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  1. Dyslipidemia and progression of cardiovascular calcification (CVC) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

    PubMed

    Qunibi, Wajeh Y

    2005-06-01

    Dyslipidemia and progression of cardiovascular calcification (CVC) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Cardiovascular calcification (CVC) is commonly encountered both in the general population as well as in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The etiology of CVC in patients with ESRD is multifactorial. Despite that, current debate remains narrowly focused on the role of calcium loading from calcium-based phosphate binders (CBPB) in the pathogenesis and progression of CVC. Yet, the alleged link between these binders and CVC has not been substantiated in well-designed controlled trials. In contrast, the purported role of sevelamer, a non-calcium-based phosphate binder, in slowing the progression of CVC in dialysis patients has attracted widespread attention. The beneficial effect of sevelamer on progression of calcification was thought to be due to lower calcium loading during its use. However, an alternative and possibly more likely mechanism involves sevelamer-induced lowering of LDL cholesterol. In this context, previous studies in individuals with normal renal function have documented amelioration of coronary artery calcification (CAC) with reduction of LDL-cholesterol by treatment with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Given that CAC is a well-accepted marker of atherosclerosis, and that high plasma cholesterol concentration is one of the main risk factors for atherosclerosis, then it is not unreasonable to suspect that CAC may be halted or even reversed by lowering of LDL cholesterol level with statin therapy. Unfortunately, the effect of lowering the LDL-cholesterol level on CAC has not been studied in patients with ESRD. Therefore, conclusions about this important topic should await the results of well-designed clinical studies that control for all factors potentially implicated in the CVC burden of patients with ESRD. In this review, I will discuss the role of various potential mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of CVC in

  2. Utilizing a disease management approach to improve ESRD patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Anand, Shaan; Nissenson, Allen R

    2002-01-01

    In this era of processes and systems to improve quality, disease management is one methodology to improve care delivery and outcomes for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In most disease management systems a senior renal nurse coordinates all aspects of the patient's care and ensures that the prescribed and necessary care is delivered for both CKD-related and comorbid conditions. The nurse also continually monitors outcomes on quality indicators and key performance measures. These outcome data are then aggregated and analyzed, are compared with local and national benchmarks, and drive the continuous quality improvement (CQI) process. Such a system attempts to centralize the currently fragmented care delivery system, continually improve patient outcomes, and conserve scarce economic resources. Early data suggest a disease management approach may improve both the morbidity and mortality of CKD patients.

  3. Risk factors and underlying cardiovascular diseases in incident ESRD patients.

    PubMed

    Di Benedetto, Attilio; Marcelli, Daniele; D'Andrea, Antonello; Cice, Gennaro; D'Isa, Salvatore; Cappabianca, Fabio; Pacchiano, Giulia; D'Amato, Roberta; Oggero, Anna Rita; Bonanno, Domenico; Pergamo, Ornella; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in dialysis patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and of CVD on admission to hemodialysis. Data were collected in 31 Italian clinics belonging to a clinic network using a prospective database (EuCliD), the main purpose of which is the support of quality assurance. Six hundred and thirty-six patients, mean age 63.9+/-15.4 years, admitted between January 1, 2000 and September 30, 2003, were separated into two groups on the basis of presence of CVD and observed for a median follow-up period of 16 months. In the CVD group, patients were significantly older and the percentage of diabetics and smokers was significantly greater than in the CVD-free group. There were no significant differences between the groups in term of uremia-related risk factors. According to logistic regression analysis evaluating the impact of traditional and nontraditional cardiovascular risk factors, only smoking habit (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.25-2.79) and diabetes (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.19-2.95) were associated with a higher relative risk for the presence of CVD at baseline. At the time of admission, CVD was present in 27% of patients. The following de novo development of CVD was observed: hypertensive disease (0.28 new cases/100 pt-years), ischemic heart disease (0.71 new cases/100 pt-years), other forms of heart disease (1.57 new cases/100 pt-years), disease of arteries, arterioles, etc. (1.85 new cases/100 pt-years) and cerebrovascular disease (0.71 new cases/100 pt-years). The rate of developing de novo CVD events was 3.70 per 100 patient-years. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is already high at admission to dialysis. Despite the care provided to dialysis patients, a significant proportion of patients develop de novo CVD.

  4. Nephrology care prior to end-stage renal disease and outcomes among new ESRD patients in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Brenda W.; Morgenstern, Hal; Hedgeman, Elizabeth; Tilea, Anca; Scholz, Natalie; Shearon, Tempie; Burrows, Nilka Rios; Shahinian, Vahakn B.; Yee, Jerry; Plantinga, Laura; Powe, Neil R.; McClellan, William; Robinson, Bruce; Williams, Desmond E.; Saran, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Background Longer nephrology care before end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has been linked with better outcomes. Methods We investigated whether longer pre-end-stage renal disease (ESRD) nephrology care was associated with lower mortality at both the patient and state levels among 443 761 incident ESRD patients identified in the USA between 2006 and 2010. Results Overall, 33% of new ESRD patients had received no prior nephrology care, while 28% had received care for >12 months. At the patient level, predictors of >12 months of nephrology care included having health insurance, white race, younger age, diabetes, hypertension and US region. Longer pre-ESRD nephrology care was associated with lower first-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.58 for >12 months versus no care; 95% confidence interval 0.57–0.59), higher albumin and hemoglobin, choice of peritoneal dialysis and native fistula and discussion of transplantation options. Living in a state with a 10% higher proportion of patients receiving >12 months of pre-ESRD care was associated with a 9.3% lower relative mortality rate, standardized for case mix (R2 = 0.47; P < 0.001). Conclusions This study represents the largest cohort of incident ESRD patients to date. Although we did not follow patients before ESRD onset, our findings, both at the individual patient and state levels, reflect the importance of early nephrology care among those with chronic kidney disease. PMID:26613038

  5. The epidemiology and control of anaemia among pre-ESRD patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McClellan, W M; Jurkovitz, C; Abramson, J

    2005-12-01

    Anaemia is a common condition among pre-end-stage renal disease (pre-ESRD) patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, data from clinical studies indicate that anaemia may be present in as many as two-thirds of such patients. Use of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) provides an effective means of correcting anaemia in CKD patients and helps to reduce the risk of renal disease progression and related problems. Unfortunately, EPO therapy is underutilized in these persons. Consequently, anaemia remains a major problem in the pre-ESRD CKD population. Evidence suggests that anaemia in the presence of CKD can lead to an increased risk of a number of adverse outcomes, including mortality, progression of kidney disease, coronary heart disease, stroke, hospitalization, and decreases in quality of life. Anaemia's association with these adverse outcomes suggests that effective treatment of anaemia in pre-ESRD CKD patients is of great importance and that substantial efforts should be made to ensure that these patients receive appropriate therapy to correct anaemia.

  6. Disease management improves ESRD outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sands, J J

    2006-02-01

    Renal disease management organizations have reported achieving significant decreases in mortality and hospitalization in conjunction with cost savings, improved patient satisfaction and quality of life. Disease management organizations strive to fill existing gaps in care delivery through the standardized use of risk assessment, predictive modeling, evidence based guidelines and process and outcomes measurement. Patient self-management education and the provision of individual nurse care managers are also key program components. As we more fully measure clinical outcomes and total health-care costs including payments from all insurance and government entities, pharmacy costs and out-of-pocket expenditures, the full implications of disease management can be better defined. The results of this analysis will have a profound influence on United States healthcare policy. At present, current data suggests that the promise of disease management, improved care at reduced cost, can and is being realized in ESRD.

  7. Accuracy of patients' reports of comorbid disease and their association with mortality in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Kerri L; Merkin, Sharon Stein; Plantinga, Laura C; Fink, Nancy E; Sadler, John H; Powe, Neil R

    2008-07-01

    Patient awareness of chronic diseases is low. Unawareness may represent poor understanding of chronic illness and may be associated with poor outcomes in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Concurrent prospective national cohort study. Incident hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients enrolled in the Choices for Healthy Outcomes in Caring for ESRD Study and followed up until 2004. Inaccurate patient self-report of 8 comorbid diseases compared with the medical record. All-cause mortality was the primary outcome. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the contribution of demographics and clinical measures in the relation of inaccurate self-report to mortality. In 965 patients, the proportion of inaccurate self-reporters ranged from 3% for diabetes mellitus to 35% for congestive heart failure. Generally, inaccurate self-reporters were older and had more chronic diseases. Greater risk of death was found for inaccurate self-reporters of ischemic heart disease (hazard ratio [HR], 1.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 1.59; P = 0.001), coronary intervention (HR, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.08 to 1.97; P = 0.01), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.14 to 1.70; P = 0.001). The greater risk of death remained significant for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR, 1.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 1.66; P = 0.003) after adjustment for age, sex, and race. In patients receiving peritoneal dialysis, greater risk of death (HR, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.34 to 3.15; P = 0.001) was found for inaccurate self-reporters of ischemic heart disease. Includes potential for residual confounding, medical record error, misclassification of patient accuracy of self-report, and low inaccurate self-report of some chronic diseases, reducing the power to measure associations. Accuracy of self-report depends on the specific comorbid disease. Patients with ESRD, especially those receiving peritoneal dialysis

  8. Hypogonadism and testosterone replacement therapy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Hypogonadism is a common problem in the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and renal transplant population. It has widespread systemic effects and has been linked with mortality in dialysis patients and at the time of renal transplant. The etiology is likely multifactorial and most patients are afflicted by various comorbidities that can contribute to hypogonadism. Clinical manifestations are mostly nonspecific. We review the approach to the diagnosis of hypogonadism, focusing on both laboratory values and clinical signs and symptoms. We review treatment with testosterone replacement in this population and highlight various studies that tend to have small sample sizes. Though these studies provide insight into testosterone replacement, the need for larger studies is emphasized to better understand the effects and safety of therapy. PMID:28078220

  9. The End-Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (ESRD-AQ): Testing The Psychometric Properties in Patients Receiving In-Center Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Phillips, Linda R.; Pavlish, Carol; Kopple, Joel D.

    2010-01-01

    Reported treatment adherence rates of patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) have been extremely varied due to lack of reliable and valid measurement tools. This study was conducted to develop and test an instrument to measure treatment adherence to hemodialysis (HD) attendance, medications, fluid restrictions, and diet prescription among patients with ESRD. This article describes the methodological approach used to develop and test the psychometric properties (such as reliability and validity) of the 46-item ESRD-Adherence Questionnaire (ESRD-AQ) in a cohort of patients receiving maintenance HD at dialysis centers in Los Angeles County. The ESRD-AQ is the first self-report instrument to address all components of adherence behaviors of patients with ESRD. The findings support that the instrument is reliable and valid, and is easy to administer. Future studies are needed in a larger sample to determine whether additional modifications are needed. PMID:20830945

  10. Pleuritic chest pain from portal hypertensive gastropathy in ESRD patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease misdiagnosed as pericarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma; Achebe, Jennifer; Odenigbo, Charles; Oguejiofor, Fidelis

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) is a gastric mucosal lesion complicating portal hypertension, with higher prevalence in decompensated cirrhosis. PHG can sometimes complicate autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) due to the presence of multiple liver cysts. Besides, PHG is known to present as chest pain, with or without hematemesis. Other causes of chest pain in ADPKD include referred chest pain from progressively enlarging kidney cysts, and rare pericardial cysts. Chest pain, especially if pleuritic, in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, is often ascribed to uremic pericarditis. We present recurrent pleuritic chest pain in a 24-year old ESRD patient with ADPKD that was initially misdiagnosed as uremic pericarditis. It was ultimately shown to represent symptomatic PHG with excellent therapeutic response to proton pump inhibitors. PMID:27069969

  11. Effectiveness of Topical Chia Seed Oil on Pruritus of End-stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Patients and Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Se Kyoo; Park, Hyun Jung; Park, Byeong Deog

    2010-01-01

    Background Several studies have been performed to evaluate the efficacy of dietary n-3 fatty acid for patients with renal dysfunction. While about 40% to 80% of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) complain about pruritus and xerosis, there are few reports on the effects of topical n-3 fatty acid on these symptoms. Objective In order to investigate the possible beneficial effects of topical n-3 fatty acid, oils extracted from chia (Salvia hispanica) seed were formulated into topical products, the effects of which were measured. Methods Five healthy volunteers having xerotic pruritus symptoms and 5 patients with pruritus caused by either ESRD or diabetes were involved in this study. A topical formulation containing 4% chia seed oils were applied for an 8-week duration. Subjective itching symptoms were assessed on a 6-point scale, as were other skin functions, namely transepidermal water loss and skin capacitance. Results After the 8 weeks of application, significant improvements in skin hydration, lichen simplex chronicus, and prurigo nodularis were observed in all patients. A similar improvement was also observed among healthy volunteers with xerotic pruritus. Improvement of epidermal permeability barrier function and skin hydration, represented by trans-epidermal water loss and skin capacitance, respectively, were also observed. No adverse effects were observed in all the tested patients and volunteers. Conclusion Chia seed oil can be used as an adjuvant moisturizing agent for pruritic skin, including that of ESRD patients. PMID:20548903

  12. Do HDL and LDL subfractions play a role in atherosclerosis in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients?

    PubMed

    Gluba-Brzózka, Anna; Franczyk, Beata; Banach, Maciej; Rysz-Górzyńska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Significantly increased cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney (CKD) disease cannot be explained by traditional risk factors. Recent studies revealed that the quality of HDL and LDL cholesterol may be more important than their serum levels. The aim of this study was to assess which LDL and HDL subfractions were more abundant in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and to analyse whether subfraction distribution could be associated with accelerated atherosclerotic processes. This study included 50 ESRD patients undergoing dialysis and 20 healthy volunteers. LDL and HDL subfractions were analysed in serum with the use of Lipoprint system. All patients had intima-media thickness (IMT) measured. Statistically significant differences in subfractions between control and study group were observed in case of: HDL1 (p < 0.0001), HDL2 (p = 0.009), HDL3 (p < 0.0001), HDL4 (p = 0.003), HDL5 (p = 0.01), HDL7 (p < 0.0001), HDL8 (p < 0.0001), HDL9 (p < 0.0001), HDL10 (p < 0.0001), large HDL (p < 0.0001), HDL Small (p < 0.0001) as well as IDL-B (p = 0.014), IDLA (p = 0.011), LDL2 (p = 0.007). Significant differences were also observed in HDL and LDL subfraction distribution between haemodialysis patients with normal and increased IMT: HDL6 (p = 0.020), HDL Large (HDL1-3) (p = 0.017), HDL Intermediate (HDL4-7) (p = 0.017). This study revealed that ESRD influenced HDL subfractions. In HD patients, large HDL subfractions are more abundant while small HDL fraction is more frequent in healthy persons. It failed to show the influence of end-stage disease on LDL subfraction levels. Shift in HDL subfractions might be responsible for the increased risk of atherosclerosis in CKD patients.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and safety of carfilzomib in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma and end-stage renal disease (ESRD): an open-label, single-arm, phase I study.

    PubMed

    Quach, Hang; White, Darrell; Spencer, Andrew; Ho, P Joy; Bhutani, Divaya; White, Mike; Inamdar, Sandeep; Morris, Chris; Ou, Ying; Gyger, Martin

    2017-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) of carfilzomib have been previously studied in multiple myeloma patients with varying degrees of renal impairment (normal, mild, moderate, severe, and end-stage renal disease [ESRD]) at doses of 15 and 20 mg/m(2). This study evaluated carfilzomib PK at higher doses of 27 and 56 mg/m(2) in normal renal function and ESRD patients. Patients received carfilzomib on two consecutive days/week for 3 weeks every 28-day cycle: 20 mg/m(2) (cycle 1 day 1-2), escalated to 27 mg/m(2) on cycle 1 day 8; if tolerated, 56 mg/m(2) starting cycle 2 day 1. The primary objective was PK assessment with safety/tolerability and response rate as secondary and exploratory objectives, respectively. 26 patients were enrolled (15 normal, 11 ESRD). There was a trend toward higher area under the concentration time curve (AUC) and maximum concentration in ESRD versus normal renal function patients; however, high interpatient PK variability was discerned. Relative to patients with normal renal function, ESRD patients showed 33% higher AUC. Overall response rate was 43% for the normal renal function and 60% for the ESRD groups. Safety findings were generally similar between the two groups and consistent with the known safety profile of carfilzomib in multiple myeloma patients. There were no meaningful differences in PK between patients with normal renal function and ESRD in light of carfilzomib exposure-response relationships. These results continue to support dosing recommendation that no starting dose adjustment of carfilzomib appears warranted in patients with baseline renal impairment.

  14. How do We Manage Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with CKD and ESRD?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon Young; Park, Hyeong Cheon

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been shown to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events. In addition, patients with pre-dialysis CKD appear to be more likely to die of heart disease than of kidney disease. CKD accelerates coronary artery atherosclerosis by several mechanisms, notably hypertension and dyslipidemia, both of which are known risk factors for coronary artery disease. In addition, CKD alters calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, resulting in hypercalcemia and vascular calcification, including the coronary arteries. Mortality of patients on long-term dialysis therapy is high, with age-adjusted mortality rates of about 25% annually. Because the majority of deaths are caused by cardiovascular disease, routine cardiac catheterization of new dialysis patients was proposed as a means of improving the identification and treatment of high-risk patients. However, clinicians may be uncomfortable exposing asymptomatic patients to such invasive procedures like cardiac catheterization, thus noninvasive cardiac risk stratification was investigated widely as a more palatable alternative to routine diagnostic catheterization. The effective management of coronary artery disease is of paramount importance in uremic patients. The applicability of diagnostic, preventive, and treatment modalities developed in nonuremic populations to patients with kidney failure cannot necessarily be extrapolated from clinical studies in non-kidney failure populations. Noninvasive diagnostic testing in uremic patients is less accurate than in nonuremic populations. Initial data suggest that dobutamine echocardiography may be the preferred diagnostic method. PCI with stenting is a less favorable alternative to CABG, however, it has a faster recovery time, reduced invasiveness, and no overall mortality difference in nondiabetic and non-CKD patients compared with CABG. CABG is associated with reduced repeat revascularizations, greater relief of angina, and increased long term

  15. Patient Characteristics and Outcomes by GN Subtype in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Montez-Rath, Maria E.; Lafayette, Richard A.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Outcomes-based research rarely focuses on patients with ESRD caused by GN. The hypotheses were that the GN subtype would clinically discriminate patient groups and independently associate with survival after ESRD therapy initiation. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Data were extracted from the US Renal Data System for adult patients with incident (1996–2011) ESRD attributed to six GN subtypes: FSGS, IgA nephropathy (IgAN), membranous nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomeruonephritis, lupus nephritis (LN), and vasculitis. ESRD attributed to diabetes and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease served as non-GN comparators. Unadjusted and adjusted mortality hazard ratios (aHRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox regression (reference, IgAN). Models sequentially adjusted for sociodemographic (model 2), comorbidity/laboratory (model 3), and ESRD treatment modality (model 4) variables. Results Among 84,301 patients with ESRD attributed to GN, the median age ranged from 39 (LN) to 66 (vasculitis) years, male sex ranged from 18% (LN) to 68% (IgAN), and black race ranged from 7% (IgAN) to 49% (LN). Patients with IgAN had the fewest comorbidities and lowest use of hemodialysis (70.1%). After a median follow-up of 2.5 (interquartile range, 1.0–4.9) years, crude mortality was lowest in IgAN (3.7 deaths/100 person years). Compared to IgAN, adjusted mortality was highest in LN (model 4 aHR=1.75; 95% CI, 1.68 to 1.83) and in diabetes (aHR=1.73; 95% CI, 1.67 to 1.79), and was also higher in all other GN subtypes (membranous nephropathy: aHR=1.23; 95% CI, 1.17 to 1.29; FSGS: aHR=1.37; 95% CI, 1.32 to 1.42; membranoproliferative GN: aHR=1.38; 95% CI, 1.31 to 1.45; vasculitis: aHR=1.51; 95% CI, 1.45 to 1.58) and in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (aHR=1.22; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.27). Conclusions This study exposes substantial heterogeneity across GN subtypes at ESRD therapy initiation and

  16. Improved hepatitis B vaccination rates in ESRD patients in California.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Peters, V

    2000-10-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Survey of Dialysis Associated Diseases, California, which includes Network 17 and 18, had one of the lowest hepatitis B vaccination rates in the country for 1994, 1995, and 1996. With 3 outbreaks of hepatitis B (HBV) in California in 1994, hepatitis B vaccination was chosen as a quality improvement project in both Network 17 and 18. With input from both Medical Review Boards and HCFA Region X, a project was formulated which focused on the improvement of the number of facilities which had hepatitis B vaccination rates which are greater than 50%. The overall purpose of both projects was to: (1) achieve access to preventative services for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) Medicare beneficiaries; (2) increase the number of ESRD patients in California who are vaccinated for HBV; (3) eliminate dialysis in California as an independent risk factor for contracting HBV; (4) decrease the number of ESRD facilities with HBV vaccination rates of 0%; and (5) increase the number of ESRD facilities with HBV vaccination rates greater than 50%. In 1998, both Network 17 and 18 denominators were adjusted to reflect the population which is eligible for vaccination. Because of historically low vaccination rate in California, the 1998 data collection sought to ascertain precise numbers for the ESRD patient population. Data were used from the 1996 and 1997 CDC Survey of Dialysis Associated Diseases from baseline measurements of HBV vaccination rates for all facilities in both Network 17 and 18. The CDC did not conduct a survey in 1998, however, Network 17 and 18 conducted a survey of dialysis associated diseases for all of California ESRD facilities. A data collection tool was designed to gather information on processes and outcomes in each facility. This allowed a continuous quality improvement (CQI)-based approach to analyze the problem, where tools like cause/effect and Pareto diagrams provided information on factors and issues affecting

  17. Prevalence and determinants of anxiety and depression in end stage renal disease (ESRD). A comparison between ESRD patients with and without coexisting diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yoong, Russell Kl; Mooppil, Nandakumar; Khoo, Eric Yh; Newman, Stanton P; Lee, Vanessa Yw; Kang, Augustine Wc; Griva, Konstadina

    2017-03-01

    To compare anxiety and/or depressive symptoms between patients with end-stage renal disease with and without comorbid diabetes and identify factors associated with symptoms of distress in this population. Data from two studies (conducted between 2010 and 2014) were pooled. A total of 526 patients on hemodialysis (68.8% with diabetes) completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Elevated symptoms were defined as HADS-Anxiety or HADS-Depression≥8. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to estimate associations between diabetic status, and other socio-demographic and clinical factors with baseline clinical anxiety and depression. A total of 233 (45.4%) reported elevated anxiety symptoms and 256 (49.9%) reported elevated depressive symptoms sufficient for caseness. Rates were not different between patients with and without diabetes. Risk for clinical depression was higher in patients who were single/unpartnered (OR=1.828), Chinese vs. Malay (OR=2.05), or had lower albumin levels (OR=0.932). None of the parameters were associated with anxiety caseness. Sociocultural factors rather than comorbid burden may help identify patients at risk for depression. The high rates of anxiety and depression underlie the importance for monitoring and intervention in dialysis care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Latent learning in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD).

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel J W; Butler, Laurie T; Harris, John P; Vaux, Emma C

    2015-04-01

    Cognitive functions such as attention and memory are known to be impaired in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), but the sites of the neural changes underlying these impairments are uncertain. Patients and controls took part in a latent learning task, which had previously shown a dissociation between patients with Parkinson's disease and those with medial temporal damage. ESRD patients (n=24) and age and education-matched controls (n=24) were randomly assigned to either an exposed or unexposed condition. In Phase 1 of the task, participants learned that a cue (word) on the back of a schematic head predicted that the subsequently seen face would be smiling. For the exposed (but not unexposed) condition, an additional (irrelevant) colour cue was shown during presentation. In Phase 2, a different association, between colour and facial expression, was learned. Instructions were the same for each phase: participants had to predict whether the subsequently viewed face was going to be happy or sad. No difference in error rate between the groups was found in Phase 1, suggesting that patients and controls learned at a similar rate. However, in Phase 2, a significant interaction was found between group and condition, with exposed controls performing significantly worse than unexposed (therefore demonstrating learned irrelevance). In contrast, exposed patients made a similar number of errors to unexposed in Phase 2. The pattern of results in ESRD was different from that previously found in Parkinson's disease, suggesting a different neural origin.

  19. Trained ESRD mentors: an important resource for total patient care.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Peggyjayne; Asick, Robin; Weaver, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The KFCP recognized a need for a mentoring program utilizing patients who have been trained to provide appropriate emotional support and practical tips to others facing the challenges of ESRD. A pilot project was developed by renal professionals and ESRD patients using a systematic approach to develop a curriculum, recruit qualified ESRD patients and caregivers, provide mentor training, and match CPs and mentees. An effective tool in other health disciplines such as American Cancer Society and Hospice, this mentoring program filled a gap in resources available to renal patients. The success of The KFCP PPP Pilot Program in the greater Harrisburg, Pennsylvania region (covering three counties) has led The KFCP to conclude that the PPP should be available to its entire 28-county constituency. Creating a KFCP staff position of PPP Coordinator has set the stage for the same methodical expansion of the program as human and financial resources allow. The KFCP has created a model that can be emulated throughout Pennsylvania and beyond. All ESRD patients and affected loved ones deserve the support of a mentor who has learned to cope well with the challenges presented by chronic kidney disease. The PPP ensures that the support provided is appropriate and beneficial.

  20. Stereopsis in end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel J W; Harris, John P; Butler, Laurie T; Vaux, Emma C

    2017-03-15

    We investigated an effect of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on the visual system by measuring the ability of 21 patients to perceive depth in the random dot stereograms and circles of the Randot Test. To control for other factors which might influence performance on the tests of stereopsis, patients were compared with healthy controls matched for age, years of education, IQ, and general cognitive ability. Vernier acuity (thought to reflect mainly central processing) and Landolt acuity (more sensitive to retinal and optical abnormalities) were also measured, but the study did not include a formal ophthalmological examination. All controls could perceive depth in random dot stereograms, whereas 9/21 patients could not. Patients who could perceive depth had worse stereoacuity than did their matched controls. The patient group as a whole had worse Vernier and Landolt acuities than the controls. The stereoblind patient subgroup had similar Vernier acuity to the stereoscopic subgroup, but worse Landolt acuity, and was more likely to have peripheral vascular disease. We conclude that ESRD had affected structures both within the eye, and within the visual brain. However, the similarity of Vernier acuity and difference of Landolt acuity in the stereoblind and stereoscopic patient subgroups suggest that the differences in stereoscopic ability arise from abnormalities in the eyes rather than in the brain.

  1. Patient Selection in the ESRD Managed Care Demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Jennifer R.; Dykstra, Dawn M.; Pisoni, Ron; Beronja, Nancy; Gaylin, Daniel S.; Oppenheimer, Caitlin Carroll; Rubin, Robert J.; Held, Philip J.

    2003-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service's (CMS') end stage renal disease (ESRD) managed care demonstration offered an opportunity to assess patient selection among a chronically ill and inherently costly population. Patient selection refers to the phenomenon whereby those Medicare beneficiaries who choose to enroll or stay in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) are, on average, younger, healthier, and less costly to treat than beneficiaries who remain in the traditional Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) sector. The results presented in this article show that enrollees into the demonstration were generally younger and healthier than a representative group of comparison patients from the same geographic areas. PMID:14628398

  2. Is kidney function affecting the management of myocardial infarction? A retrospective cohort study in patients with normal kidney function, chronic kidney disease stage III–V, and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Marc; Karam, Boutros; Faddoul, Geovani; Douaihy, Youssef El; Yacoub, Harout; Baydoun, Hassan; Boumitri, Christine; Barakat, Iskandar; Saifan, Chadi; El-Charabaty, Elie; Sayegh, Suzanne El

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are three times more likely to have myocardial infarction (MI) and suffer from increased morbidity and higher mortality. Traditional and unique risk factors are prevalent and constitute challenges for the standard of care. However, CKD patients have been largely excluded from clinical trials and little evidence is available to guide evidence-based treatment of coronary artery disease in patients with CKD. Our objective was to assess whether a difference exists in the management of MI (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction) among patients with normal kidney function, CKD stage III–V, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on patients admitted to Staten Island University Hospital for the diagnosis of MI between January 2005 and December 2012. Patients were assigned to one of three groups according to their kidney function: Data collected on the medical management and the use of statins, platelet inhibitors, beta-blockers, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers were compared among the three cohorts, as well as medical interventions including: catheterization and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) when indicated. Chi-square test was used to compare the proportions between nominal variables. Binary logistic analysis was used in order to determine associations between treatment modalities and comorbidities, and to account for possible confounding factors. Three hundred and thirty-four patients (mean age 67.2±13.9 years) were included. In terms of management, medical treatment was not different among the three groups. However, cardiac catheterization was performed less in ESRD when compared with no CKD and CKD stage III–V (45.6% vs 74% and 93.9%) (P<0.001). CABG was performed in comparable proportions in the three groups and CABG was not associated with the degree of CKD (P=0.078) in

  3. Effect of Sertraline on Uremic Pruritus Improvement in ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shakiba, Mansor; Sanadgol, Hoshang; Azmoude, Hamid Reza; Mashhadi, Mohamad Ali; Sharifi, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Background. Although uremic pruritus is a common and upsetting problem of chronic kidney disease, there is no approved treatment for it. This study was undertaken to find the efficiency of sertraline as a possible treatment for uremic pruritus. Methods. 19 ESRD patients under hemodialysis with severe chronic pruritus were randomly selected to participate in this before-after clinical trial. Before and after starting treatment with sertraline, a detailed pruritus history was obtained and pruritus graded by the 30-item inventory of pruritus that patients based on priorities grade allocated to 3 classes. Subjects were treated with sertraline 50 mg oral daily for four months, with monthly assessments of pruritus symptoms. Results. Before treatment with sertraline, the grade of pruritus in 9 (47.4%) patients was moderate and severe in 10 (52.6%) patients. After treatment, grade of pruritus in 11 (57.8%) patients was weak, 6 (31.5%) have moderate and only 2 (10.7%) patients have severe pruritus. Of 10 patients with severe pruritus, 5 (50%) patients experiencing weak pruritus, and 4 (40%) patients have moderate pruritus after treatment. Based on Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the difference between the grade of pruritus before and after treatment with sertraline was significant (P = 0.001). Conclusions. Although no definitive recommendation can be made regarding treatment of uremic pruritus, we found an increased antipruritic effect of sertraline in ESRD patients. PMID:22973512

  4. 42 CFR 405.2110 - Designation of ESRD networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Designation of ESRD networks. 405.2110 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2110 Designation of ESRD networks. CMS designated ESRD networks in which the approved ESRD facilities collectively provide the necessary care for ESRD patients...

  5. 42 CFR 405.2110 - Designation of ESRD networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designation of ESRD networks. 405.2110 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2110 Designation of ESRD networks. CMS designated ESRD networks in which the approved ESRD facilities collectively provide the necessary care for ESRD patients...

  6. 42 CFR 405.2110 - Designation of ESRD networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Designation of ESRD networks. 405.2110 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2110 Designation of ESRD networks. CMS designated ESRD networks in which the approved ESRD facilities collectively provide the necessary care for ESRD patients...

  7. 42 CFR 405.2110 - Designation of ESRD networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Designation of ESRD networks. 405.2110 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2110 Designation of ESRD networks. CMS designated ESRD networks in which the approved ESRD facilities collectively provide the necessary care for ESRD patients...

  8. 42 CFR 405.2110 - Designation of ESRD networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Designation of ESRD networks. 405.2110 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2110 Designation of ESRD networks. CMS designated ESRD networks in which the approved ESRD facilities collectively provide the necessary care for ESRD patients...

  9. Morbidity and mortality in ESRD patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Al Wakeel, Jamal S; Mitwalli, Ahmed H; Al Mohaya, S; Abu-Aisha, Hassan; Tarif, Nauman; Malik, Ghulam H; Hammad, D

    2002-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD), due to its high morbidity and mortality as well as social and financial implications, is a major public health problem. Outcome depends not only on different modalities of treatment like hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, but also on existing co-morbidities, age, duration on dialysis, supportive therapies and infection control strategies. Thus, a detailed study becomes necessary to improve health care delivery, provide medical care and to establish a geographical reference. The present study was undertaken to characterize the ESRD patients by their demographic and co-morbid conditions and relate this to the morbidity and mortality trends. The medical records of 110 ESRD patients seen over a five-year period (June 1995 to December 1999) in two tertiary-care hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia were studied retrospectively. There were 79 (64.5%) males and 31 (35.5%) females; their age ranged from 17 to 92 years (mean age 53.8 +/- 17.8 years). Diabetes was the commonest cause of ESRD seen in 26 (26.6%) followed by nephrosclerosis, unknown etiology, lupus nephritis, pyelonephritis and primary glomerulonephritis. Diabetes mellitus was the most prevalent co-morbidity seen during the study period and occurred in 65 patients (59%) followed by heart disease in 36 (32.7%), liver disease in 30 (27.3%), cerebrovascular accidents in 13 (11.8%) and neoplasm in 11 (10%). Seven (6.3%) patients only were smokers. Hemodialysis was the most frequent treatment choice as renal replacement therapy. Among the causes of hospitalization, cardiovascular conditions were the leading single cause (19.1%), followed by access related reasons and infections (11.5% each). The overall hospitalization rate was 11.2 days/year. The overall mortality rate was 8.07 deaths/year. The leading cause of death was cardiovascular in 15 (51.7%) followed by unknown/sudden death in eight (27.5%). Other causes of death included fluid overload, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, septicemia

  10. Competing-risk analysis of ESRD and death among patients with type 1 diabetes and macroalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Thorn, Lena M; Wadén, Johan; Tolonen, Nina; Saraheimo, Markku; Gordin, Daniel; Moran, John L; Thomas, Merlin C; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2011-03-01

    Patients with both type 1 diabetes and CKD have an increased risk of adverse outcomes. The competing risks of death and ESRD may confound the estimates of risk for each outcome. Here, we sought to determine the major predictors of the cumulative incidence of ESRD and pre-ESRD mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes and macroalbuminuria while incorporating the competing risk for the alternate outcome into a Fine-Gray competing-risks analysis. We followed 592 patients with macroalbuminuria for a median of 9.9 years. During this time, 56 (9.5%) patients died and 210 (35.5%) patients developed ESRD. Predictors of incident ESRD, taking baseline renal function and the competing risk for death into account, included an elevated HbA(1c), elevated LDL cholesterol, male sex, weight-adjusted insulin dose, and a shorter duration of diabetes. By contrast, predictors of pre-ESRD death, taking baseline renal function and the competing risk for ESRD into account, included only age, the presence of established macrovascular disease, and elevated cholesterol levels. This competing-risks approach has potential to highlight the appropriate targets and strategies for preventing premature mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  11. VISIT-TO-VISIT VARIABILITY OF BLOOD PRESSURE AND DEATH, ESRD AND CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    CHANG, Tara I.; TABADA, Grace H.; YANG, Jingrong; TAN, Thida X.; GO, Alan S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure is an important independent risk factor for premature death and cardiovascular events, but relatively little is known about this phenomenon in patients with chronic kidney disease not yet on dialysis. METHODS We conducted a retrospective study in a community-based cohort of 114,900 adults with chronic kidney disease stages 3–4 (estimated glomerular filtration rate 15–59 mL/min per 1.73 m2). We hypothesized that visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure would be independently associated with higher risks of death, incident treated end-stage renal disease, and cardiovascular events. We defined systolic visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure using three metrics: (1) coefficient of variation (2) standard deviation of the mean systolic blood pressure, and (3) average real variability. RESULTS The highest versus the lowest quintile of the coefficient of variation was associated with higher adjusted rates of death (hazard ratio 1.22; 95% confidence interval 1.11–1.34) and hemorrhagic stroke (hazard ratio 1.91, confidence interval 1.36–2.68). Visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure was inconsistently associated with heart failure, and was not significantly associated with acute coronary syndrome and ischemic stroke. Results were similar when using the other two visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure. Visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure had inconsistent associations with end-stage renal disease, perhaps due to the relatively low incidences of this outcome. CONCLUSIONS Higher visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure is independently associated with higher rates of death and hemorrhagic stroke in patients with moderate to advanced chronic kidney disease not yet on dialysis. PMID:26599220

  12. Maintenance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific T cell responses in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) and implications for diagnostic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Juno, Jennifer A; Waruk, Jillian L M; Mesa, Christine; Lopez, Carmen; Bueti, Joe; Ball, T Blake; Kiazyk, Sandra A

    2016-07-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients exhibit elevated risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation, but current diagnostics, including the interferon gamma release assay (IGRA), exhibit poor sensitivity in ESRD. We tested 80 ESRD patients and found an 18.75% prevalence of IGRA positivity. A subset of patients was assessed for Mtb-specific expression of 44 cytokines/chemokines, and CD4+ T cell phenotype and function. Similar to non-ESRD IGRA+ individuals, Mtb-specific IFNγ, IL-1RA, IP-10, MCP-3 and IL-2 responses were identified in the ESRD IGRA+ group. 27% of the ESRD IGRA- group exhibited MCP-3 or IL-2 Mtb-specific responses, which may identify cases of latent TB infection in ESRD. Stimulation of PBMC with PPD demonstrated similar CD4+ T cell production of IFNγ, TNFα and GM-CSF by ESRD patients. The reported low sensitivity of the IGRA in ESRD cohorts is therefore unlikely to be due to poor T cell cytokine secretion, and may instead reflect defects in antigen presentation.

  13. Polymorphisms in NADPH oxidase CYBA gene modify the risk of ESRD in patients with chronic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Chen, Min; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Bing; Liu, Xiao-ning; Zuo, Zhi; Tang, Feng-Ying

    2016-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) was defined as start of renal replacement therapy or death due to kidney disease. However, death due to acute kidney injury was not included. It typically occurs when chronic renal failure progresses to a point where the kidneys are permanently functioning at less than 10% of their capacity. Oxidative stress (OS) plays a crucial role in ESRD. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) is one of the most important enzymes during oxidative stress. Cytochrome b light chain (CYBA), encoded by a polymorphic gene, which is a critical component of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)/NADPH oxidase system and plays an important role in electron transport and superoxide anion production, is located on chromosome band 16q24 and has six exons spanning almost 7.76 kb of genomic DNA. CYBA gene polymorphisms can influence the activity of NADPH oxidase. To evaluate the association between CYBA gene polymorphisms and ESRD, we genotyped five CYBA polymorphisms using TaqMan allelic discrimination assay on DNA samples from 306 healthy controls and 332 patients with ESRD. Our results suggested that rs1049255 polymorphism of CYBA modified the risk of ESRD (p  =  0.019; OR  =  0.625; 95%CI  =  0.424-0.921). GG genotype and G allele might be a protective factor against the risk of ESRD, especially in patients with chronic glomerulonephritis.

  14. 77 FR 34047 - Medicare Program; Proposal Evaluation Criteria and Standards for End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... and Standards for End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network Organizations AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... procedures we will use to evaluate an End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network Organization's capabilities to perform, and actual performance of, the duties and functions under the ESRD Network Statement of Work (SOW...

  15. Survival Disparity of African American Versus Non-African American Patients With ESRD Due to SLE.

    PubMed

    Nee, Robert; Martinez-Osorio, Jorge; Yuan, Christina M; Little, Dustin J; Watson, Maura A; Agodoa, Lawrence; Abbott, Kevin C

    2015-10-01

    A recent study showed an increased risk of death in African Americans compared with whites with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to lupus nephritis (LN). We assessed the impact of age stratification, socioeconomic factors, and kidney transplantation on the disparity in patient survival among African American versus non-African American patients with LN-caused ESRD, compared with other causes. Retrospective cohort study. Using the US Renal Data System database, we identified 12,352 patients with LN-caused ESRD among 1,132,202 patients who initiated maintenance dialysis therapy from January 1, 1995, through December 31, 2006, and were followed up until December 31, 2010. Baseline demographics and comorbid conditions, Hispanic ethnicity, socioeconomic factors (employment status, Medicare/Medicaid insurance, and area-level median household income based on zip code as obtained from the 2000 US census), and kidney transplantation as a time-dependent variable. All-cause mortality. Multivariable Cox and competing-risk regressions. Mean duration of follow-up in the LN-caused ESRD and other-cause ESRD cohorts were 6.24±4.20 (SD) and 4.06±3.61 years, respectively. 6,106 patients with LN-caused ESRD (49.43%) and 853,762 patients with other-cause ESRD (76.24%) died during the study period (P<0.001). Patients with LN-caused ESRD were significantly younger (mean age, 39.92 years) and more likely women (81.65%) and African American (48.13%) than those with other-cause ESRD. In the fully adjusted multivariable Cox regression model, African American (vs non-African American) patients with LN-caused ESRD had significantly increased risk of death at age 18 to 30 years (adjusted HR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.24-1.65) and at age 31 to 40 years (adjusted HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.02-1.34). Among patients with other-cause ESRD, African Americans were at significantly increased risk at age 18 to 30 years (adjusted HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.11-1.22). We used zip code-based median household income as a

  16. Catheter-Related Mortality among ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wasse, Haimanot

    2010-01-01

    Hemodialysis access-related complications remain one of the most important sources of morbidity and cost among persons with end-stage renal disease, with total annual costs exceeding $1 billion annually. In this context, the creation and maintenance of an effective hemodialysis vascular access is essential for safe and adequate hemodialysis therapy. Multiple reports have documented the type of vascular access used for dialysis and associated risk of infection and mortality. Undoubtedly, the central venous catheter (CVC) is associated with the greatest risk of infection-related and all-cause mortality compared with the autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or synthetic graft (AVG). The AVF has the lowest risk of infection, longer patency rates, greater quality of life, and lower all-cause mortality compared with the AVG or CVC. It is for these reasons that the National Kidney Foundation’s Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Access recommend the early placement and use of the AVF among at least 50% of incident hemodialysis patients. This report presents catheter-related mortality and calls for heightened awareness of catheter-related complications. PMID:19000119

  17. Urgent-Start Peritoneal Dialysis and Hemodialysis in ESRD Patients: Complications and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Haijiao; Fang, Wei; Zhu, Mingli; Yu, Zanzhe; Fang, Yan; Yan, Hao; Zhang, Minfang; Wang, Qin; Che, Xiajing; Xie, Yuanyuan; Huang, Jiaying; Hu, Chunhua; Zhang, Haifen; Mou, Shan; Ni, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that urgent-start peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a feasible alternative to hemodialysis (HD) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but the impact of the dialysis modality on outcome, especially on short-term complications, in urgent-start dialysis has not been directly evaluated. The aim of the current study was to compare the complications and outcomes of PD and HD in urgent-start dialysis ESRD patients. In this retrospective study, ESRD patients who initiated dialysis urgently without a pre-established functional vascular access or PD catheter at a single center from January 2013 to December 2014 were included. Patients were grouped according to their dialysis modality (PD and HD). Each patient was followed for at least 30 days after catheter insertion (until January 2016). Dialysis-related complications and patient survival were compared between the two groups. Our study enrolled 178 patients (56.2% male), of whom 96 and 82 patients were in the PD and HD groups, respectively. Compared with HD patients, PD patients had more cardiovascular disease, less heart failure, higher levels of serum potassium, hemoglobin, serum albumin, serum pre-albumin, and lower levels of brain natriuretic peptide. There were no significant differences in gender, age, use of steroids, early referral to a nephrologist, prevalence of primary renal diseases, prevalence of co-morbidities, and other laboratory characteristics between the groups. The incidence of dialysis-related complications during the first 30 days was significantly higher in HD than PD patients. HD patients had a significantly higher probability of bacteremia compared to PD patients. HD was an independent predictor of short-term (30-day) dialysis-related complications. There was no significant difference between PD and HD patients with respect to patient survival rate. In an experienced center, PD is a safe and feasible dialysis alternative to HD for ESRD patients with an urgent need

  18. Urgent-Start Peritoneal Dialysis and Hemodialysis in ESRD Patients: Complications and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wei; Zhu, Mingli; Yu, Zanzhe; Fang, Yan; Yan, Hao; Zhang, Minfang; Wang, Qin; Che, Xiajing; Xie, Yuanyuan; Huang, Jiaying; Hu, Chunhua; Zhang, Haifen; Mou, Shan; Ni, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Background Several studies have suggested that urgent-start peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a feasible alternative to hemodialysis (HD) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but the impact of the dialysis modality on outcome, especially on short-term complications, in urgent-start dialysis has not been directly evaluated. The aim of the current study was to compare the complications and outcomes of PD and HD in urgent-start dialysis ESRD patients. Methods In this retrospective study, ESRD patients who initiated dialysis urgently without a pre-established functional vascular access or PD catheter at a single center from January 2013 to December 2014 were included. Patients were grouped according to their dialysis modality (PD and HD). Each patient was followed for at least 30 days after catheter insertion (until January 2016). Dialysis-related complications and patient survival were compared between the two groups. Results Our study enrolled 178 patients (56.2% male), of whom 96 and 82 patients were in the PD and HD groups, respectively. Compared with HD patients, PD patients had more cardiovascular disease, less heart failure, higher levels of serum potassium, hemoglobin, serum albumin, serum pre-albumin, and lower levels of brain natriuretic peptide. There were no significant differences in gender, age, use of steroids, early referral to a nephrologist, prevalence of primary renal diseases, prevalence of co-morbidities, and other laboratory characteristics between the groups. The incidence of dialysis-related complications during the first 30 days was significantly higher in HD than PD patients. HD patients had a significantly higher probability of bacteremia compared to PD patients. HD was an independent predictor of short-term (30-day) dialysis-related complications. There was no significant difference between PD and HD patients with respect to patient survival rate. Conclusion In an experienced center, PD is a safe and feasible dialysis alternative to HD

  19. Improving outcomes for ESRD patients: shifting the quality paradigm.

    PubMed

    Nissenson, Allen R

    2014-02-01

    The availability of life-saving dialysis therapy has been one of the great successes of medicine in the past four decades. Over this time period, despite treatment of hundreds of thousands of patients, the overall quality of life for patients with ESRD has not substantially improved. A narrow focus by clinicians and regulators on basic indicators of care, like dialysis adequacy and anemia, has consumed time and resources but not resulted in significantly improved survival; also, frequent hospitalizations and dissatisfaction with the care experience continue to be seen. A new quality paradigm is needed to help guide clinicians, providers, and regulators to ensure that patients' lives are improved by the technically complex and costly therapy that they are receiving. This paradigm can be envisioned as a quality pyramid: the foundation is the basic indicators (outstanding performance on these indicators is necessary but not sufficient to drive the primary outcomes). Overall, these basics are being well managed currently, but there remains an excessive focus on them, largely because of publically reported data and regulatory requirements. With a strong foundation, it is now time to focus on the more complex intermediate clinical outcomes-fluid management, infection control, diabetes management, medication management, and end-of-life care among others. Successfully addressing these intermediate outcomes will drive improvements in the primary outcomes, better survival, fewer hospitalizations, better patient experience with the treatment, and ultimately, improved quality of life. By articulating this view of quality in the ESRD program (pushing up the quality pyramid), the discussion about quality is reframed, and also, clinicians can better target their facilities in the direction of regulatory oversight and requirements about quality. Clinicians owe it to their patients, as the ESRD program celebrates its 40th anniversary, to rekindle the aspirations of the creators of

  20. Improving Outcomes for ESRD Patients: Shifting the Quality Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary The availability of life-saving dialysis therapy has been one of the great successes of medicine in the past four decades. Over this time period, despite treatment of hundreds of thousands of patients, the overall quality of life for patients with ESRD has not substantially improved. A narrow focus by clinicians and regulators on basic indicators of care, like dialysis adequacy and anemia, has consumed time and resources but not resulted in significantly improved survival; also, frequent hospitalizations and dissatisfaction with the care experience continue to be seen. A new quality paradigm is needed to help guide clinicians, providers, and regulators to ensure that patients’ lives are improved by the technically complex and costly therapy that they are receiving. This paradigm can be envisioned as a quality pyramid: the foundation is the basic indicators (outstanding performance on these indicators is necessary but not sufficient to drive the primary outcomes). Overall, these basics are being well managed currently, but there remains an excessive focus on them, largely because of publically reported data and regulatory requirements. With a strong foundation, it is now time to focus on the more complex intermediate clinical outcomes—fluid management, infection control, diabetes management, medication management, and end-of-life care among others. Successfully addressing these intermediate outcomes will drive improvements in the primary outcomes, better survival, fewer hospitalizations, better patient experience with the treatment, and ultimately, improved quality of life. By articulating this view of quality in the ESRD program (pushing up the quality pyramid), the discussion about quality is reframed, and also, clinicians can better target their facilities in the direction of regulatory oversight and requirements about quality. Clinicians owe it to their patients, as the ESRD program celebrates its 40th anniversary, to rekindle the aspirations of the

  1. Cultural Sensitivity and Challenges in Management of the Transgender Patient With ESRD in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Deborah Ann; Bulman, Maya; McMahon, Dorn W

    2016-03-01

    Transgender patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) present with specific challenges during the transplant evaluation, perioperative management, and postoperative phase of care. Demographic information, health-care records, chosen name, and gender identity along with documentation of specific health-care needs can become a challenge when gender assigned at birth is incongruent with the patients gender identity. Medical care involves addressing the end-organ disease as well as addressing those aspects of care specific to the transgender patient. This review article provides information on defining transgender, the impact of ESRD, and transgender in the transplant process and considerations in the throughout phases of care. Current recommendations for management of this unique population are provided. © 2016, NATCO.

  2. Effect of hemodialysis and diet on the exhaled breath methanol concentration in patients with ESRD.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Pahl, Madeleine V; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Blake, Donald R

    2012-05-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) causes accumulation of nitrogenous waste products and acid-base, mineral, fluid, and electrolyte disorders, which are partially corrected by hemodialysis (HD). While the effects of ESRD and dialysis on body fluid composition are well known, the effects on composition of expired breath are uncertain. Methanol is produced from unabsorbable complex carbohydrates by the colonic microbiome. Dietary restrictions of fruits and vegetables aimed at limiting potassium intake lower the intake of dietary fibers; the reduced fiber intake can in turn reduce production of methanol and its appearance in the exhaled breath. In this study, we investigated the inter- and intradialytic changes in the breath methanol levels. Ten ESRD patients were studied during HD procedures at 3- and 2-day interdialytic intervals. On each occasion, 20 exhaled breath and room air samples were collected using evacuated canisters. Ten age-matched normal subjects served as controls. The samples were analyzed on a unique 6-column/detector gas chromatography system. Seven ESRD patients consuming renal diet had lower methanol concentration (90 ± 29 ppbv) than the 3 patients consuming high-fiber diet (340 ± 48 ppbv, P ≤ .0006) and the 10 controls consuming unrestricted diets (202 ± 80 ppbv, P ≤ .001). HD significantly lowered breath methanol (60% ± 12%), paralleling the fall in serum urea concentration (70% ± 6%). The predialysis methanol concentration was slightly higher at 3-day than the 2-day interdialytic intervals. Dietary restriction of fruits and vegetables lowers methanol production by the gut microbial flora in ESRD patients. Perhaps, methanol is a reliable breath biomarker to monitor individuals' daily fiber intake. Breath methanol is dramatically reduced by HD, reflecting its efficient removal. Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Total plasma homocysteine and related amino acids in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry--comparison with the Abbott IMx homocysteine assay and the HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Sigit, J I; Hages, M; Brensing, K A; Frotscher, U; Pietrzik, K; von Bergmann, K; Lütjohann, D

    2001-08-01

    Increased concentrations of homocysteine probably contribute to the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in hemodialysed end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and are determined by a variety of factors such as age, residual renal function, and vitamin status. Fasting plasma concentrations of total homocysteine, methionine, cysteine, and cystathionine were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in 131 ESRD patients receiving daily oral folate (160-320 microg) and vitamin B6 (10-20 mg) supplements. Concentrations of homocysteine determined by GC-MS were compared with those measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and an immunofluorescence method (IMx analyzer) using Passing-Bablok regression analysis. Mean plasma concentration of total homocysteine determined by GC-MS (28.7+/-11.9 micromol/l [mean+/-SD]) was significantly lower than that determined by HPLC (34.0+/-14.5 micromol/l; p<0.001) or IMx (32.4+/-13.9 micromol/l; p<0.001). A close correlation existed between GC-MS and HPLC (r=0.931; y=1.203 x+0.279) and GC-MS and IMx (r=0.896; y=1.105 x+0.766). Linear regression analysis showed positive correlations between plasma concentrations of homocysteine and cysteine (r=0.434; p<0.001) and homocysteine and cystathionine (r=0.187; p=0.032). Plasma concentrations of homocysteine correlated negatively with folate (r=-0.281; p=0.001) and vitamin B12 (r=-0.229; p=0.009). GC-MS proved to be a sensitive and reliable method for the determination of total plasma homocysteine and related amino acids. Despite vitamin supplementation, ESRD patients requiring chronic maintenance hemodialysis, have high plasma concentrations of homocyst(e)ine which seems to be metabolized mainly within the transsulfuration pathway, while remethylation to methionine seems to be disturbed.

  4. ESRD in the geriatric population: the crisis of managed care and the opportunity of disease management.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Theodore I

    2002-01-01

    The geriatric population with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is placed at risk with regards to the quality and extent of medical coverage because of the rapidly changing financial environment. Managed care organizations (MCOs) are generally for-profit companies that must focus on the bottom line. While the verbal commitment to quality care is voiced, the financial pressures on MCOs have led to a decrease in coverage of many services and outright denial for some necessary treatments. While denying services, the MCOs have also reduced payments to providers for services rendered. The coverage crisis is compounded by health maintenance organizations (HMOs) quitting Medicare because the reimbursement from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) is less than their costs. Because of the above issues which can potentially impact on the quality of care delivered to the ESRD geriatric population, a new approach to disease management has created the opportunity to improve total patient care to a level not yet achieved in the United States. Disease management encompasses integrated care across all disciplines. Every component of care can be tracked by a dedicated information system. Improvement in outcomes has far exceeded the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) benchmark performance measurements with a disease management model approach. The key to success is the health service coordinator (HSC), a senior nurse with many years of ESRD experience. This individual coordinates care across all disciplines and expedites necessary referrals. With rapid attention to patient needs there has been a significant reduction in hospital admissions, hospital length of stay, and emergency room visits. Patient care will steadily improve as the disease management system matures as a consequence of understanding the patients total physical and psychosocial needs.

  5. The association between dietary sodium intake, ESRD, and all-cause mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Merlin C; Moran, John; Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Thorn, Lena; Ahola, Aila; Wadén, Johan; Tolonen, Nina; Saraheimo, Markku; Gordin, Daniel; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2011-04-01

    Many guidelines recommend reduced consumption of salt in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is unclear whether dietary sodium intake is associated with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In a nationwide multicenter study (the FinnDiane Study) between 1998 and 2002, 2,807 enrolled adults with type 1 diabetes without ESRD were prospectively followed. Baseline urinary sodium excretion was estimated on a 24-h urine collection. The predictors of all-cause mortality and ESRD were determined by Cox regression and competing risk modeling, respectively. The median follow-up for survival analyses was 10 years, during which 217 deaths were recorded (7.7%). Urinary sodium excretion was nonlinearly associated with all-cause mortality, such that individuals with the highest daily urinary sodium excretion, as well as the lowest excretion, had reduced survival. This association was independent age, sex, duration of diabetes, the presence and severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] and log albumin excretion rate), the presence of established cardiovascular disease, and systolic blood pressure. During follow-up, 126 patients developed ESRD (4.5%). Urinary sodium excretion was inversely associated with the cumulative incidence of ESRD, such that individuals with the lowest sodium excretion had the highest cumulative incidence of ESRD. In patients with type 1 diabetes, sodium was independently associated with all-cause mortality and ESRD. Although we have not demonstrated causality, these findings support the calls for caution before applying salt restriction universally. Clinical trials must be performed in diabetic patients to formally test the utility/risk of sodium restriction in this setting.

  6. The Association Between Dietary Sodium Intake, ESRD, and All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Merlin C.; Moran, John; Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Thorn, Lena; Ahola, Aila; Wadén, Johan; Tolonen, Nina; Saraheimo, Markku; Gordin, Daniel; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Many guidelines recommend reduced consumption of salt in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is unclear whether dietary sodium intake is associated with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a nationwide multicenter study (the FinnDiane Study) between 1998 and 2002, 2,807 enrolled adults with type 1 diabetes without ESRD were prospectively followed. Baseline urinary sodium excretion was estimated on a 24-h urine collection. The predictors of all-cause mortality and ESRD were determined by Cox regression and competing risk modeling, respectively. RESULTS The median follow-up for survival analyses was 10 years, during which 217 deaths were recorded (7.7%). Urinary sodium excretion was nonlinearly associated with all-cause mortality, such that individuals with the highest daily urinary sodium excretion, as well as the lowest excretion, had reduced survival. This association was independent age, sex, duration of diabetes, the presence and severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] and log albumin excretion rate), the presence of established cardiovascular disease, and systolic blood pressure. During follow-up, 126 patients developed ESRD (4.5%). Urinary sodium excretion was inversely associated with the cumulative incidence of ESRD, such that individuals with the lowest sodium excretion had the highest cumulative incidence of ESRD. CONCLUSIONS In patients with type 1 diabetes, sodium was independently associated with all-cause mortality and ESRD. Although we have not demonstrated causality, these findings support the calls for caution before applying salt restriction universally. Clinical trials must be performed in diabetic patients to formally test the utility/risk of sodium restriction in this setting. PMID:21307382

  7. Clinical outcomes in pediatric hemodialysis patients in the USA: lessons from CMS' ESRD CPM Project.

    PubMed

    Neu, Alicia M; Frankenfield, Diane L

    2009-07-01

    Although prospective randomized trials have provided important information and allowed the development of evidence-based guidelines in adult hemodialysis (HD) patients, with approximately 800 prevalent pediatric HD patients in the United States, such studies are difficult to perform in this population. Observational data obtained through the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS') End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Clinical Performance Measures (CPM) Project have allowed description of the clinical care provided to pediatric HD patients as well as identification of risk factors for failure to reach adult targets for clinical parameters such as hemoglobin, single-pool Kt/V (spKt/V) and serum albumin. In addition, studies linking data from the ESRD CPM Project and the United States Renal Data System have allowed evaluation of associations between achievement of those targets and the outcomes of hospitalization and death. The results of those studies, while unable to prove cause and effect, suggest that the adult ESRD CPM targets may assist in identifying pediatric HD patients at risk for poor outcomes.

  8. Fiberglass or silica exposure and increased nephritis or ESRD (end-stage renal disease).

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J R; Goldsmith, D F

    1993-06-01

    The U.S. multiplant cohort mortality study of workers producing manufactured mineral fibers is finding increasing mortality from nephritis and/or nephrosis. We examine other data sets to see if similar effects can be identified. In a case-referent study among Michigan patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), men with exposures to silica have elevated odds ratio for ESRD. In a California occupational mortality study based on 1979-81 data, a number of the construction trades, farmers, and farm laborers show excess mortality for renal disease. The highest mortality ratio is found in the category including insulation workers. This ratio remains significantly elevated when adjusted for estimated exposures to smoking, alcohol, and for socio-economic status. California mortality data from 20 years earlier (1959-61) fail to show much excess renal disease in construction workers, but do for farmers. In Singapore, granite workers with a long-term exposure to silica have excess excretion of albumin and similar compounds compared to less exposed controls, leading to the presumption that silica exposure can lead to silica nephrotoxicity. Balkan nephropathy has been associated with consumption of well water high in silica. In the Negev of Israel, dust storms are a vehicle for increasing respiratory uptake of silica. The Beduin, thought to be a population with maximal exposures, have higher rates of ESRD than do Jews in the age groups over 60 years. Although high blood concentrations of silica are found in persons with renal failure, the close association with elevated creatinine has been interpreted as evidence that the buildup of silica is due to renal failure, rather than vice-versa.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Assessment of nutritional status among ESRD patients in Jordanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tayyem, Reema F; Mrayyan, Majd T; Heath, Dennis D; Bawadi, Hiba A

    2008-05-01

    Our objective was to assess nutritional status and compare quality of treatment among hemodialysis patients in public and private hospitals in Jordan. We utilized a cross-sectional survey. Our setting involved hospital hemodialysis units. This study was undertaken in five large Jordanian hospitals between 2004 and 2005. One hundred and eighty participants diagnosed with end-stage renal failure (ESRD) were enrolled. These participants (91 women and 89 men) who underwent hemodialysis treatment were recruited using a convenience sampling technique. Data from participants who received hemodialysis treatment in public hospital settings were compared with equivalent data from participants treated in private hospital settings. Subjective global assessment (SGA), anthropometry, and biochemical measurements were used as evaluative tools. In the anthropometric measurement of triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), we found a statistically significant difference (P < .05) between participants treated in the two hospital settings. In addition, approximately 62% of all participants, regardless of treatment site, were found to be moderately to severely malnourished. Anthropometric measurements showed some significant increase between prehemodialysis and posthemodialysis weight and body mass index in private hospitals; this was not unexpected. There were no statistically significant differences in the measured mean levels of eight different biochemical parameters, with the exception of plasma phosphorus and sodium levels. The prevalence of malnutrition and the quality of treatment in our two groups of participants were similar.

  10. Increased Risk of Urinary Tract Cancer in ESRD Patients Associated with Usage of Chinese Herbal Products Suspected of Containing Aristolochic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo-Meng; Lai, Ming-Nan; Wei, Alan; Chen, Ya-Yin; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Chen, Pau-Chung; Wang, Jung-Der

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Both end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and urothelial cancer (UC) are associated with the consumption of Chinese herbal products containing aristolochic acid (AA) by the general population. The objective of this study was to determine the risk of UC associated with AA-related Chinese herbal products among ESRD patients. Methods We conducted a cohort study using the National Health Insurance reimbursement database to enroll all ESRD patients in Taiwan from 1998–2002. Cox regression models were constructed and hazard ratios and confidence intervals were estimated after controlling for potential confounders, including age, sex, residence in region with endemic black foot disease, urinary tract infection, and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen. Results A total of 38,995 ESRD patients were included in the final analysis, and 320 patients developed UC after ESRD. Having been prescribed Mu Tong that was adulterated with Guan Mu Tong (Aristolochia manshuriensis) before 2004, or an estimated consumption of more than 1–100 mg of aristolochic acid, were both associated with an increased risk of UC in the multivariable analyses. Analgesic consumption of more than 150 pills was also associated with an increased risk of UC, although there was little correlation between the two risk factors. Conclusion Consumption of aristolochic acid-related Chinese herbal products was associated with an increased risk of developing UC in ESRD patients. Regular follow-up screening for UC in ESRD patients who have consumed Chinese herbal products is thus necessary. PMID:25170766

  11. Dysregulated Chemokine Receptor Expression and Chemokine-Mediated Cell Trafficking in Pediatric Patients with ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Barbara; Dai, Wei Wei; Lesser, Martin L.; Trachtman, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Children and adolescents with ESRD on dialysis are susceptible to serious bacterial infections (SBI). Chemokines and chemokine receptors play a critical role in modulating macrophage and neutrophil function. This study examined the hypothesis that expression and/or function of these molecules is dysregulated in patients with ESRD, contributing to leukocyte dysfunction. Design setting, participants, & measurements: Pediatric patients, age 6 mo to 18 yr, with ESRD treated with either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis were enrolled in this prospective, nontherapeutic study. Blood was collected for plasma chemokine levels, chemokine receptor profiling by flow cytometry, and functional chemotaxis studies on neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Results: ESRD in children was associated with reduced expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR1 and chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) on circulating neutrophils and monocytes, respectively. When ESRD patients were divided into two subgroups, those who were infection-free and those who had three or more SBI in the preceding year, the differences in chemokine receptor expression were statistically significant compared with control subjects only in those with recurrent infection. In addition to the effects of ESRD on baseline chemokine receptor expression, the hemodialysis procedure itself acutely lowered neutrophil CXCR1 and monocyte CCR2 expression. Furthermore, neutrophil and monocyte responsiveness to chemokine-mediated trafficking signals was impaired in all ESRD patients studied. This abnormality was independent of the level of chemokine receptor expression on the leukocytes. Conclusions: The data presented in this study suggest that chemokine receptor dysregulation contributes to leukocyte dysfunction in patients with ESRD. This alteration is especially prominent in ESRD patients with recurrent infection. PMID:18235145

  12. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  13. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  14. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  15. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  16. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  17. A comparative analysis of nutritional parameters as predictors of outcome in male and female ESRD patients.

