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  1. Thyroid Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... your menstrual period. Your thyroid helps control your menstrual cycle. Too much or too little thyroid hormone can ... Problems getting pregnant. When thyroid disease affects the menstrual cycle, it also affects ovulation. This can make it ...

  2. Thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications.

  3. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Some People Who Were Treated with hGH Pregnancy & Thyroid Disease What is thyroid disease? Thyroid disease ... pituitary responds by decreasing TSH production. How does pregnancy normally affect thyroid function? Two pregnancy-related hormones— ...

  4. Thyroid Diseases Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of thyroiditis and identify autoimmune thyroid conditions Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody—a marker for autoimmune thyroid disease; ... to help detect the presence of excessive calcitonin production, which can occur with C-cell hyperplasia and ...

  5. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine thyroid function include: Free T4 test Serum TSH T3 Thyroid autoantibodies Imaging studies and fine needle biopsy are generally not needed to diagnose Hashimoto thyroiditis. This disease may also change the results of the following ...

  6. Thyroid Disease Definitions

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Thyroid Disease Definitions KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease Definitions A A ... or injury. Signs of inflammation can include redness, heat, pain, or swelling. metabolism: Metabolism refers to the ...

  7. Anemia in thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina; Hernik, Aleksandra; Ruchała, Marek

    2017-03-28

    Anemia is a frequent, although often underestimated, clinical condition accompanying thyroid diseases. In spite of the fact that anemia and thyroid dysfunction often occur simultaneously, the causative relationship between these two disorders remains ambiguous. Thyroid hormones stimulate erythrocytes precursors proliferation directly, as well as via erythropoietin production enhancement, whereas iron-deficient anemia negatively influences thyroid hormonal status. Thus, different forms of anemia might emerge in the course of thyroid dysfunction. In fact, normocytic anemia is most common, while macrocytic or microcytic anemia occur less frequently. Anemia in hypothyroidism might result from bone marrow depression, decreased erythropoietin production, comorbid diseases, or concomitant iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. Altered iron metabolism and oxidative stress may contribute to anemia in hyperthyroidism. The risk of anemia in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) may be posed by pernicious anemia and atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, autoimmune hemolytic syndrome, or rheumatic disorders. The simultaneous occurrence of anemia and thyroid disease, as well as their close relation, make the diseases an important clinical problem. The aim of the study is to provide a comprehensive review summarizing data on the prevalence, potential mechanisms, and therapy of anemia in the course of thyroid diseases from the clinical and pathogenetic perspective. Thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune thyroid disease should be considered in differential diagnosis of treatment-resistant or refractory anemia, as well as in case of increased red blood cell distribution width (RDW). Of note is that the presence of AITD itself, independently from thyroid hormonal status, might affect hemoglobin level.

  8. Metformin and thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianghui; Xu, Shuhang; Chen, Guofang; Derwahl, Michael; Liu, Chao

    2017-04-01

    An intriguing area of research in thyroidology is the recently discovered association of insulin resistance with thyroid functional and morphological abnormalities. Individuals with hyperinsulinemia have larger thyroid gland and a higher prevalence of thyroid nodules and cancer. Accordingly, patients treated with metformin have a smaller thyroid volume and a lower risk of incident goiter, thyroid nodule and cancer. Multiple studies in vitro and in vivo have demonstrated that metformin can inhibit the growth of thyroid cells and different types of thyroid cancer cells by affecting the insulin/IGF1 and mTOR pathways. Besides, metformin treatment was associated with a decrease in the levels of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in diabetic patients possibly by enhancing the effects of thyroid hormones in the pituitary and activating the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Based on this evidence, metformin appears to be a promising therapeutic tool in patients with thyroid disease. More clinical studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical significance of metformin for the treatment of thyroid diseases. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  9. Thyroid disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Carney, Leo A; Quinlan, Jeff D; West, Janet M

    2014-02-15

    Thyroid disease is the second most common endocrine disorder affecting women of reproductive age, and when untreated during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage, placental abruption, hypertensive disorders, and growth restriction. Current guidelines recommend targeted screening of women at high risk, including those with a history of thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, or other autoimmune disease; current or past use of thyroid therapy; or a family history of autoimmune thyroid disease. Appropriate management results in improved outcomes, demonstrating the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment. In women with hypothyroidism, levothyroxine is titrated to achieve a goal serum thyroid-stimulating hormone level less than 2.5 mIU per L. The preferred treatment for hyperthyroidism is antithyroid medications, with a goal of maintaining a serum free thyroxine level in the upper one-third of the normal range. Postpartum thyroiditis is the most common form of postpartum thyroid dysfunction and may present as hyper- or hypothyroidism. Symptomatic treatment is recommended for the former; levothyroxine is indicated for the latter in women who are symptomatic, breastfeeding, or who wish to become pregnant.

  10. Hashimoto's thyroiditis following Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Umar, Husaini; Muallima, Nur; Adam, John M F; Sanusi, Harsinen

    2010-01-01

    Both Graves' disease and chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) are autoimmune diseases of thyroid gland. Graves' disease is caused by stimulation of TSH receptor located on the thyroid gland by an antibody, which is known as TSH receptor antibody (TRAb). Furthermore, this may lead to hyperplasia and hyperfunction of the thyroid gland. On the contrary, the cause of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is thought due to a TSH stimulation-blocking antibody (TSBAb) which blocks the action of TSH hormone and subsequently brings damage and atrophy to thyroid gland. Approximately 15-20% of patients with Graves' disease had been reported to have spontaneous hypothyroidism resulting from the chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease). Pathogenesis for chronic thyroiditis following anti-thyroid drug treatment in patients with Graves' disease remains unclear. It has been estimated that chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's disease, which occurs following the Graves' disease episode is due to extended immune response in Graves' disease. It includes the immune response to endogenous thyroid antigens, i.e. thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin, which may enhance lymphocyte infiltration and finally causes Hashimoto's thyroiditis. We report four cases of chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) in patients who have been previously diagnosed with Graves' hyperthyroidism. In three cases, Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs in 7 to 25 years after the treatment of Grave's disease; while the other case has it only after few months of Grave's disease treatment. The diagnosis of Hashimoto's disease (chronic thyroiditis) was based on clinical manifestation, high TSHs level, positive thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody, and supported by positive results of fine needle aspiration biopsy. Moreover, the result of histopathological test has also confirmed the diagnosis in two cases. All cases have been successfully treated by levothyroxine treatment.

  11. Thyroid disease in older people.

    PubMed

    Mitrou, Panayota; Raptis, Sotirios A; Dimitriadis, George

    2011-09-01

    Several changes in thyroid hormone secretion, metabolism, and action occur with the increase in age. Aging is often associated with a decrease in serum thyroid stimulating hormone and T3 levels, whereas serum free T4 levels usually remain unchanged. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction is higher in the elderly as compared to the younger population. In elderly individuals the non-specific clinical manifestations of thyroid hormone excess or deprivation can cause confusion in the clinical setup; while some of the symptoms of thyroid disease are similar to those in younger patients, it is not uncommon for both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism to be manifested in subtle ways in older patients, often mimicking symptoms of aging or masquerading as diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, or nervous system. In addition, diagnosis of thyroid disorders is commonly complicated, due to chronic, non-thyroidal illness or medication therapy. Early diagnosis and treatment of overt thyroid disorders is crucial, since these disorders are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the elderly, usually due to common coexistent diseases such as diminished cardiovascular reserve. Treatment of subclinical thyroid disease should also be considered, based on a combination of age, symptoms and risk factors in the individual patients. In addition, both prevalence and aggressiveness of thyroid cancer increase with age. This review summarizes the changes of thyroid function, as well as the clinical manifestations and treatment of thyroid disorders with advancing age. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Environmental Issues in Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors are determinant for the appearance of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) in susceptible subjects. Increased iodine intake, selenium, and vitamin D deficiency, exposure to radiation, from nuclear fallout or due to medical radiation, are environmental factors increasing AITD. Cigarette smoking is associated with Graves’ disease and Graves’ ophthalmopathy, while it decreases the risk of hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity. Viral infections are important environmental factors in the pathogenesis of AITD, too, particularly human parvovirus B19 (EVB19) and hepatitis C virus. Among the many chemical contaminants, halogenated organochlorines and pesticides variably disrupt thyroid function. Polychlorinated biphenyls and their metabolites and polybrominated diethyl ethers bind to thyroid transport proteins, such as transthyretin, displace thyroxine, and disrupt thyroid function. Among drugs, interferon- and iodine-containing drugs have been associated with AITD. Moreover intestinal dysbiosis causes autoimmune thyroiditis. To reduce the risk to populations and also in each patient, it is necessary to comprehend the association between environmental agents and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:28373861

  13. Environmental Issues in Thyroid Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors are determinant for the appearance of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) in susceptible subjects. Increased iodine intake, selenium, and vitamin D deficiency, exposure to radiation, from nuclear fallout or due to medical radiation, are environmental factors increasing AITD. Cigarette smoking is associated with Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy, while it decreases the risk of hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity. Viral infections are important environmental factors in the pathogenesis of AITD, too, particularly human parvovirus B19 (EVB19) and hepatitis C virus. Among the many chemical contaminants, halogenated organochlorines and pesticides variably disrupt thyroid function. Polychlorinated biphenyls and their metabolites and polybrominated diethyl ethers bind to thyroid transport proteins, such as transthyretin, displace thyroxine, and disrupt thyroid function. Among drugs, interferon- and iodine-containing drugs have been associated with AITD. Moreover intestinal dysbiosis causes autoimmune thyroiditis. To reduce the risk to populations and also in each patient, it is necessary to comprehend the association between environmental agents and thyroid dysfunction.

  14. Thyroid hormones and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Avais; Pingitore, Alessandro; Pearce, Simon H S; Zaman, Azfar; Iervasi, Giorgio; Razvi, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Myocardial and vascular endothelial tissues have receptors for thyroid hormones and are sensitive to changes in the concentrations of circulating thyroid hormones. The importance of thyroid hormones in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis can be deduced from clinical and experimental data showing that even subtle changes in thyroid hormone concentrations - such as those observed in subclinical hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism, and low triiodothyronine syndrome - adversely influence the cardiovascular system. Some potential mechanisms linking the two conditions are dyslipidaemia, endothelial dysfunction, blood pressure changes, and direct effects of thyroid hormones on the myocardium. Several interventional trials showed that treatment of subclinical thyroid diseases improves cardiovascular risk factors, which implies potential benefits for reducing cardiovascular events. Over the past 2 decades, accumulating evidence supports the association between abnormal thyroid function at the time of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and subsequent adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, experimental studies showed that thyroid hormones can have an important therapeutic role in reducing infarct size and improving myocardial function after acute MI. In this Review, we summarize the literature on thyroid function in cardiovascular diseases, both as a risk factor as well as in the setting of cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure or acute MI, and outline the effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  15. Robotic Surgery for Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2013-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an innovation in thyroid surgery that may compensate for the drawbacks of conventional endoscopic surgery. A surgical robot provides strong advantages, including three-dimensional imaging, motion scaling, tremor elimination, and additional degrees of freedom. We review here recent adaptations, experience and applications of robotics in thyroid surgery. Robotic thyroid surgeries include thyroid lobectomy, total thyroidectomy, central compartment neck dissection, and radical neck dissection for benign and malignant thyroid diseases. Most of the current literature consists of case series of robotic thyroidectomies. Recent retrospective and prospective analyses have evaluated the safety and oncologic efficacy of robotic surgery for thyroid cancer. Although robotic thyroid surgery is often associated with longer operation times than conventional open surgery, robotic techniques have shown similar or superior levels of surgical completeness and safety compared with conventional open or endoscopic surgery. Compared to open thyroidectomy, robotic thyroidectomy has been associated with several quality-of-life benefits, including excellent cosmetic results, reduced neck pain and sensory changes, and decreased voice and swallowing discomfort after surgery. For surgeons, robotic surgery has improved ergonomics and has a shorter learning curve than open or endoscopic surgery. The advantages of robotic thyroid surgery over conventional surgery suggest that robotic thyroidectomy with or without neck dissection may become the preferred surgical option for thyroid diseases. Robotic thyroid surgery will likely continue to develop as more endocrine and head-and-neck surgeons are trained and more patients seek this newly developed surgical option. PMID:24783046

  16. Celiac Disease and Thyroid Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... whole body to slow down. This is called hypothyroidism. If your thyroid begins to over-produce hormones ... and Grave’s Disease are two common causes of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism (respectively). Both are autoimmune diseases: autoimmune ...

  17. Thyroid Autoimmunity: Role of Anti-thyroid Antibodies in Thyroid and Extra-Thyroidal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Eleonore; Wahl, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have a high prevalence in the population, and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is one of the most common representatives. Thyroid autoantibodies are not only frequently detected in patients with AITD but also in subjects without manifest thyroid dysfunction. The high prevalence raises questions regarding a potential role in extra-thyroidal diseases. This review summarizes the etiology and mechanism of AITD and addresses prevalence of antibodies against thyroid peroxidase, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), and anti-thyroglobulin and their action outside the thyroid. The main issues limiting the reliability of the conclusions drawn here include problems with different specificities and sensitivities of the antibody detection assays employed, as well as potential confounding effects of altered thyroid hormone levels, and lack of prospective studies. In addition to the well-known effects of TSHR antibodies on fibroblasts in Graves’ disease (GD), studies speculate on a role of anti-thyroid antibodies in cancer. All antibodies may have a tumor-promoting role in breast cancer carcinogenesis despite anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies having a positive prognostic effect in patients with overt disease. Cross-reactivity with lactoperoxidase leading to induction of chronic inflammation might promote breast cancer, while anti-thyroid antibodies in manifest breast cancer might be an indication for a more active immune system. A better general health condition in older women with anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies might support this hypothesis. The different actions of the anti-thyroid antibodies correspond to differences in cellular location of the antigens, titers of the circulating antibodies, duration of antibody exposure, and immunological mechanisms in GD and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. PMID:28536577

  18. Thyroid diseases in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Roland

    2009-12-01

    Thyroid disorders are common in pregnancy and affect maternal and fetal outcome. The reference values for normal thyroid function during first and second trimester had been re-evaluated recently. Hypothyroxinemia affects the neuropsychological development of the child. Maternal thyroid dysfunction or only the presence of thyroid-specific antibodies is associated with increased risk for early abortion, preterm delivery and neonatal morbidity. Pregnant women under levothyroxine treatment are often undertreated or overtreated. Screening for thyroid dysfunction of pregnant women is recommended and cost-effective. Recently, the recommended dose for iodine intake during pregnancy had been increased from 200 to 250 microg/day, because recent studies revealed that even mild-to-moderate iodine intake might affect the neuropsychological development of the child. About 5-18% of all pregnant women exhibit elevated thyroid-specific antibodies, but only 0.3% develop overt hypothyroidism and 0.1-0.4% overt hyperthyroidism. However, those pregnant women with autoimmune thyroiditis and normal thyroid function may have a restricted thyroid reserve, followed by hypothyroxinemia and/or thyroid-stimulating hormone increase during pregnancy. The incidence of miscarriage, preterm delivery and small for date offspring might be increased and probably a delayed neuropsychological development. Routine thyroid function testing at least as early as possible in all pregnant women is emphasized.

  19. Thyroid diseases and female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Mintziori, G; Anagnostis, P; Toulis, K A; Goulis, D G

    2012-02-01

    Thyroid diseases are very common in women of reproductive age. The aim of this study was to review the current evidence on physiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of women with thyroid disorders that are currently seeking fertility, undergoing assisted reproduction technologies (ART) or being pregnant. Normal thyroid function is essential for normal function of the gonadal axis, thus important in maintaining normal reproductive capacity. On the contrary, any type of thyroid dysfunction may reduce the likelihood of pregnancy; the latter can be restored to normal after appropriate treatment. Over eight million children have been born as a result of assisted reproduction techniques (ART) since 1978. As these procedures are becoming more common in clinical practice, the exact impact of thyroid status on reproductive outcomes as well as that of drugs used in ART on thyroid function has to be fully elucidated. Maternal thyroid function is crucial, especially during the first weeks of gestation, for offspring's wellness and brain development. On the other hand, normal physiological mechanisms during gestation can have a major impact on maternal thyroid function. As human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has a thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)-like effect, high hCG concentrations are associated with thyroid stimulation, both functionally (lower serum TSH concentrations) and anatomically (increased thyroid volume). Although the association between maternal hypothyroidism and increased perinatal morbidity has been described for over a century, more recently, even the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as recurrent abortions and placental abruption. This is of major clinical significance, as anti-thyroid antibodies are surprisingly prevalent in pregnancy, especially during the first two trimesters.

  20. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... change over just a few months. previous continue Hypothyroidism A person with mild hypothyroidism may feel just fine — in fact, the condition ... all. However, symptoms can become more obvious if hypothyroidism progresses. People with underactive thyroids might feel depressed ...

  1. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... change over just a few months. previous continue Hypothyroidism A person with mild hypothyroidism may feel just fine — in fact, the condition ... all. However, symptoms can become more obvious if hypothyroidism progresses. People with underactive thyroids might feel depressed ...

  2. Thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Tam, Abbas Ali; Kaya, Cafer; Kılıç, Fevzi Balkan Mehmet; Ersoy, Reyhan; Çakır, Bekir

    2014-12-01

    The frequency of thyroid nodules accompanying Graves' disease and the risk of thyroid cancer in presence of accompanying nodules are controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of thyroid nodules and the risk of thyroid cancer in patients operated because of graves' disease. Five hundred and twenty-six patients in whom thyroidectomy was performed because of Graves' disease between 2006 and 2013 were evaluated retrospectively. Patients who had received radioactive iodine treatment and external irradiation treatment in the neck region and who had had thyroid surgery previously were not included in the study. While accompanying thyroid nodule was present in 177 (33.6%) of 526 Graves' patients, thyroid nodule was absent in 349 (66.4%) patients. Forty-two (8%) patients had thyroid cancer. The rate of thyroid cancer was 5.4% (n = 19) in the Graves' patients who had no nodule, whereas it was 13% (n = 23) in the patients who had nodule. The risk of thyroid cancer increased significantly in presence of nodule (p = 0.003). Three patients had recurrence. No patient had distant metastasis. No patient died during the follow-up period. Especially Graves' patients who have been decided to be followed up should be evaluated carefully during the follow-up in terms of thyroid cancer which may accompany.

  3. Thyroid Ultrasound: State of the Art Part 1 - Thyroid Ultrasound reporting and Diffuse Thyroid Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dighe, Manjiri; Barr, Richard; Bojunga, Jörg; Cantisani, Vito; Chammas, Maria Cristina; Cosgrove, David; Cui, Xin Wu; Dong, Yi; Fenner, Franziska; Radzina, Maija; Vinayak, Sudhir; Xu, Jun Mei; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2017-01-31

    Accurate differentiation of focal thyroid nodules (FTL) and thyroid abnormalities is pivotal for proper diagnostic and therapeutic work-up. In these two part articles, the role of ultrasound techniques in the characterization of FTL and evaluation of diffuse thyroid diseases is described to expand on the recently published World Federation in Ultrasound and Medicine (WFUMB) thyroid elastography guidelines and review how this guideline fits into a complete thyroid ultrasound exam.

  4. Modified Miccoli's thyroid surgery for thyroid diseases

    PubMed Central

    YU, HUI; GE, XIN; PAN, WEIKANG; WANG, HUAIJIE; HUANG, QIANG; DONG, YU; GAO, YA; YU, JIANJUN

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT), originally described by Miccoli, is considered to be the most widely practiced and easily reproducible procedure for selected patients with benign and/or malignant thyroid nodules. Modified techniques based on MIVAT, namely modified Miccoli's thyroid surgery (MMTS), were developed based on MIVAT. This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary results of MMTS compared with those of MIVAT. The enrolling criteria included a benign nodule <3.5 cm in diameter, a malignant tumor <2 cm, no previous neck surgery and no evidence of any suspected lymph node metastasis or local invasion. Unilateral lobectomy was considered for benign lesions and the additional dissection of central compartment (level VI) lymph nodes was applied for malignant disease. The modified techniques included carefully selecting the operative incision, expanding the operative space, embedding a drainage tube in situ and delicately suturing every layer inwards and crosswise, as well as measuring cervical motion. In addition to the comparison of surgical outcomes between MMTS and MIVAT, other surgical parameters, including operative time, blood loss, postoperative drainage, cosmetic satisfaction, peak angle of cervical rotation, length of hospitalization and complications, were retrospectively analyzed. A consecutive series of 70 patients, including 54 cases of benign and 16 cases of malignant disease, initially underwent MIVAT between April, 2008 and May, 2012, while 127 patients, including 98 benign and 29 malignant cases, subsequently underwent MMTS between September, 2011 and October, 2014. Patients who received MMTS exhibited significantly less blood loss (20.3±11.3 vs. 32.3±12.6 ml, P<0.01), lower volume of postoperative drainage (42.77±15.2 vs. 50.48±23.2 ml, P<0.01) and higher cosmetic satisfaction (94.6±3.5 vs. 88.9±2.7%, P<0.01), but a longer operative time (102±36 vs. 50.48±23.2 min, P<0.01) when compared with MIVAT. In addition, a

  5. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... in girls, and muscle weakness. Graves disease , an autoimmune disease, is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. The ... toes thy-roy-DYE-tiss) is also an autoimmune disease and is the most common cause of hypothyroidism ...

  6. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in girls, and muscle weakness. Graves disease , an autoimmune disease, is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. It ... toes thy-roy-DYE-tiss) is also an autoimmune disease and is the most common cause of hypothyroidism ...

  7. Environmental Exposures and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Environmental exposures, ranging from perchlorate in rocket fuel to polychlorinated biphenols, have been shown to influence thyroid function. Although most of these agents are associated with reduced thyroid hormone levels or impaired thyroid hormone action, a number of environmental exposures confer an increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease. Summary Factors that increase autoimmune thyroid disease risk include radiation exposure, both from nuclear fallout and medical radiation, increased iodine intake, as well as several contaminants in the environment that influence the thyroid. Although ∼70% of the risk for developing autoimmune thyroid disease is attributable to genetic background, environmental triggers are thought to play a role in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease in susceptible individuals. Conclusions Understanding the association of environmental agents with thyroid dysfunction can be utilized to reduce the risk to populations. Knowledge of the specific factors that trigger autoimmune thyroid disease and their mode of action, however, may also inform risk reduction in the individual patient. These factors are especially relevant for those at increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease based on family history. PMID:20578899

  8. Environmental exposures and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Brent, Gregory A

    2010-07-01

    Environmental exposures, ranging from perchlorate in rocket fuel to polychlorinated biphenols, have been shown to influence thyroid function. Although most of these agents are associated with reduced thyroid hormone levels or impaired thyroid hormone action, a number of environmental exposures confer an increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease. Factors that increase autoimmune thyroid disease risk include radiation exposure, both from nuclear fallout and medical radiation, increased iodine intake, as well as several contaminants in the environment that influence the thyroid. Although approximately 70% of the risk for developing autoimmune thyroid disease is attributable to genetic background, environmental triggers are thought to play a role in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease in susceptible individuals. Understanding the association of environmental agents with thyroid dysfunction can be utilized to reduce the risk to populations. Knowledge of the specific factors that trigger autoimmune thyroid disease and their mode of action, however, may also inform risk reduction in the individual patient. These factors are especially relevant for those at increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease based on family history.

  9. Thyroid gland in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Miłkowska-Dymanowska, Joanna; Białas, Adam J; Laskowska, Paulina; Górski, Paweł; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2017-01-01

    The risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as thyroid diseases increases with age. COPD is a common systemic disease associated with chronic inflammation. Many endocrinological disorders, including thyroid gland diseases are related to systemic inflammation. Epidemiological studies suggest that patients with COPD are at higher risk of thyroid disorders. These associations are not well-studied and thyroid gland diseases are not included on the broadly acknowledged list of COPD comorbidities. They may seriously handicap quality of life of COPD patients. Unfortunately, the diagnosis may be difficult, as many signs are masked by the symptoms of the index disease. The comprehension of the correlation between thyroid gland disorders and COPD may contribute to better care of patients. In this review, we attempt to revise available literature describing existing links between COPD and thyroid diseases.

  10. Foetal programming by maternal thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Stine Linding; Olsen, Jørn; Laurberg, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Foetal programming is an emerging concept that links a wide range of exposures during foetal life to later development of disease. Thyroid disorders are common in women of reproductive age, and careful management of pregnant women suffering from thyroid disease is important considering the crucial role of thyroid hormones during early brain development. It is possible that maternal thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy may lead to structural and/or functional changes during foetal brain development. Such an effect could later predispose the offspring to an increased risk of neurologic or psychiatric disease. We recently observed that children born to mothers with thyroid dysfunction had an increased risk of developing seizure disorders, autism spectrum disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders and psychiatric disease in adolescence and young adulthood. In the review, we discuss the concept of potential foetal programming by maternal thyroid disease.

  11. Thyroid Disease Definitions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & ... There are about 80 amino acids in nature, but the human body needs only 20 of these for metabolism and growth. Essential amino acids are supplied by ...

  12. Cardiovascular effects of thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Sangster, Jodi K; Panciera, David L; Abbott, Jonathan A

    2013-07-01

    Thyroid hormones have many effects on cardiovascular function, and deficiency or excess of thyroid hormones can result in cardiac dysfunction. Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are often identified during examination of hyperthyroid and hypothyroid patients. This article addresses the effects of thyroid hormones on the cardiovascular system and the clinical relevance of the cardiovascular response to thyroid dysfunction. In addition, treatment recommendations are presented.

  13. Thyroid disease and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormones, specifically triiodothyronine (T3), have significant effects on the heart and cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, subclinical thyroid disease, and low T3 syndrome each cause cardiac and cardiovascular abnormalities through both genomic and nongenomic effects on cardiac myocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. In compromised health, such as occurs in heart disease, alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism may further impair cardiac and cardiovascular function. Diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease may benefit from including analysis of thyroid hormone status, including serum total T3 levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease (CAM) WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  15. Epidemiology of thyroid diseases in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ogbera, Anthonia Okeoghene; Kuku, Sonny Folunrusho

    2011-01-01

    Background: Thyroid disorders are common endocrine disorders encountered in the African continent. Environmental and nutritional factors are often implicated in the occurrence of some thyroid disorders that occur in this part of the world. This is a narrative review that seeks to document the pattern, prevalence, and management of thyroid disorders in the continent. Materials and Methods: The search engine used for this review were PubMed and Google scholar. All available articles on thyroid disorders from the sub-African continent, published until May 2011, were included. Results: Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) which top the list of thyroid disorders and remain the commonest cause of thyroid disorders in the continent is often affected not only by the iodine status in the region but sometimes also by selenium deficiency and thiocyanate toxicity. The reported prevalence rates of endemic goiter range from 1% to 90% depending on the area of study with myxedematous cretinism still a prominent feature of IDD in only a few regions of the continent. The extent of autoimmune thyroid disorders remains unknown because of underdiagnosis and underreporting but the few available studies note a prevalence rate of 1.2% to 9.9% of which Graves diseases is the commonest of these groups of disorders. Rarer causes of thyroid dysfunction such as thyroid tuberculosis and amiodarone related causes are also documented in this review. The onset of new thyroid diseases following amiodarone usage was documented in 27.6% of persons treated for arrhythmia. Reports on thyroid malignancies (CA) in Africa abound and differentiated thyroid malignancies are noted to occur more commonly than the other forms of thyroid CA. The documented prevalence rates of thyroid CA in the African continent are as follows (papillary: 6.7–72.1%, follicular: 4.9–68%, anaplastic: 5–21.4%, and medullary: 2.6%–13.8%). For the differentiated thyroid CA, there is a changing trend toward the more frequent

  16. Epigenetics and Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic modifications, including changes in DNA methylation, covalent modifications of histone tails, and gene silencing mediated by non-coding RNA molecules, play a substantial role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders and might be seen as the result of environmental insults that trigger these conditions. Studies in cells and tissues of patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), and particularly in Graves’ disease (GD) and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT), are increasingly revealing altered epigenetic marks and resultant deregulation of gene expression levels, but the available data are still limited to be translated into the clinical settings. Particularly, genome-wide methylation and histone tail modification screenings are limited to a few studies in GD patients, and the diagnostic values of the observed epigenetic changes or their potential prognostic utility are still unclear. Similarly, data concerning microRNA expression in AITD patients are largely descriptive and not yet translated into the clinics. In addition, studies relating certain environmental exposures to specific epigenetic changes in AITD and studies evaluating the crosstalk between different epigenetic mechanisms are largely missing. In summary, despite that there is a clear evidence of epigenetic impairment in AITD, further research is required for a better understanding of the epigenetic networks involved in disease pathogenesis, thereby opening the way for potential diagnostic and prognostic tools, as well as for epigenetic interventions in the patients. PMID:28706507

  17. Rare thyroid non-neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lacka, Katarzyna; Maciejewski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Rare diseases are usually defined as entities affecting less than 1 person per 2,000. About 7,000 different rare entities are distinguished and, among them, rare diseases of the thyroid gland. Although not frequent, they can be found in the everyday practice of endocrinologists and should be considered in differential diagnosis. Rare non-neoplastic thyroid diseases will be discussed. Congenital hypothyroidism's frequency is relatively high and its early treatment is of vital importance for neonatal psychomotor development; CH is caused primarily by thyroid dysgenesis (85%) or dyshormonogenesis (10-15%), although secondary defects - hypothalamic and pituitary - can also be found; up to 40% of cases diagnosed on neonatal screening are transient. Inherited abnormalities of thyroid hormone binding proteins (TBG, TBP and albumin) include alterations in their concentration or affinity for iodothyronines, this leads to laboratory test abnormalities, although usually with normal free hormones and clinical euthyroidism. Thyroid hormone resistance is most commonly found in THRB gene mutations and more rarely in THRA mutations; in some cases both genes are unchanged (non-TR RTH). Recently the term 'reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormones' was introduced, which encompass not only iodothyronine receptor defects but also their defective transmembrane transport or metabolism. Rare causes of hyperthyroidism are: activating mutations in TSHR or GNAS genes, pituitary adenomas, differentiated thyroid cancer or gestational trophoblastic disease; congenital hyperthyroidism cases are also seen, although less frequently than CH. Like other organs and tissues, the thyroid can be affected by different inflammatory and infectious processes, including tuberculosis and sarcoidosis. In most of the rare thyroid diseases genetic factors play a key role, many of them can be classified as monogenic disorders. Although there are still some limitations, progress has been made in our understanding of

  18. Thyroid Ultrasonography in Differentiation between Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Pishdad, P; Pishdad, G R; Tavanaa, S; Pishdad, R; Jalli, R

    2017-03-01

    Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis are the most common causes of hyper and hypothyroidism, respectively. Differentiation of these 2 diseases, if the patient is euthyroid, may sometimes be extremely difficult on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of gray scale sonography in differentiation of Graves' disease from Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This study included 149 patients divided into three groups, patients with Graves' disease (34 patients, mean age = 36.8 ± 10.17 years), Patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (62 patients, mean age = 33.4 ± 12.16 years) and control group (53 healthy people, mean age = 34.74 ± 16.87 years). Members of all groups were referred to a single radiologist for thyroid sonography for evaluation of thyroid echogenicity pattern. A total of 117 women and 32 men were examined by sonography. The most common sonographic pattern in Hashimoto and Graves' was homogenous hypo-echogenicity which was observed in 45.2% and 47.1% of cases, respectively. Peripheral hypo-echogenicity pattern was seen in 40.3% of Hashimoto's group with 100% specificity and 40.3% sensitivity. Central-hypoechogenic pattern was observed in 17.6% of Graves' group with 100% and 17.6% specificity and sensitivity, respectively. Our findings indicate that sonography has high specificity but low sensitivity in the diagnosis of either Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. It is therefore not possible to differentiate between these two diseases using sonography alone. Confirmation by laboratory data is also needed.

  19. Autoimmune mechanisms in pernicious anaemia & thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Osborne, David; Sobczyńska-Malefora, Agata

    2015-09-01

    Pernicious anaemia (PA) and some types of thyroid disease result from autoimmune processes. The autoimmune mechanisms in these conditions have not been fully elucidated. This review discusses the autoimmune mechanisms involved in PA and how these affect diagnosis and disease progression. In addition to gastric antibodies, antibodies to the vitamin B12 binding protein transcobalamin which can result in high serum B12 levels are also addressed with regard to how they affect clinical practice. The role of autoimmune susceptibility is investigated by comparing PA to one of its most common comorbidities, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Thyroid disease (although not exclusively AITD) and B12 deficiency are both also implicated in the pathology of hyperhomocysteinemia, an elevated homocysteine in plasma. Since hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular occlusive disease, this review also addresses how thyroid disease in particular leads to changes in homocysteine levels.

  20. Graves' disease associated with histologic Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Falk, S A; Birken, E A; Ronquillo, A H

    1985-02-01

    The microscopic slides of 16 patients who underwent bilateral subtotal thyroidectomy for hyperthyroid Graves' disease were reviewed and classified into three groups: I, Hashimoto's thyroiditis; II, Graves' disease; and III, both Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease. Three patients were classified as group I, 10 as group II, and three as group III. In 38% of the patients with clinical Graves' disease the histologic evidence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis could be found either alone or in combination with histologic evidence of Graves' disease (groups I and III). One patient in group I, four in group II, and three in group III had infiltrative ophthalmopathy (50% of total). Hyperthyroid Graves' disease, Graves' ophthalmopathy, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis can occur all together, in duads, or individually at a specific time in a patient's life.

  1. Thyroid disease and the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Wood-Allum, Clare A; Shaw, Pamela J

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid disorders are common in the general population and in hospitalized patients. Thyroid disease may present first with neurological complications or else may occur concurrently in patients suffering other neurological disorders, particularly those with an autoimmune etiology. For this reason neurologists will commonly encounter patients with thyroid disease. This chapter provides an overview of the neurological complications and associations of disorders of the thyroid gland. Particular emphasis is placed on conditions such as thyrotoxic periodic paralysis and myxedema coma in which the underlying thyroid disorder may be occult leading to a first, often emergency, presentation to a neurologist. Information about clinical features, diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prognosis is provided. Emphasis is placed on those aspects most likely to be relevant to the practicing neurologist and the interested reader is directed to references to good, recent review articles for further information. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Robazzi, Teresa Cristina Martins Vicente; Adan, Luis Fernando Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid function abnormalities and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases, such as Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma. Limited data are available regarding the prevalence and clinical characteristics of autoimmune thyroiditis in other rheumatologic disorders, such as rheumatic fever and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. The authors review the association of endocrine autoimmune and rheumatic autoimmune diseases, assessing various age groups and clinical conditions. The bibliographic survey was conducted through the search for scientific articles indexed in the general health sciences databases, such as Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Medline/PubMed, and Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO). The following descriptors were used: "rheumatic autoimmune diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases"; "thyroid disorders and rheumatic diseases"; "thyroiditis and rheumatic diseases"; "autoimmune diseases and thyroid"; and "pediatric rheumatic diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases". This study showed that, despite contradictory results in the literature, there is a greater prevalence of the association between autoimmune thyroid diseases and rheumatic diseases, highlighting the possibility of common pathogenic mechanisms among them.

  3. Concurrence of Grave's disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, T; Takata, I; Taketani, T; Saida, K; Nakajima, H

    1977-01-01

    Early histological changes in the thyroid gland were examined in 30 patients with juvenile thyrotoxicosis, by means of needle biopsy. Based on the degree of lymphocytic infiltration and degenerative changes in follicular epithelium, results were classified into four groups. A: hyperplastic changes without cellular infiltration (6 patients, 20%); B: hyperplastic changes with areas of focal thyroiditis less than 30% of specimen (10 patients, 33%); C: those with 30 to 60% areas ot thyroiditis (10 patients, 33%); D: almost diffuse thyroiditis (4 patients, 13%). Moderate to severe lymphocytic thyroiditis was frequently present in the early stage of hyperplastic thyroid glands. The clinical significance of the 4 histological groups was evaluated. Neither clinical signs nor routine laboratory tests could differentiate these groups except group D, in which thyrotoxic signs were mild and transient. However, serum antithyroid antibodies tended to increase in accordance with severity of thyroiditis. The rate of remission was high in groups C and D, whereas relapse was frequent in group A. These results suggest that Grave's disease and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis are closely related in the early stage of thyrotoxicosis in children, and that the clinical course may be considerably altered by the degree of associated thyroiditis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 3 PMID:580172

  4. Immunopathogenesis of Thyroid Eye Disease: Emerging Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Vibhavari M; Naik, Milind N; Goldberg, Robert A; Smith, Terry J; Douglas, Raymond S

    2009-01-01

    Graves disease represents a systemic autoimmune process targeting the thyroid, orbit, and pretibial skin. The thyroid dysfunction is treatable, but no consistently effective medical therapy has yet been described for the orbital manifestations of Graves disease, also known as thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy or thyroid eye disease. Several autoantigens are potentially relevant to the pathogenesis of thyroid eye disease. Activating antibodies generated against the thyrotropin receptor can be detected in a majority of patients, and these drive hyperthyroidism. However, stimulating antibodies against the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) may also play a role in the extra-thyroid manifestations of GD. IGF-1R is over-expressed by orbital fibroblasts derived from patients with TED, while IGF-1R+ T and IGF-1R+ B cells are considerably more frequent in GD. Actions of several cytokines and the molecular interplay peculiar to the orbit appear to provoke the inflammation, fat expansion, and deposition of excessive extracellular matrix molecules in thyroid eye disease. Based upon these new insights, several therapeutic strategies can now be proposed that, for the first time, might specifically interrupt its pathogenesis. PMID:20385333

  5. [Autoimmune thyroid disease and associated diseases].

    PubMed

    Lapcević, Mirjana

    2005-10-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) is a multifactorial, genetic disease. It is the sequelae of the impaired immunoregulation, tolerance and poor recognition of one's own proteins, oligopolysaccharides and polypeptides, due to development of somatic lymphocyte mutations. It is manifested by different clinical and morphological entities, inter-related by etiopathogenetic association, i.e., all of them are caused by disorder of immune system regulation. Chronic autoimmune thyroidism (Thyreoiditis lymphocytaria Hashimoto, HT), as well as immunogenic hyperthyroidism (Morbus Graves Basedow, MGB) are frequently associated with autoimmune diseases of other organs, such as: chronic insufficiency of salivary glands (Sy Sjögren), autoimmune hemolytic anemia, megalocytic pernicious anemia, thrombocytopenia, Rheumatoid arthritis, Diabetes mellitus (more often type 2, but also type 1), Morbus Addison, Coeliakia, and other autoimmune diseases such as systemic diseases of connecting tissue (Lupus erythematosus-SLE, Sclerodermia, Vasculitis superficialis). The incidence of autoimmune diseases has been at increase in all age groups of our population. The prevalence of organ-specific and organ-nonspecific antibodies increases with the age. Antigenicity of thyroid epithelial cell may be triggered by different chemical and biological agents (repeated viral infections), repeated stress, and in individuals with genetic propensity. Unrecognized ATD progressively leads to hypothyroidism with hyperlipidemia, blood vessel changes, osteoporosis, deformities, invalidity which substantially reduces the quality of life of patient and requires medical attention and expensive treatment on what account it is medically and socio-economically significant. Multiple diagnostic procedures contribute to faster recognition of this condition. The goal of the primary health care physician (given that preclinical phase of ATD and other associated diseases have different duration) and other specialists is to

  6. The eye and thyroid disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyan, Ajay E; Phipps, Richard P; Feldon, Steven E

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review The pathophysiology and optimal management of Thyroid Eye Disease (TED) have not yet been elucidated. Recent studies have increased our knowledge of the disease process and different diagnostic and therapeutic options. This review highlights the recent progress in TED research and identifies areas requiring further advancements. Recent findings The pathophysiology of TED likely involves genetic and environmental factors, which may potentiate cellular and humoral-mediated inflammation within the orbit. Despite progress in TED research, a target antigen has not been established with certainty. New diagnostic methods and questionnaires are being developed that potentially provide information regarding inflammatory activity of TED. Corticosteroids alone or in combination with orbital radiation may be effective in improving TED symptoms. New immunomodulating therapies may also have a role TED management. Surgery is highly effective for treatment of TED-induced optic nerve compression and for managing the chronic soft tissue changes of TED. Summary A unifying hypothesis of TED pathophysiology is elusive. Further bench research into the autoimmune process is needed. In addition, large, prospective, randomized clinical trials, based on the inflammatory activity of disease, while difficult to design, are essential to develop a consensus regarding the proper timing and use of anti-inflammatory medications. PMID:18854695

  7. Estrogen and thyroid diseases: an update.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yihan; Li, Jian; Li, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Most of thyroid diseases show female predilection, especially autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) and thyroid cancer (TC). We give an updated brief review here, focusing on estrogen, estrogen receptor (ER) and AITD as well as TC. Estrogen can regulate the functions of nearly all immunocyte subsets, which may contribute to the development of AITD. However, there was still lack of direct studies on ER subtype-specific effects on AITD. Recently, the local expression of ER subtypes and their individual mediated actions in the pathogenesis of TC have already received much attention. ERα activation seems to exacerbate the development of TC, while wild-type ERβ (ERβ1) plays a protective role against TC.

  8. Rheumatic manifestations of autoimmune thyroid disease: the other autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Tagoe, Clement E; Zezon, Anna; Khattri, Saakshi

    2012-06-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is an inflammatory thyroiditis that in some cases is characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid gland, also referred to as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis or Hashimoto thyroiditis. Hashimoto thyroiditis is one of the commonest causes of hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism has been associated with osteoarthritis (OA) and inflammatory forms of arthritis and with several well defined connective tissue diseases, which in turn can cause arthritis. The presence of arthritis in patients with AITD with normal thyroid function is now being increasingly recognized. There is also considerable evidence to suggest that AITD is highly associated with fibromyalgia syndrome. We review the current literature on the rheumatologic manifestations of AITD and describe the features in its presentation that set it apart from other forms of autoimmune arthritis.

  9. Somatostatin receptor expression in thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Helen; England, James A; Rafferty, Amy; Jesudason, Vim; Bedford, Karen; Karsai, Laszlo; Atkin, Stephen L

    2013-06-01

    Somatostatin analogues are commercially available and used for the management of acromegaly and neuroendocrine tumours, but the expression of the receptors as a target in thyroid disease has not been explored. To assess somatostatin (SST) and somatostatin receptor (SSTR1-5) expression in both normal and thyroid disorders, as a potential target for somatostatin analogue therapy, 67 thyroid tissue specimens were reviewed: 12 differentiated thyroid carcinomas, 14 follicular adenomas, 17 multinodular goitres, 14 Graves disease, 10 Hashimotos thyroiditis specimens and five normal thyroids. Tissue was immunostained for SST and SSTR1-5. Positivity and the degree of positivity were recorded by double-blinded observers. Somatostatin receptor expression was highly expressed in normal tissue for SSTR1, 3, 4 and 5 (5 of 5, 4 of 5, 4 of 5 and 5 of 5 respectively) whilst SST and SSTR 2a and b were not expressed at all. The commonest receptor expressed for all pathological subtypes grouped together was SSTR2b (63 specimens). The commonest receptors expressed in differentiated thyroid cancer were SSTR5 (11 of 12 specimens) and SSTR2b (10 of 12 specimens). The commonest receptor expressed in benign disease was SSTR2b (53 of 55 specimens). SSTR5 was significantly under-expressed in Graves disease (P < 0.05). This study illustrates that SSTR 1, 3, 4 and 5 are highly expressed in normal, benign and malignant thyroid tissue. SSTR 2a and 2b appear absent in normal tissue and present in benign and malignant thyroid tissue (P < 0.02). This suggests that focussed SSTR2 treatment may be a potential therapeutic target. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2013 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  10. Evaluation of autoimmune thyroid disease in melasma.

