6 points), and high risk (7-9 points) of progression to ESRD, with corresponding median ages for ESRD onset of 70.6, 56.9, and 49 years, respectively. Whereas a score ≤3 eliminates evolution to ESRD before 60 years of age with a negative predictive value of 81.4%, a score >6 forecasts ESRD onset before 60 years of age with a positive predictive value of 90.9%. This new prognostic score accurately predicts renal outcomes in patients with ADPKD and may enable the personalization of therapeutic management of ADPKD.

  14. Pharmaco-economic consequences of losartan therapy in patients undergoing diabetic end stage renal disease in EU and USA.

    PubMed

    de Portu, Simona; Citarella, Anna; Cammarota, Simona; Menditto, Enrica; Mantovani, Lorenzo G

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most frequent cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD). As ESRD incidence increases continuously, more resources are needed for treatment. The objective was to evaluate the economic impact of losartan added to the standard care administered to diabetic subjects with ESRD. The analysis has involved more than 500 million inhabitants. Standard methods have been used in order to conduct an economic evaluation comparing the economic outcomes deriving from the administration of losartan added to standard care versus standard care alone in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and nephropathy over 3.4 years. The study was hence conducted from the perspective of the third-party payer. The clinical outcome data were based on the results from the Reduction of Endpoints in Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus with the Angiotensin II Antagonist Losartan (RENAAL) trial. Direct medical costs are referred to the purchase costs of losartan and to the costs of hospitalization. The costs were discounted back at an annual rate of 3%. Also sensitivity analysis was performed. The RENAAL study showed that losartan confers strong renal protection in patients with DM and nephropathy. Losartan results into cost saving in all countries considered: 3,602.98€/Italy, 4,531.35€/France, 3,019.66€/Germany, 3,949.50€/Switzer-land, and 3,855.50€/US per patient. Results are not sensitive to both clinical and economic variables. In addition to the medical benefits, this analysis demonstrates the economic relevance of the treatment with losartan in DM patients affected by nephropathy.

  15. Effect of low dose nicotinic acid on hyperphosphatemia in patients with end stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Zahed, N. S.; Zamanifar, N.; Nikbakht, H.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is a risk factor for ectopic calcification and coronary artery diseases in end stage renal diseases (ESRD). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of low-dose nicotinic acid on hyperphosphatemia in patients with ESRD. This randomized, double-blind clinical trial was done on 70 ESRD patients with serum phosphoure ≥5.5 mg/dl. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups (n = 35) and the intervention group received niacin 25 mg/day as the initial dose. After 4 weeks, in patients who did not respond to treatment, niacin dose was increased up to 50 mg/dl. At the end of week 8, in case there was no treatment effect, the dose was raised to 100 mg/day. The appropriate response to treatment was defined as serum phosphorous level reductions <5.5 mg/dl. The age was 50.5 ± 14.3 years and duration of dialysis 5.1 ± 5.3 months. In the niacin group, mean phosphorus level decreased from 6.7 ± 0.84 mg/dl at the end of the 1st month to 5.8 ± 1.0 mg/dl at the end of the 2nd month and to 4.4 ± 1.4 mg/dl at the end of the 3rd month (P = 0.004). In the placebo group, mean phosphorus level increased from 6.5 ± 1.2 mg/dl to 7.2 ± 0.91 mg/dl at the end of the 3rd month (P = 0.006). In the niacin group, high density lipoprotein (HDL) increased significantly from 45.00 ± 14.9 to 47.2 ± 11.6 (P = 0.009). We conclude that niacin (100 mg/day) decreased phosphorus serum level and increased HDL serum level in patients on dialysis. PMID:27512294

  16. Age-related differences in the quality of life in end-stage renal disease in patients enrolled in hemodialysis or continuous peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Laudański, Krzysztof; Nowak, Zbigniew; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to compare the experience elderly and younger patients in terms of emotional status, disease perception, methods of coping with the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) stress, and health-related quality of life in 2 different settings of renal replacement therapy: hemodialysis (HD) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis programs (CAPD). Specifically, we hypothesized that younger people will more frequently use goal-oriented strategies to cope with illness-related stress and elderly patients will use more strategies related to the control of emotion. Material/Methods A total of 69 HD patients, 40 CAPD patients, and 89 healthy volunteers were analyzed. The Situation and Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Profile of Mood States, the Cognitive Stress Appraisal Questionnaire, and the Nottingham Health Profile were used to assess anxiety, long-term emotional status, coping mechanisms, and health-related quality of life. Data were collected on several biochemical and demographic variables. Results Our study revealed that younger and elderly people on dialysis faced quite different problems. Younger people in both RRT groups had statistically higher assessment of ESRD as loss or challenge and they more frequently used distractive and emotional preoccupation coping strategies. Depression, confusion, and bewilderment dominate the emotional status of both patient populations, especially in the younger cohort. Both HDyoung and CAPDyoung patients complained more about lack of energy, mobility limitations, and sleep disturbances as compared to their elderly HD and CAPD counterparts. Conclusions There are different needs and problems in younger and elderly patients on renal replacement therapy. Younger people required more ESRD-oriented support to relieve their health-related complaints to the level observed in their peers and needed extensive psychological assistance in order to cope with negative emotions related to their disease. PMID

  17. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists in End-Stage Renal Disease: Efficacy and Safety.

    PubMed

    Bomback, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) that block aldosterone's effects on both epithelial and non-epithelial receptors have become a mainstay of therapy for chronic heart failure. Given that cardiovascular events remain the leading cause of death for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the question of whether these MRAs can be employed in dialysis patients arises. This review summarizes the rationale for blocking aldosterone in patients with chronic and end-stage kidney disease and surveys the data on both the efficacy and safety of using MRAs in the ESRD population. A small but growing body of literature suggests that use of MRAs by ESRD patients is associated with lower blood pressure, reduced left ventricular (LV) mass, and improved LV ejection fraction. Recently, a large randomized trial found an overall 3-year mortality rate of 6.4% in ESRD patients on spironolactone 25 mg daily vs. 19.7% in ESRD patients on no MRA therapy (p = 0.002), without a significantly increased risk of hyperkalemia.

  18. Acupressure and fatigue in patients with end-stage renal disease-a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tsay, Shiow-Luan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the effectiveness of acupressure on fatigue in patients with end-stage renal-disease (ESRD). The study was a randomized control trial; qualified patients were randomly assigned into acupressure group, sham group or control group. A total of 106 participants were included in the study. The measures included the revised Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS), VAS of Fatigue, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Beck Depression Inventory. Data of fatigue measures were collected at pretreatment and a week following treatment. Sleep quality and depression were collected during post-test only. The statistical methods included the descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, ANCOVA, and repeated-measures ANOVA. ANCOVA that adjusted for differences in baseline fatigue scores (PFS), post-test of depression and sleep quality, result was significant, F(2,100)=3.99, p=0.02. Post-hoc tests revealed that patients in the acupressure group were significantly having lower scores of fatigue than patients in the control group. ANCOVA results also significant for VAS of Fatigue among groups, F(2,100)=5.63, p=0.003. Comparisons indicated that there were significant differences between the acupressure group and the control group (p=0.01) and between the sham group and control group (p=0.003). Predialysis fatigue was assessed routinely by using a rating of 0-10. Repeated-measures ANOVA results demonstrate the group main effect was significant in the perceived fatigue (F(2,88)=19.46, p<0.001). Follow-up tests indicated there were significant differences between the acupressure group and the control group (p<0.001) and between the sham group and control group (p<0.001). The study provided an alternative method for health care providers to managing ESRD patients with fatigue.

  19. Abnormal nocturnal heart rate variability response among chronic kidney disease and dialysis patients during wakefulness and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Roumelioti, Maria-Eleni; Ranpuria, Reena; Hall, Martica; Hotchkiss, John R.; Chan, Chris T.; Unruh, Mark L.; Argyropoulos, Christos

    2010-01-01

    Background. Dialysis patients and patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience a substantial risk for abnormal autonomic function and abnormal heart rate variability (HRV). It remains unknown whether HRV changes across sleep stages in patients with different severity of CKD or dialysis dependency. We hypothesized that high-frequency (HF) HRV (vagal tone) will be attenuated from wakefulness to non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and then to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in dialysis patients as compared to patients with CKD. Methods. In-home polysomnography was performed in 95 patients with stages 4–5 CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on haemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD). HRV was measured using fast Fourier transform of interbeat intervals during wakefulness and sleep. Low-frequency (LF) and HF intervals were generated. Natural logarithm HF (LNHF) and the logarithm LF/HF ratio (sympathovagal tone) were analysed by multivariable quantile regression and generalized estimating equations. Results. Of the 95 patients, 63.2% (n = 60) was male, 35.8% (n = 34) was African American and 20.4% (n = 19) was diabetic. Average age was 51.6 ± 15.1 (range 19–82). HRV variables were significantly associated with diabetic status, higher periodic limb movement indices and lower bicarbonate levels. Patients with advanced CKD did not differ from dialysis patients in their inability to increase vagal tone during sleep. During wakefulness, female gender (P = 0.05) was associated with the increases in the vagal tone. Conclusions. Patients with CKD/ESRD exhibit dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system tone manifesting as a failure to increase HRV during wakefulness and sleep. Different patient characteristics are associated with changes in HRV at different sleep stages. PMID:20466675

  20. Unusual Dyslipidemia in Patients with Chronic Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Rohini K

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a major and globally increasing health problem in the general population arising from a spectrum of diseases. Majority of the patients die even before reaching End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) due to cardiovascular complications which arise due to altered lipoprotein compositions. Aim Present study was aimed at evaluating the serum lipid profile in CKD patients and to find the pattern of its alteration in both haemodialyzed and conservatively treated CKD patients. Materials and Methods Seventy one randomly selected CKD patients attending a tertiary care hospital of Assam during one year of time frame (40 haemodialyzed and 31 conservatively treated) along with 50 apparently healthy controls were included in the study. Test for serum lipid profile, urea creatinine, FBS, PPBS, total protein and albumin were carried out in all the cases and controls. The results were analyzed and compared with the controls using Microsoft Excel software. Results Triglyceride Level (TGL) of CKD group 157.88±61.82, controls 96.98±37.52, Very Low Density Lipoprotein (VLDL) of CKD group 31.58±12.36, controls 19.39±7.50 was marginally elevated and High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) of CKD group 33.40±9.06, controls 45.95±10.35 was significantly reduced in the patient group as compared to the controls and the results were statistically highly significant with p-value<0.001. Total cholesterol (CKD group 128.2±53.57, controls 142.53±31.44) and LDL (CKD group 63.23±46.47, controls 77.35±26.81) were lower in the patient group as compared to the controls, however the difference was statistically not significant (p value 0.09 and 0.059 respectively). There was no statistically significant difference of lipid profile between hemodialyzed and conservatively treated CKD groups and there was no gender related variation of lipid profile too. Conclusion Increased TGL and reduced HDL, rather than increased total cholesterol and increased LDL are

  1. Diabetes and end-stage renal disease; a review article on new concepts.

    PubMed

    Ghaderian, Seyed Bahman; Hayati, Fatemeh; Shayanpour, Shokouh; Beladi Mousavi, Seyed Seifollah

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause or in combination with hypertensive nephropathy are the most common causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in developed and developing countries. For this review, we used a variety of sources by searching through PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Current Content and Iran Medex from January 1990 up to December 2014. Manuscripts published in English and Persian languages, as full-text articles, and or as abstract were included in the study. Patient survival in diabetics on maintenance renal replacement therapy including hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and kidney transplantation is significantly lower than that seen in nondiabetics with ESRD. The poor prognosis of diabetic patients with ESRD is partly due to presence of significant cardiovascular disease, problems with vascular access, more susceptible to infections, foot ulcer, and hemodynamic instability during HD. Although, many complications related to kidney transplantation may occur in diabetic ESRD patients, multiple studies have found that the kidney transplantation is the preferred renal replacement therapy for diabetic patients with ESRD and it is associated with a much better survival and quality of life than dialysis among these patients.

  2. Renocardiovascular Biomarkers: from the Perspective of Managing Chronic Kidney Disease and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Niizuma, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Yahata, Takaharu; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2017-01-01

    Mortality among the patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains high because of the very high incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as coronary artery disease, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure. Identifying CVD in patients with CKD/ESRD remains a significant hurdle and the early diagnosis and therapy for CVD is crucial in these patients. Therefore, it is necessary for the better management to identify and utilize cardiovascular (CV) biomarkers in profiling CVD risk and enabling stratification of early mortality. This review summarizes current evidence about renocardiovascular biomarkers: CV biomarkers in patients with CKD as well as with ESRD, emphasizing on the emerging biomarkers: B-type natriuretic peptide, cardiac troponins, copeptin, the biomarker of renal injury (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin), and the mineral and bone disorder hormone/marker (fibroblast growth factor-23). Furthermore, it discusses their potential roles especially in ESRD and in future diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for CVD in the context of managing cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:28321399

  3. Nursing considerations in support of a patient pursuing his dream.

    PubMed

    Carter, J L

    2000-02-01

    A 30-year-old man with end stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing thrice weekly hemodialysis set out to achieve a personal goal to ride his bicycle across the United States within 30 days. To support patients in achieving such a goal, nephrology nurses must consider not only nutritional components, but must be prepared to deal with the physical challenges that face patients in the daily struggles struggle to reach their goal. It became a priority and a challenge for the nephrology team to treat this young man as an athlete who also happened to have ESRD, rather than as a dialysis patient who was a cyclist.

  4. Osteopontin expression in vascular smooth muscle cells in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hironori; Honda, Hirokazu; Inada, Yoshifumi; Kato, Noriyuki; Kato, Kenichi; Kitazawa, Kozo; Sugisaki, Tetsuzo

    2006-06-01

    beta-glycerophosphate, a phosphate donor, and uremic sera induce osteopontin (OPN) expression in bovine vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). However, the correlations of serum phosphorus level with OPN expression, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level with OPN expression in humans have not previously been reported. The purpose of the current study is to compare the expression of OPN in VSMCs with clinical data in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The radial arteries of 33 patients (21 male and 12 female patients) were examined to determine the expression of OPN and collagen type I (Col I) by immunohistochemistry. The correlation of the expression of bone matrix proteins with clinical data was analyzed. Between the low-serum phosphorus (<6 mg/dL) group and high-serum phosphorus (> or =6 mg/dL) group, significant differences were detected in the expression of OPN (P = 0.0049) and the levels of BUN (P = 0.0005), serum phosphorus (P < 0.0001) and calcium x phosphorus products (P < 0.0001). Moreover, between the low-BUN (<70 mg/dL, N = 19) group and high-BUN (> or =70 mg/dL) group, significant differences were detected in the expression of OPN (P = 0.0039) and the levels of BUN (P = 0.0002), serum phosphorus (P = 0.0002) and calcium x phosphorus products (P = 0.0003). We have shown that hyperphosphatemia or azotemia is associated with the expression of OPN in VSMCs in patients with ESRD.

  5. Defective antigen presentation by monocytes in ESRD patients not responding to hepatitis B vaccination: impaired HBsAg internalization and expression of ICAM-1 and HLA-DR/Ia molecules

    PubMed Central

    Barth, C.; Pollok, M.; Michałkiewicz, J.; Madaliński, K.; Maciejewski, J.; Baldamis, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the monocyte function of uraemic non-responders to hepatitis B vaccination. Therefore, some parameters concerning antigen processing by monocytes (Mo) as antigen presenting cells (APC) were analysed. It was found that in uraemic non-responders, (1) the internalization of HBsAg by monocytes was significantly decreasjed—HBsAg complexed with specific IgG or as immune complex isolated from patients is better internalized compared with free HBsAg; (2) during antigen presentation the expression of adhesion (ICAM-1) and accessory (HLA-DR/Ia) molecules was significantly decreased in uraemic patients, especially in non-responders; and (3) impaired internalization of HBsAg as well as a decrease in ICAM-1 and HLA-DR/Ia expression, correlated well with the blunted proliferation of CD4+ T cells stimulated by autologous monocytes induced by HBsAg. PMID:18475616

  6. Voxel-based morphometry and arterial spin labeling fMRI reveal neuropathic and neuroplastic features of brain processing of itch in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Papoiu, Alexandru D P; Emerson, Nichole M; Patel, Tejesh S; Kraft, Robert A; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo; Nattkemper, Leigh A; Coghill, Robert C; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2014-10-01

    Pruritus of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a multifactorial symptom of complex etiology not yet fully understood. In this study we have investigated the cerebral perfusion patterns at rest in ESRD patients on hemodialysis, compared with those in healthy volunteers. We have also studied the brain responses evoked by experimental itch induction in ESRD, after stimulating the two distinct histamine and cowhage itch pathways, and compared them with the responses evoked in healthy volunteers. To identify potential structural alterations in ESRD patients compared with a group of age-matched healthy volunteers, we calculated the density of gray matter for the entire brain using a voxel-based morphometric analysis. Our results indicated that gray matter density was significantly reduced in ESRD patients in the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital cortices, as well as in the S1, precuneus, and insula, whereas the brain stem, hippocampus, amygdala, midcingulate cortex, and nucleus accumbens displayed an increased gray matter density. Functionally, we found a significantly higher brain perfusion at baseline associated with ESRD pruritus in the anterior cingulate, insula, claustrum, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens. The brain responses evoked by cowhage itch, which are mediated by protease-activated receptors (PAR2), displayed significant differences compared with responses in healthy individuals and were correlated with perceived itch intensity in a dual, complex manner. The inverse correlations in particular suggested that a negative feedback mechanism modulated itch intensity, when elicited in a preexistent chronic itch background.

  7. End-stage renal disease in Tabuk Area, Saudi Arabia: an epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    El Minshawy, Osama; Ghabrah, Tawfik; El Bassuoni, Eman

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, etiology and risk factors of treated end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the region of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia. We studied 460 renal replacement therapy patients through a review of medical records and patient interviews and obtained patient demographics, family history, risk factors for ESRD, environmental exposure to toxins, work conditions, social history and causes of death. The estimated prevalence of treated ESRD was 460 per million populations (PMP); 350 (76%) were treated by hemodialysis, 30 (7%) by peritoneal dialysis and 80 (17%) by kidney transplantation. The mean age was 48 ± 17 years, body mass index was 25 ± 2 kg/m 2 and the male vs. female ratio was 64% vs. 36%. Most patients (55%) were living in rural areas. Etiology of the ESRD was unknown in 33%, hypertension in 24%, chronic glomerulonephritis in 8%, obstructive uropathy in 3.5%, analgesic nephropathy in 5%, Bilhaziasis in 0.5%, chronic pyelonephritis in 2% and diabetic nephropathy in 18%. Other causes such as gouty nephropathy, collagen diseases, toxemia of pregnancy and lupus nephritis constituted 6% of the cases. We conclude that the epidemiology of the treated ESRD in Tabuk area is similar to that in Egypt, but very different from that in the United States.

  8. End-Stage Renal Disease Among HIV-Infected Adults in North America

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alison G.; Althoff, Keri N.; Jing, Yuezhou; Estrella, Michelle M.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Wester, C. William; Bosch, Ronald J.; Crane, Heidi; Eron, Joseph; Gill, M. John; Horberg, Michael A.; Justice, Amy C.; Klein, Marina; Mayor, Angel M.; Moore, Richard D.; Palella, Frank J.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Napravnik, Sonia; Lucas, Gregory M.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Benson, Constance A.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Collier, Ann C.; Boswell, Stephen; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Ken; Hogg, Robert S.; Harrigan, Richard; Montaner, Julio; Cescon, Angela; Brooks, John T.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Moore, Richard D.; Moore, Richard D.; Carey, John T.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Horberg, Michael A.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Goedert, James J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Klein, Marina B.; Rourke, Sean B.; Burchell, Ann; Rachlis, Anita R.; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.; Mayor, Angel M.; Gill, M. John; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Willig, James; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Kitahata, Mari M.; Crane, Heidi M.; Justice, Amy C.; Dubrow, Robert; Fiellin, David; Sterling, Timothy R.; Haas, David; Bebawy, Sally; Turner, Megan; Gange, Stephen J.; Anastos, Kathryn; Moore, Richard D.; Saag, Michael S.; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Kitahata, Mari M.; McKaig, Rosemary G.; Justice, Amy C.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Moore, Richard D.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Lent, Carol; Kitahata, Mari M.; Van Rompaey, Stephen E.; Crane, Heidi M.; Webster, Eric; Morton, Liz; Simon, Brenda; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Abraham, Alison G.; Lau, Bryan; Zhang, Jinbing; Jing, Jerry; Golub, Elizabeth; Modur, Shari; Hanna, David B.; Rebeiro, Peter; Wong, Cherise; Mendes, Adell

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, particularly those of black race, are at high-risk for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but contributing factors are evolving. We hypothesized that improvements in HIV treatment have led to declines in risk of ESRD, particularly among HIV-infected blacks. Methods. Using data from the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration for Research and Design from January 2000 to December 2009, we validated 286 incident ESRD cases using abstracted medical evidence of dialysis (lasting >6 months) or renal transplant. A total of 38 354 HIV-infected adults aged 18–80 years contributed 159 825 person-years (PYs). Age- and sex-standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated by race. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors of ESRD. Results. HIV-infected ESRD cases were more likely to be of black race, have diabetes mellitus or hypertension, inject drugs, and/or have a prior AIDS-defining illness. The overall SIR was 3.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8–3.6) but was significantly higher among black patients (4.5 [95% CI, 3.9–5.2]). ESRD incidence declined from 532 to 303 per 100 000 PYs and 138 to 34 per 100 000 PYs over the time period for blacks and nonblacks, respectively, coincident with notable increases in both the prevalence of viral suppression and the prevalence of ESRD risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hepatitis C virus coinfection. Conclusions. The risk of ESRD remains high among HIV-infected individuals in care but is declining with improvements in virologic suppression. HIV-infected black persons continue to comprise the majority of cases, as a result of higher viral loads, comorbidities, and genetic susceptibility. PMID:25409471

  9. Therapeutic camping for children with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Warady, B A

    1994-06-01

    Therapeutic camping experiences for children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have proliferated in the United States and abroad. This report is based on the results of a survey designed to accumulate data on the development and implementation of 20 such camps. Children attending camp ranged in age from 1 year to 19 years. Single disease-specific camps were most common, while camps for children with a variety of chronic illnesses, including ESRD, and mainstream camps were also conducted. Facilities were available for hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, but not automated peritoneal dialysis, in the majority of surveyed camps. Dialysis nurses, pediatric nephrologists, dietitians and social workers were the medical personnel that most frequently participated in the camps. On average, 32 dialysis/transplant patient campers (range 6-100) attended camp for a 1-week session. Therapeutic camping experiences for children with ESRD are extremely successful and attempts to increase the availability of similar camps should be encouraged.

  10. A Multi-Source Information System via the Internet for End-Stage Renal Disease: Scalability and Data Quality.

    PubMed

    Ben Saïd, Mohamed; le Mignot, Loic; Mugnier, Claude; Richard, Jean Baptiste; le Bihan-Benjamin, Christine; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Guillon, Didier; Simonet, Ana; Simonet, Michel; Landais, Paul

    2005-01-01

    A Multi-Source Information System (MSIS), has been designed for the Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (REIN) dedicated to End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). MSIS aims at providing reliable follow-up data for ESRD patients. It is based on an n-tier architecture, made out of a universal client, a dynamic Web server connected to a production database and to a data warehouse. MSIS is operational since 2002 and progressively deployed in 9 regions in France. It includes 11,500 patients. MSIS facilitates documenting medical events which occur during the course of ESRD patient' health care and provides means to control the quality of each patient's record and reconstruct the patient trajectory of care. Consolidated data are made available to a data warehouse and to a geographic information system for analysis and data representation in support of public-health decision making.

  11. Assessing the Validity of Surrogate Outcomes for ESRD: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jun, Min; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Woodward, Mark; Perkovic, Vlado; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Manns, Braden J; Tonelli, Marcello; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2015-09-01

    Validation of current and promising surrogate outcomes for ESRD in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has been limited. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs to further inform the ability of surrogate outcomes for ESRD to predict the efficacy of various interventions on ESRD. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL (from inception through September 2013) were searched. All RCTs in adults with proteinuria, diabetes, or CKD stages 1-4 or renal transplant recipients reporting ≥10 ESRD events and a surrogate outcome (change in proteinuria or doubling of serum creatinine [DSCR]) for ESRD during a ≥1-year follow-up were included. Two reviewers abstracted trial characteristics and outcome data independently. To assess the correlation between the surrogate outcomes and ESRD, we determined the treatment effect ratio (TER), defined as the ratio of the treatment effects on ESRD and the effects on the change in surrogate outcomes. TERs close to 1 indicate greater agreement between ESRD and the surrogate, and these ratios were pooled across interventions. We identified 27 trials (97,458 participants; 4187 participants with ESRD). Seven trials reported the effects on change in proteinuria and showed consistent effects for proteinuria and ESRD (TER, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.59 to 1.16), with minimal heterogeneity. Twenty trials reported on DSCR. Treatment effects on DSCR were consistent with the effects on ESRD (TER, 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.85 to 1.14), with moderate heterogeneity. In conclusion, DSCR is generally a good surrogate for ESRD, whereas data on proteinuria were limited. Further assessment of the surrogacy of proteinuria using prospective RCTs is warranted.

  12. Assessing the Validity of Surrogate Outcomes for ESRD: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Min; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Woodward, Mark; Perkovic, Vlado; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J.; Manns, Braden J.; Tonelli, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Validation of current and promising surrogate outcomes for ESRD in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has been limited. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs to further inform the ability of surrogate outcomes for ESRD to predict the efficacy of various interventions on ESRD. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL (from inception through September 2013) were searched. All RCTs in adults with proteinuria, diabetes, or CKD stages 1–4 or renal transplant recipients reporting ≥10 ESRD events and a surrogate outcome (change in proteinuria or doubling of serum creatinine [DSCR]) for ESRD during a ≥1-year follow-up were included. Two reviewers abstracted trial characteristics and outcome data independently. To assess the correlation between the surrogate outcomes and ESRD, we determined the treatment effect ratio (TER), defined as the ratio of the treatment effects on ESRD and the effects on the change in surrogate outcomes. TERs close to 1 indicate greater agreement between ESRD and the surrogate, and these ratios were pooled across interventions. We identified 27 trials (97,458 participants; 4187 participants with ESRD). Seven trials reported the effects on change in proteinuria and showed consistent effects for proteinuria and ESRD (TER, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.59 to 1.16), with minimal heterogeneity. Twenty trials reported on DSCR. Treatment effects on DSCR were consistent with the effects on ESRD (TER, 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.85 to 1.14), with moderate heterogeneity. In conclusion, DSCR is generally a good surrogate for ESRD, whereas data on proteinuria were limited. Further assessment of the surrogacy of proteinuria using prospective RCTs is warranted. PMID:25556165

  13. Mechanisms of Endothelial Dysfunction in Resistance Arteries from Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Luksha, Leanid; Stenvinkel, Peter; Hammarqvist, Folke; Carrero, Juan Jesús; Davidge, Sandra T.; Kublickiene, Karolina

    2012-01-01

    The study focuses on the mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in the uremic milieu. Subcutaneous resistance arteries from 35 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and 28 matched controls were studied ex-vivo. Basal and receptor-dependent effects of endothelium-derived factors, expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), prerequisites for myoendothelial gap junctions (MEGJ), and associations between endothelium-dependent responses and plasma levels of endothelial dysfunction markers were assessed. The contribution of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) to endothelium-dependent relaxation was impaired in uremic arteries after stimulation with bradykinin, but not acetylcholine, reflecting the agonist-specific differences. Diminished vasodilator influences of the endothelium on basal tone and enhanced plasma levels of asymmetrical dimethyl L-arginine (ADMA) suggest impairment in NO-mediated regulation of uremic arteries. eNOS expression and contribution of MEGJs to EDHF type responses were unaltered. Plasma levels of ADMA were negatively associated with endothelium-dependent responses in uremic arteries. Preserved responses of smooth muscle to pinacidil and NO-donor indicate alterations within the endothelium and tolerance of vasodilator mechanisms to the uremic retention products at the level of smooth muscle. We conclude that both EDHF and NO pathways that control resistance artery tone are impaired in the uremic milieu. For the first time, we validate the alterations in EDHF type responses linked to kinin receptors in ESRD patients. The association between plasma ADMA concentrations and endothelial function in uremic resistance vasculature may have diagnostic and future therapeutic implications. PMID:22563439

  14. CUBN as a Novel Locus for End-Stage Renal Disease: Insights from Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reznichenko, Anna; Snieder, Harold; van den Born, Jacob; de Borst, Martin H.; Damman, Jeffrey; van Dijk, Marcory C. R. F.; van Goor, Harry; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; Niesing, Jan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Seelen, Marc; Navis, Gerjan

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder. As genome-wide association studies identified cubilin gene CUBN as a locus for albuminuria, and urinary protein loss is a risk factor for progressive CKD, we tested the hypothesis that common genetic variants in CUBN are associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and proteinuria. First, a total of 1142 patients with ESRD, admitted for renal transplantation, and 1186 donors were genotyped for SNPs rs7918972 and rs1801239 (case-control study). The rs7918972 minor allele frequency (MAF) was higher in ESRD patients comparing to kidney donors, implicating an increased risk for ESRD (OR 1.39, p = 0.0004) in native kidneys. Second, after transplantation recipients were followed for 5.8 [3.8–9.2] years (longitudinal study) documenting ESRD in transplanted kidneys – graft failure (GF). During post-transplant follow-up 92 (9.6%) cases of death-censored GF occurred. Donor rs7918972 MAF, representing genotype of the transplanted kidney, was 16.3% in GF vs 10.7% in cases with functioning graft. Consistently, a multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that donor rs7918972 is a predictor of GF, although statistical significance was not reached (HR 1.53, p = 0.055). There was no association of recipient rs7918972 with GF. Rs1801239 was not associated with ESRD or GF. In line with an association with the outcome, donor rs7918972 was associated with elevated proteinuria levels cross-sectionally at 1 year after transplantation. Thus, we identified CUBN rs7918972 as a novel risk variant for renal function loss in two independent settings: ESRD in native kidneys and GF in transplanted kidneys. PMID:22574174

  15. Lanthanum carbonate oral powder: satisfaction, preference and adherence in French and Spanish patients with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Michael; de Sequera, Patricia; Clair, François; Pedersini, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Phosphate binders, such as lanthanum carbonate, control elevated serum-phosphate levels in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Lanthanum carbonate is available in oral powder and tablet form. The aim of this survey was to investigate satisfaction with, preference for, and adherence to lanthanum carbonate oral powder in patients with ESRD. Scope Patients from France and Spain who had been taking lanthanum carbonate powder for at least 4 weeks, and who had experience of other phosphate binders of any formulation, were asked to complete an online or telephone survey. Treatment satisfaction was measured using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication-9; preference was measured using 5-point Likert scale agreement ratings; and adherence was measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4. Data were evaluated using bivariate analyses. Findings Overall, 160 patients participated (80 per country). Lanthanum carbonate powder was reported to have a higher effectiveness rating (p<0.05), be more convenient (p<0.05), and provide a higher level of satisfaction (p<0.01) than previous binders. There was an overall preference for lanthanum carbonate powder over previous binders of any formulation (p<0.001). Adherence to medication was similar for all binders analysed: 66.3% of French patients adhered to lanthanum carbonate powder, and 65.0% adhered to previous binder treatment (p=not significant); 52.5% of Spanish patients adhered to lanthanum carbonate powder, and 56.3% adhered to previous binder treatment (p=not significant). Limitations The survey enrolled patients who had already experienced phosphate binders before the study began. Information on patient preferences for and adherence to previous phosphate binders was therefore based on the patients’ memories of these experiences, which may have been subject to change over time. Although most participants completed the online survey in this study, a telephone survey was used for

  16. Association of E-selectin with hematological, hormonal levels and plasma proteins in children with end stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Meamar, Rokhsareh; Shafiei, Mohammad; Abedini, Amin; Ghazvini, Mohammad Reza Aghaye; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Taheri, Shahram; Gheissari, Alaleh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypercoagulable state is a common serious problem in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD patients are in a condition of chronic inflammation. An increased level of E-selectin, “a key adhesion molecule that regulates leukocyte bindings to endothelium at damaged sites,” accompanies the higher risk of inflammation in ESRD patients. We aimed to investigate the possible correlation among E-selectin as an adhesion molecule, coagulation factors, and inflammatory factors in children with ESRD. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five child patients with ESRD who had been on regular dialysis treatment were registered in our study. Nighteen sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers were used as the control group. Laboratory tests were requested for the evaluation of hematological and biochemical parameters, and parathyroid hormone (PTH), and for coagulation state; fibrinogen, protein C, and protein S were measured. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (Biomerica, CA, and IDS, UK). for serum E-selectin assay was provided by R and D Systems (Abingdon, UK). Results: Hemoglubolin (Hb), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, calcium, PTH, triglyceride (TG) concentrations in serum as well as E-selectin showed significant difference between the two study groups, as indeed was expected. Serum E-selectin was significantly higher (P value = 0.033) in dialysis patients than in healthy subjects. E-selectin was positively correlated only with phosphorus in ESRD children (r = 0.398, P = 0.018). No association was found for other parameters. Conclusion: Although in our study circulating E-selectin concentration “as an inflammatory maker” is independently positively associated with limited blood markers, for better evaluation, well-designed cohort studies should be examined in ESRD children. PMID:27563628

  17. Targeting gut microbiota: a potential promising therapy for diabetic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhonge; Zhu, Shuishan; Xu, Gaosi

    2016-01-01

    Conventional studies reveal a contributory role of gut microbiota in the process of diabetes mellitus (DM) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, the mechanism through which gut microbiota influence diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is ignored. In the present article, we reviewed the changes in gut microbiota of patients with DM, DKD as well as ESRD, and how this may contribute to the progression of DKD. Although further studies are needed to either selectively change the composition of the gut microbiota or to pharmacologically control the metabolites of microbiota, the gut microbiota represents a new potential therapeutic target for DKD. PMID:27829988

  18. Individuals of Pacific Asian origin with IgA nephropathy have an increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Sean J; Cattran, Daniel C; Kim, S Joseph; Levin, Adeera; Wald, Ron; Hladunewich, Michelle A; Reich, Heather N

    2013-11-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) accounts for a far higher proportion of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Asia compared with North America. It is not known whether this is entirely because of differences in disease prevalence or a higher risk of disease progression. The lack of a racially diverse population cohort followed longitudinally has previously precluded the ability to address this question. To determine whether Asians in North America with IgAN are at higher risk for ESRD, we analyzed a cohort of 202 patients of self-reported Pacific Asian origin and 467 of other origin from the Toronto GN Registry followed up for a median of 46.4 months. The primary outcome of ESRD (dialysis, transplantation, or eGFR below 15) was analyzed using Cox regression analysis. Baseline eGFR was 59.6 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and median proteinuria was 1.8 g/day. ESRD occurred in 213 patients. By univariable analysis, the risk of ESRD was similar between the two groups (hazard ratio 0.98, 95% CI 0.73, 1.31); however, after adjusting for age, gender, eGFR, medication use, blood pressure, and proteinuria, the risk of ESRD was significantly higher in Pacific Asian individuals (hazard ratio 1.56, 95% CI 1.10, 2.22). This was supported by a significant 1.62 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year faster rate of eGFR decline (95% CI -3.19, -0.5) and an increased risk of a reduction in eGFR by half (hazard ratio 1.81, 95% CI 1.25, 2.62). Thus, in a large multiracial cohort of patients with IgAN, individuals of Pacific Asian origin have a higher risk of progression to ESRD.