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter; Barany, Peter; Chung, Sung Hee; Lindholm, Bengt; Heimbürger, Olof

    2002-07-01

    Many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are malnourished and cross-sectional studies show that markers of malnutrition may predict death. Serum albumin (S-albumin), the commonest nutritional marker, has been criticized because it is so closely related to the effects of inflammation and other non-nutritional factors. Consequently, we need other nutritional markers that can predict outcome. However, males and females differ as regards body composition and it is not known how this may influence the predictive power of different nutritional markers. In 206 ESRD patients (126 males) aged 52+/-1 years, we evaluated the relationship between survival and five estimates of nutritional status (S-albumin, subjective global assessment (SGA), lean body mass (LBM), body fat mass (FM) assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and handgrip strength (HGS)) close to start of renal replacement therapy (RRT). The patients were also classified as regards the presence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus (DM), and inflammation (CRP> or = 10 mg/l). Mortality was monitored over mean follow-up period of 37+/-2 months. In the whole patient group, the presence of CVD, DM, inflammation, and malnutrition (SGA >1) close to start of RRT all predicted poor outcome. However, whereas inflammation strongly predicted (P<0.0001) poor outcome in males, no such effect was observed in females. Also, differences were found between males and females regarding the predictive value of the five different nutritional estimates. Whereas HGS, SGA, and S-albumin independently predicted poor outcome in males, only SGA predicted outcome (independently of age, CVD, and DM) in females. Mild to moderate malnutrition, as assessed by SGA, was present in 39% of the patients and predicted outcome independently of age and co-morbidity in both males and females. However, the predictive power of various other nutritional markers differed markedly between male and female patients. Whereas a low HGS

  18. Optimal management of bone mineral disorders in chronic kidney disease and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Lundquist, Andrew L.; Nigwekar, Sagar U.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes recent studies on chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders, with a focus on new developments in disease management. Recent findings The term chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder has come to describe an increasingly complex network of alterations in minerals and skeletal disorders that contribute to the significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in patients with chronic kidney disease and ESRD. Clinical studies continue to suggest associations with clinical outcomes, yet current clinical trials have failed to support causality. Variability in practice exists as current guidelines for management of bone-mineral disorders are often based on weak evidence. Recent studies implicate novel pathways for therapeutic intervention in clinical trials. Summary Mineral-bone disorders in chronic kidney disease arise from alterations in a number of molecules in an increasingly complex physiological network interconnecting bone and the cardiovascular system. Despite extensive associations with improved outcomes in a number of molecules, clinical trials have yet to prove causality and there is an absence of new therapies available to improve patient outcomes. Additional clinical trials that can incorporate the complexity of mineral bone disorders and with the ability to intervene on more than one pathway are needed to advance patient care. PMID:26785065

  19. Hypokalemia associated with acute colonic pseudo-obstruction in an ESRD patient.

    PubMed

    Boobés, Khaled; Rosa, Robert M; Batlle, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Ogilvie's syndrome, or acute colonic pseudo-obstruction, is characterized by massive dilation of the colon without mechanical obstruction. Water and electrolytes often can be sequestered in the dilated intestinal loops resulting in profuse and watery diarrhea as well as hypokalemia. We report an anuric, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patient undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) who developed acute colonic pseudo-obstruction causing a prolonged hospitalization. He also developed severe hypokalemia with a serum potassium (K+) as low as 2.4 mEq/L and required 180 - 240 mEq of potassium chloride per day for more than a month to correct it. While PD K+ losses often contribute to hypokalemia, the PD K+ loss was estimated to be only 39 mEq/day. Therefore, PD could only contribute modestly to the recalcitrant hypokalemia observed during the episode of pseudo-obstruction. It has been shown, however, that patients with colonic pseudo-obstruction have enhanced colonic K+ secretion. In addition, experimental studies in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have demonstrated that colonic K+ excretion can be up to 3 times greater than in individuals with normal renal function. This increase may involve an upregulation of the large conductance K+ channel (maxi-K), also known as the BK channel, in the apical border of the colonocytes. We suggest that ESRD may have placed our patient at a greater risk of developing hypokalemia as his colon may have already adapted to secrete more K+. Clinicians should be aware of this extrarenal K+ wasting etiology in patients with colonic pseudo-obstruction, particularly in those with CKD where such a severe K+ deficit is not anticipated and, therefore, may inhibit more rigorous K+ replacement.

  20. Association of Left Atrial Volume With Mortality Among ESRD Patients With Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Referred for Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajan K.; Jardine, Alan G.M.; Mark, Patrick B.; Cunningham, Anthony F.; Steedman, Tracey; Powell, Joanna R.; McQuarrie, Emily P.; Stevens, Kathryn K.; Dargie, Henry J.; Jardine, Alan G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and an independent risk factor for premature cardiovascular death. Left atrial volume (LAV), measured using echocardiography, predicts death in patients with ESRD. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a volume-independent method of accurately assessing cardiac structure and function in patients with ESRD. Study Design Single-center prospective observational study to assess the determinants of all-cause mortality, particularly LAV, in a cohort of ESRD patients with LVH, defined using CMR imaging. Setting & Participants 201 consecutive ESRD patients with LVH (72.1% men; mean age, 51.6 ± 11.7 years) who had undergone pretransplant cardiovascular assessment were identified using CMR imaging between 2002-2008. LVH was defined as left ventricular mass index >84.1 g/m2 (men) or >74.6 g/m2 (women) based on published normal left ventricle dimensions for CMR imaging. Maximal LAV was calculated using the biplane area-length method at the end of left ventricle systole and corrected for body surface area. Predictors CMR abnormalities, including LAV. Outcome All-cause mortality. Results 54 patients died (11 after transplant) during a median follow-up of 3.62 years. Median LAV was 30.4 mL/m2 (interquartile range, 26.2-58.1). Patients were grouped into high (median or higher) or low (less than median) LAV. There were no significant differences in heart rate and mitral valve Doppler early to late atrial peak velocity ratio. Increased LAV was associated with higher mortality. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed poorer survival in patients with higher LAV (log rank P = 0.01). High LAV and left ventricular systolic dysfunction conferred similar risk and were independent predictors of death using multivariate analysis. Limitations Only patients undergoing pretransplant cardiac assessment are included. Limited assessment of left ventricular diastolic function

  1. Mapping End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD): Spatial Variations on Small Area Level in Northern France, and Association with Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Occelli, Florent; Deram, Annabelle; Génin, Michaël; Noël, Christian; Cuny, Damien; Glowacki, François

    2014-01-01

    Background Strong geographic variations in the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are observed in developed countries. The reasons for these variations are unknown. They may reflect regional inequalities in the population's sociodemographic characteristics, related diseases, or medical practice patterns. In France, at the district level, the highest incidence rates have been found in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region. This area, with a high population density and homogeneous healthcare provision, represents a geographic situation which is quite suitable for the study, over small areas, of spatial disparities in the incidence of ESRD, together with their correlation with a deprivation index and other risk factors. Methods The Renal Epidemiology and Information Network is a national registry, which lists all ESRD patients in France. All cases included in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais registry between 2005 and 2011 were extracted. Adjusted and smoothed standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was calculated for each of the 170 cantons, thanks to a hierarchical Bayesian model. The correlation between ESRD incidence and deprivation was assessed using the quintiles of Townsend index. Relative risk (RR) and credible intervals (CI) were estimated for each quintile. Results Significant spatial disparities in ESRD incidence were found within the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region. The sex- and age-adjusted, smoothed SIRs varied from 0.66 to 1.64. Although no correlation is found with diabetic or vascular nephropathy, the smoothed SIRs are correlated with the Townsend index (RR: 1.18, 95% CI [1.00–1.34] for Q2; 1.28, 95% CI [1.11–1.47] for Q3; 1.30, 95% CI [1.14–1.51] for Q4; 1.44, 95% CI [1.32–1.74] for Q5). Conclusion For the first time at this aggregation level in France, this study reveals significant geographic differences in ESRD incidence. Unlike the time of renal replacement care, deprivation is certainly a determinant in this phenomenon. This association is probably

  2. Evaluation of the ESRD Managed Care Demonstration Operations

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Caitlin Carroll; Shapiro, Jennifer R.; Beronja, Nancy; Dykstra, Dawn M.; Gaylin, Daniel S.; Held, Philip J.; Rubin, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Individuals with end stage renal disease (ESRD), most of whom are insured by Medicare, are generally prohibited from enrolling in Medicare managed care plans (MCPs). CMS offered ESRD patients the opportunity to participate in an ESRD managed care demonstration mandated by Congress. The demonstration tested whether managed care systems would be of interest to ESRD patients and whether these approaches would be operationally feasible and efficient for treating ESRD patients. This article examines the structure, implementation, and operational outcomes of the three demonstration sites, focusing on: the structure of these managed care programs for ESRD patients, requirements needed to attract and enroll patients, and the challenges of introducing managed care programs in the ESRD arena. PMID:14628397

  3. The Outcomes of Patients with ESRD and ANCA-Associated Vasculitis in Australia and New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wen; Bose, Bhadran; McDonald, Stephen P.; Hawley, Carmel M.; Badve, Sunil V.; Boudville, Neil; Brown, Fiona G.; Clayton, Philip A.; Campbell, Scott B.; Peh, Chen Au

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives This study aimed to evaluate dialysis and transplant outcomes of patients with ESRD secondary to ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Design, setting, participants, & measurements All ESRD patients who commenced renal replacement therapy in Australia and New Zealand between 1996 and 2010 were included. Outcomes were assessed by Kaplan–Meier, multivariable Cox regression, and competing-risks regression survival analyses. Results Of 36,884 ESRD patients, 228 had microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and 221 had granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Using competing-risks regression, compared with other causes of ESRD, MPA patients (hazard ratio [HR], 0.89; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.73–1.08; P=0.24) and GPA patients (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.74–1.19; P=0.62) experienced comparable survival on dialysis. Forty-six MPA patients (21%) and 47 GPA (20%) patients received 98 renal allografts. Respective 10-year first graft survival rates in MPA, GPA, and non-AAV patients were 50%, 62%, 70%, whereas patient survival rates were 68%, 85% and 83%, respectively. Compared with non-AAV patients, MPA transplant recipients had higher risks of graft failure (HR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.07–3.25; P=0.03) and death (HR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.02–3.69; P=0.04), whereas GPA transplant recipients experienced comparable renal allograft survival (HR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.43–1.93; P=0.81) and patient survival (HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.23–2.27; P=0.58). AAV recurrence was observed in two renal allografts (2%). Conclusions Compared with ESRD patients without AAV, those with GPA have comparable renal replacement therapy outcomes, whereas MPA patients have comparable dialysis survival but poorer renal transplant allograft and patient survival rates. PMID:23349331

  4. 42 CFR 417.423 - Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... patients. A Medicare beneficiary who elects hospice care under § 418.24 of this chapter is not eligible to... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients. 417.423... PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Enrollment, Entitlement, and Disenrollment under...

  5. 42 CFR 417.423 - Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... patients. A Medicare beneficiary who elects hospice care under § 418.24 of this chapter is not eligible to... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients. 417.423... PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Enrollment, Entitlement, and Disenrollment under...

  6. 42 CFR 417.423 - Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... patients. A Medicare beneficiary who elects hospice care under § 418.24 of this chapter is not eligible to... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients. 417.423... PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Enrollment, Entitlement, and Disenrollment under...

  7. Comparative study of impact of hemodialysis and renal transplantation on cognitive functions in ESRD patients.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Waleed; Ezzat, Haitham; Mohab, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is defined as a newly appeared deficit in at least two areas of cognitive functions, including disturbances in memory, executive functioning, attention or speed of information processing, perceptual motor abilities, or language. Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent in ESRD patients when compared with the general population. It has also been associated with a decreased quality of life. Cognitive functions in patients with ESRD showed improvement with dialysis and renal transplantation. These findings illustrate the potential importance of evaluating and comparing the effects of hemodialysis and transplantation regarding cognitive performance and thus quality of life in ESRD patients and normal subjects. This study was carried out in 100 patients (50 ESRD patients on regular hemodialysis for at least 6 months and 50 post-transplant patients who had maintained successful kidney graft for at least 3 months). All patients underwent laboratory and psychometric scoring tests, including trail making test part A, trail making test part B, digit span, and mini-mental state examination. Thirty healthy adults matched by age and sex served as a control group. The results showed significant differences in cognitive function tests results between transplant and hemodialysis patients (P<0.01), suggesting that transplant patients were superior in their cognitive performance, with the correction of anemia being the most important factor for improving cognitive performance in both groups. There were no significant differences between transplant patients and control subjects in psychometric measures (P>0.05). Renal transplantation as a modality of treatment, in ESRD patients, is superior to hemodialysis in terms of cognitive performance improvement. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk of ESRD and Death in Patients with CKD Not Referred to a Nephrologist: A 7-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lapi, Francesco; Chiodini, Paolo; Simonetti, Monica; Bianchini, Elisa; Pecchioli, Serena; Cricelli, Iacopo; Cricelli, Claudio; Piccinocchi, Gaetano; Conte, Giuseppe; De Nicola, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Rising prevalence of CKD requires active involvement of general practitioners to limit ESRD and mortality risk. However, the outcomes of patients with CKD exclusively managed by general practitioners are ill defined. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We prospectively evaluated 30,326 adult patients with nondialysis CKD stages 1–5 who had never received consultation in tertiary nephrology care recruited from 700 general practitioner offices in Italy during 2002 and 2003. CKD stages were classified as stages 1 and 2 (GFR≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 and either albuminuria or an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code for kidney disease), stage 3a (GFR=59–45), stage 3b (GFR=44–30), stage 4 (GFR=29–15), and stage 5 (GFR<15). Primary outcome was the risk of ESRD (dialysis or transplantation) or all-cause death. Results Overall 64% of patients were in stage 3a, and 4.5% of patients were in stages 3b–5. Patients with stages 1 and 2 were younger, were predominantly men, more frequently had diabetes, and had lower prevalence of previous cardiovascular disease than patients with stages 3a–5. Hypertension was frequent in all CKD stages (80%–94%), whereas there was a lower prevalence of dyslipidemia, albuminuria, and obesity associated with more advanced CKD. During the follow-up (median=7.2 years; interquartile range=4.7–7.7), 6592 patients died and 295 started ESRD. Compared with stages 1 and 2 (reference), mortality risk (hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval) was higher in stages 3b–5 (1.66, 1.49–1.86, 2.75, 2.41–3.13 and 2.54, 2.01–3.22, respectively) but not stage 3a (1.11, 0.99–1.23). Similarly, ESRD risk (hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval) was not higher at stage 3a (1.44, 0.79–2.64) but was greater in stages 3b–5 (11.0, 6.3–19.5, 91.2, 53.2–156.2 and, 122.8, 67.9–222.0, respectively). Among modifiable risk factors, anemia and albuminuria significantly

  9. Anthropometric and Metabolic Risk Factors for ESRD Are Disease-Specific: Results from a Large Population-Based Cohort Study in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Zitt, Emanuel; Pscheidt, Constanze; Concin, Hans; Kramar, Reinhard; Lhotta, Karl; Nagel, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Background Anthropometric and metabolic risk factors for all-cause end-stage renal disease (ESRD) may vary in their impact depending on the specific primary renal disease. Methods In this Austrian population-based prospective cohort study (n = 185,341; 53.9% women) the following data were collected between 1985 and 2005: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose (FBG) from 1988, blood pressure, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and smoking status. These data were merged with the Austrian Dialysis and Transplant Registry to identify ESRD patients. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for all-cause ESRD as well as for cause-specific ESRD due to the following primary renal diseases: autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), vascular nephropathy (VN), diabetic nephropathy (DN) and other diseases (OD). Results During a mean follow-up of 17.5 years 403 participants developed ESRD (ADPKD 36, VN 97, DN 86, and OD 184). All parameters except TG and GGT were significantly associated with all-cause ESRD risk. Particular cause-specific ESRD risk factor patterns were found: for ADPKD increased risk from hypertension (HR 11.55); for VN from smoking (HR 1.81), hypertension (HR 2.37), TG (≥5.70 vs. <1.17 mmol/L: HR 9.27); for DN from smoking (HR 1.77), BMI (≥30 vs. 18.5–24.9 kg/m2: HR 7.55), FBG (≥6.94 vs. <5.55 mmol/L: HR 7.67), hypertension (HR 1.08), TG (≥5.70 vs. <1.17 mmol/L: HR 2.02), GGT (HR 2.14); and for OD from hypertension (HR 2.29), TG (≥5.70 vs. <1.17 mmol/L: HR 6.99) and TC (≥6.22 vs. <5.18 mmol/L: HR 1.56). Conclusions Particular anthropometric and metabolic ESRD risk factors differ in importance depending on the primary renal disease. This needs to be considered for future preventive and therapeutic strategies addressing cause-specific ESRD. PMID:27537361

  10. 42 CFR 417.423 - Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... beneficiary who elects hospice care under § 418.24 of this chapter is not eligible to enroll in an HMO or CMP... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients. 417.423... HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Enrollment, Entitlement, and Disenrollment under Medicare Contract §...

  11. 42 CFR 417.423 - Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... beneficiary who elects hospice care under § 418.24 of this chapter is not eligible to enroll in an HMO or CMP... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients. 417.423... HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Enrollment, Entitlement, and Disenrollment under Medicare Contract §...

  12. Association between Oral Nutritional Supplementation and Clinical Outcomes among Patients with ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Cheu, Christine; Pearson, Jeffrey; Dahlerus, Claudia; Lantz, Brett; Chowdhury, Tania; Sauer, Peter F.; Farrell, Robert E.; Port, Friedrich K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Oral nutritional supplementation (ONS) was provided to ESRD patients with hypoalbuminemia as part of Fresenius Medical Care Health Plan’s (FMCHP) disease management. This study evaluated the association between FMCHP’s ONS program and clinical outcomes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Analyses included FMCHP patients with ONS indication (n=470) defined as 2-month mean albumin <3.8 g/dl until reaching a 3-month mean ≥3.8 g/dl from February 1, 2006 to December 31, 2008. Patients did not receive ONS if deemed inappropriate or refused. Patients on ONS were compared with patients who were not, despite meeting ONS indication. Patients with ONS indication regardless of use were compared with Medicare patients with similar serum albumin levels from the 2007 Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Clinical Performance Measures Project (CPM). Cox models calculated adjusted hospitalization and mortality risks at 1 year. Results Among patients with indication for ONS, 276 received supplements and 194 did not. ONS use was associated with 0.058 g/dl higher serum albumin overall (P=0.02); this difference decreased by 0.001 g/dl each month (P=0.05) such that the difference was 0.052 g/dl (P=0.04) in month 6 and the difference was no longer significant in month 12 . In analyses based on ONS use, ONS patients had lower hospitalization at 1 year (68.4%; P<0.01) versus patients without ONS (88.7%), but there was no significant reduction in mortality risk (P=0.29). In analyses based on ONS indication, patients with indication had lower mortality at 1 year (16.2%) compared with CPM patients (23.4%; P<0.01). Conclusions These findings suggest that ONS use was associated with significantly lower hospitalization rates but had no significant effect on mortality in a disease management setting. PMID:23085729

  13. Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction: ESRD Managed Care Demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Pifer, Trinh B.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Dykstra, Dawn M.; Shapiro, Jennifer R.; Oppenheimer, Caitlin Carroll; Gaylin, Daniel S.; Beronja, Nancy; Rubin, Robert J.; Held, Philip J.

    2003-01-01

    To study the effects of managed care on dialysis patients, we compared the quality of life and patient satisfaction of patients in a managed care demonstration with three comparison samples: fee-for-service (FFS) patients, managed care patients outside the demonstration, and patients in a separate national study. Managed care patients were less satisfied than FFS patients about access to health care providers, but more satisfied with the financial benefits (copayment coverage, prescription drugs, and nutritional supplements) provided under the demonstration managed care plan (MCP). After 1 year in the demonstration, patients exhibited statistically and clinically significant increases in quality of life scores. PMID:14628399

  14. Human Evaluation of the Glu298Asp Polymorphism in NOS3 Gene and its Relationship with Onset age of ESRD in Iranian Patients Suffering from ADPKD.

    PubMed

    Dasar, Negin; Ghaderian, Sayyed Mohammad Hossein; Azargashb, Eznollah

    2012-01-01

    One of the most striking features in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the difference at onset age of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Modifier genes may play a role in this phenotypic variability. The mutated nitric oxide synthase 3 gene (NOS3), have a modifier effect on the severity of ADPKD by impairment of NOS3 activity and decreasing of renal vascular nitric oxide production and, subsequently, reduced kidney function. In order to test this hypothesis, we investigated the relationship between Glu298Asp polymorphism in exon 7 of this gene and ESRD in ADPKD patients refered from Shahid Labbafi Nedjad Hospital in Tehran. The polymorphism was examined by PCR, followed by RFLP (with MboI) in three groups of ADPKD with ESRD; ADPKD without ESRD patients and normal individual as the cases, case-controls and controls, respectively. The frequencies of GG, GT, and TT genotypes in cases were 66.7%, 33.3% and 0%, in case-controls were 78.6%, 19%, 2.4%, and in controls were 64.3%, 35.7% and 0%, respectively. Our findings revealed that there was no significant difference in the genotype frequency of NOS3 gene in ADPKD patients (p=0.311).The age of onset of ESRD in ADPKD patients, harbouring the T allele of this polymorphism, was two years lower than G/G patients, but this difference was not significant (p =0.641). In conclusion, our results suggest that there is no evidence of relationship between Glu298Asp polymorphism and onset age of ESRD in Iranian ADPKD patients.

  15. Disturbances of trace element metabolism in ESRD patients receiving hemodialysis and hemodiafiltration

    PubMed Central

    Prodanchuk, Mykola; Pisarev, Evegnii; Sheiman, Boris; Kulyzkiy, Mykola

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Accumulation of trace elements occurs in conditions of decreased kidney function. In some conditions, increased trace elements can have toxic features. On the other hand, studies are showing that concentration of some trace elements could be decreased in ERSD patients as well. The most important factor affecting trace element concentration in ERSD patients is the degree of renal failure and the usage of replacement therapy. Materials and methods We analyzed the trace elements’ (boron, aluminum, vanadium, chromium, manganese, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, arsenic, selenium, rubidium, strontium, cadmium, cesium, barium and lead) concentration in the whole blood of 41 ESRD patients who were treated with hemodialysis and hemodiafiltration and also of 61 healthy blood donors. In addition, comparison of trace element blood levels of patients receiving hemodialysis and hemofiltration was carried out. Whole blood trace element concentration was determined using inductive coupled plasma mass-spectrometry (ICPMS). Results Levels of boron, aluminum, vanadium, chromium, manganese, zinc, strontium, cadmium, barium and lead were significantly increased in ESRD patients. Significantly decreased levels were observed for nickel, arsenic, selenium and rubidium. Blood levels of cobalt, copper, cadmium and lead in hemodialysis patients were significantly higher compared to patients receiving hemodiafiltration. Conclusions ESRD is accompanied with serious and multidirectional changes of trace element blood levels. The highest degree of blood level increases were observed for nonessential and toxic trace elements. Disorders of essential trace elements were manifested in a minor degree. Besides this, there were observed differences of trace element concentrations between ESRD patients receiving hemodialysis and hemo-diafiltration. PMID:24757548

  16. Non invasive evaluation of cardiac hemodynamics in end stage renal disease (ESRD).

    PubMed

    Milan, Alberto; Avenatti, Eleonora; Della Valle, Erika; Fabbri, Ambra; Ravera, Agnese; Pozzato, Marco; Ferrari, Giovanni; Quarello, Francesco; Aprà, Franco; Veglio, Franco

    2014-12-01

    Volume overload is typical of haemodialysis patients; correct volume status evaluation is crucial in achieving blood pressure homeostasis, hypertension management and good treatment planning. This study evaluates the effect of acute volume depletion on ultrasonographic parameters and suggests two of them as able to predict patients volume overload. 27 patients with end stage renal disease treated with haemodialysis underwent a complete echocardiographic exam before, after 90 min and at the end of the dialysis. Blood pressure levels significantly drop during the first 90 min of dialysis (139 ± 20 vs 126 ± 18; p < 0.0001), reaching a steady state with significantly lower values compared to baseline (130 ± 28; p = 0.02). LV and left atrial volume significantly decreased (baseline vs end dialysis 98 ± 32 vs 82 ± 31 p = 0.003 and 28 ± 10 vs. 21 ± 9 cc/m(2) p < 0.001). A significant reduction of systolic function (EF 61.6 % ± 9 vs 58.7 % ± 9 p = 0.04), of diastolic flow velocities (E/A 1.13 ± 0.37 vs. 0.87 ± 0.38 p < 0.001) and mitral annulus TDI tissue velocity (i.e. E' lat 10.6 ± 3 vs. 9.4 ± 3 cm/s; p 0.0001) were observed. Stroke work (SW) and LV end-diastolic diameter (LVEDd) indexed to height 2.7(LVEDdi) were able to predict volume overload: cut off values of respectively 13.5 mm/m(2.7) for LVEDdi and 173 cJ for SW were able to predict with a specificity of 100 % the presence of a volemic overload of at least 4 %. Blood pressure, cardiac morphology and function are significantly modified by acute volume depletion and such variations are strictly interrelated. SW and LVEDd/height(2.7) may identify ESRD patients carrying an higher volume load.

  17. Phosphorus additives. A problem for ESRD patients and the public.

    PubMed

    Harum, Peggy

    2012-07-01

    These considerations strongly suggest that a mixed composition of dietary animal and plant foods should be encouraged in a diet for patients with CKD, whereas the intake of processed foods should be limited. Of course, it is most important to restrict intake of phosphorus in all of its forms in the diet of CKD patients

  18. Predictors of Incident ESRD among Patients with Primary Hyperoxaluria Presenting Prior to Kidney Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fang; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Mehta, Ramila A.; Vaughan, Lisa E.; Olson, Julie B.; Seide, Barbara M.; Meek, Alicia M.; Cogal, Andrea G.; Lieske, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Overproduction of oxalate in patients with primary hyperoxaluria (PH) leads to calcium oxalate deposition in the kidney and ESRD in a substantial number of cases. However, the key determinants for renal outcome remain unclear. Thus, we performed a retrospective analysis to identify predictors for renal outcome among patients with PH participating in the Rare Kidney Stone Consortium (RKSC) PH Registry. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We characterized clinical and laboratory features of patients enrolled in the RKSC PH Registry. We assessed correlation between urinary measures and eGFR at diagnosis by Spearman rank correlation and estimated renal survival using the Kaplan–Meier method. We determined factors associated with renal survival by Cox proportional hazard models. Results Of 409 patients enrolled in the RKSC Registry as of March 2014, we excluded 112 patients who had ESRD at PH diagnosis from analysis. Among the remaining 297 patients, 65% had PH type 1, 12% had type 2, 13% had type 3, and 11% had unclassified PH. Median (25th, 75th percentile) age at PH diagnosis was 8.1 (4.0, 18.2) years with an eGFR of 73.0 (56.4, 97.5) ml/min per 1.73 m2 and urinary oxalate excretion rate of 1.64 (1.11, 2.44) mmol/1.73 m2 per 24 hours. During a median follow-up of 3.9 (1.0, 12.8) years, 59 (20%) patients developed ESRD. Urinary oxalate excretion at diagnosis stratified by quartile was strongly associated with incident ESRD (hazard ratio [HR], 3.4; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.4 to 7.9). During follow-up there was a significant association between urinary oxalate quartile (Q) and incident ESRD (Q4 versus Q1: HR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.2 to 9.3). This association remained even when adjusted for sex, age, and baseline eGFR (HR, 4.2; 95% CI, 1.6 to 10.8). Conclusions Among patients with PH, higher urinary oxalate excretion is predictive of poor renal outcome. PMID:26656319

  19. The Beneficial Effects of Renal Transplantation on Altered Oxidative Status of ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cerrillos-Gutiérrez, José Ignacio; Preciado-Rojas, Priscila; Gómez-Navarro, Benjamín; Sifuentes-Franco, Sonia; Carrillo-Ibarra, Sandra; Andrade-Sierra, Jorge; Rojas-Campos, Enrique; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso Martín

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation (RT), has been considered the best therapeutic option for end stage renal disease (ESRD). Objective. To determine the effect of RT on the evolution of oxidative DNA status. Methods. Prospective cohort (N = 50 receptors of RT); genotoxic damage, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and DNA repair enzyme, human 8-oxoguanine-DNA-N- glycosylase-1 (hOGG1); and antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), were evaluated. Results. Before RT, 8-OHdG were significantly elevated (11.04 ± 0.90 versus 4.73 ± 0.34 ng/mL) compared to healthy controls (p = 0.001), with normalization after 6 months of 4.78 ± 0.34 ng/mL (p < 0.001). The same phenomenon was observed with hOGG1 enzyme before RT with 2.14 ± 0.36 ng/mL (p = 0.01) and decreased significantly at the end of the study to 1.20 ng/mL (p < 0.001) but was higher than controls, 0.51 ± 0.07 ng/mL (p < 0.03). Antioxidant SOD was elevated at 24.09 ± 1.6 IU/mL versus healthy controls (p = 0.001) before RT; however, 6 months after RT it decreased significantly to 16.9 ± 1.6 IU/mL (p = 0.002), without achieving the levels of healthy controls (p = 0.01). The GPx, before RT, was significantly diminished with 24.09 ± 1.6 IU/mL versus healthy controls (39.0 ± 1.58) (p = 0.01), while, in the final results, levels increased significantly to 30.38 ± 3.16 IU/mL (p = 0.001). Discussion. Patients with ESRD have important oxidative damage before RT. The RT significantly reduces oxidative damage and partially regulates the antioxidant enzymes (SOD and GPx). PMID:27547292

  20. Cutaneous Manifestations of ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Antonia J.; Leslie, Kieron S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A broad range of skin diseases occurs in patients with ESRD: from the benign and asymptomatic to the physically disabling and life-threatening. Many of them negatively impact on quality of life. Their early recognition and treatment are essential in reducing morbidity and mortality. The cutaneous manifestations can be divided into two main categories: nonspecific and specific. The nonspecific manifestations are commonly seen and include skin color changes, xerosis, half-and-half nails, and pruritus. The specific disorders include acquired perforating dermatosis, bullous dermatoses, metastatic calcification, and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. This review article describes these conditions and considers the underlying pathophysiology, clinical presentations, diagnosis, and treatment options. PMID:24115194

  1. Serum albumin as predictor of nutritional status in patients with ESRD.

    PubMed

    Gama-Axelsson, Thiane; Heimbürger, Olof; Stenvinkel, Peter; Bárány, Peter; Lindholm, Bengt; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid

    2012-09-01

    Serum albumin is a widely used biomarker of nutritional status in patients with CKD; however, its usefulness is debated. This study investigated serum albumin and its correlation with several markers of nutritional status in incident and prevalent dialysis patients. In a cross sectional study, serum albumin (bromocresol purple), and other biochemical (serum creatinine), clinical (subjective global assessment [SGA]), anthropometric (handgrip strength, skinfold thicknesses), and densitometric (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry) markers of nutritional status were assessed in 458 incident (61% male; mean age 54 +/- 13 years; GFR, 6.6 +/-2.3 ml/min per 1.73 m(2); recruited 1994–2010) and 383 prevalent (56% male; mean age 62 +/- 14 years; recruited 1989–2004) dialysis patients. In incident patients: serum albumin was correlated with sex (beta = -0.13; P = 0.02), diabetes mellitus (beta = -0.18; P = 0.004), and urinary albumin excretion (beta = -0.42; P = 0.001) but less so with poor nutritional status (SGA score >1; beta = -0.19; P = 0.001). In prevalent patients, serum albumin was correlated with age (beta = -0.14; P = 0.05), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (beta = -0.34; P = 0.001), diabetes mellitus (beta = -0.11; P = 0.04), and SGA score >1 (beta = -0.14; P = 0.003). In predicting nutritional status assessed by SGA and other markers, adding serum albumin to models that included age, sex, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease did not significantly increase explanatory power. In incident and prevalent dialysis patients,serum albumin correlates poorly with several markers of nutritional status. Thus, its value as a reliable marker of nutritional status in patients with ESRD is limited. In addition, the following inconsistencies between the main text and Tables 1 and 3 are also corrected as follows. (1) In Table 1, the GFR initially written as 6 +/- 3 ml/min per 1.73(2) should be corrected to 6.6 +/- 2.3 ml/min per 1.73(2). (2) On line 11 of page 1448, under the

  2. The Association of Parathyroid Hormone with ESRD and Pre-ESRD Mortality in the Kidney Early Evaluation Program

    PubMed Central

    Bomback, Andrew S.; McFarlane, Samy I.; Li, Suying; Chen, Shu-Cheng; McCullough, Peter A.; Whaley-Connell, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Context: Studies have suggested that PTH may influence mortality and progression of chronic kidney disease. However, the development of either event may influence the development of the other as a competing risk. Objective: The objective of the study was to examine the association of PTH with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and pre-ESRD death using a competing risk survival model. Design, Setting, and Patients: A total of 10,823 participants in the Kidney Early Evaluation Program with chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 ml/min per 1.73m2) were examined from 2005 to 2010. Main Outcome Measures: The association of PTH levels with ESRD and pre-ESRD mortality was ascertained by linking Kidney Early Evaluation Program data to the Social Security Administration Death Master File and the U.S. Renal Data System. Results: Among the cohort, the incidence of ESRD and pre-ESRD mortality was 6.4 and 20.1 events per 1000 person-years. Higher PTH levels were associated with increasing age, black race, lack of a high school education, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and lower glomerular filtration rate. The incidence of ESRD and pre-ESRD mortality was lowest among participants in the second PTH quintile. After multivariate adjustment, as compared with the second quintile, the risk of pre-ESRD mortality was higher in the third [subhazard ratio (SHR) 1.52 (95% confidence interval 1.04–2.22)], fourth [SHR 1.73 (95% confidence interval 1.19–2.52)], and fifth [SHR 1.86 (1.28–2.52)] quintiles, respectively. Conversely, PTH was not associated with ESRD after multivariate adjustment. The association was not modified by diabetic status, gender, race, or glomerular filtration rate status. Conclusions: Elevated PTH levels are associated with increased pre-ESRD mortality but not with ESRD. PMID:23066118

  3. Variation in Cancer Incidence among Patients with ESRD during Kidney Function and Nonfunction Intervals.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Clarke, Christina A; Snyder, Jon J; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Engels, Eric A

    2016-05-01

    Among patients with ESRD, cancer risk is affected by kidney dysfunction and by immunosuppression after transplant. Assessing patterns across periods of dialysis and kidney transplantation may inform cancer etiology. We evaluated 202,195 kidney transplant candidates and recipients from a linkage between the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients and cancer registries, and compared incidence in kidney function intervals (time with a transplant) with incidence in nonfunction intervals (waitlist or time after transplant failure), adjusting for demographic factors. Incidence of infection-related and immune-related cancer was higher during kidney function intervals than during nonfunction intervals. Incidence was most elevated for Kaposi sarcoma (hazard ratio [HR], 9.1; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 4.7 to 18), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (HR, 3.2; 95% CI, 2.8 to 3.7), Hodgkin's lymphoma (HR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7 to 5.3), lip cancer (HR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.0 to 6.0), and nonepithelial skin cancers (HR, 3.8; 95% CI, 2.5 to 5.8). Conversely, ESRD-related cancer incidence was lower during kidney function intervals (kidney cancer: HR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.7 to 0.8 and thyroid cancer: HR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6 to 0.8). With each successive interval, incidence changed in alternating directions for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, melanoma, and lung, pancreatic, and nonepithelial skin cancers (higher during function intervals), and kidney and thyroid cancers (higher during nonfunction intervals). For many cancers, incidence remained higher than in the general population across all intervals. These data indicate strong short-term effects of kidney dysfunction and immunosuppression on cancer incidence in patients with ESRD, suggesting a need for persistent cancer screening and prevention. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Variation in Cancer Incidence among Patients with ESRD during Kidney Function and Nonfunction Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Christina A.; Snyder, Jon J.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Engels, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Among patients with ESRD, cancer risk is affected by kidney dysfunction and by immunosuppression after transplant. Assessing patterns across periods of dialysis and kidney transplantation may inform cancer etiology. We evaluated 202,195 kidney transplant candidates and recipients from a linkage between the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients and cancer registries, and compared incidence in kidney function intervals (time with a transplant) with incidence in nonfunction intervals (waitlist or time after transplant failure), adjusting for demographic factors. Incidence of infection-related and immune-related cancer was higher during kidney function intervals than during nonfunction intervals. Incidence was most elevated for Kaposi sarcoma (hazard ratio [HR], 9.1; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 4.7 to 18), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HR, 3.2; 95% CI, 2.8 to 3.7), Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7 to 5.3), lip cancer (HR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.0 to 6.0), and nonepithelial skin cancers (HR, 3.8; 95% CI, 2.5 to 5.8). Conversely, ESRD-related cancer incidence was lower during kidney function intervals (kidney cancer: HR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.7 to 0.8 and thyroid cancer: HR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6 to 0.8). With each successive interval, incidence changed in alternating directions for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, melanoma, and lung, pancreatic, and nonepithelial skin cancers (higher during function intervals), and kidney and thyroid cancers (higher during nonfunction intervals). For many cancers, incidence remained higher than in the general population across all intervals. These data indicate strong short-term effects of kidney dysfunction and immunosuppression on cancer incidence in patients with ESRD, suggesting a need for persistent cancer screening and prevention. PMID:26563384

  5. Bidirectional association between ESRD dialysis and diabetes: National cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yeh-Wen; Wu, Wen-Shiann; Hsu, Chen-Fang; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chien, Chih-Chiang

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetes is associated with development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) dialysis, but it is not clear whether ESRD dialysis is a risk factor for new-onset diabetes (NODM). Methods Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we designed two cohort studies to determine the association between dialysis and diabetes. Analysis 1 estimated the hazard ratios (HR) of ESRD dialysis in 20,585 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and 82,340 gender- and age- matched controls without diabetes. Analysis 2 estimated the HRs of NODM in 18,489 ESRD patients undergoing dialysis and 73,956 gender- and age- matched controls without ESRD dialysis. The follow-up period was from 2000 to date of endpoint, the date of death, or December 31, 2008. Cox proportional models were used to estimate the relative hazards. Results In analysis 1, the incidence of ESRD dialysis was higher in the T2DM cohort than in the non-diabetes cohort (6.78 vs. 0.61 per 1,000 person-years; HR: 7.97; 95%CI: 7.05–8.00). In analysis 2, the incidence of NODM was higher in the ESRD dialysis cohort than in the without-ESRD dialysis cohort (22.84 vs. 13.99 per 1,000 person-years; HR: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.34–1.47). Conclusions ESRD dialysis and diabetes were bidirectionally associated. The relationship between T2DM and incident ESRD dialysis was much stronger than between ESRD dialysis and NODM. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism of ESRD dialysis-related NODM. PMID:28296932

  6. ESRD Managed Care Demonstration: Financial Implications

    PubMed Central

    Dykstra, Dawn M.; Beronja, Nancy; Menges, Joel; Gaylin, Daniel S.; Oppenheimer, Caitlin Carroll; Shapiro, Jennifer R.; Wolfe, Robert A.; Rubin, Robert J.; Held, Philip J.

    2003-01-01

    In 1996, CMS launched the end stage renal disease (ESRD) managed care demonstration to study the experience of offering managed care to ESRD patients. This article analyzes the financial impact of the demonstration, which sought to assess its economic impact on the Federal Government, the sites, and the ESRD Medicare beneficiaries. Medicare's costs for demonstration enrollees were greater than they would have been if these enrollees had remained in the fee-for-service (FFS) system. This loss was driven by the lower than average predicted Medicare spending given the demonstration patients' conditions. The sites experienced losses or only modest gains, primarily because they provided a larger benefit package than traditional Medicare coverage, including no patient obligations and other benefits, especially prescription drugs. Patient financial benefits were approximately $9,000 annually. PMID:14628400

  7. Progression of stages 3b-5 chronic kidney disease--preliminary results of Taiwan national pre-ESRD disease management program in Southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Mei; Yang, Ming-Chin; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Sung, Junne-Ming

    2013-12-01

    The outcomes and their predictors, and rates of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) changes among Taiwanese, an ethnic Chinese population, with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3b-5, enrolled in a nationwide pre-end-stage renal disease (pre-ESRD) management program that have not been previously reported. This study focused on a cohort of patients enrolled in the Taiwan's pre-ESRD disease management program from Southern Taiwan, including 4061 CKD 3b-5 patients who received more than 12 weeks of follow-up from 2007 to 2010. The decline rates of eGFR, outcomes, and the predictors of initiating dialysis were analyzed. The study participants consisted of patients who were 70.1 ± 12.3 years old, of whom 56.4% were male, 46.3% were diabetic, and 72.1% were hypertensive. The mean annual eGFR changes were 0.47 ± 0.42 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/year, -1.27 ± 0.32 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/year, and -2.69 ± 0.39 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/year for stages 3b, 4, and 5, respectively; however, more rapid declines were noted in diabetic patients. The Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed that the probabilities of patients remaining alive and free of dialysis treatment for CKD stage 3b, 4, and 5 without or with diabetes were 89.46% versus 84.65%, 79.88% versus 55.68%, and 34.42% versus 9.64%, respectively, during 42 months of follow-up. Male gender, diabetes, lower baseline eGFR, higher systolic blood pressure, lower hematocrit, and albumin levels were the significant risk factors for initiating dialysis. Even though we cannot conclude with certainty that the Taiwan pre-ESRD disease management program is beneficial in slowing the progression of CKD stages 3b-5, our preliminary results seem to suggest this trend. Furthermore, the program may be improved by integrating it with other programs, such as those on diabetes and hypertension, thus making it a more patient-centered, multidisciplinary program. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Experiences of care among Medicare beneficiaries with ESRD: Medicare Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey results.

    PubMed

    Paddison, Charlotte A M; Elliott, Marc N; Haviland, Amelia M; Farley, Donna O; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Hambarsoomian, Katrin; Dembosky, Jacob W; Roland, Martin O

    2013-03-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have special health needs; little is known about their care experiences. Secondary analysis of 2009-2010 Medicare Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) data, using representative random samples of Medicare beneficiaries. Description of Medicare beneficiaries with ESRD and investigation of differences in patient experiences by sociodemographic characteristics and coverage type. Data were collected from 823,564 Medicare beneficiaries (3,794 with ESRD) as part of the Medicare CAHPS survey, administered by mail with telephone follow-up of nonrespondents. ESRD status, age, education, self-reported general and mental health status, race/ethnicity, sex, Medicare coverage type, state of residence, and other demographic measures. 6 composite measures of patient experience in 4 care domains (access to care, physician communication, customer service, and access to prescription drugs and drug information) and 4 ratings (overall care, personal physician, specialist physician, and prescription drug plan). Patients with ESRD reported better care experiences than non-ESRD beneficiaries for 7 of 10 measures (P < 0.05) after adjustment for patient characteristics, geography, and coverage type, although to only a small extent (adjusted mean difference, <3 points [scale, 0-100]). Black patients with ESRD and less educated patients were more likely than other patients with ESRD to report poor experiences. Inability to distinguish patient experiences of care for different treatment modalities. On average, beneficiaries with ESRD report patient experiences that are at least as positive as non-ESRD beneficiaries. However, black and less educated patients with ESRD reported worse experiences than other ESRD patients. Stratified reporting of patient experience by race/ethnicity or education in patients with ESRD can be used to monitor this disparity. Physician choice and confidence and trust in physicians may be

  9. Protein Nutrition and Malnutrition in CKD and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Yan; Qian, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Elevated protein catabolism and protein malnutrition are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The underlying etiology includes, but is not limited to, metabolic acidosis intestinal dysbiosis; systemic inflammation with activation of complements, endothelin-1 and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAAS) axis; anabolic hormone resistance; energy expenditure elevation; and uremic toxin accumulation. All of these derangements can further worsen kidney function, leading to poor patient outcomes. Many of these CKD-related derangements can be prevented and substantially reversed, representing an area of great potential to improve CKD and ESRD care. This review integrates known information and recent advances in the area of protein nutrition and malnutrition in CKD and ESRD. Management recommendations are summarized. Thorough understanding the pathogenesis and etiology of protein malnutrition in CKD and ESRD patients will undoubtedly facilitate the design and development of more effective strategies to optimize protein nutrition and improve outcomes. PMID:28264439

  10. [Exploring factors affecting meaning of life perceptions among ESRD elders].

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ling-Yu; Lin, Shu-Ying

    2009-10-01

    The number of patient with end stage renal disease (ESRD) has been growing in Taiwan. Nearly 50% of ESRD sufferers are 65 years of age or older. The disease as well as issues related to patient physiology, psychology, and spiritual well-being are worth taking seriously. While research into this topic area has been conducted, most studies addressed issues in the physiological and psychological dimensions. Studies addressing the domain of spiritual well-being remain inadequate. The purpose of this study was to explore factors affecting meaning of life perceptions in ESRD elders. Using a descriptive-correlation research approach, we employed purposive sampling to collect data from 80 ESRD elders currently under the care of a hemodialysis center in southern Taiwan. Research instruments used included a demographic questionnaire and Meaning in Life Scale. Data were analysed using SPSS 12.0 software. Findings showed that ESRD elders had relatively low meaning in life scores compared to the overall ESRD population in Taiwan. Influencing factors included education level, socio-economic status, and level of participation in leisure activities. Study findings may provide health professionals a better understanding of meaning of life perceptions amongst elders with ESRD, and, as a result, help them target better spiritual care and supportive interventions.

  11. 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration is inversely associated with serum MMP-9 in a cross-sectional study of African American ESRD patients.

    PubMed

    Wasse, Haimanot; Cardarelli, Francesca; De Staercke, Christine; Hooper, Craig; Veledar, Emir; Guessous, Idris

    2011-05-22

    Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration is inversely associated with peripheral arterial disease and hypertension. Vascular remodeling may play a role in this association, however, data relating vitamin D level to specific remodeling biomarkers among ESRD patients is sparse. We tested whether 25(OH)D concentration is associated with markers of vascular remodeling and inflammation in African American ESRD patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study among ESRD patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis within Emory University-affiliated outpatient hemodialysis units. Demographic, clinical and dialysis treatment data were collected via direct patient interview and review of patients records at the time of enrollment, and each patient gave blood samples. Associations between 25(OH)D and biomarker concentrations were estimated in univariate analyses using Pearson's correlation coefficients and in multivariate analyses using linear regression models. 25(OH) D concentration was entered in multivariate linear regression models as a continuous variable and binary variable (<15 ng/ml and ≥15 ng/ml). Adjusted estimate concentrations of biomarkers were compared between 25(OH) D groups using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Finally, results were stratified by vascular access type. Among 91 patients, mean (standard deviation) 25(OH)D concentration was 18.8 (9.6) ng/ml, and was low (<15 ng/ml) in 43% of patients. In univariate analyses, low 25(OH) D was associated with lower serum calcium, higher serum phosphorus, and higher LDL concentrations. 25(OH) D concentration was inversely correlated with MMP-9 concentration (r = -0.29, p = 0.004). In multivariate analyses, MMP-9 concentration remained negatively associated with 25(OH) D concentration (P = 0.03) and anti-inflammatory IL-10 concentration positively correlated with 25(OH) D concentration (P = 0.04). Plasma MMP-9 and circulating 25(OH) D concentrations are significantly and inversely associated among ESRD

  12. Neighborhood poverty and racial differences in ESRD incidence.

    PubMed

    Volkova, Nataliya; McClellan, William; Klein, Mitchel; Flanders, Dana; Kleinbaum, David; Soucie, J Michael; Presley, Rodney

    2008-02-01

    Poverty is associated with increased risk of ESRD, but its contribution to observed racial differences in disease incidence is not well-defined. To explore the contribution of neighborhood poverty to racial disparity in ESRD incidence, we analyzed a combination of US Census and ESRD Network 6 data comprising 34,767 patients that initiated dialysis in Georgia, North Carolina, or South Carolina between January 1998 and December 2002. Census tracts were used as the geographic units of analysis, and the proportion of the census tract population living below the poverty level was our measure of neighborhood poverty. Incident ESRD rates were modeled using two-level Poisson regression, where race, age and gender were individual covariates (level 1), and census tract poverty was a neighborhood covariate (level 2). Neighborhood poverty was strongly associated with higher ESRD incidence for both blacks and whites. Increasing poverty was associated with a greater disparity in ESRD rates between blacks and whites, with the former at greater risk. This raises the possibility that blacks may suffer more from lower socioeconomic conditions than whites. The disparity persisted across all poverty levels. The reasons for increasingly higher ESRD incidence among US blacks as neighborhood poverty increases remain to be explained.

  13. Methionine cycle kinetics and arginine supplementation in endothelial dysfunction of ESRD

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To investigate the effect of arginine supplementation on metabolic pathways involved in endothelial dysfunction of end stage renal disease (ESRD), we conducted a study on 11 ESRD patients age 49+/-16; wt 93+/-26 kg receiving an adequate protein and energy intake for 1 week, followed by a primed, con...

  14. Death Does Matter--Cancer Risk in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Study With Competing Risk Analyses.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shih-Feng; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Jan, Ren-Long; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chu, Chin-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a high mortality rate. We hypothesized that not accounting for death as a competing risk overestimates the event rate caused by ESRD. Thus, we examined the cancer risk for patients with ESRD (ESRD) after death as a competing risk event had been adjusted for. Patients with newly diagnosed ESRD (n = 64,299) between 1999 and 2007, together with age- and sex-matched controls without ESRD (ESRD) (n = 128,592) were enrolled (1:2). In a Cox proportional hazards model that included death as a competing risk, ESRD patients in Taiwan had a lower overall incidence (subdistribution hazard ratio [sdHR] = 1.29) of cancer than did ESRD patients in a Cox model that did not include death as a competing risk (HR = 1.70). After competing mortality had been adjusted for, ESRD patients ≥70 (sdHR = 0.82) and ESRD patients on long-term dialysis (> 5 follow-up years, sdHR = 0.62), had a lower risk for developing cancer than did ESRD patients. This finding supported our hypothesis that standard survival analyses overestimate the event rate, especially when the mortality rate is high. It also showed that ESRD patients, when they grow older, were far less likely to develop cancer and far more likely to die because of underlying illnesses that might also affect the risk of death because of ESRD.

  15. Very low protein diets supplemented with keto-analogues in ESRD predialysis patients and its effect on vascular stiffness and AVF Maturation.

    PubMed

    David, Cristiana; Peride, Ileana; Niculae, Andrei; Constantin, Alexandra Maria; Checherita, Ionel Alexandru

    2016-09-20

    Native arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is the most appropriate type of vascular access for chronic dialysis. Its patency rates depend on vascular wall characteristics. Ketoacid analogues of essential amino acids (KA/EAA) are prescribed in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) pre-dialysis patients to lower toxic metabolic products generation and improve nutritional status. We hypothesized that very-low protein diet (VLPD) supplemented with KA/EAA may influence arterial wall stiffness and affect AVF maturation rates and duration in pre-dialysis ESRD patients. In a prospective, cohort, 3 years study we enrolled 67 consecutive non-diabetic early referral ESRD patients that underwent AVF creation in our hospital. Patients were divided in two groups based on their regimen 12 months prior to surgery: a VLPD supplemented with KA/EAA study group versus a low protein diet non-KA/EAA-supplemented control group. For each patient we performed serum analysis for the parameters of bone mineral disease, inflammation and nutritional status, one pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurement and one Doppler ultrasound (US) determination prior the surgery, followed by consequent Doppler US assessments at 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks after it. Rates and duration of mature AVF achievement were noted. We used logistic regression to analyze the association between AVF maturation and KA/EAA administration, by comparing rates and durations between groups, unadjusted and adjusted for systolic blood pressure, C-reactive protein, PWV, phosphorus values. All parameters in the logistic model were transformed in binary variables. A p-value < α = 0.05 was considered significant; data were processed using SPSS 16 software and Excel. In the study group (n = 28, aged 57 ± 12.35, 13 females) we registered better serum phosphate (p = 0.022) and C-reactive protein control (p = 0.021), lower PWV (p = 0.007) and a higher percent of AVF creation success (33.3 % versus 17.8 %, p < 0.05). AVF

  16. Patient-Centered Care: An Opportunity to Accomplish the “Three Aims” of the National Quality Strategy in the Medicare ESRD Program

    PubMed Central

    O’Hare, Ann M.; Armistead, Nancy; Schrag, Wendy L. Funk; Diamond, Louis

    2014-01-01

    In light of mounting federal government debt and levels of Medicare spending that are widely viewed as unsustainable, commentators have called for a transformation of the United States health care system to deliver better care at lower costs. This article presents the priorities of the Coalition for Supportive Care of Kidney Patients for how clinicians might achieve this transformation for patients with advanced CKD and their families. The authors suspect that much of the high-intensity, high-cost care currently delivered to patients with advanced kidney disease may be unwanted and that the “Three Aims” put forth by the National Quality Strategy of better care for the individual, better health for populations, and reduced health care costs may be within reach for patients with CKD and ESRD. This work describes the coalition’s vision for a more patient-centered approach to the care of patients with kidney disease and argues for more concerted efforts to align their treatments with their goals, values, and preferences. Key priorities to achieve this vision include using improved prognostic models and decision science to help patients, their families, and their providers better understand what to expect in the future; engaging patients and their families in shared decision-making before the initiation of dialysis and during the course of dialysis treatment; and tailoring treatment strategies throughout the continuum of their care to address what matters most to individual patients. PMID:25035275

  17. Patient-centered care: an opportunity to accomplish the "Three Aims" of the National Quality Strategy in the Medicare ESRD program.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Ann M; Armistead, Nancy; Schrag, Wendy L Funk; Diamond, Louis; Moss, Alvin H

    2014-12-05

    In light of mounting federal government debt and levels of Medicare spending that are widely viewed as unsustainable, commentators have called for a transformation of the United States health care system to deliver better care at lower costs. This article presents the priorities of the Coalition for Supportive Care of Kidney Patients for how clinicians might achieve this transformation for patients with advanced CKD and their families. The authors suspect that much of the high-intensity, high-cost care currently delivered to patients with advanced kidney disease may be unwanted and that the "Three Aims" put forth by the National Quality Strategy of better care for the individual, better health for populations, and reduced health care costs may be within reach for patients with CKD and ESRD. This work describes the coalition's vision for a more patient-centered approach to the care of patients with kidney disease and argues for more concerted efforts to align their treatments with their goals, values, and preferences. Key priorities to achieve this vision include using improved prognostic models and decision science to help patients, their families, and their providers better understand what to expect in the future; engaging patients and their families in shared decision-making before the initiation of dialysis and during the course of dialysis treatment; and tailoring treatment strategies throughout the continuum of their care to address what matters most to individual patients. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  18. Acute appendicitis in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pei-Wen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Chen, Yung-Tai; Lee, Yi-Jung; Wang, Feng-Ming; Liu, Chia-Jen; Yang, Wu-Chang; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chen, Tzen-Wen; Li, Szu-Yuan

    2012-10-01

    Acute appendicitis in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) poses a diagnostic challenge. Delayed surgery can contribute to higher morbidity and mortality rates. However, few studies have evaluated this disease among ESRD patients. Our study focused on the lack of data on the incidence and risk factors of acute appendicitis among ESRD patients and compared the outcomes in patients who underwent different dialysis modalities. This national survey was conducted between 1997 and 2005 and included ESRD patients identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database. The incidence rate of acute appendicitis in ESRD patients was compared with that in randomly selected age-, sex-, and Charlson comorbidity score-matched non-dialysis controls. A Cox regression hazard model was used to identify risk factors. Among 59,781 incident ESRD patients, matched one-to-one with controls, there were 328 events of acute appendicitis. The incidence rate of 16.9 per 10,000 person-years in the ESRD cohort was higher than that in the control cohort (p = 0.003). The independent risk factors were atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio [HR], 2.08), severe liver disease (HR, 1.74), diabetes mellitus (HR, 1.58), and hemodialysis (HR, 1.74). Compared with the control cohort, subsequent perforation and mortality rates of acute appendicitis were also higher in the ESRD cohorts. There was no effect of dialysis modality on the patient outcomes. ESRD patients had a higher risk for acute appendicitis and poorer outcomes than non-dialysis populations. A careful examination of ESRD patients presenting with atypical abdominal pain to avoid misdiagnosis is extremely important to prevent delayed surgery.

  19. P-Cresyl Sulfate Is a Valuable Predictor of Clinical Outcomes in Pre-ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Jui; Pan, Chi-Feng; Chuang, Chih-Kuang; Sun, Fang-Ju; Wang, Duen-Jen; Chen, Han-Hsiang; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Wu, Chih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims. Previous studies have reported p-cresyl sulfate (PCS) was related to endothelial dysfunction and adverse clinical effect. We investigate the adverse effects of PCS on clinical outcomes in a chronic kidney disease (CKD) cohort study. Methods. 72 predialysis patients were enrolled from a single medical center. Serum biochemistry data and PCS were measured. The clinical outcomes including cardiovascular event, all-cause mortality, and dialysis event were recorded during a 3-year follow-up. Results. After adjusting other independent variables, multivariate Cox regression analysis showed age (HR: 1.12, P = 0.01), cardiovascular disease history (HR: 6.28, P = 0.02), and PCS (HR: 1.12, P = 0.02) were independently associated with cardiovascular event; age (HR: 0.91, P < 0.01), serum albumin (HR: 0.03, P < 0.01), and PCS level (HR: 1.17, P < 0.01) reached significant correlation with dialysis event. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with higher serum p-cresyl sulfate (>6 mg/L) were significantly associated with cardiovascular and dialysis event (log rank P = 0.03, log rank P < 0.01, resp.). Conclusion. Our study shows serum PCS could be a valuable marker in predicting cardiovascular event and renal function progression in CKD patients without dialysis. PMID:24592393

  20. Coexistent Pseudogout and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Septic Arthritis in a Patient with HIV and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Omer M.; Cervellione, Kelly L.; Singh, Bhupinder B.; Bagheri, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Pseudogout is a crystal-induced arthropathy characterized by the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals in synovial fluid, menisci, or articular cartilage. Although not very common, this entity can be seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Septic arthritis due to Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) is a rare entity that can affect immunocompromised patients such as those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or those who are on immunosuppressive drugs. Here, we describe a 51-year-old female who presented with fever, right knee pain, swelling, warmth, and decreased range of motion for several days. The initial assessment was consistent with pseudogout, with negative bacterial and fungal cultures. However, due to high white blood cell (WBC) count in the synovial fluid analysis, she was empirically started on intravenous (IV) vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam and discharged on IV vancomycin and cefepime, while acid-fast bacilli (AFB) culture was still in process. Seventeen days later, AFB culture grew Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI), and she was readmitted for relevant management. This case illustrates that septic arthritis due to MAI should be considered in the differential diagnosis of septic arthritis in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27803833

  1. Multimodality MRI Findings in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui Juan; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming

    2015-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) suffer from a number of complex neurological complications including vascular damage and cognitive dysfunction. It is of great significance to detect the neurological complications and improve the prognosis of ESRD patients. Many new noninvasive MRI techniques have been steadily used for the diagnosis of occult central nervous system complications in ESRD patients. This gives an opportunity to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of these neurological disorders. This paper is a review that presents the MRI findings of occult brain damage in ESRD patients, outlines the applications of advanced MRI techniques, and introduces a brief perspective in this study field. PMID:26064943

  2. 42 CFR 405.2112 - ESRD network organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false ESRD network organizations. 405.2112 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2112 ESRD network organizations. CMS will designate an administrative governing body (network organization) for each network. The functions of a network organization...

  3. 42 CFR 405.2112 - ESRD network organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false ESRD network organizations. 405.2112 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2112 ESRD network organizations. CMS will designate an administrative governing body (network organization) for each network. The functions of a network organization...

  4. 42 CFR 405.2112 - ESRD network organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false ESRD network organizations. 405.2112 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2112 ESRD network organizations. CMS will designate an administrative governing body (network organization) for each network. The functions of a network organization...

  5. 42 CFR 405.2112 - ESRD network organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false ESRD network organizations. 405.2112 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2112 ESRD network organizations. CMS will designate an administrative governing body (network organization) for each network. The functions of a network organization...

  6. Geographic Variation in Black–White Differences in End-of-Life Care for Patients with ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Rudolph A.; Boyko, Edward J.; Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; O’Hare, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Patterns of end-of-life care among patients with ESRD differ by race. Whether the magnitude of racial differences in end-of-life care varies across regions is not known. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This observational cohort study used data from the US Renal Data System and regional health care spending patterns from the Dartmouth Atlas of Healthcare. The cohort included 101,331 black and white patients 18 years and older who initiated chronic dialysis or received a kidney transplant between June 1, 2005, and September 31, 2008, and died before October 1, 2009. Black–white differences in the odds of in-hospital death, dialysis discontinuation, and hospice referral by quintile of end-of-life expenditure index (EOL-EI) were examined. Results In adjusted analyses, the odds ratios for dialysis discontinuation for black versus white patients ranged from 0.47 (95% confidence interval=0.43 to 0.51) in the highest quintile of EOL-EI to 0.63 (95% confidence interval=0.54 to 0.74) in the lowest quintile (P for interaction<0.001). Hospice referral ranged from 0.55 (95% confidence interval=0.50 to 0.60) in the highest quintile of EOL-EI to 0.82 (95% confidence interval=0.69 to 0.96) in the lowest quintile (P for interaction<0.001). The association of race with in-hospital death also differed in magnitude across quintiles of EOL-EI, ranging from 1.21 (95% confidence interval=1.08 to 1.35) in the highest quintile of EOL-EI to 1.47 (95% confidence interval=1.27 to 1.71) in the second quintile (P for interaction<0.001). Conclusions There are pronounced black–white differences in patterns of hospice referral and dialysis discontinuation among patients with ESRD that vary substantially across regions of the United States. PMID:23580783

  7. Contemporary Management of Coronary Artery Disease and Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2013-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have emerged as a worldwide public health problem. Due to the remarkably higher incidence and prevalence of this chronic disease in Taiwan than in other countries, CKD/ESRD has contributed to a significant health burden in Taiwan. Patients with CKD/ESRD have an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared to the normal population. Patients with ACS alone can present differently than patients with ACS and CKD/ESRD. Also, due to the lower prevalence of chest pain and ST-segment elevation, CKD/ESRD patients were more difficult to diagnose than other patients. Furthermore, whether advances in ACS management with medical therapy and an early invasive approach could improve patient outcomes with CKD/ESRD is not known. The use of antiplatelets such as aspirin and other antithrombotic agents might reduce the incidence of ACS or stroke in CKD patients. However, such use could also increase bleeding risk and even increase the likelihood of mortality, especially in dialysis patients. While recent clinical data suggest the potential benefit of aggressive management with coronary intervention for CAD and ACS in this category of patients, further clinical studies are still indicated for the proper medical strategy and revascularization therapy to improve the outcomes of CAD and ACS in CKD/ESRD patients, both in Taiwan and worldwide. Acute coronary syndrome; Chronic kidney disease; Coronary artery disease; Diagnosis; End-stage renal disease; Management.

  8. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products and chronic complications in ESRD treated by dialysis.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Zeebregts, Clark J; Navis, Gerjan; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Lefrandt, Joop D; Smit, Andries J

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular and connective tissue disorders are very common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is significantly increased in these patients. Accumulation of AGEs is believed to have a role in tissue protein aging and the pathogenesis of such age-related diseases as diabetes and ESRD. AGEs accumulate in patients with ESRD as a result of nonenzymatic glycation, oxidative stress, and diminished clearance of AGE precursors. Some AGEs show characteristic brown pigmentation and fluorescence, form protein-protein cross-links, and may ligate with AGE-specific receptors, inducing oxidative stress and cytokine production. This review focuses on the clinical relevance of AGE accumulation in patients with ESRD treated by dialysis for the development of long-term complications. The formation and accumulation of AGEs in patients with ESRD are discussed, as well as the relationship between AGE accumulation and such major complications of ESRD as cardiovascular and connective tissue disorders.

  9. Early eradication has a lower risk of peptic ulcer bleeding in Helicobacter pylori-infected chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching-Hui; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Huang, Nicole; Chang, Shen-Shong

    2016-09-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) contributes to a higher mortality rate in peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) patients. A crucial question is whether early Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy is necessary for H. pylori-infected chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. To explore whether H. pylori eradication therapy has a lower risk of PUB at the pre-ESRD stage than at the ESRD stage. Patients meeting 2 criteria were defined as newly diagnosed ESRD cases: (1) patients diagnosed with ESRD and receiving regular dialysis between 2000 and 2009; and (2) patients with no history of dialysis between 1997 and 1999. We divided the study participants into pre-ESRD and ESRD groups on the basis of the time between H. pylori eradication and dialysis. The date of the first PUB diagnosis was defined as the primary endpoint. Stratified Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was used to estimate the effect of H. pylori eradication at the pre-ESRD and ESRD stage on the occurrence of PUB. We included 476 patients in the pre-ESRD cohort and 476 patients in the matched ESRD cohort. After adjustment for age, sex, the presence of comorbidities, and medication use, the hazard ratio of PUB was 0.66 times less in the pre-ESRD cohort than in the ESRD cohort. Factors such as Charlson's score more than 3, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were associated with an increased risk of PUB. Our result supports that early H. pylori eradication has a lower risk of PUB in H. pylori-infected CKD patients. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Variation in infection prevention practices in dialysis facilities: results from the national opportunity to improve infection control in ESRD (End-Stage Renal Disease) project.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Carol E; Hines, Stephen C; Hall, Kendall K; Saran, Rajiv; Kalbfleisch, John D; Spencer, Teri; Frank, Kelly M; Carlson, Diane; Deane, Jan; Roys, Erik; Scholz, Natalie; Parrotte, Casey; Messana, Joseph M

    2015-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe patient care across hemodialysis facilities enrolled in the National Opportunity to Improve Infection Control in ESRD (end-stage renal disease) (NOTICE) project in order to evaluate adherence to evidence-based practices aimed at prevention of infection. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Thirty-four hemodialysis facilities were randomly selected from among 772 facilities in 4 end-stage renal disease participating networks. Facility selection was stratified on dialysis organization affiliation, size, socioeconomic status, and urban/rural status. MEASUREMENTS Trained infection control evaluators used an infection control worksheet to observe 73 distinct infection control practices at the hemodialysis facilities, from October 1, 2011, through January 31, 2012. RESULTS There was considerable variation in infection control practices across enrolled facilities. Overall adherence to recommended practices was 68% (range, 45%-92%) across all facilities. Overall adherence to expected hand hygiene practice was 72% (range, 10%-100%). Compliance to hand hygiene before and after procedures was high; however, during procedures hand hygiene compliance averaged 58%. Use of chlorhexidine as the specific agent for exit site care was 19% overall but varied from 0% to 35% by facility type. The 8 checklists varied in the frequency of perfect performance from 0% for meeting every item on the checklist for disinfection practices to 22% on the arteriovenous access practices at initiation. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that there are many areas for improvement in hand hygiene and other infection prevention practices in end-stage renal disease. These NOTICE project findings will help inform the development of a larger quality improvement initiative at dialysis facilities.