    PubMed

    Rostami Mogaddam, Majid; Iranparvar Alamdari, Manouchehr; Maleki, Nasrollah; Safavi Ardabili, Nastaran; Abedkouhi, Selma

    2015-06-01

    Melasma is one of the most frequently acquired hyperpigmentation disorders clinically characterized by symmetrical brown patches on sun-exposed areas. To date, few studies have been conducted about the relationship between thyroid autoimmun-ity and melasma. To evaluate the thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity in nonpregnant women with melasma. A total of 70 women with melasma and 70 age-matched healthy women with no history of melasma were enrolled in the study. We studied the thyroid hormone profile in both groups. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Patients with melasma had 18.5% frequency of thyroid disorders, and 15.7% had positive anti-TPO, while subjects from the control group had a 4.3% frequency of thyroid abnormalities, and only 5.7% had positive anti-TPO. There was a significantly higher prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in women with melasma compared with control group (P = 0.008). This study suggests that there is a relationship between thyroid autoimmunity and melasma. However, to make recommendations on screening for thyroid disease in patients with melasma, future research of good methodological quality is needed.

  11. Thyroid diseases and bone health.

    PubMed

    Williams, G R; Bassett, J H D

    2017-08-29

    Thyroid hormones are essential for skeletal development and are important regulators of bone maintenance in adults. Childhood hypothyroidism causes delayed skeletal development, retarded linear growth and impaired bone mineral accrual. Epiphyseal dysgenesis is evidenced by classic features of stippled epiphyses on X-ray. In severe cases, post-natal growth arrest results in a complex skeletal dysplasia. Thyroid hormone replacement stimulates catch-up growth and bone maturation, but recovery may be incomplete dependent on the duration and severity of hypothyroidism prior to treatment. A severe phenotype characteristic of hypothyroidism occurs in children with resistance to thyroid hormone due to mutations affecting THRA encoding thyroid hormone receptor α (TRα). Discovery of this rare condition recapitulated animal studies demonstrating that TRα mediates thyroid hormone action in the skeleton. In adults, thyrotoxicosis is well known to cause severe osteoporosis and fracture, but cases are rare because of prompt diagnosis and treatment. Recent data, however, indicate that subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and an increased risk of fracture. Population studies have also shown that variation in thyroid status within the reference range in post-menopausal women is associated with altered BMD and fracture risk. Thus, thyroid status at the upper end of the euthyroid reference range is associated with low BMD and increased risk of osteoporotic fragility fracture. Overall, extensive data demonstrate that euthyroid status is required for normal post-natal growth and bone mineral accrual, and is fundamental for maintenance of adult bone structure and strength.

  12. Autoimmune Abnormalities of Postpartum Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Di Bari, Flavia; Granese, Roberta; Le Donne, Maria; Vita, Roberto; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The year following parturition is a critical time for the de novo appearance or exacerbation of autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune thyroid disease. The vast majority of postpartum thyroid disease consists of postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) and the minority by Graves’ disease and non-autoimmune thyroiditis. PPT has a worldwide prevalence ranging from 1 to 22% and averaging 5% based on a review published in 2012. Several factors confer risk for the development of PPT. Typically, the clinical course of PPT is characterized by three phases: thyrotoxic, hypothyroid, and euthyroid phase. Approximately half of PPT women will have permanent hypothyroidism. The best humoral marker for predictivity, already during the first trimester of gestation, is considered positivity for thyroperoxidase autoantibodies (TPOAb), though only one-third to half of such TPOAb-positive pregnant women will develop PPT. Nutraceuticals (such as selenium) or omega-3-fatty acid supplements seem to have a role in prevention of PPT. In a recent study on pregnant women with stable dietary habits, we found that the fish consumers had lower rates of positivity (and lower serum levels) of both TPOAb and thyroglobulin Ab compared to meat eaters. Finally, we remind the reader of other diseases that can be observed in the postpartum period, either autoimmune or non-autoimmune, thyroid or non-thyroid. PMID:28751877

  13. The Role of Vitamin D in Thyroid Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohee

    2017-09-12

    The main role of vitamin D is regulating bone metabolism and calcium and phosphorus homeostasis. Over the past few decades, the importance of vitamin D in non-skeletal actions has been studied, including the role of vitamin D in autoimmune diseases, metabolic syndromes, cardiovascular disease, cancers, and all-cause mortality. Recent evidence has demonstrated an association between low vitamin D status and autoimmune thyroid diseases such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease, and impaired vitamin D signaling has been reported in thyroid cancers. This review will focus on recent data on the possible role of vitamin D in thyroid diseases, including autoimmune thyroid diseases and thyroid cancers.

  14. Targeting thyroid diseases with TSH receptor analogs.

    PubMed

    Galofré, Juan C; Chacón, Ana M; Latif, Rauf

    2013-12-01

    The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major regulator of thyroid function and growth, and is the key antigen in several pathological conditions including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and thyroid tumors. Various effective treatment strategies are currently available for many of these clinical conditions such as antithyroid drugs or radioiodine therapy, but they are not devoid of side effects. In addition, treatment of complications of Graves' disease such as Graves' ophthalmopathy is often difficult and unsatisfactory using current methods. Recent advances in basic research on both in vitro and in vivo models have suggested that TSH analogs could be used for diagnosis and treatment of some of the thyroid diseases. The advent of high-throughput screening methods has resulted in a group of TSH analogs called small molecules, which have the potential to be developed as promising drugs. Small molecules are low molecular weight compounds with agonist, antagonist and, in some cases, inverse agonist activity on TSHR. This short review will focus on current advances in development of TSH analogs and their potential clinical applications. Rapid advances in this field may lead to the conduct of clinical trials of small molecules related to TSHR for the management of Graves' disease, thyroid cancer, and thyroid-related osteoporosis in the coming years. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Thyroid diseases in patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Tarach, Jerzy Stanisław; Kurowska, Maria; Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Acromegaly often involves the presence of different pathologies of the thyroid gland. Long-lasting stimulation of the follicular epithelium by growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) can cause disorders in thyroid function, an increase in its mass and the development of goitre. Acromegalic patients present most frequently with non-toxic multinodular goitre. Nodules are more prevalent in patients with active acromegaly. It has been suggested that then thyroid size increases and it can be reduced through treatment with somatostatin analogues. The relationship between thyroid volume and the level of IGF-1 and the duration of the disease is unclear. Each acromegalic patient requires a hormonal and imaging evaluation of the thyroid when the diagnosis is made, and an accurate evaluation during further observation and treatment. Although the data concerning the co-occurrence of acromegaly and thyroid cancer still remain controversial, it is particularly important to diagnose the patient early and to rule out thyroid cancer. PMID:25276172

  16. Bilateral versus unilateral thyroid eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Kashkouli, Mohsen Bahmani; Kaghazkanani, Reza; Heidari, Iraj; Ketabi, Nooshin; Jam, Sara; Azarnia, Shahrzad; Pakdel, Farzad

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to compare demographics, clinical manifestations, associated systemic and ocular factors, severity and activity of patients with unilateral thyroid eye disease (U-TED) versus bilateral thyroid eye disease (B-TED). Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, all patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism and primary hypothyroidism seen in an endocrinology clinic were included from September 2003 to July 2006. Demographics, complete eye examination, severity score (NOSPECS, total eye score), and clinical activity score were recorded and compared in the B-TED and U-TED groups of patients. Results: From 851 patients with thyroid disorders, 303 (35.6%) had TED. Thirty-two patients (32/ 303, 10.56%) were found to have U-TED. Patients with U-TED (mean age 31.6 ± 11.6 years) were significantly younger than patients with B-TED (mean age 37.7 ± 14.7 years). Monovariate analysis (Chi-square and independent sample t-test) showed a significantly higher severity score in B-TED (U-TED 4.09±4.05, B-TED: 6.7±6.3; P= 0.002) and more activity score in B-TED (U-TED= 1.03±0.96, B-TED: 1.74±1.6, P= 0.001). However, multivariate analysis did not show any significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, gender, type of thyroid disease, duration of thyroid disease and TED, severity and activity of TED, smoking habit, and presentation of TED before or after the presentation of thyroid disease (0.1thyroid disease, associated findings, and severity and activity of TED. PMID:21836341

  17. [Relation between autoimmune thyroid diseases and connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Barragán-Garfias, Jorge Alberto; Zárate, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    The main physiological function of the immune system consists in the defense against infectious micro-organisms. Sometimes there is a loss of immunological tolerance with the consequence of ignorance of self-antibodies. Some thyroid diseases are related to autoimmune diseases associated with the most common exocrine glands between them. There are also the autoimmune thyroid organ specific diseases, such as Graves-Basedow and the Hashimoto thyroiditis. It has been shown that there is a higher prevalence of autoimmune thyroid diseases in patients with connective tissue diseases (systemic autoimmune) such as Sjögren syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erithmatosis and systemic myopathic diseases. In the same way a higher prevalence of antinuclear antibodies against antigens extracted from the nucleus in patients with a thyroid autoimmune disease has been identified. There is a high percentage of patients with subclinical thyroid diseases, and it is recommended for patients with connective tissue diseases with hypo- or hyperthyroidism to have thyroid globulin and peroxide antibodies measured.

  18. Radiation-induced thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Maxon, H.R.

    1985-09-01

    Ionizing radiation has been demonstrated to result in a number of changes in the human thyroid gland. At lower radiation dose levels (between 10 and 1500 rads), benign and malignant neoplasms appear to be the dominant effect, whereas at higher dose levels functional changes and thyroiditis become more prevalent. In all instances, the likelihood of the effect is related to the amount and type of radiation exposure, time since exposure, and host factors such as age, sex, and heredity. The author's current approach to the evaluation of patients with past external radiation therapy to the thyroid is discussed. The use of prophylactic thyroxine (T4) therapy is controversial. While T4 therapy may not be useful in preventing carcinogenesis when instituted many years after radiation exposure, theoretically T4 may block TSH secretion and stimulation of damaged cells to undergo malignant transformation when instituted soon after radiation exposure.

  19. Screening for thyroid disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, J H; Premawardhana, L D K E

    2005-05-01

    Although gestational hyperthyroidism is uncommon (0.2%), hypothyroidism (autoimmune disease or suboptimal iodine intake) occurs in 2.5% of women and is predictive of reduced neonatal and child neuropsychological development and maternal obstetric complications. Postpartum thyroid dysfunction (PPTD) occurs in 5-9% of women and is associated with antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (antiTPOAb) in 10% of women in early pregnancy. Therefore, screening for thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy should be considered. T4 and thyroid stimulating hormone measurements could be used to screen for hypothyroidism, which would require levothyroxine intervention treatment. T4 supply is crucial to fetal nervous system maturation; currently, the recommended daily iodine intake is 200 microg, and this is not always achieved, even in the UK. At present, a randomised prospective trial is ongoing to provide the evidence base for this screening strategy. Meanwhile, it is reasonable to (a) optimise iodine nutrition during pregnancy; (b) ascertain women with known thyroid disease; (c) identify women at increased risk of thyroid disease-for example, those with other autoimmune diseases. PPTD can be predicted by measurement of antiTPOAb in early gestation.

  20. [Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Dilas, Ljiljana Todorović; Icin, Tijana; Paro, Jovanka Novaković; Bajkin, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. AUTOIMMNUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN NON-SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Otherwise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  1. Concomitant Thyroid Disorders and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this report was to review and summarize the literature on cases of concomitant inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and thyroid diseases. We included the following previous case reports of concomitant IBD and thyroid diseases: 16 cases of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Graves' disease (GD), 3 cases of Crohn's disease (CD) and GD, 10 cases of CD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), 4 cases of IBD and subacute thyroiditis (SAT) or SAT-like symptoms, and 13 cases of IBD (12/13 cases were CD) and amyloid goiter. There might be no obvious differences of prevalence of thyroid dysfunction (hyper- or hypothyroidism), GD, and thyroid cancer between IBD patients and general populations. However, concomitant UC and HT might be relatively common in patients with multiple autoimmune disorders, and AG is one of the complications with CD patients. There might be no obvious differences of fatal prognoses between IBD patients with thyroid diseases and patients with thyroid diseases without IBD. PMID:27042663

  2. Thyroid dysfunction and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Efstathiadou, Zoe A; Kita, Marina D; Polyzos, Stergios A

    2017-02-09

    Thyroid hormones are crucial for hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a very common and potentially serious disease of modern society, shares common clinical features with hypothyroidism, such as obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Furthermore, in certain studies, increased prevalence of hypothyroidism was observed in patients with NAFLD. However, whether there is a linear relationship between thyroid hormone levels and NAFLD incidence and severity, including values within or in proximity to the reference range remains a contradictory subject in the literature. On the other hand, attempts to treat NAFLD with thyromimetic drugs remain at an early stage. In this review, data derived from observational studies along with evidence on possible treatment with thyroid hormone analogues are presented.

  3. Affective cycling in thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tapp, A.

    1988-05-01

    Depression in an elderly man with primary recurrent unipolar depression responded to radioactive iodine treatment of a thyrotoxic nodule, without the addition of psychotropic medications. Two months later, manic symptoms developed concomitant with the termination of the hyperthyroid state secondary to the radioactive iodine treatment. Clinical implications of these findings in relation to the possible mechanism of action of thyroid hormones on affective cycling are discussed.

  4. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gossage, A.A.R.; Crawley, J.C.W.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of (/sup 9/-9..mu..Tc)pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity - TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p<0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination.

  5. Molecular mimicry and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Guarneri, Fabrizio

    2016-06-15

    Hypothesized 40 years ago, molecular mimicry has been thereafter demonstrated as an extremely common mechanism by which microbes elude immune response and modulate biosynthetic/metabolic pathways of the host. In genetically predisposed persons and under particular conditions, molecular mimicry between microbial and human antigens can turn a defensive immune response into autoimmunity. Such triggering role and its pathogenetic importance have been investigated and demonstrated for many autoimmune diseases. However, this is not the case for autoimmune thyroid disease, which appears relatively neglected by this field of research. Here we review the available literature on the possible role of molecular mimicry as a trigger of autoimmune thyroid disease. Additionally, we present the results of in silico search for amino acid sequence homologies between some microbial proteins and thyroid autoantigens, and the potential pathogenetic relevance of such homologies. Relevance stems from the overlap with known autoepitopes and the occurrence of specific HLA-DR binding motifs. Bioinformatics data published by our group support and explain the triggering role of Borrelia, Yersinia, Clostridium botulinum, Rickettsia prowazekii and Helicobacter pylori. Our new data suggest the potential pathogenic importance of Toxoplasma gondii, some Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli, Candida albicans, Treponema pallidum and hepatitis C virus in autoimmune thyroid disease, indicating specific molecular targets for future research. Additionally, the consistency between in silico prediction of cross-reactivity and experimental results shows the reliability and usefulness of bioinformatics tools to precisely identify candidate molecules for in vitro and/or in vivo experiments, or at least narrow down their number.

  6. Hodgkin's disease: thyroid dysfunction following external irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, K.; Shimaoka, K.

    1981-01-01

    The thyroid gland is commonly included in the field of radiation therapy for patients with malignant lymphoma and with head and neck tumors. The radiation dose for malignant diseases varies considerably depending on the purpose of treatment and the institutional policies. A substantial number of these patients are developing subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism. The risk of developing hypothyroidism after a moderate radiation dose of 2000 to 4500 rads has been reported to be 10 to 20 percent. In addition, subclinical hypothyroidism is induced further in one third of the patients. There are also suggestions that external irradiation of the thyroid gland in patients with malignant lymphomas, as well as internal irradiation with radioiodine of the normal and hyperthyroid human thyroid glands, would induce elevations of serum antithyroid autoantibody titers. However, only a few cases of Graves disease following irradiation to the thyroid gland have been reported. We encountered a young woman who received radiation therapy to the mantle field for her Hodgkin's disease and developed hypothyroxinemia without overt signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism, followed by appearance of nodular goiter and then full-blown Graves disease.

  7. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gossage, A.A.; Crawley, J.C.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of (/sup 99m/Tc)pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity--TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p less than 0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination.

  8. [Extracapsular lobectomy in benign monolobar thyroid diseases].

    PubMed

    Prete, F; Di Ciaula, G; Sammarco, D; Parlati, C

    1995-12-01

    On the basis of their experience acquired in the field of thyroid surgery the authors examine the problems related to extracapsular lobectomy from a tactical and technical point of view, starting with its principal indications: benign monolobar thyroid disease in a single or multiple nodular form. The validity of extemporary histological tests is also assessed on the basis of their experience of rare false negatives and the relative successive totalization programme. Lastly, the paper underlines the fundamental identification of the recurrent nerve as the central point of the operation, before which the authors emphasize that nothing should be cut or ligated apart from the superior vascular peduncle and vena media.

  9. Age impact on autoimmune thyroid disease in females

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoian, Dana; Craciunescu, Mihalea; Timar, Romulus; Schiller, Adalbert; Pater, Liana; Craina, Marius

    2013-10-01

    Thyroid autoimmune disease, a widespread phenomenon in female population, impairs thyroid function during pregnancy. Identifying cases, which will develop hypothyroidism during pregnancy, is crucial in the follow-up process. The study group comprised 108 females, with ages between 20-40 years; with known inactive autoimmune thyroid disease, before pregnancy that became pregnant in the study follow-up period. They were monitored by means of clinical, hormonal and immunological assays. Supplemental therapy with thyroid hormones was used, where needed. Maternal age and level of anti-thyroid antibodies were used to predict thyroid functional impairment.

  10. Ultrasound sonoelastography in the evaluation of thyroiditis and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Ruchała, Marek; Szmyt, Krzysztof; Sławek, Sylwia; Zybek, Ariadna; Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina

    2014-01-01

    Sonoelastography (USE) is a constantly evolving imaging technique used for the noninvasive and objective estimation of tissue stiffness. Several USE methods have been developed, including Quasi-Static or Strain Elastography and Shear Wave Elastography. The utility of USE has been demonstrated in differentiating between malignant and benign thyroid lesions. Recently, USE has been applied in the evaluation of thyroiditis and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD).Thyroid inflammatory illnesses constitute a diverse group of diseases and may manifest various symptoms. These conditions may share some parallel clinical, biochemical, and ultrasonographic features, which can lead to diagnostic difficulties. USE may be an additional tool, supporting other methods in the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of thyroid diseases, other than thyroid nodular disease.The aim of this article was to analyse and summarise the available literature on the applicability of different elastographic techniques in the diagnosis, differentiation and monitoring of various types of thyroiditis and AITD. Advantages and limitations of this technique are also discussed.

  11. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won Sang

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) includes hyperthyroid Graves disease, hypothyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, and subtle subclinical thyroid dysfunctions. AITD is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental predisposing factors and results in autoimmune deterioration. Data on polymorphisms in the AITD susceptibility genes, related environmental factors, and dysregulation of autoimmune processes have accumulated over time. Over the last decade, there has been progress in the clinical field of AITD with respect to the available diagnostic and therapeutic methods as well as clinical consensus. The updated clinical guidelines allow practitioners to identify the most reasonable and current approaches for proper management. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding the genetic and environmental pathogenic mechanisms underlying AITD and introduce the updated set of clinical guidelines for AITD management. We also discuss other aspects of the disease such as management of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, use of levothyroxine plus levotriiodothyronine in the treatment of autoimmune hypothyroidism, risk assessment of long-standing antithyroid drug therapy in recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism, and future research needs. PMID:27586448

  12. Graves' disease associated with alopecia areata developing after Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Aşık, Mehmet; Binnetoğlu, Emine; Şen, Hacer; Tekeli, Zeliha; Uysal, Fatma; Ukinç, Kubilay

    2013-01-01

    Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis are the most common autoimmune thyroid diseases. Hypothyroidism can develop in patients with Graves' disease, either spontaneously or as a result of radioactive iodine therapy or surgery. However, it is rare for patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis to subsequently develop Graves' disease. We report a case of alopecia areata associated with Graves' disease in a 41-year-old woman who had previously been diagnosed with Hashimoto's disease. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease associated with other autoimmune diseases such as thyroid disorders, anemia, and other skin disorders.

  13. Thyroid Hormones and Growth in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tarım, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate growth by several mechanisms. In addition to their negative feedback effect on the stimulatory hormones thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid hormones also regulate their receptors in various physiological and pathological conditions. Up-regulation and down-regulation of the thyroid receptors fine-tune the biological effects exerted by the thyroid hormones. Interestingly, the deiodinase enzyme system is another intrinsic regulator of thyroid physiology that adjusts the availability of thyroid hormones to the tissues, which is essential for normal growth and development. Almost all chronic diseases of childhood impair growth and development. Every disease may have a unique mechanism to halt linear growth, but reduced serum concentration or diminished local availability of thyroid hormones seems to be a common pathway. Therefore, the effects of systemic diseases on thyroid physiology must be taken into consideration in the evaluation of growth retardation in affected children. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21750631

  14. Thyroid hormones and growth in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Tarım, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate growth by several mechanisms. In addition to their negative feedback effect on the stimulatory hormones thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid hormones also regulate their receptors in various physiological and pathological conditions. Up-regulation and down-regulation of the thyroid receptors fine-tune the biological effects exerted by the thyroid hormones. Interestingly, the deiodinase enzyme system is another intrinsic regulator of thyroid physiology that adjusts the availability of thyroid hormones to the tissues, which is essential for normal growth and development. Almost all chronic diseases of childhood impair growth and development. Every disease may have a unique mechanism to halt linear growth, but reduced serum concentration or diminished local availability of thyroid hormones seems to be a common pathway. Therefore, the effects of systemic diseases on thyroid physiology must be taken into consideration in the evaluation of growth retardation in affected children.

  15. The effects of thyroid hormone abnormalities on periodontal disease status.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Talal M; Wang, Bing-Yan; Cohen, Robert E

    2011-10-01

    Thyroid hormones play an important role in the regulation of physiologic processes. Thyroid disease can lead to imbalance in the homeostasis of the body and affect the healing capacity of tissues. However, limited data are available regarding the relationship between thyroid hormone imbalance (thyroid disease) and periodontal health. This review is carried out to summarize the relationship between thyroid disease and periodontal status. PUBMED and MEDLINE searches of both human and animal studies were performed to investigate the relationship between thyroid disease, periodontal status, and dental implants. Results suggest that thyroid diseases may affect the status of periodontal diseases, especially in hypothyroid conditions. The duration from disease onset to treatment of thyroid disorders may be critical, since uncontrolled thyroid disease may result in destruction of the periodontium. Further controlled studies are needed to explore the relationship between thyroid hormone imbalance and periodontal status. Periodontal therapies, including dental implant placement, appear to be safe with no increase in treatment failure, so long as the status of the thyroid gland is controlled.

  16. IL-1β and TSH disturb thyroid epithelium integrity in autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Rebuffat, Sandra A; Kammoun-Krichen, Maha; Charfeddine, Ilhem; Ayadi, Hammadi; Bougacha-Elleuch, Noura; Peraldi-Roux, Sylvie

    2013-03-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and TNFα are known to affect thyroid function. They stimulate IL-6 secretion and modify epithelium integrity by altering junction proteins. To study the role of cytokines on thyroid epithelia tightness in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), we analyzed the expression profiles of junction proteins (ZO-1, Claudin, JAM-A) and cytokines in human thyroid slices and also investigated the effect of IL-1β on the epithelium integrity in primary cultures of human thyrocytes. Junction proteins expression (ZO-1, Claudin, JAM-A) has been analyzed by immunohistochemistry on thyroid slices and by Western blot on membrane proteins extracted from thyrocytes of patients suffering from Graves and Hashimoto diseases. The high expression of junction proteins we found on Graves' disease thyroid slices as well as in cell membrane extracts acknowledges the tightness of thyroid follicular cells in this AITD. In contrast, the reduced expression of JAM and ZO-1 in thyroid cells from patients suffering from Hashimoto thyroiditis is in agreement with the loss of thyroid follicular cell integrity that occurs in this pathology. Concerning the effects on epithelium integrity of TSH and of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β in primary cultures of human thyroid cells, TSH appeared able to modify JAM-A localization but without any change in the expression levels of JAM-A, Claudin and ZO-1. Inversely, IL-1β provoked a decrease in the expression of- and a redistribution of both, Claudin and ZO-1 without modifying the expression and sub-cellular distribution patterns of JAM-A in thyroid cells. These results demonstrate (i) that Hashimoto's- and Graves' diseases display different junction proteins expression patterns with a loss of epithelium integrity in the former and (ii) that IL-1β modifies thyroid epithelial tightness of human thyrocytes by altering the expression and localization of junction proteins. Therefore, IL-1β could play a role in the

  17. Thyroid Function Testing in Neonates With Maternal History of Disease.

    PubMed

    Underland, Lisa; Kenigsberg, Lisa; Derrick, Kristina M; Crespi, Rebecca; Kaushal, Tara; Lam, Leslie

    2017-09-01

    Maternal history of thyroid disease can cause congenital hypothyroidism due to thyroid-stimulatng hormone (TSH) blocking antibodies. No guidelines exist regarding testing beyond the newborn screen. TSH and T4 levels exhibit significant fluctuations after birth which complicates testing. A total of 561 newborns with thyroid function testing done for maternal history of thyroid disease in the newborn nursery were identified retrospectively via chart review, and thyroid disease status was assessed in 352. Newborn screening data were also obtained. Of these infants, 7 had hypothyroidism with 3 having negative newborn screens. No cases of neonatal graves were identified. The 3 infants with negative newborn screens had TSH levels ranging from 6.58 to 28.4 prior to treatment with levothyroxine. All required treatment beyond age 3 years, despite trial off levothyroxine. Infants with maternal history of thyroid disease may require additional testing beyond the newborn screen. However, providers can consider delaying test until after thyroid levels are more stable.

  18. Incidental Thyroid Carcinoma Diagnosed after Total Thyroidectomy for Benign Thyroid Diseases: Incidence and Association with Thyroid Disease Type and Laboratory Markers

    PubMed Central

    Askitis, D.; Efremidou, E. I.; Karanikas, M.; Mitrakas, A.; Tripsianis, G.; Polychronidis, A.; Liratzopoulos, N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Currently, total thyroidectomy (TT) is widely used to treat benign thyroid diseases and thyroid carcinoma. The differential diagnosis between benign and malignant thyroid disorders and the potential identification of thyroid microcarcinomas with biochemical markers remain controversial. This retrospective study aimed to estimate the prognostic validity of thyroid autoantibodies, thyroglobulin (Tg), and the thyroid disease type in diagnostic approaches regarding the co-existence of incidental thyroid carcinoma (ITC) with benign thyroid diseases. Methods. A cohort of 228 patients was treated with TT for benign thyroid disorders between 2005 and 2010. Thyroid autoantibodies and Tg were preoperatively estimated. Patients were classified according to the preoperative and histologically established diagnoses, and the median values of the biochemical markers were compared between the groups. Results. ITC was detected in 33/228 patients and almost exclusively in the presence of nontoxic thyroid disorders (P = 0.014). There were no statistically significant differences in the median values of the biochemical markers between the benign and malignant groups. There was also no significant association between ITC and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis. Conclusions. The co-existence of ITC with benign and especially nontoxic thyroid diseases is significant, and treatment of these disorders with TT when indicated can lead to the identification and definitive cure of microcarcinomas. Further studies are required to establish precise markers with prognostic validity for TC diagnosis. PMID:24348554

  19. [Immunohistochemical profile of angiogenesis in the thyroid gland in various thyroid diseases].

    PubMed

    Rurua, N Z; Gogiashvili, L E; Tsagareli, Z G

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the study - to determine the feature of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) expression in the thyroid gland (TG) in various thyroid diseases. Material - thyroid tissue (operative material) with histologically confirmed diagnosis: 10 - follicular adenoma, 17 - multinodular goiter, 8 - thyroiditis Hashimoto, 8 - papillary carcinoma, 10 - intact (normal) thyroid samples (forensic autopsy). The immunohistochemical study of the material showed the following results: the increase of the Hürtle cells population 40 % or more indicates a hyperthyroidism tendency despite TSH+ receptor status. Under the thyroid pathology TSH and VEGF expression appears in thyrocytes and also in microvascular endothelial cells. VEGF expression is below the norm in the Hashimoto thyroiditis. VEGF is involved not only in angiogenesis, but in pathophysiological shifts in thyroid tissue. Microvessel density (MVD) and TSH positive receptor status under the thyroid pathology testify the absence of the endothelial cells transformation, however, this index can not serve as a biopothential prognostic marker of thyroid disease.

  20. Perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid in surgical thyroid specimens of patients with thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Pirali, Barbara; Negri, Sara; Chytiris, Spyridon; Perissi, Andrea; Villani, Laura; La Manna, Luigi; Cottica, Danilo; Ferrari, Massimo; Imbriani, Marcello; Rotondi, Mario; Chiovato, Luca

    2009-12-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are ubiquitous compounds that may act as endocrine disruptors, neurotoxic agents, and fetal development perturbing substances and may also be carcinogenic, as recently demonstrated in experimental animal models. There is little information on the potential for these compounds to affect the thyroid. Therefore, this study was performed to measure the intrathyroidal levels of PFOA and PFOS in surgical specimens of thyroid glands and to determine if there was a relationship between the concentrations of these substances and the clinical, biochemical, and histologic phenotype of the patients from whom the thyroids were obtained. We also sought to determine if there was a relationship between tissue and serum levels of both PFOA and PFOS. PFOA and PFOS were measured in 28 patients undergoing thyroid surgery for benign (15 multinodular goiters and 7 Graves' disease) and malignant (5 papillary and 1 follicular carcinoma) thyroid disorders. PFOA and PFOS were detectable in all surgical specimens of thyroid tissue. Their median concentrations were 2.0 ng/g (range = 0.4-4.6 ng/g) and 5.3 ng/g (range = 2.1-44.7), respectively. Intrathyroidal concentrations of PFOA and PFOS were similar in the thyroids of patients with thyroid diseases as in thyroid glands obtained at autopsy. There was no relationship between the intrathyroidal concentrations of either PFOA or PFOS and the underlying thyroid disease. A significant correlation between the serum and the tissue levels of PFOS was found in all patients. The serum concentrations of PFOA and PFOS were significantly higher than those in the correspondent surgical specimens. These observations do not support the view that PFOA and PFOS are actively concentrated in the thyroid. PFOA and PFOS, however, are both found in surgical and autopsy thyroid specimens. Therefore, further studies to determine if they have disrupting effects in thyroid cells or tissue, and studies

  1. Thyroid Dysfunction and Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases Among Atomic Bomb Survivors Exposed in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Misa; Ohishi, Waka; Nakashima, Eiji; Sera, Nobuko; Neriishi, Kazuo; Yamada, Michiko; Tatsukawa, Yoshimi; Takahashi, Ikuno; Fujiwara, Saeko; Sugino, Keizo; Ando, Takao; Usa, Toshiro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Hida, Ayumi

    2017-07-01

    The risk of thyroid cancer increases and persists for decades among individuals exposed to ionizing radiation in childhood, although the long-term effects of childhood exposure to medium to low doses of radiation on thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune thyroid diseases have remained unclear. To evaluate radiation dose responses for the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune thyroid disease among atomic bomb survivors exposed in childhood. Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors who were younger than 10 years old at exposure underwent thyroid examinations at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation between 2007 and 2011, which was 62 to 66 years after the bombing. Data from 2668 participants (mean age, 68.2 years; 1455 women) with known atomic bomb thyroid radiation doses (mean dose, 0.182 Gy; dose range, 0 to 4.040 Gy) were analyzed. Dose-response relationships between atomic bomb radiation dose and the prevalence of hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease), and positive for antithyroid antibodies. Prevalences were determined for hypothyroidism (129 cases, 7.8%), hyperthyroidism (32 cases of Graves' disease, 1.2%), and positive for antithyroid antibodies (573 cases, 21.5%). None of these was associated with thyroid radiation dose. Neither thyroid antibody-positive nor -negative hypothyroidism was associated with thyroid radiation dose. Additional analyses using alternative definitions of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism found that radiation dose responses were not significant. Radiation effects on thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune thyroid diseases were not observed among atomic bomb survivors exposed in childhood, at 62 to 66 years earlier. The cross-sectional design and survival bias were limitations of this study.

  2. Ultrasonography of various thyroid diseases in children and adolescents: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Jeong, Sun Hye; Park, Jisang; Lee, Heon

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid imaging is indicated to evaluate congenital hypothyroidism during newborn screening or in cases of a palpable thyroid mass in children and adolescents. This pictorial essay reviews the ultrasonography (US) of thyroid diseases in children and adolescents, including normal thyroid gland development, imaging features of congenital thyroid disorders (dysgenesis, [aplasia, ectopy, hypoplasia], dyshormonogenesis, transient hypothyroidism, thyroglossal duct cyst), diffuse thyroid disease (Grave's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and suppurative thyroiditis), and thyroid nodules. The primary imaging modalities for evaluating thyroid diseases are US and radionuclide scintigraphy. Additionally, US can be used to guide aspiration of detected nodules.

  3. Ultrasonography of Various Thyroid Diseases in Children and Adolescents: A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Hye; Jeong, Sun Hye; Park, Jisang; Lee, Heon

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid imaging is indicated to evaluate congenital hypothyroidism during newborn screening or in cases of a palpable thyroid mass in children and adolescents. This pictorial essay reviews the ultrasonography (US) of thyroid diseases in children and adolescents, including normal thyroid gland development, imaging features of congenital thyroid disorders (dysgenesis, [aplasia, ectopy, hypoplasia], dyshormonogenesis, transient hypothyroidism, thyroglossal duct cyst), diffuse thyroid disease (Grave's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and suppurative thyroiditis), and thyroid nodules. The primary imaging modalities for evaluating thyroid diseases are US and radionuclide scintigraphy. Additionally, US can be used to guide aspiration of detected nodules. PMID:25741204

  4. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Management of Patients with Radioiodine Nonresponsive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Busaidy, Naifa Lamki; Cabanillas, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (papillary and follicular) has a favorable prognosis with an 85% 10-year survival. The patients that recur often require surgery and further radioactive iodine to render them disease-free. Five percent of thyroid cancer patients, however, will eventually succumb to their disease. Metastatic thyroid cancer is treated with radioactive iodine if the metastases are radioiodine avid. Cytotoxic chemotherapies for advanced or metastatic noniodine avid thyroid cancers show no prolonged responses and in general have fallen out of favor. Novel targeted therapies have recently been discovered that have given rise to clinical trials for thyroid cancer. Newer aberrations in molecular pathways and oncogenic mutations in thyroid cancer together with the role of angiogenesis in tumor growth have been central to these discoveries. This paper will focus on the management and treatment of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancers that do not take up radioactive iodine. PMID:22530159

  5. Thyroid carcinoma in Graves' disease: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Staniforth, Joy U L; Erdirimanne, Senarath; Eslick, Guy D

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of thyroid carcinoma is increasing worldwide. Graves' disease is the most common hyperthyroid disease. Studies have suggested an increased risk of thyroid malignancy in Graves' disease: there has not yet been a meta-analysis to allow quantitative comparison. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of thyroid carcinoma in Graves' disease, and to gather information on the histological subtypes of carcinoma and the co-existence of thyroid nodules. Several databases and article reference lists were searched. Inclusion criteria included appropriate diagnostic criteria for thyroid conditions and a diagnoses of carcinoma based on histology. 33 studies were selected, all reporting on surgically-resected specimens. The event rate of thyroid carcinoma in Graves' disease was 0.07 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.12). There was no data to allow comparison with patients without hyperthyroid diseases. There was no increase in the odds of developing carcinoma in Graves' disease compared to toxic multinodular goitre and toxic uninodular goitre. 88% of thyroid carcinomas in Graves' disease were papillary, with solitary papillary micro-carcinoma (diameter 10 mm or less) comprising 23% of all detected thyroid carcinomas. Patients with Graves' disease and co-existing thyroid nodules were almost 5 times more likely to be diagnosed with thyroid carcinoma than those without nodules. Thyroid malignancy in Graves' disease requiring surgical treatment should be considered as likely as in other hyperthyroid diseases needing surgical treatment. Clinicians should consider screening selected patients with Graves' disease for nodules whilst being aware of potentially over-diagnosing papillary micro-carcinoma. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Application of iodine metabolism analysis methods in thyroid diseases].

    PubMed

    Han, Jian-hua; Qiu, Ling

    2013-08-01

    The main physiological role of iodine in the body is to synthesize thyroid hormone. Both iodine deficiency and iodine excess can lead to severe thyroid diseases. While its role in thyroid diseases has increasingly been recognized, few relevant platforms and techniques for iodine detection have been available in China. This paper summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of currently iodine detection methods including direct titration, arsenic cerium catalytic spectrophotometry, chromatography with pulsed amperometry, colorimetry based on automatic biochemistry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, so as to optimize the iodine nutrition for patients with thyroid diseases.

  7. Hyperparathyroidism and thyroid disease. A study of their association

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffer, S.S.; Szpunar, W.E.; Block, M.

    1982-06-01

    The incidence of hyperparathyroidism was prospectively evaluated in a group of patients with thyroid disease, and the incidence of thyroid disease was retrospectively evaluated in a group of patients specifically referred for evaluation of hyperparathyroidism. Hyperparathyroidism was ten times more frequent in thyroid patients than expected in a general medical population and was especially prevalent in patients with nodular goiter. The incidence of thyroid disease in patients with hyperparathyroidism was 38.8%. Although radiation therapy was shown to be a factor in these associations, it alone could not explain the observed frequency.

  8. Aqueous misdirection in thyroid eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Devjyoti; Rao, Aparna; Banerjee, Aniruddha; Padhy, Debananda

    2014-01-01

    Secondary glaucoma in thyroid eye disease (TED) is attributed either to raised episcleral venous pressure or to mechanical compression induced trabecular meshwork damage by mucopolysaccharide deposition. While the mechanism for raised intraocular pressure (IOP) in TED is largely mechanical and is often evident during its active stage, our case presented with aqueous misdirection in the left eye during the inactive stage. Appropriate diagnostic tests should be ordered to diagnose cause of raised IOP, which would help determine appropriate treatment for the cause for secondary glaucoma in TED. PMID:25414214

  9. Thyroid function after mantle irradiation in Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E. Jr.; Adler, R.A.; Clark, P.; Brinck-Johnsen, T.; Tulloh, M.E.; Colten, T.

    1981-01-02

    The thyroid function of 64 patients with Hodgkin's disease who received mantle irradiation during the period 1966 to 1976 was studied. More than two-thirds (44 to 64) had some thyroid dysfunction. Twenty had mild dysfunction manifested by an abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Twenty had what could be termed compensated hypothyroidism while four were overtly hypothyroid. The severity of dysfunction was not related to age, sex, or chemotherapy. We found, however, that decreased thyroid function was inversely proportional to the length of time between a diagnostic lymphangiogram and the radiation therapy. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the iodine load of the lymphangiogram renders the thyroid gland more radiosensitive. Thyroxine suppression of the thyroid gland during the period from the lymphangiogram through the termination of radiation therapy is suggested as a means of avoiding thyroid injury.

  10. Thyroid Resection Improves Perception of Swallowing Function in Patients with Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Greenblatt, David Yü; Sippel, Rebecca; Leverson, Glen; Frydman, James; Schaefer, Sarah; Chen, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with thyroid disease frequently complain of dysphagia. To date, there have been no prospective studies evaluating swallowing function before and after thyroid surgery. We used the swallowing quality of life (SWAL-QOL) validated outcomes assessment tool to measure changes in swallowing-related quality-of-life in patients undergoing thyroid surgery. Methods Patients undergoing thyroid surgery from May 2002 to December 2004 completed the SWAL-QOL questionnaire before and one year after surgery. Data were collected on demographic and clinicopathologic variables, and comparisons were made to determine the effect of surgery on patients’ perceptions of swallowing function. Results Of 146 eligible patients, 116 (79%) completed the study. The mean patient age was 49 years, and 81% were female. Sixty-four patients (55%) underwent total thyroidectomy and the remainder received thyroid lobectomy. Thirty patients (26%) had thyroid cancer. The most frequent benign thyroid conditions were multinodular goiter (28%) and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (27%). Mean pre-operative SWAL-QOL scores were below 90 for nine of the eleven domains, indicating the perception of impaired swallowing and imperfect quality of life. After surgery, significant improvements were seen in eight SWAL-QOL domains. Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury was associated with dramatic score decreases in multiple domains. Conclusions In patients with thyroid disease, uncomplicated thyroidectomy leads to significant improvements in many aspects of patient-reported swallowing-related quality-of-life measured by the SWAL-QOL instrument. PMID:19034567

  11. Ultrasound assessment of thyroid gland volume in diabetic patients without overt thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Nduka, Christopher C; Adeyekun, Ademola A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease are known to mutually influence each other. Thyroid disease can worsen glycaemic control in diabetes, and patients with diabetes mellitus have increased incidence of thyroid disorders such as increase in size, compared to the normal population. The aim of the study was to sonographically assess thyroid gland volume in Nigerian adult diabetic patients and compare with apparently healthy adults (controls). The study setting was the Department of Radiology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH) Nigeria. The thyroid gland in 120 diabetic subjects and equal number of apparently healthy controls was scanned with a 5-12 MHz linear transducer of a SONOACE X4 Machine. Thyroid gland volume was assessed. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA). Diabetics had significantly increased thyroid volume compared to age matched male and female control subjects (11.5 ± 5.2 cm3 vs 7.4 ± 1.9 cm3; P< 0.001 for males) and (9.9 ± 6.2 cm3 vs 7.1 ± 3.4 cm3; P< 0.001 for females) respectively. Gender did not significantly influence thyroid volume among diabetics. Diabetics have higher thyroid gland dimensions, compared to apparently healthy subjects. Gland proliferation from circulating insulin may play a role. This is not influenced by gender.

  12. Thyroid gland diseases in adult patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vondra, K; Vrbikova, J; Dvorakova, K

    2005-12-01

    This review concerns the relation between most frequent thyroid gland diseases and diabetes mellitus in adult patients. Special attention is paid to autoimmune thyroiditis, Graves' disease, thyroid autoimmunity in pregnant diabetic women, and iodine metabolism. We focused on mechanisms leading to coexistence of both endocrine disorders, and on distinctions in the prevalence, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients. The prevalence of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients is 2-3 times higher than in nondiabetic subjects; it raises with age, and is strongly influenced by female gender and autoimmune diabetes. Clinical relevance of thyroid diseases, especially in diabetic patients, significantly increases if it is associated with deteriorated function, which always cause a number problems with metabolic compensation of diabetes. Most serious consequences are increased frequency of hypoglycaemia in hypothyroidism and development of potentially life-threatening ketoacidosis in thyrotoxicosis. In spite of that, little attention is paid to the diagnosis of thyroid diseases in diabetics, as they are diagnosed in only about half of the patients. At the end, we provide recommendations for the thyroid disease screening and diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus based on our experience.

  13. [Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    PubMed

    Kawicka, Anna; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena

    2015-01-02

    In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland - they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto's disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones' activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD) also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient's body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1) and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium). Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the relationship of metabolic

  14. Benign and Malignant Nodular Thyroid Disease in Acromegaly. Is a Routine Thyroid Ultrasound Evaluation Advisable?

    PubMed Central

    Reverter, Jordi L.; Fajardo, Carmen; Resmini, Eugenia; Salinas, Isabel; Mora, Mireia; Llatjós, Mariona; Sesmilo, Gemma; Rius, Ferran; Halperin, Irene; Webb, Susan M.; Ricart, Veronica; Riesgo, Pedro; Mauricio, Dídac; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Data on the prevalence of benign and malignant nodular thyroid disease in patients with acromegaly is a matter of debate. In the last decade an increasing incidence of thyroid cancer has been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of goiter, thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer in a large series of patients with acromegaly with a cross-sectional study with a control group. Six Spanish university hospitals participated. One hundred and twenty three patients (50% men; mean age 59±13 years; disease duration 6.7±7.2 years) and 50 controls (51% males, mean age 58±15 years) were studied. All participants underwent thyroid ultrasound and fine needle aspiration. Cytological analysis was performed in suspicious nodules between 0.5 and 1.0 cm and in all nodules greater than 1.0 cm. Goiter was more frequently found in patients than in controls (24.9 vs. 8.3%, respectively; p<0.001). Nodular thyroid disease as well as nodules greater than 1 cm were also more prevalent in acromegalic patients (64.6%, vs. 28.6%, p<0.05 and 53.3 vs. 28.6%, respectively; p<0.05), and all underwent fine needle aspiration. Suspicious cytology was detected in 4 patients and in none of the controls. After thyroidectomy, papillary thyroid carcinoma was confirmed in two cases (3.3% of patients with thyroid nodules), representing 1.6% of the entire group of patients with acromegaly (2.4% including a case with previously diagnosed papillary thyroid carcinoma). These data indicated that thyroid nodular disease and cancer are increased in acromegaly, thus justifying its routine ultrasound screening. PMID:25127456

  15. Benign and malignant nodular thyroid disease in acromegaly. Is a routine thyroid ultrasound evaluation advisable?

    PubMed

    Reverter, Jordi L; Fajardo, Carmen; Resmini, Eugenia; Salinas, Isabel; Mora, Mireia; Llatjós, Mariona; Sesmilo, Gemma; Rius, Ferran; Halperin, Irene; Webb, Susan M; Ricart, Veronica; Riesgo, Pedro; Mauricio, Dídac; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Data on the prevalence of benign and malignant nodular thyroid disease in patients with acromegaly is a matter of debate. In the last decade an increasing incidence of thyroid cancer has been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of goiter, thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer in a large series of patients with acromegaly with a cross-sectional study with a control group. Six Spanish university hospitals participated. One hundred and twenty three patients (50% men; mean age 59±13 years; disease duration 6.7±7.2 years) and 50 controls (51% males, mean age 58±15 years) were studied. All participants underwent thyroid ultrasound and fine needle aspiration. Cytological analysis was performed in suspicious nodules between 0.5 and 1.0 cm and in all nodules greater than 1.0 cm. Goiter was more frequently found in patients than in controls (24.9 vs. 8.3%, respectively; p<0.001). Nodular thyroid disease as well as nodules greater than 1 cm were also more prevalent in acromegalic patients (64.6%, vs. 28.6%, p<0.05 and 53.3 vs. 28.6%, respectively; p<0.05), and all underwent fine needle aspiration. Suspicious cytology was detected in 4 patients and in none of the controls. After thyroidectomy, papillary thyroid carcinoma was confirmed in two cases (3.3% of patients with thyroid nodules), representing 1.6% of the entire group of patients with acromegaly (2.4% including a case with previously diagnosed papillary thyroid carcinoma). These data indicated that thyroid nodular disease and cancer are increased in acromegaly, thus justifying its routine ultrasound screening.