  19. Evaluation of plasma concentrations of homocysteine, IL-6, TNF-alpha, hs-CRP, and total antioxidant capacity in patients with end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Babaei, Mahin; Dashti, Nasrin; Lamei, Navid; Abdi, Khosrou; Nazari, Farhad; Abbasian, Sepideh; Gerayeshnejad, Siavash

    2014-01-01

    It has been proved that hyperhomocysteinemia has a high prevalence in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), which may contribute to the high cardiovascular risk in these patients. Cardiovascular disease is the first cause of high mortality rate in ESRD patients. The aim of the present study was to assess five important factors in patients with ESRD (the amount of homocysteine, IL-6, TNF-alpha, hs-CRP, and Total Antioxidant Capacity). These factors were surveyed in ESRD patients to compare with healthy subjects. In a cross-sectional study, we enrolled 80 patients on maintenance hemodialysis and measured the inflammatory and oxidative stress indicators. The plasma samples were assayed for five above mentioned variables using standard protocols. Two-hour post hemodialysis plasma samples were also assayed for TAC. Plasma levels of inflammation markers, IL-6 and hs-CRP, homocysteine were significantly increased in ESRD group versus control group. This increase was also found in TNF-α levels as compared to the controls, but the differences were not statistically significant. Also, the post dialysis samples had significantly lower levels of TAC as compared to predialysis ones.

  20. Successful Treatment of Hepatitis C with Simeprevir, Sofosbuvir, and Ribavirin in an HIV Coinfected Liver Transplant Patient with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Anna; Hussaini, Trana; Partovi, Nilufar; Erb, Siegfried R; Azalgara, Vladimir Marquez; Zalunardo, Nadia; Pick, Neora; Hull, Mark; Yoshida, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Although major advances have occurred in treating patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) with the development of new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), treatment of liver transplant recipients with HCV, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection, and renal disease is challenging due to the lack of efficacy and safety data in this population. We report a case of successful HCV therapy in a postliver transplant HIV coinfected patient, with stage 4 chronic kidney disease, using an all-oral regimen of simeprevir, sofosbuvir, and ribavirin. The 51-year-old male achieved SVR24, and no specific HIV-related or transplant-related adverse events were documented during the treatment period. The new DAAs show promise for HIV coinfected patients and those with severe to end-stage renal disease (ESRD); however, robust clinical trials or large cohort studies will need to be conducted to confirm the efficacy and safety of these newer agents in this setting.

  1. Iatrogenic Baclofen Neurotoxicity in ESRD: Recognition and Management.

    PubMed

    Roberts, John K; Westphal, Scott; Sparks, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Baclofen is an oral derivative of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) used to treat muscular spasticity from disorders of the central nervous system. However, it is also being used for a variety of other conditions such as musculoskeletal pain, myoclonus, and alcohol withdrawal. The elimination of baclofen is heavily dependent on intact renal function, and the contraindication for use in patients with insufficient renal function is not well recognized by healthcare providers. Here, the authors report a series of mild to severe cases of baclofen intoxication in patients with end-stage renal disease. In all cases, baclofen was initiated by either inpatient or outpatient healthcare providers and the patients generally presented with altered mentation, somnolence, and/or respiratory depression. All patients were treated with aggressive hemodialysis and made a full recovery. This paper will briefly review the literature regarding baclofen intoxication, safety of baclofen use in renal disease, and efficacy of extracorporeal therapy in the treatment of baclofen intoxication.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of serelaxin in patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease requiring hemodialysis: A single-dose, open-label, parallel-group study.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Marion; Halabi, Atef; Canadi, Jasna; Tsubouchi, Chiaki; Machineni, Surendra; Pang, Yinuo

    2016-04-01

    Serelaxin, a recombinant human relaxin-2 hormone, is in clinical development for treating acute heart failure. This open-label, parallel-group study investigated serelaxin pharmacokinetics (PK) after a single 4-hour intravenous infusion (10 µg/kg) in patients with severe renal impairment (n = 6) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring hemodialysis (PK on the day of dialysis [n = 6] or during dialysis-free interval [n = 6]), compared with matched healthy subjects (n = 18). In all participants, serum serelaxin concentration peaked at the end of infusion and subsequently declined with mean terminal elimination half-life of 6.5-8.8 hours. Compared with healthy subjects, a moderate decrease in serelaxin systemic clearance (37%-52%) and increase in its exposure (30%-115%) were observed in all patients. During the 4-hour hemodialysis in ESRD patients, 30% serelaxin was removed, with hemodialysis clearance constituting approximately 52% of total systemic clearance. Serelaxin was well tolerated with no deaths, serious adverse events (AE), or AE-related discontinuations. Antiserelaxin antibodies were not detected in any participant. Given the shallow dose-response relationship observed with serelaxin in clinical studies and its wide therapeutic window, the observed PK differences in patients with severe renal impairment compared with healthy subjects are unlikely to pose a safety risk and do not warrant a predefined dosage adjustment in such patients.

  3. Plasma ficolin levels and risk of nephritis in Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Tanha, Nima; Pilely, Katrine; Faurschou, Mikkel; Garred, Peter; Jacobsen, Søren

    2017-02-01

    Given the scavenging properties of ficolins, we hypothesized that variation in the plasma concentrations of the three ficolins may be associated with development of lupus nephritis (LN), type of LN, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and/or mortality among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE patients attending a Danish tertiary rheumatology referral center were included. Plasma concentrations of ficolin-1, ficolin-2, and ficolin-3 were determined and dichotomized by the median into high and low. LN was defined by clinical criteria; type of LN by renal biopsy; ESRD follow-up time was defined as time from onset of LN to the development of ESRD or censoring at the end of follow-up. The study included 112 SLE patients with median disease duration of 8 years of which 53 (47%) had LN at the time of inclusion. During a median follow-up of 10 years, five patients developed ESRD. Sixteen patients died. Odds ratios (ORs) of LN were 1.2 (95% CI: 0.6-2.7), 4.1 (95% CI: 1.7-9.7), and 0.9 (95% CI: 0.4-2.0) for patients with low ficolin-1, ficolin-2, and ficolin-3 plasma levels, respectively. The distribution of histological classes differed between patients with high and low plasma levels of ficolin-1 (p = 0.009). Patients with high ficolin-1 plasma levels had an increased risk of ESRD. There was no association between the levels of the analyzed plasma ficolins and mortality. Low plasma ficolin-2 levels were associated with an increased risk of having LN. High plasma levels of ficolin-1 were associated with the histological subtype of LN and development of ESRD.

  4. [Care for patients with rare diseases].

    PubMed

    Smetsers, Stephanie E; Takkenberg, J J M Hanneke; Bierings, Marc B

    2014-01-01

    A rare disease usually concerns only a handful of patients, but all patients with a rare disease combined represent a significant health burden. Due to limited knowledge and the absence of treatment guidelines, patients with rare diseases usually experience delayed diagnosis and suboptimal treatment. Historically, rare diseases have never been considered a major health problem. However, rare diseases have recently been receiving increased attention. In the Netherlands, a national plan for rare diseases was published in late 2013, with recommendations on how to improve the organisation of healthcare for people with rare diseases. Using the example of the rare disease Fanconi anemia, this paper describes the challenges and opportunities in organising healthcare for rare diseases. Two critical steps in optimising healthcare for rare diseases are developing multidisciplinary healthcare teams and stimulating patient empowerment. Optimal cooperation between patients, patient organisations, multidisciplinary healthcare teams and scientists is of great importance. In this respect, transition to adult healthcare requires special attention.

  5. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Differentiates between hospital-based providers of services and independent ESRD facilities for items and services furnished prior to January 1, 2009; (2) Does not differentiate between hospital-based providers of... facilities when applying the geographic index to hospital-based ESRD providers of services, on or...

  6. Prevalence of sleep apnea and excessive day time sleepiness in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Jahdali, Hamdan

    2012-03-01

    Sleep apnea (SA) and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) are common sleep disorders among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This cross-sectional study, carried out in two dialysis centers in Saudi Arabia, assessed the prevalence of sleep apnea and sleepiness in Saudi patients with ESRD who are on maintenance dialysis with either peritoneal or hemodialysis. We used questionnaires to assess the prevalence of SA and EDS. The association between sleep apnea, EDS, and other sleep disorders, the underlying causes of renal failure, and other demographic data were also examined. Among 227 enrolled patients, the mean patient age was 55.7 years ± 17.2 years; 53.7% were male, and 46.3% were female. The overall prevalence of SA as defined by the Berlin questionnaire (BQ) was 37% in males and 34% in females, which was not a statistically significant difference (P = 0.459). Sleep apnea was significantly associated with age, neck size, afternoon and evening hemodialysis shift, obesity, diabetes, and hypertension (P-values, 0.001, 0.029, < 0.0001, < 0.0001, < 0.008, 0.002, and < 0.001, respectively). Sleep apnea was also significantly associated with other sleep disorders such as restless leg syndrome, insomnia, habitual snoring, and EDS (P-values, < 0.001, < 0.001, < 0.001, and < 0.001, respectively). The prevalence of EDS was 44%, and EDS was significantly more prevalent in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (P < 0.001); it was also associated with older age, diabetes mellitus, and other sleep disorders. SA and EDS are common in dialysis patients and are significantly associated with other sleep disorders.

  7. Risk factors and prevention of end stage renal disease in uruguay.

    PubMed

    Mazzuchi, Nelson; Schwedt, Emma; Solá, Laura; González, Carlota; Ferreiro, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    Uruguay is a developing country with a privileged established program for renal replacement therapy (RRT) for all patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) since 1981. In December 2004, the RRT prevalence reached 916 patients per million population. The ESRD incidence has not changed significantly in the last eight years, differing with what is observed in other countries. In contrast, the ESRD incidence secondary to diabetic nephropathy has shown a permanent increase. The prevention of chronic kidney disease (CKD) began in 1989 with the Program of Prevention and Treatment of Glomerulonephritis (PPTG), being extended in 2002 to all CKD and canalized through the National Program of Renal Healthcare (NPRH) since 2004. The registry of glomerulonephritis has been demonstrated in recent years: patients are referral to nephrologists earlier, there is an increase of the frequency of patients with "clinical remission," and thus there is a decrease of the frequency of ESRD in the first three months after referral. The NPRH has been developed in a progressive way with the involvement of government authorities and the active participation of the nephrologists. A global prevention program, integrating the prevention of CKD, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, and diabetes was developed. The first steps of the program have had important achievements: a rational reorientation of nephrologic care in the first level of attention, patient access to renoprotective medications without cost; a registration system of patients, the creation of a formal multidisciplinary team, and the instauration of a continuous medical education program.

  8. [Constructing an ACP Simulation-Situation Communication Training Program for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jui-O; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-06-01

    The aging population and changing lifestyles have lead to the increased general risk of chronic kidney disease. Taiwan currently has the highest incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) of any country or region in the world. Hemodialysis patients must endure comorbidities and face the uncertainties of death. The best way to achieve a good death is for patients to sign advance care planning (ACP). However, the key factors contributing to low ACP signature rates have been the lack of communication skills and related training among medical staffs. This article explores the dilemma of ACP using an example of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and proposes a theory-based approach to develop a theoretical framework for an ACP simulation-situation communication training program that integrates the simulation situation model, PREPARED model, and scaffolding theory. Readers may use this framework to design ACP simulation-situation communication training programs that conform to their own conditions and then test the effectiveness and feasibility of these programs in clinical settings.

  9. Red Blood Cell Transfusion Risks in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tanhehco, Yvette C.; Berns, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Prior to the introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), red blood cell (RBC) transfusions were frequently required when iron and anabolic steroids failed to improve the clinical symptoms of anemia associated with hemoglobin (Hb) levels that were commonly less than 7 g/dL. After the approval of EPO in the US in 1989, the Hb levels of patients on hemodialysis dramatically improved and the need for RBC transfusions decreased significantly. The need for RBC transfusion remains for patients who require an immediate increase in their RBC mass due to symptomatic anemia and is likely to increase due to changes in the management of anemia in dialysis patients resulting from clinical trials data, regulatory changes, and new reimbursement policies for EPO. The safety of the blood supply has greatly improved over the last few decades and the risk of transfusion-transmitted diseases has now been dramatically reduced. Non-infectious complications of transfusion currently cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the US. Transfusion also brings a risk of alloimmunization, a particular concern for dialysis patients waiting for kidney transplantation. Knowledge of the risks of RBC transfusions will help clinicians better assess the risks and benefits of transfusing patients with ESRD. This article reviews the modern day infectious and non-infectious risks of allogeneic RBC transfusions. PMID:22686519

  10. Thromboembolic disease in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hindi, Nadia; Cordero, Nazaret; Espinosa, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    Thromboembolic events are common among patients with cancer as a consequence of cancer- and treatment-related factors. As these events are the second most frequent cause of death in this population, their prevention and treatment are important. Venous ultrasonography is the technique of choice for diagnosis, with sensitivity and specificity above 95 % in symptomatic thrombosis. Routine prophylaxis is not recommended for ambulatory patients, although it could be useful in selected cases. On the other hand, all inpatients should receive prophylactic therapy unless contraindicated. Therapy of thromboembolic disease is based on anticoagulants. Clinical trials demonstrate that the use of low-weight heparins is associated with a lower incidence of bleeding and recurrent thrombosis as compared with non-fractionated heparin or warfarin. Options for recurrent thrombosis include change to another anticoagulant agent, increasing doses of the same agent and cava filters.

  11. The Symptoms Prevalence, Medical Interventions, and Health Care Service Needs for Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease in a Renal Palliative Care Program.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Annie O; Yuen, Sze-Kit; Yong, David S; Tse, Doris M

    2016-12-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the symptoms prevalence and interventions initiated in the last 2 weeks of life, health care service utilization, and causes of death of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD under a renal palliative care (RPC) program. A total of 335 RPC patients were included, of which 226 patients died during the study period. The 5 most prevalent symptoms were dyspnea (63.7%), fatigue (51.8%), edema (48.2%), pain (44.2%), and anorexia (38.1%); and the 5 most prevalent interventions initiated were oxygen (69.5%), parenteral infusion (67.3%), antibiotics (53.5%), bladder catheterization (44.7%), and analgesic (39.8%) in the last 2 weeks of life. Each patient received 3.5 ± 4.4 outpatient clinic visit, 3.4 ± 10.3 home care visits, and 3.1 ± 2.7 hospital admissions. Besides ESRD (51.8%), the most common causes of death were cardiovascular events (18.6%) and infection (17.2%).

  12. Gallstones in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    With prevalence of 10–20% in adults in developed countries, gallstone disease (GSD) is one of the most prevalent and costly gastrointestinal tract disorders in the world. In addition to gallstone disease, chronic liver disease (CLD) is also an important global public health problem. The reported frequency of gallstone in chronic liver disease tends to be higher. The prevalence of gallstone disease might be related to age, gender, etiology, and severity of liver disease in patients with chronic liver disease. In this review, the aim was to identify the epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatment strategies of gallstone disease in chronic liver disease patients. PMID:28251162

  13. Hepatitis C virus infection in end-stage renal disease and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Burra, Patrizia; Rodríguez-Castro, Kryssia I; Marchini, Francesco; Bonfante, Luciana; Furian, Lucrezia; Ferrarese, Alberto; Zanetto, Alberto; Germani, Giacomo; Russo, Francesco Paolo; Senzolo, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Liver disease secondary to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on renal replacement therapy and after kidney transplantation (KT). Hemodialytic treatment (HD) for ESRD constitutes a risk factor for bloodborne infections because of prolonged vascular access and the potential for exposure to infected patients and contaminated equipment. Evaluation of HCV-positive/ESRD and HCV-positive/KT patients is warranted to determine the stage of disease and the appropriateness of antiviral therapy, despite such treatment is challenging especially due to tolerability issues. Antiviral treatment with interferon (IFN) is contraindicated after transplantation due to the risk of rejection, and therefore, treatment is recommended before KT. Newer treatment strategies of direct-acting antiviral agents in combination are revolutionizing HCV therapy, as a result of encouraging outcomes streaming from recent studies which report increased sustained viral response, low or no resistance, and good safety profiles, including preservation of renal function. KT has been demonstrated to yield better outcomes with respect to remaining on HD although survival after KT is penalized by the presence of HCV infection with respect to HCV-negative transplant recipients. Therefore, an appropriate, comprehensive, easily applicable set of clinical practice management guidelines is necessary in both ESRD and KT patients with HCV infection and HCV-related liver disease.

  14. Anti-HLA antibody profile of Turkish patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Karahan, G E; Seyhun, Y; Oguz, F; Kekik, C; Onal, E; Caliskan, Y; Bakkaloglu, H; Yazici, H; Turkmen, A; Aydin, A E; Sever, M S; Eldegez, U; Carin, M N

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to human leukocyte antigens (HLA) via blood transfusions, pregnancies, and previous transplantations can result in anti-HLA antibody production. The presence of anti-HLA antibodies in recipient sera before transplantation is an important risk factor. To demonstrate the anti-HLA antibody status of Turkish end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, 674 patients (mean age, 40.35 +/- 13.15 years; female/male, 328/346) were enrolled into the study. Anti-HLA antibody screening and identification tests were performed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The panel-reactive antibody (PRA)-negative group consisted of 564 (83.6%) and the PRA-positive group consisted of 110 (17.3%) patients. Of the 110 (17.3%) PRA-positive patients, 43 (6.4%) were class I (+) and class II (-); 19 (2.8%) were class I (-) and class II (+); 48 (7.1%) were both class I and II (+). The most frequent antibodies were directed against the A2 crossreactive group (CREG) and the A10 CREG with less frequent reactions against the B7 CREG, indicating antibodies to both frequent (members of A2 CREG) and relatively rare (members of A10 CREG and B7 CREG antigens). These data also suggested that some antibodies occur at greater than expected frequency because of shared epitopes. Our findings confirmed the significant correlation between female gender, pregnancy, failed graft history, long dialysis duration, and blood transfusions with PRA positivity (P < .05).

  15. Diabetic nephropathy as the cause of end-stage kidney disease reported on the medical evidence form CMS2728 at a single center

    PubMed Central

    Nee, Robert; Ceckowski, Kevin A.; Knight, Kendral R.; Abbott, Kevin C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: End-stage renal disease (ESRD) incidence due to Type 2 diabetic nephropathy (DN) is 35–50%, according to the United States Renal Data System. Methods: A single-center, retrospective cohort study to determine incidence and diagnostic accuracy for Type 2 DN as the primary cause of ESRD (Code 250.40) on the Center for Medicare & Medicaid (CMS) Medical Evidence Report form (CMS2728) submitted at renal replacement therapy initiation. All patients  ≥18 years of age with a CMS2728 submitted between 1 March 2006 and 31 March 2015 at a single academic military medical center (ESRD Network 5) were included. Medical records of those with a Code 250.40 diagnosis were reviewed to determine whether they met the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) 2007 criteria for DN. Results: ESRD incidence secondary to Type 2 DN was 18.7% (56/299 individual CMS2728 submissions over 9.09 years). In all, 12/56 (21.4%) did not meet KDOQI criteria for Type 2 DN. Although all had diabetes, those not meeting criteria had shorter disease duration (P  =  0.007), were more likely to have active urine sediment (P  =  0.006), and were less likely to have macroalbuminuria (P  =  0.037) or retinopathy (P  =  0.002) prior to ESRD. On exact logistic regression, retinopathy was significantly associated with KDOQI-predicted DN [odds ratio  =  19.16 (confidence interval 2.76–223.7), P  =  0.0009]. Conclusions: In this single-center cohort, 21.4% identified as having Type 2 DN as the primary cause of ESRD were incorrectly assigned per KDOQI 2007 clinical criteria. If replicated in larger populations, this could have substantial implications regarding the epidemiology of ESRD in the USA.

  16. Ghrelin and obestatin levels in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Aygen, B; Dogukan, A; Dursun, F E; Aydin, S; Kilic, N; Sahpaz, F; Celiker, H

    2009-01-01

    Malnutrition is fairly common in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, persistent lack of appetite being a major symptom. Ghrelin and obestatin are two hormones that are involved in appetite and energy homeostasis. The present study examined ghrelin and obestatin levels in 24 ESRD patients undergoing haemodialysis and 24 age-matched healthy controls. Serum and saliva ghrelin and obestatin levels in the ESRD patients were significantly higher compared with controls, while saliva ghrelin and obestatin levels in all study participants were significantly higher than serum levels. Saliva ghrelin correlated with serum ghrelin and saliva obestatin correlated with serum obestatin in all study participants, although there was no correlation between ghrelin and obestatin levels. In conclusion, the results suggest that the kidneys may have a role in the metabolism and/or clearance of obestatin, as they do for ghrelin. Further studies are needed to determine if elevated levels of these hormones in ESRD patients contribute to the malnutrition that is common in these patients.

  17. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions.

  18. The Effect of Haemodialysis Access Types on Cardiac Performance and Morbidities in Patients with Symptomatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Min-Kai; Chang, Chin-Hao; Chan, Chih-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about whether the arteriovenous type haemodialysis access affects cardiac function and whether it is still advantageous to the uremic patient with symptomatic heart disease. Methods We conducted a retrospective comparative study. Patients with heart disease and end-stage renal disease that had a new chronic access created between January 2007 and December 2008 and met the inclusion criteria were assessed. The endpoint was major adverse event (MAE)-free survivals of arteriovenous access (AVA) and tunneled cuffed double-lumen central venous catheter (CVC) groups. Whether accesses worsened heart failure was also evaluated. Results There were 43 CVC patients and 60 AVA patients. The median follow-up time from access creation was 27.6 months (IQR 34.7, 10.9~45.6). Although CVC patients were older than AVA patients (median age 78.0, IQR 14.0 vs. 67.5, IQR 16.0, respectively, p = .009), they manifested non-inferior MAE-free survival (mean 17.1, 95% CI 10.3~24.0 vs. 12.9, 95% CI 8.5~17.4 months in CVC and AVA patients, respectively, p = .290). During follow-up, more patients in the AVA group than in the CVC group deteriorated in heart failure status (35 of 57 vs. 10 of 42, respectively, odds ratio 5.1, p < .001). Preoperative-postoperative pairwise comparison of echocardiographic scans revealed an increased number of abnormal findings in the AVA group (Z = 3.91, p < .001), but not in the CVC group. Conclusions In patients with both symptomatic heart disease and end stage renal disease (ESRD), CVC patients showed non-inferior MAE-free survival in comparison to those in the AVA group. AV type access could deteriorate heart failure. Accordingly, uremic patients with symptomatic heart disease are not ideal candidates for AV type access creation. PMID:26848850

  19. Placement of long-term hemodialysis catheter (permcath) in patients with end-stage renal disease through external jugular vein

    PubMed Central

    Beigi, Ali Akbar; Sharifi, Ali; Gaheri, Hafez; Abdollahi, Saeed; Esfahani, Morteza Abdar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The number of patients with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) has progressively increased in the population. Kidney transplantation is the specific treatment for such patients; however a majority of patients will require hemodialysis before kidney transplantation. The present study aims to investigate using the external jugular vein (EJV) for Permcath placement in these patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive and analytical study was conducted in Alzahra Medical Center, Isfahan, in 2012. Catheters were inserted by cutting down the right EJV. The patency rate and potential complications were studied. The obtained data was analyzed using SPSS 21.0. Results: Out of 45 live patients, within three months of surgery, 40 patients (81.6%) had no complications and dialysis continued through Permcath. Permcath Thrombosis occurred in two patients (4.4%). Catheter infection led to the removal of it in one patient (2.2%) 1.5 months after surgery. And accidental catheter removal occurred in one patient. Conclusion: Placement of the permcath in the external jugular vein can be a safe, uncomplicated, and reliable method for patients requiring hemodialysis, and can be a life-saving alternative in patients without accessible internal jugular vein. PMID:25590030

  20. The evaluation of relationship between vitamin D and muscle power by micro manual muscle tester in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zahed, Nargesosadat; Chehrazi, Saghar; Falaknasi, Kianosh

    2014-09-01

    Muscle force of lower limb is a major factor for sustaining physical activity. Decreased muscle force can limit physical activity, which can increase mortality and morbidity in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Muscle force depends on several factors. One of the most important factors is 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OHD) that affects muscle function in both uremic and non-uremic patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between serum level of 25-OHD and muscle force of lower extremities in hemodialysis patients estimated by a Micro Manual Muscle Tester, a digital instrument that measures muscle force in kilograms This cross-sectional study was performed on 135 adult patients, 69 male (51%) and 66 female (69%) (mean: 1.4, standard deviation: 0.5), undergoing hemodialysis. Standard biochemistry parameters were measured before hemodialysis, including 25-OHD, calcium, albumin, para-hyroid hormone and C-reactive protein (CRP). Based on the result of serum level of 25-OHD, patients were classified into the following three groups: 85 patients (63%) were 25-OHD deficient (25-OHD <30), 43 patients (32%) had a normal level of 25-OHD (30-70) and seven patients (5%) had a toxic level of 25-OHD (>70) (mean: 1.42, standard deviation: 0.59). Also, based on the result of muscle force, patients were classified into the following three groups: 84/133 patients (62%) had weak muscle force (<5 kg), 46/133 patients (34%) had normal muscle force (5-10 kg) and three patients (21%) had strong muscle force (>10 kg) (mean: 1.39, standard deviation: 0.53). There was a significant relation between 25-OHD level and muscle force (P = 0.02), between age and muscle force (P = 0.002) and between gender and muscle force (P <0.001). In our opinion, 25-OHD can be a useful drug in ESRD patients to improve muscle force and physical activity.

  1. Frequency of rheumatic diseases in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Soy, Mehmet; Guldiken, Sibel; Arikan, Ender; Altun, Betul Ugur; Tugrul, Armagan

    2007-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the frequency of rheumatic diseases in patients suffering from autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD). Sixty-five patients (56 F, 9 M), who were followed by diagnosis of ATD, were questioned and examined for the presence of rheumatic disease. Basic laboratory tests and antithyroid antibodies, antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor (RF) levels were also measured by appropriate methods. Various rheumatic diseases were detected in 40 (62%) of patients with ATD. The most frequent rheumatic conditions were fibromyalgia, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, osteoarthritis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia and carpal tunnel syndrome which were detected in 20 (31%), 13 (20%), 10 (15%), 9 (14%) and 8 (12%) of patients, respectively. Autoimmune diseases, except Sjogren's syndrome, which were detected in ten patients with ATD, are as follows-vitiligo: two; autoimmune hepatitis: two; oral lichen planus: one, ulcerative colitis: one, inflammatory arthritis in four patients (two of them had rheumatoid arthritis, one had psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and one had mixed collagen tissue disease). RF was positive in two patients, one of them had rheumatoid arthritis and FANA was positive in six (9%) patients; all of them had hypothyroidism. The frequency of rheumatic diseases seems to be higher in patients suffering from ATD. Initial evaluation and a regular checking for rheumatic diseases in patients suffering from ATD were recommended.

  2. Pulp Stone, Haemodialysis, End-stage Renal Disease, Carotid Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh; Sinha, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of pulp calcification and carotid artery calcification on the dental panoramic radiographs in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients who were on haemodialysis. Methods: A total of 112 End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients on who were haemodialysis participated in this study. The periapical and the panoramic radiographs for all the patients were evaluated for the presence or absence of the narrowing of the dental pulps and for pulp stones in the pulp chambers and the pulp canals. The panoramic radiographs were also evaluated to determine the carotid calcification. Results: Carotid calcifications were detected in none of the patients. 84 (74.99%) patients had dental pulp narrowing, and 38 (33.92%) patients had pulp stones. There was no statistical correlation between pulp narrowing and Carotid Artery Calcification (CAC) in the haemodialysis patient group. There was also no statistical correlation between pulp stones and CAC in the haemodialysis patients. Conclusion: However, the incidental finding of CAC on a panoramic radiograph can provide life-saving information for the vascular disease patients, but in the present study, no significant relationship was found between the presence of the pulpal calcification and CAC in the ESRD patients who were on haemodialysis. Therefore, the presence of pulp calcification does not seem to serve as a diagnostic marker for carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:23905147

  3. Log files analysis to assess the use and workload of a dynamic web server dedicated to end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ben Said, Mohamed; Le Mignot, Loic; Richard, Jean Baptiste; Le Bihan, Christine; Toubiana, Laurent; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Landais, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A Multi-Source Information System (MSIS), has been designed for the Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (REIN) dedicated to End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). MSIS aims at providing reliable follow-up data for ESRD patients. It is based on an n-tier architecture, made out of a universal client, a dynamic Web server connected to a production database and to a data warehouse. MSIS is operational since 2002 and progressively deployed in 9 regions in France. It includes 16,677 patients. We show that the analysis of MSIS web log files allows evaluating the use of the system and the workload in a public-health perspective.

  4. Efficacy of dietary interventions in end-stage renal disease patients; a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Chaudhary Muhamamd Juniad; Bojerenu, Micheal Mauton; Safdar, Muhammad; Ahmed, Armughan; Akhtar, Muhammad Hammad; Kindratt, Tiffany Billmeier

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are common comorbid conditions. Life style, particularly diet is a critical component of treatment for these conditions. Register dietitians play a key role in bridging the gap between the science of nutrition and the empowerment of individuals to alter their lifestyles in a healthy manner. A range of dietary manipulations has been reported to reduce risk factors and decrease risk of CVD and CKD outcomes. However, many studies provided food to participants or were limited to adjustment of few specific nutrients. Diet intervention in relation with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is really complicated topic. As multiple co morbid conditions such as hypertension, CVD, CKD, and diabetes mellitus (DM) are associated with ESRD, which made the scenario really worse while fixing the dose of any diet. Still a lot of research work is required to understand this topic. PMID:28197497

  5. Exercise training and depression in ESRD: a review.

    PubMed

    Mitrou, Georgia I; Grigoriou, Stefania S; Konstantopoulou, Evi; Theofilou, Paraskevi; Giannaki, Christoforos D; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Karatzaferi, Christina; Sakkas, Giorgos K

    2013-01-01

    Depression, a mental disorder with a high personal, societal, and economic impact, affects at least 20-30% of patients receiving hemodialysis therapy. It is associated with a high mortality rate, low adherence to medication, and a low perceived quality of life. Exercise training is a promising nonpharmacological intervention that can be safely applied to these patients. Beyond the well-publicized physiological benefits of exercise training, a number of studies have focused on the effects of exercise training on mental factors and quality of life parameters including its less appreciated effects on depression symptoms. This evidence-based review article reviews and discusses the effects of exercise training on depression in end-stage renal disease patients.

  6. Reversible Ceftriaxone-Induced Pseudolithiasis in an Adult Patient with Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shima, Aya; Suehiro, Takaichi; Takii, Misaki; Soeda, Hiroyasu; Hirakawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Ceftriaxone (CTRX) is a third-generation cephalosporin widely used for the treatment of bacterial infections in patients with renal disease because of its excretion by both renal and hepatic mechanisms. Biliary pseudolithiasis is a known CTRX-associated complication; however, there have been no studies of this adverse event in adult patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. Here we report the case of a 79-year-old Japanese woman with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) receiving maintenance hemodialysis who developed CTRX-induced pseudolithiasis. The patient received CTRX for bronchial pneumonia. Fifteen days following CTRX initiation, the patient presented with stomachache. Because of the presence of one gallstone and increased gallbladder wall thickness on computed tomography scans, not detected at the onset of pneumonia, the patient was diagnosed with CTRX-induced gallbladder pseudolithiasis. CTRX was discontinued immediately. At 48 days following CTRX withdrawal, the gallstone and thickening of the gallbladder wall had completely resolved. ESRD may be a risk factor for CTRX-induced pseudolithiasis as hepatic excretion of CTRX is the predominant clearance mechanism in patients with ESRD. More attention should be paid to CTRX-induced pseudolithiasis following the use of CTRX in ESRD patients. PMID:26558252

  7. Calciphylaxis in pediatric end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imam, Abubakr A; Mattoo, Tej K; Kapur, Gaurav; Bloom, David A; Valentini, Rudolph P

    2005-12-01

    Calciphylaxis is a rare, but life-threatening complication of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that has been reported mostly in adult patients. The exact etiology is unknown, but the disease is commonly associated with a high calcium-phosphorus product and elevated levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH). We herein review the published reports on calciphylaxis in ESRD patients less than 18 years old and report the case of a patient with severe calciphylaxis who presented with lower extremity pain, muscle tenderness and difficulty in walking. The serum PTH was low, and the calcium-phosphorus product was normal. The diagnosis of calciphylaxis was confirmed by a muscle biopsy. Treatment with low calcium peritoneal dialysate and substitution of calcium-based phosphorus binders with sevelamer (Renagel) was unsuccessful. The patient's clinical condition progressed to extensive soft tissue calcification and ulcerating skin lesions. Nine months after the onset of symptoms, the patient died of cardiopulmonary arrest.

  8. Impact of Uraemic Pruritus on Quality of Life among End Stage Renal Disease Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed K.; Elshahid, Ahmed R.; El Baz, Tarek Z.; Elazab, Raed M.; Elhoseiny, Sara A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Uraemic pruritus is significant complication in (ESRD) patients and substantially impairs their quality of life (QOL). ESRD is a bothersome problem with attempts being made to increase the survival of patients on dialysis. Aim An attempt was made to compare the QOL of haemodialysis patients and suffering from uraemic pruritus with the QOL of those on haemodialysis but with no presenting uraemic pruritus. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the QOL of haemodialysis patients suffering from uraemic pruritus. The WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire was used to assess the QOL. Haemodialysis patients with pruritus who had completed three months of maintenance haemodialysis (n=100) were enrolled into the study and 100 controls (n=100) on haemodialysis but with no pruritus were further enrolled. Results The QOL of haemodialysis patients with pruritus was found to be significantly impaired (p < 0.05) in comparison to those on haemodialysis with no prutitis, particularly with respect to all the four WHOQOL-BREF domains. Conclusion Quality of life of ESRD patients on dialsysis was siginificantly affected by pruritis. PMID:27134981

  9. Red blood cell abnormalities and the pathogenesis of anemia in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Georgatzakou, Hara T; Antonelou, Marianna H; Papassideri, Issidora S; Kriebardis, Anastasios G

    2016-08-01

    Anemia is the most common hematologic complication in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It is ascribed to decreased erythropoietin production, shortened red blood cell (RBC) lifespan, and inflammation. Uremic toxins severely affect RBC lifespan; however, the implicated molecular pathways are poorly understood. Moreover, current management of anemia in ESRD is controversial due to the "anemia paradox" phenomenon, which underlines the need for a more individualized approach to therapy. RBCs imprint the adverse effects of uremic, inflammatory, and oxidative stresses in a context of structural and functional deterioration that is associated with RBC removal signaling and morbidity risk. RBCs circulate in hostile plasma by raising elegant homeostatic defenses. Variability in primary defect, co-morbidity, and therapeutic approaches add complexity to the pathophysiological background of the anemic ESRD patient. Several blood components have been suggested as biomarkers of anemia-related morbidity and mortality risk in ESRD. However, a holistic view of blood cell and plasma modifications through integrated omics approaches and high-throughput studies might assist the development of new diagnostic tests and therapies that will target the underlying pathophysiologic processes of ESRD anemia.