  11. Serious Illness Conversations in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Ernest I; Bernacki, Rachelle E; Block, Susan D

    2016-12-28

    Dialysis-dependent ESRD is a serious illness with high disease burden, morbidity, and mortality. Mortality in the first year on dialysis for individuals over age 75 years old approaches 40%, and even those with better prognoses face multiple hospitalizations and declining functional status. In the last month of life, patients on dialysis over age 65 years old experience higher rates of hospitalization, intensive care unit admission, procedures, and death in hospital than patients with cancer or heart failure, while using hospice services less. This high intensity of care is often inconsistent with the wishes of patients on dialysis but persists due to failure to explore or discuss patient goals, values, and preferences in the context of their serious illness. Fewer than 10% of patients on dialysis report having had a conversation about goals, values, and preferences with their nephrologist, although nearly 90% report wanting this conversation. Many nephrologists shy away from these conversations, because they do not wish to upset their patients, feel that there is too much uncertainty in their ability to predict prognosis, are insecure in their skills at broaching the topic, or have difficulty incorporating the conversations into their clinical workflow. In multiple studies, timely discussions about serious illness care goals, however, have been associated with enhanced goal-consistent care, improved quality of life, and positive family outcomes without an increase in patient distress or anxiety. In this special feature article, we will (1) identify the barriers to serious illness conversations in the dialysis population, (2) review best practices in and specific approaches to conducting serious illness conversations, and (3) offer solutions to overcome barriers as well as practical advice, including specific language and tools, to implement serious illness conversations in the dialysis population.

  12. Plasma vitamin C levels in ESRD patients and occurrence of hypochromic erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Eric; Richter, Anja; Kuhlmann, Martin K; Wang, Suxin; Levin, Nathan W; Kotanko, Peter; Handelman, Garry J

    2017-04-01

    The achievement of erythropoiesis in hemodialysis (HD) patients is typically managed with erythropoiesis-stimulating-agents (ESA's) and intravenous iron (IV-iron). Using this treatment strategy, HD patients frequently show an elevated fraction of red blood cells (RBC) with hemoglobin (Hb) content per cell that is below the normal range, called hypochromic RBC. The low Hb content per RBC is the result of the clinical challenge of providing sufficient iron content to the bone marrow during erythropoiesis. Vitamin C supplements have been used to increase Hb levels in HD patients with refractory anemia, which supports the hypothesis that vitamin C mobilizes iron needed for Hb synthesis. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 149 prevalent HD patients of the percent hypochromic RBC, defined as RBC with Hb < 300 ng/uL of packed RBC, in relation to plasma vitamin C levels. We also measured high-sensitivity CRP, (hs-CRP), iron, and ferritin levels. and calculated ESA dose. High plasma levels of vitamin C were negatively associated with hypochromic RBC (P < 0.003), and high ESA doses were positively associated (P < 0.001). There was no significant association of hs-CRP with percent hypochromic RBC. This finding supports the hypothesis that vitamin C mobilizes iron stores, improves iron delivery to the bone marrow, and increase the fraction of RBC with normal Hb content. Further research is warranted on development of protocols for safe and effective use of supplemental vitamin C for management of renal anemia. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  13. Influenza vaccination in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are considered at higher risk of influenza-related complications and are listed worldwide among the subjects for whom yearly influenza vaccination is strongly recommended. However, influenza vaccination coverage of patients with ESRD is significantly lower than desired. This paper explores why compliance with official recommendations for influenza vaccination is poor in patients with ESRD and analyzes the true risk of infection as well as the immunogenicity, the effectiveness and the safety of influenza vaccination in these patients. Epidemiological and clinical data support the importance of influenza in conditioning clinical deterioration of patients with ESRD, particularly in relation to their level of immunosuppression. However, the variable levels of immunodeficiency detected in patients with ESRD may reduce the immune response to influenza vaccination, which appears to be lower than that usually found in healthy subjects. However, few studies are available, and they are difficult to compare for several reasons. Additionally, limited data have been collected on influenza vaccine effectiveness, although the available studies support positive results of vaccination on outcomes of severe disease. Despite such limitations, it is important to highlight that all the available studies have confirmed the good safety and tolerability of inactivated influenza vaccines. These findings, together with the risks associated with influenza in these patients, support annual influenza vaccination in patients with ESRD as well as vaccination of their close contacts and should be presented in educational programs organized for nephrologists and patient associations.

  14. ESRD special needs plans: a proof of concept for integrated care.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Mahesh; Franco, Eric; McMurray, Stephen; Petra, Eugene; Nissenson, Allen R

    2014-11-01

    Since the completion of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' end-stage renal disease (ESRD) demonstration projects, passage of the Affordable Care Act, and announcement of ESRD Seamless Care Organizations (ESCOs) by CMS' Innovation Center, it seems that ESRD-centered accountable care organizations will be the future model for kidney care of Medicare beneficiaries. Regardless of what you call it--managed care organization, special needs plan, ESCO--balancing quality of health care with costs of health care will continue to be the primary directive for physicians and institutions using integrated care management (ICM) strategies to manage their ESRD patients' health. The renal community has had previous success with ICM, and these experiences could help to guide our way.

  15. The use of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for patients with end-stage renal disease and pre-existing advanced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Anupma; Sharma, R K; Gupta, Amit; Prasad, Narayan

    2013-07-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) associated with pre-existing advanced liver disease (ALD) has increased the risk of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to assess the outcome following the use of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) in ESRD patients with ALD. A retrospective case-controlled study was performed on 16 patients with ALD and ESRD (ESRD-ALD) and 27 control patients with ESRD but without liver disease (ESRD); both groups were started on CAPD during the same period. No major complications were observed in either group in the immediate post-surgical period and, after an average break in period of 11.3 days, the cases and controls were started on regular CAPD. The average duration of follow-up was 8 ± 2.3 months in the ESRD-ALD group compared with 20 ± 1.3 months in the ESRD group. The overall peritonitis rates were 1.26/treatment year in the ESRD-ALD group and 0.63 in the ESRD group. The 6- and 12-month survivals among ESRD-ALD patients were 63.75% and 38.75%, respectively. Patients with ESRD-ALD had significantly lower baseline serum protein and albumin levels at the time of initiation of CAPD. On follow-up, the hemoglobin levels improved in both the groups along with an improvement in the serum protein and albumin levels. Fourteen of the 16 ESRD-ALD patients died at the end of the 3-year follow-up period; deaths were due to terminal liver failure in nine patients and peritonitis in five patients. Patients who died in the ESRD-ALD group had lower serum albumin, lower body mass index (BMI) (median BMI 18.2 vs. 25.6) and higher grades of liver disease [child Pugh grade B (8), grade C (6) vs. grade B (2)] at initiation of CAPD. Our study suggests that CAPD is a safe modality in patients with ESRD-ALD and that it does not carry any major risk for bleeding tendencies, technique failure or worsening of nutritional status. Low serum albumin, lower BMI and higher grade of liver disease at initiation are associated with higher mortality

  16. Glycemic management in ESRD and earlier stages of CKD.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark E; Garg, Rajesh

    2014-02-01

    The management of hyperglycemia in patients with kidney failure is complex, and the goals and methods regarding glycemic control in chronic kidney disease (CKD) are not clearly defined. Although aggressive glycemic control seems to be advantageous in early diabetic nephropathy, outcome data supporting tight glycemic control in patients with advanced CKD (including end-stage renal disease [ESRD]) are lacking. Challenges in the management of such patients include therapeutic inertia, monitoring difficulties, and the complexity of available treatments. In this article, we review the alterations in glucose homeostasis that occur in kidney failure, current views on the value of glycemic control and issues with its determination, and more recent approaches to monitor or measure glycemic control. Hypoglycemia and treatment options for patients with diabetes and ESRD or earlier stages of CKD also are addressed, discussing the insulin and noninsulin agents that currently are available, along with their indications and contraindications. The article provides information to help clinicians in decision making in order to provide individualized glycemic goals and appropriate therapy for patients with ESRD or earlier stages of CKD.

  17. Marijuana and Cannabinoids in ESRD and Earlier Stages of CKD.

    PubMed

    Rein, Joshua L; Wyatt, Christina M

    2017-08-12

    Marijuana is the most commonly used recreational drug in the United States, and legal recreational and medicinal use has gained public acceptance during the last decade. Twenty-nine US states have established medical marijuana programs, 8 of which have also legalized recreational marijuana, and Canada is expected to legalize recreational marijuana in 2018. Advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are chronic conditions with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Patients experience substantial symptom burden that is frequently undertreated due to adverse medication side effects. This article reviews the available evidence for the use of medical marijuana to manage chronic pain, nausea/vomiting, anorexia/cachexia, and pruritus, all of which are frequently reported by patients with advanced CKD or ESRD. Potential adverse health effects of medical and recreational marijuana use are also discussed. Regardless of personal, social, and political beliefs, marijuana use is becoming mainstream, and nephrologists should be aware of the potential impact on our patient population. Further research is warranted to investigate the renal endocannabinoid system, the impact of marijuana use on kidney disease outcomes, and the risks and benefits of medical marijuana use on symptoms of advanced CKD and ESRD. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. High prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and nodular thyroid disease in patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Ana Beatriz B A; Pellizzari, Caio; Carvalho, Gisah A; Sant'Anna, Beatriz C; Montenegro, Rafaela L; Zammar Filho, Roberto G; Mesa Junior, Cleo O; Hauck Prante, Patrícia R; Olandoski, Marcia; Carvalho, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease has been known to affect thyroid hormone metabolism. Low serum levels of T3 and T4 are the most remarkable laboratorial findings. A high incidence of goiter and nodules on thyroid ultrasonography has been reported in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Our objective is to evaluate the prevalence of laboratorial and morphologic alterations in the thyroid gland in a cohort of patients with ESRD on hemodialysis (HD). Sixty-one patients with ESRD on HD were selected and compared with 43 healthy subjects matched by age, gender, and weight. Patients were submitted to thyroid ultrasonography. T3, free T4 (FT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone, antithyroglobulin, and antithyroperoxidase antibodies were measured. The mean age of patients with ESRD was 47.4 ± 12.3 and 61% were women. ESRD was mainly caused by hypertensive nephrosclerosis and diabetic nephropathy. Mean thyroid volume, as determined by ultrasonography, was similar in both groups. Patients with ESRD had more hypoechoic nodules when compared with the control group (24.1% vs. 7.9%, P = 0.056). Mean serum FT4 and T3 levels were significantly lower in patients with ESRD, and subclinical hypothyroidism was more prevalent in patients with ESRD (21.82% vs. 7.14% control group, P = 0.04). Titers of antithyroid antibodies were similar in both groups. ESRD was associated with a higher prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and lower levels of T3 and FT4. Almost a quarter of patients showed thyroid nodules >10 mm. Periodic ultrasound evaluation and assessment of thyroid function are recommended in patients with ESRD on HD.

  19. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  20. Surgical treatment for patients with periodontal disease reduces risk of end-stage renal disease: a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lin, Shih-Yi; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2014-01-01

    The association between periodontal disease treatment and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains unclear. This study aims to determine whether surgical periodontal treatment reduces ESRD risk. From the insurance claims data of patients with periodontal disease who were free of ESRD from 1997 to 2009, 35,496 patients were identified who underwent surgery for subgingival curettage and/or periodontal flap and are considered the treatment cohort. For comparison, 141,824 patients who did not undergo these treatments were considered the no-treatment cohort. Follow-ups were performed until the end of 2009 to estimate the incidence and risk of ESRD in these two cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate the related hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of ESRD. The incidence of ESRD was lower in the treatment cohort than in the no-treatment cohort (4.66 versus 7.38 per 10,000 person-years), with an adjusted HR of 0.59 (95% CI = 0.46 to 0.75). Sex- and age-specific analysis showed that the incidence rate ratio of the treatment cohort to the no-treatment cohort was higher for women than for men and declined with age. The risks of ESRD were consistently lower in the treatment cohort even when compared by comorbidity. Patients with periodontal disease who undergo procedures for subgingival curettage and/or periodontal flap have a remarkably decreased risk of ESRD.

  1. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... dialysis service drugs and biologicals as defined in § 413.171, furnished to ESRD patients on or after... facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals with only an oral form furnished to ESRD patients...

  2. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... dialysis service drugs and biologicals as defined in § 413.171, furnished to ESRD patients on or after... facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals with only an oral form furnished to ESRD patients...

  3. The effect of increasing age on the prognosis of non-dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease receiving stable nephrology care.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Luca; Minutolo, Roberto; Chiodini, Paolo; Borrelli, Silvio; Zoccali, Carmine; Postorino, Maurizio; Iodice, Carmela; Nappi, Felice; Fuiano, Giorgio; Gallo, Ciro; Conte, Giuseppe

    2012-08-01

    To define whether age modifies the prognosis of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on nephrology care, we prospectively followed patients with CKD who have been receiving nephrology care in a clinic for 1 year or more. The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), defined by the occurrence of dialysis or transplant, or death without ESRD was estimated by a competing-risk approach, and interactions between age and risk factors tested in Cox models over a median follow-up period of 62.4 months. Of 1248 patients with stage III–V CKD, 481 were younger than 65, 410 were between 65 and 75, and 357 were over 75 years old. Within each age class, the mean estimated glomerular filtration rate(eGFR) was 31, 32, and 29 ml/min per 1.73 m2, respectively. There were 394 ESRD events and 353 deaths. The risk of ESRD was higher than the risk of death without ESRD for ages <60 years, and independent of eGFR. The ESRD risk diminished with aging but still prevailed for eGFRs of 25–35 in patients between 65 and 75 years and with an eGFR below 15 in those up to 85 years old. Proteinuria significantly increased the risk of ESRD with advancing age. Surprisingly, the unfavorable effects of cardiovascular disease on ESRD and of diabetes on survival significantly decreased with increasing age. Male gender, higher phosphate, lower body mass index, and hemoglobin were age-independent predictors for ESRD, while cardiovascular disease, lower hemoglobin, higher proteinuria and uric acid, and ESRD also predicted death. Thus, in older patients on nephrology care, the risk of ESRD prevailed overmortality even when eGFR was not severely impaired. Proteinuria increases ESRD risk, while the predictive role of other modifiable risk factors was unchanged compared with younger patients.

  4. Risk of Band Keratopathy in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shih-Feng; Jan, Ren-Long; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Chang, Yuh-Shin

    2016-01-01

    This study is a retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study to investigate the risk of band keratopathy following end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The study cohort included 94,039 ESRD on-dialysis patients identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), code 585 and registered between January 2000 to December 2009 at the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. An age- and sex-matched control group comprised 94,039 patients selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Information for each patient was collected from the index date until December 2011. In total, 230 ESRD patients and 26 controls had band keratopathy (P < 0.0001) during the follow-up period, indicating a significantly elevated risk of band keratopathy in the ESRD patients compared with controls (incidence rate ratio = 12.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.14–18.32). After adjustment for potential confounders including sarcoidosis, hyperparathyroidism, iridocyclitis, and phthisis bulbi, ESRD patients were 11.56 times more likely to develop band keratopathy in the full cohort (adjusted HR = 11.56, 95% CI = 7.70–17.35). In conclusion, ESRD increases the risk of band keratopathy. Close interdisciplinary collaboration between nephrologists and ophthalmologists is important to deal with band keratopathy following ESRD and prevent visual acuity impairments. PMID:27346848

  5. Management of patients with hepatitis C infection and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Bunchorntavakul, Chalermrat; Maneerattanaporn, Monthira; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2015-02-27

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with more rapid liver disease progression and reduced renal graft and patients' survival following kidney transplantation. Evaluations and management of HCV in patients with renal disease are challenging. The pharmacokinetics of interferons (IFN), ribavirin (RBV) and some direct acting antiviral (DAA), such as sofosbuvir, are altered in patients with ESRD. With dose adjustment and careful monitoring, treatment of HCV in patients with ESRD can be associated with sustained virological response (SVR) rates nearly comparable to that of patients with normal renal function. DAA-based regimens, especially the IFN-free and RBV-free regimens, are theoretically preferred for patients with ESRD and KT in order to increase SVR rates and to reduce treatment side effects. However, based on the data for pharmacokinetics, dosing safety and efficacy of DAA for patients with severe renal impairment are lacking. This review will be focused on the evaluations, available pharmacologic data, and management of HCV in patients with severe renal impairment, patients who underwent KT, and those who suffered from HCV-related renal disease, according to the available treatment options, including DAA.

  6. Pain management in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phuong-Chi T.; Toscano, Edgar; Pham, Phuong-Mai T.; Pham, Phuong-Anh T.; Pham, Son V.; Pham, Phuong-Thu T.

    2009-01-01

    Pain has been reported to be a common problem in the general population and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Although similar data for pre-ESRD patients are lacking, we recently reported that the prevalence of pain is also very high (>70%) among pre-ESRD patients at a Los Angeles County tertiary referral centre. The high prevalence of pain in the CKD population is particularly concerning because pain has been shown to be associated with poor quality of life. Of greater concern, poor quality of life, at least in dialysis patients, has been shown to be associated with poor survival. We herein discuss the pathophysiology of common pain conditions, review a commonly accepted approach to the management of pain in the general population, and discuss analgesic-induced renal complications and therapeutic issues specific for patients with reduced renal function. PMID:25949305

  7. Obese and diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease: Peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis?

    PubMed

    Ekart, Robert; Hojs, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease that is increasingly prevalent around the world and is a well-recognized risk factor for type 2 diabetes and hypertension, leading causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The obese diabetic patient with ESRD is a challenge for the nephrologist with regard to the type of renal replacement therapy that should be suggested and offered to the patient. There is no evidence that either peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis is contraindicated in obese ESRD patients. In the literature, we can find a discrepancy in the impact of obesity on mortality among hemodialysis vs. peritoneal dialysis patients. Several studies in hemodialysis patients suggest that a higher BMI confers a survival advantage - the so-called "reverse epidemiology". In contrast, the literature among obese peritoneal dialysis patients is inconsistent, with various studies reporting an increased risk of death, no difference, or a decreased risk of death. Many of these studies only spanned across a few years, and this is probably too short of a time frame for a realistic assessment of obesity's impact on mortality in ESRD patients. The decision for dialysis modality in an obese diabetic patient with ESRD should be individualized. According to the results of published studies, we cannot suggest PD or HD as a better solution for all obese diabetic patients. The obese patient should be educated about all their dialysis options, including home dialysis therapies. In this review, the available literature related to the dialysis modality in obese patients with diabetes and ESRD was reviewed.

  8. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... independent ESRD facilities. 413.174 Section 413.174 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.174 Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities. Link to an amendment...

  9. Increased risk of death in African American patients with end-stage renal disease secondary to lupus.

    PubMed

    Sule, Sangeeta; Fivush, Barbara; Neu, Alicia; Furth, Susan

    2014-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a devastating systemic disease that can lead to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Our goal was to assess the relative mortality risk associated with race in pediatric and adult populations with ESRD secondary to SLE maintained on hemodialysis (HD). We identified an inception cohort of patients who were started on HD in January 1990 from data collected by the United States Renal Data System (USRDS). Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed in these patients using the time at risk from 1 January 1990 through 31 December 2010, the last date of the USRDS data collection period in this dataset. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess mortality, adjusted for age at dialysis initiation. Subjects were censored at transplantation or end of follow-up. There were 1580 patients with ESRD secondary to SLE, 252 pediatric patients (62% African American) and 1328 adults (56% African American). African American pediatric patients with ESRD secondary to SLE had a 2-fold increased risk of death compared with African American children with other causes of ESRD [hazard ratio (HR): 2.1, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4-2.9, P < 0.01]. Increased risk of death was also seen in African American adults with ESRD secondary to SLE compared with both Caucasians with ESRD secondary to SLE (HR: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.2-4.2, P < 0.01) and African American adults with ESRD secondary to other diseases (HR: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1-1.4, P < 0.01). Our study suggests that there is a significant increased risk for mortality in African American children and adults with ESRD secondary to SLE. This suggests that African Americans with ESRD secondary to SLE need aggressive monitoring.

  10. Etiology of End-Stage Renal Disease and Arterial Stiffness among Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    El Ghoul, Balsam; Korjian, Serge; El Alam, Andrew; Samad, Salam; Dahdah, Georges; Blacher, Jacques; Safar, Michel E.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Prior studies have demonstrated that conventional and emerging CV risk factors are associated with worsening arterial stiffness among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis. The present cross-sectional study evaluates the association between the etiology of ESRD and arterial stiffness among a cohort of hemodialysis patients. Methods. Etiology of ESRD was identified from patients' medical records and classified as either vascular renal disease, diabetic nephropathy, nondiabetic glomerulopathy, tubular interstitial nephropathy, hereditary nephropathy, or ESRD of unconfirmed etiology. Results. A total of 82 subjects were enrolled. cfPWV was independently associated with the composite of either diabetic nephropathy or vascular renal disease (p = 0.022), pulse pressure (p = 0.001), and a history of CV events (p = 0.025), but not history of hypertension or diabetes mellitus alone. The median cfPWVs in diabetic nephropathy and vascular renal disease were comparable and significantly higher than median cfPWVs in other etiologies of ESRD. Conclusion. The study suggests that the etiology of ESRD is independently associated with arterial stiffness among hemodialysis patients. Furthermore, arterial stiffness was higher among patients who developed renal sequelae of either diabetes mellitus or hypertension as compared with those who have a history of either diabetes mellitus or hypertension alone. PMID:28299320

  11. Sleep Disruption in Patients with Sleep Apnea and End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Loewen, Andrea; Siemens, AnDrea; Hanly, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Sleep apnea (SA) is common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and such patients are likely to suffer additional sleep disruption associated with restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic leg movements (PLM). Our objective was to evaluate sleep quality in ESRD patients who are newly diagnosed with SA and determine the additional contribution of PLM to sleep disruption. Methods: Two groups of patients with SA (apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) > 15) were compared, one with ESRD (n = 12) and the other with normal renal function (n = 18), using a sleep history questionnaire, sleep diary, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, polysomnography (1 night) and actigraphy (6 nights). Results: The prevalence of RLS was higher in ESRD patients (60% vs 6%, p < 0.001). ESRD patients had shorter total sleep time (TST) (264 ± 78 vs 330 ± 46 min, p = 0.01), lower sleep efficiency (68 ± 20 % vs 81 ± 11 %, p = 0.03), and more stage 1 NREM sleep (23 ± 18 vs 8 ± 5 % TST, p = 0.002). ESRD patients had a higher frequency of PLM (31 ± 37 hr-1 vs 8.0 ± 16 hr-1, p = 0.02) and PLM-related arousals (15 ± 18 hr-1 vs 1 ± 2 hr-1, p = 0.003). Actigraphy demonstrated a higher movement and fragmentation index in ESRD patients (23 ± 10 % sleep time vs 17 ± 6 % sleep time, p = 0.04). Conclusions: The co-existence of PLM is an additional source of sleep disruption in patients with ESRD and SA. Treatment of PLM, in addition to treatment of sleep apnea, may be required to improve sleep quality in this patient population. Citation: Loewen A; Siemens A; Hanly P. Sleep disruption in patients with sleep apnea and end-stage renal disease. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(4):324-329. PMID:19968009

  12. Thyroid functional disease: an under-recognized cardiovascular risk factor in kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Connie M; Brent, Gregory A; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Soldin, Offie P; Nguyen, Danh; Budoff, Matthew J; Brunelli, Steven M; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-05-01

    Thyroid functional disease, and in particular hypothyroidism, is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. In the general population, hypothyroidism is associated with impaired cardiac contractility, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and possibly higher cardiovascular mortality. It has been hypothesized that hypothyroidism is an under-recognized, modifiable risk factor for the enormous burden of cardiovascular disease and death in CKD and ESRD, but this has been difficult to test due to the challenge of accurate thyroid functional assessment in uremia. Low thyroid hormone levels (i.e. triiodothyronine) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular sequelae in CKD and ESRD patients, but these metrics are confounded by malnutrition, inflammation and comorbid states, and hence may signify nonthyroidal illness (i.e. thyroid functional test derangements associated with underlying ill health in the absence of thyroid pathology). Thyrotropin is considered a sensitive and specific thyroid function measure that may more accurately classify hypothyroidism, but few studies have examined the clinical significance of thyrotropin-defined hypothyroidism in CKD and ESRD. Of even greater uncertainty are the risks and benefits of thyroid hormone replacement, which bear a narrow therapeutic-to-toxic window and are frequently prescribed to CKD and ESRD patients. In this review, we discuss mechanisms by which hypothyroidism adversely affects cardiovascular health; examine the prognostic implications of hypothyroidism, thyroid hormone alterations and exogenous thyroid hormone replacement in CKD and ESRD; and identify areas of uncertainty related to the interplay between hypothyroidism, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease requiring further investigation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  13. Thyroid functional disease: an under-recognized cardiovascular risk factor in kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Connie M.; Brent, Gregory A.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Soldin, Offie P.; Nguyen, Danh; Budoff, Matthew J.; Brunelli, Steven M.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid functional disease, and in particular hypothyroidism, is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. In the general population, hypothyroidism is associated with impaired cardiac contractility, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and possibly higher cardiovascular mortality. It has been hypothesized that hypothyroidism is an under-recognized, modifiable risk factor for the enormous burden of cardiovascular disease and death in CKD and ESRD, but this has been difficult to test due to the challenge of accurate thyroid functional assessment in uremia. Low thyroid hormone levels (i.e. triiodothyronine) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular sequelae in CKD and ESRD patients, but these metrics are confounded by malnutrition, inflammation and comorbid states, and hence may signify nonthyroidal illness (i.e. thyroid functional test derangements associated with underlying ill health in the absence of thyroid pathology). Thyrotropin is considered a sensitive and specific thyroid function measure that may more accurately classify hypothyroidism, but few studies have examined the clinical significance of thyrotropin-defined hypothyroidism in CKD and ESRD. Of even greater uncertainty are the risks and benefits of thyroid hormone replacement, which bear a narrow therapeutic-to-toxic window and are frequently prescribed to CKD and ESRD patients. In this review, we discuss mechanisms by which hypothyroidism adversely affects cardiovascular health; examine the prognostic implications of hypothyroidism, thyroid hormone alterations and exogenous thyroid hormone replacement in CKD and ESRD; and identify areas of uncertainty related to the interplay between hypothyroidism, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease requiring further investigation. PMID:24574542

  14. Antihypertensive Medication Use in Older Patients Transitioning from Chronic Kidney Disease to End-Stage Renal Disease on Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tara I; Zheng, Yuanchao; Montez-Rath, Maria E; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2016-08-08

    The transition from CKD to ESRD can be particularly unstable, with high rates of death and hospitalizations. Few studies have examined medication use during this critical period. We examined patterns of antihypertensive medication use from the four quarters before and eight quarters after incident ESRD treated with maintenance dialysis. We used the US Renal Data System to identify patients aged ≥67 years initiating dialysis for ESRD between January 2008 and December 2010 with Medicare Part D and a low-income subsidy. We ascertained the incidence of AKI and hyperkalemia during each quarter on the basis of having at least 1 payment claim for the condition. We used Poisson regression with robust SEMs to formally test for changes in the trend and level of antihypertensive medication use in a series of intervention analyses. The number of antihypertensive drugs used increased as patients neared ESRD, peaking at an average of 3.4 in the quarter immediately preceding dialysis initiation, then declining to 2.2 medications by 2 years later. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin II receptor blocker use was stable at approximately 40%, even among patients with coronary disease and systolic heart failure, and did not correlate with AKI or hyperkalemia. Dialysis initiation was associated with a 40% (95% confidence interval, 38% to 43%) lower adjusted level of diuretic use, which continued to decline after ESRD. Three- and four-drug combinations that included a diuretic were most common before ESRD, whereas after ESRD, one- and two-drug β-blocker or calcium-channel blocker-based combinations were most common. The use of antihypertensive medications, particularly angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin II receptor blockers and diuretics, may be suboptimal during the transition from CKD to ESRD, especially in patients with coronary disease or systolic heart failure. Future studies are needed to identify strategies to increase the appropriate use of

  15. Addressing cardiovascular disease in patients with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Crook, Errol D; Washington, David O

    2002-01-01

    It is well-established that patients with renal disease are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) death. Despite better understanding of CVD in endstage renal disease (ESRD) patients and more rigid guidelines addressing the major risk factors for CVD in this population, CVD continues to be the number one cause of death in patients with ESRD. Moreover, higher rates of CVD are seen in patients with moderate, and even mild, renal dysfunction and in patients with albuminuria (micro and macroscopic). Few studies with CVD endpoints have included patients with renal disease. There is sufficient evidence to support appropriate blood pressure reduction as having a beneficial effect on CVD morbidity and mortality in patients with renal disease (especially for patients with diabetes). Data supporting the benefit of modification of other CVD risk factors is not as strong, but current recommendations do stress aggressive control of lipids, smoking cessation, and maintenance of adequate nutritional status. Inclusion of patients with renal disease in studies with CVD endpoints is necessary. Until then, it is generally recommended that CVD risk stratification and modification strategies be applied to this high-risk population.

  16. Depressive symptoms and dietary nonadherence in patients with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis: a review of quantitative evidence.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Amani Anwar; Frazier, Susan K

    2010-05-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who receive hemodialysis have high rates of psychosocial distress and nonadherence to diet prescription. The purpose of this study was to examine the quantitative research evidence about the effect of depressive symptoms on dietary adherence. A systematic search of the literature using MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycINFO databases was performed for quantitative research studies. Forty-four studies met inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Nearly all studies supported an association between depressive symptoms and dietary adherence in patients with ESRD. Depressive symptoms were associated with dietary nonadherence in patients with ESRD.

  17. Serum β-Trace Protein and β2-Microglobulin as Predictors of ESRD, Mortality, and Cardiovascular Disease in Adults With CKD in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Meredith C.; Coresh, Josef; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Xie, Dawei; Levey, Andrew S.; Nelson, Robert G.; Eckfeldt, John H.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Schelling, Jeffrey; Simonson, Michael; Sondheimer, James H.; Anderson, Amanda Hyre; Akkina, Sanjeev; Feldman, Harold I.; Kusek, John W.; Ojo, Akinlolu O.; Inker, Lesley A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Serum β-trace protein (BTP) and β2-microglobulin (B2M) are independently associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and mortality in the general population and high-risk groups with diabetes or advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Less is known about their associations with outcomes and predictive ability in adults with moderate CKD. Study Design Prospective cohort study. Setting & Participants 3613 adults from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study (45% women; mean age, 57.9 years; 41.0% non-Hispanic black; 51.9% with diabetes). Predictors BTP and B2M with a reciprocal transformation to reflect their associations with filtration, creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFRcr), measured GFR (mGFR) and a 4-marker composite score combining BTP, B2M, creatinine, and cystatin C. Predictors were standardized as z scores for comparisons across filtration markers. Outcomes ESRD, all-cause mortality, and new-onset cardiovascular disease. Results: Over a six-year median follow-up, 755 (21%) participants developed ESRD, 653 died, and 292 developed new-onset cardiovascular disease. BTP, B2M, and the 4-marker composite were independent predictors of ESRD and all-cause mortality, and B2M and the 4-marker composite of cardiovascular events, after multivariable adjustment. These associations were stronger than those observed for eGFRcr (p vs. eGFRcr ≤0.02). The 4-marker composite led to improvements in the C statistic and 2.5 year risk reclassification beyond eGFRcr for all outcomes. Limitations Filtration markers measured at one time point; mGFR available in subset of cohort. Conclusions BTP and B2M may contribute additional risk information beyond eGFRcr and the use of multiple-markers may improve risk prediction beyond this well-established marker of kidney function among persons with moderate CKD. PMID:26948990

  18. High risk of ESRD in type 1 diabetes: New strategies are needed to retard progressive renal function decline

    PubMed Central

    Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2012-01-01

    Care of patients with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) has changed during the last 30 years. Tools to control glycemia have improved and it was demonstrated that improvement in glycemic control diminished the risk of late diabetic complications, including nephropathy. Moreover, in patients with impaired renal function, aggressive treatment of hypertension and reno-protective blockade of the renin-angiotensin system were shown to postpone end-stage renal disease (ESRD), albeit for a short while. Despite these achievements, the incidence of ESRD due to T1D in the US population has not decreased but rather has increased over the last 20 years, although it now occurs at slightly older ages. This state of affairs is a call to action. This should begin with adopting a new model of diabetic nephropathy in humans. In that model, instead of microalbuminuria or proteinuria, the focus should be on diagnosis and treatment of progressive renal function decline that leads to ESRD. Such a model has received significant support in clinical and epidemiological studies. Investigation of mechanisms of such progressive renal function decline should help in the identification of new therapeutic targets and the development of new interventions. To evaluate these interventions, accurate diagnostic algorithms are needed so T1D patients will be stratified according to time to onset to ESRD. Consistent with concepts of personalized medicine, the new interventions should be tailored to and evaluated in patients predicted to have rapid, moderate or even slow progression to ESRD. PMID:23062980

  19. Patients with end-stage renal disease were at an increased risk of hospitalization for acute diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Huang, Nicole; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) show a high incidence of bacterial translocation and impaired gastrointestinal motility. The intestinal tract is believed to be the most crucial source of translocated bacteria. To evaluate the risk of colonic diverticulitis in patients with ESRD, we conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study. Patients who met the following 3 criteria were defined as patients with ESRD: patients diagnosed with ESRD who received regular hemodialysis between 2000 and 2005, patients who received hemodialysis for more than 90% of the time during the observation period (2000–2011), and patients with no prior history of hemodialysis between 1997 and 1999. We matched every patient with ESRD with 1 matched control on the basis of propensity scores. The first diagnosis of diverticulitis (ICD-9-CM codes 562.11 and 562.13) within the follow-up period was defined as the primary endpoint. Hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the patients in the control group as the reference. We included 32,547 and 32,547 patients in the ESRD and matched control cohorts, respectively. The 12-year cumulative incidence of acute colonic diverticulitis for patients with ESRD was significantly higher than that for the controls (P < 0.001). After adjustment for age, sex, comorbidities, and medication use, the HR of acute colonic diverticulitis in the ESRD cohort was 11.20 times greater than that in the control cohort (95% CI: 8.14–15.42). The results indicated that patients with ESRD are at an increased risk for acute colonic diverticulitis. PMID:27684821

  20. Improving adequacy of hemodialysis in Northern California ESRD patients: a final project report. Provider Participants and Medical Review Board of the TransPacific Renal Network.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Josephson, M

    2000-10-01

    The National Core Indicators Project, initiated in 1994, has brought progressive changes in adequacy of dialysis for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients in the TransPacific Renal Network and across the United States. The 1998 Core Indicator Project showed each Network's standing for percentage of patients with urea reduction ratio (URR) > or = 0.65 and average URR. The TransPacific Renal Network ranked 12(th) among the 18 Networks for this adequacy measure. The goals of this project were to improve the Network standing in the United States for the percent of patients with URR > or = 0.65, eliminate or reduce the barriers to achieving adequate dialysis, and evaluate URR versus KT/V data and the variances occurring with these measures. In January 1999, data were collected from all 113 Northern California hemodialysis facilities for quarter 4, 1998, to evaluate adequacy. Each facility provided patient population (N) for KT/V and URR samples, facility averages for KT/V and URR, number of patients with KT/V > or = 1.2 and URR > or = 0.65, and data on post-blood-urea-nitrogen (BUN) sampling methods. A random selection of 10% (12) providers with data below the US and Network standards was selected for an intensive assessment. Using baseline measurements, on-site data were collected from a random selection of the patient population. Chart data were reviewed, analyzed, and discussed in an exit interview with the facility management. On-site visits were performed in July/June 1999. The primary focus included adequacy data and process of care that affect adequacy outcomes, concurrent review of patients receiving treatment at the time of the site visit, and general medical record review. In Phase I, only 12 facilities showed an average URR below 0.65. All facilities reported an average KT/V greater than the DOQI target of 1.2. Forty-two facilities had their percentage of patients with a URR below the national benchmark; only 18 facilities had their percentage of patients

  1. The economics of end-stage renal disease care in Canada: incentives and impact on delivery of care.

    PubMed

    Manns, Braden J; Mendelssohn, David C; Taub, Kenneth J

    2007-09-01

    Examining international differences in health outcomes for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients requires an understanding of ESRD funding structures. In Canada, funding for all aspects of dialysis and transplant care, with the exception of drugs (for which supplementary insurance can be purchased), is provided for all citizens. Although ESRD programs across Canada's 10 provinces differ in funding structure, they share important economic characteristics, including being publicly funded and universal, and providing most facets of ESRD care for free. This paper explains how ESRD care fits into the Canadian health care system, describes the epidemiology of ESRD in Canada, and offers economic explanations for international discrepancies.

  2. Association of Serum Phosphate and Related Factors in ESRD-Related Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Cai-Mei; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Wu, Chia-Chao; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Lin, Yuh-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Vascular calcification is common in ESRD patients and is important in increasing mortality from cardiovascular complications in these patients. Hyperphosphatemia related to chronic kidney disease is increasingly known as major stimulus for vascular calcification. Hyperphosphatemia and vascular calcification become popular discussion among nephrologist environment more than five decades, and many researches have been evolved. Risk factors for calcification are nowadays focused for the therapeutic prevention of vascular calcification with the hope of reducing cardiovascular complications. PMID:21660259

  3. High Prevalence of Sickle Cell Trait in African Americans with ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, Patrick H.; Key, Nigel S.; Ansede, Heather; Falk, Ronald J.; Kshirsagar, Abhijit V.

    2010-01-01

    Sickle cell trait (HbAS) associates with impaired urinary concentration, hematuria, and renal papillary necrosis, but its prevalence among African Americans with ESRD is unknown. We performed a cross-sectional study reviewing available hemoglobin phenotypes for 188 of 206 adult African-American patients receiving renal replacement therapy in four dialysis units. Results from the state newborn screening program in corresponding counties provided the local population prevalence of sickle trait among African Americans. Compared with the general African-American population, HbAS was twice as common among African Americans with ESRD (15% versus 7%, P < 0.001). Prevalence of hemoglobin C trait (HbAC) was similarly more common (5% versus 2%, P < 0.01). The higher prevalence of HbAS and HbAC in the ESRD population raises the possibility that these hemoglobinopathies contribute to a decline in kidney function, either alone or in conjunction with other known risk factors for renal disease. The potential effect of HbAS on the development and progression of CKD and its effect on the course and management of patients with ESRD deserve further study. PMID:20056747

  4. Predictors of renal and patient outcomes in atheroembolic renal disease: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro; Pola, Alessandra; Guerini, Simona; Zubani, Roberto; Movilli, Ezio; Savoldi, Silvana; Malberti, Fabio; Maiorca, Rosario

    2003-06-01

    Atheroembolic renal disease (AERD) is part of a multisystemic disease accompanied by high cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality. Interrelationships between traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, vascular comorbidities, precipitating factors, and markers of clinical severity of the disease in determining outcome remain poorly understood. Patients with AERD presenting to a single center between 1996 and 2002 were followed-up with prospective collection of clinical and biochemical data. The major outcomes included end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. Ninety-five patients were identified (81 male). AERD was iatrogenic in 87%. Mean age was 71.4 yr. Twenty-three patients (24%) developed ESRD; 36 patients (37.9%) died. Cox regression analysis showed that significant independent predictors of ESRD were long-standing hypertension (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.1; P < 0.001) and preexisting chronic renal impairment (HR = 2.12; P = 0.02); use of statins was independently associated with decreased risk of ESRD (HR = 0.02; P = 0.003). Age (HR = 1.09; P = 0.009), diabetes (HR = 2.55; P = 0.034), and ESRD (HR = 2.21; P = 0.029) were independent risk factors for patient mortality; male gender was independently associated with decreased risk of death (HR = 0.27; P = 0.007). Cardiovascular comorbidities, precipitating factors, and clinical severity of AERD had no prognostic impact on renal and patient survival. It is concluded that AERD has a strong clinical impact on patient and renal survival. The study clearly shows the importance of preexisting chronic renal impairment in determining both renal and patient outcome, this latter being mediated by the development of ESRD. The protective effect of statins on the development of ESRD should be evaluated in a prospective study.

  5. 75 FR 49029 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ...This final rule implements a case-mix adjusted bundled prospective payment system (PPS) for Medicare outpatient end-stage renal disease (ESRD) dialysis facilities beginning January 1, 2011 (ESRD PPS), in compliance with the statutory requirement of the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act (MIPPA), enacted July 15, 2008. This ESRD PPS also replaces the current basic case-mix adjusted composite payment system and the methodologies for the reimbursement of separately billable outpatient ESRD services.

  6. [Recommendations of the Ethics Committee of the Chilean Society of Nephrology for the management of ethical problems in adult end stage renal disease patients].

    PubMed

    Vukusich, Antonio; Catoni, María Isabel; Salas, Sofía P; Valdivieso, Andrés; Roessler, Emilio

    2014-03-01

    There are different approaches to treat patients with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD): hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, renal transplantation and conservative medical management. The choice of the best therapy for each patient, needs both clinical and ethical skills. The Ethics Committee of the Chilean Society of Nephrology has elaborated recommendations to help health workers to deal with the ethical and clinical problems related to patients suffering ESRD. Its goal is to guide, at a national level, the effective use of minimal standards in the treatment and care of patients with ESRD, including appropriate care and information for patients, therapy selection, management of difficult cases and potential conflicts.

  7. Time trends in the association of ESRD incidence with area-level poverty in the US population.

    PubMed

    Garrity, Bridget H; Kramer, Holly; Vellanki, Kavitha; Leehey, David; Brown, Julia; Shoham, David A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the temporal trends of the association between area-level poverty status and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) incidence. We hypothesized that the association between area-level poverty status and ESRD incidence has increased significantly over time. Patient data from the United States Renal Data System were linked with data from the 2000 and 2010 US census. Area-level poverty was defined as living in a zip code-defined area with ≥20% of households living below the federal poverty line. Negative binomial regression models were created to examine the association between area-level poverty status and ESRD incidence by time period in the US adult population while simultaneously adjusting for the distribution of age, sex, and race/ethnicity within a zip code. Time was categorized as January 1, 1995 through December 31, 2004 (Period 1) and January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2010 (Period 2). The percentage of adults initiating dialysis with area-level poverty increased from 27.4% during Period 1 to 34.0% in Period 2. After accounting for the distribution of age, sex, and race/ethnicity within a zip code, area-level poverty status was associated with a 1.24 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22, 1.25)-fold higher ESRD incidence. However, this association differed by time period with 1.04-fold (95% CI 1.02, 1.05) higher ESRD incidence associated with poverty status for Period 2 compared with the association between ESRD and poverty status in Period 1. Area-level poverty and its association with ESRD incidence is not static over time. © 2015 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  8. Validation of chronic kidney disease risk categorization system in Chinese patients with kidney disease: A cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyan; Lv, Jicheng; Li, Haixia; Jiao, Lili; Yang, Hongyun; Song, Yinan; Xu, Guobin

    2015-12-01

    To validate the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines risk stratification system based on the combination of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and proteinuria. This was a cohort study. A total of 1219 study population were recruited. Estimated GFR and proteinuria measured by using 24 h urine protein excretion rate (PER) were predictors. Adverse outcomes included all-cause mortality (ACM) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Follow-up was done by regular visit, telephone interview and electronic medical records. Over a median follow-up of 4.6 years, 153 (12.6%) and 43 (3.5%) patients experienced ESRD and ACM, respectively. On multivariable analysis, the adjusted hazard ratio for ESRD and ACM (compared with patients with eGFR > 60 mL/min per 1.7  m²) was of 29.8 and 3.6 for those with eGFR of 15-29 mL/min per 1.73 m², respectively. The adjusted hazard ratio for ESRD and ACM (compared with patients with PER < 150 mg/24h) was of 15.9 and 3.9 for those with PER > 500 mg/24h. Higher KDIGO guidelines risk categories (indicating lower eGFR or higher proteinuria) were associated with a graded increase in the risk for the ESRD (P < 0.001) and ACM (P < 0.001). Reclassification of KDIGO guidelines risk categories yielded net reclassification improvements for those with ESRD or ACM event (NRIevents ) of 33.3% or 30.2%. Lower eGFR and higher proteinuria are risk factors for ESRD and ACM in Chinese patients. The KDIGO guidelines risk categorization system assigned patients who went on to have the event to more appropriate CKD risk categories. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  9. Preeclampsia and ESRD: The Role of Shared Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Kattah, Andrea G; Scantlebury, Dawn C; Agarwal, Sanket; Mielke, Michelle M; Rocca, Walter A; Weaver, Amy L; Vaughan, Lisa E; Miller, Virginia M; Weissgerber, Tracey L; White, Wendy; Garovic, Vesna D

    2017-04-01

    Several registry-based studies, using diagnostic codes, have suggested that preeclampsia is a risk factor for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, because the 2 diseases share risk factors, the true nature of their association remains uncertain. Our goals were to conduct a population-based study to determine the magnitude of the association between preeclampsia and ESRD and evaluate the role of shared risk factors. Population-based nested case-control study. The US Renal Data System was used to identify women with ESRD from a cohort of 34,581 women who gave birth in 1976 to 2010 in Olmsted County, MN. 44 cases of ESRD were identified and each one was matched to 2 controls based on year of birth (±1 year), age at first pregnancy (±2 years), and parity (±1 or ≥4). Preeclamptic pregnancy, confirmed by medical record review. ESRD. Prepregnancy serum creatinine and urine protein measurements were recorded. Comorbid conditions existing prior to pregnancy were abstracted from medical records and included kidney disease, obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. There was evidence of kidney disease prior to the first pregnancy in 9 of 44 (21%) cases and 1 of 88 (<1%) controls. Per chart review, 8 of 44 (18%) cases versus 4 of 88 (5%) controls had preeclamptic pregnancies (unadjusted OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.21-13.28). Results were similar after independent adjustment for race, education, diabetes, and hypertension prior to pregnancy. However, the association was attenuated and no longer significant after adjustment for obesity (OR, 3.25; 95% CI, 0.93-11.37). The limited number of ESRD cases and missing data for prepregnancy kidney function. Our findings confirm that there is a sizable association between preeclampsia and ESRD; however, obesity is a previously unexplored confounder. Pre-existing kidney disease was common, but not consistently coded or diagnosed. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. BP Control and Long-Term Risk of ESRD and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Ku, Elaine; Gassman, Jennifer; Appel, Lawrence J; Smogorzewski, Miroslaw; Sarnak, Mark J; Glidden, David V; Bakris, George; Gutiérrez, Orlando M; Hebert, Lee A; Ix, Joachim H; Lea, Janice; Lipkowitz, Michael S; Norris, Keith; Ploth, David; Pogue, Velvie A; Rostand, Stephen G; Siew, Edward D; Sika, Mohammed; Tisher, C Craig; Toto, Robert; Wright, Jackson T; Wyatt, Christina; Hsu, Chi-Yuan

    2017-02-01

    We recently showed an association between strict BP control and lower mortality risk during two decades of follow-up of prior participants in the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) trial. Here, we determined the risk of ESRD and mortality during extended follow-up of the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) trial. We linked 1067 former AASK participants with CKD previously randomized to strict or usual BP control (mean arterial pressure ≤92 mmHg or 102-107 mmHg, respectively) to the US Renal Data System and Social Security Death Index; 397 patients had ESRD and 475 deaths occurred during a median follow-up of 14.4 years from 1995 to 2012. Compared with the usual BP arm, the strict BP arm had unadjusted and adjusted relative risks of ESRD of 0.92 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.75 to 1.12) and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.78 to 1.16; P=0.64), respectively, and unadjusted and adjusted relative risks of death of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.77 to 1.10) and 0.81 (95% CI, 0.68 to 0.98; P=0.03), respectively. In meta-analyses of individual-level data from the MDRD and the AASK trials, unadjusted relative risk of ESRD was 0.88 (95% CI, 0.78 to 1.00) and unadjusted relative risk of death was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.76 to 0.99) for strict versus usual BP arms. Our findings suggest that, during long-term follow-up, strict BP control does not delay the onset of ESRD but may reduce the relative risk of death in CKD.

  11. Oral mucosa symptoms, signs and lesions, in end stage renal disease and non-end stage renal disease diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa García, Estela; Mondragón Padilla, Arnoldo; Aranda Romo, Saray; Bustamante Ramírez, Martha Alicia

    2006-11-01

    To assess oral signs, symptoms and oral lesions (OL) type and prevalence, in diabetic patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD DM), and compare them with analogous findings in a non-ESRD DM group; analyze the possible association between oral manifestations, as well as with relevant laboratory findings. Research design. Two adult groups were studied: Group A: ESRD DM on dialysis, and group B: non-ESRD DM (serum creatinine <2.0 mg/dl). Known DM evolution time, dialysis treatment type and duration, and laboratory results were recorded. An oral exam was performed, searching for signs, symptoms and ESRD-associated OL. Associations were analyzed using Chi square, Fisher s exact test, and odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals. Ages, time on dialysis, and laboratory results were compared with Student s t test. 229 individuals were examined, group A 99, and group B 130 pts. Signs and symptoms prevalence was higher in group A: 77.8% vs. 57.6%, (P<0.001), uremic breath (48.5%), unpleasant taste (45.5%) and xerostomia (44.4%) being the most frequent ones. OL were also more prevalent in group A; 65.6% vs. 36.9% (P<0.001). The most frequent OL were dry, fissured lips (28.3%), saburral tongue (18.2%) and candidiasis (17.2%). No difference was found in candidiasis prevalence between groups. Candidiasis was found associated to xerostomia (P<0.05) and smooth tongue (P<0.05) only in group A. ESRD DM patients had a significantly higher prevalence of signs, symptoms and OLs, as compared to non-ESRD DM pts. The high prevalence of uremic fetor, xerostomia, saburral tongue and candidiasis in group A, could be tried as warning signs on the possibility of non diagnosed advanced renal disease in other diabetic patients.

  12. Latency for cytomegalovirus impacts T cell ageing significantly in elderly end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Langerak, A W; Baan, C C; Litjens, N H R; Betjes, M G H

    2016-11-01

    The number of elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has increased significantly during the last decade. Elderly ESRD patients are vulnerable to infectious complications because of an aged immune system. Additional immunological ageing effects may be derived from the uraemic environment and cytomegalovirus (CMV) latency. Elderly patients may be affected by these factors in particular, but data in this age group are limited. To assess the degree of immunological ageing and proliferative capacity of T lymphocytes, 49 elderly ESRD patients (defined as aged ≥ 65 years) on the renal transplantation waiting list were recruited and compared to 44 elderly healthy individuals (HI), matched for age and CMV serostatus. CMV latency was associated with more highly differentiated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in both elderly HI and patients. Elderly CMV seropositive ESRD patients showed a substantial reduction in the number of naive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells compared with age- and CMV serostatus-matched HI. Elderly ESRD patients also showed significantly decreased numbers of central memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells compared with HI, independently of CMV serostatus. In addition, thymic output and relative telomere length of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were decreased in CMV seropositive ESRD patients compared with HI. The proliferative capacity of T cells was similar for patients and HI. Elderly ESRD patients have an advanced aged T cell compartment when compared to age-matched healthy controls, which is driven mainly by CMV latency. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  13. High density lipoprotein (HDL) particles from end-stage renal disease patients are defective in promoting reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Josephine L.C.; Gautier, Thomas; Nijstad, Niels; Tölle, Markus; Schuchardt, Mirjam; van der Giet, Markus; Tietge, Uwe J.F.

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the largest cause of mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). CVD in ESRD is not explained by classical CVD risk factors such as HDL cholesterol mass levels making functional alterations of lipoproteins conceivable. HDL functions in atheroprotection by promoting reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), comprising cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells, uptake into hepatocytes and final excretion into the feces. ESRD-HDL (n = 15) were compared to healthy control HDL (n = 15) for their capacity to promote in vitro (i) cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophage foam cells and (ii) SR-BI-mediated selective uptake into ldla[SR-BI] cells as well as (iii) in vivo RCT. Compared with HDL from controls, ESRD-HDL displayed a significant reduction in mediating cholesterol efflux (p < 0.001) and SR-BI-mediated selective uptake (p < 0.01), two key steps in RCT. Consistently, also the in vivo capacity of ESRD-HDL to promote RCT when infused into wild-type mice was significantly impaired (p < 0.01). In vitro oxidation of HDL from healthy controls with hypochloric acid was able to fully mimic the impaired biological activities of ESRD-HDL. In conclusion, we demonstrate that HDL from ESRD patients is dysfunctional in key steps as well as overall RCT, likely due to oxidative modification. PMID:28148911

  14. High density lipoprotein (HDL) particles from end-stage renal disease patients are defective in promoting reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Josephine L C; Gautier, Thomas; Nijstad, Niels; Tölle, Markus; Schuchardt, Mirjam; van der Giet, Markus; Tietge, Uwe J F

    2017-02-02

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the largest cause of mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). CVD in ESRD is not explained by classical CVD risk factors such as HDL cholesterol mass levels making functional alterations of lipoproteins conceivable. HDL functions in atheroprotection by promoting reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), comprising cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells, uptake into hepatocytes and final excretion into the feces. ESRD-HDL (n = 15) were compared to healthy control HDL (n = 15) for their capacity to promote in vitro (i) cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophage foam cells and (ii) SR-BI-mediated selective uptake into ldla[SR-BI] cells as well as (iii) in vivo RCT. Compared with HDL from controls, ESRD-HDL displayed a significant reduction in mediating cholesterol efflux (p < 0.001) and SR-BI-mediated selective uptake (p < 0.01), two key steps in RCT. Consistently, also the in vivo capacity of ESRD-HDL to promote RCT when infused into wild-type mice was significantly impaired (p < 0.01). In vitro oxidation of HDL from healthy controls with hypochloric acid was able to fully mimic the impaired biological activities of ESRD-HDL. In conclusion, we demonstrate that HDL from ESRD patients is dysfunctional in key steps as well as overall RCT, likely due to oxidative modification.

  15. National Assessment of Hospitalization Rates for Incident End-Stage Renal Disease After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Nathan P; Schaubel, Douglas E; Smith, Abigail R; Merion, Robert M; Sharma, Pratima

    2016-10-01

    We examined the association of incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD) after liver transplantation (LT) and resource utilization using a data linkage between the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients and claims data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The study cohort consisted of patients aged ≥18 years who underwent deceased donor LT between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2010, with Medicare as primary or secondary insurance and were discharged alive from the index LT hospitalization (n = 7019). The association of ESRD and post-LT hospitalization was assessed by sequential stratification, which entailed prognostic score matching of ESRD-free patients to each LT recipient at ESRD onset. The prognostic score was developed from a model of time to hospitalization and included baseline factors and hospitalization history as predictors. The overall hospitalization rates for LT recipients with and without ESRD were 2.7 and 1.1 per patient-year at risk, respectively. The total number of days hospitalized patient per year was 23 in ESRD and 7 in non-ESRD LT recipients. The adjusted post-LT hospitalization rate was 97% higher after reaching ESRD compared to non-ESRD (hazard ratio, 1.97; P < 0.0001). Hospitalization rates increased significantly for LT recipients after ESRD onset. Early risk factor modification efforts targeting patients who are at high ESRD risk may reduce post-LT ESRD incidence and hence decrease morbidity and cost among LT recipients.

  16. Behavioural research in patients with end-stage renal disease: a review and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Kaptein, Ad A; van Dijk, Sandra; Broadbent, Elizabeth; Falzon, Louise; Thong, Melissa; Dekker, Friedo W

    2010-10-01

    To suggest a behavioural research agenda for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) based on a concise review of seven stages of psychosocial research, a literature review, and current behavioural research in other chronic somatic diseases. Historical behavioural ESRD research was classified. The specialized register of the Cochrane Behavioral Medicine Field was also checked, and additional papers were selected by screening reference lists and related behavioural science journals, to identify promising areas for future research. The top-five topics identified via the literature search pertain to (1) psychological aspects and interventions, (2) adaptation, coping, and depression, (3) exercise, (4) counseling and education, and (5) compliance. 'Illness and treatment beliefs', 'sexuality', 'suicide', 'family support', and 'self-management interventions', were identified on the basis of research in other chronic illnesses as topics for future research. Regarding theory, the Common-Sense Model (CSM) was judged to offer useful theoretical perspectives; regarding methods, qualitative methods can be a valuable addition to quantitative research methods. Illness beliefs, treatment beliefs, and self-management behaviours are promising concepts in the assessment and clinical care of ESRD-patients. Cognitive-behavioural treatments appear to have potential and should be specified and elaborated for specific categories and problems of ESRD-patients. This research agenda is in line with moves towards patient-centred disease-management to improve the quality of medical care for ESRD-patients. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prognostic importance of ambulatory blood pressure recordings in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, R; Andersen, M J

    2006-04-01

    Ambulatory systolic blood pressure (BP) correlates better with risk factors for progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) compared to clinic measured BP, but its role in predicting end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death in patients with CKD is unknown. In a cohort study of 217 Veterans with CKD BP was measured by ambulatory monitoring and in the clinic. Twenty-four hour ambulatory BP was 133.5 +/- 16.6/73.1 +/- 11.1 mm Hg and clinic BP was 155.2 +/- 25.6/84.7 +/- 14.2 mm Hg. The composite renal end point of ESRD or death over a median follow-up of 3.5 years occurred in 75 patients (34.5%), death occurred in 52 patients (24.0%), and ESRD in 36/178 patients (20.2%). Thirty-nine patients died before reaching ESRD. One standard deviation (s.d.) increase in systolic BP increased the risk of composite outcome to 1.69 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32-2.17) for standard clinic measurement and to 1.88 (95% CI 1.48-2.39) for 24 h ambulatory BP recording. One s.d. increase in 24 h ambulatory systolic BP increased the risk of ESRD to 3.04 (95% CI 2.13-4.35) and to 2.20 (95% CI 1.43-3.39) when adjusted for standard clinic systolic BP. Non-dipping was associated with increased risk of total mortality and composite end point. In patients with CKD, BPs obtained by ambulatory monitoring are a stronger predictor of ESRD or death compared to BPs obtained in the clinic. Systolic ambulatory BP and nondipping are independent predictors for ESRD after adjusting for clinic BP. However, adjustment for other risk factors for CKD progression removes the independent prognostic value of ambulatory BP.

  18. Patients with end stage renal disease: a registry at Sultanah Aminah Hospital, Johor Bahru, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Liu, W J; Hooi, L S

    2007-08-01

    The epidemiology of new patients presenting to Sultanah Aminah Hospital Johor Bahru (HSAJB) with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 2003 and 2004 was analysed. Patients with ESRD were prospectively registered in the renal replacement therapy (RRT) database in the nephrology unit. The incidence of ESRD and the RRT provision rate in the district of Johor Bahru were calculated according to gender and race. There were 306 new patients in 2003 and 299 in 2004. Diabetic nephropathy contributed 56.8% new patients in 2003 and 57.9% in 2004. The mean age was 50.8 + 15.1 years in 2003 and 51.3 + 14.2 years in 2004. Males accounted for 53.3% in 2003 and 47.8% in 2004. Haemodialysis was the commonest form of RRT (60.5% in 2003, 69.9% in 2004), followed by continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (30.1% in 2003, 19.4% in 2004) and renal transplantation (5.5% in 2003, 2.3% in 2004). Ninety-one percent of patients in 2003 and 90% in 2004 were alive at the end of the year they presented. The incidence of ESRD in the district of Johor Bahru was estimated as 136 per million population (p.m.p.) in 2003 and 151 p.m.p. in 2004. In the two year period the incidence of ESRD was higher among females (154 p.m.p.) than males (134 p.m.p.). Malays (194 p.m.p.) had higher ESRD incidence compared to Chinese (126 p.m.p.) and Indians (134 p.m.p.). RRT provision in Johor Bahru (92.7%) did not differ significantly with gender or race. The increasing number of patients presenting to HSAJB with ESRD especially those with diabetic nephropathy is a major concern. Prevention strategies at the primary care level may curb the burden of this chronic disease.

  19. The effect of altitude on dosing and response to erythropoietin in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Brookhart, M Alan; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Avorn, Jerry; Bradbury, Brian D; Rothman, Kenneth J; Fischer, Michael; Mehta, Jyotsna; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2008-07-01

    For poorly understood reasons, patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) differ substantially in their response to treatment with recombinant erythropoietin (EPO). Because hypoxia influences many of the biologic pathways involved in erythropoiesis, the altitude at which a patient lives may affect the dose-response relationship of EPO. In this retrospective cohort study, clinical data from 341,737 incident hemodialysis patients registered in the U.S. Renal Data System were combined with elevation data from the U.S. Geological Survey to address this question. Higher altitude was associated with smaller EPO doses and higher hematocrit levels. For example, compared with patients at sea level, patients living above 6000 ft received 19% less EPO (12.9 versus 15.9 thousand units/wk) but had hematocrit levels 1.1 points higher (35.7% versus 34.6%). These associations were found within subgroups defined by sex, race, age, calendar time, cause of ESRD, and dialysis center profit status, and persisted after adjustment for various potential confounding factors. Furthermore, resistance to EPO decreased with elevation. Our results suggest that ESRD patients living at high altitude either increase endogenous EPO production or respond better to endogenous and exogenous EPO.

  20. Near Normalization of Metabolic and Functional Features of the Central Nervous System in Type 1 Diabetic Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease After Kidney-Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fiorina, Paolo; Vezzulli, Paolo; Bassi, Roberto; Gremizzi, Chiara; Falautano, Monica; D’Addio, Francesca; Vergani, Andrea; Chabtini, Lola; Altamura, Erica; Mello, Alessandra; Caldara, Rossana; Scavini, Marina; Magnani, Giuseppe; Falini, Andrea; Secchi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The pathogenesis of brain disorders in type 1 diabetes (T1D) is multifactorial and involves the adverse effects of chronic hyperglycemia and of recurrent hypoglycemia. Kidney-pancreas (KP), but not kidney alone (KD), transplantation is associated with sustained normoglycemia, improvement in quality of life, and reduction of morbidity/mortality in diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The aim of our study was to evaluate with magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) the cerebral morphology and metabolism of 15 ESRD plus T1D patients, 23 patients with ESRD plus T1D after KD (n = 9) and KP (n = 14) transplantation, and 8 age-matched control subjects. RESULTS Magnetic resonance imaging showed a higher prevalence of cerebrovascular disease in ESRD plus T1D patients (53% [95% CI 36–69]) compared with healthy subjects (25% [3–6], P = 0.04). Brain 1H MRS showed lower levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)-to-choline ratio in ESRD plus T1D, KD, and KP patients compared with control subjects (control subjects vs. all, P < 0.05) and of NAA-to-creatine ratio in ESRD plus T1D compared with KP and control subjects (ESRD plus T1D vs. control and KP subjects, P ≤ 0.01). The evaluation of the most common scores of psychological and neuropsychological function showed a generally better intellectual profile in control and KP subjects compared with ESRD plus T1D and KD patients. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes and ESRD are associated with a precocious form of brain impairment, chronic cerebrovascular disease, and cognitive decline. In KP-transplanted patients, most of these features appeared to be near normalized after a 5-year follow-up period of sustained normoglycemia. PMID:22190674

  1. Infection-related hospitalization and risk of end-stage renal disease in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Hung; Hung, Peir-Haur; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Chen, Yann-Jang; Guo, How-Ran; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2017-10-01

    Infections are a major cause of morbidity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and may lead to death. No nationally representative study of patients with SLE has examined the rates of infection-related hospitalization and the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We conducted a nationwide cohort study of 7326 patients with newly diagnosed SLE and no history of ESRD. All data were from Taiwan's National Health Insurance claims database for the period 2000-11. Among all SLE patients, 316 (4.3%) developed ESRD (mean follow-up time: 8.1 years). Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that the risk of ESRD increased with the number of infection-related hospitalizations. For patients with three or more infection-related admissions, the hazard ratio (HR) for ESRD was 5.08 [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.74-6.90] relative to those with no infection-related admission. Analysis by type of infection indicated that bacteremia patients had the greatest risk for ESRD (HR: 4.82; 95% CI: 3.40-6.85). Analysis of age of SLE onset indicated that patients with juvenile-onset (<18 years) and three or more infection-related hospitalizations had a greatly increased risk for ESRD (HR: 14.49; 95% CI: 5.34-39.33). Infection-related hospitalizations are associated with a significantly increased risk of ESRD in patients with SLE, especially those with juvenile-onset SLE. Among patients with different types of infectious diseases, those with bacteremia were more likely to develop ESRD.

  2. Nitric oxide synthetic pathway and cGMP levels are altered in red blood cells from end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Natalia; Giardinelli, Annalisa; Sirolli, Vittorio; Riganti, Chiara; Di Tomo, Pamela; Gazzano, Elena; Di Silvestre, Sara; Panknin, Christina; Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Csonka, Csaba; Kelm, Malte; Ferdinandy, Péter; Bonomini, Mario; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-06-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) enzymatically produce nitric oxide (NO) by a functional RBC-nitric oxide synthase (RBC-NOS). NO is a vascular key regulatory molecule. In RBCs its generation is complex and influenced by several factors, including insulin, acetylcholine, and calcium. NO availability is reduced in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and associated with endothelial dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that, through increased phosphatidylserine membrane exposure, ESRD-RBCs augmented their adhesion to human cultured endothelium, in which NO bioavailability decreased. Since RBC-NOS-dependent NO production in ESRD is unknown, this study aimed to investigate RBC-NOS levels/activation, NO production/bioavailability in RBCs from healthy control subjects (C, N = 18) and ESRD patients (N = 27). Although RBC-NOS expression was lower in ESRD-RBCs, NO, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), RBC-NOS Serine1177 phosphorylation level and eNOS/Calmodulin (CaM)/Heat Shock Protein-90 (HSP90) interaction levels were higher in ESRD-RBCs, indicating increased enzyme activation. Conversely, following RBCs stimulation with insulin or ionomycin, NO and cGMP levels were significantly lower in ESRD- than in C-RBCs, suggesting that uremia might reduce the RBC-NOS response to further stimuli. Additionally, the activity of multidrug-resistance-associated protein-4 (MRP4; cGMP-membrane transporter) was significantly lower in ESRD-RBCs, suggesting a possible compromised efflux of cGMP across the ESRD-RBCs membrane. This study for the first time showed highest basal RBC-NOS activation in ESRD-RBCs, possibly to reduce the negative impact of decreased NOS expression. It is further conceivable that high NO production only partially affects cell function of ESRD-RBCs maybe because in vivo they are unable to respond to physiologic stimuli, such as calcium and/or insulin.

