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Sample records for disease mimicking swine

  1. [Skin diseases of swine].

    PubMed

    von Altrock, A; Höltig, D

    2013-01-01

    Skin alterations can be caused by both environmental conditions and diseases of the organism. Some diseases may only manifest in the skin while others represent signs of a generalized infection. Regarding their origin, skin diseases can be divided into congenital, infectious, and nutritional disorders, and those resulting from housing scarcities. Additionally, there are skin diseases with unknown causes. Skin diseases in a swine herd can result in economic losses through decreased feed efficiency and growth rate and increased mortality. The knowledge of causes and symptoms as well as the selection of appropriate further laboratory investigations provide a valid diagnosis and enable a quick and effective therapy. This description of several skin diseases should provide a background.

  2. Enterobiasis mimicking Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Flores, Angel; Dajil, Saleh

    2004-01-01

    We report a 20-year-old man who presented with abdominal discomfort for 2 months. Colonoscopy showed skip areas with ulceration, resembling Crohn's disease. Biopsies showed chronic inflammation and a non-necrotizing granuloma. An adult pinworm was found in the lumen from an uninvolved segment. The patient responded to mebendazole.

  3. Diseases mimicking intussusception: diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Karakus, Suleyman Cuneyt; Ozokutan, Bulent Hayri; Ceylan, Haluk

    2014-10-01

    Intussusception is a common abdominal emergency in early childhood. The aim of this study was to describe the diseases mimicking intussusception and to discuss the causes and management of these conditions. Seven patients who were initially diagnosed as having intussusception on abdominal ultrasonography but who had a final diagnosis of diseases other than intussusception were reviewed retrospectively. Two patients with ileocolic intussusception underwent ultrasonography-guided reduction with a hydrostatic method but the ultrasonographic findings persisted. At surgery, only edematous ileocecal valve and mesenteric lymphadenopathy were observed. In three patients with Henoch-Schönlein purpura, initial abdominal ultrasonography showed intussusception. The patients with no sign of obstructive symptoms were managed conservatively with a diagnosis of intramural hemorrhage and on follow up the ultrasonographic findings of intussusception was resolved. One patient with the target sign on computed tomography and ultrasonography of the abdomen underwent ileocolic resection and end-to-end anastomosis due to a tumor in the cecum. There was no evidence of intussusception. One patient with a cyst in the right lower quadrant accompanying intussusception on ultrasonography of the abdomen underwent ultrasonography-guided reduction but the ultrasonographic findings persisted. On exploration, only cecal duplication cyst without intussusception was detected. Cecal resection including the cyst and end-to-end ileocolic anastomosis were performed. Ultrasonography, color Doppler ultrasonography, barium or hydrostatic enema and computed tomography are helpful in diagnosing intussusception, but patients with radiologic findings of intussusception should be evaluated on symptoms and clinical findings before surgical intervention. Also, other diseases mimicking intussusception should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  4. UPDATE ON SWINE DISEASE AND GENOMICS RESEARCH

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This review will summarize advances in swine genomics and how it has altered approaches for swine disease and vaccination research. The swine has been a major biomedical model species, for transplantation, heart disease, allergies and asthma, as well as normal neonatal development and reproductive p...

  5. Systemic sarcoidosis mimicking malignant metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Hammen, Irena; Sherson, David Lee; Davidsen, Jesper Roemhild

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of systemic sarcoidosis involving the liver, pancreas, lungs, mediastinal and intraabdominal lymph nodes and bones. Multiple organ system manifestations mimicked malignant metastatic disease. The diagnosis was established with clinical, radiological, and pathological findings after neoplasm was ruled out by pathological tests. The patient showed rapid symptom remission with systemic steroid treatment. PMID:26672956

  6. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis mimicking interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Braham, Emna; Ayadi-Kaddour, Aïda; Smati, Belhassen; Ben Mrad, Sonia; Besbes, Mohammed; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2008-11-01

    Lymphoid granulomatosis is a rare form of pulmonary angiitis. This case report presents a patient with lymphoid granulomatosis in whom the clinical presentation, radiological features and the partial response to corticosteroid therapy mimicked interstitial lung disease. Lymphoid granulomatosis was only diagnosed at post-mortem examination. The range of reported clinical presentations, diagnostic approaches and outcomes are described.

  7. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, NEWCASTLE DISEASE, HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND...

  8. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM...

  9. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM...

  10. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM...

  11. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM...

  12. Pinworm Infestation Mimicking Crohns' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ignatova, Simone; Ekstedt, Mattias

    2013-01-01

    We here report a case of a young man who presented to his general practitioner with diarrhea. Inflammatory bowel disease was suspected and a colonoscopy showed aphthous lesions suggestive of Crohns' disease but biopsies revealed eggs of Enterobius vermicularis. When treated for this parasite, his symptoms were alleviated and a followup colonoscopy revealed a normal colon and distal ileum. Enterobius vermicularis is the most common parasite worldwide and has been attributed with many different presentations and pathologies. It is therefore necessary to maintain vigilance, even in high-income countries, in order to diagnose patients with one of the many atypical presentations of pinworms. PMID:23555063

  13. Intestinal angioedema mimicking Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, A; Prather, C M

    1999-10-18

    Angioedema usually presents as episodic attacks of swelling of the face, airway and extremities, but it may also involve visceral tissues. A 58-year-old woman with repeated episodes of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting had two laparotomies and was treated for Crohn's disease for two years before a diagnosis of acquired intestinal angioedema was made. This case provides important insights into the presentation of intestinal angioedema.

  14. Pulmonary diseases with imaging findings mimicking aspergilloma.

    PubMed

    Gazzoni, Fernando Ferreira; Severo, Luiz Carlos; Marchiori, Edson; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Garcia, Tiago Severo; Irion, Klaus L; Camargo, José Jesus; Felicetti, José Carlos; de Mattos Oliveira, Flavio; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    Patients with preexisting lung cavities are at risk of developing intracavitary fungal colonization. Because Aspergillus spp. are the most commonly implicated fungi, these fungal masses are called aspergillomas. Their characteristic "ball-in-hole" appearance, however, may be found in a variety of other conditions that can produce radiologic findings mimicking aspergilloma. In this paper, we review the main diseases that may mimic the radiographic findings of aspergilloma, with brief descriptions of clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic findings.

  15. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease mimicking lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Jae-Ho; Park, Jeong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe the features and clinical implications of computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy (PCNB) in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease manifesting as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. Among a cohort of 388 patients with NTM pulmonary disease, 14 patients with clinically and radiologically suspected lung cancer were included in our study. Two chest radiologists evaluated CT features, including lesion type (nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation), morphologic features (margin, degree of enhancement, calcification), and presence of accompanying findings suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease (bronchiectasis with clustered centrilobular nodules or upper-lobe cavitary lesions) by consensus. Diagnostic procedures for microbiologic diagnosis of NTM disease and clinical outcome were reviewed. Incidence of NTM pulmonary disease presenting as solitary nodule/mass (n = 8) or mass-like consolidation (n = 6) was 3.6% (14 of 388). Most lesions were detected incidentally during routine health check-up or evaluation of other disease (11 of 14, 79%). Lesions typically showed poor contrast-enhancement (9 of 12) and internal calcification (6 of 14). No lesions had CT features suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease. All 4 lesions for which PET/CT imaging was performed showed strong fluorodeoxyglucose uptake simulating malignant lesions (mean, 4.9; range, 3.6–7.8). PCNB revealed mycobacterial histology in 6 of 11 specimens and positive culture results were obtained for 7 of 7 specimens. NTM pulmonary disease may present as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. CT features and PCNB are important to diagnose NTM disease mimicking lung cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:27367996

  16. Clinical and Histologic Mimickers of Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Kamboj, Amrit K; Oxentenko, Amy S

    2017-08-17

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small bowel, classically associated with diarrhea, abdominal pain, and malabsorption. The diagnosis of celiac disease is made when there are compatible clinical features, supportive serologic markers, representative histology from the small bowel, and response to a gluten-free diet. Histologic findings associated with celiac disease include intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hyperplasia, villous atrophy, and a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate in the lamina propria. It is important to recognize and diagnose celiac disease, as strict adherence to a gluten-free diet can lead to resolution of clinical and histologic manifestations of the disease. However, many other entities can present with clinical and/or histologic features of celiac disease. In this review article, we highlight key clinical and histologic mimickers of celiac disease. The evaluation of a patient with serologically negative enteropathy necessitates a carefully elicited history and detailed review by a pathologist. Medications can mimic celiac disease and should be considered in all patients with a serologically negative enteropathy. Many mimickers of celiac disease have clues to the underlying diagnosis, and many have a targeted therapy. It is necessary to provide patients with a correct diagnosis rather than subject them to a lifetime of an unnecessary gluten-free diet.

  17. Advancing swine models for human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Walters, Eric M; Prather, Randall S

    2013-01-01

    Swine models are relatively new kids on the block for modeling human health and diseases when compared to rodents and dogs. Because of the similarity to humans in size, physiology, and genetics, the pig has made significant strides in advancing the understanding of the human condition, and is thus an excellent choice for an animal model. Recent technological advances to genetic engineering of the swine genome enhance the utility of swine as models of human genetic diseases.

  18. Gorham's disease of the mandible mimicking periodontal disease on radiograph.

    PubMed

    Mignogna, Michele Davide; Fedele, Stefano; Lo Russo, Lucio; Lanza, Alessandro; Marenzi, Gaetano; Sammartino, Gilberto

    2005-09-01

    Gorham's disease is a rare disorder characterized by spontaneous and progressive osteolysis of one or more skeletal bones. The radiographic findings associated with Gorham's disease are particularly dramatic, as in some cases a complete resorption of the involved bone can occur, leading to the definition of phantom bone, vanishing bone, or disappearing bone disease. A 24-year-old female patient with a previous diagnosis of periodontal disease and progressive mandibular alveolar bone loss was referred to our Oral Medicine section. The initial radiographic picture showed infrabony defects and horizontal bone loss. After further extensive local and systemic evaluation, including histopathological, laboratory and imagine techniques investigations, the patient was diagnosed to be affected by Gorham's disease. Meanwhile the progression of the osteolytic process had caused the loosening of all the left mandibular teeth and a pathologic fracture. Appropriate medical therapy was successful in stabilizating the resorptive process, with no evidence of further progressive disease. When Gorham's disease involves the mandible, the role of the periodontologist is extremely important in diagnosing promptly the disorder and preventing the functional and aesthetic consequences of advanced and extensive bone loss. Gorham's disease should be included among the pathologic entities mimicking periodontal disease on radiograph, such as inflammatory disease (e.g. osteomyelitis), endocrine disease (e.g. hyperparathyroidism), intra-osseous malignancies or metastases, lymphoma, histiocytosis X, mainly eosinophilic granuloma, infective process (e.g. tuberculosis and actinomycosis), odontogenic tumours.

  19. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... where swine vesicular disease exists. 94.12 Section 94.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY:...

  20. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... where swine vesicular disease exists. 94.12 Section 94.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY:...

  1. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... where swine vesicular disease exists. 94.12 Section 94.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY:...

  2. Addison's Disease Mimicking as Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Sayani; Rao, Karthik N; Patil, Navin; Ommurugan, Balaji; Varghese, George

    2017-04-01

    Over past two decades there has been significant improvement in medical field in elucidating the underlying pathophysiology and genetics of Addison's disease. Adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease) is a rare disease with an incidence of 0.8/100,000 cases. The diagnosis may be delayed if the clinical presentation mimics a gastrointestinal disorder or psychiatric illness. We report a case of Addison's disease presenting as acute pain in abdomen mimicking clinical presentation of acute pancreatitis.

  3. Vaccination with viral protein-mimicking peptides postpones mortality in domestic pigs infected by African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Vadim; Efremov, Evgeniy E; Novikov, Boris V; Balyshev, Vladimir M; Tsibanov, Sodnom Zh; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Kolbasov, Denis V; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Periodic outbreaks of African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection around the world threaten local populations of domestic pigs with lethal disease and provide grounds for pandemic spread. Effective vaccination may bring this threat under control. We investigated the effectiveness of select peptides mimicking viral proteins in establishing a protective immune response. Forty-six synthetic peptides based on the analysis of the complete nucleotide sequence of ASFV were tested for immunogenicity in mice. The 17 best immune response-inducing peptide candidates were selected for further investigation. Twenty-four domestic pigs, 3-4 months old and weighing 20-25 kg, were divided into six groups (n = 4) and immunized by subcutaneous injection using a standard three-round injection protocol with one of four peptide combinations prepared from the 17 peptides (Groups 1-4) or with carrier only (Group 5). Group 6, the control, was not vaccinated. Animal body temperature and behavior were monitored during and post immunization for health assessment. Two weeks after the last round of immunizations, the pigs were infected with live ASFV (Espania 70) at 6.0 Ig GAE50/cm3, and the survival rate was monitored. Blood samples were collected for analysis the day before infection and on days 3, 7 and 10 post-infection, or from deceased animals. The serum titers of specific immunoglobulins against synthetic peptides and whole inactivated ASFV were determined by enzyme immunoassay before and after infection. The presence of viral DNA in blood serum samples was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Viral infection activity in blood sera was determined by heme absorption in cultured porcine bone marrow and porcine leukocyte cells. Repeating the injection of synthetic peptides in both the mice and pigs produced an immune response specific to individual peptides, which differed widely in the intensity scale. Specific anti-whole virus immunoglobulin binding activity in the swine serum samples

  4. 9 CFR 93.515 - Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appearance of disease among swine in...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.515 Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine. If any contagious disease appears among swine during the quarantine period...

  5. 9 CFR 93.515 - Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appearance of disease among swine in...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.515 Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine. If any contagious disease appears among swine during the quarantine period...

  6. 9 CFR 93.515 - Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appearance of disease among swine in...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.515 Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine. If any contagious disease appears among swine during the quarantine period...

  7. 9 CFR 93.515 - Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appearance of disease among swine in...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.515 Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine. If any contagious disease appears among swine during the quarantine period...

  8. 9 CFR 93.515 - Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appearance of disease among swine in...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.515 Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine. If any contagious disease appears among swine during the quarantine period...

  9. Organic diseases mimicking acral lick dermatitis in six dogs.

    PubMed

    Denerolle, Philippe; White, Stephen D; Taylor, Tara S; Vandenabeele, Sophie I J

    2007-01-01

    Acral lick dermatitis ("lick granuloma") in dogs is often thought to have a behavioral etiology. However, other diseases may cause lesions on the distal legs, mimicking acral lick dermatitis. In this report, six dogs were presented with acral lick dermatitis-like lesions from different underlying causes-namely lymphoma, an orthopedic pin, deep pyoderma, mast cell tumor, leishmaniasis, and (presumptive) sporotrichosis.

  10. Munchausen syndrome mimicking psychiatric disease with concomitant genuine physical illness

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Jaime; da Silva, Joaquim Alves; Xavier, Miguel; Gusmão, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Munchausen syndrome is a disorder in which patients intentionally produce symptoms mimicking physical or psychiatric illnesses with the aim to assume the sick role and to gain medical attention. Once a patient receives a Munchausen syndrome diagnosis every complaint made thence tends to be regarded with scepticism by clinical staff. However, it is possible that a bona fide illness, which might be disregarded, may coexist in these patients. We report a case of MS mimicking psychiatric disease with concomitant genuine acute physical illness. Despite the initial doubts about the veracity of the latter, due to its prompt recognition, treatment was successful. PMID:22798096

  11. Small bowel diaphragm disease mimicking malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Sarantitis, Ioannis; Gerrard, Adam Daniel; Teasdale, Rebecca; Pettit, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can produce diaphragm disease where multiple strictures develop in the small bowel. This typically presents with anaemia and symptoms of small bowel obstruction. The strictures develop as a result of circumferential mucosal ulceration with subsequent contraction of rings of scar tissue. We report a case of a 47-year-old woman with a 6-month history of NSAIDs abuse who presented with subacute small bowel obstruction 1 year after stopping NSAIDs. CT and MRI showed multiple ileal strictures with florid locoregional lymphadenopathy. A malignant diagnosis such as lymphoma was considered likely as florid mesenteric lymphadenopathy has not been previously reported in diaphragm disease. Laparotomy with small bowel resection was therefore performed. Histology showed diaphragm disease with the enlarged mesenteric nodes having reactive features. Gross locoregional lymphadenopathy should not deter a diagnosis of diaphragm disease in cases of multiple small bowel strictures where there is a strong history of NSAIDs use. PMID:26174729

  12. Hansen's disease mimicking a systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, L; Silva, L; Terroso, G; Pimenta, S; Brandão, F; Pinto, J; Prisca, A; Brito, J; Ventura, F

    2011-01-01

    Hansen's disease, caused by Mycobacterium leprae, classically presents with cutaneous and neurological manifestations. Rheumatologic manifestations present in 1 to 5% of the patients, and include arthritis, arthralgias, Charcot arthropathy, erythema nodosum and vasculitis. We report a case of a 86 year old woman with polyarthritis, subcutaneous nodules and leg ulcers whose differential diagnosis included primary vasculitis and diffuse connective tissue diseases and ended to be leprosy in a non endemic country.

  13. Infections and skin diseases mimicking diaper dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Van Gysel, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    Diaper dermatitis is a common condition that often prompts parents to seek medical attention. Irritant diaper dermatitis is by far the most common cause, but numerous potentially serious diseases can present with changes of the skin in the diaper area. The differential diagnosis can include psoriasis, metabolic disorders, rare immune diseases and infection. Clinical examination can be helpful in distinguishing the underlying cause. General screening laboratory tests, as well as select testing when a specific condition is suspected, can be used to challenge or confirm the putative diagnosis.

  14. Reactive arthritis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Trabulo, D; Mangualde, J; Cremers, I; Oliveira, A P

    2014-01-01

    Reactive arthritis comprises a subgroup of infection-associated arthritis which occurs after genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract infection in genetically susceptible hosts. Studies have proposed Salmonella, Shigella or Yersinia infection as the microorganisms responsible for the post-dysenteric form. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 is a well recognised best-known predisposing factor. We report a case of HLA-B27-associated reactive arthritis after Salmonella goldcoast enteritis, mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis.

  15. Unilateral Demodicidosis of Face Mimicking Hansens Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vashisht, Deepak; Singh, Jatinder; Baveja, Sukriti; Tiwari, Rohit; Bhatnagar, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    Demodicosis is a common parasitic infection of the hair follicles and the pilosebaceous unit by the Demodex mites viz. Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis. Infection by this parasite is common among immunocompromised and elderly. We report a case of facial Demodicosis which presented like atypical rosacea with a gradually progressing swelling and redness on right side of face which was initially diagnosed as a case of Hansen’s disease. Skin biopsy revealed follicular dilatation with presence of Demodex mite along with intense perifollicular lymphomononuclear infiltrate. Patient was treated with oral tab Ivermectin 12 mg stat along with topical gel metronidazole twice daily to which he responded favourably. PMID:28326184

  16. Microfilaria in lymph node mimicking Kimura disease

    PubMed Central

    Jayalakshmy, PS; Pothen, Lillykutty; Letha, V; Sheeja, S

    2011-01-01

    In tropical and subtropical countries, parasitic infections are very rampant causing peripheral blood and or tissue eosinophilia. Here, a case of microfilaria in lymph node that produced intense eosinophil infiltrate is being reported. The dense eosinophil collection in the lymph node raised a possibility of Kimura's disease because no worms were seen in the initial sectioning of the tissue. Extensive sampling and diligent search revealed sections of microfilaria embedded in the eosinophil abscess along with foreign body giant cell reaction to its sheath material, leading to the correct diagnosis of this case. PMID:23508372

  17. Tracheal lipoma mimicking obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Mota, Vinícius Turano; Maia, José Geraldo Soares; Barbosa, Ana Teresa Fernandes; Fernandes, Diego Franco Silveira; Rocha, Emanuelly Botelho

    2010-01-01

    Tracheal tumors are rare and can be difficult to diagnose due to their capacity to mimic other obstructive lung diseases, such as asthma and COPD. We report the case of a female patient with a tracheal tumor. She had previously been treated for asthma and COPD, with little response to the treatment. The onset of infectious complications prompted further investigation. Chest CT images suggested the presence of a tumor, which was confirmed by fiberoptic bronchoscopy. The tumor was endoscopically resected. However, the patient evolved to death due to pneumonia and septic shock.

  18. Spinal cord infarction mimicking ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae Won; Choi, Yoon Hee

    2017-06-01

    Spinal cord infarction is a rare condition and is easily misdiagnosed owing to its initial non-specific manifestation. We report a case of a 77-year-old man who presented with chest pain and upper back pain initially, and was misdiagnosed with a myocardial infarction. Four hours after admission, he complained of numbness in his entire left leg below the knee, with rapid deterioration of neurological symptoms. After 9 hours, loss of sensation progressed up to the T4 dermatome, strength of both lower extremities deteriorated to grade 0, and decrease in anal tone and deep tendon reflex was observed. Initial magnetic resonance imaging findings were normal; however, a signal change occurred 3 days after symptom onset. When patients present with acute chest pain and neurologic symptoms, the possibility of ischemic cardiac disease as well as any neurological manifestations must be investigated. Emergency physicians must remember the value of serial physical examinations.

  19. Hepatitis A infection mimicking adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, S; Mossad, S; Hoffman, G

    2000-07-01

    Fever, rash, and arthritis may be components of the prodrome of viral hepatitis. In the absence of jaundice and abnormal liver function tests, this form of polyarthritis is easily confused with primary autoimmune diseases. Whereas the association of systemic illness with musculoskeletal symptoms and numerous viral infections is well known, such an association with hepatitis A has only been rarely reported. We describe a case of hepatitis A infection mimicking adult onset Still's disease, and review the pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of Still's disease and the extraarticular manifestations of hepatitis.

  20. Dense Deposit Disease Mimicking a Renal Small Vessel Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Lavleen; Bhardwaj, Swati; Sinha, Aditi; Bagga, Arvind; Dinda, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Dense deposit disease is caused by fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway and frequently deviates from the classic membranoproliferative pattern of injury on light microscopy. Other patterns of injury described for dense deposit disease include mesangioproliferative, acute proliferative/exudative, and crescentic GN. Regardless of the histologic pattern, C3 glomerulopathy, which includes dense deposit disease and C3 GN, is defined by immunofluorescence intensity of C3c two or more orders of magnitude greater than any other immune reactant (on a 0–3 scale). Ultrastructural appearances distinguish dense deposit disease and C3 GN. Focal and segmental necrotizing glomerular lesions with crescents, mimicking a small vessel vasculitis such as ANCA-associated GN, are a very rare manifestation of dense deposit disease. We describe our experience with this unusual histologic presentation and distinct clinical course of dense deposit disease, discuss the pitfalls in diagnosis, examine differential diagnoses, and review the relevant literature. PMID:26361799

  1. Dense Deposit Disease Mimicking a Renal Small Vessel Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lavleen; Singh, Geetika; Bhardwaj, Swati; Sinha, Aditi; Bagga, Arvind; Dinda, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Dense deposit disease is caused by fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway and frequently deviates from the classic membranoproliferative pattern of injury on light microscopy. Other patterns of injury described for dense deposit disease include mesangioproliferative, acute proliferative/exudative, and crescentic GN. Regardless of the histologic pattern, C3 glomerulopathy, which includes dense deposit disease and C3 GN, is defined by immunofluorescence intensity of C3c two or more orders of magnitude greater than any other immune reactant (on a 0-3 scale). Ultrastructural appearances distinguish dense deposit disease and C3 GN. Focal and segmental necrotizing glomerular lesions with crescents, mimicking a small vessel vasculitis such as ANCA-associated GN, are a very rare manifestation of dense deposit disease. We describe our experience with this unusual histologic presentation and distinct clinical course of dense deposit disease, discuss the pitfalls in diagnosis, examine differential diagnoses, and review the relevant literature.

  2. Steroid-responsive Hashimoto encephalopathy mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Domenico; Colombo, Irene; Ghione, Isabella; Peverelli, Lorenzo; Bresolin, Nereo; Sciacco, Monica; Prelle, Alessandro

    2011-08-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare neurological disorder with a heterogeneous group of neurological symptoms associated with high titres of anti-thyroid antibodies. Clinical manifestations may include encephalopathic features such as seizures, behavioural and psychiatric manifestations, movement disorders and coma. The objective of this presentation is to describe a patient with this rare and controversial clinical syndrome mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, associated with a Hashimoto euthyroid thyroiditis and with a significant response to high dose intravenous prednisone. The responsiveness of this syndrome to steroids suggests that this disorder involves immune pathogenic mechanisms, as previous reviews reported.

  3. Contribution of the Bordetella Bps Polysaccharide to Biofilm Formation and Respiratory Disease in Swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is pervasive in swine populations and plays multiple roles in respiratory disease. Additionally, B. bronchiseptica is capable of establishing long-term or chronic infections in swine. Bacterial biofilms are increasingly recognized as important contributors to chronic bacter...

  4. Atypical Ormond's disease associated with bile duct stricture mimicking cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Quante, Michael; Appenrodt, Beate; Randerath, Simone; Wolff, Martin; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Sauerbruch, Tilman

    2009-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman with suspected hilar cholangiocarcinoma presented with jaundice and dilated intrahepatic bile ducts owing to high-grade hepatic duct confluence stenosis. The suspected tumour and the entire extrahepatic bile duct system were resected and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy was performed. Histological investigations showed perihepatic fibrosis but no signs of malignancy. One year later the patient developed bilateral hydronephrosis caused by ureteral obstruction. Since the patient had a gynaecological history of widespread inflammation, she was referred for transabdominal operative ureterolysis combined with hysterectomy and adnexectomy. Histological investigations as well as fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and computed tomography (CT) findings were compatible with retroperitoneal fibrosis (Ormond's disease). Treatment with tamoxifen was initiated. To the best of our knowledge, only a few cases of intraperitoneal fibroses mimicking cholangiocarcinoma followed by the typical symptoms of retroperitoneal Ormond's disease have been reported.

  5. Development of a fluorescent ASFV strain that retains the ability to cause disease in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African swine fever is a contagious and often lethal disease for domestic pigs with a significant economic impact for the swine industry. The etiological agent, African swine fever virus (ASFV), is a highly structurally complex double strain DNA virus. No effective vaccines or antiviral treatment ar...

  6. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine fever, classical swine fever, or swine vesicular disease exists. 94.17 Section 94.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE...

  7. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine fever, classical swine fever, or swine vesicular disease exists. 94.17 Section 94.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE...

  8. Experimental transmission of the chronic wasting disease agent to swine after oral or intracranial inoculation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a naturally occurring, fatal neurodegenerative disease of cervids. The potential for swine to serve as a host for the agent of chronic wasting disease is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of swine to the CWD agent following oral...

  9. Syphilis Mimicking Other Dermatological Diseases: Reactive Arthritis and Mucha-Habermann Disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Carneiro, Sueli Coelho; Pirmez, Rodrigo; de Hollanda, Taciana Rocha; Cuzzi, Tullia; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    The authors present two cases of syphilis: one mimicking reactive arthritis and the other Mucha-Habermann disease. Both reports illustrate syphilis as ‘the great imitator’, a description given by Sir William Osler, and call attention to the strong need for awareness among physicians of all specialties, especially the younger ones, who are not used to seeing this increasingly prevalent disease, as it once was in the past. PMID:23467097

  10. Kawasaki disease mimicking a parapharyngeal abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qianyun; Luo, Rong; Gan, Jing; Zhang, Li; Qu, Yi; Mu, Dezhi

    2015-05-01

    Parapharyngeal abscess (PPA)-like lesion is a very rare manifestation of Kawasaki disease (KD). Here we report a Chinese case of KD initially mimicking PPA, which is the first one reported in Asia.A 3-year-old male patient presented with fever, drooling, and bilateral painful cervical lymphadenopathy for 3 days. Chest X-ray and echocardiogram were normal. With substantial elevation of white blood count and C-reactive protein, purulent cervical lymphadenitis was considered. Symptoms did not improve after treatment with vancomycin, and the patient further developed trismus and restricted neck movement. Neck CT revealed a 2 × 1.5 cm hypodense lesion in the right parapharyngeal space with peripheral enhancement. PPA was suspected and on the 3rd day following admission, the patient received surgical incision and drainage. One milliliter of serous fluid was drained without bacterial growth on cultures. Fever persisted after surgery. As the clinical course proceeded, additional major signs of KD gradually evolved, and on the 6th day following admission the patient completely fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for KD. Rapid clinical improvement was observed following treatment with high-dose immunoglobulin and aspirin. Due to the parapharyngeal operation, the patient was fed milk through a nasogastric tube for 15 days. His neck incision became infected but healed gradually following dressing change and antibiotic treatment. Currently he remains asymptomatic during regular follow-up and repeated echocardiograms are normal.Both pediatricians and otolaryngologists can learn from this case that KD may initially manifest as PPA. Careful observation for major signs of KD during the clinical course can help to achieve a prompt and correct diagnosis. Thus, unnecessary surgery and cardiac complications of KD may be avoided.

  11. Contribution of Bordetella bronchiseptica Filamentous Hemagglutinin and Pertactin to Respiratory Disease in Swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Respiratory disease in pigs is the most important health concern for swine producers today. Bordetella bronchiseptica is widely prevalent in swine populations and has multiple roles in respiratory disease. It is the primary etiologic agent of atrophic rhinitis, bronchopneumonia in young pigs, and ha...

  12. Contribution of Bordetella bronchiseptica Filamentous Hemagglutinin and Pertactin to Respiratory Disease in Swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Respiratory disease in pigs is the most important health concern for swine producers today. Bordetella bronchiseptica is pervasive in swine populations and plays multiple roles in respiratory disease. It is a primary etiologic agent of atrophic rhinitis, bronchopneumonia in young pigs, and has been ...

  13. Foot-and-mouth disease in feral swine: susceptibility and transmission.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, F; Swafford, S; Petrowski, H; Bracht, A; Schmit, B; Fabian, A; Pacheco, J M; Hartwig, E; Berninger, M; Carrillo, C; Mayr, G; Moran, K; Kavanaugh, D; Leibrecht, H; White, W; Metwally, S

    2011-08-01

    Experimental studies of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in feral swine are limited, and data for clinical manifestations and disease transmissibility are lacking. In this report, feral and domestic swine were experimentally infected with FMDV (A24-Cruzeiro), and susceptibility and virus transmission were studied. Feral swine were proved to be highly susceptible to A-24 Cruzeiro FMD virus by intradermal inoculation and by contact with infected domestic and feral swine. Typical clinical signs in feral swine included transient fever, lameness and vesicular lesions in the coronary bands, heel bulbs, tip of the tongue and snout. Domestic swine exhibited clinical signs of the disease within 24 h after contact with feral swine, whereas feral swine did not show clinical signs of FMD until 48 h after contact with infected domestic and feral swine. Clinical scores of feral and domestic swine were comparable. However, feral swine exhibited a higher tolerance for the disease, and their thicker, darker skin made vesicular lesions difficult to detect. Virus titration of oral swabs showed that both feral and domestic swine shed similar amounts of virus, with levels peaking between 2 to 4 dpi/dpc (days post-inoculation/days post-contact). FMDV RNA was intermittently detectable in the oral swabs by real-time RT-PCR of both feral and domestic swine between 1 and 8 dpi/dpc and in some instances until 14 dpi/12 dpc. Both feral and domestic swine seroconverted 6-8 dpi/dpc as measured by 3ABC antibody ELISA and VIAA assays. FMDV RNA levels in animal room air filters were similar in feral and domestic swine animal rooms, and were last detected at 22 dpi, while none were detectable at 28 or 35 dpi. The FMDV RNA persisted in domestic and feral swine tonsils up to 33-36 dpi/dpc, whereas virus isolation was negative. Results from this study will help understand the role feral swine may play in sustaining an FMD outbreak, and may be utilized in guiding surveillance, epidemiologic and economic

  14. Swine Vesicular Disease in Great Britain

    PubMed Central

    Watson, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    The State Veterinary Service in Great Britain has encountered considerable difficulty in eradicating SVD. For the last four years confirmed outbreaks have been mainly confined to one region, linked directly to outbreaks in that region, or have occurred as isolated cases related to the feeding of swill. The surveillance effort to locate subclinical disease has far surpassed that of any other country. There is no doubt that the introduction of SVD into any country which adopts a stamping-out policy for FMD and does not vaccinate, could present similar problems to those experienced by Great Britain. PMID:7284952

  15. Development of Aortic Valve Disease in Familial Hypercholesterolemic Swine: Implications for Elucidating Disease Etiology.

    PubMed

    Porras, Ana M; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan; Meudt, Jennifer J; Krueger, Christian G; Hacker, Timothy A; Rahko, Peter S; Reed, Jess D; Masters, Kristyn S

    2015-10-27

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a prevalent hereditary disease associated with increased atherosclerosis and calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). However, in both FH and non-FH individuals, the role of hypercholesterolemia in the development of CAVD is poorly understood. This study used Rapacz FH (RFH) swine, an established model of human FH, to investigate the role of hypercholesterolemia alone in the initiation and progression of CAVD. The valves of RFH swine have not previously been examined. Aortic valve leaflets were isolated from wild-type (0.25- and 1-year-old) and RFH (0.25-, 1-, 2-, and 3-year-old) swine. Adult RFH animals exhibited numerous hallmarks of early CAVD. Significant leaflet thickening was found in adult RFH swine, accompanied by extensive extracellular matrix remodeling, including proteoglycan enrichment, collagen disorganization, and elastin fragmentation. Increased lipid oxidation and infiltration of macrophages were also evident in adult RFH swine. Intracardiac echocardiography revealed mild aortic valve sclerosis in some of the adult RFH animals, but unimpaired valve function. Microarray analysis of valves from adult versus juvenile RFH animals revealed significant upregulation of inflammation-related genes, as well as several commonalities with atherosclerosis and overlap with human CAVD. Adult RFH swine exhibited several hallmarks of early human CAVD, suggesting potential for these animals to help elucidate CAVD etiology in both FH and non-FH individuals. The development of advanced atherosclerotic lesions, but only early-stage CAVD, in RFH swine supports the hypothesis of an initial shared disease process, with additional stimulation necessary for further progression of CAVD. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  16. The potential risk of infectious disease dissemination via artificial insemination in swine.

    PubMed

    Althouse, G C; Rossow, K

    2011-09-01

    Artificial insemination (AI) is one of the most widely used assisted reproductive technologies in swine. To maintain a healthy semen trade, it is crucial that diligence be given to managing and minimizing the chance of extended semen playing an epidemiological role in the transmission of infectious disease. In swine, pathogens of primary importance, which may be transmitted through semen include Aujeszky's disease, brucellosis, chlamydophilosis, porcine circovirus type 2, classical swine fever, Japanese encephalitis, leptospirosis, parvovirus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, rubulavirus, foot-and-mouth disease and swine vesicular disease. This paper will summarise the current state of knowledge pertaining to these pathogens in relation to swine AI. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine fever, classical swine fever, or swine vesicular disease exists. 94.17 Section 94.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, NEWCASTLE DISEASE, HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA, AFRICAN SWINE...

  18. Treatment with interferon-alpha delays disease in swine infected with a highly virulent CSFV strain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an economically significant, highly contagious swine disease. The etiological agent, CSF virus (CSFV), is an enveloped virus with a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome, classified as a member of the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae (Becher et al.,...

  19. Common swine models of cardiovascular disease for research and training.

    PubMed

    Crisóstomo, Verónica; Sun, Fei; Maynar, Manuel; Báez-Díaz, Claudia; Blanco, Virginia; Garcia-Lindo, Monica; Usón-Gargallo, Jesús; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco Miguel

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major health concern and therefore an important topic in biomedical research. Large animal models allow researchers to assess the safety and efficacy of new cardiovascular procedures in systems that resemble human anatomy; additionally, they can be used to emulate scenarios for training purposes. Among the many biomedical models that are described in published literature, it is important that researchers understand and select those that are best suited to achieve the aims of their research, that facilitate the humane care and management of their research animals and that best promote the high ethical standards required of animal research. In this resource the authors describe some common swine models that can be easily incorporated into regular practices of research and training at biomedical institutions. These models use both native and altered vascular anatomy of swine to carry out research protocols, such as testing biological reactions to implanted materials, surgically creating aneurysms using autologous tissue and inducing myocardial infarction through closed-chest procedures. Such models can also be used for training, where native and altered vascular anatomy allow medical professionals to learn and practice challenging techniques in anatomy that closely simulates human systems.

  20. Feral swine brucellosis in the United States and prospective genomic techniques for disease epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Leiser, Owen P; Corn, Joseph L; Schmit, Brandon S; Keim, Paul S; Foster, Jeffrey T

    2013-09-27

    Brucellosis is a common infection of feral swine throughout the United States. With the recent expansion of feral swine populations across the country, this disease poses an increasing threat to agriculture and hunters. The standard approach to Brucella surveillance in feral swine has been serological testing, which gives an indication of past exposure and is a rapid method of determining populations where Brucella is present. More in-depth analyses require bacterial isolation to determine the Brucella species and biovar involved. Ultimately, for a comprehensive understanding of Brucella epizootiology in feral swine, incorporation of genotyping assays has become essential. Fortunately, the past decade has given rise to an array of genetic tools for assessing Brucella transmission and dispersal. This review aims to synthesize what is known about brucellosis in feral swine and will cover prospective genomic techniques that may be utilized to develop more complete understanding of the disease and its transmission history. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. SWINE INFLUENZA

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1931-01-01

    1. It has been possible to demonstrate, in Berkefeld filtrates of infectious material from experimental cases of swine influenza, a virus which when administered intranasally to susceptible swine induced a mild, usually afebrile illness of short duration. The changes in the respiratory tract resembled those in swine influenza but were usually much less extensive. When the filtrable virus was mixed with pure cultures of H. influenzae suis and administered to swine a disease identical clinically and pathologically with swine influenza was induced. The data presented indicate that the filtrable virus of swine influenza and H. influenzae suis act in concert to produce swine influenza and that neither alone is capable of inducing the disease. 2. One attack of swine influenza usually renders an animal immune to reinfection. Blood serum from an animal made immune in this way neutralizes infectious material from swine influenza in vitro, as shown by the failure of the mixture to produce disease in a susceptible animal. 3. The virus can be stored in a dried state or in glycerol for several weeks at least. In one instance dried material apparently retained both the virus and H. influenzas suis in viable form for a period of 54 days. 4. Fatal cases of experimental swine influenza have been observed in which H. influenzae suis was the only organism that could be cultivated from the respiratory tract. 5. Attention has been called to some features of marked similarity between epizootic swine influenzae and epidemic influenzae in man. PMID:19869924

  2. One world, one health: the threat of emerging swine diseases. A North American perspective.

    PubMed

    Davies, P R

    2012-03-01

    The predicted expansion of global livestock populations to meet the food and fibre demands of the growing human population raises numerous concerns, including the implications for disease emergence. The evolution of animal production in developed countries has been marked by substantial reduction in farm numbers with correspondingly larger herd sizes, specialization of enterprises, concentration or ownership and vertical integration. Innovations in the structure and operations of swine production have been largely driven by efforts to improve swine health, and the impact of several important swine diseases has declined. Productivity in swine production and the safety of pork products have increased markedly. The most significant emerging infectious diseases of pigs over the last decades have been highly host-specific viruses rather than multihost pathogens. While some bacterial pathogens of pigs have increased in importance in modern systems, improved management systems and biosecurity have enabled herd sizes to increase without negative impact on swine health. The most vulnerable scenario for disease emergence in swine, particularly for zoonotic agents, may be rapid expansion and intensification of swine industries in developing countries without incorporating the stringent biosecurity measures and veterinary oversight that have helped maintain the health and productivity of large herds in North America. Factors that may influence disease emergence in the long term include regulatory measures (particularly related to antimicrobial use), genetics and feeding practices. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Development of a fluorescent ASFV strain that retains the ability to cause disease in swine

    PubMed Central

    Borca, Manuel V.; O’Donnell, Vivian; Holinka, Lauren G.; Sanford, Brent; Azzinaro, Paul A.; Risatti, Guillermo R.; Gladue, Douglas P.

    2017-01-01

    African swine fever is a contagious and often lethal disease for domestic pigs with a significant economic impact for the swine industry. The etiological agent, African swine fever virus (ASFV), is a highly structurally complex double stranded DNA virus. No effective vaccines or antiviral treatment are currently commercially available. We present here the development of a strain of ASFV that has been shown to retain its ability to cause disease in swine, efficiently replicate in swine macrophage and that is fluorescently tagged. The insertion of an EGFP cassette replacing the reading frames for two neighboring genes, MGF360-13L and MGF360-14L, in highly virulent field isolate Georgia/2007, did not affect virus replication in cell cultures and did not affect disease progression in swine, the natural host for ASFV. A virulent fluorescently tagged ASFV is a suitable tool to conduct pathogenesis studies in swine, study on virus-macrophage interaction and to run large scale screens that require a sensitive high throughput output. Utilizing an EGFP reporter system for observing ASFV replication and infectivity can circumvent the time and labor-intensive steps associated with viral antigen-based assays such as the observation of hemadsorption or cytopathic effect. PMID:28436458

  4. Looks can be deceiving: three cases of neurological diseases mimicking Guillain-Barrè syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sciacca, G; Nicoletti, A; Fermo, S Lo; Mostile, G; Giliberto, C; Zappia, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Guillain-Barrè syndrome (GBS) is an acute, paralyzing, inflammatory peripheral nerve disease, featured by monophasic disease course, symmetrical limb weakness and areflexia. Several pathologies can mimic the clinical presentation of GBS, making hard the differential diagnosis for patients complaining of acute flaccid paralysis. In this paper we describe three cases of different neurological diseases presenting with acute motor symptoms mimicking GBS, reviewing the relevant literature on misdiagnosis of GBS.

  5. Swine models, genomic tools and services to enhance our understanding of human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Walters, Eric M; Wells, Kevin D; Bryda, Elizabeth C; Schommer, Susan; Prather, Randall S

    2017-03-22

    The pig is becoming increasingly important as a biomedical model. Given the similarities between pigs and humans, a greater understanding of the underlying biology of human health and diseases may come from the pig rather than from classical rodent models. With an increasing need for swine models, it is essential that the genomic tools, models and services be readily available to the scientific community. Many of these are available through the National Swine Resource and Research Center (NSRRC), a facility funded by the US National Institutes of Health at the University of Missouri. The goal of the NSRRC is to provide high-quality biomedical swine models to the scientific community.

  6. Intrapulmonary unicentric Castleman disease mimicking peripheral pulmonary malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Chen, Gang; Qiu, Xiaoming; Xu, Song; Wu, Yi; Liu, Renwang; Zhou, Qinghua; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Castleman disease, also known as angiofollicular lymph node hyperplasia, can manifest as a unicentric or multicentric disorder. Intrapulmonary Castleman disease is very rare. Here, we present a patient with intrapulmonary Castleman disease who underwent left upper pulmonary lobectomy for suspected early lung cancer. The histopathologic diagnosis of the lobar mass was hyaline-type Castleman disease. The patient has remained well after surgery, showing no local recurrence or distant disease during a two-year follow-up period. Although unicentric Castleman disease originating in the lung is rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of primary pulmonary malignant tumors. PMID:26767055

  7. Primary Histoplasma capsulatum Enterocolitis Mimicking Peptic and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakshabendi, Rahman; Torres-Miranda, Daisy; LaBarbera, Francis Daniel; Nakshabandi, Ahmad; Nakshabendi, Imad

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised patients, histoplasmosis may present as disseminated disease. We present a 52-year-old Caucasian male with symptoms of dyspepsia, postprandial epigastric pain, nausea, and nonbloody diarrhea. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopies were suspicious for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, biopsies were consistent with histoplasmosis, specifically in the duodenum. PMID:27812393

  8. Treatment with interferon-alpha delays disease in swine infected with a highly virulent CSFV strain.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Sainz, I; Ramanathan, P; O'Donnell, V; Diaz-San Segundo, F; Velazquez-Salinas, L; Sturza, D F; Zhu, J; de los Santos, T; Borca, M V

    2015-09-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNα) can effectively inhibit or abort a viral infection within the host. It has been reported that IFN induction and production is hindered during classical swine fever virus (CSFV) infection. Most of those studies have been performed in vitro, making it difficult to elucidate the actual role of IFNs during CSFV infection in swine. Here, we report the effect of IFNα treatment (delivered by a replication defective recombinant human adenovirus type 5, Ad5) in swine experimentally infected with highly virulent CSFV strain Brescia. Treatment with two different subtypes of IFNα delayed the appearance of CSF-related clinical signs and virus replication although it did not prevent lethal disease. This is the first report describing the effect of IFNα treatment during CSFV infection in swine.

  9. Hansen's disease associated with erythromelalgia mimicking Lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Damodar, Shenoi Shrutakirthi; Smitha, Prabhu; Nirmal, Balakrishnan; Sudhir, Nayak U K; Ballambat, Pai Sathish

    2014-01-01

    Hansen's disease, though considered to be at the verge of elimination in many countries including India, still continues to surprise patients and dermatologists alike. This is mainly due to its varying and unconventional presentations which may lead to initial misdiagnosis and prolongation of treatment. Here we describe an unusual case presenting with erythematous photosensitive facial lesions associated with erythromelalgia of the finger tips, provisionally diagnosed as SLE. A subsequent histopathology examination proved it to be Hansens' disease Borderline Tuberculoid variety. Hansen's disease can be termed as the modern great imitator, displacing the traditional great imitator, syphilis.

  10. Massive subdural haematomas in Menkes disease mimicking shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Sharrard, Mark; Hertz-Pannier, Lucie; Armengaud, Didier; Touati, Guy; Delonlay-Debeney, Pascale; Zerah, Michel; Brunelle, Francis; Saudubray, Jean-Marie

    2002-12-01

    Menkes disease is an X-linked inherited disorder of intestinal copper absorption resulting in copper deficiency. Cardinal features include hair abnormalities, facial dysmorphism, severe neurological impairment, hypothermia, arterial anomalies, bone abnormalities and a fatal outcome. We present a case of Menkes disease complicated by progressive macrocephaly following the development of massive subdural haematomas. These lesions associated with femoral metaphyseal spurs could be confused with nonaccidental injury such as that seen in the shaken baby syndrome. This case emphasises that Menkes disease, like glutaric aciduria type 1, should be included in the differential diagnosis of unexplained subdural haematomas and neurological deficits in infants.

  11. Prion infectivity detected in swine challenged with chronic wasting disease via the intracerebral or oral route

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a naturally-occurring, fatal neurodegenerative disease of North American cervids. The potential for swine to serve as a host for the agent of chronic wasting disease is unknown. In the US, feeding of ruminant by-products to ruminants is prohibited, but feeding of rum...

  12. Vitamin D Deficiency Accelerates Coronary Artery Disease Progression in Swine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcang; Swier, Vicki J; Boosani, Chandra S; Radwan, Mohamed M; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-08-01

    The role of vitamin D deficiency in coronary artery disease (CAD) progression is uncertain. Chronic inflammation in epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. However, the molecular mechanism underlying vitamin D deficiency-enhanced inflammation in the EAT of diseased coronary arteries remains unknown. We examined a mechanistic link between 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-mediated suppression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transporter, karyopherin α4 (KPNA4) expression and NF-κB activation in preadipocytes. Furthermore, we determined whether vitamin D deficiency accelerates CAD progression by increasing KPNA4 and nuclear NF-κB levels in EAT. Nuclear protein levels were detected by immunofluorescence and Western blot. Exogenous KPNA4 was transported into cells by a transfection approach and constituted lentiviral vector. Swine were administered vitamin D-deficient or vitamin D-sufficient hypercholesterolemic diet. After 1 year, the histopathology of coronary arteries and nuclear protein expression of EAT were assessed. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D inhibited NF-κB activation and reduced KPNA4 levels through increased vitamin D receptor expression. Exogenous KPNA4 rescued 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-dependent suppression of NF-κB nuclear translocation and activation. Vitamin D deficiency caused extensive CAD progression and advanced atherosclerotic plaques, which are linked to increased KPNA4 and nuclear NF-κB levels in the EAT. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D attenuates NF-κB activation by targeting KPNA4. Vitamin D deficiency accelerates CAD progression at least, in part, through enhanced chronic inflammation of EAT by upregulation of KPNA4, which enhances NF-κB activation. These novel findings provide mechanistic evidence that vitamin D supplementation could be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of CAD. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. IgG4-related Kidney Disease Mimicking Malignant Ureter Tumor: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wen-Hui; Xin, Jun; Shao, Chu-Xiao; Mao, Ming-Feng; Zhu, Chao-Yong; Wu, Chui-Fen; Jin, Lie

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease is a recently recognized systemic disease that can affect any organ or tissue in the body, including the kidneys. IgG4-related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD) is an important part of immunoglobulin G4-related disease. The most common renal manifestation of IgG4-RKD is tubulointerstitial nephritis and glomerular lesions. There, however, is few case of IgG4-RKD mimicking malignant ureter tumor leading to severe hydronephrosis. We herein report an unusual case of IgG4-RKD mimicking malignancy.A 66-year-old Asian man presented to the nephrologist with soreness of loins, anorexia, and acute kidney injury in 2010. His renal function spontaneously improved after 2 weeks' hemodialysis without systemic steroid therapy. Four years later, he presented to the urologist with severe left hydronephrosis because of marked thickness of the left ureter wall. As a ureteral malignancy could not be ruled out, laparoscopic nephroureterectomy was performed.IgG4-related kidney disease was confirmed by the histologic examination. Then, repeat laboratory test showed almost complete recovery of renal function after initiation of steroidal therapy.This case highlights the rare possibility of IgG4-RKD mimicking malignant ureter tumor. Nephrologist and pathologists should be aware of the possibility that hydronephrosis with ureter obstruction may be involved in IgG4-RKD.

  14. Emphysema mimicking interstitial lung disease: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Juhl, Kasper S.; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Rasmussen, Finn; Hilberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Honeycombing in general is a sign of severe end-stage fibrosis. Here we present two cases, where the combination of emphysema, acute inflammation and pulmonary embolism gave an appearance of honeycombing seen in pulmonary fibrosis. HRCT interpretation in the evaluation of acutely ill patients with pulmonary infection is a challenge. Our case reports emphasize the importance of a multidisciplinary approach, when it comes to patients with suspected complicated pulmonary diseases. At the same time they give very realistic examples of the challenges found in diagnosing patients with simultaneous acute and chronic pulmonary diseases. PMID:26236586

  15. Multicentric Castleman Disease With Tubulointerstitial Nephritis Mimicking IgG4-related Disease: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Zoshima, Takeshi; Yamada, Kazunori; Hara, Satoshi; Mizushima, Ichiro; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Harada, Kenichi; Sato, Yasuharu; Kawano, Mitsuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Multicentric Castleman disease is a benign lymphoproliferative disorder with heterogenous clinical symptoms and involves systemic organs in addition to lymph nodes. Elevated serum IgG4 levels and IgG4-positive plasma cell (IgG4+PC) infiltrates have been reported in lymph nodes, lung and skin in some multicentric Castleman disease cases, resembling IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) histologically. However, no report has been available regarding IgG4+PC infiltration in the kidneys of multicentric Castleman disease. Here, we report 2 cases of multicentric Castleman disease complicated by IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) histologically. However, there has been no report published on PC-rich tubulointerstitial nephritis, lymphadenopathy, with numerous IgG4+PC infiltration, and elevated serum IgG4 levels, mimicking IgG4-RD. The blood examinations revealed systemic inflammation and elevated C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels. Corticosteroid therapy was partially effective in both cases, and combination therapy of corticosteroid and tocilizumab was needed in both cases. Moreover, after triple therapy with corticosteroid, rituximab and cyclophosphamide were used in 1 case to tame the severe inflammation. The present cases suggest that if continuously elevated serum C-reactive protein levels and partial corticosteroid responsiveness are encountered, multicentric Castleman disease should be considered rather than IgG4-RD as a differential diagnosis even if serum IgG4 is elevated and IgG4+PCs infiltrate systemic organs.

  16. Castleman disease mimicking nodal recurrence of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi-Hong; Chen, Chi-Kuan; Lee, Chun-Chuan

    2016-02-01

    A 54-year-old woman who had undergone total thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine treatment for papillary thyroid cancer presented with elevated stimulated thyroglobulin levels and negative I-131 scan. Ultrasonography revealed suspicious lateral neck lymph nodes, which were FDG-avid. Neck dissection led to a diagnosis of Castleman disease.

  17. Extramammary Paget disease: Immunohistochemistry is critical to distinguish potential mimickers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Etienne Ce; Kwah, Yung Chien; Tan, Wee Ping; Lee, Joyce Ss; Tan, Suat Hoon

    2012-09-15

    Extra-mammary Paget disease (EMPD) is a rare intra-epithelial carcinoma that is usually found on the apocrine-rich skin of the perineum. We report 2 cases in which EMPD was initially misdiagnosed on the initial punch biopsy as melanoma-in-situ and Bowen disease respectively. Reasons for the misdiagnoses included a rare pigmented axillary variant of EMPD in the first case and atypical bowenoid features on H&E in the second. The cases are described with a critical review of the histopathological findings, along with a review of the current literature. This highlights the necessity of a comprehensive immunohistochemical panel for the assessment of intra-epithelial pagetoid atypical cells.

  18. Rosai-Dorfman disease mimicking a sphenoid wing meningioma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manish S; Padua, Michelle De; Jha, Ajaya N

    2005-03-01

    A 40-year-old male presented with a single generalized tonic-clonic seizure. MRI revealed an enhancing, dural-based, left lateral sphenoid wing lesion suggestive of a meningioma. At microsurgical excision, the lesion was firm and relatively avascular. The histopathological report revealed S-100 positive histiocytic proliferation with lymphophagocytosis (emperipolesis) characteristic of the Rosai-Dorfman disease. The case and its management are discussed.

  19. Possible neuro-Sweet disease mimicking brain tumor in the medulla oblongata--case report.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Chihiro; Esaki, Takanori; Ando, Maya; Furuya, Tsuyoshi; Noda, Kazuyuki; Nakao, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Takuji; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Mori, Kentaro

    2011-01-01

    A 62-year-old male presented with a rare case of possible neuro-Sweet Disease (NSD) mimicking brain tumor in the medulla oblongata, manifesting as numbness in the bilateral upper and lower extremities, gait disturbance, dysarthria, and swallowing disturbance which gradually deteriorated over 3 months. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass lesion in the medulla oblongata, extending to the upper cervical cord with rim enhancement by gadolinium. The preoperative diagnosis was brain tumor, such as glioma, or inflammatory disease. His neurological symptoms gradually deteriorated, so biopsy was performed through the midline suboccipital approach. Histological examination showed infiltration of inflammatory cells, mainly lymphocytes and macrophages. Human leukocyte antigen typing showed Cw1 and B54 which strongly suggested possible NSD. Steroid pulse therapy was started after surgery and the clinical symptoms improved. Neurosurgeons should be aware of inflammatory disorders such as NSD mimicking brain tumor.

  20. Large retroperitoneal schwannoma mimicking a cystic ovarian mass in a patient with Hansen's disease.

    PubMed

    Surendrababu, Narayanam R S; Cherian, Sucy Rekha; Janakiraman, Rajinikanth; Walter, Noel

    2008-06-01

    We present a rare case of retroperitoneal cystic schwannoma of the pelvis in a patient with Hansen's disease that mimicked an ovarian cyst. Due to economic constraints and because the lesion was assumed to be of ovarian origin, the patient did not undergo any cross-sectional imaging other than sonography. Sonographically guided fine needle aspiration of the cystic lesion was inconclusive. A cystic schwannoma was diagnosed at laparotomy.

  1. Sandhoff disease mimicking adult-onset bulbospinal neuronopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P K; Young, E; King, R H

    1989-01-01

    A 32 year old male is described with an onset of upper limb postural tremor in adolescence followed by muscle cramps. Progressive proximal amyotrophy and weakness in the limbs developed late in the third decade. Examination disclosed, in addition, bilateral facial weakness and mild dysarthria. Enzyme studies revealed hexosaminidase A and B deficiency, indicating a diagnosis of Sandhoff disease. Intra-axonal membranocytoplasmic bodies were present in a rectal biopsy. The presentation, which resembled that of X-linked bulbospinal neuronopathy, widens the clinical spectrum for disorders related to G(M2) gangliosidosis. Images PMID:2795083

  2. Dermoscopy of Pigmented Bowen's Disease Mimicking Early Superficial Spreading Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yuka; Tanaka, Masaru; Suzaki, Reiko; Mori, Nuiko; Konohana, Izumi

    2009-01-01

    A 89-year-old Japanese woman presented at our clinic because of a several months’ history of an asymptomatic gradually enlarging pigmented skin lesion on the dorsum of the left foot. Physical examination revealed a single hyperpigmented oval macule of 5 mm with a rough surface. The color of the lesion was dark brown to light brown. Dermoscopic examination demonstrated atypical pigment network with small dotted vessels. Irregular streaks were also partially noted at the periphery. We suspected superficial spreading melanoma and performed an excision. The histologic features were consistent with a diagnosis of pigmented Bowen's disease. We could not completely account for dermoscopic aspects from the pathological findings of hematoxylin and eosin-stained specimens; therefore, specimens were stained with Fontana-Masson stain. It clearly demonstrated the distribution of melanin in the epidermis. We concluded that atypical network was due to an uneven melanin deposition in the variably thickened epidermal rete ridges. PMID:20652107

  3. Vancomycin-associated linear IgA disease mimicking toxic epidermal necrolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Amanda Regio; de Moura, Luis Henrique Barbizan; Pinheiro, Jhonatan Rafael Siqueira; Pasin, Victor Pavan; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Porro, Adriana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Linear IgA dermatosis is a rare subepidermal autoimmune blistering disease characterized by linear deposition of IgA along the basement membrane zone. In the last three decades, many different drugs have been associated with the drug-induced form of the disease, especially vancomycin. We report a case of vancomycin-induced linear IgA disease mimicking toxic epidermal necrolysis. The aim of this work is to emphasize the need to include this differential diagnosis in cases of epidermal detachment and to review the literature on the subject and this specific clinical presentation. PMID:28300888

  4. Intra-Abdominal Actinomycosis Mimicking Malignant Abdominal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oguejiofor, Njideka; Al-Abayechi, Sarah; Njoku, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare infectious disease, caused by gram positive anaerobic bacteria, that may appear as an abdominal mass and/or abscess (Wagenlehner et al. 2003). This paper presents an unusual case of a hemodynamically stable 80-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with 4 weeks of worsening abdominal pain and swelling. He also complains of a 20-bound weight loss in 2 months. A large tender palpable mass in the right upper quadrant was noted on physical exam. Laboratory studies showed a normal white blood cell count, slightly decreased hemoglobin and hematocrit, and mildly elevated total bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase. A CT with contrast was done and showed a liver mass. Radiology and general surgery suspected malignancy and recommended CT guided biopsy. The sample revealed abundant neutrophils and gram positive rods. Cytology was negative for malignancy and cultures eventually grew actinomyces. High dose IV penicillin therapy was given for 4 weeks and with appropriate response transitioned to oral antibiotic for 9 months with complete resolution of symptoms. PMID:28299215

  5. Food residue granuloma mimicking metastatic disease on FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Crucitti, Antonio; Grossi, Ugo; Leccisotti, Lucia; Maggi, Fabio; Ricci, Riccardo; Mazzari, Andrea; Tomaiuolo, Pasquina M C; Giordano, Alessandro

    2013-05-01

    A 31-year-old woman presenting with acute abdomen underwent an emergency Hartmann's procedure for fecal peritonitis due to perforated adenocarcinoma of the left colon. Shortly after a 7-month course of adjuvant chemotherapy, follow-up contrast-enhanced CT showed multiple peritoneal and hepatic nodules, showing focal intense and homogeneous FDG uptake on FDG-PET/CT, highly suspected for recurrence of disease. Excisional biopsy of the nodules revealed foreign body granulomas made up of alimentary materials surrounded by a fibrous wall. We report a unique case of a false-positive finding secondary to food residues mimicking metastatic disease on FDG-PET in a patient with colon cancer.