  10. Endothelin 1 gene is not a major modifier of chronic kidney disease advancement among the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Annapareddy, Shiva Nagendra Reddy; Elumalai, Ramprasad; Lakkakula, Bhaskar V K S; Ramanathan, Gnanasambandan; Periyasamy, Soundararajan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by the presence of numerous cysts in the kidney and manifest with various renal and extra-renal complications leading to ESRD. Endothelin may contribute to various renal and extra-renal manifestations pointing to genetic and environmental modifying factors that alter the risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) in ADPKD. In the present study we investigated six genes coding for endothelin 1 ( EDN1 ) tagging-single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs) to unravel the EDN1 gene modifier effect for renal disease progression in ADPKD. Materials and Methods: The tag-SNPs were genotyped using FRET-based KASPar method in 108 ADPKD patients and 119 healthy subjects. Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to determine the association between ADPKD and EDN1 tag-SNPs. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of tag-SNPs on CKD progression. The relationship between different CKD stages and hypertension and their interaction Mantel-Haenszel stratified analysis was performed. Results: All loci are polymorphic and followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Distribution of EDN1 genotypes and haplotypes in control and ADPKD is not statistically significant. Five SNPs covering 3.4 kb forming single LD block, but the LD was not strong between SNPs. The EDN1 genotypes are not contributing to the CKD advancement among the ADPKD patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that the EDN1 gene is not a major modifier of CKD advancement among ADPKD patients.

  11. Evaluation and management of diabetic and non-diabetic hypoglycemia in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Gosmanov, Aidar R; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) regardless of diabetes status are at increased risk of hypoglycemia with a resultant array of adverse clinical outcomes. Therefore, hypoglycemia should be thoroughly evaluated in ESRD patients. In diabetic dialysis patients, hypoglycemic agents and nutritional alterations can trigger hypoglycemia in the background of diminished gluconeogenesis, reduced insulin clearance by the kidney and improved insulin sensitivity following initiation of renal replacement therapy. Detailed evaluation of antidiabetic regimen and nutritional patterns, patient education on self-monitoring of blood glucose and/or referral to a diabetes specialist may reduce risk of subsequent hypoglycemia. In certain situations, it is important to recognize the possibility of non-diabetic causes of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes and to avoid treating pseudo-hyperglycemia caused by glucose- non-specific glucometers in patients utilizing icodextrin-based solutions for peritoneal dialysis. Adrenal insufficiency, certain medications, malnutrition and/or infection are among the most common causes of hypoglycemia in non-diabetic ESRD patients, and they should be suspected after exclusion of inadvertent use of hypoglycemic agents. The goal of this review article is to summarize approaches and recommendations for the work up and treatment of hypoglycemia in ESRD.

  12. Infectious diseases in end-stage liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Aneesh K; Lyon, G Marshall

    2010-09-01

    Patients with chronic liver diseases sustain impairment to immune systems, which worsens over time. These defects in their host defense lead to risks of bacterial infections and increased morbidity. Providers should have heightened surveillance for infectious diseases and suspect one with any acute change in status. Patient history may reveal rare infections and allow initiation of early appropriate therapy. There should be a low threshold for obtaining diagnostic cultures and peritoneal fluid samples and discussing possible causes with an infectious diseases consultant or a microbiology laboratory. These maneuvers will maximize therapy in patients at high risk for death due to infectious disease.

  13. Investigating clinically adequate concentrations of oseltamivir carboxylate in end-stage renal disease patients undergoing hemodialysis using a population pharmacokinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Mohamed A; Lien, Kayla Yi Ting; Robson, Richard; Subramoney, Vishak; Clinch, Barry; Rayner, Craig R; Gibiansky, Leonid

    2015-11-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients receiving hemodialysis (HD) are at heightened risk for influenza, but the optimal oseltamivir dosage regimen for treating or preventing influenza in this high-risk population is still uncertain. Pharmacokinetic data for 24 adults with ESRD were pooled from a single-dose and a multiple-dose study to develop a population pharmacokinetic model using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. The final model comprised five compartments, two each to describe the systemic pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir phosphate and its metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), and a delay compartment to describe oseltamivir metabolism. Estimated OC clearance in the model was markedly faster during HD sessions (7.43 liters/min) than at other times (0.19 liter/min). Model simulations showed that 30 mg oseltamivir given after every HD session is the most suitable regimen for influenza treatment, producing trough OC concentrations above the median value achieved with the 75-mg twice-daily regimen in patients with normal renal function and peak concentrations below the highest oseltamivir exposures known to be well tolerated (median exposures after twice-daily dosing of 450 mg). Administration of the first dose following diagnosis of influenza need not wait until after the next HD session: addition of a single 30-mg dose during the 12 h before the next HD session raises OC exposures quickly without posing any safety risk. Further simulation showed that 30 mg oseltamivir given after every other HD session is the most suitable regimen for influenza prophylaxis.

  14. 78 FR 48688 - Medicare Program; Comprehensive ESRD Care Initiative; Extension of the Submission Deadlines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... outcomes for beneficiaries with ESRD regarding the functional status, quality of life, and overall well... Model, for a period beginning in 2013 and ending in 2016, with a possible extension into...

  15. 78 FR 42778 - Medicare Program; Comprehensive ESRD Care Initiative; Extension of the Submission Deadlines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... beneficiaries with ESRD regarding the functional status, quality of life, and overall well-being, as well as... period beginning in 2013 and ending in 2016, with a possible extension into subsequent years. In...

  16. Association of HLA phenotypes of end-stage renal disease patients preparing for first transplantation with anti-HLA antibody status.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Gonca Emel; Kekik, Cigdem; Oguz, Fatma Savran; Onal, Ayse Emel; Bakkaloğlu, Hüseyin; Calişkan, Yaşar Kerem; Yazici, Halil; Turkmen, Aydin; Aydin, Ali Emin; Sever, Mehmet S; Eldegez, Ulug; Carin, Mahmut Nezih

    2010-01-01

    Patients with pre-transplantation high levels of panel reactive antibody (PRA) have an increased risk of graft failure, and renal transplantation in sensitized patients remains a highly significant challenge worldwide. The influence of anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies on the development of rejection episodes depends on patient-specific clinical factors and differs from patient to patient. The HLA typing of the recipient might influence the development of anti-HLA antibodies. Some HLA antigens appear to be more immunogenic than others. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the distribution of HLA phenotypes in PRA-positive and PRA-negative end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on the basis of having sensitizing events or not. Our study included 642 (mean age: 41.54; female/male: 310/332) ESRD patients preparing for the first transplantation and who are on the cadaveric kidney transplantation waiting list of Istanbul Medical Faculty in 2008-2009. Class I HLA-A,B typing was performed by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) method, whereas class II HLA-DRB1 typing was performed by low-resolution polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-specific primer (SSP). All serum samples were screened for the presence of IgG type of anti-HLA class I- and II-specific antibodies by enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PRA-negative group consisted of 558 (86.9%) and PRA-positive group included 84 (13.1%) patients. We have found statistically significant frequency of HLA-A3 (p=0.018), HLA-A66 (p=0.04), and HLA-B18 (p=0.006) antigens in PRA-positive patients and DRB1*07 (p=0.02) having the highest frequency in patients with sensitizing event history but no anti-HLA development suggesting that DRB1*07 might be associated with low risk of anti-HLA antibody formation.

  17. Post-hemodialysis dosing of 1 vs. 2 g of ceftazidime in anuric end-stage renal disease patients on low-flux dialysis and its pharmacodynamic implications on clinical use.

    PubMed

    Goh, Jessica Hui Fen; Lee, Siok Ying; Ooi, Say Tat; Lee Soon-U, Lawrence; Hee, Kim-Hor; Renaud, Claude J

    2016-04-01

    Ceftazidime is a cost-effective antimicrobial against Gram-negative pathogens associated with sepsis in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) hemodialysis patients with potential for wider use with the advent of ceftazidime-avibactam. Dosing ceftazidime post-hemodialysis appears attractive and convenient, but limited in vivo data on pharmacodynamic efficacy (PE) attainment, defined as >70% of the interdialytic period drug concentrations exceed susceptible pathogens minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) (%TMIC), warrants further assessment. We therefore evaluated PE and tolerability of 1 against 2 g regime in anuric ESRD patients on low-flux hemodialysis. Two doses of 1 or 2 g ceftazidime were administered post-hemodialysis prior to 48- and 72-hour interdialytic intervals in ESRD inpatients without active infections. Peak and trough concentrations (mg/L) were assayed using a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Proportion of patients achieving PE for known pathogens with MICs ≤ 8 mg/L and adverse effects were assessed. Six (43%) and eight (57%) adult patients received 1 and 2 g dose, respectively. Median (25th-75th percentile), peak, 48- and 72-hour trough ceftazidime concentrations were 78 (60-98) vs. 158 (128-196), 37 (23-37) vs. 49 (39-71), and 13 (12-20) vs. 26 (21-41) mg/L, respectively, resulting in 100% TMIC for both doses. One patient on the 1-g dose experienced mild pruritus. Reliable and safe PE attainment over both 48- and 72-hour interdialytic interval was achievable with 1 g of ceftazidime dosed post-hemodialysis. The 2 g dose was equally effective and well tolerated but may not be necessary. These findings need validation in non-anuric patients, high-flux hemodialysis, and during avibactam co-administration.

  18. Patients with Fabry disease after enzyme replacement therapy dose reduction versus treatment switch.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Frank; Krämer, Johannes; Duning, Thomas; Lenders, Malte; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Krebs, Alice; Guerrero González, Hans; Sommer, Claudia; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Niemann, Markus; Störk, Stefan; Schelleckes, Michael; Reiermann, Stefanie; Stypmann, Jörg; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Wanner, Christoph; Brand, Eva

    2014-04-01

    Because of the shortage of agalsidase-beta in 2009, many patients with Fabry disease were treated with lower doses or were switched to agalsidase-alfa. This observational study assessed end-organ damage and clinical symptoms during dose reduction or switch to agalsidase-alfa. A total of 105 adult patients with Fabry disease who had received agalsidase-beta (1.0 mg/kg body weight) for ≥1 year were nonrandomly assigned to continue this treatment regimen (regular-dose group, n=38), receive a reduced dose of 0.3-0.5 mg/kg (dose-reduction group, n=29), or switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-alfa (switch group) and were followed prospectively for 1 year. We assessed clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, severe arrhythmia, stroke, progression to ESRD); changes in cardiac, renal, and neurologic function; and Fabry-related symptoms (neuropathic pain, hypohidrosis, diarrhea, and disease severity scores). Organ function and Fabry-related symptoms remained stable in the regular-dose group. In contrast, estimated GFR decreased by about 3 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (P=0.01) in the dose-reduction group, and the median albumin-to-creatinine ratio increased from 114 (0-606) mg/g to 216 (0-2062) mg/g (P=0.03) in the switch group. Furthermore, mean Mainz Severity Score Index scores and frequencies of pain attacks, chronic pain, gastrointestinal pain, and diarrhea increased significantly in the dose-reduction and switch groups. In conclusion, patients receiving regular agalsidase-beta dose had a stable disease course, but dose reduction led to worsening of renal function and symptoms. Switching to agalsidase-alfa is safe, but microalbuminuria may progress and Fabry-related symptoms may deteriorate.

  19. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy.

  20. The Growth Attainment, Hematological, Iron Status and Inflammatory Profile of Guatemalan Juvenile End-Stage Renal Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Casimiro de Almeida, Juliana; Lou-Meda, Randall; Olbert, Marion; Seifert, Markus; Weiss, Günter; Wiegerinck, Erwin T.; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Solomons, Noel W.; Schümann, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background Stunting, anemia and inflammation are frequently observed in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Objectives To assess anthropometric, hematological and inflammatory data and to study their potential interrelationship in Guatemalan juveniles undergoing hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD). Methods 54 juveniles 7–20 years of age were recruited in FUNDANIER, Guatemala City: 27 on HD and 27 PD. Hemoglobin, serum iron, transferrin, serum transferrin receptor (sTfR), serum ferritin, transferrin saturation and iron-binding capacity, white blood cell count (WBC), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), as well as IL-6, IL-1 and TNF-α, weight and height were determined by standard methods. Hepcidin–25 (Hep-25) was assessed by weak cation exchange time-of-flight mass-spectrometry. Results 92% and 55% of HD and PD children, respectively, were stunted and 95% and 85% were anemic. Among iron status biomarkers, serum ferritin was massively increased and significantly higher in the HD group compared to the PD group. Hep-25 was also greatly elevated in both groups. 41% of HD patients showed increments in three or more inflammatory biomarkers, while it was 2 or less in all PD subjects. Conclusions The degree of stunting, the prevalence and severity of anemia in Guatemalan juvenile ESRD far exceed the national statistics for this low-income Central American country. Ferritin and Hep-25 concentrations were elevated, with the latter to an extraordinary magnitude. Additional biomarkers of inflammation not directly related to iron status were elevated as well. The role of both disease- and environment-related factors in combination best explains the magnitude of the biomarker abnormalities. PMID:26445018

  1. The PROPKD Score: A New Algorithm to Predict Renal Survival in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Audrézet, Marie-Pierre; Rousseau, Annick; Hourmant, Maryvonne; Renaudineau, Eric; Charasse, Christophe; Morin, Marie-Pascale; Moal, Marie-Christine; Dantal, Jacques; Wehbe, Bassem; Perrichot, Régine; Frouget, Thierry; Vigneau, Cécile; Potier, Jérôme; Jousset, Philippe; Guillodo, Marie-Paule; Siohan, Pascale; Terki, Nazim; Sawadogo, Théophile; Legrand, Didier; Menoyo-Calonge, Victorio; Benarbia, Seddik; Besnier, Dominique; Longuet, Hélène; Férec, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The course of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) varies among individuals, with some reaching ESRD before 40 years of age and others never requiring RRT. In this study, we developed a prognostic model to predict renal outcomes in patients with ADPKD on the basis of genetic and clinical data. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1341 patients from the Genkyst cohort and evaluated the influence of clinical and genetic factors on renal survival. Multivariate survival analysis identified four variables that were significantly associated with age at ESRD onset, and a scoring system from 0 to 9 was developed as follows: being male: 1 point; hypertension before 35 years of age: 2 points; first urologic event before 35 years of age: 2 points; PKD2 mutation: 0 points; nontruncating PKD1 mutation: 2 points; and truncating PKD1 mutation: 4 points. Three risk categories were subsequently defined as low risk (0–3 points), intermediate risk (4–6 points), and high risk (7–9 points) of progression to ESRD, with corresponding median ages for ESRD onset of 70.6, 56.9, and 49 years, respectively. Whereas a score ≤3 eliminates evolution to ESRD before 60 years of age with a negative predictive value of 81.4%, a score >6 forecasts ESRD onset before 60 years of age with a positive predictive value of 90.9%. This new prognostic score accurately predicts renal outcomes in patients with ADPKD and may enable the personalization of therapeutic management of ADPKD. PMID:26150605

  2. Sleep in patients with restrictive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Won, Christine H J; Kryger, Meir

    2014-09-01

    Restrictive lung disease leads to ventilatory defects and diffusion impairments. These changes may contribute to abnormal nocturnal pathophysiology, including sleep architecture disruption and impaired ventilation and oxygenation. Patients with restrictive lung disease may suffer significant daytime fatigue and dysfunction. Hypercarbia and hypoxemia during sleep may impact progression of lung disease and related symptoms. Little is known about the impact of treatment of sleep disruption on sleep quality and overall prognosis in restrictive lung disease. This review discusses the pathophysiology of sleep and comorbid sleep disorders in restrictive lung diseases including interstitial lung disease, neuromuscular disease, and obesity hypoventilation syndrome.

  3. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  4. Integrating Patient Concerns into Parkinson's Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shen-Yang; Tan, Ai Huey; Fox, Susan H; Evans, Andrew H; Low, Soon Chai

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex motor and non-motor disorder and management is often challenging. In this review, we explore emerging approaches to improve the care of patients, drawing from the literature regarding patient-centred care, patient and caregiver perspectives and priorities, gaps in knowledge among patients and caregivers and the need for accurate information, individual variability in disease manifestations, prognostication of disease course, new developments in health technologies and personalized medicine, specialty care, pharmacological and non-pharmacological management, financial burden, lifestyle and work-related issues, support groups and palliative care.

  5. Cystic fibrosis lung disease in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Vender, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    As the longevity of all patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) continues to increase (median 2005 survival=36.8 years), more adult patients will be receiving their medical care from nonpediatric adult-care providers. Cystic fibrosis remains a fatal disease, with more than 80% of patients dying after the age of 18 years, and most deaths resulting from pulmonary disease. The changing epidemiology requires adult-care providers to become knowledgeable and competent in the clinical management of adults with CF. Physicians must understand the influence of specific genotype on phenotypic disease presentation and severity, the pathogenic factors determining lung disease onset and progression, the impact of comorbid disease factors such as CF-related diabetes and malnutrition upon lung disease severity, and the currently approved or standard accepted therapies used for chronic management of CF lung disease. This knowledge is critical to help alleviate morbidity and improve mortality for the rapidly expanding population of adults with CF.

  6. Evaluation of Exercise Tolerance in Dialysis Patients Performing Tai Chi Training: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Bulińska, Katarzyna; Kusztal, Mariusz; Kowalska, Joanna; Rogowski, Łukasz; Zembroń-Łacny, Agnieszka; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Ochmann, Bartosz; Pawlaczyk, Weronika; Woźniewski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have poor physical performance and exercise capacity due to frequent dialysis treatments. Tai Chi exercises can be very useful in the area of rehabilitation of people with ESRD. Objectives. The aim of the study was to assess exercise capacity in ESRD patients participating in 6-month Tai Chi training. Patients and Methods. Twenty dialysis patients from Wroclaw took part in the training; at the end of the project, 14 patients remained (age 69.2 ± 8.6 years). A 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and spiroergometry were performed at the beginning and after 6 months of training. Results. After 6 months of Tai Chi, significant improvements were recorded in mean distance in the 6MWT (387.89 versus 436.36 m), rate of perceived exertion (7.4 versus 4.7), and spiroergometry (8.71 versus 10.08 min). Conclusions. In the ESRD patients taking part in Tai Chi training, a definite improvement in exercise tolerance was recorded after the 6-month training. Tai Chi exercises conducted on days without dialysis can be an effective and interesting form of rehabilitation for patients, offering them a chance for a better quality of life and fewer falls and hospitalisations that are the result of it. PMID:27547228

  7. Length polymorphism in heme oxygenase-1 and risk of CKD among patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Hsin; Kuo, Ko-Lin; Hung, Szu-Chun; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Ying-Hwa; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2014-11-01

    The length polymorphism of guanosine thymidine dinucleotide repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in high-risk populations. Experimental data suggest that heme oxygenase-1 protects against kidney disease. However, the association between this polymorphism and long-term risk of CKD in high-risk patients is unknown. We analyzed the allelic frequencies of guanosine thymidine dinucleotide repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter in 386 patients with coronary artery disease recruited from January 1999 to July 2001 and followed until August 31, 2012. The S allele represents short repeats (<27), and the L allele represents long repeats (≥27). The primary renal end points consisted of sustained serum creatinine doubling and/or ESRD requiring long-term RRT. The secondary end points were major adverse cardiovascular events and mortality. At the end of study, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for each L allele in the additive model were 1.99 (1.27 to 3.14; P=0.003) for the renal end points, 1.70 (1.27 to 2.27; P<0.001) for major adverse cardiovascular events, and 1.36 (1.04 to 1.79; P=0.03) for mortality. With cardiac events as time-dependent covariates, the adjusted hazard ratio for each L allele in the additive model was 1.91 (1.20 to 3.06; P=0.01) for the renal end points. In conclusion, a greater number of guanosine thymidine dinucleotide repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter is associated with higher risk for CKD, cardiovascular events, and mortality among patients with coronary artery disease.

  8. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: ESRD/RRT.

    PubMed

    Lok, Charmaine E; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-07-07

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. During the 2015 meeting, the conference hall was once again overflowing with eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the experts included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD and dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories together with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows in the United States answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on the same series of case-oriented questions in a quiz. The audience compared their answers in real time using a cellphone application containing the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The results of the online questionnaire were displayed, and then, the quiz answers were discussed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this highly educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces selected content of educational value for the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  9. End-Stage Renal Disease in Nursing Homes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Rasheeda K.; O’Hare, Ann M.; Anderson, Ruth A.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Introduction Demand for nursing home (NH) care by patients with endstage renal disease (ESRD) is likely to increase with growing numbers of older adults initiating chronic dialysis. We completed a systematic review to summarize the literature on NH residents with ESRD. Methods MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and relevant conference proceedings were searched to identify articles using the following MESH terms or related key words in the title or abstract: “residential facilities”, “renal dialysis”, “renal replacement therapy”, and “chronic kidney failure”. We selected case control, cohort studies, and clinical trials that included older adults with ESRD (defined as those receiving chronic dialysis or those with Stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD)) living in residential care facilities. We abstracted information on study design, quality, and results. Results Of 198 unique citations identified by the search strategy, 14 articles met eligibility criteria. The majority of articles were multicenter studies that were conducted in the 1990s. One study focused on patients with Stage 5 CKD, and the remaining thirteen studies focused on chronic dialysis patients of which eight studies included only peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, four studies included both PD and hemodialysis (HD) patients, and one study included only HD patients. All studies were observational, no clinical trials were identified, and study design limitations and heterogeneity within study populations were common. Summarizing results across these studies suggests that NH residents with ESRD have limited survival, particularly early after dialysis initiation. Functional impairment is highly prevalent in this population and independently associated with poor outcomes. Conclusions NH residents with ESRD appear to be a particularly vulnerable population, but current information on their prevalence, characteristics, and outcomes is limited. Further research is needed to provide a better

  10. Medication reconciliation and therapy management in dialysis-dependent patients: need for a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Pai, Amy Barton; Cardone, Katie E; Manley, Harold J; St Peter, Wendy L; Shaffer, Rachel; Somers, Michael; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2013-11-01

    Patients with ESRD undergoing dialysis have highly complex medication regimens and disproportionately higher total cost of care compared with the general Medicare population. As shown by several studies, dialysis-dependent patients are at especially high risk for medication-related problems. Providing medication reconciliation and therapy management services is critically important to avoid costs associated with medication-related problems, such as adverse drug events and hospitalizations in the ESRD population. The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 included an unfunded mandate stipulating that medication therapy management be offered to high-risk patients enrolled in Medicare Part D. Medication management services are distinct from the dispensing of medications and involve a complete medication review for all disease states. The dialysis facility is a logical coordination center for medication management services, like medication therapy management, and it is likely the first health care facility that a patient will present to after a care transition. A dedicated and adequately trained clinician, such as a pharmacist, is needed to provide consistent, high-quality medication management services. Medication reconciliation and medication management services that could consistently and systematically identify and resolve medication-related problems would be likely to improve ESRD patient outcomes and reduce total cost of care. Herein, this work provides a review of available evidence and recommendations for optimal delivery of medication management services to ESRD patients in a dialysis facility-centered model.

  11. Kidney transplantation in patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Cybulla, Markus; Walter, Kerstin Nanette; Schwarting, Andreas; Divito, Raffaelle; Feriozzi, Sandro; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

    2009-04-01

    Little is known about the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in kidney transplant recipients with Fabry disease. Clinical characteristics of transplant recipients in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS) were therefore examined in patients with Fabry disease with or without ERT. Of the 837 European patients in FOS (March 2006), 34 male patients and two female patients had received kidney transplants. Mean age at transplantation was 37.6 +/- 10.9 years, mean time since transplantation was 7.7 +/- 6.4 years, median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 44.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and median proteinuria was 296 mg/24 h. Of 27 patients with baseline data, 59% had hypertension, 74% had left ventricular hypertrophy, 22% had cardiac valve disease, 30% had arrhythmia, and 22% had transient ischaemic attacks and 15% stroke. Twenty patients (74%; two female patients, 18 male patients) were receiving ERT with agalsidase alfa. At enrollment or at the start of ERT, median eGFRs were 59 and 35 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (P = 0.05) and median proteinuria levels were 240 and 420 mg/24 h (not significant) in treated and untreated patients respectively. Renal function remained stable in patients receiving ERT. In conclusion, agalsidase alfa is well tolerated in patients with Fabry disease who have undergone renal transplantation.

  12. Associations of Soluble CD14 and Endotoxin with Mortality, Cardiovascular Disease, and Progression of Kidney Disease among Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Poesen, Ruben; Ramezani, Ali; Claes, Kathleen; Augustijns, Patrick; Kuypers, Dirk; Barrows, Ian R.; Muralidharan, Jagadeesan; Evenepoel, Pieter; Meijers, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives CD14 plays a key role in the innate immunity as pattern-recognition receptor of endotoxin. Higher levels of soluble CD14 (sCD14) are associated with overall mortality in hemodialysis patients. The influence of kidney function on plasma sCD14 levels and its relationship with adverse outcomes in patients with CKD not yet on dialysis is unknown. This study examines the associations between plasma levels of sCD14 and endotoxin with adverse outcomes in patients with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We measured plasma levels of sCD14 and endotoxin in 495 Leuven Mild-to-Moderate CKD Study participants. Mild-to-moderate CKD was defined as presence of kidney damage or eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 for ≥3 months, with exclusion of patients on RRT. Study participants were enrolled between November 2005 and September 2006. Results Plasma sCD14 was negatively associated with eGFR (ρ=–0.34, P<0.001). During a median follow-up of 54 (interquartile range, 23–58) months, 53 patients died. Plasma sCD14 was predictive of mortality, even after adjustment for renal function, Framingham risk factors, markers of mineral bone metabolism, and nutritional and inflammatory parameters (hazard ratio [HR] per SD higher of 1.90; 95% confidence interval [95% CI],1.32 to 2.74; P<0.001). After adjustment for the same risk factors, plasma sCD14 was also a predictor of cardiovascular disease (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.69; P=0.05). Although plasma sCD14 was associated with progression of CKD, defined as reaching ESRD or doubling of serum creatinine in models adjusted for CKD-specific risk factors (HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.52; P=0.04), significance was lost when adjusted for proteinuria (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.96 to 1.48; P=0.11). There was neither correlation between plasma endotoxin and sCD14 (ρ=–0.06, P=0.20) nor was endotoxin independently associated with adverse outcome during follow-up. Conclusions Plasma sCD14 is elevated in patients with

  13. Rationale and design of A Trial of Sertraline vs. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for End-stage Renal Disease Patients with Depression (ASCEND).

    PubMed

    Hedayati, S Susan; Daniel, Divya M; Cohen, Scott; Comstock, Bryan; Cukor, Daniel; Diaz-Linhart, Yaminette; Dember, Laura M; Dubovsky, Amelia; Greene, Tom; Grote, Nancy; Heagerty, Patrick; Katon, Wayne; Kimmel, Paul L; Kutner, Nancy; Linke, Lori; Quinn, Davin; Rue, Tessa; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Unruh, Mark; Weisbord, Steven; Young, Bessie A; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2016-03-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is highly prevalent in patients with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) treated with maintenance hemodialysis (HD). Despite the high prevalence and robust data demonstrating an independent association between depression and poor clinical and patient-reported outcomes, MDD is under-treated when identified in such patients. This may in part be due to the paucity of evidence confirming the safety and efficacy of treatments for depression in this population. It is also unclear whether HD patients are interested in receiving treatment for depression. ASCEND (Clinical Trials Identifier Number NCT02358343), A Trial of Sertraline vs. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for End-stage Renal Disease Patients with Depression, was designed as a multi-center, 12-week, open-label, randomized, controlled trial of prevalent HD patients with comorbid MDD or dysthymia. It will compare (1) a single Engagement Interview vs. a control visit for the probability of initiating treatment for comorbid depression in up to 400 patients; and (2) individual chair-side CBT vs. flexible-dose treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, sertraline, for improvement of depressive symptoms in 180 of the up to 400 patients. The evolution of depressive symptoms will also be examined in a prospective longitudinal cohort of 90 HD patients who choose not to be treated for depression. We discuss the rationale and design of ASCEND, the first large-scale randomized controlled trial evaluating efficacy of non-pharmacologic vs. pharmacologic treatment of depression in HD patients for patient-centered outcomes.

  14. Chronic disease management for patients with respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Elizabeth

    National and international awareness of the heavy burden of chronic disease has led to the development of new strategies for managing care. Elisabeth Bryant explains how self-care, education and support for more patients with complex needs should be built into planned care delivery, and emphasises that the patient is the key member of the care team.

  15. Factors Affecting Hemodialysis Adequacy in Cohort of Iranian Patient with End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shahdadi, Hosein; Balouchi, Abbas; Sepehri, Zahra; Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Magbri, Awad; Keikhaie, Fereshteh; Shahakzehi, Ahmad; Sarjou, Azizullah Arbabi

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are many factors that can affect dialysis adequacy; such as the type of vascular access, filter type, device used, and the dose, and rout of erythropoietin stimulation agents (ESA) used. The aim of this study was investigating factors affecting Hemodialysis adequacy in cohort of Iranian patient with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted on 133 Hemodialysis patients referred to two dialysis units in Sistan-Baluchistan province in the cities of Zabol and Iranshahr, Iran. We have looked at, (the effects of the type of vascular access, the filter type, the device used, and the dose, route of delivery, and the type of ESA used) on Hemodialysis adequacy. Dialysis adequacy was calculated using kt/v formula, two-part information questionnaire including demographic data which also including access type, filter type, device used for hemodialysis (HD), type of Eprex injection, route of administration, blood groups and hemoglobin response to ESA were utilized. The data was analyzed using the SPSS v16 statistical software. Descriptive statistical methods, Mann-Whitney statistical test, and multiple regressions were used when applicable. Results: The range of calculated dialysis adequacy is 0.28 to 2.39 (units of adequacy of dialysis). 76.7% of patients are being dialyzed via AVF and 23.3% of patients used central venous catheters (CVC). There was no statistical significant difference between dialysis adequacy, vascular access type, device used for HD (Fresenius and B. Braun), and the filter used for HD (p> 0.05). However, a significant difference was observed between the adequacy of dialysis and Eprex injection and patients’ time of dialysis (p <0.05). Conclusion: Subcutaneous ESA (Eprex) injection and dialysis shift (being dialyzed in the morning) can have positive impact on dialysis adequacy. Patients should be educated on the facts that the type of device used for HD and the vascular access used has no

  16. Adaptation of glutathion-peroxidase activity to oxidative stress occurs in children but not in adult patients with end-stage renal failure undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Sommerburg, O; Grune, T; Ehrich, J H H; Siems, W G

    2002-07-01

    Lipid peroxidation (LPO) products formed after reaction of free radicals with membrane lipids are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac diseases. Also in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) LPO was shown to be accelerated and concentrations of non-enzymatic antioxidants were measured lower than in control subjects. However, up to now only limited knowledge about the role of antioxidant enzymes was available. Whether or not activity of those antioxidants might be induced due to oxidative stress in ESRD patients is not known. To answer the question the activity of 3 enzymatic antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathion peroxidase (GPx), was measured in red blood cells of the ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis (2 groups: children and adults) and matching controls. LPO in these subjects was determined by measurement of the LPO product 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) in blood plasma. Plasma HNE was significantly increased by factor 3 in both patient groups children and adults compared to the control groups. The activity of the enzymatic antioxidants was measured differently. While SOD was significantly lower in patients (children and adults) than in the matching controls this was not the case for catalase and GPx. While GPx activity in adult patients was comparable to that in the control groups (childrens and adults), the GPx in children with ESRD was almost twice as high than in the other groups. Since children were shown to have higher levels of glutathion, activated GPx might be a sign of adaptation of these children to the increased rate of oxidation.

  17. Long-Term Outcomes of Systemic Lupus Erythematous Patients after Pregnancy: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Ting-Fang; Chuang, Ya-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Li; Yu, Tung-Min; Chung, Mu-Chi; Li, Chi-Yuan; Chung, Chi-Jung; Ho, Wen-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on long-term maternal outcomes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are lacking. The study aimed to explore the relationships among SLE, pregnancy, outcomes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and overall mortality. Methods We established a retrospective cohort study consisting of four cohorts: pregnant (case cohort) and nonpregnant SLE patients, as well as pregnant and nonpregnant non-SLE patients. One case cohort and three comparison cohorts were matched by age at first pregnancy and index date of pregnancy by using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Dataset. All study subjects were selected based on the index date to the occurrence of ESRD or overall death. Cox proportional hazard regression models and Kaplan–Meier curves were used in the analysis. Results SLE pregnant patients exhibited significantly increased risk of ESRD after adjusting for other important confounders, including immunosuppressant and parity (HR = 3.19, 95% CI: 1.35–7.52 for pregnant non-SLE; and HR = 2.77, 95% CI: 1.24–6.15 for nonpregnant non-SLE patients). No significant differences in ESRD incidence were observed in pregnant and nonpregnant SLE patients. Pregnant SLE patients exhibited better clinical condition at the baseline and a significantly lower risk of overall mortality than nonpregnant SLE patients. Conclusions Our data support current recommendations for SLE patients to avoid pregnancy until disease activity is quiescent. Multicenter recruitment and clinical information can be used to further examine the association of SLE and ESRD (or mortality) after pregnancy. PMID:27992461

  18. Nursing care of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, E

    1988-01-01

    Nursing interventions for each of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, muscle rigidity, bradykinesia, tremors at rest and postural reflex abnormalities, are designed to increase the patient's quality of life by minimizing symptoms. Nurses are responsible for planning patient medication schedules to maximize drug effectiveness. Dietary implications include a low-protein regimen for the patient during the day, eliminating foods high in Vitamin B6, high caloric foods, and soft-solid foods offered at frequent feedings. Constipation is addressed by increasing the patient's fiber and fluid intake and by increasing the patient's mobility. Patient mobility is increased when the patient is taught purposeful activities and to concentrate on the way he walks. Communication is facilitated if the patient takes deep breaths before speaking and uses diaphragmatic speech. A telephone receiver which amplifies the patient's voice is also available. Interventions are good only if the patient chooses to implement them; he is the head of the health team planning his care.

  19. Noninvasive interrogation of microvasculature for signs of endothelial dysfunction in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Julian; Kohen, Adam; Brouder, Daniel; Rahim, Fahim; Adler, Stephen; Garrick, Renee; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2004-12-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction (ECD) has been demonstrated in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who have cardiovascular disease (CD) or diabetes mellitus (DM). While techniques to examine conduit arteries have been adapted to these patients, evaluation of microvascular function has lagged behind. Therefore, we used laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and scanned laser Doppler imaging (LDI) to quantify parameters of the postocclusion reactive hyperemia and thermal hyperemic responses (local heating to 43 degrees C) in ESRD patients (n=63) and healthy individuals (n=33). Patients with ESRD were partitioned among those with either CD or DM or both (designated CDorDM, n=30), patients with both CD and DM (designated CD+DM, n=12, statistically similar to CDorDM), and patients with neither CD or DM (designated approximately CDor DM, n=33). LDF during thermal hyperemia showed a decrease in the thermal peaks and plateau as well as a delay in plateau compared with control, consistent with ECD. LDF during reactive hyperemia showed a decrease in the pay-back area under the curve, also consistent with ECD. approximately CDorDM were heterogeneous: almost 50% contained flow abnormalities similar to CDorDM. There was also a reduction in the number of functional arterioles on LDI images. Fourier analysis of LDF oscillations showed that low-frequency oscillations characterizing endothelial function were impaired in CDorDM and in many approximately CDorDM. The data demonstrate that ESRD patients with expected ECD (CDorDM) are characterized by distinct abnormalities in LDF parameters. However, similar abnormalities are found in approximately one-half of ESRD patients without evidence for CD or DM. Postocclusive and thermal interrogation of the microvasculature with laser Doppler-resolved parameters of the microcirculation, followed by Fourier analysis of the very slow oscillations, may provide a valuable adjunct to early noninvasive diagnosis of ECD in ESRD, especially important in

  20. Perioperative management of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Katus, Linn; Shtilbans, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide, leading to a wide range of disability and medical complications. Managing patients with Parkinson's disease in the perioperative hospital setting can be particularly challenging. Suboptimal management can lead to medical complications, prolonged hospital stays, and delayed recovery. This review aims to address the most important issues related to caring for patients with Parkinson's disease perioperatively who are undergoing emergent or planned general surgery. It also intends to help hospitalists, internists, and other health care providers mitigate potential in-hospital morbidity and prevent prolonged recovery. Challenges in managing patients with Parkinson's disease in the perioperative hospital setting include disruption of medication schedules, "nothing by mouth" status, reduced mobility, and medication interactions and their side effects. Patients with Parkinson's disease are more prone to immobility and developing dysphagia, respiratory dysfunction, urinary retention, and psychiatric symptoms. These issues lead to higher rates of pneumonia, urinary tract infections, deconditioning, and falls compared with patients without Parkinson's disease, as well as prolonged hospital stays and a greater need for post-hospitalization rehabilitation. Steps can be taken to decrease these complications, including minimizing nothing by mouth status duration, using alternative routes of drugs administration when unable to give medications orally, avoiding drug interactions and medications that can worsen parkinsonism, assessing swallowing ability frequently, encouraging incentive spirometry, performing bladder scans, avoiding Foley catheters, and providing aggressive physical therapy. Knowing and anticipating these potential complications allow hospital physicians to mitigate nosocomial morbidity and shorten recovery times and hospital stays.