  3. Sociodemographic and Geographic Predictors of Quality of Care in United States Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease Due to Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Laura C.; Drenkard, Cristina; Patzer, Rachel E.; Klein, Mitchel; Kramer, Michael R.; Pastan, Stephen; Lim, S. Sam; McClellan, William M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe end-stage renal disease (ESRD) quality of care (receipt of pre-ESRD nephrology care, access to kidney transplantation, and placement of permanent vascular access for dialysis) in US patients with ESRD due to lupus nephritis (LN-ESRD) and to examine whether quality measures differ by patient sociodemographic characteristics or US region. Methods National surveillance data on patients in the US in whom treatment for LN-ESRD was initiated between July 2005 and September 2011 (n = 6,594) were analyzed. Odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were determined for each quality measure, according to sociodemographic factors and US region. Results Overall, 71% of the patients received nephrology care prior to ESRD. Black and Hispanic patients were less likely than white patients to receive pre-ESRD care (OR 0.73 [95% CI 0.63–0.85] and OR 0.73 [95% CI 0.60–0.88], respectively) and to be placed on the kidney transplant waitlist within the first year after the start of ESRD (HR 0.78 [95% CI 0.68–0.91] and HR 0.82 [95% CI 0.68–0.98], respectively). Those with Medicaid (HR 0.51 [95% CI 0.44–0.58]) or no insurance (HR 0.36 [95% CI 0.29–0.44]) were less likely than those with private insurance to be placed on the waitlist. Only 24% had a permanent vascular access, and placement was even less likely among the uninsured (OR 0.62 [95% CI 0.49–0.79]). ESRD quality-of-care measures varied 2–3-fold across regions of the US, with patients in the Northeast and Northwest generally having higher probabilities of adequate care. Conclusion LN-ESRD patients have suboptimal ESRD care, particularly with regard to placement of dialysis vascular access. Minority race/ethnicity and lack of private insurance are associated with inadequate ESRD care. Further studies are warranted to examine multilevel barriers to, and develop targeted interventions to improve delivery of, care among patients with LN-ESRD. PMID:25692867

  4. Pregnancy outcomes among renal transplant recipients and patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Saliem, Sara; Patenaude, Valerie; Abenhaim, Haim A

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of our study is to compare pregnancy outcomes between women with a functioning renal transplant and women with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We carried out a population-based retrospective cohort study using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2006 to 2011. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the age-adjusted effect of functioning renal transplant vs. ESRD requiring dialysis on pregnancy outcomes. We identified 264 birth records to women with a functional renal transplant and 267 birth records to women with ESRD on dialysis among 5,245,452 births. As compared to women with ESRD on dialysis, renal transplant recipients were less likely to have placental abruption [odds ratio, OR 0.23 (95% confidence interval, CI 0.08-0.70)], to receive blood transfusions [OR 0.17 (95% CI 0.09-0.30)], and to have growth-restricted and small-for-gestational-age babies [OR 0.45 (95% CI 0.23-0.85)]. Renal transplant recipients were more likely to have an instrumental delivery [OR 15.38 (95% CI 1.92-123.3)]. Among renal transplant women, there was a trend towards delivery by cesarean section as compared to patients with ESRD [OR 1.31 (95% CI 0.93-1.85)]. However, these results were not statistically significant. Fetal deaths were less likely to occur in women with a renal transplant [OR 0.41 (95% CI 0.17-0.96)]. There were four maternal deaths among patients with ESRD on dialysis and no maternal deaths among renal transplant patients. Patients with a functional renal graft had an overall lower rate of morbidity and adverse pregnancy complications when compared to patients with ESRD on dialysis.

  5. Increased risk of atrial fibrillation in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cheng-Huang; Zheng, Cai-Mei; Kiu, Kee-Thai; Chen, Hsin-An; Wu, Chia-Chang; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wang, Yuan-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients commonly have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases than general population. Chronic kidney disease is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF); however, little is known about the AF risk among ESRD patients with various modalities of renal replacement therapy. We used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database to determine the incident AF among peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) patients in Taiwan. Our ESRD cohort include Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 15,947 patients, who started renal replacement therapy between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2003. From the same data source, 47,841 controls without ESRD (3 subjects for each patient) were identified randomly and frequency matched by gender, age (±1 year), and the year of the study patient's index date for ESRD between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2003. During the follow-up period (mean duration: 8–10 years), 3428 individuals developed the new-onset AF. The incidence rate ratios for AF were 2.07 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.93–2.23) and 1.78 (95% CI = 1.30–2.44) in HD and PD groups, respectively. After we adjusted for age, gender, and comorbidities, the hazard ratios for the AF risk were 1.46 (95% CI = 1.32–1.61) and 1.32 (95% CI = 1.00–1.83) in HD and PD groups, respectively. ESRD patients with a history of certain comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have significantly increased risks of AF. This nationwide, population-based study suggests that incidence of AF is increased among dialysis ESRD patients. Furthermore, we have to pay more attention in clinical practice and long-term care for those ESRD patients with a history of certain comorbidities. PMID:27336884

  6. Captopril-induced sialadenitis in a patient with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahdiabadi, Fatemeh Musavi; Nikvarz, Naemeh

    2016-01-01

    Sialadenitis is a rare adverse effect of captopril. We report a case of captopril-induced sialadenitis in a patient with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A 20-year-old man with ESRD encountered parotid and submandibular swelling after receiving two doses of captopril, administered sublingually. Despite of prescribing dexamethasone, resuming hemodialysis, and discontinuing other drugs that also can cause parotitis, he improved later than what was reported in patients with normal renal function. In conclusion recovery from captopril-induced sialadenitis in patients with ESRD may be more prolonged than that of patients with normal renal function; moreover, early hemodialysis which helps in drug removal may be the most effective treatment. PMID:27162811

  7. Income-based disparities in outcomes for patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Garg, P P; Diener-West, M; Powe, N R

    2001-07-01

    The impact of income on outcomes for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), who are largely relieved of structural and financial barriers to care, is poorly understood. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 3,165 patients who developed ESRD in the early 1990s to examine whether low-income patients with ESRD have poorer health outcomes than their socioeconomically advantaged counterparts, and, if so, to determine whether greater health insurance can reduce this disparity. We found that increasing neighborhood income was associated with decreased mortality and an increased likelihood of placement on the renal transplant waiting list. The presence of private insurance coverage in addition to Medicare improved rates of listing for transplantation in a graded manner, with the greatest effect among those living in neighborhoods below the 10th percentile of income, but had no effect on socioeconomic disparities in mortality. Our results suggest that low-income patients with ESRD experience persistent financial barriers to transplantation that can be addressed with greater health benefits. However, they also experience higher mortality that is caused by personal and/or environmental factors that differ by social class. Clinicians, researchers, and policymakers must address these social, cultural, psychologic, and environmental determinants of health to improve the survival of patients with ESRD.

  8. 42 CFR 413.217 - Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... payment system. 413.217 Section 413.217 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.217 Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system. The following items...

  9. A comparison of quality of sleep between patients with chronic kidney disease not on hemodialysis and end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Salman T; Shafi, Tahir

    2017-11-01

    Few studies have compared quality of sleep between pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease (pre-dialysis CKD) patients and end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis (ESRD) and have found inconsistent results. Objective of this study is to compare quality of sleep between patients with pre-dialysis CKD and ESRD in a developing country. This study was conducted in an out-patient department and hemodialysis unit of a tertiary care facility. Patients included had either pre-dialysis CKD or ESRD. Assessment of quality of sleep was done using Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI). A total of 152 patients were included in the study. Out of these patients, 79 (52%) had ESRD and 73 (48%) had pre-dialysis CKD. Median PSQI score was 6 (IQR 3-8.8). Poor sleep quality (PSQI ≥5) was present in 100 (65.8%) patients. Only hemoglobin (β = -0.39, p < .01), depression (β = 0.56, p < .01) and history of cardiovascular disease (β = 0.22, p < .01) were associated with PSQI global score in a multiple linear regression analysis. There was no significant association between ESRD vs. pre-dialysis CKD and PSQI global scores and no significant co-relation between eGFR and global PSQI score (r = -0.34, p value .80) in pre-dialysis CKD patients. Poor sleep quality is common in patients with CKD including hemodialysis patients in a developing country, which is independent of kidney function in non-dialysis patients. There is no difference in quality of sleep between pre-dialysis CKD and ESRD patients.

  10. Imaging of Myocardial Fibrosis in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: Current Limitations and Future Possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Patel, A. S.; Marsh, A.-M.; McAdam, J.; McCann, G. P.; Burton, J. O.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is driven by a different set of processes than in the general population. These processes lead to pathological changes in cardiac structure and function that include the development of left ventricular hypertrophy and left ventricular dilatation and the development of myocardial fibrosis. Reduction in left ventricular hypertrophy has been the established goal of many interventional trials in patients with chronic kidney disease, but a recent systematic review has questioned whether reduction of left ventricular hypertrophy improves cardiovascular mortality as previously thought. The development of novel imaging biomarkers that link to cardiovascular outcomes and that are specific to the disease processes in ESRD is therefore required. Postmortem studies of patients with ESRD on hemodialysis have shown that the extent of myocardial fibrosis is strongly linked to cardiovascular death and accurate imaging of myocardial fibrosis would be an attractive target as an imaging biomarker. In this article we will discuss the current imaging methods available to measure myocardial fibrosis in patients with ESRD, the reliability of the techniques, specific challenges and important limitations in patients with ESRD, and how to further develop the techniques we have so they are sufficiently robust for use in future clinical trials. PMID:28349062

  11. Disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with end-stage renal disease: systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Patrícia; Santiago, Mittermayer B

    2012-06-01

    It is not unusual that patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) progress to terminal renal failure and subsequently require renal replacement therapy. Previous studies have shown that clinical and/or serological remission in patients with SLE is common in those who develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD). On the other hand, the persistence of lupus activity among patients undergoing long-term dialysis is not rare, either. The aim of this study is to define, by means of a systematic review, the course of SLE activity in patients who developed ESRD. Data were obtained through searches for articles in the MEDLINE (1966 to 2011), SCielo, and LILACS databases, using the following keywords: "chronic renal failure", "systemic lupus erythematosus", "end-stage renal disease", "lupus activity", "disease activity", "lupus flare", "hemodialysis", and "renal replacement therapy" and their corresponding translations in Portuguese. Twenty-four articles were found which evaluated the degree of lupus activity in patients with ESRD. Fifteen of these studies spoke of a substantial reduction of clinical and/or serological activity after the development of ESRD, while nine articles found that the amount of clinical and/or serological activity was similar to that of the phase prior to terminal renal failure, or it occurred in at least 50% of the patients studied. Although the majority of studies showed that lupus flares tend to decrease in frequency in patients who develop ESRD, in this scenario, one should be prepared to correctly diagnose a recurrence of the disease, as well as to perform appropriate therapy.

  12. Trends in anemia care in older patients approaching end-stage renal disease in the United States (1995-2010).

    PubMed

    Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Mitani, Aya A; Goldstein, Benjamin A; Brookhart, M Alan; Chertow, Glenn M

    2014-05-01

    Anemia is common in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. Whereas the treatment of anemia in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has attracted considerable attention, relatively little is known about patterns and trends in the anemia care received by patients before they start maintenance dialysis or undergo preemptive kidney transplantation. To determine the trends in anemia treatment received by Medicare beneficiaries approaching ESRD. Closed cohort study in the United States using national ESRD registry data (US Renal Data System) of patients 67 years or older who initiated maintenance dialysis or underwent preemptive kidney transplantation between 1995 and 2010. All eligible patients had uninterrupted Medicare (A+B) coverage for at least 2 years before ESRD. Time, defined as calendar year of incident ESRD. Use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA), intravenous iron supplements, and blood transfusions in the 2 years prior to ESRD; hemoglobin concentration at the time of ESRD. We used multivariable modified Poisson regression to estimate utilization prevalence ratios (PRs). Records of 466,803 patients were analyzed. The proportion of patients with incident ESRD receiving any ESA in the 2 years before increased from 3.2% in 1995 to a peak of 40.8% in 2007; thereafter, ESA use decreased modestly to 35.0% in 2010 (compared with 1995; PR, 9.85 [95% CI, 9.04-10.74]). Among patients who received an ESA, median time from first recorded ESA use to ESRD increased from 120 days in 1995 to 337 days in 2010. Intravenous iron administration increased from 1.2% (1995) to 12.3% (2010; PR, 9.20 [95% CI, 7.97-10.61]). The proportion of patients receiving any blood transfusions increased monotonically from 20.6% (1995) to 40.3% (2010; PR, 1.88 [95% CI, 1.82-1.95]). Mean hemoglobin concentrations were 9.5 g/dL in 1995, increased to a peak of 10.3 g/dL in 2006, and then decreased moderately to 9.9 g/dL in 2010. Between 1995 and 2010, older adults approaching

  13. Impact of dialysis modality on the survival of patients with end-stage renal disease and prior stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Kuan; Liang, Wen-Miin; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liu, Yao-Lung; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), 8-16 % had a history of stroke at dialysis initiation. We used the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan to evaluate whether peritoneal dialysis (PD) or hemodialysis (HD) confers a survival advantage for patients with incident ESRD and prior stroke. We identified 975 patients undergoing PD and 975 propensity score-matched patients with newly diagnosed ESRD and prior stroke undergoing HD between 2000 and 2010. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011. Comparisons of the risks of mortality between PD and HD were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. In the propensity score-matched cohorts, there was a 2.4 per 100 person-years greater mortality in patients with PD (20.4 vs. 18.0 per 100 person-years) with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.20 (95 % CI 1.06-1.36). For patients with diabetes, ESRD and prior stroke, patients undergoing PD had inferior survival compared with those undergoing HD (adjusted HR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.05-1.43), particularly among female patients (adjusted HR 1.55, 95 % CI 1.25-1.91). For patients with ESRD and prior stroke but without diabetes, there was no significant difference in mortality between PD and HD (adjusted HR 1.20, 95 % CI 0.96-1.50). PD was associated with overall poorer survival among patients with diabetes, ESRD and prior stroke and with similar overall survival among patients with ESRD and prior stroke, but without diabetes, compared with HD.

  14. Thrombophilia and Arteriovenous Fistula Survival in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Salmela, Birgitta; Hartman, Jari; Peltonen, Seija; Albäck, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives The role of thrombophilia in failing arteriovenous fistula (AVF) among patients with ESRD undergoing hemodialysis is not established. This study aimed to assess whether AVF primary patency is associated with thrombophilia and coagulation abnormalities. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This observational study screened 219 patients between 2002 and 2004 for thrombophilia before AVF surgery. Thrombophilia included factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations, protein C and antithrombin activities, and protein S. Coagulation abnormalities included high factor VIII:C, homocysteine, fibrinogen, and d-dimer levels; presence of antiphospholipid antibodies; and short thrombin time. We reviewed patient charts for comorbid conditions, AVF maturation and interventions, kidney transplantation, and patient survival (mean follow-up duration, 3.6 [range, 2.3–5.8] years). Primary patency from the AVF placement and functional primary patency from the first AVF cannulation were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results Thrombophilia was present in 9% of the patients, and coagulation abnormalities occurred in 77%. One-year primary patency was 68%; 46% of the AVF failures occurred before the initiation of hemodialysis. Female sex (hazard ratio [HR], 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7–4.1) and thrombophilia (HR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2–4.2) were independent risk factors for loss of primary patency. Thrombophilia mutations or low antithrombin level (HR, 3.8), female sex (HR, 2.5), and diabetes (HR, 1.9) were associated with shortened functional primary patency of AVF. Conclusions Against the background of frequent coagulation abnormalities, thrombophilia and female sex predispose patients with ESRD to access failure, mostly due to thrombosis or stenosis. PMID:23411429

  15. Association between lack of health insurance and risk of death and ESRD: results from the Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP).

    PubMed

    Jurkovitz, Claudine T; Li, Suying; Norris, Keith C; Saab, Georges; Bomback, Andrew S; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; McCullough, Peter A

    2013-04-01

    Uninsured adults in the United States have poor access to health care services and worse health outcomes than insured adults. Little is known about the association between lack of insurance and chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death in patients at high risk of kidney disease. We used 2000-2011 data from the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP) to examine this association. The study population included KEEP participants younger than 65 years. Outcomes were time to ESRD (chronic kidney failure treated by renal replacement therapy) and time to death. Incident ESRD was ascertained by linkage to the US Renal Data System, and vital status, by linkage to the Social Security Administration Death Master File. We used Cox proportional hazard regression to examine the association between insurance and risk of death or ESRD after adjusting for demographic variables. Of 86,588 participants, 27.8% had no form of insurance, 10.3% had public insurance, and 61.9% had private insurance; 15.0% had CKD (defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) or urine albumin-creatinine ratio ≥ 30 mg/g), 63.3% had hypertension, and 27.7% had diabetes. Of participants with CKD, 29.3% had no health insurance. Participants without insurance were younger, more likely to be Hispanic and to have 12 or fewer years of education, and less likely to have seen a physician in the past year. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, uninsured KEEP participants were 82% more likely than privately insured participants to die (HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.56-2.12; P < 0.001) and 72% more likely to develop ESRD (HR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.33-2.22; P < 0.001). The association between insurance and outcomes varied by CKD stage. Lack of insurance is an independent risk factor for early death and ESRD in this population at high risk of kidney disease. Considering the high morbidity and mortality and increasing cost

  16. Association Between Lack of Health Insurance and Risk of Death and ESRD: Results From the Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP)

    PubMed Central

    Jurkovitz, Claudine T.; Li, Suying; Norris, Keith C.; Saab, Georges; Bomback, Andrew S.; Whaley-Connell, Adam T.; McCullough, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Uninsured adults in the United States have poor access to health care services and worse health outcomes than insured adults. Little is known about the association between lack of insurance and chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death in patients at high risk of kidney disease. We used 2000–2011 data from the National Kidney Foundation’s Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP) to examine this association. Methods The study population included KEEP participants younger than 65 years. Outcomes were time to ESRD (chronic kidney failure treated by renal replacement therapy) and time to death. Incident ESRD was ascertained by linkage to the US Renal Data System, and vital status, by linkage to the Social Security Administration Death Master File. We used Cox proportional hazard regression to examine the association between insurance and risk of death or ESRD after adjusting for demographic variables. Results Of 86,588 participants, 27.8% had no form of insurance, 10.3% had public insurance, and 61.9% had private insurance; 15.0% had CKD (defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or urine albumin-creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g), 63.3% had hypertension, and 27.7% had diabetes. Of participants with CKD, 29.3% had no health insurance. Participants without insurance were younger, more likely to be Hispanic and to have 12 or fewer years of education, and less likely to have seen a physician in the past year. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, uninsured KEEP participants were 82% more likely than privately insured participants to die (HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.56–2.12; P < 0.001) and 72% more likely to develop ESRD (HR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.33–2.22; P < 0.001). The association between insurance and outcomes varied by CKD stage. Conclusions Lack of insurance is an independent risk factor for early death and ESRD in this population at high risk of kidney disease. Considering the high morbidity

  17. Food Insecurity, CKD, and Subsequent ESRD in US Adults.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanushree; Crews, Deidra C; Wesson, Donald E; Dharmarajan, Sai; Saran, Rajiv; Ríos Burrows, Nilka; Saydah, Sharon; Powe, Neil R

    2017-07-01

    Poor access to food among low-income adults has been recognized as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), but there are no data for the impact of food insecurity on progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We hypothesized that food insecurity would be independently associated with risk for ESRD among persons with and without earlier stages of CKD. Longitudinal cohort study. 2,320 adults (aged ≥ 20 years) with CKD and 10,448 adults with no CKD enrolled in NHANES III (1988-1994) with household income ≤ 400% of the federal poverty level linked to the Medicare ESRD Registry for a median follow-up of 12 years. Food insecurity, defined as an affirmative response to the food-insecurity screening question. Development of ESRD. Demographics, income, diabetes, hypertension, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and albuminuria. Dietary acid load was estimated from 24-hour dietary recall. We used a Fine-Gray competing-risk model to estimate the relative hazard (RH) for ESRD associated with food insecurity after adjusting for covariates. 4.5% of adults with CKD were food insecure. Food-insecure individuals were more likely to be younger and have diabetes (29.9%), hypertension (73.9%), or albuminuria (90.4%) as compared with their counterparts (P<0.05). Median dietary acid load in the food-secure versus food-insecure group was 51.2 mEq/d versus 55.6 mEq/d, respectively (P=0.05). Food-insecure adults were more likely to develop ESRD (RH, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.08-3.10) compared with food-secure adults after adjustment for demographics, income, diabetes, hypertension, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and albuminuria. In the non-CKD group, 5.7% were food insecure. We did not find a significant association between food insecurity and ESRD (RH, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.40-1.49). Use of single 24-hour diet recall; lack of laboratory follow-up data and measure of changes in food insecurity over time; follow-up of cohort ended 10 years ago. Among adults with CKD, food

  18. Death Does Matter—Cancer Risk in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shih-Feng; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Jan, Ren-Long; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chu, Chin-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a high mortality rate. We hypothesized that not accounting for death as a competing risk overestimates the event rate caused by ESRD. Thus, we examined the cancer risk for patients with ESRD (ESRDPos) after death as a competing risk event had been adjusted for. Patients with newly diagnosed ESRD (n = 64,299) between 1999 and 2007, together with age- and sex-matched controls without ESRD (ESRDNeg) (n = 128,592) were enrolled (1:2). In a Cox proportional hazards model that included death as a competing risk, ESRDPos patients in Taiwan had a lower overall incidence (subdistribution hazard ratio [sdHR] = 1.29) of cancer than did ESRDNeg patients in a Cox model that did not include death as a competing risk (HR = 1.70). After competing mortality had been adjusted for, ESRDPos patients ≥70 (sdHR = 0.82) and ESRDPos patients on long-term dialysis (> 5 follow-up years, sdHR = 0.62), had a lower risk for developing cancer than did ESRDNeg patients. This finding supported our hypothesis that standard survival analyses overestimate the event rate, especially when the mortality rate is high. It also showed that ESRDPos patients, when they grow older, were far less likely to develop cancer and far more likely to die because of underlying illnesses that might also affect the risk of death because of ESRD. PMID:26817891

  19. Medical Director Responsibilities to the ESRD Network

    PubMed Central

    DeOreo, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    The 18 regional ESRD Networks are established in legislation and contract with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to improve the quality and safety of dialysis, maximize patient rehabilitation, encourage collaboration among and between providers toward common quality goals, and improve the reliability and the use of data in pursuit of quality improvement. The Networks are funded by a $0.50 per treatment fee deducted from the reimbursement to dialysis providers, and their deliverables are determined by a statement of work, which is updated in a new contract every 3 years. The Conditions for Coverage require dialysis providers to participate in Network activities, and failure to do so can be the basis for sanctions against the provider. However, the Networks attempt to foster a collegial relationship with dialysis facilities by offering tools, educational activities, and other resources to assist the facilities in meeting the evolving requirements by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on the basis of national aims and domains for quality improvement in health care that transcend the ESRD program. Because of his/her responsibility for implementing the quality assessment and performance improvement activities in the facility, the medical director has much to gain by actively participating in Network activities, especially those focused on quality, safety, patient grievance, patient engagement, and coordination of care. Membership on Network committees can also foster the professional growth of the medical director through participation in quality improvement activity development and implementation, authorship of articles in peer-reviewed journals, creation of educational tools and presentations, and application of Network-sponsored materials to improve patient outcomes, engagement, and satisfaction in the medical director’s facility. The improvement of care of patients on dialysis will be beneficial to the facility in achieving its goals of

  20. Acupuncture for treating uremic pruritus in patients with end-stage renal disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun Hyung; Lee, Myeong Soo; Choi, Sun-Mi

    2010-07-01

    Uremic pruritus (UP) is a common and bothersome symptom in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that does not always respond to conventional care. Acupuncture is frequently used for the treatment of a wide range of conditions, but its effects on UP in ESRD patients are unclear. The objective of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture for UP in patients with ESRD. We searched 16 electronic databases from their inception to November 2009. All prospective clinical studies of needle acupuncture for UP in hemodialysis patients with ESRD were included regardless of their design. Risk of bias of the included studies was assessed using the Cochrane criteria. Three randomized controlled trials and three uncontrolled observational studies were included. All of the included trials reported beneficial effects of acupuncture. However, most of the studies showed high risk of bias, which leaves their reports unconvincing. The current evidence is insufficient to show that acupuncture is an effective treatment for UP inpatients with ESRD because of suboptimal quality and lack of methodological rigor of included studies. Future trials should overcome the limitations of the currently available evidence. J Pain Symptom Manage 2010;40:117e125. 2010 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee.

  1. Proposal for a functional classification system of heart failure in patients with end-stage renal disease: proceedings of the acute dialysis quality initiative (ADQI) XI workgroup.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Herzog, Charles A; Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Tumlin, James; Kellum, John A; McCullough, Peter A; Ronco, Claudio

    2014-04-08

    Structural heart disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring dialysis. More than 80% of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are reported to have cardiovascular disease. This observation has enormous clinical relevance because the leading causes of death for patients with ESRD are of cardiovascular disease etiology, including heart failure, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. The 2 systems most commonly used to classify the severity of heart failure are the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification and the American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC) staging system. With rare exceptions, patients with ESRD who do not receive renal replacement therapy (RRT) develop signs and symptoms of heart failure, including dyspnea and edema due to inability of the severely diseased kidneys to excrete sodium and water. Thus, by definition, nearly all patients with ESRD develop a symptomatology consistent with heart failure if fluid removal by RRT is delayed. Neither the AHA/ACC heart failure staging nor the NYHA functional classification system identifies the variable symptomatology that patients with ESRD experience depending upon whether evaluation occurs before or after fluid removal by RRT. Consequently, the incidence, severity, and outcomes of heart failure in patients with ESRD are poorly characterized. The 11th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative has identified this issue as a critical unmet need for the proper evaluation and treatment of heart failure in patients with ESRD. We propose a classification schema based on patient-reported dyspnea assessed both pre- and post-ultrafiltration, in conjunction with echocardiography.

  2. Pre-End-Stage Renal Disease Care and Early Survival among Incident Dialysis Patients in the US Military Health System.

    PubMed

    Nee, Robert; Fisher, Evan; Yuan, Christina M; Agodoa, Lawrence Y; Abbott, Kevin C

    2017-01-01

    Previous reports showed an increased early mortality after chronic dialysis initiation among the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) population. We hypothesized that ESRD patients in the Military Health System (MHS) would have greater access to pre-ESRD care and hence better survival rates during this early high-risk period. In this retrospective cohort study, using the US Renal Data System database, we identified 1,256,640 patients initiated on chronic dialysis from January 2, 2004 through December 31, 2014, from which a bootstrap sample of 3,984 non-MHS incident dialysis patients were compared with 996 MHS patients. We assessed care by a nephrologist and dietitian, erythropoietin administration, and vascular access use at dialysis initiation as well as all-cause mortality as outcome variables. MHS patients were significantly more likely to have had pre-ESRD nephrology care (adjusted OR [aOR] 2.9; 95% CI 2.3-3.7) and arteriovenous fistula used at dialysis initiation (aOR 2.2; 95% CI 1.7-2.7). Crude mortality rates peaked between the 4th and the 8th week for both cohorts but were reduced among MHS patients. The baseline adjusted Cox model showed significantly lower death rates among MHS vs. non-MHS patients at 6, 9, and 12 months. This survival advantage among MHS patients was attenuated after further adjustment for pre-ESRD nephrology care and dialysis vascular access. MHS patients had improved survival within the first 12 months compared to the general ESRD population, which may be explained in part by differences in pre-ESRD nephrology care and vascular access types. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. One-Year Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    O'Hair, Daniel P; Bajwa, Tanvir K; Chetcuti, Stanley J; Deeb, G Michael; Stoler, Robert C; Hebeler, Robert F; Maini, Brijeshwar; Mumtaz, Mubashir; Kleiman, Neal S; Reardon, Michael J; Li, Shuzhen; Adams, David H; Watson, Daniel R; Yakubov, Steven J; Popma, Jeffrey J; Petrossian, George

    2017-05-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) poses unique challenges in the treatment of patients with severe aortic stenosis. Although surgical valve replacement in ESRD patients has been associated with increased mortality, the outcomes from transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are not clearly defined. The CoreValve US Expanded Use Study is a prospective, nonrandomized study of TAVR in extreme-risk patients with comorbidities excluding them from the Pivotal Trial. We report on patients with ESRD. The primary endpoint was a composite of all-cause mortality or major stroke at 1 year. Ninety-six patients with ESRD underwent TAVR with the CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) and have reached 1-year follow-up. Mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons Predicted Risk of Mortality score was 16.2% ± 8.4%. The rate of all-cause mortality or major stroke at 1 year was 30.3%. The all-cause mortality rate was 5.3% at 30 days and 30.3% at 1 year. The rate at 1 year of any stroke or transient ischemic attack was 2.1%; major vascular injury was 5.2%; and new permanent pacemaker was 26.8%. Valve performance improved postprocedure and remained improved at 1 year (effective orifice area 1.71 cm(2), mean gradient 9.33 mm Hg) CONCLUSIONS: Early mortality in patients with ESRD is comparable to previously published data on extreme-risk patients without ESRD, but our data suggest a higher mortality rate at 1 year for ESRD patients, likely due to comorbid conditions. Stroke and major vascular injury are infrequent, and improved valve hemodynamics are maintained at 1 year. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Managing multiple chronic conditions in Singapore - Exploring the perspectives and experiences of family caregivers of patients with diabetes and end stage renal disease on haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vanessa Y W; Seah, Wei Ying; Kang, Augustine W C; Khoo, Eric Y H; Mooppil, Nandakumar; Griva, Konstadina

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the commonest cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Despite increasing DM-ESRD prevalence and high dependency on care, there is a lack of literature on DM-ESRD caregivers. We sought to explore the perspectives and experiences of caregivers of patients with DM undergoing haemodialysis in Singapore. This study employed an exploratory, qualitative design comprising in-depth interviews with caregivers of DM-ESRD patients. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a sample of 20 family caregivers (54.2 ± 12.6 years; 75% female) of DM-ESRD patients. Data were analysed using Thematic Analysis. Key caregiving challenges identified were managing diet, care recipients' emotions and mobility dependence. Patients' emotional reactions caused interpersonal conflicts and hindered treatment management. Difficulties in dietary management were linked to patients' erratic appetite, caregivers' lack/poor understanding of the dietary guidelines and caregivers' low perceived competence. Limited resources in terms of social support and finances were also noted. Physical and psychological well-being and employment were adversely affected by caregiving role. This study highlights distinctive aspects of the DM-ESRD caregiving experience, which impact on caregivers' health and challenge care. Disease management programmes should be expanded to support caregivers in dealing with multimorbidity.

  5. How End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Manage the Medicare Part D Coverage Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Pamela J.; Perkins, Nathan; Nuschke, Elizabeth; Carroll, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Medicare Part D was enacted to help elderly and disabled individuals pay for prescription drugs, but it was structured with a gap providing no coverage in 2010 between $2,830 and $6,440. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are especially likely to be affected due to high costs of dialysis-related drugs and the importance of adherence for…

  6. How End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Manage the Medicare Part D Coverage Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Pamela J.; Perkins, Nathan; Nuschke, Elizabeth; Carroll, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Medicare Part D was enacted to help elderly and disabled individuals pay for prescription drugs, but it was structured with a gap providing no coverage in 2010 between $2,830 and $6,440. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are especially likely to be affected due to high costs of dialysis-related drugs and the importance of adherence for…

  7. Obesity paradox in end-stage kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongha; Ahmadi, Seyed-Foad; Streja, Elani; Molnar, Miklos Z; Flegal, Katherine M; Gillen, Daniel; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2014-01-01

    In the general population, obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and decreased survival. In patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), however, an "obesity paradox" or "reverse epidemiology" (to include lipid and hypertension paradoxes) has been consistently reported, i.e. a higher body mass index (BMI) is paradoxically associated with better survival. This survival advantage of large body size is relatively consistent for hemodialysis patients across racial and regional differences, although published results are mixed for peritoneal dialysis patients. Recent data indicate that both higher skeletal muscle mass and increased total body fat are protective, although there are mixed data on visceral (intra-abdominal) fat. The obesity paradox in ESRD is unlikely to be due to residual confounding alone and has biologic plausibility. Possible causes of the obesity paradox include protein-energy wasting and inflammation, time discrepancy among competitive risk factors (undernutrition versus overnutrition), hemodynamic stability, alteration of circulatory cytokines, sequestration of uremic toxin in adipose tissue, and endotoxin-lipoprotein interaction. The obesity paradox may have significant clinical implications in the management of ESRD patients especially if obese dialysis patients are forced to lose weight upon transplant wait-listing. Well-designed studies exploring the causes and consequences of the reverse epidemiology of cardiovascular risk factors, including the obesity paradox, among ESRD patients could provide more information on mechanisms. These could include controlled trials of nutritional and pharmacologic interventions to examine whether gain in lean body mass or even body fat can improve survival and quality of life in these patients. © 2014.

  8. V-J combinations of T-cell receptor predict responses to erythropoietin in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Henry Sung-Ching; Chang, Che-Mai; Kao, Chih-Chin; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Xiao; Chang, Wen-Chang; Wu, Mai-Szu; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2017-07-11

    Anemia is common among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients who undergone hemodialysis. The total reduction of red blood cell (RBC) count is associated with poor prognosis in these patients. Although erythropoietin (EPO) has been used as an effective treatment for ESRD patients with anemia, a large number of patients still present poor responses to EPO treatment. We measured T-cell receptor sequencing profiles, including length of complementarity-deteremining region 3 (CDR3), intra- and inter-group (EPO resistant vs. responsive) clonotype diversity, V(D)J usage profiles and V-J combinations from ESRD patients and to investigate the correlation between these features and EPO treatment efficacy. Our results revealed statistical significance in the top 3 ~ 15 most abundant joint distributions of Vβ/Jβ among the two groups, suggesting the importance of V or J gene utilization in the EPO response of ESRD patients. In summary, we provided evidence addressing the potential correlation between the immune repertoire and EPO response in ESRD patients. TMU-JIRB 201309026. Registered 16 October 2013.

  9. Association between Helicobacter pylori and end-stage renal disease: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wijarnpreecha, Karn; Thongprayoon, Charat; Nissaisorakarn, Pitchaphon; Lekuthai, Natasorn; Jaruvongvanich, Veeravich; Nakkala, Kiran; Rajapakse, Ridhmi; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prevalence and association of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). METHODS SA comprehensive literature search was completed from inception until October 2016. Studies that reported prevalence, relative risks, odd ratios, hazard ratios or standardized incidence ratio of H. pylori among ESRD patients were included. Participants without H. pylori were used as comparators to assess the association between H. pylori infection and ESRD. Pooled risk ratios and 95%CI was calculated using a random-effect model. Adjusted point estimates from each study were combined by the generic inverse variance method of DerSimonian and Laird. RESULTS Of 4546 relevant studies, thirty-seven observational studies met all inclusion criteria. Thirty-five cross-sectional studies were included in the analyses to assess the prevalence and association of H. pylori with ESRD. The estimated prevalence of H. pylori among ESRD patients was 44% (95%CI: 40%-49%). The pooled RR of H. pylori in patients with ESRD was 0.77 (95%CI: 0.59-1.00) when compared with the patients without ESRD. Subgroup analysis showed significantly reduced risk of H. pylori in adult ESRD patients with pooled RR of 0.71 (95%CI: 0.55-0.94). The data on the risk of ESRD in patients with H. pylori were limited. Two cohort studies were included to assess the risk of ESRD in patients with H. pylori. The pooled risk RR of ESRD in patients with H. pylori was 0.61 (95%CI: 0.03-12.20). CONCLUSION The estimated prevalence of H. pylori in ESRD patients is 44%. Our meta-analysis demonstrates a decreased risk of H. pylori in adult ESRD patients. PMID:28293097

  10. Prevalence and Correlates of Fatigue in CKD and ESRD: Are Sleep Disorders a Key to Understanding Fatigue?

    PubMed Central

    Jhamb, Manisha; Liang, Kelly; Yabes, Jonathan; Steel, Jennifer L; Dew, Mary Amanda; Shah, Nirav; Unruh, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background Fatigue is an important symptom to patients with advanced CKD. The aim of this study is to examine the prevalence and severity of fatigue among non-dialysis dependent CKD and ESRD patients; examine association of fatigue with subjective and objective sleep quality; identify other modifiable factors associated with fatigue. Methods Cross-sectional survey of 87 non-dialysis dependent CKD (eGFR ≤45 ml/min/1.73 m2) and 86 ESRD patients was done using Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy – Fatigue (FACIT-F) and SF-36 vitality scale. Higher FACIT-F score denoted less fatigue. Objective sleep was assessed using in-home polysomnography. Predictors of fatigue were determined using linear regression model. Results Mean FACIT-F score among all participants was 34.5±11.0. Mean scores were similar among CKD and ESRD groups (34.25±11.28 versus 34.73±10.86; p=0.73). On univariate analyses, patients with higher levels of fatigue were more likely to have cardiovascular disease, benzodiazepine use, depressive symptoms, slightly lower hemoglobin and serum albumin levels. There was no significant association between severity of sleep apnea and level of fatigue (Apnea Hypopnea Index 20.1±27.6 versus 20.3±22.0; p=0.69). Presence of cardiovascular disease, low serum albumin, depressive symptoms, poor subjective sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness and restless legs syndrome (RLS) were independently associated with greater fatigue in multivariable regression models. The FACIT-F score correlated closely with the SF-36 vitality score (r =0.81, p<0.0001). Conclusions Patients with advanced CKD and ESRD experience profound fatigue. Depressive symptoms, RLS, excessive daytime sleepiness, and low albumin levels may provide targets for interventions to improve fatigue in patients with advanced CKD. PMID:24335380

  11. Hypertension--a possible vulnerability marker for depression in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Fan, Pao-Luo; Shu, Chin-Hsing; Shiang, Jeng-Chuan; Kuo, Tai-Song; Lung, For-Wey

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the association of hypertension and psychiatric morbidity in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) under adjusted personality characteristics and parental attachment. The mental health of 121 patients with ESRD in a general teaching hospital was evaluated using the 12-item version of the Chinese Health Questionnaire (CHQ). Only 40 males and 49 females completed all the questionnaires. Ten of the 40 males and 21 of the 49 females had high scores (> or = 4) and were allotted to the case group (n = 31). The remaining 58 patients constituted the control group (CHQ < 4). The logistic regression model showed that hypertension, gender, and neuroticism are statistically significant covariates. Hypertension, especially, was strongly associated with depressive vulnerability (odds ratio of hypertension versus without hypertension = 9.07:1). Structural equation modeling revealed that gender difference and hypertension directly influenced the individuals' mental health status and that the influence of hypertension on mental health was highly variable. A parsimonious structural equation model provided considerable evidence that hypertension could have an important effect on depression in ESRD patients, when predisposing factors, such as personality characteristics and parental attachment, gender, duration of hemodialysis and other medical diseases were adjusted. Hence, hypertension might be a mediating factor of depressive vulnerability in ESRD patients underling genetic and environmental problems. 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Quantifying exposure to calcium and phosphate in ESRD; predictive of atherosclerosis on top of arteriosclerosis?

    PubMed

    van Jaarsveld, B C; van der Graaf, Y; Vos, P F; Soedamah-Muthu, S S

    2010-12-01

    Long-term exposure to hypercalcaemia and hyperphosphataemia leads to media calcification and predicts mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It is debatable whether this exposure is only a risk factor for arteriosclerosis, or also for superimposed atherosclerosis. Calcium-phosphate exposure is difficult to quantify, because it is variable in time and exerts its deleterious effects only after prolonged presence. In 90 dialysis patients, calcium and phosphate values from the complete dialysis period were collected. From three-month averages, measures for calcium-phosphate exposure were derived after exclusion of transplant periods. Calcium-phosphate exposure was then related to intima-media thickness (IMT) and to ankle-brachial index (ABI) as markers of early atherosclerosis. Calcium-phosphate exposure was quantified in three ways using 1670 patient-quarters (i.e. three-months periods) covering 93% of the time on dialysis: averaged calcium-phosphate exposure, percentage of time with above-reference values, and burden of hypercalcaemia/hyperphosphataemia represented by this percentage multiplied by months on dialysis. No association was found with IMT. Patients with increased, not decreased, ABI had higher calcium-phosphate exposure throughout dialysis treatment: hyperphosphataemia burden was 31 (19 to 43) months for patients with ABI between 0.90 and 1.40 and 79 (58 to 100) months for patients with ABI >1.40 or incompressible ankle arteries (p<0.001). These findings do not support the hypothesis that calcium-phosphate exposure leads to atherosclerotic changes on top of arteriosclerosis in ESRD, and confirm its role in causing arteriosclerotic damage leading to increased arterial stiffness and incompressible ankle arteries. The used tool for quantifying calcium-phosphate exposure is easy to apply and can properly weigh the complete exposure during ESRD.

  13. Epidemiology and Mortality of Liver Abscess in End-Stage Renal Disease Dialysis Patients: Taiwan National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Chang; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Yang, Chun-Ming; Chu, Chin-Chen; Chio, Chung-Ching; Chang, Fu-Lin; Chien, Chih-Chiang

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives To determine the incidence rates and mortality of liver abscess in ESRD patients on dialysis. Design, Setting, Participants, & Measurements Using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, we collected data from all ESRD patients who initiated dialysis between 2000 and 2006. Patients were followed until death, end of dialysis, or December 31, 2008. Predictors of liver abscess and mortality were identified using Cox models. Results Of the 53,249 incident dialysis patients identified, 447 were diagnosed as having liver abscesses during the follow-up period (224/100,000 person-years). The cumulative incidence rate of liver abscess was 0.3%, 1.1%, and 1.5% at 1 year, 5 years, and 7 years, respectively. Elderly patients and patients on peritoneal dialysis had higher incidence rates. The baseline comorbidities of diabetes mellitus, polycystic kidney disease, malignancy, chronic liver disease, biliary tract disease, or alcoholism predicted development of liver abscess. Overall in-hospital mortality was 10.1%. Conclusions The incidence of liver abscess is high among ESRD dialysis patients. In addition to the well known risk factors of liver abscess, two other important risk factors, peritoneal dialysis and polycystic kidney disease, were found to predict liver abscess in ESRD dialysis patients. PMID:24551077

  14. Prevalence of and factors associated with sarcopenia in elderly patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jwa-Kyung; Choi, Sun Ryoung; Choi, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Gyun; Lee, Young Ki; Noh, Jung Woo; Kim, Hyung Jik; Song, Young Rim

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the prevalence of sarcopenia in elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and its relationship with various markers of nutrition, cognitive function, depressive symptoms, inflammation and β2-microglobulin. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 95 patients having ESRD aged over 50 years. Sarcopenia was defined as a decline in both muscle mass and strength. The mean age was 63.9 ± 10.0 years; 56.8% were men and 52.6% had diabetes. Sarcopenia was highly prevalent in elderly patients with ESRD (37.0% in men and 29.3% in women). Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), inflammatory markers and β2-microglobulin levels were significantly associated with sarcopenia, even after adjustment for age, gender, diabetes, and body mass index. Additionally, patients with depressive symptoms showed a higher risk of sarcopenia relative to those without depressive symptoms (odds ratio, OR = 6.87, 95% confidence interval, CI = 2.06-22.96) and sarcopenia was more likely to be present in patients with mild cognitive dysfunction (OR = 6.35, 95% CI = 1.62-34.96). Sarcopenia is highly prevalent in elderly patients with ESRD and is closely associated with SGA, inflammatory markers, β2-microglobulin, depression and cognitive dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Cardiovascular Events on End-Stage Renal Disease and Mortality in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Before Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Michio; Takehara, Eriko; Sasaki, Yasunori; Azetsu, Haruna; Kusaka, Keita; Shikuma, Satomi; Akita, Wataru

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular events (CVEs) are major complications in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, few studies have investigated the effects of CVEs on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and mortality of pre-dialysis patients. We followed 377 CKD patients who were at stage ≥G3 at first clinic visit in the Shuuwa General Hospital between April 2005 and July 2014. After taking baseline patient data, we evaluated renal survival rates and all-cause and CVE-related mortality in patients with CVEs [(+)CVEs] and without CVEs [(-)CVEs]. A total of 99 CVEs occurred in 93 study patients (57.0% cardiac events, 43.0% cerebrovascular events, and 6.5% peripheral artery disease events). During the study period, 127 patients reached ESRD over a median of 4.51 years' follow-up. Kaplan-Meier analysis found longer renal survival rates in the (-)CVEs group compared with the (+)CVEs group. Forty patients died during the study period over a median of 5.43 years' follow-up. Survival rates for all-cause and CVE-related mortality of (-)CVEs patients were higher than in (+)CVEs patients. After adjustment for sex, age, current smoking, blood pressure, diabetes, estimated glomerular filtration rate, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, left ventricular hypertrophy, body mass index, albumin, hemoglobin, calcium, phosphate, C-reactive protein, and spot urine protein, the occurrence of CVEs was still a significant risk factor for ESRD (HR 1.516, P = 0.017) and all-cause mortality (HR 7.871, P < 0.001). Our findings suggest that the occurrence of CVEs is a potent risk factor for ESRD and mortality in CKD patients before dialysis. © 2015 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  16. Diffuse Interstitial Brain Edema in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis: A Tract-Based Spatial Statistics Study

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang; Wen, Ji-qiu; Qi, Rong-feng; Luo, Song; Zhong, Jian-hui; Chen, Hui-juan; Ji, Gong-jun; Lu, Guang Ming; Zhang, Long Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract To investigate white matter (WM) alterations and their correlation with cognition function in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) approach. This prospective HIPAA-complaint study was approved by our institutional review board. Eighty HD ESRD patients and 80 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were included. Neuropsychological (NP) tests and laboratory tests, including serum creatinine and urea, were performed. DTI data were processed to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps with TBSS. FA and MD difference between the 2 groups were compared. We also explored the associations of FA values in WM regions of lower FA with ages, NP tests, disease, and dialysis durations, serum creatinine and urea levels of ESRD patients. Compared with controls, HD ESRD patients had lower FA value in the corpus callosum, bilateral corona radiate, posterior thalamic radiation, left superior longitudinal fasciculus, and right cingulum (P < 0.05, FWE corrected). Almost all WM regions had increased MD in HD ESRD patients compared with controls (P < 0.05, FWE corrected). In some regions with lower FA, FA values showed moderate correlations with ages, NP tests, and serum urea levels. There was no correlation between FA values and HD durations, disease durations, and serum creatinine levels of ESRD patients (all P > 0.05). Diffuse interstitial brain edema and moderate WM integrity disruption occurring in HD ESRD patients, which correlated with cognitive dysfunction, and serum urea levels might be a risk factor for these WM changes. PMID:25526483

  17. Digoxin Associates with Mortality in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, J. Michael; Hakim, Raymond M.

    2010-01-01

    The safety of prescribing digoxin in ESRD is unknown. Hypokalemia, which frequently occurs among dialysis patients, may enhance the toxicity of digoxin. Here, we analyzed the association between digoxin prescription and survival in a retrospective cohort using covariate- and propensity score–adjusted Cox models to minimize the potential for confounding by indication. Among 120,864 incident hemodialysis patients, digoxin use associated with a 28% increased risk for death (hazard ratio [HR] 1.28; 95% confidence interval 1.25 to 1.31). Increasing serum digoxin level was also significantly associated with mortality (HR 1.19 per ng/ml increase; 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.35). This increased mortality risk with level was most pronounced in patients with lower predialysis serum potassium (K) levels (HR 2.53 [P = 0.01] for K <4.3 mEq/L versus HR 0.86 [P = 0.35] for K >4.6 mEq/L). In conclusion, digoxin use among patients who are on hemodialysis associates with increased mortality, especially among those with low predialysis K concentrations. PMID:20576808

  18. The Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Vascular Biomarkers in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jeonggeun; Lee, Chan Joo; Lee, Sang-Hak; Kang, Seok-Min; Choi, Donghoon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and an important risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) disease. We investigated the impact of DM on subclinical CV damage by comprehensive screening protocol in ESRD patients. Materials and Methods Echocardiography, coronary computed tomography angiogram, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and central blood pressure with pulse wave velocity (PWV) were performed in 91 ESRD patients from the Cardiovascular and Metabolic disease Etiology Research Center-HIgh risk cohort. Results The DM group (n=38) had higher systolic blood pressure than the non-DM group (n=53), however, other clinical CV risk factors were not different between two groups. Central aortic systolic pressure (148.7±29.8 mm Hg vs. 133.7±27.0 mm Hg, p= 0.014), PWV (12.1±2.7 m/s vs. 9.4±2.1 m/s, p<0.001), and early mitral inflow to early mitral annulus velocity (16.7±6.4 vs. 13.7±5.9, p=0.026) were higher in the DM group. Although the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) was not different between the DM and the non-DM group (95% vs. 84.4%, p=0.471), the severity of CAD was higher in the DM group (p=0.01). In multivariate regression analysis, DM was an independent determinant for central systolic pressure (p=0.011), PWV (p<0.001) and the prevalence of CAD (p=0.046). Conclusion Diabetic ESRD patients have higher central systolic pressure and more advanced arteriosclerosis than the non-DM control group. These findings suggest that screening for subclinical CV damage may be helpful for diabetic ESRD patients. PMID:27873498

  19. Advance care planning in CKD/ESRD: an evolving process.

    PubMed

    Holley, Jean L

    2012-06-01

    Advance care planning was historically considered to be simply the completion of a proxy (health care surrogate designation) or instruction (living will) directive that resulted from a conversation between a patient and his or her physician. We now know that advance care planning is a much more comprehensive and dynamic patient-centered process used by patients and families to strengthen relationships, achieve control over medical care, prepare for death, and clarify goals of care. Some advance directives, notably designated health care proxy documents, remain appropriate expressions of advance care planning. Moreover, although physician orders, such as do-not-resuscitate orders and Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment, may not be strictly defined as advance directives, their completion, when appropriate, is an integral component of advance care planning. The changing health circumstances and illness trajectory characteristic of ESRD mandate that advance care planning discussions adapt to a patient's situation and therefore must be readdressed at appropriate times and intervals. The options of withholding and withdrawing dialysis add ESRD-specific issues to advance care planning in this population and are events each nephrologist will at some time confront. Advance care planning is important throughout the spectrum of ESRD and is a part of nephrology practice that can be rewarding to nephrologists and beneficial to patients and their families.

  20. Living well with end stage renal disease: patients' narratives interrupted from a virtue perspective.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Wim; Uerz, Inez; Wils, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Over the last few decades there has been a revival of interest in virtue ethics, with the emphasis on the virtuous caregiver. This paper deals with the 'virtuous patient', specifically the patient with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). We believe that a virtue approach provides insights not available to current methods of studying coping styles and coping strategies. Data are derived from seven semi-structured in-depth interviews. The transcripts of the interviews were subjected to an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). The focus of the analysis was on 'living well with chronic illness.' It appears that the moral challenges faced by patients with ESRD are manifold. When they are invited to tell the story of their illness, they do not explicitly speak of virtues, but they often refer to moral qualities, and to attitudes that can be regarded as virtuous. We identify several such concepts in the narratives of patients with ESRD. We conclude that the Aristotelian model of virtue ethics is particularly descriptively (and possibly also normatively) relevant to the explanation of the life narratives and the moral challenges of patients with an ESRD.

  1. Tuberculous spondylitis in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing chronic hemodialysis therapy.

    PubMed

    Verettas, D J; Ververidis, A N; Boyiatzis, C; Panagoutsos, S; Galanis, V; Passadakis, P; Kazakos, K; Vargemezis, V

    2006-04-01

    Tuberculosis of the spine is not rare in immunocompromised patients and particularly in those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Furthermore, the possible vascular compromise of the spinal cord in patients with diabetic nephropathy may result in symptoms of neurological involvement that could lead to deterioration and paralysis. We report a series of 4 patients with ESRD undergoing dialysis that developed tuberculous spondylitis of the thoracic spine. Diabetic nephropathy was the primary cause for chronic kidney disease in 2 patients; 3 of these patients were treated conservatively with anti-tuberculous medication and orthotic splints and were cured. The fourth patient with diabetes mellitus and clinically evident signs and symptoms of severe vascular insufficiency has additionally developed incomplete paraplegia. A complete sensory recovery and partial recovery of the hip flexors and abductors within 3 months occurred, following decompression of the spine and drainage of the abscess, in combination with long-term anti-tuberculous treatment and spinal orthosis.

  2. Joint analysis of multi-level repeated measures data and survival: an application to the end stage renal disease (ESRD) data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Ma, Jennie Z; O'Quigley, John

    2008-11-29

    Shared random effects models have been increasingly common in the joint analyses of repeated measures (e.g. CD4 counts, hemoglobin levels) and a correlated failure time such as death. In this paper we study several shared random effects models in the multi-level repeated measures data setting with dependent failure times. Distinct random effects are used to characterize heterogeneity in repeated measures at different levels. The hazard of death may be dependent on random effects from various levels. To simplify the estimation procedure, we adopt the Gaussian quadrature technique with a piecewise log-linear baseline hazard for the death process, which can be conveniently implemented in the freely available software aML. As an example, we analyze repeated measures of hematocrit level and survival for end stage renal disease patients clustered within a randomly selected 126 dialysis centers in the U.S. renal data system data set. Our model is very comprehensive yet easy to implement, making it appealing to general statistical practitioners.

  3. Misdiagnosis of Addison's disease in a patient with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kocyigit, Ismail; Unal, Aydin; Tanriverdi, Fatih; Hayri Sipahioglu, Murat; Tokgoz, Bulent; Oymak, Oktay; Utas, Cengiz

    2011-01-01

    Addison's disease is a rare disorder in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In patients, the diagnosis of Addison's disease is difficult in clinical practice because most of the clinical findings of this disease are similar to those of the renal failure. We present a 51-year-old male patient, who underwent hemodialysis therapy for 8 years, diagnosed with Addison's disease after having myalgia, skin hyperpigmentation, weight loss, sweating, and nausea for the past few weeks. The physical examination was completely normal except for muscle weakness, hyperpigmentation on labial mucosa and skin in a patient. The laboratory tests revealed anemia and hypoglycemia. Serum cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, and ACTH stimulation test results were consistent with Addison's disease. Adrenal computerized tomography revealed bilateral atrophic glands. Additionally, it was found that elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels and antithyroid peroxidase antibody titer were positive. Our purpose is to emphasize that physicians should be alert to the potential for additional different conditions particularly in terms of adrenal failure in patients with ESRD.

  4. Marriage and End-Stage Renal Disease: Implications for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shortridge, Emily F.; James, Cara V.

    2010-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately represented among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD is managed with a strict routine that might include regular dialysis as well as dietary, fluid intake, and other lifestyle changes. In a disease such as this, with such disruptive treatment modalities, marriage, specifically, and its ties…

  5. Marriage and End-Stage Renal Disease: Implications for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shortridge, Emily F.; James, Cara V.

    2010-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately represented among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD is managed with a strict routine that might include regular dialysis as well as dietary, fluid intake, and other lifestyle changes. In a disease such as this, with such disruptive treatment modalities, marriage, specifically, and its ties…

  6. 42 CFR 413.220 - Methodology for calculating the per-treatment base rate under the ESRD prospective payment system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methodology for calculating the per-treatment base... Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.220 Methodology for calculating the per.... The methodology for determining the per treatment base rate under the ESRD prospective payment...

  7. End stage renal disease serum contains a specific renal cell growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, L.H.; Kulkarni, C.; Mills, G. )

    1991-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) kidneys display abnormal growth characterized by a continuum of cystic disease, adenoma and carcinoma. This study evaluates the hypothesis that serum of patients with ESRD contains increased amounts of a growth factor which specifically induces proliferation of renal cells. ESRD sera compared to sera from normal controls induced a two to three-fold increase in the proliferative rate of renal cell carcinoma cell lines and normal kidney explants compared to cell lines from other sites. The increased proliferative activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was paralleled by an increase in cytosolic free calcium. The growth factor activity was encoded by a polypeptide of between 15 and 30 kd. The activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was not mimicked or inhibited by epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet derived growth factor indicating that the renal cell specific growth factor activity in ESRD is different from these factors.

  8. Living kidney donors and ESRD.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2015-07-01

    There are more than 325 living kidney donors who have developed end-stage renal disease and have been listed on the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)/United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) deceased donor kidney wait list. The OPTN/UNOS database records where these kidney donors are listed and, if they donated after April 1994, where that donation occurred. These 2 locations are often not the same. In this commentary, I examine whether a national living donor registry should be created and whether transplantation centers should be notified when one of their living kidney donors develops end-stage renal disease. I consider and refute 5 potential objections to center notification. I explain that transplantation centers should look back at these cases and input data into a registry to attempt to identify patterns that could improve donor evaluation protocols. Creating a registry and mining the information it contains is, in my view, our moral and professional responsibility to future patients and the transplantation endeavor. As individuals and as a community, we need to acknowledge the many unknown risks of living kidney donation and take responsibility for identifying these risks. We then must share information about these risks, educate prospective donors about them, and attempt to minimize them.

  9. Patients, populations and policy: patient outcomes in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Powe, N R

    2001-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease represents an interesting illustration for evaluating an epidemic of chronic illness, the impact of care processes and technology on health outcomes, the impact of financial incentives and cost containment on health outcomes, and the choices society must consider in responding to a chronic illness. The evidence suggests that strong economic pressures exist in the care of chronic kidney disease and that cost containment is important. The results in large part reflect the impact of economic pressures on clinical decision making in the absence of good evidence on outcomes. To improve clinical decision making we need valid evidence linking specific processes of care to patient outcomes. Specific processes amenable to study include the provision of preventive services, physician and nurse technical and interpersonal care and adherence to clinical practice guidelines. The ESRD Quality Study (EQUAL) currently underway and supported by the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, may help to guide physicians and centers in caring for their patients with chronic kidney disease. This investigation examines the relation between process of care and outcomes and expands outcomes measure to include disease-specific quality-of-life measures and patient satisfaction and accounts for case mix using the Index of Co-Existent Disease, a measure of the extent of different comorbid diseases as well as their severity (18,19,20). Better data on how processes of care are linked to health outcomes can inform decision making and allow educated cost cutting and quality maintenance.

  10. Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Testosterone among patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yeran; Johansen, Kirsten L.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of low testosterone level is particularly high among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and has been associated with mortality. In populations without ESRD, low testosterone level has also been associated with a number of morbidities including cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, low muscle mass, low bone mass, low physical performance, and frailty. However, there is controversy regarding what constitutes low testosterone level in the aging population and at what level replacement therapy with testosterone is indicated. There are no randomized controlled trials investigating long-term outcomes of testosterone replacement therapy in populations with or without ESRD. Available trial results suggest equivocal improvements in sexual function. Muscle mass and bone mineral density appear to improve but results in physical function and performance are mixed and there are no data on fracture prevention. Some recent data suggest harm when testosterone was given to men with limited mobility. Finally, there is little evidence that testosterone adds to existing erythropoietin agents in the treatment of anemia in ESRD. Due to lack of evidence supporting long-term use of testosterone, the authors recommend against the routine use of testosterone in ESRD patients with low testosterone levels. Testosterone treatment can be considered in those with low bone mass and total testosterone level less than 200 ng/dL, or in younger patients with sexual complaints with total testosterone level lower than the reference range. It is important to engage patients in discussion of risks and benefits before initiating testosterone therapy; testosterone therapy should be discontinued if the intended treatment effect is not observed after short-term use. PMID:25376701

  11. Association of GSTO1 and GSTO2 Polymorphism with Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease Development and Patient Survival.

    PubMed

    Cimbaljevic, Slavica; Suvakov, Sonja; Matic, Marija; Pljesa-Ercegovac, Marija; Pekmezovic, Tatjana; Radic, Tanja; Coric, Vesna; Damjanovic, Tatjana; Dimkovic, Nada; Markovic, Rodoljub; Savic-Radojevic, Ana; Simic, Tatjana

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with long-term cardiovascular complications. The cytosolic family of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) is involved in the detoxication of various toxic compounds and antioxidant protection. GST omega class members, GSTO1 and GSTO2 possess, unlike other GSTs, dehydroascorbate reductase and deglutathionylation activities. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of genetic polymorphisms of GSTO1 (rs4925) and GSTO2 (rs156697) as risk determinants for ESRD development, as well as in the survival of these patients. A total of 199 patients and 199 healthy subjects were included in the study and genotyped for both GSTO1 and GSTO2 polymorphism. Protein thiol and carbonyl groups as markers of protein oxidative damage were determined spectrophotometrically. Cox proportional hazard model and Kaplan-Meier analysis were performed to investigate the role of GSTO1 and GSTO2 genetic polymorphism on mortality of ESRD patients during the follow-up period (36 month). Individuals carrying the variant GSTO2 GG genotype were at 2.45-fold higher risk of ESRD development compared to the wild type GSTO2 AA genotype (OR=2.45; 95%CI=1.18-5.07; p=0.016). The results of GSTO1/GSTO2 haplotype analysis showed that the haplotype combination of GSTO1 (*A)/GSTO2 (*A) (GSTO1 variant/GSTO2 wild type allele) was protective for ESRD (OR=0.23 95%CI=0.12-0.44, p=0.001). Patients carrying at least one GSTO1 reference allele have shorter mean overall (Log rank=2.844, p =0.241) and cardiovascular survival probability (Log rank=4.211, p=0.122). GSTO polymorphisms have been shown to act as significant markers in assessing the risk of ESRD development and patients' survival.

  12. Effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on serum lipids and vascular inflammation in patients with end-stage renal disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tianhua; Sun, Yiting; Sun, Wei; Yao, Li; Sun, Li; Liu, Linlin; Ma, Jianfei; Wang, Lining

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (O3FAs) are associated with lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adults. However, this association in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains controversial prompting the need for investigation into the role of O3FAs on serum lipids and vascular inflammation markers. The present meta-analysis summarized the effects of O3FA supplementation on serum lipids and vascular inflammatory markers in patients with ESRD. PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focused on serum lipids and vascular inflammation markers in patients with ESRD. Standard mean differences (SMD) were used to measure the effect of O3FA supplementation on serum lipids and vascular inflammatory markers. The final pooled analysis included 20 RCTs involving 1,461 patients with ESRD. The results indicated that O3FA supplementation reduced TG by 0.61, LDL by 0.35 and CRP by 0.56. However, O3FA had no significant effect on TC, HDL, albumin, hemoglobin, homocysteine, DBP, glucose, lipoprotein(a), and ferritin. O3FA supplementation is associated with lower several serum lipids and vascular inflammation markers in patients with ESRD. PMID:28008943

  13. Applying best practices to designing patient education for patients with end-stage renal disease pursuing kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Stacy L; Waterman, Amy D; Davis, LaShara A; Peipert, John D; Fish, Anne F

    2015-03-01

    Despite the known benefits of kidney transplant, less than 30% of the 615 000 patients living with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States have received a transplant. More than 100 000 people are presently on the transplant waiting list. Although the shortage of kidneys for transplant remains a critical factor in explaining lower transplant rates, another important and modifiable factor is patients' lack of comprehensive education about transplant. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of known best practices from the broader literature that can be used as an evidence base to design improved education for ESRD patients pursuing a kidney transplant. Best practices in chronic disease education generally reveal that education that is individually tailored, understandable for patients with low health literacy, and culturally competent is most beneficial. Effective education helps patients navigate the complex health care process successfully. Recommendations for how to incorporate these best practices into transplant education design are described. Providing more ESRD patients with transplant education that encompasses these best practices may improve their ability to make informed health care decisions and increase the numbers of patients interested in pursuing transplant.

  14. Impact of Renal Disease on Patients with Hepatitis C: A Retrospective Analysis of Disease Burden, Clinical Outcomes, and Health Care Utilization and Cost.