  16. [Maternal autoimmune thyroid disease: relevance for the newborn].

    PubMed

    Temboury Molina, M Carmen; Rivero Martín, M José; de Juan Ruiz, Jesús; Ares Segura, Susana

    2015-04-08

    Autoimmune thyroid disease is amongst the most frequent endocrine disorders during pregnancy. It is associated with an increase in perinatal morbidity, congenital defects, neurological damage, fetal and neonatal thyroid dysfunction. Maternal thyroid hormones play a key role in child neurodevelopment. We aimed to evaluate the thyroid function and the clinical course of neonates born from mothers with autoimmune thyroid disease during the first months of life in order to define the follow-up. We monitored thyroid function and clinical status during the first months in 81 newborns of mothers with autoimmune thyroid disease; 16 had Graves disease and 65 autoimmune thyroiditis. A percentage of 4.93 newborns had congenital defects, and 8.64% neonates showed an increase in thyrotropin (TSH) (>9.5 μUI/mL 2 times) and required thyroxin within the first month of life. A 85.7% of these showed a negative newborn screening (due to a later increase of TSH). A higher TSH value in the newborn was related to an older age of the mother, higher levels of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody during pregnancy and lower birth weight. A higher free thyroxine (FT4) value in the newborn was related to fewer days of life and mothers with Graves disease. We recommend the evaluation of TSH, T4 and TPO antibodies before 10 weeks in all pregnant women with follow-up if maternal thyroid autoimmunity or disorders is detected. It is also recommended to test children's serum TSH and FT4 at 48 h of life in newborns of mothers with autoimmune thyroid disease and repeat them between the 2nd and 4th week in children with TSH>6 μUI/mL. Careful endocrine follow-up is advised in pregnant women and children if hyperthyroidism is detected. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Atopy and autoimmune thyroid diseases: melatonin can be useful?

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Gabriella; Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; Colavita, Laura; Cuppari, Caterina; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Arena, Salvatore; Arrigo, Teresa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Gitto, Eloisa

    2016-11-04

    Recently, there has been growing interest in the relationship between allergic and autoimmune diseases. Allergy and autoimmunity can be considered two potential outcomes of dysregulated immunity and analysis of literature data shows a strong positive association between a history of Th2-mediated allergic disorders and Th1-mediated autoimmune disorders.Autoimmune thyroid diseases are the most common of all autoimmune pathological conditions.Currently, the mechanisms explaining an association among atopy, autoimmunity, and thyroid diseases are not fully understood.There are data in literature pointing to the relationship between melatonin and thyroid activity. Several studies have suggested a paracrine role for this molecule in the regulation of thyroid activity, documenting that administration, as an antioxidant, in thyroid tissues under conditions of increased oxidative stress, could be helpful to reduce the oxidative processes involved in autoimmune thyroid diseases.Although thyroid autoimmunity has been regularly associated with atopic conditions in children, the possible protective role of melatonin has not yet been investigated.This review summarizes what is known regarding the connection between atopy and autoimmune thyroid diseases, and analyses the probable beneficial action of melatonin.

  18. Regional variation in thyroid cancer incidence in Belgium is associated with variation in thyroid imaging and thyroid disease management.

    PubMed

    Van den Bruel, Annick; Francart, Julie; Dubois, Cecile; Adam, Marielle; Vlayen, Joan; De Schutter, Harlinde; Stordeur, Sabine; Decallonne, Brigitte

    2013-10-01

    Increased thyroid cancer incidence is at least partially attributed to increased detection and shows considerable regional variation. We investigated whether regional variation in cancer incidence was associated with variations in thyroid disease management. We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study that involved linking data from the Belgian Health Insurance database and the Belgian Cancer Registry to compare thyroid-related procedures between regions with high and low cancer incidence. Primary outcome measures were rates of TSH testing, imaging, fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), and thyroid surgery. Secondary study outcomes were proportions of subjects with thyrotoxicosis and nodular disease treated with surgery, of subjects treated with surgery preceded by FNAC or with synchronous lymph node dissection, and of thyroid cancer diagnosis after surgery. The rate of TSH testing was similar, but the rate of imaging was lower in the low incidence region. The rate of FNAC was similar, whereas the rate of surgery was lower in the low incidence region (34 [95% CI 33; 35 ] vs 80 [95% CI 79; 81 ] per 100,000 person years in the high incidence region; P < .05). In the low incidence region compared to the high incidence region, surgery represented a less chosen therapy for euthyroid nodular disease patients (47% [95% CI 46; 48] vs 69% [95% CI 68; 70]; P < .05), proportionally more surgery was preceded by FNAC, more cancer was diagnosed after total thyroidectomy, and thyroid cancer patients had more preoperative FNAC and synchronous lymph node dissection. Regional variation in thyroid cancer incidence, most marked for low-risk disease, is associated with different usage of thyroid imaging and surgery, supporting variable detection as a key determinant in geographic variation.

  19. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake in Parkinson's disease also decreases at thyroid.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hideaki; Udaka, Fukashi; Oda, Masaya; Tamura, Akiko; Kubori, Tamotsu; Nishinaka, Kazuto; Kameyama, Masakuni

    2005-05-01

    Decreased cardiac metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake was reported in Parkinson's disease and this contributes to the differential diagnosis between Parkinson's disease and other forms of parkinsonism such as multiple system atrophy. However, decreased MIBG uptake of the thyroid has not been demonstrated. To compare MIBG uptake of the thyroid among Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and controls. Twenty-six patients with Parkinson's disease, 11 patients with multiple system atrophy and 14 controls were examined in this study. Planar images were taken 15 minutes (early images) and 3 hours (late images) after intravenous injection of 111 MBq 123I-MIBG. MIBG uptake of the thyroid on early images decreased significantly in Parkinson's disease compared to controls (p < 0.0001) and multiple system atrophy (p = 0.018). MIBG uptake of the thyroid on early images decreased significantly also in multiple system atrophy compared to controls (p = 0.027). On late images, thyroid uptake differed significantly only between Parkinson's disease and controls (p = 0.010). Our study is the first to demonstrate decreased MIBG uptake of the thyroid in Parkinson's disease. Sympathetic nervous denervation of Parkinson's disease occurred not only in the heart but also in the thyroid.

  20. Thyroid disease awareness is associated with high rates of identifying subjects with previously undiagnosed thyroid dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Conventional screening for hypothyroidism is controversial. Although hypothyroidism is underdiagnosed, many organizations do not recommend screening, citing low disease prevalence in unselected populations. We studied attendees at a thyroid health fair, hypothesizing that certain patient characteristics would enhance the yield of testing. Methods We carried out an observational study of participants at a Michigan health fair that focused on thyroid disease. We collected patient-reported symptoms and demographics by questionnaire, and correlated these with the TSH values obtained through the health fair. Results 794 of 858 health fair attendees participated. Most were women, and over 40% reported a family history of thyroid disease. We identified 97 (12.2%) participants with previously unknown thyroid dysfunction. No symptom or combination of symptoms discriminated between hypothyroid and euthyroid individuals. Hypothyroid and euthyroid participants in the health fair reported each symptom with a similar prevalence (p > 0.01), a prevalence which was very high. In fact, when compared with a previously published case-control study that reported symptoms, the euthyroid health fair participants reported a higher symptom prevalence (range 3.9% to 66.3%, mean 31.5%), than the euthyroid individuals from the case-control study (range 2% to 54%, mean 17.4%). Conclusions A high proportion of previously undiagnosed thyroid disease was identified at this health fair. We initially hypothesized symptoms would distinguish between thyroid function states. However, this was not the case in this health fair screening population. The prevalence of reported symptoms was similar and high in both euthyroid and hypothyroid participants. Because attendees were self-selected, it is possible that this health fair that focused on thyroid disease attracted participants specifically concerned about thyroid health. Despite the lack of symptom discrimination, the much higher

  1. Graves' Disease that Developed Shortly after Surgery for Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hea Min; Park, Soon Hyun; Lee, Jae Min; Park, Kang Seo

    2013-09-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that may present with various clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves' disease have a greater number of thyroid nodules and a higher incidence of thyroid cancer compared with patients with normal thyroid activity. However, cases in which patients are diagnosed with recurrence of Graves' disease shortly after partial thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer are very rare. Here we report a case of hyperthyroid Graves' disease that occurred after partial thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. In this case, the patient developed hyperthyroidism 9 months after right hemithyroidectomy, and antithyroglobulin autoantibody and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor stimulating autoantibody were positive. Therefore, we diagnosed Graves' disease on the basis of the laboratory test results and thyroid ultrasonography findings. The patient was treated with and maintained on antithyroid drugs. The mechanism of the recurrence of Graves' disease in this patient is still unclear. The mechanism may have been the improper response of the immune system after partial thyroidectomy. To precisely determine the mechanisms in Graves' disease after partial thyroidectomy, further studies based on a greater number of cases are needed.

  2. Autoimmune thyroid disease: mechanism, genetics and current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y H; Fu, D G

    2014-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies recognized a steady increase in the incidence of different autoimmune endocrine disorders, including autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). The etiology of AITD is multifactorial and involves genetic and environmental factors and apparently with a strong preponderance in females. There are mainly two types of AITD, Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease and both of these show strong association in age groups above 45-50 years. Among environmental factors smoking and alcohol have significant effects, both protective as well as for aggravating the disease, even though the precise nature of these effects are not clearly known. There are elevated levels of circulating antibodies against the thyroid proteins, mainly thyroid oxidase, thyroglobulin and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor, in patients with Graves' disease or Hashimoto's disease. Linkage and association studies in AITD identified several major genes that are relevant for the onset of AITD, including the thyroid-specific genes, thyroglobulin and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor and also many immune-regulatory genes. In this review we addressed many aspects of AITD including disease mechanisms, involved thyroid antigens, environmental factors and genetic factors.

  3. Minimally invasive surgery for thyroid eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Milind Neilkant; Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Gupta, Adit; Kamal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) can affect the eye in myriad ways: proptosis, strabismus, eyelid retraction, optic neuropathy, soft tissue changes around the eye and an unstable ocular surface. TED consists of two phases: active, and inactive. The active phase of TED is limited to a period of 12–18 months and is mainly managed medically with immunosuppression. The residual structural changes due to the resultant fibrosis are usually addressed with surgery, the mainstay of which is orbital decompression. These surgeries are performed during the inactive phase. The surgical rehabilitation of TED has evolved over the years: not only the surgical techniques, but also the concepts, and the surgical tools available. The indications for decompression surgery have also expanded in the recent past. This article discusses the technological and conceptual advances of minimally invasive surgery for TED that decrease complications and speed up recovery. Current surgical techniques offer predictable, consistent results with better esthetics. PMID:26669337

  4. Minimally invasive surgery for thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Naik, Milind Neilkant; Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Gupta, Adit; Kamal, Saurabh

    2015-11-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) can affect the eye in myriad ways: proptosis, strabismus, eyelid retraction, optic neuropathy, soft tissue changes around the eye and an unstable ocular surface. TED consists of two phases: active, and inactive. The active phase of TED is limited to a period of 12-18 months and is mainly managed medically with immunosuppression. The residual structural changes due to the resultant fibrosis are usually addressed with surgery, the mainstay of which is orbital decompression. These surgeries are performed during the inactive phase. The surgical rehabilitation of TED has evolved over the years: not only the surgical techniques, but also the concepts, and the surgical tools available. The indications for decompression surgery have also expanded in the recent past. This article discusses the technological and conceptual advances of minimally invasive surgery for TED that decrease complications and speed up recovery. Current surgical techniques offer predictable, consistent results with better esthetics.

  5. Corneal biomechanical properties in thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Gamze Ozturk; Kaynak, Pelin; Altan, Cıgdem; Ozturker, Can; Aksoy, Ebru Funda; Demirok, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Omer Faruk

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of thyroid eye disease (TED) on the measurement of corneal biomechanical properties and the relationship between these parameters and disease manifestations. A total of 54 eyes of 27 individuals with TED and 52 eyes of 30 healthy control participants were enrolled. Thyroid ophthalmopathy activity was defined using the VISA (vision, inflammation, strabismus, and appearance/exposure) classification for TED. The intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement with Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT), axial length (AL), keratometry, and central corneal thickness (CCT) measurements were taken from each patient. Corneal biomechanical properties, including corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF) and noncontact IOP measurements, Goldmann-correlated IOP (IOPg) and corneal-compensated IOP (IOPcc) were measured with the Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) using the standard technique. Parameters such as best corrected visual acuity, axial length, central corneal thickness, and corneal curvature were not statistically significant between the two groups (p > 0.05). IOP measured with GAT was higher in participants with TED (p < 0.001). The CH of TED patients was significantly lower than that of the control group. There was no significant difference in the corneal resistance factor between groups. However, IOPg and IOPcc were significantly higher in TED patients. CH and VISA grading of TED patients showed a negative correlation (p = 0.007). In conclusion, TED affects the corneal biomechanical properties by decreasing CH. IOP with GAT and IOPg is found to be increased in these patients. As the severity of TED increases, CH decreases in these patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Imaging of the thyroid in benign and malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Intenzo, Charles M; Dam, Hung Q; Manzone, Timothy A; Kim, Sung M

    2012-01-01

    The thyroid gland was one of the first organs imaged in nuclear medicine, beginning in the 1940s. Thyroid scintigraphy is based on a specific phase or prelude to thyroid hormone synthesis, namely trapping of iodide or iodide analogues (ie, Tc99m pertechnetate), and in the case of radioactive iodine, eventual incorporation into thyroid hormone synthesis within the thyroid follicle. Moreover, thyroid scintigraphy is a reflection of the functional state of the gland, as well as the physiological state of any structure (ie, nodule) within the gland. Scintigraphy, therefore, provides information that anatomical imaging (ie, ultrasound, computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging) lacks. Thyroid scintigraphy plays an essential role in the management of patients with benign or malignant thyroid disease. In the former, the structure or architecture of the gland is best demonstrated by anatomical or cross-sectional imaging, such as ultrasound, CT, or even magnetic resonance imaging. The role of scintigraphy, however, is to display the functional state of the thyroid gland or that of a clinically palpable nodule within the gland. Such information is most useful in (1) patients with thyrotoxicosis, and (2) those patients whose thyroid nodules would not require tissue sampling if their nodules are hyperfunctioning. In neoplastic thyroid disease, thyroid scintigraphy is often standard of care for postthyroidectomy remnant evaluation and in subsequent thyroid cancer surveillance. Planar radioiodine imaging, in the form of the whole-body scan (WBS) and posttherapy scan (PTS), is a fundamental tool in differentiated thyroid cancer management. Continued controversy remains over the utility of WBS in a variety of patient risk groups and clinical scenarios. Proponents on both sides of the arguments compare WBS with PTS, thyroglobulin, and other imaging modalities with differing results. The paucity of large, randomized, prospective studies results in dependence on consensus

  7. Selenium and Thyroid Disease: From Pathophysiology to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Mara; Carrilho, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Selenium is a micronutrient embedded in several proteins. In adults, the thyroid is the organ with the highest amount of selenium per gram of tissue. Selenium levels in the body depend on the characteristics of the population and its diet, geographic area, and soil composition. In the thyroid, selenium is required for the antioxidant function and for the metabolism of thyroid hormones. Methods. We performed a review of the literature on selenium's role in thyroid function using PubMed/MEDLINE. Results. Regarding thyroid pathology, selenium intake has been particularly associated with autoimmune disorders. The literature suggests that selenium supplementation of patients with autoimmune thyroiditis is associated with a reduction in antithyroperoxidase antibody levels, improved thyroid ultrasound features, and improved quality of life. Selenium supplementation in Graves' orbitopathy is associated with an improvement of quality of life and eye involvement, as well as delayed progression of ocular disorders. The organic form of selenium seems to be the preferable formulation for supplementation or treatment. Conclusion. Maintaining a physiological concentration of selenium is a prerequisite to prevent thyroid disease and preserve overall health. Supplementation with the organic form is more effective, and patients with autoimmune thyroiditis seem to have benefits in immunological mechanisms. Selenium supplementation proved to be clinically beneficial in patients with mild to moderate Graves' orbitopathy. PMID:28255299

  8. Association between thyroid autoimmunity and fibromyalgic disease severity.

    PubMed

    Bazzichi, Laura; Rossi, Alessandra; Giuliano, Tiziana; De Feo, Francesca; Giacomelli, Camillo; Consensi, Arianna; Ciapparelli, Antonio; Consoli, Giorgio; Dell'osso, Liliana; Bombardieri, Stefano

    2007-12-01

    Our objectives were to investigate thyroid abnormalities and autoimmunity in 120 patients affected by fibromyalgia (FM) and to study their relationships with clinical data and symptoms. Thyroid assessment by means of antithyroglobulin antibodies, antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, free triiodo-thyronine, free thyroxine, and thyroid stimulating hormone analyses was carried out. The clinical parameters "Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire", pain, tender points, fatigue, and other symptoms, and the presence of depression or anxiety disorders were evaluated. The basal thyroid hormone levels of FM patients were in the normal range, while 41% of the patients had at least one thyroid antibody. Patients with thyroid autoimmunity showed a higher percentage of dry eyes, burning, or pain with urination, allodynia, blurred vision, and sore throat. Correlations found between thyroid autoimmunity and age or with the presence of depression or anxiety disorders were not significant. However, in the cohort of post-menopausal patients, the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity was higher with respect to pre-menopausal patients. In conclusion, autoimmune thyroiditis is present in an elevated percentage of FM patients, and it has been associated with the presence of typical symptoms of the disease.

  9. Thyroid Hormones and Thyroid Disease in Relation to Perchlorate Dose and Residence Near a Superfund Site

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ellen B.; Blount, Benjamin C.; Rasor, Marianne O’Neill; Lee, Jennifer S.; Alwis, Udeni; Srivastav, Anup; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2013-01-01

    Background Perchlorate is a widely occurring contaminant, which can competitively inhibit iodide uptake and thus thyroid hormone production. The health effects of chronic low dose perchlorate exposure are largely unknown. Objectives In a community-based study, we compared thyroid function and disease in women with differing likelihoods of prior and current perchlorate exposure. Methods Residential blocks were randomly selected from areas: 1) with potential perchlorate exposure via drinking water; 2) with potential exposure to environmental contaminants; and 3) neighboring but without such exposures. Eligibility included having lived in the area for ≥6 months and aged 20–50 years during 1988–1996 (during documented drinking water well contamination). We interviewed 814 women and collected blood samples (assayed for thyroid stimulating hormone [TSH] and free thyroxine [fT4]) from 431 interviewed women. Daily urine samples were assayed for perchlorate and iodide for 178 premenopausal women with blood samples. We performed multivariable regression analyses comparing thyroid function and disease by residential area and by urinary perchlorate dose adjusted for urinary iodide levels. Results Residential location and current perchlorate dose were not associated with thyroid function or disease. Conclusions No persistent effect of perchlorate on thyroid function or disease was found several years after contaminated wells were capped. PMID:22968349

  10. Thyroid hormones and thyroid disease in relation to perchlorate dose and residence near a superfund site.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ellen B; Blount, Benjamin C; O'Neill Rasor, Marianne; Lee, Jennifer S; Alwis, Udeni; Srivastav, Anup; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2013-07-01

    Perchlorate is a widely occurring contaminant, which can competitively inhibit iodide uptake and thus thyroid hormone production. The health effects of chronic low dose perchlorate exposure are largely unknown. In a community-based study, we compared thyroid function and disease in women with differing likelihoods of prior and current perchlorate exposure. Residential blocks were randomly selected from areas: (1) with potential perchlorate exposure via drinking water; (2) with potential exposure to environmental contaminants; and (3) neighboring but without such exposures. Eligibility included having lived in the area for ≥6 months and aged 20-50 years during 1988-1996 (during documented drinking water well contamination). We interviewed 814 women and collected blood samples (assayed for thyroid stimulating hormone and free thyroxine) from 431 interviewed women. Daily urine samples were assayed for perchlorate and iodide for 178 premenopausal women with blood samples. We performed multivariable regression analyses comparing thyroid function and disease by residential area and by urinary perchlorate dose adjusted for urinary iodide levels. Residential location and current perchlorate dose were not associated with thyroid function or disease. No persistent effect of perchlorate on thyroid function or disease was found several years after contaminated wells were capped.

  11. Serum Selenium Levels in Euthyroid Nodular Thyroid Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sakız, Davut; Kaya, Ahmet; Kulaksizoglu, Mustafa

    2016-11-01

    The thyroid gland is susceptible to nodulation. The mechanism responsible for the growth of only some follicular cells, which results in nodule formation, is not yet clear. Selenium deficiency may be a risk factor in the development of thyroid nodules. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between selenium levels in patients with euthyroid nodular thyroid disease. Seventy patients with a solitary euthyroid thyroid nodule, 70 patients with more than one euthyroid nodule, and 60 healthy patients without thyroid nodules were included in the study. Venous serum samples were stored at -80°C and analyzed the same day using spectrometry. The selenium levels of patients with multiple thyroid nodules, solitary nodules, and patients without nodules were 57.3 ± 14.8 μg/L; 58.8 ± 15.1 μg/L; and 57.6 ± 13.3 μg/L, respectively. The mean serum selenium level of all patients included in the study was 57.9 ± 14.4 μg/L. Although serum selenium levels were slightly higher in men, a statistically significant difference was not observed. In our study, a significant relationship between serum selenium levels and nodular thyroid disease was not seen. Our study was undertaken in an iodine sufficient region. Mean serum selenium levels were lower compared with many other studies, which may be associated with the low selenium content of the soil. Nodular thyroid disease shows multifactorial features. When our study is considered together with previous studies, serum selenium levels may considered to be effective on structural thyroid diseases if combined with additional factors such as severe iodine deficiency. Further studies are required to assess the role of selenium in thyroid nodule formation.

  12. [Thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Buffet, Camille; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of thyroiditis encompasses a broad spectrum of thyroid disorders. Analysis of signs and symptoms, biochemical changes, neck ultrasound characteristics and radioactive iodine uptake values allows an accurate diagnosis. Recent studies of the whole genome have helped to identify many susceptibility genes for autoimmune thyroiditis. However, none of these genes contribute to a significant increase in risk of developing this thyroiditis. Clinical awareness of the characteristic presentations of exceptional thyroiditis (acute suppurative thyroiditis, Riedel's thyroiditis) is an important issue. Selenium administration seems to be beneficial for reducing the incidence of thyroiditis. Finally, certain drug-induced thyroiditis remains a therapeutic challenge for the physician.

  13. Nuclear Medicine in Thyroid Diseases in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Volkan-Salancı, Bilge; Özgen Kıratlı, Pınar

    2015-01-01

    Both benign and malignant diseases of the thyroid are rare in the pediatric and adolescent population, except congenital hypothyroidism. Nuclear medicine plays a major role, both in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid pathologies. Use of radioactivity in pediatric population is strictly controlled due to possible side effects such as secondary cancers; therefore, management of pediatric patients requires detailed literature knowledge. This article aims to overview current algorithms in the management of thyroid diseases and use of radionuclide therapy in pediatric and adolescent population. PMID:26316469

  14. The cellular infiltrate in Hashimoto's disease and focal lymphocytic thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, M.

    1969-01-01

    The lymphoid cells infiltrating the thyroid in three examples of Hashimoto's disease and three examples of focal lymphocytic thyroiditis have been studied by light and electron microscopy. The cell types found were small lymphocytes, plasma cells and plasmablasts, immunoblasts, and cells morphologically intermediate between immunoblasts and small lymphocytes. The infiltrate was similar in the two conditions studied and resembled the cell response found in other conditions thought to be due to delayed hypersensitivity. It is considered that these similarities support the views that focal lymphocytic thyroiditis is a focal form of Hashimoto's disease and that delayed hypersensitivity is important in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Images PMID:5819155

  15. Thyroid hormone transporters in health and disease: advances in thyroid hormone deiodination.

    PubMed

    Köhrle, Josef

    2007-06-01

    Thyroid hormone metabolism by the three deiodinase selenoproteins -- DIO1, DIO2, and DIO3 -- regulates the local availability of various iodothyronine metabolites and thus mediates their effects on gene expression, thermoregulation, energy metabolism, and many key reactions during the development and maintenance of an adult organism. Circulating serum levels of thyroid hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone, used as a combined indicator of thyroid hormone status, reflect a composite picture of: thyroid secretion; tissue-specific production of T(3) by DIO1 and DIO2 activity, which both contribute to circulating levels of T(3); and degradation of the prohormone T4, of the thyromimetically active T(3), of the inactive rT(3), of other iodothyronines metabolites with a lower iodine content and of thyroid hormone conjugates. Degradation reactions are catalyzed by either DIO1 or DIO3. Aberrant expression of individual deiodinases in disease, single nucleotide polymorphisms in their genes, and novel regulators of DIO gene expression (such as bile acids) provide a more complex picture of the fine tuning and the adaptation of systemic and local bioavailability of thyroid hormones.

  16. Color-flow Doppler sonography in Graves disease: "thyroid inferno".

    PubMed

    Ralls, P W; Mayekawa, D S; Lee, K P; Colletti, P M; Radin, D R; Boswell, W D; Halls, J M

    1988-04-01

    Graves disease is a common diffuse abnormality of the thyroid gland usually characterized by thyrotoxicosis. We performed color-flow Doppler sonography in 16 patients with Graves disease and compared the results with those in 15 normal volunteers and 14 patients with other thyroid diseases (eight with multinodular goiter, four with focal masses, and two with papillary thyroid carcinoma). All 16 Graves disease patients exhibited a pulsatile pattern we call "thyroid inferno." This pattern consists of multiple small areas of intrathyroidal flow seen diffusely throughout the gland in both systole and diastole. In systole, both high-velocity flow (color coded white) and lower velocity flow (color coded red and blue) were noted. In diastole, fewer areas of flow and lower velocity flow were noted. Patients with Graves disease also exhibited color flow around the periphery of the gland. The inferno pattern did not occur in normal subjects or in patients with other thyroid diseases. On occasion, focal areas of intrathyroidal flow were detected in patients with multinodular goiter and focal thyroid masses. High-resolution gray-scale images did not show the small vascular channels from which the flow signal originated. Color-flow Doppler sonography shows promise as a cost-effective, noninvasive technique for diagnosing Graves disease.

  17. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Pregnancy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Galofre, Juan C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The maternal physiological changes that occur in normal pregnancy induce complex endocrine and immune responses. During a normal pregnancy, thyroid gland volume may enlarge, and thyroid hormone production increases. Hence, the interpretation of thyroid function during gestation needs to be adjusted according to pregnancy-specific ranges. The elevated prevalence of gestation-related thyroid disorders (10%–15%) and the important repercussions for both mother and fetus reported in multiple studies throughout the world denote, in our opinion, the necessity for routine thyroid function screening both before and during pregnancy. Once thyroid dysfunction is suspected or confirmed, management of the thyroid disorder necessitates regular monitoring in order to ensure a successful outcome. The aim of treating hyperthyroidism in pregnancy with antithyroid drugs is to maintain serum thyroxine (T4) in the upper normal range of the assay used with the lowest possible dose of drug, whereas in hypothyroidism, the goal is to return serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) to the range between 0.5 and 2.5 mU/L. PMID:19951221

  18. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Tolga; Güllüoğlu, Bahadır Mahmut; Yegen, Cumhur Şevket; Soran, Atilla

    2015-01-01

    Objective The association of breast cancer and thyroid autoimmunity has been suggested by many studies in the literature, but the causality still needed to be proven. With this study we aimed to search the correlation between thyroid autoimmunity and breast cancer prognostic factors. Materials and Methods To this prospective cohort study 200 consecutive breast cancer patients, who were operated in our clinic were included. Patients’ serum thyroid hormone, anti-thyroglobuline (anti-TG) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) levels and tumors’ prognostic parameters (tumor size, axillary involvement, histological grade, lymphovascular invasion, receptor status, Ki-67 proliferation index) were collected. The correlation between serum thyroid autoantibody levels and tumor’s prognostic factors were studied. Results The prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity (high levels of serum anti-TPO and/or anti-TG) was 18.5% (n=37). Patients with thyroid autoimmunity had a significant lower rate of axillary involvement and a lower rate of Ki-67 proliferation index (22% vs. 46% [p=0,007] and 12.73% vs. 20.72% [p=0.025], respectively) and were more commonly included to the “low-risk” group (<14%) according to their Ki-67 scores (68% vs. 46%; p=0.015). Other parameters did not differ between the two groups. Conclusion We found a favorable correlation between thyroid autoimmunity and axillary involvement and also Ki-67 proliferation index score, which are two crucial and strongly predictive parameters of breast cancer prognoses. This supports the idea of thyroid autoimmunity being a favorable prognostic parameter. Further studies are necessary to investigate the reasons of protective or predictive effect of high thyroid peroxidase levels in breast cancer patients.

  19. Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. Postpartum thyroiditis, which causes ... hormone levels in the blood) followed by temporary hypothyroidism, is a common cause of thyroid problems after ...

  20. Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid is used to treat the symptoms of hypothyroidism (a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone). Symptoms of hypothyroidism include lack of energy, depression, constipation, weight gain, ...

  1. Thyroid dysfunction after radiotherapy in children with Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Constine, L.S.; Donaldson, S.S.; McDougall, I.R.; Cox, R.S.; Link, M.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1984-02-15

    Thyroid function was measured in 119 children, 16 years of age or less, after radiotherapy (XRT) for Hodgkin's disease. Thyroid abnormalities developed in 4 of 24 children (17%) who received 2600 rad or less, and in 74 of 95 children (78%) who received greater than 2600 rad to the cervical area, including the thyroid. The abnormality in all but three (one with hyperthyroidism and two with thyroid nodules) included the development of elevated levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Age, sex, and administration of chemotherapy were not significant factors in the development of thyroid dysfunction. All children had lymphangiograms (LAG) and no time relationship was noted between thyroid dysfunction and LAG-XRT interval. The mean interval from radiotherapy to documented thyroid dysfunction was 18 months in the low-dose group and 31 months in the high-dose group, with most patients becoming abnormal within 3 to 5 years. Of interest was a spontaneous return of TSH to within normal limits in 20 children and substantial improvement in another 7. This study confirms the occurrence of dose-related occult hypothyroidism in children following external irradiation of the neck.

  2. Fetal microchimeric cells in autoimmune thyroid diseases: harmful, beneficial or innocent for the thyroid gland?

    PubMed

    Lepez, Trees; Vandewoestyne, Mado; Deforce, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) show a female predominance, with an increased incidence in the years following parturition. Fetal microchimerism has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of AITD. However, only the presence of fetal microchimeric cells in blood and in the thyroid gland of these patients has been proven, but not an actual active role in AITD. Is fetal microchimerism harmful for the thyroid gland by initiating a Graft versus Host reaction (GvHR) or being the target of a Host versus Graft reaction (HvGR)? Is fetal microchimerism beneficial for the thyroid gland by being a part of tissue repair or are fetal cells just innocent bystanders in the process of autoimmunity? This review explores every hypothesis concerning the role of fetal microchimerism in AITD.

  3. Combined development of thyroid gland and reproductive system benign diseases.

    PubMed

    Makaridze, T; Mardaleishvili, K

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the study is to establish the role of endocrine disturbances in development of malignant tumors in patients with thyroid gland and reproductive system pathology. We studied 207 patients with synchronic and metachronic development of thyroid gland and reproductive system benign tumors. The patients' average age was 35-58 years. According to study the following aspects were determined: clinical and hormonal aspect of thyroid gland and reproductive system benign tumor disease coincidence, analyses of thyroid gland and reproductive system pre-cancer disease pathogenesis, neuroendocrine relations-like increased thyrotrophic hormone secretion causes strengthening of prolactin secretion, which depresses luteinizing hormone release and increases production of follicular stimulating hormone. It has been proved that fibromyomas absolute hyperestrogenemia which develops during hypersecretion of follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) plays a role in etiology of uterine Gonadoliberin hypersecretion, especially follicular stimulating hormone FSH and corpus luteum deficiency is very important in development of ovarian pre-cancer and cancer diseases.

  4. Thyroid function testing in elephant seals in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Yochem, Pamela K; Gulland, Frances M D; Stewart, Brent S; Haulena, Martin; Mazet, Jonna A K; Boyce, Walter M

    2008-02-01

    Northern Elephant Seal Skin Disease (NESSD) is a severe, ulcerative, skin condition of unknown cause affecting primarily yearling northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris); it has been associated with decreased levels of circulating thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Abnormalities of the thyroid gland that result in decreased hormone levels (hypothyroidism) can result in hair loss, scaling and secondary skin infections. However, concurrent illness (including skin ailments) can suppress basal levels of thyroid hormones and mimic hypothyroidism; when this occurs in animals with normal thyroid glands it is called "sick euthyroid syndrome". The two conditions (true hypothyroidism vs. "sick euthyroid") can be distinguished in dogs by testing the response of the thyroid gland to exogenous thyrotropin (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, TSH). To determine whether hypothyroidism is involved in the etiology of NESSD, we tested thyroid function of stranded yearling elephant seals in the following categories: healthy seals (rehabilitated and ready for release; N=9), seals suffering from NESSD (N=16) and seals with other illnesses (e.g., lungworm pneumonia; N=10). Levels of T4 increased significantly for all three categories of elephant seals following TSH stimulation, suggesting that seals with NESSD are "sick euthyroid" and that the disease is not associated with abnormal thyroid gland function.

  5. Thyroid Ultrasonography in Differentiation between Graves’ Disease and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Pishdad, P.; Pishdad, G.R.; Tavanaa, S.; Pishdad, R.; Jalli, R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Graves’ disease and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis are the most common causes of hyper and hypothyroidism, respectively. Differentiation of these 2 diseases, if the patient is euthyroid, may sometimes be extremely difficult on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of gray scale sonography in differentiation of Graves’ disease from Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Methods: This study included 149 patients divided into three groups, patients with Graves’ disease (34 patients, mean age = 36.8 ± 10.17 years), Patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (62 patients, mean age = 33.4 ± 12.16 years) and control group (53 healthy people, mean age = 34.74 ± 16.87 years). Members of all groups were referred to a single radiologist for thyroid sonography for evaluation of thyroid echogenicity pattern. Results: A total of 117 women and 32 men were examined by sonography. The most common sonographic pattern in Hashimoto and Graves’ was homogenous hypo-echogenicity which was observed in 45.2% and 47.1% of cases, respectively. Peripheral hypo-echogenicity pattern was seen in 40.3% of Hashimoto’s group with 100% specificity and 40.3% sensitivity. Central-hypoechogenic pattern was observed in 17.6% of Graves’ group with 100% and 17.6% specificity and sensitivity, respectively. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that sonography has high specificity but low sensitivity in the diagnosis of either Graves’ disease or Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. It is therefore not possible to differentiate between these two diseases using sonography alone. Confirmation by laboratory data is also needed. PMID:28451576

  6. Identification of Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and Clinical Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teumer, Alexander; Brown, Suzanne J.; Jensen, Richard A.; Rawal, Rajesh; Roef, Greet L.; Plantinga, Theo S.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Lahti, Jari; Simmonds, Matthew J.; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Shields, Beverley M.; Pietzner, Diana; Nagy, Rebecca; Broer, Linda; Chaker, Layal; Korevaar, Tim I. M.; Plia, Maria Grazia; Sala, Cinzia; Völker, Uwe; Richards, J. Brent; Sweep, Fred C.; Gieger, Christian; Corre, Tanguy; Kajantie, Eero; Thuesen, Betina; Taes, Youri E.; Visser, W. Edward; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Hamilton, Alexander; Li, Wei; Homuth, Georg; Lobina, Monia; Mariotti, Stefano; Soranzo, Nicole; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Spielhagen, Christin; Ross, Alec; Arnold, Alice; van de Bunt, Martijn; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Heier, Margit; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Masciullo, Corrado; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Lim, Ee M.; Reischl, Eva; Leedman, Peter J.; Lai, Sandra; Delitala, Alessandro; Bremner, Alexandra P.; Philips, David I. W.; Beilby, John P.; Mulas, Antonella; Vocale, Matteo; Abecasis, Goncalo; Forsen, Tom; James, Alan; Widen, Elisabeth; Hui, Jennie; Prokisch, Holger; Rietzschel, Ernst E.; Palotie, Aarno; Feddema, Peter; Fletcher, Stephen J.; Schramm, Katharina; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kluttig, Alexander; Radke, Dörte; Traglia, Michela; Surdulescu, Gabriela L.; He, Huiling; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Tiller, Daniel; Vaidya, Bijay; de Meyer, Tim; Jørgensen, Torben; Eriksson, Johan G.; O'Leary, Peter C.; Wichmann, Eric; Hermus, Ad R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Ittermann, Till; Hofman, Albert; Bosi, Emanuele; Schlessinger, David; Wallaschofski, Henri; Pirastu, Nicola; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Netea-Maier, Romana T.; Gough, Stephen C. L.; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Henriette; Frayling, Timothy M.; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Linneberg, Allan; Räikkönen, Katri; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; Walsh, John P.; Meisinger, Christa; den Heijer, Martin; Visser, Theo J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Wilson, Scott G.; Völzke, Henry; Cappola, Anne; Toniolo, Daniela; Sanna, Serena; Naitza, Silvia; Peeters, Robin P.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the possible causative genes of TPOAbs and AITD remain largely unknown, we performed GWAS meta-analyses in 18,297 individuals for TPOAb-positivity (1769 TPOAb-positives and 16,528 TPOAb-negatives) and in 12,353 individuals for TPOAb serum levels, with replication in 8,990 individuals. Significant associations (P<5×10−8) were detected at TPO-rs11675434, ATXN2-rs653178, and BACH2-rs10944479 for TPOAb-positivity, and at TPO-rs11675434, MAGI3-rs1230666, and KALRN-rs2010099 for TPOAb levels. Individual and combined effects (genetic risk scores) of these variants on (subclinical) hypo- and hyperthyroidism, goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68–2.81, P = 8.1×10−8), a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26–1.82, P = 2.9×10−6), as well as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66–0.89, P = 6.5×10−4). The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22–1.54, P = 1.2×10−7 and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.12–1.39, P = 6.2×10−5). The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18–2.10, P = 1.9×10−3). This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease. With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide

  7. Identification of novel genetic Loci associated with thyroid peroxidase antibodies and clinical thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Medici, Marco; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio; Teumer, Alexander; Brown, Suzanne J; Jensen, Richard A; Rawal, Rajesh; Roef, Greet L; Plantinga, Theo S; Vermeulen, Sita H; Lahti, Jari; Simmonds, Matthew J; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Freathy, Rachel M; Shields, Beverley M; Pietzner, Diana; Nagy, Rebecca; Broer, Linda; Chaker, Layal; Korevaar, Tim I M; Plia, Maria Grazia; Sala, Cinzia; Völker, Uwe; Richards, J Brent; Sweep, Fred C; Gieger, Christian; Corre, Tanguy; Kajantie, Eero; Thuesen, Betina; Taes, Youri E; Visser, W Edward; Hattersley, Andrew T; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Hamilton, Alexander; Li, Wei; Homuth, Georg; Lobina, Monia; Mariotti, Stefano; Soranzo, Nicole; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Spielhagen, Christin; Ross, Alec; Arnold, Alice; van de Bunt, Martijn; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Heier, Margit; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Masciullo, Corrado; Galesloot, Tessel E; Lim, Ee M; Reischl, Eva; Leedman, Peter J; Lai, Sandra; Delitala, Alessandro; Bremner, Alexandra P; Philips, David I W; Beilby, John P; Mulas, Antonella; Vocale, Matteo; Abecasis, Goncalo; Forsen, Tom; James, Alan; Widen, Elisabeth; Hui, Jennie; Prokisch, Holger; Rietzschel, Ernst E; Palotie, Aarno; Feddema, Peter; Fletcher, Stephen J; Schramm, Katharina; Rotter, Jerome I; Kluttig, Alexander; Radke, Dörte; Traglia, Michela; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; He, Huiling; Franklyn, Jayne A; Tiller, Daniel; Vaidya, Bijay; de Meyer, Tim; Jørgensen, Torben; Eriksson, Johan G; O'Leary, Peter C; Wichmann, Eric; Hermus, Ad R; Psaty, Bruce M; Ittermann, Till; Hofman, Albert; Bosi, Emanuele; Schlessinger, David; Wallaschofski, Henri; Pirastu, Nicola; Aulchenko, Yurii S; de la Chapelle, Albert; Netea-Maier, Romana T; Gough, Stephen C L; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette; Frayling, Timothy M; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Linneberg, Allan; Räikkönen, Katri; Smit, Johannes W A; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; Walsh, John P; Meisinger, Christa; den Heijer, Martin; Visser, Theo J; Spector, Timothy D; Wilson, Scott G; Völzke, Henry; Cappola, Anne; Toniolo, Daniela; Sanna, Serena; Naitza, Silvia; Peeters, Robin P

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the possible causative genes of TPOAbs and AITD remain largely unknown, we performed GWAS meta-analyses in 18,297 individuals for TPOAb-positivity (1769 TPOAb-positives and 16,528 TPOAb-negatives) and in 12,353 individuals for TPOAb serum levels, with replication in 8,990 individuals. Significant associations (P<5×10(-8)) were detected at TPO-rs11675434, ATXN2-rs653178, and BACH2-rs10944479 for TPOAb-positivity, and at TPO-rs11675434, MAGI3-rs1230666, and KALRN-rs2010099 for TPOAb levels. Individual and combined effects (genetic risk scores) of these variants on (subclinical) hypo- and hyperthyroidism, goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68-2.81, P = 8.1×10(-8)), a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26-1.82, P = 2.9×10(-6)), as well as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66-0.89, P = 6.5×10(-4)). The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54, P = 1.2×10(-7) and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.39, P = 6.2×10(-5)). The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.10, P = 1.9×10(-3)). This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease. With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide insight into why

  8. Familial autoimmune thyroid disease and PTPN-22.

    PubMed

    Conzuelo Rodríguez, Gabriel; Mendieta Zerón, Hugo

    2015-08-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is a multifactorial disease with a genetic predisposition. The protein tyrosine phosphatase-22 (PTPN-22) gene is a powerful inhibitor of T-cell activation. The aim of this study was to compare messenger RNA (mRNA) PTPN22 expression between healthy persons and patients with hypothyroidism and with their affected relatives. This was a cross-sectional, prospective and descriptive study. DNA was extracted from leukocytes (4,000-10,000 cells) using the Magna Pure LC 2.0 Instrument and MagNA Pure LC RNA Isolation Kit I (Roche, Germany). A real-time polymerase reaction (qPCR) was performed utilizing the primer sets specific for the PTPN-22 gene, and the succinate dehydrogenase complex, the subunit A, Flavoprotein (Fp) (SDHA) constitutive gene. All reactions were performed with the 7500 Fast Real Time PCR System (Applied Biosystems, Applera International, Inc. Cheshire, UK) employing the SYBR Advantage qPCR Premix Kit (Clontech, USA). Twenty five patients with AITD (hypothyroidism), all females (mean age 39.6 ± 11.8 years) and 23 control subjects (mean age 24.4 ± 4.2 years) were included in the study. There was no statistical difference between both groups in PTPN-22 mRNA expression (p = 0.125). There is no clear difference in mRNA PTPN-22 expression. The ideal genes for a systematic screening for familial AITD are yet to be found. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  9. Less aggressive disease in patients with primary squamous cell carcinomas of the thyroid gland and coexisting lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Asik, Mehmet; Binnetoglu, Emine; Sen, Hacer; Gunes, Fahri; Muratli, Asli; Kankaya, Duygu; Uysal, Fatma; Sahin, Mustafa; Ukinc, Kubilay

    2015-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the thyroid gland is extremely rare. Infrequently, primary SCC of the thyroid gland is accompanied by other thyroid diseases such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Recently, studies have demonstrated that differentiated thyroid cancer with coexisting HT has a better prognosis. However, the prognosis of patients with primary SCC of the thyroid gland and coexistent HT has not been clearly identified. We compared the clinical characteristics and disease stages of patients with primary SCC with and without lymphocytic thyroiditis (LT). We reviewed reports of primary SCC of the thyroid gland published in the English literature. We identified 46 papers that included 17 cases of primary SCC of the thyroid gland with LT and 77 cases of primary SCC of the thyroid gland without LT. Lymph node metastasis and local invasion rates did not differ between these two groups. Distant metastases were absent in patients with LT, and were observed in 13 (16.9%) patients without LT. A greater proportion of patients without LT had advanced stage disease (stage IV A-B-C) than patients with LT (p < 0.05). Patients with primary SCC of the thyroid gland and coexisting LT had lower tumour-node-metastasis stage and frequency of distant metastasis than those without LT. Lymphocytic infiltration in patients with SCC appears to limit tumour growth and distant metastases.