  6. Hepatic Mucormycosis Mimicking Veno-occlusive Disease: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Friess, Stuart H; Dehner, Louis P

    2016-01-01

    The clinical history of a 12-year-old boy with trisomy 21 who suffered from relapsed pre-B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia with clinical symptoms of hepatic veno-occlusive disease and death is reported. The postmortem findings were significant for hepatic mucormycosis with selective involvement of the central veins, sinusoids, and portal tracts resulting in obstruction of the outflow tract and massive hepatocellular necrosis. Hematogenous dissemination of mucormycosis causing acute splenitis and hemorrhagic intestinal necrosis were also observed. To our knowledge, mucormycosis invasion of the central veins, sinusoids, and portal tracts by fungal hyphae resulting in a syndrome mimicking hepatic veno-occlusive disease has not been previously reported.

  7. A case of solely lung-involved IgG4-related disease mimicking tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hongyi; Li, Haitao; Hu, Yongbing; Niu, Ruichao; Pan, Pinhua; Hu, Chengping

    2015-01-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a chronic progressive autoimmune disease. Solely lung involved IgG4-RD is extremely rare. Herein, we reported a case of IgG4-related disease as mimicking tuberculosis. A 52-year-old male patient was admitted due to cough and hemoptysis for two months and fever for 1 month. The pre-admission diagnosis in another hospital was secondary pulmonary tuberculosis, but the quadruple anti-tuberculosis therapy was ineffective and the disease condition continued to deteriorate. The percutaneous lung biopsy was carried out after admission and the pathological diagnosis was IgG4-related disease. The patient's disease condition was improved following hormonal therapy.

  8. Type III interferon protects swine against foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Perez-Martin, Eva; Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Weiss, Marcelo; Sturza, Diego F; Dias, Camila C; Ramirez-Medina, Elizabeth; Grubman, Marvin J; de los Santos, Teresa

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, we have developed novel strategies to control foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), including the use of biotherapeutics such as interferons (IFN) delivered by a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). Swine can be sterilely protected after vaccination with an Ad5 that encodes porcine type I IFN (poIFN-α), and cattle can be similarly protected or develop significantly reduced disease when treated with an Ad5 delivering bovine type III IFN (boIFN-λ3). Here, we have evaluated the efficacy of porcine IFN-λ3 (poIFN-λ3) against FMD virus in vivo. Swine inoculated with different doses of Ad5-poIFN-λ3 were protected against disease in a dose-dependent manner. Despite the absence of systemic antiviral activity, 7 out of 10 Ad5-poIFN-λ3 inoculated animals did not develop disease or viremia, and the other 3 inoculated animals displayed delayed and milder disease by 7 days postchallenge as compared with control animals inoculated with an Ad5 control vector. While analysis of gene expression showed significant induction of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes in Ad5-poIFN-λ3-treated cultured porcine epithelial kidney cells, there was limited gene induction in peripheral blood monocytes isolated from treated swine. These results suggest that treatment with Ad5-poIFN-λ3 is an effective biotherapeutic strategy against FMD in swine.

  9. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... has declared free of swine vesicular disease is maintained on the APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis... which they must be cooked in hot oil (deep-fried) at a minimum of 104 °C for an additional 150 minutes...

  10. First Complete Coding Sequence of a Spanish Isolate of Swine Vesicular Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a porcine pathogen and a member of the Enterovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family. The SVDV genome is composed of a single-stranded RNA molecule of positive polarity. Here, we report the first complete sequence of the coding region of a Spanish SVDV isolate (SPA/1/'93). PMID:26941157

  11. Contact heterogeneities in feral swine: implications for disease management and future research

    Treesearch

    Kim M. Pepin; Amy J. Davis; James Beasley; Raoul  Boughton; Tyler  Campbell; Susan M. Cooper; Wes Gaston; Steve Hartley; John Kilgo; Samantha M. Wisely; Christy Wyckoff; Kurt C. VerCauteren

    2016-01-01

    Contact rates vary widely among individuals in socially structured wildlife populations. Understanding the interplay of factors responsible for this variation is essential for planning effective disease management. Feral swine (Sus scrofa) are a socially structured species which pose an increasing threat to livestock and human health, and little is known about contact...

  12. Type III interferon protects swine against foot-and-mouth disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years we have developed novel strategies to control foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) including the use of biotherapeutics such as interferons (IFN) delivered by a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). Swine can be sterilely protected after vaccination with an Ad5 that encodes po...

  13. Nutrition and fasting mimicking diets in the prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases and immunosenescence.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Young; Lee, Changhan; Longo, Valter D

    2017-11-05

    Complex and coordinated signals are necessary to initiate and sustain the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of lymphocytes. These signals, which are known to determine T-cell fate and function, also depend on the metabolic state of the organism. Recent studies indicate that both the type and levels of nutrients can influence the generation, survival and function of lymphocytes and therefore can affect several autoimmune diseases. Here, we review the dysregulation of lymphocytes during autoimmunity and aging, the mechanisms associated with loss of immune function, and how fasting mimicking diets and other dietary interventions affect autoimmunity and immunosenescence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Intracerebral presentation of Hodgkin disease mimicking meningioma in a young woman: case presentation with literature review.

    PubMed

    Apollonsky, Nataly; Edelman, Morris; Johnson, Alan; Bhuiya, Tawfiqul; Karayalcin, Gungor

    2008-05-01

    Intracranial involvement of the Hodgkin disease (HD) is a rare entity. Until now, 9 cases of initial presentation of the HD as a brain tumor with appropriate morphologic and histochemical confirmation were reported. Of the 9 patients, 6 had isolated primary intracranial HD and 3 patients after further investigation were found to have extracranial involvement. Seven patients had nodular sclerosing histology, 1 had mixed cellularity, and in 1 case histology was not reported. We describe a patient with systemic nodular sclerosing HD, who initially presented with a brain mass mimicking meningioma and was found to have disseminated lymphadenopathy and bone involvement.

  15. The Bordetella bronchiseptica Type III Secretion System Is Required for Persistence and Disease Severity but Not Transmission in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Brockmeier, Susan L.; Loving, Crystal L.; Register, Karen B.; Kehrli, Marcus E.; Shore, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is pervasive in swine populations and plays multiple roles in respiratory disease. Most studies addressing virulence factors of B. bronchiseptica utilize isolates derived from hosts other than pigs in conjunction with rodent infection models. Based on previous in vivo mouse studies, we hypothesized that the B. bronchiseptica type III secretion system (T3SS) would be required for maximal disease severity and persistence in the swine lower respiratory tract. To examine the contribution of the T3SS to the pathogenesis of B. bronchiseptica in swine, we compared the abilities of a virulent swine isolate and an isogenic T3SS mutant to colonize, cause disease, and be transmitted from host to host. We found that the T3SS is required for maximal persistence throughout the lower swine respiratory tract and contributed significantly to the development of nasal lesions and pneumonia. However, the T3SS mutant and the wild-type parent are equally capable of transmission among swine by both direct and indirect routes, demonstrating that transmission can occur even with attenuated disease. Our data further suggest that the T3SS skews the adaptive immune response in swine by hindering the development of serum anti-Bordetella antibody levels and inducing an interleukin-10 (IL-10) cell-mediated response, likely contributing to the persistence of B. bronchiseptica in the respiratory tract. Overall, our results demonstrate that the Bordetella T3SS is required for maximal persistence and disease severity in pigs, but not for transmission. PMID:24366249

  16. The Bordetella bronchiseptica type III secretion system is required for persistence and disease severity but not transmission in swine.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tracy L; Brockmeier, Susan L; Loving, Crystal L; Register, Karen B; Kehrli, Marcus E; Shore, Sarah M

    2014-03-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is pervasive in swine populations and plays multiple roles in respiratory disease. Most studies addressing virulence factors of B. bronchiseptica utilize isolates derived from hosts other than pigs in conjunction with rodent infection models. Based on previous in vivo mouse studies, we hypothesized that the B. bronchiseptica type III secretion system (T3SS) would be required for maximal disease severity and persistence in the swine lower respiratory tract. To examine the contribution of the T3SS to the pathogenesis of B. bronchiseptica in swine, we compared the abilities of a virulent swine isolate and an isogenic T3SS mutant to colonize, cause disease, and be transmitted from host to host. We found that the T3SS is required for maximal persistence throughout the lower swine respiratory tract and contributed significantly to the development of nasal lesions and pneumonia. However, the T3SS mutant and the wild-type parent are equally capable of transmission among swine by both direct and indirect routes, demonstrating that transmission can occur even with attenuated disease. Our data further suggest that the T3SS skews the adaptive immune response in swine by hindering the development of serum anti-Bordetella antibody levels and inducing an interleukin-10 (IL-10) cell-mediated response, likely contributing to the persistence of B. bronchiseptica in the respiratory tract. Overall, our results demonstrate that the Bordetella T3SS is required for maximal persistence and disease severity in pigs, but not for transmission.

  17. IgG4-related disease presenting with destructive sinonasal lesion mimicking malignancy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-Nien

    2016-11-01

    IgG4-related disease is a newly recognized systemic fibroinflammatory disorder. We report a 36-year-old man who presented with intractable right nasal pain and frontal headache for 1 month. Computed tomography revealed an ill-defined lesion with bony erosion over the right anterior ethmoid sinus and middle turbinate. The lesion was resected through endoscopic anterior ethmoidectomy and middle turbinectomy. IgG4-related disease was definitively diagnosed according to histopathological features. Prednisolone was administered postoperatively. IgG4-related disease presenting with destructive sinonasal lesion mimicking malignancy is rare. Awareness is essential to avoid delayed diagnosis or unnecessary invasive intervention, because the disorder responds to glucocorticoid and immunosuppressant therapy.

  18. Respiratory diseases and allergic sensitization in swine breeders: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Galli, Luigina; Facchetti, Susanna; Raffetti, Elena; Donato, Francesco; D'Anna, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    The daily occupation as a swine breeder involves exposure to several bacterial components and organic dusts and inhalation of a large amount of allergens. To investigate the risk of respiratory diseases and atopy in swine breeders compared with the general population living in the same area. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in an agricultural area of northern Italy that enrolled a random sample of resident male breeders and non-breeders. Demographic features, comorbidities, and presence of allergic respiratory disease were retrieved through interview. Prick tests for common allergens were performed. An evaluation of pollen and mold in air samples taken inside and outside some swine confinement buildings also was performed. One hundred one male breeders (78 native-born, mean age ± SD 43.0 ± 11.1 years) and 82 non-breeders (43.0 ± 11.1 years) were enrolled. When restricting the analysis to native-born subjects, breeders vs non-breeders showed a lower prevalence of respiratory allergy (12.8% vs 31.1%, respectively, P = .002), asthma (6.4% vs 15.8%, P = .059), rhinitis (16.7% vs 51.2%, P < .001), persistent cough (5.1% vs 15.9%, P = .028), and sensitization to grass (7.7% vs 25.6%, P = .002). There was no difference in prick test positivity, polysensitization, nasal cytologic pattern, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity between breeders and non-breeders. Air concentration of molds and pollens was lower inside than outside the swine buildings investigated, particularly when the pigs were inside vs outside the buildings. This study suggests that swine breeding does not increase, and might decrease, the risk of pollen sensitization and allergic disease. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Idelalisib-induced colitis and skin eruption mimicking graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Hammami, Muhammad Bader; Al-Taee, Ahmad; Meeks, Marshall; Fesler, Mark; Hurley, M Yadira; Cao, Dengfeng; Lai, Jin-Ping

    2017-04-01

    Idelalisib is a selective inhibitor of the delta isoform of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase which was approved by the United States Federal Drug Administration in 2014 for the treatment of relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia and indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Drug-induced injury of the gastrointestinal tract is a relatively frequent but usually under-recognized disease entity. We report the case of a 56-year-old male with a history of relapsed follicular lymphoma status post allogenic bone marrow transplant who developed severe diarrhea with a skin eruption mimicking graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) 6 months after starting idelalisib. He underwent a colonoscopy demonstrating a grossly normal-appearing colon and terminal ileum. Biopsies taken during the procedure revealed mild active ileitis, colitis, and proctitis with frequent epithelial apoptosis, and focal intra-epithelial lymphocytosis. Skin biopsies revealed sub-acute spongiotic dermatitis suggestive of either contact dermatitis or an eczematous drug reaction. Symptoms were attributed to idelalisib given their resolution with withdrawal of the drug in conjunction with the skin and colonic biopsies. High clinical suspicion and awareness of the histological features of idelalisib-associated colitis is important to distinguish it from potential mimickers such as GVHD and infectious colitis.

  20. Miniature Swine as a Clinically Relevant Model of Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Huang, Christene A; Orf, Katherine; Bronson, Roderick T; Sachs, David H; Spitzer, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Miniature swine provide a preclinical model of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for studies of graft-versus-host disease. HCT between MHC-matched or ‑mismatched pigs can be performed to mimic clinical scenarios with outcomes that closely resemble those observed in human HCT recipients. With myeloablative conditioning, HCT across MHC barriers is typically fatal, with pigs developing severe (grade III or IV) GVHD involving the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and skin. Unlike rodent models, miniature swine provide an opportunity to perform extended longitudinal studies on individual animals, because multiple tissue biopsies can be harvested without the need for euthanasia. In addition, we have developed a swine GVHD scoring system that parallels that used in the human clinical setting. Given the similarities of GVHD in pigs and humans, we hope that the use of this scoring system facilitates clinical and scientific discourse between the laboratory and the clinic. We anticipate that results of swine studies will support the development of new strategies to improve the identification and treatment of GVHD in clinical HCT scenarios. PMID:26473348

  1. Miniature Swine as a Clinically Relevant Model of Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Huang, Christene A; Orf, Katherine; Bronson, Roderick T; Sachs, David H; Spitzer, Thomas R

    2015-10-01

    Miniature swine provide a preclinical model of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for studies of graft-versus-host disease. HCT between MHC-matched or -mismatched pigs can be performed to mimic clinical scenarios with outcomes that closely resemble those observed in human HCT recipients. With myeloablative conditioning, HCT across MHC barriers is typically fatal, with pigs developing severe (grade III or IV) GVHD involving the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and skin. Unlike rodent models, miniature swine provide an opportunity to perform extended longitudinal studies on individual animals, because multiple tissue biopsies can be harvested without the need for euthanasia. In addition, we have developed a swine GVHD scoring system that parallels that used in the human clinical setting. Given the similarities of GVHD in pigs and humans, we hope that the use of this scoring system facilitates clinical and scientific discourse between the laboratory and the clinic. We anticipate that results of swine studies will support the development of new strategies to improve the identification and treatment of GVHD in clinical HCT scenarios.

  2. Ultrasonographic evaluation of adrenal glands in dogs with primary hypoadrenocorticism or mimicking diseases.

    PubMed

    Wenger, M; Mueller, C; Kook, P H; Reusch, C E

    2010-08-07

    The adrenal glands of 30 dogs with primary adrenal insufficiency (hypoadrenocorticism) were measured ultrasonographically and compared with those of 14 healthy dogs and those of 10 dogs with diseases mimicking hypoadrenocorticism. Thickness and length of the adrenals were measured on abdominal ultrasonography and the results for each group were compared. Dogs with primary hypoadrenocorticism had significantly thinner adrenals compared with the other two groups, and their left adrenal glands were also significantly shorter than those of healthy dogs. Adrenal ultrasonography may be of diagnostic value in dogs with clinical signs suggestive of primary hypoadrenocorticism, as a left adrenal gland measuring less than 3.2 mm in thickness is strongly suggestive of the disease.

  3. Intraepithelial lymphocytes, scores, mimickers and challenges in diagnosing gluten-sensitive enteropathy (celiac disease)

    PubMed Central

    Sergi, Consolato; Shen, Fan; Bouma, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    The upper digestive tract is routinely scoped for several causes of malabsorption, and the number of duodenal biopsy specimens has increased notably in the last 10 years. Gluten-sensitive enteropathy (GSE) is an autoimmune disease, which shows an increasing prevalence worldwide and requires a joint clinico-pathological approach. The classical histopathology of GSE with partial or total villous blunting is well recognized, but the classification of GSE is not straightforward. Moreover, several mimickers of GSE with intraepithelial lymphocytosis have been identified in the last 20 years, with drug interactions and medical comorbidities adding to the conundrum. In this review, we report on the normal duodenal mucosa, the clinical presentation and laboratory diagnosis of GSE, the duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytes and immunophenotype of GSE-associated lymphocytes, the GSE mimickers, the differences “across oceans” among guidelines in diagnosing GSE, and the use of a synoptic report for reporting duodenal biopsies in both children and adults in the 21st century. PMID:28216964

  4. Agents of the "suis-ide diseases" of swine: Actinobacillus suis, Haemophilus parasuis, and Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed Central

    MacInnes, J I; Desrosiers, R

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, Actinobacillus suis, Haemophilus parasuis, and Streptococcus suis have emerged as important pathogens of swine, particularly in high health status herds. Their association with a wide range of serious clinical conditions and has given rise to the moniker "suis-ide diseases." These organisms are early colonizers and, for that reason, are difficult to control by management procedures such as segregated early weaning. Vaccination, serodiagnostic testing, and even serotyping are complicated by the presence of multiple serotypes, cross-reactive antigens, and the absence of clear markers for virulence. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and management of the causative agents of the "suis-ide diseases" of swine. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:10369563

  5. Approved and experimental countermeasures against pestiviral diseases: Bovine viral diarrhea, classical swine fever and border disease.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Givens, M Daniel

    2013-10-01

    The pestiviruses, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), classical swine fever (CSFV) and border disease virus, are important livestock pathogens in many countries, but current vaccines do not completely prevent the spread of infection. Control of pestiviral diseases is especially difficult due to the constant viremia and viral shedding of persistently infected (PI) animals, which must be identified and eliminated to prevent disease transmission. Existing vaccines are limited by the delay between vaccination and the onset of protection, the difficulty of differentiating serologically between vaccinated and naturally infected animals and the need for broad vaccine cross-protection against diverse virus strains. Antiviral therapy could potentially supplement vaccination by providing immediate protection in the case of an outbreak. Numerous compounds with in vitro antiviral activity against BVDV have been identified through its role as a surrogate for hepatitis C virus. Fewer drugs active against CSFV have been identified, but many compounds that are effective against BVDV will likely inhibit CSFV, given their similar genomic sequences. While in vitro research has been promising, the paucity of efficacy studies in animals has hindered the commercial development of effective antiviral drugs against the pestiviruses. In this article, we summarize the clinical syndromes and routes of transmission of BVD, CSF and border disease, discuss currently approved vaccines, review efforts to develop antiviral therapies for use in outbreak control and suggest promising directions for future research.

  6. First Complete Coding Sequence of a Spanish Isolate of Swine Vesicular Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Sobrino, Francisco; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A

    2016-03-03

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a porcine pathogen and a member of the Enterovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family. The SVDV genome is composed of a single-stranded RNA molecule of positive polarity. Here, we report the first complete sequence of the coding region of a Spanish SVDV isolate (SPA/1/'93). Copyright © 2016 Vázquez-Calvo et al.

  7. Swine Dysentery.

    PubMed

    Burrough, E R

    2017-01-01

    Swine dysentery is a severe enteric disease in pigs, which is characterized by bloody to mucoid diarrhea and associated with reduced growth performance and variable mortality. This disease is most often observed in grower-finisher pigs, wherein susceptible pigs develop a significant mucohemorrhagic typhlocolitis following infection with strongly hemolytic spirochetes of the genus Brachyspira. While swine dysentery is endemic in many parts of the world, the disease had essentially disappeared in much of the United States by the mid-1990s as a result of industry consolidation and effective treatment, control, and elimination methods. However, since 2007, there has been a reported increase in laboratory diagnosis of swine dysentery in parts of North America along with the detection of novel pathogenic Brachyspira spp worldwide. Accordingly, there has been a renewed interest in swine dysentery and Brachyspira spp infections in pigs, particularly in areas where the disease was previously eliminated. This review provides an overview of knowledge on the etiology, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of swine dysentery, with insights into risk factors and control.

  8. Crohn's disease-associated interstitial lung disease mimicking sarcoidosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Thao, Choua; Lagstein, Amir; Allen, Tadashi; Dincer, Huseyin Erhan; Kim, Hyun Joo

    2016-10-07

    Respiratory involvement in Crohn's disease (CD) is a rare manifestation known to involve the large and small airways, lung parenchyma, and pleura. The clinical presentation is nonspecific, and diagnostic tests can mimic other pulmonary diseases, posing a diagnostic challenge and delay in treatment. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with a history of CD and psoriatic arthritis who presented with dyspnea, fever, and cough with abnormal radiological findings. Diagnostic testing revealed an elevated CD4:CD8 ratio in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and cryoprobe lung biopsy results showed non-necrotizing granulomatous inflammation. We describe here the second reported case of pulmonary involvement mimicking sarcoidosis in Crohn's disease and a review of the literature on the approaches to making a diagnosis of CD-associated interstitial lung disease.

  9. Penile intraepithelial neoplasia with pagetoid features: report of an unusual variant mimicking Paget disease.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ali; Griffith, Rogers C; Chaux, Alcides

    2014-04-01

    Precancerous lesions of the penis frequently share the morphologic features of the invasive counterpart. We have recently subclassified penile intraepithelial neoplasia into differentiated, warty, and basaloid subtypes, each one with distinctive microscopic morphology. Nevertheless, in our experience, some cases depart from this classification scheme and show unusual morphologic features, hindering the proper diagnosis on routine morphology alone. Herein we present a case of penile intraepithelial neoplasia with a pagetoid growth pattern, closely mimicking Paget disease. We describe the necessary steps to reach the final diagnose, including the use of immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin (CK) 7, CK20, CK34βE12, CAM 5.2, AE1/AE3, CEA, S100, Melan-A, and p63. We also discuss other differential diagnoses that should be considered such as malignant melanoma and urothelial carcinoma in situ with pagetoid spread and less common lesions such as pagetoid dyskeratosis, clear cell papulosis, and mucinous metaplasia.

  10. Financial Impacts of Priority Swine Diseases to Pig Farmers in Red River and Mekong River Delta, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pham, H T T; Antoine-Moussiaux, N; Grosbois, V; Moula, N; Truong, B D; Phan, T D; Vu, T D; Trinh, T Q; Vu, C C; Rukkwamsuk, T; Peyre, M

    2017-08-01

    A study was conducted between May 2013 and August 2014 in three provinces of Vietnam to investigate financial impacts of swine diseases in pig holdings in 2010-2013. The aim of the study was to quantify the costs of swine diseases at producer level in order to understand swine disease priority for monitoring at local level. Financial impacts of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), foot and mouth disease (FMD), and epidemic diarrhoea were assessed for 162 pig holders in two Red River Delta provinces and in one Mekong River Delta province, using data on pig production and swine disease outbreaks at farms. Losses incurred by swine diseases were estimated, including direct losses due to mortality (100% market value of pig before disease onset) and morbidity (abortion, delay of finishing stage), and indirect losses due to control costs (treatment, improving biosecurity and emergency vaccination) and revenue foregone (lower price in case of emergency selling). Financial impacts of swine diseases were expressed as percentage of gross margin of pig holding. The gross margin varied between pig farming groups (P < 0.0001) in the following order: large farm (USD 18 846), fattening farm (USD 7014) and smallholder (USD 2350). The losses per pig holding due to PRRS were the highest: 41% of gross margin for large farm, 38% for fattening farm and 63% for smallholder. Cost incurred by FMD was lower with 19%, 25% and 32% of gross margin of pig holding in large farm, fattening farm and smallholder, respectively. The cost of epidemic diarrhoea was the lowest compared to losses due to PRRS and FMD and accounted for around 10% of gross margin of pig holding in the three pig farming groups. These estimates provided critical elements on swine disease priorities to better inform surveillance and control at both national and local level. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. ATYPICAL MACULOPATHY IN A PATIENT WITH LIGHT CHAIN DEPOSITION DISEASE MIMICKING ADVANCED GEOGRAPHIC ATROPHY

    PubMed Central

    Oshry, Lauren J.; Reichel, Elias

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report a previously unreported presentation of advanced geographic atrophy of the macula mimicking nonneovascular (dry) age-related macular degeneration in a patient with light chain deposition disease. Methods: Ocular examination included dilated fundus examination, fundus autofluorescence, full-field electroretinography, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Patients: Single-patient case report. Results: Dilated fundus examination demonstrated diffuse loss of the retinal pigment epithelium in a geographic atrophy pattern in the macula and drusenlike deposits localized to the outer retina and retinal pigment epithelium. There were no signs of choroidal neovascularization or retinal pigment epithelium detachments. Fundus autofluorescence demonstrated wide areas of retinal pigment epithelium loss. Full-field electroretinography was normal. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography displayed atrophy of the outer retinal layers. Discussion: This is the first documented case of drusenlike deposits and maculopathy in a patient with light chain deposition disease that mimics advanced geographic atrophy that is typically observed in nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration. Physicians should be aware of the macular changes that can be associated with light chain deposition disease, and patients with light chain deposition disease should be regularly evaluated for associated macular disease. PMID:26934302

  12. Detection of African swine fever, classical swine fever, and foot-and-mouth disease viruses in swine oral fluids by multiplex reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Grau, Frederic R; Schroeder, Megan E; Mulhern, Erin L; McIntosh, Michael T; Bounpheng, Mangkey A

    2015-03-01

    African swine fever (ASF), classical swine fever (CSF), and foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) are highly contagious animal diseases of significant economic importance. Pigs infected with ASF and CSF viruses (ASFV and CSFV) develop clinical signs that may be indistinguishable from other diseases. Likewise, various causes of vesicular disease can mimic clinical signs caused by the FMD virus (FMDV). Early detection is critical to limiting the impact and spread of these disease outbreaks, and the ability to perform herd-level surveillance for all 3 diseases rapidly and cost effectively using a single diagnostic sample and test is highly desirable. This study assessed the feasibility of simultaneous ASFV, CSFV, and FMDV detection by multiplex reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction (mRT-qPCR) in swine oral fluids collected through the use of chewing ropes. Animal groups were experimentally infected independently with each virus, observed for clinical signs, and oral fluids collected and tested throughout the course of infection. All animal groups chewed on the ropes readily before and after onset of clinical signs and before onset of lameness or serious clinical signs. ASFV was detected as early as 3 days postinoculation (dpi), 2-3 days before onset of clinical disease; CSFV was detected at 5 dpi, coincident with onset of clinical disease; and FMDV was detected as early as 1 dpi, 1 day before the onset of clinical disease. Equivalent results were observed in 4 independent studies and demonstrate the feasibility of oral fluids and mRT-qPCR for surveillance of ASF, CSF, and FMD in swine populations. © 2015 The Author(s).

  13. Scenario tree model for animal disease freedom framed in the OIE context using the example of a generic swine model for Aujeszky's disease in commercial swine in Canada.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jette; Vallières, André

    2016-01-01

    "Freedom from animal disease" is an ambiguous concept that may have a different meaning in trade and science. For trade alone, there are different levels of freedom from OIE listed diseases. A country can: be recognized by OIE to be "officially free"; self-declare freedom, with no official recognition by the OIE; or report animal disease as absent (no occurrence) in six-monthly reports. In science, we apply scenario tree models to calculate the probability of a population being free from disease at a given prevalence to provide evidence of freedom from animal disease. Here, we link science with application by describing how a scenario tree model may contribute to a country's claim of freedom from animal disease. We combine the idea of a standardized presentation of scenario tree models for disease freedom and having a similar model for two different animal diseases to suggest that a simple generic model may help veterinary authorities to build and evaluate scenario tree models for disease freedom. Here, we aim to develop a generic scenario tree model for disease freedom that is: animal species specific, population specific, and has a simple structure. The specific objectives were: to explore the levels of freedom described in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code; to describe how scenario tree models may contribute to a country's claim of freedom from animal disease; and to present a generic swine scenario tree model for disease freedom in Canada's domestic (commercial) swine applied to Aujeszky's disease (AD). In particular, to explore how historical survey data, and data mining may affect the probability of freedom and to explore different sampling strategies. Finally, to frame the generic scenario tree model in the context of Canada's claim of freedom from AD. We found that scenario tree models are useful to support a country's claim of freedom either as "recognized officially free" or as part of a self-declaration but the models should not stand alone in a

  14. Characterization of Multiple-Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolates from Diseased Chickens and Swine in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hanchun; Chen, Sheng; White, David G.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick; Walker, Robert; Meng, Jianghong

    2004-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates from diseased piglets (n = 89) and chickens (n = 71) in China were characterized for O serogroups, virulence genes, antimicrobial susceptibility, class 1 integrons, and mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance. O78 was the most common serogroup identified (63%) among the chicken E. coli isolates. Most isolates were PCR positive for the increased serum survival gene (iss; 97%) and the temperature-sensitive hemagglutinin gene (tsh; 93%). The O serogroups of swine E. coli were not those typically associated with pathogenic strains, nor did they posses common characteristic virulence factors. Twenty-three serogroups were identified among the swine isolates; however, 38% were O nontypeable. Overall, isolates displayed resistance to nalidixic acid (100%), tetracycline (98%), sulfamethoxazole (84%), ampicillin (79%), streptomycin (77%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (76%). Among the fluoroquinolones, resistance ranged between 64% to levofloxacin, 79% to ciprofloxacin, and 95% to difloxacin. DNA sequencing of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE quinolone resistance-determining regions of 39 nalidixic acid-resistant E. coli isolates revealed that a single gyrA mutation was found in all of the isolates; mutations in parC together with double gyrA mutations conferred high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin MIC, ≥8 μg/ml). Class 1 integrons were identified in 17 (19%) isolates from swine and 42 (47%) from chickens. The majority of integrons possessed genes conferring resistance to streptomycin and trimethoprim. These findings suggest that multiple-antimicrobial-resistant E. coli isolates, including fluoroquinolone-resistant variants, are commonly present among diseased swine and chickens in China, and they also suggest the need for the introduction of surveillance programs in China to monitor antimicrobial resistance in pathogenic bacteria that can be potentially transmitted to humans from food animals. PMID:15297487

  15. Recoding classical swine fever virus (CSFV) structural glycoprotein E2 produces complete virus attenuation in swine and protects infected animals against disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Controlling classical swine fever (CSF) involves vaccination in endemic regions and preemptive slaughter of infected swine herds during epidemics. Generally, live attenuated vaccines induce solid immunity. Using diverse approaches, reverse genetics has been useful in developing classical swine fever...

  16. Synthetic RNAs Mimicking Structural Domains in the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Genome Elicit a Broad Innate Immune Response in Porcine Cells Triggered by RIG-I and TLR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Borrego, Belén; Rodríguez-Pulido, Miguel; Revilla, Concepción; Álvarez, Belén; Sobrino, Francisco; Domínguez, Javier; Sáiz, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against viral infections. Exploiting innate responses for antiviral, therapeutic and vaccine adjuvation strategies is being extensively explored. We have previously described, the ability of small in vitro RNA transcripts, mimicking the sequence and structure of different domains in the non-coding regions of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome (ncRNAs), to trigger a potent and rapid innate immune response. These synthetic non-infectious molecules have proved to have a broad-range antiviral activity and to enhance the immunogenicity of an FMD inactivated vaccine in mice. Here, we have studied the involvement of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) in the ncRNA-induced innate response and analyzed the antiviral and cytokine profiles elicited in swine cultured cells, as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PMID:26193305

  17. Synthetic RNAs Mimicking Structural Domains in the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Genome Elicit a Broad Innate Immune Response in Porcine Cells Triggered by RIG-I and TLR Activation.

    PubMed

    Borrego, Belén; Rodríguez-Pulido, Miguel; Revilla, Concepción; Álvarez, Belén; Sobrino, Francisco; Domínguez, Javier; Sáiz, Margarita

    2015-07-17

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against viral infections. Exploiting innate responses for antiviral, therapeutic and vaccine adjuvation strategies is being extensively explored. We have previously described, the ability of small in vitro RNA transcripts, mimicking the sequence and structure of different domains in the non-coding regions of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome (ncRNAs), to trigger a potent and rapid innate immune response. These synthetic non-infectious molecules have proved to have a broad-range antiviral activity and to enhance the immunogenicity of an FMD inactivated vaccine in mice. Here, we have studied the involvement of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) in the ncRNA-induced innate response and analyzed the antiviral and cytokine profiles elicited in swine cultured cells, as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs).

  18. Wegener’s granulomatosis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease and presenting with chronic enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Shahedi, Kamyar; Hanna, Ramy Magdy; Melamed, Oleg; Wilson, James

    2013-01-01

    Wegener’s granulomatosis, also known as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, is a small vessel vasculitis with primarily pulmonary, renal, and sinus disease manifestations. The prevalence of Wegener’s granulomatosis is three cases per 100,000 patients. Cardiovascular, neurologic, cutaneous, and joint manifestations have been reported in many case reports and case series. Gastrointestinal manifestations are less noted in Wegener’s granulomatosis, although they have been previously reported in the form of intestinal perforation and intestinal ischemia. Additionally, there are characteristic findings of vasculitis that are noted with active Wegener’s granulomatosis of the small bowel. We report a case of an elderly patient who presented with weight loss, diarrhea, and hematochezia. His symptoms were chronic and had lasted for more than 1 year before diagnosis. Inflammatory bowel disease or chronic enteritis due to Salmonella arizonae because of reptile exposure originally were suspected as etiologies of his presentation. The findings of proteinuria, renal failure, and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis on renal biopsy, in conjunction with an elevated c-ANCA titer, confirmed the diagnosis of Wegener’s granulomatosis with associated intestinal vasculitis. This case demonstrates an atypical presentation of chronic duodenitis and jejunitis secondary to Wegener’s granulomatosis, which mimicked inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24124396

  19. Network analysis of swine shipments in Ontario, Canada, to support disease spread modelling and risk-based disease management.

    PubMed

    Dorjee, S; Revie, C W; Poljak, Z; McNab, W B; Sanchez, J

    2013-10-01

    Understanding contact networks are important for modelling and managing the spread and control of communicable diseases in populations. This study characterizes the swine shipment network of a multi-site production system in southwestern Ontario, Canada. Data were extracted from a company's database listing swine shipments among 251 swine farms, including 20 sow, 69 nursery and 162 finishing farms, for the 2-year period of 2006 to 2007. Several network metrics were generated. The number of shipments per week between pairs of farms ranged from 1 to 6. The medians (and ranges) of out-degree were: sow 6 (1-21), nursery 8 (0-25), and finishing 0 (0-4), over the entire 2-year study period. Corresponding estimates for in-degree of nursery and finishing farms were 3 (0-9) and 3 (0-12) respectively. Outgoing and incoming infection chains (OIC and IIC), were also measured. The medians (ranges) of the monthly OIC and IIC were 0 (0-8) and 0 (0-6), respectively, with very similar measures observed for 2-week intervals. Nursery farms exhibited high measures of centrality. This indicates that they pose greater risks of disease spread in the network. Therefore, they should be given a high priority for disease prevention and control measures affecting all age groups alike. The network demonstrated scale-free and small-world topologies as observed in other livestock shipment studies. This heterogeneity in contacts among farm types and network topologies should be incorporated in simulation models to improve their validity. In conclusion, this study provided useful epidemiological information and parameters for the control and modelling of disease spread among swine farms, for the first time from Ontario, Canada. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Case of Sarcoidosis with Interstitial Lung Disease Mimicking Clinically Amyopathic Dermatomyositis and Rapidly Progressive Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nogi, Shinichi; Sasaki, Noriko; Chinen, Naofumi; Honda, Kiri; Saito, Eiko; Wakabayashi, Takayuki; Yamada, Chiho; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report a patient with sarcoidosis who developed edematous erythema and interstitial lung disease. At the initial visit, clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM) with rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (RP-ILD) was suspected because he had progressive dyspnea but no muscle weakness. The presence of anti-CADM-140/MDA5 autoantibodies was immediately assessed to facilitate a precise diagnosis, with negative results. Thereafter, skin and transbronchial lung biopsies revealed noncaseating granuloma with Langhans giant cells in both specimens, leading to a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. In this case, clinical features of skin and lung were unable to distinguish DM (including CADM) from sarcoidosis, but the lack of anti-CADM-140/MDA5 antibody was useful for differentiating CADM with RP-ILD mimicking sarcoidosis from bona fide sarcoidosis. PMID:25431723

  1. Experimental Transmission of the Chronic Wasting Disease Agent to Swine after Oral or Intracranial Inoculation.

    PubMed

    Moore, S Jo; West Greenlee, M Heather; Kondru, Naveen; Manne, Sireesha; Smith, Jodi D; Kunkle, Robert A; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Greenlee, Justin J

    2017-10-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a naturally occurring, fatal neurodegenerative disease of cervids. The potential for swine to serve as hosts for the agent of CWD is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of swine to the CWD agent following experimental oral or intracranial inoculation. Crossbred piglets were assigned to three groups, intracranially inoculated (n = 20), orally inoculated (n = 19), and noninoculated (n = 9). At approximately the age at which commercial pigs reach market weight, half of the pigs in each group were culled ("market weight" groups). The remaining pigs ("aged" groups) were allowed to incubate for up to 73 months postinoculation (mpi). Tissues collected at necropsy were examined for disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) by Western blotting (WB), antigen capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and in vitro real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC). Brain samples from selected pigs were also bioassayed in mice expressing porcine prion protein. Four intracranially inoculated aged pigs and one orally inoculated aged pig were positive by EIA, IHC, and/or WB. By RT-QuIC, PrP(Sc) was detected in lymphoid and/or brain tissue from one or more pigs in each inoculated group. The bioassay was positive in four out of five pigs assayed. This study demonstrates that pigs can support low-level amplification of CWD prions, although the species barrier to CWD infection is relatively high. However, detection of infectivity in orally inoculated pigs with a mouse bioassay raises the possibility that naturally exposed pigs could act as a reservoir of CWD infectivity.IMPORTANCE We challenged domestic swine with the chronic wasting disease agent by inoculation directly into the brain (intracranially) or by oral gavage (orally). Disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) was detected in brain and lymphoid tissues from intracranially and orally inoculated pigs as early as 8 months of age (6 months

  2. Experimental Transmission of the Chronic Wasting Disease Agent to Swine after Oral or Intracranial Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, S. Jo; West Greenlee, M. Heather; Kondru, Naveen; Manne, Sireesha; Smith, Jodi D.; Kunkle, Robert A.; Kanthasamy, Anumantha

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a naturally occurring, fatal neurodegenerative disease of cervids. The potential for swine to serve as hosts for the agent of CWD is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of swine to the CWD agent following experimental oral or intracranial inoculation. Crossbred piglets were assigned to three groups, intracranially inoculated (n = 20), orally inoculated (n = 19), and noninoculated (n = 9). At approximately the age at which commercial pigs reach market weight, half of the pigs in each group were culled (“market weight” groups). The remaining pigs (“aged” groups) were allowed to incubate for up to 73 months postinoculation (mpi). Tissues collected at necropsy were examined for disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) by Western blotting (WB), antigen capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and in vitro real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC). Brain samples from selected pigs were also bioassayed in mice expressing porcine prion protein. Four intracranially inoculated aged pigs and one orally inoculated aged pig were positive by EIA, IHC, and/or WB. By RT-QuIC, PrPSc was detected in lymphoid and/or brain tissue from one or more pigs in each inoculated group. The bioassay was positive in four out of five pigs assayed. This study demonstrates that pigs can support low-level amplification of CWD prions, although the species barrier to CWD infection is relatively high. However, detection of infectivity in orally inoculated pigs with a mouse bioassay raises the possibility that naturally exposed pigs could act as a reservoir of CWD infectivity. IMPORTANCE We challenged domestic swine with the chronic wasting disease agent by inoculation directly into the brain (intracranially) or by oral gavage (orally). Disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) was detected in brain and lymphoid tissues from intracranially and orally inoculated pigs as early as 8 months of age

  3. Fasting-mimicking diet and markers/risk factors for aging, diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Shelehchi, Mahshid; Mirzaei, Hamed; Cheng, Chia Wei; Budniak, Julia; Groshen, Susan; Mack, Wendy J; Guen, Esra; Di Biase, Stefano; Cohen, Pinchas; Morgan, Todd E; Dorff, Tanya; Hong, Kurt; Michalsen, Andreas; Laviano, Alessandro; Longo, Valter D

    2017-02-15

    Calorie restriction or changes in dietary composition can enhance healthy aging, but the inability of most subjects to adhere to chronic and extreme diets, as well as potentially adverse effects, limits their application. We randomized 100 generally healthy participants from the United States into two study arms and tested the effects of a fasting-mimicking diet (FMD)-low in calories, sugars, and protein but high in unsaturated fats-on markers/risk factors associated with aging and age-related diseases. We compared subjects who followed 3 months of an unrestricted diet to subjects who consumed the FMD for 5 consecutive days per month for 3 months. Three FMD cycles reduced body weight, trunk, and total body fat; lowered blood pressure; and decreased insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). No serious adverse effects were reported. After 3 months, control diet subjects were crossed over to the FMD program, resulting in a total of 71 subjects completing three FMD cycles. A post hoc analysis of subjects from both FMD arms showed that body mass index, blood pressure, fasting glucose, IGF-1, triglycerides, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and C-reactive protein were more beneficially affected in participants at risk for disease than in subjects who were not at risk. Thus, cycles of a 5-day FMD are safe, feasible, and effective in reducing markers/risk factors for aging and age-related diseases. Larger studies in patients with diagnosed diseases or selected on the basis of risk factors are warranted to confirm the effect of the FMD on disease prevention and treatment.

  4. Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) may be underdiagnosed when mimicking mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Briones, P; Vilaseca, M A; García-Silva, M T; Pineda, M; Colomer, J; Ferrer, I; Artigas, J; Jaeken, J; Chabás, A

    2001-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) and mitochondrial diseases are multisystem disorders with clinical characteristics that may overlap. We present four patients with CDG whose phenotypes suggested the diagnosis of a mitochondrial disease. Patients 1 and 2 are siblings with hemiplegic headache, stroke-like episodes, lactic acidaemia and history of maternal migraine; their initial clinical diagnosis was MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes). Patient 3 suffers from ataxia, neuropathy, ophtalmoplegia and retinitis pigmentosa suggestive of NARP (neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa) syndrome. Patient 4 presented with neurological regression mimicking Leigh disease, with ptosis, myoclonus, ataxia and brainstem and cerebellar atrophy. Screening for mitochondrial disease including enzyme and mtDNA investigations on muscle biopsy were performed on Patients 1, 2 and 4 with normal results. However, evidence for a glycosylation disorder was substantiated by an increased carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT). The isoelectric focussing pattern of serum sialotransferrin was typical of CDG type I in Patients 1, 2 and 3 and was shifted towards the less sialylated bands in case 4. A deficiency of phosphomanomutase (PMM) confirmed the diagnosis of CDG-Ia in Patients 1, 2 and 3, who are compound heterozygous for mutations R141H/T237M (Patients 1 and 2) and R141H/P113L (Patient 3). In Patient 4, PMM activity was normal, and further enzymatic and molecular studies are underway. As the search for the primary defect in mitochondrial diseases is often unsuccessful, the pool of mitochondrial patients that remain without definite diagnosis might include CDG cases. Routine screening for CDG may avoid precocious invasive investigations.

  5. Extensive cervical lymphadenitis mimicking bacterial adenitis as the first presentation of Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Felipe de Souza; da Silva, Marco Felipe Castro; Kozu, Kátia Tomie; Camargo, Luís Fernando Aranha; Rossi, Flávia Feijó Panico; Silva, Clovis Artur; Campos, Lúcia Maria de Arruda

    2015-01-01

    Cervical adenitis >1.5cm in diameter is the less frequently observed criteria in patients with Kawasaki disease and it is usually found in association with other symptoms during the acute phase. Moreover, the finding of fever and lymphadenitis with intense local signs of inflammation and phlegmon is rarely seen as the initial manifestation of Kawasaki disease. We report the case of a 7-year-old boy who had cervical lymphadenitis with adjacent cellulitis and phlegmon mimicking bacterial adenitis as the first presentation of Kawasaki disease. The patient had fever, cervical lymphadenitis with adjacent cellulitis, and severe headache. Cefadroxil was prescribed based on the clinical diagnosis of bacterial adenitis. Because he remained febrile and phlogistic signs worsened, after 1 day of hospitalization, antibiotics were administrated intravenously (ceftriaxone and oxacillin). The computed tomography of the neck showed primary infectious/inflammatory process. On the fourth day, the patient had dry and scaly lips, and treatment with oxacillin was replaced by clindamycin because the patient was still febrile. On the ninth day, he presented non-exudative bilateral conjunctival injection. On the tenth day of febrile disease, a rash appeared on his trunk, hands and feet. Patient’s symptoms resolved after intravenous administration of immunoglobulin (2g/kg/dose), and he was discharged 2 days later. On the 14th day, the patient had lamellar desquamation of fingers. Kawasaki disease should be considered as a differential diagnosis in children with febrile cervical lymphadenitis unresponsive to empiric antibiotics even if they have adjacent cellulitis and phlegmon. PMID:26132362

  6. Acute inflammatory bowel disease complicating chronic alcoholism and mimicking carcinoid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Dattolo, Pietro; Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ferro, Giuseppe; Fusco, Francesca; Consalvo, Matteo; Chiodi, Leandro; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-05-01

    We report the case of a woman with a history of chronic alcohol abuse who was hospitalized with diarrhea, severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium infusion, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, alternations of high blood pressure with phases of hypotension, irritability and increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and cortisol. Although carcinoid syndrome was hypothesized, abdominal computed tomography and colonoscopy showed non-specific inflammatory bowel disease with severe colic wall thickening, and multiple colic biopsies confirmed non-specific inflammation with no evidence of carcinoid cells. During the following days diarrhea slowly decreased and the patient's condition progressively improved. One year after stopping alcohol consumption, the patient was asymptomatic and serum potassium was normal. Chronic alcohol exposure is known to have several deleterious effects on the intestinal mucosa and can favor and sustain local inflammation. Chronic alcohol intake may also be associated with high blood pressure, behavior disorders, abnormalities in blood pressure regulation with episodes of hypotension during hospitalization due to impaired baroreflex sensitivity in the context of an alcohol withdrawal syndrome, increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid as a result of malabsorption syndrome, and increased urinary cortisol as a result of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. These considerations, together with the regression of symptoms and normalization of potassium levels after stopping alcohol consumption, suggest the intriguing possibility of a alcohol-related acute inflammatory bowel disease mimicking carcinoid syndrome.

  7. Acute Inflammatory Bowel Disease Complicating Chronic Alcoholism and Mimicking Carcinoid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Dattolo, Pietro; Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ferro, Giuseppe; Fusco, Francesca; Consalvo, Matteo; Chiodi, Leandro; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a woman with a history of chronic alcohol abuse who was hospitalized with diarrhea, severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium infusion, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, alternations of high blood pressure with phases of hypotension, irritability and increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and cortisol. Although carcinoid syndrome was hypothesized, abdominal computed tomography and colonoscopy showed non-specific inflammatory bowel disease with severe colic wall thickening, and multiple colic biopsies confirmed non-specific inflammation with no evidence of carcinoid cells. During the following days diarrhea slowly decreased and the patient's condition progressively improved. One year after stopping alcohol consumption, the patient was asymptomatic and serum potassium was normal. Chronic alcohol exposure is known to have several deleterious effects on the intestinal mucosa and can favor and sustain local inflammation. Chronic alcohol intake may also be associated with high blood pressure, behavior disorders, abnormalities in blood pressure regulation with episodes of hypotension during hospitalization due to impaired baroreflex sensitivity in the context of an alcohol withdrawal syndrome, increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid as a result of malabsorption syndrome, and increased urinary cortisol as a result of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. These considerations, together with the regression of symptoms and normalization of potassium levels after stopping alcohol consumption, suggest the intriguing possibility of a alcohol-related acute inflammatory bowel disease mimicking carcinoid syndrome. PMID:22949895

  8. Generation, characterization, and application in serodiagnosis of recombinant swine vesicular disease virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wanhong; Goolia, Melissa; Salo, Tim; Zhang, Zhidong; Yang, Ming

    2017-08-31

    Swine vesicular disease (SVD) is a highly contagious viral disease that causes vesicular disease in pigs. The importance of the disease is due to its indistinguishable clinical signs from those of foot-and-mouth disease, which prevents international trade of swine and related products. SVD-specific antibody detection via an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the most versatile and commonly used method for SVD surveillance and export certification. Inactivated SVD virus is the commonly used antigen in SVD-related ELISA. A recombinant SVD virus-like particle (VLP) was generated by using a Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system. Results of SVD-VLP analyses from electron microscopy, western blotting, immunofluorescent assay, and mass spectrometry showed that the recombinant SVD-VLP morphologically resemble authentic SVD viruses. The SVD-VLP was evaluated as a replacement for inactivated whole SVD virus in competitive and isotype-specific ELISAs for the detection of antibodies against SVD virus. The recombinant SVD-VLP assay produced results similar to those from inactivated whole virus antigen ELISA. The VLP-based ELISA results were comparable to those from the virus neutralization test for antibody detection in pigs experimentally inoculated with SVD virus. Use of the recombinant SVD-VLP is a safe and valuable alternative to using SVD virus antigen in diagnostic assays.

  9. Structural vulnerability of the French swine industry trade network to the spread of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Rautureau, S; Dufour, B; Durand, B

    2012-07-01

    The networks generated by live animal movements are the principal vector for the propagation of infectious agents between farms, and their topology strongly affects how fast a disease may spread. The structural characteristics of networks may thus provide indicators of network vulnerability to the spread of infectious disease. This study applied social network analysis methods to describe the French swine trade network. Initial analysis involved calculating several parameters to characterize networks and then identifying high-risk subgroups of holdings for different time scales. Holding-specific centrality measurements ('degree', 'betweenness' and 'ingoing infection chain'), which summarize the place and the role of holdings in the network, were compared according to the production type. In addition, network components and communities, areas where connectedness is particularly high and could influence the speed and the extent of a disease, were identified and analysed. Dealer holdings stood out because of their high centrality values suggesting that these holdings may control the flow of animals in part of the network. Herds with growing units had higher values for degree and betweenness centrality, representing central positions for both spreading and receiving disease, whereas herds with finishing units had higher values for in-degree and ingoing infection chain centrality values and appeared more vulnerable with many contacts through live animal movements and thus at potentially higher risk for introduction of contagious diseases. This reflects the dynamics of the swine trade with downward movements along the production chain. But, the significant heterogeneity of farms with several production units did not reveal any particular type of production for targeting disease surveillance or control. Besides, no giant strong connected component was observed, the network being rather organized according to communities of small or medium size (<20% of network size

  10. Analysis of Swine Movement in Four Canadian Regions: Network Structure and Implications for Disease Spread.

    PubMed

    Thakur, K K; Revie, C W; Hurnik, D; Poljak, Z; Sanchez, J

    2016-02-01

    Direct and indirect contacts among animal holdings are important in the spread of infectious diseases. The objectives of this study were to describe networks of pig movements and the sharing of trucks used for those movements between swine farms in four Canadian regions using network analysis tools and to obtain contact parameters for infectious disease spread simulation models. Four months of swine movement data from a pilot pig traceability programme were used. Two types of networks were created using three time scales (weekly, monthly and the full study period): one-mode networks of farm-to-farm direct contact representing animal shipments and two-mode networks representing the sharing of trucks between farms. Contact patterns among farms were described by estimating a range of relevant network measures. The overall network neglecting the four regions consisted of 145 farms, which were connected by 261 distinct links. A total of 184 trucks were used to transport 2043 shipments of pigs during the study period. The median in- and out-degree for the overall one-mode network was 1 and ranged from 0 to 26 and 0 to 10, respectively. The overall one-mode network had heterogeneous degree distribution, a high clustering coefficient and shorter average path length than would be expected for randomly generated networks of similar size. On average one truck was shared by four farms in the overall network, or by three farms when considered the monthly and weekly networks. Degree distribution of the two-mode overall network demonstrated characteristics of power-law distribution. For more than 50% of shipments on any given day, the same truck was used for at least one other shipment. Findings from this study are in agreement with previous work, which suggested that swine movement networks exhibit small-world and scale-free topologies. Furthermore, trucks used for the shipment of pigs can play an important role in connecting otherwise unconnected farms and may increase the

  11. In vitro activity and rodent efficacy of clinafloxacin for bovine and swine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Michael T; Quesnell, Rebecca; Tiwari, Raksha; Lemay, Mary; Watts, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    Clinafloxacin is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone that was originally developed and subsequently abandoned in the late 1990s as a human health antibiotic for respiratory diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of clinafloxacin as a possible treatment for respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommended procedures with recent strains from the Zoetis culture collection. Rodent efficacy was determined in CD-1 mice infected systemically or intranasally with bovine Mannheimia haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida, or swine Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and administered clinafloxacin for determination of ED50 (efficacious dose-50%) values. The MIC90 values for clinafloxacin against bovine P. multocida, M. haemolytica, Histophilus somni, and M. bovis were 0.125, 0.5, 0.125, and 1 μg/ml, respectively, and the MIC90 values against swine P. multocida, A. pleuropneumoniae, S. suis, and M. hyopneumoniae were í0.03, í0.03, 0.125, and í0.008 μg/ml, respectively. Efficacy in mouse models showed average ED50 values of 0.019 mg/kg/dose in the bovine M. haemolytica systemic infection model, 0.55 mg/kg in the bovine P. multocida intranasal lung challenge model, 0.08 mg/kg/dose in the bovine P. multocida systemic infection model, and 0.7 mg/kg/dose in the swine A. pleuropneumoniae systemic infection model. Clinafloxacin shows good in vitro activity and efficacy in mouse models and may be a novel treatment alternative for the treatment of respiratory disease in cattle and pigs.

  12. In vitro activity and rodent efficacy of clinafloxacin for bovine and swine respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Michael T.; Quesnell, Rebecca; Tiwari, Raksha; LeMay, Mary; Watts, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinafloxacin is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone that was originally developed and subsequently abandoned in the late 1990s as a human health antibiotic for respiratory diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of clinafloxacin as a possible treatment for respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommended procedures with recent strains from the Zoetis culture collection. Rodent efficacy was determined in CD-1 mice infected systemically or intranasally with bovine Mannheimia haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida, or swine Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and administered clinafloxacin for determination of ED50 (efficacious dose-50%) values. The MIC90 values for clinafloxacin against bovine P. multocida, M. haemolytica, Histophilus somni, and M. bovis were 0.125, 0.5, 0.125, and 1 μg/ml, respectively, and the MIC90 values against swine P. multocida, A. pleuropneumoniae, S. suis, and M. hyopneumoniae were í0.03, í0.03, 0.125, and í0.008 μg/ml, respectively. Efficacy in mouse models showed average ED50 values of 0.019 mg/kg/dose in the bovine M. haemolytica systemic infection model, 0.55 mg/kg in the bovine P. multocida intranasal lung challenge model, 0.08 mg/kg/dose in the bovine P. multocida systemic infection model, and 0.7 mg/kg/dose in the swine A. pleuropneumoniae systemic infection model. Clinafloxacin shows good in vitro activity and efficacy in mouse models and may be a novel treatment alternative for the treatment of respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. PMID:23785362

  13. 9 CFR 94.10 - Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists. 94.10 Section 94.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY...

  14. Distribution and interspecies contact of feral swine and cattle on rangeland in south Texas: implications for disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Susan M; Scott, H Morgan; de la Garza, Guadalupe R; Deck, Aubrey L; Cathey, James C

    2010-01-01

    The last outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in the United States occurred in 1929. Since that time, numbers and distribution of feral swine (Sus scrofa) have increased greatly, especially in the southern states. This creates a potential risk to livestock production because swine are susceptible to, and can be carriers of, several economically harmful diseases of livestock. Most importantly, swine are potent amplifiers of FMD virus. In this study, global positioning system (GPS) collars were placed on rangeland cattle (Bos indicus x taurus) and feral swine to determine shared habitat use by these species on a large ranch in south Texas from 2004 to 2006. The aim was to identify locations and rates of interspecies contact that may result in effective transfer of FMD virus, should an outbreak occur. In shrubland and riparian areas, animals were dispersed, so contacts within and between species were relatively infrequent. Indirect contacts, whereby cattle and feral swine used the same location (within 20 m) within a 360-min period, occurred primarily at water sources, and seasonally in irrigated forage fields and along ranch roads. Direct contacts between species (animals <20 m apart and within 15 min) were rare and occurred primarily at water sources. Changes in ranch management practices are suggested to reduce interspecies contact should an FMD disease outbreak occur. This information can also be used to improve current epidemiologic models to better fit free-ranging animal populations.

  15. Protective immune responses in guinea pigs and swine induced by a suicidal DNA vaccine of the capsid gene of swine vesicular disease virus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shi-Qi; Liu, Xiang-Tao; Guo, Hui-Chen; Yin, Shuang-Hui; Shang, You-Jun; Feng, Xia; Liu, Zai-Xin; Xie, Qing-Ge

    2007-03-01

    A suicidal DNA vaccine based on a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon was evaluated for the development of a vaccine against swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV). The 1BCD gene of SVDV was cloned and inserted into pSCA1, an SFV DNA-based replicon vector. The resultant plasmid, pSCA/1BCD, was transfected into BHK-21 cells and the antigenicity of the expressed protein was confirmed using an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Immunogenicity was studied in guinea pigs and swine. Animals were injected intramuscularly three times with pSCA/1BCD at regular intervals. Anti-SVDV antibodies were detected by ELISA, the lymphocyte proliferation response was tested by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide method and neutralizing antibodies were measured by microneutralization tests. The data showed that SVDV-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies and lymphocyte proliferation were induced in both guinea pigs and swine. Furthermore, after three successive vaccinations with pSCA/1BCD, half of the pigs were protected against challenge with SVDV. These results should encourage further work towards the development of a DNA vaccine against SVDV.

  16. Swine vesicular disease in northern Italy: diffusion through densely populated pig areas.

    PubMed

    Bellini, S; Alborali, L; Zanardi, G; Bonazza, V; Brocchi, E

    2010-12-01

    At the end of 2006, a recrudescence of swine vesicular disease (SVD) was recorded in Italy and the disease spread widely throughout the northern regions. Lombardy, a densely populated pig area, was most affected and the presence of the disease caused heavy economic losses to the entire pig industry. Although SVD is considered only moderately contagious, the epidemic in the north was characterised by a rapid spread of the condition. Numerous difficulties were encountered in eradicating it. Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the population of pigs in Lombardy, concentrated mainly in a few areas which were the most severely affected during the 2006 to 2007 SVD epidemic. Increases in both the pig population and animal movements, combined with weak biosecurity measures, increased the spread rate of the disease and hampered eradication activities.

  17. Extraintestinal Crohn's disease mimicking autoimmune inner ear disease: a histopathological approach.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, M; Hegemann, I; Hegemann, S C A

    2011-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune inner ear disease develop rapidly progressive sensorineural hearing loss over a period of several weeks or months, often accompanied by vestibular loss. This disease can occur as a distinct clinical entity or in association with an underlying autoimmune disorder. Treatment comprises immunosuppression by corticosteroids, cytostatic drugs or tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists. We report histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of the inner ear of a patient with a granulomatous inner ear disease suffering from Crohn's disease that was nonresponsive to treatment and who underwent surgery for bilateral cochlear implants.