    PubMed

    Solid, Craig A; Peter, Senaka A; Natwick, Tanya; Guo, Haifeng; Collins, Allan J; Arduino, Jean Marie

    2017-01-01

    Few studies explore the magnitude of the disease burden and health care utilization imposed by renal disease among patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV). We aimed to describe the characteristics, outcomes, and health care utilization and costs of patients with HCV with and without renal impairment. This retrospective analysis used 2 administrative claims databases: the US commercially insured population in Truven Health MarketScan® data (aged 20-64 years), and the US Medicare fee-for-service population in the Medicare 20% sample (aged ≥65 years). Baseline characteristics and comorbid conditions were identified from claims during 2011; patients were followed for up to 1 year (beginning January 1, 2012) to identify health outcomes of interest and health care utilization and costs. In the MarketScan and Medicare databases, 35,965 and 10,608 patients with HCV were identified, 8.5 and 26.5% with evidence of renal disease (chronic kidney disease [CKD] or end-stage renal disease [ESRD]). Most comorbid conditions and unadjusted outcome rates increased across groups from patients with no evidence of renal disease to non-ESRD CKD to ESRD. Health care utilization followed a similar pattern, as did the costs. Our findings suggest that HCV patients with concurrent renal disease have significantly more comorbidity, a higher likelihood of negative health outcomes, and higher health care utilization and costs. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Heparin induces an accumulation of atherogenic lipoproteins during hemodialysis in normolipidemic end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Carlo M; Noto, Davide; Cefalù, Angelo B; Ganci, Antonia; Giammarresi, Carlo; Panno, Donata; Cusumano, Gaspare; Greco, Massimiliano; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Averna, Maurizio R

    2015-07-01

    Dyslipidemias may account for the excess of cardiovascular mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Lipoprotein studies in ESRD patients are usually relative to prehemodialysis samples even if significative changes may occur after dialysis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of ESRD on triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) subpopulations distribution and acute change following hemodialytic procedures, including the relative contribution of heparin administration. We selected a group of normolipidemic male middle-aged ESRD patients free of any concomitant disease affecting lipoprotein remnant metabolism compared with controls. We separated TRL subfractions according to density and apoE content and evaluated the changes of these particles after hemodialytic procedures with or without heparin. ESRD subjects had higher TRL subfractions, with the exception of apoE-rich particles, lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) largest subclasses, and a smaller low-density lipoprotein peak particle size than controls. After a hemodialytic standard procedure with heparin, we demonstrated a significant reduction of triglyceride, an increase of HDL-cholesterol levels, and a raise of small very-low-density lipoprotein, intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), apoE-rich particles, and non-HDL-cholesterol levels. When hemodialysis was performed without heparin, no significant changes were observed. In the absence of concomitant hyperlipidemic triggers, ESRD patients show significant lipoprotein abnormalities before dialysis, but without any increased remnant particles concentrations. We speculate that hemodialysis, in particular heparin administration during this procedure, leads to a massive atherogenic TRLs production because of the acute stimulation of the dysfunctional lipolytic system not followed by an efficient removal, determining a recurrent lipoprotein remnant accumulation. © 2014 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  16. Association of GSTO1 and GSTO2 Polymorphism with Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease Development and Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cimbaljevic, Slavica; Suvakov, Sonja; Matic, Marija; Pljesa-Ercegovac, Marija; Pekmezovic, Tatjana; Radic, Tanja; Coric, Vesna; Damjanovic, Tatjana; Dimkovic, Nada; Markovic, Rodoljub; Savic-Radojevic, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Oxidative stress in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with long-term cardiovascular complications. The cytosolic family of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) is involved in the detoxication of various toxic compounds and antioxidant protection. GST omega class members, GSTO1 and GSTO2 possess, unlike other GSTs, dehydroascorbate reductase and deglutathionylation activities. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of genetic polymorphisms of GSTO1 (rs4925) and GSTO2 (rs156697) as risk determinants for ESRD development, as well as in the survival of these patients. Methods A total of 199 patients and 199 healthy subjects were included in the study and genotyped for both GSTO1 and GSTO2 polymorphism. Protein thiol and carbonyl groups as markers of protein oxidative damage were determined spectrophotometrically. Cox proportional hazard model and Kaplan-Meier analysis were performed to investigate the role of GSTO1 and GSTO2 genetic polymorphism on mortality of ESRD patients during the follow-up period (36 month). Results Individuals carrying the variant GSTO2 GG genotype were at 2.45-fold higher risk of ESRD development compared to the wild type GSTO2 AA genotype (OR=2.45; 95%CI=1.18–5.07; p=0.016). The results of GSTO1/ GSTO2 haplotype analysis showed that the haplotype combination of GSTO1 (*A)/GSTO2 (*A) (GSTO1 variant/GSTO2 wild type allele) was protective for ESRD (OR=0.23 95%CI=0.12-0.44, p=0.001). Patients carrying at least one GSTO1 reference allele have shorter mean overall (Log rank=2.844, p =0.241) and cardiovascular survival probability (Log rank=4.211, p=0.122). Conclusions GSTO polymorphisms have been shown to act as significant markers in assessing the risk of ESRD development and patients’ survival. PMID:28356881

  17. APOL1 renal-risk genotypes associate with longer hemodialysis survival in prevalent nondiabetic African American patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijun; Langefeld, Carl D; Comeau, Mary E; Bonomo, Jason A; Rocco, Michael V; Burkart, John M; Divers, Jasmin; Palmer, Nicholette D; Hicks, Pamela J; Bowden, Donald W; Lea, Janice P; Krisher, Jenna O; Clay, Margo J; Freedman, Barry I

    2016-08-01

    Relative to European Americans, evidence supports that African Americans with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) survive longer on dialysis. Renal-risk variants in the apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1), associated with nondiabetic nephropathy and less subclinical atherosclerosis, may contribute to dialysis outcomes. Here, APOL1 renal-risk variants were assessed for association with dialytic survival in 450 diabetic and 275 nondiabetic African American hemodialysis patients from Wake Forest and Emory School of Medicine outpatient facilities. Outcomes were provided by the ESRD Network 6-Southeastern Kidney Council Standardized Information Management System. Dates of death, receipt of a kidney transplant, and loss to follow-up were recorded. Outcomes were censored at the date of transplantation or through 1 July 2015. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were computed separately in patients with nondiabetic and diabetic ESRD, adjusting for the covariates age, gender, comorbidities, ancestry, and presence of an arteriovenous fistula or graft at dialysis initiation. In nondiabetic ESRD, patients with 2 (vs. 0/1) APOL1 renal-risk variants had significantly longer dialysis survival (hazard ratio 0.57), a pattern not observed in patients with diabetes-associated ESRD (hazard ratio 1.29). Thus, 2 APOL1 renal-risk variants are associated with longer dialysis survival in African Americans without diabetes, potentially relating to presence of renal-limited disease or less atherosclerosis.

  18. Sevelamer carbonate experience in Indian end stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Abraham, G; Kher, V; Saxena, S; Jayakumar, M; Chafekar, D; Pargaonkar, P; Shetty, M; Reddy, Y N V; Reddy, Y N V

    2012-05-01

    This open label, multicentric, comparative clinical trial was done to compare the efficacy and tolerability of two sevelamer formulations, sevelamer carbonate, and sevelamer hydrochloride, in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in Indian end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. A total of 97 ESRD patients on hemodialysis, were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either sevelamer carbonate or sevelamer hydrochloride. All patients were evaluated every week for 6 weeks for efficacy and safety variables. Total 88 patients completed the study. After 6 weeks of therapy, there were similar reductions (P<0.0001) in mean serum phosphorus and the CaxP product both the groups. The responder rates for test and reference groups were 75%, 68.18% respectively (P=0.3474). The adverse events reported were nausea, abdominal pain/discomfort, heartburn, constipation, diarrhea, increased prothrombin time, and severe arthritis. No serious adverse events were reported. There was no significant difference between the groups for adverse events and the laboratory parameters. From the results of this multicentric, comparative, randomized clinical study on sevelamer carbonate we can recommend that sevelamer carbonate may be used as a phosphate binder in Indian chronic kidney disease patients.

  19. Applying best practices to designing patient education for patients with end-stage renal disease pursuing kidney transplant

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Stacy L.; Waterman, Amy D.; Davis, LaShara A.; Peipert, John D.; Fish, Anne F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known benefits of kidney transplant, less than 30% of the 615000 patients living with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States have received a transplant. More than 100000 people are presently on the transplant waiting list. Although the shortage of kidneys for transplant remains a critical factor in explaining lower transplant rates, another important and modifiable factor is patients’ lack of comprehensive education about transplant. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of known best practices from the broader literature that can be used as an evidence base to design improved education for ESRD patients pursuing a kidney transplant. Best practices in chronic disease education generally reveal that education that is individually tailored, understandable for patients with low health literacy, and culturally competent is most beneficial. Effective education helps patients navigate the complex health care process successfully. Recommendations for how to incorporate these best practices into transplant education design are described. Providing more ESRD patients with transplant education that encompasses these best practices may improve their ability to make informed health care decisions and increase the numbers of patients interested in pursuing transplant. PMID:25758805

  20. Arterial disease and vascular access in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Baktiroglu, Selcuk; Yanar, Fatih; Ozata, Ibrahim H; Oner, Gizem; Ercan, Damla

    2016-03-01

    There are conflicting reports on the effects of diabetes on the outcomes of hemodialysis access procedures. While some found no negative effects, others reported deleterious effects of diabetes on vascular access outcomes. Why is there concern about diabetes and related vascular problems on vascular access procedures? What are the differences of diabetic patients and their vasculature from that of nondiabetics? Do they have an effect on hemodialysis vascular access outcomes? We will try to find answers to these questions in light of the available evidence. Recent literature on arterial disease in diabetes and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and the effects on vascular access outcomes were searched in order to find answers to above questions. There are conflicting and controversial reports on the effects of preexisting vascular problems due to diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) on the outcomes of hemodialysis access procedures. Diabetic vasculature, especially in patients with ESRD, has some specific problems, the most important of which seem to be the calcification and stiffening of the arteries. Although some authors report inferior outcomes of vascular access procedures in diabetic patients, there is evidence that most of the problems encountered can be dealt with by careful patient selection, surgical skill, and experience.

  1. Identifying Depression in South Asian Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: Considerations for Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shivani; Bhui, Kamaldeep; Chilcot, Joseph; Wellsted, David; Farrington, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Depression is a prevalent burden for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and one that is under-recognized and consequently under-treated. Although several studies have explored the association between depression symptoms, treatment adherence and outcomes in Euro-American patient groups, quantitative and qualitative exploration of these issues in patients from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds has been lacking. This review discusses the methodological issues associated with measuring depression in patients of South Asian origin who have a 3- to 5-fold greater risk of developing ESRD. There is a need to advance research into the development of accurate screening practices for this patient group, with an emphasis on studies utilizing rigorous approaches to evaluating the use of both emic (culture-specific) and etic (universal or culture-general) screening instruments. PMID:22470400

  2. Sex differences in vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular outcomes: The cardiac, endothelial function, and arterial stiffness in ESRD (CERES) study.

    PubMed

    Guajardo, Isabella; Ayer, Amrita; Johnson, Alexander D; Ganz, Peter; Mills, Claire; Donovan, Catherine; Scherzer, Rebecca; Shah, Sanjiv J; Peralta, Carmen A; Dubin, Ruth F

    2017-03-08

    Recent studies suggest that women with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) may have higher rates of mortality than men, but it is unknown whether sex differences in vascular function explain this disparity. The cardiac, endothelial function, and arterial stiffness in ESRD (CERES) study is an ongoing, prospective observational study designed to investigate vascular function, myocardial injury, and cardiovascular outcomes in ESRD. Among 200 CERES participants (34% women), we evaluated arterial wave reflections as augmentation index normalized to a heart rate of 75 (AIx75), arterial stiffness as pulse wave velocity, and macro- and microvascular endothelial dysfunction as flow-mediated dilation and velocity time integral (VTI). Over a median of 14 months, participants were followed for the composite outcome of cardiovascular hospitalization or all-cause death. Women had higher arterial wave reflection (Mean, SD AIx75 30% ± 9% for women vs. 21% ± 10% for men; P < 0.001) and worse microvascular function (VTI 55 ± 30 cm for women vs. 70 ± 27 cm for men; P = 0.007). After multivariable adjustment, female sex remained associated with a 0.5-SD higher AIx75 (95% CI [0.01, 0.9]) and 0.3-SD lower VTI (95%CI [0.1, 0.7]). Women experienced higher adjusted rates of the composite outcome (HR 2.5; 95%CI [1.1, 5.6]; P = 0.03), and further adjustment for arterial wave reflection attenuated this risk. Vascular dysfunction may partly explain the association of female sex with higher cardiovascular risk and mortality in patients with ESRD. Further studies are needed to explore whether sex differences in vascular function predict long-term outcomes, and whether hormonal or inflammatory factors explain these associations. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  3. Progression and outcomes of non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease patients: A single center longitudinal follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Khan, Yusra Habib; Sarriff, Azmi; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Khan, Amer Hayat; Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain; Jummaat, Fauziah

    2017-01-01

    Despite increase global prevalence of End stage renal disease (ESRD) and subsequent need for renal replacement therapy (RRT), relatively little is known about disease progression and prognosis of earlier stages of CKD. Current study was conducted to examine rate of CKD progression, predictors of ESRD and death. A total 621 patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 15-59ml/min/1.73m(2) (CKD stage 3 & 4) were selected and followed up for 10 years or until ESRD or death, whichever occurred first. Subjects who did not meet inclusion criteria were excluded (n=1474). Annual cumulative decline in eGFR was 3.01±0.40 ml/min/1.73m(2) . Overall disease progression was observed in 60% patients while 18% died. Among patients with CKD stage 3, 21% progressed to stage 4, 10% to stage 5ND (non-dialysis) and 31% to RRT while mortality was observed in 16% patients. On the other hand, 8% patients with CKD stage 4 progressed to stage 5ND, 31% to RRT and mortality was observed in 24% cases. Patients with CVD, higher systolic blood pressure, elevated phosphate levels, heavy proteinuria, microscopic hematuria and use of diuretics were more likely to develop ESRD. Advancing age, low eGFR, low systolic blood pressure, low hemoglobin and baseline diabetes were found to be significant predictors of mortality while being female reduced risk of mortality. Our data suggest that, in this CKD cohort, patients were more likely to develop ESRD than death. Prime importance should be given to mild forms of CKD to retard and even reverse CKD progression. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  4. The Risks of Incident and Recurrent Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea in Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Kidney Disease Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Phatharacharukul, Parkpoom; Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Edmonds, Peter J; Mahaparn, Pailin; Bruminhent, Jackrapong

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the risks of incident and recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring dialysis. A literature search was performed from inception to February 2015. Studies that reported relative risks, odds ratios, or hazard ratios comparing the risks of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in patients with CKD or ESRD versus those without CKD or ESRD were included. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Twenty studies (nine case-control, seven cohort, and four cross-sectional studies with 162,218,041 patients) were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled RRs of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in patients with CKD and ESRD were 1.95 (95% CI 1.81-2.10) and 2.63 (95% CI 2.04-3.38), respectively. When meta-analysis was limited only to cohort and case-control studies with confounder-adjusted analysis, the pooled RRs of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in patients with CKD and ESRD were 1.89 (95% CI 1.75-2.05) and 2.50 (95% CI 1.49-4.17), respectively. The pooled RR of recurrent C. difficile-associated diarrhea in patients with CKD was 2.61 (95% CI 1.53-4.44). Data on the risk of recurrent C. difficile-associated diarrhea were limited. This meta-analysis demonstrates significantly increased risks of incident and recurrent C. difficile-associated diarrhea in patients with CKD. Furthermore, the magnitude of increased risk of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in ESRD patients is even higher.

  5. Blastocystis and schistosomiasis coinfection in a patient with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Young, Colin R; Yeo, Fred E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) represent a spectrum of impaired immunity with effects on cellular immunity, soluble immune factors, and inflammation. As a result, infections due to impaired immune system responses are responsible for significant morbidity in patients with kidney disease. Because of immune dysfunction in CKD, these patients have reduced probability to clear infections and are susceptible to pathogenic effects of common organisms. We present a case of a patient with CKD coinfected with Schistosoma mansoni and Blastocystis spp. This appears to be the first reported association of Schistosoma mansoni and Blastocystis spp. in a patient with CKD.

  6. Blastocystis and Schistosomiasis Coinfection in a Patient with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Young, Colin R.; Yeo, Fred E.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) represent a spectrum of impaired immunity with effects on cellular immunity, soluble immune factors, and inflammation. As a result, infections due to impaired immune system responses are responsible for significant morbidity in patients with kidney disease. Because of immune dysfunction in CKD, these patients have reduced probability to clear infections and are susceptible to pathogenic effects of common organisms. We present a case of a patient with CKD coinfected with Schistosoma mansoni and Blastocystis spp. This appears to be the first reported association of Schistosoma mansoni and Blastocystis spp. in a patient with CKD. PMID:25389440

  7. Comparison of survival in patients with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis versus peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Beladi Mousavi, Seyed Seifollah; Hayati, Fatemeh; Valavi, Ehsan; Rekabi, Fazlollah; Mousavi, Marzieh Beladi

    2015-03-01

    Although the life expectancy of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has improved in recent years, it is still far below that of the general population. In this retrospective study, we compared the survival of patients with ESRD receiving hemodialysis (HD) versus those on peritoneal dialysis (PD). The study was conducted on patients referred to the HD and PD centers of the Emam Khomini Hospital and the Aboozar Children's Hospital from January 2007 to May 2012 in Ahvaz, Iran. All ESRD patients on maintenance HD or PD for more than two months were included in the study. The survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and the differences between HD and PD patients were tested by the log-rank test. Overall, 239 patients, 148 patients on HD (61.92%) and 91 patients on continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) (38.55%) with mean age of 54.1 ± 17 years were enrolled in the study. Regardless of the causes of ESRD and type of renal replacement therapy (RRT), one-, two- and three-year survival of patients was 65%, 51% and 35%, respectively. There was no significant difference between type of RRT in one- (P-value = 0.737), two- (P-value = 0.534) and three- (P-value = 0.867) year survival. There was also no significant difference between diabetic and non-diabetic patients under HD and CAPD in the one-, two- and three-year survival. Although the three-year survival of diabetic patients under CAPD was lower than that of non-diabetic patients (13% vs. 34%), it was not statistically significant (P-value = 0.50). According to the results of the current study, there is no survival advantage of PD during the first years of initiation of dialysis, and the one-, two- and three-year survival of HD and PD patients is also similar.

  8. [Simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) for an old age male with type 2 diabetes complicated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD): a case report].

    PubMed

    Tian, Bo-le; Zhang, Zhao-da; Liu, Xu-bao; Hu, Wei-ming; Han, Fang-hai; Mai, Gang; Zhao, Ji-chun; Wang, Li; Ren, Yan; Lu, Hui-ming; Luo, Chao-zhi; Luo, Chuan-xing; Yuan, Chao-xin; Lu, Yan-rong

    2007-11-01

    We reported the first case of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) in our hospital. The recipient is a 65 year old male, who suffered type 2 diabetes for 15 years and renal dysfunction for 5 years and other diabetic complications such as retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy. SPK was performed successfully for him in March, 2007, in which the donor kidney was put in left iliac fossa, while the donor pancreas grafted to set in right iliac fossa of recipient, with pancreas exocrine drainage controlled by anastomosis to the small bowel and endocrine release done to the circulatory system. Serum C-peptide, Creatinine and Blood urea nitrogen became normal levels at day 1, 4 and 11 of post-operation respectively. The concentration of blood glucose was stabilized gradually to normal level and therefore the injected insulin was stopped using to the patient at day 16 of post-operative days. OGTT test showed the function of grafted pancreas was normal 3 weeks after transplant, and no transplantation-related complications occurred. With the recipient followed up for 6 months, both his blood glucose level and renal function maintained normal without using injected insulin, and he was getting to recover from other diabetic complications also.

  9. Bullous Dermatosis in an End-Stage Renal Disease Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Abu Minshar, Marwan; Thompson, Andrew; Malik, Yahya Osman

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease including ESRD patients may present with a wide spectrum of cutaneous abnormalities, ranging from xerosis to hyperpigmentation to severe deforming necrotizing lesions. Skin problems are not uncommon in this population of patients, with a clinical presentation that can be quite bizarre, mandating a long list of differential diagnostic possibilities, and subsequent rise of a puzzling diagnostic challenge. We describe an ESRD patient who presented with blistering, nonhealing ulcerative lesions with a diagnostic skin biopsy revealing a mixed pattern of linear IgA bullous dermatosis and dermatitis herpetiformis. A clinical remission could be achieved with pulse intravenous steroids followed by oral maintenance in combination with dapsone, with no evidence of recurrence. PMID:28003921

  10. Correlation of antidepressive agents and the mortality of end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Jui; Loh, El-Wui; Lin, Ching-Heng; Yu, Tung-Min; Chan, Chin-Hong; Lan, Tsuo-Hung

    2012-05-01

    Depression is one of the most common psychological disorders in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and is associated with impaired quality of life and increased mortality and rate of hospitalization. We aimed to examine the contributions of depression and the use of antidepressive agents in the mortality of ESRD patients. A retrospective observatory study was conducted using the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Patients with newly diagnosed as ESRD during the year 2001 to 2007 were collected. A total of 2312 ESRD patients were identified in the database. Statistical analyses were conducted to examine the contributions of depression and exposure of antidepressive agents in mortality rates of ESRD patients. Diagnosis of depression did not influence mortality rate (mortality rate in patients with depression: 26.5%; mortality rate in patients without depression: 26.2%; P= 1.000). Those who had antidepressive agents exposure had significantly higher mortality rate (mortality rate: 32.3%) than those who did not (mortality rate: 24.5%) (P < 0.001). Our findings suggest that (i) the mortality rate of ESRD patients was not affected by the diagnosis of depression, and (ii) exposure of antidepressive agents in ESRD patients was associated with a higher mortality rate. The high mortality rate in ESRD patients exposed to antidepressive agents can be a bias by indication. Equally, a true contribution of the antidepressive agents cannot be ruled out and this needs clarification. © 2012 The Authors. Nephrology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  11. Serum Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Predicts End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nien, Feng-Jung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Jiang, Yi-Der; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Kao, Hsien-Li; Lin, Mao-Shin; Wei, Jung-Nan; Lin, Cheng-Hsin; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) participates in inflammation and catalyzes the deamination of primary amines into aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonia, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. We have shown that serum VAP-1 is higher in patients with diabetes and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and can predict cardiovascular mortality in subjects with diabetes. In this study, we investigated if serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD in diabetic subjects. Methods In this prospective cohort study, a total of 604 type 2 diabetic subjects were enrolled between 1996 to 2003 at National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan, and were followed for a median of 12.36 years. The development of ESRD was ascertained by linking our database with the nationally comprehensive Taiwan Society Nephrology registry. Serum VAP-1 concentrations at enrollment were measured by time-resolved immunofluorometric assay. Results Subjects with serum VAP-1 in the highest tertile had the highest incidence of ESRD (p<0.001). Every 1-SD increase in serum VAP-1 was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.55 (95%CI 1.12–2.14, p<0.01) for the risk of ESRD, adjusted for smoking, history of cardiovascular disease, body mass index, hypertension, HbA1c, duration of diabetes, total cholesterol, use of statins, ankle-brachial index, estimated GFR, and proteinuria. We developed a risk score comprising serum VAP-1, HbA1c, estimated GFR, and proteinuria, which could predict ESRD with good performance (area under the ROC curve = 0.9406, 95%CI 0.8871–0.9941, sensitivity = 77.3%, and specificity = 92.8%). We also developed an algorithm based on the stage of CKD and a risk score including serum VAP-1, which can stratify these subjects into 3 categories with an ESRD risk of 0.101%/year, 0.131%/year, and 2.427%/year, respectively. Conclusions In conclusion, serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD

  12. Restless legs syndrome among Saudi end-stage renal disease patients on hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Siraj O.; Alkhouli, Abeer F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in Saudi patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 3 hemodialysis centers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between June 2012 and September 2013. All patients were individually interviewed and data was collected on the following demographic features, medical history, laboratory test, the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and Berlin Questionnaire. Results: Three hundred and fifty-five patients were recruited. The prevalence of RLS among ESRD patients was 19.4%, with most patients having moderate to severe disease. The RLS was significantly associated with obstructive sleep apnea (p<0.0001) and excessive daytime sleepiness based on the ESS (p=0.009). The RLS showed no correlation with hemodialysis adequacy, chronicity, frequency per week, and hemodialysis duration per session; however, there was a weak negative relation between adequacy of hemodialysis and RLS severity. None of the comorbidities showed any association with RLS. The odds of developing RLS increased significantly with an increasing body mass index (p=0.001). Administration of aspirin (p=0.037) and anticoagulants (p=0.035) were also associated with increased risk of RLS. Conclusion: Restless legs syndrome is common in ESRD patients on hemodialysis, and it is an important source of sleep disruption. In addition to body mass index, Aspirin and anticoagulants may be important risk factors. PMID:25719586

  13. Large-scale mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle of patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Lim, P S; Cheng, Y M; Wei, Y H

    2000-09-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with enhanced oxidative stress. This disease state provides a unique system for investigating the deleterious effect of exogenous sources of free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). To test the hypothesis that uremic milieu might cause more severe damage to mtDNA, we investigated the prevalence and abundance of mtDNA deletions in the skeletal muscles of ESRD patients. The results showed that the frequencies of occurrence of the 4977 bp and 7436 bp deletions of mtDNA in the muscle tissues of the older ESRD patients were higher than those of the younger patients. The frequency of occurrence of the 4977 bp-deleted mtDNA in the muscle was 33.3% for the patients in the age group of < 40 years, 66.6% in the 41-60-year-old group, 100% in the 61-80-year-old group, and 100% in patients >80 years of age, respectively. Only 22% of the normal aged controls carried the 4977 bp mtDNA deletion, whereas 77% (17/22) of the ESRD patients exhibited the mtDNA deletion. Using a semiquantitative PCR method, we determined the proportion of the 4977 bp-deleted mtDNA from the muscles that had been confirmed to harbor the deletion. We found that the proportions of the 4977 bp-deleted mtDNA in the muscle were significantly higher than those of the aged matched controls. Using long-range PCR techniques, a distinctive array of mtDNA deletions was demonstrated in the muscle of uremic patients. In summary, we found diverse and multiple mtDNA deletions in the skeletal muscles of ESRD patients. These deletions are more prevalent and abundant in ESRD patients than those found in normal populations. Accumulation of uremic toxins and impaired free radical scavenging systems may be responsible for the increased oxidative stress in ESRD patients. Such stress may result in oxidative damage and aging-associated mutation of the mitochondrial genome.

  14. The angiotensin-I converting enzyme gene I/D variation contributes to end-stage renal disease risk in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Ming; Ge, Xiaoxu; Dai, Xu; Zhao, Jiao; Fu, Mingzhou; Wang, Tao; Fang, Xiyao; Li, Can; Zhang, Rong; Zhao, Weijing; Zheng, Taishan; Wang, Feng; Yu, Ming; Lei, Tao; Wang, Niansong; Bao, Yuqian; Liu, Limei; Liu, Yanjun; Jia, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    Whether the DD genotype of the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) I/D variation contributes to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remains controversial. Differences in study design, case and control definition, sample size and ethnicity may contribute to the discrepancies reported in association studies. We performed a case-control study to evaluate the association of the ACE I/D variation with ESRD risk in Chinese patients with T2DM receiving hemodialysis and analyzed the genotype-phenotype interaction. Unrelated Chinese patients (n = 432) were classified into the non-diabetic nephropathy (DN) control group (n = 222, duration of diabetes >10 years, no signs of renal involvement) and the DN-ESRD group (n = 210; ESRD due to T2DM, receiving hemodialysis). Polymerase chain reaction was used to genotype ACE I/D for all 432 subjects. The frequencies of the ID + DD genotypes were higher in the DN-ESRD group than non-DN control group (65.2 vs. 50.9 %; adjusted OR 1.98 (95 % CI, 1.31-3.00; P = 0.001). In the DN-ESRD group, the DD genotypic subgroup had significantly elevated HbA1c and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) compared to the II subgroup (both P < 0.05). The DD genotype of the ACE I/D variation may be associated with more elevated blood pressure and HbA1c, and therefore may predict the development, progression and severity of DN-ESRD in Chinese patients with T2DM undergoing hemodialysis.

  15. Serum hepcidin levels in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Rubab, Zille; Amin, Huma; Abbas, Khizer; Hussain, Shabbir; Ullah, Muhammad Ikram; Mohsin, Shahida

    2015-01-01

    Patients on hemodialysis (HD) are usually anemic because of defective erythropoeisis. Hepcidin is a polypeptide that regulates iron homeostasis and could serve as an indicator of functional iron deficiency in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD); this may also aid in the assessment of patient's response to erythropoietin (EPO). The present study was directed to investigate serum levels of hepcidin, iron status and inflammation markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with ESRD on maintenance HD and to observe the correlation of serum hepcidin with conventional iron and inflammatory markers. A total of 42 patients of both sexes on maintenance HD and EPO therapy were enrolled; 42 ageand sex-matched healthy subjects were included as controls. Laboratory tests including complete blood count, serum hepcidin, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), serum ferritin, serum iron and CRP were performed. Serum hepcidin levels were significantly higher in patients with ESRD than in the control group (18.2 ± 2.8 ng/mL and 8.5 ± 2.3 ng/mL, respectively P = 0.000). The hemoglobin, hematocrit, serum iron, TIBC and transferrin saturation levels in the patient group were significantly lower than in the control group. Higher hepcidin levels were found in EPO non-responders (19.6 ± 2.4 ng/mL) while lower levels (16.9 ± 2.5 ng/mL) were seen in responders (P = 0.001). A positive and significant correlation was observed between the values of serum hepcidin and CRP. Our study indicates that higher hepcidin levels are found in ESRD patients on HD and in those not responding to EPO. Our findings suggest that hepcidin might play a role in the pathophysiology of anemia associated with chronic diseases as well as EPO resistance.

  16. Complications and Mortality in Chronic Renal Failure Patients Undergoing Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Comparison Between Dialysis and Renal Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Priscilla K; Chen, Antonia F; Rasouli, Mohammad R; Post, Zachary D; Orozco, Fabio R; Ong, Alvin C

    2016-02-01

    In total joint arthroplasty (TJA) literature, there is a paucity of large cohort studies comparing chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) vs non-CKD/ESRD patients. Thus, the purposes of this study were (1) to identify inhospital complications and mortality in CKD/ESRD and non-CKD/ESRD patients and (2) compare inhospital complications and mortality between dialysis and renal transplantation patients undergoing TJA. We queried the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database for patients with and without diagnosis of CKD/ESRD and those with a renal transplant or on dialysis undergoing primary or revision total knee or hip arthroplasty from 2007 to 2011. Patient comorbidities were identified using the Elixhauser comorbidity index. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes were used to identify postoperative surgical site infections (SSIs), wound complications, deep vein thrombosis, and transfusions. Chronic kidney disease/ESRD was associated with greater risk of SSIs (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; P<.001), wound complications (OR, 1.1; P=.01), transfusions (OR, 1.6; P<.001), deep vein thrombosis (OR, 1.4; P=.03), and mortality (OR, 2.1; P<.001) than non-CKD/ESRD patients. Dialysis patients had higher rates of SSI, wound complications, transfusions, and mortality compared to renal transplant patients. Chronic kidney disease/ESRD patients had a greater risk of SSIs and wound complications compared to those without renal disease, and the risk of these complications was even greater in CKD/ESRD patients receiving dialysis. These findings emphasize the importance of counseling CKD patients about higher potential complications after TJA, and dialysis patients may be encouraged to undergo renal transplantation before TJA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Left-ventricular systolic and diastolic dyssynchrony as assessed by multi-harmonic phase analysis of gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with end-stage renal disease and normal LVEF

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas P.; Verdes, Liudmila; Butler, Javed; Garcia, Ernest V.

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to develop a multi-harmonic phase analysis method to measure diastolic dyssynchrony from conventional gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging(MPI) data and to compare it with systolic dyssynchrony in normal subjects and in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and normal left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Methods 121 consecutive patients with ESRD and normal LVEF and 30 consecutive normal controls were enrolled. Diastolic dyssynchrony parameters were calculated using 3-harmonic phase analysis. Systolic dyssynchrony parameters were calculated using the established 1-harmonic phase analysis. Results The systolic and diastolic dyssynchrony parameters were correlated, but significantly different in both control and ESRD groups, indicating they were physiologically related but measured different LV mechanisms. The systolic and diastolic dyssynchrony parameters were each significantly different between the control and the ESRD groups. Significant systolic and diastolic dyssynchrony were found in 47% and 65% of the entire ESRD group. Conclusion Multi-harmonic phase analysis has been developed to assess diastolic dyssynchrony, which measured a new LV mechanism of regional function from gated SPECT MPI and showed a significantly higher prevalence rate than systolic dyssynchrony in patients with ESRD and normal LVEF. PMID:21229401

  18. The risk for end-stage renal disease is increased after burn.

    PubMed

    Helanterä, Ilkka; Koljonen, Virve; Finne, Patrik; Tukiainen, Erkki; Gissler, Mika

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) commonly complicates burn. Recently, AKI has been suggested to be causally related to chronic end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but controversial data also exist. Our aim was to study the risk of ESRD after burn in a nationwide analysis. All burn patients undergoing hospitalization between 1998 and 2011 were identified from the National Hospital Discharge Register, and the data were linked with the Finnish Registry for Kidney Diseases, which includes all individuals receiving chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT) in Finland. Altogether 41,179 adults were treated at hospitals for burns in Finland between 1998 and 2011. Of these, 86 had a diagnosis of AKI related to the burn. Forty-three burn survivors had ESRD and RRT initiated related to or after the burn. The overall risk for ESRD after burn was increased (standardized incidence ratio, SIR, 2.40, 95% CI 1.73-3.23) compared with the Finnish population. Standardized incidence ratio was 3.11 (95% CI 1.66-5.32) in women and 1.89 (95% CI 1.27-2.69) in men. Of these 43 patients, 38 had a specific non-burn-related diagnosis of ESRD identified in the registry, and ESRD was deemed unlikely to be directly related to the burn. In five patients, the diagnosis of ESRD was unknown cause of renal failure, and causality of the burn with ESRD was evaluated as plausible. In conclusion, a significantly increased risk of ESRD was recorded after a severe burn. Our results do not support increased incidence of ESRD solely as a consequence of AKI due to burn, but burn may increase the risk of ESRD in patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Expansion of polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cells in patients with end-stage renal disease may lead to infectious complications.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yan-Fang; Cai, Rui-Ming; Lin, Qu; Ye, Qing-Jian; Ren, Jian-Hua; Yin, Liang-Hong; Li, Xing

    2017-02-16

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are recently identified immune suppressive cells in multiple chronic inflammations. Here, we investigated MDSCs in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and their clinical significance in these patients and healthy individuals (49 each). Polymorphonuclear and mononuclear MDSCs were investigated by flow cytometry. Patients with ESRD before hemodialysis presented a significantly higher level of polymorphonuclear MDSCs. Depletion of polymorphonuclear-MDSCs resolved T cell IFN-γ responses. By co-culture, T cell proliferation and the production of IFN-γ were abrogated by the addition of polymorphonuclear MDSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Both of these effects were reversed by a reactive oxygen species inhibitor. The levels of reactive oxygen species were higher in polymorphonuclear MDSCs derived from patients with ESRD than from normal individuals. The mRNA level of NOX2, the key protein complex responsible for reactive oxygen species production, was higher in ESRD-related polymorphonuclear MDSCs. The phospho-STAT3 level, a key activator of MDSCs, was higher in ESRD-related polymorphonuclear MDSCs. Finally, the polymorphonuclear MDSC level before and after hemodialysis was positively related to infectious diseases. Patients with ESRD were dichotomized into 2 groups by the amount of polymorphonuclear MDSCs. Patients with high levels of polymorphonuclear MDSCs presented with a higher incidence of infectious events. Thus, polymorphonuclear MDSCs were elevated in ESRD patients with strong immune-suppressive capability through a phospho-STAT3/reactive oxygen species pathway. Hence, polymorphonuclear MDSCs might increase the risk of infectious complications.

  20. Differences in the treatment of male and female patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Florakas, C; Wilson, R; Toffelmire, E; Godwin, M; Morton, R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is a difference in the allocation of types of dialysis to male and female patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). DESIGN: Descriptive study. SETTING: Canada. PATIENTS: All patients registered with the Canadian Organ Replacement Register (CORR) whose treatment began between 1981 and 1991. Data were obtained for 19,732 patients, of whom 18,010 had sufficiently complete data and were being treated with either peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis 3 months after the diagnosis of ESRD. OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportions of patients receiving peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis according to sex. RESULTS: Significantly more male (58.1%) than female (50.8%) patients were receiving hemodialysis 3 months after diagnosis (p < 0.00001). Multivariate analysis to control for the possible confounding effects of age, province of treatment, diagnosis, concurrent illness and year of diagnosis did not explain the difference. CONCLUSIONS: In Canada from 1981 to 1991 male patients were more likely than female patients to receive hemodialysis for the treatment of ESRD. Additional research is needed to explain this finding. PMID:7954176

  1. Losartan reduces the costs of diabetic end-stage renal disease: an Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Seng, Wong Kok; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Han, Dong Cheol; Teong, Chua Chin; Chan, Juliana; Burke, Thomas A; Carides, George W; Choi, Yon Jong

    2005-10-01

    To evaluate losartan and conventional antihypertensive therapy (CT) compared with CT alone on the cost associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Singapore and Taiwan. Reduction of end-points in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with the angiotensin II antagonist losartan (RENAAL) was a multinational, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the renal protective effects of losartan on a background of CT in patients with type 2 diabetes and nephropathy. The primary composite end-point was a doubling of serum creatinine, ESRD or death. Data on the duration of ESRD for the Asian subgroup of patients enrolled in RENAAL were used to estimate the economic benefits of slowing the progression of nephropathy. The cost associated with ESRD was estimated by combining the number of days each patient experienced ESRD with the average daily cost of dialysis from the third-party payer perspective in Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Singapore and Taiwan. Total cost, converted to US dollars, was the sum of ESRD and losartan costs. Losartan plus CT reduced the number of days with ESRD by 37.9 per patient over 3.5 years compared with CT alone. This reduction in ESRD days resulted in a decrease in the cost associated with ESRD, which ranges from $910 to $4346 per patient over 3.5 years across the six countries or regions. After accounting for the cost of losartan, the reduction in ESRD days resulted in net savings in each of the six countries or regions, ranging from $55 to $515 per patient. Treatment with losartan in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy not only reduced the incidence of ESRD among Asian patients, but resulted in direct medical cost savings in countries or regions representing Asia.

  2. The Relationship between Magnesium and Endothelial Function in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shina; Ryu, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Seung-Jung; Ryu, Dong-Ryeol; Kang, Duk-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients tend to have higher serum magnesium values than healthy population due to their positive balance of magnesium in kidney. Recent studies found that magnesium level is positively correlated with endothelial function. Therefore, this study was conducted to define the relationship between magnesium level and endothelial dysfunction in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis (HD). Materials and Methods A total of 27 patients were included in this cross-sectional study. Iontophoresis with laser-Doppler flowmetry, flow mediated dilation (FMD), and carotid intima-media thickness were measured. Patients' average serum magnesium levels were measured over previous three months, including the examination month. Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis and multivariate regression model were used to define the association between magnesium and endothelial function. Results In the univariate analysis, higher magnesium levels were associated with better endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV) of the FMD in ESRD patients on HD (r=0.516, p=0.007). When the participants were divided into two groups according to the median magnesium level (3.47 mg/dL), there was a significant difference in EDV of FMD (less than 3.47 mg/dL, 2.8±1.7%; more than 3.47 mg/dL, 5.1±2.0%, p=0.004). In multivariate analysis, magnesium and albumin were identified as independent factors for FMD (β=1.794, p=0.030 for serum magnesium; β=3.642, p=0.012 for albumin). Conclusion This study demonstrated that higher serum magnesium level may be associated with better endothelial function in ESRD patients on HD. In the future, a large, prospective study is needed to elucidate optimal range of serum magnesium levels in ESRD on HD patients. PMID:27593873

  3. The Relationship between Magnesium and Endothelial Function in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients on Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shina; Ryu, Jung Hwa; Kim, Seung Jung; Ryu, Dong Ryeol; Kang, Duk Hee; Choi, Kyu Bok

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients tend to have higher serum magnesium values than healthy population due to their positive balance of magnesium in kidney. Recent studies found that magnesium level is positively correlated with endothelial function. Therefore, this study was conducted to define the relationship between magnesium level and endothelial dysfunction in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis (HD). A total of 27 patients were included in this cross-sectional study. Iontophoresis with laser-Doppler flowmetry, flow mediated dilation (FMD), and carotid intima-media thickness were measured. Patients' average serum magnesium levels were measured over previous three months, including the examination month. Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis and multivariate regression model were used to define the association between magnesium and endothelial function. In the univariate analysis, higher magnesium levels were associated with better endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV) of the FMD in ESRD patients on HD (r=0.516, p=0.007). When the participants were divided into two groups according to the median magnesium level (3.47 mg/dL), there was a significant difference in EDV of FMD (less than 3.47 mg/dL, 2.8±1.7%; more than 3.47 mg/dL, 5.1±2.0%, p=0.004). In multivariate analysis, magnesium and albumin were identified as independent factors for FMD (β=1.794, p=0.030 for serum magnesium; β=3.642, p=0.012 for albumin). This study demonstrated that higher serum magnesium level may be associated with better endothelial function in ESRD patients on HD. In the future, a large, prospective study is needed to elucidate optimal range of serum magnesium levels in ESRD on HD patients.

  4. Adropin and irisin levels in relation to nutrition, body composition, and insulin resistance in patients with end-stage renal disease on chronic hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kałużna, Małgorzata; Hoppe, Krzysztof; Schwermer, Krzysztof; Ibrahim, Aisha Y; Pawlaczyk, Krzysztof; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna

    2016-07-25

    INTRODUCTION    Newly discovered myokines, adropin, and irisin, are regulators of energy homeostasis and metabolism in humans. In end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the significance and role of irisin and adropin as metabolism regulators are still unclear. OBJECTIVES    The aim of this study was to evaluate serum adropin and irisin levels and establish their relation to insulin resistance, nutritional status, and hydration status in patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD) and on peritoneal dialysis (PD). PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study consisted of 71 subjects, including 48 patients (18 women, 30 men; median age, 56.5 years; range, 26-84 years) either on HD (n = 41) or PD (n = 7) and 36 healthy controls matched for age and sex. We measured the serum levels of adropin, irisin, creatinine, albumin, glucose, and insulin, as well as the plasma levels of lipids. The bioimpedance method was used to evaluate the body composition and overhydration in patients with ESRD. RESULTS    Irisin levels were significantly lower in patients with ESRD compared with controls, but there were no differences in adropin levels between both study groups. Adropin levels were inversely correlated with body mass, lean tissue mass, total, intracellular, and extracellular water, and albumin concentrations in patients with ESRD. Irisin levels were positively correlated with glucose levels and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. No significant correlations were observed between adropin and irisin concentrations and overhydration. CONCLUSIONS    Adropin may be considered as a new marker of nutritional status in patients with ESRD. The significance and cause of low irisin levels characteristic for these patients are still unclear. Adropin and irisin should be further investigated as possible markers of cachexia and insulin resistance in patients with ESRD.

  5. Living with Restless Legs Syndrome/Willis-Ekbom Disease.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Naoko

    2015-09-01

    Restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED) is commonly seen in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but this condition has not been properly recognized. The prevalence of RLS/WED in ESRD shows the ethnic variation (7%-68%), with the similar tendency of primary RLS/WED. Although RLS/WED in ESRD is defined in secondary RLS/WED, the factors of ESRD that are involved in the genesis of RLS/WED remain unknown. Even after renal transplantation, RLS/WED symptoms do not completely disappear, and genetic predisposition to RLS/WED may play an important role in causing RLS/WED. Long-term intervention for RLS/WED and ESRD will be necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Noninvasive assessment of coronary vasodilation using cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients at high risk for coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Patricia K; Meyer, Craig; Engvall, Jan; Yang, Phillip; McConnell, Michael V

    2008-01-01

    Background Impaired coronary vasodilation to both endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent stimuli have been associated with atherosclerosis. Direct measurement of coronary vasodilation using x-ray angiography or intravascular ultrasound is invasive and, thus, not appropriate for asymptomatic patients or for serial follow-up. In this study, high-resolution coronary cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) was used to investigate the vasodilatory response to nitroglycerine (NTG) of asymptomatic patients at high risk for CAD. Methods A total of 46 asymptomatic subjects were studied: 13 high-risk patients [8 with diabetes mellitus (DM), 5 with end stage renal disease (ESRD)] and 33 age-matched controls. Long-axis and cross-sectional coronary artery images were acquired pre- and 5 minutes post-sublingual NTG using a sub-mm-resolution multi-slice spiral coronary CMR sequence. Coronary cross sectional area (CSA) was measured on pre- and post-NTG images and % coronary vasodilation was calculated. Results Patients with DM and ESRD had impaired coronary vasodilation to NTG compared to age-matched controls (17.8 ± 7.3% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%, p = 0.002). This remained significant for ESRD patients alone (14.8 ± 7.7% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%; p = 0.003) and for DM patients alone (19.8 ± 6.3% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%; p = 0.049), with a non-significant trend toward greater impairment in the ESRD vs. DM patients (14.8 ± 7.7% vs. 19.8 ± 6.3%; p = 0.23). Conclusion Noninvasive coronary CMR demonstrates impairment of coronary vasodilation to NTG in high-risk patients with DM and ESRD. This may provide a functional indicator of subclinical atherosclerosis and warrants clinical follow up to determine prognostic significance. PMID:18513419

  7. Debate: Should dialysis at home be mandatory for all suitable ESRD patients?: home-based dialysis therapies are the second choice after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lewicki, Michelle C; Polkinghorne, Kevan R; Kerr, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Since their inception in the 1960s, home-based dialysis therapies have been viable alternatives to conventional thrice weekly in center hemodialysis. In spite of this, uptake of these therapies has been steadily declining over past decades with utilization varying globally; dependent on training support, funding models, and prevailing Nephrologist beliefs. In the Australian context, home dialysis (predominantly peritoneal dialysis and extended hours nocturnal hemodialysis) is now again increasing in popularity--with enthusiasm driven not only by evidence of an array of physiological and psychological patient benefit but also significant economic advantage: critical in the current climate where dialysis therapies in Australia take approximately $1 billion dollars per year from the healthcare budget. When assessing the significant advantages of home-based therapies, it is important to consider not only the increasing body of evidence around improved survival but also that for dramatically better health-related quality of life, decreased economic burden and the overall benefits of undertaking treatment in the home. With patient-centered care an increasingly important aspect of our decision making paradigm, home-based dialysis should be considered as the default option in all patients transitioning to renal replacement therapy.

  8. Erythropoietin resistance in end-stage renal disease patient with gastric antral vascular ectasia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Desiree Ji Re; Fragata, Juliana; Pestana, José Osmar Medina; Draibe, Sergio; Canziani, Maria Eugênia; Cendoroglo, Miguel; Góes, Miguel Ângelo de

    2015-01-01

    We observed a case of recombinant human erythropoietin resistance caused by Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia in a 40-year-old female with ESRD on hemodialysis. Some associated factors such as autoimmune disease, hemolysis, heart and liver disease were discarded on physical examination and complementary tests. The diagnosis is based on the clinical history and endoscopic appearance of watermelon stomach. The histologic findings are fibromuscular proliferation and capillary ectasia with microvascular thrombosis of the lamina propria. However, these histologic findings are not necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia is a serious condition and should be considered in ESRD patients on hemodialysis with anemia and resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin because GAVE is potentially curable with specific endoscopic treatment method or through surgical procedure.

  9. Severe renal osteodystrophy in a pediatric patient with end-stage renal disease: Sagliker syndrome?

    PubMed

    Yavascan, Onder; Kose, Engin; Alparslan, Caner; Sirin Kose, Seda; Bal, Alkan; Kanik, Ali; Aksu, Nejat

    2013-07-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is a multifactorial disorder of bone metabolism in chronic kidney disease (CKD). As CKD progresses, ensuing abnormalities in vitamin D metabolism and parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion result in distortions in trabecular microarchitecture, thinning of the cortical shell, and increased cortical porosity. The recently described Sagliker syndrome (SS) might be an exaggerated version of ROD and is a very striking and prominent feature of secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It includes a distorted facial appearance, short stature, extremely severe maxillary and mandibulary changes, soft tissue tumors in the mouth, teeth/dental abnormalities, fingertip changes, knee and scapula deformities, hearing abnormalities, and neurologic and psychological problems. We herein describe an affected 14-year-old girl with severe ROD resulting from ESRD, who had severe peripheral and central neurologic problems caused by bone deformities, mimicking the features of Sagliker syndrome. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bioprosthetic versus mechanical prostheses for valve replacement in end-stage renal disease patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong Fang; Zhou, Jessie J.; Karagaratnam, Aran; Phan, Steven; Yan, Tristan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) indicated for dialysis are increasingly requiring cardiac valve surgery. The choice of bioprosthetic or mechanic valve prosthesis for such patients requires careful risk assessment. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess current evidence available. Methods A comprehensive search from six electronic databases was performed from their inception to February 2015. Results from patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac surgery for bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement were identified. Results Sixteen studies with 8,483 patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac valve replacement surgery were included. No evidence of publication bias was detected. Prior angioplasty by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery was significantly higher in the bioprosthetic group compared to the mechanical group (16.0% vs. 12.0%, P=0.04); all other preoperative baseline patient characteristics were similar. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality or all-cause mortality between the two comparisons. Compared with the mechanical group, the frequency of bleeding (5.2% vs. 6.4%, P=0.04) and risk of thromboembolism (2.7% vs. 12.8%, P=0.02) were significantly lower in the bioprosthetic group. There were similar rates of reoperation and valve endocarditis. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that patients with ESRD undergoing bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement had similar mid-long term survival. The bioprosthetic group had lower rates of bleeding and thromboembolism. Further studies are required to differentiate the impact of valve location. The presented results may be applicable for ESRD patients requiring prosthetic valve replacement. PMID:27162649

  11. Prevalence of pre-end-stage renal disease care and associated outcomes among urban, micropolitan, and rural dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Maripuri, Saugar; Ikizler, T Alp; Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2013-01-01

    Pre-end-stage renal disease (ESRD) care is associated with improved outcomes among patients receiving dialysis. It is unknown what proportion of US micropolitan and rural dialysis patients receive pre-ESRD care and benefit from such care when compared to urban. A retrospective cohort study was performed using data from the US Renal Data System. Patients ≥18 years old who initiated dialysis in 2006 and 2007 were classified as rural, micropolitan or urban and the prevalence of pre-ESRD care (early nephrology care >6 months, permanent vascular access, -dietary education) was determined using the medical evidence report. The association of pre-ESRD care with dialysis mortality and transplantation was assessed using Cox regression with stratification for geographic residence. Of 204,463 dialysis patients, 80% were urban, 10.2% were micropolitan and 9.8% were rural. Overall attainment of pre-ESRD care was poor. After adjustment, there were no significant geographic differences in attainment of early nephrology care or permanent dialysis access. Receiving care reduced all-cause mortality and increased the likelihood of transplantation to a similar degree regardless of geographic residence. Both micropolitan and rural patients received less dietary education (relative risk = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.76-0.84 and relative risk = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.80-0.89, respectively). Among patients who receive dialysis, the prevalence of early nephrology care and permanent dialysis access is poor and does not vary by geographic residence. Micropolitan and rural patients receive less dietary education despite an observed mortality benefit, suggesting that barriers may exist to quality dietary care in more remote locations. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Whole body counter assessment of internal radiocontamination in patients with end-stage renal disease living in areas affected by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Shimmura, Hiroaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Akiyama, Junichi; Nomura, Shuhei; Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Tokiwa, Michio

    2015-12-07

    To assess internal radiocontamination of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who were regularly taking haemodialysis (HD) and living in areas affected by the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant after the Great East Japan earthquake on 11 March 2011. Internal radiocontamination in 111 patients with ESRD regularly taking HD at Jyoban Hospital in Iwaki city, Fukushima from July 2012 to November 2012 was assessed with a whole body counter (WBC). The maximum annual effective dose was calculated from the detected Cs-137 levels. Interviews concerning patient dietary preferences and outdoor activities were also conducted. Among the 111 patients tested, internal radiocontamination with Cs-137 was detected in two participants, but the levels were marginal and just exceeded the detection limit (250 Bq/body). The tentatively calculated maximum annual effective dose ranged from 0.008 to 0.009 mSv/year, which is far below the 1 mSv/year limit set by the government of Japan. Relative to 238 non-ESRD participants, patients with ERSD had significantly more opportunities to consume locally grown produce that was not distributed to the market (p<0.01). However, the percentage of patients with ESRD with detectable Cs (1.8%) was lower than that for non-ESRD participants (3.8%), although this difference was not significant (p=0.51). These findings suggest that internal radiocontamination levels and the calculated annual additional effective doses were negligible for patients with ESRD taking HD in areas affected by the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant. Although HD is suggested to promote Cs-137 excretion, continuous inspection of locally grown produce together with WBC screening for radiocontamination should be continued for patients with ESRD regularly taking HD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Whole body counter assessment of internal radiocontamination in patients with end-stage renal disease living in areas affected by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Shimmura, Hiroaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Akiyama, Junichi; Nomura, Shuhei; Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Tokiwa, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess internal radiocontamination of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who were regularly taking haemodialysis (HD) and living in areas affected by the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant after the Great East Japan earthquake on 11 March 2011. Methods Internal radiocontamination in 111 patients with ESRD regularly taking HD at Jyoban Hospital in Iwaki city, Fukushima from July 2012 to November 2012 was assessed with a whole body counter (WBC). The maximum annual effective dose was calculated from the detected Cs-137 levels. Interviews concerning patient dietary preferences and outdoor activities were also conducted. Results Among the 111 patients tested, internal radiocontamination with Cs-137 was detected in two participants, but the levels were marginal and just exceeded the detection limit (250 Bq/body). The tentatively calculated maximum annual effective dose ranged from 0.008 to 0.009 mSv/year, which is far below the 1 mSv/year limit set by the government of Japan. Relative to 238 non-ESRD participants, patients with ERSD had significantly more opportunities to consume locally grown produce that was not distributed to the market (p<0.01). However, the percentage of patients with ESRD with detectable Cs (1.8%) was lower than that for non-ESRD participants (3.8%), although this difference was not significant (p=0.51). Conclusions These findings suggest that internal radiocontamination levels and the calculated annual additional effective doses were negligible for patients with ESRD taking HD in areas affected by the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant. Although HD is suggested to promote Cs-137 excretion, continuous inspection of locally grown produce together with WBC screening for radiocontamination should be continued for patients with ESRD regularly taking HD. PMID:26644125

  14. Clearance of melatonin and 6-sulfatoxymelatonin by hemodialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Lüdemann, P; Zwernemann, S; Lerchl, A

    2001-10-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) suffer from a number of related disorders. These include endocrine abnormalities, sleep disturbances, and depression. Melatonin is involved in the synchronization of exogenous zeitgebers with the endogenous rhythms, and it has effects on various psychological factors. As the concentrations of melatonin and the effects of dialysis have only occasionally been investigated in ESRD, we performed a study involving 35 patients, measuring the serum concentrations of melatonin, and of its major metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), before and after hemodialysis. Serum samples taken during morning hours from a control group (n=11) with intact kidneys served as controls. Patients were dialyzed for approximately 4 hr between 07:00 and 13:00 hr (S1), between 13:00 and 20:00 hr (S2), or between 18:30 and 22:30 hr (S3). Mean melatonin concentrations before hemodialysis were highly elevated when compared with the controls (40.6 vs. 6.7 pg/mL; P<0.001). Although melatonin levels were decreased to 20.3 pg/mL after dialysis, they were still well above the control levels. Likewise, aMT6s concentrations before dialysis were highly elevated in ESRD patients before dialysis when compared with controls (39.5 vs. 2.0 pg/mL; P<0.001), and also decreased by dialysis to levels still well above control levels (25.3 pg/mL). Clearance efficacy was better for melatonin (48.9%) than for aMT6s (36.6%; P<0.05). In ESRD patients, a diurnal rhythm for melatonin was observed (S1, 45.1 pg/mL; S2, 31.5 pg/mL; S3, 48.7 pg/mL; P<0.05), indicating that the normal synthesis rhythm is maintained. None of the following secondary disorders were correlated with melatonin concentrations: insomnia, delayed sleep onset, night-time arousals, and restless-leg syndrome. The reason for this observation is probably the melatonin concentrations, which were so high that no sub-classification could be identified. It is concluded that in ESRD patients, hemodialysis is unable

  15. Coexisting Tertiary Hyperparathyroidism and Severe Hypothyroidism in an End-Stage Renal Disease Patient on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Osman Malik, Yahya; Raza, Syed Mohsin; Arunselvan, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical syndrome of uremia is a bedside diagnosis which mimics a wide spectrum of other clinical disorders, most commonly thyroid disease. End-stage renal disease (ESRD), as a disorder, frequently alters thyroid hormone metabolism, and this is not significantly normalized by dialysis. Although the thyroid and parathyroid glands are considered independent organs, their anatomical juxtaposition in the neck, as well as sharing a common embryological origin, might play a role in some of the possible association between thyroid and parathyroid disease. It has been demonstrated in experimental animals that changes in the thyroid gland might lead to pathological changes in the parathyroids and vice versa. Case Presentation: An incidence of as high as 25% of hypothyroidism has been reported in patients with ESRD on dialysis. We report a patient with ESRD on maintenance hemodialysis (MHDx) who has had a combination of profound tertiary hyperparathyroidism (HPTH) and severe hypothyroidism. Conclusions: Literature search revealed an increased prevalence of hypothyroidism with secondary HPTH from renal failure. Although there is increased prevalence of hypothyroid state in secondary HPTH from renal failure, the association appears much weaker in primary HPTH and again no conclusive pathological relation has been identified between the two endocrine glands. A closer look and perhaps long-term prospective studies are required in the future to determine this association. PMID:25883915

  16. Patients With Diabetic Foot Disease Fear Major Lower-Extremity Amputation More Than Death.

    PubMed

    Wukich, Dane K; Raspovic, Katherine M; Suder, Natalie C

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most-feared complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), comparing those with diabetic foot pathology with those without diabetic foot pathology. We determined the frequency of patients ranking major lower-extremity amputation (LEA) as their greatest fear in comparison to blindness, death, diabetic foot infection (DFI), or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring dialysis. We further categorized the study group patients (N = 207) by their pathology such as diabetic foot ulcer (DFU), Charcot neuroarthropathy, foot infection, or acute neuropathic fractures and dislocations. The control group (N = 254) was comprised of patients with diabetes who presented with common non-diabetes-related foot pathology. A total of 461 patients were enrolled in this study and included 254 patients without diabetic foot complications and 207 patients with diabetic foot problems. When comparing patients with and without diabetic disease, no significant differences were observed with regard to their fear of blindness, DFI, or ESRD requiring dialysis. Patients with diabetic foot disease (61 of 207, 31.9%) were 136% more likely (odds ratio [OR] = 2.36; 95% CI = 1.51-3.70; P = .002] to rank major LEA as their greatest fear when compared with diabetic patients without foot disease (42 of 254, 16.5%) and were 49% less likely (OR = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.34-0.79; P = .002) to rank death as their greatest fear compared with patients without diabetic foot disease. With diabetic foot pathology fear major LEA more than death, foot infection, or ESRD. Variables that were associated with ranking LEA as the greatest fear were the presence of a diabetic-related foot complication, duration of DM ≥10 years, insulin use, and the presence of peripheral neuropathy. Level II: Prospective, Case controlled study.

  17. Rationale and design of a patient-centered medical home intervention for patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Porter, Anna C; Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Fischer, Michael J; Gallardo, Rani; Berbaum, Michael L; Lash, James P; Castillo, Sheila; Schiffer, Linda; Sharp, Lisa K; Tulley, John; Arruda, Jose A; Hynes, Denise M

    2015-05-01

    In the U.S., more than 400,000 individuals with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) require hemodialysis (HD) for renal replacement therapy. ESRD patients experience a high burden of morbidity, mortality, resource utilization, and poor quality of life (QOL). Under current care models, ESRD patients receive fragmented care from multiple providers at multiple locations. The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a team approach, providing coordinated care across the healthcare continuum. While this model has shown some early benefits for complex chronic diseases such as diabetes, it has not been applied to HD patients. This study is a non-randomized quasi-experimental intervention trial implementing a Patient-Centered Medical Home for Kidney Disease (PCMH-KD). The PCMH-KD extends the existing dialysis care team (comprised of a nephrologist, dialysis nurse, dialysis technician, social worker, and dietitian) by adding a general internist, pharmacist, nurse coordinator, and a community health worker, all of whom will see the patients together, and separately, as needed. The primary goal is to implement a comprehensive, multidisciplinary care team to improve care coordination, quality of life, and healthcare use for HD patients. Approximately 240 patients will be recruited from two sites; a non-profit university-affiliated dialysis center and an independent for-profit dialysis center. Outcomes include (i) patient-reported outcomes, including QOL and satisfaction; (ii) clinical outcomes, including blood pressure and diet; (iii) healthcare use, including emergency room visits and hospitalizations; and (iv) staff perceptions. Given the significant burden that patients with ESRD on HD experience, enhanced care coordination provides an opportunity to reduce this burden and improve QOL.

  18. Rationale and Design of a Patient-Centered Medical Home Intervention for Patients with End-stage Renal Disease on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Anna C.; Fitzgibbon, Marian L.; Fischer, Michael J.; Gallardo, Rani; Berbaum, Michael L.; Lash, James P.; Castillo, Sheila; Schiffer, Linda; Sharp, Lisa K.; Tulley, John; Arruda, Jose A.; Hynes, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    In the U.S., more than 400,000 individuals with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) require hemodialysis (HD) for renal replacement therapy. ESRD patients experience a high burden of morbidity, mortality, resource utilization, and poor quality of life (QOL). Under current care models ESRD patients receive fragmented care from multiple providers at multiple locations. The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a team approach, providing coordinated care across the healthcare continuum. While this model has shown some early benefits for complex chronic diseases such as diabetes, it has not been applied to HD patients. This study is a non-randomized quasi-experimental intervention trial implementing a Patient-Centered Medical Home for Kidney Disease (PCMH-KD). The PCMH-KD extends the existing dialysis care team (comprised of a nephrologist, dialysis nurse, dialysis technician, social worker, and dietitian) by adding a general internist, pharmacist, nurse coordinator, and a community health worker, all of whom will see the patients together, and separately, as needed. The primary goal is to implement a comprehensive, multidisciplinary care team to improve care coordination, quality of life, and healthcare use for HD patients. Approximately 240 patients will be recruited from two sites; a non-profit university-affiliated dialysis center and an independent for-profit dialysis center. Outcomes include: i) patient-reported outcomes, including QOL and satisfaction; ii) clinical outcomes, including blood pressure and diet; iii) healthcare use, including emergency room visits and hospitalizations; and iv) staff perceptions. Given the significant burden that patients with ESRD on HD experience, enhanced care coordination provides an opportunity to reduce this burden and improve QOL. PMID:25735489

  19. Healthy Dietary Patterns and Risk of Mortality and ESRD in CKD: A Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jaimon T; Palmer, Suetonia C; Wai, Shu Ning; Ruospo, Marinella; Carrero, Juan-Jesus; Campbell, Katrina L; Strippoli, Giovanni F M

    2017-02-07

    Patients with CKD are advised to follow dietary recommendations that restrict individual nutrients. Emerging evidence indicates overall eating patterns may better predict clinical outcomes, however, current data on dietary patterns in kidney disease are limited. This systematic review aimed to evaluate the association between dietary patterns and mortality or ESRD among adults with CKD. Medline, Embase, and reference lists were systematically searched up to November 24, 2015 by two independent review authors. Eligible studies were longitudinal cohort studies reporting the association of dietary patterns with mortality, cardiovascular events, or ESRD. A total of seven studies involving 15,285 participants were included. Healthy dietary patterns were generally higher in fruit and vegetables, fish, legumes, cereals, whole grains, and fiber, and lower in red meat, salt, and refined sugars. In six studies, healthy dietary patterns were consistently associated with lower mortality (3983 events; adjusted relative risk, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.63 to 0.83; risk difference of 46 fewer (29-63 fewer) events per 1000 people over 5 years). There was no statistically significant association between healthy dietary patterns and risk of ESRD (1027 events; adjusted relative risk, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.68 to 1.40). Healthy dietary patterns are associated with lower mortality in people with kidney disease. Interventions to support adherence to increased fruit and vegetable, fish, legume, whole grain, and fiber intake, and reduced red meat, sodium, and refined sugar intake could be effective tools to lower mortality in people with kidney disease. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. Clinical management of restless legs syndrome in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sahli, Zeyad T; Jo, Jae; Mousa, Shaker A; Tarazi, Frank I

    2017-02-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological movement disorder, characterized by restless and unpleasant sensations in the deep inside of legs. The symptoms of RLS are less noticeable during daytime, but more prevalent at night. Therefore, the disorder can induce low quality of life, insomnia, and impairment of daytime activity. RLS in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients is especially problematic due to premature discontinuation of dialysis and increased mortality. The prevalence of RLS among dialysis patients is much higher compared to the prevalence of the same disorder in patients with normal renal functions. Even though there are recommended treatment guidelines for the general population established by Medical Advisory Board of the RLS foundation, which include the use of dopamine agonists, levodopa, gabapentin, benzodiazepines, and opioids, limited information is available on the effects of these therapies in ESRD patients. Since the existing clinical data were extrapolated from small sample sizes in short-term clinical trials, further clinical studies are still needed to better assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of these medications in patients with ESRD.

  1. Factors affecting adherence of end-stage renal disease patients to an exercise programme.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A; Stephens, R; McKnight, T; Dodd, S

    1991-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that regular exercise is both physiologically and psychologically beneficial to patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, ESRD patients traditionally have a high non-adherence level to their self-care and medical regimens. To date, their adherence to exercise programmes has not been studied. Background information about employment, medical history, previous exercise habits and locus of control was obtained from 40 volunteer ESRD patients who started exercise at home. Twenty-eight participants maintained the exercise programme, consisting of aerobic activity lasting an average of 25 min, four times per week, for 12 weeks. The adherent patients were found to have encouraging support groups (75 versus 25%), to be between 41 and 60 years of age (64 versus 33%), to have been on dialysis for between 2 and 5 years, and to have loci of control (feeling of control over life events) classed as 'internal' (68 versus 25%). Factors such as sex, race, employment status and depression were found to have little influence on adherence. The major finding of this study was that patients adherent to exercise could be distinguished by unique psychological and psychosocial factors, and that adherence in this population was higher (70 compared with 50%) than some estimates for the general population. PMID:1751896

  2. Comparison of plasma and erythrocyte membrane fatty acid compositions in patients with end-stage renal disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sertoglu, Erdim; Kurt, Ismail; Tapan, Serkan; Uyanik, Metin; Serdar, Muhittin A; Kayadibi, Huseyin; El-Fawaeir, Saad

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the serum lipid profile and fatty acid (FA) compositions of erythrocyte membrane (EM) and plasma in three different patient groups (group 1: type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)+end-stage renal disease (ESRD), group 2: ESRD, group 4: T2DM) and healthy controls (group 3) simultaneously. 40 ESRD patients treated with hemodialysis (HD) in Gulhane School of Medicine (20 with T2DM) and 32 controls (17 with T2DM, 15 healthy controls) were included in the study. Plasma and EM FA concentrations were measured by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Plasma and EM palmitic acid (PA) and stearic acid (SA) levels were significantly higher in T2DM patients compared to controls (p=0.040 and p=0.002 for plasma, p=0.001 and p=0.010 for EM, respectively). EM docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels were also significantly lower in patients with ESRD+T2DM and ESRD compared to controls (p=0.004 and p=0.037, respectively). Patients with insulin resistance display a pattern of high long chain saturated FAs (PA, SA and arachidic acids). However, while there are no recognized standards for normal EM DHA content, decreased levels of EM DHA in ESRD patient groups (groups 1 and 2) suggest that there may be reduced endogenous synthesis of DHA in HD subjects, due to the decreased functionality of desaturase and elongase enzymes. Because membrane PUFA content affects membrane fluidity and cell signaling, these findings are worthy of further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Projection of the supply of and demand for board-certified nephrologists for ESRD in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Huan-Cheng; Liou, Yi-Min; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2008-04-01

    Taiwan is the country where end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is most prevalent. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the rising demand for dialysis or transplantation as a result of ESRD can be balanced by the supply of board-certified (B-C) nephrologists. Two Markov processes were applied for the projection of the supply of B-C nephrologists in ESRD and for the projection of the demand from ESRD in 2020, assuming linear, exponential growth and no increase. The supply of B-C nephrologists was projected at 1346 in 2020. To make allowance for the share of total time of professional activities in full-time equivalent (FTE) for B-C nephrologists, the demand was 1556, 962 and 2652 with assumptions of steady, linear and exponential growth, respectively. By the year 2020, 210 and 1306 additional FTE nephrologists will be required to meet, respectively, a linear and an exponential increase in demand from ESRD. The projection of the supply of and the demand for B-C nephrologists was made in this study using two Markov processes. The methods and results can be adopted as a reference for health manpower planning on B-C nephrologists.