  10. Thyroid Autoantibodies in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Subjects with and without Thyroid Disease: Implications for Hashimoto's Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Ilias, Ioannis; Karagiorga, Vasiliki; Paraskevas, George; Bougea, Anastasia; Bourbouli, Mara; Pappa, Athina; Nikopoulou, Stamatina; Kapaki, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Plasma antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (anti-Tg) are widely used in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroiditis. No research has compared anti-TPO and anti-Tg both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy individuals vis-à-vis patients with thyroid disease. Methods. We measured anti-TPO and anti-Tg antibodies in plasma and CSF in nine subjects (mean age ± SD: 73 ± 6 years) with hypothyroidism and nine subjects (mean age ± SD: 73 ± 8 years) without thyroid disease. Results. The concentration of anti-TPO autoantibodies in CSF was very low compared to plasma in both subjects with thyroid and without thyroid disease (P = 0.007). CSF anti-Tg autoantibodies titers were very low compared to the plasma in subjects with thyroid disease (P = 0.004), whereas, in subjects without thyroid disease, this difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.063). Conclusions. Thyroid autoantibodies levels were low in plasma and CSF; we did not observe any transfer of thyroid autoantibodies from the peripheral blood to the CSF. Therefore, regarding Hashimoto's encephalopathy, where elevated antithyroid autoantibodies are often measured in blood, it is more likely that thyroiditis and encephalopathy represent nonspecific, but distinct, events of an aggressive immune system.

  11. Thyroid Autoantibodies in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Subjects with and without Thyroid Disease: Implications for Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ilias, Ioannis; Karagiorga, Vasiliki; Paraskevas, George; Bougea, Anastasia; Bourbouli, Mara; Pappa, Athina; Nikopoulou, Stamatina; Kapaki, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Plasma antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (anti-Tg) are widely used in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroiditis. No research has compared anti-TPO and anti-Tg both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy individuals vis-à-vis patients with thyroid disease. Methods. We measured anti-TPO and anti-Tg antibodies in plasma and CSF in nine subjects (mean age ± SD: 73 ± 6 years) with hypothyroidism and nine subjects (mean age ± SD: 73 ± 8 years) without thyroid disease. Results. The concentration of anti-TPO autoantibodies in CSF was very low compared to plasma in both subjects with thyroid and without thyroid disease (P = 0.007). CSF anti-Tg autoantibodies titers were very low compared to the plasma in subjects with thyroid disease (P = 0.004), whereas, in subjects without thyroid disease, this difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.063). Conclusions. Thyroid autoantibodies levels were low in plasma and CSF; we did not observe any transfer of thyroid autoantibodies from the peripheral blood to the CSF. Therefore, regarding Hashimoto's encephalopathy, where elevated antithyroid autoantibodies are often measured in blood, it is more likely that thyroiditis and encephalopathy represent nonspecific, but distinct, events of an aggressive immune system. PMID:26798549

  12. Fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jowairiyya; Tagoe, Clement E

    2014-07-01

    Fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain syndromes are among the commonest diseases seen in rheumatology practice. Despite advances in the management of these conditions, they remain significant causes of morbidity and disability. Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most prevalent autoimmune disorder, affecting about 10 % of the population, and is a recognized cause of fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain. Recent reports are shedding light on the mechanisms of pain generation in autoimmune thyroid disease-associated pain syndromes including the role of inflammatory mediators, small-fiber polyneuropathy, and central sensitization. The gradual elucidation of these pain pathways is allowing the rational use of pharmacotherapy in the management of chronic widespread pain in autoimmune thyroid disease. This review looks at the current understanding of the prevalence of pain syndromes in autoimmune thyroid disease, their likely causes, present appreciation of the pathogenesis of chronic widespread pain, and how our knowledge can be used to find lasting and effective treatments for the pain syndromes associated with autoimmune thyroid disease.

  13. Celiac disease in children and adolescents with Hashimoto Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Tuhan, Hale; Işık, Sakine; Abacı, Ayhan; Şimşek, Erdem; Anık, Ahmet; Anal, Özden; Böber, Ece

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and laboratory findings and determine the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in children with Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT). Material and Methods: The data of a total of 80 patients with positive anti-thyroid antibodies who were aged between 6 and 17.9 years were retrospectively studied. Age, gender, complaints at the time of presentation, family history of thyroid disorders, clinical and laboratory findings were recorded. The levels of thyrotropin, free thyroxin, thyroid autoantibodies (thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies), immunoglobulin A (IgA), anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA-tTG), and thyroid ultrasonography findings were enrolled. Results: Eighty patients (65 females (81.2%) and 15 males (18,8%)) were included in the study. Family history of thyroid disease was present in 38 (47.5%) patients. The most common complaints at the time of presentation were goiter (%30) and weight gain (%25). Forty three (53.8%), 23 (28.7%), and 14 (17.5%) patients presented with euthyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and obvious hypothyroidism. Thirty seven (46.2%) patients had goiter. IgA-tTG was found to be positive after a diagnosis of HT was made in only one patient (1.25%) and the diagnosis of CD was confirmed when intestinal biopsy of this patient revealed villus atrophy, crypt hyperplasia and increase in the intraepithelial lymphocyte count. Conclusions: In our study, it was found that the most common complaints at presentation in patients with a diagnosis of hashimoto thyroiditis included goiter, weakness and weight gain and the prevalence of celiac diseases was found to be 1.25% (1/80). This study shows that the prevalence of CD in patients with a diagnosis of HT is higher compared to the prevalence in the healthy pediatric population. PMID:27489467

  14. Thyroid diseases in atomic bomb survivors exposed in utero.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Misa; Ashizawa, Kiyoto; Neriishi, Kazuo; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Nakashima, Eiji; Usa, Toshiro; Tominaga, Tan; Hida, Ayumi; Sera, Nobuko; Soda, Midori; Fujiwara, Saeko; Yamada, Michiko; Maeda, Renju; Nagataki, Shigenobu; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2008-05-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the association of thyroid disease with radiation dose in atomic bomb survivors exposed in utero. This was a cross-sectional study. The study was conducted in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Participants included 328 atomic bomb survivors exposed in utero (mean age 55.2 yr, 162 males) who participated in the thyroid study at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Examinations were conducted between March 2000 and February 2003. The relationships of various thyroid conditions to atomic bomb radiation dose were measured. Among the 319 participants excluding nine participants whose exposure radiation dose was not estimated, the mean maternal uterine radiation dose was 0.256 Gy. We observed no significant dose-response relationship for the prevalence of solid thyroid nodules (odds ratio at 1 Gy, 2.78; 95% confidence interval 0.50-11.80, P = 0.22), but the risk estimate was similar to the estimate for childhood exposures. The prevalence of cysts and autoimmune thyroid diseases was not associated with radiation dose (P > 0.30). We could not evaluate the dose response for malignant tumors or benign nodules due to the small number of cases. We did not observe a statistically significant linear dose response to radiation for thyroid nodules or autoimmune thyroid diseases 55-58 yr after participants' in utero exposure. However, the risk estimate for solid thyroid nodules was similar for those exposed in utero and those exposed in childhood. Because the study had limited statistical power to detect moderately sized effects, further studies are needed for a definitive conclusion.

  15. Celiac disease in children and adolescents with Hashimoto Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Tuhan, Hale; Işık, Sakine; Abacı, Ayhan; Şimşek, Erdem; Anık, Ahmet; Anal, Özden; Böber, Ece

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and laboratory findings and determine the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in children with Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT). The data of a total of 80 patients with positive anti-thyroid antibodies who were aged between 6 and 17.9 years were retrospectively studied. Age, gender, complaints at the time of presentation, family history of thyroid disorders, clinical and laboratory findings were recorded. The levels of thyrotropin, free thyroxin, thyroid autoantibodies (thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies), immunoglobulin A (IgA), anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA-tTG), and thyroid ultrasonography findings were enrolled. Eighty patients (65 females (81.2%) and 15 males (18,8%)) were included in the study. Family history of thyroid disease was present in 38 (47.5%) patients. The most common complaints at the time of presentation were goiter (%30) and weight gain (%25). Forty three (53.8%), 23 (28.7%), and 14 (17.5%) patients presented with euthyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and obvious hypothyroidism. Thirty seven (46.2%) patients had goiter. IgA-tTG was found to be positive after a diagnosis of HT was made in only one patient (1.25%) and the diagnosis of CD was confirmed when intestinal biopsy of this patient revealed villus atrophy, crypt hyperplasia and increase in the intraepithelial lymphocyte count. In our study, it was found that the most common complaints at presentation in patients with a diagnosis of hashimoto thyroiditis included goiter, weakness and weight gain and the prevalence of celiac diseases was found to be 1.25% (1/80). This study shows that the prevalence of CD in patients with a diagnosis of HT is higher compared to the prevalence in the healthy pediatric population.

  16. Frequency of rheumatic diseases in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Soy, Mehmet; Guldiken, Sibel; Arikan, Ender; Altun, Betul Ugur; Tugrul, Armagan

    2007-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the frequency of rheumatic diseases in patients suffering from autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD). Sixty-five patients (56 F, 9 M), who were followed by diagnosis of ATD, were questioned and examined for the presence of rheumatic disease. Basic laboratory tests and antithyroid antibodies, antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor (RF) levels were also measured by appropriate methods. Various rheumatic diseases were detected in 40 (62%) of patients with ATD. The most frequent rheumatic conditions were fibromyalgia, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, osteoarthritis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia and carpal tunnel syndrome which were detected in 20 (31%), 13 (20%), 10 (15%), 9 (14%) and 8 (12%) of patients, respectively. Autoimmune diseases, except Sjogren's syndrome, which were detected in ten patients with ATD, are as follows-vitiligo: two; autoimmune hepatitis: two; oral lichen planus: one, ulcerative colitis: one, inflammatory arthritis in four patients (two of them had rheumatoid arthritis, one had psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and one had mixed collagen tissue disease). RF was positive in two patients, one of them had rheumatoid arthritis and FANA was positive in six (9%) patients; all of them had hypothyroidism. The frequency of rheumatic diseases seems to be higher in patients suffering from ATD. Initial evaluation and a regular checking for rheumatic diseases in patients suffering from ATD were recommended.

  17. Using fractal analysis of thermal signatures for thyroid disease evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavriloaia, Gheorghe; Sofron, Emil; Gavriloaia, Mariuca-Roxana; Ghemigean, Adina-Mariana

    2010-11-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the body and it protects against heat, light, injury and infection. Skin temperature is an important parameter for diagnosing diseases. Thermal analysis is non-invasive, painless, and relatively inexpensive, showing a great potential research. Since the thyroid regulates metabolic rate it is intimately connected to body temperature, more than, any modification of its function generates a specific thermal image on the neck skin. The shapes of thermal signatures are often irregular in size and shape. Euclidean geometry is not able to evaluate their shape for different thyroid diseases, and fractal geometry is used in this paper. Different thyroid diseases generate different shapes, and their complexity are evaluated by specific mathematical approaches, fractal analysis, in order to the evaluate selfsimilarity and lacunarity. Two kinds of thyroid diseases, hyperthyroidism and papillary cancer are analyzed in this paper. The results are encouraging and show the ability to continue research for thermal signature to be used in early diagnosis of thyroid diseases.

  18. [100 years of Hashimoto thyroiditis, still an intriguing disease].

    PubMed

    Baretić, Maja

    2011-12-01

    In 1912 Japanese physician Hashimoto Hakaru described 4 patients with chronic thyroid disease. The histopathology findings exactly 100 years ago described lymphocyte infiltration, fibrosis, parenchymal atrophy and eosinophilic changes of some acinar cells. Those findings are typical for the autoimmune thyroid disease named by the author Hashimoto thyroiditis or lymphocytic thyroiditis. Hashimoto thyroiditis: The pathophysiology of thyroid autoimmunity during the past decades was described in details. Many thyroid antigens were identified (thyroid - stimulating hormone or TSH, thyroglobulin, thyreoperoxidase) and antibodies are directed towards them. Thyreocyte is also able to function as antigen presenting cell. It presents antigen on its surface and expresses MHC class II and class I molecules. Etiology of autoimmune thyroiditis combines genetic and environmental factors. Genetic factors dominate, and influence with about 80% on the occurrence of immunity. Some HLA genes (HLA-DR3, HLA-DR4, HLA-DR5 and HLA-DQA) and some non-HLA genes (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 -CTLA-4, CD40 gene, gene for protein tyrosine phosphatase 22 -PTPN22, thyroglobulin and TSH gene) are involved. 20% of etiology is attributed to environmental factors (smoking, iodine intake, selenium deficiency, pollution, infectious conditions, physical and emotional stress) and physiological states (puberty, rapid growth, pregnancy, menopause, aging, female gender). Although Hashimoto thyroiditis is known for many years, it is still sometimes presented with surprisingly diverse clinical entities and frequently astonishes many physicians. A case of a female patient with long-standing hypothesis (fine needle aspiration showed lymphocytic infiltration, thyreoperoxidase antibodies were positive) is presented. During the postpartum period, complicated with septic endometritis a new onset of hyperthyreosis appeared. The etiology of hyperthyroidism was unclear, with three possible explanations. The first

  19. Screening for thyroid disease in a primary care unit with a thyroid stimulating hormone assay with a low detection limit.

    PubMed Central

    Eggertsen, R.; Petersen, K.; Lundberg, P. A.; Nyström, E.; Lindstedt, G.

    1988-01-01

    In a study at a primary care centre in a predominantly rural area of Sweden the records of all patients with established thyroid disease were scrutinised and 2000 consecutive adult patients screened with an immunoenzymometric thyroid stimulating hormone assay. The aims of the study were fourfold: firstly, to assess the total burden of thyroid disease in primary care centres in Sweden; secondly, to assess the efficacy of clinical diagnosis of the disease in unselected populations of patients; thirdly, to assess the efficacy of clinical evaluation of treatment with thyroxine; and, lastly, to see whether a single analysis of the serum thyroid stimulating hormone concentration by recent methods would be enough to identify an abnormality of thyroid function. Of the roughly 17,400 adults in the study community, 111 women and 10 men were being treated for thyroid disease. Screening detected 68 patients (3.5%) not receiving thyroxine who had a serum thyroid stimulating hormone concentration of 0.20 mU/l or less, all of whom were followed up clinically. Fifty of these patients were also studied biochemically during follow up. Only nine of the 68 patients had thyroid disease (three with thyrotoxicosis requiring treatment), no evidence of the disease being found in the remainder. Sixteen patients had spontaneous hypothyroidism requiring treatment, and neither these nor three patients with thyrotoxicosis had been detected at the preceding clinical examination. Of 35 patients in whom thyroid disease was suspected clinically at screening, none had laboratory evidence of thyroid dysfunction. In this series 1.3% of all women in the study community (2.6% of all 50-59 year olds) and 0.1% of the men were being treated for thyroid disease at the primary care centre, roughly 1.0% of adults subjected to screening were found to have thyroid disease requiring treatment, and most patients with a thyroid stimulating hormone concentration of 0.20 mU/l or less did not have thyroid dysfunction

  20. Thyroid hormone transporters in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jurgen; Friesema, Edith C H; Milici, Carmelina; Visser, Theo J

    2005-08-01

    Cellular entry is required for conversion of thyroid hormone by the intracellular deiodinases and for binding of 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T(3)) to its nuclear receptors. Recently, several transporters capable of thyroid hormone transport have been identified. Functional expression studies using Xenopus laevis oocytes have demonstrated that organic anion transporters (e.g., OATPs), and L-type amino acid transporters (LATs) facilitate thyroid hormone uptake. Among these, OATP1C1 has a high affinity and specificity for thyroxine (T(4)). OATP1C1 is expressed in capillaries throughout the brain, suggesting it is critical for transport of T(4) over the blood-brain barrier. We have also characterized a member of the monocarboxylate transporter family, MCT8, as a very active and specific thyroid hormone transporter. Human MCT8 shows preference for T(3) as the ligand. MCT8 is highly expressed in liver and brain but is also widely distributed in other tissues. The MCT8 gene is located on the X chromosome. Recently, mutations in MCT8 have been found to be associated with severe X-linked psychomotor retardation and strongly elevated serum T(3) levels.

  1. Thyroid Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Enfermedades de la tiroides Ukrainian (Українська) Thyroid Scan Тіреосцинтиграма - Українська (Ukrainian) Bilingual ...

  2. In vitro and in vivo reversal of thyroid epithelial polarity: its relevance for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hanafusa, T; Pujol-Borrell, R; Chiovato, L; Doniach, D; Bottazzo, G F

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for culturing intact human thyroid follicles, based on the study of 40 thyroidectomy specimens from normal (n = 18) and diseased glands (n = 22). Reversal of the normal polarity of thyrocytes, whereby the microvilli move from the colloid edge to the vascular pole of the cells, occurs gradually when the amount of fetal calf serum (FCS) is changed from 0.5% to 10%. The translocation of thyroid 'microvillar' antigens, (surface expression of 'microsomal' and a separate surface antigen) from the follicular to the vascular pole of thyrocytes was assessed by indirect immunofluorescence with human sera containing microsomal antibodies, as well as by electron microscopy. In normal and diseased thyroid glands up to 80% of follicles became reversed after 5-10 days in high FCS and the microsomal/microvillar antigen persisted for about twice as long as in monolayer cultures. Spontaneous reversal of polarity was observed in six of eight glands from patients with Graves' thyrotoxicosis or toxic nodular goitre in freshly dispersed tissues or after 2 days in 0.5% FCS, unlike normal tissues where only a trace of reversal appeared after 7 days of culture under these conditions. It is postulated that polarity reversal may play a role in human thyroid autoimmunity as the normally secluded 'microvillar' antigens becomes transposed to the vascular pole of thyroid follicles where they are in direct contact with cytotoxic antibodies or sensitized immunocytes. This could initiate lesions in intact follicles. Inappropriate HLA-DR expression on thyrocytes, either stimulated by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) or appearing spontaneously as an early marker of thyroiditis, did not correlate with reversal of polarity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6380840

  3. [Hashimoto Thyroiditis and Periodontal Disease: A Narrative Review].

    PubMed

    Morais, Ana; Resende, Marta; Pereira, José

    2016-10-31

    Currently there is a growing interest in studying systemic conditions with impact on the periodontium. The aim of this article is to determinate if there is a relation between Hashimoto's thyroiditis and periodontal disease. Founded on periodontology based on evidence and in the combination of the keywords: 'Hashimoto disease'; 'Hypothyroidism'; 'Periodontal disease'; 'Systemic Diseases'; a search and evaluation of articles was conducted in Medline, Scopus and Thomson Reuters databases, selecting 30 articles for integral analysis. There have been developed several studies, searching for a better comprehension about the complexity and pathogenesis of periodontal diseases, associated them to multiple systemic conditions. Actually, the relationship that is best described in the literature is the one with rheumatoid arthritis; however, other relations have been pointed, such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The identification of multiple etiopathogenic mechanisms common to Hashimoto's thyroiditis and periodontal disease allow to suspect of a relation between them. Some of these mechanisms include the proliferation of lymphocytes T helper 1 and T helper 17 and their impact on the periodontium, the dysfunction of vascular endothelium in gingival microcirculation and the influence of hypothyroidism on bone metabolism, namely on the alveolar bone. There is biological plausibility to support the establishment of an association between Hashimoto's thyroiditis and periodontal disease. However, there are not enough studies to support the existence of a causal nexus between these two pathologies, so, in the future, more studies should be conducted to determinate there relation and interaction.

  4. Access, availability, and infrastructure deficiency: The current management of thyroid disease in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Fualal, Jane; Ehrenkranz, Joel

    2016-12-01

    Thyroid disease, a neglected tropical disease and the most common noncommunicable disease in the developing world, is overlooked, under-diagnosed, and inadequately managed. The spectrum of thyroid disorders in the developing world is qualitatively different from that found in industrialized countries. This qualitative difference has resulted in limited access to clinical, laboratory, and imaging resources that are necessary for the care of patients with thyroid disease. The management of thyroid disease in the developing world is comparable to the care provided for disorders of the thyroid in North America fifty years ago.This article reviews public health and clinical aspects of developing world medical and surgical thyroid disease. Topics covered include iodine deficiency disorders, congenital hypothyroidism, goiter, thyroid cancer, and hyper- and hypothyroidism. The review concludes with a description of programs based on smartphone technology to improve the availability, affordability, and quality of thyroid disease care.

  5. Thyroid disease in the emergency department: a clinical and laboratory review.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Laura; Hansen, Karen N

    2005-02-01

    Emergency physicians regularly treat patients with thyroid disorders. Until the 1950s, clinical evaluation was the only available diagnostic tool. Since then, increasingly sophisticated laboratory assays have been developed to confirm thyroid pathology. Thyroid physiology, fundamental to interpreting thyroid function tests, is based on a classic negative feedback mechanism involving the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Primary hypothyroidism in developed countries is most commonly caused by Hashimoto's disease. Secondary and tertiary etiologies are uncommon and the result of hypothalamic and pituitary pathology. Clinical presentations range from subclinical disease to myxedema coma. Thyrotoxicosis has many etiologies. A hyperadrenergic state precipitates characteristic signs and symptoms. Thyroid storm and thyrotoxic periodic paralysis are emergent complications. Third generation assays have made thyroid function testing practical for emergency physicians. An ultrasensitive thyroid stimulating hormone level is the most useful. A free thyroxine level is the preferred study for confirming a thyroid disorder. Confounding factors may affect thyroid function interpretation.

  6. Differentiation between Graves' disease and painless thyroiditis by diffusion-weighted imaging, thyroid iodine uptake, thyroid scintigraphy and serum parameters.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaowei; Zhang, Guizhi; Sun, Haoran; Tan, Jian; Yu, Chunshun; Tian, Weijun; Li, Weidong; Yang, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Mei; He, Qing; Zhang, Yujie; Han, Shugao

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), thyroid radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU), thyroid scintigraphy and thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) levels in the differential diagnosis between Graves' disease (GD) and painless thyroiditis (PT). A total of 102 patients with GD and 37 patients with PT were enrolled in the study. DWI was obtained with a 3.0-T magnetic resonance scanner, and ADC values were calculated. RAIU and thyroid scintigraphy were performed. Tissue samples were obtained from patients with GD (6 cases) following thyroidectomy, and from patients with PT (2 cases) following biopsy. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were drawn, optimal cut-off values were selected, and the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were assessed. It was found that the ADC, TRAb and RAIU were significantly higher in GD than in PT (P<0.05). ROC curves showed areas under the curves for RAIU, ADC and TRAb that were >0.900. RAIU was the reference method. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV were 96.078, 91.892, 95.000, 97.059 and 89.474% for ADC, and 88.235, 75.676, 84.892, 90.909 and 70.000% for TRAb, after the optimal thresholds of 1.837×10(-3) mm(2)/sec and 1.350 IU/ml were determined respectively. Histopathology showed that tissue cellularity in PT was much higher than in GD due to massive lymphocytic infiltration. The results of the present study indicate that RAIU, ADC and TRAb are of diagnostic value for differentiating between GD and PT. DWI has great potential for thyroid pathophysiological imaging because it reflects differences in tissue cellularity between GD and PT.

  7. Cardiovascular hemodynamics and exercise tolerance in thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Kahaly, George J; Kampmann, Christoph; Mohr-Kahaly, Susanne

    2002-06-01

    The heart is an organ sensitive to the action of thyroid hormone, and measurable changes in cardiovascular performance are detected with small variations in thyroid hormone serum concentrations. Most patients with thyroid disease experience cardiovascular manifestations, and the most serious complications of thyroid dysfunction occur as a result of cardiac involvement. The increased metabolic state and oxygen consumption that occur in hyperthyroid patients require an increased supply of oxygen and removal of metabolic products from the periphery. This is accomplished by increasing the cardiac output to meet the needs of the periphery. Circulation time is decreased in hyperthyroid patients, and a lowered arterial resistance and increased venous resistance promote the return of blood to the heart. Thyroid hormones may significantly decrease the strength of respiratory and skeletal muscles and affect regulatory mechanisms of adaptation to incremental effort. In hyperthyroidism, cardiovascular exercise testing and analysis of respiratory gas exchange demonstrate low efficiency of cardiopulmonary function as well as impaired chronotropic, contractile, and vasodilatatory reserves, which are reversible when euthyroidism is restored. During exercise, the increment (delta) of minute ventilation (respiratory rate x tidal volume), and oxygen pulse (oxygen uptake per heart beat) are significantly lower in dysthyroidism versus euthyroidism. Especially in older patients with thyroid dysfunction, markedly reduced workload, delta ejection fraction, and delta heart rate, both at the anaerobic threshold as well as at maximal exercise, are observed. In thyrotoxicosis, mitochondria oxidative dysfunction during exercise mostly causes intracellular acidosis, whereas in hypothyroidism, inadequate cardiovascular support appears to be one of the principal factors involved. These abnormalities partly explain why subjects with dysthyroidism are intolerant to exertion. Thus, in thyroid

  8. Increased lymphangiogenesis in Riedel thyroiditis (Immunoglobulin G4-related thyroid disease).

    PubMed

    Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Ladra, María Jesús; Abdulkader, Ihab; Eloy, Catarina; Soares, Paula; Barreiro, Francisco; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Beiras-Iglesias, Andrés

    2014-09-01

    The present study describes in depth a case of Riedel thyroiditis (RT) to clarify its pathogenesis and its putative inclusion in the spectrum of IgG4-related disease. We report the clinicopathological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural features of a case of RT in a 39-year-old white Spanish woman, admitted with a hard goiter and cold nodule in the left thyroid lobe. This case represents 0.05 % of a series of 1,973 consecutive thyroidectomies performed in our hospital. More than 80 % of the left thyroid lobe was effaced by fibrosis and inflammation (lymphocytes, 57 IgG4+ plasma cells per 1 high-power field, an IgG4/IgG ratio of 0.67, and eosinophils) with extension into the surrounding tissues and occlusive phlebitis. Immunostaining for podoplanin (D2-40) detected signs of increased lymphangiogenesis in the fibroinflammatory areas that were confirmed by electron microscopy. A strong, diffuse stain for podoplanin and transforming growth factor ß1 was also detected in the same areas. The increased number of lymphatic vessels in RT is reported for the first time. Our findings support the inclusion of RT within the spectrum of IgG4-related thyroid disease (IgG4-RTD). Although the etiology and physiopathology of IgG4-RTD still remain elusive, the results obtained in the present case suggest the participation of lymphatic vessels in the pathogenesis of RT.

  9. Thyroid disease in pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus: increased preterm delivery.

    PubMed

    Stagnaro-Green, A; Akhter, E; Yim, C; Davies, Terry F; Magder, Ls; Petri, M

    2011-06-01

    Thyroid disease is common in pregnancy and is associated with miscarriage, preterm delivery and postpartum thyroiditis (PPT). Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with miscarriage and preterm delivery. The hypotheses of the study are (1) pregnant women with SLE will have a high prevalence of undiagnosed hypothyroidism and a high prevalence of PPT, and (2) women with SLE and thyroid disease will have an increased incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes as compared with pregnant women with SLE who do not have thyroid disease. This was a retrospective study of the Hopkins Lupus Cohort. All women had thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid antibodies assayed on frozen sera. In total, 63 pregnant women who met the ACR classification for SLE were evaluated. Outcome measures were the prevalence of thyroid disease during pregnancy and postpartum, and pregnancy outcomes. Some 13% of the women were on thyroid hormone prior to becoming pregnant, 11% were diagnosed with hypothyroidism during pregnancy, and 14% developed PPT. The prevalence of preterm delivery was 67% in women with thyroid disease and 18% in women who were thyroid disease free (p = 0.002). The presence of thyroid antibodies was not correlated with preterm delivery. Pregnant women with SLE have an increased prevalence of thyroid disease. Women with SLE and thyroid disease have an increased prevalence of preterm delivery.

  10. Long term thyroid function after subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Busnardo, B; Girelli, M E; Rubello, D; Eccher, C; Betterle, C

    1988-05-01

    Between 1973 and 1980, 93 patients with Graves' disease underwent subtotal thyroidectomy by the same surgeon (the size of thyroid remnant was 4 g per side). No case of operative mortality, no case of thyroid storm nor of surgical complications occurred. Three months after surgery 40% of patients were euthyroid, 25% had overt hypothyroidism, 35% had subclinical hypothyroidism. In the following yr important variations of thyroid function were observed. The number of patients with subclinical hypothyroidism decreased slowly (22% and 9% at 3 and 6 yr, respectively), and some became euthyroid, some hypothyroid, others relapsed. Seven patients had recurrent hyperthyroidism. In particular at 3 yr 45% of patients were euthyroid, 28% had overt hypothyroidism, 22% had subclinical hypothyroidism, 4% had recurrence; at 6 yr 56% were euthyroid, 32% had overt hypothyroidism, 9% had subclinical hypothyroidism, 3% had recurrence. Four out of the 8 patients operated under 20-yr-old became hypothyroid in comparison with only 2 out of the 15 patients over 50-yr-old. Relapses were present only in patients operated at less than 40-yr and only in females. No correlation was found between thyroid lymphocytic infiltration and thyroid function after surgery, nor between the presence of antithyroid antibodies and hypothyroidism. All cases who relapsed had high TMA titers both before and after operation. This study confirms the need for accurate follow-up after subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease.

  11. Assessment of thyroid and gonadal function in liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kharb, Sandeep; Garg, M. K.; Puri, Pankaj; Brar, Karninder S.; Pandit, Aditi; Srivastava, Sharad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Liver is involved with the synthesis of carrier proteins and metabolism of various hormones and liver diseases may, therefore, be associated with various endocrine disturbances. This study was conducted to assess thyroid and gonadal function in subjects with acute hepatitis (AH), chronic liver disease (CLD), and those who had undergone liver transplantation (LT). Materials and Methods: Patients with AH, CLD with Child-Pugh stage A (CLD-1) and Child-Pugh stage B or C (CLD-2), and LT seen at our tertiary level hospital were assessed clinically, biochemically, and for thyroid and gonadal functions besides 25 healthy controls. Results: Thyroid dysfunction and hypogonadism were present in 14 (16%) and 24 (28%) patients with liver diseases respectively. Among thyroid dysfunction, the commonest was sick euthyroid syndrome six (7%), followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in three patients (3.5%), subclinical hyperthyroidism and thyrotoxicosis in two patients each (2.3%) and overt hypothyroidism in one patient. Among patients with LT and AH groups, the only abnormality was significantly lower total T3 compared with healthy controls. The CLD2 group had significantly lower levels of all thyroid hormones compared with controls and CLD1 group. Hypogonadism was commonest in patients with CLD-2 (14; 50%) followed by LT (3; 33%), CLD-1 (4; 20%), and AH (3; 14%). Hypogonadism was predicted by older age, lower levels of serum albumin, total cholesterol, and triglycerides and higher levels of plasma glucose, serum bilirubin, aspartate transaminases, and international normalized ratio. Gonadal functions showed recovery following LT. Conclusions: Thyroid dysfunction and hypogonadism form an important part of the spectrum of acute and CLD, and patients with LT. Deterioration of synthetic functions of liver disease predicts presence of hypogonadism. PMID:25593833

  12. Immunogenetics of autoimmune thyroid diseases: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanna J; Li, Cheuk Wun; Hammerstad, Sara Salehi; Stefan, Mihaela; Tomer, Yaron

    2015-11-01

    Both environmental and genetic triggers factor into the etiology of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Although the exact pathogenesis and causative interaction between environment and genes are unknown, GD and HT share similar immune-mediated mechanisms of disease. They both are characterized by the production of thyroid autoantibodies and by thyroidal lymphocytic infiltration, despite being clinically distinct entities with thyrotoxicosis in GD and hypothyroidism in HT. Family and population studies confirm the strong genetic influence and inheritability in the development of AITD. AITD susceptibility genes can be categorized as either thyroid specific (Tg, TSHR) or immune-modulating (FOXP3, CD25, CD40, CTLA-4, HLA), with HLA-DR3 carrying the highest risk. Of the AITD susceptibility genes, FOXP3 and CD25 play critical roles in the establishment of peripheral tolerance while CD40, CTLA-4, and the HLA genes are pivotal for T lymphocyte activation and antigen presentation. Polymorphisms in these immune-modulating genes, in particular, significantly contribute to the predisposition for GD, HT and, unsurprisingly, other autoimmune diseases. Emerging evidence suggests that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the immunoregulatory genes may functionally hinder the proper development of central and peripheral tolerance and alter T cell interactions with antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the immunological synapse. Thus, susceptibility genes for AITD contribute directly to the key mechanism underlying the development of organ-specific autoimmunity, namely the breakdown in self-tolerance. Here we review the major immune-modulating genes that are associated with AITD and their potential functional effects on thyroidal immune dysregulation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Immunogenetics of Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases: A comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hanna J; Li, Cheuk Wun; Hammerstad, Sara Salehi; Stefan, Mihaela; Tomer, Yaron

    2015-01-01

    Both environmental and genetic triggers factor into the etiology of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Although the exact pathogenesis and causative interaction between environment and genes are unknown, GD and HT share similar immune-mediated mechanisms of disease. They both are characterized by the production of thyroid autoantibodies and by thyroidal lymphocytic infiltration, despite being clinically distinct entities with thyrotoxicosis in GD and hypothyroidism in HT. Family and population studies confirm the strong genetic influence and inheritability in the development of AITD. AITD susceptibility genes can be categorized as either thyroid specific (Tg, TSHR) or immune-modulating (FOXP3, CD25, CD40, CTLA-4, HLA), with HLA-DR3 carrying the highest risk. Of the AITD susceptibility genes, FOXP3 and CD25 play critical roles in the establishment of peripheral tolerance while CD40, CTLA-4, and the HLA genes are pivotal for T lymphocyte activation and antigen presentation. Polymorphisms in these immune-modulating genes, in particular, significantly contribute to the predisposition for GD, HT and, unsurprisingly, other autoimmune diseases. Emerging evidence suggests that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the immunoregulatory genes may functionally hinder the proper development of central and peripheral tolerance and alter T cell interactions with antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the immunological synapse. Thus, susceptibility genes for AITD contribute directly to the key mechanism underlying the development of organ-specific autoimmunity, namely the breakdown in self-tolerance. Here we review the major immune-modulating genes that are associated with AITD and their potential functional effects on thyroidal immune dysregulation. PMID:26235382

  14. CUTTING EDGE: THE ETIOLOGY OF AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Eschler, Deirdre Cocks; Hasham, Alia; Tomer, Yaron

    2011-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanisms leading to autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). For the first time we are beginning to unravel these mechanisms at the molecular level. AITD, including Graves’ disease (GD) and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT), are common autoimmune diseases affecting the thyroid. They have a complex etiology that involves genetic and environmental influences. Seven genes have been shown to contribute to the etiology of AITD. The first AITD gene discovered, HLA-DR3, is associated with both GD and HT. More recently this association was dissected at the molecular level when it was shown that substitution of the neutral amino acids Ala or Gln with arginine at position beta 74 in the HLA-DR peptide binding pocket is the specific sequence change causing AITD. Non-MHC genes that confer susceptibility to AITD can be classified into two groups: 1) immune regulatory genes (e.g. CD40, CTLA-4, PTPN22); 2) thyroid specific genes -thyroglobulin, and TSH receptor genes. These genes interact with environmental factors, such as infection, likely through epigenetic mechanisms to trigger disease. In this review we summarize the latest findings on disease susceptibility and modulation by environmental factors. PMID:21234711

  15. IgG4 Staining in Thyroid Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Irwin; Rajak, Saul N; Kearney, Daniel J; Andrew, Nicholas H; Selva, Dinesh

    2015-09-10

    IgG4-related ophthalmic disease is increasingly widely recognized. Moreover, IgG4 staining can occur in other inflammatory diseases. The authors report a case of IgG4 staining of an enlarged, inflamed levator palpebrae superioris in a patient with a past history of thyroid eye disease. A 78-year-old woman with quiescent hyperthyroidism had clinical and radiological evidence of levator palpebrae superioris inflammation without superior rectus involvement. A biopsy was consistent with IgG4-related ophthalmic disease. There was a marked but incomplete response to an orbital injection of triamcinolone. The authors discuss the association between thyroid eye disease and IgG4 staining and the diagnostic issues that arise when IgG4-related ophthalmic disease criteria are fulfilled in patients with other orbital inflammatory conditions.

  16. 2017 Guidelines of the American Thyroid Association for the Diagnosis and Management of Thyroid Disease During Pregnancy and the Postpartum.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Erik K; Pearce, Elizabeth N; Brent, Gregory A; Brown, Rosalind S; Chen, Herbert; Dosiou, Chrysoula; Grobman, William A; Laurberg, Peter; Lazarus, John H; Mandel, Susan J; Peeters, Robin P; Sullivan, Scott

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid disease in pregnancy is a common clinical problem. Since the guidelines for the management of these disorders by the American Thyroid Association (ATA) were first published in 2011, significant clinical and scientific advances have occurred in the field. The aim of these guidelines is to inform clinicians, patients, researchers, and health policy makers on published evidence relating to the diagnosis and management of thyroid disease in women during pregnancy, preconception, and the postpartum period. The specific clinical questions addressed in these guidelines were based on prior versions of the guidelines, stakeholder input, and input of task force members. Task force panel members were educated on knowledge synthesis methods, including electronic database searching, review and selection of relevant citations, and critical appraisal of selected studies. Published English language articles were eligible for inclusion. The American College of Physicians Guideline Grading System was used for critical appraisal of evidence and grading strength of recommendations. The guideline task force had complete editorial independence from the ATA. Competing interests of guideline task force members were regularly updated, managed, and communicated to the ATA and task force members. The revised guidelines for the management of thyroid disease in pregnancy include recommendations regarding the interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnancy, iodine nutrition, thyroid autoantibodies and pregnancy complications, thyroid considerations in infertile women, hypothyroidism in pregnancy, thyrotoxicosis in pregnancy, thyroid nodules and cancer in pregnant women, fetal and neonatal considerations, thyroid disease and lactation, screening for thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy, and directions for future research. We have developed evidence-based recommendations to inform clinical decision-making in the management of thyroid disease in pregnant and postpartum women. While all

  17. Prevalence and clinical relevance of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor-blocking antibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Diana, T; Krause, J; Olivo, P D; König, J; Kanitz, M; Decallonne, B; Kahaly, G J

    2017-09-01

    The prevalence and clinical relevance of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TSHR) blocking antibodies (TBAb) in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) was investigated. Serum TBAb were measured with a reporter gene bioassay using Chinese hamster ovary cells. Blocking activity was defined as percentage inhibition of luciferase expression relative to induction with bovine TSH alone (cut-off 40% inhibition). All samples were measured for TSHR stimulatory antibody (TSAb) and TSHR binding inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII). A total of 1079 unselected, consecutive patients with AITD and 302 healthy controls were included. All unselected controls were negative for TBAb and TSAb. In contrast, the prevalence of TBAb-positive patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease was 67 of 722 (9·3%) and 15 of 357 (4·2%). Of the 82 TBAb-positive patients, thirty-nine (48%), 33 (40%) and 10 (12%) were hypothyroid, euthyroid and hyperthyroid, respectively. Ten patients were both TBAb- and TSAb-positive (four hypothyroid, two euthyroid and four hyperthyroid). Thyroid-associated orbitopathy was present in four of 82 (4·9%) TBAb-positive patients, with dual TSHR antibody positivity being observed in three. TBAb correlated positively with TBII (r = 0·67, P < 0·001) and negatively with TSAb (r = -0·86, P < 0·05). The percentage of TBII-positive patients was higher the higher the level of inhibition in the TBAb assay. Of the TBAb-positive samples with  > 70% inhibition, 87% were TBII-positive. Functional TSHR antibodies impact thyroid status. TBAb determination is helpful in the evaluation and management of patients with AITD. The TBAb assay is a relevant and important tool to identify potentially reversible hypothyroidism. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  18. Castleman disease mimicking nodal recurrence of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi-Hong; Chen, Chi-Kuan; Lee, Chun-Chuan

    2016-02-01

    A 54-year-old woman who had undergone total thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine treatment for papillary thyroid cancer presented with elevated stimulated thyroglobulin levels and negative I-131 scan. Ultrasonography revealed suspicious lateral neck lymph nodes, which were FDG-avid. Neck dissection led to a diagnosis of Castleman disease.

  19. Effect of steroid replacement on thyroid function and thyroid autoimmunity in Addison's disease with primary hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Jaya Prakash; Selviambigapathy, Jayakumar; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar; Nagarajan, K.; Vivekanandan, Muthupillai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Steroid replacement without thyroxine supplementation normalizes thyroid function test (TFT) in some but not all Addison's disease patients with primary hypothyroidism. Both autoimmune and nonautoimmune mechanisms contribute to this improvement in TFT. However, the documentation of the change in thyroid autoimmunity after cortisol replacement is very limited in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of steroid replacement on TFT and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO-Ab) titer in Addison's disease with primary hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted in a tertiary care center in South India. Six Addison's disease patients with primary hypothyroidism, who were only on steroid replacement, were included in the study. Low serum cortisol (<83 nmol/L) with high plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (>22 pmol/L) and/or hyperpigmentation of skin/mucous membranes was considered as the diagnostic criteria for Addison's disease. Primary hypothyroidism (both overt and subclinical) was defined as high thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) with/without low free thyroxine (fT4). TFT and anti-TPO-Ab were performed before and after steroid replacement in all of them. Results: Poststeroid replacement, there was a normalization of TSH in all but one subjects. In overt hypothyroidism patients, fT4 also normalized. The improvement in TFT was not associated with decreasing titer of the anti-TPO-Ab in all six patients. However, there was a significant difference in TSH after steroid replacement compared to the baseline status. Conclusions: The concept of normalization of primary hypothyroidism with cortisol replacement in patients with Addison's disease should be recognized to avoid iatrogenic thyrotoxicosis caused by thyroxine replacement. Both autoimmune and nonautoimmune mechanisms contribute to these alterations. PMID:27042409

  20. Effect of steroid replacement on thyroid function and thyroid autoimmunity in Addison's disease with primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Jaya Prakash; Selviambigapathy, Jayakumar; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar; Nagarajan, K; Vivekanandan, Muthupillai

    2016-01-01

    Steroid replacement without thyroxine supplementation normalizes thyroid function test (TFT) in some but not all Addison's disease patients with primary hypothyroidism. Both autoimmune and nonautoimmune mechanisms contribute to this improvement in TFT. However, the documentation of the change in thyroid autoimmunity after cortisol replacement is very limited in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of steroid replacement on TFT and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO-Ab) titer in Addison's disease with primary hypothyroidism. This observational study was conducted in a tertiary care center in South India. Six Addison's disease patients with primary hypothyroidism, who were only on steroid replacement, were included in the study. Low serum cortisol (<83 nmol/L) with high plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (>22 pmol/L) and/or hyperpigmentation of skin/mucous membranes was considered as the diagnostic criteria for Addison's disease. Primary hypothyroidism (both overt and subclinical) was defined as high thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) with/without low free thyroxine (fT4). TFT and anti-TPO-Ab were performed before and after steroid replacement in all of them. Poststeroid replacement, there was a normalization of TSH in all but one subjects. In overt hypothyroidism patients, fT4 also normalized. The improvement in TFT was not associated with decreasing titer of the anti-TPO-Ab in all six patients. However, there was a significant difference in TSH after steroid replacement compared to the baseline status. The concept of normalization of primary hypothyroidism with cortisol replacement in patients with Addison's disease should be recognized to avoid iatrogenic thyrotoxicosis caused by thyroxine replacement. Both autoimmune and nonautoimmune mechanisms contribute to these alterations.