  18. Endotracheal intubation in swine.

    PubMed

    Chum, Helen; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2012-11-01

    Swine are commonly used as research models for cardiovascular surgery and disease, gastrointestinal disease, organ transplantation and intra-renal surgery. These surgical models require anesthesia and, consequently, endotracheal intubation in order to protect the airway; prevent aspiration of saliva, blood and foreign materials; and maintain positive pressure ventilation of the animal. Successful intubation is vital to the stable maintenance of swine under inhalational anesthesia. Here we discuss key features of swine anatomy that make intubation challenging, equipment necessary for successful intubation and techniques for endotracheal intubation in swine.

  19. Late-onset acute graft-versus-host disease mimicking hand, foot, and mouth disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahabal, Gauri; George, Leni; Bindra, Mandeep; George, Biju

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) classically presents as a pruritic erythematous maculopapular rash. We describe a patient who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and presented with a hand foot and mouth disease like clinical presentation. Histopathology was suggestive of acute GVHD. This case is being reported to make dermatologists aware of this unusual presentation of GVHD. PMID:27990387

  20. Cloned Viral Protein Vaccine for Foot-and-Mouth Disease: Responses in Cattle and Swine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleid, Dennis G.; Yansura, Daniel; Small, Barbara; Dowbenko, Donald; Moore, Douglas M.; Grubman, Marvin J.; McKercher, Peter D.; Morgan, Donald O.; Robertson, Betty H.; Bachrach, Howard L.

    1981-12-01

    A DNA sequence coding for the immunogenic capsid protein VP3 of foot-and-mouth disease virus A12, prepared from the virion RNA, was ligated to a plasmid designed to express a chimeric protein from the Escherichia coli tryptophan promoter-operator system. When Escherichia coli transformed with this plasmid was grown in tryptophan-depleted media, approximately 17 percent of the total cellular protein was found to be an insoluble and stable chimeric protein. The purified chimeric protein competed equally on a molar basis with VP3 for specific antibodies to foot-and-mouth disease virus. When inoculated into six cattle and two swine, this protein elicited high levels of neutralizing antibody and protection against challenge with foot-and-mouth disease virus.

  1. Swine Dysentery: Aetiology, Pathogenicity, Determinants of Transmission and the Fight against the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Martínez-Lobo, Francisco Javier; Arguello, Héctor; Carvajal, Ana; Rubio, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Swine Dysentery (SD) is a severe mucohaemorhagic enteric disease of pigs caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, which has a large impact on pig production and causes important losses due to mortality and sub-optimal performance. Although B. hyodysenteriae has been traditionally considered a pathogen mainly transmitted by direct contact, through the introduction of subclinically infected animals into a previously uninfected herd, recent findings position B. hyodysenteriae as a potential threat for indirect transmission between farms. This article summarizes the knowledge available on the etiological agent of SD and its virulence traits, and reviews the determinants of SD transmission. The between-herds and within-herd transmission routes are addressed. The factors affecting disease transmission are thoroughly discussed, i.e., environmental survival of the pathogen, husbandry factors (production system, production stage, farm management), role of vectors, diet influence and interaction of the microorganism with gut microbiota. Finally, prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to fight against the disease are briefly described. PMID:23665849

  2. Swine dysentery: aetiology, pathogenicity, determinants of transmission and the fight against the disease.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Martínez-Lobo, Francisco Javier; Arguello, Héctor; Carvajal, Ana; Rubio, Pedro

    2013-05-10

    Swine Dysentery (SD) is a severe mucohaemorhagic enteric disease of pigs caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, which has a large impact on pig production and causes important losses due to mortality and sub-optimal performance. Although B. hyodysenteriae has been traditionally considered a pathogen mainly transmitted by direct contact, through the introduction of subclinically infected animals into a previously uninfected herd, recent findings position B. hyodysenteriae as a potential threat for indirect transmission between farms. This article summarizes the knowledge available on the etiological agent of SD and its virulence traits, and reviews the determinants of SD transmission. The between-herds and within-herd transmission routes are addressed. The factors affecting disease transmission are thoroughly discussed, i.e., environmental survival of the pathogen, husbandry factors (production system, production stage, farm management), role of vectors, diet influence and interaction of the microorganism with gut microbiota. Finally, prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to fight against the disease are briefly described.

  3. Swine immune system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Probably no area of veterinary medicine has seen a greater explosion in knowledge then the immune system and its implications in disease and vaccination. In this chapter on the Swine Immune System for the 10th Edition of Diseases of Swine we expand on the information provided in past editions by in...

  4. Salmonella DIVA vaccine reduces disease, colonization and shedding due to virulent S. Typhimurium infection in swine.

    PubMed

    Bearson, Bradley L; Bearson, Shawn M D; Brunelle, Brian W; Bayles, Darrell O; Lee, In Soo; Kich, Jalusa D

    2017-05-01

    Non-host-adapted Salmonella serovars, including the common human food-borne pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), are opportunistic pathogens that can colonize food-producing animals without causing overt disease. Interventions against Salmonella are needed to enhance food safety, protect animal health and allow the differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). An attenuated S. Typhimurium DIVA vaccine (BBS 866) was characterized for the protection of pigs following challenge with virulent S. Typhimurium. The porcine transcriptional response to BBS 866 vaccination was evaluated. RNA-Seq analysis was used to compare gene expression between BBS 866 and its parent; phenotypic assays were performed to confirm transcriptional differences observed between the strains. Vaccination significantly reduced fever and interferon-gamma (IFNγ) levels in swine challenged with virulent S. Typhimurium compared to mock-vaccinated pigs. Salmonella faecal shedding and gastrointestinal tissue colonization were significantly lower in vaccinated swine. RNA-Seq analysis comparing BBS 866 to its parental S. Typhimurium strain demonstrated reduced expression of the genes involved in cellular invasion and bacterial motility; decreased invasion of porcine-derived IPEC-J2 cells and swimming motility for the vaccine strain was consistent with the RNA-Seq analysis. Numerous membrane proteins were differentially expressed, which was an anticipated gene expression pattern due to the targeted deletion of several regulatory genes in the vaccine strain. RNA-Seq analysis indicated that genes involved in the porcine immune and inflammatory response were differentially regulated at 2 days post-vaccination compared to pre-vaccination. Evaluation of the S. Typhimurium DIVA vaccine indicates that vaccination will provide both swine health and food safety benefits.

  5. 9 CFR 94.25 - Restrictions on the importation of live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free of classical swine fever. 94.25 Section 94... DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE... the importation of live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free of classical swine...

  6. 9 CFR 94.25 - Restrictions on the importation of live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free of classical swine fever. 94.25 Section 94... DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE... the importation of live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free of classical swine...

  7. 9 CFR 94.25 - Restrictions on the importation of live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free of classical swine fever. 94.25 Section 94... DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE... the importation of live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free of classical swine...

  8. Multilayered disease-mimicking bladder phantom with realistic surface topology for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gennifer T.; Lurie, Kristen L.; Khan, Saara A.; Liao, Joseph C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has shown potential as a complementary modality to white light cystoscopy (WLC), the gold standard for imaging bladder cancer. OCT can visualize sub-surface details of the bladder wall, which enables it to stage cancers and detect tumors that are otherwise invisible to WLC. Currently, OCT systems have too slow a speed and too small a field of view for comprehensive bladder imaging, which limits its clinical utility. Validation and feasibility testing of technological refinements aimed to provide faster imaging and wider fields of view necessitates a realistic bladder phantom. We present a novel process to fabricate the first such phantom that mimics both the optical and morphological properties of layers of the healthy and pathologic bladder wall as they characteristically appear with OCT. The healthy regions of the silicone-based phantom comprises three layers: the urothelium, lamina propria and muscularis propria, each containing an appropriate concentration of titanium dioxide to mimic its distinct scattering properties. As well, the layers each possess a unique surface appearance imposed by a textured mold. Within this phantom, pathologic tissue-mimicking regions are created by thickening specific layers or creating inclusions that disrupt the layered appearance of the bladder wall, as is characteristic of bladder carcinomas. This phantom can help to evaluate the efficacy of new OCT systems and software for tumor localization. Moreover, the procedure we have developed is highly generalizable for the creation of OCT-relevant, multi-layer phantoms for tissues that incorporate diseased states characterized by the loss of layered structures.

  9. EXPERIMENTS ON THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF PSEUDORABIES : I. MODE OF TRANSMISSION OF THE DISEASE IN SWINE AND THEIR POSSIBLE ROLE IN ITS SPREAD TO CATTLE.

    PubMed

    Shope, R E

    1935-06-30

    Pseudorabies is a very fatal but non-contagious disease in cattle and the common laboratory animals. It is a relatively mild yet highly contagious disease in swine. It has been shown that in swine the nose serves both for the entrance and the exit of the virus. Furthermore, it has been observed that fatal pseudorabies infections in rabbits can be induced merely by bringing their abraded skin into contact with the noses of infected swine. The blood sera of swine on two farms where pseudorabies had occurred among the cattle were found to be capable of neutralizing pseudorabies virus. It is believed that in these instances the swine had a mild and unrecognized pseudorabies infection and transmitted their disease to the cattle with which they were associated, by transfer of the virus on their noses to the abraded skin of the cattle.

  10. Multicentric Castleman disease mimicking IgG4-related disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yasumori; Takeshita, Hayato; Moriwaki, Yuji; Hisatomi, Keiko; Matsuda, Masakazu; Yamashita, Natsuki; Kawahara, Chieko; Shigemitsu, Yoshika; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Kawakami, Atsushi; Kurohama, Hirokazu; Niino, Daisuke; Ito, Masahiro; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for shoulder joint stiffness. She had a history of polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia and an elevated C-reactive protein level. Her laboratory data revealed an elevated serum immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) level, hypergammaglobulinemia, and rheumatoid factor positivity in the absence of anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibody. [18(F)]-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed significant [18(F)]-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in multiple lymph nodes (axillary, hilar, para-aortic, and inguinal). Biopsy of the inguinal lymph node showed expansion of the interfollicular areas by heavily infiltrating plasma cells, consistent with multicentric Castleman disease (MCD). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a 37.3% IgG4-positive:IgG-positive plasma cell ratio, indicating overlapping IgG4-related disease. However, serological cytokine analysis revealed elevated levels of interleukin-6 (9.3 pg/ml) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (1210 pg/ml), which are compatible with MCD. Corticosteroid treatment resolved the serological and imaging abnormalities. IgG4-related disease can mimic MCD, and it is crucial to distinguish between these two diseases. Serum interleukin-6 and VEGF levels may help to discriminate MCD from IgG4-related disease.

  11. NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASE MIMICKING MYASTHENIA GRAVIS IN A NIGERIAN FEMALE ADOLESCENT: COULD THIS BE NEMALINE ROD DISEASE?

    PubMed

    Oyinlade, O A; Lagunju, I A; Adebayo, B E

    2016-12-01

    Nemaline rod disease is a congenital myopathy, presentation of which may mimic myasthenia gravis. We report a suspected case of nemaline rod disease in a female adolescent who presented with features similar to myasthenia gravis but failed to respond effectively to its conventional management. She had features of respiratory failure and cardiomyopathy. Patient had a turbulent clinical course and finally succumbed to illness on the fifth day of admission. This report is meant to sensitize child neurologists and general paediatricians on the need to have a broad spectrum of considerations in the management of suspected myasthenia gravis, especially when response to anticholinesterase is poor.

  12. NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASE MIMICKING MYASTHENIA GRAVIS IN A NIGERIAN FEMALE ADOLESCENT: COULD THIS BE NEMALINE ROD DISEASE?

    PubMed Central

    Oyinlade, O.A.; Lagunju, I.A.; Adebayo, B.E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nemaline rod disease is a congenital myopathy, presentation of which may mimic myasthenia gravis. Method: We report a suspected case of nemaline rod disease in a female adolescent who presented with features similar to myasthenia gravis but failed to respond effectively to its conventional management. She had features of respiratory failure and cardiomyopathy. Results: Patient had a turbulent clinical course and finally succumbed to illness on the fifth day of admission. Conclusion: This report is meant to sensitize child neurologists and general paediatricians on the need to have a broad spectrum of considerations in the management of suspected myasthenia gravis, especially when response to anticholinesterase is poor. PMID:28337097

  13. Survey of Feral Swine ( Sus scrofa ) Infection with the Agent of Chagas Disease ( Trypanosoma cruzi ) in Texas, 2013-14.

    PubMed

    Comeaux, Juliette M; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Lewis, Barbara C; Cummings, Kevin J; Mesenbrink, Brian T; Leland, Bruce R; Bodenchuk, Michael J; Hamer, Sarah A

    2016-07-01

    : Feral swine ( Sus scrofa ) are an invasive species and reservoir of numerous zoonotic pathogens in the US, and Texas leads the nation in the estimated population size of feral hogs. Texas also harbors enzootic transmission cycles of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi , agent of Chagas disease. Given previous evidence that swine can serve as reservoirs of T. cruzi in Latin America and new evidence of triatomines (kissing bugs) feeding on swine in Texas, we measured the prevalence of T. cruzi infection in feral swine in Texas. From 2013 to 2014, we sampled blood and/or cardiac tissue from 78 feral swine across 14 Texas counties (seven with and seven without prior documentation of kissing bug occurrence) and used PCR and histopathology to detect T. cruzi infection. We determined an overall infection prevalence of 6% (3 of 54) based on PCR evaluation of cardiac tissue, and no blood samples were positive (n=72). All three positive pigs were from counties where kissing bugs are documented. No T. cruzi amastigotes were noted on histopathology (n=54). Sarcocysts were observed in 10 (18%) of the samples, five of which also had mild focal areas of degeneration and inflammatory cell infiltration. Eco-epidemiologic investigations can provide an assessment of contributions of feral hogs to maintenance of T. cruzi across a landscape to help protect human and animal health.

  14. The Bordetella bronchiseptica type III secretion system is required for persistence and disease severity but not transmission in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is pervasive in swine populations and plays multiple roles in respiratory disease. Most studies addressing virulence factors of B. bronchiseptica utilize isolates derived from hosts other than pigs in conjunction with rodent infection models. Based on previous in vivo mouse...

  15. 77 FR 74787 - Notice of Availability of an Evaluation of the Swine Vesicular Disease Status of Certain Regions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... an Evaluation of the Swine Vesicular Disease Status of Certain Regions in Italy AGENCY: Animal and... determination is based on our review of the documentation submitted by the Government of Italy in support of its... 1997, the European Commission and the Government of Italy submitted a request to APHIS seeking...

  16. Serological survey of veterinarians to assess the zoonotic potential of three emerging swine diseases in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Benitez, J F; Rosas-Estrada, K; Pulido-Camarillo, E; de la Peña-Moctezuma, A; Castillo-Juárez, H; Ramírez-Mendoza, H

    2014-03-01

    We conducted an immunological assay of blood samples taken from 85 swine-specialist veterinarians attending the Congress of the Mexican Association of Swine Specialist Veterinarians in Mexico in 2011. Serum samples were assayed for Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV), Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and Leptospira spp. antibodies. Using a hemagglutination inhibition test, we registered 2.3% and 27% seropositivity for PorPV and EMCV, respectively. Using viral neutralization tests, we registered 5.8% and 47% seropositivity for PorPV and EMCV, respectively. For Leptospira spp., we registered a seropositivity of 38.8%. The variables (sex, age, years of exposure, number of visited farms, biosecurity level and region) showed no significant effect (P > 0.05) on the seropositivity for EMCV, PorPV and Leptospira spp. except for number of visited farms on HI seropositivity for EMCV (P < 0.05; odds ratio: 1.38). The data obtained provide information on the epidemiology of emerging diseases with zoonotic potential in occupational risk groups. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Species characterization and minimum inhibitory concentration patterns of Brachyspira species isolates from swine with clinical disease.

    PubMed

    Clothier, Kristin A; Kinyon, Joann M; Frana, Timothy S; Naberhaus, Nadine; Bower, Leslie; Strait, Erin L; Schwartz, Kent

    2011-11-01

    Typhlocolitis and dysentery due to Brachyspira hyodysenteriae infection represent an economically important disease syndrome in growing pigs. Largely disappearing from U.S. swine herds in the late 1990 s and early 2000s, Brachyspira-associated disease and bacterial isolation from swine with clinical disease has increased in the last several years, and non-B. hyodysenteriae isolates are commonly identified. Antimicrobial resistance has been demonstrated in Brachyspira spp. isolates from Europe and Asia, and may be the reason for the resurgence in U.S. herds. Seventy-nine clinical isolates identified at the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Lab were tested with multiple polymerase chain reaction assays to establish species identity, and evaluated for minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) using an agar dilution method against lincomycin, gentamicin, valnemulin, tiamulin, salinomycin, and carbadox. Only 38.0% of isolates could be confirmed as the known pathogens B. hyodysenteriae (30.4%) or Brachyspira pilosicoli (7.6%). Twenty of the 79 isolates (25.3%) were identified as Brachyspira murdochii, and 13.9% could not be identified to species. The MIC values were consistently high against lincomycin and moderately high against gentamicin. The remaining antimicrobials had MICs that were at the low end of the test ranges. Brachyspira murdochii and Brachyspira spp. had significantly greater MIC values against several of these drugs than other Brachyspira spp. examined. The increased incidence of these less definitively characterized Brachyspira species with increased MIC values to commonly prescribed antimicrobials may, at least in part, explain the increased prevalence and severity of this disease complex in recent years. Further research is necessary to understand these changes.

  18. Chronic Granulomatous Disease Mimicking Colonic Crohn’s Disease Successfully Treated with Infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Rosa; Maia, Tiago; Sarmento, António; Magro, Fernando; Macedo, Guilherme

    2017-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a genetically induced disease caused by mutations in one of the components of the NADPH-oxidase in phagocytes, characterized by life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and granuloma formation. Treatment includes prevention of infectious complications and immunomodulation. However, a standard strategy is not yet defined. The authors report an X-linked CGD female carrier who presented during adulthood with diarrhea and colorectal ulcers, with high impairment of quality of life. Induction with infliximab 5 mg/kg (weeks 0, 2, and 6) with infectious prophylaxis was initiated. She continued infliximab 5 mg/kg every 8 weeks with complete symptomatic response at 15 months. PMID:28377934

  19. Swine flu vaccine: present status.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2009-11-01

    In early 2009, "swine flu", a new infectious disease, emerged in Mexico and further spread around the world. It is currently accepted as the most problematic infection at present. To control this new infection, the swine flu vaccine is the hope. The reasons that we need the swine flu vaccine will be discussed. Also, the present status, current attempts and problems of swine flu vaccine development will be presented in this commentary.

  20. Swine origin influenza (swine flu).

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Meghna R; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, S K

    2009-08-01

    Swine origin influenza was first recognized in the border area of Mexico and United States in April 2009 and during a short span of two months became the first pandemic. The currently circulating strain of swine origin influenza virus of the H1N1 strain has undergone triple reassortment and contains genes from the avian, swine and human viruses. It is transmitted by droplets or fomites. Incubation period is 2 to 7 days. Common clinical symptoms are indistinguishable by any viral respiratory illness, and include fever, cough, sore throat and myalgia. A feature seen more frequently with swine origin influenza is GI upset. Less than 10% of patients require hospitalization. Patients at risk of developing severe disease are - younger than five years, elderly, pregnant women, with chronic systemic illnesses, adolescents on aspirin. Of the severe manifestations of swine origin influenza, pneumonia and respiratory failure are the most common. Unusual symptoms reported are conjunctivitis, parotitis, hemophagocytic syndrome. Infants may present with fever and lethargy with no respiratory symptoms. Diagnosis is based on RT PCR, Viral culture or increasing neutralizing antibodies. Principle of treatment consist of isolation, universal precautions, good infection control practices, supportive care and use of antiviral drugs. Antiviral drugs effective against H1N1 virus include: oseltamivir and zamanavir. With good supportive care case fatality is less than 1%. Preventive measures include: social distancing, practicing respiratory etiquette, hand hygiene and use of chemoprohylaxis with antiviral drugs. Vaccine against H1N1 is not available at present, but will be available in near future.

  1. 9 CFR 94.10 - Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists. 94.10 Section 94.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE...

  2. 9 CFR 94.10 - Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists. 94.10 Section 94.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE...

  3. 9 CFR 94.10 - Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists. 94.10 Section 94.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE...

  4. Contact heterogeneities in feral swine: implications for disease management and future research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pepin, Kim; Davis, Amy J.; Beasley, James; Boughton, Raoul; Campbell, Tyler; Cooper, Susan; Gaston, Wes; Hartley, Stephen B.; Kilgo, John C.; Wisely, Samantha; Wyckoff, Christy; VerCauteren, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Contact rates vary widely among individuals in socially structured wildlife populations. Understanding the interplay of factors responsible for this variation is essential for planning effective disease management. Feral swine (Sus scrofa) are a socially structured species which pose an increasing threat to livestock and human health, and little is known about contact structure. We analyzed 11 GPS data sets from across the United States to understand the interplay of ecological and demographic factors on variation in co-location rates, a proxy for contact rates. Between-sounder contact rates strongly depended on the distance among home ranges (less contact among sounders separated by >2 km; negligible between sounders separated by >6 km), but other factors causing high clustering between groups of sounders also seemed apparent. Our results provide spatial parameters for targeted management actions, identify data gaps that could lead to improved management and provide insight on experimental design for quantitating contact rates and structure.

  5. Contact heterogeneities in feral swine: implications for disease management and future research

    DOE PAGES

    Pepin, Kim M.; Davis, Amy J.; Beasley, James; ...

    2016-03-17

    Contact rates vary widely among individuals in socially structured wildlife populations. Understanding the interplay of factors responsible for this variation is essential for planning effective disease management. Feral swine (Sus scrofa) are a socially structured species which pose an increasing threat to livestock and human health, and little is known about contact structure. We analyzed 11 GPS data sets from across the United States to understand the interplay of ecological and demographic factors on variation in co-location rates, a proxy for contact rates. Between-sounder contact rates strongly depended on the distance among home ranges (less contact among sounders separated bymore » >2 km; negligible between sounders separated by >6 km), but other factors causing high clustering between groups of sounders also seemed apparent. Our results provide spatial parameters for targeted management actions, identify data gaps that could lead to improved management and provide insight on experimental design for quantitating contact rates and structure.« less

  6. Resveratrol modifies risk factors for coronary artery disease in swine with metabolic syndrome and myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Robich, Michael P; Osipov, Robert M; Chu, Louis M; Han, Yuchi; Feng, Jun; Nezafat, Reza; Clements, Richard T; Manning, Warren J; Sellke, Frank W

    2011-08-16

    Resveratrol has been purported to modify risk factors for obesity and cardiovascular disease. We sought to examine the effects of resveratrol in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome and chronic myocardial ischemia. Yorkshire swine were fed either a normal diet (control), a high cholesterol diet (HCD), or a high cholesterol diet with supplemental resveratrol (HCD-R; 100mg/kg/day) for 11 weeks. After 4 weeks of diet modification a baseline cardiovascular MRI was performed and an ameroid constrictor was placed on the left circumflex coronary artery of each animal to induce chronic myocardial ischemia. At 7 weeks, a second cardiovascular MRI was performed and swine were sacrificed and myocardial tissue harvested. Resveratrol supplementation resulted in lower body mass indices, serum cholesterol, and C-reactive protein levels, improved glucose tolerance and endothelial function, and favorably augmented signaling pathways associated with myocardial metabolism. Interestingly, serum tumor necrosis factor-α levels were not influenced by resveratrol treatment. Immunoblotting for markers of metabolism demonstrated that insulin receptor substrate-1, glucose transporters 1 and 4, and phospho-AMPK were increased in the HCD-R group. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and retinol binding protein 4 were downregulated in the HCD-R group as compared to the HCD group. Myocardial perfusion and function at rest as assessed with magnetic resonance imaging were not different between groups. By favorably influencing risk factors, resveratrol may decrease the burden of chronic metabolic disease and improve cardiovascular health. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Primary Sjögren's syndrome with chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis and lymphadenopathy mimicking IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Yasunori; Yamada, Kazunori; Mizushima, Ichiro; Matsumura, Masami; Nakajima, Kenichi; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Yamaguchi, Yutaka

    2015-07-01

    We describe a 62-year-old woman with Sjögren's syndrome (SS) presenting with tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) and lymphadenopathy mimicking IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). Computed tomography revealed multiple swollen lymph nodes. Biopsy of the largest lymph node showed reactive lymphadenopathy with dense IgG4 positive plasma cell (IgG4 + PC) infiltration. Renal biopsy showed chronic plasma cell-rich TIN with IgG4 + PC infiltration. This case suggests that Immunoglobulin G4 immunostaining does not always support the diagnosis of IgG4-RD in the differential diagnosis between SS and IgG4-RD.

  8. Application of discrete choice experiment to assess farmers' willingness to report swine diseases in the Red River Delta region, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hoa T T; Peyre, Marisa; Trinh, Tuyen Quang; Nguyen, Oanh Cong; Vu, Ton Dinh; Rukkwamsuk, Theera; Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    A discrete choice experiment (DCE) is carried out to value socio-economic factors influencing the farmer's decision to report swine diseases and to assess the willingness of farmers to report swine diseases. Data were collected between March and July 2015 in two provinces in the Red River Delta, Northern Vietnam, from 196 pig producers by face-to face interview. A conditional logit model is used to measure the relative importance of the socio-economic factors and calculate the expected probability of disease reporting under changes of levels of these factors. Results of the study indicated that the likelihood of compensation and the type of culling implemented (all or only unrecovered pigs) are the two most important factors influencing farmer reporting. Compensation level, movement restriction and delay in compensation payment also have significant impacts on farmer's decision to report animal disease but they are not as important as the above factors. Three different scenarios including changes in six different factors (attributes) are tested to predict probability of animal disease reporting. Under the current situation (uncertainty of being compensated), only 4% of the farmers would report swine disease outbreak to the official surveillance system if the culling policy involves all pigs in affected farms. This number is increased to 26% if culling in affected farms is restricted to unrecovered pigs only. Ensuring certainty of compensation increases reporting probability by up to 50% and 90% if all or only unrecovered pigs are destroyed, respectively. The results of this study are important for improving the performance and sustainability of swine disease surveillance system in Vietnam. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Promising multiple-epitope recombinant vaccine against foot-and-mouth disease virus type O in swine.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jun-Jun; Wong, Chung Kai; Lin, Tong; Lee, Shuk Kwan; Cong, Guo-Zheng; Sin, Fion Wai Yee; Du, Jun-Zheng; Gao, Shan-Dian; Liu, Xiang-Tao; Cai, Xue-Peng; Xie, Yong; Chang, Hui-Yun; Liu, Ji-Xing

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop a completely safe immunogen to replace the traditional inactivated vaccine, a tandem-repeat multiple-epitope recombinant vaccine against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus (FMDV) type O was developed. It contained three copies each of residues 141 to 160 and 200 to 213 of VP1 of the O/China/99 strain of FMDV coupled with a swine immunoglobulin G heavy-chain constant region (scIgG). The data showed that the multiple-epitope recombinant vaccine elicited high titers of anti-FMDV specific antibodies in swine at 30 days postvaccination (dpv) and conferred complete protection against a challenge with 10³ 50% swine infective doses of the O/China/99 strain. The anti-FMDV specific antibody titers were not significantly different between the multiple-epitope recombinant vaccine and the traditional vaccine (t test, P > 0.05). The number of 50% pig protective doses was 6.47, which is higher than the number recommended by the World Organization for Animal Health. The multiple-epitope recombinant vaccine resulted in a duration of immunity of at least 6 months. We speculate that the multiple-epitope recombinant vaccine is a promising vaccine that may replace the traditional inactivated vaccine for the prevention and control of FMD in swine in the future.

  10. Burn-induced subepicardial injury in frog heart: a simple model mimicking ST segment changes in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Itsuro

    2016-02-01

    To mimic ischemic heart disease in humans, several animal models have been created, mainly in rodents by surgically ligating their coronary arteries. In the present study, by simply inducing burn injuries on the bullfrog heart, we reproduced abnormal ST segment changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG), mimicking those observed in ischemic heart disease, such as acute myocardial infarction and angina pectoris. The "currents of injury" created by a voltage gradient between the intact and damaged areas of the myocardium, negatively deflected the ECG vector during the diastolic phase, making the ST segment appear elevated during the systolic phase. This frog model of heart injury would be suitable to explain the mechanisms of ST segment changes observed in ischemic heart disease.

  11. One world--one health: the threat of emerging swine diseases. An Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Ayudhya, S Nuntawan Na; Assavacheep, P; Thanawongnuwech, R

    2012-03-01

    Owing to the expanding globalization, the trans-boundary spread of an epizootic can easily result from uncontrolled animal movements and human traffic. Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a major trans-boundary disease in most Asian countries. Its sporadic re-emergence suggests that collaborative FMD control strategies should be uniformly implemented in endemic countries to ensure the overall national herd vaccination coverage, biocontainment when outbreaks occur, and strict biosecurity control of animal movement between countries. Sustained commitments from governments, cooperative diplomatic relationships, and public awareness campaigns are critical to FMD control, to ensure collaboration among veterinarians, traders and farmers throughout Southeast Asia (SEA). Recently, highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (HP-PRRS) and porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED) spread from China to Southeast Asian countries, causing major economic losses. Foot and mouth disease, HP-PRRS, and PED currently remain endemic and may continue to sporadically re-emerge, owing to inadequate public health management and/or biosecurity failures. Therefore, the risk factors must be identified to better understand the epidemiology of these diseases in an effort to develop effective control measures. International coordination through the establishment of a collaborative network supported by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) should be implemented to prevent trans-boundary transmission among countries. This review discusses trans-boundary swine diseases of particular importance to SEA, including FMD, HP-PRRS and PED, with a primary focus on major factors contributing to the spread of these diseases and important control measures, reflecting the impact of globalization on disease control and surveillance. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Use of Oral Fluids for Detection of Virus and Antibodies in Pigs Infected with Swine Vesicular Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, C; Bittner, H; Ambagala, A; Lung, O; Babiuk, S; Yang, M; Zimmerman, J; Giménez-Lirola, L G; Nfon, C

    2016-09-15

    The use of swine oral fluid (OF) for the detection of nucleic acids and antibodies is gaining significant popularity. Assays have been developed for this purpose for endemic and foreign animal diseases of swine. Here, we report the use of OF for the detection of virus and antibodies in pigs experimentally infected with swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV), a virus that causes a disease clinically indistinguishable from the economically devastating foot-and-mouth disease. Viral genome was detected in OF by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) from 1 day post-infection (DPI) to 21 DPI. Virus isolation from OF was also successful at 1-5 DPI. An adapted competitive ELISA based on the monoclonal antibodies 5B7 detected antibodies to SVDV in OF starting at DPI 6. Additionally, using isotype-specific indirect ELISAs, SVDV-specific IgM and IgA were evaluated in OF. IgM response started at DPI 6, peaking at DPI 7 or 14 and declining sharply at DPI 21, while IgA response started at DPI 7, peaked at DPI 14 and remained high until the end of the experiment. These results confirm the potential use of OF for SVD surveillance using both established and partially validated assays in this study.

  13. Cell and Gene Therapy for Genetic Diseases: Inherited Disorders Affecting the Lung and Those Mimicking Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keeler, Allison M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Some of the first human gene therapy trials targeted diseases of the lung and provided important information that will continue to help shape future trials. Here we describe both cell and gene therapies for lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin disorder as well as fatty acid oxidation disorders that mimic sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Human clinical gene therapy trials for cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin have been performed using a variety of vectors including adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and nonviral vectors. No human clinical gene therapy trials have been performed for disorders of fatty acid oxidation; however, important proof-of-principle studies have been completed for multiple fatty acid oxidation disorders. Important achievements have been made and have yet to come for cell and gene therapies for disorders of the lung and those mimicking SIDS. PMID:22642257

  14. Cell and gene therapy for genetic diseases: inherited disorders affecting the lung and those mimicking sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Allison M; Flotte, Terence R

    2012-06-01

    Some of the first human gene therapy trials targeted diseases of the lung and provided important information that will continue to help shape future trials. Here we describe both cell and gene therapies for lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin disorder as well as fatty acid oxidation disorders that mimic sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Human clinical gene therapy trials for cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin have been performed using a variety of vectors including adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and nonviral vectors. No human clinical gene therapy trials have been performed for disorders of fatty acid oxidation; however, important proof-of-principle studies have been completed for multiple fatty acid oxidation disorders. Important achievements have been made and have yet to come for cell and gene therapies for disorders of the lung and those mimicking SIDS.

  15. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing African swine fever virus protein 72 is safe and immunogenic in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinxin; Yang, Jifei; Ji, Yanhong; Okoth, Edward; Liu, Bin; Li, Xiaoyang; Yin, Hong; Zhu, Qiyun

    2016-04-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a lethal hemorrhagic disease that affects wild and domestic swine. The etiological agent of ASF is African swine fever virus (ASFV). Since the first case was described in Kenya in 1921, the disease has spread to many other countries. No commercial vaccines are available to prevent ASF. In this study, we generated a recombinant Newcastle disease virus (rNDV) expressing ASFV protein 72 (p72) by reverse genetics and evaluated its humoral and cellular immunogenicity in a mouse model. The recombinant virus, rNDV/p72, replicated well in embryonated chicken eggs and was safe to use in chicks and mice. The p72 gene in rNDV/p72 was stably maintained through ten passages. Mice immunized with rNDV/p72 developed high titers of ASFV p72 specific IgG antibody, and had higher levels of IgG1 than IgG2a. Immunization also elicited T-cell proliferation and secretion of IFN-γ and IL-4. Taken together, these results indicate that rNDV expressing ASFV p72 might be a potential vaccine candidate for preventing ASF.

  16. Emergence of a Multidrug-Resistant Shiga Toxin-Producing Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Lineage in Diseased Swine in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hikoda, Yuna; Fujii, Yuki; Murata, Misato; Miyoshi, Hirotsugu; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Iwata, Taketoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Akiba, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) are important causes of diarrhea and edema disease in swine. The majority of swine-pathogenic E. coli strains belong to a limited range of O serogroups, including O8, O138, O139, O141, O147, O149, and O157, which are the most frequently reported strains worldwide. However, the circumstances of ETEC and STEC infections in Japan remain unknown; there have been few reports on the prevalence or characterization of swine-pathogenic E. coli. In the present study, we determined the O serogroups of 967 E. coli isolates collected between 1991 and 2014 from diseased swine in Japan, and we found that O139, O149, O116, and OSB9 (O serogroup of Shigella boydii type 9) were the predominant serogroups. We further analyzed these four O serogroups using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing, and virulence factor profiling. Most of the O139 and O149 strains formed serogroup-specific PFGE clusters (clusters I and II, respectively), whereas the O116 and OSB9 strains were grouped together in the same cluster (cluster III). All of the cluster III strains belonged to a single sequence type (ST88) and carried genes encoding both enterotoxin and Shiga toxin. This PFGE cluster III/ST88 lineage exhibited a high level of multidrug resistance (to a median of 10 antimicrobials). Notably, these bacteria were resistant to fluoroquinolones. Thus, this lineage should be considered a significant risk to animal production due to the toxigenicity and antimicrobial resistance of these bacteria. PMID:26865687

  17. Poncet's disease with high titers of rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies mimicking rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hirokazu; Inagaki, Masako; Shioda, Mikio; Nagasaka, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Reactive arthritis accompanying tuberculosis (TB), also known as Poncet's disease, is a rare condition. In the present report, we describe the case of a patient with Poncet's disease, who presented with high titers of rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA), which mimicked rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A 69-year-old man with a childhood history of chronic left gonitis suffered from right knee arthritis for 3 years. Chronic monoarthritis in his right knee and positive results obtained on interferon-gamma release assay were suggestive of tuberculous arthritis. However, there was no evidence of TB infection. Moreover, the high titers of RF and ACPA suggested a diagnosis of RA. Surprisingly, the culture of a small sample from his bony ankylosed left knee that had no focal signs of infection, exhibited a positive result for TB infection. Thus, based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed with Poncet's disease. His symptoms improved after initiation of anti-TB therapy, which supported the accuracy of the diagnosis. In addition, we analyzed the characteristics of Poncet's disease by conducting a literature review, and identified that the presence of extra-articular manifestation and negative results for RF and ACPA tests were the features that facilitated distinguishing between typical Poncet's disease and RA; however, since tuberculous patients occasionally exhibit positive results for ACPA tests, the differential diagnosis is essential in ACPA-positive arthritic patients.

  18. Dermatophyte infections mimicking other skin diseases: a 154-person case survey of tinea atypica in the district of Cagliari (Italy).

    PubMed

    Atzori, Laura; Pau, Monica; Aste, Natalia; Aste, Nicola

    2012-04-01

    Although usually simple, the diagnosis of dermatophyte infection is sometimes neglected. An observational study has been realized to evaluate the role of corticosteroid exposure (tinea incognito) and of other primary characteristics of the dermatophytosis that from onset mimic other diseases and mislead an unexperienced physician. Between 1990 and 2009, all cases of atypical dermatophytosis mimicking other skin diseases were collected from the more general number of dermatophyte infections diagnosed at the Dermatology Department of Cagliari University, Italy. One-hundred and fifty-four cases (71 male/83 female, 2-81 years old) were studied, with a median of 7 cases/year. The most observed clinical forms were those mimicking impetigo, eczematous dermatitis, lupus erythematosus, polymorphous light eruption, psoriasis, and rosacea. The identified dermatophytes were: Microsporum canis (70 cases), Trichophyton rubrum (43 cases), Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. mentagrophytes (29 cases), Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. interdigitale (six cases), Microsporum gypseum (three cases), Epidermophyton floccosum (two cases), and Trichophyton verrucosum (one case). Diagnostic difficulties are discussed, with special attention to the origin of the pathomorphosis. In our experience, clinical atypia is not a mere consequence of corticosteroid therapy but present at the very onset of the illness, due to the variable dermatophyte invasive capacity, the site of invasion, physiological individual, and/or acquired condition, such as excessive washing or sun exposure. Therefore, we suggest using the term "tinea atypica" rather than "tinea incognito" to include all forms of dermatophytosis that do not present the classic features for both primary and secondary pathomorphosis. © 2012 The International Society of Dermatology.

  19. Primary central nervous system vasculitis and its mimicking diseases - clinical features, outcome, comorbidities and diagnostic results - A case control study.

    PubMed

    Becker, J; Horn, P A; Keyvani, K; Metz, I; Wegner, C; Brück, W; Heinemann, F M; Schwitalla, J C; Berlit, P; Kraemer, M

    2017-05-01

    To compare clinical features and outcome, imaging characteristics, biopsy results and laboratory findings in a cohort of 69 patients with suspected or diagnosed primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) in adults; to identify risk factors and predictive features for PCNSV. We performed a case-control-study including 69 patients referred with suspected PCNSV from whom 25 were confirmed by predetermined diagnostic criteria based on biopsy (72%) or angiography (28%). Forty-four patients turned out to have 15 distinct other diagnoses. Clinical and diagnostic data were compared between PCNSV and Non-PCNSV cohorts. Clinical presentation was not able to discriminate between PCNSV and its differential diagnoses. However, a worse clinical outcome was associated with PCNSV (p=0.005). Biopsy (p=0.004), contrast enhancement (p=0.000) or tumour-like mass lesion (p=0.008) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intrathecal IgG increase (p=0.020), normal Duplex findings of cerebral arteries (p=0.022) and conventional angiography (p 0.010) were able to distinguish between the two cohorts. In a cohort of 69 patients with suspected PCNSV, a large number (64%) was misdiagnosed and partly received treatment, since mimicking diseases are very difficult to discriminate. Clinical presentation at manifestation does not help to differentiate PCNSV from its mimicking diseases. MRI and cerebrospinal fluid analysis are unlikely to be normal in PCNSV, though unspecific if pathological. Cerebral angiography and biopsy must complement other diagnostics when establishing the diagnosis in order to avoid misdiagnosis and mistreatment. German clinical trials register: http://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/, Unique identifier: DRKS00005347. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Scrapie in swine: a diagnostic challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A naturally occurring prion disease has not been recognized in swine, but the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy does transmit to swine by experimental routes. Swine are thought to have a robust species barrier when exposed to the naturally occurring prion diseases of other species, but the s...

  1. Scrapie in swine: a diagnostic challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A naturally occurring prion disease has not been recognized in swine, but the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy does transmit to swine by experimental routes. Swine are thought to have a robust species barrier when exposed to the naturally occurring prion diseases of other species, but the s...

  2. Analysis of Swine Movements in a Province in Northern Vietnam and Application in the Design of Surveillance Strategies for Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Baudon, E; Fournié, G; Hiep, D T; Pham, T T H; Duboz, R; Gély, M; Peiris, M; Cowling, B J; Ton, V D; Peyre, M

    2017-04-01

    While swine production is rapidly growing in South-East Asia, the structure of the swine industry and the dynamic of pig movements have not been well-studied. However, this knowledge is a prerequisite for understanding the dynamic of disease transmission in swine populations and designing cost-effective surveillance strategies for infectious diseases. In this study, we assessed the farming and trading practices in the Vietnamese swine familial farming sector, which accounts for most pigs in Vietnam, and for which disease surveillance is a major challenge. Farmers from two communes of a Red River Delta Province (northern Vietnam) were interviewed, along with traders involved in pig transactions. Major differences in the trade structure were observed between the two communes. One commune had mainly transversal trades, that is between farms of equivalent sizes, whereas the other had pyramidal trades, that is from larger to smaller farms. Companies and large familial farrow-to-finish farms were likely to act as major sources of disease spread through pig sales, demonstrating their importance for disease control. Familial fattening farms with high pig purchases were at greater risk of disease introduction and should be targeted for disease detection as part of a risk-based surveillance. In contrast, many other familial farms were isolated or weakly connected to the swine trade network limiting their relevance for surveillance activities. However, some of these farms used boar hiring for breeding, increasing the risk of disease spread. Most familial farms were slaughtering pigs at the farm or in small local slaughterhouses, making the surveillance at the slaughterhouse inefficient. In terms of spatial distribution of the trades, the results suggested that northern provinces were highly connected and showed some connection with central and southern provinces. These results are useful to develop risk-based surveillance protocols for disease detection in the swine familial

  3. Cost implications of African swine fever in smallholder farrow-to-finish units: economic benefits of disease prevention through biosecurity.

    PubMed

    Fasina, F O; Lazarus, D D; Spencer, B T; Makinde, A A; Bastos, A D S

    2012-06-01

    African swine fever remains the greatest limitation to the development of the pig industry in Africa, and parts of Asia and Europe. It is especially important in West and Central African countries where the disease has become endemic. Biosecurity is the implementation of a set of measures that reduce the risk of infection through segregation, cleaning and disinfection. Using a 122-sow piggery unit, a financial model and costing were used to estimate the economic benefits of effective biosecurity against African swine fever. The outcomes suggest that pig production is a profitable venture that can generate a profit of approximately US$109,637.40 per annum and that an outbreak of African swine fever (ASF) has the potential to cause losses of up to US$910,836.70 in a single year. The implementation of biosecurity and its effective monitoring can prevent losses owing to ASF and is calculated to give a benefit-cost ratio of 29. A full implementation of biosecurity will result in a 9.70% reduction in total annual profit, but is justified in view of the substantial costs incurred in the event of an ASF outbreak. Biosecurity implementation is robust and capable of withstanding changes in input costs including moderate feed price increases, higher management costs and marginal reductions in total outputs. It is concluded that biosecurity is a key to successful pig production in an endemic situation.

  4. Ocular adnexal IgG4-producing mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma mimicking IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasuharu; Ohshima, Koh-Ichi; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Huang, Xingang; Cui, Wei; Ohno, Kyotaro; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a recently proposed clinical entity with several unique clinicopathological features. A chronic inflammatory state with marked fibrosis, which can often be mistaken for malignancy, especially by clinical imaging analyses, unifies these features. In the present report, we describe a case of IgG4-producing mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma mimicking IgG4-related disease. The patient was a 55-year-old male who was being followed for right orbital tumor over 1.5 years. The lesion had recently increased in size, so a biopsy was performed. Histologically, the lesion was consistent with IgG4-related disease ; however, IgG4+ plasma cells showed immunoglobulin light-chain restriction and immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement was detected in the lesion. Therefore, the lesion was diagnosed as IgG4-producing mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. In conclusion, in histological diagnosis of IgG4-related disease, it is important to examine not only IgG4-immunostain but also immunoglobulin light-chain restriction.

  5. The Epidemiology of African Swine Fever in "Nonendemic" Regions of Zambia (1989-2015): Implications for Disease Prevention and Control.

    PubMed

    Simulundu, Edgar; Lubaba, Caesar H; van Heerden, Juanita; Kajihara, Masahiro; Mataa, Liywalii; Chambaro, Herman Moses; Sinkala, Yona; Munjita, Samuel Munalula; Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Nalubamba, King Shimumbo; Samui, Kenny; Pandey, Girja Shanker; Takada, Ayato; Mweene, Aaron S

    2017-08-23

    African swine fever (ASF) is a highly contagious and deadly viral hemorrhagic disease of swine. In Zambia, ASF was first reported in 1912 in Eastern Province and is currently believed to be endemic in that province only. Strict quarantine measures implemented at the Luangwa River Bridge, the only surface outlet from Eastern Province, appeared to be successful in restricting the disease. However, in 1989, an outbreak occurred for the first time outside the endemic province. Sporadic outbreaks have since occurred almost throughout the country. These events have brought into acute focus our limited understanding of the epidemiology of ASF in Zambia. Here, we review the epidemiology of the disease in areas considered nonendemic from 1989 to 2015. Comprehensive sequence analysis conducted on genetic data of ASF viruses (ASFVs) detected in domestic pigs revealed that p72 genotypes I, II, VIII and XIV have been involved in causing ASF outbreaks in swine during the study period. With the exception of the 1989 outbreak, we found no concrete evidence of dissemination of ASFVs from Eastern Province to other parts of the country. Our analyses revealed a complex epidemiology of the disease with a possibility of sylvatic cycle involvement. Trade and/or movement of pigs and their products, both within and across international borders, appear to have been the major factor in ASFV dissemination. Since ASFVs with the potential to cause countrywide and possibly regional outbreaks, could emerge from "nonendemic regions", the current ASF control policy in Zambia requires a dramatic shift to ensure a more sustainable pig industry.

  6. IgG4-related disease mimicking chalazion in the upper eyelid with skin manifestations on the trunk.

    PubMed

    Leivo, Tiina; Koskenmies, Sari; Uusitalo, Marita; Tynninen, Olli

    2015-08-01

    IgG4-related disease is a recently defined inflammatory process characterized by IgG4-bearing plasma cells in the involved tissues. The most common sites of involvement are the pancreas, hepatobiliary tract, salivary glands, lymph nodes, retroperitoneum and orbit, especially the lacrimal glands. Other ocular or ocular adnexal sites are rare. To our knowledge, there is one reported case of a conjunctival involvement. We describe a patient, who had an IgG4-RD mimicking chalazion in the upper eyelid, confined to the tarsus, with multiple skin lesions on the trunk. This is a case report of a 55-year-old female. A 55-year-old female presented with an upper eyelid lesion, which was clinically diagnosed as chalazion and drained three times. Histopathological diagnoses were chalazion and inflammation with mixed cells, respectively. Additionally, the patient had had skin nodules on the trunk for several years. Finally, after a third recurrence, the tarsal eyelid lesion was completely excised. The tarsal pathology specimen showed 85 IgG4 positive plasma cells per HPF and the IgG4/IgG ratio was 0.64, suggesting a probable IgG4-related disease. The re-examined skin lesions resembled histologically the eyelid lesion. It is essential to be aware of IgG4-related disease, including in recurrent chalazia.

  7. Beyond Cat Scratch Disease: A Case Report of Bartonella Infection Mimicking Vasculitic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Spinella, Amelia; Lumetti, Federica; Sandri, Gilda; Cestelli, Valentina; Mascia, Maria Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is a bacterial disease caused by Bartonella henselae and it is mainly characterized by self-limiting lymphadenopathy in the draining site of a cat scratch or bite. We report a patient with history of fever, swelling lymph nodes, vasculitic-like skin lesions, and positivity of Bartonella serology initially considered as expression of a disimmune disease. PMID:22924138

  8. Phylogeny of Spanish swine influenza viruses isolated from respiratory disease outbreaks and evolution of swine influenza virus within an endemically infected farm.

    PubMed

    Martín-Valls, Gerard E; Simon-Grifé, Meritxell; van Boheemen, Sander; de Graaf, Miranda; Bestebroer, Theo M; Busquets, Núria; Martín, Margarita; Casal, Jordi; Fouchier, Ron A M; Mateu, Enric

    2014-06-04

    In the present study, outbreaks of respiratory disease were investigated for the presence of swine influenza virus (SIV). In 14 cases the circulating SIV strains were isolated, fully sequenced and compared with other known SIVs. The viruses causing the outbreaks belonged to the H1N1 (including human pandemic H1N1), H3N2 and H1N2 subtypes. In 11/14 cases the phylogenetic analyses indicated the occurrence of probable reassortment events. In the second part of the study, the genetic evolution of H1N1 SIV was assessed in a longitudinal study in closed groups of pigs over six months. Sequencing of the 22 isolates indicated co-circulation of two different variants for the same virus, as well as the emergence of SIV reassortants at certain time-points. These results indicate that reassortment events in SIV are common, and point towards the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology of SIV, particularly in endemic farms.

  9. Structure of Swine Vesicular Disease Virus: Mapping of Changes Occurring during Adaptation of Human Coxsackie B5 Virus To Infect Swine

    PubMed Central

    Verdaguer, Núria; Jimenez-Clavero, Miguel A.; Fita, Ignacio; Ley, Victoria

    2003-01-01

    The structure of swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) was solved and refined at a 3.0-Å resolution by X-ray crystallography to gain information about the role of sequence changes that occurred as this virus evolved from the parental human pathogen coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5). These amino acid substitutions can be clustered in five distinct regions: (i) the antigenic sites, (ii) the hydrophobic pocket of the VP1 β-sandwich, (iii) the putative CAR binding site, (iv) the putative heparan sulfate binding site, and (v) the fivefold axis. The VP1 pocket is occupied by a branched pocket factor, apparently different from that present in the closely related virus CVB3 and in other picornaviruses. This finding may be relevant for the design of new antiviral compounds against this site. Density consistent with the presence of ions was observed on the fivefold and threefold axes. The structure also provided an accurate description of the putative receptor binding sites. PMID:12941886

  10. IgG4-related kidney disease from the renal pelvis that mimicked urothelial carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Ren, Xinyu; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Di; Feng, Ruie

    2015-05-27

    IgG4-related kidney disease is a comprehensive term for renal lesions associated with IgG4-related disease, which mainly manifests as plasma cell-rich tubulointerstitial nephritis with increased IgG4+ plasma cells and fibrosis. IgG4-related kidney disease in the renal pelvis is rare. We describe a 53-year-old Asian woman who was referred to our hospital with a space-occupying renal lesion discovered by medical examination. A physical examination and laboratory evaluation revealed no significant abnormalities. Computed tomography scans showed a soft-tissue mass with an irregular border and mild homogeneous enhancement in the right renal pelvis and calyces. A positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan revealed soft-tissue density shadows with increased radionuclide uptake. To investigate a suspected pelvic carcinoma, a right ureteronephrectomy was performed. A pathologic examination of the renal sections showed a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate rich in IgG4+ plasma cells, with fibrosis beneath the urothelial epithelium of the renal pelvis. Postoperatively, the serum IgG4 level was significantly elevated. The patient was diagnosed with IgG4-related kidney disease. We present a case of IgG4-related kidney disease mimicking urothelial carcinoma in the renal pelvis. When a buried and solitary hypovascular tumor is detected in the kidney, we must consider IgG4-related kidney disease as a differential diagnosis. Accordingly, elevated serum IgG4, radiologic findings, and pathologic examination may improve the diagnosis.

  11. [Serological examinations for swine vesicular disease (SVD) in a closed pig breeding herd using ELISA].

    PubMed

    Pannwitz, Gunter; Haas, Bernd; Hoffmann, Bernd; Fischer, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    In a closed pig establishment housing about 18,000 pigs, 2895 gilts were tested pre-export for SVD (swine vesicular disease) antibodies using Ceditest/PrioCHECK SVDV-AB ELISA. 130 gilts (4.5%) tested positive. In addition, 561 animals of this farm were sampled per random for SVD serology. One in 241 weaners (0.4%), eight in 150 gilts (5.3%) and 18 in 170 (10.6%) pregnant sows tested ELISA SVD-antibody positive. Of the ELISA positive samples, 23 tested positive in VNT (virus neutralization test). Of these, 20 VNT-positive animals were re-sampled two weeks later and re-tested via ELISA and VNT in different laboratories, displaying falling titres with one to two animals remaining VNT-positive. Epidemiological investigations and clinical examinations on site did not yield any evidence for SVD. 745 faecal samples taken from individual pigs and collected from pens tested negative in SVDV-RNA-PCR. 40 of these samples tested negative in virus isolation on cell culture. Pathological examinations on fallen pigs did not reveal any evidence for SVD either. After comparing our ELISA results with data recorded in the ELISA validation by Chenard et al. (1998), we propose that the published test performance is perhaps not currently applicable for the commercial test. Provided that SVD-antibody negative pigs were tested, a specificity of 99.6% in weaners, 95.5% in gilts and 89.4% in pregnant sows would appear to be more appropriate for the Ceditest/PrioCHECK SVDV-AB ELISA. Details are provided for all examined pigs regarding husbandry, breed, age, weeks pregnant and previous vaccinations. The results of other serological tests on the same sera are given. Possible clusterings of false-positive SVD-ELISA results are discussed.

  12. Exploring relationships between whole carcass condemnation abattoir data, non-disease factors and disease outbreaks in swine herds in Ontario (2001-2007).

    PubMed

    Thomas-Bachli, Andrea L; Pearl, David L; Friendship, Robert M; Berke, Olaf

    2014-03-28

    Improving upon traditional animal disease surveillance systems may allow more rapid detection of disease outbreaks in animal populations. In Ontario, between the years 2001 - 2007, widespread outbreaks of several diseases caused major impacts to the swine industry. This study was undertaken to investigate whether whole carcass condemnation data of market pigs from provincial abattoirs from 2001 - 2007 could have provided useful information for disease surveillance of Ontario swine. The objective was to examine the suitability of these data for detection of disease outbreaks using multi-level models and spatial scan statistics. We investigated the ability of these data to provide spatially-relevant surveillance information by determining the approximate distance pigs are shipped from farm to provincial abattoirs in the province, and explored potentially biasing non-disease factors within these data. Provincially-inspected abattoirs in Ontario were found to be located in close proximity to the hog farms of origin. The fall season and increasing abattoir capacity were associated with a decrease in condemnation rates. Condemnation rates varied across agricultural regions by year, and some regions showed yearly trends consistent with the timing of emergence of new disease strains that affected the Ontario swine population. Scan statistics identified stable clusters of condemnations in space that may have represented stable underlying factors influencing condemnations. The temporal scans detected the most likely cluster of high condemnations during the timeframe in which widespread disease events were documented. One space-time cluster took place during the beginning of the historical disease outbreaks and may have provided an early warning signal within a syndromic surveillance system. Spatial disease surveillance methods may be applicable to whole carcass condemnation data collected at provincially-inspected abattoirs in Ontario for disease detection on a local scale

  13. Mechanical dissociation of swine liver to produce organoid units for tissue engineering and in vitro disease modeling.

    PubMed

    Irani, Katayun; Pomerantseva, Irina; Hart, Alison R; Sundback, Cathryn A; Neville, Craig M; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2010-01-01

    The complex intricate architecture of the liver is crucial to hepatic function. Standard protocols used for enzymatic digestion to isolate hepatocytes destroy tissue structure and result in significant loss of synthetic, metabolic, and detoxification processes. We describe a process using mechanical dissociation to generate hepatic organoids with preserved intrinsic tissue architecture from swine liver. Oxygen-supplemented perfusion culture better preserved organoid viability, morphology, serum protein synthesis, and urea production, compared with standard and oxygen-supplemented static culture. Hepatic organoids offer an alternative source for hepatic assist devices, engineered liver, disease modeling, and xenobiotic testing.

  14. Disinfection of foot-and-mouth disease and African swine fever viruses with citric acid and sodium hypochlorite on birch wood carriers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transboundary animal disease viruses such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and African swine fever virus (ASFV) are highly contagious and cause severe morbidity and mortality in livestock. Proper disinfection during an outbreak can help prevent virus spread and will shorten the time for contam...

  15. Screwworms, Cochliomyia hominivorax, reared for mass release do not carry and spread foot-and-mouth disease virus and classical swine fever virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transporting live screwworms Cochliomyia hominivorax Coquerel for developing new strains from countries where foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and classical swine fever (CSF) are endemic, to the mass rearing facilities in Mexico and Panama may introduce these exotic diseases. This study was conducted to...

  16. Pulmonary Disease Secondary to Reflux Mimicking Interstitial Pneumonia in Systemic Sclerosis: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Ricardo Azêdo de Luca; Mazolli Veiga, Nathalia; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Mocarzel, Luis Otávio Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a complex disease due to the variety of clinical presentations, often superimposed on other conditions, related or not to the connective tissue. We report a 43-year-old Brazilian woman with limited systemic sclerosis and pulmonary symptoms secondary to gastroesophageal reflux disease, with a clinical presentation similar to a diffuse interstitial lung disease. Because of the frequency of interstitial lung injury due to systemic sclerosis, this was an important differential diagnosis, which could be excluded after optimized treatment of reflux disease, with clinical and radiological improvement. Clinical management of patients with collagen diseases requires clinician skills to identify the natural history and understand its nuances. This is a common situation in clinical practice, but with a few discussions in international literature. PMID:26885429

  17. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change, shall...

  18. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change, shall...

  19. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change, shall...

  20. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change, shall...

  1. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change, shall...

  2. Experimental infection with a Thai reassortant swine influenza virus of pandemic H1N1 origin induced disease.

    PubMed

    Charoenvisal, Nataya; Keawcharoen, Juthatip; Sreta, Donruethai; Tantawet, Siriporn; Jittimanee, Suphattra; Arunorat, Jirapat; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2013-03-16

    Following the emergence of the pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus in 2009 in humans, this novel virus spread into the swine population. Pigs represent a potential host for this virus and can serve as a mixing vessel for genetic mutations of the influenza virus. Reassortant viruses eventually emerged from the 2009 pandemic and were reported in swine populations worldwide including Thailand. As a result of the discovery of this emergent disease, pathogenesis studies of this novel virus were conducted in order that future disease protection and control measures in swine and human populations could be enacted. The pandemic H1N1 2009 virus (pH1N1) and its reassortant virus (rH1N1) isolated from pigs in Thailand were inoculated into 2 separate cohorts of 9, 3-week-old pigs. Cohorts were consisted of one group experimentally infected with pH1N1 and one group with rH1N1. A negative control group consisting of 3 pigs was also included. Clinical signs, viral shedding and pathological lesions were investigated and compared. Later, 3 pigs from viral inoculated groups and 1 pig from the control group were necropsied at 2, 4, and 12 days post inoculation (DPI). The results indicated that pigs infected with both viruses demonstrated typical flu-like clinical signs and histopathological lesions of varying severity. Influenza infected-pigs of both groups had mild to moderate pulmonary signs on 1-4 DPI. Interestingly, pigs in both groups demonstrated viral RNA detection in the nasal swabs until the end of the experiment (12 DPI). The present study demonstrated that both the pH1N1 and rH1N1 influenza viruses, isolated from naturally infected pigs, induced acute respiratory disease in experimentally inoculated nursery pigs. Although animals in the rH1N1-infected cohort demonstrated more severe clinical signs, had higher numbers of pigs shedding the virus, were noted to have increased histopathological severity of lung lesions and increased viral antigen in lung tissue, the findings were

  3. Castleman’s disease mimicking lymph node metastases in a young woman with laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Łazar-Poniatowska, Małgorzata; Seredyńska, Joanna; Biernat, Wojciech; Jassem, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Laryngeal cancer occurs rarely in adolescents and young people. Castleman’s disease is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder of uncertain etiopathogenesis and heterogeneous clinicopathological forms. Involved lymph nodes and extranodal lesions in the course of Castleman’s disease may mimic malignant involvement. We report a case of an 18-year-old woman with T2N0M0 laryngeal glottis cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy. During the irradiation, the patient underwent an excision of incidentally discovered left-sided enlarged cervical lymph nodes located outside the irradiated area. Coincidental hyaline vascular type of Castleman’s disease was diagnosed. During six-year follow-up she has been free of cancer relapse and Castleman’s disease symptoms. PMID:28373827

  4. 9 CFR 52.3 - Appraisal of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appraisal of swine. 52.3 Section 52.3... COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES SWINE DESTROYED BECAUSE OF PSEUDORABIES § 52.3 Appraisal of swine. (a) Herds of swine and individual breeding sows to be destroyed because they...