  4. Renal Parenchymal Area and Risk of ESRD in Boys with Posterior Urethral Valves

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Jose E.; Furth, Susan L.; Zderic, Stephen A.; Canning, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Approximately 20% of boys with posterior urethral valves develop ESRD; however, few factors associated with the risk of ESRD have been identified. The objective of this study was to determine if renal parenchymal area, defined as the area of the kidney minus the area of the pelvicaliceal system on first postnatal ultrasound, is associated with the risk of ESRD in infants with posterior urethral valves. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A retrospective cohort of boys who were diagnosed with posterior urethral valves at less than 6 months of age between 1988 and 2011 and followed for at least 1 year at a free-standing children’s hospital was assembled. Cox proportional hazard regression and Kaplan–Meier analysis were used to estimate the association between renal parenchymal area and time to ESRD. Cox models were adjusted for age at presentation, minimum creatinine 1 month after bladder decompression, and vesicoureteral reflux. Results Sixty patients were followed for 393 person-years. Eight patients developed ESRD. Median renal parenchymal area was 15.9 cm2 (interquartile range=13.0–21.6 cm2). Each 1-cm2 increase in renal parenchymal area was associated with a lower risk of ESRD (hazard ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.42 to 0.98). The rate of time to ESRD was 10 times higher in boys with renal parenchymal area<12.4 cm2 than boys with renal parenchymal area≥12.4 cm2 (P<0.001). Renal parenchymal area could best discriminate children at risk for ESRD when the minimum creatinine in the first 1 month after bladder decompression was between 0.8 and 1.1 mg/dl. Conclusion In boys with posterior urethral valves presenting during the first 6 months of life, lower renal parenchymal area is associated with an increased risk of ESRD during childhood. The predictive ability of renal parenchymal area, which is available at time of diagnosis, should be validated in a larger, prospectively-enrolled cohort. PMID:24311709

  5. Association of eGFR-Related Loci Identified by GWAS with Incident CKD and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Böger, Carsten A.; Gorski, Mathias; Li, Man; Hoffmann, Michael M.; Huang, Chunmei; Yang, Qiong; Teumer, Alexander; Krane, Vera; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Haak, Thomas; Boes, Eva; Coassin, Stefan; Coresh, Josef; Kollerits, Barbara; Haun, Margot; Paulweber, Bernhard; Köttgen, Anna; Li, Guo; Shlipak, Michael G.; Powe, Neil; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Dehghan, Abbas; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André; Hofman, Albert; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Witteman, Jacqueline; Bochud, Murielle; Siscovick, David; Rettig, Rainer; Kronenberg, Florian; Wanner, Christoph; Thadhani, Ravi I.; Heid, Iris M.

    2011-01-01

    Family studies suggest a genetic component to the etiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end stage renal disease (ESRD). Previously, we identified 16 loci for eGFR in genome-wide association studies, but the associations of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for incident CKD or ESRD are unknown. We thus investigated the association of these loci with incident CKD in 26,308 individuals of European ancestry free of CKD at baseline drawn from eight population-based cohorts followed for a median of 7.2 years (including 2,122 incident CKD cases defined as eGFR <60ml/min/1.73m2 at follow-up) and with ESRD in four case-control studies in subjects of European ancestry (3,775 cases, 4,577 controls). SNPs at 11 of the 16 loci (UMOD, PRKAG2, ANXA9, DAB2, SHROOM3, DACH1, STC1, SLC34A1, ALMS1/NAT8, UBE2Q2, and GCKR) were associated with incident CKD; p-values ranged from p = 4.1e-9 in UMOD to p = 0.03 in GCKR. After adjusting for baseline eGFR, six of these loci remained significantly associated with incident CKD (UMOD, PRKAG2, ANXA9, DAB2, DACH1, and STC1). SNPs in UMOD (OR = 0.92, p = 0.04) and GCKR (OR = 0.93, p = 0.03) were nominally associated with ESRD. In summary, the majority of eGFR-related loci are either associated or show a strong trend towards association with incident CKD, but have modest associations with ESRD in individuals of European descent. Additional work is required to characterize the association of genetic determinants of CKD and ESRD at different stages of disease progression. PMID:21980298

  6. Not Early Referral but Planned Dialysis Improves Quality of Life and Depression in Newly Diagnosed End Stage Renal Disease Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji In; Kim, Myounghee; Kim, Ho; An, Jung Nam; Lee, Jeonghwan; Yang, Seung Hee; Cho, Jang-Hee; Kim, Yong-Lim; Park, Ki-Soo; Oh, Yun Kyu; Lim, Chun Soo; Kim, Dong Ki; Kim, Yon Su; Lee, Jung Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has recently become an important issue. It reportedly affects morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In this study, we investigated whether early referral and planned dialysis improve the HRQOL and depression of patients with ESRD. Methods We prospectively enrolled newly diagnosed patients with ESRD, from 31 hospitals in Korea, who completed questionnaires at 3 months after dialysis. We also got follow-up survey at 1 year after dialysis. To measure HRQOL and depression, Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form 36 (KDQOL-36) and Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI) were utilized. Results A total of 643 patients were analyzed. Referral type did not affect either KDQOL-36 or BDI scores. However, the planned dialysis group showed significantly better scores in 4 of 5 KDQOL-36 domains than did the unplanned group at 3 months after dialysis and partly, the effect was sustained for 1 year after dialysis. The benefit of planned dialysis was significant after adjusting for age, sex, type of dialysis, marital status, educational attainment, occupation, modified Charlson comorbidity index, albumin, and hemoglobin levels. BDI scores were also lower which indicate less depressive mood in planned dialysis group than those in unplanned group both at 3 months and 1 year after dialysis. Conclusions Not early referral but planned dialysis improved both the short- and long-term HRQOL and depression of patients with ESRD. Nephrologists should try to help patients to initiate dialysis in a planned manner. PMID:25706954

  7. Assessment of Left Ventricular Dissipative Energy Loss by Vector Flow Mapping in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yue; Liu, Yanting; Wu, Ting; Song, Huizi; Chen, Zhongxiu; Zhu, Wei; Cai, Yuyan; Zhang, Wen; Bai, Wenjuan; Tang, Hong; Rao, Li

    2016-05-01

    Dissipative energy loss derived from vector flow mapping represents the viscous dissipation of turbulent blood flow. We aimed to determine the left ventricular (LV) energy loss in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Patients with ESRD and a preserved LV ejection fraction, who consisted of a group receiving peritoneal dialysis, a group receiving hemodialysis, and a group receiving preparation for dialysis initiation, were examined by echocardiography; a group of healthy control participants were examined as well. Vector flow mapping analysis was then performed from the apical 4-chamber view to calculate the energy loss during diastole and systole in the left ventricle. Conventional transthoracic echocardiography and LV energy loss calculations were successfully performed in 63 cases and 50 controls. The patients with ESRD had significantly higher diastolic energy loss [median (interquartile range), 71.73 (46.08-106.75) versus 23.32 (17.17-29.26) mW/m; P < .001] and higher systolic energy loss [25.28 (19.03-33.93) versus 12.52 (9.35-16.47) mW/m; P < .001]. A significant difference in diastolic energy loss between the peritoneal dialysis and preparation groups was found [54.92 (39.28-89.94) versus 84.82 (62.58-171.4) mW/m; P = .04]. In patients with ESRD, the log-transformed diastolic energy loss had a significant association with the peak early diastolic transmitral flow velocity (P = .011), peak early diastolic transmitral flow velocity-to-peak early diastolic mitral annular flow velocity ratio (P = .001), LV mass index (P = .017), and heart rate (P = .003). Impaired blood flow efficiency was detected in patients with ESRD by using dissipative energy loss derived from vector flow mapping. The energy loss value could be a novel parameter for evaluating the ventricular workload of uremic hearts in terms of fluid mechanics. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  8. Clearance of glucoregulatory peptide hormones during haemodialysis and haemodiafiltration in non-diabetic end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Morten B; Idorn, Thomas; Knop, Filip K; Holst, Jens J; Hornum, Mads; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have increased fasting concentrations and disturbed postprandial responses of several glucoregulatory hormones. We aimed to evaluate the impact of high-flux haemodialysis (HD) and high-volume haemodiafiltration (HDF) on fasting and postprandial plasma levels of glucoregulatory pancreatic and gut peptide hormones in ESRD patients. Ten non-diabetic HD-treated ESRD patients were included to undergo a 3-h standardized liquid mixed meal test 1 h into an HD and an HDF, respectively. On a third, optional, examination day, the meal test was performed without concurrent dialysis treatment. Concentrations of glucose, C-peptide, insulin, glucagon, glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide were measured in plasma and dialysate. Ten participants completed the meal test during HD, eight completed the meal test during HDF and four completed the optional meal test without dialysis. All plasma hormone concentrations declined significantly during the first fasting hour of dialysis with no differences between HD and HDF. Significant clearance of the investigated hormones was observed for both dialysis modalities with significantly higher clearance of insulin, C-peptide and GIP during HDF compared with HD. The fractional appearance of hormones entering the utilized dialysate was higher during HDF. Both dialysis modalities reduced postprandial plasma hormone concentrations in a similar manner. Our findings show that HD and HDF, respectively, significantly remove glucoregulatory peptide hormones from plasma of non-diabetic ESRD patients; a phenomenon which may affect the glucose metabolism in dialysis-treated ESRD patients. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  9. Adiponectin and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Anastasia; Psylinakis, Emmanuel; Spyridaki, Aspasia

    2016-07-01

    Adiponectin (ADPN) is an adipokine with significant anti-inflammatory, insulin-sensitizing and anti-atherogenic properties, which is generally associated with a beneficial cardiometabolic profile. Paradoxically, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is characterized by markedly increased plasma ADPN levels and increased cardiovascular risk. In spite of the cardioprotective properties attributed to adiponectin, cardiovascular complications remain the main cause of mortality in the ESRD population. Furthermore, these patients have enhanced chronic inflammation, increased insulin resistance and persistent protein-energy wasting. Studies of the impact of ADPN on clinical outcomes among ESRD patients have so far yielded contradictory results. This review article summarizes the current knowledge on ADPN functions and explores the role of ADPN in ESRD patients, with specific focus on inflammation, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease and wasting.

  10. Kidney Transplant in a 26-Year-Old Nigerian Patient with Sickle Cell Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, U. H.; Wachukwu, C.; Emem-Chioma, P.; Wokoma, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) is a common complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). It has variable presentation, ranging from hyposthenuria to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Management of ESRD in SCD patients is froth with multiple challenges which has potential to impact negatively the outcome of the patient. Kidney transplant is the preferred renal replacement therapy in these patients. The objective of this case study is to report kidney transplant in a Nigerian young man with sickle cell nephropathy and to highlight the outcome and the challenges to kidney transplant in this patient. The index case is a 26-years-old sickle cell disease patient with ESRD complicated with cardiovascular, pulmonary, immunological, and infective challenges. These conditions were controlled, and the patient had a successful live-related kidney transplant. Kidney transplant is a viable option for sickle cell disease patients with ESRD. PMID:24555134

  11. A systematic review of sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Nina Teixeira; Urbano, Jessica Julioti; Nacif, Sergio Roberto; Silva, Anderson Soares; Peixoto, Roger Andre Oliveira; Urbano, Giovanni Julioti; Oliveira, Ezequiel Fernandes; Santos, Israel Reis; Oliveira, Claudia Santos; Insalaco, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the available evidence on sleep disorders in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing hemodialysis (HD). [Subjects and Methods] Two independent reviewers performed a computer-assisted search of the MEDLINE, SciELO, LILACS, and BIREME Virtual Health Library medical databases from their inception to November 2015. [Results] One thousand one hundred twenty-six articles were found that met the inclusion criteria. Articles were excluded if they were not in English, the patients did not undergo HD, or the studies were not cross-sectional or clinical trials. After reading the full text, a further 300 studies were excluded because they did not use polysomnography. The remaining 18 studies with ESRD patients undergoing HD comprised 8 clinical trials and 10 cross-sectional studies. This systematic review followed the criteria outlined by the PRISMA declaration. [Conclusion] In this systematic review, a high prevalence of sleep disorders was observed in ESRD, including sleep-disordered breathing. This knowledge may enable health professionals to devise new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of these patients, in order to reduce morbidity and mortality and improve their quality of life. PMID:27512289

  12. Circulating TGF-β1–Regulated miRNAs and the Risk of Rapid Progression to ESRD in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pezzolesi, Marcus G.; Satake, Eiichiro; McDonnell, Kevin P.; Major, Melissa; Smiles, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether circulating TGF-β1–regulated miRNAs detectable in plasma are associated with the risk of rapid progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a cohort of proteinuric patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and normal eGFR. Plasma specimens obtained at entry to the study were examined in two prospective subgroups that were followed for 7–20 years (rapid progressors and nonprogressors), as well as a reference panel of normoalbuminuric T1D patients. Of the five miRNAs examined in this study, let-7c-5p and miR-29a-3p were significantly associated with protection against rapid progression and let-7b-5p and miR-21-5p were significantly associated with the increased risk of ESRD. In logistic analysis, controlling for HbA1c and other covariates, let-7c-5p and miR-29a-3p were associated with more than a 50% reduction in the risk of rapid progression (P ≤ 0.001), while let-7b-5p and miR-21-5p were associated with a >2.5-fold increase in the risk of ESRD (P ≤ 0.005). This study is the first prospective study to demonstrate that circulating TGF-β1–regulated miRNAs are deregulated early in T1D patients who are at risk for rapid progression to ESRD. PMID:25931475

  13. Measuring, managing, and improving the quality of end-stage renal disease care.

    PubMed

    Levinsky, N G; Mesler, D E

    1994-08-01

    As the federal end-stage renal disease (ESRD) program enters its third decade, it continues to grow both in terms of patient enrollment and cost. High visibility as well as patient, physician, and societal concerns regarding ESRD treatment outcomes and expenditures make the development of improved and expanded quality assurance and improvement (QA/QI) mechanisms for the ESRD program vital. The purpose of a QA/QI program is to identify and apply techniques for assessing and improving ESRD care quality to achieve the best possible outcome for all patients who can benefit medically, within the expenditure constraints set by society. Current QA knowledge and methods are reviewed in this article and are judged to be useful but of limited value. Limitations of current quality assessment tools, provider resistance, and inadequate governmental support are substantial barriers to implementation of a QA program. An ESRD QA/QI program should develop improved QA tools at the same time that available tools are cautiously put to work. Such a program would be based in individual treatment units, using existing network and US Renal Data System structures and a new national ESRD QA committee for support and oversight. As additional ESRD QA data become available, providers would incorporate the new information into decision making at all levels to enhance patient outcome. Substantial financial support from the government will be needed to implement such a quality program. A comprehensive ESRD QA program could serve as a model for QA for the national health care system.

  14. Subjective global assessment of nutritional status of patients with chronic renal insufficiency and end stage renal disease on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Tapiawala, Shruti; Vora, H; Patel, Zamrud; Badve, S; Shah, B

    2006-12-01

    (1)To assess the nutritional status of chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) and dialysis patients using the subjective global assessment (SGA) method. (2) To validate SGA in assessing the nutritional status of this group of patients. The nutritional status of 81 patients was evaluated using dietary recall, anthropometry, biochemical parameters and SGA. There were 51 males and 30 females. Their mean +/- SD age was 53.8 +/- 14.3 years. There were 27 patients with (CRI) on conservative management, 38 patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) on maintenance hemodialysis (HD) and 16 patients with ESRD on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). SGA was done using seven variables derived from medical history and physical examination. Each variable was scored from 1-7 depending on the severity. The SGA scores were correlated with the standard methods. Thirteen (48%) patients with CRI, 22 (58%) patients on HD and 8 (50%) patients on CAPD were malnourished. It was seen that the dietary protein & calorie intake and serum albumin level did not correlate well with the SGA scores. The anthropometric measures correlated with the SGA scores (Skinfolds and SGA r = 0.2, MAC and SGA r = 0.5 and MAMC and SGA r = 0.5). Malnutrition is an important complication in CRI patients and ESRD patients on dialysis. SGA is a reliable method of assessing nutritional status. Most important is the fact that it can detect the changing trend of nutritional status, which may be missed by one-time anthropometry and biochemical methods.

  15. Measuring health-related quality of life in children with ESRD: performance of the generic and ESRD-specific instrument of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL).

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Stuart L; Graham, Nicole; Warady, Bradley A; Seikaly, Mouin; McDonald, Ruth; Burwinkle, Tasha M; Limbers, Christine A; Varni, James W

    2008-02-01

    Minimal data exist to describe health-related quality of life in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Cross-sectional study. 193 children aged 5 to 18 years with ESRD and 190 parents of children aged 2 to 18 years with ESRD at 4 pediatric nephrology centers across the United States. Generic and disease-specific health-related quality of life. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory version 4.0 (PedsQL 4.0) Generic Core Scales encompass: (1) Physical Functioning (8 items), (2) Emotional Functioning (5 items), (3) Social Functioning (5 items), and (4) School Functioning (5 items). The PedsQL 3.0 ESRD Module encompasses: (1) General Fatigue (4 items), (2) About My Kidney Disease (5 items), (3) Treatment Problems (4 items), (4) Family and Peer Interaction (3 items), (5) Worry (10 items), (6) Perceived Physical Appearance (3 items), and (7) Communication (5 items). Internal consistency reliability for the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales and the PedsQL 3.0 ESRD Module was acceptable for both parent-proxy report and child self-report, with the exception of 1 parent-proxy report and 3 child self-report scales on the ESRD Module. The PedsQL Generic Core Scales differentiated between healthy children and children with ESRD, supporting discriminant validity. Intercorrelations between the PedsQL Generic Core Scales and the ESRD Module were in the medium to large range, supporting construct validity. A confirmatory factor analysis further supported construct validity of the ESRD Module. Test-retest reliability was not conducted, limited generalizability may exist given the age distribution of the children included, and imperfect agreement between child and parent-proxy reports. Results support the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales in children with ESRD and provide initial support for the PedsQL 3.0 ESRD Module, although additional validation testing is warranted.

  16. Dynamic assessment of myocardial involvement in patients with end-stage renal disease by ultrasonic tissue characterization and serum markers of collagen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fatema, Kaniz; Hirono, Osamu; Masakane, Ikuto; Nitobe, Joji; Kaneko, Kazuyoshi; Zhang, Xuehua; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao

    2004-04-01

    Congestive heart failure is the most common cause of mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, noninvasive assessment for cardiac involvement in ESRD has not been established. Assessment of ultrasonic tissue characterization and serum markers of collagen degradation is useful for defining myocardial involvement in ESRD. Cyclic variation of ultrasonic integrated backscatter of the ventricular septum (CV-IBS) and the serum levels of free matrix metalloproteinase-I (MMP-I) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-I (TIMP-I) were measured in 30 patients with ESRD undergoing routine hemodialysis (HD) and in 40 patients with essential hypertension (HTN). Compared with the group with HTN, ESRD (before HD) showed larger left ventricular (LV) mass index (217 +/- 56 vs. 146 +/- 45 g/m2, p < 0.01), worse LV diastolic function (E/A, 0.6 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.9 +/- 0.3, p < 0.05), smaller CV-IBS (9.0 +/- 1.3 vs. 12.4 +/- 0.9 dB, p < 0.01), and larger TIMP-I/MMP-I (46 +/- 10 vs. 34 +/- 10, p < 0.05), in spite of the comparable ventricular wall thickness. Thus, these indices may possibly reflect myocardial interstitial fibrosis. After HD (after the improvement of myocardial interstitial edema), a negative linear relationship between CV-IBS and TIMP-I/MMP-I was observed (r= -0.52, p < 0.05). Noninvasive assessment of ultrasonic tissue characterization and serum markers of collagen type I degradation may be a new diagnostic tool for defining myocardial interstitial fibrosis in patients with ESRD and LV hypertrophy.

  17. Nephrolithiasis-induced end stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Ounissi, M; Gargueh, T; Mahfoudhi, M; Boubaker, K; Hedri, H; Goucha, R; Abderrahim, E; Ben Hamida, F; Ben Abdallah, T; El Younsi, F; Ben Maiz, H; Kheder, A

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Nephrolithiasis still remains a too frequent and underappreciated cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Methods and patients: Of the entire cohort of 7128 consecutive patients who started maintenance dialysis in our nephrology department between January 1992 and December 2006, a total of 45 patients (26 women, 19 men) had renal stone disease as the cause of ESRD. The type of nephrolithiasis was determined in 45 cases and etiology in 42. The treatment and evolution of stone disease and patient’s survival were studied. Results: The overall proportion of nephrolithiasis related ESRD was 0.63%. The mean age was 48.4 years. Infection stones (struvite) accounted for 40%, calcium stones, 26.67% (primary hyperparathyroidism:15.56%; familial hypercalciuria: 4.44%, unknown etiology: 6.66%), primary hyperoxaluria type 1, 17.78% and uric acid lithiasis in 15.56% of cases. The mean delay of the evolution of the stone renal disease to chronic renal failure was 85.8 months. The feminine gender, obesity and elevated alkaline phosphatases >128 IU/L were significantly correlated with fast evolution of ESRD. The median evolution to ESRD was 12 months. The normal body mass index (BMI), medical treatment of stone and primary hyperoxaluria type 1 were correlated with fast evolution to ESRD. All patients were treated by hemodialysis during a mean evolution of 60 months. Sixteen patients died. The patient's survival rate at 1, 3 and 5 years was 97.6, 92.8 and 69% respectively. Hypocalcemia, cardiopathy and normal calcium-phosphate product were significantly correlated with lower survival rate. Conclusion: Severe forms of nephrolithiasis remain an underestimated cause of ESRD. These findings highlight the crucial importance of accurate stone analysis and metabolic evaluation to provide early diagnosis and efficient treatment for conditions leading to ESRD. PMID:21694924

  18. End-stage renal disease associated with prophylactic lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Aiff, Harald; Attman, Per-Ola; Aurell, Mattias; Bendz, Hans; Schön, Staffan; Svedlund, Jan

    2014-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of lithium associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to compare the relative risk of ESRD in lithium users versus non-lithium users. Second, the role of lithium in the pathogenesis of ESRD was evaluated. We used the Swedish Renal Registry to search for lithium-treated patients with ESRD among 2644 patients with chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT)-either dialysis or transplantation, within two defined geographical areas in Sweden with 2.8 million inhabitants. The prevalence date was December 31, 2010. We found 30 ESRD patients with a history of lithium treatment. ESRD with RRT was significantly more prevalent among lithium users than among non-lithium users (p<0.001). The prevalence of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population was 15.0‰ (95% CI 9.7-20.3), and close to two percent of the RRT population were lithium users. The relative risk of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population compared with the general population was 7.8 (95% CI 5.4-11.1). Out of those 30 patients, lithium use was classified, based on chart reviews, as being the sole (n=14) or main (n=10) cause of ESRD in 24 cases. Their mean age at the start of RRT was 66 years (46-82), their mean time on lithium 27 years (12-39), and 22 of them had been on lithium for 15 years or more. We conclude that lithium-associated ESRD is an uncommon but not rare complication of lithium treatment.

  19. Febuxostat-induced agranulocytosis in an end-stage renal disease patient

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Xue Er; Lee, Chien-Te; Pei, Sung-Nan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Febuxostat, a nonpurine xanthine oxidase inhibitor, is approved as the first-line urate-lowering therapy in gout patients with normal renal function or mild to moderate renal impairment. The most common adverse effects of febuxostat are liver function test abnormalities, diarrhea, and skin rash. However, there is insufficient data in patients with severe renal impairment and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We report the first case, to our knowledge, in which agranulocytosis developed after febuxostat treatment in an ESRD patient. Clinical presentation: A 67-year-old woman with gout and ESRD received febuxostat 40 mg a day for 2.5 months. She subsequently complicated with febrile neutropenia and the absolute neutrophil count was only 14/μL. After broad-spectrum antibiotics treatment and no more exposure to febuxostat for 17 days, her infection and neutrophil count recovered. Bone marrow study during neutropenic period showed myeloid hypoplasia without evidence of hematologic neoplasms. Conclusion: As febuxostat use may become more common in the population of advanced renal failure, clinicians should be aware of this rare but potentially life-threatening adverse effect. Based on our experience, close monitoring hemogram and immediate discontinuation of this medication may prevent serious consequences. PMID:28079821

  20. Febuxostat-induced agranulocytosis in an end-stage renal disease patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Poh, Xue Er; Lee, Chien-Te; Pei, Sung-Nan

    2017-01-01

    Febuxostat, a nonpurine xanthine oxidase inhibitor, is approved as the first-line urate-lowering therapy in gout patients with normal renal function or mild to moderate renal impairment. The most common adverse effects of febuxostat are liver function test abnormalities, diarrhea, and skin rash. However, there is insufficient data in patients with severe renal impairment and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We report the first case, to our knowledge, in which agranulocytosis developed after febuxostat treatment in an ESRD patient. A 67-year-old woman with gout and ESRD received febuxostat 40 mg a day for 2.5 months. She subsequently complicated with febrile neutropenia and the absolute neutrophil count was only 14/μL. After broad-spectrum antibiotics treatment and no more exposure to febuxostat for 17 days, her infection and neutrophil count recovered. Bone marrow study during neutropenic period showed myeloid hypoplasia without evidence of hematologic neoplasms. As febuxostat use may become more common in the population of advanced renal failure, clinicians should be aware of this rare but potentially life-threatening adverse effect. Based on our experience, close monitoring hemogram and immediate discontinuation of this medication may prevent serious consequences.

  1. Speckle tracking echocardiography detects uremic cardiomyopathy early and predicts cardiovascular mortality in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Kramann, Rafael; Erpenbeck, Johanna; Schneider, Rebekka K; Röhl, Anna B; Hein, Marc; Brandenburg, Vincent M; van Diepen, Merel; Dekker, Friedo; Marx, Nicolaus; Floege, Jürgen; Becker, Michael; Schlieper, Georg

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular mortality is high in ESRD, partly driven by sudden cardiac death and recurrent heart failure due to uremic cardiomyopathy. We investigated whether speckle-tracking echocardiography is superior to routine echocardiography in early detection of uremic cardiomyopathy in animal models and whether it predicts cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing dialysis. Using speckle-tracking echocardiography in two rat models of uremic cardiomyopathy soon (4-6 weeks) after induction of kidney disease, we observed that global radial and circumferential strain parameters decreased significantly in both models compared with controls, whereas standard echocardiographic readouts, including fractional shortening and cardiac output, remained unchanged. Furthermore, strain parameters showed better correlations with histologic hallmarks of uremic cardiomyopathy. We then assessed echocardiographic and clinical characteristics in 171 dialysis patients. During the 2.5-year follow-up period, ejection fraction and various strain parameters were significant risk factors for cardiovascular mortality (primary end point) in a multivariate Cox model (ejection fraction hazard ratio [HR], 0.97 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.95 to 0.99; P=0.012]; peak global longitudinal strain HR, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.07 to 1.28; P<0.001]; peak systolic and late diastolic longitudinal strain rates HRs, 4.7 [95% CI, 1.23 to 17.64; P=0.023] and 0.25 [95% CI, 0.08 to 0.79; P=0.02], respectively). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed circumferential early diastolic strain rate, among others, as an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality (secondary end point; HR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.74; P=0.002). Together, these data support speckle tracking as a postprocessing echocardiographic technique to detect uremic cardiomyopathy and predict cardiovascular mortality in ESRD.

  2. Epidemiology of cancer in end-stage renal disease dialysis patients: a national cohort study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Chih-Chiang; Han, Ming-Ming; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chu, Chin-Chen; Hung, Chien-Ya; Sun, Yih-Min; Yeh, Nai-Cheng; Ho, Chung-Han; Lin, Chih-Ching; Kao, Hao-Yun; Weng, Shih-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of site-specific cancers in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on maintenance dialysis have been rarely studied for Asian populations. We tapped Taiwan`s National Health Insurance Research Database to identify and recruit patients starting maintenance dialysis between 1999 and 2004. They were followed from initiation of dialysis until death, discontinuation of dialysis, or the end of 2008. We calculated the survival rate and mortality risk of dialysis patients with cancer. Of 40,833 dialysis patients, 2352 (5.8%) had been newly diagnosed with cancer. Being older, being male, and having chronic liver disease were factors associated with a higher risk for new cancer in ESRD dialysis patients. In men, liver cancer (20.63%) was the most frequent, followed by cancers of the bladder (16.88%) and kidney (11.61%). In women, bladder cancer (25.57%) was the most frequent, followed by cancers of the kidney (16.31%) and breast (11.20%). The 5-year survival rates for kidney and bladder cancer were higher than for other cancers; the survival rates for lung, stomach, and liver cancer were lower. In conclusion, the distribution of site-specific cancer was different between men and women in patients with ESRD on dialysis. More attention should be paid to teaching dialysis patients how to avoid the well-known cancer risks and carcinogens and individualized regular cancer screenings. PMID:28123593

  3. The effectiveness and safety of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition or receptor blockade in vascular diseases in patients with hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Cheng, Hui-Teng; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who are on hemodialysis have high risk of vascular diseases. Our study sought to examine whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) could reduce the frequencies of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events in patients receiving hemodialysis using the medication possession ratio (MPR) method of analysis. This retrospective cohort study identified cases of ESRD with dialysis from the National Health Insurance Research Database between 1999 and 2006, and used Cox-regression methods to evaluate risk of poor outcomes. Primary outcomes, including death from any cause, and secondary outcomes, including admission for stroke, myocardial infarction, and heart failure, were examined. Compared to the nonuser group, the adjusted HRs for mortality of the nonadherence group and the adherence group were 0.81 (95% CI: 0.76–0.86) and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.86–1.13), respectively. Cardiovascular events were more frequent in patients with ESRD receiving ACEIs /ARBs than in nonusers. Compared with nonusers, the hazard of secondary outcome significantly increased in the nonadherence group or adherence group in 10 years follow-up. Compared with patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease, patients on hemodialysis may not experience the same cardiovascular and cerebrovascular benefits from ACEIs/ARBs use. PMID:28353612

  4. Sailing between Scylla and Charybdis: oral long-term anticoagulation in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thilo; Brandenburg, Vincent; Schlieper, Georg; Marx, Nikolaus; Floege, Jürgen

    2013-03-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients exhibit an increased risk of bleeding compared with non-chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients due to uraemic platelet dysfunction, altered vessel architecture and other factors. This renders any long-term oral anticoagulation potentially difficult. While there is little doubt that ESRD patients with recurrent thromboembolism or a mechanical cardiac valve should receive vitamin K antagonists (coumarins), the use of coumarins in ESRD patients with atrial fibrillation is a matter of debate. In non-CKD patients, current guidelines strongly recommend the use of oral anticoagulants for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation if certain risk factors are present (CHA2DS2-VASc score). This recommendation is often extrapolated to patients with advanced CKD or ESRD but data supporting this practice are weak to absent. Besides an increased bleeding risk in ESRD patients, coumarins will also accelerate cardiovascular calcification and are potent risk factors for the development of calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (calciphylaxis). Novel coumarin alternatives such as direct thrombin inhibitors are promising but none is currently approved for use in ESRD patients. Whether interventional treatment strategies such as atrial appendage occlusion are safe and effective options in advanced CKD is also as yet unresolved. This review attempts to balance the potential risks and benefits of coumarin usage in ESRD patients and to give the best possible recommendations for everyday patient care.

  5. Health-related quality of life in patients with pediatric onset of end-stage renal disease: state of the art and recommendations for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Tjaden, Lidwien A; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Noordzij, Marlies; Groothoff, Jaap W

    2016-10-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is increasingly recognized as a key outcome in both clinical and research settings in the pediatric population with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This review aims to: (1) summarize the current knowledge on HRQoL and socioprofessional outcomes and (2) provide strategies for incorporation of HRQoL assessment into clinical practice. Studies report that pediatric patients with ESRD have significantly lower HRQoL scores compared with children with other chronic diseases. Patients treated by dialysis are at particularly high risk for impaired HRQoL. Furthermore, patients more often have impaired neurocognitive functioning and lower academic achievement. Important determinants of impaired HRQoL include medical factors (i.e., receiving dialysis, disabling comorbidities, cosmetic side effects, stunted growth), sociodemographic factors (i.e., female gender, non-Western background) and psychosocial factors (i.e., noneffective coping strategies). Contrary to the situation in childhood, adult survivors of pediatric ESRD report a normal mental HRQoL. Despite this subjective feeling of well-being, these patients have on average experienced significantly more difficulties in completing their education, developing intimate relationships, and securing employment. Several medical and psychosocial strategies may potentially improve HRQoL in children with ESRD. Regular assessment of HRQoL and neurocognitive functioning in order to identify areas in which therapies and interventions may be required should be part of standard clinical care.

  6. The Association of Losartan and Ramipril Therapy With Kidney and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsing, Shih-Chun; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Sun, Chien-An; Chien, Wu-Chien; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Kao, Sen-Yeong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this nation-wide cohort study was to assess the association of using an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) therapy on the prognosis of hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We used Cox's proportional hazard regression model to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and first hospitalization for cardiovascular disease (CVD) for losartan and ramipril versus conventional antihypertensive agents. In total, 136,266 hypertensive patients with CKD in Taiwan were followed up from 2001 to 2008. In an average follow-up of 5.9 years, 7364 (5.40%) patients reached ESRD, 4165 (3.06%) patients died, and 6163 (4.52%) patients had their first hospitalization for CVD. Use of losartan or ramipril was associated with a lower risk of the endpoints compared with the conventional group. In the losartan group, the risks of ESRD, all- and cardiovascular-cause mortality, and first hospitalization for CVD were decreased by 9.2% (P = 0.01), 24.6% (P < 0.001), 12.4% (P = 0.03), and 36.0% (P = 0.01), respectively. In the ramipril group, these risks decreased by 7.6% (P = 0.02) for ESRD, 56.9% (P < 0.001) for all-cause mortality, 7.5% (P = 0.04) for cardiovascular mortality, and 24.7% (P < 0.001) for first hospitalization. This study indicated that losartan and ramipril had distinct association on the prognosis of hypertensive patients with CKD, and was first to disclose that the mean time to reach each endpoint for patients in the losartan, ramipril, and conventional group was not significantly different. However, further study is needed to confirm results of the present study. PMID:26632888

  7. Predictors of positive thallium 201 single photon emission computed tomography in patients of end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Irfan; Ayub, Muhammad; Abid, Abdul Rehman; Azhar, Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    To study coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors predicting positive thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) indicating underlying CAD among patients of end stage renal disease. PLACE AND DESIGN: This cross-sectional (analytical) study was done at Department of Cardiology, Punjab Institute of Cardiology, from April 2004 to Dec 2007. One hundred consecutive patients with ESRD undergoing thallium SPECT as a routine screening test before renal transplant were studied. Dipyridamole thallium SPECT was performed in patients who were unable to exercise. Thallium SPECT was positive in 47 (47%) cases. There were significant differences in age, underlying diabetic nephropathy and total cholesterol levels among patients positive and negative on thallium SPECT. Among the risk factors age and underlying diabetic nephropathy were significantly associated (p < 0.05) with a positive thallium SPECT in patients with ESRD. Positive thallium SPECT indicating underlying CAD was observed in a significant number of patients with ESRD awaiting renal transplant. Presence of advanced age and underlying diabetic nephropathy predict a positive thallium SPECT in this population.

  8. End Stage Renal Disease as a Potential Risk Factor for Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, San-Ni; Yang, Te-Cheng; Lin, Jian-Teng; Lian, Ie-Bin

    2015-11-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) has been reported to be an important risk factor for systemic vascular disease. Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is closely related with cardiovascular diseases; however, its association with ESRD had not been reported. The aim of the study was to investigate whether ESRD is a risk factor for RVO, including central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). This population-based study is based on the longitudinal data from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The study cohort comprised 5344 patients with diagnosis of ESRD on hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis during the period from January 1996 to December 2011. For each ESRD patient, we selected 20 non-ESRD patients matched on age and sex. Each ESRD patient and his/her controls were followed from the initiation of renal dialysis until either the diagnosis of RVO or censorship. Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare the hazard of RVO between cohorts. Stratified Cox proportional hazard models were applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) adjusted by the comorbidities of RVO including diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension, hypercholesteremia, and hypertriglyceridemia. After stratifying by DM status, the statistics were applied again to examine the associations among the DM cohort and non-DM cohort.The 16-year RVO cumulative incidence for ESRD cohort was 2-fold to the non-ESRD (1.01% vs 0.46%). After matching with age, sex, hypertension, and hypercholesteremia, the adjusted HR was 1.46 (95% confidence interval = 1.07-2.01, P value = 0.018). By further excluding patients with DM, the adjusted HR escalated to 2.43 (95% confidence interval = 1.54-3.83, P < 0.001). In contrast, there was no significant risk of ESRD on RVO in the DM patients (HR = 1.03). We conclude that among the non-DM patients, ESRD cases had significantly higher RVO rate than the non-ESRD, which indicates that ESRD maybe a potential risk factor for the development of RVO in

  9. Adherence to antihypertensive agents improves risk reduction of end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Roy, Louise; White-Guay, Brian; Dorais, Marc; Dragomir, Alice; Lessard, Myriam; Perreault, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    Uncontrolled hypertension is associated with an increased risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Intensified blood pressure control may slow progression of chronic kidney disease; however, the impact of antihypertensive agent adherence on the prevention of ESRD has never been evaluated. Here we assessed the impact of antihypertensive agent adherence on the risk of ESRD in 185,476 patients in the RAMQ databases age 45 to 85 and newly diagnosed/treated for hypertension between 1999 and 2007. A case cohort study design was used to assess the risk of and multivariate Cox proportional models were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratio of ESRD. Adherence level was reported as a medication possession ratio. Mean patient age was 63 years, 42.2% male, 14.0% diabetic, 30.3% dyslipidemic, and mean follow-up was 5.1 years. A high adherence level of 80% or more to antihypertensive agent(s) compared to a lower one was related to a risk reduction of ESRD (hazard ratio 0.67; 95% confidence intervals 0.54-0.83). Sensitivity analysis revealed that the effect is mainly in those without chronic kidney disease. Risk factors for ESRD were male, diabetes, peripheral artery disease, chronic heart failure, gout, previous chronic kidney disease, and use of more than one agent. Thus, our study suggests that a better adherence to antihypertensive agents is related to a risk reduction of ESRD and this adherence needs to be improved to optimize benefits.

  10. Red blood cell calcium homeostasis in patients with end-stage renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gafter, U.; Malachi, T.; Barak, H.; Djaldetti, M.; Levi, J. )

    1989-09-01

    Low cell calcium level is essential for preservation of red blood cell (RBC) membrane deformability and survival. RBCs from patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) demonstrate reduction in membrane deformability, possibly as a result of increased RBC cellular calcium level. To evaluate calcium homeostasis in RBCs from patients with ESRD, we measured cell calcium level, basal and calmodulin-stimulated calcium-stimulated Mg-dependent ATPase (CaATPase) activity, and calcium 45 efflux were measured before and after hemodialysis. The in vitro effect of uremic plasma and of urea on CaATPase activity of normal RBCs was tested, and 45Ca influx into RBCs of patients undergoing hemodialysis also was determined. A morphologic evaluation of red cells from patients with ESRD was performed with a scanning electron microscope. RBC calcium level in patients (mean +/- SEM 21.2 +/- 2.8 mumol/L of cells; n = 28) was higher than in controls (4.9 +/- 0.3 mumol/L of cells; n = 24; p less than 0.001). Hemodialysis had no effect on cell calcium level. Both basal and calmodulin-stimulated RBC CaATPase activities in patients with ESRD (n = 9) were reduced by approximately 50% (p less than 0.01), but after hemodialysis, enzyme activity returned to normal. 45Ca efflux from calcium-loaded cells, which was 2574.0 +/- 217.0 mumol/L of cells per 0.5 hours before hemodialysis, increased to 3140.7 +/- 206.8 mumol/L of cells per 0.5 hours after hemodialysis (p less than 0.005). In vitro incubation of normal RBCs with uremic plasma depressed CaATPase activity, but incubation with urea had no effect. RBCs of patients with ESRD revealed increased 45Ca influx, 7.63 +/- 1.15 mumol/L of cells per hour versus 4.61 +/- 0.39 mumol/L of cells per hour (p less than 0.025). RBCs of patients revealed a high incidence of spherocytosis and echynocytosis, which correlated with a high cell calcium level (r = 0.894, p less than 0.01).

  11. Forecasting the Incidence and Prevalence of Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease in Malaysia up to the Year 2040

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Tassha Hilda; Hashim, Nadiah Hanis; Mohan, Kirubashni; Kim Liong, Ang; Ahmad, Ghazali; Bak Leong, Goh; Bavanandan, Sunita; Haniff, Jamaiyah

    2017-01-01

    Background. The incidence of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring dialysis has been growing rapidly in Malaysia from 18 per million population (pmp) in 1993 to 231 pmp in 2013. Objective. To forecast the incidence and prevalence of ESRD patients who will require dialysis treatment in Malaysia until 2040. Methodology. Univariate forecasting models using the number of new and current dialysis patients, by the Malaysian Dialysis and Transplant Registry from 1993 to 2013 were used. Four forecasting models were evaluated, and the model with the smallest error was selected for the prediction. Result. ARIMA (0, 2, 1) modeling with the lowest error was selected to predict both the incidence (RMSE = 135.50, MAPE = 2.85, and MAE = 87.71) and the prevalence (RMSE = 158.79, MAPE = 1.29, and MAE = 117.21) of dialysis patients. The estimated incidences of new dialysis patients in 2020 and 2040 are 10,208 and 19,418 cases, respectively, while the estimated prevalence is 51,269 and 106,249 cases. Conclusion. The growth of ESRD patients on dialysis in Malaysia can be expected to continue at an alarming rate. Effective steps to address and curb further increase in new patients requiring dialysis are urgently needed, in order to mitigate the expected financial and health catastrophes associated with the projected increase of such patients. PMID:28348890

  12. Ascertainment and Verification of End-Stage Renal Disease and End-Stage Liver Disease in the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design

    PubMed Central

    Kitahata, Mari M.; Drozd, Daniel R.; Crane, Heidi M.; Van Rompaey, Stephen E.; Althoff, Keri N.; Gange, Stephen J.; Klein, Marina B.; Lucas, Gregory M.; Abraham, Alison G.; Lo Re, Vincent; McReynolds, Justin; Lober, William B.; Mendes, Adell; Modur, Sharada P.; Jing, Yuezhou; Morton, Elizabeth J.; Griffith, Margaret A.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Moore, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of HIV disease has shifted from traditional AIDS-defining illnesses to serious non-AIDS-defining comorbid conditions. Research aimed at improving HIV-related comorbid disease outcomes requires well-defined, verified clinical endpoints. We developed methods to ascertain and verify end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and validated screening algorithms within the largest HIV cohort collaboration in North America (NA-ACCORD). Individuals who screened positive among all participants in twelve cohorts enrolled between January 1996 and December 2009 underwent medical record review to verify incident ESRD or ESLD using standardized protocols. We randomly sampled 6% of contributing cohorts to determine the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of ESLD and ESRD screening algorithms in a validation subcohort. Among 43,433 patients screened for ESRD, 822 screened positive of which 620 met clinical criteria for ESRD. The algorithm had 100% sensitivity, 99% specificity, 82% PPV, and 100% NPV for ESRD. Among 41,463 patients screened for ESLD, 2,024 screened positive of which 645 met diagnostic criteria for ESLD. The algorithm had 100% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 27% PPV, and 100% NPV for ESLD. Our methods proved robust for ascertainment of ESRD and ESLD in persons infected with HIV. PMID:25789171

  13. Clinical Application and Pharmacodynamic Monitoring of Apixaban in a Patient with End-Stage Renal Disease Requiring Chronic Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kufel, Wesley D; Zayac, Adam S; Lehmann, David F; Miller, Christopher D

    2016-11-01

    Despite prescribing guidance, limited data exist to describe the use of apixaban in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring hemodialysis (HD). Current apixaban dosing recommendations for this patient population are based largely on a single-dose pharmacokinetic study of eight patients. We describe the clinical application and pharmacodynamic monitoring of apixaban in a 62-year-old 156-kg African-American woman with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and ESRD requiring hemodialysis who developed calciphylaxis while receiving warfarin therapy. Based on a multidisciplinary clinical judgment decision due to concern for drug accumulation after multiple doses in patients with ESRD receiving HD, she was anticoagulated with apixaban 2.5 mg twice/day, as opposed to 5 mg twice/day as recommended by the package insert. Antifactor Xa monitoring was used, and resultant peak and trough apixaban concentrations were above the upper limit of detection for our clinical laboratory (more than 2.00 IU/ml). On day 7 of her hospitalization, the patient developed gastrointestinal bleeding, and apixaban was discontinued; no further clinical signs of bleeding occurred during her subsequent hospitalization course. Use of the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 6) between apixaban exposure and the manifestation of gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient ultimately died 44 days after the acute bleeding event; however, coagulation concerns were not implicated in the patient's death. To our knowledge, this is the first case report that describes apixaban use and associated antifactor Xa monitoring in a patient with ESRD receiving HD, and it provides concern for current apixaban dosing recommendations in this patient population. Further pharmacokinetic and clinical data are likely necessary to better characterize apixaban use in these patients to optimize safety and efficacy. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  14. Alteration of type I collagen in the radial artery of patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yaling; Zhang, Junxia; Xu, Jinsheng; Cui, Liwen; Zhang, Huiran; Zhang, Shenglei

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in chronic kidney disease. Extracellular matrix remodeling is implicated in atherosclerosis development. This study investigated the effects and possible mechanism of type I collagen expression on radial artery elasticity in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Sixty-five patients receiving forearm arteriovenous fistula in the Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University from January 2010 to December 2012 were enrolled in the study. The echo-tracking technique was used to measure radial artery 1-point pulse wave velocity (PWVβ), and immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the expression of type I collagen and transcription factor CBFA1, a marker for calcification, in the radial artery. Uremic serum and serum from healthy volunteers of different concentrations were then used to treat the rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to measure COL1A1 and CBFA1 transcription and a Western blot was performed to detect type I collagen expression in the rat aortic VSMCs. In patients with ESRD, increased COL1A1 expression was an independent risk factor for radial artery PWVβ (P < 0.05) and was positively associated with that of CBFA1 (r = 0.573, P < 0.001). In the rat aortic VSMCs, serum from patients with ESRD upregulated COL1A1 and CBFA1 transcription as well as type I collagen expression in a concentration-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Type I collagen expression is an essential factor for radial artery elasticity dysfunction in patients with ESRD. Uremic toxins apparently induced a phenotypic transition of the rat aortic VSMCs, leading to increased type I collagen secretion and subsequent extracellular matrix remodeling.

  15. Potential impact of peer mentoring on treatment choice in patients with chronic kidney disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, Nasrollah

    2015-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the resultant end stage renal disease (ESRD) are associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and cost for the individual patient and society. CKD is among the major contributors to years of life lost (YLL) due to premature mortality. Also, while the disability adjusted life years (DALY) for many conditions decreased between 1990 and 2010, the DALY for CKD has increased by 69%. In addition to the physical disability, CKD is associated with high prevalence (27.9%) of major depressive episodes, associated with limitations of employment, and a significant negative effect on quality of life (QOL). A major determinant of QOL is satisfaction with treatment choice. There is consensus among investigators that patients who are actively engaged in their own care experience improved health outcomes. The shared decision making (SDM) approach allows patients and providers the opportunity to work in partnership to make decisions that are congruent with the patient's values, preferences, and distinct situations. SDM has been associated with improved outcomes among patients with various chronic disease states. Mentoring, particularly by trained peers, has been used as an approach to enhance SDM in several chronic conditions, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we will focus on care of patients with CKD as a model for the study of the impact of peer mentoring on SDM and choice of treatment for ESRD.

  16. Acute kidney injury and ESRD management in austere environments.

    PubMed

    Raman, Gaurav; Perkins, Robert M; Jaar, Bernard G

    2012-05-01

    Current knowledge about managing acute kidney injury in disaster situations stems mostly from lessons learned while taking care of crush syndrome patients during major earthquakes. More recently, there has been a greater focus on emergency preparedness for ESRD management. Natural or man-made disasters create an "austere environment," wherein resources to administer standard of care are limited. Advance planning and timely coordinated intervention during disasters are paramount to administer effective therapies and save lives. This article reviews the presentation and management of disaster victims with acute kidney injury and those requiring renal replacement therapies. Major contributions of some key national and international organizations in the field of disaster nephrology are highlighted. The article intends to increase awareness about nephrology care of disaster victims, among nephrology and non-nephrology providers alike.

  17. Reproducibility of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity in end-stage renal disease patients: methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Rosendo A; Cronin, Valerie; Ramsay, Timothy; Zimmerman, Deborah; Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    In end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, increased arterial stiffness detected by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) is associated with fatal cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. Since cf-PWV is an operator-dependent technique, poor reproducibility may be a source of bias in the estimation of arterial stiffness. We assessed the week-to-week reproducibility of cf-PWV and radial artery pulse wave analysis in healthy subjects and ESRD patients. We also determined the extent of patient eligibility, enrollment, acceptance, and comfort. In a cohort study design, independent tonometric examinations of carotid, femoral, and radial arteries were conducted in 20 healthy subjects and 15 ESRD patients attending chronic hemodialysis treatments according to a randomized sequence by two operators on 2 days scheduled 1-week apart. cf-PWV, augmentation index (AIx@HR75) and central pulse pressure (CPP) were the outcome measures. Patients were tested at mid-week and prior to dialysis treatment. The variability on the distance measured between the suprasternal notch and femoral site using two different methods (standard vs direct) was compared. A post-examination survey assessed acceptance and comfort associated with examinations. Reproducibility was evaluated by intra-class correlations (ICCs). The mean age for healthy subjects and ESRD patients was 45 ± 12 and 63 ± 16 years, respectively. ESRD patients had higher cf-PWV (p = 0.0002), elevated AIx@HR75 (p = 0.003), and increased CPP (p = 0.001) compared to healthy subjects. The mean inter-visit differences for all stiffness indices were non-significant (p > 0.05), but the mean inter-operator differences for the cf-PWV were significant only in the healthy subject group (-0.7 m/s; p = 0.02). The ICCs between operators and visits were higher for the ESRD group compared to the healthy subjects (between operators, 0.870 vs 0.461; between visits, 0.830 vs 0.570). Distances were longer

  18. Prognostic value of troponin T and homocysteine in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sahinarslan, Asife; Güz, Galip; Okyay, Kaan; Mutluay, Rüya; Yalçin, Ridvan; Bali, Musa; Sindel, Sükrü; Cengel, Atiye

    2008-09-01

    The most important cause of increased mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the prognostic value of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and homocysteine in the long-term follow-up of ESRD patients. The study included 78 patients (54 males, 24 females; mean age 53.2+/-16.6 years) with ESRD, who had been on hemodialysis treatment for at least three months. Baseline troponin T and homocysteine levels were measured and the patients were followed-up from March 2002 to May 2007 for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Major adverse cardiovascular events occurred in 26 patients (33.3%), including cerebrovascular events (n=3, 3.9%), congestive heart failure (CHF) (n=18, 23.1%), coronary artery disease (CAD) (n=19, 24.4%), and death (n=19, 24.4%). Two-thirds of diabetic patients developed MACE and the mean age in the MACE group was significantly greater (p<0.001). Troponin T levels were significantly higher in patients who developed MACE (0.21+/-0.43 ng/ml vs 0.06+/-0.28 ng/ml, p=0.002), whereas homocysteine levels did not differ significantly between the two groups (p=0.82). For a cutoff value of 0.10 ng/ml, cTnT was > or =0.1 ng/ml in 17 patients (21.8%), and <0.10 ng/ml in 61 patients (78.8%). Patients having a cTnT level of > or =0.10 ng/ml showed significantly higher rates of MACE (64.7% vs 24.6%; p=0.003), CHF (47.1% vs 16.4%; p=0.02), and death (52.9% vs 16.4%; p=0.004). There was also a greater tendency to CAD in this group (41.2% vs 19.7%, p=0.10). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, age and diabetes mellitus were the independent predictors of MACE development. Homocysteine levels cannot predict MACE in ESRD patients in the long-term follow-up. Despite a significantly higher incidence of MACE in patients with high cTnT levels, cTnT was not an independent predictor of cardiovascular outcome.

  19. End-Stage Renal Disease After Renal Surgery in Patients with Normal Preoperative Kidney Function: Balancing Surgical Strategy and Individual Disorders at Baseline.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, Umberto; Larcher, Alessandro; Terrone, Carlo; Antonelli, Alessandro; Volpe, Alessandro; Fiori, Cristian; Furlan, Maria; Dehò, Federico; Minervini, Andrea; Serni, Sergio; Porpiglia, Francesco; Trevisani, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea; Carini, Marco; Simeone, Claudio; Montorsi, Francesco; Bertini, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Although nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) has demonstrated benefit in terms of renal function preservation, it is unclear whether NSS might also decrease the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) relative to radical nephrectomy (RN). In the current paper, we aimed to report the rate and the predictors of ESRD after surgery, accounting for detailed individual baseline characteristics and comorbidities. A multi-institutional collaboration among five European tertiary care centers allowed study of 2027 patients with normal preoperative renal function and a clinically localized T1abN0M0 renal mass. Cox regression analyses were used to predict the risk of ESRD (defined as the onset of a postoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate <15ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) after adjusting for the individual baseline risk of developing chronic kidney disease. Univariable ESRD rates at 5 and 10 yr of follow-up were virtually equivalent for patients who underwent NSS (1.5% and 2.5%, respectively) versus RN (1.9% and 2.7%, respectively; hazard ratio [HR]: 0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.4-1.6). However, diabetes, smoking, uncontrolled hypertension, and other comorbidities were consistently more frequent in the NSS group relative to their RN counterparts. After adjusting for detailed baseline individual characteristics, NSS was shown to have an independent protective effect relative to RN (HR: 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8; p=0.02) at multivariable analyses.

  20. High Dietary Acid Load Predicts ESRD among Adults with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Deidra C.; Wesson, Donald E.; Tilea, Anca M.; Saran, Rajiv; Ríos-Burrows, Nilka; Williams, Desmond E.; Powe, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Small clinical trials have shown that a reduction in dietary acid load (DAL) improves kidney injury and slows kidney function decline; however, the relationship between DAL and risk of ESRD in a population-based cohort with CKD remains unexamined. We examined the association between DAL, quantified by net acid excretion (NAEes), and progression to ESRD in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Among 1486 adults with CKD age≥20 years enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, DAL was determined by 24-h dietary recall questionnaire. The development of ESRD was ascertained over a median 14.2 years of follow-up through linkage with the Medicare ESRD Registry. We used the Fine–Gray competing risks method to estimate the association of high, medium, and low DAL with ESRD after adjusting for demographics, nutritional factors, clinical factors, and kidney function/damage markers and accounting for intervening mortality events. In total, 311 (20.9%) participants developed ESRD. Higher levels of DAL were associated with increased risk of ESRD; relative hazards (95% confidence interval) were 3.04 (1.58 to 5.86) for the highest tertile and 1.81 (0.89 to 3.68) for the middle tertile compared with the lowest tertile in the fully adjusted model. The risk of ESRD associated with DAL tertiles increased as eGFR decreased (P trend=0.001). Among participants with albuminuria, high DAL was strongly associated with ESRD risk (P trend=0.03). In conclusion, high DAL in persons with CKD is independently associated with increased risk of ESRD in a nationally representative population. PMID:25677388

  1. High Dietary Acid Load Predicts ESRD among Adults with CKD.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanushree; Crews, Deidra C; Wesson, Donald E; Tilea, Anca M; Saran, Rajiv; Ríos-Burrows, Nilka; Williams, Desmond E; Powe, Neil R

    2015-07-01

    Small clinical trials have shown that a reduction in dietary acid load (DAL) improves kidney injury and slows kidney function decline; however, the relationship between DAL and risk of ESRD in a population-based cohort with CKD remains unexamined. We examined the association between DAL, quantified by net acid excretion (NAEes), and progression to ESRD in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Among 1486 adults with CKD age≥20 years enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, DAL was determined by 24-h dietary recall questionnaire. The development of ESRD was ascertained over a median 14.2 years of follow-up through linkage with the Medicare ESRD Registry. We used the Fine-Gray competing risks method to estimate the association of high, medium, and low DAL with ESRD after adjusting for demographics, nutritional factors, clinical factors, and kidney function/damage markers and accounting for intervening mortality events. In total, 311 (20.9%) participants developed ESRD. Higher levels of DAL were associated with increased risk of ESRD; relative hazards (95% confidence interval) were 3.04 (1.58 to 5.86) for the highest tertile and 1.81 (0.89 to 3.68) for the middle tertile compared with the lowest tertile in the fully adjusted model. The risk of ESRD associated with DAL tertiles increased as eGFR decreased (P trend=0.001). Among participants with albuminuria, high DAL was strongly associated with ESRD risk (P trend=0.03). In conclusion, high DAL in persons with CKD is independently associated with increased risk of ESRD in a nationally representative population.

  2. Association between Vitamin D Deficiency and Anemia in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yung Ly; Kim, Hyunwook; Kwon, Young Eun; Ryu, Dong-Ryeol; Lee, Mi Jung; Park, Kyung Sook; Ryu, Han Jak; Park, Jung Tak; Oh, Hyung Jung; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Despite new treatment strategies, anemia remains the most prevalent complication in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We investigated whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D3] deficiency was associated with anemia in ESRD patients. Materials and Methods We reviewed the medical records of 410 ESRD patients who had undergone renal transplantation (RTx) at Yonsei University Health System and who had 25(OH)D3 levels measured at the time of RTx. Patients were divided into two groups based on baseline 25(OH)D3 concentrations: group 1, 25(OH)D3 levels <10 ng/mL; and group 2, 25(OH)D3 levels ≥10 ng/mL. Results Using multivariate regression models, 25(OH)D3, age, and erythrocyte-stimulating agent (ESA) dose were found to be significantly associated with hemoglobin (Hb) levels [25(OH)D3: β=0.263, p<0.001; age: β=0.122, p=0.010; ESA dose: β=-0.069, p=0.005]. In addition, logistic regression analysis revealed that patients in group 1 had a significantly higher risk for developing anemia (Hb level <10 g/dL) compared to group 2 patients, even after adjusting for potential risk factors for anemia (odds ratio=3.857; confidence interval=1.091–13.632; p=0.036). Conclusion 25(OH)D3 deficiency was significantly associated with anemia in patients with ESRD. Randomized controlled trials are needed to determine whether vitamin D supplementation can improve anemia in these patients. PMID:27401647

  3. A systematic review regarding the association of illness perception and survival among end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Parfeni, Mihaela; Nistor, Ionut; Covic, Adrian

    2013-10-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients have increased mortality and morbidity. According to Leventhal's self-regulation model, these patients mentally develop illness representations and coping strategies in order to better understand their condition. Mental representations seem to be an important factor for clinical and psychosocial outcomes. We aimed to systematically review all available data regarding the association between illness perception and survival/mortality among ESRD patients receiving dialysis treatment. This is a systematic review of prospective observational studies, evaluating illness perception and its association with survival/mortality in ESRD dialysis stage patients. We searched CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library until August 2012, MEDLINE from 1950, EMBASE from 1980, PsychINFO from 1967 and additional sources to identify all records evaluating illness perception and clinical outcomes in this population. Two authors assessed potential citations for eligibility and quality and extracted all data. The studied intervention was the application of the most commonly used questionnaires for assessing illness perception. The main outcomes were survival and mortality. We identified five studies evaluating the relationship between illness perception and survival/mortality in ESRD patients receiving dialysis treatment. All included studies were prospective observational ones. Four studies showed that a negative perception of illness is associated with increased risk of death and one study failed to find any association between illness perception and mortality. This is the first systematic search that analysed the existing data showing an association between illness representation and survival/mortality among these patients. The main limitation of this review includes the design of the included studies (prospective observational studies without a non-exposed control group). This study implies that patient's outcome may be improved by changes in illness

  4. Association between Vitamin D Deficiency and Anemia in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yung Ly; Kim, Hyunwook; Kwon, Young Eun; Ryu, Dong Ryeol; Lee, Mi Jung; Park, Kyung Sook; Ryu, Han Jak; Park, Jung Tak; Oh, Hyung Jung; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae Hyun; Kang, Shin Wook

    2016-09-01

    Despite new treatment strategies, anemia remains the most prevalent complication in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We investigated whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D3] deficiency was associated with anemia in ESRD patients. We reviewed the medical records of 410 ESRD patients who had undergone renal transplantation (RTx) at Yonsei University Health System and who had 25(OH)D3 levels measured at the time of RTx. Patients were divided into two groups based on baseline 25(OH)D3 concentrations: group 1, 25(OH)D3 levels <10 ng/mL; and group 2, 25(OH)D3 levels ≥10 ng/mL. Using multivariate regression models, 25(OH)D3, age, and erythrocyte-stimulating agent (ESA) dose were found to be significantly associated with hemoglobin (Hb) levels [25(OH)D3: β=0.263, p<0.001; age: β=0.122, p=0.010; ESA dose: β=-0.069, p=0.005]. In addition, logistic regression analysis revealed that patients in group 1 had a significantly higher risk for developing anemia (Hb level <10 g/dL) compared to group 2 patients, even after adjusting for potential risk factors for anemia (odds ratio=3.857; confidence interval=1.091-13.632; p=0.036). 25(OH)D3 deficiency was significantly associated with anemia in patients with ESRD. Randomized controlled trials are needed to determine whether vitamin D supplementation can improve anemia in these patients.

  5. Uremic pericarditis, pericardial effusion, and constrictive pericarditis in end-stage renal disease: Insights and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Karim Abdur; Betancor, Jorge; Xu, Bo; Kumar, Arnav; Rivas, Carlos Godoy; Sato, Kimi; Wong, Leslie P; Asher, Craig R; Klein, Allan L

    2017-09-05

    A rising prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has led to a rise in ESRD-related pericardial syndromes, calling for a better understanding of its pathophysiology, diagnoses, and management. Uremic pericarditis, the most common manifestation of uremic pericardial disease, is a contemporary problem that calls for intensive hemodialysis, anti-inflammatories, and often, drainage of large inflammatory pericardial effusions. Likewise, asymptomatic pericardial effusions can become large and impact the hemodynamics of patients on chronic hemodialysis. Constrictive pericarditis is also well documented in this population, ultimately resulting in pericardiectomy for definitive treatment. The management of pericardial diseases in ESRD patients involves internists, cardiologists, and nephrologists. Current guidelines lack clarity with respect to the management of pericardial processes in the ESRD population. Our review aims to describe the etiology, classification, clinical manifestations, diagnostic imaging tools, and treatment options of pericardial diseases in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. End-stage renal disease in Tunisian infants: Etiology and outcome.

    PubMed

    Jellouli, M; Boussetta, A; Abidi, K; Hammi, Y; Zarrouk, C; Gargah, T

    2016-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) in infants has particular features in terms of etiologies and therapeutic modalities. The aim of our study is to describe the etiologies and the ESRD outcomes among Tunisian infants. This retrospective study was conducted over 15 years (from January 1998 to December 31, 2013) in the Pediatric Department at Charles Nicolle Hospital. In total, 157 pediatric patients had ESRD. The mean incidence was 4.25 million children. The study involved 24 infants; the sex ratio was equal to 2. The mean age at diagnosis of ESRD was 8 months (range, 1-21 months). Growth retardation was noticed in 14 patients. The main causes were Congenital Anomalies of the Kidneys and Urinary Tract (9 infants) and hereditary renal disease (9 infants). All patients were treated with peritoneal dialysis; 16 infants presented peritonitis. Mortality rate was about 28%. The leading causes of death were cardiovascular diseases and infections.

  7. Chromosome 2q31.1 Associates with ESRD in Women with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sandholm, Niina; McKnight, Amy Jayne; Salem, Rany M.; Brennan, Eoin P.; Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; McKay, Gareth J.; Sadlier, Denise M.; Williams, Winfred W.; Martin, Finian; Panduru, Nicolae Mircea; Tarnow, Lise; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tryggvason, Karl; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Comeau, Mary E.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Godson, Catherine; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Maxwell, Alexander P.; Florez, Jose C.