  1. Autoimmune thyroid disease elicited by NY-ESO-1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vita, Roberto; Guarneri, Fabrizio; Agah, Ravin; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2014-02-01

    Immunotherapies and targeted therapies are frequently associated with thyroid dysfunction, which is in contrast with the rare thyroid abnormalities induced by cytotoxic agents. Immunotherapy with NY-ESO-1, a tumor-associated antigen expressed by a number of malignancies, was reported to trigger hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism in two HLA-A2 patients with ovarian cancer. We describe now a case of Graves' disease triggered by NY-ESO-1 in a HLA-A2-negative woman. A 32-year-old woman with a synovial sarcoma received radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and finally NY-ESO-1 vaccine. The patient was found to have HLA A11/A33(19), B13/B56(22), Cw3/-. One month after the beginning of immunotherapy, thyroid dysfunction was clinically suspected and Graves' disease was biochemically confirmed. Fearful of the antithyroid drugs' side effects, the patient was treated with a beta-blocker (propranolol, 80-20 mg/day). As hyperthyroidism progressively worsened, the patient underwent total thyroidectomy. We hypothesized that NY-ESO-1 shared partial homology with thyroid autoantigens (the so-called molecular mimicry mechanism) and that at least one pair of homologous sequences contained amino acid sequence binding motifs to a restricted number of HLA molecules. We used BLAST software to search amino acid sequence homologies between NY-ESO-1 and thyroid autoantigens (thyrotropin receptor [TSH-R], thyroperoxidase, and thyroglobulin), and the HLA ligand/motif database to look for HLA/T-cell receptor binding motifs in the regions of NY-ESO-1 and thyroid autoantigens that were homologous. We found 15 epitopic regions of NY-ESO-1 homologous to 15 regions of thyroid autoantigens, some of which epitopic: 5 of TSH-R, 8 of thyroglobulin, and 2 of thyroperoxidase. These homologous sequences contain binding motifs belonging to several HLA class I antigens, including HLA A2 and the patient's A11 and A33. Genetically predisposed patients who receive NY-ESO-1 vaccination are at risk to develop thyroid

  2. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P < 1.12 × 10(-6); a permutation test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases.

  3. Oxidative Stress and Immune System in Vitiligo and Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Roberta; Dragoni, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired dermatological disease frequently associated with autoimmune thyroid disorders. Several theories have been proposed so far to unravel the complex vitiligo pathogenesis. Currently, the autocytotoxic and the autoimmune theories are the most accredited hypothesis, since they are sustained by several important clinical and experimental evidences. A growing body of evidences shows that autoimmunity and oxidative stress strictly interact to finally determine melanocyte loss. In this scenario, associated thyroid autoimmunity might play an active and important role in triggering and maintaining the depigmentation process of vitiligo. PMID:25838868

  4. Overlapping Morphologic and Immunohistochemical Features of Hashimoto Thyroiditis and IgG4-Related Thyroid Disease.

    PubMed

    Raess, Philipp W; Habashi, Arlette; El Rassi, Edward; Milas, Mira; Sauer, David A; Troxell, Megan L

    2015-05-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is an emerging clinicopathologic entity characterized by both IgG4+ plasma cell infiltration and fibrosis in one or more organs, prototypically pancreas or salivary/lacrimal glands. IgG4-RD in the thyroid (IgG4-RTD) is an area of active study, and the relationship between IgG4-RTD and Hashimoto thyroiditis is not fully delineated due to their overlapping histologic features. Retrospective review was performed of all thyroidectomy cases demonstrating lymphocytic inflammation at a single institution over a 4-year period. Approximately half (23/38) of patients had a clinical diagnosis of Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT). Nine of the 38 patients had increased absolute and relative numbers of IgG4+ plasma cells. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of HT had increased lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, but the relative proportion of IgG4+ plasma cells was not increased compared to patients without HT. There was no correlation between IgG4 levels and the amount of fibrosis in patients with or without HT. Patients identified as having the fibrosing variant of HT were not more likely to have increased levels of IgG4+ plasma cells than those without. There is significant morphologic and immunohistochemical overlap between HT and IgG4-RTD. Future studies to identify specific characteristics of IgG4-RTD involving the thyroid are necessary to accurately define this entity.

  5. Erythrovirus B19 and autoimmune thyroid diseases. Review of the literature and pathophysiological hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Page, Cyril; Duverlie, Gilles; Sevestre, Henri; Desailloud, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Erythrovirus B19 (EVB19) has been incriminated, over recent years, in the onset and/or pathogenesis of many diseases, especially autoimmune thyroid diseases. This review of the literature (published over the last 40 years using Pubmed and Science Direct search engines) was designed to define the role of EVB19, particularly in autoimmune thyroid diseases.Two cases of subacute thyroiditis, one case of Graves' disease (associated with type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis), and one case of Hashimoto's thyroiditis following acute EVB19 infection were reported. A retrospective case-control study in a pediatric population demonstrated the role of EVB19 in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Four retrospective studies of pathology slides (including PCR, immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization) and a prospective case-control study on pathology slides demonstrated the presence of EVB19 in thyroid tissue of patients with benign multinodular goiter, Graves' disease, autoimmune thyroiditis (including Hashimoto's thyroiditis), and thyroid cancer. EVB19 can be demonstrated in the thyroid gland in a wide range of diseases. Although acute EVB19 infection could theoretically trigger autoimmune thyroid disease, there is currently no evidence that EVB19 plays a specific role in the pathophysiology of autoimmune thyroid diseases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Complications in surgical treatment of thyroid diseases].

    PubMed

    Osmólski, Antoni; Frenkiel, Zofia; Osmólski, Robert

    2006-01-01

    of this study was examination of laryngeal nerve injury, hypoparathyroidism, bleeding and thyroid storm frequency after thyroidectomy. Retrospective analysis of 847 patients surgically treated from 1985 to 2004 due to thyroid cancer (77) or multinodular goiter (770). We analyzed influence of type of thyroidectomy, diagnosis and reoperation on complication rates. Statistical analysis was performed with Chi2 or Fisher exact test. Unilateral lobectomy was performed in 195 cases (23%)--total unilateral lobectomy in 51% of patients and partial or subtotal lobectomy in rest of them. Bilateral lobectomy was performed in 652 patients--in 20% of cases it was total thyroidectomy and partial or subtotal thyroidectomy in 524 of patients. There was no mortality in operative or postoperative period. Wound exploration due to bleeding was performed in 3 cases (0,4%) and thyroid storm was noticed in 1,6% of all patients. Unilateral permanent laryngeal nerve injury was in 2,1% of patients, in one patient it was permanent bilateral nerve injury and unilateral temporary nerve injury in 3,2%. We noticed statistically significant differences in permanent and temporary nerve injury between total and partial thyroidectomy groups (7,0% vs 1,3% and 8.6% vs 2,2%; p < 0,005) and after primary operation and reoperation groups (8,9% vs 1,7% and 6,7% vs 2,9; p < 0,005). Permanent and temporary recurrent laryngeal nerve injury rates after total thyroidectomy due to cancer or multinodular goiter were not significant (7,8% vs 5,9% and 9,1% vs 7,8%; p = 0,72). Temporary hypoparathyroidism was noticed in 34 cases (4%) and permanent in one case. Again temporary hypoparathyroidism was significantly higher after total thyroidectomy compared to partial (18,0% vs 2,1%; p < 0,005) and after reoperation (17,8% vs 3,2%; p < 0,005). There were no differences in hypoparathyroidism rates after total thyroidectomy due to cancer or multinodular goiter (20,8% vs 13,7%; p = 0,35). Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury

  7. Subclinical thyroid dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases: 2016 update.

    PubMed

    Floriani, Carmen; Gencer, Baris; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2017-02-27

    Subclinical thyroid dysfunction comprises subclinical hypothyroidism (SHypo), defined as elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by normal free thyroxine (FT4), and subclinical hyperthyroidism (SHyper) with decreased or undetectable TSH and normal FT4. Up to 10% of the elderly have SHypo, which is usually asymptomatic. Individual participant data (IPD) analyses of prospective cohort studies from the international Thyroid Studies Collaboration show that SHypo is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 1,58 for TSH ≥ 10 mIU/L, 95% CI 1.10-2.27), as well as increased risk of stroke, and heart failure (HF) for both higher and lower TSH. Small studies found that SHypo affects carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), diastolic function, peripheral vascular resistance, endothelial function, and lipid profile. SHyper is associated with increased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) (HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.16-2.43) and CHD events (HR 1.21, 95% CI 0.99-1.46). The TSH threshold for initiating treatment is unclear. In the absence of large randomized controlled trials, the best evidence suggests SHypo therapy should be started at TSH ≥ 10 mIU/L, and SHyper therapy at TSH < 0.1 mIU/L. Recommendations on screening are discordant, but most guidelines advocate that thyroid function should be checked in those at risk for hypothyroidism, those over 60, and those with known CHD and HF. This review updates current evidence on the association between thyroid dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, as well as on screening and treatment of subclinical thyroid dysfunction.

  8. DYSMICROBISM, INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE AND THYROIDITIS: ANALYSIS OF THE LITERATURE.

    PubMed

    Tomasello, G; Tralongo, P; Amoroso, F; Damiani, P; Sinagra, E; Noto, M; Arculeo, V M; Jurjus Zein, R; Saad, W; Jurjus, A; Gerbino, A; Leone, A

    2015-01-01

    The human body is colonized by a large number of microbes that are collectively referred to as the microbiota. They interact with the hosting organism and some do contribute to the physiological maintenance of the general good health thru regulation of some metabolic processes while some others are essential for the synthesis of vitamins and short-chain fatty acids. The abnormal variation, in the quality and/or quantity of individual bacterial species residing in the gastro-intestinal tract, is called “dysmicrobism”. The immune system of the host will respond to these changes at the intestinal mucosa level which could lead to Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD). This inflammatory immune response could subsequently extend to other organs and systems outside the digestive tract such as the thyroid, culminating in thyroiditis. The goal of the present study is to review and analyze data reported in the literature about thyroiditis associated with inflammatory bowel diseases such as Ulcerative Colitis (UC) and Crohn’s Disease (CD). It was reported that similarities of some molecular bacterial components with molecular components of the host are considered among the factors causing IBD through an autoimmune reaction which could involve other non-immune cell types. The axis dysmicrobism-IBD-autoimmune reaction will be investigated as a possible etiopathogenic mechanism to Autoimmune Thyroiditis. If such is the case, then the employment of specific probiotic strains may represent a useful approach to moderate the immune system.

  9. [Clinical and pathological differences between papillary thyroid carcinoma with Graves' disease and papillary thyroid carcinoma with Hashimoto's thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Xu, D D; Lun, Y; Liu, X; Jiang, H; Song, J B; Duan, Z Q; Xin, S J; Zhang, J

    2017-08-22

    Objective: To explore the clinical and pathological differences between papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) with Graves' disease (GD) and PTC with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Methods: A total of 33 PTC patients with GD and 132 PTC patients with HT in the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University from January 2009 to December 2015 were enrolled. The clinical and histopathological data were analyzed. Results: The average serum concentration of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) of PTCs with GD was significantly lower than PTCs with HT [0.01 (0, 0.10) mU/L vs 2.28(1.51, 3.14) mU/L, P<0.001]. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in nodule diameter [(15.7±7.0) mm vs (13.5±7.8)mm, P=0.14], percentage of lymph node metastasis (LNM) [33.3%(11/33) vs 39.4%(52/132), P=0.52], TNM stage Ⅲ-Ⅳ disease [12.1%(4/33) vs 11.4% (15/132), P=1.00], papillary thyroid micro-carcinoma (PTMC) [60.6% (20/33) vs 60.6%(80/132), P=1.00]and classic PTC in all its variant patterns [81.8%(27/33) vs 75.0%(99/132), P=0.36]. The age (P<0.01, OR=0.95, 95%CI: 0.92-0.98) and PTMC (P<0.01, OR=0.30, 95%CI: 0.13-0.67), rather than TSH (P=0.08) were independently correlated with LNM. Recurrence rate of PTC with GD was significantly lower than PTC with HT (log-rank test, P=0.03). In Cox proportional hazards regression model, variant pattern of PTC was independently correlated with recurrence rate (P<0.05). Conclusions: GD with PTC wasn't different from HT concomitant with PTC, except for thyroid function test. In addition, recurrence rate of PTC with GD was lower than that of PTC with HT after controlling TSH in the same level.

  10. Characteristics of patients with graves disease and intrathyroid hypovascularity compared to painless thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Shigihara, Nayumi; Takeno, Kageumi; Komiya, Koji; Goto, Hiromasa; Abe, Hiroko; Sato, Junko; Honda, Akira; Fujitani, Yoshio; Watada, Hirotaka

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency and sonographic and laboratory characteristics of Graves disease with intrathyroid hypovascularity in Japanese patients and to compare these characteristics in patients with painless thyroiditis. A total of 194 consecutive patients with Graves disease and 21 patients with painless thyroiditis were enrolled. The patients underwent thyroid volume measurement, mean superior thyroid artery peak systolic velocity (PSV) measurement, power Doppler sonography, and proper blood testing to discriminate between Graves disease and painless thyroiditis. Based on the power Doppler sonographic findings, they were divided into 4 groups: from pattern 0 (most hypovascular thyroid) to pattern III (most hypervascular thyroid). Comparisons of multiple thyroid parameters were made among the groups. The prevalence of Graves disease with pattern 0 (n = 27) was 13.9% among the patients with Graves disease. The sonographic and laboratory data for patients with Graves disease and pattern 0 were compared to those of the 21 patients with painless thyroiditis, which typically shows intrathyroid hypovascularity. Free triiodothyronine and thyroxine levels and the superior thyroid artery PSV were significantly lower in patients with Graves disease and pattern 0 than those with patterns I, II, and III (P < .05). The thyroid volume and thyrotropin receptor antibody level were significantly lower in patients with Graves disease and pattern 0 than those with pattern III. In the comparison between patients with Graves disease and pattern 0 and those with painless thyroiditis and pattern 0, apart from thyrotropin receptor antibody, only the superior thyroid artery PSV was different. Although the clinical features of patients with Graves disease and intrathyroid hypovascularity were similar to those patients with painless thyroiditis, the superior thyroid artery PSV showed a moderate ability to discriminate these patients. © 2014 by the American

  11. Encephalopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Potentially Reversible Condition

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Inês; Marques, Inês B.; Ferreira, Rogério; Sousa, Lívia

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease may occasionally associate with unspecific neurological symptoms, which are more commonly insidious, include cognitive or behavioural symptoms, and may associate with tremor, myoclonus, or ataxia. We report a 61-year-old female patient who presented with chronic headache, insidious mood, and cognitive disturbance which evolved in a few months to dementia associated with exuberant limb myoclonus. Diagnostic workup revealed high anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody titers and an inflammatory CSF profile, and it was negative for other possible etiologies. Treatment with steroids induced significant improvement. The diagnosis of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is still controversial given the fact that the clinical presentation and diagnostic workup are unspecific, the pathophysiology is still undetermined, and the diagnosis is mostly of exclusion. No direct correlation is found between anti-thyroid antibody titers and clinical presentation, and it is currently speculated that other still unrecognized antibodies may be responsible for this clinical entity. It is extremely important to recognize this entity because it is potentially treatable with immunotherapies. It is also increasingly recognized that clinical improvement with first-line treatment with steroids may be absent or incomplete, and other immunotherapies as immunosuppressants, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasma exchange must be attempted in the clinical suspicion of EEAT. PMID:27127515

  12. Contemporary Management of Recurrent Nodal Disease in Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Na’ara, Shorook; Amit, Moran; Fridman, Eran; Gil, Ziv

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) comprises over 90% of thyroid tumors and includes papillary and follicular carcinomas. Patients with DTC have an excellent prognosis, with a 10-year survival rate of over 90%. However, the risk of recurrent tumor ranges between 5% and 30% within 10 years of the initial diagnosis. Cervical lymph node disease accounts for the majority of recurrences and in most cases is detected during follow-up by ultrasound or elevated levels of serum thyroglobulin. Recurrent disease is accompanied by increased morbidity. The mainstay of treatment of nodal recurrence is surgical management. We provide an overview of the literature addressing surgical management of recurrent or persistent lymph node disease in patients with DTC. PMID:26886954

  13. Thyroid functional disease: an under-recognized cardiovascular risk factor in kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Connie M; Brent, Gregory A; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Soldin, Offie P; Nguyen, Danh; Budoff, Matthew J; Brunelli, Steven M; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-05-01

    Thyroid functional disease, and in particular hypothyroidism, is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. In the general population, hypothyroidism is associated with impaired cardiac contractility, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and possibly higher cardiovascular mortality. It has been hypothesized that hypothyroidism is an under-recognized, modifiable risk factor for the enormous burden of cardiovascular disease and death in CKD and ESRD, but this has been difficult to test due to the challenge of accurate thyroid functional assessment in uremia. Low thyroid hormone levels (i.e. triiodothyronine) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular sequelae in CKD and ESRD patients, but these metrics are confounded by malnutrition, inflammation and comorbid states, and hence may signify nonthyroidal illness (i.e. thyroid functional test derangements associated with underlying ill health in the absence of thyroid pathology). Thyrotropin is considered a sensitive and specific thyroid function measure that may more accurately classify hypothyroidism, but few studies have examined the clinical significance of thyrotropin-defined hypothyroidism in CKD and ESRD. Of even greater uncertainty are the risks and benefits of thyroid hormone replacement, which bear a narrow therapeutic-to-toxic window and are frequently prescribed to CKD and ESRD patients. In this review, we discuss mechanisms by which hypothyroidism adversely affects cardiovascular health; examine the prognostic implications of hypothyroidism, thyroid hormone alterations and exogenous thyroid hormone replacement in CKD and ESRD; and identify areas of uncertainty related to the interplay between hypothyroidism, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease requiring further investigation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  14. Thyroid functional disease: an under-recognized cardiovascular risk factor in kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Connie M.; Brent, Gregory A.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Soldin, Offie P.; Nguyen, Danh; Budoff, Matthew J.; Brunelli, Steven M.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid functional disease, and in particular hypothyroidism, is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. In the general population, hypothyroidism is associated with impaired cardiac contractility, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and possibly higher cardiovascular mortality. It has been hypothesized that hypothyroidism is an under-recognized, modifiable risk factor for the enormous burden of cardiovascular disease and death in CKD and ESRD, but this has been difficult to test due to the challenge of accurate thyroid functional assessment in uremia. Low thyroid hormone levels (i.e. triiodothyronine) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular sequelae in CKD and ESRD patients, but these metrics are confounded by malnutrition, inflammation and comorbid states, and hence may signify nonthyroidal illness (i.e. thyroid functional test derangements associated with underlying ill health in the absence of thyroid pathology). Thyrotropin is considered a sensitive and specific thyroid function measure that may more accurately classify hypothyroidism, but few studies have examined the clinical significance of thyrotropin-defined hypothyroidism in CKD and ESRD. Of even greater uncertainty are the risks and benefits of thyroid hormone replacement, which bear a narrow therapeutic-to-toxic window and are frequently prescribed to CKD and ESRD patients. In this review, we discuss mechanisms by which hypothyroidism adversely affects cardiovascular health; examine the prognostic implications of hypothyroidism, thyroid hormone alterations and exogenous thyroid hormone replacement in CKD and ESRD; and identify areas of uncertainty related to the interplay between hypothyroidism, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease requiring further investigation. PMID:24574542

  15. Shared Genetic Relationships Underlying Generalized Vitiligo and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Generalized vitiligo is an autoimmune disease of skin pigmentation that is associated with increased prevalence of other autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD; principally Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease), both in vitiligo patients and their close relatives, suggesting a heritable predisposition involving, in part, shared susceptibility genes. Summary This review summarizes current knowledge of vitiligo epidemiology and genetics, highlighting recent findings from genome-wide approaches to disease gene identification, emphasizing susceptibility loci shared with other autoimmune diseases, particularly AITD, as well as some important differences. Conclusions Inherited susceptibility to generalized vitiligo involves a number of specific genes, many of which are shared with other autoimmune diseases that are epidemiologically associated with vitiligo, including AITD, confirming a longstanding hypothesis about the genetic basis of these disorders. These genes provide potential therapeutic targets for novel approaches to treatment as well as for approaches to presymptomatic diagnosis and disease prevention in individuals with inherited susceptibility to this group of autoimmune diseases. PMID:20578892

  16. The immunogenetics of autoimmune diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Y; Barbesino, G; Greenberg, D; Davies, T F

    1997-03-01

    Although medical genetics is a well-developed area of interest, relatively little is known about the diseases caused by the combination of many genes. These multiinfluenced diseases include the autoimmune endocrine diseases. Recent advances in the techniques for whole-genome screening have shown a variety of loci that are linked to the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and similar data are likely to be soon generated in autoimmune thyroid disease. Here, the authors survey the current state of genetic knowledge in these two areas and describe the investigative and analytical techniques that are now available. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:63-70). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  17. Role of color Doppler in differentiation of Graves' disease and thyroiditis in thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Donkol, Ragab Hani; Nada, Aml Mohamed; Boughattas, Sami

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role of thyroid blood flow assessment by color-flow Doppler ultrasonography in the differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis and compare it to technetium pertechnetate thyroid scanning. METHODS: Twenty-six patients with thyrotoxicosis were included in the study. Clinical history was taken and physical examination and thyroid function tests were performed for all patients. Thyroid autoantibodies were measured. The thyroid glands of all patients were evaluated by gray scale ultrasonography for size, shape and echotexture. Color-flow Doppler ultrasonography of the thyroid tissue was performed and spectral flow analysis of both inferior thyroid arteries was assessed. Technetium99 pertechnetate scanning of the thyroid gland was done for all patients. According to thyroid scintigraphy, the patients were divided into two groups: 18 cases with Graves’ disease and 8 cases with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. All patients had suppressed thyrotropin. The diagnosis of Graves’ disease and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis was supported by the clinical picture and follow up of patients. RESULTS: Peak systolic velocities of the inferior thyroid arteries were significantly higher in patients with Graves’ disease than in patients with thyroiditis (P = 0.004 in the right inferior thyroid artery and P = 0.001 in left inferior thyroid artery). Color-flow Doppler ultrasonography parameters demonstrated a sensitivity of 88.9% and a specificity of 87.5% in the differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. CONCLUSION: Color Doppler flow of the inferior thyroid artery can be used in the differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis, especially when there is a contraindication of thyroid scintigraphy by radioactive material in some patients. PMID:23671754

  18. Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma: Disease Response Evaluation Using American Thyroid Association Risk Assessment Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Aamna; Khalid, Madeeha; Riaz, Saima; Nawaz, M Khalid; Bashir, Humayun

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the overall and progression-free survival for follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) based on the American Thyroid Association (ATA) staging system for recurrence risk assessment and the TNM staging system. A clinical review of FTC patients between 1995 and 2014 was conducted at a single center. The data was classified using the TNM staging system into low, intermediate, and high risk of recurrence as per the ATA risk assessment. Over the course of 19 years, 114 (11.9%) of all of the thyroid cancer patients presenting to our hospital had FTC (i.e. 78 females and 36 males). The age range was 15-80 years. Ninety-four tumors were resectable and 18 were unresectable. Sixteen patients were excluded due to insufficient information on their recurrence risk. Based on the ATA categorization, 36 patients had a low recurrence risk. All patients were alive at the time of categorization, and 1 showed progressive disease. Thirty-eight patients had an intermediate recurrence risk. One patient died and 2 showed progression. Twenty-four had a high recurrence risk. Seven patients died and 6 showed progression. In terms of TNM stages, 2 (3.2%) stage I, 3 (17.6%) stage II, 1 (14%) stage III, and 2 (12.5%) stage IV patients died during follow-up. Both ATA risk classification and TNM staging were significant predictors of disease-free survival. On bivariate analysis, the ATA classification (HR  4.67; 95% CI 1.74-12.5, p  =  0.002) was a better predictor of survival compared to the TNM classification (HR 1.26; 95% CI 0.98-1.62, p = 0.063). ATA risk stratification predicts the disease recurrence rate and survival better than TNM staging. Age does not have an association; the risk category with dynamic reassessment effectively better predicts the course of disease in FTC.

  19. Computed tomography in the evaluation of thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.M.; Newman, G.E.; Korobkin, M.; Workman, J.B.; Moore, A.V.; Coleman, R.E.

    1984-05-01

    Traditionally, thyroid imaging has been performed primarily using radionuclide scanning. High-resolution computed tomography (CT) was performed in 18 patients to evaluate the CT appearance of various thyroid abnormalities including diffuse toxic goiter, multinodular goiter, Hashimoto thyroiditis, thyroid adenoma, and malignant thyroid tumors. CT images of the thyroid were correlated with radionuclide scanning, surgical findings, and clinical and laboratory results. CT provided a complementary method for evaluation of the thyroid by defining the morphology of the thyroid gland and more precisely defining the anatomic extent of thyroid abnormalities in relation to the normal structures of the neck and mediastinum.

  20. Fetal cell microchimerism: a protective role in autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Cirello, Valentina; Rizzo, Roberta; Crippa, Milena; Campi, Irene; Bortolotti, Daria; Bolzani, Silvia; Colombo, Carla; Vannucchi, Guia; Maffini, Maria Antonia; de Liso, Federica; Ferrero, Stefano; Finelli, Palma; Fugazzola, Laura

    2015-07-01

    The physiological persistence of fetal cells in the circulation and tissue of a previously pregnant woman is called fetal cell microchimerism (FCM). It has been hypothesized to play a role in systemic autoimmune disease; however, only limited data are available regarding its role in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Circulating FCM was analyzed in a large series of previously pregnant women with Graves' disease (GD), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), or no disease (healthy controls (HCs)). To exclude the possible bias related to placental factors, the polymorphic pattern of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) gene, which is known to be involved in the tolerance of fetal cells by the maternal immune system, was investigated. FCM was evaluated by PCR in the peripheral blood, and the Y chromosome was identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in some GD tissues. HLA-G polymorphism typing was assessed by real-time PCR. FCM was significantly more frequent in HC (63.6%) than in GD (33.3%) or HT (27.8%) women (P=0.0004 and P=0.001 respectively). A quantitative analysis confirmed that circulating male DNA was more abundant in HC than it was in GD or HT. Microchimeric cells were documented in vessels and in thyroid follicles. In neither GD/HT patients nor HC women was the HLA-G typing different between FCM-positive and FCM-negative cases. The higher prevalence of FCM in HC as compared to GD and HT patients suggests that it plays a possible protective role in autoimmune thyroid disorders. Placental factors have been excluded as determinants of the differences found. The vascular and tissue localization of microchimeric cells further highlights the ability of those cells to migrate to damaged tissues. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  1. Interleukins as markers of inflammation in malignant and benign thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Provatopoulou, Xeni; Georgiadou, Despoina; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Kalogera, Eleni; Spyridakis, John; Gounaris, Antonia; Zografos, George N

    2014-08-01

    Thyroid disorders, including thyroid cancer and autoimmune thyroid diseases, have been closely associated with inflammation. This study aims to investigate the role of inflammation in thyroid disease by assessing serum cytokine levels in patients with malignant and benign thyroid conditions. Serum levels of ten interleukins (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-13) were quantitatively determined in 20 patients with thyroid cancer, 38 patients with benign thyroid disease and 50 healthy controls by multiplex technology. Serum IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6 levels were strongly associated with each other. IL-10 and IL-12 correlated with IL-1β, IL-5, IL-6, and with each other. Age was inversely correlated with serum levels of IL-2, IL-4 and IL-13. A positive correlation between T3 and IL-13 levels was also observed. Significantly higher levels of IL-6, IL-7, IL-10 and IL-13, as well as significantly lower levels of IL-8 were observed in patients with benign and malignant thyroid disease compared to controls. The combination of IL-13 and IL-8 in a two-marker panel was highly efficient in discriminating thyroid disorders (AUC 0.90). Malignant and benign thyroid conditions are associated with altered expression levels of interleukins, supporting the association between thyroid disease and underlying inflammatory processes.

  2. Effects of Latent Toxoplasmosis on Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kaňková, Šárka; Procházková, Lucie; Flegr, Jaroslav; Calda, Pavel; Springer, Drahomíra; Potluková, Eliška

    2014-01-01

    Background Toxoplasmosis, one of the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide, can induce various hormonal and behavioural alterations in infected hosts, and its most common form, latent toxoplasmosis, influences the course of pregnancy. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) belong to the well-defined risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a link between latent toxoplasmosis and maternal AITD in pregnancy. Methods Cross-sectional study in 1248 consecutive pregnant women in the 9–12th gestational weeks. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb), and free thyroxine (FT4) were assessed by chemiluminescence; the Toxoplasma status was detected by the complement fixation test (CFT) and anti-Toxoplasma IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results Overall, 22.5% of the women were positive for latent toxoplasmosis and 14.7% were screened positive for AITD. Women with latent toxoplasmosis had more often highly elevated TPOAb than the Toxoplasma-negative ones (p = 0.004), and latent toxoplasmosis was associated with decrease in serum TSH levels (p = 0.049). Moreover, we found a positive correlation between FT4 and the index of positivity for anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies (p = 0.033), which was even stronger in the TPOAb-positive Toxoplasma-positive women, (p = 0.014), as well as a positive correlation between FT4 and log2 CFT (p = 0.009). Conclusions Latent toxoplasmosis was associated with a mild increase in thyroid hormone production in pregnancy. The observed Toxoplasma-associated changes in the parameters of AITD are mild and do not seem to be clinically relevant; however, they could provide new clues to the complex pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases. PMID:25350671

  3. Effects of latent toxoplasmosis on autoimmune thyroid diseases in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kaňková, Šárka; Procházková, Lucie; Flegr, Jaroslav; Calda, Pavel; Springer, Drahomíra; Potluková, Eliška

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis, one of the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide, can induce various hormonal and behavioural alterations in infected hosts, and its most common form, latent toxoplasmosis, influences the course of pregnancy. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) belong to the well-defined risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a link between latent toxoplasmosis and maternal AITD in pregnancy. Cross-sectional study in 1248 consecutive pregnant women in the 9-12th gestational weeks. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb), and free thyroxine (FT4) were assessed by chemiluminescence; the Toxoplasma status was detected by the complement fixation test (CFT) and anti-Toxoplasma IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Overall, 22.5% of the women were positive for latent toxoplasmosis and 14.7% were screened positive for AITD. Women with latent toxoplasmosis had more often highly elevated TPOAb than the Toxoplasma-negative ones (p = 0.004), and latent toxoplasmosis was associated with decrease in serum TSH levels (p = 0.049). Moreover, we found a positive correlation between FT4 and the index of positivity for anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies (p = 0.033), which was even stronger in the TPOAb-positive Toxoplasma-positive women, (p = 0.014), as well as a positive correlation between FT4 and log2 CFT (p = 0.009). Latent toxoplasmosis was associated with a mild increase in thyroid hormone production in pregnancy. The observed Toxoplasma-associated changes in the parameters of AITD are mild and do not seem to be clinically relevant; however, they could provide new clues to the complex pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases.

  4. Synthetic gene network restoring endogenous pituitary-thyroid feedback control in experimental Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Pratik; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Folcher, Marc; Zulewski, Henryk; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-02-02

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism because of autoantibodies that bind to the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) on the thyroid gland, triggering thyroid hormone release. The physiological control of thyroid hormone homeostasis by the feedback loops involving the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis is disrupted by these stimulating autoantibodies. To reset the endogenous thyrotrophic feedback control, we designed a synthetic mammalian gene circuit that maintains thyroid hormone homeostasis by monitoring thyroid hormone levels and coordinating the expression of a thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antagonist (TSHAntag), which competitively inhibits the binding of thyroid-stimulating hormone or the human autoantibody to TSHR. This synthetic control device consists of a synthetic thyroid-sensing receptor (TSR), a yeast Gal4 protein/human thyroid receptor-α fusion, which reversibly triggers expression of the TSHAntag gene from TSR-dependent promoters. In hyperthyroid mice, this synthetic circuit sensed pathological thyroid hormone levels and restored the thyrotrophic feedback control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis to euthyroid hormone levels. Therapeutic plug and play gene circuits that restore physiological feedback control in metabolic disorders foster advanced gene- and cell-based therapies.

  5. Synthetic gene network restoring endogenous pituitary–thyroid feedback control in experimental Graves’ disease

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Pratik; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Folcher, Marc; Zulewski, Henryk; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease is an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism because of autoantibodies that bind to the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) on the thyroid gland, triggering thyroid hormone release. The physiological control of thyroid hormone homeostasis by the feedback loops involving the hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid axis is disrupted by these stimulating autoantibodies. To reset the endogenous thyrotrophic feedback control, we designed a synthetic mammalian gene circuit that maintains thyroid hormone homeostasis by monitoring thyroid hormone levels and coordinating the expression of a thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antagonist (TSHAntag), which competitively inhibits the binding of thyroid-stimulating hormone or the human autoantibody to TSHR. This synthetic control device consists of a synthetic thyroid-sensing receptor (TSR), a yeast Gal4 protein/human thyroid receptor-α fusion, which reversibly triggers expression of the TSHAntag gene from TSR-dependent promoters. In hyperthyroid mice, this synthetic circuit sensed pathological thyroid hormone levels and restored the thyrotrophic feedback control of the hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid axis to euthyroid hormone levels. Therapeutic plug and play gene circuits that restore physiological feedback control in metabolic disorders foster advanced gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:26787873

  6. Papillary thyroid carcinoma: does the association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis affect the clinicopathological characteristics of the disease?

    PubMed

    Girardi, Fábio Muradás; Barra, Marinez Bizarro; Zettler, Cláudio Galleano

    2015-01-01

    Papillary carcinoma is the most common malignant thyroid neoplasm. The effect of the concurrent presence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and papillary thyroid carcinoma remains controversial. To evaluate the association between Hashimoto's thyroiditis and clinicopathological parameters in thyroid papillary carcinoma cases, based on an historical institutional cohort analysis. Cross-sectional study obtained from a historical cohort, including all cases submitted to thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma in a single institution during an 11-year period study. A total of 417 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma were enrolled; 148 (35.4%) also had Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A female predominance among cases associated to Hashimoto's thyroiditis was observed. The thyroid tumor, in cases associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, had a smaller mean diameter, lower frequency of extra-thyroid extension, and earlier clinicopathological staging. A high proportion of papillary thyroid carcinoma cases are associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. There are associations among these cases with several histopathological factors already recognized for their prognostic value, which by themselves could impact outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. de Quervain thyroiditis in a young boy following hand-foot-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Engkakul, Pontipa; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat; Poomthavorn, Preamrudee

    2011-04-01

    de Quervain thyroiditis, also known as subacute thyroiditis, is a self-limited inflammatory disease of the thyroid gland. It is extremely rare in children. The hallmarks for diagnosis are painful thyroid enlargement, elevated inflammatory markers, and decreased uptake of the thyroid gland on thyroid scintigraphy. Viral infection has been proposed to be associated with de Quervain thyroiditis. Coxsackie virus has been reported to be one of the viruses associated with the disease. To our knowledge, childhood de Quervain thyroiditis associated with hand-foot-mouth disease caused by coxsackie infection has never been reported. We report a 2.7-year-old boy who presented with typical features of de Quervain thyroiditis following hand-foot-mouth disease caused by coxsackie B4 infection. He had a brief thyrotoxic phase initially, followed by transient hypothyroid phase and euthyroidism thereafter. His thyroid scintigraphy showed a typical faint uptake at the diagnosis, and an improvement of the thyroid scan and uptake was shown 8 weeks later. He was treated with prednisolone and nearly complete resolution was documented within 2 months. Careful evaluation of the patient led to the correct diagnosis and appropriate management.

  8. The human anti-thyroid peroxidase autoantibody repertoire in Graves' and Hashimoto's autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Chardès, Thierry; Chapal, Nicolas; Bresson, Damien; Bès, Cédric; Giudicelli, Véronique; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Péraldi-Roux, Sylvie

    2002-06-01

    Human anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) autoantibodies (aAb) are generated during autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). Within recent years, increasing knowledge of the TPO-specific aAb repertoire, gained mainly by the use of combinatorial library methodology, has led to the cloning and sequencing of around 180 human anti-TPO aAb. Analysis of the immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) genes encoding the TPO aAb in the ImMunoGeneTics database (IMGT) (http://imgt.cines.fr) reveals major features of the TPO-directed aAb repertoire during AITD. Heavy chain VH domains of TPO-specific aAb from Graves' disease patients preferentially use D proximal IGHV1 genes, whereas those from Hashimoto's thyroiditis are characterized more frequently by IGHV3 genes, mainly located in the middle of the IGH locus. A large proportion of the anti-TPO heavy chain VH domains is obtained following a VDJ recombination process that uses inverted D genes. J distal IGKV1 and IGLV1 genes are predominantly used in TPO aAb. In contrast to the numerous somatic hypermutations in the TPO-specific heavy chains, there is only limited amino acid replacement in most of the TPO-specific light chains, particularly in those encoded by J proximal IGLV or IGKV genes, suggesting that a defect in receptor editing can occur during aAb generation in AITD. Among the predominant IGHV1 or IGKV1 TPO aAb, conserved somatic mutations are the hallmark of the TPO aAb repertoire. The aim of this review is to provide new insights into aAb generation against TPO, a major autoantigen involved in AITD.

  9. Screening for thyroid disease in pregnancy: a review.

    PubMed

    Cassar, N J; Grima, A P; Ellul, G J; Schembri-Wismayer, P; Calleja-Agius, J

    2013-08-01

    Screening for thyroid disease in pregnancy remains a contentious issue. This review presents these diverging views and discusses their reasons as well as the relevant facts. The final aim is to establish the information gaps and limitations - technological or otherwise - which still need to be eliminated in order to settle the debate conclusively. The prevalence of the more common thyroid dysfunctions that occur in and after pregnancy is discussed. The subsequent impact of these disorders on mother and offspring is also described. Special focus is placed on the benefits and setbacks of currently available and newly proposed investigations, which assay serum hormone levels, serum autoantibody levels, and/or use clinical data. It is pointed out that the relevance of screening varies from one region of the world to the other, based on the content of iodine and selenium in food and water. The review then discusses the current major arguments for and against screening, as well as recommendations and proposed alternatives.

  10. Thyroid cancer in Graves' disease: is surgery the best treatment for Graves' disease?

    PubMed

    Tamatea, Jade A U; Tu'akoi, Kelson; Conaglen, John V; Elston, Marianne S; Meyer-Rochow, Goswin Y

    2014-04-01

    Graves' disease is a common cause of thyrotoxicosis. Treatment options include anti-thyroid medications or definitive therapy: thyroidectomy or radioactive iodine (I(131) ). Traditionally, I(131) has been the preferred definitive treatment for Graves' disease in New Zealand. Reports of concomitant thyroid cancer occurring in up to 17% of Graves' patients suggest surgery, if performed with low morbidity, may be the preferred option. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of thyroid cancer and surgical outcomes in a New Zealand cohort of patients undergoing thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. This study is a retrospective review of Waikato region patients undergoing thyroid surgery for Graves' disease during the 10-year period prior to 1 December 2011. A total of 833 patients underwent thyroid surgery. Of these, 117 were for Graves' disease. Total thyroidectomy was performed in 82, near-total in 33 and subtotal in 2 patients. Recurrent thyrotoxicosis developed in one subtotal patient requiring I(131) therapy. There were two cases of permanent hypoparathyroidism and one of permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Eight patients (6.8%) had thyroid cancer detected, none of whom had overt nodal disease. Five were papillary microcarcinomas (one of which was multifocal), two were papillary carcinomas (11 mm and 15 mm) and one was a minimally invasive follicular carcinoma. Thyroid cancer was identified in approximately 7% of patients undergoing surgery for Graves' disease. A low complication rate (<2%) of permanent hypoparathyroidism and nerve injury (<1%) supports surgery being a safe alternative to I(131) especially for patients with young children, ophthalmopathy or compressive symptoms. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  11. Coincidental Optic Nerve Meningioma and Thyroid Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Garg, Aakriti; Patel, Payal; Lignelli, Angela; Baron, Edward; Kazim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, and Graves disease presented with clinical evidence of thyroid eye disease (TED) and optic neuropathy. She was referred when a tapered dose of steroids prompted worsening of her TED. CT and MRI were consistent with TED and bilateral optic nerve meningioma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of concurrent TED and unsuspected bilateral optic nerve meningioma. When investigating the etiology of TED-associated optic neuropathy, careful attention to orbital imaging is required because coexisting pathology may exist.

  12. First reported case of unilateral Graves' disease in the left lobe of a bilobar thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Chen, Louis C; Green, Jennifer B

    2011-06-01

    Unilateral Graves' disease is a rare disease variant that can occur in a bilobar thyroid gland. We report the first documented case of unilateral Graves' disease in the left lobe of a bilobar thyroid gland and review the pertinent literature. A 48-year-old man presented in June 2010 with thyrotoxicosis. I-131 radioisotope uptake was elevated at 33.4%, and scintigraphy revealed that uptake of the radioisotope was uniformly increased in the left lobe of the thyroid gland. Ultrasonography of the thyroid gland revealed a non-nodular, enlarged, and heterogeneous left lobe; Doppler investigation of the lobe showed hypervascularity classically seen in Graves' disease. The right lobe of the thyroid, on the other hand, appeared homogeneous and hypovascular on ultrasonography. Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin was significantly elevated at 191% (reference range <140%). Unilateral Graves' disease was the most likely diagnosis. As has occasionally been described in the literature, unilateral involvement of the thyroid gland is a rare presentation of Graves' disease. Pre-existing functional or structural differences (either congenital or acquired) between the two lobes may contribute to this rare presentation. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of unilateral Graves' disease presenting in the left lobe of a bilobar thyroid gland. Although the pathophysiology of unilateral Graves's disease has not been clearly elucidated, clinicians should be aware that Graves' disease can present unilaterally in either lobe of the thyroid gland.