  1. Fungal infection in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Marina, Ana Isabel; Morato, Esperanza; Rábano, Alberto; Carrasco, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that leads to dementia mainly among the elderly. This disease is characterized by the presence in the brain of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that provoke neuronal cell death, vascular dysfunction, and inflammatory processes. In the present work, we have analyzed the existence of fungal infection in Alzheimer's disease patients. A proteomic analysis provides compelling evidence for the existence of fungal proteins in brain samples from Alzheimer's disease patients. Furthermore, PCR analysis reveals a variety of fungal species in these samples, dependent on the patient and the tissue tested. DNA sequencing demonstrated that several fungal species can be found in brain samples. Together, these results show that fungal macromolecules can be detected in brain from Alzheimer's disease patients. To our knowledge these findings represent the first evidence that fungal infection is detectable in brain samples from Alzheimer's disease patients. The possibility that this may represent a risk factor or may contribute to the etiological cause of Alzheimer's disease is discussed.

  2. Effectiveness of Aspirin on Double Lumen Permanent Catheter Efficacy in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Mozafar, Mohammad; Samsami, Majid; Sobhiyeh, Mohammad Reza; Jabbehdari, Sayena; Fallah Zavareh, Mahtab

    2013-01-01

    Background The complications of vascular access are the most imperative etiology for hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in chronic hemodialysis. The most prevalent complication of central catheter is dysfunction due to thrombosis. Aspirin is an anti-aggregative platelet drug that may increase the patency of permanent catheters (perm-cath). Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of Aspirin in perm-cath survival. Patients and Methods This study included a total of 185 ESRD cases according to the inclusion criteria for perm-cath insertion in hemodialysis. One hundred and eighty patients following perm-cath insertion had proper blood flow through perm-cath during hemodialysis. Patients were randomly divided between intervention (80 mg/day Aspirin initiated a day following catheter insertion) and control (placebo) groups. The average time that the perm-cath was functional was noted. Demographic characteristics included comorbidities and past history were also used to address probable influence on perm-cath function and patency. Results The mean survival time of the catheter in Aspirin group was significantly higher than the control group (5.3 ± 4.7 month versus 3.9 ± 2.7 month, P = 0.012). No significant difference in major complications of Aspirin use (such as GI bleeding) was noted between two groups (P = 0.52). In terms of the patient’s demographic characteristics, those of the female gender and a history of diabetes mellitus were found to have significant influence on median survival rate of the catheters (P = 0.021, 0.043 respectively). Conclusions These results suggest that Aspirin use following perm-cath insertion might be beneficial for catheter survival. This increased survival time might enable patient’s use of AVF maturation for long term dialysis access. PMID:23841041

  3. Autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Robazzi, Teresa Cristina Martins Vicente; Adan, Luis Fernando Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid function abnormalities and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases, such as Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma. Limited data are available regarding the prevalence and clinical characteristics of autoimmune thyroiditis in other rheumatologic disorders, such as rheumatic fever and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. The authors review the association of endocrine autoimmune and rheumatic autoimmune diseases, assessing various age groups and clinical conditions. The bibliographic survey was conducted through the search for scientific articles indexed in the general health sciences databases, such as Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Medline/PubMed, and Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO). The following descriptors were used: "rheumatic autoimmune diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases"; "thyroid disorders and rheumatic diseases"; "thyroiditis and rheumatic diseases"; "autoimmune diseases and thyroid"; and "pediatric rheumatic diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases". This study showed that, despite contradictory results in the literature, there is a greater prevalence of the association between autoimmune thyroid diseases and rheumatic diseases, highlighting the possibility of common pathogenic mechanisms among them.

  4. Male microchimerism at high levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from women with end stage renal disease before kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Albano, Laetitia; Rak, Justyna M; Azzouz, Doua F; Cassuto-Viguier, Elisabeth; Gugenheim, Jean; Lambert, Nathalie C

    2012-01-01

    Patients with end stage renal diseases (ESRD) are generally tested for donor chimerism after kidney transplantation for tolerance mechanism purposes. But, to our knowledge, no data are available on natural and/or iatrogenic microchimerism (Mc), deriving from pregnancy and/or blood transfusion, acquired prior to transplantation. In this context, we tested the prevalence of male Mc using a real time PCR assay for DYS14, a Y-chromosome specific sequence, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 55 women with ESRD, prior to their first kidney transplantation, and compared them with results from 82 healthy women. Male Mc was also quantified in 5 native kidney biopsies obtained two to four years prior to blood testing and in PBMC from 8 women collected after female kidney transplantation, several years after the initial blood testing. Women with ESRD showed statistically higher frequencies (62%) and quantities (98 genome equivalent cells per million of host cells, gEq/M) of male Mc in their PBMC than healthy women (16% and 0.3 gEq/M, p<0.00001 and p = 0.0005 respectively). Male Mc was increased in women with ESRD whether they had or not a history of male pregnancy and/or of blood transfusion. Three out of five renal biopsies obtained a few years prior to the blood test also contained Mc, but no correlation could be established between earlier Mc in a kidney and later presence in PBMC. Finally, several years after female kidney transplantation, male Mc was totally cleared from PBMC in all women tested but one. This intriguing and striking initial result of natural and iatrogenic male Mc persistence in peripheral blood from women with ESRD raises several hypotheses for the possible role of these cells in renal diseases. Further studies are needed to elucidate mechanisms of recruitment and persistence of Mc in women with ESRD.

  5. Dietary Patterns and Risk of Death and Progression to ESRD in Individuals With CKD: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M.; Muntner, Paul; Rizk, Dana V.; McClellan, William M.; Warnock, David G.; Newby, P.K.; Judd, Suzanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nutrition is strongly linked with health outcomes in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, few studies have examined relationships between dietary patterns and health outcomes in persons with CKD. Study Design Observational cohort study. Setting & Participants 3,972 participants with CKD (defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 or an albumin-creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g at baseline) from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, a prospective cohort study of 30,239 black and white adults at least 45 years of age. Predictors Five empirically derived dietary patterns identified via factor analysis: “Convenience” (Chinese and Mexican foods, pizza, other mixed dishes), “Plant-Based” (fruits, vegetables), “Sweets/Fats” (sugary foods), “Southern” (fried foods, organ meats, sweetened beverages), and “Alcohol/Salads” (alcohol, green-leafy vegetables, salad dressing). Outcomes All-cause mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Results A total of 816 deaths and 141 ESRD events were observed over approximately 6 years of follow-up. There were no statistically significant associations of Convenience, Sweets/Fats or Alcohol/Salads pattern scores with all-cause mortality after multivariable adjustment. In Cox regression models adjusted for sociodemographic factors, energy intake, co-morbidities, and baseline kidney function, higher Plant-Based pattern scores (indicating greater consistency with the pattern) were associated with lower risk of mortality (HR comparing fourth to first quartile, 0.77; 95%CI, 0.61–0.97) whereas higher Southern pattern scores were associated with greater risk of mortality (HR comparing fourth to first quartile, 1.51; 95%CI, 1.19–1.92). There were no associations of dietary patterns with incident ESRD in multivariable-adjusted models. Limitations Missing dietary pattern data, potential residual confounding from lifestyle factors. Conclusions A

  6. [Chronic kidney disease in the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Mora-Gutiérrez, José María; Slon Roblero, María Fernanda; Castaño Bilbao, Itziar; Izquierdo Bautista, Diana; Arteaga Coloma, Jesús; Martínez Velilla, Nicolás

    2016-05-06

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is widely prevalent worldwide, with a special impact on elderly population. Around half of people aged over 75 meet diagnostic criteria for CKD according to the recent 'Kidney disease improving global outcomes' (KDIGO) 2012 clinical practice guideline on the evaluation and management of CKD. However, geriatric patients have characteristics that may not be addressed by general guidelines. Therefore, it is important to know the natural history of the disease, symptoms, and 'red-flags' that could help in the management of these patients. In this review, a complete approach is presented on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CKD in the geriatric population.

  7. Vaccinating Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Jason; Wasan, Sharmeel

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are not vaccinated at the same rate as general medical patients. IBD places patients at increased risk for developing vaccine-preventable illnesses, and this risk is further exacerbated by immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, gastroenterologists should familiarize themselves with health maintenance measures pertaining to patients with IBD. This article highlights the vaccinations required for patients with IBD, especially those who are immunosuppressed: influenza; pneumococcal pneumonia; hepatitis A and B viruses; human papilloma virus; meningococcal disease; tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis; measles, mumps, and rubella; varicella zoster; and herpes zoster. This article also discusses issues regarding patients with IBD who travel outside of the United States, as well as highlights and provides suggestions for areas of quality improvement that are needed in the field. PMID:27917091

  8. Venous thromboembolic disease in colorectal patients.

    PubMed

    McNally, Michael P; Burns, Christopher J

    2009-02-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease, which includes deep vein thromboses as well as pulmonary emboli, can be a significant complication in the postoperative patient. In particular, colorectal patients often carry a higher risk for venous thromboembolism when compared with patients undergoing other operative procedures. Features unique to colorectal patients are the high incidence of inflammatory bowel disease or malignancy. Typically, these patients will undergo lengthy pelvic procedures, which also contribute to a cumulative risk of venous thrombosis. It is critical that all patients and the proposed operative procedure are appropriately risk stratified. Risk stratification allows for easier implementation of an appropriate prophylactic strategy. There are a wide range of safe and effective mechanical and pharmacologic measures available. The authors provide very specific recommendations, but note that clinical judgment plays a significant role.

  9. Early Results of Pilot Study Using Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Positive Kidneys to Transplant HCV Infected Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease Allowing for Successful Interferon-Free Direct Acting Antiviral Therapy after Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos-Orozco, Juan F; Kim, Robin; Thiesset, Heather F; Hatch, Jenny; Lynch, Keisa; Chaly, Jr, Thomas; Shihab, Fuad; Ahmed, Faris; Hall, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in kidney transplant (KTX) patients reduces long-term patient and graft survival. Direct-acting antivirals (DAA) are > 90% effective in achieving sustained viral response (SVR); however, DAAs are not routinely available to patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The University of Utah Transplant Program developed a protocol to allow HCV-positive potential KTX recipients to accept HCV-positive donors' kidneys. Three months after successful KTX, they were eligible for DAA therapy. Methods: HCV-positive patients approved for KTX by the University of Utah Transplant Selection Committee were eligible to be enrolled in this study. Patients consented for the use of HCV-positive donor organs. Three to six months after successful KTX, these patients were treated for HCV with interferon-free direct-acting antiviral regimens according to viral genotype and prior treatment experience. Results: Between 2014-2015, 12 HCV-positive patients were listed for KTX. Eight patients were kidney only eligible, seven patients received HCV-positive deceased donor kidneys, and one received an HCV-negative organ. Currently, six patients have completed treatment, all have achieved sustained viral response (SVR), and one patient is currently awaiting treatment. All seven patients have functioning kidney grafts. Wait time for KTX was reduced amongst all blood groups from an average of 1,350 days to only 65 days. Conclusions: HCV-positive patients with ESRD can successfully receive an HCV-positive donor's kidney. Once transplanted, these patients can receive DAA therapy and achieve SVR. Use of HCV-positive organs reduced time on the waitlist by greater than three years and expanded the donor organ pool. PMID:28018760

  10. Persistent Hypoglycemia in Patient with Hodgkin's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Harold Cinco; Munshi, Lubna Bashir; Sharon, David

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a rare complication of Hodgkin's disease. Several explanations have been postulated but the exact pathophysiology is not well understood. We are presenting a case of newly diagnosed Stage IV Hodgkin's disease that developed persistent and recurrent hypoglycemia despite giving glucagon, repeated 50% dextrose, and D5 and D10 continuous infusion. Hypoglycemia workup showed the C-peptide level to be low. Patient was suspected of having hypoglycemia related to lymphoma and was given a trial of prednisone which resolved the hypoglycemic episodes and made the patient euglycemic for the rest of his hospital stay. The presence of a substance that mimicked the effects of insulin was highly suspected. Several case reports strengthen the hypothesis of an insulin-like growth factor or antibodies secreted by the cancer cells causing hypoglycemia in Hodgkin's disease but none of them have been confirmed. Further investigation is warranted to more clearly define the pathophysiology of persistent hypoglycemia in patients with Hodgkin's disease. PMID:26839722

  11. Lower Extremity Revascularization in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Douglas W; Dansey, Kirsten; Hamdan, Allen D

    2016-11-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who present with critical limb ischemia (CLI) have become an increasingly common and complex treatment problem for vascular surgeons. Dialysis patients have high short-term mortality rates regardless of whether revascularization is pursued. ESRD patients with CLI can be managed with: local wound care, endovascular or surgical revascularization, or amputation. Some patients may heal small foot wounds with local wound care alone, even if distal perfusion is marginal, as long as any infectious process has been controlled. Surgical revascularization has a mortality rate of 5-10% but has a high chance of limb salvage. However, overall 5-year survival may be as low as 28%. Endovascular therapy also carries a high perioperative mortality risk in this population with similar limb salvage rates. Amputation is indicated in patients with advanced stage CLI, as described by the Society for Vascular Surgery's Wound, Ischemia and foot Infection (WIfI) system. Statistical models predict that endovascular or surgical revascularization strategies are less costly and more functionally beneficial to patients than primary amputation alone. Decisions on how to manage ESRD patients with CLI are complex but revascularization can often result in limb salvage, despite limited overall survival. Dialysis patients with good life expectancy and good quality conduit may benefit most from surgical bypass.

  12. Current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Gerald G; Saunders, Amanda Vaughn

    2010-09-01

    There is neither proven effective prevention for Alzheimer disease nor a cure for patients with this disorder. Nevertheless, a spectrum of biopsychosocial therapeutic measures is available for slowing progression of the illness and enhancing quality of life for patients. These measures include a range of educational, psychological, social, and behavioral interventions that remain fundamental to effective care. Also available are a number of pharmacologic treatments, including prescription medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for Alzheimer disease, "off-label" uses of medications to manage target symptoms, and controversial complementary therapies. Physicians must make the earliest possible diagnosis to use these treatments most effectively. Physicians' goals should be to educate patients and their caregivers, to plan long-term care options, to maximally manage concurrent illnesses, to slow and ameliorate the most disabling symptoms, and to preserve effective functioning for as long as possible. The authors review the various current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

  13. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    PubMed

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  14. Cystathionine Levels in Patients With Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, N.A.; Onkenhout, W.; Kerstens, H.J.; Roos, Raymund A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently a profound depletion of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), the principal enzyme involved in the generation of cysteine from cystathionine, was shown in Huntington disease (HD) patients and several transgenic HD mouse models. We therefore hypothesized that blood and urine cystathionine levels may be increased in HD patients and that this increase might correlate with disease progression. Methods: We measured concentrations of cystathionine as well as 22 other amino acids in fasting plasma and 24-h urine samples of nine early-stage HD patients and nine age, sex, and body mass index matched controls. Results: There were no significant differences in the plasma or urine concentrations of cystathionine or any other amino acid between HD patients and controls. Conclusion: We found no evidence for changes in plasma or urine concentrations of cystathionine in early-stage HD patients. Therefore, cystathionine levels are unlikely to be useful as a state biomarker in HD. PMID:26435880

  15. Psychosocial interventions for patients with chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of patients with chronic diseases will be one of the main challenges of medicine in the future. This paper presents an overview of different origins, mechanism, and symptoms necessary for understanding new and different interventions that include a psychosomatic view. In a psychosomatic therapeutic intervention there are very different targets, such as psychological symptoms, personality traits, attitudes toward disease and life, risk behaviour, and social isolation and as biological targets the change of autonomic imbalance and of the effects of the psycho-endocrinological or psycho-immunological stress responses. And there are also different psychosomatic measures that influence the individual biological, psychological and sociological targets. There is a need to give different answer to different questions in the field of psychosomatic and behavioral medicine. Comparative effectiveness research is an important strategy for solving some methodological issues. What is the target of treatment for different diseases: Symptom reduction, healing, or limiting progression to the worst case - the death of patients. We know that, the patient-physician relationship is important for every medical/therapeutic action for patients with chronic diseases. This volume of BioPsychoSocial Medicine will present four different psychosomatic treatment studies from the clinical field in the sense of phase 2 studies: Reports of patients with obesity, anorexia nervosa, chronic somatoform pain and coronary artery disease were presented PMID:22293471

  16. Diagnosis of cardiac disease in pediatric end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Chavers, Blanche M.; Solid, Craig A.; Sinaiko, Alan; Daniels, Frank X.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J.; Frankenfield, Diane L.; Herzog, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Cardiac disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This study aimed to report the frequency of cardiac disease diagnostic methods used in US pediatric maintenance hemodialysis patients. Methods. A cross-sectional analysis of all US pediatric (ages 0.7–18 years, n = 656) maintenance hemodialysis patients was performed using data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ESRD Clinical Performance Measures Project. Clinical and laboratory information was collected in 2001. Results were analysed by age, sex, race, Hispanic ethnicity, dialysis duration, body mass index (BMI), primary ESRD cause and laboratory data. Results. Ninety-two percent of the patients had a cardiovascular risk factor (63% hypertension, 38% anemia, 11% BMI > 94th percentile, 63% serum phosphorus > 5.5 mg/dL and 55% calcium–phosphorus product ≥ 55 mg2/dL2). A diagnosis of cardiac disease was reported in 24% (n = 155) of all patients: left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement 17%, congestive heart failure/pulmonary edema 8%, cardiomyopathy 2% and decreased left ventricular function 2%. Thirty-one percent of patients were not tested. Of those tested, the diagnostic methods used were chest X-rays in 60%, echocardiograms in 35% and electrocardiograms in 33%; left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement was diagnosed using echocardiogram (72%), chest X-ray (20%) and electrocardiogram (15%). Conclusions. Although 92% of patients had cardiovascular risk factors, an echocardiography was performed in only one-third of the patients. Our study raises the question of why echocardiography, considered the gold standard for cardiac disease diagnosis, has been infrequently used in pediatric maintenance dialysis patients, a high-risk patient population. PMID:20861193

  17. Genetic polymorphisms located in genes related to immune and inflammatory processes are associated with end-stage renal disease: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease progression has been linked to pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of inflammation. These markers are also elevated in end-stage renal disease (ESRD), which constitutes a serious public health problem. Objective To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in genes related to immune and inflammatory processes, could be associated with ESRD development. Design and methods A retrospective case-control study was carried out on 276 patients with ESRD and 288 control subjects. Forty-eight SNPs were genotyped via SNPlex platform. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between each sigle polymorphism and the development of ESRD. Results Four polymorphisms showed association with ESRD: rs1801275 in the interleukin 4 receptor (IL4R) gene (OR: 0.66 (95%CI = 0.46-0.95); p = 0.025; overdominant model), rs4586 in chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) gene (OR: 0.70 (95%CI = 0.54-0.90); p = 0.005; additive model), rs301640 located in an intergenic binding site for signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) (OR: 1.82 (95%CI = 1.17-2.83); p = 0.006; additive model) and rs7830 in the nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) gene (OR: 1.31 (95%CI = 1.01-1.71); p = 0.043; additive model). After adjusting for multiple testing, results lost significance. Conclusion Our preliminary data suggest that four genetic polymorphisms located in genes related to inflammation and immune processes could help to predict the risk of developing ESRD. PMID:22817530

  18. Disparities in end-stage renal disease care in South America.

    PubMed

    Lugon, J R; Strogoff de Matos, J P

    2010-11-01

    South America is one of the most heterogeneous regions in the world regarding ethnical composition and socioeconomic development level. Our aim was to analyze the status of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) management in the Portuguese-speaking and Spanish-speaking countries of South America. Data were collected using a survey sent to the Society of Nephrology of each country, and complemented with data available in the Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry or personal communication with collaborators within the nephrology societies. Most of South America countries have a hybrid of public and private healthcare system. Universal access to renal replacement therapy (RRT) is provided in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay and Venezuela which comprise nearly 73% of South America population. The expenditure on health per capita varies from nearly US$ 200 per year in Bolivia to more than US$ 1,600 per year in Argentina. The prevalence of patients on RRT varies from 95 pmp. in Paraguay and 924 pmp in Chile. There is an important association between the prevalence of diabetes and the number of patients on RRT. Older people also are at a higher risk of developing ESRD. The rapid aging of the population and a higher prevalence of diabetes will probably translate into a burden of ESRD in the future. It is to be hoped that political and economical stability in the region can ease the adoption of universal access to ESRD treatment in all South American countries.

  19. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... established that ESRD beneficiary discharges, excluding discharges classified into MS-DRG 652 (Renal Failure), MS-DRG 682 (Renal Failure with MCC), MS-DRG 683 (Renal Failure with CC), MS-DRG 684 (Renal Failure without CC/MCC) and MS-DRG 685 (Admit for Renal Dialysis), where the beneficiary received...

  20. Ways of promoting health to patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease from a nursing perspective in Vietnam: A phenomenographic study

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Lotta; Ziegert, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Health promotion plays an important role in the management of diabetes and chronic kidney disease, especially when the prevalence of the disease is rising in Vietnam. Nurses have been identified to be the front figure in health promotion; however, little is written about how nurses in Vietnam work with these issues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe nurses’ conceptions about how health is promoted, with special focus on physically activity, for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and/or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Individual interviews were done with 25 nurses working at two major hospitals in Hanoi, Vietnam. A phenomenographic approach was used to analyse the interviews. Nurses described how creating positive relationships and supporting patients to take part in their social context promoted health. Health was also promoted by educating patients and relatives about health and disease and by supporting patients to be physically active. The findings indicate that the Vietnamese nursing knowledge about health promotion needs to be gathered, and health promotion needs to be further integrated in the education. Further research is necessary to examine patients’ knowledge and attitudes about health and the efficiency of various health-promoting strategies in the Vietnamese context. PMID:27172515

  1. Periodontal management of patients with cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    2002-08-01

    Periodontists are often called upon to provide periodontal therapy for patients with a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Safe and effective periodontal treatment requires a general understanding of the underlying cardiovascular diseases, their medical management, and necessary modifications to dental/periodontal therapy that may be required. In this informational paper more common cardiovascular disorders will be discussed and dental management considerations briefly described. This paper is intended for the use of periodontists and members of the dental profession.

  2. Association of APOL1 variants with mild kidney disease in the first-degree relatives of African American patients with non-diabetic end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Barry I; Langefeld, Carl D; Turner, Jolyn; Núñez, Marina; High, Kevin P; Spainhour, Mitzie; Hicks, Pamela J; Bowden, Donald W; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M; Murea, Mariana; Rocco, Michael V; Divers, Jasmin

    2012-10-01

    Familial aggregation of non-diabetic end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is found in African Americans and variants in the apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) contribute to this risk. To detect genetic associations with milder forms of nephropathy in the high-risk families, analyses were performed using generalized estimating equations to assess relationships between kidney disease phenotypes and APOL1 variants in 786 relatives of 470 families. Adjusting for familial correlations, 23.1, 46.7, and 30.2% of genotyped relatives possessed two, one, or no APOL1 risk variants, respectively. Relatives with two compared with one or no risk variants had statistically indistinguishable median systolic blood pressure, urine albumin to creatinine ratio, estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR; MDRD equation), and serum cystatin C levels. After adjusting for age, gender, age at ESRD in families, and African ancestry, significant associations were detected between APOL1 with overt proteinuria and estimated GFR (CKD-EPI equation), with a trend toward significance for quantitative albuminuria. Thus, relatives of African Americans with non-diabetic ESRD are enriched for APOL1 risk variants. After adjustment, two APOL1 risk variants weakly predict mild forms of kidney disease. Second hits appear necessary for the initiation of APOL1-associated nephropathy.

  3. Pharmacological and Non-pharmacological Treatment Options for Depression and Depressive Symptoms in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriou, Stefania S.; Karatzaferi, Christina; Sakkas, Giorgos K.

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a mental disorder with a high prevalence among patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). It is reported that depression afflicts approximately 20-30% of this patient population, being associated, amongst other, with high mortality rate, low adherence to medication and low perceived quality of life. There is a variety of medications known to be effective for the treatment of depression but due to poor adherence to treatment as well as due to the high need for medications addressing other ESRD comorbidities, depression often remains untreated. According to the literature, depression is under-diagnosed and undertreated in the majority of the patients with chronic kidney disease. In the current review the main pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches and research outcomes for the management of depressive symptoms in hemodialysis patients are discussed. PMID:26973957

  4. Exercise for older patients with chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Petrella, R J

    1999-10-01

    Coronary artery disease, hypertension, congestive heart failure, type 2 diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and cognitive disorders become more prevalent as people age. Besides delaying the onset of many of these conditions, regular exercise may improve function and delay disability and morbidity in those who have them. Further, exercise may work synergistically with medication to combat the effects of some chronic diseases. Special adaptations for older patients include lower-intensity exercise (eg, fewer repetitions), low-impact exercise (cycling, exercise while sitting), and modified equipment (smaller weights, special shoes, loose clothing). Unresolved issues include development of optimal strategies for motivating older patients to begin and maintain exercise programs.

  5. The emergence of Parkinson disease among patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Elstein, Deborah; Alcalay, Roy; Zimran, Ari

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade, several lines of evidence have been presented that document the clinical manifestations, genetic associations, and sub-cellular mechanisms of the inter-relatedness of β-glucocerebrosidase mutations and the emergence of Parkinson disease among carriers and patients with Gaucher disease. This review is an attempt to apprise the reader of the recent literature with the caveat that this is an area of intensive exploration that is constantly being updated because of the immediate clinical ramifications but also because of the impact on our understanding of Parkinson disease, and finally because of the unexpected inter-reactions between these entities on the molecular level. It has been an unexpected happenstance that it has been discovered that a rare monogenetic disease has an interface at many points with a neurological disorder of the elderly that has both familial and sporadic forms: to date there is no cure for either of these disorders.

  6. [Cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Abe, Nobuhito; Mori, Etsuro

    2012-04-01

    Parkinson disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting in motor symptoms and cognitive deficits. Neuropsychological studies have suggested that patients with Parkinson disease exhibit a broad range of cognitive deficits even in the early stages of the disease. In this review, we discuss the neuropsychological evidence for cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson disease, outlining the different domains of cognitive disturbance. First, we review previous findings on executive dysfunction, which is associated with a disruption in frontostriatal circuitry mainly driven by dopaminergic dysmodulation. Executive dysfunction is the core symptom in the cognitive deficits in Parkinson disease. Second, we focus on impairment in different domains of memory function, such as short-term and long-term memory. Third, we discuss the pattern of cognitive deficits in visuospatial ability, ranging from basic perceptual processes to rather complex motor skills. Next, we summarize the profile of cognitive deficits in language, although previous findings are mixed and hence this topic is relatively controversial. Finally, we introduce several recent findings on social cognitive deficits, which is a new area of research that has emerged in the past decade. We also discuss the possible neural mechanisms underlying each domain of cognitive deficits in patients with Parkinson disease.

  7. Crohn disease and the gynecologic patient.

    PubMed

    Sides, Cleve; Trinidad, Mari Charisse; Heitlinger, Leo; Anasti, James

    2013-01-01

    Although Crohn disease (CD) is considered an inflammatory bowel disease, extraintestinal gynecologic manifestations are varied, frequent, and oftentimes difficult to manage. Its predilection for young and reproductive-age women makes it an important disease process for the gynecologist to understand, as its complications can have long-term repercussions on the developmental, sexual, reproductive, and psychological health of affected women. Patients may present with a variety of vulvovaginal, perineal, perianal, and urologic complaints. Perianal involvement from an intestinal fistula is the most common skin manifestation seen in CD. Other gynecologic manifestations include metastatic CD and rectovaginal and urovaginal fistulas. Recognition and accurate diagnosis of extraintestinal gynecologic manifestations, as well as a good understanding of the gynecologic effects of chronic disease, are necessary for optimal management. The article provides an overview of CD and highlights the gynecologic considerations in caring for women affected by this disease.

  8. Tyrosine Metabolism in Patients with Liver Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Robert J.; Conn, Harold O.

    1967-01-01

    Plasma levels of tyrosine were assayed in the fasting state and after oral administration of either tyrosine (tyrosine tolerance test) or phenylalanine (phenlyalanine conversion test) in normal subjects and in patients with hepatitis, biliary obstruction, or cirrhosis. Fasting tyrosine levels tended to be slightly increased in patients with hepatitis and biliary obstruction and markedly increased in patients with cirrhosis. Tyrosine tolerance tests in patients with cirrhosis were characterized by larger than normal increments in tyrosine levels and by delayed returns toward fasting levels. The results of phenylalanine conversion tests were abnormal in approximately one-half of patients with either hepatitis or biliary obstruction and four-fifths of patients with cirrhosis. Abnormalities were characterized by elevated fasting plasma tyrosine levels, or small and delayed increments in tyrosine levels, or both. Abnormal phenylalanine conversion test results in patients with cirrhosis did not correlate closely with any clinical feature of cirrhosis or with the results of any standard liver function test; there was positive correlation only with abnormal ammonia tolerance, a test of portalsystemic shunting. Tests of tyrosine metabolism do not appear to be useful for routine clinical assessment of liver function. Tyrosine tolerance tests and phenylalanine conversion tests done for purposes of diagnosis of other diseases may yield misleading results in patients with liver disease. PMID:6074004

  9. Voluntary Imitation in Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Bisio, Ambra; Casteran, Matthieu; Ballay, Yves; Manckoundia, Patrick; Mourey, France; Pozzo, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Although Alzheimer's disease (AD) primarily manifests as cognitive deficits, the implicit sensorimotor processes that underlie social interactions, such as automatic imitation, seem to be preserved in mild and moderate stages of the disease, as is the ability to communicate with other persons. Nevertheless, when AD patients face more challenging tasks, which do not rely on automatic processes but on explicit voluntary mechanisms and require the patient to pay attention to external events, the cognitive deficits resulting from the disease might negatively affect patients' behavior. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether voluntary motor imitation, i.e., a volitional mechanism that involves observing another person's action and translating this perception into one's own action, was affected in patients with AD. Further, we tested whether this ability was modulated by the nature of the observed stimulus by comparing the ability to reproduce the kinematic features of a human demonstrator with that of a computerized-stimulus. AD patients showed an intact ability to reproduce the velocity of the observed movements, particularly when the stimulus was a human agent. This result suggests that high-level cognitive processes involved in voluntary imitation might be preserved in mild and moderate stages of AD and that voluntary imitation abilities might benefit from the implicit interpersonal communication established between the patient and the human demonstrator.

  10. Osteoporosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Compston, J E; Judd, D; Crawley, E O; Evans, W D; Evans, C; Church, H A; Reid, E M; Rhodes, J

    1987-01-01

    Bone mineral content in spinal trabecular and peripheral cortical bone was measured in 75 unselected patients with small and/or large intestinal inflammatory bowel disease. Osteoporosis, defined as a bone mineral content greater than 2 SD below the age and sex matched normal mean value was present in 23 patients (30.6%). Three amenorrhoeic females aged 34, 38, and 42 years had severe clinical osteoporosis and a further three patients had one or more vertebral crush fractures. Eighteen of the 23 patients with osteoporosis had small intestinal disease with one or more resections and the mean lifetime steroid dose in those with osteoporosis was significantly higher than in those with normal bone mineral content. Bone mineral content in spinal trabecular bone showed significant negative correlations with lifetime steroid dose and serum alkaline phosphatase and a significant positive correlation with serum albumin. Peripheral cortical bone mineral content was positively correlated with body weight, height and body mass index. We conclude that the prevalence of osteoporosis is increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, severe clinical osteoporosis developing in some relatively young patients. The pathogenesis of this bone loss is probably multifactorial; steroid therapy is likely to be an important contributory factor. PMID:3583068

  11. Role of non-HLA genetic variants in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, P; Tripathi, G; Sharma, R K; Sankhwar, S N; Agrawal, S

    2009-08-01

    Cytokines and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of primary kidney disease and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Cytokine secretion is reported to be dependent on the single nucleotide polymorphisms located in the cytokine genes. The role of different polymorphisms in cytokines and ICAM genes as probable susceptibility factors for ESRD has been explored in the present study. The study was conducted on 258 ESRD patients and on ethnically matched 569 controls. Individuals were genotyped for interleukin (IL)-6 (G174C), IL-4 (C590T), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) (-G308A and -G238A) and ICAM-1 (A469G) gene polymorphisms using standard polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism-based method. We observed significant difference in the genotype frequencies of the TNF-alpha-308AA [P = 0.001; odds ratios (OR) = 7.61, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 2.1-27.9] and TNF-alpha-238AA (P = 0.001; OR = 5.8, 95% CI = 2.2-15.1). Furthermore, C allele of IL-6 -G174C and G allele of ICAM-1 A469G were significantly different in ESRD patients when compared with controls (P = 0.0001; OR = 5.5, 95% CI = 3.9-7.7 and P < 0.0001; OR = 3.8, 95% CI = 3.1-4.7). For the IL-4 C590T polymorphism, although the homozygous mutant genotype (TT) was not found to be significantly associated with ESRD, a statistically significant association with T allele (P = 0.008) was observed. Furthermore, combined analysis showed a higher risk in ESRD patients with high IL-4- and low IL-6-producing genotypes, low IL-4- and low IL-6-producing genotypes and high-producing genotype of TNF-alpha (308 and 238) with the increased risk of 6.47-, 3.7- and 3.3-fold, respectively. Our results suggest that IL-6, IL-4, TNF-alpha and ICAM gene polymorphisms are implicated in ESRD.

  12. Sialadenosis in Patients with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Close, John M.; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-01-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis. PMID:19644542

  13. Sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guggenheimer, James; Close, John M; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-06-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis.

  14. Myopathy in patients with Hashimoto's disease.

    PubMed

    Villar, Jaqueline; Finol, Héctor J; Torres, Sonia H; Roschman-González, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland. Patients may present or not a hypothyroid state, and frequently have manifestations of myopathy. The present work was aimed to assess the clinical symptoms and signs of skeletal muscle alterations in HT, describe the muscular pathological changes and relate them to the functional thyroid status and to the autoimmune condition of the patient. Clinical and laboratory studies were performed in ten HT patients and three control subjects (hormonal levels and electromyography). Biopsies from their vastus lateralis of quadriceps femoris muscle were analyzed under light (histochemistry and immunofluorescense) and electron microscopy. All patients showed muscle focal alterations, ranging from moderate to severe atrophy, necrosis, activation of satellite cells, presence of autophagosomes, capillary alterations and macrophage and mast cell infiltration, common to autoimmune diseases. The intensity of clinical signs and symptoms was not related to the morphological muscle findings, the electromyography results, or to the state of the thyroid function. Reactions for immunoglobulin in muscle fibers were positive in 80% of the patients. Fiber type II proportion was increased in all patients, with the exception of those treated with L-thyroxine. In conclusion, autoimmune processes in several of the patients may be associated to the skeletal muscle alterations, independently of the functional state of the thyroid gland; however, fiber II type proportion could have been normalized by L-thyroxine treatment.