    2013-01-01

    Sex and genetic variation influence the risk of developing diabetic nephropathy and ESRD in patients with type 1 diabetes. We performed a genome-wide association study in a cohort of 3652 patients from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study with type 1 diabetes to determine whether sex-specific genetic risk factors for ESRD exist. A common variant, rs4972593 on chromosome 2q31.1, was associated with ESRD in women (P<5×10−8) but not in men (P=0.77). This association was replicated in the meta-analysis of three independent type 1 diabetes cohorts (P=0.02) and remained significant for women (P<5×10−8; odds ratio, 1.81 [95% confidence interval, 1.47 to 2.24]) upon combined meta-analysis of the discovery and replication cohorts. rs4972593 is located between the genes that code for the Sp3 transcription factor, which interacts directly with estrogen receptor α and regulates the expression of genes linked to glomerular function and the pathogenesis of nephropathy, and the CDCA7 transcription factor, which regulates cell proliferation. Further examination revealed potential transcription factor–binding sites within rs4972593 and predicted eight estrogen-responsive elements within 5 kb of this locus. Moreover, we found sex-specific differences in the glomerular expression levels of SP3 (P=0.004). Overall, these results suggest that rs4972593 is a sex-specific genetic variant associated with ESRD in patients with type 1 diabetes and may underlie the sex-specific protection against ESRD. PMID:24029427

  8. An open-label, non-randomised, phase 1, single-dose study to assess the pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in patients with end-stage renal disease requiring intermittent haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Sunzel, Maria; Learoyd, Maria; Li, Jianguo; Li, Yan; Ngo, Ngoc; Edeki, Timi

    2015-12-01

    For patients with normal renal function, the recommended ceftaroline fosamil dose is a 600 mg 1-h intravenous (i.v.) infusion every 12 h (q12h). In patients with a creatinine clearance of ≤30 mL/min, including those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the recommended dose is a 200 mg 1-h i.v. infusion q12h. This phase 1 study (NCT01664065) evaluated the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of ceftaroline fosamil 200 mg 1-h i.v. infusion in patients with ESRD. Patients with ESRD (n=8) participated in two treatment periods (ceftaroline fosamil 200 mg administered pre- and post-haemodialysis) separated by >1 week. Healthy volunteers (n=7) received a single 600 mg dose of ceftaroline fosamil. Blood (pre- and post-haemodialysis) and dialysate samples were obtained for pharmacokinetic analysis. In patients with ESRD, the geometric mean [coefficient of variation (%CV)] plasma ceftaroline area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC0-∞) following post-haemodialysis ceftaroline fosamil 200 mg infusion was 64.8 (38.9)μg·h/mL, similar to that in volunteers following a 600 mg infusion [62.7 (9.4)μg·h/mL]. Ceftaroline AUC0-∞ decreased by ca. 50% when infusion was initiated pre-haemodialysis. In the pre-haemodialysis treatment period, 80% of the ceftaroline fosamil dose was recovered in dialysate as ceftaroline (73%) and ceftaroline M-1 (7%). The frequency of adverse events was similar across patients with ESRD (pre- and post-haemodialysis) and volunteers (43%, 50% and 43% of subjects, respectively). Ceftaroline fosamil 200 mg 1-h i.v. infusion q12h, administered post-haemodialysis on dialysis days, is an appropriate dosage regimen for ESRD patients.

  9. Lanthanum carbonate: a review of its use in lowering serum phosphate in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Curran, Monique P; Robinson, Dean M

    2009-11-12

    Orally administered lanthanum carbonate (Fosrenol) dissociates in the acid environment of the upper gastrointestinal tract to release the cation lanthanum, which then binds dietary phosphate. Lanthanum carbonate was effective in reducing levels of serum phosphate and serum calcium x phosphate product and then maintaining these levels within target ranges for up to 6 years in adult patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The reduction in serum phosphate levels with lanthanum carbonate was generally similar to that with calcium carbonate or sevelamer hydrochloride. This agent was generally well tolerated, with the most frequently reported adverse events being gastrointestinal in nature and occurring at a similar rate to that with calcium carbonate. However, lanthanum carbonate was associated with fewer episodes of hypercalcaemia than calcium carbonate. Overall, lanthanum carbonate is a valuable option for the reduction of serum phosphate levels in patients with ESRD on haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.

  10. Genomic damage in endstage renal disease-contribution of uremic toxins.

    PubMed

    Schupp, Nicole; Heidland, August; Stopper, Helga

    2010-10-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), whether on conservative, peritoneal or hemodialysis therapy, have elevated genomic damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes and an increased cancer incidence, especially of the kidney. The damage is possibly due to accumulation of uremic toxins like advanced glycation endproducts or homocysteine. However, other endogenous substances with genotoxic properties, which are increased in ESRD, could be involved, such as the blood pressure regulating hormones angiotensin II and aldosterone or the inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. This review provides an overview of genomic damage observed in ESRD patients, focuses on possible underlying causes and shows modulations of the damage by modern dialysis strategies and vitamin supplementation.

  11. Association of statin use and the risk of end-stage renal disease: A nationwide Asian population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-06-01

    Although experimental models have shown that statins could alleviate glomerular damage and decrease urinary protein excretion, the renal effects of statins remain unclear. A case-control study was conducted using data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance system. An end-stage renal disease (ESRD) group comprising 11,486 patients was established. Each patient was frequency-matched by age, sex, and comorbidities with one person without ESRD from the general population. Logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the influence of statin use on ESRD risk. The overall adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of ESRD among patients who received statins was 1.59 (95% confidence interval=1.50-1.68). The raised ESRD risk of statin remained consolidated regardless of statin type (P<.001), except lovastatin. Further, while stratified by cumulative define daily dose, the risk of ESRD increased with accumulative dosage of statins (P for trend<.001). This population-based case-control study showed that statin use might be associated with increased ESRD risks. Large-scale randomized clinical trial encompassing statins of different kinds and populations of different comorbidities would be helpful to clarify the potential ESRD risks of statin users. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pulmonary Congestion Predicts Cardiac Events and Mortality in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Torino, Claudia; Tripepi, Rocco; Tripepi, Giovanni; D’Arrigo, Graziella; Postorino, Maurizio; Gargani, Luna; Sicari, Rosa; Picano, Eugenio; Mallamaci, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary congestion is highly prevalent and often asymptomatic among patients with ESRD treated with hemodialysis, but whether its presence predicts clinical outcomes is unknown. Here, we tested the prognostic value of extravascular lung water measured by a simple, well validated ultrasound B-lines score (BL-US) in a multicenter study that enrolled 392 hemodialysis patients. We detected moderate-to-severe lung congestion in 45% and very severe congestion in 14% of the patients. Among those patients with moderate-to-severe lung congestion, 71% were asymptomatic or presented slight symptoms of heart failure. Compared with those patients having mild or no congestion, patients with very severe congestion had a 4.2-fold risk of death (HR=4.20, 95% CI=2.45–7.23) and a 3.2-fold risk of cardiac events (HR=3.20, 95% CI=1.75–5.88) adjusted for NYHA class and other risk factors. Including the degree of pulmonary congestion in the model significantly improved the risk reclassification for cardiac events by 10% (P<0.015). In summary, lung ultrasound can detect asymptomatic pulmonary congestion in hemodialysis patients, and the resulting BL-US score is a strong, independent predictor of death and cardiac events in this population. PMID:23449536

  13. Bariatric Surgery as a Bridge to Renal Transplantation in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Bahri, Shadi; Fakhry, Tannous K; Gonzalvo, John Paul; Murr, Michel M

    2017-05-13

    Obesity is a relative contraindication to organ transplantation. Preliminary reports suggest that bariatric surgery may be used as a bridge to transplantation in patients who are not eligible for transplantation because of morbid obesity. The Bariatric Center at Tampa General Hospital, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. We reviewed the outcomes of 16 consecutive patients on hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who underwent bariatric surgery from 1998 to 2016. Demographics, comorbidities, weight loss, as well as transplant status were reported. Data is mean ± SD. Six men and ten women aged 43-66 years (median = 54 years) underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB, n = 12), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB, n = 3), or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG, n = 1). Preoperative BMI was 48 ± 8 kg/m(2). Follow-up to date was 1-10 years (median = 2.8 years); postoperative BMI was 31 ± 7 kg/m(2); %EBWL was 62 ± 24. Four patients underwent renal transplantation (25%) between 2.5-5 years after bariatric surgery. Five patients are currently listed for transplantation. Five patients were not listed for transplantation due to persistent comorbidities; two of these patients died as a consequence of their comorbidities (12.5%) more than 1 year after bariatric surgery. Two patients were lost to follow-up (12.5%). Bariatric surgery is effective in patients with ESRD and improves access to renal transplantation. Bariatric surgery offers a safe approach to weight loss and improvement in comorbidities in the majority of patients. Referrals of transplant candidates with obesity for bariatric surgery should be considered early in the course of ESRD.

  14. Microscopic Haematuria and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Stage 3-5 Nondiabetic Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    You-Hsien Lin, Hugo; Yen, Chun-Yu; Lim, Lee-Moay; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Tsai, Jer-Chia; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Hung, Chi-Chih; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2015-10-16

    Microscopic haematuria is proposed as a prognostic factor for renal outcomes in patients with glomerulonephritis. However, the role of haematuria in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) or heavy proteinuria has not been investigated. We divided 1799 patients with stage 3-5 nondiabetic CKD into 3 groups according to the results from 3 urinalyses: no haematuria (0-2 red blood cells [RBCs]/hpf ≥2 times), mild haematuria (2-5 RBCs/hpf ≥2 times) and moderate haematuria (≥5-10 RBCs/hpf ≥2 times). The estimated glomerular filtration rate was 25.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2), with a urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (UPCR) of 881 mg/g. The hazard ratios (HRs) of mild and moderate haematuria for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were 1.28 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.56, P = 0.024) and 1.34 (95% CI: 1.03-1.74, P = 0.030), respectively. The HR of moderate haematuria for mortality was 1.56 (95% CI: 1.11-2.20, P = 0.011). According to subgroup analysis, the HR of moderate haematuria for ESRD in patients with a UPCR of <500 mg/g was more prominent than that in patients with a UPCR of ≥500 mg/g. Microscopic haematuria in patients with stage 3-5 nondiabetic CKD is associated with increased risks of ESRD and mortality.

  15. Predictors of quality of life in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marc M; El Douaihy, Youssef; Boumitri, Christine; Rondla, Chetana; Moussaly, Elias; Daoud, Magda; El Sayegh, Suzanne E

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of quality of life (QOL) of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients (physical, mental, and social well-being) has become an essential tool to develop better plans of care. Objective of this study is to determine which demographic and biochemical parameters correlate with the QOL scores in patients with ESRD on hemodialysis (HD) using Kidney Disease QOL-36 surveys (KDQOL). A retrospective chart review of all ESRD patients who underwent HD at an outpatient center. The five components of the KDQOL were the primary end points of this study (burden of kidney disease, symptoms and problems, effects of kidney disease on daily life, mental component survey, and physical component survey). Scores were grouped into three categories (below average, average, and above average). In addition to demographics (age, sex, and race), the independent variables such as weight gain, number of years on dialysis, urea reduction ratio, calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, albumin, and hemoglobin in the serum were collected. Chi-square analysis for dependent variables and the nominal independent variables was used, and analysis of variance analysis was used for continuous independent variables. Ordinal regression using PLUM (polytomous universal model) method was used to weigh out possible effects of confounders. The cohort size was 111 patients. Mean age was 61.8 (±15.5) years; there were more males than females (64.9% vs 35.1%), the mean time-on-dialysis at the time of the study was 4.3 (4.8) years. Approximately two-thirds of the responses on all five domains of the questionnaire ranked average when compared to the national numbers. The remainders were split between above average (20.6%) and below average (13.4%). In our cohort, no relationships were statistically significant between the five dependent variables of interest and the independent variables by chi-square- and t-test analyses. This was further confirmed by regression analysis. Of note, sex carried the

  16. Contrast Medium Exposure During Computed Tomography and Risk of Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Shun; Chiu, Chien-Shan; How, Chorng-Kuang; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsuan-Jen; Hsieh, Vivian Chia-Rong; Hu, Sung-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term association between contrast medium exposure during computed tomography (CT) and the subsequent development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We conducted a population-based cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 7100 patients with nonadvanced CKD who underwent contrast medium-enhanced CT were identified and served as the study cohort. To avoid selection bias, we used the propensity score to match 7100 nonadvanced CKD patients, who underwent noncontrast medium-enhanced CT to serve as the comparison cohort. The age, sex, index year, and frequency of undergoing CTs were also matched between the study and comparison cohorts. Participants were followed until a new diagnosis of ESRD or December 31, 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression. Contrast medium exposure was not identified as a risk factor for developing ESRD in nonadvanced CKD patients after confounders adjustment (adjusted HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66–1.26; P = 0.580). We further divided the patients who underwent CTs with contrast medium use into ≤1 exposure per year on average, >1 and <2 exposure per year on average, and ≥2 exposure per year on average. After adjusting for confounders, we identified a much higher risk for developing ESRD in the 2 groups of >1 and <2 exposure per year on average and ≥2 exposure per year on average (adjusted HR = 8.13; 95% CI, 5.57–11.87 and adjusted HR = 12.08; 95% CI, 7.39–19.75, respectively) compared with the patients who underwent CTs without contrast medium use. This long-term follow-up study demonstrated that contrast medium exposure was not associated with an increased risk of ESRD development in nonadvanced CKD patients. PMID:27100424

  17. Nondialytic therapy for end-stage renal disease is an underutilized care paradigm in the United States: time for a more robust reappraisal of this treatment option.

    PubMed

    Onuigbo, Macaulay A C

    2013-01-01

    Nondialytic therapy (NDT)--also calledconservative kidney management--is a growing modality of treatment for select chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients globally. Nevertheless, NDT is rarely practiced in the United States. We set out to investigate NDT activity before initiation of renal replacement therapy in a Northwestern Wisconsin Mayo Clinic ESRD population. Records of all prevalent ESRD patients on chronic hemodialysis in our practice were retrospectively reviewed in May 2012. Dialysis nurses and social workers were informally interviewed to augment the review process. Of the 166 ESRD patients reviewed, 82 (49%) were 70 years of age or older, 46 (28%) were 70-79 years, and 36 (22%) were 80-89 years. Most of these older patients had multiple significant comorbidities ("multimorbidity"). Evidence for NDT activity before initiation of renal replacement therapy was virtually nonexistent. The older ESRD patients with multimorbidity experienced frequent hospitalizations. Our preliminary review suggests that their quality of life may have been better with NDT. Almost one half of our ESRD population was made up of people more than 70 years of age, most with multimorbidity. In our practice, NDT is a neglected paradigm, as it is in most U.S. nephrology practices. The place of NDT, actively provided by a specialized multidisciplinary team, for U.S. ESRD patients demands urgent attention and robust reappraisal by U.S. nephrologists.

  18. Trends in the incidence, demographics, and outcomes of end-stage renal disease due to lupus nephritis in the US from 1995 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Costenbader, Karen H; Desai, Amrita; Alarcón, Graciela S; Hiraki, Linda T; Shaykevich, Tamara; Brookhart, M Alan; Massarotti, Elena; Lu, Bing; Solomon, Daniel H; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2011-06-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether recent advances in lupus nephritis treatment have led to changes in the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) secondary to lupus nephritis, or in the characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of patients with lupus nephritis ESRD. Patients with incident lupus nephritis ESRD (1995-2006) were identified in the US Renal Data System. Trends in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were assessed. We tested for temporal changes in standardized incidence rates (SIRs) for sociodemographic groups using Poisson regression. Changes in rates of waitlisting for kidney transplant, kidney transplantation, and all-cause mortality were examined using crude and adjusted time-to-event analyses. We identified 12,344 incident cases of lupus nephritis ESRD. Mean age at ESRD onset was 41 years; 81.6% of the patients were women and 49.5% were African American. SIRs for lupus nephritis ESRD among those who were ages 5-39 years, African American, or lived in the southeastern US increased significantly from 1995 to 2006. Increases in body mass index and in the prevalence of both diabetes mellitus and hypertension were detected. Mean serum hemoglobin level at ESRD onset increased, while that of serum creatinine decreased over time. More patients received hemodialysis and fewer received peritoneal dialysis. There was a slight increase in the frequency of preemptive kidney transplantation at ESRD onset, but kidney transplantation rates within the first 3 years of ESRD declined. Mortality did not change over the 12 years of study. Our findings indicate that the characteristics of patients with lupus nephritis ESRD and initial therapies have changed in recent years. While SIRs rose in younger patients, among African Americans, and in the South, outcomes did not improve in over a decade of evaluation. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  19. Healthcare decision-making in end stage renal disease-patient preferences and clinical correlates.

    PubMed

    Jayanti, Anuradha; Neuvonen, Markus; Wearden, Alison; Morris, Julie; Foden, Philip; Brenchley, Paul; Mitra, Sandip

    2015-11-14

    Medical decision-making is critical to patient survival and well-being. Patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) are faced with incrementally complex decision-making throughout their treatment journey. The extent to which patients seek involvement in the decision-making process and factors which influence these in ESRD need to be understood. 535 ESRD patients were enrolled into the cross-sectional study arm and 30 patients who started dialysis were prospectively evaluated. Patients were enrolled into 3 groups- 'predialysis' (group A), 'in-centre' haemodialysis (HD) (group B) and self-care HD (93 % at home-group C) from across five tertiary UK renal centres. The Autonomy Preference Index (API) has been employed to study patient preferences for information-seeking (IS) and decision-making (DM). Demographic, psychosocial and neuropsychometric assessments are considered for analyses. 458 complete responses were available. API items have high internal consistency in the study population (Cronbach's alpha > 0.70). Overall and across individual study groups, the scores for information-seeking and decision-making are significantly different indicating that although patients had a strong preference to be well informed, they were more neutral in their preference to participate in DM (p < 0.05). In the age, education and study group adjusted multiple linear regression analysis, lower age, female gender, marital status; higher API IS scores and white ethnicity background were significant predictors of preference for decision-making. DM scores were subdivided into tertiles to identify variables associated with high (DM > 70: and low DM (≤30) scores. This shows association of higher DM scores with lower age, lower comorbidity index score, higher executive brain function, belonging in the self-caring cohort and being unemployed. In the prospectively studied cohort of predialysis patients, there was no change in decision-making preference scores after

  20. Effect of low dose nicotinic acid on hyperphosphatemia in patients with end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Zahed, N S; Zamanifar, N; Nikbakht, H

    2016-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is a risk factor for ectopic calcification and coronary artery diseases in end stage renal diseases (ESRD). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of low-dose nicotinic acid on hyperphosphatemia in patients with ESRD. This randomized, double-blind clinical trial was done on 70 ESRD patients with serum phosphoure ≥5.5 mg/dl. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups (n = 35) and the intervention group received niacin 25 mg/day as the initial dose. After 4 weeks, in patients who did not respond to treatment, niacin dose was increased up to 50 mg/dl. At the end of week 8, in case there was no treatment effect, the dose was raised to 100 mg/day. The appropriate response to treatment was defined as serum phosphorous level reductions <5.5 mg/dl. The age was 50.5 ± 14.3 years and duration of dialysis 5.1 ± 5.3 months. In the niacin group, mean phosphorus level decreased from 6.7 ± 0.84 mg/dl at the end of the 1(st) month to 5.8 ± 1.0 mg/dl at the end of the 2(nd) month and to 4.4 ± 1.4 mg/dl at the end of the 3(rd) month (P = 0.004). In the placebo group, mean phosphorus level increased from 6.5 ± 1.2 mg/dl to 7.2 ± 0.91 mg/dl at the end of the 3(rd) month (P = 0.006). In the niacin group, high density lipoprotein (HDL) increased significantly from 45.00 ± 14.9 to 47.2 ± 11.6 (P = 0.009). We conclude that niacin (100 mg/day) decreased phosphorus serum level and increased HDL serum level in patients on dialysis.

  1. Icodextrin eliminates phosphate and ameliorates cardiac hypertrophy and valvular calcification in patients with end-stage renal disease and diabetes mellitus undergoing peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Takeyuki; Hayasaki, Takahiro; Hobo, Akinori; Furuta, Shinji; Kabu, Koki; Tonozuka, Yukio; Iida, Yoshiyasu

    2013-01-01

    Among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, cardiovascular disease is a common comorbidity and one of most important factors affecting clinical prognosis. Calcium deposition has been reported to correlate with plasma phosphate. Icodextrin (Ico)-based peritoneal dialysis (PD) has many advantages over glucose (Glu)-based PD. We aimed to identify factors that suppress arteriosclerosis and valvular disease in patients with ESRD and diabetes mellitus (DM) undergoing Ico-based PD. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the effects of Ico-based PD (n = 20) on phosphate elimination and cardiovascular disease progression in patients with ESRD andDM, and we compared the results with those for Glu-based PD (n = 20). Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and aortic valve calcification (AVC) score were significantly decreased and daily phosphate elimination was significantly increased in the Ico group compared with the Glu group. Furthermore, mean daily phosphate elimination was significantly and negatively correlated with the amelioration in LVMI and AVC score. Our study suggests that, compared with glucose, icodextrin has the ability to eliminate more phosphate from the body, indicating that phosphate elimination might potentially be a means of controlling cardiovascular disease in PD patients with DM.

  2. Comparison of Measured GFR, Serum Creatinine, Cystatin C, and Beta-Trace Protein to Predict ESRD in African Americans With Hypertensive CKD

    PubMed Central

    Bhavsar, Nrupen A.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Kusek, John W.; Contreras, Gabriel; Bakris, George; Coresh, Josef; Astor, Brad C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Identification of persons with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who are at highest risk to progress to end stage renal disease (ESRD) is necessary to reduce the burden of kidney failure. The relative utility of traditional markers of kidney function, including estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and serum creatinine, and emerging markers of kidney function, including cystatin C and beta-trace protein (BTP), to predict ESRD and mortality has yet to be established. Study Design Randomized clinical trial followed by an observational cohort study. Setting & Participants 865 African American individuals with hypertensive CKD enrolled in a clinical trial of two levels of blood pressure control and three different antihypertensive drugs as initial therapy and subsequently followed by an observational cohort study. Predictors Quintile of measured GFR (mGFR) by iothalamate clearance, serum creatinine, serum creatinine-based estimated GFR (eGFRSCr), cystatin C, and BTP. Outcomes and Measurements Incidence of ESRD and mortality. Results A total of 246 participants reached ESRD over a median follow-up of 102 months. The incidence rate of ESRD was higher with higher quintiles of each marker. The association between higher BTP and ESRD was stronger than those for the other markers, including mGFR. All the markers remained significantly associated with ESRD after adjustment for mGFR and relevant covariates (all p<0.05), with BTP retaining the strongest association (HR for highest versus lowest quintile, 5.7; 95% CI, 2.2-14.9). Associations with the combined endpoint of ESRD or mortality (n=390) were weaker, but remained significant for cystatin C (p=0.05) and BTP (p=0.004). Limitations The ability of these markers to predict ESRD and mortality in other racial and ethnic groups and among individuals with CKD due to other causes is unknown. Conclusions Plasma BTP and cystatin C may be useful adjuncts to serum creatinine and mGFR in evaluating risk for progression of

  3. Successful vancomycin desensitization in a patient with end-stage renal disease and anaphylactic shock to vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, S J; Wise, S L; al-Tawfiq, J A; Robb, J L; Cushing, H E

    1998-10-01

    To report successful desensitization in a patient with a history of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and anaphylactic shock after receiving vancomycin. A 47-year-old white woman with a history of ESRD was admitted to the hospital reporting persistent nausea, vomiting, and diffuse abdominal pain. She had developed anaphylactic shock after exposure to vancomycin 3 years prior to this hospitalization. The patient's hospital course was complicated by septic shock and positive blood cultures for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. The patient tolerated vancomycin desensitization and received intravenous vancomycin 100 mg/d for 21 days. The desensitization protocol used in this report allows for gradual increases in vancomycin serum concentrations, avoiding peak and trough concentrations that occur with intravenous boluses. Maintaining the desensitized state is dependent on the continuous presence of the antigen with a return of clinical sensitivity after drug discontinuation. The vancomycin desensitization protocol and subsequent dosing strategy was used to ensure the continuous presence of vancomycin at steady-state concentrations to prevent the return of anaphylactic sensitivity. Desensitization was successful in a patient with ESRD and history of anaphylactic shock to vancomycin.

  4. [Skin diseases in hemodialysis and kidney transplant patients].

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Clarissa Morais Busatto; Gussão, Bruna Calvi; de Matos, Jorge Paulo Strogoff; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo; Pinto, Jane Marcy Neffá

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the world is facing an escalate in the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Databases containing information about patients in end stage renal disease (ESRD), especially in the United States, were the sources of initial information about it. Brazil has the third largest population on dialysis in the world, and there are about 680 dialysis centers, spread across all units of the federation in the present, providing treatment to an estimated population of almost 90,000 patients. Cutaneous involvement in the chronic renal failure is characterized by a number of manifestations, which may be related to three processes: the primary renal disease, the uremic state, or the therapeutic measures used in their handling. The skin changes in these two classes of patients, dialysis and transplant recipients, have been the subject of several studies. n recent years, however, great progress has been achieved in these two therapeutic modalities, which may have changed not only the type of the dermatologic disorders associated with these two conditions, but also their intensity or frequency. This article aims to yield an update as to the topic skin diseases in hemodialysis and kidney transplant patients.

  5. Improving Hepatitis B Vaccine Efficacy in End-Stage Renal Diseases Patients and Role of Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Hajipour, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a serious global health problem.The prevalence of viral hepatitis is higher in dialysis patients than in the general population because of the opportunity for exposure during the dialysis procedure. Immunization is the most effective way to prevent transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hence the development of acute or chronic hepatitis B. It is well established that patients with end-stage renal disease including dialysis-dependent patients, have an impaired immune response to hepatitis B vaccine. End stage renal diseases (ESRD) patients have lower seroconversion rates compared with the subjects with intact renal function. Moreover, even after the completion of vaccination schedule anti-hepatitis B (anti-HBs) titers of responder dialysis, patients are low and decline logarithmically with time. The impaired efficacy of HBV vaccine in patients with ESRD has been attributed to numerous factors such as immune compromise because of uremia and some other factors. One approach to improve the immunogenicity of existing HBV vaccines is adjuvantation, and it's very important to find more effective adjutants for improving HBV vaccine efficacy. In this paper we have a brief review on recently known new ways for improving HBV vaccine efficacy. PMID:23029621

  6. Epidemiology of acute infections among patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Lorien S; Go, Alan S

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of this review were (1) to review recent literature on the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infections in patients who had chronic kidney disease (CKD) and did or did not require renal replacement therapy; (2) to review literature on the efficacy and use of selected vaccines for patients with CKD; and (3) to outline a research framework for examining key issues regarding infections in patients with CKD. Infection-related hospitalizations contribute substantially to excess morbidity and mortality in patients with ESRD, and infection is the second leading cause of death in this population. Patients who have CKD and do not require renal replacement therapy seem to be at higher risk for infection compared with patients without CKD; however, data about patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis therapy are very limited. Numerous factors potentially predispose patients with CKD to infection: advanced age, presence of coexisting illnesses, vaccine hyporesponsiveness, immunosuppressive therapy, uremia, dialysis access, and the dialysis procedure. Targeted vaccination seems to have variable efficacy in the setting of CKD and is generally underused in this population. In conclusion, infection is a primary issue when caring for patients who receive maintenance dialysis. Very limited data exist about the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infection in patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis. Future research is needed to delineate accurately the epidemiology of infections in these populations and to develop effective preventive strategies across the spectrum of CKD severity.

  7. Epidemiology of Acute Infections among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dalrymple, Lorien S.; Go, Alan S.

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this review were (1) to review recent literature on the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infections in patients who had chronic kidney disease (CKD) and did or did not require renal replacement therapy; (2) to review literature on the efficacy and use of selected vaccines for patients with CKD; and (3) to outline a research framework for examining key issues regarding infections in patients with CKD. Infection-related hospitalizations contribute substantially to excess morbidity and mortality in patients with ESRD, and infection is the second leading cause of death in this population. Patients who have CKD and do not require renal replacement therapy seem to be at higher risk for infection compared with patients without CKD; however, data about patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis therapy are very limited. Numerous factors potentially predispose patients with CKD to infection: advanced age, presence of coexisting illnesses, vaccine hyporesponsiveness, immunosuppressive therapy, uremia, dialysis access, and the dialysis procedure. Targeted vaccination seems to have variable efficacy in the setting of CKD and is generally underused in this population. In conclusion, infection is a primary issue when caring for patients who receive maintenance dialysis. Very limited data exist about the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infection in patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis. Future research is needed to delineate accurately the epidemiology of infections in these populations and to develop effective preventive strategies across the spectrum of CKD severity. PMID:18650409

  8. Influence of Type D personality on health-related quality of life among Korean patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Son, Youn-Jung; You, Mi-Ae; Song, Eun Kyeung

    2012-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to explore the prevalence of Type D personality and the impact of Type D personality (the combination of negative affectivity and social inhibition) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and to determine whether this link of Type D personality to HRQOL is mediated by depressive symptoms. Patients (n = 144) from an outpatient nephrology clinic of a university hospital participated in this cross-sectional study. The prevalence of Type D personality using Type D Personality Scale-14 was 26%. After adjustment for patients' characteristics and depressive symptoms in multivariate analysis, Type D personality was an independent predictor of HRQOL. This relation of Type D personality to HRQOL was mediated by depressive symptoms. Our findings underline that intervention should be directed towards reducing depressive symptoms in patients with Type D personality in order to improve HRQOL of ESRD patients.

  9. Diabetes mellitus, superoxide dismutase and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma polymorphisms modify the outcome of end-stage renal disease patients of Han Chinese origin.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Chen, Yen-Ching; Fang, Cheng-Chung; Hu, Fu-Chang; Chang, Chen-Chih; Yen, Chung-Jen

    2016-12-07

    Increased oxidative stress significantly modifies the outcome of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and is counteracted by anti-oxidative capacity. However, whether anti-oxidant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influence the outcome of ESRD individuals with or without DM has not been tested before. We prospectively enrolled multi-center ESRD patients of Han Chinese origin betwen 2002 and 2003, recording their anti-oxidant (superoxide dismutase [SOD2], glutathione peroxidase [GPX1]) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) genotyping results, and stratified based on DM. They were followed up until 2008, with risk factors for mortality analyzed by Cox proportional hazard regression. We discovered that diabetic ESRD carriers of CC genotype of SOD2 exon 2 had an increased risk of mortality compared to non-diabetic ones with other genotypes (hazard ratio [HR] 4.04, p = 0.04), while GPX1 SNPs had no influence. Interactions between SOD2 and PPAR-γ SNPs regarding the mortality influence were also detected (for SOD2 CC genotype x PPAR-γexon 6 CT genotype, HR 3.19, p = 0.008), suggesting the importance of considering a combination panel of SNPs on patient survival. This might be the largest study focusing on the relationship between anti-oxidant SNPs and the outcomes of diabetic ESRD patients of Han Chinese origin. More studies are needed to validate our findings. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. A quality improvement model for optimizing care of the diabetic end-stage renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Mahnensmith, Rex L; Zorzanello, Mary; Hsu, Yueh-Han; Williams, Mark E

    2010-01-01

    Persons with diabetes mellitus whose kidney disease progresses to end-stage requiring dialysis have poorer outcomes compared to nondiabetic patients who commence maintenance dialysis. In the diabetic patient without renal failure, sustained strict glycemic, lipid, and blood pressure (BP) control can retard or thwart diabetic complications such as retinopathy, neuropathy, coronary disease, and peripheral vascular disease. Achieving these outcomes requires multidisciplinary collaborative care. Best care of the diabetic person requires a dedicated clinician who knows the patient well, who closely follows the course of clinical problems, who provides frequent assessments and interventions, and who also directs care to other agencies, clinics, and specialized clinicians who provide expert focused evaluations and interventions aimed at specific clinical concerns. Diabetic patients who reach end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have even greater clinical need of a dedicated principal care clinician than the diabetic patient who has minimal or moderate kidney disease. The diabetic patient with ESRD exhibits greater fluctuations in glucose and BP due to dialysis-related diet patterns and fluid balances and has more active cardiovascular problems due to the combined influences of calcium, phosphorus, and lipid imbalances. These problems warrant exceptional care that includes frequent surveillance and monitoring with timely interventions if patient outcomes are to be improved. We present here a quality improvement model for optimizing care of the diabetic dialysis patient that relies on a dedicated practitioner who can evaluate and intervene on the multiple variables within and beyond the dialysis clinic that impact the patient's health. We present three detailed clinical care pathways that the dedicated clinician can follow. We believe that patient outcomes can be improved with this approach that provides customized problem-focused care, collaborates with the dialysis

  11. Mucocutaneous manifestations and nail changes in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Tajbakhsh, Ramin; Dehghan, Mohammad; Azarhoosh, Ramin; Haghighi, Ali Nobakht; Sadani, Somayeh; Zadeh, Soheila Samad; Kabootari, Maryam; Qorbani, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Mucocutaneous manifestations are common among patients on hemodialysis (HD). This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of mucocutaneous manifestations in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who are on HD. In this cross-sectional, descriptive and analytic study conducted in 2009, 100 patients on HD at the Five Azar Hospital in Gorgan city were randomly selected. All the patients underwent detailed examination by a dermatologist to look for lesions in the skin, hair, nail and mucous membranes; if felt necessary, biopsy was obtained from the lesions. The findings were statistically analyzed using SPSS-13 software. For evaluation of normality of distribution, Kolmogorov-Smirnov was used, for quantitative variables Mann-Whitney and T-test (abnormal distribution) were used and for qualitative variables, Chi-2 and Fisher were used. In this study, P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Fifty-one males and 49 females were enrolled. The mean age was 49 ± 12 years. Diabetes was the most common cause of ESRD. In 95% of the patients, at least one mucocutaneous manifestation was present. Xerosis (78.3%) was the most common lesion, followed by pruritus (39.1%), lentigo (34.8%), skin discoloration (32.6%), leukonychia (32%) and thinning of the nail bed (24%). Xerosis, scaling, lentigo, folliculitis, idiopathic guttate hypopigmentation, leukonychia and half and half nail were associated with age. A significant relationship was seen between duration on dialysis and skin discoloration and leukonychia. Clubbing had a significant association with calcium-phosphorus product (Ca × P). There was a significant association between serum ferritin level and pruritus and tinea versicolor lesions. Our study shows that mucocutaneous manifestations are common among patients with ESRD. Identification of these manifestations and their association with causative factors are useful for preventing the lesions.

  12. Nutritional Status Predicts 10-Year Mortality in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease on Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shin Sook; Chang, Jai Won; Park, Yongsoon

    2017-04-18

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW) is associated with mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on maintenance hemodialysis. The correct diagnosis of PEW is extremely important in order to predict clinical outcomes. However, it is unclear which parameters should be used to diagnose PEW. Therefore, this retrospective observational study investigated the relationship between mortality and nutritional parameters in ESRD patients on maintenance hemodialysis. A total of 144 patients were enrolled. Nutritional parameters, including body mass index, serum albumin, dietary intake, normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), and malnutrition inflammation score (MIS), were measured at baseline. Fifty-three patients died during the study. Survivors had significantly higher nPCR (1.10 ± 0.24 g/kg/day vs. 1.01 ± 0.21 g/kg/day; p = 0.048), energy intake (26.7 ± 5.8 kcal/kg vs. 24.3 ± 4.2 kcal/kg; p = 0.009) and protein intake (0.91 ± 0.21 g/kg vs. 0.82 ± 0.24 g/kg; p = 0.020), and lower MIS (5.2 ± 2.3 vs. 6.1 ± 2.1, p = 0.039). In multivariable analysis, energy intake <25 kcal/kg (HR 1.860, 95% CI 1.018-3.399; p = 0.044) and MIS > 5 (HR 2.146, 95% CI 1.173-3.928; p = 0.013) were independent variables associated with all-cause mortality. These results suggest that higher MIS and lower energy intake are harmful to ESRD patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Optimal energy intake could reduce mortality in these patients.

  13. IGF-1 and Survival in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ting; Gama Axelsson, Thiane; Heimbürger, Olof; Bárány, Peter; Stenvinkel, Peter; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives IGF-1 deficiency links to malnutrition in CKD patients; however, it is not clear to what extent it associates with survival among these patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Serum IGF-1 and other biochemical, clinical (subjective global assessment), and densitometric (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry) markers of nutritional status and mineral and bone metabolism were measured in a cohort of 365 Swedish clinically stable CKD stage 5 patients (median age of 53 years) initiating dialysis between 1994 and 2009; in 207 patients, measurements were also taken after 1 year of dialysis. Deaths were registered during a median follow-up of 5 years. Associations of mortality with baseline IGF-1 and changes of IGF-1 after 1 year of dialysis were evaluated by Cox models. Results At baseline, IGF-1 concentrations associated negatively with age, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, poor nutritional status, IL-6, and osteoprotegerin and positively with body fat mass, bone mineral density, serum phosphate, calcium, and fibroblast growth factor-23. At 1 year, IGF-1 had increased by 33%. In multivariate regression, low age, diabetes mellitus, and high serum phosphate and calcium associated with IGF-1 at baseline, and in a mixed model, these factors, together with high fat body mass, associated with changes of IGF-1 during the first 1 year of dialysis. Adjusting for calendar year of inclusion, age, sex, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, IL-6, and poor nutritional status, a 1 SD higher level of IGF-1 at baseline associated with lower mortality risk (hazard ratio, 0.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 0.98). Persistently low or decreasing IGF-1 levels during the first 1 year on dialysis predicted worse survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.06 to 4.50). Conclusion In incident dialysis patients, low serum IGF-1 associates with body composition and markers of mineral and bone metabolism, and it

  14. Cost-effectiveness of haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis for patients with end-stage renal disease in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Lau, Titus; Luo, Nan

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of haemodialysis (HD), continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Singapore. A Markov model was developed to examine the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of HD, CAPD and APD over the 10-year time horizon from the societal perspective, using clinical data from an observational study and the national renal registry, utilities from published studies and costs from dialysis services providers. The base-case analysis was for a hypothetical cohort of 60-year-old non-diabetic ESRD patients. A high-risk group of 60-year-old diabetic ESRD patients was also studied. In the base-case analysis, the quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were 3.27 with CAPD, 3.48 with APD and 4.69 with HD. The total costs were Singapore dollar $169 872 for CAPD, $201 509 for APD and $306 827 for HD. CAPD and HD had extended dominance over APD. The ICER of HD versus CAPD was $96 447 (US$69 121) per QALY. One-way sensitivity analyses indicated that the results were most sensitive to the utility of HD. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses demonstrated that CAPD had the maximum probability of being cost-effective among treatments under evaluation at a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $60 000 (US$43 000) per QALY. The high-risk group analyses showed similar results. The ICER of HD versus CAPD was $106 281 (US$76 168) per QALY and the probability of CAPD being optimal was the highest using the same WTP threshold. Our analysis suggested that starting dialysis with CAPD is most cost-effective for ESRD patients in Singapore. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  15. Interpreting transition from adolescence to adulthood in patients on dialysis who have end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cura, Jonathan

    2012-09-01

    Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) undergo renal replacement therapies such as haemodialysis, and usually have to deal with a lifetime of treatment. If an individual has ESRD at a young age, eventually the individual experiences a stage of transition from adolescence to adulthood. Interpretive phenomenology was used to uncover the meaning of transition from adolescence to adulthood. Six patients on haemodialysis between the ages of 17 to 22 years agreed to participate in the study. Multiple sources of data were utilised: semi-structured interviews, video recordings, diaries and field notes. Using Ricoeur's theory of interpretation, the data were analysed. Three general themes were found: Living a Shorter Life; Dependence and Independence; and Struggle of Being Normal Amidst Difference. Transition to Adulthood among patients with ESRD is like a pendulum continuously moving in a back and forth motion. The "World-in-Between" is a constant search of self within two ends of characteristics: of holding on and giving up; expression and non-expression of self. © 2012 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  16. Erythropoiesis-stimulating Agent Use among Patients with Lupus Nephritis Approaching End-stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Puerta, José A; Waikar, Sushrut S; Solomon, Daniel H; Liu, Jun; Alarcón, Graciela S; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Costenbader, Karen H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) utilization among lupus nephritis (LN) patients with incipient ESRD. We aimed to identify sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with ESA use among incident LN ESRD patients. Methods Among all individuals age ≥18 with incident ESRD from 1995-2008 in the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS), we identified those with systemic lupus erythematosus (ICD-9 code 710.0) as the cause of ESRD. ESA use at ESRD onset was ascertained from the Medical Evidence Report. Year of onset, age, sex, race/ethnicity, medical insurance, employment status, residential region, clinical factors and comorbidities were considered potentially associated with ESA use in multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analyses. Results We identified 12,533 individuals with incident LN ESRD (1% of entire population). Of those, 4,288 (34%) received an ESA preceding ESRD. In multivariable-adjusted models, ESA users had higher serum albumin and hemoglobin concentrations, were more likely to be women, and to live in the Northeast. Conversely, Medicaid beneficiaries, the uninsured, unemployed, African Americans, Hispanics, and those with IV drug use, congestive heart failure and obesity had lower ESA use. Conclusion Among all U.S. patients and those with LN who developed ESRD, approximately one third received ESAs. Patient sex, race, age, medical insurance, residential region and clinical factors were significantly associated with ESA therapy. While there are no guidelines for ESA use in LN patients approaching ESRD, there has been wide sociodemographic variation, raising questions about ESA prescription practices. PMID:24672742

  17. Circulating Nonphosphorylated Carboxylated Matrix Gla Protein Predicts Survival in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Westenfeld, Ralf; Krüger, Thilo; Cranenburg, Ellen C.; Magdeleyns, Elke J.; Brandenburg, Vincent M.; Djuric, Zivka; Damjanovic, Tatjana; Ketteler, Markus; Vermeer, Cees; Dimkovic, Nada; Floege, Jürgen; Schurgers, Leon J.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms for vascular calcification and its associated cardiovascular mortality in patients with ESRD are not completely understood. Dialysis patients exhibit profound vitamin K deficiency, which may impair carboxylation of the calcification inhibitor matrix gla protein (MGP). Here, we tested whether distinct circulating inactive vitamin K–dependent proteins associate with all-cause or cardiovascular mortality. We observed higher levels of both desphospho-uncarboxylated MGP (dp-ucMGP) and desphospho-carboxylated MGP (dp-cMGP) among 188 hemodialysis patients compared with 98 age-matched subjects with normal renal function. Levels of dp-ucMGP correlated with those of protein induced by vitamin K absence II (PIVKA-II; r = 0.62, P < 0.0001). We found increased PIVKA-II levels in 121 (64%) dialysis patients, indicating pronounced vitamin K deficiency. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with low levels of dp-cMGP had an increased risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Multivariable Cox regression confirmed that low levels of dp-cMGP increase mortality risk (all-cause: HR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.3; cardiovascular: HR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2 to 6.2). Furthermore, patients with higher vascular calcification scores showed lower levels of dp-cMGP. In 17 hemodialysis patients, daily supplementation with vitamin K2 for 6 weeks reduced dp-ucMGP levels by 27% (P = 0.003) but did not affect dp-cMGP levels. In conclusion, the majority of dialysis patients exhibit pronounced vitamin K deficiency. Lower levels of circulating dp-cMGP may serve as a predictor of mortality in dialysis patients. Whether vitamin K supplementation improves outcomes requires further study. PMID:21289218

  18. The Association of Losartan and Ramipril Therapy With Kidney and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Chinese Nation-Wide Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsing, Shih-Chun; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Sun, Chien-An; Chien, Wu-Chien; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Kao, Sen-Yeong

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this nation-wide cohort study was to assess the association of using an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) therapy on the prognosis of hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We used Cox's proportional hazard regression model to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and first hospitalization for cardiovascular disease (CVD) for losartan and ramipril versus conventional antihypertensive agents. In total, 136,266 hypertensive patients with CKD in Taiwan were followed up from 2001 to 2008. In an average follow-up of 5.9 years, 7364 (5.40%) patients reached ESRD, 4165 (3.06%) patients died, and 6163 (4.52%) patients had their first hospitalization for CVD. Use of losartan or ramipril was associated with a lower risk of the endpoints compared with the conventional group. In the losartan group, the risks of ESRD, all- and cardiovascular-cause mortality, and first hospitalization for CVD were decreased by 9.2% (P = 0.01), 24.6% (P < 0.001), 12.4% (P = 0.03), and 36.0% (P = 0.01), respectively. In the ramipril group, these risks decreased by 7.6% (P = 0.02) for ESRD, 56.9% (P < 0.001) for all-cause mortality, 7.5% (P = 0.04) for cardiovascular mortality, and 24.7% (P < 0.001) for first hospitalization. This study indicated that losartan and ramipril had distinct association on the prognosis of hypertensive patients with CKD, and was first to disclose that the mean time to reach each endpoint for patients in the losartan, ramipril, and conventional group was not significantly different. However, further study is needed to confirm results of the present study.

  19. Low Serum Creatine Kinase Level Predicts Mortality in Patients with a Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Marie; Chassé, Jean-François; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Flamant, Martin; Vrtovsnik, François; Houillier, Pascal; Stengel, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Background Serum creatine kinase (sCK) reflects CK activity from striated skeletal muscle. Muscle wasting is a risk factor for mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study is to evaluate whether sCK is a predictor of mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a CKD population. Methods We included 1801 non-dialysis-dependent CKD patients from the NephroTest cohort. We used time-fixed and time-dependent cause-specific Cox models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for the risk of death and for the risk of ESRD associated with gender-specific sCK tertiles. Results Higher sCK level at baseline was associated with a lower age, a higher body mass index, and a higher level of 24 h urinary creatinine excretion, serum albumin and prealbumin (p<0.001). Men, patients of sub-Saharan ancestry, smokers and statin users also experienced a higher level of sCK. In a time-fixed Cox survival model (median follow-up 6.0 years), the lowest gender-specific sCK tertile was associated with a higher risk of death before and after adjustment for confounders (Crude model: hazard ratio (HR) 1.77 (95% CI: 1.34–2.32) compared to the highest tertile; fully-adjusted model: HR 1.37 (95% CI: 1.02–1.86)). Similar results were obtained with a time-dependent Cox model. The sCK level was not associated with the risk of ESRD. Conclusion A low level of sCK is associated with an increased risk of death in a CKD population. sCK levels might reflect muscle mass and nutritional status. PMID:27248151

  20. Low Serum Creatine Kinase Level Predicts Mortality in Patients with a Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Flahault, Adrien; Metzger, Marie; Chassé, Jean-François; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Flamant, Martin; Vrtovsnik, François; Houillier, Pascal; Stengel, Bénédicte; Thervet, Eric; Pallet, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Serum creatine kinase (sCK) reflects CK activity from striated skeletal muscle. Muscle wasting is a risk factor for mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study is to evaluate whether sCK is a predictor of mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a CKD population. We included 1801 non-dialysis-dependent CKD patients from the NephroTest cohort. We used time-fixed and time-dependent cause-specific Cox models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for the risk of death and for the risk of ESRD associated with gender-specific sCK tertiles. Higher sCK level at baseline was associated with a lower age, a higher body mass index, and a higher level of 24 h urinary creatinine excretion, serum albumin and prealbumin (p<0.001). Men, patients of sub-Saharan ancestry, smokers and statin users also experienced a higher level of sCK. In a time-fixed Cox survival model (median follow-up 6.0 years), the lowest gender-specific sCK tertile was associated with a higher risk of death before and after adjustment for confounders (Crude model: hazard ratio (HR) 1.77 (95% CI: 1.34-2.32) compared to the highest tertile; fully-adjusted model: HR 1.37 (95% CI: 1.02-1.86)). Similar results were obtained with a time-dependent Cox model. The sCK level was not associated with the risk of ESRD. A low level of sCK is associated with an increased risk of death in a CKD population. sCK levels might reflect muscle mass and nutritional status.

  1. The ESRD Quality Incentive Program-Can We Bridge the Chasm?

    PubMed

    Weiner, Daniel; Watnick, Suzanne

    2017-03-15

    The ESRD Quality Incentive Program (QIP) is the first mandatory federal pay for performance program launched on January 1, 2012. The QIP is tied to the ESRD prospective payment system and mandated by the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008, which directed the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to expand the payment bundle for renal dialysis services and legislated that payment be tied to quality measures. The QIP links 2% of the payment that a dialysis facility receives for Medicare patients on dialysis to the facility's performance on quality of care measures. Quality measures are evaluated annually for inclusion on the basis of importance, validity, and performance gap. Other quality assessment programs overlap with the QIP; all have substantial effects on provision of care as clinicians, patients, regulators, and dialysis organizations scramble to keep up with the frequent release of wide-ranging regulations. In this review, we provide an overview of quality assessment and quality measures, focusing on the ESRD QIP, its effect on care, and its potential future directions. We conclude that a patient-centered, individualized, and parsimonious approach to quality assessment needs to be maintained to allow the nephrology community to further bridge the quality chasm in dialysis care.

  2. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)--is it a new marker of hyporesponsiveness to recombinant human erythropoietin in patients that are on chronic hemodialysis?

    PubMed

    Orlic, L; Mikolasevic, I; Lukenda, V; Racki, S; Stimac, D; Milic, S

    2014-12-01

    Anemia is a major consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) that develops early in the course of illness and affects most patients who exhibit some degree of reduced renal function. Erythropoietin (EPO) deficiency is considered the most important cause of anemia in CKD. Renal anemia has serious clinical consequence. In addition to reducing patient physical capacity and quality of life, anemia induces adaptive cardiovascular mechanisms that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and death. Thus, treatment of anemia in CKD is very important. While EPO is effective in correcting anemia in most cases, up to 10% of patients however, have an inadequate response to therapy. The two most common and important reasons why patients become relatively unresponsive to EPO therapy are the development of true iron deficiency and the onset of an inflammatory state that impairs the response to EPO. Indeed, the role of inflammation and pro-inflammatory cytokines in resistance to EPO therapy is gaining increasing recognition. On the other hand, the main organ for C-reactive protein (CRP) synthesis is the liver and it is well known that the synthesis of an acute-phase proteins by the liver is up regulated by inflammation. The main consequence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is sub-chronic liver inflammation that leads and contributes to dyslipidemia, inflammation, enhanced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Considering the recent data about high prevalence of NAFLD in CKD patients, probably due to shared metabolic risk factors, we hypothesized that end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients with NAFLD will need a much higher dose of EPO to achieve the target hemoglobin levels in comparison with ESRD patients without NAFLD. The possible underlying mechanism is sub-chronic liver inflammation in NAFLD patients that leads and contributes to poor response to EPO. Therefore, we believe that NAFLD could be a new clinical marker of poor response to EPO therapy in

  3. Emergent Dialysis and its Impact on Quality of Life in Undocumented Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Andrew N; Fox, William R; Roppolo, Lynn P; Suter, Robert E

    2017-01-19

    This study aimed to define the ethnographic composition and assess the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of a large population of undocumented patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) seeking emergent dialysis in the emergency department (ED) of a large public hospital in the United States. All ESRD patients presenting to the hospital's main ED were identified during a 4-week consecutive enrollment period. Consenting patients completed two surveys-an ethnographic questionnaire and the validated kidney disease quality of life-36 (KDQOL-36) instrument. The study was conducted at a large county hospital in Dallas, Texas. In 2013, the hospital recorded >50,000 ED visits and administered approximately 6,000 dialysis treatments to ED patients. 88 of 101 unfunded patients presenting to the ED during the study period consented to participate, resulting in an 87.1% response rate. 65 of these patients were undocumented immigrants. Quantitative scores for the 5 subscales of the KDQOL-36 were calculated for the study population. Measures of physical and mental health in our study population were lower than those published for scheduled dialysis patients. 79.5% of our patients lost employment due to their dialysis requirements. At least 71.4% of the study patients were unaware that they required dialysis before immigrating to the United States. Quality of life scores were found to be low among our population of undocumented emergent dialysis patients. Our data also provide some evidence that availability of dialysis at no cost is not a primary driver of illegal immigration of ESRD patients to the United States.

  4. Factors Associated with the Choice of Peritoneal Dialysis in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Pei-Chun; Hou, Jia-Jeng; Jong, Ing-Ching; Hung, Peir-Haur; Hsiao, Chih-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors associated with receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD) in patients with incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a hospital in Southern Taiwan. Methods. The study included all consecutive patients with incident ESRD who participated in a multidisciplinary predialysis education (MPE) program and started their first dialysis therapy between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2013, in the study hospital. We provided small group teaching sessions to advanced CKD patients and their family to enhance understanding of various dialysis modalities. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyze the association of patient characteristics with the chosen dialysis modality. Results. Of the 656 patients, 524 (80%) chose hemodialysis and 132 chose PD. Our data showed that young age, high education level, and high scores of activities of daily living (ADLs) were positively associated with PD treatment. Patients who received small group teaching sessions had higher percentages of PD treatment (30.5% versus 19.5%; P = 0.108) and preparedness for dialysis (61.1% versus 46.6%; P = 0.090). Conclusion. Young age, high education level, and high ADL score were positively associated with choosing PD. Early creation of vascular access may be a barrier for PD. PMID:27042665

  5. Defining end-stage renal disease in clinical trials: a framework for adjudication.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv

    2016-06-01

    Unlike definition of stroke and myocardial infarction, there is no uniformly agreed upon definition to adjudicate end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD remains the most unambiguous and clinically relevant end point for clinical trialists, regulators, payers and patients with chronic kidney disease. The prescription of dialysis to patients with advanced chronic kidney disease is subjective and great variations exist among physicians and countries. Given the difficulties in diagnosing ESRD, the presence of estimated GFR <15 mL/min/1.7 3m(2) itself has been suggested as an end point. However, this definition is still a surrogate since many patients may live years without being symptomatic or needing dialysis. The purpose of this report is to describe a framework to define when the kidney function ends and when ESRD can be adjudicated. Discussed in this report are (i) the importance of diagnosing symptomatic uremia or advanced asymptomatic uremia thus establishing the need for dialysis; (ii) establishing the chronicity of dialysis so as to distinguish it from acute dialysis; (iii) establishing ESRD when dialysis is unavailable, refused or considered futile and (iv) the adjudication process. Several challenges and ambiguities that emerge in clinical trials and their possible solutions are provided. The criteria proposed herein may help to standardize the definition of ESRD and reduce the variability in adjudicating the most important renal end point in clinical trials of chronic kidney disease.

  6. Filtration markers as predictors of ESRD and mortality in Southwestern American Indians with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Foster, Meredith C; Inker, Lesley A; Hsu, Chi-Yuan; Eckfeldt, John H; Levey, Andrew S; Pavkov, Meda E; Myers, Bryan D; Bennett, Peter H; Kimmel, Paul L; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Coresh, Josef; Nelson, Robert G

    2015-07-01

    A growing number of serum filtration markers are associated with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in adults. Whether β-trace protein (BTP) and β2-microglobulin (B2M) are associated with these outcomes in adults with type 2 diabetes is not known. Longitudinal cohort study. 250 Pima Indians with type 2 diabetes (69% women; mean age, 42 years; mean diabetes duration, 11 years). Serum BTP, B2M, and glomerular filtration rate measured by iothalamate clearance (mGFR) or estimated using creatinine (eGFRcr) or cystatin C level (eGFRcys). Incident ESRD and all-cause mortality through December 2013. HRs were reported per interquartile range decrease of the inverse of BTP and B2M (1/BTP and 1/B2M) using Cox regression. Improvement in risk prediction with the addition of BTP or B2M level to established markers (eGFRcys with mGFR or eGFRcr) was evaluated using C statistics, continuous net reclassification improvement, and relative integrated discrimination improvement (RIDI). During a median follow-up of 14 years, 69 participants developed ESRD and 95 died. Both novel markers were associated with ESRD in multivariable models. BTP level remained statistically significant after further adjustment for mGFR (1/BTP, 1.53 [95% CI, 1.01-2.30]; 1/B2M, 1.54 [95% CI, 0.98-2.42]). B2M level was associated with mortality in multivariable models and after further adjustment for mGFR (HR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.38-3.26). The addition of B2M level to established markers increased the C statistic for mortality but only weakly when assessed by either continuous net reclassification improvement or RIDI; none was improved for ESRD by the addition of these markers. Small sample size, single measurements of markers. In Pima Indians with type 2 diabetes, BTP and, to a lesser extent, B2M levels were associated with ESRD. B2M level was associated with mortality after adjustment for traditional risk factors and established filtration markers. Further studies are warranted to confirm whether

  7. End-stage renal disease among Roma and non-Roma: Roma are at risk.

    PubMed

    Kolvek, Gabriel; Rosicova, Katarina; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Podracka, Ludmila; Stewart, Roy E; Nagyova, Iveta; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; van Dijk, Jitse P

    2012-08-01

    Ethnic differences in the occurrence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are reported on various populations across the world, but evidence on Roma is lacking. The aim of this study was to explore the relative risk (RR) of ESRD for Roma who constitute a major minority in Slovakia. Patients treated by means of hemodialysis during 2005-2008 were questioned for their ethnicity. Rates of ESRD among Roma and non-Roma based on hemodialysis data were calculated as well as the RR of Roma for ESRD. The latter was repeated after standardization for differences in age of both populations. Roma represented 11.6 % of all hemodialyzed patients. The RR of ESRD for Roma was 1.34, compared to the majority population. After age standardization, the RR for Roma was 2.85. This study shows that the risk for ESRD is significantly higher for Roma than for non-Roma. A genetic propensity of Roma to renal failure may partially explain the higher risk. Moreover, a poorer control of risk factors for ESRD in Slovak Roma contributes to the increased risk.

  8. Periodontal disease: a covert source of inflammation in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Gener; Dumitriu, Horia Traian; Dumitriu, Anca Silvia; Ismail, Fidan Bahtiar

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of atherosclerotic complications (myocardial infarction, stroke, and sudden death) is increased in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, especially in haemodialysis patients. Increasing evidence suggests that both in general population and in dialysis patients, systemic inflammation plays a dominant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic complications. In general population, also, evidence shows that moderate to severe periodontitis can contribute to inflammatory burden by increasing serum CRP levels and may increase the prevalence of atherosclerotic events. Moreover, the results of some new interventional studies reveal that effective phase I periodontal therapy may decrease serum CRP levels, the most important acute phase protein, monitored as a systemic marker of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction as well, used as an initial predictor of atherosclerotic events. Considering that moderate to severe periodontal diseases have a higher prevalence in CKD and in dialysis population and that periodontal examination is not part of the standard medical assessment, destructive periodontitis might be an ignored source of systemic inflammation in end-stage renal disease patients and may add to the chronic inflammatory status in CKD.

  9. Periodontal Disease: A Covert Source of Inflammation in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dumitriu, Anca Silvia

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of atherosclerotic complications (myocardial infarction, stroke, and sudden death) is increased in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, especially in haemodialysis patients. Increasing evidence suggests that both in general population and in dialysis patients, systemic inflammation plays a dominant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic complications. In general population, also, evidence shows that moderate to severe periodontitis can contribute to inflammatory burden by increasing serum CRP levels and may increase the prevalence of atherosclerotic events. Moreover, the results of some new interventional studies reveal that effective phase I periodontal therapy may decrease serum CRP levels, the most important acute phase protein, monitored as a systemic marker of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction as well, used as an initial predictor of atherosclerotic events. Considering that moderate to severe periodontal diseases have a higher prevalence in CKD and in dialysis population and that periodontal examination is not part of the standard medical assessment, destructive periodontitis might be an ignored source of systemic inflammation in end-stage renal disease patients and may add to the chronic inflammatory status in CKD. PMID:23840952

  10. Risk of Retinal Vein Occlusion Following End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuh-Shin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Jan, Ren-Long

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the risk of retinal vein occlusion (RVO) following end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The study was designed as a retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study. The subjects were ESRD patients identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), code 585. The study cohort included 92,774 ESRD patients registered between January 2000 and December 2009 at the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. An age- and sex-matched control group comprised 92,774 patients (case:control = 1:1) selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Information for each patient was collected from the index date until December 2011. The incidence and risk of RVO were compared between the ESRD and control groups. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for RVO after adjustment for potential confounders was obtained by Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate the RVO cumulative incidence rate. The main outcome measure was the incidence of RVO following ESRD. In total, 904 ESRD patients (0.97%) and 410 controls (0.44%) had RVO (P < 0.0001) during the follow-up period, leading to a significantly elevated risk of RVO in the ESRD patients compared with controls (incidence rate ratio = 3.05, 95% confidence interval = 2.72-3.43). After adjustment for potential confounders including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, congestive heart failure, and coronary artery disease, ESRD patients were 3.05 times more likely to develop RVO in the full cohort (adjusted hazard ratio = 3.05, 95% confidence interval = 2.64-3.51). In addition, hypertension patients showed high incidence rate of RVO in the ESRD group compared with controls (incidence rate ratio = 1.71, 95% confidence interval = 1.44-2.03) and maintained significant risk of RVO after adjustment for other confounders in the cohort (adjusted

  11. Sexual dysfunction in women with ESRD requiring hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Strippoli, Giovanni F M; Vecchio, Mariacristina; Palmer, Suetonia; De Berardis, Giorgia; Craig, Jonathan; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Johnson, David; Pellegrini, Fabio; Nicolucci, Antonio; Sciancalepore, Michela; Saglimbene, Valeria; Gargano, Letizia; Bonifati, Carmen; Ruospo, Marinella; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Montinaro, Vincenzo; Stroumza, Paul; Zsom, Marianna; Torok, Mariatta; Celia, Eduardo; Gelfman, Ruben; Bednarek-Skublewska, Anna; Dulawa, Jan; Graziano, Giusi; Gentile, Giorgio; Ferrari, Juan Nin; Santoro, Antonio; Zucchelli, Annalisa; Triolo, Giorgio; Maffei, Stefano; Hegbrant, Jörgen; Wollheim, Charlotta; De Cosmo, Salvatore; Manfreda, Valeria M

    2012-06-01

    The few existing studies of sexual dysfunction in women on hemodialysis are limited by small sample size. This large, cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence and correlates of female sexual dysfunction in advanced kidney disease. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, METHODS: A total of 1472 women with ESRD undergoing hemodialysis were recruited to a multinational, cross-sectional study conducted within a collaborative dialysis network in Europe and South America. Sexual dysfunction was identified by the Female Sexual Function Index. Correlates of self-reported sexual dysfunction were identified by regression analyses. Of the 1472 women, 659 completed questionnaires (45%). More than half (362 of 659 [55%]) lived with a partner, and 232 of 659 (35%) reported being sexually active. Of these 659 respondents, 555 (84%) reported sexual dysfunction. Women with a partner (282 of 362 [78%]) were less likely to report sexual dysfunction than those without a partner (273 of 297 [92%]) (P<0.001). Sexual dysfunction was independently associated with age, depressive symptoms, less education, menopause, diabetes, and diuretic therapy. Nearly all women who were not wait-listed for a kidney transplant and were living without a partner (249 of 260 [96%]) reported sexual dysfunction. More than half (128 of 232 [55%]) of sexually active women reported sexual dysfunction, associated with age, depressive symptoms, menopause, low serum albumin, and diuretic therapy. This descriptive study suggests most women on hemodialysis experience sexual problems. Additional research on the relevance of sexual dysfunction to symptom burden and quality of life in these women is needed.

  12. ESRD due to Multiple Myeloma in the United States, 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Reule, Scott; Sexton, Donal J; Solid, Craig A; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Foley, Robert N

    2016-05-01

    Although management of multiple myeloma has changed substantially in the last decade, it is unknown whether the burden of ESRD due to multiple myeloma has changed, or whether survival of patients with multiple myeloma on RRT has improved. Regarding ESRD due to multiple myeloma necessitating RRT in the United States, we evaluated temporal trends between 2001 and 2010 for demography-adjusted incidence ratios, relative to rates in 2001-2002, and mortality hazards from RRT initiation, relative to hazards in 2001-2002. In this retrospective cohort study, we used the US Renal Data System database (n=1,069,343), 2001-2010, to identify patients with ESRD due to multiple myeloma treated with RRT (n=12,703). Demography-adjusted incidence ratios of ESRD from multiple myeloma decreased between 2001-2002 and 2009-2010 in the overall population (demography-adjusted incidence ratio 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.79 to 0.86) and in most demographic subgroups examined. Mortality rates were 86.7, 41.4, and 34.4 per 100 person-years in the first 3 years of RRT, respectively, compared with 32.3, 20.6, and 21.3 in matched controls without multiple myeloma. Unadjusted mortality hazards ratios declined monotonically after 2004 to a value of 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.67 to 0.77 in 2009-2010, and declines between 2001-2002 and 2008-2009 were observed (P<0.05) in most demographic subgroups examined. Findings were similar when adjustment was made for demographic characteristics, comorbidity markers, and laboratory test values. These data suggest the incidence of RRT from multiple myeloma in the United States has decreased in the last decade, and clinically meaningful increases in survival have occurred for these patients.

  13. End-stage renal disease and economic incentives: the International Study of Health Care Organization and Financing (ISHCOF).

    PubMed

    Dor, Avi; Pauly, Mark V; Eichleay, Margaret A; Held, Philip J

    2007-09-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a debilitating, costly, and increasingly common condition. Little is known about how different financing approaches affect ESRD outcomes and delivery of care. This paper presents results from a comparative review of 12 countries with alternative models of incentives and benefits, collected under the International Study of Health Care Organization and Financing, a substudy within the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study. Variation in spending per ESRD patient is relatively small, but correlated with overall per capita health care spending. Remaining differences in costs and outcomes do not seem strongly linked to differences in incentives.

  14. Malnutrition in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients in a teaching hospital in Southern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oluseyi, Adejumo; Enajite, Okaka

    2016-03-01

    Malnutrition is a complication in chronic kidney disease (CKD) known to affect quality of life and prognosis although not often diagnosed. It is associated with rapid progression to end stage renal disease (ESRD) and mortality. Early identification and treatment will slow down progression to ESRD and mortality. To determine the prevalence and pattern of malnutrition in pre-dialysis CKD patients in Southern Nigeria. One hundred and twenty consecutive pre-dialysis CKD and 40 control subjects without CKD were studied. Data obtained from participants were demographics, body mass index (BMI), and aetiology of CKD. Indices used to assess presence of malnutrition were low BMI, hypocholesterolaemia and hypoalbuminaemia. Statistical significance was taken at 0.05 level. The mean age of the CKD subjects was 48.8±16.6years with a male: female ratio of 1.7:1. Prevalence of malnutrition in the CKD subjects was 46.7%, higher than 27.5% observed in the controls (p=0.033). Prevalence of malnutrition increased significantly across CKD stages 2 to 5 (p=0.020). It was significantly commoner in elderly patients (p=0.047) but not significantly different between males and females(p=0.188). Malnutrition is common in pre-dialysis CKD patients even in early CKD stages. Prevalence of malnutrition increases with worsening kidney function and increasing age.