  5. Pulmonary talc granulomatosis mimicking malignant disease 30 years after last exposure: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Krimsky, William S; Dhand, Suneel

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary talc granulomatosis is a rare disorder characterized by the development of foreign body granuloma secondary to talc exposure. Previous case reports have documented the illness in current intravenous drug users who inject medications intended for oral use. We present a rare case of the disease in a patient with a distant history of heroin abuse who presented initially with history and imaging findings highly suggestive of malignancy. Case presentation A 53-year-old man reported a 4-month history of increasing dyspnea and weight loss. He had a long history of smoking and admission chest X-ray revealed a density in the right hemithorax. Computed tomography confirmed a probable mass with further speculated opacities in both lung fields suspicious for malignant spread. Biopsies obtained using endobronchial ultrasound-guided aspiration returned negative for malignancy and showed bronchial epithelial cells with foreign body giant cell reaction and polarizable birefringent talc crystals. Conclusion This case demonstrates a rare presentation of talc granulomatosis three decades after the last likely exposure. The history and imaging findings in a chronic smoker were initially strongly suggestive of malignant disease, and we recommend that talc-induced lung disease is considered in any patient with multiple scattered pulmonary lesions and a history of intravenous drug use. Confirmation of the disease by biopsy is essential, but unfortunately there are few successful proven management options for patients with worsening disease. PMID:18598367

  6. McCune-Albright syndrome mimicking malignancy: an endocrine disease from oncologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Genç, D Bahar; Özkan, M Alp; Büyükgebiz, Atilla

    2012-09-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is categorized as either monostotic or polyostotic and may occur as a component of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS). Imaging findings can mimic neoplastic diseases. We present a case of MAS initially suspected to have neoplastic disease. A 9-year-old girl was admitted to pediatric emergency with ataxia. Upon hospitalization, an extradural mass was seen on cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the bone survey showed lytic lesions in the long bones. The patient was referred to the pediatric oncology department with a presumptive diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis or metastatic tumor. Further investigations demonstrated that the patient had MAS and coexisting postinfectious cerebellitis. The findings in this patient demonstrate that the radiographic findings and the clinical presentation of FD and MAS may be similar to those of malignant diseases.

  7. Metastatic breast cancer in the mandibular condyle mimicking temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease

    PubMed Central

    Della Chiesa, Andrea; Scherrer, Beat; Kuttenberger, Johannes J.

    2014-01-01

    Metastases or tumour to the jaws are rare and those to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are even rarer. The symptoms like preauricular pain, swelling and clicking are generally associated with TMJ disease. But the same symptoms are also found in tumours of the jaws or other diseases. We report on the case of a 48-year-old woman with a 12-year history of breast cancer who was referred to our department for clarification of preauricular swelling and pain. The possible aetiology of TMJ disorders and the frequency and localization of metastases to the jaws are discussed. PMID:24876331

  8. Miniature Swine for Preclinical Modeling of Complexities of Human Disease for Translational Scientific Discovery and Accelerated Development of Therapies and Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Schomberg, Dominic T; Tellez, Armando; Meudt, Jennifer J; Brady, Dane A; Dillon, Krista N; Arowolo, Folagbayi K; Wicks, Joan; Rousselle, Serge D; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan

    2016-04-01

    Noncommunicable diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, and cancer, are the leading cause of death in the world. The cost, both monetary and time, of developing therapies to prevent, treat, or manage these diseases has become unsustainable. A contributing factor is inefficient and ineffective preclinical research, in which the animal models utilized do not replicate the complex physiology that influences disease. An ideal preclinical animal model is one that responds similarly to intrinsic and extrinsic influences, providing high translatability and concordance of preclinical findings to humans. The overwhelming genetic, anatomical, physiological, and pathophysiological similarities to humans make miniature swine an ideal model for preclinical studies of human disease. Additionally, recent development of precision gene-editing tools for creation of novel genetic swine models allows the modeling of highly complex pathophysiology and comorbidities. As such, the utilization of swine models in early research allows for the evaluation of novel drug and technology efficacy while encouraging redesign and refinement before committing to clinical testing. This review highlights the appropriateness of the miniature swine for modeling complex physiologic systems, presenting it as a highly translational preclinical platform to validate efficacy and safety of therapies and devices.

  9. Genetic evolution of recently emerged novel human-like swine H3 influenza A viruses (IAV) in United States swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major cause of respiratory disease in swine. IAV transmission from humans to swine is a major contributor to swine IAV diversity. In 2012, a novel H3N2 with an HA (hu-H3) and NA derived from human seasonal H3N2 was detected in United States (US) swine. The h...

  10. "Resetting" of postural tremors at the wrist with mechanical stretches in Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and normal subjects mimicking tremor.

    PubMed

    Britton, T C; Thompson, P D; Day, B L; Rothwell, J C; Findley, L J; Marsden, C D

    1992-05-01

    The response of postural wrist tremors to brief mechanical displacements was compared in two groups of patients, one with classical hereditary essential tremor (n = 18) and another with typical Parkinson's disease (n = 13). These groups were compared with an additional group of normal subjects mimicking wrist tremor (n = 9). The degree to which brief mechanical displacements of the wrist produced by torque pulses of three different sizes could modulate the timing of rhythmic electromyographic bursts in the forearm flexor muscles was quantified by deriving a resetting index, which could range between 0 (no phase resetting) and 1 (complete phase resetting). In all three groups of subjects studied, the resetting index varied significantly with the size of the mechanical perturbation and, in an inverse fashion, with the ongoing tremor amplitude. When due allowance for these factors was made, the difference in mean resetting indexes between the three groups of patients and subjects was reduced to the extent that no definitive statement could be made as to whether brief mechanical perturbations had more effect on essential tremor than parkinsonian tremor. The method is therefore unlikely to be useful in differentiating the common causes of postural wrist tremors.

  11. Right ventricular endomyocardial fibrosis mimicking Ebstein anomaly in a patient with Behçet's disease: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Buturak, Ali; Saygili, Ozlem; Ulus, Sıla; Kalfa, Melike; Karabulut, Hasan; Alhan, Cem; Dagdelen, Sinan; Aksu, Kenan

    2014-05-01

    Behçet's disease is a multisystemic, chronic inflammatory disorder with diffuse clinical manifestations including the cardiovascular system. Endomyocardial fibrosis is a rarely seen complication of Behçet's disease leading to progressive heart failure. We report a case of right ventricular endomyocardial fibrosis mimicking Ebstein anomaly in a 26-year-old male Turkish patient with Behçet's disease, who had heart failure symptoms. In addition, the previously reported cases of endomyocardial fibrosis complicating Behçet's disease are reviewed in this article.

  12. Florid vulval Paget disease exhibiting p16 immunoreactivity and mimicking classic VIN.

    PubMed

    Sah, Shatrughan P; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2013-03-01

    The diagnosis of vulval Paget disease is generally relatively straightforward but may be difficult, especially when the Paget cells are few in number. We report 2 cases of the opposite scenario where the Paget cells were present in such large numbers and formed confluent sheets such that they effaced the residual keratinocytes. There were associated epidermal hyperplastic changes in the form of acanthosis, papillomatosis, and hyperkeratosis, and the overall morphology resulted in close mimicry of classic (undifferentiated/human papillomavirus-related) vulval intraepithelial neoplasia. There was focal intraepidermal clefting in both cases, resulting in an acantholytic appearance. In both cases, the Paget cells were strongly positive with p16 that further heightened the mimicry of vulval intraepithelial neoplasia. The Paget cells were diffusely positive with cytokeratin 7, CAM5.2, carcinoembryonic antigen, and epithelial membrane antigen and with mucin stains, and molecular tests for human papillomavirus were negative. The p16 immunoreactivity, which has not previously been reported in vulval Paget disease, prompted us to stain a small number of additional cases of more typical vulval Paget disease with this marker. Four of 5 additional cases were positive with varying degrees and patterns of immunoreactivity. Florid vulval Paget disease may morphologically mimic vulval intraepithelial neoplasia, and this mimicry may be exacerbated by p16 immunoreactivity.

  13. Osteoid osteoma of the lunatum mimicking Kienböck's disease.

    PubMed

    Güner, Mehmet Derviş; Kamburoğlu, Haldun Onuralp; Bektaş, Umut; Ay, Şadan

    2015-01-01

    Hands, especially lunatum, are involved very rarely with osteoid osteoma. This report presents an osteoid osteoma of the lunatum, which was previously misdiagnosed as Kienböck's disease and had undergone surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging may lead the clinician to misdiagnose because of the excessive bone edema around the carpus. The operation should be planned according to radiography and computed tomography findings.

  14. Erdheim-Chester disease: a rare cause of recurrent fever of unknown origin mimicking lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mariampillai, Anusiyanthan; Sivapiragasam, Abirami; Kumar, Amit; Hindenburg, Alexander; Cunha, Burke A; Zhou, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with recurrent fever of unknown origin (FUO) with prominent back pain, hepatosplenomegaly, and abdominal/pelvic adenopathy suggesting lymphoma. A bone biopsy showed histiocytic infiltration. Studies for lymphoma were negative, but immunohistochemical stains were diagnostic of Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD). ECD should be included as a rare cause of recurrent FUO with bone involvement.

  15. Controlling disease outbreaks in wildlife using limited culling: modelling classical swine fever incursions in wild pigs in Australia.

    PubMed

    Cowled, Brendan D; Garner, M Graeme; Negus, Katherine; Ward, Michael P

    2012-01-16

    Disease modelling is one approach for providing new insights into wildlife disease epidemiology. This paper describes a spatio-temporal, stochastic, susceptible- exposed-infected-recovered process model that simulates the potential spread of classical swine fever through a documented, large and free living wild pig population following a simulated incursion. The study area (300 000 km2) was in northern Australia. Published data on wild pig ecology from Australia, and international Classical Swine Fever data was used to parameterise the model. Sensitivity analyses revealed that herd density (best estimate 1-3 pigs km-2), daily herd movement distances (best estimate approximately 1 km), probability of infection transmission between herds (best estimate 0.75) and disease related herd mortality (best estimate 42%) were highly influential on epidemic size but that extraordinary movements of pigs and the yearly home range size of a pig herd were not. CSF generally established (98% of simulations) following a single point introduction. CSF spread at approximately 9 km2 per day with low incidence rates (< 2 herds per day) in an epidemic wave along contiguous habitat for several years, before dying out (when the epidemic arrived at the end of a contiguous sub-population or at a low density wild pig area). The low incidence rate indicates that surveillance for wildlife disease epidemics caused by short lived infections will be most efficient when surveillance is based on detection and investigation of clinical events, although this may not always be practical. Epidemics could be contained and eradicated with culling (aerial shooting) or vaccination when these were adequately implemented. It was apparent that the spatial structure, ecology and behaviour of wild populations must be accounted for during disease management in wildlife. An important finding was that it may only be necessary to cull or vaccinate relatively small proportions of a population to successfully contain

  16. Controlling disease outbreaks in wildlife using limited culling: modelling classical swine fever incursions in wild pigs in Australia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Disease modelling is one approach for providing new insights into wildlife disease epidemiology. This paper describes a spatio-temporal, stochastic, susceptible- exposed-infected-recovered process model that simulates the potential spread of classical swine fever through a documented, large and free living wild pig population following a simulated incursion. The study area (300 000 km2) was in northern Australia. Published data on wild pig ecology from Australia, and international Classical Swine Fever data was used to parameterise the model. Sensitivity analyses revealed that herd density (best estimate 1-3 pigs km-2), daily herd movement distances (best estimate approximately 1 km), probability of infection transmission between herds (best estimate 0.75) and disease related herd mortality (best estimate 42%) were highly influential on epidemic size but that extraordinary movements of pigs and the yearly home range size of a pig herd were not. CSF generally established (98% of simulations) following a single point introduction. CSF spread at approximately 9 km2 per day with low incidence rates (< 2 herds per day) in an epidemic wave along contiguous habitat for several years, before dying out (when the epidemic arrived at the end of a contiguous sub-population or at a low density wild pig area). The low incidence rate indicates that surveillance for wildlife disease epidemics caused by short lived infections will be most efficient when surveillance is based on detection and investigation of clinical events, although this may not always be practical. Epidemics could be contained and eradicated with culling (aerial shooting) or vaccination when these were adequately implemented. It was apparent that the spatial structure, ecology and behaviour of wild populations must be accounted for during disease management in wildlife. An important finding was that it may only be necessary to cull or vaccinate relatively small proportions of a population to successfully contain

  17. Isolated testicular immunoglobulin G4-related disease: A mimicker of malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Jithin; Bhat, Suresh; Doddamani, Siddalingeswar; Devi, Lekshmi

    2016-01-01

    ImmunoglobulinG4 related disease (IgG4RD) is a systemic fibroinflammatory disease recognized recently. This usually presents with multiorgan involvement. We are reporting a case of a35-year-old male patient with isolated IgG4RD of the testis. This patient presented with right testis pain which responded to conservative treatment. However, later, he reported with hard swelling in the right testis which on imaging was suggestive of malignancy and hence underwent radical orchiectomy. Histopathology with immunohistochemical staining confirmed IgG4RD of the testis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of purely isolated case of IgG4RD of testis in English literature. PMID:27843221

  18. Rice body mass formation mimicking a neoplastic disease around the trochanteric bursae of the hip.

    PubMed

    Uludağ, Serkan; Seyahi, Aksel; Ege, Yaman; Tetik, Onur

    2010-01-01

    Multiple rice body formation is an uncommon inflammatory process. Sometimes it leads to a big mass in unusual locations. Although sometimes associated with bursitis and systemic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, the pathophysiology of this rare entity is still obscure. We present a 29-year-old woman with multiple rice body mass formation in the trochanteric bursa of the left hip. She was operated, and had no recurrence at 18 months after the surgery.

  19. Changes Mimicking New Leptomeningeal Disease After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Muscal, Jodi A.; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Bertuch, Alison A.; Su, Jack; Woo, Shiao Y.; Mahoney, Donald H.; Chintagumpala, Murali

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Acute and late changes in magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric brain have been described after radiotherapy (RT). We report the post-RT neuroimaging changes in the posterior fossa after intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) in children with medulloblastoma and contrast them with those of leptomeningeal disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 53 consecutive children with medulloblastoma who were treated with craniospinal RT followed by IMRT to the posterior fossa and chemotherapy between 1997 and 2006. Results: After IMRT to the posterior fossa, 8 (15%) of 53 patients developed increased fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery signal changes in the brainstem or cerebellum and patchy, multifocal, nodular contrast enhancement at a median of 6 months. The enhancement superficially resembled leptomeningeal disease. However, the enhancement resolved without intervention at a median of 6 months later. The accompanying fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery signal changes occasionally preceded the enhancement, were often parenchymal in location, and resolved or persisted to a lesser degree. All 8 patients with transient magnetic resonance imaging changes in the posterior fossa were alive at last follow-up. In contrast, leptomeningeal disease occurred in 8 (15%) of our 53 patients at a median of 19.5 months after IMRT completion. Of these 8 patients, 7 demonstrated initial nodular enhancement outside the conformal field, and 7 patients died. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging changes can occur in the posterior fossa of children treated with IMRT for medulloblastoma. In our experience, these transient changes occur at a characteristic time and location after RT, allowing them to be distinguished from leptomeningeal disease.

  20. Osteoid osteoma of the lunatum mimicking Kienböck’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Güner, Mehmet Derviş; Kamburoğlu, Haldun Onuralp; Bektaş, Umut; Ay, Şadan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hands, especially lunatum, are involved very rarely with osteoid osteoma. This report presents an osteoid osteoma of the lunatum, which was previously misdiagnosed as Kienböck’s disease and had undergone surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging may lead the clinician to misdiagnose because of the excessive bone edema around the carpus. The operation should be planned according to radiography and computed tomography findings. PMID:27252961

  1. Infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare in AIDS: endoscopic duodenal appearance mimicking Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Iglesias, J L; Yañez, J; Durana, J; Arnal, F

    1988-09-01

    We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who presented with diarrhea, weight loss and abdominal lymph node enlargement. A diagnosis of infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare with a clinical picture similar to Whipple's disease was established. The endoscopic study of the duodenum revealed multiple yellow nodules that became confluent in the second portion, entirely replacing the normal mucosa. These endoscopic findings have not been described previously in intestinal infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare.

  2. 75 FR 33574 - Notice of Revision and Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Swine Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-14

    ... interstate spread of swine diseases and protect swine health and to request extension of approval of the... INFORMATION CONTACT: For information on regulations to prevent the interstate spread of swine diseases and to... interstate movement of swine within a production system to prevent the spread of swine diseases, and Part 85...

  3. 9 CFR 94.8 - Pork and pork products from regions where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to exist. 94.8 Section 94.8 Animals and... NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE... where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to exist. African swine fever exists or the...

  4. 9 CFR 94.8 - Pork and pork products from regions where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to exist. 94.8 Section 94.8 Animals and... NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE... where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to exist. African swine fever exists or the...

  5. Involvement of innate and adaptive immunity in a murine model of coronary arteritis mimicking Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Danica J; Yilmaz, Atilla; Shimada, Kenichi; Fishbein, Michael C; Lowe, Emily L; Chen, Shuang; Wong, Michelle; Doherty, Terence M; Lehman, Thomas; Crother, Timothy R; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Arditi, Moshe

    2009-10-15

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common cause of acquired cardiac disease and acute vasculitis in children in the developed world. Injection of a cell wall extract isolated from Lactobacillus casei (LCCWE) into mice causes a focal coronary arteritis that histopathologically mimics the coronary lesions observed in KD patients. In this study we used this model to investigate the participation of T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells (DC) in the development of coronary arteritis. RAG1(-/-), B cell(null), and wild-type (WT) mice were injected with a single dose of LCCWE (500 microg/mouse i.p.). None of the RAG1(-/-) mice developed coronary arteritis, whereas 70% of WT and 100% of B cell(null) mice developed coronary lesions, indicating that T cells were required for lesion formation. When splenocytes isolated from LCCWE-treated mice were restimulated with LCCWE, we observed significant IFN-gamma secretion in WT but not in RAG1(-/-) mice. Immunohistochemical staining showed F4/80(+) macrophages, activated MIDC-8(+) myeloid DCs (mDC), plasmacytoid DCs, and colocalization of CD3(+) T cells with mDCs in coronary artery lesions, suggesting an Ag-driven process. T cells but not B cells are required for LCCWE-induced coronary arteritis. Similar to human lesions, the coronary lesions contain macrophages, activated mDCs, and plaslmacytoid DCs all in close proximity to T cells, further strengthening the relevance of this mouse model to the immunopathology of coronary disease in KD. These studies are consistent with the interpretation that macrophages and DCs may collaborate with T cells in the pathological mechanisms of coronary arteritis.

  6. [Paget's disease mimicking metastatic prostate cancer on bone scan image : a case report].

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Ken; Koie, Takuya; Yamamoto, Hayato; Okamoto, Akiko; Imai, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ohyama, Chikara

    2013-04-01

    A 61-year-old man was referred to our hospital complaining of elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (5.1 ng/ml). Histopathologic diagnosis with trans-rectal prostate biopsy specimen was adenocarcinoma, Gleason score 4+5 = 9. Bone scintigraphy revealed an abnormal uptake on left coxal bone. The patient was diagnosed with prostate cancer with bone metastasis. He received androgen deprivation therapy for two years. Serum PSA decreased to an undetected level. However, the abnormal activity of left coxal bone lesion was not changed on bone scintigraphy. Coxal bone biopsy was performed. The bone lesion was histopathologically diagnosed as Paget's disease of bone.

  7. Cat scratch disease mimicking Richter's Syndrome in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Razaq, Mohammad; Godkar, Darshan; Mankan, Nagander; Sridhar, Sundara; Hussain, Shafkat; Ohri, Anju

    2005-03-01

    Richter's Syndrome is a highly refractory and usually fatal condition. It occurs as a result of transformation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or low grade lymphoma into highly aggressive lymphoma. Patients usually present with rapidly enlarging lymph nodes and systemic symptoms like night sweats, fever and weight loss. We are reporting a case of CLL presenting with similar symptoms. Initial suspicion of Richter's Syndrome proved wrong when lymph node biopsy did not reveal evidence of high grade lymphoma. Instead it showed findings consistent with cat scratch disease (CSD), later confirmed by serology. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of CSD in a patient with CLL.

  8. In memoriam: Cristiana Patta, DVM, 1958-2012. Virologist and specialist in African swine fever and exotic animal diseases.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The veterinary world is shocked and deeply saddened by the untimely death of Cristiana Patta, manager at Sardinia's Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale. Cristiana was a nationally and internationally acclaimed virologist, distinguished throughout her intense but all-too-brief life by her talent and professionalism. After studying microbiology and virology at the University of Sassari, specialising in microbiological and virological techniques, she began her career as a researcher in the viral animal diseases sector at the Istituto di Sassari. Her work included the main aspects of exotic animal diseases, from diagnosis to control, as well as the planning and management of eradication programmes for the principal infectious diseases (swine fever, brucellosis, tuberculosis and bluetongue) under European Union surveillance. Her knowledge of swine fever - and particularly African swine fever - led her to become a national and international expert in the control of this disease. In this role, she became a member of the roster of experts of the Ministry of Health and the European Commission. She contributed to numerous European research projects and was an invited speaker at many scientific assemblies sponsored by international organisations such as the OIE, FAO and EU. Cristiana also provided an authoritative contribution to training activities promoted by the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale dell'Abruzzo e del Molise 'G. Caporale' in Teramo in its capacity as OIE collaboration centre for veterinary training, epidemiology, food safety and animal welfare, offering her expertise in exotic livestock diseases. The Italian veterinary service and national and European reference centres all benefitted from her experience and knowledge, through training events organised by the Ministry of Health and the regional authorities. Her technical expertise was matched by her managerial skills, in particular in the clinical management of veterinary public health facilities. The

  9. A case report of pigmented mammary Paget's disease mimicking nevus of the nipple.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyan; Umemura, Shinobu; Kumaki, Nobue; Izumi, Miki; Saito, Yuki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Ozawa, Akira; Tokuda, Yutaka

    2014-05-01

    A 43-year-old Japanese woman consulted our hospital for a pigmented lesion on her right nipple. Two years later, the lesion became enlarged, measuring 5 × 5 mm. It was dark brown, had an irregular shape and relatively clear borders. Incisional biopsy yielded a pathological diagnosis of junctional nevus of the skin. An additional 2 years later, a small mass developed under the right nipple area and core needle biopsy yielded a pathologic diagnosis of invasive ductal carcinoma. Partial resection of the right EC areas included the skin of the nipple and sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed. Histologically, the skin of the nipple demonstrated small clusters of pigmented carcinoma cells that were low molecular weight cytokeratin (CAM5.2) positive. Most of the carcinoma cells were small and did not have abundant cytoplasm, but nuclear enlargement and prominent nucleoli indicated malignancy, and the cytoplasm was pale compared with that of the surrounding squamous epithelial cells. Scattered dendritic melanocytes were identified by S-100 protein and HMB-45 immunohistochemically. In the upper dermis, carcinoma cells also involved the lactiferous ducts. A small focus of carcinoma cells that invaded the fat tissues did not contain melanin pigment. The final diagnosis was pigmented mammary Paget's disease. Pigmented lesions on the nipple should be carefully examined, because pigmented mammary Paget's disease sometimes mimics malignant melanoma or junctional nevus.

  10. Transgenic mouse model of IgM(+) lymphoproliferative disease mimicking Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, V S; Sompallae, R; Rosean, T R; Walsh, S; Acevedo, M; Kovalchuk, A L; Han, S-S; Jing, X; Holman, C; Rehg, J E; Herms, S; Sunderland, J S; Morse, H C; Janz, S

    2016-11-04

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a low-grade incurable immunoglobulin M(+) (IgM(+)) lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma for which a genetically engineered mouse model of de novo tumor development is lacking. On the basis of evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 6 (IL6), and the survival-enhancing oncoprotein, B cell leukemia 2 (BCL2), have critical roles in the natural history of WM, we hypothesized that the enforced expression of IL6 and BCL2 in mice unable to perform immunoglobulin class switch recombination may result in a lymphoproliferative disease that mimics WM. To evaluate this possibility, we generated compound transgenic BALB/c mice that harbored the human BCL2 and IL6 transgenes, EμSV-BCL2-22 and H2-L(d)-hIL6, on the genetic background of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency. We designated these mice BCL2(+)IL6(+)AID(-) and found that they developed-with full genetic penetrance (100% incidence) and suitably short latency (93 days median survival)-a severe IgM(+) lymphoproliferative disorder that recapitulated important features of human WM. However, the BCL2(+)IL6(+)AID(-) model also exhibited shortcomings, such as low serum IgM levels and histopathological changes not seen in patients with WM, collectively indicating that further refinements of the model are required to achieve better correlations with disease characteristics of WM.

  11. Transgenic mouse model of IgM+ lymphoproliferative disease mimicking Waldenström macroglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, V S; Sompallae, R; Rosean, T R; Walsh, S; Acevedo, M; Kovalchuk, A L; Han, S-S; Jing, X; Holman, C; Rehg, J E; Herms, S; Sunderland, J S; Morse, H C; Janz, S

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a low-grade incurable immunoglobulin M+ (IgM+) lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma for which a genetically engineered mouse model of de novo tumor development is lacking. On the basis of evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 6 (IL6), and the survival-enhancing oncoprotein, B cell leukemia 2 (BCL2), have critical roles in the natural history of WM, we hypothesized that the enforced expression of IL6 and BCL2 in mice unable to perform immunoglobulin class switch recombination may result in a lymphoproliferative disease that mimics WM. To evaluate this possibility, we generated compound transgenic BALB/c mice that harbored the human BCL2 and IL6 transgenes, EμSV-BCL2-22 and H2-Ld-hIL6, on the genetic background of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency. We designated these mice BCL2+IL6+AID− and found that they developed—with full genetic penetrance (100% incidence) and suitably short latency (93 days median survival)—a severe IgM+ lymphoproliferative disorder that recapitulated important features of human WM. However, the BCL2+IL6+AID− model also exhibited shortcomings, such as low serum IgM levels and histopathological changes not seen in patients with WM, collectively indicating that further refinements of the model are required to achieve better correlations with disease characteristics of WM. PMID:27813533

  12. Citrin deficiency as a cause of chronic liver disorder mimicking non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Michiharu; Yazaki, Masahide; Tanaka, Naoki; Sano, Kenji; Hashimoto, Etsuko; Takei, Yo-ichi; Song, Yuan-Zong; Tanaka, Eiji; Kiyosawa, Kendo; Saheki, Takeyori; Aoyama, Toshifumi; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2008-11-01

    Citrin deficiency caused by SLC25A13 gene mutations develops into adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2) and may be accompanied with hepatic steatosis and steatohepatitis. As its clinical features remain unclear, we aimed to explore the characteristics of fatty liver disease associated with citrin deficiency. The prevalence of hepatic steatosis in 19 CTLN2 patients was examined, and clinical features were compared with those of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients without known SLC25A13 gene mutations. Seventeen (89%) CTLN2 patients had steatosis, and 4 (21%) had been diagnosed as having NAFLD before appearance of neuropsychological symptoms. One patient had steatohepatitis. Citrin deficiency-associated fatty livers showed a considerably lower prevalence of accompanying obesity and metabolic syndrome, higher prevalence of history of pancreatitis, and higher serum levels of pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) than fatty livers without the mutations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses revealed that a body mass index < 20kg/m(2) and serum PSTI>29ng/mL were associated with citrin deficiency. Patients presenting with non-alcoholic fatty liver unrelated to obesity and metabolic syndrome might have citrin deficiency, and serum PSTI may be a useful indicator for distinguishing this from conventional NAFLD.

  13. Tuberculosis terminal ileitis: A forgotten entity mimicking Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gurzu, Simona; Molnar, Calin; Contac, Anca Otilia; Fetyko, Annamaria; Jung, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis (TB) is an uncommon lesion for which differential diagnosis can be difficult. We present a case of a 53-year-old male and a systematic review of the literature, from clinical symptoms to differential diagnosis, unusual complications and therapy. The patient was admitted to the hospital with signs of acute abdomen as a result of a perforated terminal ileitis. Based on the skip lesions of the terminal ileum and cecum, Crohn’s disease (CD) was clinically suspected. An emergency laparotomy and right colectomy with terminal ileum resection was performed and systematic antibiotherapy was prescribed. The patient’s status deteriorated and he died 4 d after the surgical intervention. At the autopsy, TB ileotyphlitis was discovered. The clinical criteria of the differential diagnosis between intestinal TB and CD are not very well established. Despite the large amount of published articles on this subject, only 50 papers present new data regarding intestinal TB. Based on these studies and our experience, we present an update focused on the differential diagnosis and therapy of intestinal TB. We highlight the importance of considering intestinal TB as a differential diagnosis for inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the modern techniques of diagnosis and therapy, the fulminant evolution of TB can still lead to a patient’s death. PMID:27672643

  14. Hepatic angiosarcoma mimicking sinusoidal obstruction syndrome/venoocclusive disease: a pathologic-radiologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Wiland, Homer O; Pai, Rish K; Purysko, Andrei S

    2012-08-01

    We present a case of a 63-year-old man with liver dysfunction and biopsy findings of venoocclusive disease (VOD) who, at autopsy, was discovered to have multifocal hepatic angiosarcoma. After double lung transplantation, he initially presented with signs of liver failure and portal hypertension resulting in recurrent high-volume ascites. Clinically, VOD was considered, and tacrolimus was discontinued, due to its known association with VOD. This, however, did not result in clinical improvement, and computed tomography eventually revealed the development of multiple low-attenuating hepatic lesions over the course of several months. Biopsies of the masses and background liver demonstrated changes most consistent with VOD, characterized by sinusoidal congestion affecting the centrilobular areas with associated hepatocyte atrophy and dropout. A reticulin stain highlighted deposition of reticulin fibers within the sinusoids and central veins. Scattered sinusoidal atypical cells were identified; however, a definitive diagnosis of malignancy was not possible. He eventually passed away because of complications of liver disease. At autopsy, there were multiple firm, red-brown masses identified throughout both hepatic lobes. Upon histologic review, the masses were shown to be angiosarcoma. Away from the tumor, the liver also demonstrated features of VOD. It is likely that the histologic appearance of VOD in the background liver probably represents secondary changes due to injury to the hepatic sinusoids by the primary malignancy. We conclude that it is necessary to consider the possibility of unsampled vascular malignancy when hepatic masses are identified on imaging and histology is consistent with VOD.

  15. Tubular Dysfunction Mimicking Dent's Disease in 2 Infants Born with Extremely Low Birth Weight

    PubMed Central

    Awazu, Midori; Arai, Mie; Ohashi, Shoko; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sekine, Takashi; Ikeda, Kazushige

    2017-01-01

    Two preterm infants, with extremely low birth weight born at gestational weeks 24 and 25, showed generalized proximal tubular dysfunction during their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit, including glucosuria, low molecular weight proteinuria, phosphaturia, uricosuria, enzymuria (elevated urine N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase), panaminoaciduria, and hypercalciuria, associated with renal calcification. Renal tubular acidosis was not present in either patient. DNA mutation analysis for Dent's disease, performed in patient 1, was negative. Although both patients had rickets of prematurity, tubular dysfunction persisted after its resolution. Patient 2, who had severe chronic lung disease, also had elevated serum creatinine, proteinuria, and hypertension, suggesting glomerular damage. In patient 1, low molecular weight proteinuria, enzymuria, panaminoaciduria, hypercalciuria, and renal calcification were still present at the age of 8 years. In patient 2, tubular dysfunction resolved except for β2 microglobulinuria at the age of 5 years. While a reduced nephron number resulting in focal segmental glomerulosclerosis is well-known, generalized proximal tubular dysfunction can also occur in infants born preterm and/or with extremely low birth weight. PMID:28203565

  16. Comparative analysis of cloned cDNAs encoding Chinese yellow cattle and Gansu black swine integrin receptors for foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Du, Ping; Shang, Youjun; Yin, Shuanghui; Zhang, Keshan; Wang, Guangxiang; Lv, Zhanlu; Yang, Shunli; Wu, Jinyan; Jin, Ye; Chen, Yan; Liu, Yongjie; Tian, Hong; Liu, Xiangtao

    2013-10-01

    To analyze foot-and-mouth disease virus tropism and host range with respect to the integrin receptor, we cloned cDNAs encoding the integrin αν, β1, β3, β6 and β8 subunits from Chinese yellow cattle and Gansu black swine and carried out comparative analysis of their molecular characteristics. The lengths of the mature proteins and the functional domains of the four integrin β subunits were the same between bovine and swine; however, the number of putative N-linked glycosylation sites and cysteine residues and their arrangement varied. Homology analysis of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences showed that FMDV integrin receptors of Chinese yellow cattle and Gansu black swine are highly conserved. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all FMDV integrin receptor subunits of cattle and swine are clustered into the Artiodactyla group; however, Chinese yellow cattle are phylogenetically closer to sheep than to Gansu black swine. We postulate that the host tropism of FMDV may, in part, be related to the divergence of integrin subunits among different species.

  17. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection associated with urticarial vasculitis mimicking adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Dua, Janet; Nandagudi, Anupama; Sutcliffe, Nurhan

    2012-12-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is well known to be a frequent cause of atypical pneumonia worldwide. However, it may also present with a wide variety of clinical features, including cutaneous symptoms, which are not widely recognised. Urticarial vasculitis occurring with M. pneumoniae has been described to occur in only one other case report. This amalgamation of non-specific clinical symptoms and signs can lead to a diagnostic dilemma. We describe a case of M. pneumoniae infection presenting with extrapulmonary manifestations and urticarial vasculitis, which was misdiagnosed as adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD). Had immunosuppressive therapy been commenced for AOSD in the presence of undiagnosed infection, this may have resulted in potentially serious consequences. This case highlights the need to remain vigilant about diagnosing M. pneumoniae as its serological diagnosis may take weeks and it has many extrapulmonary manifestations, which can masquerade as other conditions.

  18. Parkinson’s disease with Onuf’s nucleus involvement mimicking multiple system atrophy

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Sean Stephen; Massey, Luke A; Williams, David R; Revesz, Tamas; Lees, Andrew; Holton, Janice

    2009-01-01

    Urinary frequency, urgency and nocturia are common complaints in Parkinson’s disease (PD). The hypothesis most widely proposed to explain neurogenic bladder symptoms in PD is that cell loss in the substantia nigra may cause detrusor hyperactivity due to a loss in the D1 receptor-mediated tonic inhibition of the micturition reflex, although other causes including anti-parkinsonian medication cortical effects have been considered.1 We present the clinical and pathological findings of a patient with parkinsonism who presented with prominent dysautonomia and a poor response to dopaminergic medications and was considered to have possible multiple system atrophy parkinsonism (MSA-P). Pathological examination revealed that the patient had PD with α-synuclein pathology in the Onuf’s nucleus (ON). PMID:21686637

  19. Dermoscopic Features of Pigmented Bowen's Disease in a Japanese Female Mimicking Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Ken; Sawada, Mizuki; Ishizaki, Sumiko; Ito, Haruo; Fujibayashi, Mariko; Tanaka, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    Various structures have been reported for dermoscopic features of pigmented Bowen's disease (BD), which could be a mimic of various pigmented skin lesions. A 79-year-old Japanese woman presented with a 3-year history of brown-black macule on her right upper arm without symptom. Dermoscopic examination demonstrated irregular flossy streaks, irregular brown dots/globules, blue-whitish regression structures, and overlaying whitish scaly areas. We suspected pigmented skin lesions including seborrheic keratosis, pigmented eccrine poroma, and malignant melanoma and excised completely with a 5 mm margin. Histopathological features were consistent with a diagnosis of pigmented BD. Although similar dermoscopic features might be revealed in pigmented skin lesions and it may occasionally be difficult to distinguish between pigmented BD and other pigmented skin lesions, dermoscopy would be useful in speculating pathologic features of pigmented BD. PMID:20811602

  20. Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease Mimicking Psoriasis in a Patient with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sihyeok; Kim, In Su

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a common complication of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) that can be classified as acute or chronic. Chronic GVHD, which usually occurs more than 3 months after BMT, includes typical lichenoid or sclerodermatous lesions. Psoriasiform eruption is a rare clinical manifestation of chronic GVHD, and there have been no reports of psoriasiform chronic GVHD associated with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. A 33-year-old woman who was diagnosed with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 10 years ago visited our outpatient clinic with psoriasiform eruption over her entire body. She underwent allogeneic BMT 7 months previously from her sibling. Skin biopsy was performed on the lesion, and the histological features suggested GVHD. The psoriasiform lesions improved with narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy, with secondary vitiligo remaining on the corresponding locations. PMID:26848224

  1. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease mimicking an epidural spinal cord tumor: case report.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michelle M; Mashaly, Hazem; Puduvalli, Vinay K; Jin, Ming; Mendel, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    The authors report a case of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) presenting as a paraspinal, epidural mass. This disease encompasses a host of autoimmune conditions that were previously thought to be separate entities. It is characterized by fibrosis, mediated by the aberrant proliferation and tissue invasion of IgG4-positive plasma cells, which can occur in any organ. As with other autoimmune conditions, it tends to be responsive to steroids and other immunosuppressants. It can rarely present as a tumefactive lesion of the central nervous system, creating the potential for misdiagnosis (given its similar radiological appearance to malignancy) and mistreatment. In 2015, a panel of experts convened to set forth guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of IgG4-RD. In the case presented here, the patient initially presented with pain and weakness in the left upper extremity. Initial neuroimages revealed a contrast-enhancing mass extending from C-4 to T-1, invading the epidural spinal canal, encasing the exiting nerve roots, infiltrating the paraspinal musculature, and surrounding the left vertebral artery. A PET scan confirmed the mass was hypermetabolic, but results of fine-needle aspiration and CT-guided biopsy were inconclusive. Open biopsy yielded fibrotic tissue that met the pathological criteria for IgG4-RD: lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, fibrosis in a storiform pattern, and obliterative phlebitis. The patient was treated with 2 doses of 4 mg of dexamethasone (Decadron) and then 50 mg of prednisone per day. Within 2 weeks, the mass was radiologically shown to have drastically decreased in size. The prednisone dose was decreased to 40 mg per day, and 100 mg of azathioprine per day was added. The patient continued to improve and the mass continued to decrease over the next 6 months. Currently, she has been weaned from all steroids and will be maintained on a daily dose of 100 mg of azathioprine.

  2. Differences in Pathogenesis for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the Mouse Versus the Swine Model Identify Bacterial Gene Products Required for Systemic but not Gastrointestinal Disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over the last several decades, the mouse model of Typhoid fever has been an extremely productive model to investigate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenesis. The mouse is the paradigm for investigating systemic disease due to infection by Salmonella; however, the swine model of gastro...

  3. Adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccine confers early and full protection against FMDV O1 Manisa in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A human adenovirus (Ad5) vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) sero-type O1-Manisa subunit vaccine (Ad5-O1Man) was engineered to deliver FMDV O1-Manisa empty capsids. Swine inoculated with Ad5-O1Man developed an FMDV-specific neutralizing antibody response as compared to animals inoculated wi...

  4. Small-scale pig farmers' behavior, silent release of African swine fever virus and consequences for disease spread.

    PubMed

    Costard, Solenne; Zagmutt, Francisco J; Porphyre, Thibaud; Pfeiffer, Dirk Udo

    2015-11-27

    The expanding distribution of African swine fever (ASF) is threatening the pig industry worldwide. Most outbreaks occur in backyard and small-scale herds, where poor farmers often attempt to limit the disease's economic consequences by the emergency sale of their pigs. The risk of African swine fever virus (ASFV) release via this emergency sale was investigated. Simulation modeling was used to study ASFV transmission in backyard and small-scale farms as well as the emergency sale of pigs, and the potential impact of improving farmers and traders' clinical diagnosis ability-its timeliness and/or accuracy-was assessed. The risk of ASFV release was shown to be high, and improving farmers' clinical diagnosis ability does not appear sufficient to effectively reduce this risk. Estimates obtained also showed that the distribution of herd size within the backyard and small-scale sectors influences the relative contribution of these farms to the risk of release of infected pigs. These findings can inform surveillance and control programs.

  5. Occurrence of a pig respiratory disease associated with swine influenza A (H1N2) virus in Tochigi Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Shuji; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Hirokazu; Usami, Yoshihide; Kubo, Masanori; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko

    2010-04-01

    In February 2008, a feeder pig herd of the affected farm in Tochigi Prefecture, Japan, showed increasing respiratory symptoms; by April, the situation worsened with 12-16 pigs dying daily. Diagnostic tests revealed the presence of H1N2 subtype of swine influenza virus (SIV) and Pasteurella multocida from nasal swab and lung emulsion. Serological tests by hemagglutination inhibition method and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method (ELISA; imported from U.S.A.) indicated the spread of SIV into the pig herds of the affected farm around April 2008. The severe infection and subsequent damage were considered as a result of the combined infection of SIV (H1N2) and bacteria that may have been prevalent in the pig farm. Genetic homology search of sequences for the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of A/swine/Tochigi/1/08 showed high homology to Japanese SIVs (H1N2) isolated in the 2000s. Therefore, we considered that Japanese SIV (H1N2) has established an independent stable lineage and participated in infecting pig populations as one of the factors of the pig respiratory disease complex. Consistent surveillance would contribute to clarifying the prevalence of dominant SIVs.

  6. Celiac disease with cerebral and peripheral nerve involvement mimicking multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, J; Leutmezer, F

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Due to the similarity in the clinical presentation, morphology, and course, celiac disease (CD) may be mixed up with other immunological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Case report: In a 43-year-old Caucasian male with a history of diarrhea and colics since young age, progressive sensory disturbances developed since age 18 years. At age 34, he was diagnosed as relapsing-remitting MS upon an inflammatory CSF-syndrome and non-specific white matter lesions and treated with interferon beta-1b during the next 8 years without effect. At age 35, axonal polyneuropathy and ataxia were diagnosed. Despite normal anti-gliadin, endomysial, and transglutaminase antibodies, CD was diagnosed at age 41, based upon the history, polyneuropathy, positivity for HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, the white matter lesions, and a beneficial response of the gastrointestinal problems and polyneuropathy to gluten-free diet. Conclusions: CD may mimic MS and may be present despite the absence of anti-gliadin, endomysial or transglutaminase antibodies. CD should be considered if there is a gastrointestinal problem, polyneuropathy, and ataxia, even if CSF and MRI findings are suggestive of MS. PMID:25408772

  7. Clinical outcome of Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome mimicking acute biliary disease.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seong Yong; Kim, Jin Il; Cheung, Dae Young; Cho, Se Hyun; Park, Soo-Heon; Han, Joon-Yeol; Kim, Jae Kwang

    2008-12-07

    To analyze the clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome. The clinical courses of patients that visited St. Mary's Hospital with abdominal pain from January 2005 to December 2006 and were diagnosed with Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome were examined. Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome was identified in 22 female patients of childbearing age; their mean age was 31.0+/-8.1 years. Fourteen of these cases presented with pain in the upper right abdomen alone or together with pain in the lower abdomen, and six patients presented with pain only in the lower abdomen. The first impression at the time of visit was acute cholecystitis or cholangitis in 10 patients and acute appendicitis or pelvic inflammatory disease in eight patients. Twenty-one patients were diagnosed by abdominal computer tomography (CT), and the results of abdominal sonography were normal for 10 of these patients. Chlamydia trichomatis was isolated from 18 patients. Two patients underwent laparoscopic adhesiotomy and 20 patients were completely cured by antibiotic treatment. For women of childbearing age with acute pain in the upper right abdomen alone or together with pain in the lower abdomen, Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome should be considered during differential diagnosis. Moreover, in cases suspected to be Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome, abdominal CT, rather than abdominal sonography, assists in the diagnosis.

  8. Clinical outcome of Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome mimicking acute biliary disease

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seong Yong; Kim, Jin Il; Cheung, Dae Young; Cho, Se Hyun; Park, Soo-Heon; Han, Joon-Yeol; Kim, Jae Kwang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome. METHODS: The clinical courses of patients that visited St. Mary’s Hospital with abdominal pain from January 2005 to December 2006 and were diagnosed with Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome were examined. RESULTS: Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome was identified in 22 female patients of childbearing age; their mean age was 31.0 ± 8.1 years. Fourteen of these cases presented with pain in the upper right abdomen alone or together with pain in the lower abdomen, and six patients presented with pain only in the lower abdomen. The first impression at the time of visit was acute cholecystitis or cholangitis in 10 patients and acute appendicitis or pelvic inflammatory disease in eight patients. Twenty-one patients were diagnosed by abdominal computer tomography (CT), and the results of abdominal sonography were normal for 10 of these patients. Chlamydia trichomatis was isolated from 18 patients. Two patients underwent laparoscopic adhesiotomy and 20 patients were completely cured by antibiotic treatment. CONCLUSION: For women of childbearing age with acute pain in the upper right abdomen alone or together with pain in the lower abdomen, Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome should be considered during differential diagnosis. Moreover, in cases suspected to be Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome, abdominal CT, rather than abdominal sonography, assists in the diagnosis. PMID:19058334

  9. African swine fever virus serotype-specific proteins are significant protective antigens for African swine fever

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African swine fever (ASF) is an emerging disease threat for the swine industry worldwide. No ASF vaccine is available and progress is hindered by lack of knowledge concerning the extent of African swine fever virus (ASFV) strain diversity and the viral antigens conferring type specific protective im...

  10. Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Autoimmunity Mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.; Tan, K. Meng; Lennon, Vanda A.; Barajas, Ramon F.; Haman, Aissa; Klein, Christopher J.; Josephson, S. Andrew; Pittock, Sean J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Rapidly progressive dementia has a variety of causes, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and neuronal voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) autoantibody–associated encephalopathy. Objective To describe patients thought initially to have CJD but found subsequently to have immunotherapy-responsive VGKC autoimmunity. Design Observational, prospective case series. Setting Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, and the Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco. Patients A clinical serologic cohort of 15 patients referred for paraneoplastic autoantibody evaluation. Seven patients were evaluated clinically by at least one of us. Clinical information for the remaining patients was obtained by physician interview or medical record review. Main Outcome Measures Clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, electroencephalographic patterns, cerebrospinal fluid analyses, and responses to immunomodulatory therapy. Results All the patients presented subacutely with neurologic manifestations, including rapidly progressive dementia, myoclonus, extrapyramidal dysfunction, visual hallucinations, psychiatric disturbance, and seizures; most (60%) satisfied World Health Organization diagnostic criteria for CJD. Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities included cerebral cortical diffusion-weighted imaging hyperintensities. Electroencephalographic abnormalities included diffuse slowing, frontal intermittent rhythmic delta activity, and focal epileptogenic activity but not periodic sharp wave complexes. Cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein or neuron-specific enolase levels were elevated in 5 of 8 patients. Hyponatremia was common (60%). Neoplasia was confirmed histologically in 5 patients (33%) and was suspected in another 5. Most patients’ conditions (92%) improved after immunomodulatory therapy. Conclusions Clinical, radiologic, electrophysiologic, and laboratory findings in VGKC autoantibody–associated encephalopathy may be

  11. Swine in biomedical research. Vol. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbleson, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents information on the following topics: hemodynamic characteristics of the conscious resting pig; cardiovascular and metabolic responses to acute and chronic exercise in swine (ILLEGIBLE) a large animal model for studies (ILLEGIBLE) effects of heparin-protamine interaction in swine - intravenous vs. intraarterial; swine as animal models in cardiovascular research; studies of coronary thrombosis in swine with von Willebrand's disease; role of plasma intermediate and low density lipoproteins in early atherogenesis in hyperlipidemic swine; swine as a model in renal physiology and nephrology; the pig as a model for studying kidney disease in man; hypertension of renal origin and the effects of Captopril in miniature pigs; porcine natural killer/killer cell system; the behavior of pig lymphocyte populations in vivo; a review of spontaneous and experimental porcine eperythrozoonosis; and Sinclair swine melanoma.

  12. Immunological and respiratory findings in swine farmers.

    PubMed

    Zuskin, E; Kanceljak, B; Schachter, E N; Mustajbegovic, J; Goswami, S; Maayani, S; Marom, Z; Rienzi, N

    1991-12-01

    The prevalence of respiratory symptoms and ventilatory capacity abnormalities in relation to immunological status was studied in 32 swine farmers and in 39 controls. A large number of swine farmers reacted to swine confinement building antigens (swine hair, 34%, swine confinement agents, 28%) but also to other extracts such as animal food (78%) and corn flour (37%). Control workers also reacted to these antigens in similar frequencies. Increased serum IgE levels were found in 3 swine farmers (9.4%) and all 3 had positive skin tests to at least one of the swine antigens. Among control workers one (2.6%) had an increased serum IgE level; this worker exhibited a positive skin reaction to swine food antigen. Swine farmers with positive skin reactions had across-shift reductions of FEF50 and FEF25 significantly larger than those with negative skin tests (P less than 0.01). Preshift measured ventilatory capacity data (FEV1, FEF50, FEF25) in swine farmers with positive skin tests were significantly lower (compared to predicted) than in those with negative skin tests. Additionally, we showed that a water-soluble swine confinement building antigen causes a dose-related contraction of nonsensitized guinea pig trachea smooth muscle studied in vitro. Our data indicate significant differences in lung function between swine workers with positive and negative skin tests. We suggest that skin testing may be helpful in identifying workers at risk for developing lung disease.

  13. Lichenoid exanthema mimicking graft-versus-host disease associated with obstructive lung disease in a non-transplanted patient.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Franziska Carola; Holland, Angelique; Hörster, Stefan; Vogelmeier, Claus; Hertl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Lichenoid graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is commonly observed in patients who have received donor lymphocyte infusions or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Here we report a striking case of lichenoid GVH-like exanthema in a young woman without any history of blood transfusions or BMT. A polymorphous, multiforme-like exanthema was observed after systemic antibiotic therapy of bronchitis and was initially diagnosed as drug eruption. Later on, disseminated lichenoid papules were noticed on the trunk and extremities with all histologic and clinical characteristics of lichenoid GVHD. Cutaneous GVH-like disease developed, as did obstructive lung disease. Pulmonary as well as skin disease were both refractory to various immunosuppressive therapies. The immune pathogenesis that caused the skin and lung disease in this patient remains unclear. Multiple pregnancies with two abortions with the potential induction of microchimerism may play a role in the disease pathogenesis.

  14. Multifocal septic osteomyelitis mimicking skeletal metastatic disease in a patient with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, Evangelos; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Valotassiou, Varvara; Georgiou, Evangelia; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Vlychou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    enhancement suggestive of septic arthritis. The MR imaging findings combined with the scintigraphic findings were consistent with subacute multifocal septic arthritis involving the axial skeleton, as a pyogenic spondylodiscitis at the T9-T10 level, the left SCJ joint and the left knee joint. Subsequently, aspiration of the SCJ and the left knee joint was performed. A purulent fluid was drained and sent to microbiology. The sample revealed 96.000 cells/μL (95% neutrophils) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The patient received intravenous vancomucin (2gr. twice a day for 14 days) and subsequently the dose was adjusted to maintain the vancomucin serum levels between 17 and 20mcg/mL. The total treatment duration was 12 weeks. Four months later the patient had fully recovered and his blood tests were normal. The patient had not been referred to an oncology department yet, as the onset of the arthritis occurred about two weeks after the diagnosis of prostate cancer. In conclusion, we present a patient with known malignancy, fever, skeletal pain and multiple bone lesions in the (99m)Tc-MDP and the MRI examination, not due to metastatic disease but to septic arthritis.

  15. IgA antibody response of swine to foot-and-mouth disease virus infection and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Juan M; Butler, John E; Jew, Jessica; Ferman, Geoffrey S; Zhu, James; Golde, William T

    2010-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) continues to be a significant economic problem worldwide. Control of the disease involves the use of killed-virus vaccines, a control measure developed decades ago. After natural infection, the primary site of replication of FMDV is the pharyngeal area, suggesting that a mucosal immune response is the most effective. Humoral immunity to killed-virus vaccination induces antibodies that can prevent the clinical disease but not local infection. Determining whether infection or vaccination stimulates IgA-mediated local immunity depends on the method of analysis. Different assays have been described to analyze the quality of antibody responses of cattle and swine to FMDV, including indirect double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IDAS-ELISA) and antibody capture assay-ELISA (ACA-ELISA). We tested these assays on swine and show that vaccinated animals had FMDV-specific IgM and IgG but no IgA in either serum or saliva. After the infection, both assays detected FMDV-specific IgM, IgG, and IgA in serum. Notably, serum IgA was more readily detected using the ACA-ELISA, whereas IgA was not detected in saliva with this assay. FMDV-specific IgA antibodies were detected in saliva samples using the IDAS-ELISA. These data show that parenterally administered, killed-virus vaccine does not induce a mucosal antibody response to FMDV and illuminates limitations and appropriate applications of the two ELISAs used to measure FMDV-specific responses. Further, the presence of the IgA antivirus in serum correlates with the presence of such antibodies in saliva.

  16. 9 CFR 93.505 - Certificate for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... freedom from the said diseases of the district of origin only: And provided further, That in the case of... disease of the district of origin only. For domestic swine, the certificate shall also show that the entire region of origin is free of African swine fever and swine vesicular disease and that, for 60...

  17. The association between submission counts to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory and the economic and disease challenges of the Ontario swine industry from 1998 to 2009.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, T; Friendship, R; Pearl, D L; McEwen, B; Ker, A; Dewey, C

    2012-10-01

    An intuitive assumption is to believe that the number of submissions made to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory is dictated by the financial state of the industries using the laboratory. However, no research is available to document how the economics of a food animal industry affects laboratory submissions and therefore disease monitoring and surveillance efforts. The objective of this study was to determine if economic indices associated with the Ontario swine industry can account for the variability seen in these submissions. Retrospective swine submissions made to the Animal Health Laboratory at the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario from January 1998 to July 2009 were compiled. The following economic, demographic, and health variables impacting Ontario swine production were selected for analysis: auction price, lean-hog futures, currency exchange rate, price of corn, an outbreak of porcine circovirus type-2 associated diseases (PCVAD), government incentive program, number of farms in province, and average farm size. All independent variables identified by unconditional associations to have a significance of P≤0.2 with the outcome of monthly submission count were included in a multivariable negative binomial model. A final model was identified by a backwards elimination procedure. A total of 30,432 swine submissions were recorded. The mean frequency of monthly submissions over 139 months was 212.9 (SD=56.0). After controlling for farm size, the number of pigs in Ontario, higher submission counts were associated with a weaker CAD$ versus US$, higher auction prices, and a PCVAD outbreak (P<0.001). The results suggest that both economic volatility and disease outbreaks in the Ontario swine industry drive submissions to the laboratory. In conclusion, lab submissions are a useful source of animal health data for disease surveillance; however, surveillance activities should also monitor the economics of the industry.

  18. Computer-aided assessment of pulmonary disease in novel swine-origin H1N1 influenza on CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Dwyer, Andrew J.; Summers, Ronald M.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    The 2009 pandemic is a global outbreak of novel H1N1 influenza. Radiologic images can be used to assess the presence and severity of pulmonary infection. We develop a computer-aided assessment system to analyze the CT images from Swine-Origin Influenza A virus (S-OIV) novel H1N1 cases. The technique is based on the analysis of lung texture patterns and classification using a support vector machine (SVM). Pixel-wise tissue classification is computed from the SVM value. The method was validated on four H1N1 cases and ten normal cases. We demonstrated that the technique can detect regions of pulmonary abnormality in novel H1N1 patients and differentiate these regions from visually normal lung (area under the ROC curve is 0.993). This technique can also be applied to differentiate regions infected by different pulmonary diseases.

  19. Completion of the swine genome will simplify the production of swine as a large animal biomedical model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anatomic and physiological similarities to the human make swine an excellent large animal model for human health and disease. Methods Cloning from a modified somatic cell, which can be determined in cells prior to making the animal, is the only method available for the production of targeted modifications in swine. Results Since some strains of swine are similar in size to humans, technologies that have been developed for swine can be readily adapted to humans and vice versa. Here the importance of swine as a biomedical model, current technologies to produce genetically enhanced swine, current biomedical models, and how the completion of the swine genome will promote swine as a biomedical model are discussed. Conclusions The completion of the swine genome will enhance the continued use and development of swine as models of human health, syndromes and conditions. PMID:23151353

  20. Injection of celiac disease patient sera or immunoglobulins to mice reproduces a condition mimicking early developing celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kalliokoski, Suvi; Caja, Sergio; Frias, Rafael; Laurila, Kaija; Koskinen, Outi; Niemelä, Onni; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma R; Lindfors, Katri

    2015-01-01

    Typical features of celiac disease are small-bowel villus atrophy, crypt hyperplasia, and inflammation which develop gradually concomitant with ingestion of gluten. In addition, patients have anti-transglutaminase 2 (TG2) autoantibodies in their serum and tissues. The aim of this study was to establish whether celiac disease can be passively transferred to mice by serum or immunoglobulins. Serum aliquots or purified immunoglobulins (Ig) were intraperitoneally injected into Hsd:Athymic Nude-Foxn1nu mice for 8 or 27 days. As mice do not have proper IgA transport from peritoneum to blood, sera with a high content of IgG class anti-TG2 antibodies from untreated IgA-deficient celiac patients were used. Mouse sera were tested for celiac disease-specific autoantibodies, and several tissues were analyzed for autoantibody deposits targeted to TG2. Morphological assessment was made of the murine small intestinal mucosa. Injection of celiac disease patient sera or total IgG led to a significant delay in weight gain and mild diarrhea in a subset of mice. The mice injected with celiac patient sera or IgG had significantly decreased villus height crypt depth (Vh/CrD) ratios and celiac disease-specific autoantibody deposits targeted to TG2 in several tissues, including the small intestine. None of these features were observed in control mice. We conclude that administration of IgA-deficient celiac disease patient serum or total IgG induces both deterioration of the intestinal mucosa and clinical features of celiac disease in mice. The experimentally induced condition in the mice injected with patient serum or IgG resembles early developing celiac disease in humans. Celiac disease patient sera or total IgG was injected into athymic mice. A significant delay in weight gain and mild diarrhea was observed. Mice evinced significantly decreased villus height crypt depth ratios. Celiac disease-specific autoantibody deposits were present in several tissues. The condition in mice

  1. Field efficacy of an inactivated bivalent influenza vaccine in a multi-site swine production system during an outbreak of systemic porcine circovirus associated disease

    PubMed Central

    Poljak, Zvonimir; Dewey, Catherine E.; Martin, S. Wayne; Christensen, Jette; Friendship, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is a disease of significance for the swine industry, and vaccination is often recommended as a way to reduce its impact on production. The efficacy of SI vaccines is well established under experimental conditions, but information about field efficacy is scarce. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a commercial inactivated bivalent (H1N1/H3N2) vaccine under conditions of natural exposure to a field SI variant. To accomplish our goal we used a randomized, blinded, field trial in 2 cohorts of finisher pigs in a multi-site swine production system located in southern Ontario. During the trial, this herd experienced an outbreak of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD). The efficacy of the SI vaccine was assessed through its effect on average daily weight gain, and serological responses to SI over time. The effect of vaccination on pig growth was different in the 2 cohorts. Weight gain was higher in vaccinated pigs than in control pigs in Cohort 1, but was numerically higher for control pigs than for vaccinated pigs in Cohort 2. Vaccination against swine influenza, in a herd experiencing an outbreak of PCVAD, was of questionable value. PMID:20592840

  2. Swine Influenza Virus and Association with the Porcine Respiratory Disease Complex in Pig Farms in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, C; Cibulski, S P; Andrade, C P; Teixeira, T F; Varela, A P M; Scheffer, C M; Franco, A C; de Almeida, L L; Roehe, P M

    2016-05-01

    Despite the putative endemic status of swine influenza A virus (swIAV) infections, data on the occurrence of swine influenza outbreaks are scarce in Brazil. The aim of this study was to detect and subtype swIAVs from six outbreaks of porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) in southern Brazil. Nasal swabs were collected from 66 piglets with signs of respiratory disease in six herds. Lung tissue samples were collected from six necropsied animals. Virus detection was performed by PCR screening and confirmed by virus isolation and hemagglutination (HA). Influenza A subtyping was performed by a real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) to detect the A(H1N1)pdm09; other swIAV subtypes were determined by multiplex RT-PCR. In lung tissues, the major bacterial and viral pathogens associated with PRDC (Pasteurella multocida, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and PCV2) were investigated. In some affected pigs, clinico-pathological evaluations were conducted. Influenza A was detected by screening PCR in 46 of 66 swab samples and from five of six lungs. Virus was recovered from pigs of all six herds. Subtype A(H1N1)pdm09 was detected in four of six herds and H1N2 in the other two herds. In lung tissues, further agents involved in PRDC were detected in all cases; Pasteurella multocida was identified in five of six samples and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in three of six. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (1/6), Haemophilus parasuis (1/6) and PCV2 (1/6) were also detected. These findings indicate that subtypes A(H1N1)pdm09 and H1N2 were present in pigs in southern Brazil and were associated with PRDC outbreaks.