  15. Subsequent leukaemia in autoimmune disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Försti, Asta; Ji, Jianguang; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients diagnosed with some autoimmune (AI) diseases are at an increased risk of leukaemia but limited data are available on survival. We systematically analysed the risks (standardized incidence ratio, SIR) and survival (hazard ratio, HR) in nine types of leukaemia among 402 462 patients hospitalized for any of 33 AI diseases and compared to persons not hospitalized for AI diseases. Risk for all leukaemia was increased after 13 AI diseases and survival was decreased after six AI diseases. SIRs were increased after all AI diseases for seven types of leukaemia, including SIR 1·69 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1·29-2·19) for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 1·85 (95% CI: 1·65-2·07) for acute myeloid leukaemia, 1·68 (95% CI: 1·37-2·04) for chronic myeloid leukaemia, 2·20 (95% CI: 1·69-2·81) for 'other myeloid leukaemia', 2·45 (95% 1·99-2·98) for 'other and unspecified leukaemia', 1·81 (95% CI: 1·11-2·81) for monocytic leukaemia, and 1·36 (95% CI: 1·08-1·69) for myelofibrosis. The HRs were increased for four types of leukaemia, most for myelofibrosis (1·74, 95% CI: 1·33-2·29) and ALL (1·42, 95% CI: 1·03-1·95). Some AI diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, were associated with increased SIRs and HRs in many types of leukaemia. The present data showed increases in risk and decreases in survival for many types of leukaemia after various AI diseases. Leukaemia is a rare complication in AI disease but findings about this comorbidity at the time of leukaemia diagnosis may help to optimize the treatment and improve survival.

  16. Extending palliative care to patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Sarah K

    2010-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease have an illness which shortens their life and involves a heavy symptom burden for patient and carer. This article discusses some common palliative care issues pertinent to patients with Parkinson's disease.

  17. Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease FOR ... 263-9000 Bethesda, Maryland (January 21, 2014) – Adding quinoa to the gluten-free diet of patients with ...

  18. Patients with Fabry Disease after Enzyme Replacement Therapy Dose Reduction and Switch-2-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Lenders, Malte; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Krämer, Johannes; Duning, Thomas; Reiermann, Stefanie; Sommer, Claudia; Stypmann, Jörg; Blaschke, Daniela; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Hense, Hans-Werner; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Brand, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Because of the shortage of agalsidase-β supply between 2009 and 2012, patients with Fabry disease either were treated with reduced doses or were switched to agalsidase-α. In this observational study, we assessed end organ damage and clinical symptoms with special focus on renal outcome after 2 years of dose-reduction and/or switch to agalsidase-α. A total of 89 adult patients with Fabry disease who had received agalsidase-β (1.0 mg/kg body wt) for >1 year were nonrandomly assigned to continue this treatment regimen (regular-dose group, n=24), to receive a reduced dose of 0.3-0.5 mg/kg and a subsequent switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-α (dose-reduction-switch group, n=28), or to directly switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-α (switch group, n=37) and were followed-up for 2 years. We assessed clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, severe arrhythmia, stroke, progression to ESRD), changes in cardiac and renal function, Fabry-related symptoms (pain, hypohidrosis, diarrhea), and disease severity scores. Determination of renal function by creatinine and cystatin C-based eGFR revealed decreasing eGFRs in the dose-reduction-switch group and the switch group. The Mainz Severity Score Index increased significantly in these two groups (P=0.02 and P<0.001, respectively), and higher frequencies of gastrointestinal pain occurred during follow-up. In conclusion, after 2 years of observation, all groups showed a stable clinical disease course with respect to serious clinical events. However, patients under agalsidase-β dose-reduction and switch or a direct switch to agalsidase-α showed a decline of renal function independent of the eGFR formula used.

  19. Asymmetrical Pedaling Patterns in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Penko, Amanda L.; Hirsch, Joshua R.; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Martin, Philip E.; Blackburn, Gordon; Alberts, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1.5 million Americans are affected by Parkinson's disease [1] which includes the symptoms of postural instability and gait dysfunction. Currently, clinical evaluations of postural instability and gait dysfunction consist of a subjective rater assessment of gait patterns using items from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and assessments can be insensitive to the effectiveness of medical interventions. Current research suggests the importance of cycling for Parkinson's disease patients, and while Parkinson's gait has been evaluated in previous studies, little is known about lower extremity control during cycling. The purpose of this study is to examine the lower extremity coordination patterns of Parkinson's patients during cycling. Methods Twenty five participants, ages 44-72, with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated in an exercise test on a cycle ergometer that was equipped with pedal force measurements. Crank torque, crank angle and power produced by right and left leg were measured throughout the test to calculate Symmetry Index at three stages of exercise (20 Watt, 60 Watt, maximum performance). Findings Decreases in Symmetry Index were observed for average power output in Parkinson's patients as workload increased. Maximum power Symmetry Index showed a significant difference in symmetry between performance at both the 20 Watt and 60 Watt stage and the maximal resistance stage. Minimum power Symmetry Index did not show significant differences across the stages of the test. While lower extremity asymmetries were present in Parkinson's patients during pedaling, these asymmetries did not correlate to postural instability and gait dysfunction Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores. Interpretation This pedaling analysis allows for a more sensitive measure of lower extremity function than the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and may help to provide unique insight into current and

  20. Arterial aging and arterial disease: interplay between central hemodynamics, cardiac work, and organ flow—implications for CKD and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    London, Gerard; Covic, Adrian; Goldsmith, David; Wiecek, Andrzej; Suleymanlar, Gultekin; Ortiz, Alberto; Massy, Ziad; Lindholm, Bengt; Martinez-Castelao, Alberto; Fliser, Danilo; Agarwal, Rajiv; Jager, Kitty J; Dekker, Friedo W; Blankestijn, Peter J; Zoccali, Carmine

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). All epidemiological studies have clearly shown that accelerated arterial and cardiac aging is characteristic of these populations. Arterial premature aging is heterogeneous. It principally involves the aorta and central capacitive arteries, and is characterized by preferential aortic stiffening and disappearance of stiffness/impedance gradients between the central and peripheral arteries. These changes have a double impact: on the heart, upstream, with left ventricular hypertrophy and decreased coronary perfusion; and, downstream, on renal and brain microcirculation (decrease in glomerular filtration and cognitive functions). Multifactorial at origin, the pathophysiology of aortic ‘progeria' and microvascular disorders in CKD/ESRD is not well understood and should be the focus of interest in future studies. PMID:25018896

  1. Nonmotor symptoms in patients with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tie-mei; Yu, Shu-yang; Guo, Peng; Du, Yang; Hu, Yang; Piao, Ying-shan; Zuo, Li-jun; Lian, Teng-hong; Wang, Rui-dan; Yu, Qiu-jin; Jin, Zhao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson disease (PD) is usually accompanied by numerous nonmotor symptoms (NMS), such as neuropsychiatric symptoms, sleep disorders, autonomic dysfunctions, and sensory disturbances. However, it is not clear that the factors influencing the occurrence of NMS and its sequence with motor symptoms (MS). We conducted comprehensive assessments of NMS by using 13 scales in 1119 PD patients. A total of 70.8% PD patients present NMS. Olfactory dysfunction tends to occur in PD patients with older age, more severe depression, sleep problems, and autonomic dysfunctions. Older patients are more likely to have olfactory dysfunction before MS than younger patients. Rapid eye movement behavior disorder is more prone to happen in patients with older age, older onset age, more severe depression, sleep problems, and autonomic dysfunctions. Patients with rapid eye movement behavior disorder before MS are older in onset age than after group. Olfactory dysfunction, constipation, rapid eye movement behavior disorder, and depression, as early warning NMSs of PD, connected to each other. There is a clinical heterogeneity that older patients are more likely to have NMS before MS, while younger patients are opposite. PMID:27977578

  2. Serum uric acid levels and long-term outcomes in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Tokiko; Mochizuki, Toshio; Takei, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku

    2014-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but data regarding the relationship between serum uric acid levels and the long-term outcomes of CKD patients have been limited. The present study evaluated the associations between baseline serum uric acid levels with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The subjects of this study were 551 stage 2-4 CKD patients. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the relationship between serum uric acid tertiles and all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, 50 % reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and development of ESRD, initially without adjustment, and then after adjusting for several groups of covariates. The mean age of the study subjects was 58.5 years, 59.3 % were men, and 10.0 % had diabetes. The mean eGFR was 42.02 ± 18.52 ml/min/1.73 m(2). In all subjects, the mean serum uric acid level was 6.57 ± 1.35 mg/dl, and 52.2 % of study subjects were on hypouricemic therapy (allopurinol; 48.3 %) at baseline. Thirty-one patients (6.1 %) died during a follow-up period of approximately 6 years. There was no significant association between serum uric acid level and all-cause mortality, CVD mortality, development of ESRD and 50 % reduction in eGFR in the unadjusted Cox models. In the adjusted models, hyperuricemia was found to be associated with all-cause mortality and CVD mortality after adjustment with CVD risk factors, kidney disease factors, and allopurinol, but not associated with development of ESRD and 50 % reduction in eGFR. The results of this study showed that hyperuricemia but not serum uric acid levels were associated with all-cause mortality, CVD mortality after adjustments with CVD risk factors, kidney disease factors, and allopurinol in stage 2-4 CKD patients.

  3. Oral Hygiene in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Batista, Leonardo M; Portela de Oliveira, Millena Teles; Magalhaes, Wilrama B; Bastos, Poliana Lima

    2015-11-02

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a multifactorial etiology. The symptoms are characterized by motor disorders - tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural instability, which hinder oral hygiene. Oral and dental health in Parkinson's disease has been under-documented and findings are conflicting. Moreover, a number of dentists have limited experience regarding the management of these patients. This article reviews literature published within the last fifteen years, to better understand the impact of this disease in oral health. A literature search (MEDLINE and PUBMED), using keywords Parkinson Disease and Oral Hygiene, yielded 27 articles, from which 20 were selected. All of the articles were published in English in the last 15 years.

  4. Association of tibia lead and blood lead with end-stage renal disease: A pilot study of African-Americans

    SciTech Connect

    Muntner, Paul . E-mail: pmuntner@tulane.edu; Menke, Andy; Batuman, Vecihi; Rabito, Felicia A.; He Jiang; Todd, Andrew C.

    2007-07-15

    The association between body lead burden and kidney disease remains controversial. Fifty-five African-American end-stage renal disease (ESRD) cases and 53 age- and sex-matched African-American controls without known renal disease were recruited from Tulane University-affiliated dialysis clinics and out-patient clinics, respectively. Blood lead was measured via atomic absorption spectrophotometry and tibia lead (a measure of body lead) was measured via {sup 109}Cd-based K shell X-ray fluorescence. Median blood lead levels were significantly higher among ESRD cases (6 {mu}g/dL) compared to their control counterparts (3 {mu}g/dL; P<0.001). Although no participants had overt lead poisoning (blood lead {>=}25 {mu}g/dL), seven cases but no controls had blood lead levels above 10 {mu}g/dL (P=0.006). The median tibia lead level was 17 micrograms of lead per gram of bone mineral ({mu}g/g) and 13 {mu}g/g among ESRD cases and their control counterparts, respectively (P=0.134). Four ESRD cases (7%), but no controls, had a tibia lead level above 40 {mu}g/g (P=0.115) while a similar proportion of cases and controls had tibia lead between 20 and 39 {mu}g/g (33% and 32%, respectively; P=0.726). After adjustment for potential confounders, the odds ratios of ESRD associated with a tibia lead {>=}20 {mu}g/g and each four-fold higher tibia lead (e.g., 5-20 {mu}g/g) were 1.55 (95% CI: 0.55, 4.41) and 1.88 (95% CI: 0.53, 6.68), respectively. These findings support the need for prospective cohort studies of body lead burden and renal disease progression.

  5. Dyslipidemia, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-chi; Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the relationship between dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular diseases in patients with diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is associated with complications in the cardiovascular and renal system, and is increasing in prevalence worldwide. Modification of the multifactorial risk factors, in particular dyslipidemia, has been suggested to reduce the rates of diabetes-related complications. Dyslipidemia in diabetes is a condition that includes hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein levels, and increased small and dense low-density lipoprotein particles. This condition is associated with higher cardiovascular risk and mortality in diabetic patients. Current treatment guidelines focus on lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level; multiple trials have confirmed the cardiovascular benefits of treatment with statins. Chronic kidney disease also contributes to dyslipidemia, and dyslipidemia in turn is related to the occurrence and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Different patterns of dyslipidemia are associated with different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Some trials have shown that treatment with statins not only decreased the risk of cardiovascular events, but also delayed the progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, studies using statins as the sole treatment of hyperlipidemia in patients on dialysis have not shown benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk. Diabetic patients with nephropathy have a higher risk of cardiovascular events than those without nephropathy. The degree of albuminuria and the reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate are also correlated with the risk of cardiovascular events. Treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers to reduce albuminuria in diabetic patients has been shown to decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  6. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Patients with Neuromuscular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    In neuromuscular disease (NMD) patients with progressive muscle weakness, respiratory muscles are also affected and hypercapnia can increase gradually as the disease progresses. The fundamental respiratory problems NMD patients experience are decreased alveolar ventilation and coughing ability. For these reasons, it is necessary to precisely evaluate pulmonary function to provide the proper inspiratory and expiratory muscle aids in order to maintain adequate respiratory function. As inspiratory muscle weakening progresses, NMD patients experience hypoventilation. At this point, respiratory support by mechanical ventilator should be initiated to relieve respiratory distress symptoms. Patients with adequate bulbar muscle strength and cognitive function who use a non-invasive ventilation aid, via a mouthpiece or a nasal mask, may have their hypercapnia and associated symptoms resolved. For a proper cough assist, it is necessary to provide additional insufflation to patients with inspiratory muscle weakness before using abdominal thrust. Another effective method for managing airway secretions is a device that performs mechanical insufflation-exsufflation. In conclusion, application of non-invasive respiratory aids, taking into consideration characterization of respiratory pathophysiology, have made it possible to maintain a better quality of life in addition to prolonging the life span of patients with NMD. PMID:16807978

  7. Kidney transplantation in patients with systemic sclerosis: a nationwide multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Dominique; Dehay, Julien; Ott, Julien; Sberro, Rebecca; Brunelle, Charlotte; Kamar, Nassim; Colosio, Charlotte; Chatelet, Valérie; Albano, Laetitia; Girerd, Sophie; Audard, Vincent; Barbet, Christelle; Dantal, Jacques; Ducloux, Didier; Durrbach, Antoine; Garrigue, Valérie; Hazzan, Marc; Heng, Anne-Elisabeth; Mariat, Christophe; Merville, Pierre; Rerolle, Jean-Philippe; Moulin, Bruno; Guerrot, Dominique

    2017-03-01

    Kidney transplantation is one of the therapeutic options for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in systemic sclerosis (SS). Current evidence demonstrates poorer patient and graft survival after transplantation in SS than in other primary kidney diseases. All the patients presenting ESRD associated with SS who had received a kidney allograft between 1987 and 2013 were systematically included from 20 French kidney transplantation centres. Thirty-four patients received 36 kidney transplants during the study period. Initial kidney disease was scleroderma renal crisis in 76.4%. Extrarenal involvement of SS was generally stable, except cardiac and gastrointestinal involvements, which worsened after kidney transplantation in 45% and 26% of cases, respectively. Patient survival was 100%, 90.3% and 82.5% at 1, 3 and 5 years post-transplant, respectively. Pulmonary involvement of SS was an independent risk factor of death after transplantation. Death-censored graft survival was 97.2% after 1 and 3 years, and 92.8% after 5 years. Recurrence of scleroderma renal crisis was diagnosed in three cases. In our study, patient and graft survivals after kidney transplantation can be considered as excellent. On this basis, we propose that in the absence of extrarenal contraindication, SS patients presenting with ESRD should be considered for kidney transplantation.

  8. Treatment of osteoporosis in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul D

    2005-03-01

    As glomerular filtration rate (GFR) declines from age-related bone loss or disease that specifically induces a decline in GFR, there are a number of metabolic bone conditions that may accompany the decline in GFR. These metabolic bone conditions span a spectrum from mild-to-severe secondary hyperparathyroidism in early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) to the development of additional heterogeneous forms of bone diseases each with its distinctly quantitative bone histomorphometric characteristics. Osteoporosis can also develop in patients with CKD and ESRD for many reasons beyond age-related bone loss and postmenopausal bone loss. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in patients with severe CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is not as easy to do as it is in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO)--neither fragility fractures nor The World Health Organization bone mineral density criteria can be used to diagnose osteoporosis in this population since all forms of renal bone disease may fracture or have low "T scores". The diagnosis of osteoporosis in patients with CKD/ESRD must be done by first the exclusion of the other forms of renal osteodystrophy, by biochemical profiling or by double tetracycline-labeled bone biopsy; and the finding of low trabecular bone volume. In such patients, preliminary data would suggest that oral bisphosphonates seem to be safe and effective down to GFR levels of 15 mL/min. In patients with stage 5 CKD who are fracturing because of osteoporosis or who are on chronic glucocorticoids, reducing the oral bisphosphonate dosage to half of its usual prescribed dosing for PMO seems reasonable from known bisphosphonate pharmacokinetics, though we do need better scientific data to fully understand bisphosphonate usage in this population.

  9. End-Stage Renal Disease in an Infant With Hajdu-Cheney Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Battelino, Nina; Writzl, Karin; Bratanič, Nevenka; Irving, Melita D; Novljan, Gregor

    2016-06-01

    Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HJCYS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, skeletal disorder caused by mutations in the NOTCH2 signaling pathway for which genetic testing has recently become available. Renal abnormalities are associated in at least 10% of cases. We present an 8-year-old Caucasian boy, born with multiple dysmorphic features consistent with HJCYS. Imaging of the urinary tract revealed bilateral cystic dysplastic kidneys with associated vesicoureteral reflux. Renal function has been impaired since birth and deteriorated progressively to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by the age of two and a half years, when peritoneal dialysis was initiated and only recently renal transplantation was performed. Additional congenital abnormalities and multisystem involvement in HJCYS further complicated management, and he developed refractory anemia. Molecular diagnosis was confirmed by identification of a truncating mutation in exon 34 of NOTCH2. Although, renal abnormalities are considered an integral part of the HJCYS, published reports on ESRD are scarce. In those few published cases, where ESRD was recognized, renal failure developed either in late adolescence or adulthood. This is the first report of early ESRD occurring in a child. Patients with HJCYS may need chronic renal replacement therapy even in early childhood. The management of these children can be challenging given the multisystemic manifestations of HJCYS.

  10. Emotional Working Memory in Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Satler, Corina; Tomaz, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have assessed whether emotional content affects processes supporting working memory in Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Methods We assessed 22 AD patients and 40 elderly controls (EC) with a delayed matching and non-matching to sample task (DMST/DNMST), and a spatial-delayed recognition span task (SRST; unique/varied) using emotional stimuli. Results AD patients showed decreased performance on both tasks compared with EC. With regard to the valence of the stimuli, we did not observe significant performance differences between groups in the DMST/DNMST. However, both groups remembered a larger number of negative than positive or neutral pictures on unique SRST. Conclusion The results suggest that AD patients show a relative preservation of working memory for emotional information, particularly for negative stimuli. PMID:22163239

  11. Immune blood biomarkers of Alzheimer disease patients.

    PubMed

    Avagyan, Hripsime; Goldenson, Ben; Tse, Eric; Masoumi, Ava; Porter, Verna; Wiedau-Pazos, Martina; Sayre, James; Ong, Reno; Mahanian, Michelle; Koo, Patrick; Bae, Susan; Micic, Miodrag; Liu, Philip T; Rosenthal, Mark J; Fiala, Milan

    2009-05-29

    Alzheimer disease (AD) patients have an impairment of anti-amyloid-beta (Abeta) innate immunity and a defect in immune gene transcription [Fiala, M., Liu, P.T., Espinosa-Jeffrey, A., Rosenthal, M.J., Bernard, G., Ringman, J.M., Sayre, J., Zhang, L., Zaghi, J., Dejbakhsh, S., Chiang, B., Hui, J., Mahanian, M., Baghaee, A., Hong, P., Cashman, J., 2007b. Innate immunity and transcription of MGAT-III and Toll-like receptors in Alzheimer's disease patients are improved by bisdemethoxycurcumin. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 104, 12849-12854]. Early diagnosis is a cornerstone of preventive approaches to AD. Phospho-tau and Abeta CSF levels are useful markers of neurodegeneration but not of a process leading to neurodegeneration. To detect an early biomarker of AD, we developed a flow cytometric test of Abeta phagocytosis, which was 94% positive (<400 MFI units) in AD patients (mean age+/-SEM 77+2.2 years; mean score+/-SEM 198.6+/-25.5 MFI units) and 60% positive in MCI patients (77+/-5.6 years; 301+/-106 MFI units). Control subjects, active senior university professors, were 100% negative (74.2+/-4.2 years; 1348+/-174 MFI units). The test had a low specificity in older caregivers and older amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We also tested transcriptional regulation of the genes MGAT-III and Toll-like receptor-3 in macrophages. Macrophages of "Type I" patients (a majority of patients) showed gene down regulation at baseline and up regulation by curcuminoids; macrophages of "Type II" patients showed opposite responses. The results of flow cytometric testing suggest that normal Abeta phagocytosis is associated with healthy cognition and lesser risk of AD. The significance of abnormal results in aged persons should be investigated by prospective studies to determine the risk of AD.

  12. Is CAPD a viable option among ADPKD with end stage renal disease population in India? Its outcomes and economics.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Anupma; Dharshan, R; Bhadhuaria, Dharmendra; Prasad, Narayan; Gupta, Amit; Sharma, R K

    2015-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited renal disease, with 50-75% of these patients requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). The outcome of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in ADPKD with end-disease renal disease (ESRD) is not clearly defined, more so in developing countries. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the outcomes and economics of PD in these ESRD patients and compared them with other causes of ESRD on PD. Data were reviewed of all the PD patients who were followed-up at our institute from January 2007 to December 2011. The inclusion criteria were ADPKD patients who chose PD as the dialysis modality (Group 1), while age and gender-matched ESRD (other than ADPKD) patients who were started on PD during the same period were considered as the other group (Group 2). A total of 26 ADPKD patients underwent PD with an average size of kidneys among ADPKD ESRD patients of 15.2 + 2.1 cm. The overall peritonitis rates were similar among the compared groups. The median survival for the first peritonitis episodes were 1.2 and 1.8 years (95% confidence interval 0.82-1.91) for the control and ADPKD groups, respectively. The overall patient survival was 22 among PKD while five patients died among the control group. Among PKD, one patient died due to intra-cerebral bleed while one patient had severe cyst hemorrhage and infection, while three others had peritonitis and sepsis. Hernia was observed in four ADPKD patients, once on PD that was surgically corrected and PD was resumed in all. Two patients lost the catheter due to peritonitis while one patient had membrane failure while one underwent surgical exploration due to diverticulosis. PD treatment was not prevented by voluminous kidneys in any of these patients and no patient ceased PD treatment due to insufficient peritoneal space. Besides this, the cost on PD was much less as compared with that on hemodialysis (HD). PD is a reasonable mode of RRT among ADPKD, where HD is not

  13. PSYCHOSOMATIC ASPECTS IN PATIENTS WITH DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Tsintsadze, N; Beridze, L; Tsintsadze, N; Krichun, Y; Tsivadze, N; Tsintsadze, M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the magnitude of anxiety and depression in our common dermatological patients and its correlation with age, sex. For this purpose, we used Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale HADS. The psychometric validity of HADS has been established by validating the questionnaire against the structured psychiatric interviews. A study of anxiety and depression in patients with dermatologic diseases was conducted on the basis of outpatients department in 211 patients with dermatologic diseases; among them were 107 male and 104 female, aged 16 to 75 years. Among them were patients with Acne, Alopecia Areata, Psoriasis, Vitiligo, Neurodermatitis, Scabies, Eczema and Other diseases (Atopic Dermatitis, Chronic Urticaria, Lichen Planus, Herpes Zoster, Melasma, Warts and Etc.). Based on studies of patients reveals that 65.4% of them are anxiety, depression - 56.2%, both anxiety and depression in 24.7%, there figures higher than the dates of other authorizes. As a result of a direct link research risk disorder depressive spectrum with sex, age; in woman anxiety and depression occurs more frequently than men, and anxiety occurs more frequently in young age. Especially there are hight frequencies of manifestation of abuse in patients with Psoriasis (anxiety - 83.3%, depression - 69.4%, both - 38.8%), Eczema (anxiety - 73.3%, depression - 56.6%, both - 26.7%), Acne (anxiety - 78.4%, depression - 54%, both - 21.6%), Vitiligo (anxiety - 66.7%, depression - 60%, both - 33.3%). Our study noticed higher dates of anxiety and depression than the dates of other outhorizes.

  14. Hemofiltration and Hemodiafiltration Reduce Intradialytic Hypotension in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Altieri, Paolo; Andrulli, Simeone; Bolasco, Piergiorgio; Sau, Giovanna; Pedrini, Luciano A.; Basile, Carlo; David, Salvatore; Feriani, Mariano; Montagna, Giovanni; Di Iorio, Biagio Raffaele; Memoli, Bruno; Cravero, Raffaella; Battaglia, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic intradialytic hypotension is a common complication of hemodialysis (HD). The application of convective therapies to the outpatient setting may improve outcomes, including intradialytic hypotension. In this multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled study, we randomly assigned 146 long-term dialysis patients to HD (n = 70), online predilution hemofiltration (HF; n = 36), or online predilution hemodiafiltration (HDF; n = 40). The primary end point was the frequency of intradialytic symptomatic hypotension (ISH). Compared with the run-in period, the frequency of sessions with ISH during the evaluation period increased for HD (7.1 to 7.9%) and decreased for both HF (9.8 to 8.0%) and HDF (10.6 to 5.2%) (P < 0.001). Mean predialysis systolic BP increased by 4.2 mmHg among those who were assigned to HDF compared with decreases of 0.6 and 1.8 mmHg among those who were assigned to HD and HF, respectively (P = 0.038). Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated significant risk reductions in ISH for both HF (odds ratio 0.69; 95% confidence interval 0.51 to 0.92) and HDF (odds ratio 0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.33 to 0.63). There was a trend toward higher dropout for those who were assigned to HF (P = 0.107). In conclusion, compared with conventional HD, convective therapies (HDF and HF) reduce ISH in long-term dialysis patients. PMID:20813866

  15. Foods for patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    As a general rule patients with celiac disease must avoid five cereals--wheat rye, triticale, barley and oats. Very sensitive individuals must also avoid two products of these cereals--malt and hydrolyzed vegetable protein. Some less sensitive individuals may be able to tolerate barley and oats in small quantities. All other foods are acceptable, including the cereals corn, rice, buckwheat, millet and sorghum, as well as malt-flavored breakfast cereals. Wine, spirits, beer and ale are also acceptable unless otherwise contraindicated. Monosodium glutamate, other food additives and pharmaceutical preparations are also acceptable. The ingredients of prepackaged processed foods are listed on the labels. Patients with celiac disease must examine labels to ensure that they avoid the harmful cereals. With appropriate precautions they need not be concerned about eating away from home. PMID:7139445

  16. Aquatic therapy for patients with rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    McNeal, R L

    1990-11-01

    Aquatic therapy is justifiably a rapidly expanding, beneficial form of patient treatment. The goals established at the initial and subsequent evaluations usually are met as quickly and as sensibly as possible. Understanding the theory of water techniques is essential in implementing an aquatic therapy program. The success of the program, however, will always depend on the pleasure and benefits achieved by the patients. Remember, rheumatic patients most likely will need to modify their previous daily functioning. Patients need to be aware of the long-term ramifications of the disease process and understand how treatment and care may be altered during various stages of exacerbation and remission. Patient education is critical in ensuring individual responsibility for the changes that must be made when not supervised by a professional. Aquatic therapy is a step in molding a positive lifestyle change for the patient. The patient can be encouraged to be fitness oriented and, at the same time, exercise in a manner that is safe, effective, and biomechanically and physiologically sound. The environment, hopefully, also will be conductive to family and social interaction that ultimately encourages the compliance of long-term exercise programs.

  17. Fertility and contraception in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R J; Holley, J L

    1998-01-01

    The hormonal aberrations that occur with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are presented in this review in relation to fertility and conception among women on dialysis. The imbalance in gonadotropin production in dialysis-dependent men and women is characterized by elevations in luteinizing hormone (LH). In women dialysis patients, the normal estradiol-stimulated LH surge does not occur, resulting in anovulation. In men dialysis patients spermatogenesis is impaired, and low testosterone levels cause elevated LH. Infertility in those with ESRD is a culmination of many factors, including impotence and loss of libido, anovulation, and an altered hormonal milieu. Despite these inhibitors of conception, women on dialysis can conceive; pregnancy has been reported in 1% to 7% of women on dialysis in survey studies. The influence of dialysis mode (hemodialysis v peritoneal dialysis), recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), and dialysis adequacy on the likelihood of conception among patients of either sex on dialysis is unknown. Reduced sexual activity and interest has consistently been reported in the ESRD population. The reasons for this are complex and likely involve the effects of comorbid illnesses, overall health status, body image factors, and hormonal alterations. Nephrologists rarely discuss conception and contraception with their women dialysis patients. Greater attention to these issues is needed.

  18. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christina; Schuchmann, Marcus; Zimmermann, Tim

    2011-02-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a life-threatening complication following solid organ transplantation. Many posttransplant lymphomas develop from the uncontrolled proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B-cells, whereas EBV-negative PTLDs were increasingly recognized within the past decade. Major risk factors for the development of PTLDs after liver transplantation are immunosuppressive therapy and the type of underlying disease: viral hepatitis, autoimmune liver disease, or alcoholic liver cirrhosis contribute to an increased risk for PTLD. Therapeutic regimens include reduction of immunosuppression, the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab, and chemotherapy, as well as new approaches using interferon-α and anti-interleukin-6 antibodies. Despite the different therapeutic regimens, mortality from PTLD remains high. Therefore, it is of major importance to identify patients at risk at an early stage of the disease. In this review, risk factors for PTLD development after liver transplantation, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapy are discussed.

  19. Diabetic nephropathy; principles of diagnosis and treatment of diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nazar, Chaudhary Muhammad Junaid

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a leading epidemic of the present world. It is considered the leading cause of death among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. The complications associated with diabetes mellitus have boosted the number of deaths in the last years. These complications are the result of long lasting effects of diabetes mellitus on the glomerular microvasculature of the kidney. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) develops in patients with several years' medical history of diabetes and renal failure. However, research shows that patients with type 1 diabetes progress early to ESRD as compared to those with type 2. DN is more prevalent in ethnic minorities as compared to other groups in society. There are new and different treatment options available since medical science has progressed due to increased research efforts. Unfortunately, there is no permanent cure. The aim of this article is to explore the research of therapeutic strategies currently in use by medical practitioners in order to increase understanding of DN.

  20. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected.

  1. [Psychopharmacotherapy in patients with cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Cordes, J; Lange-Asschenfeldt, C; Hiemke, C; Kahl, K G

    2012-11-01

    Increased cardiometabolic morbidity and increased overall mortality has been observed in patients with severe mental disorders. Therefore, cardiometabolic safety is an important issue in the treatment of patients with psychiatric disorders, in particular in patients with comorbid cardiometabolic diseases. Frequent adverse side effects include disturbances of lipid and glucose metabolism, body weight changes and alterations of the QTc interval. Dependent on the particular substance used and on factors concerning individual vulnerability, these side effects vary in relative frequency. Therefore, regular monitoring is recommended including ECG. Furthermore, interactions between different medicaments may occur, either leading to enhanced or decreased drug concentrations. Prior to psychopharmacological treatment, proper cardiological treatment is recommended. The management of cardiovascular risks under psychopharmacology requires interdisciplinary cooperation between the cardiologist, general practitioner and psychiatrist.

  2. Exploration of Anaemia as a Progression Factor in African Americans with Cardiovascular Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the higher incidence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) among African Americans, whites in the United States population have a higher prevalence of chronic kidney disease. This may be due, in part, to a faster rate of progression to ESRD among African Americans with kidney disease. Anemia i...

  3. Functional assessment of chronic illness therapy—the fatigue scale exhibits stronger associations with clinical parameters in chronic dialysis patients compared to other fatigue-assessing instruments

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Huang, Jenq-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a high symptom burden, among which fatigue is highly prevalent. Many fatigue-assessing instruments exist, but comparisons among instruments in this patient population have yet to be investigated. Methods. ESRD patients under chronic hemodialysis were prospectively enrolled and seven types of fatigue instruments were administered: Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Fatigue (FACIT-F), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Lee Fatigue Scale (LFS), Fatigue Questionnaire (FQ), Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI), and Short-Form 36-Vitality (SF36-V). Using these instruments, we investigated the correlation between fatigue severity and clinical/biochemical parameters, including demographic/comorbidity profile, dialysis-related complications, and frailty severity. We used regression analysis with serum albumin and frailty severity as the dependent variables to investigate the independent correlations. Results. A total of 46 ESRD patients were enrolled (average age of 67 ± 11.6 years), and 50% of them had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results from the seven tested instruments showed high correlation with each other. We found that the fatigue severity by FACIT-F was significantly associated with age (p = 0.03), serum albumin (p = 0.003) and creatinine (p = 0.02) levels, while SF36-V scores were also significantly associated with age (p = 0.02) and serum creatinine levels (p = 0.04). However, the fatigue severity measured by the FSS, FSI, FQ, BFI, and LFS did not exhibit these associations. Moreover, regression analysis showed that only FACIT-F scores were independently associated with serum albumin levels and frailty severity in ESRD patients. Conclusion. Among the seven fatigue-assessing instruments, only the FACIT-F yielded results that demonstrated significant and independent associations with important outcome-related features in ESRD patients. PMID:26998414

  4. Revascularisation of patients with end-stage renal disease on chronic haemodialysis: bypass surgery versus PCI—analysis of routine statutory health insurance data

    PubMed Central

    Möckel, Martin; Searle, Julia; Baberg, Henning Thomas; Dirschedl, Peter; Levenson, Benny; Malzahn, Jürgen; Mansky, Thomas; Günster, Christian; Jeschke, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to analyse the short-term and long-term outcome of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing percutaneous intervention (PCI) as compared to coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) to evaluate the optimal coronary revascularisation strategy. Design Retrospective analysis of routine statutory health insurance data between 2010 and 2012. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was adjusted all-cause mortality after 30 days and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events at 1 year. Secondary outcomes were repeat revascularisation at 30 days and 1 year and bleeding events within 7 days. Results The total number of cases was n=4123 (PCI; n=3417), median age was 71 (IQR 62–77), 30.4% were women. The adjusted OR for death within 30 days was 0.59 (95% CI 0.43 to 0.81) for patients undergoing PCI versus CABG. At 1 year, the adjusted OR for major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) was 1.58 (1.32 to 1.89) for PCI versus CABG and 1.47 (1.23 to 1.75) for all-cause death. In the subgroup of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), adjusted all-cause mortality at 30 days did not differ significantly between both groups (OR 0.75 (0.47 to 1.20)), whereas in patients without AMI the OR for 30-day mortality was 0.44 (0.28 to 0.68) for PCI versus CABG. At 1 year, the adjusted OR for MACCE in patients with AMI was 1.40 (1.06 to 1.85) for PCI versus CABG and 1.47 (1.08 to 1.99) for mortality. Conclusions In this cohort of unselected patients with ESRD undergoing revascularisation, the 1-year outcome was better for CABG in patients with and without AMI. The 30-day mortality was higher in non-AMI patients with CABG reflecting an early hazard with surgery. In cases where the patient's characteristics and risk profile make it difficult to decide on a revascularisation strategy, CABG could be the preferred option. PMID:27752331

  5. Fabry disease: experience of screening dialysis patients for Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Eiji; Saito, Osamu; Akimoto, Tetsu; Asano, Yasushi

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence rate for Fabry disease is conventionally considered to be 1 case in 40,000; however, due to increased screening accuracy, reports now suggest that prevalence is 1 case in 1,500 among male children, and it is likely that the clinical importance of the condition will increase in the future. In dialysis patients to date, prevalence rates are between 0.16 and 1.2 %. Globotriaosylsphingosine (Lyso-GL-3), which is a substrate of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A), has surfaced as a new biomarker, and is also effective in the determination and monitoring of the effects of enzyme replacement therapy. In terms of genetic abnormalities, the E66Q mutation has recently become a topic of discussion, and although doubts have been expressed over whether or not it is the gene responsible for Fabry disease, there is still a strong possibility that it is a functional genetic polymorphism. At present, the standard treatment for Fabry disease is enzyme replacement therapy, and in order to overcome the problems involved with this, a method of producing recombinant human α-Gal A using methanol-assimilating yeast, and chemical or medicinal chaperone treatment are of current interest. Migalastat hydrochloride is known as a pharmacological chaperone, but is currently in Phase III global clinical trials. Adding saposin B to modified α-N-acetyl galactosaminidase is also under consideration as a treatment method.