  13. Thyroid storm associated with Graves' disease covered by diabetic ketoacidosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Osada, Erika; Hiroi, Naoki; Sue, Mariko; Masai, Natsumi; Iga, Ryo; Shigemitsu, Rika; Oka, Reiko; Miyagi, Masahiko; Iso, Kaoru; Kuboki, Koji; Yoshino, Gen

    2011-04-14

    Thyroid storm is a condition in which multiple organ dysfunction results from failure of the compensatory mechanisms of the body owing to excessive thyroid hormone activity induced by some factors in patients with thyrotoxicosis. While diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an important trigger for thyroid storm, simultaneous development of DKA and thyroid storm is rare. A 59-year-old woman with no history of either diabetes mellitus or thyroid disease presented to our hospital because of developing nausea, vomiting and diarrhea for 2 days. Physical examination showed mild disturbance of consciousness, fever, and tachycardia. There were no other signs of thyrotoxicosis. Laboratory studies revealed elevation of random blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin, strongly positive of urine acetone, and metabolic acidosis. Since DKA was diagnosed, we initiated the patient on treatment with administration of insulin and adequate fluid replacement. Although the hyperglycemia and acidosis were immediately relieved, the disturbance of consciousness and tachycardia remained persistent. Levels of FT3 and FT4 were extremely high and TSH was below the detectable limit. TRAb was positive. The thyroid storm score of Burch & Wartofsky was 75/140, and the thyroid storm diagnostic criteria of the Japan Thyroid Association were satisfied. Oral administration of thiamazole, potassium iodide and propranolol resulted in immediate relief of the tachycardia. We encountered a case of thyroid storm associated with Graves' disease covered by DKA. Thyroid storm and DKA are both potentially fatal, and the prognosis varies depending on whether or not these conditions are detected and treated sufficiently early. The thyroid storm diagnostic criteria prepared in 2008 by the Japan Thyroid Association are very simple as compared to the Burch & Wartofsky scoring system for thyroid storm. The Japanese criteria may be useful in the diagnosis of this condition since they enable clinicians to identify a broad

  14. A bioassay for thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins of patients with Graves' disease using porcine thyroid monolayer cells.

    PubMed

    Fukue, Y; Uchimura, H; Kuzuya, N; Okano, S; Kanaji, Y; Takaku, F

    1986-06-01

    A bioassay for thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins (TSI) of patients with Graves' disease was developed by porcine thyroid monolayer cells. Thyroid cells were prepared by dispersion using collagenase and trypsin. Aliquots of the cell suspension (2 X 10(6) cells/1.5 ml/dish) in Ham's F-12 medium (pH 7.2) containing 10% calf serum and 1.5 mM Hepes were seeded and cultured in air at 36 C. On day 6 of culture, cells were incubated with test samples (IgG or bTSH) in 1 ml of serum-free, 0.5 mM IMX-included fresh medium for an additional time, and cAMP in the cells was measured by radioimmunoassay. Intracellular cAMP was increased within 5 minutes after the addition of bTSH and the maximal increase was observed after 30 min. Responses of cAMP were in a dose-related manner up to 10 mU/ml of bTSH. With the addition of IgG from untreated Graves' patients, dose-related increases in cAMP were also observed up to 10 mg/ml IgG and the maximal response was seen at 2 hours incubation. Thyroid stimulating activity in IgG's from normal subjects and patients with Graves' disease was tested with a dose of 10 mg/ml and 2 hours incubation and the activity was expressed as a percent of the control (incubated in the same experiment without IgG). One hundred forty one of 145 untreated patients showed higher activity (228 +/- 51.8%, mean +/- SD; 127-393%, range) than normal subjects (103 +/- 13.3%, mean +/- SD, n = 24; 80-129%, range). Sequential changes in TSI activity in 27 patients after initiating thionamide drugs were studied for 24 months. Initially all 27 patients showed positive TSI and 6 months later 15 remained positive. At 6 months after that, 10 of 23, 4 of 16, and 2 of 6 followed patients showed positive TSI. These results indicate that this bioassay is clinically useful for detecting TSI.

  15. Vitiligo and overt thyroid diseases: A nationwide population-based study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jung Min; Lee, June Hyunkyung; Yun, Jae Seung; Han, Byeol; Han, Tae Young

    2017-05-01

    Associations between vitiligo and thyroid diseases have been reported repeatedly. We investigated the associations between vitiligo and overt autoimmune thyroid diseases and thyroid cancer using the Korean National Health Insurance claims database. We defined patients with vitiligo as those whose records showed ≥4 physician contacts between 2009 and 2013 in which vitiligo was the principal diagnosis. We also established an age- and sex-matched control group without vitiligo (2 per 1 vitiligo patient). The outcomes of interest were concurrent Graves disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis (the patients were taking relevant thyroid medications) and thyroid cancer. The study enrolled 73,336 vitiligo patients and 146,672 controls. Patients with vitiligo were at increased risks of Graves disease (odds ratio [OR] 2.610 [95% confidence interval {CI} 2.319-02.938]), Hashimoto thyroiditis (OR 1.609 [95% CI 1.437-1.802]), and thyroid cancer (OR 1.127 [95% CI 1.022-1.242]), compared with the controls. The associations were consistently stronger in males and younger patients. Individual clinical information was not available, and the homogeneous population may limit the generalizability of the results. Vitiligo was significantly associated with overt autoimmune thyroid diseases and overt thyroid cancer. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Metamorphic thyroid autoimmunity in Down Syndrome: from Hashimoto's thyroiditis to Graves' disease and beyond.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Tommaso; Valenzise, Mariella; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Corrias, Andrea; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Radetti, Giorgio; De Luca, Filippo; Wasniewska, Malgorzata

    2015-11-11

    It is known that Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) may progress to Graves' disease (GD) and that this phenomenon may be more frequent in the patients with Down syndrome (DS). To shed light on the relationships between Down syndrome (DS) and metamorphic thyroid autoimmunity. We reconstructed the conversion process from HT to GD in 12 DS children. All the data recorded at HT diagnosis and throughout the time interval from entry to GD presentation were retrospectively taken from patients' files, as well as those recorded at GD diagnosis and during the subsequent evolution. From GD diagnosis all patients underwent methimazole treatment, at a dose that was adjusted on the basis of clinical findings and thyroid tests. Time interval between HT and GD was not different in the seven patients who received during that time a L-thyroxine (L-T4) treatment than in those who were not treated. After methimazole onset all patients exhibited a prolonged remission of hyperthyroidism. In 8/12 patients this treatment is still being continued 2-7 years after its initiation. The mean methimazole dosage needed to maintain euthyroidism in these eight patients was 0.12 ± 0.02 mg/kg/day. In the remaining four patients methimazole was withdrawn from 1.9 to 7 years after its initiation and no relapses were recorded 2.0-2.1 years after its withdrawal. These patients developed, 0.1-0.3 years after methimazole withdrawal, a picture of overt hypothyroidism and needed treatment with L-T4, that is now being continued. No patients needed non-pharmacological therapies. 1) DS children might be incline to manifest over time a phenotypic metamorphosis from HT to GD and to subsequently fluctuate from hyperthyroidism to hypothyroidism; 2) in DS GD may have a mild biochemical and clinical course.

  17. Histopathologic reproducibility of thyroid disease in an epidemiologic study

    SciTech Connect

    Ron, E.; Griffel, B.; Liban, E.; Modan, B.

    1986-03-01

    An investigation of the long-term effects of childhood scalp irradiation demonstrated a significantly increased risk of thyroid tumors in the irradiated population. Because of the complexity of thyroid cancer diagnosis, a histopathologic slide review of 59 of the 68 patients (irradiated and nonirradiated) with thyroid disease was undertaken. The review revealed 90% agreement (kappa = +0.85, P less than 0.01) between the original and review diagnosis. Four of 27 cases previously diagnosed as malignant were reclassified as benign, yielding a cancer misdiagnosis rate of 14.8%. All four of the misdiagnosed cancers were of follicular or mixed papillary-follicular type. As a result of the histologic review, the ratio of malignant to benign tumors decreased from 2.55 to 1.75. Since disagreement in diagnosis was similar in the irradiated and nonirradiated groups, the relative risk of radiation-associated neoplasms did not change substantially. The histopathologic review shows that although there were some problems in diagnostic reproducibility, they were not statistically significant and did not alter our previous conclusions regarding radiation exposure. However, a 15% reduction in the number of malignancies might affect epidemiologic studies with an external comparison as well as geographic or temporal comparisons.

  18. Methodology of the thyroid gland disease decision-making using profiling in steroid hormone pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Sun; Yoon, Chang No

    2007-02-19

    To find out the genetic factors of outbreak of thyroid gland disease, we developed the thyroid gland decision-making system, which processes the metabolic profile in steroid hormone map using a statistical method. Metabolic profile is a measured data of lots of mixed materials that includes not only known metabolites, but also unknown ones, which is estimated to have an influence on the thyroid gland disease. Therefore, to develop thyroid gland disease decision-making system, analyzing metabolic profile containing multi-materials would be useful for diagnosing thyroid gland disease. Because experimental values used for system construction are area values for the retention time, the observations are preprocessed through variable transition and t-test to use the area values concurrently and the highly correlated materials are estimated by principal component analysis. The thyroid gland decision-making system developed through the logistic regression is an excellent system demonstrating 98.7% accuracy in the classification table.

  19. Anterior pituitary cell antibodies detected in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, I; Inukai, T; Takahashi, M; Ishii, A; Ohshima, K; Mori, M; Shimomura, Y; Kobayashi, S; Hashimoto, A; Sugiura, M

    1988-10-01

    An immunofluorescence study using unfixed cryostat sections of rat pituitary glands was carried out on sera from 34 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 28 patients with Graves' disease, 10 patients with thyroid adenoma and 50 healthy subjects. After absorption of sera with rat liver tissues, 19 of 34 patients retained reactivity to anterior pituitary cell antibodies (PCA, 55.8%). On the other hand, immunofluorescence in anterior pituitary cells was faint and detected in only 2 of 28 patients with Graves' disease (7.1%) after absorption of their sera with rat liver aceton powder. A similar result was also obtained when PCA were compared in the sera of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease with high titers of thyroid microsomal autoantibodies. PCA were detected neither in the sera of patients with thyroid adenoma nor in the healthy subjects. The present study suggests that PCA were considerably more prevalent in Hashimoto's thyroiditis than in Graves' disease.

  20. [Effectiveness of iodine prophylaxis and frequency of thyroid enlargement (thyroid goiter) and clinical diagnosis of thyroid diseases in inhabitants of the Szczecin region after the Czernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Syrenicz, A; Goździk, J; Pynka, S; Pilarska, K; Gruszczyńska, M; Gołebiowska, I; Syrenicz, M; Miazgowski, T; Listewnik, M; Krzyzanowska, B

    1991-01-01

    The study, supported by program MZ-XVII, was carried on 4567 inhabitants of the area of Szczecin (2350 females and 2217 males). The population was chosen randomly, according to a simple drawing scheme. All subjects were clinically examined using standardised questionnaires. In 3468 persons (including 1807 girls and women, 1661 boys and men) apart form clinical examination, the assessment of thyrotropin, thyroxine and triiodothyronine in serum and frequency of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antithyroid membrane antibodies were evaluated. The data indicate that 94% of children in Szczecin's region received the prophylactic dose of iodine, mostly between the 1st and the 5th of May 1986. Only 17% of the adults received iodine. The most common preparation was Lugol solution given in a single dose. Among all persons who received iodine, only in 5% of subjects the side effects were noted (mostly in children), including symptoms of gastrointestinal tract (vomiting, abdomen pain) and occasionally intrathyroid side effects (thyroid pains). In examined population the high frequency of thyroid enlargement, mainly in women (up to 43-44% at the age group 30-50 years) was found. The frequency of clinical diagnosis of thyroid disease was higher in women than in man (most often the diffuse goiter, rarely the nodular goiter). The frequency of thyroid enlargement and clinical diagnosis of thyroid disease was not dependent on prophylactic iodine intake. The iodine prophylaxis did not influence on thyroid hormones and TSH serum levels and on frequency of antithyroid antibodies.

  1. Thyroid surgery for Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi Wei; Masterson, Liam; Fish, Brian; Jani, Piyush; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2015-11-25

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease caused by the production of auto-antibodies against the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor, which stimulates follicular cell production of thyroid hormone. It is the commonest cause of hyperthyroidism and may cause considerable morbidity with increased risk of cardiovascular and respiratory adverse events. Five per cent of people with Graves' disease develop moderate to severe Graves' ophthalmopathy. Thyroid surgery for Graves' disease commonly falls into one of three categories: 1) total thyroidectomy, which aims to achieve complete macroscopic removal of thyroid tissue; 2) bilateral subtotal thyroidectomy, in which bilateral thyroid remnants are left; and 3) unilateral total and contralateral subtotal thyroidectomy, or the Dunhill procedure. Recent American Thyroid Association guidelines on treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism emphasised the role of surgery as one of the first-line treatments. Total thyroidectomy removes target tissue for the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody. It controls hyperthyroidism at the cost of lifelong thyroxine replacement. Subtotal thyroidectomy leaves a thyroid remnant and may be less likely to lead to complications, however a higher rate of recurrent hyperthyroidism is expected and revision surgery would be challenging. The choice of the thyroidectomy technique is currently largely a matter of surgeon preference, and a systematic review of the evidence base is required to determine which option offers the best outcomes for patients. To assess the optimal surgical technique for Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy. We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and PubMed, EMBASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). The date of the last search was June 2015 for all databases. We did not apply any language restrictions. Only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving participants with a diagnosis

  2. Thyroid function and ischemic heart disease: a Mendelian randomization study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie V; Schooling, C Mary

    2017-08-17

    To clarify the role of thyroid function in ischemic heart disease (IHD) we assessed IHD risk and risk factors according to genetically predicted thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) positivity. Separate-sample instrumental variable analysis with genetic instruments (Mendelian randomization) was used in an extensively genotyped case (n = 64,374)-control (n = 130,681) study, CARDIoGRAMplusC4D. Associations with lipids, diabetes and adiposity were assessed using the Global Lipids Genetics Consortium Results (n = 196,475), the DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis case (n = 34,380)-control (n = 114,981) study, and the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (body mass index in 152,893 men and 171,977 women, waist-hip ratio in 93,480 men and 116,741 women). Genetically predicted thyroid function was not associated with IHD (odds ratio (OR) per standard deviation for TSH 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97 to 1.12; for FT4 1.01, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.12; for TPOAb positivity 1.10, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.46) or after Bonferroni correction with risk factors, except for an inverse association of FT4 with low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. The associations were generally robust to sensitivity analyses using a weighted median method and MR Egger. This novel study provides little indication that TSH, FT4 or TPOAb positivity affects IHD, despite potential effects on its risk factors.

  3. Excess iodine promotes apoptosis of thyroid follicular epithelial cells by inducing autophagy suppression and is associated with Hashimoto thyroiditis disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengcheng; Wu, Fei; Mao, Chaoming; Wang, Xuefeng; Zheng, Tingting; Bu, Ling; Mou, Xiao; Zhou, Yuepeng; Yuan, Guoyue; Wang, Shengjun; Xiao, Yichuan

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of the autoimmune thyroid disease Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) has increased in recent years, and increasing evidence supports the contribution of excess iodine intake to thyroid disease. In this study, we examined the status of autophagy and apoptosis in thyroid tissues obtained from patients with HT, and we determined the effects of excessive iodine on the autophagy and apoptosis of thyroid follicular cells (TFCs) in an attempt to elucidate the effects of excess iodine on HT development. Our results showed decreases in the autophagy-related protein LC3B-II, and increases in caspase-3 were observed in thyroid tissues from HT patients. Interestingly, the suppression of autophagy activity in TFCs was induced by excess iodine in vitro, and this process is mediated through transforming growth factor-β1 downregulation and activation of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. In addition, excess iodine induced autophagy suppression and enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis of TFCs, which could be rescued by the activation of autophagy. Taken together, our results demonstrated that excess iodine contributed to autophagy suppression and apoptosis of TFCs, which could be important factors predisposing to increased risk of HT development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Determination of serum neopterin levels in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    PubMed

    Balázs, Csaba; Türke, Boglárka; Vámos, Arpád

    2012-07-22

    An elevated serum level of neopterin indicates the activation of the cellular immune system. The objective was to find a correlation in autoimmune thyroid patients between neopterin levels and the clinical stage of the disease and to examine whether neopterin can predict the relapse of the disease. Serum neopterin, thyroid stimulating hormone, free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine, anti-thyroglobulin and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody levels were determined in 137 patients with Graves' disease (in different stages), 25 with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and 14 with toxic adenoma. The neopterin levels were significantly higher in patients with Graves' disease (hyper-, eu-, hypothyroidism and relapsed hyperthyroidism) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Positive correlation was found between neopterin and anti-thyroglobulin and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody levels, but no correlation was detected between neopterin levels and thyroid hormones, thyroid stimulating hormone values and antibodies against thyroid stimulating hormone receptors. Higher level of serum neopterin reflects an underlying autoimmune process, and does not correlate with changes in thyroid hormone levels. Determination of neopterin level can be an important indicator in the exacerbation of autoimmune processes.

  5. [The role of hereditary and environmental factors in autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    PubMed

    Balázs, Csaba

    2012-07-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases are the most common organ-specific autoimmune disorders affecting 5% to 10% of the population in Western countries. The clinical presentation varies from hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease to hypothyroidism in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. While the exact etiology of thyroid autoimmunity is not known, the interaction between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors appears to be of fundamental importance to initiate the process of thyroid autoimmunity. The identified autoimmune thyroid disease susceptibility genes include immune-modulating genes, such as the major histocompatibility complex, and thyroid-specific genes, including TSH receptor, thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase. The majority of the anti-TSH-receptor antibodies have a stimulating capacity and are responsible for hyperthyroidism. The anti-thyroglobulin- and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies belonging to the catalytic type of antibodies destroy the thyrocytes resulting in hypothyroidism. The appearance of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies precedes the induction of thyroiditis and the manifestation of hypothyroidism. The molecular analysis of thyroglobulin gene polymorphism is important in the mechanism of autoimmune thyroiditis. The autoantigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex molecules is a key point of the autoimmune mechanism. It has been shown that a HLA-DR variant containing arginine at position 74 of the DRβ1 chain confers a strong genetic susceptibility to autoimmune thyroid diseases, Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, while glutamine at position DRβ1-74 is protective. Human thyroglobulin 2098 peptide represents a strong and specific DRβ1-Arg74 binder, while a non-binding control peptide, thyroglobulin 2766 fails to induce this response. Moreover, thyroglobulin 2098 stimulated T-cells from individuals who were positive for thyroglobulin antibodies, demonstrating that thyroglobulin 2098 is an immunogenic peptide capable of being

  6. Thyroid disease in pregnancy: new insights in diagnosis and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Korevaar, Tim I M; Medici, Marco; Visser, Theo J; Peeters, Robin P

    2017-10-01

    Adequate thyroid hormone availability is important for an uncomplicated pregnancy and optimal fetal growth and development. Overt thyroid disease is associated with a wide range of adverse obstetric and child development outcomes. An increasing number of studies now indicate that milder forms of thyroid dysfunction are also associated with these adverse pregnancy outcomes. The definitions of both overt and subclinical thyroid dysfunction have changed considerably over the past few years, as new data indicate that the commonly used fixed upper limits of 2.5 mU/l or 3.0 mU/l for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) are too low to define an abnormal thyroid function. Furthermore, some studies now show that the reference ranges are not necessarily the best cut-off for identifying pregnancies at high risk of adverse outcomes. In addition, data suggest that thyroid peroxidase autoantibody positivity and high or low concentrations of human chorionic gonadotropin seem to have a more prominent role in the interpretation of thyroid dysfunction than previously thought. Data on the effects of thyroid disease treatment are lacking, but some studies indicate that clinicians should be aware of the potential for overtreatment with levothyroxine. Here, we put studies from the past decade on reference ranges for TSH, determinants of thyroid dysfunction, risks of adverse outcomes and options for treatment into perspective. In addition, we provide an overview of the current views on thyroid physiology during pregnancy and discuss strategies to identify high-risk individuals who might benefit from levothyroxine treatment.

  7. Secondary malignancy following radiotherapy for thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Christopher C; Chang, Eun Hae; Al-Kharazi, Khalid; Pickles, Tom

    2016-01-01

    To describe the first case of a secondary meningioma in a patient after radiation treatment for thyroid eye disease (TED). Secondarily to identify any additional cases of secondary malignancy resulting from radiotherapy for thyroid eye disease from our institutional experience. Thyroid eye disease (TED) is a self-limiting auto-immune disorder causing expansion of orbital soft tissue from deposition of glycosaminoglycans and collagen, leading to significant cosmetic and functional morbidity. Established management options for TED include: glucocorticosteroids, orbital radiotherapy, and surgical orbital decompression. Two large series on radiotherapy for TED have been reported without any cases of secondary malignancy. The case of a patient with visual failure, found to have a sphenoid wing meningioma after previous TED radiotherapy is described. We then reviewed 575 patients with at least 3-year follow-up receiving radiotherapy for TED at British Columbia Cancer Agency to identify other possible secondary malignancies. The patient had postoperative improvement in her vision without any identified complications. Three additional cases of hematologic malignancy were identified. The calculated risk in our population of developing a radiation-induced meningioma after TED with at least 3 years of follow-up of is 0.17% (1/575); with hematopoetic malignancies the risk for secondary malignancy is 0.7% (4/575). Our calculated risk for secondary malignancy (0.17%, 0.7%) is similar to the reported theoretical risk published in the literature (0.3-1.2%). There is real risk for the development of a secondary malignancy after radiotherapy treatment of TED and treatment options should include consideration for this potential.

  8. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  9. Comparative study of ultrasound and computed tomography for incidentally detecting diffuse thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Jung, Soo Jin; Ha, Tae Kwun; Park, Ha Kyoung; Kang, Taewoo

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic values of thyroid ultrasound (US) and neck computed tomography (CT) in incidentally detecting diffuse thyroid disease (DTD). A single radiologist made US and CT diagnoses of incidentally detected DTD in 130 consecutive patients before thyroidectomy for various malignancies. Histopathologic examinations confirmed normal thyroid (n = 80), Hashimoto thyroiditis (n = 20), non-Hashimoto lymphocytic thyroiditis (n = 28) and diffuse hyperplasia (n = 2). Receiver operating characteristic curves revealed that the best diagnostic indices of both imaging methods were achieved on the basis of two or more abnormal imaging findings. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of US and CT in incidentally detecting DTD by this classification were 72% and 72%, 87.5% and 91.3% and 81.5% and 83.8%, respectively. Thyroid US and neck CT have similar diagnostic values for differentiating incidental DTD from normal thyroid.

  10. Management of thyroid eye disease in the United Kingdom: A multi-centre thyroid eye disease audit.

    PubMed

    Mellington, F E; Dayan, C M; Dickinson, A J; Hickey, J L; MacEwen, C J; McLaren, J; Perros, P; Rose, G E; Uddin, J; Vaidya, B; Foley, P; Lazarus, J H; Mitchell, A; Ezra, D G

    2017-06-01

    This article aims to provide baseline data and highlight any major deficiencies in the current level of care provided for adult patients with thyroid eye disease (TED). We undertook a prospective, nonrandomized cross-sectional multicenter observational study. During a 3-month period June-August 2014, consecutive adult patients with TED who presented to nominated specialist eye clinics in the United Kingdom, completed a standardized questionnaire. Main outcome measures were: demographics, time from diagnosis to referral to tertiary centre, time from referral to review in specialist eye clinic, management of thyroid dysfunction, radioiodine and provision of steroid prophylaxis, smoking, and TED classification. 91 patients (mean age 47.88 years) were included. Female-to-male ratio was 6:1. Mean time since first symptoms of TED = 27.92 (73.71) months; from first visit to any doctor with symptoms to diagnosis = 9.37 (26.03) months; from hyperthyroidism diagnosis to euthyroidism 12.45 (16.81) months. First, 13% had received radioiodine. All those with active TED received prophylactic steroids. Seven patients who received radioiodine and did not have TED at the time went on to develop it. Then, 60% patients were current or ex-smokers. 63% current smokers had been offered smoking cessation advice. 65% patients had active TED; 4% had sight-threatening TED. A large proportion of patients (54%) were unaware of their thyroid status. Not enough patients are being provided with smoking cessation advice and information on the impact of smoking on TED and control of thyroid function.

  11. Interphase ribosomal RNA cistron staining in thyroid epithelial cells in Grave's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and benign and malignant tumours of the thyroid gland

    PubMed Central

    Mamaev, N N; Grynyeva, E N; Blagosklonnaya, Y V

    1996-01-01

    Aim—To evaluate the expression of ribosomal cistrons in human thyroid epithelial cells (TECs) of patients with Grave's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and benign and malignant tumours of the thyroid gland. Methods—TEC nucleoli were investigated in fine needle biopsy specimens from 10 controls, 39 patients with Grave's disease, 15 with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 56 with benign, and 15 with malignant tumours of the thyroid. A one step silver staining method was applied. In most cases serum concentrations of thyroxine and triiodothyronine as well as goitre size were determined. In every case 100 TECs were evaluated for the mean numbers of nucleoli and for the average number of argyrophilic nucleolar organiser regions (AgNORs) per nucleus. Results—NORs were activated in all patients, but not in controls. The numbers of AgNORs in patients with Grave's disease were closely correlated with thyroxine or triiodothyronine, or both, concentrations and with the size of the thyroid. In patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis about 30% of TECs nucleoli did not contain AgNORs, whereas others were heavily impregnated with silver. Compared with controls and benign tumours, the nucleoli of carcinomatous TECs were larger and irregular in shape. The mean number of AgNORs per nucleus in malignant cells was higher than that in their benign counterparts. Conclusions—The mechanism by which NORs are activated in TECs varies depending on the type of lesion. The higher AgNOR score in TECs from malignant tumours can be used to distinguish them from their benign counterparts. Images PMID:16696083

  12. Volume changes in remnant thyroid tissue after thyroidectomy in Graves disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Yin; Chao, Cheng-Min; Wu, Ta-Jen; Huang, Shih-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Surgery is one of the treatment choices for Graves disease. The residual thyroid tissue may shrink or become larger. The object of this study was trying to find out what factors affect the residual thyroid gland volume change after thyroidectomy in Graves disease. We followed thyroid volume changes by ultrasonography in 101 patients with Graves disease who underwent one side lobectomy and another side subtotal thyroidectomy from 1996 to 2006. These patients were divided into three groups according to the residual thyroid size increasing, no change in size, and shrinking. We checked the factors as follows: age, body weight, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level, TSH-receptor antibody level, anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody level, total thyroid volume before and after thyroidectomy, and degree of lymphocyte infiltration. We found that young age and lower residual volume ratio were the most powerful two factors affecting remnant thyroid gland volume changing. We also found that there is no significant correlation between TSH levels and thyroid volume change, nor TSH-receptor antibody titer or thyroid volume change. Age and residual volume ratio were the most powerful two factors in this study. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Mechanisms in endocrinology: autoimmune thyroid disease: old and new players.

    PubMed

    Effraimidis, Grigoris; Wiersinga, Wilmar M

    2014-06-01

    The last 10 years have seen some progress in understanding the etiology of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). The female preponderance can now be explained - at least in part - by fetal microchimerism and X-chromosome inactivation. The number of identified susceptibility genes for AITD is increasing (among others now including TSHR, TG, HLA, CTLA4, PTPN22, CD40, FCRL3, IL2RA, and FOXP3), but these genes together probably do not explain more than about 10% of the heritability of AITD. As twin studies indicate that genes contribute for 70% of AITD, it follows that there must be many more loci, each of them contributing a little. While the genetic studies have clarified why various autoimmune diseases so often cluster in the same patient, the molecular mechanism of action of these genetic polymorphisms (frequently located in introns) has hardly been explained. Polymorphisms in AITD susceptibility genes may become helpful in clinical practice, e.g. in assessing risk of recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism (GH) after a course of antithyroid drugs. Moderate alcohol intake decreases the risk on overt GH and overt Hashimoto's hypothyroidism. Current smokers - as well known - are at increased risk for Graves' disease, but - surprisingly - at diminished risk for Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Low selenium and low vitamin D levels might increase the risk of developing AITD, but data are still inconclusive. Current options for preventive interventions in subjects at risk to develop AITD are very limited.

  14. Pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune disease: the role of cellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Leví, Ana Maria; Marazuela, Mónica

    2016-10-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and Graves' disease (GD) are two very common organ-specific autoimmune diseases which are characterized by circulating antibodies and lymphocyte infiltration. Although humoral and cellular mechanisms have been classically considered separately in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), recent research suggests a close reciprocal relationship between these two immune pathways. Several B- and T-cell activation pathways through antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and cytokine production lead to specific differentiation of T helper (Th) and T regulatory (Treg) cells. This review will focus on the cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AITD. Specifically, it will provide reasons for discarding the traditional simplistic dichotomous view of the T helper type 1 and 2 pathways (Th1/Th2) and will focus on the role of the recently characterized T cells, Treg and Th17 lymphocytes, as well as B lymphocytes and APCs, especially dendritic cells (DCs). Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Milk production and distribution in low-dose counties for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmel, J.G. . Social and Economic Sciences Research Center); Beck, D.M. )

    1992-06-01

    This report identifies sources of milk consumed by residents of Ferry, Okanogan, and Stevens Counties. This information will be used by the Hanford thyroid Disease Study to determine whether thyroid disease has been increased among people exposed to past iodine--131 emissions from Hanford Site Facilities.

  16. Intermediate microRNA expression profile in Graves' disease falls between that of normal thyroid tissue and papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Matthias; Grabellus, Florian; Worm, Karl; Arnold, Georg; Walz, Martin; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Sheu-Grabellus, Sien-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have previously reported a higher prevalence of papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC) in patients with Graves' disease (GD). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that are upregulated in PTC compared with benign thyroid tissue. The objective of the study was to examine the miRNA expression of selected miRNAs that are known to be upregulated in PTC in patients with GD. Paraffin embedded thyroid tissue from 159 patients with GD was screened for expression of the miRNAs 146b, 181b, 21, 221 and 222 by RT-PCR. The expression profiles of four normal thyroids, 50 PTCs without concomitant GD and 11 patients with untreated GD served as the controls. The expression pattern of these miRNAs in patients with GD is intermediate between that of benign thyroid tissue (p<0.001) and PTC (in three out of five miRNAs, p<0.001). This corresponds to a 15-fold change for GD versus PTC, and a 31-fold change for GD versus normal thyroid tissue. The miRNA expression in 11 papillary microcarcinomas found in our study (a prevalence of 0.07) was not different from that in PTC samples from patients without GD for four of five miRNA types. Furthermore, we found a significant difference in the expression of miRNA 221/222 between treated and untreated GD tissue. In conclusion, we found an intermediate expression of specific miRNAs in thyroid tissue from patients with GD that fell between the expression levels found in normal thyroid glands and PTC, which suggests a possible influence of certain miRNAs on developing PTC in patients with GD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. [Alveolar hemorrhage associated with intestinal inflammatory disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rabec, C; Barcat, J; Rey, D

    2003-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is characterized by diffuse bleeding into alveolar spaces. Three histopathological patterns may be seen: 1) pulmonary capillaritis due to immunological aggression to the membrane, 2) diffuse alveolar damage within the context of acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 3) and "bland" DAH without alveolar or capillary damage. In the first two groups, pulmonary damage usually occurs within the context of a systemic disease. In the last, injury is usually found only in the lung, an entity called pulmonary hemosiderosis. We present a case of DAH with neither capillaritis nor diffuse alveolar damage in association with inflammatory bowel disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The case is interesting both because the association has not yet been described in the literature and because the presence of alveolar bleeding without evident tissue damage within the context of known autoimmune diseases may extend the field to include a new pathophysiological mechanism of pulmonary hemorrhage.

  18. Hashimoto's thyroiditis associated Evans syndrome: A rare case report on the clustered autoimmune disease triad.

    PubMed

    Koti, Kalyan; Thumma, Rayapa Reddy; Nagarajan, Swathanthra; Mathi, Atchyuta

    2013-07-01

    Evans syndrome is a rare combination of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia. Their association with autoimmune thyroid diseases has been reported by few authors; however, a sequential development of the Evans syndrome in cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is extremely rare. The clustering of these autoimmune diseases might share a common pathogenic pathway. We present the fourth such case in world literature, of a 34-year-old female diagnosed with Hashimoto's thyroiditis in 2006, who has been taking synthetic thyroid hormone since then. Her condition is now clinically complicated with the development of the Evans syndrome.

  19. Distinct histopathological features of Hashimoto's thyroiditis with respect to IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiong; Zhou, Gengyin; Ozaki, Takashi; Nishihara, Eijun; Matsuzuka, Fumio; Bai, Yanhua; Liu, Zhiyan; Taniguchi, Emiko; Miyauchi, Akira; Kakudo, Kennichi

    2012-08-01

    A form of Hashimoto's thyroiditis with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing changes and increased numbers of IgG4-positive plasma cells has recently been reported in the literature. These histopathological features suggest that this subtype of Hashimoto's thyroiditis may be closely related to IgG4-related disease. Therefore, this unique form of IgG4-related Hashimoto's thyroiditis, which is referred to as IgG4 thyroiditis, has its own clinical, serological, and sonographic features that are distinct from those associated with non-IgG4 thyroiditis. IgG4 thyroiditis shares similarities with the well-known fibrous variant of Hashimoto's thyroiditis; however, the detailed histopathological features of IgG4 thyroiditis have not been well established. Based on immunostaining results, 105 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis were divided into an IgG4 thyroiditis group (n=28) and a non-IgG4 thyroiditis group (n=77). As in our previous reports, IgG4 thyroiditis was associated with a patient population of a younger age, a lower female-to-male ratio, rapid progression, higher levels of thyroid autoantibodies, subclinical hypothyroidism, and diffuse sonographic echogenicity. Histopathologically, this group revealed severe lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, dense stromal fibrosis, marked follicular cell degeneration, numerous micro-follicles, and notable giant cell/histiocyte infiltration. Importantly, the IgG4-related group did not completely overlap with fibrous variant of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Four cases (14%) in the IgG4 thyroiditis group presented only mild fibrosis in the stroma, whereas 29 cases (38%) in the non-IgG4 thyroiditis group met the diagnostic criteria for fibrous variant of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Furthermore, we observed three patterns of stromal fibrosis in Hashimoto's thyroiditis: interfollicular fibrosis, interlobular fibrosis, and scar fibrosis. The IgG4 thyroiditis group was significantly associated with the presence of predominant interfollicular fibrosis. In

  20. Crohn’s disease and risk of fracture: does thyroid disease play a role?

    PubMed Central

    Pooran, Nakechand; Singh, Pankaj; Bank, Simmy

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role of thyroid disease as a risk for fractures in Crohn’s patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1998 to 2000. The study group consisted of 210 patients with Crohn’s disease. A group of 206 patients without inflammatory bowel disease served as controls. Primary outcome was thyroid disorder. Secondary outcomes included use of steroids, immunosuppressive medications, surgery and incidence of fracture. RESULTS: The prevalence of hyperthyroidism was similar in both groups. However, the prevalence of hypothyroidism was lower in Crohn’s patients (3.8% vs 8.2%, P = 0.05). Within the Crohn’s group, the use of immunosuppressive agents (0% vs 11%), steroid usage (12.5% vs 37%), small bowel surgery (12.5% vs 28%) and large bowel surgery (12.5% vs 27%) were lower in the hypothyroid subset as compared to the euthyroid subset. Seven (3.4%) Crohn’s patients suffered fracture, all of whom were euthyroid. CONCLUSION: Thyroid disorder was not found to be associated with Crohn’s disease and was not found to increase the risk for fractures. Therefore, screening for thyroid disease is not a necessary component in the management of Crohn’s disease. PMID:12632531

  1. Paraoxonase and arylesterase levels in autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Hakan; Tabur, Suzan; Ozkaya, Mesut; Oguz, Elif; Elboga, Umut; Aksoy, Nurten; Akarsu, Ersin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate serum paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity and its association with oxidative stress in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). A total of 50 patients with AITD, including 25 with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and 25 with Graves' disease were enrolled. The control group comprised 27 healthy subjects. Blood samples were obtained in the euthyroid period and 3 months after initiation of medical treatment. Serum samples from patients with AITD and the healthy control group were analyzed for basal PON1, salt-stimulated PON1, and arylesterase (ARE) activities, along with lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) and total free sulfhydryl (-SH) levels. Serum PON1 activities and -SH levels were significantly lower (P < 0.001, for each), whereas LOOH levels were significantly higher (P < 0.001, for each) in patients with AITD, compared to the control group. We observed no significant differences in ARE levels between the patient and healthy control groups (P > 0.05). PON1 activity was positively correlated with -SH (r = 0.522, P < 0.001) and negatively correlated with LOOH (r = -0.487, P < 0.001). PON1 phenotype distribution of the subjects was not significantly different among the three groups (P = 0.961). Serum PON1 activity is decreased in patients with AITD, and correlated positively with -SH, a well-known antioxidant, and negatively with LOOH, an index of lipid oxidation.

  2. Serological aggravation of autoimmune thyroid disease in two cases receiving nivolumab.

    PubMed

    Narita, Tomohiko; Oiso, Naoki; Taketomo, Yasunori; Okahashi, Kazunori; Yamauchi, Kohei; Sato, Masako; Uchida, Shusuke; Matsuda, Hiromasa; Kawada, Akira

    2016-02-01

    Nivolumab, a blockade of programmed cell death 1, is now administrated for advanced malignant melanomas. Nivolumab-associated adverse events include organ-specific autoimmune disorders; autoimmune thyroid disease, vitiligo and insulin-dependent diabetes. However, predisposed persons are currently unknown. Here, we report serological aggravation of autoimmune thyroid disease in two cases receiving nivolumab: one with Hashimoto disease and another with probable subclinical Hashimoto disease. We should verify if nivolumab-related hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are predisposed to occur in euthyroid individuals with subclinical autoimmune thyroid disease.

  3. Circulating microRNAs in autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroya; Itoh, Mitsuyasu; Hiratsuka, Izumi; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2014-08-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), are the most common autoimmune diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs, which can play pivotal roles in immune functions and development of autoimmunity. Recently, it has been recognized that identification of circulating miRNAs can provide important and novel information regarding disease pathogenesis and clinical condition. However, the role circulating miRNAs in AITD has not yet been described. The aim of this study was to characterize the different circulating levels of miRNA in patients with AITD. Sixty-four participants who met the criteria for HT or GD and healthy subjects were recruited. Microarrays were used to analyse the expression patterns of miRNA in serum obtained from patients with HT and GD and healthy subjects. After analysing the microarray data, four interesting miRNAs (miR-16, miR-22, miR-375 and miR-451) were selected and validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Several miRNAs were observed to be differently expressed in serum from patients with AITD compared with healthy subjects by microarray analysis. Further analysis consistently showed that serum levels of miR-22, miR-375 and miR-451 were increased in patients with HT. On the other hand, the serum levels of miR-16, miR-22, miR-375 and miR-451 were increased in patients with GD compared with healthy subjects. We revealed that different levels of serum miRNAs were associated with GD and HT, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Family history of malignant and benign thyroid diseases and risk of thyroid cancer: a population-based case-control study in New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Leux, Christophe; Truong, Thérèse; Petit, Claire; Baron-Dubourdieu, Dominique; Guénel, Pascal

    2012-05-01

    Exceptionally high incidence rates of thyroid cancer have been observed in New Caledonia, particularly in Melanesian women, but familial aggregation of thyroid diseases in this population is unknown. We study the association between family history of malignant or benign thyroid diseases and non-medullary thyroid cancer in this country. We conducted a population-based case-control study including 332 cases with papillary or follicular carcinoma diagnosed in 1993-1999 and 412 controls, matched by sex and 5-year age-group. Thyroid cancer was associated with a history of thyroid cancer in first-degree relatives (odds ratio (OR), 3.2; 95 % CI, 1.6-6.2) and with a family history of multinodular goiter (OR, 3.6; 95 % CI, 1.9-7.0). The ORs did not change by age at diagnosis and with the number of affected relatives. The study provides evidence that the familial component of thyroid cancer is particularly strong in men. Thyroid cancer was not associated with a family history of thyroid diseases in Melanesians from the Loyalty Islands, the area with the highest incidence rates for thyroid cancer, possibly indicating a high frequency of genetic susceptibility variants and lack of genetic variation in this population subgroup. Overall our findings confirm an elevated risk of thyroid cancer in individuals with a family history of malignant or benign thyroid diseases, particularly in Melanesians where familial aggregation of thyroid cancer had never been investigated before. The study of genetic variants in candidate susceptibility genes for thyroid cancer may help clarifying the absence of an association in the subgroup of Melanesians from the Loyalty Islands.

  5. Thyroid Follicular Carcinoma in a Fourteen-year-old Girl with Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Kojima-Ishii, Kanako; Ihara, Kenji; Ohkubo, Kazuhiro; Matsuo, Terumichi; Toda, Naoko; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Kono, Shinji; Hara, Toshiro

    2014-04-01

    Here we present the case of a 14-yr-old girl who developed thyroid follicular carcinoma accompanied by Graves' disease. She was diagnosed with Graves' disease at 10 yr of age and soon achieved a euthyroid state after starting treatment. When she was 13 yr of age, her hyperthyroidism and goiter worsened despite medical therapy. Multiple nodules were found in her enlarged thyroid gland by ultrasonography. Her serum Tg level seemed within the normal range. She underwent near-total thyroidectomy for control of thyroid function. Histopathological study demonstrated that multiple oxyphilic follicular neoplasms were surrounded by the thyroid tissue compatible with Graves' disease. Capsular invasion was identified in one of the nodules, and thus the histological diagnosis was minimally invasive follicular carcinoma. She did not have signs suggesting metastasis, and has had no relapse for 18 mo after the operation. Although some previous studies showed a high prevalence of thyroid cancer with an aggressive nature in adult patients with Graves' disease, few reports about thyroid cancer accompanied by Graves' disease are available in children. The present case, however, suggests that careful investigation is needed when we detect thyroid nodules or progressive thyroid enlargement, especially in children with Graves' disease.

  6. Thyroid Follicular Carcinoma in a Fourteen-year-old Girl with Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kojima-Ishii, Kanako; Ihara, Kenji; Ohkubo, Kazuhiro; Matsuo, Terumichi; Toda, Naoko; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Kono, Shinji; Hara, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Here we present the case of a 14-yr-old girl who developed thyroid follicular carcinoma accompanied by Graves’ disease. She was diagnosed with Graves’ disease at 10 yr of age and soon achieved a euthyroid state after starting treatment. When she was 13 yr of age, her hyperthyroidism and goiter worsened despite medical therapy. Multiple nodules were found in her enlarged thyroid gland by ultrasonography. Her serum Tg level seemed within the normal range. She underwent near-total thyroidectomy for control of thyroid function. Histopathological study demonstrated that multiple oxyphilic follicular neoplasms were surrounded by the thyroid tissue compatible with Graves’ disease. Capsular invasion was identified in one of the nodules, and thus the histological diagnosis was minimally invasive follicular carcinoma. She did not have signs suggesting metastasis, and has had no relapse for 18 mo after the operation. Although some previous studies showed a high prevalence of thyroid cancer with an aggressive nature in adult patients with Graves’ disease, few reports about thyroid cancer accompanied by Graves’ disease are available in children. The present case, however, suggests that careful investigation is needed when we detect thyroid nodules or progressive thyroid enlargement, especially in children with Graves’ disease. PMID:24790388

  7. Efficacy of needle biopsy in postradiation thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, I.B.; Palmer, J.A.; Bain, J.; Strawbridge, H.; Walfish, P.G.

    1983-12-01

    Retrospective review was carried out of 124 patients with nodular disease of the thyroid gland and a history of radiation exposure who had undergone needle aspiration biopsy. Latency period from time of radiation varied from 2 to 50 years; but in 92 patients it exceeded 2 decades. Our patient group included those with occupational exposure and a past history of radiation for cancer. Incidence of cancer in the entire group was 49% but, for solitary lesions, this was increased to 56%, while only a 30% incidence of cancer was found in cases of multinodular goiters. Accuracy of needle aspiration biopsy overall was 74%: for the group with cancer--90%, for the group with adenomas--65%, and for the group with ''benign'' tumors--83%. Further assessment of needle technique indicated a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 90%, positive predictive value of 90%, and negative predictive value of 83% to 65%. The accuracy could be increased to 84% if all adenomas were considered as possible malignancies. Eighteen percent of our patients had second tumors in the head and neck or breast area. Near-total thyroidectomy was considered to be the preferred procedure without accidental nerve injury and was done in one case of hypoparathyroidism after excision of an extensive tracheal invasive cancer. No evidence of death, recurrence, or metastasis as a result of thyroid cancer has been noted. While needle biopsy is indispensable to intelligent management, the history of radiation to the head and neck area must be preeminent in the selection of patients for surgical treatment. Conservative management appears to be reasonable in those patients with ''benign'' cytology, a less than 1 cm nodule, multinodularity, a functioning thyroid scan result, but persistence in the face of a lack of response to conservative management does not appear to be warranted.

  8. [Differentiated thyroid cancer: an ancient disease with new knowledge].