  3. Effect of High-Calcium Diet on Coronary Artery Disease in Ossabaw Miniature Swine With Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Phillips-Eakley, Alyssa K; McKenney-Drake, Mikaela L; Bahls, Martin; Newcomer, Sean C; Radcliffe, John S; Wastney, Meryl E; Van Alstine, William G; Jackson, George; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Martin, Berdine R; Sturek, Michael; Weaver, Connie M

    2015-08-13

    Calcium is a shortfall essential nutrient that has been a mainstay of osteoporosis management. Recent and limited findings have prompted concern about the contribution of calcium supplementation to cardiovascular risk. A proposed mechanism is through the acceleration of coronary artery calcification. Determining causality between calcium intake and coronary artery calcification has been hindered by a lack of sensitive methodology to monitor early vascular calcium accumulation. The primary study aim was to assess the impact of high calcium intake on coronary artery calcification using innovative calcium tracer kinetic modeling in Ossabaw swine with diet-induced metabolic syndrome. Secondary end points (in vitro wire myography, histopathology, intravascular ultrasound) assessed coronary disease. Pigs (n=24; aged ≈15 months) were fed an atherogenic diet with adequate calcium (0.33% by weight) or high calcium (1.90% from calcium carbonate or dairy) for 6 months. Following 5 months of feeding, all pigs were dosed intravenously with (41)Ca, a rare isotope that can be measured in serum and tissues at a sensitivity of 10(-18) mol/L by accelerator mass spectrometry. Kinetic modeling evaluated early coronary artery calcification using (41)Ca values measured in serial blood samples (collected over 27 days) and coronary artery samples obtained at sacrifice. Serum disappearance of (41)Ca and total coronary artery (41)Ca accumulation did not differ among groups. Secondary end points demonstrated no treatment differences in coronary artery disease or function. There was no detectable effect of high calcium diets (from dairy or calcium carbonate) on coronary artery calcium deposition in metabolic syndrome swine. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  4. Effect of High-Calcium Diet on Coronary Artery Disease in Ossabaw Miniature Swine With Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Phillips-Eakley, Alyssa K; McKenney-Drake, Mikaela L; Bahls, Martin; Newcomer, Sean C; Radcliffe, John S; Wastney, Meryl E; Van Alstine, William G; Jackson, George; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Martin, Berdine R; Sturek, Michael; Weaver, Connie M

    2015-01-01

    Background Calcium is a shortfall essential nutrient that has been a mainstay of osteoporosis management. Recent and limited findings have prompted concern about the contribution of calcium supplementation to cardiovascular risk. A proposed mechanism is through the acceleration of coronary artery calcification. Determining causality between calcium intake and coronary artery calcification has been hindered by a lack of sensitive methodology to monitor early vascular calcium accumulation. The primary study aim was to assess the impact of high calcium intake on coronary artery calcification using innovative calcium tracer kinetic modeling in Ossabaw swine with diet-induced metabolic syndrome. Secondary end points (in vitro wire myography, histopathology, intravascular ultrasound) assessed coronary disease. Methods and Results Pigs (n =24; aged ≈15 months) were fed an atherogenic diet with adequate calcium (0.33% by weight) or high calcium (1.90% from calcium carbonate or dairy) for 6 months. Following 5 months of feeding, all pigs were dosed intravenously with 41Ca, a rare isotope that can be measured in serum and tissues at a sensitivity of 10−18 mol/L by accelerator mass spectrometry. Kinetic modeling evaluated early coronary artery calcification using 41Ca values measured in serial blood samples (collected over 27 days) and coronary artery samples obtained at sacrifice. Serum disappearance of 41Ca and total coronary artery 41Ca accumulation did not differ among groups. Secondary end points demonstrated no treatment differences in coronary artery disease or function. Conclusion There was no detectable effect of high calcium diets (from dairy or calcium carbonate) on coronary artery calcium deposition in metabolic syndrome swine. PMID:26272654

  5. 9 CFR 94.9 - Pork and pork products from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... where classical swine fever exists. 94.9 Section 94.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED...

  6. 9 CFR 94.9 - Pork and pork products from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... where classical swine fever exists. 94.9 Section 94.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED...

  7. 78 FR 9028 - Notice of Availability of a Swine Brucellosis and Pseudorabies Proposed Action Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... affects both animals and humans. The disease mainly affects cattle, bison, and swine. Swine brucellosis... with antibiotics. Pseudorabies is a contagious, communicable disease of livestock, primarily swine, and... as free of the disease. The swine brucellosis regulations also specify requirements for the...

  8. The natural history of porcine circovirus type 2: from an inoffensive virus to a devastating swine disease?

    PubMed

    Segalés, Joaquim; Kekarainen, Tuija; Cortey, Martí

    2013-07-26

    The present review summarizes the current knowledge on the natural history of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection and its related diseases. The perception about PCV2 as a significant pathogen has markedly changed in the last 15 years. The ubiquitous nature of the virus, the retrospective evidence of this infection long before disease association, the multifactorial aetio-pathogenesis of PCV2-systemic disease (SD) and the lack of consistent demonstration of Koch's postulates caused great controversy about the real causal capabilities of this virus. The advent of vaccines against PCV2 radically changed such perception and this virus is nowadays regarded as a very important pig pathogen. Moreover, the current PCV2 vaccines are ones of the most widely used in pig producing countries. On the other hand, how the virus causes disease is still a not fully solved complex scientific question, but host, infection timing and the virus itself are pivotal factors to consider explaining disease presentation at an individual level. The appearance of PCV2-SD as an epidemic problem at the end of 1990 s or early-mid 2000s might be related with a number of known and unknown variables. Based on available data, the international trade of pigs may have played a major role in the dissemination of more susceptible swine genetic lines as well as in the global PCV2 genotype replacement (PCV2b over PCV2a) during such period. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Modulation of postural wrist tremors by magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex in patients with Parkinson's disease or essential tremor and in normal subjects mimicking tremor.

    PubMed

    Britton, T C; Thompson, P D; Day, B L; Rothwell, J C; Findley, L J; Marsden, C D

    1993-05-01

    The effect of magnetic brain stimulation on postural wrist tremor was studied in 10 patients with Parkinson's disease, 12 with hereditary essential tremor, and 10 normal subjects who mimicked tremor by making rapid alternating wrist movements. In all patients and normal subjects, magnetic brain stimulation over the contralateral motor cortex at an intensity approximately 10% above threshold produced the following sequence of events: (1) a small direct electromyographic (EMG) response, followed by (2) suppression of the rhythmic EMG activity responsible for the tremor, before (3) reappearance of the tremor time-locked to the stimulus. It is concluded that magnetic brain stimulation over the motor cortex can modulate the oscillatory mechanisms responsible for the generation of postural tremors. Group analysis revealed that the time to reappearance of rhythmic EMG activity varied significantly with the period of parkinsonian postural tremors, but not with the period of essential or mimicked tremors. Magnetic stimulation also significantly shortened the period of parkinsonian postural tremors, but did not influence the period of essential or mimicked tremors. These behavioral differences indicate differences in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying parkinsonian postural tremor and essential tremor.

  10. Case report of Lewy body disease mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a 44-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Saint-Aubert, Laure; Pariente, Jérémie; Dumas, Herve; Payoux, Pierre; Brandel, Jean-Philippe; Puel, Michèle; Vital, Anne; Guedj, Eric; Lesage, Suzanne; Peoc'h, Katell; Brefel Courbon, Christine; Ory Magne, Fabienne

    2016-07-30

    Few patients are reported with dementia with Lewy bodies before fifty years-old, which may partly reflect the difficulty of accurate diagnosis in young population. We report the case of a 44-year-old male with pathologically confirmed sporadic dementia with Lewy bodies, who did not fulfil the revised clinical criteria for this disease. We document this atypical case with clinical and cognitive evaluation, imaging, biochemistry, genetics and pathology investigations. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease was first suspected in this patient with no previous medical history, who developed acute and rapid cognitive impairment, L-dopa-non-responsive parkinsonism, and delusion. Positive 14-3-3 protein was initially detected in cerebrospinal fluid and until the late stages of the disease. Severe atrophy with no diffusion hypersignal was found on structural MRI as well as an extensive hypometabolism on (18)F-FDG-PET, in comparison to age-matched healthy volunteers. Genetic investigation found no alpha-synuclein gene mutation. The patient died within 5 years, and post-mortem examination found numerous Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites consistent with pure Lewy body disease. This comprehensively described case illustrates that dementia with Lewy bodies can occur in young patients with atypical clinical presentation. Biochemistry and neuroimaging investigations can sometimes be insufficient to allow accurate diagnostic. More specific markers to support such diagnosis are needed.

  11. Adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccine confers early and full protection against FMDV O1 Manisa in swine.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Sainz, Ignacio; Medina, Gisselle N; Ramirez-Medina, Elizabeth; Koster, Marla J; Grubman, Marvin J; de Los Santos, Teresa

    2017-02-01

    A human adenovirus (Ad5) vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) O1-Manisa subunit vaccine (Ad5-O1Man) was engineered to deliver FMDV O1-Manisa capsid and capsid-processing proteins. Swine inoculated with Ad5-O1Man developed an FMDV-specific humoral response as compared to animals inoculated with an empty Ad5-vector. Vaccinated animals were completely protected against homologous challenge at 7 or 21 days post-vaccination. Potency studies exhibited a PD50 of about 10(7) pfu/animal while a dose of 4×10(7)pfu/animal fully protected swine against FMDV intradermal challenge. In-vitro cross-neutralization analysis distinctly predicted that swine vaccinated with Ad5-O1Man would be protected against challenge with homologous FMDV O1Man Middle East-South Asia (ME-SA) topotype and also against recent outbreak strains of Mya-98 South East Asia (SEA) lineage including O1-UK-2001 and O1-South Korea-2010. These results indicate that recombinant Ad5-O1Man is an effective, safe and cross-reacting vaccine that could potentially be used preventively and in outbreak situations, to control FMDV O Mya-98 lineage in swine. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Evaluation of the Cortisol-to-ACTH Ratio in Dogs with Hypoadrenocorticism, Dogs with Diseases Mimicking Hypoadrenocorticism and in Healthy Dogs.

    PubMed

    Boretti, F S; Meyer, F; Burkhardt, W A; Riond, B; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Reusch, C E; Sieber-Ruckstuhl, N S

    2015-01-01

    The adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test is the gold standard for diagnosing hypoadrenocorticism (HA) in dogs. However, problems with the availability of synthetic ACTH (tetracosactrin/cosyntropin) and increased costs have prompted the need for alternative methods. To prospectively evaluate the cortisol-to-ACTH ratio (CAR) as a screening test for diagnosing canine HA. Twenty three dogs with newly diagnosed HA; 79 dogs with diseases mimicking HA; 30 healthy dogs. Plasma ACTH and baseline cortisol concentrations were measured before i.v. administration of 5 μg/kg ACTH in all dogs. CAR was calculated and the diagnostic performance of ACTH, baseline cortisol, CAR and sodium-to-potassium ratios (SPRs) was assessed based on receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves calculating the area under the ROC curve. The CAR was significantly lower in dogs with HA compared to that in healthy dogs and in those with diseases mimicking HA (P < .0001). There was an overlap between HA dogs and those with HA mimicking diseases, but CAR still was the best parameter for diagnosing HA (ROC AUC 0.998), followed by the ACTH concentration (ROC AUC 0.97), baseline cortisol concentration (ROC AUC 0.96), and SPR (ROC AUC 0.86). With a CAR of >0.01 the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 99%, respectively. Calculation of the CAR is a useful screening test for diagnosing primary HA. As a consequence of the observed overlap between the groups, however, misdiagnosis cannot be completely excluded. Moreover, additional studies are needed to evaluate the diagnostic reliability of CAR in more dogs with secondary HA. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  13. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus: An update on an emerging and re-emerging viral disease of swine.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recognized in the late 1980’s in North America and Europe the syndrome that caused reproductive and respiratory problems in swine was initially called “Mystery Swine Disease” and is now termed “Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS)”. In the early 1990’s an arterivirus, referred to as ...

  14. Glutaraldehyde Inactivation of Exotic Animal Viruses in Swine Heart Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, H. R.; Blackwell, J. H.; Walker, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Glutaraldehyde, 0.2%, in a 1:100 (wt/vol) ratio, inactivated four animal viruses (foot-and-mouth disease, swine vesicular disease, African swine fever, hog cholera) in swine heart tissues during 11-day exposures at 22 to 26°C. PMID:225989

  15. Scleroderma Mimickers

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Nadia D.; Hummers, Laura K.

    2017-01-01

    Opinion statement Cutaneous fibrosing disorders encompass a diverse array of diseases united by the presence of varying degrees of dermal sclerosis. The quality and distribution of skin involvement, presence or absence of systemic complications and unique associated laboratory abnormalities often help to distinguish between these diseases. It is imperative that an effort is made to accurately differentiate between scleroderma and its mimics, in order to guide long-term management and facilitate implementation of the appropriate treatment modality where indicated. PMID:28473954

  16. Challenging mimickers of primary systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Miloslavsky, Eli M; Stone, John H; Unizony, Sebastian H

    2015-01-01

    The need to distinguish true primary systemic vasculitis from its multiple potential mimickers is one of the most challenging diagnostic conundrums in clinical medicine. This article reviews 9 challenging vasculitis mimickers: fibromuscular dysplasia, calciphylaxis, segmental arterial mediolysis, antiphospholipid syndrome, hypereosinophilic syndrome, lymphomatoid granulomatosis, malignant atrophic papulosis, livedoid vasculopathy, and immunoglobulin G4-related disease.

  17. African swine fever virus infection of the bushpig (Potamochoerus porcus) and its significance in the epidemiology of the disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E C; Hutchings, G H; Mukarati, N; Wilkinson, P J

    1998-04-30

    Warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus), giant forest hog (Hylochoerus meinertzhageni) and bushpig (Potamochoerus porcus) are known to be susceptible to infection with African swine fever (ASF) virus. Little however, is known about the ecology of the disease in the bushpig. This study has shown that the bushpig remains viraemic for between 35 and 91 days following infection during which time it is able to infect the tick vector O. moubata. These ticks were able to transmit the disease to pigs. The virus persists in the lymphatic tissues for less than 34 weeks. Bushpigs infected with LIL 20/l virus but not VIC T90/l virus transmitted infection to in-contact pigs. Infected domestic pigs did not transmit the infection to in-contact bushpigs. ASF virus was able to replicate in in vitro cultures of bushpig leucocytes and endothelial cells. Recovered bushpigs could be reinfected with some strains of virus but not others. While it has been demonstrated that bushpigs remain carriers of ASFV following infection a complete understanding of their significance in the epidemiology of the disease awaits further investigations of their association with O. moubata.

  18. Motion-based video monitoring for early detection of livestock diseases: The case of African swine fever.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Carrión, Eduardo; Martínez-Avilés, Marta; Ivorra, Benjamin; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Ramos, Ángel Manuel; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Early detection of infectious diseases can substantially reduce the health and economic impacts on livestock production. Here we describe a system for monitoring animal activity based on video and data processing techniques, in order to detect slowdown and weakening due to infection with African swine fever (ASF), one of the most significant threats to the pig industry. The system classifies and quantifies motion-based animal behaviour and daily activity in video sequences, allowing automated and non-intrusive surveillance in real-time. The aim of this system is to evaluate significant changes in animals' motion after being experimentally infected with ASF virus. Indeed, pig mobility declined progressively and fell significantly below pre-infection levels starting at four days after infection at a confidence level of 95%. Furthermore, daily motion decreased in infected animals by approximately 10% before the detection of the disease by clinical signs. These results show the promise of video processing techniques for real-time early detection of livestock infectious diseases.

  19. 76 FR 28910 - Importation of Live Swine, Swine Semen, Pork, and Pork Products From Liechtenstein and Switzerland

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... are dangerous and destructive communicable diseases of ruminants and swine. Sections 94.9 and 94.10 of... ruminant and swine meat and products to the United States are subject to certain restrictions to...

  20. Development of a Luminex assay for the detection of swine antibodies to non-structural proteins of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsu-Han; Lee, Fan; Lin, Yeou-Liang; Pan, Chu-Hsiang; Shih, Chia-Ni; Lee, Ming-Chang; Tsai, Hsiang-Jung

    2013-10-31

    Foot-and mouth disease (FMD), swine vesicular disease (SVD), and vesicular stomatitis (VS) are highly contagious vesicular diseases of swine but are not easy to differentiate clinically. For the purpose of instant detecting of FMD and differentiating it from the other vesicular diseases, a Luminex assay was developed. Sera from 64 infected, 307 vaccinated, and 280 naïve pigs were tested by the Luminex assay. Diagnostic sensitivity of the assay was 100%. Diagnostic specificity of the assay was 98.7% in vaccinated pigs and 97.5% to 100% in naïve pigs. Agreement between the results from the Luminex assay and those from a 3ABC polypeptide blocking ELISA was 96.3% with kappa statistics of 0.92. The Luminex assay can detect the immune response to NSP-3ABC in swine as early as eight days post-infection. Moreover, all of the 15 vaccinated but unprotected pigs were all detected by the Luminex assay. The results indicated that the Luminex assay has potential with specificity in detecting antibodies to FMDV 3ABC NSP and in distinguishing FMDV-infected pigs from with either SVDV or VSV. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Benign fibrous dysplasia on [(11)C]choline PET: a potential mimicker of disease in patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chris N; Hunt, Christopher H; Lehman, Vance T; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Diehn, Felix E; Schwartz, Kara M; Eckel, Laurence J

    2012-08-01

    We present the case of a 74-year-old male with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer who underwent [(11)C]choline PET/CT. The PET/CT demonstrated an intense focus of uptake within the skull base that was initially felt to potentially represent metastatic disease. Subsequent evaluation with MRI and dedicated thin-section CT revealed this area to be benign fibrous dysplasia of the bone. The focal uptake on PET/CT with [(11)C]choline in benign fibrous dysplasia represents a potential mimicker of metastatic disease. Due to recognizing this benign process, our patient was able to avoid systemic treatment and/or focal radiation and was treated with cryotherapy for biopsy-proven local recurrence within the prostate bed. While benign fibrous dysplasia can demonstrate increased radiotracer uptake on other modalities (i.e., bone scintigraphy, FDG PET/CT), its appearance on [(11)C]choline PET/CT has been largely overlooked in the literature. With the increasing use of [(11)C]choline PET/CT for biochemical recurrent prostate cancer evaluation, it is important to understand this potential mimicker of disease.

  2. Recoding structural glycoprotein E2 in classical swine fever virus (CSFV) produces complete virus attenuation in swine and protects infected animals against disease.

    PubMed

    Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Risatti, Guillermo R; Holinka, Lauren G; O'Donnell, Vivian; Carlson, Jolene; Alfano, Marialexia; Rodriguez, Luis L; Carrillo, Consuelo; Gladue, Douglas P; Borca, Manuel V

    2016-07-01

    Controlling classical swine fever (CSF) mainly involves vaccination with live attenuated vaccines (LAV). Experimental CSFV LAVs has been lately developed through reverse genetics using several different approaches. Here we present that codon de-optimization in the major CSFV structural glycoprotein E2 coding region, causes virus attenuation in swine. Four different mutated constructs (pCSFm1-pCSFm4) were designed using various mutational approaches based on the genetic background of the highly virulent strain Brescia (BICv). Three of these constructs produced infectious viruses (CSFm2v, CSFm3v, and CSFm4v). Animals infected with CSFm2v presented a reduced and extended viremia but did not display any CSF-related clinical signs. Animals that were infected with CSFm2v were protected against challenge with virulent parental BICv. This is the first report describing the development of an attenuated CSFV experimental vaccine by codon usage de-optimization, and one of the few examples of virus attenuation using this methodology that is assessed in a natural host. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Using Machine Learning to Predict Swine Movements within a Regional Program to Improve Control of Infectious Diseases in the US.

    PubMed

    Valdes-Donoso, Pablo; VanderWaal, Kimberly; Jarvis, Lovell S; Wayne, Spencer R; Perez, Andres M

    2017-01-01

    Between-farm animal movement is one of the most important factors influencing the spread of infectious diseases in food animals, including in the US swine industry. Understanding the structural network of contacts in a food animal industry is prerequisite to planning for efficient production strategies and for effective disease control measures. Unfortunately, data regarding between-farm animal movements in the US are not systematically collected and thus, such information is often unavailable. In this paper, we develop a procedure to replicate the structure of a network, making use of partial data available, and subsequently use the model developed to predict animal movements among sites in 34 Minnesota counties. First, we summarized two networks of swine producing facilities in Minnesota, then we used a machine learning technique referred to as random forest, an ensemble of independent classification trees, to estimate the probability of pig movements between farms and/or markets sites located in two counties in Minnesota. The model was calibrated and tested by comparing predicted data and observed data in those two counties for which data were available. Finally, the model was used to predict animal movements in sites located across 34 Minnesota counties. Variables that were important in predicting pig movements included between-site distance, ownership, and production type of the sending and receiving farms and/or markets. Using a weighted-kernel approach to describe spatial variation in the centrality measures of the predicted network, we showed that the south-central region of the study area exhibited high aggregation of predicted pig movements. Our results show an overlap with the distribution of outbreaks of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, which is believed to be transmitted, at least in part, though animal movements. While the correspondence of movements and disease is not a causal test, it suggests that the predicted network may approximate

  4. Using Machine Learning to Predict Swine Movements within a Regional Program to Improve Control of Infectious Diseases in the US

    PubMed Central

    Valdes-Donoso, Pablo; VanderWaal, Kimberly; Jarvis, Lovell S.; Wayne, Spencer R.; Perez, Andres M.

    2017-01-01

    Between-farm animal movement is one of the most important factors influencing the spread of infectious diseases in food animals, including in the US swine industry. Understanding the structural network of contacts in a food animal industry is prerequisite to planning for efficient production strategies and for effective disease control measures. Unfortunately, data regarding between-farm animal movements in the US are not systematically collected and thus, such information is often unavailable. In this paper, we develop a procedure to replicate the structure of a network, making use of partial data available, and subsequently use the model developed to predict animal movements among sites in 34 Minnesota counties. First, we summarized two networks of swine producing facilities in Minnesota, then we used a machine learning technique referred to as random forest, an ensemble of independent classification trees, to estimate the probability of pig movements between farms and/or markets sites located in two counties in Minnesota. The model was calibrated and tested by comparing predicted data and observed data in those two counties for which data were available. Finally, the model was used to predict animal movements in sites located across 34 Minnesota counties. Variables that were important in predicting pig movements included between-site distance, ownership, and production type of the sending and receiving farms and/or markets. Using a weighted-kernel approach to describe spatial variation in the centrality measures of the predicted network, we showed that the south-central region of the study area exhibited high aggregation of predicted pig movements. Our results show an overlap with the distribution of outbreaks of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, which is believed to be transmitted, at least in part, though animal movements. While the correspondence of movements and disease is not a causal test, it suggests that the predicted network may approximate

  5. Carotid Endothelial VCAM-1 Is an Early Marker of Carotid Atherosclerosis and Predicts Coronary Artery Disease in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Masseau, I.; Bowles, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim was to determine if endothelial VCAM-1 (eVCAM-1) expression in the common carotid artery (CCA) would correlate with predictive markers of atherosclerotic disease, would precede reduction of markers of endothelial cell function and would predict coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods and results Carotid arterial segments (bifurcation, proximal and distal CCA) were harvested from 14 and 24 month-old male castrated familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) swine, a model of spontaneous atherosclerosis. Quantification of local expression of eVCAM-1, intimal macrophage accumulation, oxidative stress, intima-media (I/M) ratio, intima-media thickness (IMT), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated eNOS (p-eNOS) in selected regions of the carotids revealed a relationship between local inflammation and atheroscle-rotic plaque progression. Importantly, inflammation was not uniform throughout the CCA. Endo-thelial VCAM-1 expression was the greatest at the bifurcation and increased with age. Finally, eV-CAM-1 best estimated the severity of CAD compared to blood levels of glucose, hypercholestero-lemia, carotid IMT, and p-eNOS. Conclusion Our data suggested that eVCAM-1 was closely associated with atherosclerotic plaque progression and preceded impairment of EDD. Thus, this study supported the use of carotid VCAM-1 targeting agents to estimate the severity of CAD. PMID:26702331

  6. [Serological detection of Brucella suis, influenza virus and Aujeszky's disease virus in backyard and small swine holders in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Dibarbora, Marina; Cappuccio, Javier A; Aznar, María N; Bessone, Fernando A; Piscitelli, Hernán; Pereda, Ariel J; Pérez, Daniel R

    Farmers raising less than 100 sows represent more than 99% of swine producers in Argentina, although little is known about their sanitary status and productive characteristics in the country. Sanitary and productive information was obtained. Furthermore, samples for serological studies were taken to detect antibodies against Brucella suis (Bs), Aujeszky's disease virus (AV) and influenza virus (IV) in 68 backyard and small producers with less than 100 sows located in the north, central and south regions of Argentina. Antibodies against H1 pandemic were detected in 80% of the farms while 11%, 11.7% and 6.0% of the producers were positive to influenza H3 cluster 2, AV and Bs, respectively. None of the producers was aware of the risk factors concerning the transmission of diseases from pigs to humans. A percentage of 47% of them buy pigs for breeding from other farmers and markets. With regard to biosecurity measures, only 16% of the farms had perimeter fences. The results of this study demonstrate that productive characterization and disease surveys are important to improve productivity and to reduce the risk of disease transmission among animals and humans. The study of sanitary status and risk factors is necessary for better control and eradication of diseases in backyard or small producers. More representative studies at country level should be carried out to detect the pathogensthat circulate and, with this knowledge, to implement prevention and control measures. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of H-Index and Other Bibliometric Indicators to Evaluate Research Productivity Outcome on Swine Diseases.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Ivan; Cortey, Martí; Olvera, Àlex; Segalés, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    H-index is the most commonly applied tool to evaluate scientific productivity. In this study, the use of the H-index to evaluate scientific production in swine veterinary medicine was explored. A database of 137 pig infectious agents was constructed, including its taxonomic division, zoonotic potential, status as emerging pathogen and whether it was OIE-listed. The H-index and the total number of citations were calculated for those pathogens, the location of the affiliation of the first author of each paper included in the H-index core was registered and, for the ten pathogens with the highest H-index, evolution over time was measured. H-index values were compared to the M quotient, A-index, G-index, HG-index and the G/H ratio. H-indices were found to be severely affected by search accuracy and the database was hand curated. Swine pathogen H-indexes were highly dispersed ranging from 0 to 106 and were generally higher for pathogens causing endemic diseases in large pig producing countries. Indeed, the three top pathogens were Escherichia coli, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and Porcine circovirus type 2 with H-indices 106, 95 and 85, respectively. H-indices of viruses and bacteria were significantly higher (P<0.001) than other pathogen types. Also, non-zoonotic pathogens had higher H-indices than zoonotic pathogens (p<0.009) while no differences could be found for being listed by the OIE. For emerging diseases, only non-emerging viruses had higher H-index (p = 0.02). The study of H-indexes over time revealed three general patterns and that they had increased mainly after the 1980's. As expected, there were strong geographic patterns in terms of authorship and North America (38%) and Europe (46%) coped the majority of the papers. Finally, in order to quantify the contribution of a subject to a specific field, a new index "Deciphering Citations Organized by Subject" (Dcos) is proposed.

  8. Use of H-Index and Other Bibliometric Indicators to Evaluate Research Productivity Outcome on Swine Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Olvera, Àlex; Segalés, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    H-index is the most commonly applied tool to evaluate scientific productivity. In this study, the use of the H-index to evaluate scientific production in swine veterinary medicine was explored. A database of 137 pig infectious agents was constructed, including its taxonomic division, zoonotic potential, status as emerging pathogen and whether it was OIE-listed. The H-index and the total number of citations were calculated for those pathogens, the location of the affiliation of the first author of each paper included in the H-index core was registered and, for the ten pathogens with the highest H-index, evolution over time was measured. H-index values were compared to the M quotient, A-index, G-index, HG-index and the G/H ratio. H-indices were found to be severely affected by search accuracy and the database was hand curated. Swine pathogen H-indexes were highly dispersed ranging from 0 to 106 and were generally higher for pathogens causing endemic diseases in large pig producing countries. Indeed, the three top pathogens were Escherichia coli, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and Porcine circovirus type 2 with H-indices 106, 95 and 85, respectively. H-indices of viruses and bacteria were significantly higher (P<0.001) than other pathogen types. Also, non-zoonotic pathogens had higher H-indices than zoonotic pathogens (p<0.009) while no differences could be found for being listed by the OIE. For emerging diseases, only non-emerging viruses had higher H-index (p = 0.02). The study of H-indexes over time revealed three general patterns and that they had increased mainly after the 1980’s. As expected, there were strong geographic patterns in terms of authorship and North America (38%) and Europe (46%) coped the majority of the papers. Finally, in order to quantify the contribution of a subject to a specific field, a new index “Deciphering Citations Organized by Subject” (Dcos) is proposed. PMID:26930283

  9. Urticaria mimickers in children.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Anubhav N; Mathes, Erin F

    2013-01-01

    Acute urticaria is a self-limited cutaneous condition marked by transient, erythematous, and pruritic wheals. It is a hypersensitivity response that is often secondary to infection, medications, or food allergies in children. In contrast, the urticarial "mimickers" described in this review article are often seen in the context of fever and extracutaneous manifestations in pediatric patients. The differential diagnosis ranges from benign and self-limited hypersensitivity responses to multisystem inflammatory diseases. Establishing the correct diagnosis of an urticarial rash in a pediatric patient is necessary to both prevent an unnecessary work up for self-limited conditions and to appropriately recognize and evaluate multisystem inflammatory disorders. Herein, we describe two cases to illustrate the clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, histopathology and differential diagnoses for several mimickers of acute urticaria including: urticaria multiforme, serum sickness like reaction, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy, systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes, and urticarial vasculitis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. An approach to model monitoring and surveillance data of wildlife diseases-exemplified by Classical Swine Fever in wild boar.

    PubMed

    Stahnke, N; Liebscher, V; Staubach, C; Ziller, M

    2013-11-01

    The analysis of epidemiological field data from monitoring and surveillance systems (MOSSs) in wild animals is of great importance in order to evaluate the performance of such systems. By parameter estimation from MOSS data, conclusions about disease dynamics in the observed population can be drawn. To strengthen the analysis, the implementation of a maximum likelihood estimation is the main aim of our work. The new approach presented here is based on an underlying simple SIR (susceptible-infected-recovered) model for a disease scenario in a wildlife population. The three corresponding classes are assumed to govern the intensities (number of animals in the classes) of non-homogeneous Poisson processes. A sampling rate was defined which describes the process of data collection (for MOSSs). Further, the performance of the diagnostics was implemented in the model by a diagnostic matrix containing misclassification rates. Both descriptions of these MOSS parts were included in the Poisson process approach. For simulation studies, the combined model demonstrates its ability to validly estimate epidemiological parameters, such as the basic reproduction rate R0. These parameters will help the evaluation of existing disease control systems. They will also enable comparison with other simulation models. The model has been tested with data from a Classical Swine Fever (CSF) outbreak in wild boars (Sus scrofa scrofa L.) from a region of Germany (1999-2002). The results show that the hunting strategy as a sole control tool is insufficient to decrease the threshold for susceptible animals to eradicate the disease, since the estimated R0 confirms an ongoing epidemic of CSF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. 9 CFR 94.24 - Restrictions on the importation of pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined European...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined European CSF region. 94.24 Section 94.24 Animals..., EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE... pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined European CSF region. (a) Pork and pork products...

  12. 9 CFR 94.24 - Restrictions on the importation of pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined European...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined European CSF region. 94.24 Section 94.24 Animals..., EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE... pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined European CSF region. (a) Pork and pork products...

  13. 9 CFR 94.24 - Restrictions on the importation of pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined EU CSF...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined EU CSF region. 94.24 Section 94.24 Animals and... NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE... pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined EU CSF region. (a) Pork and pork products. In...

  14. Serological and molecular investigation of the prevalence of Aujeszky's disease in feral swine (Sus scrofa) in the subregions of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Paes, Rita de Cássia da Silva; Fonseca, A A; Monteiro, L A R C; Jardim, G C; Piovezan, U; Herrera, H M; Mauro, R A; Vieira-da-Motta, O

    2013-08-30

    The feral swine (FS) originated from the domestic pig and is present throughout the Brazilian wetland plain (the Pantanal). Aujeszky's disease (AD) was first serologically confirmed in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul (MS) in 2001; however, there was no viral confirmation. The aim of this study was to investigate antibodies against-SuHV-1 in the sera of feral swine in the studied areas, detect SuHV-1 through PCR and classify the viral genome. Among the 218 animals sampled, 186 were analyzed by ELISA, resulting in 88 (47.3%) reactive samples. In the serum neutralization test (SN), 57/179 (31.8%) samples presented antibodies against the AD virus (SuHV-1). By nested PCR, 104 DNA samples were extracted for analysis and confirmed with amplification of a fragment of glycoprotein B (gB) in five samples. The SuHV-1 was detected in 12 samples by using primers for glycoprotein E (gE) and viral genome was classified as Type I by ul44 partial sequencing. The amplification of SuHV-1 glycoprotein fragments in the fetuses of seropositive sows indicate that the vertical transmission contribute to maintain SuHV-1 in a free-living feral swine population. The origin of AD in the feral swine populations of the Pantanal is unknown, however, the determination of viral latency, the vertical transmission of the antigen by the amplification of SuHV-1 glycoprotein fragments in the fetuses of seropositive sows and genome typing contribute to the elucidation of the epidemiology of this disease in the wetlands of MS, Brazil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Interferon-alpha production by swine dendritic cells is inhibited during acute infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Nfon, Charles K; Ferman, Geoffrey S; Toka, Felix N; Gregg, Douglas A; Golde, William T

    2008-03-01

    Viruses have evolved multiple mechanisms to evade the innate immune response, particularly the actions of interferons (IFNs). We have previously reported that exposure of dendritic cells (DCs) to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in vitro yields no infection and induces a strong type I IFN (IFN-alpha and IFN-beta) response, indicating that DCs may play a critical role in the innate response to the virus. In vivo, FMDV induces lymphopenia and reduced T-cell proliferative responses to mitogen, viral effects that may contribute to evasion of early immune responses. In this study we analyzed the in vivo effects of FMDV infection on the IFN-alpha response of two populations of dendritic cells. During the acute phase of infection of swine, production of IFN-alpha from monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and skin-derived DCs (skin DCs) is inhibited. This effect occurs concurrently with rising viral titers in the blood; however, these cells are not productively infected. Interestingly, there are no changes in the capability of these DCs to take up particles and process antigens, indicating that antigen-presenting cell function is normal. These data indicate that inhibition of the IFN-alpha response of dendritic cell populations from blood and skin by FMDV enhances viral pathogenesis in infected animals.

  16. Correlated responses of respiratory disease and immune capacity traits of Landrace pigs selected for Mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine (MPS) lesion.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Toshihiro; Maeda, Kouki; Onodera, Wataru; Kadowaki, Hiroshi; Kojima-Shibata, Chihiro; Suzuki, Eisaku; Uenishi, Hirohide; Satoh, Masahiro; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2016-09-01

    Five generations of Landrace pigs selected for average daily gain, backfat thickness, Mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine (MPS) lesion score, and plasma cortisol levels, was executed to decrease the MPS lesion score. Genetic parameters and correlated genetic responses for respiratory disease and peripheral blood immune traits were estimated in 1395 Landrace pigs. We estimated the negative genetic correlation of MPS lesion score with phagocytic activity (PA) at 7 weeks of age (-0.67). The breeding values of PA at 7 weeks of age and 105 kg body weight and the correlated selection response of the ratio of granular leukocytes to lymphocytes at 105 kg body weight were significantly increased, and sheep red blood cell-specific antibody production (AP) was significantly decreased in a selection-dependent manner. Increasing of natural immunological indicators (e.g. PA) and decreasing of humoral immunological indicator (e.g. AP) were observed due to genetically decreasing MPS lesion score. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. Serological and Molecular Detection of Senecavirus A Associated with an Outbreak of Swine Idiopathic Vesicular Disease and Neonatal Mortality.

    PubMed

    Gimenez-Lirola, Luis Gabriel; Rademacher, Chris; Linhares, Daniel; Harmon, Karen; Rotolo, Marisa; Sun, Yaxuan; Baum, David H; Zimmerman, Jeffrey; Piñeyro, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    We performed a longitudinal field study in a swine breeding herd that presented with an outbreak of vesicular disease (VD) that was associated with an increase in neonatal mortality. Initially, a USDA Foreign Animal Disease (FAD) investigation confirmed the presence of Senecavirus A (SVA) and ruled out the presence of exotic agents that produce vesicular lesions, e.g., foot-and-mouth disease virus and others. Subsequently, serum samples, tonsil swabs, and feces were collected from sows (n = 22) and their piglets (n = 33) beginning 1 week after the onset of the clinical outbreak and weekly for 6 weeks. The presence of SVA RNA was evaluated in all specimens collected by reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) targeting a conserved region of the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR). The serological response (IgG) to SVA was evaluated by the weekly testing of sow and piglet serum samples on a SVA VP1 recombinant protein (rVP1) indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The rVP1 ELISA detected seroconversion against SVA in clinically affected and non-clinically affected sows at early stages of the outbreak as well as maternal SVA antibodies in offspring. Overall, the absence of vesicles (gross lesions) in SVA-infected animals and the variability of RT-qPCR results among specimen type demonstrated that a diagnostic algorithm based on the combination of clinical observations, RT-qPCR in multiple diagnostic specimens, and serology are essential to ensure an accurate diagnosis of SVA. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Serological and Molecular Detection of Senecavirus A Associated with an Outbreak of Swine Idiopathic Vesicular Disease and Neonatal Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Chris; Linhares, Daniel; Harmon, Karen; Rotolo, Marisa; Sun, Yaxuan; Baum, David H.; Zimmerman, Jeffrey; Piñeyro, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We performed a longitudinal field study in a swine breeding herd that presented with an outbreak of vesicular disease (VD) that was associated with an increase in neonatal mortality. Initially, a USDA Foreign Animal Disease (FAD) investigation confirmed the presence of Senecavirus A (SVA) and ruled out the presence of exotic agents that produce vesicular lesions, e.g., foot-and-mouth disease virus and others. Subsequently, serum samples, tonsil swabs, and feces were collected from sows (n = 22) and their piglets (n = 33) beginning 1 week after the onset of the clinical outbreak and weekly for 6 weeks. The presence of SVA RNA was evaluated in all specimens collected by reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) targeting a conserved region of the 5′ untranslated region (5′-UTR). The serological response (IgG) to SVA was evaluated by the weekly testing of sow and piglet serum samples on a SVA VP1 recombinant protein (rVP1) indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The rVP1 ELISA detected seroconversion against SVA in clinically affected and non-clinically affected sows at early stages of the outbreak as well as maternal SVA antibodies in offspring. Overall, the absence of vesicles (gross lesions) in SVA-infected animals and the variability of RT-qPCR results among specimen type demonstrated that a diagnostic algorithm based on the combination of clinical observations, RT-qPCR in multiple diagnostic specimens, and serology are essential to ensure an accurate diagnosis of SVA. PMID:27225408

  19. Constitutively Active IRF7/IRF3 Fusion Protein Completely Protects Swine against Foot-and-Mouth Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Carvajal, Lisbeth; Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Ramirez-Medina, Elizabeth; Rodríguez, Luis L; de Los Santos, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most devastating livestock diseases around the world. Several serotype-specific vaccine formulations exist, but they require about 5 to 7 days to induce protective immunity. Our previous studies have shown that a constitutively active fusion protein of porcine interferon (IFN) regulatory factors (IRF) 7 and 3 [IRF7/3(5D)] strongly induced type I IFN and antiviral genes in vitro and prevented mortality in an FMD mouse model when delivered with a replication-defective adenoviral vector [Ad5-poIRF7/3(5D)]. Here, we demonstrate that pigs treated with 10(8), 10(9), or 10(10) PFU of Ad5-poIRF7/3(5D) 24 h before FMDV challenge were fully protected from FMD clinical signs and did not develop viremia, virus shedding or antibodies against FMDV nonstructural proteins. Pigs treated with Ad5-poIRF7/3(5D) had higher levels of IFN and antiviral activity in serum, and upregulated expression of several IFN-stimulated genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, compared to pigs treated with Ad5-Blue vector control. Importantly, treatment of porcine cultured cells with Ad5-poIRF7/3(5D) inhibited the replication of all 7 FMDV serotypes. In vitro experiments using cultured embryonic fibroblasts derived from IFN receptor knockout mice suggested that the antiviral response induced by Ad5-poIRF7/3(5D) was dependent on type I and III IFN pathways; however, experiments with mice demonstrated that a functional type I IFN pathway mediates Ad5-poIRF7/3(5D) protection conferred in vivo Our studies demonstrate that inoculation with Ad5-poIRF7/3(5D) completely protects swine against FMD by inducing a strong type I IFN response and highlights its potential application to rapidly and effectively prevent FMDV replication and dissemination. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a fast-spreading disease that affects farm animals, with economically and socially devastating consequences. Our study shows that inoculation with a constitutively active

  20. Update on the Risk of Introduction of African Swine Fever by Wild Boar into Disease-Free European Union Countries.

    PubMed

    Bosch, J; Rodríguez, A; Iglesias, I; Muñoz, M J; Jurado, C; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; de la Torre, A

    2016-06-28

    Despite efforts to prevent the appearance and spread of African swine fever (ASF) in the European Union, several Member States are now affected (Lithuania, Poland, Latvia and Estonia). Disease appearance in 2014 was associated with multiple entrances linked to wild boar movement from endemic areas (EFSA Journal, 8, 2015, 1556), but the risk of new introductions remains high (Gallardo et al., Porcine Health Management, 1, and 21) as ASF continues to be active in endemic countries (Russian Federation, Belarus and Ukraine). Since 2014, the number of ASF notifications has increased substantially, particularly in wild boar (WB), in parallel with slow but constant geographical advance of the disease. This situation suggests a real risk of further disease spread into other Member States, posing a great threat to pig production in the EU. Following the principles of the risk-based veterinary surveillance, this article applies a methodology developed by De la Torre et al. (Transboundary and Emerging Diseases, 62, and 272) to assess the relative risk of new introductions of ASF by natural movements of WB according to the current epidemiological situation. This update incorporates the most recent available data and an improved version of the most important risk estimator: an optimized cartographic tool of WB distribution to analyse wild boar suitable habitat. The highest relative risk values were estimated for Slovakia (5) and Romania (5), followed by Finland (4), Czech Republic (3) and Germany (3). Relative risk for Romania and Finland is associated mainly with disease entrance from endemic areas such as the Russian Federation and Ukraine, where the disease is currently spreading; relative risk for Germany and Czech Republic is associated mainly with the potential progress of the disease through the EU, and relative risk for Slovakia is associated with both pathways. WB habitat is the most important risk estimator, whereas WB density is the least significant, suggesting

  1. Efficacy of accelerated hydrogen peroxide(®) disinfectant on foot-and-mouth disease virus, swine vesicular disease virus and Senecavirus A.

    PubMed

    Hole, K; Ahmadpour, F; Krishnan, J; Stansfield, C; Copps, J; Nfon, C

    2017-03-01

    In a laboratory, disinfectants used to inactivate pathogens on contaminated surfaces and to prevent spread of diseases often have adverse side effects on personnel and the environment. It is, therefore, essential to find safer, fast-acting and yet effective disinfectants. The objective of this study was to evaluate an accelerated hydrogen peroxide(®) (AHP(®) )-based disinfectant against high consequence foreign animal disease pathogens such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV), as well as Senecavirus A (SVA), which causes similar lesions as FMDV and SVDV. We tested varying dilutions and contact times of AHP against FMDV, SVDV and SVA by the standard US EPA and modified methods. AHP was effective against all three viruses, albeit at a higher concentration and double the manufacturer recommended contact time when testing wet films of SVDV. AHP is an effective disinfectant against FMDV, SVDV and SVA. AHP-based disinfectant can, therefore, be used in high containment laboratories working with FMDV, SVDV and related pathogens. © 2016 The Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Journal of Applied Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Patterns of gene expression in swine macrophages infected with classical swine fever virus detected by microarray

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical Swine Fever (CSF) is a highly contagious disease of swine that is characterized by fever, hemorrhage, leukopenia, abortion, and high mortality. The etiological agent, CSF virus (CSFV), is classified as a Pestivirus, along with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) and Border Disease Virus...

  3. Protection of guinea pigs and swine by a recombinant adenovirus expressing O serotype of foot-and-mouth disease virus whole capsid and 3C protease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zengjun; Bao, Huifang; Cao, Yimei; Sun, Pu; Guo, Jianhun; Li, Pinghua; Bai, Xingwen; Chen, Yingli; Xie, Baoxia; Li, Dong; Liu, Zaixin; Xie, Qingge

    2008-12-19

    Two recombinant adenoviruses were constructed expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid and 3C/3CD proteins in replicative deficient human adenovirus type 5 vector. Guinea pigs vaccinated with 1-3 x 10(8)TCID(50) Ad-P12x3C recombinant adenovirus were completely protected against 10,000GID(50) homologous virulent FMDV challenge 25 days post vaccination (dpv). Ad-P12x3CD vaccinated guinea pigs were only partially protected. Swine were vaccinated once with 1x10(9)TCID(50) Ad-P12x3C hybrid virus and challenged 28 days later. Three of four vaccinated swine were completely protected against 200 pig 50% infectious doses (ID(50)) of homologous FMDV challenge, and vaccinated pigs developed specific cellular and humoral immune responses. The immune effect of Ad-P12x3C in swine further indicated that the recombinant adenovirus was highly efficient in transferring the foreign gene. This approach may thus be a very hopeful tool for developing FMD live virus vector vaccine.

  4. Evaluation of pyramid training as a method to increase diagnostic sampling capacity during an emergency veterinary response to a swine disease outbreak.

    PubMed

    Canon, Abbey J; Lauterbach, Nicholas; Bates, Jessica; Skoland, Kristin; Thomas, Paul; Ellingson, Josh; Ruston, Chelsea; Breuer, Mary; Gerardy, Kimberlee; Hershberger, Nicole; Hayman, Kristen; Buckley, Alexis; Holtkamp, Derald; Karriker, Locke

    2017-06-15

    OBJECTIVE To develop and evaluate a pyramid training method for teaching techniques for collection of diagnostic samples from swine. DESIGN Experimental trial. SAMPLE 45 veterinary students. PROCEDURES Participants went through a preinstruction assessment to determine their familiarity with the equipment needed and techniques used to collect samples of blood, nasal secretions, feces, and oral fluid from pigs. Participants were then shown a series of videos illustrating the correct equipment and techniques for collecting samples and were provided hands-on pyramid-based instruction wherein a single swine veterinarian trained 2 or 3 participants on each of the techniques and each of those participants, in turn, trained additional participants. Additional assessments were performed after the instruction was completed. RESULTS Following the instruction phase, percentages of participants able to collect adequate samples of blood, nasal secretions, feces, and oral fluid increased, as did scores on a written quiz assessing participants' ability to identify the correct equipment, positioning, and procedures for collection of samples. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that the pyramid training method may be a feasible way to rapidly increase diagnostic sampling capacity during an emergency veterinary response to a swine disease outbreak.

  5. Thirty-Five-Year Presence of African Swine Fever in Sardinia: History, Evolution and Risk Factors for Disease Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Mur, L; Atzeni, M; Martínez-López, B; Feliziani, F; Rolesu, S; Sanchez-Vizcaino, J M

    2016-04-01

    Despite the implementation of control efforts and funds to fight against the disease, African swine fever (ASF) has been present in Sardinia since 1978. It has caused serious problems for both the industrial pig sector and the regional authorities in Sardinia, as well as the economy of Italy and the European Union, which annually supports the costly eradication programme. During this time, ASF has persisted, especially in the central-east part of Sardinia where almost 75% of the total outbreaks are concentrated. The Sardinian pig sector is clearly divided into two categories based on the specialization and industrialization of production: industrial farms, which represents only 1.8% of the farms in the island and non-professional holdings, which are comprised of small producers (90% of pig holdings have <15 pigs) and apply little to no biosecurity measures. Additionally, illegally raised pigs are still bred in free-ranging systems in certain isolated parts of the island, despite strict regulations. The illegal raising of pigs, along with other high-risk management practices (e.g., use of communal areas) are likely the primary reasons for endemic persistence of the virus in this area. The compensation provided to the farmers, and other aspects of the eradication programme have also negatively influenced eradication efforts, indicating that socio-cultural and economic factors play an important role in the epidemiology of ASF on the island. The aim of this study was to comprehensively review the evolution of the 35-year presence of ASF in Sardinia, including control measures, and the environmental and socio-economic factors that may have contributed to disease endemicity on the island. The present review highlights the need for a coordinated programme that considers these socio-economic and environmental factors and includes an assessment of new cost-effective control strategies and diagnostic tools for effectively controlling ASF in Sardinia.

  6. Full protection of swine against foot-and-mouth disease by a bivalent B-cell epitope dendrimer peptide.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Esther; Guerra, Beatriz; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Defaus, Sira; Dekker, Aldo; Andreu, David; Sobrino, Francisco

    2016-05-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. We have reported (Cubillos et al., 2008) that a synthetic dendrimeric peptide consisting of four copies of a B-cell epitope [VP1(136-154)] linked through thioether bonds to a T-cell epitope [3A(21-35)] of FMDV [B4T(thi)] elicits potent B- and T-cell specific responses and confers solid protection in pigs to type C FMDV challenge. Herein we show that downsized versions of this peptide bearing two copies of a B-cell epitope from a type O isolate and using thioether [B2T(thi)] or maleimide [B2T(mal)] conjugation chemistries for their synthesis elicited in swine similar or higher B and T-cell specific responses than tetravalent B4T(thi). Moreover, while partial protection was observed in animals immunized with B4T(thi) (60%) and B2T(thi) (80%), B2T(mal) conferred full (100%) protection against FMDV challenge, associated to high levels of circulating IgG2 and mucosal IgGA, and entirely prevented virus shedding. Interestingly, B2T(mal) is also the most advantageous option in terms of synthetic practicality. Taken together, the results reported here point out to B2T(mal) as a highly valuable, cost-effective FMDV candidate vaccine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky; Anderson, Tavis K; Berger, Kathryn; Bielejec, Filip; Burke, David F; Dudas, Gytis; Fonville, Judith M; Fouchier, Ron Am; Kellam, Paul; Koel, Bjorn F; Lemey, Philippe; Nguyen, Tung; Nuansrichy, Bundit; Peiris, Js Malik; Saito, Takehiko; Simon, Gaelle; Skepner, Eugene; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Webby, Richard J; Van Reeth, Kristien; Brookes, Sharon M; Larsen, Lars; Watson, Simon J; Brown, Ian H; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-04-15

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential. Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds complexity to the risk profiles for the movement of swine and the potential for swine-derived infections in humans.

  8. Classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Moennig, V; Becher, P; Beer, M

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever is a serious and economically important transboundary disease threatening pig production globally. The infection may occur in backyard pigs, feral pig populations and domestic pigs. Whereas there are proven control strategies for the latter pig population, control in backyard pigs with poor biosecurity settings or in wild boar populations of high density still poses a problem in some parts of the world. Laboratory diagnostic methods, efficacious vaccines and contingency plans are in place in most industrialised countries. So far modified live vaccines (MLV) are still the first choice for rapid and reliable immune protection. Since antibodies elicited by conventional MLV cannot be distinguished from antibodies after natural infection, considerable efforts are put into the development of a live marker vaccine accompanied by a serological test. Nevertheless, some remaining gaps with respect to the diagnosis of and vaccination against classical swine fever have been identified.

  9. In Silico Identification of Mimicking Molecules as Defense Inducers Triggering Jasmonic Acid Mediated Immunity against Alternaria Blight Disease in Brassica Species

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rajesh K.; Baunthiyal, Mamta; Shukla, Rohit; Pandey, Dinesh; Taj, Gohar; Kumar, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Alternaria brassicae and Alternaria brassicicola are two major phytopathogenic fungi which cause Alternaria blight, a recalcitrant disease on Brassica crops throughout the world, which is highly destructive and responsible for significant yield losses. Since no resistant source is available against Alternaria blight, therefore, efforts have been made in the present study to identify defense inducer molecules which can induce jasmonic acid (JA) mediated defense against the disease. It is believed that JA triggered defense response will prevent necrotrophic mode of colonization of Alternaria brassicae fungus. The JA receptor, COI1 is one of the potential targets for triggering JA mediated immunity through interaction with JA signal. In the present study, few mimicking compounds more efficient than naturally occurring JA in terms of interaction with COI1 were identified through virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulation studies. A high quality structural model of COI1 was developed using the protein sequence of Brassica rapa. This was followed by virtual screening of 767 analogs of JA from ZINC database for interaction with COI1. Two analogs viz. ZINC27640214 and ZINC43772052 showed more binding affinity with COI1 as compared to naturally occurring JA. Molecular dynamics simulation of COI1 and COI1-JA complex, as well as best screened interacting structural analogs of JA with COI1 was done for 50 ns to validate the stability of system. It was found that ZINC27640214 possesses efficient, stable, and good cell permeability properties. Based on the obtained results and its physicochemical properties, it is capable of mimicking JA signaling and may be used as defense inducers for triggering JA mediated resistance against Alternaria blight, only after further validation through field trials. PMID:28487711

  10. In Silico Identification of Mimicking Molecules as Defense Inducers Triggering Jasmonic Acid Mediated Immunity against Alternaria Blight Disease in Brassica Species.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rajesh K; Baunthiyal, Mamta; Shukla, Rohit; Pandey, Dinesh; Taj, Gohar; Kumar, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Alternaria brassicae and Alternaria brassicicola are two major phytopathogenic fungi which cause Alternaria blight, a recalcitrant disease on Brassica crops throughout the world, which is highly destructive and responsible for significant yield losses. Since no resistant source is available against Alternaria blight, therefore, efforts have been made in the present study to identify defense inducer molecules which can induce jasmonic acid (JA) mediated defense against the disease. It is believed that JA triggered defense response will prevent necrotrophic mode of colonization of Alternaria brassicae fungus. The JA receptor, COI1 is one of the potential targets for triggering JA mediated immunity through interaction with JA signal. In the present study, few mimicking compounds more efficient than naturally occurring JA in terms of interaction with COI1 were identified through virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulation studies. A high quality structural model of COI1 was developed using the protein sequence of Brassica rapa. This was followed by virtual screening of 767 analogs of JA from ZINC database for interaction with COI1. Two analogs viz. ZINC27640214 and ZINC43772052 showed more binding affinity with COI1 as compared to naturally occurring JA. Molecular dynamics simulation of COI1 and COI1-JA complex, as well as best screened interacting structural analogs of JA with COI1 was done for 50 ns to validate the stability of system. It was found that ZINC27640214 possesses efficient, stable, and good cell permeability properties. Based on the obtained results and its physicochemical properties, it is capable of mimicking JA signaling and may be used as defense inducers for triggering JA mediated resistance against Alternaria blight, only after further validation through field trials.

  11. The Epidemiology of African Swine Fever in “Nonendemic” Regions of Zambia (1989–2015): Implications for Disease Prevention and Control

    PubMed Central

    Lubaba, Caesar H.; Kajihara, Masahiro; Mataa, Liywalii; Chambaro, Herman Moses; Sinkala, Yona; Munjita, Samuel Munalula; Nalubamba, King Shimumbo; Samui, Kenny; Pandey, Girja Shanker; Takada, Ayato; Mweene, Aaron S.

    2017-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a highly contagious and deadly viral hemorrhagic disease of swine. In Zambia, ASF was first reported in 1912 in Eastern Province and is currently believed to be endemic in that province only. Strict quarantine measures implemented at the Luangwa River Bridge, the only surface outlet from Eastern Province, appeared to be successful in restricting the disease. However, in 1989, an outbreak occurred for the first time outside the endemic province. Sporadic outbreaks have since occurred almost throughout the country. These events have brought into acute focus our limited understanding of the epidemiology of ASF in Zambia. Here, we review the epidemiology of the disease in areas considered nonendemic from 1989 to 2015. Comprehensive sequence analysis conducted on genetic data of ASF viruses (ASFVs) detected in domestic pigs revealed that p72 genotypes I, II, VIII and XIV have been involved in causing ASF outbreaks in swine during the study period. With the exception of the 1989 outbreak, we found no concrete evidence of dissemination of ASFVs from Eastern Province to other parts of the country. Our analyses revealed a complex epidemiology of the disease with a possibility of sylvatic cycle involvement. Trade and/or movement of pigs and their products, both within and across international borders, appear to have been the major factor in ASFV dissemination. Since ASFVs with the potential to cause countrywide and possibly regional outbreaks, could emerge from “nonendemic regions”, the current ASF control policy in Zambia requires a dramatic shift to ensure a more sustainable pig industry. PMID:28832525

  12. Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of illness at all. How common is swine flu among pigs? H1N1 and H3N2 swine flu viruses are endemic among pig populations in the ... and winter) , but can occur year round. While H1N1 swine viruses have been ... least 1930, H3N2 influenza viruses did not begin circulating among pigs in ...