  6. Auditory Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Auditory dysfunction is a common clinical symptom that can induce profound effects on the quality of life of those affected. Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is the most prevalent neurological disorder today, but it has generally been considered a rare cause of auditory dysfunction. However, a substantial proportion of patients with stroke might have auditory dysfunction that has been underestimated due to difficulties with evaluation. The present study reviews relationships between auditory dysfunction and types of CVD including cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformation, moyamoya disease, and superficial siderosis. Recent advances in the etiology, anatomy, and strategies to diagnose and treat these conditions are described. The numbers of patients with CVD accompanied by auditory dysfunction will increase as the population ages. Cerebrovascular diseases often include the auditory system, resulting in various types of auditory dysfunctions, such as unilateral or bilateral deafness, cortical deafness, pure word deafness, auditory agnosia, and auditory hallucinations, some of which are subtle and can only be detected by precise psychoacoustic and electrophysiological testing. The contribution of CVD to auditory dysfunction needs to be understood because CVD can be fatal if overlooked. PMID:25401133

  7. Elderly patients and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nimmons, Danielle; Limdi, Jimmy K

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing globally. Coupled with an ageing population, the number of older patients with IBD is set to increase. The clinical features and therapeutic options in young and elderly patients are comparable but there are some significant differences. The wide differential diagnosis of IBD in elderly patients may result in a delay in diagnosis. The relative dearth of data specific to elderly IBD patients often resulting from their exclusion from pivotal clinical trials and the lack of consensus guidelines have made clinical decisions somewhat challenging. In addition, age specific concerns such as co-morbidity; loco-motor and cognitive function, poly-pharmacy and its consequences need to be taken into account. In applying modern treatment paradigms to the elderly, the clinician must consider the potential for more pronounced adverse effects in this vulnerable group and set appropriate boundaries maximising benefit and minimising harm. Meanwhile, clinicians need to make personalised decisions but as evidence based as possible in the holistic, considered and optimal management of IBD in elderly patients. In this review we will cover the clinical features and therapeutic options of IBD in the elderly; as well as addressing common questions and challenges posed by its management. PMID:26855812

  8. Mirror movements in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Donatella; Tiple, Dorina; Suppa, Antonio; Colosimo, Carlo; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Cincotta, Massimo; Defazio, Giovanni; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2008-01-30

    Mirror movements (MM) refer to ipsilateral involuntary movements that appear during voluntary activity in contralateral homologous body regions. This study aimed to compare the frequency and distribution of MM in an unselected sample of 274 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 100 healthy subjects, and to check a possible relationship between MM and parkinsonian features. MM of the hand were scored according to the Woods and Teuber scale. The frequency of MM was lower in PD patients than in healthy subjects (29% vs. 71%, P < 0.0001). The distribution of MM also differed in the two groups being often bilateral in healthy subjects, invariably unilateral in PD patients. When parkinsonian signs were unilateral, MM always manifested on the unaffected side; when parkinsonian signs were bilateral, MM manifested on the less affected side. PD patients manifesting MM scored significantly lower on Hohen and Yahr staging than patients without MM. Likewise, there was a significant inverse correlation between the intensity of MM as rated by the Woods and Teuber score and HY staging (r = -0.16, P < 0.01). The low frequency of MM in PD probably relates to the complex interactions between the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to parkinsonian signs and the mechanisms responsible for movement lateralization.

  9. Effects of Oral L-Carnitine Supplementation on Lipid Profile, Anemia, and Quality of Life in Chronic Renal Disease Patients under Hemodialysis: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Emami Naini, Afsoon; Moradi, Mahnaz; Mortazavi, Mojgan; Amini Harandi, Asghar; Hadizadeh, Mehdi; Shirani, Farhad; Basir Ghafoori, Hamed; Emami Naini, Pardis

    2012-01-01

    In patients on maintenance hemodialysis several factors reduce the body stored carnitine which could lead to dyslipidemia, anemia, and general health in these patients. We evaluated the effect of oral L-carnitine supplementation on lipid profiles, anemia, and quality of life (QOL) in hemodialysis patients. In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis received either L-carnitine 1 g/d (n = 24) or placebo (27 patients) for 16 weeks. At the end of the study, there was a significant decrease in triglyceride (−31.1 ± 38.7 mg/dL, P = 0.001) and a significant increase in HDL (3.7 ± 2.8 mg/dL, P < 0.001) levels in the carnitine group. Decrease in total cholesterol (−6.6 ± 16.0 mg/dL, P = 0.075) and increase in hemoglobin (0.7 ± 1.7 g/dL, P = 0.081) concentrations in the carnitine group were not significant. There was no statistically significant changes in LDL in any group (P > 0.05). Erythropoietin dose was significantly decreased in both the carnitine (−4750 ± 5772 mg, P = 0.001) and the placebo group (−2000 ± 4296 mg, P < 0.05). No improvement was observed in QOL scores of two groups. In ESRD patients under maintenance hemodialysis, oral L-carnitine supplementation may reduce triglyceride and cholesterol and increase HDL and hemoglobin and subsequently reduce needed erythropoietin dose without effect on QOL. PMID:22720143

  10. Lessons from 30 years' data of Korean end-stage renal disease registry, 1985-2015.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dong-Chan; Yun, Sung Ro; Lee, Seoung Woo; Han, Sang Woong; Kim, Won; Park, Jongha; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2015-09-01

    The Korean Society of Nephrology (KSN) launched a nationwide official survey program about dialysis therapy in 1985. Nowadays, the accumulated data for 30 years by this "Insan Prof. Min Memorial end-stage renal disease (ESRD) Registry" program have been providing the essential information for dialysis clinical practice, academic nephrology research, and health management policy. We reviewed 30 years of data to identify important changes and implications for the future improvement of dialysis therapy in Korea. Hemodialysis patients, especially diabetics and elderly patients have increased in number very rapidly during recent years in Korea. The Korean prevalence rate of ESRD patients was about 70% of the United States and about 50% of Japan according to the international comparisons in the annual data report of United States Renal Data System. The blood pressure control, anemia control, and dialysis adequacy have continuously improved year by year. The importance of calcium and phosphorus control has also been increasing because of the increase in long-term dialysis patients. In addition, chronic dialysis complications should be closely monitored and dialysis modifications, such as hemodiafiltration therapy, might be considered. Because of the increase of private clinics and nursing hospitals in dialysis practice, the role of dialysis specialists and continuing education are thought to be essential. For strict cost-effective dialysis control of increasing elderly, diabetic, and long-term dialysis patients, the KSN ESRD patient registration should be run by the KSN and health ministry in cooperation, in which the dialysis fee reimbursement should be accompanied.

  11. Lessons from 30 years’ data of Korean end-stage renal disease registry, 1985–2015

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Dong-Chan; Yun, Sung Ro; Lee, Seoung Woo; Han, Sang Woong; Kim, Won; Park, Jongha; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2015-01-01

    The Korean Society of Nephrology (KSN) launched a nationwide official survey program about dialysis therapy in 1985. Nowadays, the accumulated data for 30 years by this “Insan Prof. Min Memorial end-stage renal disease (ESRD) Registry” program have been providing the essential information for dialysis clinical practice, academic nephrology research, and health management policy. We reviewed 30 years of data to identify important changes and implications for the future improvement of dialysis therapy in Korea. Hemodialysis patients, especially diabetics and elderly patients have increased in number very rapidly during recent years in Korea. The Korean prevalence rate of ESRD patients was about 70% of the United States and about 50% of Japan according to the international comparisons in the annual data report of United States Renal Data System. The blood pressure control, anemia control, and dialysis adequacy have continuously improved year by year. The importance of calcium and phosphorus control has also been increasing because of the increase in long-term dialysis patients. In addition, chronic dialysis complications should be closely monitored and dialysis modifications, such as hemodiafiltration therapy, might be considered. Because of the increase of private clinics and nursing hospitals in dialysis practice, the role of dialysis specialists and continuing education are thought to be essential. For strict cost-effective dialysis control of increasing elderly, diabetic, and long-term dialysis patients, the KSN ESRD patient registration should be run by the KSN and health ministry in cooperation, in which the dialysis fee reimbursement should be accompanied. PMID:26484037

  12. Rationale and Design of A Trial of Sertraline vs. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for End-stage Renal Disease Patients with Depression (ASCEND)

    PubMed Central

    Hedayati, S. Susan; Daniel, Divya M.; Cohen, Scott; Comstock, Bryan; Cukor, Daniel; Diaz-Linhart, Yaminette; Dember, Laura M.; Dubovsky, Amelia; Greene, Tom; Grote, Nancy; Heagerty, Patrick; Katon, Wayne; Kimmel, Paul L.; Kutner, Nancy; Linke, Lori; Quinn, Davin; Rue, Tessa; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Unruh, Mark; Weisbord, Steven; Young, Bessie A.; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2015-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is highly prevalent in patients with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) treated with maintenance hemodialysis (HD). Despite the high prevalence and robust data demonstrating an independent association between depression and poor clinical and patient-reported outcomes, MDD is under-treated when identified in such patients. This may in part be due to the paucity of evidence confirming the safety and efficacy of treatments for depression in this population. It is also unclear whether HD patients are interested in receiving treatment for depression. ASCEND (Clinical Trials Identifier Number NCT02358343), A Trial of Sertraline vs. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for End-stage Renal Disease Patients with Depression, was designed as a multi-center, 12-week, open-label, randomized, controlled trial of prevalent HD patients with comorbid MDD or dysthymia. It will compare (1) a single Engagement Interview vs. a control visit for the probability of initiating treatment for comorbid depression in up to 400 patients; and (2) individual chair-side CBT vs. flexible-dose treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, sertraline, for improvement of depressive symptoms in 180 of the up to 400 patients. The evolution of depressive symptoms will also be examined in a prospective longitudinal cohort of 90 HD patients who choose not to be treated for depression. We discuss the rationale and design of ASCEND, the first large-scale randomized controlled trial evaluating efficacy of non-pharmacologic vs. pharmacologic treatment of depression in HD patients for patient-centered outcomes. PMID:26621218

  13. Emotional trauma associated with renal disease and natural disasters.

    PubMed

    McClellan, M J

    2001-10-01

    Emotional trauma frequently follows any disaster such as fire, flood, earthquake, accidents, war, bombings, and life-threatening disease. One such disease is end stage renal disease (ESRD), an irreversible, progressive loss of renal function (Lancaster, 1995). Since this is a "do or die" situation, it requires artificial methods of hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, or transplant, which require learned coping skills. Emotional trauma may occur pre or post-disaster and may include flashbacks when events trigger suppressed memories or unresolved emotions. Aftercare of disasters requires dedicated professionals to guide patients toward essential lifelines.

  14. Lower Muscle Endurance in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Henning; Aagaard, Niels K.; Jakobsen, Johannes; Dorup, Inge; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease often complain of restricted physical capacity, which could be due to decreased muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to assess the muscular endurance in patients with alcoholic liver disease. In a cross sectional study, 24 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 22 controls were evaluated using…

  15. Fast renal decline to end-stage renal disease: an unrecognized feature of nephropathy in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krolewski, Andrzej S; Skupien, Jan; Rossing, Peter; Warram, James H

    2017-03-30

    A new model of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes emerged from our studies of Joslin Clinic patients. The dominant feature is progressive renal decline, not albuminuria. This decline is a unidirectional process commencing while patients have normal renal function and, in the majority, progressing steadily (linearly) to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While an individual's rate of renal decline is constant, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope varies widely among individuals from -72 to -3.0 ml/min/year. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines define rapid progression as rate of eGFR declines > 5 ml/min/year, a value exceeded by 80% of patients in Joslin's type 1 diabetes ESRD cohort. The extraordinary range of slopes within the rapid progression category prompted us to partition it into "very fast," "fast" and "moderate" decline. We showed, for the first time, that very fast and fast decline from normal eGFR to ESRD within 2 to 10 years constitutes 50% of the Joslin cohort. In this review we present data about frequency of fast decliners in both diabetes types, survey some mechanisms underlying fast renal decline, discuss methods of identifying patients at risk and comment on the need for effective therapeutic interventions. Whether the initiating mechanism of fast renal decline affects glomerulus, tubule, interstitium or vasculature is unknown. Since no animal model mimics progressive renal decline, studies in humans are needed. Prospective studies searching for markers predictive of the rate of renal decline yield findings that may make detection of fast decliners feasible. Identifying such patients will be the foundation for developing effective individualized methods to prevent or delay onset of ESRD in diabetes.

  16. CDC Group EO-4 and Candida tropicalis Peritonitis in a Patient on Peritoneal Dialysis after Upper Endoscopy, Colonoscopy and Coil Embolization of the Gastroduodenal Artery.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Shameek; Ziemba, Yonah; Jaiswal, Shikha; Frank, Adam; Brahmbhatt, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an excellent form of renal replacement therapy for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Over 10,000 patients receive PD in the United States [United States Renal Data System: 2015 USRDS Annual Data Report: Epidemiology of Kidney Disease in the United States, 2015]. PD has superior outcomes compared to hemodialysis in the first 2 years of ESRD [Sinnakirouchenan and Holley: Adv Chronic Kidney Dis 2011;18: 428-432]. However, peritonitis is a known complication and may result in significant morbidity and necessitate transition to hemodialysis, which increases medical costs [Holley and Piraino: Semin Dial 1990;3: 245-248]. We report the first case of a PD patient who underwent endoscopy, colonoscopy and CT angiogram with coil embolization for gastrointestinal bleeding without antibiotic prophylaxis and subsequently developed CDC group EO-4 organism and fungal peritonitis.

  17. CDC Group EO-4 and Candida tropicalis Peritonitis in a Patient on Peritoneal Dialysis after Upper Endoscopy, Colonoscopy and Coil Embolization of the Gastroduodenal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Shameek; Ziemba, Yonah; Jaiswal, Shikha; Frank, Adam; Brahmbhatt, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an excellent form of renal replacement therapy for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Over 10,000 patients receive PD in the United States [United States Renal Data System: 2015 USRDS Annual Data Report: Epidemiology of Kidney Disease in the United States, 2015]. PD has superior outcomes compared to hemodialysis in the first 2 years of ESRD [Sinnakirouchenan and Holley: Adv Chronic Kidney Dis 2011;18: 428-432]. However, peritonitis is a known complication and may result in significant morbidity and necessitate transition to hemodialysis, which increases medical costs [Holley and Piraino: Semin Dial 1990;3: 245-248]. We report the first case of a PD patient who underwent endoscopy, colonoscopy and CT angiogram with coil embolization for gastrointestinal bleeding without antibiotic prophylaxis and subsequently developed CDC group EO-4 organism and fungal peritonitis. PMID:28100993

  18. Influence of nutritional education on hemodialysis patients' knowledge and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Amanpour, Farzaneh; Dadgari, Ali

    2016-03-01

    To determine the effects of educational instructions on hemodialysis patients' knowledge and quality of life (QOL), we studied 99 patients randomly assigned to control and experimental groups after participation in a pretest exam. The two groups were not significantly different in terms of demographic composition. The instrument used in this study was a questionnaire regarding patients' knowledge and the standard questionnaire to assess QOL for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Then, intervention (nutritional education) was conducted in the experimental group lasting for 12 weeks. After 16 weeks, a post test regarding subjects' knowledge on dietary instructions and their QOL were as conducted. There was no significant difference in QOL score and knowledge score before and after intervention in the control group, but there was a significant difference in the experimental group. In addition, after the intervention, the difference in knowledge and QOL score persisted between the two groups. The results of this study supported the positive effects of educational program on patients' knowledge and QOL among ESRD patients. It is recommended that dietary instruction be included in all educational programs to improve ESRD patients' QOL.

  19. Advanced glycation end products, carotid atherosclerosis, and circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroki; Koyama, Hidenori; Fukumoto, Shinya; Tanaka, Shinji; Shoji, Takuhito; Shoji, Tetsuo; Emoto, Masanori; Tahara, Hideki; Inaba, Masaaki; Kakiya, Ryusuke; Tabata, Tsutomu; Miyata, Toshio; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2011-04-01

    Numbers of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been shown to be decreased in subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the mechanism of which remained poorly understood. In this study, mutual association among circulating EPC levels, carotid atherosclerosis, serum pentosidine, and skin autofluorescence, a recently established noninvasive measure of advanced glycation end products accumulation, was examined in 212 ESRD subjects undergoing hemodialysis. Numbers of circulating EPCs were measured as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) VEGFR2+ cells and progenitor cells as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) fraction by flow cytometry. Skin autofluorescence was assessed by the autofluorescence reader; and serum pentosidine, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Carotid atherosclerosis was determined as intimal-medial thickness (IMT) measured by ultrasound. Circulating EPCs were significantly and inversely correlated with skin autofluorescence in ESRD subjects (R = -0.216, P = .002), but not with serum pentosidine (R = -0.079, P = .25). Circulating EPCs tended to be inversely associated with IMT (R = -0.125, P = .069). Intimal-medial thickness was also tended to be correlated positively with skin autofluorescence (R = 0.133, P = .054) and significantly with serum pentosidine (R = 0.159, P = .019). Stepwise multiple regression analyses reveal that skin autofluorescence, but not serum pentosidine and IMT, was independently associated with low circulating EPCs. Of note, skin autofluorescence was also inversely and independently associated with circulating progenitor cells. Thus, tissue accumulated, but not circulating, advanced glycation end products may be a determinant of a decrease in circulating EPCs in ESRD subjects.

  20. Famous Stone Patients and Their Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael E.

    2007-04-01

    The fact that stone patients have endured much throughout the ages and that prior to our current era, when the ultimate horror, "being cut for the stone" was the only alternative to the repeated episodes of colic, should be recalled from time to time. Urolithiasis has affected humanity throughout the ages and has been indiscriminate to those lives it touched. A full accounting of those who have suffered and recorded their agonies is beyond the scope of this investigation; however, even a partial accounting is valuable for present day physicians who care for those with stone disease. For the present work, the historical accounts of stone disease literature were scrutinized for individual sufferers who could be cross-referenced from other sources as legitimately afflicted by stones. Only those patients that could be documented and were (or are) well known were included, because the internet is now a verdant repository of thousands of "not so well knowns." Reliable historical data was found for a variety of persons from the pre-Christian era to the present, including those remembered as philosophers and scientists, physicians, clergy, leaders and rulers, entertainers, athletes and fictitious/Hollywood-type individuals. Verified accounts of famous stone formers were chosen for this paper, and are presented in chronological order. The list of urolithiasis sufferers presented here is undoubtedly incomplete, but it is not through lack of trying that they are missing. Most often, the suffering do so silently, and that is always allowed.

  1. Outcomes of Bowel Resection in Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    There is limited data regarding outcomes of bowel resection in patients with Crohn's disease. We sought to investigate complications of such patients after bowel resection. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases were used to examine the clinical data of Crohn's patients who underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to investigate outcomes of such patients. We sampled a total of 443,950 patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Of these, 20.5 per cent had bowel resection. Among patients who had bowel resection, 51 per cent had small bowel Crohn's disease, 19.4 per cent had large bowel Crohn's disease, and 29.6 per cent had both large and small bowel Crohn's disease. Patients with large bowel disease had higher mortality risk compared with small bowel disease [1.8% vs 1%, adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.42, P < 0.01]. Risks of postoperative renal failure (AOR: 1.56, P < 0.01) and respiratory failure (AOR: 1.77, P < 0.01) were higher in colonic disease compared with small bowel disease but postoperative enteric fistula was significantly higher in patients with small bowel Crohn's disease (AOR: 1.90, P < 0.01). Of the patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease, 20.5 per cent underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Although colonic disease has a higher mortality risk, small bowel disease has a higher risk of postoperative fistula.

  2. Plasma protein thiolation index (PTI) as a biomarker of thiol-specific oxidative stress in haemodialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Graziano; Reggiani, Francesco; Podestà, Manuel A; Garavaglia, Maria Lisa; Portinaro, Nicola M; Milzani, Aldo; Badalamenti, Salvatore; Dalle-Donne, Isabella

    2015-12-01

    The role of oxidative stress in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), which occurs at significantly higher levels than in the general population, is often underestimated in clinical practice. Emerging evidence highlights the strong correlation of oxidative stress with chronic inflammation and cardiovascular disease, which are highly prevalent in most patients on maintenance haemodialysis (HD) and are a major risk factor for mortality in this population. In this study, total plasma thiols and plasma S-thiolated proteins were measured in patients with ESRD, before and after a regular HD session, and compared to age-matched healthy subjects. We found a significant decrease in the level of total plasma thiols and, conversely, a significant increase in the level of S-thiolated proteins in these patients. In most patients, post-HD plasma level of total thiols did not differ from the one in healthy subjects, whereas plasma level of S-thiolated proteins was lower in HD patients than in age-matched healthy controls. This suggests that a single HD session restores plasma thiol redox status and re-establishes the antioxidant capacity of plasma thiols. Additionally, we determined protein thiolation index (PTI), i.e., the molar ratio between the sum of all low molecular mass thiols bound to S-thiolated plasma proteins and protein free cysteinyl residues. Patients with ESRD had a significantly higher PTI compared to age-matched healthy subjects and HD was associated with a decrease in PTI to normal, or lower than normal, levels. Although this study is limited in size, our results suggest that PTI is a useful indicator of thiol-specific oxidative stress in patients with ESRD on maintenance HD. This study also emphasizes that PTI determination is a cheap and simple tool suitable for large-scale clinical studies that could be used for routine screening of thiol-specific oxidative stress.

  3. Lumbo-sacral spine disease due to bovine tuberculosis in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nawaid; Srinivasan, Koottalai; Panayi, Jeannette; Moudgil, Harmesh

    2011-12-01

    Lumbo-sacral spinal disease due to bovine tuberculosis (TB) in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease is rare. We report this unpredicted finding in an immunocompetent patient and discuss the natural history in an area of low prevalence.

  4. Effects of Cinacalcet and Concurrent Low-Dose Vitamin D on FGF23 Levels in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiguang; Krebill, Ron; Menard, Rochelle; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) levels are elevated in ESRD and have been associated with adverse outcomes. The effects of various treatments for secondary hyperparathyroidism on FGF23 levels in ESRD have not been examined in a clinical trial. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We assessed intact FGF23 levels in 91 subjects over the course of the ACHIEVE trial, which was designed to compare escalating doses of Cinacalcet plus fixed low-dose calcitriol analogs (Cinaclcet-D) with titration of calcitriol analogs alone (Flex-D) to suppress parathyroid hormone. Between-group and within-group changes in log-transformed FGF23 levels were analyzed. Factors associated with change in FGF23 were assessed using a multiple regression model. Results: Intact FGF23 levels were markedly elevated in subjects at baseline. A statistically significant difference in percent change in log FGF23 levels was observed between treatment groups (P < 0.002). The Cinacalcet-D group had a significant decrease in percent change in log FGF23 levels (corrected P = 0.021), whereas FGF23 levels trended toward an increase in the Flex-D group. Change in FGF23 level was significantly associated with changes in levels of phosphate (P < 0.0001) and calcium (P = 0.0002) but not parathyroid hormone. Conclusions: Treatment with Cinacalcet plus low-dose calcitriol analogs results in lower FGF23 levels compared with a treatment regimen using calcitriol analogs alone in ESRD. The mechanisms underlying the differential effects of these treatment regimens on FGF23 levels and the clinical impact of these changes on FGF23 remain to be defined. PMID:19965548

  5. Nephropathy in dietary hyperoxaluria: A potentially preventable acute or chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Glew, Robert H; Sun, Yijuan; Horowitz, Bruce L; Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Barry, Marc; Fair, Joanna R; Massie, Larry; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2014-01-01

    Hyperoxaluria can cause not only nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, but also renal parenchymal disease histologically characterized by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals throughout the renal parenchyma, profound tubular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. Hyperoxaluric nephropathy presents clinically as acute or chronic renal failure that may progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This sequence of events, well recognized in the past in primary and enteric hyperoxalurias, has also been documented in a few cases of dietary hyperoxaluria. Estimates of oxalate intake in patients with chronic dietary hyperoxaluria who developed chronic kidney disease or ESRD were comparable to the reported average oxalate content of the diets of certain populations worldwide, thus raising the question whether dietary hyperoxaluria is a primary cause of ESRD in these regions. Studies addressing this question have the potential of improving population health and should be undertaken, alongside ongoing studies which are yielding fresh insights into the mechanisms of intestinal absorption and renal excretion of oxalate, and into the mechanisms of development of oxalate-induced renal parenchymal disease. Novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for treating all types of hyperoxaluria are expected to develop from these studies. PMID:25374807

  6. Expression of periodontal interleukin-6 protein is increased across patients with neither periodontal disease nor diabetes, patients with periodontal disease alone and patients with both diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Jonathan H.; Hardy, Douglas Crane; Schuyler, Corinne A.; Slate, Elizabeth H.; Huang, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives Epidemiological studies have established that patients with diabetes have an increased prevalence and severity of periodontal disease. Interleukin (IL)-6, a multifunctional cytokine, plays a role in the tissue inflammation that characterizes periodontal disease. Our recent study has shown a trend of increase in periodontal IL-6 expression at the mRNA level across patients with neither periodontal disease nor diabetes, patients with periodontal disease alone and patients with both diseases. However, the periodontal IL-6 expression at the protein level in these patients has not been investigated. Material and Methods Periodontal tissue specimens were collected from eight patients without periodontal disease and diabetes (group 1), from 17 patients with periodontal disease alone (group 2) and from 10 patients with both periodontal disease and diabetes (group 3). The frozen sections were prepared from these tissue specimens and IL-6 protein expression was detected and quantified. Results The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test showed that differences in IL-6 protein levels among the three groups were statistically significant (p = 0.035). Nonparametric analysis using Jonckheere-Terpstra test showed a tendency of increase in periodontal IL-6 protein levels across group 1 to group 2 to group 3 (p = 0.006). Parametric analysis of variance (ANOVA) on IL-6 protein levels showed that neither age nor gender significantly affected the difference of IL-6 levels among the groups. Conclusion Periodontal IL-6 expression at the protein level is increased across patients with neither periodontal disease nor diabetes, patients with periodontal disease alone, and patients with both diseases. PMID:20682019

  7. The Expert Patient and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The concept of “expert patient” has been developed in the last two decades to define a patient who has a significant knowledge of his/her disease and treatment in addition to self-management skills. However, this concept has evolved over the last years, and these patients are now considered, not only to be more efficient in the management of their own condition and communicating effectively with health professionals, but to also act as educators for other patients and as resources for the last, provide feedback on care delivery, and be involved in the production and implementation of practice guidelines, as well as in the development and conduct of research initiatives. There are some barriers, however, to the integration of this new contributor to the health care team, and specific requirements need to be considered for an individual to be considered as an expert. This new player has, however, a potentially important role to improve current care, particularly in respiratory health. PMID:27445572

  8. Hypertension, End-Stage Renal Disease and Rehabilitation: A Look at Black Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Ivor Lensworth; Ackah, Samuel

    1992-01-01

    Reviews the important relationship between end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and hypertension for African Americans; and considers issues associated with ESRD and the subsequent need for kidney transplants, including organ availability. Individual and societal implications of these diseases are discussed. (SLD)

  9. Geriatric syndromes are potential determinants of the medication adherence status in prevalent dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Geriatric syndromes (GS) exhibit high prevalence in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) under chronic dialysis irrespective of age. We sought to determine whether GS influences medication adherence in ESRD patients. Methods. A prospective cohort of chronic dialysis patients was assembled. The presence of GS components, including frailty/prefrailty, polypharmacy, and malnutrition, were ascertained through a validated questionnaire, electronic records and chart abstraction, and laboratory tests. The severity of medication non-adherence was defined using the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS). Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed targeting MMAS results and incorporating relevant clinical features and GS. Results. The prevalence of frailty/pre-frailty, polypharmacy, and hypoalbuminemia/ malnutrition among the enrolled participants was 66.7%, 94%, and 14%, respectively. The average MMAS scores in these dialysis patients were 2 ± 1.7 (range, 0–6), with only 15.7% exhibiting high medication adherence. Multiple regression analyses showed that the absence of frailty/pre-frailty (P = 0.01) were significantly associated with poorer medication adherence, while the presence of polypharmacy (P = 0.02) and lower serum albumin, a potential sign of malnutrition (P = 0.03), were associated with poor adherence in another model. Conclusion. This study is among the very few reports addressing GS and medication adherence, especially in ESRD patients. Interventions targeting frailty, polypharmacy, and malnutrition might potentially improve the medication non-adherence and symptom control in these pill-burdened patients. PMID:27326380

  10. Renal abnormalities in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ataga, K I; Orringer, E P

    2000-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia and the related hemoglobinopathies are associated with a large spectrum of renal abnormalities. The patients have impaired urinary concentrating ability, defects in urinary acidification and potassium excretion, and supranormal proximal tubular function. The latter is manifest by increased secretion of creatinine and by reabsorption of phosphorus and beta(2)-microglobulin. Young patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have supranormal renal hemodynamics with elevations in both effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These parameters decrease with age as well as following the administration of prostaglandin inhibitors. Proteinuria, a common finding in adults with sickle cell disease, may progress to the nephrotic syndrome. Proteinuria, hypertension, and increasing anemia predict end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While ESRD can be managed by dialysis and/or renal transplantation, there may be an increased rate of complications in renal transplant recipients with SCD. Hematuria is seen in individuals with all of the SCDs as well as with sickle cell trait. In most cases the etiology of the hematuria turns out to be benign. However, there does appear to be an increased association between SCD and renal medullary carcinoma. Therefore, those SCD patients who present with hematuria should initially undergo a thorough evaluation in order to exclude this aggressive neoplasm. Papillary necrosis may occur due to medullary ischemia and infarction. Erythropoietin levels are usually lower than expected for their degree of anemia and decrease further as renal function deteriorates. An abnormal balance of renal prostaglandins may be responsible for some of the changes in sickle cell nephropathy. Acute renal failure is a component of the acute multiorgan failure syndrome (MOFS). Finally, progression of sickle cell nephropathy to ESRD may be slowed by adequate control of hypertension and proteinuria. However, the prevention of the

  11. [Autonomy of the patient with chronic diseases: from passive patient to active patient].

    PubMed

    González Mestre, Assumpció

    2014-01-01

    Due to social, economic and cultural changes, there has been a transformation of Health Services around the world. A new figure has emerged from this: the Active Patient, more responsible, with more information and willing to change his life as a chronic patient. In order to respond to this new situation, several countries have established initiatives such as self-reliance programmes for chronic patients. The aim of this article is to underline the Expert Patient Programme Catalonia(®) and to explain its operation and the results obtained up until now. The purpose of this program is to improve the experience of chronic disease by patients, from meetings in which an expert patient provides his knowledge and experiences to a group of patients with the same disease, with the aim of promoting changes in habits and lifestyles that improve the quality of life and the coexistence of the person with his chronic process.

  12. Hypoxia: The Force that Drives Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiangwei; Colgan, Sean P; Shelley, Carl Simon

    2016-01-01

    In the United States the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) reached epidemic proportions in 2012 with over 600,000 patients being treated. The rates of ESRD among the elderly are disproportionally high. Consequently, as life expectancy increases and the baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, the already heavy burden imposed by ESRD on the US health care system is set to increase dramatically. ESRD represents the terminal stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A large body of evidence indicating that CKD is driven by renal tissue hypoxia has led to the development of therapeutic strategies that increase kidney oxygenation and the contention that chronic hypoxia is the final common pathway to end-stage renal failure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that one of the most potent means by which hypoxic conditions within the kidney produce CKD is by inducing a sustained inflammatory attack by infiltrating leukocytes. Indispensable to this attack is the acquisition by leukocytes of an adhesive phenotype. It was thought that this process resulted exclusively from leukocytes responding to cytokines released from ischemic renal endothelium. However, recently it has been demonstrated that leukocytes also become activated independent of the hypoxic response of endothelial cells. It was found that this endothelium-independent mechanism involves leukocytes directly sensing hypoxia and responding by transcriptional induction of the genes that encode the β2-integrin family of adhesion molecules. This induction likely maintains the long-term inflammation by which hypoxia drives the pathogenesis of CKD. Consequently, targeting these transcriptional mechanisms would appear to represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. PMID:26847481

  13. Effects of lowering LDL cholesterol on progression of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Richard; Lewis, David; Emberson, Jonathan; Reith, Christina; Agodoa, Lawrence; Cass, Alan; Craig, Jonathan C; de Zeeuw, Dick; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Fellström, Bengt; Levin, Adeera; Wheeler, David C; Walker, Rob; Herrington, William G; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J

    2014-08-01

    Lowering LDL cholesterol reduces the risk of developing atherosclerotic events in CKD, but the effects of such treatment on progression of kidney disease remain uncertain. Here, 6245 participants with CKD (not on dialysis) were randomly assigned to simvastatin (20 mg) plus ezetimibe (10 mg) daily or matching placebo. The main prespecified renal outcome was ESRD (defined as the initiation of maintenance dialysis or kidney transplantation). During 4.8 years of follow-up, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe resulted in an average LDL cholesterol difference (SEM) of 0.96 (0.02) mmol/L compared with placebo. There was a nonsignificant 3% reduction in the incidence of ESRD (1057 [33.9%] cases with simvastatin plus ezetimibe versus 1084 [34.6%] cases with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.89 to 1.05; P=0.41). Similarly, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe had no significant effect on the prespecified tertiary outcomes of ESRD or death (1477 [47.4%] events with treatment versus 1513 [48.3%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.04; P=0.34) or ESRD or doubling of baseline creatinine (1189 [38.2%] events with treatment versus 1257 [40.2%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.01; P=0.09). Exploratory analyses also showed no significant effect on the rate of change in eGFR. Lowering LDL cholesterol by 1 mmol/L did not slow kidney disease progression within 5 years in a wide range of patients with CKD.