    PubMed

    Granados García, Martín; León Takahashi, Alberto Mitsuo; Guerrero Huerta, Francisco Javier; Taissoun Aslan, Zaki Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and its incidence appears to be rising rapidly with a good prognosis. However, the involvement of different medical specialties has changed the focus of treatment and triggered a number of controversies. In the absence of controlled trials, the guidelines for treatment are founded on prognostic factors for survival and local control, the effects of the treatments, and comorbidities. Recently, the major advances in the field of genetics and molecular biology have been applied in the treatment of iodine refractory disease, and the use of tracers and recombinant hormones have succeeded in improving adjuvant treatment. Based on this information, we present this review with the aim of updating the knowledge of an ancient disease.

  9. Thyroid stimulating antibody: an index of thyroid stimulation in Graves' disease?

    PubMed

    Baldet, L; Madec, A M; Papachristou, C; Stefanutti, A; Orgiazzi, J; Jaffiol, C

    1987-09-01

    Early (20 min) thyroid radio-iodine uptake (ERU) and thyroid-stimulating antibodies (TSab) were determined in 27 untreated unselected patients with Graves' disease at the time of diagnosis. In 21 subjects the same tests were further performed in parallel during combined carbimazole-L-T3 therapy (mean duration of follow-up: 10.8 +/- 5.8 months; mean +/- SD). TSab was determined by a cAMP-human thyrocyte culture stimulation assay and expressed in microliter-equivalent of a TSab standard/ml (microliter-eq/ml). Before treatment, ERU, ranging from 15 to 54% of the injected dose (normal less than or equal to 8% dose) correlated with serum T3 (r: 0.54; P less than 0.01); TSab, ranging from 6 to 85 microliter-eq/ml was detected in 21/27 patients. There was a significant correlation between ERU and TSab (Spearman rank test: r: 0.57; P less than 0.01). During the first months of treatment, 5 of the 21 patients sequentially studied had undetectable TSab levels throughout the study and in these patients ERU decreased by 57% of its initial value; the remaining 16 subjects were divided into two groups according to ERU changes: in group A (9 patients), initial ERU decreased by 50% or more or the absolute value became less than 20% of the dose and TSab decreased from 10.9 +/- 4.8 microliter-eq/ml to 5.3 +/- 1.6 microliter-eq/ml (P less than 0.01); in group B (7 patients), the fall of ERU was less than 50% or the absolute value remained greater than 20% of the dose and TSab values remained unchanged.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Thyroid storm following radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy for pediatric graves disease

    PubMed Central

    Rohrs, Henry J.; Silverstein, Janet H.; Weinstein, David A.; Amdur, Robert J.; Haller, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 11 Final Diagnosis: Thyroid storm Symptoms: Diarrhea • tachycardia • tachypnea • tremor • wheezing Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Rare disease Background: A growing number of pediatric endocrinologists treat Graves disease with radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy due to the typically definitive nature of I-131 therapy. Given the published benefits and perceived low risks of RAI when compared to surgery or long-term anti-thyroid medication, the trend towards therapy with RAI is likely to continue. Nevertheless, RAI is not without significant risk. Case Report: An 11-year-old girl with newly diagnosed Graves disease received RAI for definitive treatment of her hyperthyroidism. Within 24 hours of receiving I-131, she developed increasing sleepiness and eventually became unresponsive. Upon arrival at the emergency department she had a tonic-clonic seizure and was diagnosed with thyroid storm. Despite best efforts to manage her hyperthyroidism, she suffered a stroke of the left cerebral hemisphere that left her with persistent neurological deficits. Conclusions: Although thyroid storm after thyroid ablation is rare, the significant morbidity and potential mortality of pediatric thyroid storm warrant further studies to determine if children with markedly elevated thyroid hormone concentrations at diagnosis should receive prolonged pretreatment with anti-thyroid drugs. While such an approach may reduce the efficacy of I-131 ablation, it can also reduce and hopefully eliminate the risk of post-ablative thyroid storm. PMID:24847412

  11. Thyroid storm following radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy for pediatric graves disease.

    PubMed

    Rohrs, Henry J; Silverstein, Janet H; Weinstein, David A; Amdur, Robert J; Haller, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Female, 11 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Thyroid storm Symptoms: Diarrhea • tachycardia • tachypnea • tremor • wheezing - Clinical Procedure: - Specialty: - Rare disease. A growing number of pediatric endocrinologists treat Graves disease with radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy due to the typically definitive nature of I-131 therapy. Given the published benefits and perceived low risks of RAI when compared to surgery or long-term anti-thyroid medication, the trend towards therapy with RAI is likely to continue. Nevertheless, RAI is not without significant risk. An 11-year-old girl with newly diagnosed Graves disease received RAI for definitive treatment of her hyperthyroidism. Within 24 hours of receiving I-131, she developed increasing sleepiness and eventually became unresponsive. Upon arrival at the emergency department she had a tonic-clonic seizure and was diagnosed with thyroid storm. Despite best efforts to manage her hyperthyroidism, she suffered a stroke of the left cerebral hemisphere that left her with persistent neurological deficits. Although thyroid storm after thyroid ablation is rare, the significant morbidity and potential mortality of pediatric thyroid storm warrant further studies to determine if children with markedly elevated thyroid hormone concentrations at diagnosis should receive prolonged pretreatment with anti-thyroid drugs. While such an approach may reduce the efficacy of I-131 ablation, it can also reduce and hopefully eliminate the risk of post-ablative thyroid storm.

  12. Skin disease and thyroid autoimmunity in atopic South Italian children

    PubMed Central

    Pedullà, Marcella; Fierro, Vincenzo; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Capuano, Francesco; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Ruocco, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    AIM To verify the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity (TA) and the possible association between atopy and TA in children affected by skin disease. METHODS Three hundred and twenty-four children consecutively referred due to skin disease symptoms to our Pediatric Department were enrolled. One hundred and eighty-seven were diagnosed with atopic dermatitis (AD), 95 with acute urticaria, 40 with chronic urticaria (CU), and 2 with alopecia areata (AA). According to the work-up for atopy, the children were divided into two groups: Atopics and non-atopics. TA was diagnosed by serum thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies and/or thyroglobulin autoantibodies levels more than twice normal values over a period of two months by immunoassay. RESULTS In all children with skin disease, a significant prevalence of TA in atopics compared with non-atopics (13.67% vs 2.67%, P = 0.0016) and a significant association between TA and atopy (OR = 5.76, 95%CI: 1.71-19.35) were observed. These findings were confirmed as significant in children with AD: TA in atopics was 11.5%, while TA in non-atopics was 2.7% (P = 0.03, OR = 4.68, 95%CI: 1.02-21.38). In addition, atopics with CU showed a significantly higher prevalence of TA (26.9%), but none of the non-atopics showed CU (P = 0.0326). On the other hand, atopics with AA showed a 100% (2 out of 2) prevalence of TA, compared with none of the non-atopics. CONCLUSION In children with skin disease, atopy seems to be associated with an increased risk of TA. PMID:27610344

  13. A Genetic Risk Score for Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies Associates With Clinical Thyroid Disease in Community-Based Populations

    PubMed Central

    Schultheiss, Ulla T.; Teumer, Alexander; Medici, Marco; Li, Yong; Daya, Natalie; Chaker, Layal; Homuth, Georg; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Nauck, Matthias; Hofman, Albert; Selvin, Elizabeth; Völzke, Henry; Peeters, Robin P.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Antibodies against thyroid peroxidase (TPOAbs) are detected in 90% of all patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis, the most common cause of hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism is associated with a range of adverse outcomes. The current knowledge of its genetic underpinnings is limited. Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify novel genetic variants associated with TPOAb concentrations and positivity using genome-wide association data and to characterize their association with thyroid function and disease. Design, Setting, and Participants: We studied European ancestry participants of 3 independent prospective population-based studies: Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities study (n = 7524), Study of Health in Pomerania (n = 3803), and Study of Health in Pomerania-TREND (n = 887). Exposure: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), individually and combined into a genetic risk score (GRS), were examined. Main Outcomes: The main outcomes were TPOAb concentrations and positivity, thyroid hormone concentrations (TSH, free T4), and clinical thyroid diseases (subclinical and overt hypothyroidism and goiter). Results: Significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (P < 5 · 10−8) mapped into 4 genomic regions not previously implicated for TPOAbs (RERE, extended HLA region) and into 5 previously described loci. A higher Genetic Risk Score (GRS) based on these 9 SNPs showed strong and graded associations with higher TPOAb, TSH, and lower free T4 concentrations (P < .001). Compared with individuals in the lowest GRS quartile, those in the highest quartile had 1.80-fold higher odds of subclinical hypothyroidism (95% confidence interval, 1.27–2.55) and 1.89-fold higher odds of overt hypothyroidism (95% confidence interval, 1.24–2.87). Conclusion: The identification of 4 novel genetic loci associated with TPOAb concentrations and positivity gives further insight into the genetic underpinnings of hypothyroidism. A GRS showed strong and graded associations

  14. Thyroid "vise" in an infant with neonatal Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Regelmann, Molly O; Sullivan, Corinne K; Rapaport, Robert

    2013-10-01

    On the rare occasion when neonatal goiter is the cause of airway compromise, it typically presents with a palpable neck mass. In the setting of maternal Graves' disease (GD), fetal and neonatal goiters are most commonly caused by maternal treatment with antithyroid medication, and the goiter resolves within days of initiation of thyroxine replacement in the neonate. We describe an atypical presentation of a patient with severe neonatal GD born to a euthyroid mother at 35 weeks' gestational age with respiratory compromise, symptoms of hyperthyroidism, and a nonpalpable thyroid gland. The mother had a history of GD treated with radioactive iodine ablation; during the pregnancy she was treated with levothyroxine throughout and propylthiouracil beginning at 5 months' gestation, for fetal tachycardia. Laboratory testing after birth confirmed neonatal GD. The patient was treated with methimazole, Lugol's solution, and levothyroxine, and the patient remained euthyroid from day of life 10. After multiple extubation attempts failed, the patient was found on visualization studies to have a large, predominantly posterior, "vise-like" goiter encasing the larynx and upper trachea. The patient was successfully extubated, and all medications were discontinued on day of life 60. The patient remained euthyroid 1 month after discontinuation of treatment. The patient's atypical presentation illustrates the need for early neck imaging in patients with neonatal GD and respiratory distress, especially when the thyroid gland is not palpable. Treatment options for resolving a goiter due to neonatal GD are not clear.

  15. EVALUATION OF QUANTITATIVE THYROID SCINTIGRAPHY FOR DIAGNOSIS AND STAGING OF DISEASE SEVERITY IN CATS WITH HYPERTHYROIDISM: COMPARISON OF THE PERCENT THYROIDAL UPTAKE OF PERTECHNETATE TO THYROID-TO-SALIVARY RATIO AND THYROID-TO-BACKGROUND RATIOS.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Mark E; Guterl, Jade N; Rishniw, Mark; Broome, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid scintigraphy is commonly used for evaluation of cats with hyperthyroidism, with the thyroid-to-salivary ratio (T/S) being the most common method to quantify the degree of thyroid activity and disease. Calculation of thyroid-to-background ratios (T/B) or percent thyroidal uptake of (99m) TcO(-) 4 (TcTU) has only been reported in a few studies. The purpose of this prospective, cross-sectional study was to evaluate a number of quantitative scintigraphic indices as diagnostic tests for hyperthyroidism, including the T/S, three different T/B, TcTU, and estimated thyroid volume. Of 524 cats referred to our clinic for evaluation of suspected hyperthyroidism, the diagnosis was confirmed (n = 504) or excluded (n = 20) based on results of a serum thyroid panel consisting of thyroxine (T4 ), triiodothyronine (T3 ), free T4 (fT4 ), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations. In the hyperthyroid cats, median values for TcTU, T/S, and three T/B ratios were all significantly higher (P < 0.001) than values in euthyroid suspect cats or clinically normal cats. All scintigraphic parameters were relatively sensitive and specific as diagnostic tests for hyperthyroidism, but the T/S ratio had the highest test accuracy. The T/S ratio correlated strongly with the TcTU (r = 0.85). However, the TcTU had a higher and more significant correlation (P < 0.01) with serum T4 (r = 0.76 vs. 0.64), T3 (r = 0.77 vs. 0.64), and estimated thyroid volume (r = 0.62 vs. 0.38). Overall, calculation of TcTU is an accurate diagnostic test, but also appears to be the best parameter to predict the functional volume and metabolic activity of the feline adenomatous thyroid gland. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  16. Update on the Management of Thyroid Disease during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy can result in serious complications for both the mother and infant; however, these complications can be prevented by optimal treatment of maternal overt thyroid dysfunction. Although several studies have demonstrated that maternal subclinical hypothyroidism is associated with obstetric complications and neurocognitive impairments in offspring, there is limited evidence that levothyroxine treatment can improve these complications. Therefore, most professional societies do not recommend universal screening for thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy, and instead recommend a case-finding approach in which only high-risk women are tested. However, recent studies have estimated that targeted thyroid function testing misses approximately 30% to 55% of hypothyroidism cases in pregnant women, and some associations and researchers have recommended universal screening of pregnant women to facilitate the early detection and treatment of overt hypothyroidism. This review summarizes recent data on thyroid function test changes, thyroid functional disorder management, and thyroid screening during pregnancy. PMID:27546871

  17. Thyroid cancer following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease: a case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Moroff, S.V.; Fuks, J.Z.

    1986-01-01

    Improved survival resulting from advances in therapy in patients with Hodgkin's disease is associated with long-term morbidity, including the potential for the development of a second solid malignancy. We report a 44-year-old man with an unusually aggressive course of thyroid carcinoma 15 years after treatment for Hodgkin's disease. In a review of the English-language literature, we found 21 cases of thyroid cancer following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease, with latency periods ranging from 6 to 48 years. The development of secondary thyroid cancer after high-dose neck irradiation may be related to hypothyroidism, itself a complication of radiotherapy. Thyroid function should be measured at least once a year in all patients given neck irradiation, with initiation of thyroid hormone replacement if there is evidence of sustained hypothyroidism.

  18. Notch3 expression correlates with thyroid cancer differentiation, induces apoptosis, and predicts disease prognosis.

    PubMed

    Somnay, Yash R; Yu, Xiao-Min; Lloyd, Ricardo V; Leverson, Glen; Aburjania, Zviadi; Jang, Samuel; Jaskula-Sztul, Renata; Chen, Herbert

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid tumorigenesis is characterized by a progressive loss of differentiation exhibited by a range of disease variants. The Notch receptor family (1-4) regulates developmental progression in both normal and cancerous tissues. This study sought to characterize the third Notch isoform (Notch3) across the various differentiated states of thyroid cancer, and determine its clinical impact. Notch3 expression was analyzed in a tissue microarray of normal and pathologic thyroid biopsies from 155 patients. The functional role of Notch3 was then investigated by upregulating its expression in a follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) cell line. Notch3 expression regressed across decreasingly differentiated, increasingly malignant thyroid specimens, correlated with clinicopathological attributes reflecting poor prognosis, and independently predicted survival following univariate and multivariate analyses. Overexpression of the active Notch3 intracellular domain (NICD3) in a gain-of-function FTC line led to functional activation of centromere-binding protein 1, while increasing thyroid-specific gene transcription. NICD3 induction also reduced tumor burden in vivo and initiated the intrinsic apoptotic cascade, alongside suppressing cyclin and B-cell lymphoma 2 family expression. Loss of Notch3 expression may be fundamental to the process of dedifferentiation that accompanies thyroid oncogenesis. Conversely, activation of Notch3 in thyroid cancer exerts an antiproliferative effect and restores elements of a differentiated phenotype. These findings provide preclinical rationale for evaluating Notch3 as a disease prognosticator and therapeutic target in advanced thyroid cancer. Cancer 2017;123:769-82. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  19. The Relationship between Subclinical Thyroid Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Score in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hee Joong; Ahn, Seong Hee; Hong, Seongbin; Suh, Young Ju

    2017-10-01

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism are characterized by abnormal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) with normal free thyroxine. Subclinical thyroid diseases, to date, have received less attention compared with other thyroid diseases since they are asymptomatic. This study aimed to verify the association between subclinical thyroid diseases and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) risk score in the Korean population. This was a population-based cohort study using data collected from 3,722 subjects (aged ≥ 30 years) during the 6th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES VI; 2013-2015). Gender-specific Framingham risk scores were calculated to identify the association between subclinical thyroid diseases and 10-year CVD risk score. Complex survey, with consideration of sampling weight, was analyzed using generalized linear models after stratification by gender. The TSH reference range was between 0.61 and 6.91 mIU/L in this study. TSH showed a positive association with the 10-year CVD risk score only in the female population (P = 0.001). There were significant differences in the least squares means of 10-year CVD risk score by the effect of subclinical hypothyroidism compared with euthyroidism (normal group) in females, after adjusting for body mass index, white blood cell, and urine iodine (P = 0.006 and Bonferroni corrected P = 0.012). In conclusion, subclinical hypothyroidism is associated with increased 10-year CVD risk score in the female Korean population aged 30 years or more. Therefore, we recommend to clinically checkup major CVD risk factors in female patients with subclinical hypothyroidism aged 30 years or more. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  20. Clinical Update in Aspects of the Management of Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aspects of autoimmune thyroid disease updated in this review include: immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related thyroid disease (Riedel's thyroiditis, fibrosing variant of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, IgG4-related Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and Graves' disease with elevated IgG4 levels); recent epidemiological studies from China and Denmark indicating that excess iodine increases the incidence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and hypothyroidism; immunomodulatory agents (ipilimumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab) activate immune response by inhibiting T-cell surface receptors which down-regulate immune response, i.e., cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and programmed cell death protein 1 pathways; alemtuzumab is a humanised monoclonal antibody to CD52 which causes immune depletion and thyroid autoimmune disease especially Graves' hyperthyroidism; small molecule ligand (SML) agonists which activate receptors, SML neutral antagonists, which inhibit receptor activation by agonists, and SML inverse agonists which inhibit receptor activation by agonists and inhibit constitutive agonist independent signaling have been identified. SML antagonism of thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor stimulatory antibody could treat Graves' hyperthyroidism and Graves' ophthalmopathy; and thyroxine treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism can produce iatrogenic subclinical hyperthyroidism with the risk of atrial fibrillation and osteoporosis. The increased risk of harm from subclinical hyperthyroidism may be stronger than the potential benefit from treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism. PMID:28029020

  1. Thyrotoxicosis in a neonate of a mother with no history of thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Brookfield, D S; McCandless, A E; Smith, C S

    1976-04-01

    A newborn infant had rectal prolapse, congenital lactase deficiency, and temporary neonatal thyrotoxicosis. The thyrotoxicosis was associated with a raised long-acting thyroid stimulator index in a mother with no personal or family history of thyroid or related autoimmune disease. The parents were first cousins.

  2. The Pathophysiology of Thyroid Eye Disease (TED): Implications for Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shivani; Douglas, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of Review Thyroid eye disease (TED) is a poorly understood autoimmune manifestation most commonly associated with Graves’ disease. Current nonspecific treatment paradigms offer symptomatic improvement but fail to target the underlying pathogenic mechanisms and thus, do not significantly alter the long-term disease outcome. The purpose of this review is to provide an update of the current understanding of the immunopathogenesis of TED and explore these implications for targeted immunotherapy. Recent Findings Orbital fibroblasts are integral to the pathogenesis of TED and may modulate immune responses by production of cytokines and hyaluronan in response to activation of shared autoantigens including thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-R1). Fibrocytes share many of these phenotypic and functional features, suggesting a link between systemic and site-specific disease. Use of targeted immunotherapies in TED is limited, though data from the use Rituximab (RTX), a B cell depleting agent, are encouraging. Sustained clinical response has been seen with RTX in several reports, despite return of peripheral B cell levels to pretreatment levels. Additionally, this response appears to be independent to cytokine and antibody production, suggesting possible modulation of antigen presentation as a mechanism of its effect. Summary Progressive advances in the understanding of the immunopathogenesis of TED continue to spur clinical trials utilizing targeted immune therapies. Continued understanding of the molecular mechanisms of disease will expand potential treatments for TED patients and obviate the need for reconstructive surgical therapies. PMID:21730841

  3. Postpartum autoimmune thyroid syndrome: a model of aggravation of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Amino, N; Tada, H; Hidaka, Y

    1999-07-01

    Postpartum thyroid dysfunction is rather a common problem during the postpartum period being found in approximately 5% of mothers in the general population. It occurs from subclinical autoimmune thyroiditis that is aggravated after parturition and causes various types of thyroid dysfunction. Immune activity is physiologically suppressed during pregnancy so that the fetus is not rejected, and rebounds above the normal level after parturition. Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis also spontaneously ameliorate during pregnancy, and are often aggravated after parturition. The high-risk mothers for postpartum thyroid dysfunction are well screened by antithyroid microsomal antibody (MCAb) and 60% to 70% of MCAb-positive mothers develop postpartum thyroid dysfunction, which is transient in most cases. New onset of Graves' disease may be screened by thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) and 70% of TSAb-positive mothers develop either transient or persistent postpartum Graves' disease that usually occurs 3 to 6 months postpartum. Immune rebound after parturition may cause not only autoimmune thyroid diseases but other autoimmune diseases, which may be investigated with similar strategies to those in postpartum autoimmune thyroid disease. Thus, we found that postpartum onset of rheumatoid arthritis was found in 0.08% of women in the general population and could be partially predicted by measuring rheumatoid factors in early pregnancy. There are several case reports of other autoimmune diseases that develop after delivery; postpartum renal failure or postdelivery hemolytic-uremic syndrome, postpartum idiopathic polymyositis, postpartum syndrome with antiphospholipid antibodies, postpartum autoimmune myocarditis. Many other possible postpartum autoimmune diseases are still unexplored. Puerperal diseases should be carefully examined in relation to autoimmune abnormalities in the affected organs.

  4. Thyroid remnant ablation success and disease outcome in stage III or IV differentiated thyroid carcinoma: recombinant human thyrotropin versus thyroid hormone withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Vallejo Casas, Juan A; Mena Bares, Luisa M; Gálvez Moreno, Maria A; Moreno Ortega, Estefanía; Marlowe, Robert J; Maza Muret, Francisco R; Albalá González, María D

    2016-06-01

    Most publications to date compare outcomes after post-surgical thyroid remnant ablation stimulated by recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) versus thyroid hormone withholding/withdrawal (THW) in low-recurrence risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients. We sought to perform this comparison in high-risk patients. We retrospectively analyzed ~9-year single-center experience in 70 consecutive adults with initial UICC (Union for International Cancer Control) stage III/IV, M0 DTC undergoing rhTSH-aided (N.=54) or THW-aided (N.=16) high-activity ablation. Endpoints included ablation success and DTC outcome. Assessed ≥1 year post-ablation, ablation success comprised a) no visible scintigraphic thyroid bed uptake or pathological extra-thyroidal uptake; b) undetectable stimulated serum thyroglobulin (Tg) without interfering autoantibodies; c) both criteria. DTC outcome, determined at the latest visit, comprised either 1) "no evidence of disease" (NED): undetectable Tg, negative Tg autoantibodies, negative most recent whole-body scan, no suspicious findings clinically, on neck ultrasonography, or on other imaging; 2) persistent disease: failure to attain NED; or 3) recurrence: loss of NED. After the first ablative activity, ablation success by scintigraphic plus biochemical criteria was 64.8% in rhTSH patients, 56.3% in THW patients (P=NS). After 3.5-year versus 6.2-year median follow-up (P<0.05), DTC outcomes were NED, 85.2%, persistent disease, 13.0%, recurrence, 1.9%, in the rhTSH group and NED, 87.5%, persistent or recurrent disease, 6.3% each, in the THW group (P=NS). In patients with initial stage III/IV, M0 DTC, rhTSH-aided and THW-assisted ablation were associated with comparable remnant eradication or DTC cure rates.

  5. IL-14 and IL-16 are expressed in the thyroid of patients with either Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Elizabeth Helen; Ajjan, Ramzi A; Metcalfe, Russell A; Watson, Philip F; Weetman, Anthony P

    2015-11-01

    Cytokines have an important role in orchestrating the pathophysiology in autoimmune thyroid disease. The aim of the current study was to analyse the expression of interleukin (IL)-14 and IL-16 in the thyroid tissue of patients with Graves' disease (GD), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) or multinodular goitre (MNG) and in that of normal individuals, in patients' intrathyroidal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and in patient and normal cultured thyroid follicular cells. The expression of IL-14 and IL-16 mRNA and protein was investigated using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification, and Western blotting and ELISAs, respectively. IL-14 mRNA expression was detected in thyroid tissue from 8/9 GD, 3/4 HT and 3/13 MNG patients and 1/6 normal individuals, and IL-16 mRNA expression in thyroid tissue from 9/9 GD, 4/4 HT and 9/13 MNG patients and 4/6 normal individuals. IL-14 mRNA expression was detected in intrathyroidal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from 2/2 GD and 2/2 HT patients, while IL-16 mRNA was detected in samples from 1/2 HT patients but not in those from either patient with GD. IL-14 and IL-16 mRNA expression was found in thyroid follicular cells derived from 2/2 patient with GD and 1/1 normal individual. IL-14 protein was detected in thyroid tissue from 6/6 GD, 1/1 HT and 0/6 MNG patients and 0/6 normal individuals, and IL-16 protein in thyroid tissue from 6/6 GD, 1/1 HT and 1/6 MNG patients and 0/6 normal individuals. Expression of IL-14 protein was stimulated in thyroid follicular cells derived from two patients with GD and one normal individual by peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-conditioned medium. Treatment of thyrocytes from two patients with GD and one normal individual with PBMC-conditioned medium and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α stimulated IL-16 protein expression. In normal thyrocytes, IL-16 protein synthesis was induced also by IL-1β, IL-17A, IL-4 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. The data provide evidence that the

  6. Increased Incidence of Thyroid Disease in Patients with Celiac Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xin; Lu, Li; Yang, Rong; Li, Yanbin; Shan, Ling; Wang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of thyroid disease is likely increased among individuals with celiac disease (CD). In addition, exposure to gluten-free treatment may be associated with a risk of thyroid disease, but this association remains controversial. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the association between thyroid disease and CD. The articles were obtained from the PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and Chinese WanFang bibliographical databases for the period up to May 2016. The results were analysed in a meta-analysis with odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). There were 13 articles in this meta-analysis, including 15629 CD cases and 79342 controls. Overall, the prevalence of thyroid disease in patients with CD was significantly increased compared with that in the control groups (OR 3.08, 95% CI 2.67–3.56, P<0.001). Moreover, there was no significant difference in the OR between the gluten-treated and untreated groups (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.61–1.92, P = 0.786). The results of our meta-analysis support the hypothesis that the prevalence of thyroid disease in patients with CD is increased compared with that in controls, which suggests that CD patients should be screened for thyroid disease. The effect of gluten-free treatment on thyroid disease needs further investigation. PMID:28030626

  7. Simultaneous occurrence of diabetic ketoacidosis, thyroid storm, and multiple cerebral infarctions due to Moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Noh, Byoungho H; Cho, Sang-Won; Ahn, Sung Yeon

    2016-02-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the precipitating factors that can evoke a thyroid storm. Thyroid storm may cause cerebral ischemia in Moyamoya disease, which can coexist in patients with Graves' disease. A 16-year-old girl complaining of dizziness and palpitations visited the emergency department and was diagnosed with DKA combined with hyperthyroidism. A thyroid storm occurred 6 h after the start of DKA management. Her Burch and Wartofsky score was 65 points. Right hemiplegia developed during the thyroid storm, and brain magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted images revealed multiple acute infarcts in both hemispheres. MR angiography showed stenosis of both distal internal carotid arteries and both M1 portions of the middle cerebral arteries, consistent with Moyamoya disease. After acute management for the thyroid storm with methimazole, Lugol solution and hydrocortisone, the patient's neurological symptoms completely resolved within 1 month, and free T4 level normalized within 2 months. Thyroid storm may trigger cerebral ischemia in Moyamoya disease and lead to rapid progression of cerebrovascular occlusive disease. As a simultaneous occurrence of DKA, thyroid storm and cerebrovascular accident in Moyamoya disease highly elevates morbidity and mortality, prompt recognition and management are critical to save the patient's life.

  8. Socioeconomic Disparities in the Presentation and Treatment of Graves' Disease and Thyroid Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Vargason, Caroline W; Chelnis, James G; Barahimi, Behin I; Mawn, Louise A

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is an inflammatory, autoimmune orbitopathy with multifactorial etiology. Clinical presentation of TED spans a range from mild surface irritation to vision threatening compressive optic neuropathy. Potential vision loss underscores the importance of understanding genetic and environmental factors influencing the severity of TED presentation. This review will describe the classic risk factors for TED, outline treatments for Graves' disease (GD) and TED, and describe newer evidence of socioeconomic disparities in TED presentation.

  9. Radiation dose-response relationships for thyroid nodules and autoimmune thyroid diseases in Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors 55-58 years after radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Misa; Usa, Toshiro; Tominaga, Tan; Neriishi, Kazuo; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Nakashima, Eiji; Ashizawa, Kiyoto; Hida, Ayumi; Soda, Midori; Fujiwara, Saeko; Yamada, Michiko; Ejima, Eri; Yokoyama, Naokata; Okubo, Masamichi; Sugino, Keizo; Suzuki, Gen; Maeda, Renju; Nagataki, Shigenobu; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2006-03-01

    Effects of irradiation on thyroid diseases such as thyroid nodules and autoimmune thyroid diseases have not been evaluated among people exposed to radiation more than 50 years in the past. To evaluate the prevalence of thyroid diseases and their radiation-dose responses in atomic bomb survivors. Survey study comprising 4091 cohort members (mean age, 70 [SD, 9] years; 1352 men and 2739 women) who participated in the thyroid study at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Thyroid examinations were conducted between March 2000 and February 2003. Prevalence of thyroid diseases, including thyroid nodules (malignant and benign) and autoimmune thyroid diseases, and the dose-response relationship of atomic bomb radiation in each thyroid disease. Thyroid diseases were identified in 1833 (44.8%) of the total participants (436 men [32.2% of men] and 1397 women [51.0% of women]) (P<.001). In 3185 participants, excluding persons exposed in utero, not in the city at the time of the atomic bombings, or with unknown radiation dose, the prevalence of all solid nodules, malignant tumors, benign nodules, and cysts was 14.6%, 2.2%, 4.9%, and 7.7%, respectively. The prevalence of positive thyroid antibodies, antithyroid antibody-positive hypothyroidism, and Graves disease was 28.2%, 3.2%, and 1.2%, respectively. A significant linear dose-response relationship was observed for the prevalence of all solid nodules, malignant tumors, benign nodules, and cysts (P<.001). We estimate that about 28% of all solid nodules, 37% of malignant tumors, 31% of benign nodules, and 25% of cysts are associated with radiation exposure at a mean and median thyroid radiation dose of 0.449 Sv and 0.087 Sv, respectively. No significant dose-response relationship was observed for positive antithyroid antibodies (P = .20), antithyroid antibody-positive hypothyroidism (P = .92), or Graves disease (P = .10). A significant linear radiation dose response for thyroid nodules, including malignant tumors and

  10. Technetium-99m thyroid scan; does it have a diagnostic aid in sub-clinical auto-immune thyroid disease in systemic lupus erythematosus patients?

    PubMed

    Amin, A; Alkemary, A; Abdo, M; Salama, M

    2016-02-01

    Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) thyroid scintigraphy is a well known diagnostic tool that shows the entire gland in a single image. We aimed to evaluate its additive diagnostic value in subclinical autoimmune thyroid disease (S-AITD) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. We investigated 100 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients without overt thyroid involvement (eight men and 92 women; mean age 40±6.5 years) and 50 age and sex matched controls. All were subjected to thyroid evaluation using anti-thyroglobulin (anti-TG) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibodies; hormones (FT3; FT4 and TSH) and Tc-99m thyroid scintigraphy. 14/100 (14%) and none (0%) were positive for S-AITD in SLE and control groups, respectively (P = 0.0001). They were classified by thyroid scintigraphy and hormonal profile into 2/14 Hashimoto; 10/14 atrophic thyroiditis and 2/14 Graves' disease. Anti-TPO was elevated in 12 SLE cases, while anti-TG was elevated in only 2/14 (P = 0.0001). Thyroid scintigraphy showed statistically significant associations with FT4, TSH and anti-TPO. Tc-99m thyroid scintigraphy may have an additional diagnostic role in S-AITD among SLE patients, with an impact on patient management. This potential needs to be further evaluated in a larger series on a multicenter basis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Iodine Excess as an Environmental Risk Factor for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuqian; Kawashima, Akira; Ishido, Yuko; Yoshihara, Aya; Oda, Kenzaburo; Hiroi, Naoki; Ito, Tetsuhide; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    The global effort to prevent iodine deficiency disorders through iodine supplementation, such as universal salt iodization, has achieved impressive progress during the last few decades. However, iodine excess, due to extensive environmental iodine exposure in addition to poor monitoring, is currently a more frequent occurrence than iodine deficiency. Iodine excess is a precipitating environmental factor in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease. Excessive amounts of iodide have been linked to the development of autoimmune thyroiditis in humans and animals, while intrathyroidal depletion of iodine prevents disease in animal strains susceptible to severe thyroiditis. Although the mechanisms by which iodide induces thyroiditis are still unclear, several mechanisms have been proposed: (1) excess iodine induces the production of cytokines and chemokines that can recruit immunocompetent cells to the thyroid; (2) processing excess iodine in thyroid epithelial cells may result in elevated levels of oxidative stress, leading to harmful lipid oxidation and thyroid tissue injuries; and (3) iodine incorporation in the protein chain of thyroglobulin may augment the antigenicity of this molecule. This review will summarize the current knowledge regarding excess iodide as an environmental toxicant and relate it to the development of autoimmune thyroid disease. PMID:25050783

  12. Iodine excess as an environmental risk factor for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuqian; Kawashima, Akira; Ishido, Yuko; Yoshihara, Aya; Oda, Kenzaburo; Hiroi, Naoki; Ito, Tetsuhide; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2014-07-21

    The global effort to prevent iodine deficiency disorders through iodine supplementation, such as universal salt iodization, has achieved impressive progress during the last few decades. However, iodine excess, due to extensive environmental iodine exposure in addition to poor monitoring, is currently a more frequent occurrence than iodine deficiency. Iodine excess is a precipitating environmental factor in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease. Excessive amounts of iodide have been linked to the development of autoimmune thyroiditis in humans and animals, while intrathyroidal depletion of iodine prevents disease in animal strains susceptible to severe thyroiditis. Although the mechanisms by which iodide induces thyroiditis are still unclear, several mechanisms have been proposed: (1) excess iodine induces the production of cytokines and chemokines that can recruit immunocompetent cells to the thyroid; (2) processing excess iodine in thyroid epithelial cells may result in elevated levels of oxidative stress, leading to harmful lipid oxidation and thyroid tissue injuries; and (3) iodine incorporation in the protein chain of thyroglobulin may augment the antigenicity of this molecule. This review will summarize the current knowledge regarding excess iodide as an environmental toxicant and relate it to the development of autoimmune thyroid disease.

  13. The microbiota and autoimmunity: Their role in thyroid autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Köhling, Hedda L; Plummer, Sue F; Marchesi, Julian R; Davidge, Kelly S; Ludgate, Marian

    2017-07-06

    Since the 1970s, the role of infectious diseases in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease (GD) has been an object of intensive research. The last decade has witnessed many studies on Yersinia enterocolitica, Helicobacter pylori and other bacterial organisms and their potential impact on GD. Retrospective, prospective and molecular binding studies have been performed with contrary outcomes. Until now it is not clear whether bacterial infections can trigger autoimmune thyroid disease. Common risk factors for GD (gender, smoking, stress, and pregnancy) reveal profound changes in the bacterial communities of the gut compared to that of healthy controls but a pathogenetic link between GD and dysbiosis has not yet been fully elucidated. Conventional bacterial culture, in vitro models, next generation and high-throughput DNA sequencing are applicable methods to assess the impact of bacteria in disease onset and development. Further studies on the involvement of bacteria in GD are needed and may contribute to the understanding of pathogenetic processes. This review will examine available evidence on the subject. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Thyroid Antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... blocking production of thyroid hormones and resulting in hypothyroidism . TBII is not routinely tested, but TSI is ... autoimmune disease . A low level of thyroid hormones ( hypothyroidism ) can cause symptoms, such as: Weight gain Fatigue ...

  15. Total Thyroidectomy for Benign Thyroid Diseases: What is the Price to be Paid?

    PubMed Central

    Gangappa, Rajashekara Babu; Chowdary, Prashanth Basappa; Patanki, Adithya Malolan; Ishwar, Mahalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Total thyroidectomy has been used to treat patients with malignant thyroid disease. But for patients with benign thyroid disease, the safety and efficacy of total thyroidectomy is a matter of debate. Subtotal thyroidectomy that was previously the treatment of choice for benign thyroid disease has been associated with high recurrence rates. The risk of permanent complications is greatly increased in patients who undergo surgery for recurrence of benign thyroid disease. Total thyroidectomy is an operation that can be safely performed, with low incidence of permanent complications, which allows one to broaden its indications in various benign thyroid diseases, thus avoiding future recurrences and reoperations. Aim To assess the benefits of total thyroidectomy for benign thyroid diseases. Materials and Methods This randomized prospective study was conducted between Feb 2013 and Nov 2014 in the Department of General Surgery at Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute. It included 116 patients undergoing total thyroidectomy procedure for benign thyroid disease. All cases were followed-up for a period of 6 months for incidence of RLN palsy, hypoparathyroidism, disease recurrence and number of incidental malignancies detected on postoperative histological analyses of the thyroid specimens. Results Most of the patients were in the third decade of their lives. The female to male ratio was 6.7:1. Total thyroidectomy was done for 116 benign thyroid diseases with multinodular goiter as the most common diagnosis. The incidence of postoperative hypocalcaemia was 16.37% (however, only 1 patient developed permanent hypocalcaemia) and that of wound infection was 2.58% and seroma formation was 2.58%. None of the patients included in this study had haematoma formation or RLN paralysis. An incidental malignancy was identified in 11.20% patients. Conclusion Total thyroidectomy shows benefits in eradicating multinodular goiter, alleviating Grave’s opthalmopathy

  16. [Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of thyroid disease and their utility].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Koshi; Mori, Masatomo

    2012-11-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is a common disorder in daily clinical practice, however due to unspecific and diverse symptoms of the disease, it is sometimes hard to make a definite diagnosis. Japan thyroid association (JTA) published 'Guideline for the diagnosis of thyroid disease, 2010' and it is open to the public on the JTA website(http : //www.japanthyroid.jp/doctor/ guideline/japanese.html). English version of the guideline is also available. JTA also published 'Guideline for the management of subclinical hypothyroidism 2008' and 'Guideline for the diagnosis of thyroid storm, version 2'. The latter in English version has been published in Thyroid(http : //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22494618). The utility of these guidelines is discussed.

  17. Thyroid storm associated with Graves' disease covered by diabetic ketoacidosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Thyroid storm is a condition in which multiple organ dysfunction results from failure of the compensatory mechanisms of the body owing to excessive thyroid hormone activity induced by some factors in patients with thyrotoxicosis. While diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an important trigger for thyroid storm, simultaneous development of DKA and thyroid storm is rare. Case presentation A 59-year-old woman with no history of either diabetes mellitus or thyroid disease presented to our hospital because of developing nausea, vomiting and diarrhea for 2 days. Physical examination showed mild disturbance of consciousness, fever, and tachycardia. There were no other signs of thyrotoxicosis. Laboratory studies revealed elevation of random blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin, strongly positive of urine acetone, and metabolic acidosis. Since DKA was diagnosed, we initiated the patient on treatment with administration of insulin and adequate fluid replacement. Although the hyperglycemia and acidosis were immediately relieved, the disturbance of consciousness and tachycardia remained persistent. Levels of FT3 and FT4 were extremely high and TSH was below the detectable limit. TRAb was positive. The thyroid storm score of Burch & Wartofsky was 75/140, and the thyroid storm diagnostic criteria of the Japan Thyroid Association were satisfied. Oral administration of thiamazole, potassium iodide and propranolol resulted in immediate relief of the tachycardia. Discussion We encountered a case of thyroid storm associated with Graves' disease covered by DKA. Thyroid storm and DKA are both potentially fatal, and the prognosis varies depending on whether or not these conditions are detected and treated sufficiently early. The thyroid storm diagnostic criteria prepared in 2008 by the Japan Thyroid Association are very simple as compared to the Burch & Wartofsky scoring system for thyroid storm. The Japanese criteria may be useful in the diagnosis of this condition since they

  18. Psychiatric Symptoms due to Thyroid Disease in a Female Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Capetillo-Ventura, Nelly; Baeza, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is involved in the production of thyroid hormone which is needed to maintain the normal functioning of various organs and systems, including the central nervous system. This study reports a case of hypothyroidism in a fifteen-year-old female adolescent who was attended for psychiatric symptoms. This case reveals the importance of evaluating thyroid function in children and adolescents with neuropsychiatric symptoms. PMID:25436160

  19. [Pernicious anemia and autoimmune thyroid diseases in elderly people].

    PubMed

    Velarde-Mayol, Cristina; de la Hoz-García, Benito; del Cañizo-Fernández-Roldán, Carlos; Hernández-López, Alba Marina; Loza-Candia, Isabel; Cardona-Hernández, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD), and pernicious anemia (PA) in particular, are common in elderly people. The relationship between both of these is currently being discussed. The objective of this study is to determine the correlation between ATD and PA in elderly people, and if there are other associated factors affecting this relationship. The factors studied to analyse this association were social-health variables, autoimmune comorbidity (type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases), the taking of drugs that alter vitamin B12 levels (Metformin and protein bomb inhibitors), and the chronological order in which both diseases appear in this population. A logistic regression analysis was performed to determine which of the described variables could have an on both diseases. The prevalence was 8.2% for ATD and 3.3% for PA, with a progressive increase in the annual incidence in the past 10 years from 7.1 to 12.7 cases per 1,000 persons>65 years for ATI, and from 1.6 to 7.4 cases for PA. PA was found in 18.6% of the patients with ATD, and the 45% of PA presented with ATD, mainly in women (RR=6.0). The average time in diagnosing the second disease was about 8 years. When there was a third autoimmune disease the likelihood of ATD and PA increased fourfold. Patients with ATD and consuming drugs which were affecting the absorption of vitamin B12 had double the probability of developing a PA compared with those who were not taking medications. The results of this study confirm the association between ATI and AP among people 65 or older, also a progressive increase in the incidence of these diseases. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. PBDE flame retardants, thyroid disease, and menopausal status in U.S. women.

    PubMed

    Allen, Joseph G; Gale, Sara; Zoeller, R Thomas; Spengler, John D; Birnbaum, Linda; McNeely, Eileen

    2016-05-24

    Women have elevated rates of thyroid disease compared to men. Environmental toxicants have been implicated as contributors to this dimorphism, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), flame retardant chemicals that disrupt thyroid hormone action. PBDEs have also been implicated in the disruption of estrogenic activity, and estrogen levels regulate thyroid hormones. Post-menopausal women may therefore be particularly vulnerable to PBDE induced thyroid effects, given low estrogen reserves. The objective of this study was to test for an association between serum PBDE concentrations and thyroid disease in women from the United States (U.S.), stratified by menopause status. Serum PBDE concentrations (BDEs 47, 99, 100 and 153) from the National Health and Examination Survey (NHANES) and reports on thyroid problems were available in the NHANES 2003-2004 cycle. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using multivariate logistic regression models accounting for population-weighted survey techniques and controlling for age, body mass index (BMI), education, smoking, alcohol consumption and thyroid medication. Menopause status was obtained by self-reported absence of menstruation in the previous 12 months and declared menopause. Women in the highest quartile of serum concentrations for BDEs 47, 99, and 100 had increased odds of currently having thyroid disease (ORs: 1.5, 1.8, 1.5, respectively) compared to the reference group (1st and 2nd quartiles combined); stronger associations were observed when the analysis was restricted to postmenopausal women (ORs: 2.2, 3.6, 2.0, respectively). Exposure to BDEs 47, 99, and 100 is associated with thyroid disease in a national sample of U.S. women, with greater effects observed post-menopause, suggesting that the disruption of thyroid signaling by PBDEs may be enhanced by the altered estrogen levels during menopause.