  13. Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Mhuircheartaigh, Jennifer Ni; Lin, Yu-Ching; Wu, Jim S

    2014-01-01

    Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety. PMID:25114385

  14. Salmonella DIVA vaccine reduces disease, colonization and shedding due to virulent S. Typhimurium infection in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Non-host adapted Salmonella serovars are opportunistic pathogens that can colonize food-producing animals without causing overt disease, including the frequent foodborne pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Interventions against Salmonella need to both enhance food safe...

  15. Experimental Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae challenge in swine: comparison of computed tomographic and radiographic findings during disease.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Carsten; Hennig-Pauka, Isabel; Hoeltig, Doris; Buettner, Falk F R; Beyerbach, Martin; Gasse, Hagen; Gerlach, Gerald-F; Waldmann, Karl-H

    2012-04-30

    In pigs, diseases of the respiratory tract like pleuropneumonia due to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) infection have led to high economic losses for decades. Further research on disease pathogenesis, pathogen-host-interactions and new prophylactic and therapeutic approaches are needed. In most studies, a large number of experimental animals are required to assess lung alterations at different stages of the disease. In order to reduce the required number of animals but nevertheless gather information on the nature and extent of lung alterations in living pigs, a computed tomographic scoring system for quantifying gross pathological findings was developed. In this study, five healthy pigs served as control animals while 24 pigs were infected with App, the causative agent of pleuropneumonia in pigs, in an established model for respiratory tract disease. Computed tomographic (CT) findings during the course of App challenge were verified by radiological imaging, clinical, serological, gross pathology and histological examinations. Findings from clinical examinations and both CT and radiological imaging, were recorded on day 7 and day 21 after challenge. Clinical signs after experimental App challenge were indicative of acute to chronic disease. Lung CT findings of infected pigs comprised ground-glass opacities and consolidation. On day 7 and 21 the clinical scores significantly correlated with the scores of both imaging techniques. At day 21, significant correlations were found between clinical scores, CT scores and lung lesion scores. In 19 out of 22 challenged pigs the determined disease grades (not affected, slightly affected, moderately affected, severely affected) from CT and gross pathological examination were in accordance. Disease classification by radiography and gross pathology agreed in 11 out of 24 pigs. High-resolution, high-contrast CT examination with no overlapping of organs is superior to radiography in the assessment of pneumonic lung lesions

  16. Association of the host immune response with protection using a live attenuated African swine fever virus model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African swine fever (ASF) is a lethal hemorrhagic disease of swine caused by a double-stranded DNA virus, African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV). There is no vaccine to prevent the disease and current control measures are limited to culling and restricted animal movement. Swine infected with attenuated st...

  17. Snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs as a model for swine infectious disease research

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanyun; Haines, Deborah M.; Harding, John C.S.

    2013-01-01

    The current study tested the benefit of commercially available spray-dried bovine colostrum (The Saskatoon Colostrum Company, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) in raising snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs. In experiment 1, 12 SF-pCD pigs received a liquid diet composed mainly of bovine colostrum from birth to day 10; 6 remained on the same liquid diet (COL), and the other 6 were fed a diet composed mainly of milk replacer (RPL) until weaning. In experiment 2, 12 SF-pCD pigs were fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning; after weaning, 6 were fed a starter diet containing 20% (w/w) bovine colostrum powder (STARTER-COL), and the other 6 were fed a starter diet without any bovine colostrum (STARTER-CTRL) until termination (day 42 or day 49). In experiment 1 the COL pigs had significantly fewer fever-days than did the RPL pigs. In experiment 2 diarrhea, typhlocolitis, and pancreatic degeneration developed in 4 of the STARTER-COL pigs after weaning. In both experiments all the pigs fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning survived until termination. All pigs tested free of swine influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Porcine parvovirus. In experiment 2 all the pigs tested free of Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), but some in both groups tested positive for Torque teno virus genogroups 1 and 2. In conclusion, with the use of snatch-farrowing and bovine colostrum, pigs can be raised in the absence of porcine maternal antibodies with 100% survival and freedom from most porcine pathogens of biologic relevance. This model is potentially suitable for animal disease research. PMID:24082397

  18. Snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs as a model for swine infectious disease research.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyun; Haines, Deborah M; Harding, John C S

    2013-04-01

    The current study tested the benefit of commercially available spray-dried bovine colostrum (The Saskatoon Colostrum Company, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) in raising snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs. In experiment 1, 12 SF-pCD pigs received a liquid diet composed mainly of bovine colostrum from birth to day 10; 6 remained on the same liquid diet (COL), and the other 6 were fed a diet composed mainly of milk replacer (RPL) until weaning. In experiment 2, 12 SF-pCD pigs were fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning; after weaning, 6 were fed a starter diet containing 20% (w/w) bovine colostrum powder (STARTER-COL), and the other 6 were fed a starter diet without any bovine colostrum (STARTER-CTRL) until termination (day 42 or day 49). In experiment 1 the COL pigs had significantly fewer fever-days than did the RPL pigs. In experiment 2 diarrhea, typhlocolitis, and pancreatic degeneration developed in 4 of the STARTER-COL pigs after weaning. In both experiments all the pigs fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning survived until termination. All pigs tested free of swine influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Porcine parvovirus. In experiment 2 all the pigs tested free of Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), but some in both groups tested positive for Torque teno virus genogroups 1 and 2. In conclusion, with the use of snatch-farrowing and bovine colostrum, pigs can be raised in the absence of porcine maternal antibodies with 100% survival and freedom from most porcine pathogens of biologic relevance. This model is potentially suitable for animal disease research.

  19. 9 CFR 94.24 - Restrictions on the importation of pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined European...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined European CSF region. 94.24 Section 94.24 Animals..., NEWCASTLE DISEASE, HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE... Restrictions on the importation of pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined European CSF region...

  20. Missed Appendicitis: Mimicking Urologic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Akhavizadegan, Hamed

    2012-01-01

    Appendicitis, a common disease, has different presentations. This has made its diagnosis difficult. This paper aims to present two cases of missed appendicitis with completely urologic presentation and the way that helped us to reach the correct diagnosis. The first case with symptoms fully related to kidney and the second mimicking epididymorchitis hindered prompt diagnosis. Right site of the pain, relapsing fever, frequent physical examination, and resistance to medical treatment were main clues which help us to make correct diagnosis. PMID:23326748

  1. Subcellular distribution of swine vesicular disease virus proteins and alterations induced in infected cells: A comparative study with foot-and-mouth disease virus and vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Acebes, Miguel A.; Gonzalez-Magaldi, Monica; Rosas, Maria F.; Borrego, Belen; Brocchi, Emiliana; Armas-Portela, Rosario; Sobrino, Francisco

    2008-05-10

    The intracellular distribution of swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) proteins and the induced reorganization of endomembranes in IBRS-2 cells were analyzed. Fluorescence to new SVDV capsids appeared first upon infection, concentrated in perinuclear circular structures and colocalized to dsRNA. As in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV)-infected cells, a vesicular pattern was predominantly found in later stages of SVDV capsid morphogenesis that colocalized with those of non-structural proteins 2C, 2BC and 3A. These results suggest that assembly of capsid proteins is associated to the replication complex. Confocal microscopy showed a decreased fluorescence to ER markers (calreticulin and protein disulfide isomerase), and disorganization of cis-Golgi gp74 and trans-Golgi caveolin-1 markers in SVDV- and FMDV-, but not in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-infected cells. Electron microscopy of SVDV-infected cells at an early stage of infection revealed fragmented ER cisternae with expanded lumen and accumulation of large Golgi vesicles, suggesting alterations of vesicle traffic through Golgi compartments. At this early stage, FMDV induced different patterns of ER fragmentation and Golgi alterations. At later stages of SVDV cytopathology, cells showed a completely vacuolated cytoplasm containing vesicles of different sizes. Cell treatment with brefeldin A, which disrupts the Golgi complex, reduced SVDV ({approx} 5 log) and VSV ({approx} 4 log) titers, but did not affect FMDV growth. Thus, three viruses, which share target tissues and clinical signs in natural hosts, induce different intracellular effects in cultured cells.

  2. Performance of a plastic-wrapped composting system for biosecure emergency disposal of disease-related swine mortalities.

    PubMed

    Glanville, Thomas D; Ahn, Heekwon; Akdeniz, Neslihan; Crawford, Benjamin P; Koziel, Jacek A

    2016-02-01

    A passively-ventilated plastic-wrapped composting system initially developed for biosecure disposal of poultry mortalities caused by avian influenza was adapted and tested to assess its potential as an emergency disposal option for disease-related swine mortalities. Fresh air was supplied through perforated plastic tubing routed through the base of the compost pile. The combined air inlet and top vent area is ⩽∼1% of the gas exchange surface of a conventional uncovered windrow. Parameters evaluated included: (1) spatial and temporal variations in matrix moisture content (m.c.), leachate production, and matrix O2 concentrations; (2) extent of soft tissue decomposition; and (3) internal temperature and the success rate in achieving USEPA time/temperature (T) criteria for pathogen reduction. Six envelope materials (wood shavings, corn silage, ground cornstalks, ground oat straw, ground soybean straw, or ground alfalfa hay) and two initial m.c.'s (15-30% w.b. for materials stored indoors, and 45-65% w.b. to simulate materials exposed to precipitation) were tested to determine their effect on performance parameters (1-3). Results of triple-replicated field trials showed that the composting system did not accumulate moisture despite the 150kg carcass water load (65% of 225kg total carcass mass) released during decomposition. Mean compost m.c. in the carcass layer declined by ∼7 percentage points during 8-week trials, and a leachate accumulation was rare. Matrix O2 concentrations for all materials other than silage were ⩾10% using the equivalent of 2m inlet/vent spacing. In silage O2 dropped below 5% in some cases even when 0.5m inlet/vent spacing was used. Eight week soft tissue decomposition ranged from 87% in cornstalks to 72% in silage. Success rates for achievement of USEPA Class B time/temperature criteria ranged from 91% for silage to 33-57% for other materials. Companion laboratory biodegradation studies suggest that Class B success rates can be improved

  3. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... vesicular disease is maintained on the APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals... 260 °C for approximately 210 minutes after which they must be cooked in hot oil (deep-fried) at a...

  4. Swine production.

    PubMed

    Plain, Ronald L; Lawrence, John D

    2003-07-01

    The US swine industry is large and growing. The quantity of pork desired by consumers of US pork is growing at the rate of 1.5%/y. New production systems and new technology have enabled production per sow to grow at a rate of 4% annually in recent years. Consequently, the number of sows in the United States is declining. Because productivity growth is outpacing demand growth, the deflated price of hogs and pork is declining. Hog production and prices continue to exhibit strong seasonal and cyclic patterns. Pork production is usually lowest in the summer and highest in the fall. Production and prices tend to follow 4-year patterns. The US swine industry continues to evolve toward fewer and larger producers who rely on contracts for both hog production and marketing. In 2000, over half of the hogs marketed were from approximately 156 firms marketing more than 50,000 head annually. These producers finished 60% of their production in contract facilities. Over 90% of their marketings were under contract or were owned by a packer. These producers expressed a high level of satisfaction with hog production. Both they and their contract growers were satisfied with production contracts. These large producers were satisfied with their marketing contracts and planned to continue them in the future. The hog industry has changed a great deal in the last decade. There is little reason to believe this rapid rate of change will not continue. This swine industry is highly competitive and profit driven. Profit margins are too small to allow producers the luxury of ignoring new technology and innovative production systems. Consequently, hog production will continue its rapid evolution from traditional agriculture to typical industry.

  5. Isolation and characterization of porcine epidemic diarrhea viruses associated with the 2013 disease outbreak in US swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was detected for the first time in US swine in April 2013 and has caused significant economic loss. Obtaining a US PEDV isolate that can grow efficiently in cell culture is critical for PEDV pathogenesis study, diagnostic assays and vaccine development. It was ...

  6. Glasser's Disease of Swine Produced by the Intratracheal Inoculation of Haemophilus suis

    PubMed Central

    Neil, D. H.; McKay, K. A.; L'Ecuyer, C.; Corner, A. H.

    1969-01-01

    The intracheal inoculation of pigs with Haemophilus suis led to the production of Glasser's disease at every attempt without significant pulmonary involvement. Isolation of this organism from the experimental animals was possible only in the acute phase of the disease. The indirect fluorescent antibody technique when applied to frozen sections of tissues obtained from the experimentally infected pigs at autopsy, revealed a few rod forms but mostly “round bodies” of H. suis in animals from which the organism was isolated, and “round bodies” only in the pigs from which the organism was not isolated. Attention is drawn to the similarities between the lesions caused by H. suis and Mycoplasma hyorhinis, and to the confusion which may result therefrom. It is stressed that the laboratory diagnosis of these two diseases is complicated by the fact that both agents may not be isolated on the media commonly used in diagnostic laboratories. Both organisms necessitate the use of special media where the clinical and autopsy results indicate polyserositis and arthritis. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:4242769

  7. Mutations in the classical swine fever virus NS4B protein affects virulence in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    NS4B is one of the non-structural proteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), the etiological agent of a severe, highly lethal disease of swine. Protein domain analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of the NS4B protein of highly pathogenic CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) identified a Toll/Inte...

  8. Pathogenesis and transmission studies: non-swine influenza A viruses in the swine host

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract Influenza A virus (IAV) causes disease in poultry, pigs, and people with wild waterfowl being the natural reservoir. IAV strains have been periodically transmitted between swine and humans in both directions and avian IAV have also sporadically infected swine. If an individual is infected w...

  9. Mutations in classical swine fever virus NS4B affect virulence in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    NS4B is one of the non-structural proteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), a virus causing a severe disease in swine. Protein domain analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of NS4B in highly pathogenic CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) identified a Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor like domain (TIR...

  10. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  11. Classical swine fever in China: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuzi; Li, Su; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2014-08-06

    Classical swine fever (CSF), caused by Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), is an OIE-listed, highly contagious, often fatal disease of swine worldwide. Currently, the disease is controlled by prophylactic vaccination in China and many other countries using the modified live vaccines derived from C-strain, which was developed in China in the mid-1950s. This minireview summarizes the epidemiology, diagnostic assays, control and challenges of CSF in China. Though CSF is essentially under control, complete eradication of CSF in China remains a challenging task and needs long-term, joint efforts of stakeholders.

  12. Intrathoracic tumor of the chest wall: A case of Castleman's disease mimicking myositis of the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Tampakis, Athanasios; Tampaki, Ekaterini Christina; Daikeler, Thomas; Lardinois, Didier

    2017-01-10

    Castleman's disease refers to a group of uncommon lymphoproliferative disorders which exhibit common lymph-node histological features. A 72-year-old male patient presented with signs of lower limb myositis. Detailed work-up focused initially on evaluating hematological malignancies, the presence of a solid tumor, autoimmune diseases and degenerative disorders of the peripheral nerves. Finally, a PET-CT scan was performed to exclude paraneoplastic manifestations of a primary tumor, revealing  however a tumor of the thoracic wall. The definite histological diagnosis confirmed the presence of unicentric Castleman's disease of the chest wall. The manifestations of the present case suggest that a systemic inflammation might occur in the unicentric form of the disease possibly due to cytokine hypersecretion. The unicentric manifestation of the disease should be well distinguished from the multicentric appearance. Unicentric disease is a surgical condition and warrants a follow-up based on the systemic inflammation that might occur.

  13. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Variant Other Information on Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Virus Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook ... disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses that regularly cause outbreaks of influenza in pigs. ...

  14. Swine Flu -A Comprehensive View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vandana; Sood, Meenakshi

    2012-07-01

    The present article is aimed on comprehensive view of Swine flu. It was first isolated from pigs in 1930 in USA. Pandemic caused by H1N1 in 2009 brought it in limelight. Itís a viral respiratory disease caused by viruses that infects pigs, resulting in nasal secretions, barking cough, decreased appetite, and listless behavior. Swine virus consist of eight RNA strands, one strand derived from human flu strains, two from avian (bird) strains, and five from swine strains. Swine flu spreads from infected person to healthy person by inhalation or ingestion of droplets contaminated with virus while sneezing or coughing. Two antiviral agents have been reported to help prevent or reduce the effects of swine flu, flu shot and nasal spray. WHO recommended for pandemic period to prevent its future outbreaks through vaccines or non-vaccines means. Antiviral drugs effective against this virus are Tamiflu and Relenza. Rapid antigen testing (RIDT), DFA testing, viral culture, and molecular testing (RT-PCR) are used for its diagnosis in laboratory

  15. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification for diagnosis of 18 World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) notifiable viral diseases of ruminants, swine and poultry.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Shimaa M G; Ali, Haytham; Chase, Christopher C L; Cepica, Arnost

    2015-12-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a simple, powerful state-of-the-art gene amplification technique used for the rapid diagnosis and early detection of microbial diseases. Many LAMP assays have been developed and validated for important epizootic diseases of livestock. We review the LAMP assays that have been developed for the detection of 18 viruses deemed notifiable of ruminants, swine and poultry by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). LAMP provides a fast (the assay often takes less than an hour), low cost, highly sensitive, highly specific and less laborious alternative to detect infectious disease agents. The LAMP procedure can be completed under isothermal conditions so thermocyclers are not needed. The ease of use of the LAMP assay allows adaptability to field conditions and works well in developing countries with resource-limited laboratories. However, this technology is still underutilized in the field of veterinary diagnostics despite its huge capabilities.

  16. A systems approach to the policy-level risk assessment of exotic animal diseases: network model and application to classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Delgado, João; Pollard, Simon; Snary, Emma; Black, Edgar; Prpich, George; Longhurst, Phil

    2013-08-01

    Exotic animal diseases (EADs) are characterized by their capacity to spread global distances, causing impacts on animal health and welfare with significant economic consequences. We offer a critique of current import risk analysis approaches employed in the EAD field, focusing on their capacity to assess complex systems at a policy level. To address the shortcomings identified, we propose a novel method providing a systematic analysis of the likelihood of a disease incursion, developed by reference to the multibarrier system employed for the United Kingdom. We apply the network model to a policy-level risk assessment of classical swine fever (CSF), a notifiable animal disease caused by the CSF virus. In doing so, we document and discuss a sequence of analyses that describe system vulnerabilities and reveal the critical control points (CCPs) for intervention, reducing the likelihood of U.K. pig herds being exposed to the CSF virus. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  17. Enhanced immunogenicity of multiple-epitopes of foot-and-mouth disease virus fused with porcine interferon alpha in mice and protective efficacy in guinea pigs and swine.

    PubMed

    Du, Yijun; Li, Yufeng; He, Hairong; Qi, Jing; Jiang, Wenming; Wang, Xinglong; Tang, Bo; Cao, Jun; Wang, Xianwei; Jiang, Ping

    2008-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically devastating vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals. In this study, three amino acid residues 21-60, 141-160 and 200-213 from VP1 protein of FMDV were selected as multiple-epitopes (VPe), and a recombinant adenovirus expressing the multiple-epitopes fused with porcine interferon alpha (rAd-pIFN alpha-VPe) was constructed. Six groups of female BALB/c mice (18 mice per group) were inoculated subcutaneously (s.c.) twice at 2-week intervals with the recombinant adenoviruses and the immune responses were examined. Following this the protective efficacy of rAd-pIFN alpha-VPe was examined in guinea pigs and swine. The results showed that both FMDV-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses could be induced by rAd-VPe and increased when rAd-pIFN alpha is included in this regime in mice model. Moreover, the levels of the immune responses in the group inoculated with rAd-pIFN alpha-VPe were significantly higher than the group inoculated with rAd-VPe plus rAd-pIFN alpha. All guinea pigs and swine vaccinated with rAd-pIFN alpha-VPe were completely protected from viral challenge. It demonstrated that recombinant adenovirus rAd-pIFN alpha-VPe might be an attractive candidate vaccine for preventing FMDV infection.

  18. A DNA vaccine encoding foot-and-mouth disease virus B and T-cell epitopes targeted to class II swine leukocyte antigens protects pigs against viral challenge.

    PubMed

    Borrego, Belén; Argilaguet, Jordi M; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Dominguez, Javier; Pérez-Filgueira, Mariano; Escribano, José M; Sobrino, Francisco; Rodriguez, Fernando

    2011-11-01

    Development of efficient and safer vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a must. Previous results obtained in our laboratory have demonstrated that DNA vaccines encoding B and T cell epitopes from type C FMDV, efficiently controlled virus replication in mice, while they did not protect against FMDV challenge in pigs, one of the FMDV natural hosts. The main finding of this work is the ability to improve the protection afforded in swine using a new DNA-vaccine prototype (pCMV-APCH1BTT), encoding FMDV B and T-cell epitopes fused to the single-chain variable fragment of the 1F12 mouse monoclonal antibody that recognizes Class-II Swine Leukocyte antigens. Half of the DNA-immunized pigs were fully protected upon viral challenge, while the remaining animals were partially protected, showing a delayed, shorter and milder disease than control pigs. Full protection in a given vaccinated-pig correlated with the induction of specific IFNγ-secreting T-cells, detectable prior to FMDV-challenge, together with a rapid development of neutralizing antibodies after viral challenge, pointing towards the relevance that both arms of the immune response can play in protection. Our results open new avenues for developing future FMDV subunit vaccines.

  19. 9 CFR 94.24 - Restrictions on the importation of pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined EU CSF...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE... pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined EU CSF region. 94.24 Section 94.24 Animals and...

  20. Characterization of a Novel Chimeric Swine Enteric Coronavirus from Diseased Pigs in Central Eastern Europe in 2016.

    PubMed

    Belsham, G J; Rasmussen, T B; Normann, P; Vaclavek, P; Strandbygaard, B; Bøtner, A

    2016-12-01

    During a severe outbreak of diarrhoea and vomiting in a pig herd in Central Eastern Europe, faecal samples were tested positive for porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV) and negative for transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) using a commercial RT-qPCR assay that can detect both of these coronaviruses. However, further analyses, using other TGEV- and PEDV-specific RT-qPCR assays, provided results inconsistent with infection by either of these viruses. Sequencing of an amplicon (ca. 1.6 kb), generated by an RT-PCR specific for the PEDV S-gene, indicated a very close similarity (ca. 99% identity) to recently described chimeric viruses termed swine enteric coronaviruses (SeCoVs). These viruses (with an RNA genome of ca. 28 kb) were first identified in Italy in samples from 2009 but have not been detected there since 2012. A closely related virus was detected in archived samples in Germany from 2012, but has not been detected subsequently. Building on the initial sequence data, further amplicons were generated and over 9 kb of sequence corresponding to the 3'-terminus of the new SeCoV genome was determined. Sequence comparisons showed that the three known SeCoVs are ≥98% identical across this region and contain the S-gene and 3a sequences from PEDV within a backbone of TGEV, but the viruses are clearly distinct from each other. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that pigs from within the SeCoV-infected herd seroconverted against PEDV but tested negative in a TGEV-specific ELISA that detects antibodies against the S protein. These results indicate that SeCoV is continuing to circulate in Europe and suggest it can cause a disease that is very similar to PED. Specific detection of the chimeric SeCoVs either requires development of a new diagnostic RT-qPCR assay or the combined use of assays targeting the PEDV S-gene and another part of the TGEV genome. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Developmental Origins of Health and Disease in swine: implications for animal production and biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Bulnes, A; Astiz, S; Ovilo, C; Lopez-Bote, C J; Torres-Rovira, L; Barbero, A; Ayuso, M; Garcia-Contreras, C; Vazquez-Gomez, M

    2016-07-01

    The concept of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) addresses, from a large set of epidemiological evidences in human beings and translational studies in animal models, both the importance of genetic predisposition and the determinant role of maternal nutrition during pregnancy on adult morphomics and homeostasis. Compelling evidences suggest that both overnutrition and undernutrition may modify the intrauterine environment of the conceptus and may alter the expression of its genome and therefore its phenotype during prenatal and postnatal life. In fact, the DOHaD concept is an extreme shift in the vision of the factors conditioning adult phenotype and supposes a drastic change from a gene-centric perspective, only modified by lifestyle and nutritional strategies during juvenile development and adulthood, to a more holistic approach in which environmental, parental, and prenatal conditions are strongly determining postnatal development and homeostasis. The implications of DOHaD are profound in all the mammalian species and the present review summarizes current knowledge on causes and consequences of DOHaD in pigs, both for meat production and as a well-recognized model for biomedicine research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A bivalent dendrimeric peptide bearing a T-cell epitope from foot-and-mouth disease virus protein 3A improves humoral response against classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Bohórquez, José Alejandro; Defaus, Sira; Muñoz-González, Sara; Perez-Simó, Marta; Rosell, Rosa; Fraile, Lorenzo; Sobrino, Francisco; Andreu, David; Ganges, Llilianne

    2017-06-15

    Three dendrimeric peptides were synthesized in order to evaluate their immunogenicity and their potential protection against classical swine fever virus (CSFV) in domestic pigs. Construct 1, an optimized version of a previously used dendrimer, had four copies of a B-cell epitope derived from CSFV E2 glycoprotein connected to an also CSFV-derived T-cell epitope through maleimide instead of thioether linkages. Construct 2 was similarly built but included only two copies of the B-cell epitope, and in also bivalent construct 3 the CSFV T-cell epitope was replaced by a previously described one from the 3A protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Animals were inoculated twice with a 21-day interval and challenged 15days after the second immunization. Clinical signs were recorded daily and ELISA tests were performed to detect antibodies against specific peptide and E2. The neutralising antibody response was assessed 13days after challenge. Despite the change to maleimide connectivity, only partial protection against CSFV was again observed. The best clinical protection was observed in group 3. Animals inoculated with constructs 2 and 3 showed higher anti-peptide humoral response, suggesting that two copies of the B-cell epitope are sufficient or even better than four copies for swine immune recognition. In addition, for construct 3 higher neutralizing antibody titres against CSFV were detected. Our results support the immunogenicity of the CSFV B-cell epitope and the cooperative role of the FMDV 3A T-cell epitope in inducing a neutralising response against CSFV in domestic pigs. This is also the first time that the FMDV T-cell epitope shows effectivity in improving swine immune response against a different virus. Our findings highlight the relevance of dendrimeric peptides as a powerful tool for epitope characterization and antiviral strategies development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The putative capsid protein of the newly identified avian hepatitis E virus shares antigenic epitopes with that of swine and human hepatitis E viruses and chicken big liver and spleen disease virus.

    PubMed

    Haqshenas, G; Huang, F F; Fenaux, M; Guenette, D K; Pierson, F W; Larsen, C T; Shivaprasad, H L; Toth, T E; Meng, X J

    2002-09-01

    We recently identified a novel virus, designated avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV), from chickens with hepatitis-splenomegaly (HS) syndrome in the USA. We showed that avian HEV is genetically related to swine and human HEVs. Here we report the antigenic cross-reactivity of the putative open reading frame 2 (ORF2) capsid protein of avian HEV with those of swine and human HEVs and the Australian chicken big liver and spleen disease virus (BLSV). The region encoding the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues of avian HEV ORF2 was cloned into expression vector pRSET-C. The truncated ORF2 protein was expressed in E. coli as a fusion protein and purified by affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis revealed that the avian HEV ORF2 protein reacted with antisera against the Sar-55 strain of human HEV and with convalescent antisera against swine HEV and the US2 strain of human HEV, as well as with antiserum against BLSV. Convalescent sera from specific-pathogen-free chickens experimentally infected with avian HEV also reacted with the recombinant capsid proteins of swine HEV and Sar-55 human HEV. Antisera against the US2 human HEV also reacted with recombinant ORF2 proteins of both swine HEV and Sar-55 human HEV. The antigenic cross-reactivity of the avian HEV putative capsid protein with those of swine and human HEVs was further confirmed, for the most part, by ELISA assays. The data indicate that avian HEV shares certain antigenic epitopes in its putative capsid protein with swine and human HEVs, as well as with BLSV. The results have implications for HEV diagnosis and taxonomy.

  4. Influenza exposure in United States feral swine populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, J.S.; Minnis, R.B.; Campbell, T.A.; Barras, S.; DeYoung, R.W.; Pabilonia, K.; Avery, M.L.; Sullivan, H.; Clark, L.; McLean, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Swine play an important role in the disease ecology of influenza. Having cellular receptors in common with birds and humans, swine provide opportunities for mixed infections and potential for genetic reassortment between avian, human, and porcine influenza. Feral swine populations are rapidly expanding in both numbers and range and are increasingly coming into contact with waterfowl, humans, and agricultural operations. In this study, over 875 feral swine were sampled from six states across the United States for serologic evidence of exposure to influenza. In Oklahoma, Florida, and Missouri, USA, no seropositive feral swine were detected. Seropositive swine were detected in California, Mississippi, and Texas, USA. Antibody prevalences in these states were 1% in Mississippi, 5% in California, and 14.4% in Texas. All seropositive swine were exposed to H3N2 subtype, the predominant subtype currently circulating in domestic swine. The only exceptions were in San Saba County, Texas, where of the 15 seropositive samples, four were positive for H1N1 and seven for both H1N1 and H3N2. In Texas, there was large geographical and temporal variation in antibody prevalence and no obvious connection to domestic swine operations. No evidence of exposure to avian influenza in feral swine was uncovered. From these results it is apparent that influenza in feral swine poses a risk primarily to swine production operations. However, because feral swine share habitat with waterfowl, prey on and scavenge dead and dying birds, are highly mobile, and are increasingly coming into contact with humans, the potential for these animals to become infected with avian or human influenza in addition to swine influenza is a distinct possibility. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  5. A rare case of an ACTH/CRH co-secreting midgut neuroendocrine tumor mimicking Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Streuli, Regina; Krull, Ina; Brändle, Michael; Kolb, Walter; Stalla, Günter; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Enzler-Tschudy, Annette; Bilz, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic ACTH/CRH co-secreting tumors are a very rare cause of Cushing's syndrome and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Differentiating between Cushing's disease and ectopic Cushing's syndrome may be particularly difficult if predominant ectopic CRH secretion leads to pituitary corticotroph hyperplasia that may mimic Cushing's disease during dynamic testing with both dexamethasone and CRH as well as bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS). We present the case of a 24-year-old man diagnosed with ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome caused by an ACTH/CRH co-secreting midgut NET. Both high-dose dexamethasone testing and BIPSS suggested Cushing's disease. However, the clinical presentation with a rather rapid onset of cushingoid features, hyperpigmentation and hypokalemia led to the consideration of ectopic ACTH/CRH-secretion and prompted a further workup. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed a cecal mass which was identified as a predominantly CRH-secreting neuroendocrine tumor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an ACTH/CRH co-secreting tumor of the cecum presenting with biochemical features suggestive of Cushing's disease. The discrimination between a Cushing's disease and ectopic Cushing's syndrome is challenging and has many caveats.Ectopic ACTH/CRH co-secreting tumors are very rare.Dynamic tests as well as BIPSS may be compatible with Cushing's disease in ectopic CRH-secretion.High levels of CRH may induce hyperplasia of the corticotroph cells in the pituitary. This could be the cause of a preserved pituitary response to dexamethasone and CRH.Clinical features of ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism with rapid development of Cushing's syndrome, hyperpigmentation, high circulating levels of cortisol with associated hypokalemia, peripheral edema and proximal myopathy should be a warning flag of ectopic Cushing's syndrome and lead to further investigations.

  6. Inoculation of swine with foot-and-mouth disease SAP-mutant virus induces early protection against disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) leader proteinase (L^pro) cleaves itself from the viral polyprotein and cleaves the translation initiation factor eIF4G. As a result, host cell translation is inhibited, affecting the host innate immune response. We have demonstrated that L^pro is also associated ...

  7. Targeted Proteolysis of Plectin Isoform 1a Accounts for Hemidesmosome Dysfunction in Mice Mimicking the Dominant Skin Blistering Disease EBS-Ogna

    PubMed Central

    Walko, Gernot; Vukasinovic, Nevena; Gross, Karin; Fischer, Irmgard; Sibitz, Sabrina; Fuchs, Peter; Reipert, Siegfried; Jungwirth, Ute; Berger, Walter; Salzer, Ulrich; Carugo, Oliviero; Castañón, Maria J.; Wiche, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in the cytolinker protein plectin account for the multisystem disorders epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) associated with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD), pyloric atresia (EBS-PA), and congenital myasthenia (EBS-CMS). In contrast, a dominant missense mutation leads to the disease EBS-Ogna, manifesting exclusively as skin fragility. We have exploited this trait to study the molecular basis of hemidesmosome failure in EBS-Ogna and to reveal the contribution of plectin to hemidesmosome homeostasis. We generated EBS-Ogna knock-in mice mimicking the human phenotype and show that blistering reflects insufficient protein levels of the hemidesmosome-associated plectin isoform 1a. We found that plectin 1a, in contrast to plectin 1c, the major isoform expressed in epidermal keratinocytes, is proteolytically degraded, supporting the notion that degradation of hemidesmosome-anchored plectin is spatially controlled. Using recombinant proteins, we show that the mutation renders plectin's 190-nm-long coiled-coil rod domain more vulnerable to cleavage by calpains and other proteases activated in the epidermis but not in skeletal muscle. Accordingly, treatment of cultured EBS-Ogna keratinocytes as well as of EBS-Ogna mouse skin with calpain inhibitors resulted in increased plectin 1a protein expression levels. Moreover, we report that plectin's rod domain forms dimeric structures that can further associate laterally into remarkably stable (paracrystalline) polymers. We propose focal self-association of plectin molecules as a novel mechanism contributing to hemidesmosome homeostasis and stabilization. PMID:22144912

  8. Modulation of postural tremors at the wrist by supramaximal electrical median nerve shocks in essential tremor, Parkinson's disease and normal subjects mimicking tremor.

    PubMed

    Britton, T C; Thompson, P D; Day, B L; Rothwell, J C; Findley, L J; Marsden, C D

    1993-10-01

    The response of postural wrist tremors to supramaximal median nerve stimulation was examined in patients with hereditary essential tremor (n = 10) and Parkinson's disease (n = 9), and in normal subjects mimicking wrist tremor (n = 8). The average frequency of on-going tremor was the same in all three groups. Supramaximal peripheral nerve shocks inhibited and then synchronised the rhythmic electromyographic (EMG) activity of all types of tremor. The duration of inhibition ranged from 90 to 210ms, varying inversely with the frequency of on-going tremor. There was no significant difference in mean duration of inhibition or in the timing of the first peak after stimulation on the average rectified EMG records between the three groups. The degree to which supramaximal peripheral nerve shocks could modulate the timing of rhythmic EMG bursts in the forearm flexor muscles was also quantified by deriving a resetting index. No significant difference in mean resetting index of the three groups was found. These results suggest that such studies cannot be used to differentiate between the common causes of postural wrist tremors.

  9. Design and Evaluation of a Multiplex PCR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Genes for Nine Different Virulence Factors Associated with Escherichia coli that Cause Diarrhea and Edema Disease in Swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A multiplex PCR assay was developed for detection and characterization of pathogenic E. coli that cause diarrhea and Edema Disease in swine. This PCR assay was designed as a single reaction for detecting five different adhesins (K88, K99, 987P, F41 and F18), three enterotoxins (LT, STaP, STb), and ...

  10. Using national movement databases to help inform responses to swine disease outbreaks in Scotland: the impact of uncertainty around incursion time

    PubMed Central

    Porphyre, Thibaud; Boden, Lisa A.; Correia-Gomes, Carla; Auty, Harriet K.; Gunn, George J.; Woolhouse, Mark E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Modelling is an important component of contingency planning and control of disease outbreaks. Dynamic network models are considered more useful than static models because they capture important dynamic patterns of farm behaviour as evidenced through animal movements. This study evaluates the usefulness of a dynamic network model of swine fever to predict pre-detection spread via movements of pigs, when there may be considerable uncertainty surrounding the time of incursion of infection. It explores the utility and limitations of animal movement data to inform such models and as such, provides some insight into the impact of improving traceability through real-time animal movement reporting and the use of electronic animal movement databases. The study concludes that the type of premises and uncertainty of the time of disease incursion will affect model accuracy and highlights the need for improvements in these areas. PMID:26833241

  11. Development of a multiplex Luminex assay for detecting swine antibodies to structural and nonstructural proteins of foot-and-mouth disease virus in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsu-Han; Lee, Fan; Lin, Yeou-Liang; Pan, Chu-Hsiang; Shih, Chia-Ni; Tseng, Chun-Hsien; Tsai, Hsiang-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and swine vesicular disease (SVD) are serious vesicular diseases that have devastated swine populations throughout the world. The aim of this study was to develop a multianalyte profiling (xMAP) Luminex assay for the differential detection of antibodies to the FMD virus of structural proteins (SP) and nonstructural proteins (NSP). After the xMAP was optimized, it detected antibodies to SP-VP1 and NSP-3ABC of the FMD virus in a single serum sample. These tests were also compared with 3ABC polypeptide blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and virus neutralization test (VNT) methods for the differential diagnosis and assessment of immune status, respectively. To detect SP antibodies in 661 sera from infected naïve pigs and vaccinated pigs, the diagnostic sensitivity (DSn) and diagnostic specificity (DSp) of the xMAP were 90.0-98.7% and 93.0-96.5%, respectively. To detect NSP antibodies, the DSn was 90% and the DSp ranged from 93.3% to 99.1%. The xMAP can detect the immune response to SP and NSP as early as 4 days postinfection and 8 days postinfection, respectively. Furthermore, the SP and NSP antibodies in all 15 vaccinated but unprotected pigs were detected by xMAP. A comparison of SP and NSP antibodies detected in the sera of the infected samples indicated that the results from the xMAP had a high positive correlation with results from the VNT and a 3ABC polypeptide blocking ELISA assay. However, simultaneous quantitation detected that xMAP had no relationship with the VNT. Furthermore, the specificity was 93.3-94.9% with 3ABC polypeptide blocking ELISA for the FMDV-NSP antibody. The results indicated that xMAP has the potential to detect antibodies to FMDV-SP-VP1 and NSP-3ABC and to distinguish FMDV-infected pigs from pigs infected with the swine vesicular disease virus. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Development of a live attenuated antigenic marker classical swine fever vaccine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical Swine Fever, caused by Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), is a highly contagious disease affecting swine worldwide. The two main strategies for disease control are prophylactic vaccination and non-vaccination “stamping out” policies. In a vaccination-to-live strategy, marker vaccines coul...

  13. A rare case of an ACTH/CRH co-secreting midgut neuroendocrine tumor mimicking Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Streuli, Regina; Krull, Ina; Brändle, Michael; Kolb, Walter; Stalla, Günter; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Enzler-Tschudy, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic ACTH/CRH co-secreting tumors are a very rare cause of Cushing’s syndrome and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Differentiating between Cushing’s disease and ectopic Cushing’s syndrome may be particularly difficult if predominant ectopic CRH secretion leads to pituitary corticotroph hyperplasia that may mimic Cushing’s disease during dynamic testing with both dexamethasone and CRH as well as bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS). We present the case of a 24-year-old man diagnosed with ACTH-dependent Cushing’s syndrome caused by an ACTH/CRH co-secreting midgut NET. Both high-dose dexamethasone testing and BIPSS suggested Cushing’s disease. However, the clinical presentation with a rather rapid onset of cushingoid features, hyperpigmentation and hypokalemia led to the consideration of ectopic ACTH/CRH-secretion and prompted a further workup. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed a cecal mass which was identified as a predominantly CRH-secreting neuroendocrine tumor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an ACTH/CRH co-secreting tumor of the cecum presenting with biochemical features suggestive of Cushing’s disease. Learning points: The discrimination between a Cushing’s disease and ectopic Cushing’s syndrome is challenging and has many caveats. Ectopic ACTH/CRH co-secreting tumors are very rare. Dynamic tests as well as BIPSS may be compatible with Cushing’s disease in ectopic CRH-secretion. High levels of CRH may induce hyperplasia of the corticotroph cells in the pituitary. This could be the cause of a preserved pituitary response to dexamethasone and CRH. Clinical features of ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism with rapid development of Cushing’s syndrome, hyperpigmentation, high circulating levels of cortisol with associated hypokalemia, peripheral edema and proximal myopathy should be a warning flag of ectopic Cushing’s syndrome and lead to further investigations

  14. A novel mutation of α-galactosidase A gene causes Fabry disease mimicking primary erythromelalgia in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wei; Wei, Bin; Zhu, Hao; Miao, Zhigang; Zhang, Weimin; Leng, Cuihua; Li, Jizhen; Zhang, Dan; Sun, Miao; Xu, Xingshun

    2017-05-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked genetic disorder caused by the mutations of α-galactosidase A (GLA, MIM 300644) gene presenting with various clinical symptoms including small-fiber peripheral neuropathy and limb burning pain. Here, we reported a Chinese pedigree with the initial diagnosis of primary erythromelalgia in an autosomal dominant (AD)-inherited pattern. Mutation analysis of SCN9A and GLA genes by direct sequencing and functional analysis of a novel mutation of GLA in cells were performed. Our data did not show any pathological mutations in SCN9A gene; however, a novel missense mutation c.139T>C (p.W47R) of GLA was identified in a male proband as well as two female carriers in this family. Enzyme assay of α-galactosidase A activity showed deficient enzyme activity in male patients and female carriers, further confirming the diagnosis of Fabry disease. Finally, a functional analysis indicated that the replacement of the 47th amino acid tryptophan (W47) with arginine (W47R) or glycine (W47G) led to reduced activity of α-galactosidase A in 293T cells. Therefore, these findings demonstrated that the novel mutation p.W47R of GLA is the cause of Fabry disease. Because Fabry disease and primary erythromelalgia share similar symptoms, it is a good strategy for clinical physicians to perform genetic mutation screenings on both SCN9A and GLA genes in those patients with limb burning pain but without a clear inheritant pattern.

  15. Neurolymphomatosis in Primary Cutaneous CD4+ Pleomorphic Small/Medium-sized T-cell Lymphoma Mimicking Hansen's Disease.

    PubMed

    Khader, Anza; Vineetha, Mary; George, Mamatha; Manakkad, Shiny Padinjarayil; Balakrishnan, Sunitha; Rajan, Uma

    2017-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis (NL) refers to nerve infiltration by neurotropic neoplastic cells in the setting of a known or an unknown hematological malignancy. It typically presents as painful or painless peripheral mononeuropathy, mononeuritis multiplex, polyneuropathy, polyradiculopathy, or cranial neuropathy. A 32-year-old male presented with a hyperpigmented hypoesthetic plaque over the anterolateral aspect of the right leg with thickening of the right common peroneal nerve and foot drop clinically diagnosed as Hansen's disease. Biopsy taken from skin showed infiltrates of pleomorphic small and medium sized lymphocytes in the dermis and subcutis. On immunohistochemistry, the cells were positive for CD3, CD4 and negative for CD8, CD20, and CD30. Ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration of the thickened nerve showed infiltrates of atypical lymphoid cells. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of NL in primary cutaneous CD4+ pleomorphic small/medium-sized T-cell lymphoma was made. The disease responded to systemic chemotherapy and localized radiotherapy with no evidence of relapse during 3 years follow-up. NL in primary cutaneous CD4+ pleomorphic small/medium-sized T-cell lymphoma presenting with manifestations redolent of Hansen's disease is not described in available literature. This case also demonstrates the utility of fine needle aspiration of nerve, a minimally invasive procedure in the diagnosis of NL.

  16. Swine: Selection and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Designed for secondary vocational agriculture students, this text provides an overview of selecting and evaluating swine in Future Farmers of America livestock judging events. The first of four major sections addresses topics such as the main points in evaluating market hogs and breeding swine and provides an example class of swine. Section 2,…

  17. Swine: Selection and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Designed for secondary vocational agriculture students, this text provides an overview of selecting and evaluating swine in Future Farmers of America livestock judging events. The first of four major sections addresses topics such as the main points in evaluating market hogs and breeding swine and provides an example class of swine. Section 2,…

  18. Neuro-Behçet's disease, its mimickers and anti-TNF therapy: a case-based review.

    PubMed

    Neves, Fabricio S; Ferreira, Rafael M; Pereira, Ivanio A; Zimmermann, Adriana F; Lin, Katia

    2013-01-01

    When the central nervous system is the primary affected site in an initial attack of Behçet's disease (BD), the differential diagnosis is particularly challenging. Because the specificity of immunobiologic therapy is growing, the specific diagnosis may impact the chosen therapy. For instance, anti-tumour necrosis factor agents are efficacious in BD but may be harmful in multiple sclerosis or systemic lupus erythematosus. We present two cases with similar neurological features but different diagnosis (BD and systemic lupus erythematosus) as a starting point to review diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for neuro-BD and its differential diagnoses.

  19. A child with Epstein-Barr Virus-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis complicated by coronary artery lesion mimicking Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shogo; Yoshimura, Ken; Tanabe, Yuko; Kimata, Takahisa; Noda, Yukihiro; Kawasaki, Hirohide; Kaneko, Kazunari

    2013-10-01

    There is considerable overlap between hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and Kawasaki disease (KD) in terms of aberrant immune response though the etiology of KD remains unknown. We present a case fulfilling the criteria of both HLH and KD complicated by coronary artery dilatation: HLH was confirmed to be triggered by Epstein-Barr virus. This case alarms us the possibility that even patients with HLH may be complicated by coronary artery lesion, which is one of the hallmarks of KD. We would like to draw attention that if features of KD become apparent in patients with HLH, echocardiographic examinations should be performed not to miss coronary artery lesion.

  20. Megakaryocytes mimicking metastatic breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hoda, Syed A; Resetkova, Erika; Yusuf, Yasmin; Cahan, Anthony; Rosen, Paul P

    2002-05-01

    False-positive diagnosis of lymph nodes occurs when a benign element in a lymph node, or in its capsule, is interpreted as metastatic carcinoma. This report describes a patient with breast carcinoma who had megakaryocytes in axillary sentinel lymph nodes mimicking metastatic carcinoma. The patient had no history of a hematologic disease, and we found no evidence of a concurrent hematopoietic disorder. The megakaryocytes were reactive for CD31, CD61, and von Willebrand factor, but not for cytokeratin (AE1/AE3). Megakaryocytes should be added to the list of benign histologic abnormalities that may simulate metastatic carcinoma in a sentinel lymph node.

  1. Norwegian scabies mimicking rupioid psoriasis*

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Juliana Bastos; de Sousa, Virna Lygia Lobo Rocha; da Trindade Neto, Pedro Bezerra; Paulo Filho, Thomás de Aquino; Cabral, Virgínia Célia Dias Florêncio; Pinheiro, Patrícia Moura Rossiter

    2012-01-01

    Norwegian scabies is a highly contagious skin infestation caused by an ectoparasite, Scarcoptes scabiei var. Hominis, which mainly affects immunosuppressed individuals. Clinically, it may simulate various dermatoses such as psoriasis, Darier's disease, seborrheic dermatitis, among others. This is a case report of a 33-year-old woman, immunocompetent, diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder (cancer phobia), who had erythematous, well-defined plaques, covered with rupioid crusts, on her neck, axillary folds, breast, periumbilical region, groin area, besides upper back and elbows, mimicking an extremely rare variant of psoriasis, denominated rupioid psoriasis. PMID:23197214

  2. The great mimickers of rosacea.

    PubMed

    Olazagasti, Jeannette; Lynch, Peter; Fazel, Nasim

    2014-07-01

    Although rosacea is one of the most common conditions treated by dermatologists, it also is one of the most misunderstood. It is a chronic disorder affecting the central parts of the face and is characterized by frequent flushing; persistent erythema (ie, lasting for at least 3 months); telangiectasia; and interspersed episodes of inflammation with swelling, papules, and pustules. Understanding the clinical variants and disease course of rosacea is important to differentiate this entity from other conditions that can mimic rosacea. Herein we present several mimickers of rosacea that physicians should consider when diagnosing this condition.

  3. Exuberant cortical thymocyte proliferation mimicking T-lymphoblastic lymphoma within recurrent large inguinal lymph node masses of localized Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Rina; Nathwani, Bharat N; Yiakoumis, Xanthi; Moschogiannis, Maria; Sachanas, Sotirios; Stefanaki, Kalliopi; Pangalis, Gerassimos A

    2015-07-01

    We report a 13-year-old adolescent girl, the youngest thus far, with "an indolent T-lymphoblastic" proliferation (~10%) that uniquely presented within recurrent, large inguinal lymph node masses in a predominating (90%) background of Castleman disease. These nodal masses were resected thrice; the patient is well 5 years after diagnosis without further treatment. Histologically, the features of Castleman disease, hyaline vascular type, were present. Importantly, the interfollicular T-lymphoblastic component occurred as multiple clusters and islands of variable shapes and sizes composed of small "lymphoblasts" indistinguishable from normal cortical thymocytes but without thymic epithelial cells. Immunohistochemically, these lymphoblasts were consistent with the intermediate stage of T-cell differentiation (TdT(+)CD34(-)CD99(+)CD1a(+)CD2(+)CD3(+)CD4(+)CD8(+)CD5(+)CD7(+)CD10(+) [subset]), with 80% Ki-67. Molecularly, the T cells were nonclonal. Our case provides evidence for the benign nature of this highly unusual and poorly understood entity; because the current terminology can be readily misinterpreted as an indolent lymphoblastic lymphoma, we suggest a new term accurately reflecting this entity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Control of African swine fever epidemics in industrialized swine populations.

    PubMed

    Halasa, Tariq; Bøtner, Anette; Mortensen, Sten; Christensen, Hanne; Toft, Nils; Boklund, Anette

    2016-12-25

    African swine fever (ASF) is a notifiable infectious disease with a high impact on swine health. The disease is endemic in certain regions in the Baltic countries and has spread to Poland constituting a risk of ASF spread toward Western Europe. Therefore, as part of contingency planning, it is important to explore strategies that can effectively control an epidemic of ASF. In this study, the epidemiological and economic effects of strategies to control the spread of ASF between domestic swine herds were examined using a published model (DTU-DADS-ASF). The control strategies were the basic EU and national strategy (Basic), the basic strategy plus pre-emptive depopulation of neighboring swine herds, and intensive surveillance of herds in the control zones, including testing live or dead animals. Virus spread via wild boar was not modelled. Under the basic control strategy, the median epidemic duration was predicted to be 21days (5th and 95th percentiles; 1-55days), the median number of infected herds was predicted to be 3 herds (1-8), and the total costs were predicted to be €326 million (€256-€442 million). Adding pre-emptive depopulation or intensive surveillance by testing live animals resulted in marginal improvements to the control of the epidemics. However, adding testing of dead animals in the protection and surveillance zones was predicted to be the optimal control scenario for an ASF epidemic in industrialized swine populations without contact to wild boar. This optimal scenario reduced the epidemic duration to 9days (1-38) and the total costs to €294 million (€257-€392 million). Export losses were the driving force of the total costs of the epidemics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A rare case of temporal arteritis with rheumatoid arthritis and interstitial lung disease mimicking pulpo-periodontal pathology

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Sanjay; Palle, Ajay Reddy; Sylvia, Dulapalli Sharon; Renuka, Valli; Challa, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    A 75-year-old male patient was planned for dental treatment due to pain of suspected pulpo-periodontal origin in relation to right maxillary first molar. Careful evaluation revealed the pain to be non-odontogenic in nature and led to the diagnosis of temporal arteritis with rheumatoid arthritis along with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Characteristic findings of temporal arteritis include headache, jaw claudication, visual loss, and constitutional symptoms (malaise, fever, weight loss, loss of appetite). Temporal artery biopsy (TAB) remains the gold standard for diagnosis. Additional diagnostic tests include blood tests (ESR, CRP). This article reports and discusses how the orofacial manifestations can lead to misdiagnosis of temporal arteritis. Hence, temporal arteritis should be included in the differential diagnosis of orofacial pain in the elderly especially to prevent complications like vision loss. PMID:25210275

  6. A rare case of temporal arteritis with rheumatoid arthritis and interstitial lung disease mimicking pulpo-periodontal pathology.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Sanjay; Palle, Ajay Reddy; Sylvia, Dulapalli Sharon; Renuka, Valli; Challa, Radhika

    2014-07-01

    A 75-year-old male patient was planned for dental treatment due to pain of suspected pulpo-periodontal origin in relation to right maxillary first molar. Careful evaluation revealed the pain to be non-odontogenic in nature and led to the diagnosis of temporal arteritis with rheumatoid arthritis along with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Characteristic findings of temporal arteritis include headache, jaw claudication, visual loss, and constitutional symptoms (malaise, fever, weight loss, loss of appetite). Temporal artery biopsy (TAB) remains the gold standard for diagnosis. Additional diagnostic tests include blood tests (ESR, CRP). This article reports and discusses how the orofacial manifestations can lead to misdiagnosis of temporal arteritis. Hence, temporal arteritis should be included in the differential diagnosis of orofacial pain in the elderly especially to prevent complications like vision loss.

  7. Pseudotumoral hemicerebellitis as a mimicker of Lhermitte-Duclos disease in children: does neuroimaging help to differentiate them?

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Steinlin, Maja; Toelle, Sandra P; Beck, Jürgen; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    The clinical presentation and neuroimaging findings of children with pseudotumoral hemicerebellitis (PTHC) and Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD) may be very similar. The differentiation between these entities, however, is important because their management and prognosis are different. We report on three children with PTHC. For all three children, in the acute situation, the differentiation between PTHC and LDD was challenging. A review of the literature shows that a detailed evaluation of conventional and neuroimaging data may help to differentiate between these two entities. A striated folial pattern, brainstem involvement, and prominent veins surrounding the thickened cerebellar foliae on susceptibility weighted imaging favor LDD, while post-contrast enhancement and an increased choline peak on (1)H-Magnetic resonance spectroscopy suggest PTHC.

  8. Presentation of Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis Type 3 Mimicking Wilson Disease: Molecular Genetic Diagnosis and Response to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Dhanpat; Schilsky, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 (PFIC3) is an autosomal recessive disorder of cholestasis of hepatocellular origin, typically seen in infancy or childhood caused by a defect in the ABCB4 located on chromosome 7. Here we report on an older patient, aged 15, who presented with biochemical testing that led to an initial consideration of a diagnosis of Wilson disease (WD) resulting in a delayed diagnosis of PFIC3. Diagnosis of PFIC3 was later confirmed by molecular studies that identified novel mutations in the ABCB4 gene. Cholestasis due to PFIC3 can cause elevated hepatic copper and increased urine copper excretion that overlap with current diagnostic criteria for WD. Molecular diagnostics are very useful for establishing the diagnosis of PFIC3. Ursodeoxycholic acid ameliorates cholestasis in PFIC3, and may help mediate a reduction in hepatic copper content in response to treatment. PMID:26473142

  9.  Acute hepatitis E mimicking a flare of disease in a patient with chronic autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Calisti, Giorgio; Irish, Dianne N; Ijaz, Samreen; Tedder, Richard S; Moore, Kevin

     Acute hepatitis E is becoming increasingly recognised in Europe with up to 40% of the population in Southern France being exposed to the virus, which is harboured in pigs. Patients with known liver disease may present with acute hepatitis E and present a diagnostic challenge. For example patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) who are immunosuppressed and contract hepatitis E may be at increased risk of developing chronicity due to concurrent immunosuppression. Importantly, the diagnosis may be missed with the infection misdiagnosed as an autoimmune flare, and immunosuppression increased by the attending physician, thus enhancing the risk of chronicity of infection leading to progressive liver injury in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of acute hepatitis E in a patient with AIH and discuss the features that helped us differentiating it from an autoimmune flare.

  10. Identifying an outbreak of a novel swine disease using test requests for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome as a syndromic surveillance tool

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Animal disease monitoring and surveillance are crucial for ensuring the health of animals, humans and the environment. Many studies have investigated the utility of monitoring syndromes associated with data from veterinary laboratory submissions, but no research has focused on how negative test results from a veterinary diagnostic laboratory data can be used to improve our knowledge of disease outbreaks. For example, if a diagnostic laboratory was seeing a disproportionate number of negative test results for a known disease could this information be an indication of a novel disease outbreak? The objective of this study was to determine the association between the porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD) outbreak in Ontario 2004–2006 and the results of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PPRSV) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the results of PRRSV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnostic tests requested by veterinarians. Results Retrospective data were collected from the Animal Health Laboratory (AHL) at the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario Canada and were comprised of weekly counts of PRRSV ELISA and PRRSV PCR diagnostic tests requested by swine practitioners from 2000–2007. The results of the PRRSV ELISA and PRRSV PCRs were analysed separately in two models using logistic regression with the dependent variables being: the weekly probability of PRRSV ELISA positivity, and the weekly probability of PRRSV PCR positivity, respectively. The weekly probability of PRRSV PCR positivity decreased during the PVCAD outbreak (OR=0.66, P=0.01). The weekly probability of PRRSV ELISA positivity was not associated with the PCVAD outbreak. Conclusions The results of this study showed that during the PCVAD outbreak in Ontario from December 2004-May 2006, the probability of a positive PRRSV PCR at the AHL decreased. We conclude that when a decrease in test positivity occurs for a known disease, it may suggest that a new

  11. Identifying an outbreak of a novel swine disease using test requests for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome as a syndromic surveillance tool.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Terri L; Friendship, Robert M; Pearl, David L; McEwen, Beverly; Dewey, Catherine E

    2012-10-16

    Animal disease monitoring and surveillance are crucial for ensuring the health of animals, humans and the environment. Many studies have investigated the utility of monitoring syndromes associated with data from veterinary laboratory submissions, but no research has focused on how negative test results from a veterinary diagnostic laboratory data can be used to improve our knowledge of disease outbreaks. For example, if a diagnostic laboratory was seeing a disproportionate number of negative test results for a known disease could this information be an indication of a novel disease outbreak? The objective of this study was to determine the association between the porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD) outbreak in Ontario 2004-2006 and the results of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PPRSV) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the results of PRRSV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnostic tests requested by veterinarians. Retrospective data were collected from the Animal Health Laboratory (AHL) at the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario Canada and were comprised of weekly counts of PRRSV ELISA and PRRSV PCR diagnostic tests requested by swine practitioners from 2000-2007. The results of the PRRSV ELISA and PRRSV PCRs were analysed separately in two models using logistic regression with the dependent variables being: the weekly probability of PRRSV ELISA positivity, and the weekly probability of PRRSV PCR positivity, respectively. The weekly probability of PRRSV PCR positivity decreased during the PVCAD outbreak (OR=0.66, P=0.01). The weekly probability of PRRSV ELISA positivity was not associated with the PCVAD outbreak. The results of this study showed that during the PCVAD outbreak in Ontario from December 2004-May 2006, the probability of a positive PRRSV PCR at the AHL decreased. We conclude that when a decrease in test positivity occurs for a known disease, it may suggest that a new disease agent is emerging in the

  12. 9 CFR 93.504 - Import permits for swine and for swine specimens for diagnostic purposes; and reservation fees...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-mouth disease exists. (3) An application for permit to import swine may also be denied because of... be 100 percent of the cost of providing care, feed, and handling during quarantine, as estimated by... swine from regions where foot-and-mouth disease or rinderpest exists. This paragraph (c) applies to the...