  14. Effects of Lowering LDL Cholesterol on Progression of Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Richard; Lewis, David; Emberson, Jonathan; Reith, Christina; Agodoa, Lawrence; Cass, Alan; Craig, Jonathan C.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Fellström, Bengt; Levin, Adeera; Wheeler, David C.; Walker, Rob; Herrington, William G.; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J.; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J.; Reith, Christina; Emberson, Jonathan; Wheeler, David C.; Tomson, Charles; Wanner, Christoph; Krane, Vera; Cass, Alan; Craig, Jonathan; Neal, Bruce; Jiang, Lixin; Hooi, Lai Seong; Levin, Adeera; Agodoa, Lawrence; Gaziano, Mike; Kasiske, Bertram; Walker, Rob; Massy, Ziad A.; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Krairittichai, Udom; Ophascharoensuk, Vuddidhej; Fellström, Bengt; Holdaas, Hallvard; Tesar, Vladimir; Wiecek, Andrzej; Grobbee, Diederick; de Zeeuw, Dick; Grönhagen-Riska, Carola; Dasgupta, Tanaji; Lewis, David; Herrington, Will; Mafham, Marion; Majoni, William; Wallendszus, Karl; Grimm, Richard; Pedersen, Terje; Tobert, Jonathan; Armitage, Jane; Baxter, Alex; Bray, Christopher; Chen, Yiping; Chen, Zhengming; Hill, Michael; Knott, Carol; Parish, Sarah; Simpson, David; Sleight, Peter; Young, Alan; Collins, Rory

    2014-01-01

    Lowering LDL cholesterol reduces the risk of developing atherosclerotic events in CKD, but the effects of such treatment on progression of kidney disease remain uncertain. Here, 6245 participants with CKD (not on dialysis) were randomly assigned to simvastatin (20 mg) plus ezetimibe (10 mg) daily or matching placebo. The main prespecified renal outcome was ESRD (defined as the initiation of maintenance dialysis or kidney transplantation). During 4.8 years of follow-up, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe resulted in an average LDL cholesterol difference (SEM) of 0.96 (0.02) mmol/L compared with placebo. There was a nonsignificant 3% reduction in the incidence of ESRD (1057 [33.9%] cases with simvastatin plus ezetimibe versus 1084 [34.6%] cases with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.89 to 1.05; P=0.41). Similarly, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe had no significant effect on the prespecified tertiary outcomes of ESRD or death (1477 [47.4%] events with treatment versus 1513 [48.3%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.04; P=0.34) or ESRD or doubling of baseline creatinine (1189 [38.2%] events with treatment versus 1257 [40.2%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.01; P=0.09). Exploratory analyses also showed no significant effect on the rate of change in eGFR. Lowering LDL cholesterol by 1 mmol/L did not slow kidney disease progression within 5 years in a wide range of patients with CKD. PMID:24790178

  15. Managing patients for zoonotic disease in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, Clifford; Corning, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Zoonoses involve infections and infestations transmissible from animals to humans. Zoonoses are a major global threat. Exposure to zoonotic pathogens exists in various settings including encroachment on nature; foreign travel; pet keeping; bushmeat consumption; attendance at zoological parks, petting zoos, school ‘animal contact experiences’, wildlife markets, circuses, and domesticated and exotic animal farms. Under-ascertainment is believed to be common and the frequency of some zoonotic disease appears to be increasing. Zoonoses include direct, indirect and aerosolized transmission. Improved awareness of zoonoses in the hospital environment may be important to the growing need for prevention and control. We reviewed relevant literature for the years 2000 to present and identified a significant need for the promotion of awareness and management of zoonoses in the hospital environment. This article provides a new decision-tree, as well as staff and patient guidance on the prevention and control of zoonoses associated with hospitals. PMID:24040497

  16. Technology innovation for patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mitsides, Nicos; Keane, David F; Lindley, Elizabeth; Mitra, Sandip

    2014-01-01

    The loss of kidney function is a life-changing event leading to life-long dependence on healthcare. Around 5000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure every year. Historically, technology in renal medicine has been employed for replacement therapies. Recently, a lot of emphasis has been placed on technologies that aid early identification and prevent progression of kidney disease, while at the same time empowering affected individuals to gain control over their chronic illness. There is a shift in diversity of technology development, driven by collaborative innovation initiatives such the National Institute's for Health Research Healthcare Technology Co-operative for Devices for Dignity. This has seen the emergence of the patient as a key figure in designing technologies that are fit for purpose, while business involvement has ensured uptake and sustainability of these developments. An embodiment of this approach is the first successful Small Business Research Initiative in the field of renal medicine in the UK.

  17. Updated management of chronic kidney disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hass, Virginia McCoy

    2014-06-01

    Chronic diseases, including chronic kidney disease (CKD), are the primary threat to global public health in the 21st century. Recently updated guidelines from the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative provide patient care benchmarks that physician assistants can use when caring for patients with diabetes and CKD and developing clinical performance improvement plans.

  18. Association between human resources and risk of hospitalisation in end-stage renal disease outpatients receiving haemodialysis: a longitudinal cohort study using claim data during 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon-Hee; Han, Kyu-Tae; Nam, Chung Mo; Moon, Ki Tae; Kim, Woorim; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objective The number of patients requiring haemodialysis has gradually increased in South Korea. Owing to this growth, concerns have been raised regarding haemodialysis quality of care, and healthcare professionals must consider alternatives for appropriate management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Therefore, we investigated the association between risk of hospitalisation of outpatients who received haemodialysis due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the human resources of the haemodialysis unit. Setting We used data from National Health Insurance (NHI) claims during October 2013 to September 2014. Participants These data comprised 40 543 outpatients with ESRD (4 751 047 outpatient cases) who received haemodialysis. Interventions No interventions were made. Outcome measure We performed Poisson regression analysis using a generalised estimating equation that included both patient and haemodialysis unit characteristics to examine the factors associated with hospitalisation of outpatients with ESRD. Results Among 4 751 047 outpatient cases, 27 997 (0.59%) were hospitalised during the study period. A higher proportion of haemodialysis patient care specialists and a higher number of nurses experienced in haemodialysis were inversely associated with the risk of hospitalisation (per 10% increase in haemodialysis patient care specialists: relative risk (RR)=0.987, 95% CI 0.981 to 0.993; per 10-person increase in nurses who provided haemodialysis: RR=0.876, 95% CI 0.833 to 0.921). In addition, such associations were greater in severe patients. Conclusions Our findings suggest that haemodialysis units with high-quality, haemodialysis-specialised human resources could positively affect the outcomes of outpatients with ESRD. Based on our findings, health policymakers and professionals should implement strategies for the optimal management of patients with CKD. PMID:27534988

  19. Approach to patients with refractory coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Ikram; Nasr, Iman; Campling, Hannah; Ciclitira, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is a recognised complication, albeit very rare, of coeliac disease (CD). This condition is described when individuals with CD continue to experience enteropathy and subsequent or ongoing malabsorption despite strict adherence to a diet devoid of gluten for at least 12 months and when all other causes mimicking this condition are excluded. Depending on the T-cell morphology and T-cell receptor (TCR) clonality at the β/γ loci, RCD can be subdivided into type 1 (normal intra-epithelial lymphocyte morphology, polyclonal TCR population) and type 2 (aberrant IELs with clonal TCR). It is important to differentiate between the two types as type 1 has an 80% survival rate and is managed with strict nutritional and pharmacological management. RCD type 2 on the other hand has a 5-year mortality of 50% and can be complicated by ulcerative jejunitis or enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL). Management of RCD type 2 has challenged many experts, and different treatment approaches have been adopted with variable results. Some of these treatments include immunomodulation with azathioprine and steroids, methotrexate, cyclosporine, alemtuzumab (an anti CD-52 monoclonal antibody), and cladribine or fludarabine sometimes with autologous stem cell transplantation. In this article, we summarise the management approach to patients with RCD type 2. PMID:27803799

  20. Successful Pregnancy in a 31-Year-Old Peritoneal Dialysis Patient with Bilateral Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nazer, Ahmed; AlOmar, Osama; Al-Badawi, Ismail A.

    2013-01-01

    Frequency of pregnancy among childbearing age women with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing long-term periodic dialysis ranges from 1% to 7%. Although pregnancy in dialysis women with ESRD is considered a largely high-risk pregnancy, occurrence of successful pregnancy is not impossible with success rates approaching 70%. Rates of successful pregnancy are greatly impacted by early pregnancy diagnosis and preserved residual renal functions. Herein, to the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of successful pregnancy (despite late diagnosis at 14 weeks of gestation) in a 31-year-old peritoneal dialysis patient with bilateral nephrectomy and no whatsoever preserved residual renal function. Moreover, a literature review on pregnancy in dialysis patients is presented. PMID:24198990

  1. Huntington's disease: visuomotor disturbance in patients and offspring.

    PubMed Central

    Oepen, G; Mohr, U; Willmes, K; Thoden, U

    1985-01-01

    In 15 patients with Huntington's disease, 17 offspring at risk and 63 healthy controls, visuomotor performances were assessed by quantitative (statistical) and qualitative analysis. The much enlarged error score of the nondominant left hand in patients with Huntington's disease was explained as callosal dyspraxia. Five of the 17 offspring revealed results similar to that of the patients. PMID:3158723

  2. Fabry's Disease: Case Series and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Muzaffar Maqsood; Khan, Imran; Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Ahmad, Muzaffar

    2016-01-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A enzyme with the progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in vascular endothelial cells leading to cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal, neuropathic, lenticular, and dermatological manifestations. It is a rare cause of end-stage renal disease. It classically affects males whereas 10–15% of female heterozygote carriers are affected depending on localization. Both the FD and its association with ESRD is rare. With this background, this case series of five patient's along with the review of literature is presented here. PMID:27398254

  3. Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography Safety in Chagas Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Furtado, Rogerio Gomes; Turco, Fabio de Paula; Melato, Luciano Henrique; Hotta, Viviane Tiemi; Nunes, Colandy Godoy de Oliveira; Rassi Jr., Luiz; Rassi, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Background A few decades ago, patients with Chagas disease were predominantly rural workers, with a low risk profile for obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). As urbanization has increased, they became exposed to the same risk factors for CAD of uninfected individuals. Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) has proven to be an important tool in CAD diagnosis. Despite being a potentially arrhythmogenic method, it is safe for coronary patients without Chagas disease. For Chagas disease patients, however, the indication of DSE in clinical practice is uncertain, because of the arrhythmogenic potential of that heart disease. Objectives To assess DSE safety in Chagas disease patients with clinical suspicion of CAD, as well as the incidence of arrhythmias and adverse events during the exam. Methods Retrospective analysis of a database of patients referred for DSE from May/2012 to February/2015. This study assessed 205 consecutive patients with Chagas disease suspected of having CAD. All of them had their serology for Chagas disease confirmed. Results Their mean age was 64±10 years and most patients were females (65.4%). No patient had significant adverse events, such as acute myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, asystole, stroke, cardiac rupture and death. Regarding arrhythmias, ventricular extrasystoles occurred in 48% of patients, and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in 7.3%. Conclusion DSE proved to be safe in this population of Chagas disease patients, in which no potentially life-threatening outcome was found. PMID:28099588

  4. International Registry for Patients With Castleman Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-21

    Castleman Disease; Castleman's Disease; Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymph Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymph Node Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia; GLNH; Hyperplasia, Giant Lymph Node; Lymph Node Hyperplasia, Giant

  5. Managing Acute Complications Of Sickle Cell Disease In Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sathyaseelan; Chao, Jennifer H

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease is a chronic hematologic disease with a variety of acute, and often recurring, complications. Vaso-occlusive crisis, a unique but common presentation in sickle cell disease, can be challenging to manage. Acute chest syndrome is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease, occurring in more than half of patients who are hospitalized with a vaso-occlusive crisis. Uncommon diagnoses in children, such as stroke, priapism, and transient red cell aplasia, occur more frequently in patients with sickle cell disease and necessitate a degree of familiarity with the disease process and its management. Patients with sickle cell trait generally have a benign course, but are also subject to serious complications. This issue provides a current review of evidence-based management of the most common acute complications of sickle cell disease seen in pediatric patients in the emergency department.

  6. Children and End-State Renal Disease (ERSD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I'm outside the U.S. Children & End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) How to tell if your child ... Social Security card CMS Form 2728 ("End-Stage Renal Disease Medical Evidence Report Medicare Entitlement and/or ...

  7. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive function in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive impairment are common in dialysis patients. Given the proposed role of microvascular disease on cognitive function, particularly cognitive domains that incorporate executive functions, we hypothesized that prevalent systemic CVD would be associated with wor...

  8. Perioperative Management of Patients with Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Susan M.; Figgie, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Diseases of the connective tissue are a varied group of disorders with major musculoskeletal manifestations such as joint pain and loss of function. As a consequence of the accompanying inflammatory joint disease, such patients often require surgery. Due to the protean organ-related consequences of these conditions, patients who suffer from chronic connective tissue disease are a highly challenging population in the perioperative context. This paper reviews the management of such patients in this clinical setting. PMID:22294961

  9. Long-term renal outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury: A nationwide population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kor, Chew-Teng; Chiu, Ping-Fang; Tsai, Chun-Chieh; Lian, Ie-Bin; Yang, Tao-Hsiang; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Chang, Chia-Chu

    2017-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important cause of death and disability worldwide. The relationship between TBI and kidney diseases is largely unknown. Methods We aimed to determine whether TBI is associated with long-term adverse renal outcomes. We performed a nationwide, population-based, propensity score-matched cohort study of 32,152 TBI patients and 128,608 propensity score-matched controls. Data were collected by the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan from 2000 to 2012. Our clinical outcomes were chronic kidney disease (CKD), end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the composite endpoint of ESRD or all-cause mortality. Results The incidence rate of CKD was higher in the TBI than in the control cohort (8.99 vs. 7.4 per 1000 person-years). The TBI patients also showed higher risks of CKD (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08–1.20; P < 0.001) and composite endpoints (aHR 1.08, 95% CI 1.01–1.15; P = 0.022) than the control groups, but the ESRD was not significantly different between the groups. In subgroup analyses, the risks of incident CKD and composite endpoints were significantly raised in TBI patients aged < 65 years and/or without comorbidities. However, the risks of both CKD and composite outcome were little affected by the severity of TBI. Conclusions TBI has a modest but significant effect on incident CKD and composite endpoint, but not on ESRD alone. TBI patients under 65 are at greater risk of CKD and composite outcome than their older counterparts. PMID:28196132

  10. Effect of yoga exercise therapy on oxidative stress indicators with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Lorenzo; McGrowder, Donovan A; Pena, Yeiny T; Cabrera, Elsa; Lawrence-Wright, Marilyn B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress promotes endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in chronic renal disease. Objectives: This study investigated the impact of Hatha yoga on oxidative stress indicators and oxidant status, in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis. Design: This prospective randomized study consisted of 33 ESRD patients in the Hatha yoga exercise group who were matched with 35 ESRD patients in the control group. Outcome Measures: The oxidative stress indicators (malondialdehyde - MDA, protein oxidation - POX, phospholipase A2 - PLA2 activity) and the oxidative status (superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities) were determined in the blood samples taken at the pre-hemodialysis treatment, at baseline (0 months) and after four months. Results: In patients in the Hatha yoga exercise group, lipid peroxidation, as indicated by MDA decreased by 4.0% after four months (P = 0.096). There was also a significant reduction in the activity of PLA from 2.68 ± 0.02 IU / L to 2.34 IU / L (− 12.7%; P = 0.010) and POX from 2.28 ± 0.02 nmol / mg to 2.22 ± 0.01 nmol / mg (− 22.6%; P = 0.0001). The activity of SOD significantly increased from 12.91 ± 0.17 U / L to 13.54 ± 0.15 U / L (4.65%; P = 0.0001) and catalase from 79.83 ± 0.63 U / L to 80.54 ± 0.80 U / L (0.90%; P = 0.0001). There was a significant correlation between the pre-hemodialysis oxidative stress parameters at the zero month and after four months for the activities of PLA (r = 0.440), catalase (r = 0.872), and SOD (r = 0.775). Conclusions: These findings suggest that the Hatha yoga exercise has therapeutic, preventative, and protective effects in ESRD subjects, by decreasing oxidative stress. PMID:23440311

  11. Peripartum cardiomyopathy in a patient with Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Kajiya, Takashi; Lee, Souki; Yamashita, Makoto; Sasaki, Yuichi; Kamizono, Yusuke; Imamura, Masakazu; Toyonaga, Koichi; Toda, Hitoshi; Koriyama, Nobuyuki; Tei, Chuwa

    2010-11-05

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare life-threatening cardiomyopathy of unknown etiology that occurs during the peripartum period in previously healthy women. Autoimmune and viral factors have been suggested to be involved in PPCM. Here we describe a patient with Graves' disease, which is one of the organ-specific autoimmune diseases, who developed acute heart failure due to PPCM at 2 weeks after her first delivery. The patient recovered completely with conservative treatment for heart failure. An association between PPCM and Graves' disease has not been reported before. PPCM may be an organ-specific autoimmune disease, so the coexistence of other autoimmune diseases should be considered in PPCM patients.

  12. Dialysis and transplantation in Fabry disease: indications for enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Mignani, Renzo; Feriozzi, Sandro; Schaefer, Roland M; Breunig, Frank; Oliveira, João Paulo; Ruggenenti, Piero; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

    2010-02-01

    ESRD is a major cause of morbidity and premature mortality in Fabry disease, particularly in classically affected males. The decline of renal function in Fabry nephropathy is adversely affected by male gender, advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), and severe proteinuria. The diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy may be missed if not specifically addressed in progressive CKD and patients have been first identified in screening programs of dialysis patients. Fabry patients have worse 3-year survival rates on dialysis as compared with nondiabetic controls. The 5-year survival rate of transplanted Fabry patients is also lower than that of controls. However, because Fabry nephropathy does not recur in the allograft and transplanted Fabry patients appear to have better overall outcomes than those maintained on dialysis, kidney transplantation should be recommended as a first choice in renal replacement therapy (RRT) for Fabry disease. Appropriately designed and powered studies are not available to answer the question whether enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) influences outcomes, the course of cardiomyopathy, events, or survival in Fabry patients on RRT. The authors are not aware of compelling indications for ERT in RRT patients because progression of cardiomyopathy was documented during ERT. Whether the excess mortality risk of Fabry patients on RRT can be prevented by ERT is unknown. Despite observational reports of symptomatic improvement, the available evidence supporting ERT for such patients is not compelling enough. To clarify this issue, studies are needed to test the effectiveness of agalsidases in preventing cardiac and cerebrovascular complications in Fabry patients with ESRD.

  13. Hypertension in children with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Skrzypczyk, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    This review summarizes current data on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of hypertension (HTN) in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Worldwide prevalence of ESRD ranges from 5.0 to 84.4 per million age-related population. HTN is present in 27-79% of children with ESRD, depending on the modality of renal replacement therapy and the exact definition of hypertension. Ambulatory BP monitoring has been recommended for the detection of HTN and evaluation of treatment effectiveness. HTN in dialyzed patients is mostly related to hypervolemia, sodium overload, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and sympathetic nervous system, impaired nitric oxide synthesis, reduced vitamin D levels, and effects of microRNA. In children undergoing chronic dialysis therapy, important factors include optimization of renal replacement therapy and preservation of residual renal function, allowing reduction of volume- and sodium-overload, along with appropriate drug treatment, particularly with calcium channel blockers, RAAS inhibitors, and loop diuretics.

  14. End-Stage Renal Disease Outcomes among the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Creatinine Safety Program (Creatinine SureNet): Opportunities to Reflect and Improve

    PubMed Central

    Sim, John J; Batech, Michael; Danforth, Kim N; Rutkowski, Mark P; Jacobsen, Steven J; Kanter, Michael H

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The Kaiser Permanente Southern California (KPSC) creatinine safety program (Creatinine SureNet) identifies and outreaches to thousands of people annually who may have had a missed diagnosis for chronic kidney disease (CKD). We sought to determine the value of this outpatient program and evaluate opportunities for improvement. Methods: Longitudinal cohort study (February 2010 through December 2015) of KPSC members captured into the creatinine safety program who were characterized using demographics, laboratory results, and different estimations of glomerular filtration rate. Age- and sex-adjusted rates of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were compared with those in the overall KPSC population. Results: Among 12,394 individuals, 83 (0.7%) reached ESRD. The age- and sex-adjusted relative risk of ESRD was 2.7 times higher compared with the KPSC general population during the same period (94.7 vs 35.4 per 100,000 person-years; p < 0.001). Screening with the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (vs Modification Diet in Renal Diseases) equation would capture 44% fewer individuals and have a higher predictive value for CKD. Of those who had repeated creatinine measurements, only 13% had a urine study performed (32% among patients with confirmed CKD). Conclusion: Our study found a higher incidence of ESRD among individuals captured into the KPSC creatinine safety program. If the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation were used, fewer people would have been captured while improving the accuracy for diagnosing CKD. Urine testing was low even among patients with confirmed CKD. Our findings demonstrate the importance of a creatinine safety net program in an integrated health system but also suggest opportunities to improve CKD care and screening. PMID:28241912

  15. Prevalence and correlates of functional dependence among maintenance dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Niall T; Schiller, Brigitte; Saxena, Anjali B; Thomas, I-Chun; Kurella Tamura, Manjula

    2015-10-01

    Functional dependence is an important determinant of longevity and quality of life. The purpose of the current study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of functional dependence among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) receiving maintenance dialysis. We enrolled 148 participants with ESRD from five clinics. Functional status, as measured by basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL, IADL), was ascertained by validated questionnaires. Functional dependence was defined as needing assistance in at least one of seven IADLs or at least one of four ADLs. Demographic characteristics, chronic health conditions, anthropometric measurements, and laboratories were assessed by a combination of self-report and chart review. Cognitive function was assessed with a neurocognitive battery, and depressive symptoms were assessed by questionnaire. Mean age of the sample was 56.2 ± 14.6 years. Eighty-seven participants (58.8%) demonstrated dependence in ADLs or IADLs, 70 (47.2%) exhibited IADL dependence alone, and 17 (11.5%) exhibited combined IADL and ADL dependence. In a multivariable-adjusted model, stroke, cognitive impairment, and higher systolic blood pressure were independent correlates of functional dependence. We found no significant association between demographic characteristics, chronic health conditions, depressive symptoms or laboratory measurements, and functional dependence. Impairment in executive function was more strongly associated with functional dependence than memory impairment. Functional dependence is common among ESRD patients and independently associated with stroke, systolic blood pressure, and executive function impairment.

  16. A J-shaped association between serum uric acid levels and poor renal survival in female patients with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Matsukuma, Yuta; Masutani, Kosuke; Tanaka, Shigeru; Tsuchimoto, Akihiro; Fujisaki, Kiichiro; Torisu, Kumiko; Katafuchi, Ritsuko; Hirakata, Hideki; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kitazono, Takanari

    2017-03-01

    Recently, low serum uric acid (SUA) levels and high SUA levels, have emerged as risk factors for cardiovascular disease, as well as for the incidence of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the effect of low SUA on the progression of CKD remains unclear. To evaluate the association between SUA and renal prognosis in patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN), one of the most common causes of CKD, we retrospectively followed 1218 patients who were diagnosed with primary IgAN by kidney biopsy between October 1979 and December 2010. Patients were divided into three groups on the basis of SUA level tertiles: low (L group), middle (M group) and high (H group) tertiles (<6.1, 6.1-7.0, and >7.0 mg dl(-1), respectively, for men and <4.4, 4.4-5.3, and >5.3 mg dl(-1), respectively, for women). The risk factors for developing end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model. After a median follow-up of 5.1 years, 142 patients (11.7%) developed ESRD. The hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) showed a J-shaped trend with the tertiles in both men (1.18 (0.55-2.54), 1.00 (reference), and 1.80 (1.01-3.10) in L, M and H groups, respectively) and women (2.73 (1.10-6.76), 1.00 (reference) and 2.49 (1.16-5.34) in L, M and H groups, respectively). Notably, low SUA was significantly associated with incident ESRD in women. This finding suggests that SUA has a J-shaped association with ESRD in patients with IgAN, especially women.

  17. Ultrasonographic imaging of inflammatory bowel disease in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Liliana; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Braden, Barbara; Cui, Xin-Wu; Buchhorn, Reiner; Chang, Jian-Min; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one of the most common chronic gastrointestinal diseases in pediatric patients. Choosing the optimal imaging modality for the assessment of gastrointestinal disease in pediatric patients can be challenging. The invasiveness and patient acceptance, the radiation exposure and the quality performance of the diagnostic test need to be considered. By reviewing the literature regarding imaging in inflammatory bowel disease the value of ultrasound in the clinical management of pediatric patients is highlighted. Transabdominal ultrasound is a useful, noninvasive method for the initial diagnosis of IBD in children; it also provides guidance for therapeutic decisions and helps to characterize and predict the course of the disease in individual patients. Ultrasound techniques including color Doppler imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasound are promising imaging tools to determine disease activity and complications. Comparative studies between different imaging methods are needed. PMID:25954096

  18. Coronary artery calcification in Korean patients with incident dialysis.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eunjin; Seong, Eun Yong; Han, Byoung-Geun; Kim, Dong Ki; Lim, Chun Soo; Kang, Shin-Wook; Park, Cheol Whee; Kim, Chan-Duck; Shin, Byung Chul; Kim, Sung Gyun; Chung, Wookyung; Park, Jae Yoon; Lee, Joo Yeon; Kim, Yon Su

    2016-10-05

    Introduction Patients with chronic kidney disease have an extremely high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). In patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), coronary artery calcification (CAC) is associated with increased mortality from CVD. Methods The present study aimed to investigate the risk factors for CAC in Korean patients with incident dialysis. Data on 423 patients with ESRD who started dialysis therapy between December 2012 and March 2014 were obtained from 10 university-affiliated hospitals. CAC was identified by using noncontrast-enhanced cardiac multidetector computed tomography. The CAC score was calculated according to the Agatston score, with CAC-positive subjects defined by an Agatston score >0. Findings Patients' mean age was 55.6 ± 14.6 years, and 64.1% were men. The CAC-positive rate was 63.8% (270 of 423). Results of univariate analyses showed significant differences in age, sex, etiology of ESRD and comorbid conditions according to the CAC score. However, results of multiple regression analysis showed that only a higher age was significantly associated with the CAC score. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that the sensitivity and specificity of L-spine radiography for diagnosing CAC were 56% and 91%, respectively, for diagnosing CAC (area under the curve, 0.735). Discussion CAC was frequent in patients with incident dialysis, and multiple regression analysis showed that only age was significantly associated with the CAC score. In addition, L-spine radiography could be a helpful modality for diagnosing CAC in patients with incident dialysis.

  19. [Pregnancy in a patient with mitochondrial disease].

    PubMed

    Racine, A-C; Blanchot, G; Le Vaillant, C; Boog, G

    2004-04-01

    We report a case of a pregnant woman with a mitochondrial disorder affecting the energy-generating pathway of oxidative phosphorylation which was suggested when the patient presented the progressive clinical phenotype of a proximal tubular renal insufficiency, a muscular weakness of extremities, a bilateral optic neuropathy and a brain magnetic resonance imaging suggesting diffuse leucoencephalopathy. Her diagnosis was made on the basis of abnormal mitochondria on a muscle biopsy and of spectrophotometric deficiencies of the complexes I, II+III and IV of the respiratory chain. No specific molecular mutation could be detected. Her pregnancy was complicated by a severe preeclampsia, an insulin requiring gestational diabetes and a worrying renal failure which precipitated the premature delivery by cesarean section at 30 weeks gestation. The clinical course of the female neonate weighing 1030 grams was uneventful. At two Years of age she showed no sign of mitochondrial disease. But the postpartum course of the mother was complicated by seizures and a terminal renal failure leading presently to dialysis, but requiring a kidney transplantation in the near future.

  20. Changes in Semantic Memory in Early Stage Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weingartner, Herbert J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Contrasts changes in semantic memory in elderly normal controls and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients before patients expressed symptoms. Found that controls generated more uncommon exemplars from closed semantic categories (fruits and vegetables) than did AD patients prior to presumed onset of AD. AD patients were just as productive as controls…

  1. Subclinical intestinal inflammation in chronic granulomatous disease patients.

    PubMed

    Broides, Arnon; Sagi, Orli; Pinsk, Vered; Levy, Jacov; Yerushalmi, Baruch

    2016-02-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease is a primary immunodeficiency caused by impaired neutrophil production of reactive oxygen species. Non-infectious colitis is common in chronic granulomatous disease, and high levels of antimicrobial antibodies that are associated with Crohn's disease are common even without colitis. Fecal calprotectin concentration is a marker for intestinal inflammation. We sought to determine whether subclinical intestinal inflammation occurs in asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients. Asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients without overt gastrointestinal symptoms suggestive of colitis at the time of enrollment were studied for fecal calprotectin concentration, antibodies associated with Crohn's disease and systemic inflammatory markers. Eight patients were included, aged 54-176 months. In 7/8 (87.5 %) fecal calprotectin concentration was normal (<50) and elevated (137 mg/kg) in only one patient. This patient later developed colitis. In 7/8 (87.5 %) anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody was positive. C-reactive protein, albumin, complete blood count and p-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody were normal in all 8 patients. Subclinical colitis is not evident in most asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients; however, in some patients, fecal calprotectin concentration may be elevated, possibly indicating the presence of subclinical colitis and predicting the occurrence of clinically relevant colitis. Serum anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody concentrations do not seem to correlate with fecal calprotectin concentration in asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients.

  2. Reduction of plasma oxalate levels by oral application of Oxalobacter formigenes in 2 patients with infantile oxalosis.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Bernd; Dittlich, Katalin; Fehrenbach, Henry; Plum, Georg; Beck, Bodo B

    2011-09-01

    The spectrum of primary hyperoxaluria type I is extremely heterogeneous, ranging from singular to recurrent urolithiasis and early end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In infantile oxalosis, the most devastating form, ESRD occurs as early as within the first weeks of life. No kidney replacement therapy sufficiently removes endogenously overproduced oxalate. However, curative combined liver-kidney transplant often is impracticable in small infants. Oxalobacter formigenes (O formigenes), an anaerobic oxalate-degrading bacterium, is a colonizer of the healthy human colon. Oral administration of O formigenes has been shown to significantly decrease urine and plasma oxalate levels in patients with primary hyperoxaluria. We report compassionate use of O formigenes in two 11-month-old girls with infantile oxalosis and ESRD. They received O formigenes twice a day for 4 weeks (or until transplant). Dialysis regimens were unchanged. Plasma oxalate levels decreased from >110 μmol/L before to 71.53 μmol/L under treatment in patient 1 and from >90 to 68.56 μmol/L (first treatment period) and 50.05 μmol/L (second treatment period) in patient 2. O formigenes was well tolerated. No serious side effects were reported. Extremely increased plasma oxalate levels in patients with infantile oxalosis may enable intestinal elimination of endogenous oxalate in the presence of O formigenes. Therefore, O formigenes therapy may be helpful as a bridging procedure until transplant in such patients.

  3. The Effect of Vitamin D Administration on Intracellular Adhesion Molecule-1 and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Levels in Hemodialysis Patients: A Placebo-controlled, Double-blinded Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Naeini, Afsoon Emami; Moeinzadeh, Firouzeh; Vahdat, Sahar; Ahmadi, Akbar; Hedayati, Zahra Parin; Shahzeidi, Safoora

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Vitamin D deficiency is quite common among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, and Vitamin D administration could reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients through different mechanisms. Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of mortality in these patients that are caused by vascular injuries. Intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) are vascular inflammation indicators. The goal of this study is to find the effect of Vitamin D administration on ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 serum levels in ESRD patients on hemodialysis. Methods: The current study is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial on 64 patients in two groups of control and treatment. Serum levels of Vitamin D, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 were measured before and after the study. Treatment group was treated with Vitamin D pearls while control group underwent treatment with placebo pearls. Average serum levels of Vitamin D, ICAM, and VCAM were measured in both groups before and after the study and were analyzed by ANOVA, paired t-test, and Chi-square test using SPSS software. Findings: Sixty-four ESRD patients were recruited for this study consisting of 32 male and 32 female subjects within the ages of 18 and 76 years. The change in serum level of Vitamin D was significant in treatment group (P = 0.001) but not in control group (P > 0.05). Serum levels of ICAM and VCAM also changed significantly in treatment group (P = 0.001) but not in control group (P > 0.05) Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, it could be said that Vitamin D administration in ESRD patients may increase serum level of Vitamin D up to four times. It also reduces serum levels of ICAM and VCAM which might improve the vascular condition of these patients.

  4. Respiratory disease terminology: Discordance between pulmonologists and patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nishtha; Singh, Sheetu; Jain, Nirmal Kumar; Singh, Virendra

    2017-01-01

    Context: A number of local dialects and languages exist in India, which leads to a single disease being addressed by a number of names which may overlap with other disease names also. This creates misunderstanding and is a hindrance to effective patient–doctor communication. Aims: The paper aims to find out how effectively the name of the respiratory disease is communicated to the patient. The terminology used by patients to describe their disease was also noted at limited level. Settings and Design: The study was conducted in the form of parallel cross-sectional surveys, among pulmonologists and patients. Methods: Among the members of the Indian Chest Society and those attending the National Conference on Pulmonary Diseases (NAPCON-2015), 1028 pulmonologists participated in the online survey which was the first part of the study. The term used to address the common respiratory disease was inquired in the survey. To find the response of patients, a questionnaire was given to the patients attending four respiratory disease clinics of a city. They were inquired about the name of respiratory disease they were suffering from. Results: Pneumonia was the disease which was communicated with exact terminology by 898 (87.4%) doctors to their patients. In contrast, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was communicated with precise terminology by only 171 (16.6%) doctors. Pulmonary tuberculosis was exactly told by 708 (69%), asthma by 731 (71.1%), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by 593 (57.7%) doctors. However, only 17.6% of the 1122 patients participating in the survey had a knowledge of the name of disease they were suffering from. Conclusions: The exact terminology of the common respiratory diseases is not effectively used by many doctors and most of the patients. The study identifies an important gap in patient–doctor communication, and therefore, highlights the need of effective patient education. PMID:28144053

  5. Troponin T as a predictor of end-stage renal disease and all-cause death among African-Americans and whites from hypertensive families

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, LaTonya J.; Rule, Andrew D.; Butler, Kenneth R.; Schwartz, Gary L.; Jaffe, Allan S.; Bartley, Adam C.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Turner, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate cardiac troponin T (cTnT) as a predictor of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death in a cohort of African-American and white community dwelling adults with hypertensive families. Patients & Methods 3,050 participants (whites from Rochester, Minnesota; African-Americans from Jackson, Mississippi) of the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy study were followed from baseline exam (June 1996–August 2000) through January 22, 2010. Cox regression models were used to examine the association of cTnT with ESRD and death adjusting for traditional risk factors. Results Cohort demographics and measurements included: whites (46%), hypertensive (71%), eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73m2 (32%), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein>3 mg/L (52%), and abnormal cTnT (≥0.01 ng/mL) (2%). At 10 years, 27% with abnormal cTnT developed ESRD compared to 1% with normal cTnT. Similarly, at 10 years, 47% with an abnormal cTnT had died compared to 7% with a normal cTnT. Abnormal cTnT was strongly associated with ESRD and death. This effect was attenuated but was still highly significant after adjustment for demographics, eGFR, and traditional risk factors for ESRD (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] 23.91 (95% CI 12.9, 44.2); adjusted HR 2.81 (CI 1.3, 5.9) and death (unadjusted HR 8.43 [CI 6.0, 11.9]); adjusted HR 3.46 (CI 2.3, 5.1). Conclusion cTnT makes an independent contribution beyond traditional risk markers to the prediction of ESRD and all-cause death in community-dwelling individuals. Further studies may be needed to determine if cTnT screening among individuals with hypertension or within a subset of hypertensives would help identify those at risk for ESRD and all-cause death. PMID:26494378

  6. Coping strategies utilized by adolescents with end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Snethen, Julia A; Broome, Marion E; Kelber, Sheryl; Warady, Bradley A

    2004-01-01

    Children and adolescents with end stage renal disease (ESRD) require life-long treatment. The purpose of this descriptive investigation was to identify coping strategies that adolescents with ESRD use to manage their chronic illness. Participants for this investigation were 35 adolescents, 13-18 years of age, with ESRD. The A-COPE survey instrument was used in a clinical and camp setting to measure the coping strategies used by adolescents with ESRD. Analyses revealed that adolescents with ESRD utilized a variety of coping strategies to manage the stresses of living with their chronic condition. Personal characteristics of gender, transplant status, age, and religious views were significantly related to the coping strategies the adolescents reported using.