  15. Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation for projection of end stage renal disease patients in Greece.

    PubMed

    Rodina-Theocharaki, A; Bliznakova, K; Pallikarakis, N

    2012-07-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) treatment methods are considered to be among the most expensive procedures for chronic conditions worldwide which also have severe impact on patients' quality of life. During the last decade, Greece has been among the countries with the highest incidence and prevalence, while at the same time with the lowest kidney transplantation rates. Predicting future patients' number on Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) is essential for health care providers in order to achieve more effective resource management. In this study a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation is presented for predicting the future number of ESRD patients for the period 2009-2020 in Greece. The MCMC model comprises Monte Carlo sampling techniques applied on probability distributions of the constructed Markov Chain. The model predicts that there will be 15,147 prevalent patients on RRT in Greece by 2020. Additionally, a cost-effectiveness analysis was performed on a scenario of gradually reducing the hemodialysis patients in favor of increasing the transplantation number by 2020. The proposed scenario showed net savings of 86.54 million Euros for the period 2009-2020 compared to the base-case prediction.

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma polymorphisms affect systemic inflammation and survival in end-stage renal disease patients starting renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Q; Nordfors, L; Axelsson, J; Heimbürger, O; Qureshi, A R; Báràny, P; Lindholm, B; Lönnqvist, F; Schalling, M; Stenvinkel, P

    2005-09-01

    Inflammation may contribute to the markedly increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, the prevalence of inflammation varies in different ESRD populations. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) is an important nuclear signaling protein that may regulate inflammatory response, and recent studies have revealed genetic polymorphisms that have significant effect on PPAR-gamma signaling. The aim of this study was to clarify whether the PPAR-gamma 161C/T and PPAR-gamma2 Pro12Ala single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influence the inter-individual variance of inflammation and mortality in ESRD patients. The present prospective study included 229 incident Caucasian ESRD patients (62% males) just prior to starting renal replacement therapy and 207 healthy controls (62% males). Blood samples were taken for measuring systemic inflammatory (CRP, TNF-alpha, IL-6) and nutritional (S-albumin) parameters. The presence of diabetes mellitus, malnutrition (subjective global assessment (SGA)) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) were also assessed. Genotyping of the two PPAR-gamma SNPs was performed using Pyrosequencing. During follow-up (1621+/-63 days), both all-cause and CVD-mortality were investigated. ESRD patients had a higher prevalence of both the PPAR-gamma 161 CC and PPAR-gamma2 Pro12Pro genotypes than the general population (p<0.01). Whereas the Pro12Pro genotype was associated with higher median serum levels of both hs-CRP (p<0.05) and TNF-alpha (p<0.01) the 161CC genotype was associated with a significantly higher (6.6 mg/L versus 3.3 mg/L; p<0.01) median hs-CRP level. Following adjustment for age, gender, SGA and CVD a significantly higher mortality rate was observed in patients with the Pro12Pro genotype. This study demonstrates significant differences in PPAR-gamma genotype distribution between ESRD patients and healthy controls. Furthermore, as the PPAR-gamma2 Pro12Pro genotype was associated with

  17. Aging and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Kosaku; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Yanai, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    A recent report has dealt with geriatric nephrology, including epidemiology and pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD), attempting to get nephrologists to pay more attention to elderly CKD patients. The aims of this article are to summarize the morphological and functional properties of the aging kidney, and to better understand nephrology care for elderly CKD patients. The kidneys are affected by the aging process, which results in numerous effects on the renal system. In addition, the elderly population is hetereogenous - some have a decline in GFR explained by diseases that complicate aging such as arteriosclerosis with hypertension, whereas in the most of healthy adults the decline in GFR is much more modest and not inevitable. The values for normal estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in aging population have important implications for the diagnosis of CKD in the elderly. However, the MDRD equation underestimates mean eGFR by 25% and the CKD-EPI equation underestimates mean GFR by 16%. This bias may lead to misclassifying healthy older persons as having CKD. It is also still unknown whether and how age influences the predictive role of other risk factors for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death in referred as well as unreferred patients. The risk of ESRD was reported to be higher than the risk of death without ESRD for ages <60 years, and independent of eGFR. Proteinuria significantly increased the risk of ESRD with advancing age. In older patients on nephrology care, the risk of ESRD prevailed over mortality even when eGFR was not severely impaired. Proteinuria increases the risk of ESRD, while the predictive role of other modifiable risk factors was unchanged compared with younger patients. The decision to initiate renal replacement therapy in the elderly is complicated by more challenges than in younger patients. Calorie restriction and Klotho deficiency may be a candidate therapeutic target for attenuating kidney aging. © 2014 S

  18. The association between bioimpedance analysis and quality of life in pre-dialysis stage 5 chronic kidney disease, hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Yongsiri, Somchai; Thammakumpee, Jiranuch; Prongnamchai, Suriya; Dinchuthai, Pakaphan; Chueansuwan, Rachaneeporn; Tangjaturonrasme, Siriporn; Chaivanit, Pechngam

    2014-03-01

    Protein-energy wasting is a significant problem in End stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Furthermore, it compromises the patient's Quality of life (QOL). Multifrequency Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (BIS) is a validated method to assess body composition in dialysis patients. There has been no data on the relationship between body composition and QOL in ESRD patients who were treated with different modalities. To explore the association between body composition as assessed by BIS and QOL in ESRD patients who received different treatment modalities. The present study is a cross sectional, descriptive analytic study of the association between QOL and BIS in ESRD patients in Burapha University, Chonburi, Thailand. QOL was assessed by WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire, body composition was measured by BIS technique. The difference between groups was tested by one-way ANOVA test, relationship between groups was tested with Pearson correlation test. Eighteen predialysis-CKD5, 26 peritoneal dialysis (PD), and 34 hemodialysis (HD) patients were included in the present study. All PD patients had weekly Kt/V > or = 1.7 per week and all HD patients had weekly Kt/V > or = 3.6 per week. There were no statistically difference in baseline characteristics including Charlson comorbidity index, dietary intake, BMI, and blood pressure between groups. Mean QOL scores in each group were in the middle range and not significantly difference. PD patients had more over hydration when compare to HD patients (16.18 +/- 11.24 vs. 2.36 +/- 11.07 %OH/ECW p < 0.0001). There were inversed correlation between overhydration and physical health in HD patients (r = -0.372, p = 0.033) but not in PD and CKD5 patients. CKD5 patients had more lean tissue index (LTI) than PD and HD patients (LTI = 14.34 +/- 3.13, 12.26 +/- 3.65, 11.48 +/- 3.48 kg/m2 respectively, p = 0.023). There were correlation between LTI and overall QOL in CKD5 (r = 0.690, p = 0.002) and PD patients (r = 0.498, p = 0.010). In HD patients, LTI

  19. Predicting end-stage renal disease: Bayesian perspective of information transfer in the clinical decision-making process at the individual level.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Borislav D; Perna, Annalisa; Ruggenenti, Piero; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2003-05-01

    Predicting outcomes such as end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by integration and better utilization at individual level of epidemiologic data may facilitate clinical decision-making processes. To predict individual ESRD risk in an average patient in the United States, ESRD prevalence and levels of uncertainty and conditional risk factors independence were considered by population data (1998) and pooled analysis of 11 randomized trials. Data integration and input were by decision-tree simulation approach (simple, parallel, and sequential scenarios) and Bayes' theorem. Sensitivity analysis and risk profiles were employed to address uncertainty and assess different risk factor combinations. A health state values, associated with ESRD outcome levels, were taken from the literature. In this theoretical study, we provided a scholarly example about the use of two known risk factors (urinary protein >/=3 g/day and systolic blood pressure >/=140 mm Hg) to predict individual ESRD risk in an average patient in the United States. The highest posterior (decisional) probability of ESRD occurrence (risk of 3.61% to 5.07%) in the individual patient was associated with the worst health state, as assessed by multidimensional scenarios when both risk factors were present. Decision tree models through an empirical Bayesian approach may serve to predict the individual ESRD risk on the basis of simple epidemiologic, demographic, and clinical information that is easily available already at the first patient evaluation.

  20. End-stage renal disease in Indonesia: treatment development.

    PubMed

    Prodjosudjadi, Wiguno; Suhardjono, A

    2009-01-01

    The number of cases of chronic kidney disease is growing rapidly, especially in the developing world. At a certain level of renal function, progression of chronic kidney disease to endstage renal disease (ESRD) is inevitable. ESRD has become a major health problem because it is a devastating medical condition, and the cost of treatment is a huge economic burden. This article presents data collected from 13 nephrology centers in response to specifically designed questionnaires. These centers were divided into 7 groups on the basis of geographic location. Previous data had given the impression that the incidence and prevalence of ESRD had increased, and the results of this study support these previous data. Since a national registry of ESRD has just been developed for Indonesia and we can present only limited data in this study, the numbers in this article underestimate the true incidence and prevalence rates. Although hemodialysis facilities have been developed rapidly, further development is still required. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis as an alternative renal replacement therapy (RRT) is only now being introduced. Kidney transplantation programs expand very slowly. RRT still imposes a high cost of treatment for ESRD; therefore, these treatments are unaffordable for most patients. Recently, government health insurance has covered financially strained families requiring RRT. Since the cost of RRT for ESRD has significantly increased over time, the management approach should be shifted from treatment to prevention.

  1. The Healthy Start Renal Clinic: Benefits of Tracking and Early Intervention in Pre-End Stage Renal Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Self, Ida; Lindberg, Jill; Filangeri, Judith; Anderson, Shannon; Szerlip, Marjorie; Best, Julie; Sadler, Rebecca; Savoie, Judy; Jackson, Dina; James, Carla; Husserl, Fred; Copely, J. Brian

    1999-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a strong association between the benefits of pre-end stage renal disease (ESRD) education and decreased length of hospital stay (LOS) and hospital charges, delay of renal replacement therapy (RRT), and a smooth transition to RRT. The Ochsner Healthy Start Renal Clinic (HSRC) is a multidisciplinary early education and tracking program for pre-ESRD patients and their families. We identified and educated pre-ESRD patients about kidney disease, allowing them to discuss and make informed decisions about their treatment and be better prepared to cope with the transition to RRT and the changes in their lives resulting from kidney failure. HSRC patients demonstrated a significant decrease in length of hospital stay (p = 0.05), a trend towards decreased hospital episodes and charges, decreased use of temporary venous access, and a smooth transition to RRT. The control group was made up of patients who had either refused the structured education or had been referred to HSRC late and received only conventional instruction by a social worker at the point where dialysis was imminent. We compared the number of episodes of hospitalization, LOS, and overall hospital charges for the period immediately surrounding initiation of chronic dialysis (2 months before and 1 month following onset) of all 36 patients who began chronic hemodialysis in our facility between November 1997 and November 1998. HSRC patients had LOS half as long (p=0.05), fewer hospital episodes, and hospital charges of $5,000 less per patient than the non-HSRC group. Initial data strongly suggest that early education and intervention through the coordination of a multidisciplinary team maximize the continuity of patient care. PMID:21845139

  2. Evaluation of a telenovela designed to improve knowledge and behavioral intentions among Hispanic patients with end-stage renal disease in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Myriam; Allem, Jon-Patrick; Mendez, Nicole; Qazi, Yasir; Unger, Jennifer B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Culturally relevant education is needed to improve rates of successful kidney transplantation among Hispanic patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This study examined whether patients’ knowledge about kidney disease, post-operative care, and proactive health practices improved after watching a telenovela series about ESRD. Design 334 ESRD patients and 94 family members/caregivers were assigned to watch a telenovela (“Fixing Paco,” a bilingual health education film) or receive standard of care at a transplant center or at a dialysis clinic. Outcomes for pre-transplant patients assigned to standard of care at dialysis centers or at a transplant center were compared to pre-transplant patients in the treatment condition (standard of care + telenovela). Results Knowledge and behavioral intention scores at baseline across conditions and locations were similar, suggesting that assignment resulted in comparable groups at baseline. Using linear regression, this study found statistically significant improvements in knowledge scores among the telenovela group as compared to the standard of care groups. The telenovela group also had greater improvements in behavioral intention scores compared to the standard of care groups. Family members assigned to the telenovela group had significant improvements in knowledge scores as compared to the standard of care groups. Conclusion Being well informed about ESRD and adopting proactive health behaviors are important mechanisms in improving transplantation outcomes. These findings suggest that knowledge about kidney disease, post-operative care, and proactive health practices could be improved by viewing a telenovela. Implications, limitations, and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:25650806

  3. Prognosis of CKD Patients Receiving Outpatient Nephrology Care in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Chiodini, Paolo; Zoccali, Carmine; Borrelli, Silvio; Cianciaruso, Bruno; Di Iorio, Biagio; Santoro, Domenico; Giancaspro, Vincenzo; Abaterusso, Cataldo; Gallo, Ciro; Conte, Giuseppe; Minutolo, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Prognosis in nondialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients under regular nephrology care is rarely investigated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We prospectively followed from 2003 to death or June 2010 a cohort of 1248 patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 and previous nephrology care ≥1 year in 25 Italian outpatient nephrology clinics. Cumulative incidence of ESRD or death before ESRD were estimated using the competing-risk approach. Results Estimated rates (per 100 patient-years) of ESRD and death 8.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.4 to 9.2) and 5.9 (95% CI 5.2 to 6.6), respectively. Risk of ESRD and death increased progressively from stages 3 to 5. ESRD was more frequent than death in stage 4 and 5 CKD, whereas the opposite was true in stage 3 CKD. Younger age, lower body mass index, proteinuria, and high phosphate predicted ESRD, whereas older age, diabetes, previous cardiovascular disease, ESRD, proteinuria, high uric acid, and anemia predicted death (P < 0.05 for all). Among modifiable risk factors, proteinuria accounted for the greatest contribution to the model fit for either outcome. Conclusions In patients receiving continuity of care in Italian nephrology clinics, ESRD was a more frequent outcome than death in stage 4 and 5 CKD, but the opposite was true in stage 3. Outcomes were predicted by modifiable risk factors specific to CKD. Proteinuria used in conjunction with estimated GFR refined risk stratification. These findings provide information, specific to CKD patients under regular outpatient nephrology care, for risk stratification that complement recent observations in the general population. PMID:21817127

  4. Prognosis of CKD patients receiving outpatient nephrology care in Italy.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Luca; Chiodini, Paolo; Zoccali, Carmine; Borrelli, Silvio; Cianciaruso, Bruno; Di Iorio, Biagio; Santoro, Domenico; Giancaspro, Vincenzo; Abaterusso, Cataldo; Gallo, Ciro; Conte, Giuseppe; Minutolo, Roberto

    2011-10-01

    Prognosis in nondialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients under regular nephrology care is rarely investigated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We prospectively followed from 2003 to death or June 2010 a cohort of 1248 patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 and previous nephrology care ≥1 year in 25 Italian outpatient nephrology clinics. Cumulative incidence of ESRD or death before ESRD were estimated using the competing-risk approach. Estimated rates (per 100 patient-years) of ESRD and death 8.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.4 to 9.2) and 5.9 (95% CI 5.2 to 6.6), respectively. Risk of ESRD and death increased progressively from stages 3 to 5. ESRD was more frequent than death in stage 4 and 5 CKD, whereas the opposite was true in stage 3 CKD. Younger age, lower body mass index, proteinuria, and high phosphate predicted ESRD, whereas older age, diabetes, previous cardiovascular disease, ESRD, proteinuria, high uric acid, and anemia predicted death (P < 0.05 for all). Among modifiable risk factors, proteinuria accounted for the greatest contribution to the model fit for either outcome. In patients receiving continuity of care in Italian nephrology clinics, ESRD was a more frequent outcome than death in stage 4 and 5 CKD, but the opposite was true in stage 3. Outcomes were predicted by modifiable risk factors specific to CKD. Proteinuria used in conjunction with estimated GFR refined risk stratification. These findings provide information, specific to CKD patients under regular outpatient nephrology care, for risk stratification that complement recent observations in the general population.

  5. State Medicaid Coverage, ESRD Incidence, and Access to Care

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Hall, Yoshio N.; Mitani, Aya A.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of low-income nonelderly adults covered by Medicaid varies widely by state. We sought to determine whether broader state Medicaid coverage, defined as the proportion of each state’s low-income nonelderly adult population covered by Medicaid, associates with lower state-level incidence of ESRD and greater access to care. The main outcomes were incidence of ESRD and five indicators of access to care. We identified 408,535 adults aged 20–64 years, who developed ESRD between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2008. Medicaid coverage among low-income nonelderly adults ranged from 12.2% to 66.0% (median 32.5%). For each additional 10% of the low-income nonelderly population covered by Medicaid, there was a 1.8% (95% confidence interval, 1.0% to 2.6%) decrease in ESRD incidence. Among nonelderly adults with ESRD, gaps in access to care between those with private insurance and those with Medicaid were narrower in states with broader coverage. For a 50-year-old white woman, the access gap to the kidney transplant waiting list between Medicaid and private insurance decreased by 7.7 percentage points in high (>45%) versus low (<25%) Medicaid coverage states. Similarly, the access gap to transplantation decreased by 4.0 percentage points and the access gap to peritoneal dialysis decreased by 3.8 percentage points in high Medicaid coverage states. In conclusion, states with broader Medicaid coverage had a lower incidence of ESRD and smaller insurance-related access gaps. PMID:24652791

  6. Trends in management and outcomes of ST-elevation myocardial infarction in patients with end-stage renal disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tanush; Harikrishnan, Prakash; Kolte, Dhaval; Khera, Sahil; Subramanian, Kathir S; Mujib, Marjan; Masud, Ali; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Sule, Sachin; Jain, Diwakar; Ahmed, Ali; Lanier, Gregg M; Cooper, Howard A; Frishman, William H; Bhatt, Deepak L; Fonarow, Gregg C; Panza, Julio A; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2015-04-15

    Acute myocardial infarction in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Limited data are available on the contemporary trends in management and outcomes of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients with ESRD. We analyzed the 2003 to 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases to examine the temporal trends in STEMI, use of mechanical revascularization for STEMI, and in-hospital outcomes in patients with ESRD aged ≥18 years in the United States. From 2003 to 2011, whereas the number of patients with ESRD admitted with the primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction increased from 13,322 to 20,552, there was a decrease in the number of STEMI hospitalizations from 3,169 to 2,558 (ptrend <0.001). The overall incidence rate of cardiogenic shock in patients with ESRD and STEMI increased from 6.6% to 18.3% (ptrend <0.001). The use of percutaneous coronary intervention for STEMI increased from 18.6% to 37.8% (ptrend <0.001), whereas there was no significant change in the use of coronary artery bypass grafting (ptrend = 0.32). During the study period, in-hospital mortality increased from 22.3% to 25.3% (adjusted odds ratio [per year] 1.09; 95% confidence interval 1.08 to 1.11; ptrend <0.001). The average hospital charges increased from $60,410 to $97,794 (ptrend <0.001), whereas the average length of stay decreased from 8.2 to 6.5 days (ptrend <0.001). In conclusion, although there have been favorable trends in the utilization of percutaneous coronary intervention and length of stay in patients with ESRD and STEMI, the incidence of cardiogenic shock has increased threefold, with an increase in risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality, likely because of the presence of greater co-morbidities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Drug-eluting stents in patients with end-stage renal disease: meta-analysis and systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Mesgarzadeh, Paymon; Ziada, Khaled M

    2010-12-01

    The study sought to examine the total weight of evidence regarding the use of drug eluting (DES) and bare metal stents (BMS) in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). The potential superiority of DES over BMS in reducing target lesion or vessel revascularization (TLR or TVR) in patients with ESRD on dialysis has not been established. Small studies comparing DES to BMS in this population have yielded inconclusive results mainly due to the small sample size. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, CINAHL, and the Cochrane CENTRAL database of controlled clinical trials (December 2009) for controlled trials comparing DES to BMS in ESRD patients. We conducted a fixed-effects meta-analysis across seven eligible studies (n = 869 patients). Compared with BMS-treated patients, DES-treated patients had significantly lower TLR/TVR (OR 0.55 CI: 0.39-0.79) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) (OR 0.54; CI: 0.40-0.73). The absolute risk reduction (ARR) with DES in TLR/TVR was -0.09 (CI: -0.14 to -0.04; NNT 11) and in MACE was -0.13 (CI: -0.19 to -0.07; NNT 8). A trend towards lower incidence of all cause mortality was also noted with DES (OR 0.68; CI: 0.45-1.01). No significant differences were noted between both groups in the relative or absolute risk of myocardial infarction. The use of DES in patients with ESRD is safe and yields significant reduction in the risk of TLR/TVR and MACE. Larger randomized studies are needed to confirm the results of this meta-analysis and establish the appropriate stent choice in this high risk population. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Beck Depression Inventory-Fast Screen (BDI-FS): an efficient tool for depression screening in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Neitzer, Andrea; Sun, Sumi; Doss, Sheila; Moran, John; Schiller, Brigitte

    2012-04-01

    Depression is common in patients suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Various screening tools for depression in ESRD patients are available. This study aimed to validate the Beck Depression Inventory-Fast Screen (BDI-FS) with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) as depression screening tool in conventional hemodialysis (CHD) patients. One hundred sixty two CHD patients were studied with both screening questionnaires. We used the Pearson Correlation Coefficient to measure the agreement between BDI-II and BDI-FS scores from 134 patients who responded to both questionnaires. Receiver operating characteristics curve and area under the curve were constructed to determine a valid BDI-FS cutoff score to identify ESRD patients at risk for depression. BDI-II and BDI-FS scores strongly correlated (Pearson r = 0.85, p < 0.0001). At a BDI-II cutoff ≥16, receiver operating characteristics showed the best balance between sensitivity and specificity for the BDI-FS cutoff value of ≥4 with a sensitivity of 97.2% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 85.5%, 99.9%) and a specificity of 91.8% (95% CI: 84.5%, 96.4%). When applying the above cutoff scores, prevalence of depressive symptoms in all completed questionnaires was found to be 28.7% (BDI-II) and 30.1% (BDI-FS), respectively. The BDI-FS was found to be an efficient and effective tool for depression screening in ESRD patients which can be easily implemented in routine dialysis care.

  9. Dialysis methods may affect carotid intima-media thickness in Chinese end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhanqin; Zhu, Ming; Guan, Jianming; Chen, Jianghua; He, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhu, Shaoming; Song, Xuequan; Wang, Xiaoyi; Jiang, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of cardiovascular morbidity in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) is an early independent predictor of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study is to compare the continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and the maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) for carotid IMT in Chinese ESRD patients. A total of 72 CAPD patients, 92 MHD patients, and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included. Dialysis patients were divided into five subgroups according to dialysis duration: 3-6, 7-12, 13-59, 60-119, and 120-179 months. Carotid IMT and carotid plaques were detected for each patient. The carotid IMT and total plaque detection rate in the CAPD and MHD groups were considerably higher than in the healthy control group (p < 0.01). No significant difference was found in the carotid IMT and total plaque detection rate between the CAPD group and the MHD group (p > 0.05). However, after stratification by dialysis duration, the total carotid IMT in the CAPD subgroup was higher than in the MHD subgroup in dialysis duration of 60-119 and 120-179 months (p < 0.05), and there was no significant difference in the total plaque detection rate between the CAPD and MHD subgroups in the same dialysis duration (p > 0.05). Our study showed that both CAPD and MHD affect carotid IMT in Chinese ESRD patients, and the degree of atherosclerosis in CAPD patients might be higher than that in MHD patients after 5 years of dialysis.

  10. γδ T-cell function is inhibited in end-stage renal disease and impacted by latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Juno, Jennifer A; Waruk, Jillian L M; Harris, Angela; Mesa, Christine; Lopez, Carmen; Bueti, Joe; Ball, T Blake; Kiazyk, Sandra A

    2017-10-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are at elevated risk of acquiring infectious diseases, including tuberculosis (TB). Inflammation and uremia negatively impact immune function in this population, but specific pathways involved in TB immunity have not been identified. Although γδ T cells are known to contribute to protection from TB, their phenotype and function in patients with ESRD is relatively unknown. To determine this we recruited 20 patients with and 20 without ESRD (controls), with or without latent TB infection to assess γδ T cell frequency, surface phenotype, and cytokine production by flow cytometry in response to stimulation. γδ T cells derived from patients with ESRD exhibited significantly lower expression of CCR5, CXCR3, and CD26 compared to controls. Furthermore, patients with ESRD, particularly the group with latent TB infection, exhibited poor IFNγ, TNFα, and GMCSF responses to stimulation with either phosphoantigen HMB-PP, IL-12/IL-18, E. coli, or phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin. Similar dysfunctional responses were observed in patients with active TB. Surprisingly, neither the γδ phenotype nor its function was associated with plasma markers of inflammation or microbial translocation. Thus, there is significant perturbation of the γδ T-cell population in patients with ESRD, particularly in those with latent TB infection. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. All rights reserved.

  11. Agreements between Indirect Calorimetry and Prediction Equations of Resting Energy Expenditure in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients on Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seoung Woo; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kwon, Hei Kyung; Son, Sook Mee; Song, Joon Ho

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Equations are frequently used to estimate resting energy expenditure (REE) in a clinical setting. However, few studies have examined their accuracy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Materials and Methods To investigate agreement between indirect calorimetry and several REE estimating equations in 38 ESRD patients on peritoneal dialysis, we performed indirect calorimetry and compared the results with REEs estimated using 5 equations [Harris-Benedict (HBE), Mifflin, WHO, Schofield, and Cunningham]. Results Measured REE was 1393.2 ± 238.7 kcal/day. There were no significant differences between measured and estimated REEs except Mifflin (1264.9 ± 224.8 kcal/day). Root mean square errors were smallest for HBE, followed by Schofield, Cunningham, and WHO, and largest for Mifflin (171.3, 171.9, 174.6, 175.3, and 224.6, respectively). In Bland-Altman plot, correlation coefficients between mean values and differences were significant for HBE (r = 0.412, p = 0.012) and tended to be significant for Cunningham (r = 0.283, p = 0.086). In DM patients and patients with overhydration, HBE showed significant underestimation when REE increased. Conclusion In ESRD patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), REE-estimating equations have no significant differences from indirect calorimetry, except Mifflin. However, HBE showed greater bias than others when REE was high. PMID:18452263

  12. Selenium status indices, laboratory data, and selected biochemical parameters in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zagrodzki, Pawel; Bartoń, Henryk; Walas, Stanisław; Fołta, Maria; Stompór, Tomasz; Janusz-Grzybowska, Eve; Drozdz, Maciej; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2007-04-01

    We investigated the relations between selenium status (SeS) parameters, indexes of nutrition, erythropoiesis, and uremic toxemia, serum electrolytes, and other biochemical markers in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, as no multivariate statistical analysis concerning all of these parameters was performed so far. SeS was evaluated by plasma Se concentration (plSe) and glutathione peroxidase (plGSHPx) activity in 69 uremic patients treated with hemodialysis (HD) and 40 healthy controls. The hierarchical multivariate partial least squares model (PLS2) was employed to establish data structure and correlations between parameters investigated. plSe and plGSHPx activity were significantly lower in patients when compared with controls (p=0.000). plSe was positively associated with indexes of erythropoiesis and nutritional status, as well as serum electrolytes and parameters of uremic toxemia. plGSHPx was inversely dependent on the pair of parameters: intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and aluminum plasma concentration (Al). We conclude that (1) ESRD strongly decreases selenium status and (2) the PLS2 approach revealed the existence of significant interactions among plSe, plGSHPx, and selected biochemical parameters or groups of such parameters; some of these associations need further studies to be clarified.

  13. Altered Pattern of Spontaneous Brain Activity in the Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study with Regional Homogeneity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jianhui; Qi, Rongfeng; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the pattern of spontaneous neural activity in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) with and without neurocognitive dysfunction using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) with a regional homogeneity (ReHo) algorithm. Materials and Methods rs-fMRI data were acquired in 36 ESRD patients (minimal nephro-encephalopathy [MNE], n = 19, 13 male, 37±12.07 years; non-nephro-encephalopathy [non-NE], n = 17, 11 male, 38±12.13 years) and 20 healthy controls (13 male, 7 female, 36±10.27 years). Neuropsychological (number connection test type A [NCT-A], digit symbol test [DST]) and laboratory tests were performed in all patients. The Kendall's coefficient of concordance (KCC) was used to measure the regional homogeneity for each subject. The regional homogeneity maps were compared using ANOVA tests among MNE, non-NE, and healthy control groups and post hoc t -tests between each pair in a voxel-wise way. A multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationships between ReHo index and NCT-A, DST scores, serum creatinine and urea levels, disease and dialysis duration. Results Compared with healthy controls, both MNE and non-NE patients showed decreased ReHo in the multiple areas of bilateral frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. Compared with the non-NE, MNE patients showed decreased ReHo in the right inferior parietal lobe (IPL), medial frontal cortex (MFC) and left precuneus (PCu). The NCT-A scores and serum urea levels of ESRD patients negatively correlated with ReHo values in the frontal and parietal lobes, while DST scores positively correlated with ReHo values in the bilateral PCC/precuneus, MFC and inferior parietal lobe (IPL) (all P<0.05, AlphaSim corrected). No significant correlations were found between any regional ReHo values and disease duration, dialysis duration and serum creatinine values in ESRD patients (all P>0.05, AlphaSim corrected). Conclusion Diffused decreased ReHo values were

  14. Lack of comparability of intact parathyroid hormone measurements among commercial assays for end-stage renal disease patients: implication for treatment decisions.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Tom; Yang, Zan; Caraiani, Nicolae; Ilamathi, Ekambaram

    2006-09-01

    Variability among assays used to measure intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) is of particular concern because of the routine use of iPTH assay results to guide management of osteodystrophy and calcium metabolism in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which results from commercially available iPTH assays diverge from results obtained with the Nichols Allegro(R) Intact PTH immunoradiometric assay (IRMA), which was used as evidence in the development of the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative Clinical Practice Guidelines. We divided EDTA plasma from 46 dialysis patients with ESRD and measured iPTH values with the following commercially available iPTH assays: Nichols' Allegro iPTH IRMA, Nichols Advantage iPTH immunochemiluminescent assay (ICMA), Scantibodies' Total Intact PTH IRMA, DiaSorin's N-tact iPTH IRMA, DPC's Coat-A-Count iPTH IRMA, Roche's Elecsys iPTH ICMA, and DSL's Active iPTH IRMA. Method comparison showed considerable interassay differences in the measurement of iPTH in ESRD patients. IPTH values assessed by other methods ranged, on average, from 60% to 152% of the Nichols Allegro IRMA values. Of the 6 iPTH assays tested, only the Scantibodies Total Intact PT IRMA (P = 0.7554) and the Roche Elecsys iPTH ICMA (P = 0.1327) resulted in iPTH values not statistically different from those obtained with the Nichols Allegro iPTH IRMA. Noncomparability among iPTH assays remains a distinct problem for the management of ESRD patients. These results should be taken into consideration when determining the course of medical treatment based on measured iPTH concentrations.

  15. Risk factors for mortality in end-stage kidney disease patients under online-hemodiafiltration: three-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Martins, Pedro de; Moura, Alexandra; Madureira, José; Alija, Pablo; Oliveira, José Gerardo; Lopez, Martin; Filgueiras, Madalena; Amado, Leonilde; Sameiro-Faria, Maria; Miranda, Vasco; Mesquita, Edgar; Teixeira, Laetitia; Poveda, Verónica; Lobato, Luísa; Santos-Silva, Alice; Costa, Elísio

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the predictors of mortality in a group of end-stage kidney disease (ESRD) patients under dialysis, by performing a three-year follow-up study. From the 236 patients included in this study, 54 patients died during the three-year follow-up period. Our data showed that the risk of death was higher in patients presenting lower levels of mean cell hemoglobin concentration, transferrin, and albumin. Our study showed that poor nutritional status and an inflammatory-induced iron depleted erythropoiesis are important factors for mortality in these patients.

  16. End-stage renal disease with atrial fibrillation: uncharted territory in the modern world of anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Browne, Sandra D; McMaster, Justin; Rizvi, Syed A; Ahmed, Sultan

    2014-08-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) and atrial fibrillation are increasingly common concurrent findings among many patients. Coexisting ESRD and atrial fibrillation can further exacerbate each disease process; thus, evidence-based medicine protocols are needed for the treatment of patients with both ESRD and new-onset atrial fibrillation to clarify the appropriate anticoagulant management of such patients. The manuscript surveys the literature to look for a suitable answer to the pressing question that requires development of an evidence-based protocol: 'Which anticoagulant is best for the patient with ESRD and atrial fibrillation?' Unlike many disease processes that have ample evidence available in order to better manage the patient, in the patient with end-stage kidney disease and new onset of atrial fibrillation, the situation becomes much more complicated. We believe randomized controlled trials for both the classical and the newer oral anticoagulants could provide evidence-based medicine protocols for the treatment of patients with ESRD and new-onset atrial fibrillation.

  17. Renal monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease: a report of 64 patients from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Samih H; Valeri, Anthony M; Cornell, Lynn D; Fidler, Mary E; Sethi, Sanjeev; D'Agati, Vivette D; Leung, Nelson

    2012-02-01

    To better define the clinical-pathologic spectrum and prognosis of monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease (MIDD), this study reports the largest series. Characteristics of 64 MIDD patients who were seen at Mayo Clinic are provided. Of 64 patients with MIDD, 51 had light chain deposition disease, 7 had heavy chain deposition disease, and 6 had light and heavy chain deposition disease. The mean age at diagnosis was 56 years, and 23 patients (36%) were ≤50 years of age. Clinical evidence of dysproteinemia was present in 62 patients (97%), including multiple myeloma in 38 (59%). M-spike was detected on serum protein electrophoresis in 47 (73%). Serum free light chain ratio was abnormal in all 51 patients tested. Presentation included renal insufficiency, proteinuria, hematuria, and hypertension. Nodular mesangial sclerosis was seen in 39 patients (61%). During a median of 25 months of follow-up (range, 1-140) in 56 patients, 32 (57%) had stable/improved renal function, 2 (4%) had worsening renal function, and 22 (39%) progressed to ESRD. The mean renal and patient survivals were 64 and 90 months, respectively. The disease recurred in three of four patients who received a kidney transplant. Patients with MIDD generally present at a younger age than those with light chain amyloidosis or light chain cast nephropathy. Serum free light chain ratio is abnormal in all MIDD patients, whereas only three-quarters have abnormal serum protein electrophoresis. The prognosis for MIDD is improving compared with historical controls, likely reflecting earlier detection and improved therapies.

  18. Permanent cardiac pacing in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Kuan; Lin, Kuo-Hung; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2016-12-01

    Studies investigating the risk of cardiac dysrhythmia warranting permanent pacemaker therapy for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients are limited. This study investigated the incidence rate of permanent cardiac pacing in dialysis patients. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database, we identified 28 471 newly diagnosed ESRD patients in 2000-2010 [9700 on peritoneal dialysis (PD) and 18 771 on hemodialysis (HD)] and 113 769 randomly selected controls without kidney disease, frequency-matched by sex, age and diagnosis date. We also established propensity score-matched HD and PD cohorts with 9700 patients each. Incidence rates and hazard ratios (HRs) of implantation were evaluated by the end of 2011. Complications were also evaluated among patients with implantation. The incidence rates of permanent pacemaker implantation were 5.93- and 3.50-fold greater in HD and PD patients than in controls (1.44 and 0.85 versus 0.24 per 1000 person-years, respectively). The adjusted HRs (aHRs) of implantation were 3.26 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.41-4.42] and 2.36 (95% CI = 1.56-3.58) for HD and PD patients, respectively, compared with controls. The pacemaker implantation rate was 0.33 per 1000 person-years greater in the propensity score-matched HD cohort than in the PD cohort, with an aHR of 1.30 (95% CI = 0.82-2.05) for the HD cohort compared with the PD cohort. Dialysis patients are at an increased risk of dysrhythmia requiring pacemaker implantation compared with the general population. The risks are not significantly different between HD and PD patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  19. Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic syndrome in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y H; Lee, C T; Hsu, K T; Chen, J B

    1999-09-01

    Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic syndrome (HHNK) is an emergency complication of diabetes mellitus. The conventional treatment modality often includes massive fluid supplementation. In maintenance hemodialysis patients, dehydration via the renal route may not occur, and fluid management is rather complicated. In this study, we investigated the precipitating factors, treatment modalities, clinical course and prognosis of HHNK patients who received maintenance hemodialysis. From January 1988 through August 1998, 16 diabetic patients who had developed HHNK were enrolled. Eight of them were end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on maintenance hemodialysis, and another group included 8 acute renal failure (ARF) diabetes mellitus patients who received their first hemodialysis during the HHNK episode. We retrospectively reviewed their medical charts and recorded each patient's age, treatment modalities, especially fluid supplementation, predisposing factors, and biochemical data during the HHNK episode. Complications and the final outcome were also recorded. There were no significant differences in biochemical data and patients' ages between the two groups (p > 0.05). The major predisposing factor for the ARF patients was infection, but irregular use of or discontinuing oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA) or insulin was the major predisposing factor for the ESRD patients. Less fluid supplementation was given in the ESRD group as compared to the ARF group and no deaths occurred in the ESRD group of patients. However, 6 patients expired in the ARF group of patients. Regular medical care, early diagnosis and recognition, and easier management of fluid administration explain the rather smooth course and better prognosis in the ESRD group of patients.

  20. [Review of quality of life instruments used in end-stage renal disease].

    PubMed

    Gentile, S; Delarozière, J Ch; Fernandez, C; Tardieu, S; Devictor, B; Dussol, B; Daurès, J P; Berland, Y; Sambuc, R

    2003-01-01

    Health related quality of life (HRQOL) indicators take into account the personal perception of health, and are proposed as an alternative for efficacy indicators in medical and therapeutic decision making. They provide, due to elaboration and validation of a questionnaire, a standardised assessment of the health status perception. This paper provides a review of a variety of HRQOL instruments developed for patients suffering end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Generic instruments are designed to be applicable in general population and disease-targeted instrument are potentially more sensitive to the characteristics of a specific population. Among HRQOL instruments, we found 4 generic questionnaires (the Sickness Impact Profile, the SF 36, the Nottingham Health Profile and the EQ-5D), 3 disease-targeted questionnaires developed for ESRD patient undergoing dialysis (the Kidney Disease Quality of Life instrument, the Kidney Disease Questionnaire and the Choice Health Experience Questionnaire), 1 questionnaire specific for ESRD patients (the HRQOL questionnaire), and 2 specific disease-targeted instruments for renal transplant (the Kidney Transplant Questionnaire and the ESRD Symptom Checklist-Transplantation Module). In France, very few studies on the quality of life of ESRD patients were published; no specific questionnaire validated in French is yet published.

  1. Effect of Exercise Therapy on Lipid Parameters in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Lorenzo; McGrowder, Donovan A; Pena, Yeiny T; Cabrera, Elsa; Lawrence-Wright, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dyslipidemia has been established as a well-known traditional risk factor for cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients. Aim: This study investigated the impact of Hatha yoga exercise on lipid parameters in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis. Materials and Methods: This prospective randomized study consisted of 33 ESRD patients in the Hatha yoga exercise group that was matched with 35 ESRD patients in the control group. Serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol were determined at baseline (0 month) and after 4 months. Results: Comparing values after 4 months versus baseline in the prehemodialysis Hatha yoga exercise group, there was found a significant decrease in total cholesterol from 5.126 ± 0.092 mmol/l to 4.891 ± 0.072 mmol/l (-4.58%; P = 0.0001), triglycerides from 2.699 ± 0.078 mmol/l to 2.530 ± 0.063 mmol/l (-6.26%; P = 0.0001), LDL-cholesterol from 2.729 ± 0.083 mmol/l to 2.420 ± 0.066 mmol/l (-11.32%; P = 0.0001), and total cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio from 5.593 ± 0.119 mmol/l to 4.907 ± 0.116 mmol/l (-12.26%; P = 0.047). For patients in the Hatha yoga exercise group, 51.5% had normal total cholesterol at 0 month while 70.0% had normal total cholesterol (P < 0.05) after 4 four months and 54.5% of patients had normal LDL-cholesterol at 0 month while 84.9% had normal LDL-cholesterol after 4 months (P < 0.05). Conclusion: These findings suggest that Hatha yoga exercise has preventive and beneficial effects and may be a safe therapeutic modality in ESRD patients. PMID:22923917

  2. Role of cytogenetic biomarkers in management of chronic kidney disease patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zeba; Pandey, Manoj; Samartha, Ravindra M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is much more common than people recognize, and habitually goes undetected and undiagnosed until the disease is well advanced or when their kidney functions is down to 25% of normal function. Genetic and non-genetic factors contribute to cause CKD. Non-genetic factors include hypertension, High level of DNA damage due to the production of reactive oxygen species and nucleic acid oxidation has been reported in CKD patients. Main genetic factor which causes CKD is diabetic nephropathy. A three- to nine-fold greater risk of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) is observed in individuals with a family history of ESRD. This greater risk have led researchers to search for genes linked to diabetic and other forms of nephropathy for the management of CKD. Multicenter consortia are currently recruiting large numbers of multiplex diabetic families with index cases having nephropathy for linkage and association analyses using various cytogenetic techniques. In addition, large-scale screening studies are underway, with the goals of better defining the overall prevalence of chronic kidney disease, as well as educating the population about risk factors for nephropathy, including family history. Cytogenetic biomarkers play an imperative role for the linkage study using G banding and detection of genomic instability in CKD patients. Classical and molecular cytogenetic tools with cytogenetic biomarkers provide remarkable findings in CKD patients. The aim of the present review is to draw outline of classical and molecular cytogenetic findings in CKD patients and their possible role in management to reduce genomic instability in CKD patients. PMID:27833523

  3. Role of cytogenetic biomarkers in management of chronic kidney disease patients: A review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeba; Pandey, Manoj; Samartha, Ravindra M

    2016-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is much more common than people recognize, and habitually goes undetected and undiagnosed until the disease is well advanced or when their kidney functions is down to 25% of normal function. Genetic and non-genetic factors contribute to cause CKD. Non-genetic factors include hypertension, High level of DNA damage due to the production of reactive oxygen species and nucleic acid oxidation has been reported in CKD patients. Main genetic factor which causes CKD is diabetic nephropathy. A three- to nine-fold greater risk of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) is observed in individuals with a family history of ESRD. This greater risk have led researchers to search for genes linked to diabetic and other forms of nephropathy for the management of CKD. Multicenter consortia are currently recruiting large numbers of multiplex diabetic families with index cases having nephropathy for linkage and association analyses using various cytogenetic techniques. In addition, large-scale screening studies are underway, with the goals of better defining the overall prevalence of chronic kidney disease, as well as educating the population about risk factors for nephropathy, including family history. Cytogenetic biomarkers play an imperative role for the linkage study using G banding and detection of genomic instability in CKD patients. Classical and molecular cytogenetic tools with cytogenetic biomarkers provide remarkable findings in CKD patients. The aim of the present review is to draw outline of classical and molecular cytogenetic findings in CKD patients and their possible role in management to reduce genomic instability in CKD patients.

  4. Proton Pump Inhibitors and Risk of Incident CKD and Progression to ESRD.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Bowe, Benjamin; Li, Tingting; Xian, Hong; Balasubramanian, Sumitra; Al-Aly, Ziyad

    2016-10-01

    The association between proton pump inhibitors (PPI) use and risk of acute interstitial nephritis has been described. However, whether exposure to PPI associates with incident CKD, CKD progression, or ESRD is not known. We used Department of Veterans Affairs national databases to build a primary cohort of new users of PPI (n=173,321) and new users of histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2 blockers; n=20,270) and followed these patients over 5 years to ascertain renal outcomes. In adjusted Cox survival models, the PPI group, compared with the H2 blockers group, had an increased risk of incident eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and of incident CKD (hazard ratio [HR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.18 to 1.26; and HR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.34, respectively). Patients treated with PPI also had a significantly elevated risk of doubling of serum creatinine level (HR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.42 to 1.65), of eGFR decline >30% (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.28 to 1.37), and of ESRD (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.21 to 3.18). Furthermore, we detected a graded association between duration of PPI exposure and risk of renal outcomes among those exposed to PPI for 31-90, 91-180, 181-360, and 361-720 days compared with those exposed for ≤30 days. Examination of risk of renal outcomes in 1:1 propensity score-matched cohorts of patients taking H2 blockers versus patients taking PPI and patients taking PPI versus controls yielded consistent results. Our results suggest that PPI exposure associates with increased risk of incident CKD, CKD progression, and ESRD.

  5. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of ESRD.... (5) The payment to a hospital equals the average length of stay of ESRD beneficiaries in the...

  6. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of ESRD.... (5) The payment to a hospital equals the average length of stay of ESRD beneficiaries in the...

  7. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of ESRD.... (5) The payment to a hospital equals the average length of stay of ESRD beneficiaries in the...

  8. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of ESRD.... (5) The payment to a hospital equals the average length of stay of ESRD beneficiaries in the...

  9. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., payment to an ESRD facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals as defined in § 413.171... to an ESRD facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals with only an oral form furnished...

  10. Safety and efficacy of liraglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes and end-stage renal disease: protocol for an investigator-initiated prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, parallel intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Idorn, Thomas; Knop, Filip K; Jørgensen, Morten; Jensen, Tonny; Resuli, Marsela; Hansen, Pernille M; Christensen, Karl B; Holst, Jens J; Hornum, Mads; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Owing to renal clearance, several antidiabetic agents cannot be used in patients with ESRD. The present protocol describes an investigator-initiated trial aiming to test safety and efficacy of treatment with the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes and dialysis-dependent ESRD. Methods and analysis Twenty patients with type 2 diabetes and ESRD will be compared with 20 matched patients with type 2 diabetes and normal kidney function in a randomised, parallel, placebo-controlled (1 : 1), double-blinded setting. All participants will receive 12 weeks of daily treatment with liraglutide/placebo in an individually titrated dose of 0.6, 1.2 or 1.8 mg. Over nine visits, plasma liraglutide, glycaemic control, β-cell response, cardiovascular parameters, various biomarkers and adverse events will be assessed. The primary endpoint will be evaluated from dose-corrected plasma trough liraglutide concentration at the final trial visit to determine potential accumulation in the ESRD group. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the Danish Medicines Agency, the Scientific-Ethical Committee of the Capital Region of Denmark and the Danish Data Protection Agency. An external monitoring committee (The Good Clinical Practice Unit at Copenhagen University Hospitals) will oversee the study. The results of the study will be presented at national and international scientific meetings, and publications will be submitted to peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01394341 PMID:23624993

  11. How do Thai patients with end stage renal disease adapt to being dependent on haemodialysis?: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yodchai, Kantaporn; Dunning, Trisha; Hutchinson, Alison M; Oumtanee, Areewan; Savage, Sally

    2011-12-01

    Researchers have explored the experiences of patients on haemodialysis (HD); however, most studies do not include Thai patients. Thus, the way Thai patients experience and adapt to HD is unknown. To conduct a pilot study to explore how HD affects Thai patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) and understand HD patients' perspectives about adapting to being dependant on HD. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews that focused on problems, feelings, thoughts, attitudes and ways of adapting to HD. Grounded theory (GT) method was selected to guide data collection and analysis. Five patients (age range 24-66 years; mean 45.40 years; mode = 24) participated in the study. Four main coping processes emerged during data analysis: planning, adjustment and avoidance, belief in religion and superstition and living with hope. In addition, the patients reported a range of adverse effects of HD including fluid restriction, fatigue, effects on sexual activity, altered body image, fear of dying, stress and depression and suicide. Thai patients with ESRD felt treatment, including HD, adversely affected their lives and required physical, psychological and social changes to enable them to cope. They reported use of a range of strategies to deal with the adverse effects. © 2011 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  12. Analgesics use and ESRD in younger age: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, Fokke J; Heinemann, Lothar AJ; Graf, Helmut; Lewis, Michael; Moehner, Sabine; Assmann, Anita; Kühl-Habich, Doerthe

    2007-01-01

    Background An ad hoc peer-review committee was jointly appointed by Drug Authorities and Industry in Germany, Austria and Switzerland in 1999/2000 to review the evidence for a causal relation between phenacetin-free analgesics and nephropathy. The committee found the evidence as inconclusive and requested a new case-control study of adequate design. Methods We performed a population-based case-control study with incident cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) under the age of 50 years and four age and sex-matched neighborhood controls in 170 dialysis centers (153 in Germany, and 17 in Austria) from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2004. Data on lifetime medical history, risk factors, treatment, job exposure and intake of analgesics were obtained in a standardized face-to-face interview using memory aids to enhance accuracy. Study design, study performance, analysis plan, and study report were approved by an independent international advisory committee and by the Drug Authorities involved. Unconditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results The analysis included 907 cases and 3,622 controls who had never used phenacetin-containing analgesics in their lifetime. The use of high cumulative lifetime dose (3rd tertile) of analgesics in the period up to five years before dialysis was not associated with later ESRD. Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were 0.8 (0.7 – 1.0) and 1.0 (0.8 – 1.3) for ever- compared with no or low use and high use compared with low use, respectively. The same results were found for all analgesics and for mono-, and combination preparations with and without caffeine. No increased risk was shown in analyses stratifying for dose and duration. Dose-response analyses showed that analgesic use was not associated with an increased risk for ESRD up to 3.5 kg cumulative lifetime dose (98 % of the cases with ESRD). While the large subgroup of users with a lifetime dose up to 0.5 kg (278 cases and 1365 controls) showed a

  13. Hemodialysis versus Peritoneal Dialysis: A Comparison of Survival Outcomes in South-East Asian Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Khin, Lay-Wai; Lau, Titus; Chua, Horng-Ruey; Vathsala, A; Lee, Evan; Luo, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Studies comparing patient survival of hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) have yielded conflicting results and no such study was from South-East Asia. This study aimed to compare the survival outcomes of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who started dialysis with HD and PD in Singapore. Survival data for a maximum of 5 years from a single-center cohort of 871 ESRD patients starting dialysis with HD (n = 641) or PD (n = 230) from 2005-2010 was analyzed using the flexible Royston-Parmar (RP) model. The model was also applied to a subsample of 225 propensity-score-matched patient pairs and subgroups defined by age, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. After adjusting for the effect of socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, the risk of death was higher in patients initiating dialysis with PD than those initiating dialysis with HD (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.67-2.59; p<0.001), although there was no significant difference in mortality between the two modalities in the first 12 months of treatment. Consistently, in the matched subsample, patients starting PD had a higher risk of death than those starting HD (HR: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.30-2.28, p<0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that PD may be similar to or better than HD in survival outcomes among young patients (≤65 years old) without diabetes or cardiovascular disease. ESRD patients who initiated dialysis with HD experienced better survival outcomes than those who initiated dialysis with PD in Singapore, although survival outcomes may not differ between the two dialysis modalities in young and healthier patients. These findings are potentially confounded by selection bias, as patients were not randomized to the two dialysis modalities in this cohort study.

  14. Risk Factors for ESRD in Individuals With Preserved Estimated GFR With and Without Albuminuria: Results From the Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tara I.; Li, Suying; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Peralta, Carmen A.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Fried, Linda F.; Whaley-Connell, Adam T.; McCullough, Peter A.; Tamura, Manjula Kurella

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the increasing costs and poor outcomes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), we sought to identify risk factors for ESRD in people with preserved estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), with or without albuminuria, who were at high risk of ESRD. Methods This cohort study included participants in the National Kidney Foundation’s Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP) with eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2 at baseline stratified by the presence or absence of albuminuria. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation was used to calculate eGFR. Urine was tested for albuminuria by semiquantitative dipstick. The outcome was the development of treated chronic kidney failure, defined as initiation of maintenance dialysis therapy or kidney transplantation, determined by linkage to the US Renal Data System. We used a Cox model with the Fine-Gray method to assess risk factors for treated chronic kidney failure while accounting for the competing risk of death. Results During a median follow-up of 4.8 years, 126 of 13,923 participants with albuminuria (16/10,000 patient-years) and 56 of 109,135 participants without albuminuria (1.1/10,000 patient-years) developed treated chronic kidney failure. Diabetes was a strong risk factor for developing treated chronic kidney failure in participants with and without albuminuria (adjusted HRs of 9.3 [95% CI, 5.7–15.3] and 7.8 [95% CI, 4.1–14.8], respectively). Black race, lower eGFR, and higher systolic blood pressure also were associated with higher adjusted risks of developing treated chronic kidney failure. Conclusions In a diverse high-risk cohort of KEEP participants with preserved eGFR, we showed that diabetes, higher systolic blood pressure, lower eGFR, and black race were risk factors for developing treated chronic kidney failure irrespective of albuminuria status, although the absolute risk of kidney failure in participants without albuminuria was very low. Our findings support testing for kidney

  15. Risk factors for ESRD in individuals with preserved estimated GFR with and without albuminuria: results from the Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP).

    PubMed

    Chang, Tara I; Li, Suying; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Peralta, Carmen A; Shlipak, Michael G; Fried, Linda F; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; McCullough, Peter A; Tamura, Manjula Kurella

    2013-04-01

    Given the increasing costs and poor outcomes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), we sought to identify risk factors for ESRD in people with preserved estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), with or without albuminuria, who were at high risk of ESRD. This cohort study included participants in the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP) with eGFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) at baseline stratified by the presence or absence of albuminuria. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation was used to calculate eGFR. Urine was tested for albuminuria by semiquantitative dipstick. The outcome was the development of treated chronic kidney failure, defined as initiation of maintenance dialysis therapy or kidney transplantation, determined by linkage to the US Renal Data System. We used a Cox model with the Fine-Gray method to assess risk factors for treated chronic kidney failure while accounting for the competing risk of death. During a median follow-up of 4.8 years, 126 of 13,923 participants with albuminuria (16/10,000 patient-years) and 56 of 109,135 participants without albuminuria (1.1/10,000 patient-years) developed treated chronic kidney failure. Diabetes was a strong risk factor for developing treated chronic kidney failure in participants with and without albuminuria (adjusted HRs of 9.3 [95% CI, 5.7-15.3] and 7.8 [95% CI, 4.1-14.8], respectively). Black race, lower eGFR, and higher systolic blood pressure also were associated with higher adjusted risks of developing treated chronic kidney failure. In a diverse high-risk cohort of KEEP participants with preserved eGFR, we showed that diabetes, higher systolic blood pressure, lower eGFR, and black race were risk factors for developing treated chronic kidney failure irrespective of albuminuria status, although the absolute risk of kidney failure in participants without albuminuria was very low. Our findings support testing for kidney disease in high-risk populations, which

  16. Protection against death and renal failure by renin-angiotensin system blockers in patients with diabetes and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jian; Huang, Yan-Mei; Song, Xin-Nan; Hong, Xue-Zhi; Wang, Min; Ling, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Xi; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-07-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are widely used to block the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Yet it remains uncertain whether these drugs are equally effective and safe. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of ACEis/ARBs in diabetes and kidney disease published in PubMed, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Wanfang databases were searched for clinical outcomes including all-cause mortality, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), hyperkalemia and cough. Eight meta-analyses included 2177-61,264 patients with follow-up of 6-108 months. RAS blockers reduced mortality (relative risk ratio (RR), 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.86-0.95) without heterogeneity. The death protection was significant specifically with ACEis (RR, 0.85, 95% CI, 0.79-0.91), but not with ARBs. Protection against ESRD was homogenously evident by ARBs (RR, 0.79, 95% CI, 0.73-0.87), ACEis (RR, 0.79, 95% , 0.64-0.94), and both (RR, 0.79, 95% CI, 0.73-0.87). Significant side effects were hyperkalemia by ARBs (RR, 2.44, 95% CI, 1.13-5.26), and cough by ACEis (RR, 2.38, 95% CI, 1.75-3.22) CONCLUSIONS: In patients with diabetes and kidney disease, ACEis and ARBs are consistently protective for the development of ESRD. Use of ACEis alone additionally reduces deaths and increases the risk for cough. Use of ARBs alone increases the risk for hyperkalemia without additional benefit of death protection. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Effect of a preventive foot care program on lower extremity complications in diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Reda, Andrew; Hurton, Scott; Embil, John M; Smallwood, Susan; Thomson, Lily; Zacharias, James; Dascal, Mario; Cheang, Mary; Trepman, Elly; Koulack, Joshua

    2012-12-01

    Lower extremity complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and diabetes mellitus. Patient education programs may decrease the risk of diabetic foot complications. A preventive program was instituted, consisting of regular assessments by a foot care nurse with expertise in foot care and wound management and patient education about foot care practices and footwear selection. Medical records were reviewed and patients were examined. A comparison was made with data about patients from a previous study done from this institution prior to development of the foot care program. Diabetic subjects more frequently had weakness of the left tibialis anterior, left tibialis posterior, and left peroneal muscles than non-diabetic subjects. A smaller percentage of diabetic subjects had sensory neuropathy compared with the previous study from 5years earlier, but a greater percentage of diabetic subjects had absent pedal pulses in the current study. The frequency of inadequate or poor quality footwear was less in the current study compared with the previous study. The current data suggest that a foot care program consisting of nursing assessments and patient education may be associated with a decrease in frequency of neuropathy and improved footwear adequacy in diabetic patients with ESRD. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. The PROPKD Score: A New Algorithm to Predict Renal Survival in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Audrézet, Marie-Pierre; Rousseau, Annick; Hourmant, Maryvonne; Renaudineau, Eric; Charasse, Christophe; Morin, Marie-Pascale; Moal, Marie-Christine; Dantal, Jacques; Wehbe, Bassem; Perrichot, Régine; Frouget, Thierry; Vigneau, Cécile; Potier, Jérôme; Jousset, Philippe; Guillodo, Marie-Paule; Siohan, Pascale; Terki, Nazim; Sawadogo, Théophile; Legrand, Didier; Menoyo-Calonge, Victorio; Benarbia, Seddik; Besnier, Dominique; Longuet, Hélène; Férec, Claude; Le Meur, Yannick

    2016-03-01

    The course of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) varies among individuals, with some reaching ESRD before 40 years of age and others never requiring RRT. In this study, we developed a prognostic model to predict renal outcomes in patients with ADPKD on the basis of genetic and clinical data. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1341 patients from the Genkyst cohort and evaluated the influence of clinical and genetic factors on renal survival. Multivariate survival analysis identified four variables that were significantly associated with age at ESRD onset, and a scoring system from 0 to 9 was developed as follows: being male: 1 point; hypertension before 35 years of age: 2 points; first urologic event before 35 years of age: 2 points; PKD2 mutation: 0 points; nontruncating PKD1 mutation: 2 points; and truncating PKD1 mutation: 4 points. Three risk categories were subsequently defined as low risk (0-3 points), intermediate risk (4-6 points), and high risk (7-9 points) of progression to ESRD, with corresponding median ages for ESRD onset of 70.6, 56.9, and 49 years, respectively. Whereas a score ≤3 eliminates evolution to ESRD before 60 years of age with a negative predictive value of 81.4%, a score >6 forecasts ESRD onset before 60 years of age with a positive predictive value of 90.9%. This new prognostic score accurately predicts renal outcomes in patients with ADPKD and may enable the personalization of therapeutic management of ADPKD.

  19. Differences in bone turnover and intact PTH levels between African American and Caucasian patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, B Peter; Butros, Rezkalla; Naqvi, Shehzab; Geng, Zhaopo; Mawad, Hanna; Friedler, Robert; Fanti, Paolo; Monier-Faugere, Marie-Claude; Malluche, Hartmut H

    2003-08-01

    Evidence derived from healthy subjects suggests that African Americans have higher serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and decreased bone responsiveness to PTH than Caucasians. African American patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) also have higher serum PTH than Caucasians. Studies that correlate intact PTH (iPTH) levels with bone turnover in ESRD patients were performed in a predominantly Caucasian population. In this study, serum iPTH and bone histomorphometric data were analyzed for racial differences in 76 ESRD patients (Caucasian = 48, African Americans = 28). Bone turnover was determined by histomorphometric measurement of activation frequency in all patients. Age, duration of dialysis, and calcium and phosphorus levels were similar between the two groups. iPTH levels (pg/mL; mean +/- SE) were significantly higher in the African American group (534 +/- 79 vs. 270 +/- 46, P < 0.01). Also, alkaline phosphatase levels (IU/L) were significantly higher in the African American group (162 +/- 31 vs. 144 +/- 43, P < 0.01). Correlations between PTH levels and activation frequency were r = 0.60, P < 0.01 in Caucasians and r = 0.22, P = NS in African Americans. The mean PTH level in African American patients with histologic findings of low bone turnover was 460 +/- 115 vs. 168 +/- 41 in Caucasian patients with similar bone turnover (P < 0.01). In patients with low bone turnover, African Americans had significantly higher osteoid volume and thickness, number of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, erosion surface, peritrabecular fibrosis, and single-label surface than Caucasians. However, erosion depth, bone formation rate per osteoblast and mineralization apposition rate were similar between the two groups. There is no correlation between iPTH and bone turnover in African Americans with ESRD. A substantial number of African American patients with low bone turnover have very high serum PTH levels. Bone histomorphometric results reveal differences in remodeling

  20. Cardiovascular calcification in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Salusky, Isidro B; Goodman, William G

    2002-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among dialysis patients are substantially higher than in the general population. The reasons for this high incidence are multiple. They include traditional factors such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia, sodium overload, and elevated homocysteine levels as well as disturbances of mineral metabolism, specifically abnormalities in phosphorus and calcium homeostasis. This review will describe the specific cardiovascular complications related to calcifications in ESRD, the implications of the abnormalities of mineral metabolism in its pathogenesis and the current imaging techniques available for the detection of cardiovascular calcifications. Excess of calcium load contributes to the development of cardiac calcifications; therefore, alternative strategies to diminish exogenous calcium load should be considered in patients with ESRD.

  1. Patient Perception of Treatment Burden is High in Celiac Disease Compared to Other Common Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sveta; Akbari, Mona; Vanga, Rohini; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Hansen, Joshua; Theethira, Thimmaiah; Tariq, Sohaib; Dennis, Melinda; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The only treatment for celiac disease (CD) is life-long adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). Noncompliance is associated with signs and symptoms of celiac disease, yet long-term adherence rates are poor. It is not known how the burden of the GFD compares to other medical treatments, and there are limited data on the socio-economic factors influencing treatment adherence. In this study we compared treatment burden and health state in CD compared with other chronic illnesses and evaluated the relationship between treatment burden and adherence. Methods A survey was mailed to participants with: CD, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), hypertension (HTN), diabetes mellitus (DM), congestive heart failure (CHF), and end stage renal disease on dialysis (ESRD). Surveys included demographic information and visual analog scales measuring treatment burden, importance of treatment, disease-specific and overall health status. Results We collected surveys from 341 celiac and 368 non-celiac participants. Celiac participants reported high treatment burden, greater than participants with GERD or HTN and comparable to ESRD. Conversely, patients with CD reported the highest health state of all groups. Factors associated with high treatment burden in CD included poor adherence, concern regarding food cost, eating outside the home, higher income, lack of college education and time limitations in preparing food. Poor adherence in CD was associated with increased symptoms, income, and low perceived importance of treatment. Discussion Participants with CD have high treatment burden but also excellent overall health status in comparison with other chronic medical conditions. The significant burden of dietary therapy for celiac disease argues for the need for safe adjuvant treatment as well as interventions designed to lower the perceived burden of the GFD. PMID:24980880

  2. Brain Microstructural Abnormalities Are Related to Physiological Alterations in End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Junzhang; Dong, Jianwei; He, Jinlong; Zhan, Wenfeng; Xu, Lijuan; Xu, Yikai; Jiang, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study whole-brain microstructural alterations in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and examine the relationship between brain microstructure and physiological indictors in the disease. Materials and Methods Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected from 35 patients with ESRD (28 men, 18–61 years) and 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs, 32 men, 22–58 years). A voxel-wise analysis was then used to identify microstructural alterations over the whole brain in the ESRD patients compared with the HCs. Multiple biochemical measures of renal metabolin, vascular risk factors, general cognitive ability and dialysis duration were correlated with microstructural integrity for the patients. Results Compared to the HCs, the ESRD patients exhibited disrupted microstructural integrity in not only white matter (WM) but also gray matter (GM) regions, as characterized by decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD). Further correlation analyses revealed that the in MD, AD and RD values showed significantly positive correlations with the blood urea nitrogen in the left superior temporal gyrus and significantly negative correlations with the calcium levels in the left superior frontal gyrus (orbital part) in the patients. Conclusion Our findings suggest that ESRD is associated with widespread diffusion abnormalities in both WM and GM regions in the brain, and microstructural integrity of several GM regions are related to biochemical alterations in the disease. PMID:27227649

  3. Protein-energy wasting and nutritional supplementation in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, A; Regolisti, G; Karupaiah, T; Sahathevan, S; Sadu Singh, B K; Khor, B H; Salhab, N; Karavetian, M; Cupisti, A; Fiaccadori, E

    2017-06-01

    Protein-Energy Wasting (PEW) is the depletion of protein/energy stores observed in the most advanced stages of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). PEW is highly prevalent among patients on chronic dialysis, and is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, high morbidity/mortality rates and increased healthcare costs. This narrative review was aimed at exploring the pathophysiology of PEW in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis. The main aspects of nutritional status evaluation, intervention and monitoring in this clinical setting were described, as well as the current approaches for the prevention and treatment of ESRD-related PEW. An exhaustive literature search was performed, in order to identify the relevant studies describing the epidemiology, pathogenesis, nutritional intervention and outcome of PEW in ESRD on hemodialysis. The pat