  13. Oncocytic adenomas of thyroid-mimicking benign or metastatic disease on 18F-FDG-PET scan.

    PubMed

    Zandieh, Shahin; Pokieser, Wolfgang; Knoll, Peter; Sonneck-Koenne, Charlotte; Kudlacek, Martina; Mirzaei, Siroos

    2015-06-01

    The literature is sparse concerning 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) accumulation in the Hürthle cell neoplasm (HCN) of the thyroid. Given the difficulty of accurately diagnosing HCN, even with ultrasound (US) and fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB), the ability to accurately characterize these lesions by 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) would be of value. To describe six cases of oncocytic proliferation in the thyroid gland that mimics the presence of metastatic disease and was detected incidentally by an 18F-FDG PET scan. We conducted whole-body 18F-FDG PET examinations for cancer staging in 1862 oncological patients from 2012 to 2013. Among them, six subjects (4 women, 2 men; age range, 45-85 years) with focal-enhanced 18F-FDG accumulation in the thyroid gland were selected from the study population. This study group was further investigated using 99 m-Tc-pertechnetate scintigraphy, US, and FNAB. Two experienced nuclear physicians reviewed the images. Gray-scale US and color Doppler (CD) sonographic examinations of the thyroid were undertaken for all subjects using a sonographic device Logiq 5 Expert (GE Medical Systems, Osaka, Japan) equipped with a 7-12 MHz linear array transducer. In all six cases, abnormal 18F-FDG uptake was found locally in the thyroid. The average SUVmax of the HCN was 5.8 (range, 2.6-16). In all six cases, 99 m-Tc-pertechnetate scintigraphy showed a cold spot. Compared with normal parenchymal vascularity, five of the six masses were shown to be hypervascular by CD ultrasonography. On PET scans, oncocytic proliferations of the thyroid may mimic metastases of other malignancies. The focal-enhanced uptake of 18F-FDG PET may be associated with a focal increase in the metabolic activity of the thyroid parenchyma due to the presence of oncocytes. Our study emphasizes the importance of obtaining cytological evidence before making a diagnosis of metastatic disease. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions

  14. A de novo TUBB4A mutation in a patient with hypomyelination mimicking Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Keiko; Okumura, Akihisa; Ikeno, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Akira; Saito, Akira; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-03-01

    Hypomyelinating leukoencephalopathy is a heterogeneous disorder caused by mutations in several-different genes. Clinical entity of hypomyelination with atrophy of the basal ganglia and cerebellum (H-ABC) is one of them. A male patient showed pendular nystagmus, infantile hypotonia, an abnormal pattern of brain auditory evoked potential, and hypomyelination on brain magnetic resonance imaging, which suggested Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) as the candidate diagnosis; however, no abnormality was found in the proteolipid protein 1 gene (PLP1) that is responsible for PMD. Whole exome sequencing was performed to identify pathogenic mutations in this patient. A de novo mutation was identified in the tubulin 4a gene (TUBB4A), which has been recently reported to be associated with H-ABC. Although the patient did not show any neurological features suggesting H-ABC, such as extrapyramidal or cerebellar signs, radiological findings demonstrated the finding of cerebellar atrophy at the age of 36months. This study suggested us the difficulty of clinical diagnosis for H-ABC early in the life of the patient, which makes predication of prognosis and genetic counseling difficult. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Melorheostosis mimicking synovial osteochondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Chhabra, Avneesh; Samet, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Melorheostosis is an uncommon, sporadic, sclerosing bone lesion that may affect the adjacent soft tissues. It has been associated with many entities such as osteopoikilosis, soft tissue vascular malformations, bone and soft tissue tumors, nephrotic syndrome, segmental limb contractures, osteosarcoma, desmoid tumor, and mesenteric fibromatosis. Synovial osteochondromatosis is a benign neoplasia of the hyaline cartilage presenting as nodules in the subsynovial tissue of a joint or tendon sheath. The intra-articular extension of melorheostosis mimicking synovial osteochondromatosis has not been reported before. In this article, the authors describe an unusual case mimicking synovial chondromatosis arising as a result of melorheostosis and their characteristic imaging findings.

  16. The Amino Acid Substitution Q65H in the 2C Protein of Swine Vesicular Disease Virus Confers Resistance to Golgi Disrupting Drugs.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Caridi, Flavia; González-Magaldi, Mónica; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Sobrino, Francisco; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a porcine pathogen and a member of the species Enterovirus B within the Picornaviridae family. Brefeldin A (BFA) is an inhibitor of guanine nucleotide exchange factors of Arf proteins that induces Golgi complex disassembly and alters the cellular secretory pathway. Since BFA has been shown to inhibit the RNA replication of different enteroviruses, including SVDV, we have analyzed the effect of BFA and of golgicide A (GCA), another Golgi disrupting drug, on SVDV multiplication. BFA and GCA similarly inhibited SVDV production. To investigate the molecular basis of the antiviral effect of BFA, SVDV mutants with increased resistance to BFA were isolated. A single amino acid substitution, Q65H, in the non-structural protein 2C was found to be responsible for increased resistance to BFA. These results provide new insight into the relationship of enteroviruses with the components of the secretory pathway and on the role of SVDV 2C protein in this process.

  17. 9 CFR 94.25 - Restrictions on the importation of live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE... port of arrival. The certification must identify both the exporting region and the region of origin as... the region of origin of the pork or pork products as a region designated in §§ 94.9 and 94.10 as...

  18. Reconstruction of a swine SLA-I protein complex and determination of binding nonameric peptides derived from the foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng-Shan; Fang, Qin-Mei; Li, Yun-Gang; Li, Xin-Sheng; Hao, Hui-Fang; Xia, Chun

    2006-10-15

    No experimental system to date is available to identify viral T-cell epitopes in swine. In order to reconstruct the system for identification of short antigenic peptides, the swine SLA-2 gene was linked to the beta(2)m gene via (G4S)3, a linker encoding a 15-amino acid glycine-rich sequence (G4S)3, using splicing overlap extension-PCR (SOE-PCR). The maltose binding protein (MBP)-SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m fusion protein was expressed and purified in a pMAL-p2X/Escherichia coli TB1 system. The purified MBP-SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m protein was cleaved by factor Xa protease, and further purified by DEAE-Sepharose chromatography. The conformation of the SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m protein was determined by circular dichroism (CD) spectrum. In addition, the refolded SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m protein was used to bind three nonameric peptides derived from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) O subtype VP1. The SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m-associated peptides were detected by mass spectrometry. The molecular weights and amino acid sequences of the peptides were confirmed by primary and secondary spectra, respectively. The results indicate that the SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m was 41.6kDa, and its alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil by CD estimation were 78 aa, 149 aa, 67 aa, and 93 aa, respectively. SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m protein was able to bind the nonameric peptides derived from the FMDV VP1 region: 26-34 (RRQHTDVSF) and 157-165 (RTLPTSFNY). The experimental system demonstrated that the reconstructed SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m protein complex can be used to identify nonameric peptides, including T-cell epitopes in swine.

  19. The costs of preventive activities for exotic contagious diseases-A Danish case study of foot and mouth disease and swine fever.

    PubMed

    Denver, Sigrid; Alban, Lis; Boklund, Anette; Houe, Hans; Mortensen, Sten; Rattenborg, Erik; Tamstorf, Trine Vig; Zobbe, Henrik; Christensen, Tove

    2016-09-01

    The present paper provides an overview of the costs of preventive activities, currently undertaken in Denmark, related to foot and mouth disease (FMD) and classical and African swine fever (SF). Only costs held between outbreaks were included. Costs were divided into public costs and costs paid by the pig and cattle industries, respectively. Data were retrieved from multiple sources such as databases, legal documents, official statistics, yearly reports and expert opinions. As no previous studies have assessed such costs, data collection and estimation procedures were discussed and decided upon in a group of experts from universities, industry, and public authorities. The costs of each preventive activity were related to the type of activity, the number of times the activity was carried out and the share of costs that could be associated with FMD or SF. Uncertainty about parameters was incorporated in the analysis by assuming that the FMD/SF shares of costs as well as total costs for each activity could take on a most likely as well as a minimum and maximum value. A high degree of transparency was prioritized in the cost analysis, which enables reproducibility and easy access to conducting sensitivity analyses. A total of 27 FMD/SF preventive activities were identified. The estimated median (minimum-maximum) of total costs amounted to €32 (18-50) million in 2013. The single most costly FMD/SF related activity, amounting to €8 (5-13) million or 26% of total costs, was a national legal requirement to clean lorries immediately after transportation of live animals. The distribution of costs between stakeholders was estimated to be as follows: pig industry 63%, cattle industry 27%, and the public authorities 10%. Most of the activities focused on reducing the probability of spreading FMD/SF, while only a few activities were directed mainly towards reducing the probability of introduction. Legally required FMD/SF activities (mainly based on EU legislation) accounted

  20. Metabolic, Cardiac and Renal Effects of the Slow Hydrogen Sulfide-Releasing Molecule GYY4137 During Resuscitated Septic Shock in Swine With Pre-Existing Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Nubaum, Benedikt L; Vogt, Josef; Wachter, Ulrich; McCook, Oscar; Wepler, Martin; Matallo, José; Calzia, Enrico; Gröger, Michael; Georgieff, Michael; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Radermacher, Peter; Hafner, Sebastian

    2017-01-19

    Decreased levels of endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) contribute to atherosclerosis, whereas equivocal data are available on H2S effects during sepsis. Moreover, H2S improved glucose utilization in anaesthetized, ventilated, hypothermic mice, but normothermia and/or sepsis blunted this effect. The metabolic effects of H2S in large animals are controversial. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the H2S donor GYY4137 during resuscitated, fecal peritonitis-induced septic shock in swine with genetically and diet-induced coronary artery disease (CAD). 12 and 18 hours after peritonitis induction, pigs received either GYY4137 (10 mg kg, n = 9) or vehicle (n = 8). Before, at 12 and 24 hours of sepsis, we assessed left ventricular (pressure-conductance catheters) and renal (creatinine clearance, blood NGAL levels) function. Endogenous glucose production and glucose oxidation were derived from the plasma glucose isotope and the expiratory CO2/CO2 enrichment during continuous i.v. 1,2,3,4,5,6-C6-glucose infusion. GYY4137 significantly increased aerobic glucose oxidation, which coincided with higher requirements of exogenous glucose to maintain normoglycemia, as well as significantly lower arterial pH and decreased base excess. Apart from significantly lower cardiac eNOS expression and higher troponin levels, GYY4137 did not significantly influence cardiac and kidney function or the systemic inflammatory response. During resuscitated septic shock in swine with CAD, GYY4137 shifted metabolism to preferential carbohydrate utilization. Increased troponin levels are possibly due to reduced local NO availability. Cautious dosing, the timing of GYY4137 administration and interspecies differences most likely account for the absence of any previously described anti-inflammatory or organ-protective effects of GYY4137 in this model.

  1. Pig major acute-phase protein and apolipoprotein A-I responses correlate with the clinical course of experimentally induced African Swine Fever and Aujeszky's disease.

    PubMed

    Carpintero, Rakel; Alonso, Covadonga; Piñeiro, Matilde; Iturralde, María; Andrés, Marta; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique; Madec, Francois; Alava, María A; Piñeiro, Andrés; Lampreave, Fermín

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, we studied the acute phase protein response after experimental virus infection in pigs. The animals were experimentally infected with African Swine Fever (ASF) or Aujeszky's disease (AD) viruses. The clinical course of ASF infection correlated with increasingly high levels of pig Major Acute-phase Protein (pig-MAP) (mean value of 6 mg/mL on day 6 post infection (p.i.), from 6 to 9 times higher than day 0) and sharp apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) decrease (mean value of 0.5 mg/mL, from 4 to 10 times lower than day 0 on day 4 p.i.). AD-clinical signs appeared at day 3 p.i., both in vaccinated (moderate clinical signs) and non-vaccinated pigs (severe outcome within 48 h p.i.). Pig-MAP and apo A-I profiles also followed clinical signs (changing from 0.70 mg/mL to around 3 mg/mL and from around 3 mg/mL to 0.96 mg/mL, respectively in non-vaccinated animals), with minor changes in concentration in the vaccinated group. Haptoglobin levels significantly increased in ASF and AD infected animals (mean maximum values of 2.77 and 3.96 mg/mL, respectively). Minor differences for the C-Reactive Protein in the case of ASF were observed, whereas its concentration increased more than 7 times in AD-infection. The albumin level was not modified in either case. The correlation of clinical signs to our data suggests the potential use of pig-MAP and apo A-I in monitoring infections in swine.

  2. Reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis carrying large virulence plasmids after the foot and mouth disease outbreak in swine in southern Taiwan, and their independent evolution in human and pig.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Chu, Chi-Hong; Chen, Shu-Wun; Yeh, Chia-Ming; Chiu, Chern-Hsun; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Lin, Jiunn-Horng; Chu, Chishih

    2012-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis (S. Choleraesuis) is a highly invasive zoonotic pathogen that causes bacteremia in humans and pigs. The prevalence of S. Choleraesuis in man has gradually decreased since the outbreak of foot and mouth disease in pigs in 1997 in southern Taiwan. The goal of this study was to investigate the change in prevalence of S. Choleraesuis carrying the virulence plasmid (pSCV) in human and swine isolates collected in 1995-2005 and characterize these. 380 isolates were collected from human and swine blood samples. Large pSCVs were determined by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance genes, and the phylogenetic association of these large pSCV were analyzed. The number of isolates harboring the large pSCV was significantly reduced, and their prevalence differed between human and swine isolates. These large pSCVs were a recombinant of original 50-kb pSCV and R plasmid. In addition, some large pSCVs lacked two pSCV-specific deletion regions from pef to repC and from traT to samA. These large pSCVs carried the resistance genes bla(TEM,)aadA2, and sulI, as well as class I integrons of 0.65 and/or 1.9 kb in size, but were inconjugatible. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the large pSCV evolves independently in human and swine isolates. S. Choleraesuis with large pSCV was significantly reduced after the foot and mouth disease outbreak and may evolve in human and swine specific isolates. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Aujeszky's disease and the effects of infection on Japanese swine herd productivity: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Itsuro; Ishizeki, Sayoko; Yamazaki, Hisanori

    2015-05-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is endemic in some regions of Japan. We investigated the effects of PRV infection status on herd productivity. Serum samples were obtained from 48 swine herds in Japan. Within each herd, three serum samples were obtained from growing pigs at four different ages, as well as from sows in low and high parity groups. Sera were tested for antibodies against wild-type PRV via competitive ELISA. Herds were classified into PRV positive and negative groups based on serological results. Herds infected with PRV exhibited postweaning mortalities (6.84%) that were significantly (P=0.0018) higher than those in unaffected herds (4.73%). Because of the reduced productivity in PRV positive herds, the current PRV eradication program must be strengthened.

  4. An rfaH mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium is attenuated in swine and reduces intestinal colonization, fecal shedding, and disease severity due to virulent Salmonella Typhimurium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Swine are often asymptomatic carriers of Salmonella spp., and interventions are needed to limit colonization of swine to enhance food safety and reduce environmental contamination. We evaluated the attenuation and potential vaccine use in pigs of a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant of r...

  5. [Effect of formula of removing both phlegm and blood stasis on Chinese medicine symptom complex score for coronary heart disease Chinese miniature swine model with phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Ren; Ren, Jian-Xun; Li, Lei; Ren, Jun-Guo; Liu, Guang-Yu; Liu, Jian-Xun

    2013-12-01

    To establish the "clinical-mimetic" Chinese medicine symptom complex score method for the coronary heart disease Chinese miniature swine model with phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome, in order to observe the effect of formula of removing both phlegm and blood stasis (TYTZ) on the Chinese medicine symptom complex score for the coronary heart disease Chinese miniature swine model with phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome. Totally 36 Chinese miniature swine were randomly divided to the normal control group, the model group, the Shujiangzhi group, and TYTZ groups with doses of 2.0, 1.0 and 0.5 g x kg(-1), with six in each group. Except for the normal control group, all of the other groups were fed with high fat diet for two weeks. The coronary heart disease model with phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome was established by injuring left anterior descending artery with interventional balloons and continuously feeding with high fat diet for eight weeks. After the operation, the groups were administered with drugs for eight weeks. Their main symptoms, accompanied symptoms, tongue and pulse signs of the coronary heart disease Chinese miniature swine with phlengm-stasis cementation syndrome were observed according to the symptom-graded scoring method. Compared with the model group, TYTZ in different doses could reduce the scores of main symptoms at the 6th and 10th week. Specifically, TYTZ in low dose could reduce the scores of tongue at the 6th week and the scores of accompanied symptoms, and tongue and pulse signs at the 10th week; And TYTZ in high dose could decrease all symptom scores at the 6th and 10th week (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). TYTZ can improve the scores of the main symptoms, accompanied symptoms, tongue and pulse signs in coronary heart disease Chinese miniature swine with phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome. It is suggested that the "clinical-mimetic" objective scoring for syndromes of Chinese miniature swine is of great significant to the development of new

  6. Quantifying the global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled wit...

  7. Geochemical fate of arsenic in swine litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quazi, S.; Makris, K.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Punamiya, P.

    2007-12-01

    Swine diet is often supplemented by organoarsenicals, such as roxarsone to treat diseases and to promote growth. Recent data reported roxarsone degradation under anaerobic conditions in poultry litter, but no such data exist for swine wastes typically stored in unprotected lagoons in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). However, serious environmental health risk may arise upon significant arsenic (As) release into solution. The problem may be exacerbated under certain environmental conditions where organoarsenicals, such as roxarsone transform into the more toxic inorganic As, posing serious health risk to the surrounding ecosystem. The objective of this study were to analyze swine wastes collected from 19 randomly selected CAFOs in the USA for As concentrations, and to determine the geochemical fate of As in the swine waste suspensions. Swine wastes were analyzed for total-recoverable, total soluble, and water-extractable As, which were measured by ICP-MS. Speciation of As was performed following a well-established hyphenated technique using HPLC- ICPMS. Swine waste suspensions differed in solids contents; thus, the particulate matters with varying As concentrations were spiked with roxarsone and incubated under dark/light and aerobic/anaerobic conditions. Findings show the prevalence of inorganic As [As(V)] in swine waste suspension solutions. Roxarsone underwent degradation to both organoarsenicals, such as p-ASA, as well as inorganic arsenate and to a number of unidentified metabolites. Roxarsone degradation kinetics was influenced by the solids content and the air conditions (anaerobic/aerobic) of the swine waste suspensions. Maximum degradation rates were observed under anaerobic conditions, in suspensions which were low in solids content. Roxarsone degradation was primarily microbially-mediated, but in certain cases abiotic degradation was also observed, which were significantly slower.

  8. Patterns of Cellular Gene Expression in Swine Macrophages Infected with Highly Virulent Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Experimental exposure of swine to highly virulent Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) strain Brescia causes an invariably fatal disease of all infected animals by 8 to 14 days post-infection. Host mechanisms involved in this severe outcome of infection have not been clearly established. To understa...

  9. Suitability and limitations of portion-specific abattoir data as part of an early warning system for emerging diseases of swine in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Abattoir data have the potential to provide information for geospatial disease surveillance applications, but the quality of the data and utility for detecting disease outbreaks is not well understood. The objectives of this study were to 1) identify non-disease factors that may bias these data for disease surveillance and 2) determine if major disease events that took place during the study period would be captured using multi-level modelling and scan statistics. We analyzed data collected at all provincially-inspected abattoirs in Ontario, Canada during 2001-2007. During these years there were outbreaks of porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) and swine influenza that produced widespread disease within the province. Negative binomial models with random intercepts for abattoir, to account for repeated measurements within abattoirs, were created. The relationships between partial carcass condemnation rates for pneumonia and nephritis with year, season, agricultural region, stock price, and abattoir processing capacity were explored. The utility of the spatial scan statistic for detecting clusters of high partial carcass condemnation rates in space, time, and space-time was investigated. Results Non-disease factors that were found to be associated with lung and kidney condemnation rates included abattoir processing capacity, agricultural region and season. Yearly trends in predicted condemnation rates varied by agricultural region, and temporal patterns were different for both types of condemnations. Some clusters of high condemnation rates of kidneys with nephritis in time and space-time preceded the timeframe during which case clusters were detected using traditional laboratory data. Yearly kidney condemnation rates related to nephritis lesions in eastern Ontario were most consistent with the trends that were expected in relation to the documented disease outbreaks. Yearly lung condemnation

  10. Suitability and limitations of portion-specific abattoir data as part of an early warning system for emerging diseases of swine in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Bachli, Andrea L; Pearl, David L; Friendship, Robert M; Berke, Olaf

    2012-01-06

    Abattoir data have the potential to provide information for geospatial disease surveillance applications, but the quality of the data and utility for detecting disease outbreaks is not well understood. The objectives of this study were to 1) identify non-disease factors that may bias these data for disease surveillance and 2) determine if major disease events that took place during the study period would be captured using multi-level modelling and scan statistics. We analyzed data collected at all provincially-inspected abattoirs in Ontario, Canada during 2001-2007. During these years there were outbreaks of porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) and swine influenza that produced widespread disease within the province. Negative binomial models with random intercepts for abattoir, to account for repeated measurements within abattoirs, were created. The relationships between partial carcass condemnation rates for pneumonia and nephritis with year, season, agricultural region, stock price, and abattoir processing capacity were explored. The utility of the spatial scan statistic for detecting clusters of high partial carcass condemnation rates in space, time, and space-time was investigated. Non-disease factors that were found to be associated with lung and kidney condemnation rates included abattoir processing capacity, agricultural region and season. Yearly trends in predicted condemnation rates varied by agricultural region, and temporal patterns were different for both types of condemnations. Some clusters of high condemnation rates of kidneys with nephritis in time and space-time preceded the timeframe during which case clusters were detected using traditional laboratory data. Yearly kidney condemnation rates related to nephritis lesions in eastern Ontario were most consistent with the trends that were expected in relation to the documented disease outbreaks. Yearly lung condemnation rates did not

  11. The Bordetella Bps polysaccharide is required for biofilm formation and persistence in the lower respiratory tract of swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is pervasive in swine populations and plays multiple roles in respiratory disease. Additionally, B. bronchiseptica is capable of establishing long-term or chronic infections in swine. Bacterial biofilms are increasingly recognized as important contributors to chronic bacter...

  12. Pseudorabies virus in wild swine: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Müller, T; Hahn, E C; Tottewitz, F; Kramer, M; Klupp, B G; Mettenleiter, T C; Freuling, C

    2011-10-01

    Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV1, syn. Aujeszky's disease virus [ADV] or pseudorabies virus [PrV]), which belongs to the family Herpesviridae, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, genus Varicellovirus is the causative agent of Aujeszky's disease (AD, pseudorabies), a notifiable disease, that causes substantial economic losses to the swine industry in countries, where AD is present. Members of the family Suidae (true pigs) are the only natural hosts for PrV, although the virus can infect numerous other mammals including ruminants, carnivores and rodents. Despite the tremendous progress that has been made in controlling and eliminating PrV in domestic pigs, there is mounting evidence that PrV infections are more widespread in wild swine across the world than originally thought. Unfortunately, our understanding of the extent of PrV infections in these wild populations and of the threat to domestic swine is still fragmentary. This review aims at giving a global perspective on PrV infections in wild swine by scrutinizing the current state of knowledge concerning (i) the global occurrence of PrV infections in free-living populations of wild swine, e.g., wild boar and feral swine, (ii) the molecular characterization of wild swine PrV, (iii) infection characteristics of PrV in populations of wild swine, (iv) the risk of spillover infections to domestic pigs, (v) potential risk-mitigating measures, focusing on further research needs.

  13. Disinfection of foot-and-mouth disease and African swine fever viruses with citric acid and sodium hypochlorite on birch wood carriers.

    PubMed

    Krug, Peter W; Larson, Christopher R; Eslami, Angelique C; Rodriguez, Luis L

    2012-04-23

    Transboundary animal disease viruses such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and African swine fever virus (ASFV) are highly contagious and cause severe morbidity and mortality in livestock. Proper disinfection during an outbreak can help prevent virus spread and will shorten the time for contaminated agriculture facilities to return to food production. Wood surfaces are prevalent at these locations, but there is no standardized method for porous surface disinfection; commercial disinfectants are only certified for use on hard, nonporous surfaces. To model porous surface disinfection in the laboratory, FMDV and ASFV stocks were dried on wood coupons and exposed to citric acid or sodium hypochlorite. We found that 2% citric acid was effective at inactivating both viruses dried on a wood surface by 30 min at 22°C. While 2000 ppm sodium hypochlorite was capable of inactivating ASFV on wood under these conditions, this chemical did not meet the 4-log disinfection threshold for FMDV. Taken together, our data supports the use of chemical disinfectants containing at least 2% citric acid for porous surface disinfection of FMDV and ASFV.

  14. Rapid detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus, influenza A virus and classical swine fever virus by high-speed real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Wernike, Kerstin; Beer, Martin; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    High sensitivity, minor risk of cross-contamination and in particular the rapid reaction time make quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays well suited for outbreak investigations as well as for monitoring epidemics of pathogens. In this study qPCR assays for three highly contagious animal diseases, namely foot-and-mouth-disease (FMD), influenza A (IA) and classical swine fever (CSF) have been developed. Furthermore, an amplification control targeting 18S ribosomal RNA was included. Each assay was validated with samples from infected animals using three different standard qPCR-machines in two thermal profiles: one standard and one high-speed approach, respectively. The high-speed PCR assays allowed the reliable diagnosis of FMD, influenza A and CSF in less than 28 min with an analytical sensitivity of at least 200 genome copies/μl in every case, with slight differences regarding reaction time and sensitivity for the individual PCR-cycler instruments. Therefore, the newly established rapid RT-PCR systems will be a valuable method for the monitoring and control of these three important viruses and will be a robust option for the development of novel molecular pen-side tests.

  15. Direct contact transmission of three different foot-and-mouth disease virus strains in swine demonstrates important strain-specific differences.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Juan M; Tucker, Meghan; Hartwig, Ethan; Bishop, Elizabeth; Arzt, Jonathan; Rodriguez, Luis L

    2012-08-01

    A novel direct contact transmission model for the study of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection of swine was utilized to investigate transmission characteristics of three FMDV strains belonging to serotypes A, O and Asia1. Each strain demonstrated distinct transmission characteristics and required different exposure times to achieve successful contact transmission. While a 4h exposure was sufficient for strain A24 Cruzeiro (A24Cru), both O1 Manisa and Asia1 Shamir transmission required 18 h or more. Viral excretion levels from donors (for all three strains) and virus present in room air (for A24Cru and O1 Manisa) were evaluated and associated with clinical signs and observed transmission pattern. Although all directly inoculated donor animals showed acute FMD, A24Cru had the highest levels of viral shedding in saliva and nasal swabs followed by O1 Manisa and Asia1 Shamir. Virus levels in room air were higher and were detected longer for A24Cru than for O1 Manisa. These results provide direct evidence for important strain-specific variation in transmission characteristics and emphasize the need for thorough evaluation of different FMDV viral strains using a well defined contact transmission methodology. This information is critical for vaccine and biotherapeutic efficacy testing, pathogenesis and disease modeling of FMDV transmission. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. A condition closely mimicking IgG4-related disease despite the absence of serum IgG4 elevation and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration.

    PubMed

    Hara, Satoshi; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Mizushima, Ichiro; Yamada, Kazunori; Fujita, Kentaro; Harada, Kenichi; Matsumura, Masami; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Sato, Yasuharu; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Nagata, Michio

    2016-09-01

    We describe a 74-year-old Japanese man with systemic fibroinflammatory conditions closely resembling those of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). Radiology and histology showed characteristics of IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis, despite normal serum IgG4 value and scanty IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in each organ. This case suggests that a condition closely mimicking IgG4-RD may develop without IgG4-positive plasma cells and those exceptional cases should also be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of IgG4-RD.

  17. A serological survey on classical swine fever (CSF), Aujeszky's disease (AD) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus infections in French wild boars from 1991 to 1998.

    PubMed

    Albina, E; Mesplède, A; Chenut, G; Le Potier, M F; Bourbao, G; Le Gal, S; Leforban, Y

    2000-11-15

    In early 1992, a CSF epizootic was clinically recognised in a wild boar population of approximately 1300 animals within an area of 250km(2) located in the east of France. In order to check the CSF situation in wild boars outside this area, a serological survey was carried out in the rest of France, for 8 consecutive years (1991-1998). This paper reports on the results obtained during this survey which included wild boars shot during the hunting period but also boars reared within fences. Around 1000-2700 sera a year were tested for the presence of antibodies to classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and also to Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV). Out of 12025 sera tested over the whole period, 80 wild boars were found positive for CSF antibodies. Sixty of them were collected on wild boars shot during the years 1992-1994 in the epizootic area located in east of France and 10 were collected in Corsica during the years 1994-1996. The last four positive samples were single reactors coming from areas or farms, which were thereafter confirmed to be serologically negative. These results together with the fact that no disease has been reported so far illustrate that the French wild boar population is probably not concerned by CSF infection (excepted in the east of France where the disease has now become enzootic). Two hundred and forty nine sera were initially detected as CSF positive but confirmed secondarily as positive for border disease (BD) antibodies. This finding shows that wild boars are also susceptible to infection by ruminant pestiviruses. Four hundred and twenty three wild boars have been found positive for ADV antibodies. In addition, from 1993 to 1995, 909 samples were tested for the presence of antibodies to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Thirty three of them were positive. The results on AD and PRRS antibody detection show that wild boars may constitute a reservoir for various infectious diseases of pigs.

  18. Vulnerability of the British swine industry to classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Porphyre, Thibaud; Correia-Gomes, Carla; Chase-Topping, Margo E; Gamado, Kokouvi; Auty, Harriet K; Hutchinson, Ian; Reeves, Aaron; Gunn, George J; Woolhouse, Mark E J

    2017-02-22

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a notifiable, highly contagious viral disease of swine which results in severe welfare and economic consequences in affected countries. To improve preparedness, it is critical to have some understanding of how CSF would spread should it be introduced. Based on the data recorded during the 2000 epidemic of CSF in Great Britain (GB), a spatially explicit, premises-based model was developed to explore the risk of CSF spread in GB. We found that large outbreaks of CSF would be rare and generated from a limited number of areas in GB. Despite the consistently low vulnerability of the British swine industry to large CSF outbreaks, we identified concerns with respect to the role played by the non-commercial sector of the industry. The model further revealed how various epidemiological features may influence the spread of CSF in GB, highlighting the importance of between-farm biosecurity in preventing widespread dissemination of the virus. Knowledge of factors affecting the risk of spread are key components for surveillance planning and resource allocation, and this work provides a valuable stepping stone in guiding policy on CSF surveillance and control in GB.

  19. Vulnerability of the British swine industry to classical swine fever

    PubMed Central

    Porphyre, Thibaud; Correia-Gomes, Carla; Chase-Topping, Margo E.; Gamado, Kokouvi; Auty, Harriet K.; Hutchinson, Ian; Reeves, Aaron; Gunn, George J.; Woolhouse, Mark E. J.

    2017-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a notifiable, highly contagious viral disease of swine which results in severe welfare and economic consequences in affected countries. To improve preparedness, it is critical to have some understanding of how CSF would spread should it be introduced. Based on the data recorded during the 2000 epidemic of CSF in Great Britain (GB), a spatially explicit, premises-based model was developed to explore the risk of CSF spread in GB. We found that large outbreaks of CSF would be rare and generated from a limited number of areas in GB. Despite the consistently low vulnerability of the British swine industry to large CSF outbreaks, we identified concerns with respect to the role played by the non-commercial sector of the industry. The model further revealed how various epidemiological features may influence the spread of CSF in GB, highlighting the importance of between-farm biosecurity in preventing widespread dissemination of the virus. Knowledge of factors affecting the risk of spread are key components for surveillance planning and resource allocation, and this work provides a valuable stepping stone in guiding policy on CSF surveillance and control in GB. PMID:28225040

  20. Classical swine fever in 6- and 11-week-old pigs: haematological and immunological parameters are modulated in pigs with mild clinical disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens; Lohse, Louise; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Ase

    2010-12-01

    The severity of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) infection is believed to be determined by different factors, including the virulence of the strain as well as factors related to the host. In the present study, we infected 6- and 11-week-old pigs of unique sanitary status with CSFV strain Eystrup to elucidate the influence of age on virulence. In both age-groups, a mild clinical course correlated well with the gross-pathological findings at necropsy. The minor variations of clinical, pathological, haematological and immunological parameters between the various age-groups demonstrated that a time-span of approximately 1 month of age did not play a significant role for the severity of CSF disease in young, weaned pigs. The detailed analysis of various haematological and cellular immunological parameters proved to provide a valuable set of objective reference values for healthy control pigs and for pigs with mild clinical CSF disease. Despite that only mild disease occurred in the infected pigs, modulations of haematological and immunological parameters were observed. Depletion of B cell and a number of T cell populations in peripheral blood was observed in both age-groups, however, the changes being most pronounced in the 6-week-old pigs. In the infected pigs, but not in any of the controls, a population of large granulocytes (LG) developed in peripheral blood. The LG, which were demonstrated to be identical to low-density granulocytes, appeared before the development of viraemia. Therefore, we suggest detection of LDG to be used as an additional tool in early CSF diagnosis. The observation that pigs with a unique, high sanitary status only developed mild disease after infection with CSFV strain Eystrup emphasizes the important role of the host in the CSFV virulence puzzle. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. An autopsy-verified case of FTLD-TDP type A with upper motor neuron-predominant motor neuron disease mimicking MM2-thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuichi; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Takekoshi, Akira; Yoshikura, Nobuaki; Asano, Takahiko; Mimuro, Maya; Kimura, Akio; Satoh, Katsuya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    Here we report an autopsy-verified case of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD)-transactivation responsive region (TAR) DNA binding protein (TDP) type A with upper motor neuron-predominant motor neuron disease mimicking MM2-thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). A 69-year-old woman presented with an 11-month history of progressive dementia, irritability, insomnia, and gait disturbance without a family history of dementia or prion disease. Neurological examination revealed severe dementia, frontal signs, and exaggerated bilateral tendon reflexes. Periodic sharp-wave complexes were not observed on the electroencephalogram. Brain diffusion MRI did not reveal abnormal changes. An easy Z score (eZIS) analysis for (99m)Tc-ECD-single photon emission computed tomography ((99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT) revealed a bilateral decrease in thalamic regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). PRNP gene analysis demonstrated methionine homozygosity at codon 129 without mutation. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed normal levels of both 14-3-3 and total tau proteins. Conversely, prion protein was slowly amplified in the CSF by a real-time quaking-induced conversion assay. Her symptoms deteriorated to a state of akinetic mutism, and she died of sudden cardiac arrest, one year after symptom onset.  Despite the SPECT results supporting a clinical diagnosis of MM2-thalamic-type sCJD, a postmortem assessment revealed that this was a case of FTLD-TDP type A, and excluded prion disease. Thus, this case indicates that whereas a bilateral decreasing thalamic rCBF detected by (99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT can be useful for diagnosing MM2-thalamic-type sCJD, it is not sufficiently specific. Postmortem diagnosis remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of this condition.

  2. Brucellosis in spondyloarthritis mimicking an exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Garip, Y; Eser, F; Erten, S; Yilmaz, O; Yildirim, P

    2014-01-01

    Spondyloarthritis are a group of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect the axial skeleton, entheses and peripheral joints and may have extraarticular manifestations such as uveitis, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease. Brucellosis is a systemic infectious disease, endemic in Middle East, Latin America, and Mediterranean countries, which may present manifestations that resemble other diseases posing serious problems of differential diagnosis. Some hallmarks of Brucellosis may mimic a spondyloarthritis flare. In this paper, authors present a clinical case of brucellosis occurring in a patient with spondyloarthritis. Clinical symptoms initially mimicked exacerbation of spondyloarthritis.

  3. Thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis mimicking lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yağci, Begül; Varan, Ali; Uner, Aysegül; Akyüz, Canan; Büyükpamukçu, Münevver

    2008-12-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by clonal expansion of antigen presenting Langerhans cells. Different clinical features can be seen according to the involved organs and systems. Multisystem disease with organ dysfunction is more common in infants, whereas single system disease is usually observed in older children. The disease can affect any system or organ throughout the body. Thymus is a rarely involvement site reported in LCH and usually is accompanied by skin, bone or lung disease. Here we report a 12-year-old male with thymic involvement by LCH clinically mimicking lymphoma.

  4. Genetic characterization of the cell-adapted PanAsia strain of foot-and-mouth disease virus O/Fujian/CHA/5/99 isolated from swine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background According to Office International Des Epizooties (OIE) Bulletin, the PanAsia strain of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) was invaded into the People's Republic of China in May 1999. It was confirmed that the outbreaks occurred in Tibet, Hainan and Fujian provinces. In total, 1280 susceptible animals (68 cattle, 1212 swine) were destroyed for the epidemic control. To investigate the distinct biological properties, we performed plaque assay, estimated the pathogenicity in suckling mice and determined the complete genomic sequence of FMDV swine-isolated O/Fujian/CHA/5/99 strain. In addition, a molecular modeling was carried out with the external capsid proteins. Results The pathogenicity study showed that O/Fujian/CHA/5/99 had high virulence with respect to infection in 3-day-old suckling-mice (LD50 = 10-8.3), compared to O/Tibet/CHA/1/99 (LD50 = 10-7.0) which isolated from bovine. The plaque assay was distinguishable between O/Fujian/CHA/5/99 and O/Tibet/CHA/1/99 by their plaque phenotypes. O/Fujian/CHA/5/99 formed large plaque while O/Tibet/CHA/1/99 formed small plaque. The 8,172 nucleotides (nt) of O/Fujian/CHA/5/99 was sequenced, and a phylogenetic tree was generated from the complete nucleotide sequences of VP1 compared with other FMDV reference strains. The identity data showed that O/Fujian/CHA/5/99 is closely related to O/AS/SKR/2002 (94.1% similarity). Based on multiple sequence alignments, comparison of sequences showed that the characteristic nucleotide/amino acid mutations were found in the whole genome of O/Fujian/CHA/5/99. Conclusion Our finding suggested that C275T substitution in IRES of O/Fujian/CHA/5/99 may induce the stability of domain 3 for the whole element function. The structure prediction indicated that most of 14 amino acid substitutions are fixed in the capsid of O/Fujian/CHA/5/99 around B-C loop and E-F loop of VP2 (antigenic site 2), and G-H loop of VP1 (antigenic site 1), respectively. These results implicated that these

  5. Characterization of an influenza A virus isolated from pigs during an outbreak of respiratory disease in swine and people during a county fair in the United States.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Amy L; Swenson, Sabrina L; Lager, Kelly M; Gauger, Phillip C; Loiacono, Christina; Zhang, Yan

    2009-05-28

    In August 2007, pigs and people became clinically affected by an influenza-like illness during attendance at an Ohio county fair. Influenza A virus was identified from pigs and people, and the virus isolates were characterized as swine H1N1 similar to swine viruses currently circulating in the U.S. pig population. The swine isolate, A/SW/OH/511445/2007 (OH07), was evaluated in an experimental challenge and transmission study reported here. Our results indicate that the OH07 virus was pathogenic in pigs, was transmissible among pigs, and failed to cross-react with many swine H1 anti-sera. Naturally exposed pigs shed virus as early as 3 days and as long as 7 days after contact with experimentally infected pigs. This suggests there was opportunity for exposure of people handling the pigs at the fair. The molecular analysis of the OH07 isolates demonstrated that the eight gene segments were similar to those of currently circulating triple reassortant swine influenza viruses. However, numerous nucleotide changes leading to amino acid changes were demonstrated in the HA gene and throughout the genome as compared to contemporary swine viruses in the same genetic cluster. It remains unknown if any of the amino acid changes were related to the ability of this virus to infect people. The characteristics of the OH07 virus in our pig experimental model as well as the documented human transmission warrant close monitoring of the spread of this virus in pig and human populations.

  6. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae bacterins and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection: induction of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) in the gnotobiotic swine model of PCV2-associated disease.

    PubMed

    Krakowka, Steven; Ellis, John; McNeilly, Francis; Waldner, Cheryl; Rings, D Michael; Allan, Gordon

    2007-07-01

    Groups (5 to 15 per group) of gnotobiotic swine were infected oronasally with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) at 3 days of age and then given 1 of 6 different commercial Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) bacterins as either a single dose (7 d of age, 1 application products) or 2 doses (7 and 21 d of age, 2 application product). Control groups received PCV2 alone (n = 9) or were infected with PCV2 and immunized twice with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (ICFA) (n = 7). Five of 7 (71%) PCV2-infected piglets immunized with KLH/ICFA developed mild or overt PMWS, whereas none of 9 piglets infected with PCV2 alone developed PMWS. Five of 12 (42%) piglets vaccinated with a commercial bacterin containing mineral oil adjuvant developed PMWS following vaccination. None of the PCV2-infected piglets in the other bacterin-vaccinated groups developed PMWS in this model of PCV2-associated disease. This difference in prevalence of PMWS in piglets given the mineral oil-adjuvanted M. hyopneumoniae bacterin and the other M. hyopneumoniae bacterin vaccination groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05).

  7. Swine interferon-induced transmembrane protein, sIFITM3, inhibits foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinfang; Qian, Ping; Wu, Qunfeng; Liu, Shasha; Fan, Wenchun; Zhang, Keshan; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Huawei; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2014-09-01

    The interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 (IFITM3) is a widely expressed potent antiviral effector of the host innate immune system. It restricts a diverse group of pathogenic, enveloped viruses, by interfering with endosomal fusion. In this report, the swine IFITM3 (sIFITM3) gene was cloned. It shares the functionally conserved CD225 domain and multiple critical amino acid residues (Y19, F74, F77, R86 and Y98) with its human ortholog, which are essential for antiviral activity. Ectopic expression of sIFITM3 significantly inhibited non-enveloped foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in BHK-21 cells. Furthermore, sIFITM3 blocked FMDV infection at early steps in the virus life cycle by disrupting viral attachment to the host cell surface. Importantly, inoculation of 2-day-old suckling mice with a plasmid expressing sIFITM3 conferred protection against lethal challenge with FMDV. These results suggest that sIFITM3 is a promising antiviral agent and that can safeguard the host from infection with FMDV.

  8. The Amino Acid Substitution Q65H in the 2C Protein of Swine Vesicular Disease Virus Confers Resistance to Golgi Disrupting Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Caridi, Flavia; González-Magaldi, Mónica; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Sobrino, Francisco; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a porcine pathogen and a member of the species Enterovirus B within the Picornaviridae family. Brefeldin A (BFA) is an inhibitor of guanine nucleotide exchange factors of Arf proteins that induces Golgi complex disassembly and alters the cellular secretory pathway. Since BFA has been shown to inhibit the RNA replication of different enteroviruses, including SVDV, we have analyzed the effect of BFA and of golgicide A (GCA), another Golgi disrupting drug, on SVDV multiplication. BFA and GCA similarly inhibited SVDV production. To investigate the molecular basis of the antiviral effect of BFA, SVDV mutants with increased resistance to BFA were isolated. A single amino acid substitution, Q65H, in the non-structural protein 2C was found to be responsible for increased resistance to BFA. These results provide new insight into the relationship of enteroviruses with the components of the secretory pathway and on the role of SVDV 2C protein in this process. PMID:27199941

  9. The emergence of a new strain of porcine circovirus-2 in Ontario and Quebec swine and its association with severe porcine circovirus associated disease — 2004–2006

    PubMed Central

    Carman, Susy; Cai, Hugh Y.; DeLay, Josepha; A.Youssef, Sameh; McEwen, Beverly J.; Gagnon, Carl A.; Tremblay, Donald; Hazlett, Murray; Lusis, Peter; Fairles, Jim; Alexander, Hazel S.; van Dreumel, Tony

    2008-01-01

    In the late fall of 2004 more severe lesions of porcine circovirus-2 associated disease (PCVAD) than usual occurred during an outbreak of porcine circovirus-2 (PCV-2) infection in Ontario nursery and grower/finisher pigs. The lesions were of unprecedented severity and included diffuse bronchointerstitial pneumonia, granulomatous enteritis, vasculitis, interstitial nephritis, and new lesions of splenic infarction. Some affected herds had up to 50% mortality. The outbreak correlated with the sudden emergence of a variant PCV-2, with PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) type 321. Phylogenetic comparison of ORF2 sequences and full genome sequences showed the new variant to be different from the previously dominant RFLP type 422 viruses, and similar to viruses that had occurred in France and other European and Asian countries. A subsequent retrospective study showed a statistically significant increase in the frequency of histological lesions in lymph node, spleen, lung, small intestine, colon and kidney, for pigs spontaneously infected with RFLP type 321, compared with the older RFLP type 422 strain. Viral burden, based on IHC staining in lymph node, also showed a statistically significant increase in pigs infected with the newer variant RFLP type 321, compared with the older RFLP type 422 strain. This enhanced virulence in pigs infected with PCV-2 RFLP type 321 strain may be related to the genetic differences in this new strain of PCV-2. This virus is now the dominant strain of PCV-2 virus found in Ontario and Quebec swine. PMID:18505190

  10. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  11. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  12. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  13. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  14. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  15. Mad honey intoxication mimicking acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dur, Ali; Sonmez, Ertan; Civelek, Cemil; AhmetTurkdogan, Kenan; AkifVatankulu, Mehmet; Sogut, Ozgur

    2014-09-01

    Mad honey intoxication or grayanotoxin poisoning is caused by consumption of grayanotoxin-containing toxic honey produced from leaves and flowers of the Rhododendron family. Despite the rarity of intoxication cases, the correct diagnosis and treatment are required because of the significance of haemodynamic disturbance and confounding of symptoms for disease identification. We report herein a case of a patient with mad honey intoxication mimicking acute non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction and review the pathophysiology and diagnostic considerations.

  16. Progressive adaptation of a Georgian isolate of African swine fever virus to vero cells leads to a gradual attenuation of virulence in swine corresponding to major changes of the viral genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a contagious and often lethal disease of feral and domestic swine. Experimental vaccines derived from naturally occurring, genetically modified or cell culture-adapted ASFV have been evaluated but no commercial vaccine is available to control African Swine Fev...

  17. Deletion of African swine fever virus Georgia 2007 virulence-associated gene 9GL (B119L) leads to virus attenuation in swine at low doses while inducing an effective protection against homologous challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal viral disease of domestic pigs that has significant economic consequences for swine breeding. The control of African Swine Fever (ASF) has been hampered by the unavailability of vaccines. Experimental vaccines...

  18. African swine fever virus Georgia isolate harboring deletions of MGF360 and MGF505 genes is attenuated in swine and confers protection against challenge with the virulent parental virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal disease of domestic pigs that has significant economic consequences for the swine industry. The control of African Swine Fever (ASF) has been hampered by the unavailability of vaccines. Experimental vaccines h...

  19. THE INFECTION OF FERRETS WITH SWINE INFLUENZA VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1934-01-01

    The experiments described confirm the earlier observation of Smith, Andrewes, and Laidlaw that the swine influenza virus is pathogenic for ferrets when administered intranasally. A disease that is clinically more severe and pathologically more extensive than that described by the above workers is obtained if inoculation with the virus is performed under ether anesthesia. Animals infected in this way show at autopsy an edematous type of pneumonia of lobar distribution which may terminate fatally. The virus maintains its pathogenicity for ferrets when stored in 50 per cent glycerol at refrigerator temperature for as long as 75 days. After serial passage through 16 ferrets the virus is still capable of inducing swine influenza when mixed with H. influenzae suis and administered intranasally to swine. Ferret passage causes no apparent attenuation of the virus for swine. Serum from pigs recovered from swine influenza is capable of neutralizing the ferret-passaged virus for either swine or ferrets. Likewise serum from recovered ferrets neutralizes the swine influenza virus for either ferrets or swine. PMID:19870285

  20. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky; Anderson, Tavis K; Berger, Kathryn; Bielejec, Filip; Burke, David F; Dudas, Gytis; Fonville, Judith M; Fouchier, Ron AM; Kellam, Paul; Koel, Bjorn F; Lemey, Philippe; Nguyen, Tung; Nuansrichy, Bundit; Peiris, JS Malik; Saito, Takehiko; Simon, Gaelle; Skepner, Eugene; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Webby, Richard J; Van Reeth, Kristien; Brookes, Sharon M; Larsen, Lars; Watson, Simon J; Brown, Ian H; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential. Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds complexity to the risk profiles for the movement of swine and the potential for swine-derived infections in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12217.001 PMID:27113719

  1. Combined administration of synthetic RNA and a conventional vaccine improves immune responses and protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus in swine.

    PubMed

    Borrego, Belén; Blanco, Esther; Rodríguez Pulido, Miguel; Mateos, Francisco; Lorenzo, Gema; Cardillo, Sabrina; Smitsaart, Eliana; Sobrino, Francisco; Sáiz, Margarita

    2017-03-16

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the causative agent of a highly contagious disease and a major concern in animal health worldwide. We have previously reported the use of RNA transcripts mimicking structural domains in the non-coding regions of the FMDV RNA as potent type-I interferon (IFN) inducers showing antiviral effect in vivo, as well as their immunomodulatory properties in combination with an FMD vaccine in mice. Here, we describe the enhancing effect of RNA delivery on the immunogenicity and protection induced by a suboptimal dose of a conventional FMD vaccine in pigs. Animals receiving the RNA developed earlier and higher levels of neutralizing antibodies against homologous and heterologous isolates, compared to those immunized with the vaccine alone, and had higher anti-FMDV titers at late times post-vaccination. RNA delivery also induced higher specific T-cell response and protection levels against FMDV challenge. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from pigs inoculated with RNA and the vaccine had a higher IFN-γ specific response than those from pigs receiving the vaccine alone. When challenged with FMDV, all three animals immunized with the conventional vaccine developed antibodies to the non-structural viral proteins 3ABC and two of them developed severe signs of disease. In the group receiving the vaccine together with the RNA, two pigs were fully protected while one showed delayed and mild signs of disease. Our results support the immunomodulatory effect of these RNA molecules in natural hosts and suggest their potential use for improvement of FMD vaccines strategies.

  2. Investigation of a pig herd with animals seropositive for classical swine fever and where porcine circovirus-associated disease had been diagnosed.

    PubMed

    Bingham, P C; McFadden, A M J; Wang, J; Kittelberger, R; Clough, R R; Tham, K M

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the cause of classical swine fever (CSF) virus-seropositive animals in a nucleus pig-breeding herd in New Zealand, where porcine circovirus-associated disease had been diagnosed. An exotic disease investigation was undertaken to exclude CSF and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) on a nucleus pig-breeding herd comprising approximately 300 breeding sows, 1,000 weaners, and 650 grower pigs. The herd was experiencing poor reproductive performance in sows, and breeding records showed a declining farrowing rate attributable to a single manager. The growing pigs (10-15 weeks old) were experiencing respiratory disease and wasting, and the mortality rate by pen varied between 9 and 20%. Post-mortem changes in affected grower pigs were consistent with circovirus-associated diseases. DIAGNOSTIC TESTING: Serological screening using an IDEXX-ELISA gave negative results for PRRS virus antibodies, but two grower pigs and one sow tested positive for CSF virus antibodies. These three seropositive animals remained positive to CSF virus, using three commercial ELISA test kits, over 27 weeks. A newly developed virus neutralisation test (VNT), using a New Zealand isolate of border disease (BD) virus, demonstrated that the seropositive pig sera had higher antibody titres to BD virus than to bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) virus and CSF virus. PCR performed on tonsil, kidney, ileum and spleen gave negative results for CSF virus, and histopathology on lymph nodes, intestine, lung, kidney, liver and brain showed no evidence of the disease. Virus isolation performed on a number of samples was negative. The seropositive samples for CSF virus found in this investigation were likely to be a cross reaction to a pestivirus other than CSF virus. The finding of a possible endemic pestivirus capable of being transmitted between sheep and pigs on this farm may explain findings from previous serological survey work in New Zealand, and supports experience elsewhere, where

  3. Disease severity declines over time after a wild boar population has been affected by classical swine fever--legend or actual epidemiological process?

    PubMed

    Lange, M; Kramer-Schadt, S; Blome, S; Beer, M; Thulke, H-H

    2012-09-15

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a severe multi-systemic disease that can affect both domestic pigs and wild boar. Past outbreaks in European wild boar involved high-virulent CSF virus (CSFV) strains and were mostly self-limiting. In these cases, morbidity and mortality rates were high in the affected regions. In contrast, endemic infections have been observed in several European wild boar populations in recent decades. Morbidity and mortality rates were much lower despite the fact that outbreaks were still detected via diseased or fallen animals. The virus strains involved were mostly classified as genotype 2.3 strains of moderate virulence causing age-dependent disease outcomes. The mechanisms leading to the establishment and perpetuation of endemicity are still not fully understood, but the factor "moderate virulence" seems to be of considerable importance. In this study, we aim to clarify whether the perception of declined 'CSF severity' could hypothetically reflect the adaptation of an initially high-virulent virus or whether this might be better explained as a misinterpretation of observations. A mechanistic eco-epidemiological model was employed to follow up a highly virulent strain of CSFV introduced into large connected wild boar populations. In the model, the virulence of the CSF virus is represented by case mortality and life expectancy after lethal infection. Allowing for small stochastic variation, these two characteristics of the virus are passed on with every new simulated infection that occurs. Model analysis revealed a decrease from high to moderate case mortality within a few years of simulated perpetuation of the virus. The resulting mortality corresponded to the level where the population average of the infectious period and the basic reproduction number of the disease were maximal. This shift in virulence was sufficient to prolong virus circulation considerably beyond the epidemic phase of the simulated outbreaks. Alternative mechanistic

  4. Swine influenza virus co-infection with Bordetella bronchiseptica enhances bacterial colonization and host immune responses exacerbating pulmonary lesions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) is one of the most important disease causing agents for the U.S. swine industry, not only as a primary pathogen but as a predisposing agent to secondary bacterial infection. Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bb) is often isolated from swine and has been shown to contribute to th...

  5. A human-like H1N2 influenza virus detected during an outbreak of acute respiratory disease in swine in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Rejane; Rech, Raquel Rubia; Gava, Danielle; Cantão, Mauricio Egídio; da Silva, Marcia Cristina; Silveira, Simone; Zanella, Janice Reis Ciacci

    2015-01-01

    Passive monitoring for detection of influenza A viruses (IAVs) in pigs has been carried out in Brazil since 2009, detecting mostly the A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus. Since then, outbreaks of acute respiratory disease suggestive of influenza A virus infection have been observed frequently in Brazilian pig herds. During a 2010-2011 influenza monitoring, a novel H1N2 influenza virus was detected in nursery pigs showing respiratory signs. The pathologic changes were cranioventral acute necrotizing bronchiolitis to subacute proliferative and purulent bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Lung tissue samples were positive for both influenza A virus and A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus based on RT-qPCR of the matrix gene. Two IAVs were isolated in SPF chicken eggs. HI analysis of both swine H1N2 influenza viruses showed reactivity to the H1δ cluster. DNA sequencing was performed for all eight viral gene segments of two virus isolates. According to the phylogenetic analysis, the HA and NA genes clustered with influenza viruses of the human lineage (H1-δ cluster, N2), whereas the six internal gene segments clustered with the A(H1N1)pdm09 group. This is the first report of a reassortant human-like H1N2 influenza virus derived from pandemic H1N1 virus causing an outbreak of respiratory disease in pigs in Brazil. The emergence of a reassortant IAV demands the close monitoring of pigs through the full-genome sequencing of virus isolates in order to enhance genetic information about IAVs circulating in pigs.

  6. New insights on the management of wildlife diseases using multi-state recapture models: the case of classical swine fever in wild boar.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Sophie; Toigo, Carole; Hars, Jean; Pol, Françoise; Hamann, Jean-Luc; Depner, Klaus; Le Potier, Marie-Frederique

    2011-01-01

    The understanding of host-parasite systems in wildlife is of increasing interest in relation to the risk of emerging diseases in livestock and humans. In this respect, many efforts have been dedicated to controlling classical swine fever (CSF) in the European Wild Boar. But CSF eradication has not always been achieved even though vaccination has been implemented at a large-scale. Piglets have been assumed to be the main cause of CSF persistence in the wild since they appeared to be more often infected and less often immune than older animals. However, this assumption emerged from laboratory trials or cross-sectional surveys based on the hunting bags. In the present paper we conducted a capture-mark-recapture study in free-ranging wild boar piglets that experienced both CSF infection and vaccination under natural conditions. We used multi-state capture recapture models to estimate the immunization and infection rates, and their variations according to the periods with or without vaccination. According to the model prediction, 80% of the infected piglets did not survive more than two weeks, while the other 20% quickly recovered. The probability of becoming immune did not increase significantly during the summer vaccination sessions, and the proportion of immune piglets was not higher after the autumn vaccination. Given the high lethality of CSF in piglets highlighted in our study, we consider unlikely that piglets could maintain the chain of CSF virus transmission. Our study also revealed the low efficacy of vaccination in piglets in summer and autumn, possibly due to the low palatability of baits to that age class, but also to the competition between baits and alternative food sources. Based on this new information, we discuss the prospects for the improvement of CSF control and the interest of the capture-recapture approach for improving the understanding of wildlife diseases.

  7. Swine Influenza Viruses: a North American Perspective

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Influenza is a zoonotic viral disease that represents a health and economic threat to both humans and animals worldwide. Swine influenza was first recognized clinically in pigs in the Midwestern U.S. in 1918, coinciding with the human influenza pandemic known as the Spanish flu. Since that time swin...

  8. Swine Fecal Metagenomics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metagenomic approaches are providing rapid and more robust means to investigate the composition and functional genetic potential of complex microbial communities. In this study, we utilized a metagenomic approach to further understand the functional diversity of the swine gut. To...

  9. Swine Fecal Metagenomics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metagenomic approaches are providing rapid and more robust means to investigate the composition and functional genetic potential of complex microbial communities. In this study, we utilized a metagenomic approach to further understand the functional diversity of the swine gut. To...

  10. Role of Antioxidants in Horse Serum-mediated Vasculitis in Swine: Potential Relevance to Early Treatment in Mitigation of Coronary Arteritis in Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Philip, Saji; Lee, Wen-Chuan; Cherian, Kotturathu Mammen; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Lue, Hung-Chi

    2017-08-01

    Horse serum-induced immune complex coronary vasculitis in swine is the first experimental model to mimic most of the pictures of Kawasaki disease. Immune complex mechanism has been implicated as one of the possible mechanisms in the pathogenesis of vasculitis in Kawasaki disease. Antioxidants have a significant role in the reduction of cardiovascular diseases in both human and animal studies. We tried giving vitamins A, E, and C to treat immune complex vasculitis, in the hope of mitigating coronary vasculitis in Kawasaki disease. Our study group consisted of 30 pure bred male piglets of 2-3 months of age, and they were divided into test and control groups. The test (AEC) group (n = 20) received two doses of horse serum, 10 mL (0.65 g protein)/kg body weight at 5-day intervals, and oral vitamins A, E, and C once daily for 14 days. The control group (n = 10) was further divided into the saline group (n = 3) receiving two doses of normal saline and the horse serum group (n = 7) receiving two doses of horse serum at 5-day intervals. Piglets were observed for the rashes and coronary artery dimensions. Both the AEC and the control horse serum group developed rashes after horse serum infusions, but the AEC group developed significantly fewer rashes, and no rashes were seen in the saline group. The control horse serum group (mean ± standard deviation = 2.13 ± 0.72) showed significant coronary artery dilatation, whereas there was no significant dilatation in the AEC group (mean ± standard deviation = 0.81 ± 0.58) or the control saline group (p = 0.002). Serum sickness is a prototype of immune complex vasculitis, and the severity can be ameliorated with antioxidants. A trial of therapeutic dosages of vitamins A, E, and C in acute phase of Kawasaki disease, may be effective in mitigation of coronary artery lesion in addition to intravenous immunoglobulin and aspirin. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Suppression of Swine NK Cell Function During Acute Infection with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infects cloven-hoofed animals and causes an economically devastating disease. This highly acute infection has multiple negative effects on the innate response, presumably contributing to the rapid spread of virus within the host. Understanding the regulation of in...

  12. Constitutively active IRF7/IRF3 fusion protein completely protects swine against Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most devastating livestock diseases around the world. Several serotype specific vaccine formulations exist but require about 5-7 days to induce protective immunity. Our previous studies have shown that a constitutively active fusion protein of porcine ...