  7. 77 FR 67449 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System, Quality Incentive Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ...This final rule updates and makes revisions to the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS) for calendar year (CY) 2013. This rule also sets forth requirements for the ESRD quality incentive program (QIP), including for payment year (PY) 2015 and beyond. In addition, this rule implements changes to bad debt reimbursement for all Medicare providers, suppliers, and other......

  8. Intensive care of the adult patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Allan, Catherine K

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of congenital heart disease in the adult population has increased out of proportion to that of the pediatric population as survival has improved, and adult congenital heart disease patients make up a growing percentage of pediatric and adult cardiac intensive care unit admissions. These patients often develop complex multiorgan system disease as a result of long-standing altered cardiac physiology, and many require reoperation during adulthood. Practitioners who care for these patients in the cardiac intensive care unit must have a strong working knowledge of the pathophysiology of complex congenital heart disease, and a full team of specialists must be available to assist in the care of these patients. This chapter will review some of the common multiorgan system effects of long-standing congenital heart disease (eg, renal and hepatic dysfunction, coagulation abnormalities, arrhythmias) as well as some of the unique cardiopulmonary physiology of this patient population.

  9. Factors contributing to malnutrition in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung R; Chung, Sun J; Yoo, Sung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the nutritional status and to identify clinical, psychosocial, and nutritional factors contributing to malnutrition in Korean patients with Parkinson's disease. We used a descriptive, cross-sectional study design. Of 102 enrolled patients, 26 (25.5%) were malnourished and 27 (26.5%) were at risk of malnutrition based on Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores. Malnutrition was related to activity of daily living score, Hoehn and Yahr stage, duration of levodopa therapy, Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger's Anxiety Inventory scores, body weight, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and body mass index. On multiple logistic regression analysis, anxiety score, duration of levodopa therapy, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and loss of body weight were significant factors predicting malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, nutritional assessment, including psychological evaluation, is required for Parkinson's disease patients to facilitate interdisciplinary nutritional intervention for malnourished patients.

  10. Comparative study of extrapolative factors linked with oxidative injury and anti-inflammatory status in chronic kidney disease patients experiencing cardiovascular distress

    PubMed Central

    Rasool, Mahmood; Ashraf, Muhammad Abdul Basit; Malik, Arif; Waquar, Sulayman; Khan, Shahida Aziz; Qazi, Mahmood Husain; Ahmad, Waseem; Asif, Muhammad; Khan, Sami Ullah; Zaheer, Ahmad; Qaisrani, Muther Mansoor; Khan, Abdul Rehman; Iqbal, Aamir; Raza, Amir; Iram, Saima; Kamran, Kashif; Iqbal, Asim; Mustafa, Mohammad Zahid; Choudhry, Hani; Zamzami, Mazin A.; Abdulaal, Wesam H.; Jamal, Mohammad Sarwar

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a group of heterogeneous abnormalities affecting the function and structure of the kidney and mostly further proceeds to cardiovascular damage prior to end stage renal disease (ESRD). The oxidative insult and inflammatory mediators have some undefined role in CKD and cardiovascular complications. It is therefore, aimed at to pin point the predictive factors in the development of cardiovascular disorder in patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods Fifty patients of CKD experiencing cardiovascular distress and twenty normal individuals having same age and sex acted as control during these observations. Blood samples (Each 5 ml) were drawn and subjected to centrifugation for 10–15 minutes to separate the serum at 4000-5000rpm. The levels of MDA, GSH, SOD, CAT, VIT C, VIT E, IL-1, TNF-alpha, nitric oxide (NO) and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) were estimated and analyzed. Results The nitric oxide levels in the CKD patients decreased significantly (13.26±1.25 ng/ml) compared to controls (42.15±5.26 ng/ml). The serum vitamin E and C levels in these patients recorded 2.15±0.25 μg/ml and 0.97±0.09 μg/ml respectively as against their assigned controls which read 6.35±1.22 μg/ml and 3.29±0.25 μg/ml. Furthermore, a significantly higher level of Malondialdehyde (MDA) as1.25±0.07 nmol/ml was observed in CKD patients viz-a-viz relevant control. However, the serum SOD, catalase (CAT) and GSH levels in the same patients registered a significant decline as evident from respective figures 0.07±0.002 μg/dl, 1.22±0.012 μmol/mol, and 3.25±1.05 μg/dl. The control for these was observed as0.99±0.06 μg/dl, 3.19±0.05 μmol/mol, and 8.64±0.03 μg/dL. On the other hand, the IL-1 levels in the CKD patients found quite higher (402.5±18.26 pg/ml). This clearly points to substantial increase in oxidative insult and reduced NO levels leading to the renal and cardiovascular damage. Conclusion Observations support

  11. Periodontal disease in diabetic patients - clinical and histopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Corlan Puşcu, Dorina; Ciuluvică, Radu Constantin; Anghel, Andreea; Mălăescu, Gheorghe Dan; Ciursaş, Adina Nicoleta; Popa, Gabriel Valeriu; Agop Forna, Doriana; Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Siloşi, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is one of the most frequent diseases affecting people all over the world. The relation between periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus raised the interest both of dentists and doctors treating metabolic diseases, as the two conditions influence one another. In our study, we analyzed a number of 75 patients with diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease that presented to the medical consultory for conditions of the dental maxillary system. The clinical study showed that periodontal disease and diabetes may affect young adults as well, still this pathological association more frequently appears after the age of 50. The disease was identified especially in the women living in urban area. The clinical examination of the dental maxillary system identified the presence of gingival ulcerations, dental calculus, gingival bleeding, radicular leftovers with anfractuous margins, fixed prostheses with an inappropriate cervical adjustment. Of the systemic diseases associated to periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, there was observed that 66.66% of the patients also suffered from cardiovascular diseases (high blood pressure, ischemic cardiopathy, heart failure), and 37.33% suffered from obesity. The histopathological and immunohistochemical tests highlighted the presence of an inflammatory chronic, intense reaction, mainly formed of lymphocytes, plasmocytes, macrophages and granulocytes, heterogeneously disseminated and alteration of the structure of marginal and superficial periodontium. The inflammatory reaction in the patients with periodontal disease and diabetes was more intense than in the patients with periodontal disease without diabetes.

  12. Non-surgical periodontal management in scleroderma disease patients.

    PubMed

    Laforgia, A; Corsalini, M; Stefanachi, G; Tafuri, S; Ballini, A; Pettini, F; Di Venere, D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the periodontal status of people with scleroderma and their response to non-surgical treatment protocol aimed at controlling the evolution of the disease. The response to non-surgical periodontal treatment was tested on patients belonging to a scleroderma group and a control group: the data show an improvement of the periodontal conditions of all these patients in response to treatment. When compared on the same diagram, a slight remission of the periodontal disease was obtained in both scleroderma and healthy patients. This highlights the benefit to soft tissues produced by non-surgical periodontal treatment also in patients affected by systemic diseases.

  13. Hormones and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kircelli, Fatih; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Ok, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the major cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the occurrence and progression of cardiovascular disease. Various risk factors, including altered hormone levels, have been suggested to be associated with arterial stiffness. Based on the background that chronic kidney disease predisposes individuals to a wide range of hormonal changes, we herein review the available data on the association between arterial stiffness and hormones in patients with chronic kidney disease and summarize the data for the general population.

  14. Two adolescent patients with coexistent Graves' disease and Moyamoya disease in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Chong Kun; Kim, Su Yung

    2014-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a cerebrovascular condition that results in the narrowing of the vessels of the circle of Willis and collateral vessel formation at the base of the brain. Although relationships between Graves' disease and cerebrovascular accidents in Moyamoya disease are obscure, the coexistence of the two diseases is noteworthy. Moyamoya disease has been rarely reported in adolescent patients with thyrotoxicosis. Recently, we encountered two adolescent Korean patients with Moyamoya disease associated with Graves' disease who presented with episodic right-sided hemiparesis and syncope. These two girls who had Graves' disease had no history of other diseases or head trauma. A thyroid function test revealed a euthyroid state and a high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibody titer at that time. The patients were diagnosed with Moyamoya disease based on brain magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral four-vessel angiography. The patients underwent cranial revascularization by encephalo-duroarterio-synangiosis as soon as a diagnosis was made, which resulted in successful symptom resolution. They fared well and had no additional neurological symptoms as of their last follow-up visits. Here, we report these two cases of confirmed Moyamoya disease complicated by Graves' disease with a review of the literature, and discuss the possible association between the two diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first report in South Korea on Moyamoya disease associated with Graves' disease in adolescents with a euthyroid. PMID:25076974

  15. Sevelamer therapy for pediatric end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Storms, Lara E; Chicella, Michael F; Dice, James E

    2006-03-01

    Sevelamer, a non-calcium-containing, non-aluminum-containing phosphate binder, is frequently prescribed for treatment in adults with hyperphosphatemia secondary to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, published information regarding sevelamer use in children younger than 11 years is lacking. We report the use of sevelamer as a phosphate binder in a 19-month-old girl with ESRD who was receiving calcium carbonate 1250 mg 3 times/day for hyperphosphatemia. The patient's initial serum phosphorus concentration was 8.6 mg/dl, and the calcium-phosphorus product was 75 mg(2)/dl(2). This was well above the level that places patients at risk for complications such as joint, vessel, and soft-tissue calcification. An aluminum-containing phosphate binder was not an option given the patient's renal disease and the concern for neurotoxicity. Sevelamer was considered, but a MEDLINE search revealed no pediatric dosing information. An initial dosage of 100 mg/kg/day divided every 8 hours was administered, as extrapolated from adult data, and then titrated to 130 mg/kg/day divided every 8 hours based on the patient's response. The child's dietary phosphorus intake remained constant throughout her hospital stay. During sevelamer therapy, her serum phosphorus concentration dropped as low as 5.2 mg/dl; at discharge it was 6.5 mg/dl, with a corresponding calcium-phosphorus product in the upper 50s. No adverse effects associated with sevelamer were observed. In the dosages we used, sevelamer resulted in an acceptable calcium-phosphorus product and returned the patient's serum phosphorus concentration to near normal. Sevelamer appears to be a viable option as a phosphate binder in children with ESRD.

  16. [Comorbid autoimmune pathology in patients treated with disease modifying drugs].

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Z A; Sizyakina, L P; Belovolova, R A; Megeryan, V A

    2016-01-01

    Because of intensive growth of the prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases (AID) during the last years, the comorbidity of MS and AID is not a rarity. In this literature review, the development of comorbid AID in patients with MS is considered to be the probable complication of disease modifying therapy with drugs of different groups. The authors present the own data on the prevalence of comorbid autoimmune pathology in patients with MS treated with disease modifying drugs.

  17. Scintigraphic perfusion patterns in patients with diffuse lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.E.; Sullivan, D.C.; Gottschalk, A.; Putman, C.E.

    1982-04-01

    Perfusion scintigrams of 55 patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse lung disease were reviewed. Thirty-nine had acute and/or chronic changes caused by congestive heart failure, and 16 had diffuse reticulonodular disease. A normal or near-normal perfusion pattern was seen in 40/55 (73%), and this finding was equally common in the two groups. The authors conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful in excluding pulmonary embolism in patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse, symmetrical lung disease.

  18. Treatment of patients with minimal stage IIIA Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Powlis, W.D.; Mauch, P.; Goffman, T.; Goodman, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    Treatment recommendations for patients with upper abdominal Stage IIIA Hodgkin's (III1A) disease have varied widely. The current study reports on a combined institutional retrospective review of 85 patients with surgically staged III1A Hodgkin's disease. Twenty-two patients received combined modality therapy (CMT), 36 patients were treated initially with total nodal irradiation (TNI), and 27 with mantle and para-aortic radiotherapy (MPA). Patients treated with CMT had an actuarial 8-year freedom from relapse (FFR) of 96% as compared to a FFR of 51% in TNI treated patients (p = 0.002), and a FFR of 54% in MPA treated patients (p = 0.004). Of the 11 relapses in MPA treated patients, 7 had a component of their failure in the untreated pelvic or inguinal nodes. The patients treated with CMT had an 8-year actuarial survival of 100% as compared to 79% in TNI treated patients (p = 0.055) and 78% in patients treated with MPA (p = 0.025). Histology and the number of splenic nodules were the most important prognostic variables. Patients with MC/LD histology and greater than or equal to 5 splenic nodules have a high risk of relapse (10/13) when treated with radiation alone (TNI or MPA). We recommend CMT for this group of patients. Patients with NS/LP histology and 1-4 splenic nodules represent a favorable subset of Stage III1A patients. Only 4/21 patients have relapsed and all 21 patients are currently alive without disease regardless of treatment. We currently feel that patients with Stage III1A Hodgkin's disease with NS/LP histology and splenic disease limited to 1-4 nodules are good candidates for MPA as an alternative to TNI or CMT.

  19. Measurement of the intestinal permeability in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, Matty L; Singh, Ramandeep; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Bemelman, Frederike J

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate methods measuring the intestinal per-meability in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and clarify whether there is an increased intestinal permeability in CKD. METHODS: We reviewed the literature in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) protocol and performed a systematic literature search through MEDline and EMBASE. All controlled trials and cohort studies using non-invasive methods to assess intestinal permeability in CKD patients were included. Excluded were: Conference abstracts and studies including patients younger than 18 years or animals. From the included studies we summarized the used methods and their advantages and disadvantages. For the comparison of their results we divided the included studies in two categories based on their included patient population, either assessing the intestinal permeability in mild to moderate CKD patients or in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Results were graphically displayed in two plots, one comparing the intestinal permeability in mild to moderate CKD patients to healthy controls and one comparing the intestinal permeability in ESRD patients to healthy controls. RESULTS: From the 480 identified reports, 15 met our inclusion criteria. Methods that were used to assess the intestinal permeability varied from markers measured in plasma to methods based on calculating the urinary excretion of an orally administered test substance. None of the applied methods has been validated in CKD patients and the influence of decreased renal function on the different methods remains unclear to a certain extent. Methods that seem the least likely to be influenced by decreased renal function are the quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial DNA in blood and D-lactate. Considering the results published by the included studies; the studies including patients with mild to moderate CKD conducted conflicting results. Some studies did report an increase in intestinal

  20. 42 CFR 413.184 - Payment exception: Pediatric patient mix.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE...-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.184 Payment exception:...

  1. 42 CFR 413.184 - Payment exception: Pediatric patient mix.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE...-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.184 Payment exception:...

  2. 42 CFR 413.184 - Payment exception: Pediatric patient mix.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE...-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.184 Payment exception:...

  3. 42 CFR 413.184 - Payment exception: Pediatric patient mix.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE...-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.184 Payment exception:...

  4. Single Center Experience with Pre-dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Al Wakeel, Jamal S; Mitwalli, Ahmed H; Abu-Aisha, Hassan; Tarif, Nauman; Memon, Nawaz; Sulimani, Fathia; Askar, Akram; Isnani, Arthur

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the management of factors accelerating renal injury such as hypertension and diabetes on progression of chronic renal failure (CRF). For this end, the records of 112 CRF patients with serum creatinine (SCr) level of 150- 850 micromol/L were retrospectively studied at King Khaled University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The leading causes of CRF in the study patients were diabetes in 52 (46.4%) patients, glomerulonephritis in 25 (22.4%) and hypertension in 17 (15.2%). Progressive elevation of SCr level was recorded at 92 micromol/L/year in 62 (55.4%) patients with initial SCr level of 150-300 micromol/L; they progressed to end stage renal disease (ESRD) in a mean duration of 4 (1/2) years. Forty-three (38.4%) patients with SCr level of 300-450 micromol/L had an increase of SCr at 136 micromol/L/year and progressed to ESRD in a mean period of four years. Seven (6.2%) patients who had initial SCr level of > 450 micromol/L had an increase of 136 micromol/L/year and progressed to ESRD in a mean duration of 2 (1/2) years. Sixty-two (55.4%) patients had initial blood pressure (BP) readings above the recommended level of 130/80 mm Hg. Antihypertensive management stabilized 47 (75.8%) of these patients using multiple drug regimens such as an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor and diuretics (20.5%). Though this center did not use erythropoietin (EPO) in these patients, the control of the levels of hemoglobin and hematocrit was obtained by aggressive iron supplementation including intravenous administration. In conclusion, the present management of CRF patients, which attempts to comply with the international standards, still needs refining in order to reach better outcome.

  5. Small bowel imaging in managing Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Albert, Jörg G

    2012-01-01

    The small bowel is essential to sustain alimentation and small bowel Crohn's disease (CD) may severely limit its function. Small bowel imaging is a crucial element in diagnosing small bowel CD, and treatment control with imaging is increasingly used to optimize the patients outcome. Thereby, capsule endoscopy, Balloon-assisted enteroscopy, and Magnetic resonance imaging have become key players to manage CD patients. In this review, role of small bowel imaging is detailed discussed for use in diagnosing and managing Crohn's disease patients.

  6. Nephrolithiasis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in the community

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Dídia Bismara; Moss, Alan C; Schor, Nestor

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been associated with renal stone formation. The objective of this study was to determine prospectively the prevalence of nephrolithiasis in a community-based population of patients with IBD and to analyze factors associated with renal calculus formation. Methods Screening renal ultrasound was performed in a well characterized cohort of patients seen between 2009 and 2012 at an IBD clinic. We enrolled 168 patients, including 93 with Crohn’s disease and 75 with ulcerative colitis. Clinical and phenotypic variables associated with asymptomatic nephrolithiasis were determined. Results Nephrolithiasis was detected in 36 patients with Crohn’s disease and in 28 patients with ulcerative colitis (38% for both). Although none of the patients had been previously hospitalized for symptomatic nephrolithiasis, nine with Crohn’s disease and five with ulcerative colitis had recurrent urinary tract infections or hydronephrosis. In patients with Crohn’s disease, ileocolonic (L3) disease was associated with a greater risk of nephrolithiasis than was ileal (L1) or colonic (L2) disease (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8–7). Active ulcerative colitis (regardless of severity) represented a significant risk factor for formation of renal calculi (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.1–15, P = 0.02). Conclusion In surgery-naïve patients with IBD in the community, asymptomatic nephrolithiasis is common and should be considered when renal dysfunction or infection is detected. PMID:23935383

  7. Development and Cultural Adaptation Of the Spanish Version of the End Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (SESRD-AQ)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngmee; Evangelista, Lorraine S.

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed and validated the End-Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (ESRD-AQ) to measure adherence behaviors (e.g., hemodialysis attendance, medication use, fluid restrictions, and diet) of patients on maintenance hemodialysis. To determine whether the ESRD-AQ can be used to measure adherence behaviors in non- English-speaking patients, we translated and adapted the ESRD-AQ into Spanish (SESRD-AQ) using forward and backward translation and cultural adaptation of the content. Validity and reliability were measured using item-level content validity indexes, intraclass correlation coefficients, and known-group analysis. All validity indices were within an acceptable range; strong test-retest stability existed across all items, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.82 to 1.00. The developed SESRD-AQ is a valid assessment tool for use among Spanish-speaking patients on maintenance hemodialysis. This instrument refinement and validation process can be replicated with other maintenance hemodialysis population groups. PMID:24579396

  8. Measurement and treatment of elevated blood pressure in the pediatric patient with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Swinford, Rita D; Portman, Ronald J

    2004-04-01

    Hypertension, as in adults, is a frequent complication found in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, hypertension has now become one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of childhood. The most recent data available (2003) indicate that at least 38% of children with CKD in the United States are receiving antihypertensive therapy. Only recently has it been shown in children that hypertension, traditionally considered a marker for disease severity in children, is additionally a significant and independent risk factor for accelerated deterioration of kidney function and progression of CKD and a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The following review outlines the differences and similarities of childhood versus adult hypertension with respect to measurement, diagnosis, treatment, and consequence in CKD. The definition of hypertension changes continually as a child grows with or without CKD. Despite numerous guidelines, the diagnosis of childhood hypertension continues to be based on epidemiologic data rather than evidence. For children, the current definition includes 2 categories: high normal, which is blood pressure (BP) between the 90th and 95th percentile, and hypertensive, which is BP above the 95th percentile. The evaluation of all hypertensive children should include a complete assessment of end-organ damage, including eyes, cardiovascular system (including blood vessels), kidneys, and nervous system. For children with CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a high percentage have left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). The finding of end-organ damage or comorbidity (CKD, diabetes) in any child is an absolute indication for immediate pharmacologic therapy, whereas the presence of hypertension above the 95th percentile in children without CKD warrants initial intervention such as life style modification. The guidelines for measurement of BP in children with CKD are similar to those in children without CKD and include casual BP

  9. Disease management programs for CKD patients: the potential and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Michael V

    2009-03-01

    Disease management describes the use of a number of approaches to identify and treat patients with chronic health conditions, especially those that are expensive to treat. Disease management programs have grown rapidly in the United States in the past several years. These programs have been established for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but some have been discontinued because of the high cost of the program. Disease management programs for CKD face unique challenges. Identification of patients with CKD is hampered by incomplete use of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for CKD by physicians and the less than universal use of estimated glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine measurements to identify patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). CKD affects multiple organ systems. Thus, a comprehensive disease management program will need to manage each of these aspects of CKD. These multiple interventions likely will make a CKD disease management program more costly than similar disease management programs designed for patients with diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, or other chronic diseases. The lack of data that can be used to develop effective disease management programs in CKD makes it difficult to determine goals for the management of each organ system affected by CKD. Finally, long periods of observation will be needed to determine whether a particular disease management program is effective in not only improving patient outcomes, but also decreasing both resource use and health care dollars. This long-term observation period is contrary to how most disease management contracts are written, which usually are based on meeting goals during a 1- to 3-year period. Until these challenges are resolved, it likely will be difficult to maintain effective disease management programs for CKD.

  10. 25 (OH) Vitamin D Levels and Renal Disease Progression in Patients with Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy and Blockade of the Renin-Angiotensin System

    PubMed Central

    Luño, José; Barrio, Vicente; de Vinuesa, Soledad García; Praga, Manuel; Goicoechea, Marian; Lahera, Vicente; Casas, Luisa; Oliva, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Experimental studies show that 25 (OH) vitamin D is a suppressor of renin biosynthesis and that vitamin D deficiency has been associated with CKD progression. Patients with type II diabetes and CKD have an exceptionally high rate of severe 25 (OH) vitamin D deficiency; however, it is not known whether this deficiency is a risk factor for progression of diabetic nephropathy. This study aimed to investigate whether there is an association of 25 (OH) vitamin D deficiency with disease progression in type II diabetic nephropathy. Design, setting, participants, & measurements 25 (OH) vitamin D levels were measured at baseline and 4 and 12 months in 103 patients included in a multicenter randomized controlled trial to compare the efficacy of combining an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and an angiotensin receptor blocker with the efficacy of each drug in monotherapy to slow progression of established diabetic nephropathy during 2006–2011. The primary composite endpoint was a >50% increase in baseline serum creatinine, ESRD, or death. All study participants were included in the analysis. Results Fifty-three patients (51.5%) had 25 (OH) vitamin D deficiency (<15 ng/ml). After a median follow-up of 32 months, the endpoint was reached by 23 patients with deficiency (43.4%) and 8 patients without (16%). Multivariate Cox regression analysis adjusted for urinary protein/creatinine ratio, estimated GFR, and baseline aldosterone showed that 25 (OH) vitamin D deficiency was associated with the primary endpoint (hazard ratio, 2.88; 95% confidence interval, 1.84 to 7.67; P=0.04). Conclusions These results show that 25 (OH) vitamin D deficiency is independently associated with a higher risk of the composite outcome in patients with type II diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24135218

  11. Coordination of care in disease management: opportunities and financial issues.

    PubMed

    Mosley, C

    2000-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and pre-ESRD require higher utilization of health care resources. Current reimbursement modalities contribute to the fragmentation of care, and inadequate financial information obscures the fiscal impact disease management's coordination of care can have for this population. Ignoring the extreme costs of the first 3 months of hemodialysis underestimates costs by as much as 16%. Potential areas of coordination and the financial benefits are discussed. In each venue of the care settings of a patient with chronic renal failure (CRF) they may receive excellent service. Too often there is not optimal coordination of care between these venues, and in fact the fragmentation of care can cause unnecessary wear and tear on the patient, and increases the overall expense to a health care system. Understanding sources of fragmentation, reimbursement effects, and potential corrections will enhance the patient's voyage through the system. This article provides some examples of the discoordination that presently exists and financial implications especially during the transition onto dialysis. In patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), each arena of care has criteria established to quantitate quality. None of the settings, whether it is the dialysis unit, the hospital, the skilled nursing facility, or the physician's office, exists in the absence of regulations. These may be state or federal, National Council on Quality Assurance (NCQA), Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS), water standards, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), fire codes, physician peer review, Medicare billing, Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA), the ESRD networks, credentialing, health maintenance organization (HMO) insurance requirements, pharmacy benefits and formularies, safe harbors, "antikickback," or National Kidney Foundation Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-DOQI) guidelines. For all the providers of care

  12. Carnitine metabolism in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Krähenbühl, S; Reichen, J

    1997-01-01

    Carnitine metabolism was studied in 79 patients with chronic liver disease, including 22 patients with noncirrhotic liver disease and 57 patients with different types of cirrhosis (22 patients with hepatitis B- or C-associated cirrhosis, 15 patients with alcohol-induced cirrhosis, 15 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis [PBC], and 5 patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis), and compared with 28 control subjects. In comparison with control subjects, patients with noncirrhotic liver disease showed no change in the plasma carnitine pool, whereas patients with cirrhosis had a 29% increase in the long-chain acylcarnitine concentration. Analysis of subgroups of patients with cirrhosis showed that patients with alcohol-induced cirrhosis had an increase in the total plasma carnitine concentration (67.8 +/- 29.5 vs. 55.2 +/- 9.9 micromol/L in control subjects), resulting from increases in both the short-chain and long-chain acylcarnitine concentration. In this group of patients, the acylcarnitine concentrations showed a close correlation with the total carnitine concentration, and the total carnitine concentration with the serum bilirubin concentration. Urinary excretion of carnitine was not different between patients with noncirrhotic or cirrhotic liver disease and control patients. However, patients with PBC showed an increased urinary excretion of total carnitine (52.5 +/- 40.0 vs. 28.0 +/- 16.7 micromol carnitine/mmol creatinine), resulting from an increase in the fractional excretion of both free carnitine and short-chain acylcarnitine. The current studies show that patients with cirrhosis are normally not carnitine deficient. Patients with alcohol-induced cirrhosis have increased plasma carnitine concentrations, which may result from increased carnitine biosynthesis because of increased skeletal muscle protein turnover. The increase in the fractional carnitine excretion in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis may result from competition of bile acids and

  13. Coronary artery disease in patients with cerebrovascular disease: a prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Rokey, R.; Rolak, L.A.; Harati, Y.; Kutka, N.; Verani, M.S.

    1984-07-01

    Coronary artery disease is the cause of death in most patients who have transient ischemic attacks or stroke. Evaluation for this condition is not routinely performed in such patients, and no prospective studies have been reported. We prospectively examined 50 consecutive patients with transient ischemic attacks or mild stroke to determine the prevalence and importance of coronary artery disease. All patients were examined by a cardiologist and underwent both exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and exercise radionuclide ventriculography. Sixteen patients were suspected to have coronary artery disease on the basis of clinical evaluation. In 15 of these the was confirmed by the nuclear scans. The remaining 34 patients had no clinical evidence of heart disease, yet 14 had abnormal cardiac scans. Twenty of 22 patients with abnormal scans who underwent cardiac catheterization had significant coronary artery disease or a cardiomyopathy. The discovery of heart disease altered clinical management in 13 patients. Overall, 29 of 50 patients had significant coronary artery disease, compared with a 7% prevalence of the condition in other patients of similar age at the same institution.

  14. Addressing challenges and needs in patient education targeting hardly reached patients with chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Torenholt, Rikke; Møller, Birgitte Lund; Vestergaard, Susanne; Engelund, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Some patients do not benefit from participation in patient education due to reasons related to disease burden, literacy, and socioeconomic challenges. In this communication, we address more specifically both the challenges that these hardly reached patients face in relation to patient education programs and the challenges educators face when conducting patient education with hardly reached patients. We define principles for the format and content of dialogue tools to better support this patient group within the population of individuals with diabetes.

  15. Addressing challenges and needs in patient education targeting hardly reached patients with chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Torenholt, Rikke; Møller, Birgitte Lund; Vestergaard, Susanne; Engelund, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Some patients do not benefit from participation in patient education due to reasons related to disease burden, literacy, and socioeconomic challenges. In this communication, we address more specifically both the challenges that these hardly reached patients face in relation to patient education programs and the challenges educators face when conducting patient education with hardly reached patients. We define principles for the format and content of dialogue tools to better support this patient group within the population of individuals with diabetes. PMID:25729695

  16. Thrombophilic Risk Factors in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Ayten; Senturk, Omer; Aygun, Cem; Celebi, Altay; Caglayan, Cigdem; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have an increased risk for thromboembolism. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of thrombophilic risk factors in IBD patients and to assess the associations of these factors with disease activity. Methods Forty-eight patients with IBD (24 ulcerative colitis, 24 Crohn’s disease) and 40 matched healthy control individuals were enrolled. In addition to routine biochemical analysis, fasting blood samples were studied for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, protein-C, protein-S, antithrombin III, factor VII, factor VIII, D-dimer, vitamin B12, folic acid and homocysteine. Results Levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, D-dimer and the number of platelets were significantly higher in patients with IBD. When compared to control group, in patients with Crohn’s disease serum homocystein levels were significantly higher (p = 0.025) while serum folic acid levels were significantly lower (p < 0.019). Levels of fibrinogen, D-dimer, protein C, factor VIII, total homocystein and the number of platelets were found to be significantly higher in Crohn’s disease patients who were in active period of the disease. Conclusions Thrombophilic defects are multifactorial and might be frequently seen in IBD patients. They might contribute to thrombotic complications of this disease. PMID:27942288

  17. Splenectomy for hematologic disease. The UCLA experience with 306 patients.

    PubMed

    Musser, G; Lazar, G; Hocking, W; Busuttil, R W

    1984-07-01

    Between 1956 and 1981, 306 splenectomies for hematologic diseases were performed at the UCLA Medical Center. Of these operations, more than 75% were performed for therapeutic reasons to control anemia, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, or painful symptoms of splenomegaly. Of the 65 patients who had idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, 77% showed an excellent response, and of the 39 patients who had hereditary spherocytosis, 90% responded. Other diseases with predictably good response rates were autoimmune hemolytic anemias, Felty's syndrome, and hairy cell leukemia. Forty patients with Hodgkin's disease had splenectomies for diagnostic purposes the last 10 years. The overall morbidity and mortality were 24% and 6%, respectively, the most common complications being pneumonia, wound infections, and local postoperative bleeding, and the most common cause of death being sepsis. The review supports the thesis that in carefully selected patients, therapeutic splenectomy can have desirable palliative effects and that diagnostic splenectomy has a sufficiently low risk to warrant its consideration in patients with Hodgkin's disease.

  18. Approach to the patient with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kevin E

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with motor, nonmotor, and behavioral findings. Imaging technology advances have allowed the characterization of the underlying pathologic changes to the brain and identification of specific lesions in dopaminergic neurons. Although certain imaging techniques allow for detection up to 20 years before the onset of motor symptoms, these advances have yet to produce meaningful treatments to halt the disease or reverse its course. Current treatments are directed at optimizing symptomatic management. Referral to a movement disorder specialist familiar with PD should be considered for providers with limited familiarity in diagnosis or treatment.

  19. Associations of the calcium-sensing receptor gene CASR rs7652589 SNP with nephrolithiasis and secondary hyperparathyroidism in haemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Grzegorzewska, Alicja E.; Paciorkowski, Mateusz; Mostowska, Adrianna; Frycz, Bartosz; Warchoł, Wojciech; Stolarek, Ireneusz; Figlerowicz, Marek; Jagodziński, Paweł P.

    2016-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis, secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT), and cardiovascular complications are associated with disturbances in Ca handling and contribute to morbidity/mortality during haemodialysis (HD). Calcimimetics, activators of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), provide an effective means of reducing parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion in sHPT. Polymorphism in CaSR gene (CASR) influences Ca-related parameters, however it was not shown in HD patients for CASR rs7652589. The minor allele at this polymorphism modifies the binding sites of transcription factors and CaSR expression. We hypothesized that CASR rs7652589 variants may also influence CaSR in end stage renal disease (ESRD). We aimed to determine the associations of rs7652589 with nephrolithiasis-related ESRD, Ca, P, ALP, PTH, response to treatment with cinacalcet, prevalence of coronary artery disease, and all-cause/cardiovascular mortality in HD patients (n = 1162). Healthy individuals (n = 918) were controls. This study shows that the A allele of rs7652589 is a risk allele for nephrolithiasis-related ESRD. The AA genotype is associated with more severe sHPT (higher Ca and PTH concentrations). The A allele is associated with reduced CaSR transcript level in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. According to computational analysis, potential binding sites for GLI3, AHR and TP53 are removed by the A allele, whereas binding sites for SOX18 and TP63 are created. PMID:27739473

  20. Erectile dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ophuis, A.J.M. Oude; Nijeholt, A.A.B. Lycklama à

    2006-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a highly prevalent disease, especially in cardiovascular-compromised men. Many of the well-established risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also risk factors for erectile dysfunction. A correlation between erectile dysfunction and endothelial dysfunction is well established. It is postulated that erectile dysfunction with an arteriovascular aetiology can predate and be an indicator of potential coronary artery disease. In this paper we will attempt to increase awareness among cardiologists for the predictive value of erectile dysfunction for future cardiovascular disease in order to optimise cardiovascular risk management. The treatment of erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular interactions is also discussed in detail. ImagesFigure 1AFigure 1B PMID:25696612

  1. Clostridium difficile infection in a patient with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chien-Hui; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2012-06-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder, which is rare in pediatric patients. The definite etiology and mechanism to induce an acute exacerbation of Crohn disease remains mostly unknown. The authors report on a 14-year-old girl with Crohn disease who has acute gastrointestinal symptoms caused by toxin A-producing Clostridium difficile, which mimicked a flare-up of Crohn disease. There was no preceding antibiotic prescription before the episode. The disease activity did not improve after steroid treatment, which is unusual for Crohn disease. However, all symptoms were dramatically relieved after eradication of C difficile, and led to a symptom-free period for more than 3 years. This case report aims to address the unusual presentation of a usual pathogen, C difficile, in a pediatric patient with Crohn disease.

  2. Development of Hodgkin's disease in a patient with leprosy.

    PubMed

    Weshler, Z; Leviatan, A; Gordon, R; Kopolovic, J

    1978-01-01

    We present a patient with leprosy who developed Hodgkin's disease of the nodular sclerosing type. There are two previous reports describing the combination of leprosy and Hodgkin's disease in a single patient [3, 9]. Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed 14 months after the complete disappearance of mycobacterium leprae from the skin lesions, under treatment with DDS (diamino-diphenyl-sulfone). Hodgkin's disease was treated by irradiation and chemotherapy. Obstructive jaundice developed which resolved under treatment by irradiation of the hilar area of the liver, chemotherapy and hormones. During two years of immuno-suppressive therapy, without DDS, no exacerbation of the leprosy occurred.