  13. Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Netanel; Ben-Itzhak, Ofer; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    In a patient with systemic multiorgan disease with overlapping features, the differential diagnosis included infectious diseases, malignancies, and systemic autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. We present an unusual case of a young male with B cell lymphoma who presented with symptoms mimicking systemic vasculitis and review the existing literature. PMID:27293945

  14. Biotin in swine nutrition.

    PubMed

    Kornegay, E T

    1985-01-01

    For many years, it was believed that supplemental biotin was not needed in swine diets because of the wide distribution of biotin in feedstuffs used in the formulation of swine diets, and because of the known synthesis of biotin by the animal's intestinal microflora. However, interest in biotin nutrition for swine was rekindled in the mid-1970s when several field reports indicated a biotin deficiency in swine that was responsive to biotin supplementation in many cases. Results from university research are accumulating, especially from long-term sow studies (three to four parities), which suggest that supplemental biotin will improve litter size, conception rate, weaning-to-estrus interval, toe lesions, and haircoat condition. Milk biotin concentration and plasma biotin concentration of sows and piglets were also elevated when supplemental biotin was fed. Using presently available feedstuffs and under modern swine production conditions, a marginal biotin deficiency is possible. Swine producers experiencing poor reproductive performance in their sow herds, associated with excessive loss of hair and severe foot lesions, should evaluate the biotin content of their sow diet and consider supplemental biotin.

  15. Noninfectious virus-like particle antigen for detection of swine vesicular disease virus antibodies in pigs by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young-Joon; Choi, Kang-Seuk; Nah, Jin-Ju; Paton, David J; Oem, Jae-Ku; Wilsden, Ginette; Kang, Shien-Young; Jo, Nam-In; Lee, Joo-Ho; Kim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Hee-Woo; Park, Jong-Myeong

    2005-08-01

    An inactivated SVDV antigen is used in current enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of antibodies to swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV). To develop a noninfectious recombinant alternative, we produced SVDV-like particles (VLPs) morphologically and antigenically resembling authentic SVDV particles by using a dual baculovirus recombinant, which expresses simultaneously the P1 and 3CD protein genes of SVDV under different promoters. Antigenic differences between recombinant VLPs and SVDV particles were not statistically significant in results obtained with a 5B7-ELISA kit, indicating that the VLPs could be used in the place of SVDV antigen in ELISA kits. We developed a blocking ELISA using the VLPs and SVDV-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody 3H10 (VLP-ELISA) for detection of SVDV serum antibodies in pigs. The VLP-ELISA showed a high specificity of 99.9% when tested with pig sera that are negative for SVDV neutralization (n=1,041). When tested using sera (n=186) collected periodically from pigs (n=19) with experimental infection with each of three different strains of SVDV, the VLP-ELISA detected SVDV serum antibodies as early as 3 days postinfection and continued to detect the antibodies from all infected pigs until termination of the experiments (up to 121 days postinfection). This test performance was similar to that of the gold standard virus neutralization test and indicates that the VLP-ELISA is a highly specific and sensitive method for the detection of SVDV serum antibodies in pigs. This is the first report of the production and diagnostic application of recombinant VLPs of SVDV. Further potential uses of the VLPs are discussed.

  16. Knowledge and behavior in an animal disease outbreak - Evidence from the item count technique in a case of African swine fever in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Randrianantoandro, Tiana N; Kono, Hiroichi; Kubota, Satoko

    2015-03-01

    Pig production in Madagascar is not sufficient for domestic consumption. Unfortunately, African swine fever (ASF), which is a severe disease, is endemic in Madagascar and constitutes a constant threat for farmers. Therefore, ASF must be eradicated in order to guarantee the development of pig production. One of the main strategies in controlling ASF is stamping out which requires the farmers' collaboration in reporting cases or suspected cases. The objective of this study was to estimate the proportion of farmers who knowingly sell ASF-infected meat without reporting. Since selling ASF-infected meat is prohibited by the government, we used the item count technique (ICT), an indirect questioning technique appropriate for measuring the proportion of people engaged in sensitive behavior, for one subsample, while another subsample was asked directly whether they sell ASF-infected meat. Based on the ICT, approximately 73.2% of farmers who have experienced ASF sell the ASF-infected meat. This estimate was not statistically different from that obtained by direct questioning. In the 28% of interviewed farmers who believe ASF can affect humans, the ICT yielded a higher estimate than did direct questioning, indicating that pig farmers who sell ASF-infected meat hide that fact because of their belief that infected meat might harm human consumers, not because of the law. The ICT was thus a suitable technique to address the problem of sensitive behavior. In the case of ASF outbreaks, the Malagasy government should enforce the law more strictly and provide compensation as incentive for reporting cases.

  17. Implementation and validation of an economic module in the Be-FAST model to predict costs generated by livestock disease epidemics: Application to classical swine fever epidemics in Spain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Carrión, E; Ivorra, B; Martínez-López, B; Ramos, A M; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2016-04-01

    Be-FAST is a computer program based on a time-spatial stochastic spread mathematical model for studying the transmission of infectious livestock diseases within and between farms. The present work describes a new module integrated into Be-FAST to model the economic consequences of the spreading of classical swine fever (CSF) and other infectious livestock diseases within and between farms. CSF is financially one of the most damaging diseases in the swine industry worldwide. Specifically in Spain, the economic costs in the two last CSF epidemics (1997 and 2001) reached jointly more than 108 million euros. The present analysis suggests that severe CSF epidemics are associated with significant economic costs, approximately 80% of which are related to animal culling. Direct costs associated with control measures are strongly associated with the number of infected farms, while indirect costs are more strongly associated with epidemic duration. The economic model has been validated with economic information around the last outbreaks in Spain. These results suggest that our economic module may be useful for analysing and predicting economic consequences of livestock disease epidemics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Effect of formula of removing both phlegm and blood stasis in improving cardiac function of Chinese mini-swine with coronary heart disease of phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Lin, Cheng-Ren; Ren, Jian-Xun; Miao, Lan; Yao, Ming-Jiang; Li, Dan; Shi, Yue; Ma, Yan-Lei; Fu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Jian-Xun

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate that the effect of formula of removing both phlegm and blood stasis in improving cardiac function of Chinese mini-swine with coronary heart disease of phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome. Totally 36 Chinese mini-swine were randomly divided to six groups: the normal control group, the model group, the Danlou tablet group, and Tanyu Tonzhi Fang(TYTZ) groups with doses of 2. 0, 1. 0 and 0. 5 g kg-1, with six in each group. Except for the normal control group, all of other groups were fed with high-fat diet for 2 weeks. Interventional balloons are adopted to injure their left anterior descending artery endothelium. After the operation, they were fed with high-fat diet for 8 weeks to prepare the coronary heart disease model of phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome. After the operation, they were administered with drugs for 8 weeks. The changes in the myocardial ischemia were observed. The changes in the cardiac function and structure were detected by cardiac ultrasound and noninvasive hemodynamic method. Compared with the normal control group, the model group showed significant increase in myocardial ischemia and SVR and obvious decrease in CO, SV and LCW in noninvasive hemodynamic parameters (P <0.05 or P <0.01). The ultrasonic cardiogram indicated notable decrease in IVSd, LVPWs, EF and FS, and remarkable increase in LVIDs (P<0. 05 orP<0.01). Compared with the model group, TYTZ could reduce the myocardial ischemia, strengthen cardiac function, and improve the abnormal cardiac structure and function induced by ischemia (P <0. 05 or P <0. 01). TYTZ shows a significant effect in improving cardiac function of Chinese mini-swine with coronary heart disease of phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome. The clinical cardiac function detection method could be adopted to correctly evaluate the changes in the post-myocardial ischemia cardiac function, and narrow the gap between clinical application and basic experimental studies.

  19. Evaluation of post-farm-gate passive surveillance in swine for the detection of foot and mouth disease in Australia.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Jover, M; Cogger, N; Martin, P A J; Schembri, N; Holyoake, P K; Toribio, J-A L M L

    2011-07-01

    Pigs are considered high risk for the introduction and spread of foot and mouth disease (FMD) in Australia. One of the most likely pathways of introduction of FMD into Australia would be through the illegal importation of FMD-contaminated meat, which is then fed to feral or domestic pigs. Locations where animals from different origins are commingled, such as livestock markets and abattoirs, pose a risk for disease spread. Early detection of exotic diseases at these locations is crucial in limiting the spread of an outbreak. The aims of this study were to evaluate the likelihood of exotic disease detection with current passive disease surveillance activities for pigs at saleyards and abattoirs in eastern Australia, and make recommendations for improving surveillance. Sensitivity (Se) of the current post-farm-gate passive surveillance for detection of exotic diseases was estimated using the scenario tree modelling methodology (Martin et al., 2007a). Four surveillance system components were identified: (i) domestic saleyard, (ii) export saleyard, (iii) domestic abattoir, and (iv) export abattoir. Pig farms were classified according to herd size (Small vs. Large) and subsequently into two risk categories depending on the probability of swill feeding (Swill feeding vs. Not swill feeding). A scenario tree representing the pathways by which infected animals could be detected was developed and the Se of detection in each surveillance system component was estimated. Industry statistics, information on previous exotic disease outbreaks, and interviews with pig producers were used to estimate herd category proportions and the relative risk of swill feeding. Quantitative estimates for probabilities of detection were sourced from State legislation and policies, stakeholder consultation and observational studies at saleyards and abattoirs. Results of a FMD case study showed a Se of detection at a representative location for each surveillance system component during a 2-week

  20. Mimicking the Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-03

    When Galileo first observed Venus displaying a crescent phase, he excitedly wrote to Kepler (in anagram) of Venus mimicking the moon-goddess. He would have been delirious with joy to see Saturn and Titan, seen in this image, doing the same thing. More than just pretty pictures, high-phase observations -- taken looking generally toward the Sun, as in this image -- are very powerful scientifically since the way atmospheres and rings transmit sunlight is often diagnostic of compositions and physical states. In this example, Titan's crescent nearly encircles its disk due to the small haze particles high in its atmosphere refracting the incoming light of the distant Sun. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 3 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken in violet light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Aug. 11, 2013. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.1 million miles (1.7 million kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 154 degrees. Image scale is 64 miles (103 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18291

  1. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Tanrıverdi, Elif; Özgül, Mehmet Akif; Uzun, Oğuz; Gül, Şule; Çörtük, Mustafa; Yaşar, Zehra; Acat, Murat; Arda, Naciye; Çetinkaya, Erdoğan

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important.

  2. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Özgül, Mehmet Akif; Uzun, Oğuz; Yaşar, Zehra; Acat, Murat; Arda, Naciye; Çetinkaya, Erdoğan

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important. PMID:27594885

  3. Epidemiology, geographical distribution, and economic consequences of swine zoonoses: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Uddin Khan, Salah; Atanasova, Kalina R; Krueger, Whitney S; Ramirez, Alejandro; Gray, Gregory C

    2013-01-01

    We sought to review the epidemiology, international geographical distribution, and economic consequences of selected swine zoonoses. We performed literature searches in two stages. First, we identified the zoonotic pathogens associated with swine. Second, we identified specific swine-associated zoonotic pathogen reports for those pathogens from January 1980 to October 2012. Swine-associated emerging diseases were more prevalent in the countries of North America, South America, and Europe. Multiple factors were associated with the increase of swine zoonoses in humans including: the density of pigs, poor water sources and environmental conditions for swine husbandry, the transmissibility of the pathogen, occupational exposure to pigs, poor human sanitation, and personal hygiene. Swine zoonoses often lead to severe economic consequences related to the threat of novel pathogens to humans, drop in public demand for pork, forced culling of swine herds, and international trade sanctions. Due to the complexity of swine-associated pathogen ecology, designing effective interventions for early detection of disease, their prevention, and mitigation requires an interdisciplinary collaborative “One Health” approach from veterinarians, environmental and public health professionals, and the swine industry. PMID:26038451

  4. 9 CFR 94.3 - Organs, glands, extracts, or secretions of ruminants or swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, NEWCASTLE DISEASE, HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA... ruminants or swine, originating in any region where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists, as...

  5. 9 CFR 94.3 - Organs, glands, extracts, or secretions of ruminants or swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER..., originating in any region where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists, as designated in § 94.1, except...

  6. 9 CFR 94.3 - Organs, glands, extracts, or secretions of ruminants or swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER..., originating in any region where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists, as designated in § 94.1, except...

  7. 9 CFR 94.3 - Organs, glands, extracts, or secretions of ruminants or swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER..., originating in any region where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists, as designated in § 94.1, except...

  8. 9 CFR 94.3 - Organs, glands, extracts, or secretions of ruminants or swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER..., originating in any region where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists, as designated in § 94.1, except...

  9. 76 FR 28885 - Brucellosis in Swine; Add Texas to List of Validated Brucellosis-Free States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... the genus Brucella. The disease mainly affects cattle, bison, and swine, but goats, sheep, horses, and... as the regulations) contain specific provisions for cattle, bison, and swine. Under the regulations... in 9 CFR Part 78 Animal diseases, Bison, Cattle, Hogs, Quarantine, Reporting and...

  10. Governmental provisions to manage and eradicate feral swine in areas of the United States.

    PubMed

    Centner, Terence J; Shuman, Rebecca M

    2015-03-01

    Feral swine (wild hogs) are one of the most widely distributed free-ranging mammals in the world. In the United States, feral swine serve as game animals for the sport of hunting in some areas, while they are nuisance species at other locations. Increasing feral swine populations creates negative impacts to growing crops, native plant communities, and wildlife. Feral swine can also serve as reservoirs for a number of bacterial and viral diseases that can infect wild animals, livestock, and humans. The US state governments are adopting statutes and regulations to reduce the growth and dispersal of feral swine populations. An analysis of these provisions suggests that while they seek to control feral swine populations, they are unlikely to provide any significant relief from damages to crops and native ecosystems. More localized reduction plans and a national disease control program are suggested to assuage damages being wrought by these invasive animals.

  11. Fatal disease associated with Swine Hepatitis E virus and Porcine circovirus 2 co-infection in four weaned pigs in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yifei; Shi, Ruihan; She, Ruiping; Mao, Jingjing; Zhao, Yue; Du, Fang; Liu, Can; Liu, Jianchai; Cheng, Minheng; Zhu, Rining; Li, Wei; Wang, Xiaoyang; Soomro, Majid Hussain

    2015-03-26

    In recent decades, Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) infection has been recognized as the causative agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, and has become a threat to the swine industry. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is another high prevalent pathogen in swine in many regions of the world. PCV2 and HEV are both highly prevalent in pig farms in China. In this study, we characterized the HEV and PCV2 co-infection in 2-3 month-old piglets, based on pathogen identification and the pathological changes observed, in Hebei Province, China. The pathological changes were severe, and general hyperemia, hemorrhage, inflammatory cell infiltration, and necrosis were evident in the tissues of dead swine. PCR was used to identify the pathogen and we tested for eight viruses (HEV, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, PCV2, Classical swine fever virus, Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, Transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus, Porcine parvovirus and Pseudorabies virus) that are prevalent in Chinese pig farms. The livers, kidneys, spleens, and other organs of the necropsied swine were positive for HEV and/or PCV2. Immunohistochemical staining showed HEV- and PCV2-antigen-positive signals in the livers, kidneys, lungs, lymph nodes, and intestine. HEV and PCV2 co-infection in piglets was detected in four out of seven dead pigs from two pig farms in Hebei, China, producing severe pathological changes. The natural co-infection of HEV and PCV2 in pigs in China has rarely been reported. We speculate that co-infection with PCV2 and HEV may bring some negative effect on pig production and recommend that more attention should be paid to this phenomenon.

  12. Introductions and evolution of human-origin seasonal influenza a viruses in multinational swine populations.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Wentworth, David E; Culhane, Marie R; Vincent, Amy L; Viboud, Cecile; LaPointe, Matthew P; Lin, Xudong; Holmes, Edward C; Detmer, Susan E

    2014-09-01

    The capacity of influenza A viruses to cross species barriers presents a continual threat to human and animal health. Knowledge of the human-swine interface is particularly important for understanding how viruses with pandemic potential evolve in swine hosts. We sequenced the genomes of 141 influenza viruses collected from North American swine during 2002 to 2011 and identified a swine virus that possessed all eight genome segments of human seasonal A/H3N2 virus origin. A molecular clock analysis indicates that this virus--A/sw/Saskatchewan/02903/2009(H3N2)--has likely circulated undetected in swine for at least 7 years. For historical context, we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of an additional 1,404 whole-genome sequences from swine influenza A viruses collected globally during 1931 to 2013. Human-to-swine transmission occurred frequently over this time period, with 20 discrete introductions of human seasonal influenza A viruses showing sustained onward transmission in swine for at least 1 year since 1965. Notably, human-origin hemagglutinin (H1 and H3) and neuraminidase (particularly N2) segments were detected in swine at a much higher rate than the six internal gene segments, suggesting an association between the acquisition of swine-origin internal genes via reassortment and the adaptation of human influenza viruses to new swine hosts. Further understanding of the fitness constraints on the adaptation of human viruses to swine, and vice versa, at a genomic level is central to understanding the complex multihost ecology of influenza and the disease threats that swine and humans pose to each other. The swine origin of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic virus underscored the importance of understanding how influenza A virus evolves in these animals hosts. While the importance of reassortment in generating genetically diverse influenza viruses in swine is well documented, the role of human-to-swine transmission has not been as intensively studied. Through a

  13. Introductions and Evolution of Human-Origin Seasonal Influenza A Viruses in Multinational Swine Populations

    PubMed Central

    Wentworth, David E.; Culhane, Marie R.; Vincent, Amy L.; Viboud, Cecile; LaPointe, Matthew P.; Lin, Xudong; Holmes, Edward C.; Detmer, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The capacity of influenza A viruses to cross species barriers presents a continual threat to human and animal health. Knowledge of the human-swine interface is particularly important for understanding how viruses with pandemic potential evolve in swine hosts. We sequenced the genomes of 141 influenza viruses collected from North American swine during 2002 to 2011 and identified a swine virus that possessed all eight genome segments of human seasonal A/H3N2 virus origin. A molecular clock analysis indicates that this virus—A/sw/Saskatchewan/02903/2009(H3N2)—has likely circulated undetected in swine for at least 7 years. For historical context, we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of an additional 1,404 whole-genome sequences from swine influenza A viruses collected globally during 1931 to 2013. Human-to-swine transmission occurred frequently over this time period, with 20 discrete introductions of human seasonal influenza A viruses showing sustained onward transmission in swine for at least 1 year since 1965. Notably, human-origin hemagglutinin (H1 and H3) and neuraminidase (particularly N2) segments were detected in swine at a much higher rate than the six internal gene segments, suggesting an association between the acquisition of swine-origin internal genes via reassortment and the adaptation of human influenza viruses to new swine hosts. Further understanding of the fitness constraints on the adaptation of human viruses to swine, and vice versa, at a genomic level is central to understanding the complex multihost ecology of influenza and the disease threats that swine and humans pose to each other. IMPORTANCE The swine origin of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic virus underscored the importance of understanding how influenza A virus evolves in these animals hosts. While the importance of reassortment in generating genetically diverse influenza viruses in swine is well documented, the role of human-to-swine transmission has not been as

  14. Immunoprotective mechanisms in swine within the "grey zone" in antibody response after immunization with foot-and-mouth disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liu; Feng, Xia; Jin, Ye; Ma, Junwu; Cai, Hu; Zhang, Xiaoxia

    2016-07-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by the FMD virus (FMDV). Vaccination represents one approach for limiting the effects of FMD. The level of protection in vaccinated animals after challenge with foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is closely related to the antibody titer, which can be classified into three zones: a "white zone", a "grey zone", and a "black zone". The aim of the present study was to clarify the immunoprotective mechanisms operating in the grey zone, in which vaccinated animals have intermediate antibody titers, making it difficult to predict the level of protection. Thirty-three pigs were used to analyze the distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations in whole blood and the expression levels of 40 cytokines before vaccination and challenge. The antibody titer in pigs in the grey zone ranged from 1:6-1:45. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte subpopulations, expression levels of Th1 cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin (IL)-12, IL-15, IL-18, and monocyte interferon gamma inducing factor (MIG), and of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-1α, transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), and TWEAK R varied between protected and unprotected animals. The results of this study suggest that the cellular immune response is the key factor responsible for immunoprotection in vaccinated animals with antibody titers within the grey zone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Interspecies Interactions and Potential Influenza A Virus Risk in Small Swine Farms in Peru

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-15

    sick poultry in an IAV-affected area was a risk factor for human infection [35]. Human-swine interactions The swine farms in Chancay and Tumbes...R. Soares-Magalhaes J, Rushton J, et al: Industrial livestock production and global health risks . Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Initiative: A Living...available soon. Interspecies interactions and potential Influenza A virus risk in small swine farms in Peru BMC Infectious Diseases 2012, 12:58 doi:10.1186

  16. North American soft ticks (Ornithodoros spp.): biology and feral swine parasitism as risks for the emergence of African swine fever in the U.S.A.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African Swine Fever (ASF) is an emerging arboviral disease that affects pigs. The causative agent is the double-stranded DNA African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV). Several soft tick species in the genus Ornithodoros are known arthropod vectors of ASFV. Infection with ASFV can result in a hemorrhagic synd...

  17. A Review of the Current Status of Relevant Zoonotic Pathogens in Wild Swine (Sus scrofa) Populations: Changes Modulating the Risk of Transmission to Humans.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Fons, F

    2017-02-01

    Many wild swine populations in different parts of the World have experienced an unprecedented demographic explosion that may result in increased exposure of humans to wild swine zoonotic pathogens. Interactions between humans and wild swine leading to pathogen transmission could come from different ways, being hunters and game professionals the most exposed to acquiring infections from wild swine. However, increasing human settlements in semi-natural areas, outdoor activities, socio-economic changes and food habits may increase the rate of exposure to wild swine zoonotic pathogens and to potentially emerging pathogens from wild swine. Frequent and increasing contact rate between humans and wild swine points to an increasing chance of zoonotic pathogens arising from wild swine to be transmitted to humans. Whether this frequent contact could lead to new zoonotic pathogens emerging from wild swine to cause human epidemics or emerging disease outbreaks is difficult to predict, and assessment should be based on thorough epidemiologic surveillance. Additionally, several gaps in knowledge on wild swine global population dynamics trends and wild swine-zoonotic pathogen interactions should be addressed to correctly assess the potential role of wild swine in the emergence of diseases in humans. In this work, viruses such as hepatitis E virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Influenza virus and Nipah virus, and bacteria such as Salmonella spp., Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, Campylobacter spp. and Leptospira spp. have been identified as the most prone to be transmitted from wild swine to humans on the basis of geographic spread in wild swine populations worldwide, pathogen circulation rates in wild swine populations, wild swine population trends in endemic areas, susceptibility of humans to infection, transmissibility from wild swine to humans and existing evidence of wild swine-human transmission events.

  18. Attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis-mediated RNAi targeted to conserved regions against foot-and-mouth disease virus in guinea pigs and swine.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wei; Jin, Hong; Jiang, Chengda; Yan, Weiyao; Liu, Mingqiu; Chen, Jiulian; Zuo, Xiaoping; Zheng, Zhaoxin

    2010-01-01

    In this study, specific sequences within three genes (3D, VP4 and 2B) of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome were determined to be effective RNAi targets. These sequences are highly conserved among different serotype viruses based on sequence analysis. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-expressing plasmids (p3D-NT19, p3D-NT56, pVP4-NT19, pVP4-NT65 and p2B-NT25) were constructed to express siRNA targeting 3D, VP4 and 2B, respectively. The antiviral potential of these siRNA for various FMDV isolates was investigated in baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells and suckling mice. The results show that these siRNA inhibited virus yield 10- to 300-fold for different FMDV isolates of serotype O and serotype Asia I at 48 h post infection in BHK-21 cells compared to control cells. In suckling mice, p3D-NT56 and p2B-NT25 delayed the death of mice. Twenty percent to 40% of the animals that received a single siRNA dose survived 5 days post infection with serotype O or serotype Asia I. We used an attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis (C500) vaccine strain, to carry the plasmid that expresses siRNA directed against the polymerase gene 3D (p3D-NT56) of FMDV. We used guinea pigs to evaluate the inhibitory effects of recombinant S. cho (p3D-NT56/S. cho) on FMDV infection. The results show that 80% of guinea pigs inoculated with 10(9) CFU of p3D-NT56/S. cho and challenged 36 h later with 50 ID(50) of homologous FMDV were protected. We also measured the antiviral activity of p3D-NT56/S. cho in swine. The results indicate that 100% of the animals treated with 5 x 10(9) CFU of p3D-NT56/S. cho were protected in 9 days. INRA, EDP Sciences, 2010.

  19. Pig traders' networks on the Kenya-Uganda border highlight potential for mitigation of African swine fever virus transmission and improved ASF disease risk management.

    PubMed

    Lichoti, Jacqueline Kasiiti; Davies, Jocelyn; Maru, Yiheyis; Kitala, Philip M; Githigia, Samuel M; Okoth, Edward; Bukachi, Salome A; Okuthe, Sam; Bishop, Richard P

    2017-05-01

    We applied social network analysis to pig trader networks on the Kenya-Uganda border. Social network analysis is a recently developed tool, which is useful for understanding value chains and improving disease control policies. We interviewed a sample of 33 traders about their experiences with trade and African swine fever (ASF), analyzed the networks they generated in purchasing pigs and selling pork and their potential contribution to modulating dissemination of the ASF virus (ASFV). The majority of the traders were aware of clinical signs of ASF and the risk of trade transmitting ASFV. Most said they avoided buying pigs from ASF outbreak villages or sick pigs but their experiences also indicated that inadvertent purchase was relatively common. Traders had early knowledge of outbreaks since they were contacted by farmers who had heard rumours and wanted to sell their pigs to avoid the risk of them dying. Individual traders bought pigs in up to nine villages, and up to six traders operated in a village. Although each trade typically spanned less than 5km, networks of the various traders, comprising movements of pigs from source villages to slaughter slabs/sites and retail outlets, and movement of pork to villages where it was consumed, linked up indirectly across the 100km×50km study area and revealed several trade pathways across the Kenya-Uganda border. ASF could potentially spread across this area and beyond through sequential pig and pork transactions. Regulation of the pig and pork trade was minimal in practice. The risk of ASFV being spread by traders was compounded by their use of poorly constructed slaughter slabs/sites with open drainage, ineffective or non-existent meat inspection services, lack of provision for biosecurity in the value chain, and sales of pork to customers who were unaware of the risks to their own pigs from contact with ASF infected pork. More effective regulation is warranted. However, limitations on government capacity, together with

  20. Attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis-mediated RNAi targeted to conserved regions against foot-and-mouth disease virus in guinea pigs and swine

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Wei; Jin, Hong; Jiang, Chengda; Yan, Weiyao; Liu, Mingqiu; Chen, Jiulian; Zuo, Xiaoping; Zheng, Zhaoxin

    2010-01-01

    In this study, specific sequences within three genes (3D, VP4 and 2B) of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome were determined to be effective RNAi targets. These sequences are highly conserved among different serotype viruses based on sequence analysis. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-expressing plasmids (p3D-NT19, p3D-NT56, pVP4-NT19, pVP4-NT65 and p2B-NT25) were constructed to express siRNA targeting 3D, VP4 and 2B, respectively. The antiviral potential of these siRNA for various FMDV isolates was investigated in baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells and suckling mice. The results show that these siRNA inhibited virus yield 10- to 300-fold for different FMDV isolates of serotype O and serotype Asia I at 48 h post infection in BHK-21 cells compared to control cells. In suckling mice, p3D-NT56 and p2B-NT25 delayed the death of mice. Twenty percent to 40% of the animals that received a single siRNA dose survived 5 days post infection with serotype O or serotype Asia I. We used an attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis (C500) vaccine strain, to carry the plasmid that expresses siRNA directed against the polymerase gene 3D (p3D-NT56) of FMDV. We used guinea pigs to evaluate the inhibitory effects of recombinant S. cho (p3D-NT56/S. cho) on FMDV infection. The results show that 80% of guinea pigs inoculated with 109 CFU of p3D-NT56/S. cho and challenged 36 h later with 50 ID50 of homologous FMDV were protected. We also measured the antiviral activity of p3D-NT56/S. cho in swine. The results indicate that 100% of the animals treated with 5 × 109 CFU of p3D-NT56/S. cho were protected in 9 days. PMID:20167192

  1. [Development of immunoenzyme methods for detecting antibodies to Aujeszky's disease virus gB glycoprotein in swine serum].

    PubMed

    Morenkov, O S

    2000-01-01

    Four ELISA methods have been developed for detecting antibodies to Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) glycoprotein gB. Indirect ELISA is based on affinity-purified gB (affi-gB-ELISA); three blocking ELISAs: indirect blocking ELISA (lbgB-ELISA), direct blocking ELISA (db-gB-ELISA), and two-site "sandwich" ELISA (sb-gB-ELISA) are based on monoclonal antibodies to conservative immunodominant epitopes of gB. The specificities and sensitivities of ELISAs were compared with each other and with indirect ELISA based on purified ADV virions (vir-ELISA). Affi-gB ELISA, db-gB-ELISA, and sb-gB-ELISA possess 100% sensitivity, ib-gB-ELISA 98% sensitivity, and vir-ELISA 93% sensitivity. Affi-gB ELISA, ib-gB-ELISA, db-gB-ELISA, and sb-gB-ELISA possess 100% specificity and vir-ELISA 92% specificity. The efficiency of detection of ADV-specific antibodies by affi-gB ELISA, db-gB-ELISA, and sb-gB-ELISA was comparable to that of analogous commercial test. Since db-gB-ELISA is easier to perform than affi-gB-ELISA or sb-gB-ELISA, it is concluded to be the most appropriate test for detecting pigs infected with ADV among non-vaccinated animals.

  2. Quantitative approach for the risk assessment of African swine fever and Classical swine fever introduction into the United States through legal imports of pigs and swine products

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Ibatá, Diana María; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Quijada, Darla; Burton, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    The US livestock safety strongly depends on its capacity to prevent the introduction of Transboundary Animal Diseases (TADs). Therefore, accurate and updated information on the location and origin of those potential TADs risks is essential, so preventive measures as market restrictions can be put on place. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the current risk of African swine fever (ASF) and Classical swine fever (CSF) introduction into the US through the legal importations of live pigs and swine products using a quantitative approach that could be later applied to other risks. Four quantitative stochastic risk assessment models were developed to estimate the monthly probabilities of ASF and CSF release into the US, and the exposure of susceptible populations (domestic and feral swine) to these introductions at state level. The results suggest a low annual probability of either ASF or CSF introduction into the US, by any of the analyzed pathways (5.5*10−3). Being the probability of introduction through legal imports of live pigs (1.8*10−3 for ASF, and 2.5*10−3 for CSF) higher than the risk of legally imported swine products (8.90*10−4 for ASF, and 1.56*10−3 for CSF). This could be caused due to the low probability of exposure associated with this type of commodity (products). The risk of feral pigs accessing to swine products discarded in landfills was slightly higher than the potential exposure of domestic pigs through swill feeding. The identification of the months at highest risk, the origin of the higher risk imports, and the location of the US states most vulnerable to those introductions (Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin for live swine and California, Florida and Texas for swine products), is valuable information that would help to design prevention, risk-mitigation and early-detection strategies that would help to minimize the catastrophic consequences of potential ASF/CSF introductions into the US. PMID:28797058

  3. Quantitative approach for the risk assessment of African swine fever and Classical swine fever introduction into the United States through legal imports of pigs and swine products.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Ibatá, Diana María; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Quijada, Darla; Burton, Kenneth; Mur, Lina

    2017-01-01

    The US livestock safety strongly depends on its capacity to prevent the introduction of Transboundary Animal Diseases (TADs). Therefore, accurate and updated information on the location and origin of those potential TADs risks is essential, so preventive measures as market restrictions can be put on place. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the current risk of African swine fever (ASF) and Classical swine fever (CSF) introduction into the US through the legal importations of live pigs and swine products using a quantitative approach that could be later applied to other risks. Four quantitative stochastic risk assessment models were developed to estimate the monthly probabilities of ASF and CSF release into the US, and the exposure of susceptible populations (domestic and feral swine) to these introductions at state level. The results suggest a low annual probability of either ASF or CSF introduction into the US, by any of the analyzed pathways (5.5*10-3). Being the probability of introduction through legal imports of live pigs (1.8*10-3 for ASF, and 2.5*10-3 for CSF) higher than the risk of legally imported swine products (8.90*10-4 for ASF, and 1.56*10-3 for CSF). This could be caused due to the low probability of exposure associated with this type of commodity (products). The risk of feral pigs accessing to swine products discarded in landfills was slightly higher than the potential exposure of domestic pigs through swill feeding. The identification of the months at highest risk, the origin of the higher risk imports, and the location of the US states most vulnerable to those introductions (Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin for live swine and California, Florida and Texas for swine products), is valuable information that would help to design prevention, risk-mitigation and early-detection strategies that would help to minimize the catastrophic consequences of potential ASF/CSF introductions into the US.

  4. Vaccination influences the evolution of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Niu, Dan-Dan; Si, Hong-Li; Ding, Nai-Zheng; He, Cheng-Qiang

    2014-07-01

    Classical swine fever is a serious, economically damaging disease caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). The CSFV is composed of two clades, according to phylogenetic estimates. Attenuated live vaccine such as HCLV, has been widely used to protect pigs from CSFV, but the influence of vaccination on the evolution of CSFV has not been studied. We conducted a systemic analysis of the impact of vaccination on the evolution of CSFV by comparing vaccine-related and non-vaccine-related CSFV groups. We found that vaccination may affect strain diversity and immune escape through recombination and point mutation. We also found that vaccination may influence the population dynamics, evolutionary rate and adaptive evolution of classical swine fever virus. Our evidence suggests that the vaccination might also change host adaptation through influencing codon usage of the virus in swine. These findings suggest that it is necessary to avoid excessive use of CSFV attenuated vaccines.

  5. Pathogenesis and Transmission of Feral Swine Pseudorabies Virus Isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction. Aujesky’s Disease or pseudorabies, is one of the oldest recognized swine diseases. It is caused by pseudorabies virus (PRV), an alpha-herpesvirus that can induce respiratory disease, reproductive failure, and affect the central nervous system. PRV vaccines, in conjunction with serologi...

  6. Agriculture. Swine Livestock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for agricultural production, specifically for swine, is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a task sheet for developing leadership skills, and a task list. Each…

  7. Agriculture. Swine Livestock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for agricultural production, specifically for swine, is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a task sheet for developing leadership skills, and a task list. Each…

  8. Swine Brucellosis: Current Perspectives

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brucella suis is a significant zoonosis that is present in domestic livestock and wildlife in many countries worldwide. Transmission from animal reservoirs is the source of human infection as human to human transmission is very rare. Although swine brucellosis causes economic losses in domestic liv...

  9. Modelling the Growth of Swine Flu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The spread of swine flu has been a cause of great concern globally. With no vaccine developed as yet, (at time of writing in July 2009) and given the fact that modern-day humans can travel speedily across the world, there are fears that this disease may spread out of control. The worst-case scenario would be one of unfettered exponential growth.…

  10. Foot-and-mouth disease virus-like particles produced by a SUMO fusion protein system in Escherichia coli induce potent protective immune responses in guinea pigs, swine and cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious infection in cloven-hoofed animals. The format of FMD virus-like particles (VLP) as a non-replicating particulate vaccine candidate is a promising alternative to conventional inactivated FMDV vaccines. In this study, we explored a prokaryotic system to express and assemble the FMD VLP and validated the potential of VLP as an FMDV vaccine candidate. VLP composed entirely of FMDV (Asia1/Jiangsu/China/2005) capsid proteins (VP0, VP1 and VP3) were simultaneously produced as SUMO fusion proteins by an improved SUMO fusion protein system in E. coli. Proteolytic removal of the SUMO moiety from the fusion proteins resulted in the assembly of VLP with size and shape resembling the authentic FMDV. Immunization of guinea pigs, swine and cattle with FMD VLP by intramuscular inoculation stimulated the FMDV-specific antibody response, neutralizing antibody response, T-cell proliferation response and secretion of cytokine IFN-γ. In addition, immunization with one dose of the VLP resulted in complete protection of these animals from homologous FMDV challenge. The 50% protection dose (PD50) of FMD VLP in cattle is up to 6.34. These results suggest that FMD VLP expressed in E. coli are an effective vaccine in guinea pigs, swine and cattle and support further development of these VLP as a vaccine candidate for protection against FMDV. PMID:23826638

  11. Evaluation of the risk of classical swine fever (CSF) spread from backyard pigs to other domestic pigs by using the spatial stochastic disease spread model Be-FAST: the example of Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, Beatriz; Ivorra, Benjamin; Ramos, Angel Manuel; Fernández-Carrión, Eduardo; Alexandrov, Tsviatko; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel

    2013-07-26

    The study presented here is one of the very first aimed at exploring the potential spread of classical swine fever (CSF) from backyard pigs to other domestic pigs. Specifically, we used a spatial stochastic spread model, called Be-FAST, to evaluate the potential spread of CSF virus (CSFV) in Bulgaria, which holds a large number of backyards (96% of the total number of pig farms) and is one of the very few countries for which backyard pigs and farm counts are available. The model revealed that, despite backyard pigs being very likely to become infected, infections from backyard pigs to other domestic pigs were rare. In general, the magnitude and duration of the CSF simulated epidemics were small, with a median [95% PI] number of infected farms per epidemic of 1 [1,4] and a median [95% PI] duration of the epidemic of 44 [17,101] days. CSFV transmission occurs primarily (81.16%) due to indirect contacts (i.e. vehicles, people and local spread) whereas detection of infected premises was mainly (69%) associated with the observation of clinical signs on farm rather than with implementation of tracing or zoning. Methods and results of this study may support the implementation of risk-based strategies more cost-effectively to prevent, control and, ultimately, eradicate CSF from Bulgaria. The model may also be easily adapted to other countries in which the backyard system is predominant. It can also be used to simulate other similar diseases such as African swine fever.

  12. Foot-and-mouth disease virus-like particles produced by a SUMO fusion protein system in Escherichia coli induce potent protective immune responses in guinea pigs, swine and cattle.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui-Chen; Sun, Shi-Qi; Jin, Ye; Yang, Shun-Li; Wei, Yan-Quan; Sun, De-Hui; Yin, Shuang-Hui; Ma, Jun-Wu; Liu, Zai-Xin; Guo, Jian-Hong; Luo, Jian-Xun; Yin, Hong; Liu, Xiang-Tao; Liu, Ding Xiang

    2013-07-04

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious infection in cloven-hoofed animals. The format of FMD virus-like particles (VLP) as a non-replicating particulate vaccine candidate is a promising alternative to conventional inactivated FMDV vaccines. In this study, we explored a prokaryotic system to express and assemble the FMD VLP and validated the potential of VLP as an FMDV vaccine candidate. VLP composed entirely of FMDV (Asia1/Jiangsu/China/2005) capsid proteins (VP0, VP1 and VP3) were simultaneously produced as SUMO fusion proteins by an improved SUMO fusion protein system in E. coli. Proteolytic removal of the SUMO moiety from the fusion proteins resulted in the assembly of VLP with size and shape resembling the authentic FMDV. Immunization of guinea pigs, swine and cattle with FMD VLP by intramuscular inoculation stimulated the FMDV-specific antibody response, neutralizing antibody response, T-cell proliferation response and secretion of cytokine IFN-γ. In addition, immunization with one dose of the VLP resulted in complete protection of these animals from homologous FMDV challenge. The 50% protection dose (PD50) of FMD VLP in cattle is up to 6.34. These results suggest that FMD VLP expressed in E. coli are an effective vaccine in guinea pigs, swine and cattle and support further development of these VLP as a vaccine candidate for protection against FMDV.

  13. Identification of peptides from foot-and-mouth disease virus structural proteins bound by class I swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) alleles, SLA-1*0401 and SLA-2*0401.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, L E; Harndahl, M; Nielsen, M; Patch, J R; Jungersen, G; Buus, S; Golde, W T

    2013-06-01

    Characterization of the peptide-binding specificity of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I and II molecules is critical to the understanding of adaptive immune responses of swine toward infectious pathogens. Here, we describe the complete binding motif of the SLA-2*0401 molecule based on a positional scanning combinatorial peptide library approach. By combining this binding motif with data achieved by applying the NetMHCpan peptide prediction algorithm to both SLA-1*0401 and SLA-2*0401, we identified high-affinity binding peptides. A total of 727 different 9mer and 726 different 10mer peptides within the structural proteins of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), strain A24 were analyzed as candidate T-cell epitopes. Peptides predicted by the NetMHCpan were tested in ELISA for binding to the SLA-1*0401 and SLA-2*0401 major histocompatibility complex class I proteins. Four of the 10 predicted FMDV peptides bound to SLA-2*0401, whereas five of the nine predicted FMDV peptides bound to SLA-1*0401. These methods provide the characterization of T-cell epitopes in response to pathogens in more detail. The development of such approaches to analyze vaccine performance will contribute to a more accelerated improvement of livestock vaccines by virtue of identifying and focusing analysis on bona fide T-cell epitopes.

  14. Infant botulism mimicking an acute abdomen.

    PubMed

    Pisanti, R; Vitiello, R; Formicola, S; Pisanti, A

    2009-12-01

    Botulism is the acute, flaccid paralysis caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum. In the infant, clinical symptoms are usually unspecific such as poor feeding, weak suck, feeble cry, drooling, followed by a symmetric, descending, flaccid paralysis beginning with the cranial nerve musculature. The initial symptoms of the disease are often similar to several diseases and therefore differential diagnosis is very difficult and rarely suspected by the physician. Since 2004 only 22 cases of infant botulism have been reported in Italy. Since most paediatricians are unfamiliar with the clinical manifestations of infant botulism, the diagnosis can be easily missed. Hence the disease may well be underestimated and underreported. We report a clinical case of botulism presenting initially with abdominal distention, thereby mimicking acute abdomen.

  15. Identification of an NTPase motif in classical swine fever virus NS4B protein

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease of swine caused by CSF virus (CSFV), a positive sense single-stranded RNA virus in the genus Pestivirus of the Flaviviridae family. Here, we have identified, within CSFV non-structural (NS) protein NS4B, conserved sequence el...

  16. Gene expression changes in the swine microbiota with the in-feed antibiotic carbadox

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Administering antibiotics to livestock and poultry can treat and prevent disease while improving feed efficiency. Carbadox is an in-feed antibiotic, commonly used in swine production to prevent swine dysentery and promote animal growth. Carbadox has been shown to induce bacteriophages in some cultiv...

  17. Pathogenesis Studies of the 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus and Pseudorabies Virus From Wild Pigs In Swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over the last ten years in the United States the epidemiology and ecology of swine flu and pseudorabies has been dynamic. Swine flu is caused by influenza A virus and the disease was first recognized in pigs concurrent with the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic in humans. Pigs displayed clinical signs simil...

  18. Early Induction of Cytokines in Pigs Coinfected with Swine Influenza Virus and Bordetella bronchiseptica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Respiratory disease is one of the most important health issues for the swine industry, and coinfection with two or more pathogens is a common occurrence. Bordetella bronchiseptica and swine influenza virus (SIV) are important and common respiratory pathogens of pigs. A study examining the effect o...

  19. Early Induction of Cytokines in Pigs Coinfected with Swine Influenza Virus and Bordetella bronchiseptica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Respiratory disease is one of the most important health issues for the swine industry, and coinfection with two or more pathogens is a common occurrence. Bordetella bronchiseptica and swine influenza virus (SIV) are important and common respiratory pathogens of pigs. The effect of coinfection of S...

  20. Molecular characterization of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class II genes in outbred pig populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The highly polymorphic swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) genes are one of the most important determinants in swine immune, disease and vaccine responses. Thus, understanding how SLA gene polymorphism affects immunity, especially in outbred pig populations with a diverse genetic background, requires accu...

  1. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF SWINE LEUKOCYTE ANTIGEN (SLA) CLASS I GENES IN OUTBRED PIG POPULATIONS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The highly polymorphic swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) genes are one of the most important determinants in swine immune responses to infectious diseases, vaccines, and in transplantation. Study of SLA influence requires accurate and effective typing methods. We developed a simple and rapid method to t...

  2. Dirofilariasis Mimicking an Acute Scrotum.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi, Mirko; Rinaldi, Victoria Elisa; Prestipino, Marco; Giovenali, Paolo; Appignani, Antonino

    2015-10-01

    Human infections caused by Dirofilaria repens have been reported in many areas of the world. We describe a case of a 3-year-old child with an intrascrotal mass caused by D repens mimicking an acute scrotum. This represents the first case of scrotal dirofilariasis described in pediatric age with such an unusual presentation.

  3. Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis mimicking gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ewelukwa, Ofor; Ali, Omair; Akram, Salma

    2014-05-08

    Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) is a benign, uncommon variant of chronic cholecystitis characterised by focal or diffuse destructive inflammatory process of the gallbladder (GB). Macroscopically, it appears like yellowish tumour-like masses in the wall of the GB. This article reports on a 74-year-old woman with XGC mimicking GB cancer.

  4. Rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Eren, Eryiğit; Demiralay, Ebru; Işıklar, İclal; Demirağ, Alp; Moray, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Although diverticular disease of the colon is common, the occurrence of rectal diverticula is extremely rare with only sporadic reports in the literature since 1911. Symptomatic rectal diverticula are seen even less frequently, and surgical intervention is needed for only complicated cases. Here we report the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction.

  5. Robust Protection against Highly Virulent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Swine by Combination Treatment with Recombinant Adenoviruses Expressing Porcine Alpha and Gamma Interferons and Multiple Small Interfering RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Kim, Se-Kyung; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Taeseong; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Seo, Min-Goo; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because the currently available vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) provide no protection until 4 to 7 days postvaccination, the only alternative method to halt the spread of the FMD virus (FMDV) during outbreaks is the application of antiviral agents. Combination treatment strategies have been used to enhance the efficacy of antiviral agents, and such strategies may be advantageous in overcoming viral mechanisms of resistance to antiviral treatments. We have developed recombinant adenoviruses (Ads) for the simultaneous expression of porcine alpha and gamma interferons (Ad-porcine IFN-αγ) as well as 3 small interfering RNAs (Ad-3siRNA) targeting FMDV mRNAs encoding nonstructural proteins. The antiviral effects of Ad-porcine IFN-αγ and Ad-3siRNA expression were tested in combination in porcine cells, suckling mice, and swine. We observed enhanced antiviral effects in porcine cells and mice as well as robust protection against the highly pathogenic strain O/Andong/SKR/2010 and increased expression of cytokines in swine following combination treatment. In addition, we showed that combination treatment was effective against all serotypes of FMDV. Therefore, we suggest that the combined treatment with Ad-porcine IFN-αγ and Ad-3siRNA may offer fast-acting antiviral protection and be used with a vaccine during the period that the vaccine does not provide protection against FMD. IMPORTANCE The use of current foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines to induce rapid protection provides limited effectiveness because the protection does not become effective until a minimum of 4 days after vaccination. Therefore, during outbreaks antiviral agents remain the only available treatment to confer rapid protection and reduce the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in livestock until vaccine-induced protective immunity can become effective. Interferons (IFNs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been reported to be effective antiviral agents against

  6. Robust Protection against Highly Virulent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Swine by Combination Treatment with Recombinant Adenoviruses Expressing Porcine Alpha and Gamma Interferons and Multiple Small Interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Mi; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Kim, Se-Kyung; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Taeseong; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Seo, Min-Goo; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-08-01

    Because the currently available vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) provide no protection until 4 to 7 days postvaccination, the only alternative method to halt the spread of the FMD virus (FMDV) during outbreaks is the application of antiviral agents. Combination treatment strategies have been used to enhance the efficacy of antiviral agents, and such strategies may be advantageous in overcoming viral mechanisms of resistance to antiviral treatments. We have developed recombinant adenoviruses (Ads) for the simultaneous expression of porcine alpha and gamma interferons (Ad-porcine IFN-αγ) as well as 3 small interfering RNAs (Ad-3siRNA) targeting FMDV mRNAs encoding nonstructural proteins. The antiviral effects of Ad-porcine IFN-αγ and Ad-3siRNA expression were tested in combination in porcine cells, suckling mice, and swine. We observed enhanced antiviral effects in porcine cells and mice as well as robust protection against the highly pathogenic strain O/Andong/SKR/2010 and increased expression of cytokines in swine following combination treatment. In addition, we showed that combination treatment was effective against all serotypes of FMDV. Therefore, we suggest that the combined treatment with Ad-porcine IFN-αγ and Ad-3siRNA may offer fast-acting antiviral protection and be used with a vaccine during the period that the vaccine does not provide protection against FMD. The use of current foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines to induce rapid protection provides limited effectiveness because the protection does not become effective until a minimum of 4 days after vaccination. Therefore, during outbreaks antiviral agents remain the only available treatment to confer rapid protection and reduce the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in livestock until vaccine-induced protective immunity can become effective. Interferons (IFNs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been reported to be effective antiviral agents against FMDV, although the

  7. Talc granulomatosis mimicking sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, A; Aggarwal, B; Menon, B; Kulshreshtha, R

    2008-07-01

    Pulmonary disease due to talc, a group of hydrous magnesium silicates, is almost exclusively encountered secondary to occupational exposure or intravenous drug abuse. Talcosis or talc pneumoconiosis is one of the rarer forms of silicate-induced lung disease. It is seen in workers exposed during its production, and occasionally, in users of cosmetic talc and in intravenous drug addicts. Very often, the history of exposure is not recognised by the patient, and it is only the finding of granulomatous cellular interstitial lesions containing birefringent crystals which indicates considerable talc exposure. We report a 38-year-old woman who was initially diagnosed with sarcoidosis, until a bronchoscopic biopsy revealed the presence of numerous foreign body giant cells and birefringent particles forming non-caseating granulomas. There was no history of occupational exposure to talc or intravenous drug abuse. The patient responded to oral corticosteroid treatment. Talcosis is generally considered to be relatively benign.

  8. Cerebral cryptococcoma mimicking glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ulett, Kimberly B; Cockburn, James W J; Jeffree, Rosalind; Woods, Marion L

    2017-02-10

    Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii cause invasive fungal disease, with meningitis being the most common manifestation of central nervous system (CNS) disease. Encapsulated cryptococcomas occur rarely, predominantly in immunocompetent hosts, usually related to C. gattii Our patient was an immunocompetent man who presented with headache and a large cystic CNS lesion thought to be glioblastoma. Biopsy of a concomitant lung lesion confirmed cryptococcoma and empiric antifungal therapy was started for presumed CNS cryptococcoma. Antifungal therapy failed to shrink the CNS lesion, and surgical excision confirmed C. gattii CNS cryptococcoma. Following surgery he had complete resolution of symptoms. This case highlights that cryptococcoma cannot be distinguished from tumour on clinical or imaging findings. A combined medical and surgical approach is optimal for the management of large or surgically accessible cryptococcomas, as antifungal therapy alone is unlikely to penetrate large lesions sufficiently to lead to a cure.

  9. THE INFECTION OF MICE WITH SWINE INFLUENZA VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1935-01-01

    The experiments confirm the earlier observation of Andrewes, Laidlaw and Smith that the swine influenza virus is pathogenic for white mice when administered intranasally. Two field strains of the swine influenza virus were found to differ in their initial pathogenicity for mice. One strain was apparently fully pathogenic even in its 1st mouse passage while the other required 2 or 3 mouse passages to acquire full virulence for this species. Both strains, however, were initially infectious for mice, without the necessity of intervening ferret passages. There is no evidence that bacteria play any significant rôle in the mouse disease though essential in that of swine, and fatal pneumonias can be produced in mice by pure virus infections. Mice surviving the virus disease are immune to reinfection for at least a month. In mice the disease is not contagious though it is notably so in swine. The virus, while regularly producing fatal pneumonias when administered intranasally to mice, appears to be completely innocuous when given subcutaneously or intraperitoneally. Prolonged serial passage of the virus in mice does not influence its infectivity or virulence for swine or ferrets. It is a stable virus so far as its infectivity is concerned, and can be transferred at will from any one of its three known susceptible hosts to any other. In discussing these facts the stability of the swine influenza virus has been contrasted with the apparent instability of freshly isolated strains of the human influenza virus. Though the mouse is an un-natural host for the virus it is, nevertheless, useful for the study of those aspects of swine influenza which have to do with the virus only. PMID:19870434

  10. Genotoxicity of swine effluents.

    PubMed

    Techio, V H; Stolberg, J; Kunz, A; Zanin, E; Perdomo, C C

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of genotoxic effects of swine effluents from different stages of a treatment system for swine wastes through bioassay of stamen hairs and micronuclei in Tradescantia (clone BNL 4430). No significant differences (p≥0.05) regarding the genic mutations were found in the bioassay of stamen hairs, independently of the effluent analysed. For the genotoxicity test with micronuclei, the plants exposed to raw wastes, to sludge, and to effluent of the biodigester have presented higher rates of chromosomal damages (micronuclei), with significant differences in relation to the control group and other effluent of the waste treatment system (p≤0.05). The association between the chemical parameters and the genotoxicity data have shown that the variables COD and TKN have presented significant correlation (p≤0.05) with the number of mutagenic events in the tetrads.

  11. Nuclear inclusions mimicking poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 inclusions in a case of inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia with a novel mutation in the valosin-containing protein gene.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Shiro; Shimizu, Toshio; Komori, Takashi; Mori-Yoshimura, Madoka; Minami, Narihiro; Hayashi, Yukiko K

    2016-07-01

    A middle-aged Japanese man presented with slowly progressive asymmetric weakness of legs and arm but had neither ptosis nor dysphagia. He had a family history of similar condition suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. A muscle biopsy showed mixture of neurogenic atrophy and myopathy with rimmed vacuoles. Furthermore we found intranuclear inclusions that had a fine structure mimicking that of inclusions reported in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Immunohistochemical staining for polyadenylate-binding nuclear protein 1, which is identified within the nuclear inclusions of OPMD, demonstrated nuclear positivity in this case. However, OPMD was thought unlikely based on the clinical features and results of genetic analyses. Instead, a novel mutation in valosin-containing protein, c.376A>T (p.Ile126Phe), was revealed. A diagnosis of inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia was made. This is the first report of polyadenylate-binding nuclear protein 1-positive nuclear inclusions in the muscle of this condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Serological and bacteriological study of swine brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lord, V R; Cherwonogrodzky, J W; Marcano, M J; Melendez, G

    1997-01-01

    A serological and bacteriological study was performed with sera taken from 2,228 swine from six states in Venezuela. None of the animals were vaccinated against brucellosis, and the prevalence of the disease varied from 5 to 89% on farms located in these states. Our studies indicated that the animals could be categorized into four groups depending on the degree of reactivity in serological tests. Brucella suis biovar 1 was isolated from the lymph nodes, spleens, and semen samples of seropositive animals and identified by oxidative metabolic techniques. B. suis could not be isolated from tissues of seronegative swine even from farms with cases of the disease (detected by serology). Results suggest that, although the immunodiffusion assay using Brucella melitensis B115 polysaccharide B or B. abortus 1119-3 O-polysaccharide could be useful in the detection of active infections, it is perhaps not as sensitive as some of the other standard serological tests used in this study for the detection of swine brucellosis. PMID:8968931

  13. Serological and bacteriological study of swine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Lord, V R; Cherwonogrodzky, J W; Marcano, M J; Melendez, G

    1997-01-01

    A serological and bacteriological study was performed with sera taken from 2,228 swine from six states in Venezuela. None of the animals were vaccinated against brucellosis, and the prevalence of the disease varied from 5 to 89% on farms located in these states. Our studies indicated that the animals could be categorized into four groups depending on the degree of reactivity in serological tests. Brucella suis biovar 1 was isolated from the lymph nodes, spleens, and semen samples of seropositive animals and identified by oxidative metabolic techniques. B. suis could not be isolated from tissues of seronegative swine even from farms with cases of the disease (detected by serology). Results suggest that, although the immunodiffusion assay using Brucella melitensis B115 polysaccharide B or B. abortus 1119-3 O-polysaccharide could be useful in the detection of active infections, it is perhaps not as sensitive as some of the other standard serological tests used in this study for the detection of swine brucellosis.

  14. An rfaH Mutant of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium is Attenuated in Swine and Reduces Intestinal Colonization, Fecal Shedding, and Disease Severity Due to Virulent Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Bearson, Bradley L.; Bearson, Shawn M. D.; Kich, Jalusa D.; Lee, In Soo

    2014-01-01

    Swine are often asymptomatic carriers of Salmonella spp., and interventions are needed to limit colonization of swine to enhance food safety and reduce environmental contamination. We evaluated the attenuation and potential vaccine use in pigs of a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant of rfaH, the gene encoding the RfaH antiterminator that prevents premature termination of long mRNA transcripts. Pigs inoculated with wild-type S. Typhimurium exhibited a significant elevation in average body temperature (fever) at 1 and 2 days post-inoculation; rfaH-inoculated pigs did not (n = 5/group). During the 7-day trial, a significant reduction of Salmonella in the feces, tonsils, and cecum were observed in the rfaH-inoculated pigs compared to wild-type inoculated pigs. To determine whether vaccination with the rfaH mutant could provide protection against wild-type S. Typhimurium challenge, two groups of pigs (n = 14/group) were intranasally inoculated with either the rfaH mutant or a PBS placebo at 6 and 8 weeks of age and challenged with the parental, wild-type S. Typhimurium at 11 weeks of age. The average body temperature was significantly elevated in the mock-vaccinated pigs at 1 and 2 days post-challenge, but not in the rfaH-vaccinated pigs. Fecal shedding at 2 and 3 days post-challenge and colonization of intestinal tract tissues at 7 days post-challenge by wild-type S. Typhimurium was significantly reduced in the rfaH-vaccinated pigs compared to mock-vaccinated pigs. Serological analysis using the IDEXX HerdChek Swine Salmonella Test Kit indicated that vaccination with the rfaH mutant did not stimulate an immune response against LPS. These results indicate that vaccination of swine with the attenuated rfaH mutant confers protection against challenge with virulent S. Typhimurium but does not interfere with herd level monitoring for Salmonella spp., thereby allowing for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). PMID

  15. Myositis ossificans: the mimicker

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Arunkumar; Sarawagi, Radha; Prakash, Manikka Lakshmanan

    2013-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy presented with upper backache and a painful swelling in the right paraspinal region for 7 days. He had no history of trauma. MRI showed a non-specific ill-defined heterogeneous lesion, which showed intense postcontrast enhancement. Ultrasonogram showed a peripheral sheet of calcification around the lesion. A CT scan showed a faint rim of calcification, which increased in thickness over weeks, confirming the diagnosis as myositis ossificans. We present our approach to the case and also review the imaging features of different stages of the disease process and their differentials. PMID:24326436

  16. 9 CFR 93.517 - Swine from Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Government showing that said swine have been inspected on the premises of origin immediately before the date of movement therefrom and found to be free of evidence of communicable disease and that, as far as it has been possible to determine, they were not exposed to any such disease during the preceding 60...

  17. Influenza A virus pathogenesis and vaccination in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Swine influenza is an acute respiratory disease of pigs that is characterized by fever followed by lethargy, anorexia, and serous nasal discharge. The disease progresses rapidly and may be complicated when associated with other respiratory pathogens. Influenza A virus (IAV) is one of the most preval...

  18. 9 CFR 85.5 - Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. 85.5 Section 85.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.5 Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. Infected swine or...

  19. 9 CFR 85.5 - Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. 85.5 Section 85.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.5 Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. Infected swine or...

  20. 9 CFR 85.5 - Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. 85.5 Section 85.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.5 Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. Infected swine or...