  1. Low Population Selenium Status Is Associated With Increased Prevalence of Thyroid Disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Rayman, Margaret P; Lv, Hongjun; Schomburg, Lutz; Cui, Bo; Gao, Chuqi; Chen, Pu; Zhuang, Guihua; Zhang, Zhenan; Peng, Xiaogang; Li, Hua; Zhao, Yang; He, Xiaohong; Zeng, Gaoyuan; Qin, Fei; Hou, Peng; Shi, Bingyin

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have supported the premise that an adequate selenium intake is essential for thyroid gland function. The objective was to investigate whether the prevalence of thyroid disease differed in two areas that were similar, except for very different soil/crop selenium concentrations. Cross-sectional observational study. The setting was two counties of Shaanxi Province, China, here defined as adequate- and low-selenium. A total of 6152 participants were selected by stratified cluster-sampling. Participants completed demographic and dietary questionnaires and underwent physical and thyroid ultrasound examinations. Serum samples were analyzed for thyroid function parameters and selenium concentration. Serum selenium was compared between different demographic, dietary, and lifestyle categories in the two counties. The relationship between selenium status, dietary factors, and pathological thyroid conditions was explored by logistic regression. Complete data sets were available from 3038 adequate-selenium participants and 3114 low-selenium participants in whom median (interquartile range) selenium concentrations differed almost 2-fold (103.6 [79.7, 135.9] vs 57.4 [39.4, 82.1] μg/L; P = .001). The prevalence of pathological thyroid conditions (hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism, autoimmune thyroiditis, and enlarged thyroid) was significantly lower in the adequate-selenium county than in the low-selenium county (18.0 vs 30.5%; P < .001). Higher serum selenium was associated with lower odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of autoimmune thyroiditis (0.47; 0.35, 0.65), subclinical hypothyroidism (0.68; 0.58, 0.93), hypothyroidism (0.75; 0.63, 0.90), and enlarged thyroid (0.75; 0.59, 0.97). Low selenium status is associated with increased risk of thyroid disease. Increased selenium intake may reduce the risk in areas of low selenium intake that exist not only in China but also in many other parts of the world.

  2. CTLA-4 gene polymorphisms and their influence on predisposition to autoimmune thyroid diseases (Graves’ disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis)

    PubMed Central

    Pastuszak-Lewandoska, Dorota; Sewerynek, Ewa; Domańska, Daria; Gładyś, Aleksandra; Skrzypczak, Renata

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is associated with both genetic and environmental factors which lead to the overactivity of immune system. Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA-4) gene polymorphisms belong to the main genetic factors determining the susceptibility to AITD (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT and Graves' disease, GD) development. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between CTLA-4 polymorphisms (A49G, 1822 C/T and CT60 A/G) and HT and/or GD in Polish patients. Material and methods Molecular analysis involved AITD group, consisting of HT (n=28) and GD (n=14) patients, and a control group of healthy persons (n=20). Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood and CTLA-4 polymorphisms were assessed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method, using three restriction enzymes: Fnu4HI (A49G), BsmAI (1822 C/T) and BsaAI (CT60 A/G). Results Statistical analysis (χ2 test) confirmed significant differences between the studied groups concerning CTLA-4 A49G genotypes. CTLA-4 A/G genotype was significantly more frequent in AITD group and OR analysis suggested that it might increase the susceptibility to HT. In GD patients, OR analysis revealed statistically significant relationship with the presence of G allele. In controls, CTLA-4 A/A genotype frequency was significantly increased suggesting a protective effect. There were no statistically significant differences regarding frequencies of other genotypes and polymorphic alleles of the CTLA-4 gene (1822 C/T and CT60 A/G) between the studied groups. Conclusions CTLA-4 A49G polymorphism seems to be an important genetic determinant of the risk of HT and GD in Polish patients. PMID:22851994

  3. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas Roldán, Jorge; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Castellanos-de la Hoz, Juan; Giraldo-Villamil, Juliana; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladys; Cruz-Tapias, Paola; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and impact of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Eight-hundred patients were included. The association between AITD and RA was analyzed was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. In addition, a literature review was done focusing on geographical variations. Results. In our cohort the prevalence of AITD was 9.8% while the presence of antibodies was 37.8% for antithyroperoxidase enzyme (TPOAb) and 20.8% for antithyroglobulin protein (TgAb). The presence of type 2 diabetes, thrombosis, abnormal body mass index, and a high educational level was positively associated with AITD. The literature review disclosed a geographical variation of AITD in RA ranging from 0.5% to 27%. Autoantibody prevalence ranges from 6% to 31% for TgAb, 5% to 37% for TPOAb, and from 11.4% to 32% for the presence of either of the two. Conclusion. AITD is not uncommon in RA and should be systematically assessed since it is a risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These results may help to further study the common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases, to improve patients' outcome, and to define public health policies. An international consensus to accurately diagnose AITD is warranted. PMID:23209899

  4. Terminal complement complexes and C1/C1 inhibitor complexes in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed Central

    Weetman, A P; Cohen, S B; Oleesky, D A; Morgan, B P

    1989-01-01

    The potential role of complement activation and the membrane attack complex in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis has been investigated by measuring serum concentrations of the C1r-C1s-C1 inhibitor complex (C1/C1-inh) and the terminal complement complex (TCC), and by studying the binding to thyroid tissue of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against TCC neoantigens. Serum C1/C1-inh and TCC concentrations were significantly increased in 29 patients with untreated Graves' disease compared with 47 healthy subjects (P less than 0.001 for both), and decreased significantly after carbimazole treatment in 18 of these patients for whom post-treatment samples were available (P less than 0.01 and P less than 0.02, respectively). The serum TCC concentration, but not that of C1/C1-inh, was also significantly increased in 15 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis compared with the 47 healthy subjects (P less than 0.001). TCCs were identified by immunohistochemical staining around the thyroid follicles in thyroidectomy specimens from patients with Graves' disease (six out of six) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (two out of two); normal thyroid tissue from two subjects showed no staining. These results suggest a role for complement, in particular the membrane attack complex in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease. Images Fig. 3 PMID:2766576

  5. Levator excursion as a predictor of both eyelid lag and lagophthalmos in thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Lelli, Gary J; Duong, Jimmy K; Kazim, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between levator excursion and both eyelid lag and lagophthalmos in thyroid eye disease. We retrospectively reviewed 104 eyelids of 52 thyroid eye disease patients over a 9-month interval by measuring levator function (mm), eyelid lag (0-4+) and lagophthalmos (mm). Lower levator excursion is associated with higher eyelid lag scores (p < 0.001) and with greater degrees of lagophthalmos (p < 0.001). Both associations were upheld after adjustment for upper eyelid margin reflex distance and Hertel exophthalmometry (p < 0.0001). For every 1-mm decrease in levator function, eyelid lag score increases on average by 0.29 and lagophthalmos increases on average by 0.23 mm. Diminished levator excursion is associated with increasing levels of eyelid lag and lagophthalmos. Levator excursion is an important clinical measurement in thyroid eye disease patients and may replace eyelid lag grading and lagophthalmos as a more accurate indicator of eyelid retraction in thyroid eye disease.

  6. Development of minimal-change glomerular disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis during the treatment of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Ando, Fumiaki; Okado, Tomokazu; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Uchida, Shinichi; Sasaki, Sei

    2013-11-01

    Minimal-change glomerular disease, sarcoidosis and autoimmune thyroid disease rarely occur in the same patient. We herein report a patient in which minimal-change glomerular disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis developed during the treatment of sarcoidosis with steroids. A 66-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with symptoms of nephrotic syndrome. Nine months before admission, she was diagnosed as having ocular and pulmonary sarcoidosis, for which prednisolone at an initial dose of 40 mg/day was started. When the dose of prednisolone was tapered to 20 mg/day, she noticed swelling of the lower extremities. Examination confirmed the simultaneous occurrence of minimal-change glomerular disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, which were diagnosed based on kidney histology, ultrasonography of the thyroid gland and positive antithyroglobulin antibodies. We used intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by 40 mg/day oral prednisolone. The patient achieved complete remission of nephrotic syndrome and steroids were tapered without relapse.

  7. Changes in haemostasis and thrombosis associated with thyroid disease: Presentation of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Rodilla Fiz, A M; Garví López, M; Gómez Garrido, M; Girón la Casa, M

    2016-01-01

    There is a relationship between thyroid diseases and primary and secondary changes in haemostasis. The most frequent association between them are hypocoagulability states with clinical hypothyroidism and vascular thrombophilia (hypercoagulability and/or hypofibrinolysis) with hyperparathyroidism. However, there are recent studies that have detected changes in haemostasis -primary and secondary- associated with thyroid diseases with normal hormone levels, suggesting other pathogenic mechanisms not yet known. The cases are presented of 2 patients with thyroid disease that required surgery: one multinodular goitre and one papillary carcinoma of the thyroid, both with normal hormone levels. They were shown to have haemostasis disorders during the preoperative work up. These showed a Factor VII deficiency and a Factor XI deficiency along with a thrombotic disease of unknown origin, respectively.

  8. Low cardiac output thyroid storm in a girl with Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Chantra, Marut; Limsuwan, Alisa; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat

    2016-10-01

    A 15-year-old girl with Graves' disease presented with hypotension after methimazole and propranolol were re-started for hyperthyroidism. She was found to have pulmonary artery hypertension resulting in obstructive shock. Thyroid storm was diagnosed according to Burch and Wartofsky score. She was promptly treated with anti-thyroid drugs, inorganic iodide, corticosteroid, and respiratory support. Pulmonary hypertension was treated with inhaled nitric oxide until the clinical status improved. Propranolol was withdrawn due to poor cardiac function. We herein present a unique case of a difficult-to-treat Graves' disease presenting with severe pulmonary hypertension resulting in low cardiac output thyroid storm. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. Estrogen exposure, obesity and thyroid disease in women with severe pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Severe pulmonary hypertension is a lethal group of disorders which preferentially afflicts women. It appears that in recent years the patient profile has shifted towards older, obese, and postmenopausal women, suggesting that endocrine factors may be important. Several studies have revealed an increased prevalence of thyroid disease in these patients, but no studies have evaluated for a coexistence of endocrine factors. In particular, no studies have attempted to evaluate for concurrent thyroid disease, obesity and long-term estrogen exposure in patients. 88 patients attending the Pulmonary Hypertension Association 8th International meeting completed a questionnaire and were interviewed. Information was collected regarding reproductive history, height, weight, and previous diagnosis of thyroid disease. 46% met criteria for obesity. 41% reported a diagnosis of thyroid disease. 81% of women reported prior use of hormone therapy. 70% reported greater than 10 years of exogenous hormone use. 74% of female patients reported two or more of potentially disease modifying endocrine factors (obesity, thyroid disease or estrogen therapy). The coexistent high prevalence in our cohort of exogenous estrogen exposure, thyroid disease and obesity suggests that an interaction of multiple endocrine factors might contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension and may represent epigenetic modifiers in genetically-susceptible individuals. PMID:19748850

  10. (131)I treatment in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Ortega, A J M; Vázquez, R G; Cuenca, J I C; Brocca, M A M; Castilla, J; Martínez, J M M; González, E N

    2016-01-01

    Radioiodine (RAI) is a cornerstone in the treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (DTC). In patients on haemodialysis due to End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), it must be used cautiously, considering the renal clearance of this radionuclide. Also, the safety of the procedure and subsequent long-term outcome is still not well defined. In 2001, we described a dosimetric method and short-term results in three patients, with a good safety profile. We hypothesize that our method is safe in a long-term scenario without compromising the prognosis of both renal and thyroid disease. Descriptive-retrospective study. A systematic search was carried out using our clinical database from 2000 to 2014. DTC and radioiodine treatment while on haemodialysis. peritoneal dialysis. Final sample n=9 patients (n=5 males), age 48 years (median age 51 years males, 67 years female group); n=8 papillary thyroid cancer, n=1 follicular thyroid cancer; n=5 lymph node invasion; n=1 metastatic disease. Median RAI dose administered on haemodialysis 100mCi. 7.5 years after radioiodine treatment on haemodialysis, n=7 deemed free of thyroid disease, n=1 persistent non-localised disease. No complications related to the procedure or other target organs were registered. After 3.25 years, n=4 patients underwent successful renal transplantation; n=4 patients did not meet transplantation criteria due to other conditions unrelated to the thyroid disease or its treatment. One patient died due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (free of thyroid disease). Radioiodine treatment during haemodialysis is a long-term, safe procedure without worsening prognosis of either renal or thyroid disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  11. Non-Malignant Thyroid Diseases Following a Wide Range of Radiation Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Elaine; Brenner, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Background The thyroid gland is one of the most radiosensitive human organs. While it is well known that radiation exposure increases the risk of thyroid cancer, less is known about its effects in relation to non-malignant thyroid diseases. Objectives The aim of this review is to evaluate the effects of high and low dose radiation on benign structural and functional diseases of the thyroid. Methods We examined the results of major studies from cancer patients treated with high-dose radiotherapy or thyrotoxicosis patients treated with high doses of iodine-131, patients treated with moderate to high dose radiotherapy for benign diseases, persons exposed to low doses from environmental radiation and survivors of the atomic bombings who were exposed to a range of doses. We evaluated radiation effects on structural (tumors, nodules), functional (hyper- and hypothyroidism), and autoimmune thyroid diseases. Results Following a wide range of doses of ionizing radiation, an increased risk of thyroid adenomas and nodules was observed in a variety of populations and settings. The dose response appeared to be linear at low to moderate doses, but in one study there was some suggestion of a reduction in risk above 5 Gy. The elevated risk for benign tumors continues for decades following exposure. Considerably less consistent findings are available regarding functional thyroid diseases including autoimmune diseases. In general, associations for these outcomes were fairly weak and significant radiation effects were most often observed following high doses, particularly for hypothyroidism. Conclusions A significant radiation dose-response relation was demonstrated for benign nodules and follicular adenomas. The effects of radiation on functional thyroid diseases are less clear, partly due to the greater difficulties studying these diseases. PMID:21128812

  12. RET/PTC Rearrangements Are Associated with Elevated Postoperative TSH Levels and Multifocal Lesions in Papillary Thyroid Cancer without Concomitant Thyroid Benign Disease

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xuan; He, Caiyun; Ma, Jiangjun; Tang, Tao; Zhang, Xiao; Ye, Zulu; Long, Yakang; Shao, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    RET/PTC rearrangements, resulting in aberrant activity of the RET protein tyrosine kinase receptor, occur exclusively in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). In this study, we examined the association between RET/PTC rearrangements and thyroid hormone homeostasis, and explored whether concomitant diseases such as nodular goiter and Hashimoto's thyroiditis influenced this association. A total of 114 patients diagnosed with PTC were enrolled in this study. Thyroid hormone levels, clinicopathological parameters and lifestyle were obtained through medical records and surgical pathology reports. RET/PTC rearrangements were detected using TaqMan RT-PCR and validated by direct sequencing. No RET/PTC rearrangements were detected in benign thyroid tissues. RET/PTC rearrangements were detected in 23.68% (27/114) of PTC tissues. No association between thyroid function, clinicopathological parameters and lifestyle was observed either in total thyroid cancer patients or the subgroup of patients with concomitant disease. In the subgroup of PTC patients without concomitant disease, RET/PTC rearrangement was associated with multifocal cancer (P = 0.018). RET/PTC rearrangement was also correlated with higher TSH levels at one month post-surgery (P = 0.037). Based on likelihood-ratio regression analysis, the RET/PTC-positive PTC cases showed an increased risk of multifocal cancers in the thyroid gland (OR = 5.57, 95% CI, 1.39–22.33). Our findings suggest that concomitant diseases such as nodular goiter and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in PTC may be a confounding factor when examining the effects of RET/PTC rearrangements. Excluding the potential effect of this confounding factor showed that RET/PTC may confer an increased risk for the development of multifocal cancers in the thyroid gland. Aberrantly increased post-operative levels of TSH were also associated with RET/PTC rearrangement. Together, our data provides useful information for the treatment of papillary thyroid cancer. PMID

  13. RET/PTC Rearrangements Are Associated with Elevated Postoperative TSH Levels and Multifocal Lesions in Papillary Thyroid Cancer without Concomitant Thyroid Benign Disease.

    PubMed

    Su, Xuan; He, Caiyun; Ma, Jiangjun; Tang, Tao; Zhang, Xiao; Ye, Zulu; Long, Yakang; Shao, Qiong; Shao, Jianyong; Yang, Ankui

    2016-01-01

    RET/PTC rearrangements, resulting in aberrant activity of the RET protein tyrosine kinase receptor, occur exclusively in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). In this study, we examined the association between RET/PTC rearrangements and thyroid hormone homeostasis, and explored whether concomitant diseases such as nodular goiter and Hashimoto's thyroiditis influenced this association. A total of 114 patients diagnosed with PTC were enrolled in this study. Thyroid hormone levels, clinicopathological parameters and lifestyle were obtained through medical records and surgical pathology reports. RET/PTC rearrangements were detected using TaqMan RT-PCR and validated by direct sequencing. No RET/PTC rearrangements were detected in benign thyroid tissues. RET/PTC rearrangements were detected in 23.68% (27/114) of PTC tissues. No association between thyroid function, clinicopathological parameters and lifestyle was observed either in total thyroid cancer patients or the subgroup of patients with concomitant disease. In the subgroup of PTC patients without concomitant disease, RET/PTC rearrangement was associated with multifocal cancer (P = 0.018). RET/PTC rearrangement was also correlated with higher TSH levels at one month post-surgery (P = 0.037). Based on likelihood-ratio regression analysis, the RET/PTC-positive PTC cases showed an increased risk of multifocal cancers in the thyroid gland (OR = 5.57, 95% CI, 1.39-22.33). Our findings suggest that concomitant diseases such as nodular goiter and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in PTC may be a confounding factor when examining the effects of RET/PTC rearrangements. Excluding the potential effect of this confounding factor showed that RET/PTC may confer an increased risk for the development of multifocal cancers in the thyroid gland. Aberrantly increased post-operative levels of TSH were also associated with RET/PTC rearrangement. Together, our data provides useful information for the treatment of papillary thyroid cancer.

  14. A Screening Study of Thyroid Cancer and Other Thyroid Diseases among Individuals Exposed in Utero to Iodine-131 from Chernobyl Fallout

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, M.; Brenner, A.; Bogdanova, T.; Derevyanko, A.; Kuptsova, N.; Likhtarev, I.; Bouville, A.; Tereshchenko, V.; Kovgan, L.; Shpak, V.; Ostroumova, E.; Greenebaum, E.; Zablotska, L.; Ron, E.; Tronko, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Like stable iodine, radioiodines concentrate in the thyroid gland, increasing thyroid cancer risk in exposed children. Data on exposure to the embryonic/fetal thyroid are rare, raising questions about use of iodine 131 (I-131) in pregnant women. We present here estimated risks of thyroid disease from exposure in utero to I-131 fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional thyroid screening study (palpation, ultrasound, thyroid hormones, and, if indicated, fine needle aspiration) from 2003 to 2006. Participants were 2582 mother-child pairs from Ukraine in which the mother had been pregnant at the time of the accident on April 26, 1986, or 2 months after the time during which I-131 fallout was still present (1494 from contaminated areas, 1088 in the comparison group). Individual cumulative in utero thyroid dose estimates were derived from estimated I-131 activity in the mother’s thyroid (mean 72 mGy; range 0–3230 mGy). Results: There were seven cases of thyroid carcinoma and one case of Hurthle cell neoplasm identified as a result of the screening. Whereas the estimated excess odds ratio per gray for thyroid carcinoma was elevated (excess odds ratio per gray 11.66), it was not statistically significant (P = 0.12). No radiation risks were identified for other thyroid diseases. Conclusion: Our results suggest that in utero exposure to radioiodines may have increased the risk of thyroid carcinoma approximately 20 yr after the Chernobyl accident, supporting a conservative approach to medical uses of I-131 during pregnancy. PMID:19106267

  15. Risk factors for neonatal thyroid dysfunction in pregnancies complicated by Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Uenaka, Mizuki; Tanimura, Kenji; Tairaku, Shinya; Morioka, Ichiro; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Yamada, Hideto

    2014-06-01

    To determine the factors related to adverse pregnancy outcomes and neonatal thyroid dysfunction in pregnancies complicated by Graves' disease. Thirty-five pregnancies complicated by Graves' disease were divided into two groups: adverse pregnancy outcome (n=15) and no adverse pregnancy outcome (n=20). Adverse pregnancy outcomes included spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, premature delivery, fetal growth restriction, and pregnancy-induced hypertension. The 31 pregnancies resulting in live births were also divided into two groups: neonatal thyroid dysfunction (n=9) and normal neonatal thyroid function (n=22). Serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), TSH-receptor antibody (TRAb), the duration of hyperthyroidism in pregnancy, doses of antithyroid medication, and the duration of maternal antithyroid medication throughout pregnancy were compared. There were no significant differences in these factors between pregnancies with an adverse pregnancy outcome and those with no adverse pregnancy outcome. However, serum levels of FT4, TRAb, the duration of hyperthyroidism in pregnancy, the maximum daily dose of antithyroid medication, and the total dose of antithyroid medication were significantly different between pregnancies with neonatal thyroid dysfunction and those with normal neonatal thyroid function. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the FT4 level in mothers was a significant factor related to the development of neonatal thyroid dysfunction (odds ratio 28.84, 95% confidence interval 1.65-503.62, p<0.05). Graves' disease activity in women of childbearing age should be well controlled prior to conception. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Subclinical thyroid disease--should we treat, should we screen for it?].

    PubMed

    Trbojević, Bozo

    2003-01-01

    Subclinical thyroid disease is defined by an abnormally high (subclinical hypothyroidism) or low (subclinical hyperthyroidism) serum thyrotropin (TSH) with peripheral thyroid hormone concentrations within the laboratory reference ranges. Such abnormalities in thyroid function tests are very common in the population and have been extensively dealt with in textbooks and reviews. Subclinical hypothyroidism is common especially in elderly women. There is no clear evidence to date that subclinical hypothyroidism causes clinical hearth disease. However, mild thyroid gland failure, evidenced solely by elevation of the serum TSH concentration, may be associated with increased morbidity, particularly for cardiovascular disease and subtly decreased myocardial contractility. In subclinical hypothyroidism both cardiac structures and function remain normal at rest, but impaired ventricular function as well as cardiovascular and respiratory adaptation to effort may became unmasked during exercise. These changes are reversible when euthyroidism is restored. Subclinical hypothyroidism does result in small increase in low density lipoprotein cholesterol and a decrease in high density lipoprotein, changes that enhance the risk for development of atherossclerosis and coronary artery disease. Because undetected subclinical hypothyroidism during pregnancy may adversely affect the neuropsychological development and survival of the fetus and be associated with hypertension and toxemia, screening pregnant women has been advocated. In addition, data suggesting that subclinical hypothyroidism is associated with ovulatory dysfunction and infertility may make screening worthwhile in this population as well. The combination of an undetectable serum thyrotropin concentration, as measured by an assay with a threshold of detection that is 0.1 mU per liter or less, and normal serum triiodothyronine and thyroxine concentrations (usually at the upper end of the normal range) is known as subclinical

  17. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure and thyroid disease in community and worker cohorts.

    PubMed

    Winquist, Andrea; Steenland, Kyle

    2014-03-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was released from a mid-Ohio River Valley chemical plant, exposing the surrounding community to PFOA for >50 years, primarily through drinking water. Toxicological studies and some previous human studies have suggested that PFOA can disrupt thyroid homeostasis. We examined the association between PFOA and thyroid disease among community members and plant workers. Participants completed health surveys during 2008-2011. Yearly serum PFOA concentrations were estimated for each participant starting at birth or in 1952, whichever came later. We used Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by birth year, to assess adult thyroid disease hazard in relation to time-varying yearly or cumulative (sum of yearly estimates) estimated PFOA serum concentration, controlling for sex, race, education, smoking, and alcohol use. Of 32,254 participants, 3,633 reported functional thyroid disease (excluding neoplasms, congenital disease, nodules without functional changes, cysts, and unspecified type). Analyses were restricted to 2109 cases of functional thyroid disease with thyroid prescription medication use and validation through medical record review. In analyses starting at age 20 years or in 1952, thyroid disease hazard ratios across cumulative exposure quintiles were 1.00, 1.24, 1.27, 1.36, and 1.37 among women and 1.00, 1.12, 0.83, 1.01, and 1.05 among men (log-linear trend tests: P = 0.03 and P = 0.85, respectively); similar results were observed for yearly exposure. Associations were observed for hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism among women. Some subanalyses also suggested an increased hazard of hypothyroidism among men. Higher PFOA exposure was associated with incident functional thyroid disease in this large cohort with high exposure.

  18. Prevalence of macroprolactinaemia in regularly menstruating women with non-toxic goitre or autoimmune thyroid disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The so called “big-big” prolactin (Prl), also known as macroprolactin is formed by Prl-immunoglobulin (Prl-IgG) complexes and may cause elevation of serum Prl concentrations measured by standard assays, potentially leading to unnecessary investigations and/or treatment. In our study, we have endeavoured to assess the prevalence of macroprolactinaemia in euthyroid, regularly menstruating women with thyroid disease, as well as to assess whether autoimmune thyroid disease may result in an increased prevalence of macroprolactinaemia. Material and methods We measured serum Prl in 182 regularly menstruating women aged 32.7 ± 7.5 years (mean ± SD, range 17–46 years) who attended endocrine clinic either for investigation of non-toxic goitre (n = 86, age 33.2 ± 7.8 years) or with autoimmune thyroid disease (n = 96, age 32.3 ± 7.2 years). Autoimmune thyroid disease was defined as raised titre of at least one anti-thyroid antibody [anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg) and/or anti-TSH-receptor (anti-TSH-R) antibodies]. All women were clinically and biochemically euthyroid, either without or on treatment with L-thyroxine. In those with raised Prl (i.e., above 530 mIU/l) we ruled out the presence of macroprolactinaemia by polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation method. Results There was no significant age difference between women with and without autoimmune thyroid disease (p = 0.84). Raised Prl concentrations were found in 10 women with thyroid disease (5.5%), and of those a significant macroprolactinaemia (i.e., reduction of Prl concentrations of more than 60% after PEG precipitation) was found in 9 subjects (4.94%). There were no differences in the prevalence of macroprolactinaemia between women with autoimmune thyroid disease (4 out of 96), and without autoimmune thyroid disease (5 out of 86, p = 0.75). Conclusions Approximately one out of twenty women with regular menses is likely to have

  19. [Thyroid abscess revealing Graves-Basedow disease: about a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Chenguir, Meriem; Souldi, Hajar; Loufad, Fatima Zahra; Rouadi, Sami; Abada, Reda; Roubal, Mohamed; Mahtar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid abscess is a very rare clinical entity. It accounts for 0.1% of the surgical pathologies of the thyroid gland. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of the gland give it resistance to pathogens. Streptococcal and Staphylococcal are the most common. Tuberculosis is rarely reported in the literature. The occurrence of infection associated with toxic goiter is exceptional. The authors report a rare case of a 22-year-old young patient with thyroid abscess revealing a toxic goitre. He presented to our otorhinolaryngology emergency unit with anterior cervical swelling, slightly lateralized to the left, moving on swallowing, associated with hemoptysis, signs of thyroid dysfunction, fever, night sweats. Cervical CT scan showed a mass occupying the left lobe of the thyroid gland, with fluid content, measuring 2 cm and with purulent fluid collected via fine needle aspiration biopsy. Cytobacteriological examination showed Staphylococcus with positive BK test. Patient underwent chest radiograph showing right apical pulmonary alveolar. Cytobacteriological examination of sputum isolated Koch bacillus. Thyroid biological assessment was in favor of Graves-Basedow disease. The management was medical and included parenteral triple antibiotic, anti-bacillary and anti-thyroid synthesis therapy with good evolution. The diagnosis of tuberculosis should be suspected in patients with thyroid abscess formation associated with an unclear clinical picture. This is most often caused by hematogenous spread from another primary infection, particularly a pulmonary infection. The treatment is based on antibacillary drugs sometimes associated with surgery.

  20. A small subgroup of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is associated with IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Jokisch, Friedrich; Kleinlein, Irene; Haller, Bernhard; Seehaus, Tanja; Fuerst, Heinrich; Kremer, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    IgG4-related disease is a newly identified syndrome characterized by high serum IgG4 levels and increased IgG4-positive plasma cells in involved organs. The incidence of IgG4-related thyroiditis in the Caucasian population of Europe is unknown. We investigated formalin-fixed thyroid gland samples of 216 patients (191 Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 5 Riedel's thyroiditis, and 20 goiters, as controls), morphologically, and immunohistochemically. Cases were divided into two groups: IgG4-related Hashimoto's thyroiditis (24 cases) together with Riedel thyroiditis (1 case) and 171 non-IgG4-related thyroiditis. Compared to the non-IgG4-related cases, IgG4-related thyroiditis showed a higher IgG4/IgG ratio (0.6 vs. 0.1, p < 0.0001), a higher median IgG4 count (45.2 vs. 6.2, p < 0.0001), an association with younger age (42.1 vs. 48.1 years, p = 0.036), and a lower female-to-male ratio (11:1 vs. 17.5:1). Fibrous variant of Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed in 23 of the 24 IgG4-related cases (96 %) and in 13 of 167 (18 %, p > 0.001) non-IgG4-related cases. The single case of IgG4-related Riedel's thyroiditis also showed a higher median IgG4 plasma cell count (56.3 vs. 14.3) and a higher IgG4/IgG ratio (0.5 vs. 0.2) than the four cases of non-IgG4-related Riedel's thyroiditis. Our data suggests the incidence of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) of the thyroid gland in Europe is considerably lower than that observed in other studies. A significant elevation of IgG4-positive plasma cells was only found in a small group of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and then accompanied by intense fibrosis, indicating an association with IgG4-RD. Morphologically, IgG4-RD of the thyroid gland differs from that in other organ systems, exhibiting a dense fibrosis without intense eosinophilia or obliterative phlebitis.

  1. Nitrate intake and the risk of thyroid cancer and thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Ward, Mary H; Kilfoy, Briseis A; Weyer, Peter J; Anderson, Kristin E; Folsom, Aaron R; Cerhan, James R

    2010-05-01

    Nitrate is a contaminant of drinking water in agricultural areas and is found at high levels in some vegetables. Nitrate competes with uptake of iodide by the thyroid, thus potentially affecting thyroid function. We investigated the association of nitrate intake from public water supplies and diet with the risk of thyroid cancer and self-reported hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism in a cohort of 21,977 older women in Iowa who were enrolled in 1986 and who had used the same water supply for >10 years. We estimated nitrate ingestion from drinking water using a public database of nitrate measurements (1955-1988). Dietary nitrate intake was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire and levels from the published literature. Cancer incidence was determined through 2004. We found an increased risk of thyroid cancer with higher average nitrate levels in public water supplies and with longer consumption of water exceeding 5 mg/L nitrate-N (for >or=5 years at >5 mg/L, relative risk [RR] = 2.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-6.2]). We observed no association with prevalence of hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Increasing intake of dietary nitrate was associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer (highest vs. lowest quartile, RR = 2.9 [1.0-8.1]; P for trend = 0.046) and with the prevalence of hypothyroidism (odds ratio = 1.2 [95% CI = 1.1-1.4]), but not hyperthyroidism. Nitrate may play a role in the etiology of thyroid cancer and warrants further study.

  2. Use of Color Doppler Ultrasonography to Measure Thyroid Blood Flow and Differentiate Graves' Disease from Painless Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Tsujimoto, Naoyuki; Tanimoto, Keiji; Terasaki, Jungo; Amino, Nobuyuki; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds Color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) has not yet been established as a method to investigate the pathogenesis of thyrotoxicosis. Objectives Our first objective was to determine whether the measurement of peak systolic blood-flow velocity in the superior thyroid artery (STV) and thyroid tissue blood flow (TBF) using CDU could differentiate Graves' disease (GD) from painless thyroiditis (PT). The second objective was to examine the factors mediating increased blood flow to the thyroid gland in GD. Methods Recruited patients had untreated GD or PT and visited the Department of Internal Medicine (I), Osaka Medical College, between April 1, 2006 and May 31, 2010. Age, gender, blood pressure, pulse rate, thyroid-stimulating hormone, free thyroxine, tri-iodothyronine, TSH receptor antibody and thyroid volume were evaluated in patients. In addition, bilateral measurements of STV, TBF and peak systolic velocity in the common carotid artery (CCV) were also performed. TBF was quantified by calculating the ratio of blood-flow pixels to total pixels in the region of interest using sagittal section images of the thyroid gland. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine the ability of STV and TBF measurements to differentiate GD from PT. Results For the average of STV measured on both sides, the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.956. For the average of TBF measured on both sides, the AUC was 0.920. At an average STV cut-off value of 43 cm/s, the sensitivity to discriminate GD from PT was 0.87 and the specificity was 1.00. At an average TBF cut-off value of 3.8%, the sensitivity was 0.71 and the specificity was 1.00. In the GD group, neither blood pressure nor pulse rate correlated with the average STV or TBF. Moreover, there was no correlation between STV and CCV or between TBF and CCV on either side. However, STV was correlated with TBF (right side: R = 0.47; left side: R = 0.52). Conclusions The

  3. Fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of primary hydatid disease of the thyroid; first reported case in the USA.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Pavithra Irushi; Chennuri, Rohini; Tarjan, Gabor

    2016-04-01

    Echinococcosis or hydatid disease (HD) is a parasitic disease caused by species of the Echinococcus genus. Since the incidence of HD in the USA is very low and the primary HD of the thyroid is extremely rare even in endemic regions, the occurrence of primary thyroid HD is exceptional in the USA. Thyroid HD is rarely diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration (FNA). Our literature review revealed less than ten cases of primary HD of thyroid diagnosed by FNA worldwide. Hereby, we report the first case of a primary thyroid HD diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration in the USA.

  4. Clinical Relevance of Environmental Factors in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute for about 70% to 80% and environmental factors for about 20% to 30% to the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Relatives of AITD patients carry a risk to contract AITD themselves. The 5-year risk can be quantified by the so-called Thyroid Events Amsterdam-score, based on serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroid peroxidase (TPO)-antibodies and family history. Subjects at risk may ask what they can do to prevent development of AITD. This review summarizes what is known about modulation of exposure to environmental factors in terms of AITD prevention. To stop smoking decreases the risk on Graves disease but increases the risk on Hashimoto disease. Moderate alcohol intake provides some protection against both Graves and Hashimoto disease. Low selenium intake is associated with a higher prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity, but evidence that selenium supplementation may lower TPO antibodies and prevent subclinical hypothyroidism remains inconclusive. Low serum vitamin D levels are associated with a higher prevalence of TPO antibodies, but intervention studies with extra vitamin D have not been done yet. Stress may provoke Graves hyperthyroidism but not Hashimoto thyroiditis. Estrogen use have been linked to a lower prevalence of Graves disease. The postpartum period is associated with an increased risk of AITD. Taking together, preventive interventions to diminish the risk of AITD are few, not always feasible, and probably of limited efficacy. PMID:27184015

  5. Clinical Relevance of Environmental Factors in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease.

    PubMed

    Wiersinga, Wilmar M

    2016-06-01

    Genetic factors contribute for about 70% to 80% and environmental factors for about 20% to 30% to the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Relatives of AITD patients carry a risk to contract AITD themselves. The 5-year risk can be quantified by the so-called Thyroid Events Amsterdam-score, based on serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroid peroxidase (TPO)-antibodies and family history. Subjects at risk may ask what they can do to prevent development of AITD. This review summarizes what is known about modulation of exposure to environmental factors in terms of AITD prevention. To stop smoking decreases the risk on Graves disease but increases the risk on Hashimoto disease. Moderate alcohol intake provides some protection against both Graves and Hashimoto disease. Low selenium intake is associated with a higher prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity, but evidence that selenium supplementation may lower TPO antibodies and prevent subclinical hypothyroidism remains inconclusive. Low serum vitamin D levels are associated with a higher prevalence of TPO antibodies, but intervention studies with extra vitamin D have not been done yet. Stress may provoke Graves hyperthyroidism but not Hashimoto thyroiditis. Estrogen use have been linked to a lower prevalence of Graves disease. The postpartum period is associated with an increased risk of AITD. Taking together, preventive interventions to diminish the risk of AITD are few, not always feasible, and probably of limited efficacy.

  6. The role of diffusion weighted MR imaging for differentiation between Graves' disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, T; Bozgeyik, Z; Ozturk, F; Burakgazi, G; Akyol, M; Coskun, S; Ozkan, Y; Ogur, E

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) for differentation between Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Fifty patients (27 Graves diseases and 23 Hashimoto thyroiditis) and twenty healthy volunteers were examined using T1, T2 and DWMRI. The patients were diagnosed on the basis of physical findings and the results of thyroid function tests and serological tests. Circular ROIs were positioned on the bilateral thyroid lobes and isthmus. All measurements were repeated three different b values including 100, 600 and 1000 s/mm2 in all cases. ADC (Apparent diffusion coefficient) maps were calculated automatically with the MR system. Mean ADC values were 2.93 × 10-3, 1.97 × 10-3 and 1.62 × 10-3 mm2/s in the healthy volunteers; 3.47 × 10-3, 2.25 × 10-3 and 1.64 × 10-3 mm2/s in Graves' disease; 2.53 × 10-3, 1.76 × 10-3, 1.28 × 10-3 mm2/s in Hashimoto thyroiditis for b100, b600 and b1000, respectively. The ADC values of the Graves diseases were higher than healty volunteers and Hashimoto thyroiditis. ADC values were statistically significant for differentation between Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves' disease all b values (p < 0.05). DWMRI is fast sequence and does not require contrast agent. Quantitative assessment of the lesion is possible using ADC map. So, DWMRI may be useful differentiation of the Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves' disease.

  7. Risk of Thyroid Nodular Disease and Thyroid Cancer in Patients with Acromegaly – Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wolinski, Kosma; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Ruchala, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acromegaly is a quite rare chronic disease caused by the increased secretion of growth hormone (GH) and subsequently insulin - like growth factor 1. Although cardiovascular diseases remains the most common cause of mortality among acromegalic patients, increased prevalence of malignant and benign neoplasms remains a matter of debate. The aim of this study is to evaluate the risk of thyroid nodular disease (TND) and thyroid cancer in patients with acromegaly. Materials and Methods PubMed, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Cinahl, Academic Search Complete, Web of Knowledge, PubMed Central, PubMed Central Canada and Clinical Key databases were searched to identify studies containing. Random–effects model was used to calculate pooled odds ratios and risk ratios of TND in acromegaly. Studies which not included control groups were systematically reviewed. Results TND was more frequent in acromegaly than in control groups (OR = 6.9, RR = 2.1). The pooled prevalence of TND was 59.2%. Also thyroid cancer (TC) proved to be more common in acromegalic patients (OR = 7.5, RR = 7.2), prevalence was 4.3%. The pooled rate of malignancy (calculated per patient) was equal to 8.7%. Conclusions This study confirms that both TND and TC occur significantly more often in acromegalic patients than in general population. These results indicate that periodic thyroid ultrasound examination and careful evaluation of eventual lesions should be an important part of follow-up of patients with acromegaly. PMID:24551163

  8. Comorbidity of chronic spontaneous urticaria and autoimmune thyroid diseases: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kolkhir, P; Metz, M; Altrichter, S; Maurer, M

    2017-10-01

    Patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) are widely held to often have other autoimmune disorders, including autoimmune thyroid disease. Here, we systematically evaluated the literature on the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in CSU and vice versa. There is a strong link between CSU and elevated levels of IgG antithyroid autoantibodies (AAbs), with most of a large number of studies reporting rates of ≥10%. Levels of IgG against thyroid peroxidase (TPO) are more often elevated in CSU than those of other IgG antithyroid AAbs (strong evidence). Levels of IgG antithyroid AAbs are more often elevated in adult patients with CSU than in children (strong evidence). Patients with CSU exhibit significantly higher levels of IgG antithyroid AAbs (strong evidence) and IgE-anti-TPO (weak evidence) than controls. Elevated IgG antithyroid AAbs in CSU are linked to the use of glucocorticoids (weak evidence) but not to disease duration or severity/activity, gender, age, or ASST response (inconsistent evidence). Thyroid dysfunction rates are increased in patients with CSU (strong evidence). Hypothyroidism and Hashimoto's thyroiditis are more common than hyperthyroidism and Graves' disease (strong evidence). Thyroid dysfunction is more common in adult patients with CSU than in children (strong evidence) and in female than in male patients with CSU (weak evidence). Urticaria including CSU is more prevalent in patients with thyroid autoimmunity than in controls (weak evidence). CSU can improve in response to treatment with levothyroxine or other thyroid drugs (strong evidence). Pathogenic mechanisms in CSU patients with thyroid autoimmunity may include IgE against autoantigens, immune complexes, and complement. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  9. Thyroid cancer and co-occurring RET mutations in Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Valtter B; Pukkala, Eero; Kivisaari, Reetta; Salo, Perttu P; Koivusalo, Antti; Arola, Johanna; Miettinen, Päivi J; Rintala, Risto J; Perola, Markus; Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the occurrence of thyroid cancer and co-occurring RET mutations in a population-based cohort of adult Hirschsprung disease (HD) patients. All 156 patients operated for HD in a tertiary center during 1950-1986 were followed for thyroid malignancies up to 2010 through the nationwide Finnish Cancer Registry. Ninety-one individuals participated in clinical and genetic screening, which included serum calcitonin and thyroid ultrasound (US) with cytology. Exons 10, 11, 13, and 16 were sequenced in all, and all exons of RET in 43 of the subjects, including those with thyroid cancer, RET mutations, suspicious clinical findings, and familial or long-segment disease. Through the cancer registry, two cases (aged 35 and 37 years) of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) were observed; the incidence for MTC was 340-fold (95% CI 52-1600) compared with average population. These individuals had C611R and C620R mutations in exon 10. One papillary thyroid cancer without RET mutations was detected by clinical screening. Four subjects (aged 31-50 years) with co-occurring RET mutations in exons 10 (C609R; n=1) and 13 (Y791F, n=3) had sporadic short-segment HD with normal thyroid US and serum calcitonin. Three novel mutations and five single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found outside exons 10 and 13 without associated signs of thyroid cancer. MTC-associated RET mutations were restricted to exons 10 and 13 affecting ∼5% of unselected adults with HD. Clinical thyroid assessment did not improve accuracy of genetic screening, which should not be limited to patients with familial or long-segment disease.

  10. Thyroid disease and its treatment: short- and long-term consequences.

    PubMed

    Franklyn, J A

    1999-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is common, with up to 5% of the population affected by hyper- or hypothyroidism. Short-term effects of overt thyroid dysfunction are well recognised: for example, effects of hyperthyroidism on pulse rate or blood pressure and effects of hypothyroidism on lipids. There is now also increasing evidence for long-term morbidity and mortality associated with thyroid dysfunction. This includes an increased likelihood of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular mortality in subjects with previous thyrotoxicosis treated with radioiodine, and of osteoporotic fracture of the femur in those with previous thyrotoxicosis. Subclinical or mild thyroid dysfunction may also be associated with long-term effects, with evidence for increased risk of atrial fibrillation in those with subclinical hyperthyroidism. Treatment for thyroid disease may also cause long-term problems. The cancer risk associated with therapeutic radioiodine for hyperthyroidism has been investigated extensively. Our own studies reveal no increase in cancer diagnoses or deaths, apart from a small increase in thyroid cancer risk which may be associated with the underlying thyroid disease.

  11. Radiologic Parameters of Orbital Bone Remodeling in Thyroid Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Tan, Nicholas Y Q; Leong, Yuan-Yuh; Lang, Stephanie S; Htoon, Zin M; Young, Stephanie M; Sundar, Gangadhara

    2017-05-01

    To radiologically examine for the presence of bony remodeling of the orbit in thyroid eye disease (TED). Computed tomography (CT) scans of 248 orbits of 124 patients with TED and 185 orbits of 138 controls were retrospectively reviewed, and the following parameters measured: the angle of the inferomedial orbital strut (AIOS), the angle of the medial wall (AMW), and the diameters of the extraocular muscles. The association of TED with the AIOS or AMW was analyzed with linear regression models, and the correlations between the AMW or AIOS measurements with the extraocular muscle measurements were determined. Overall, the AIOS was found to be larger (P < 0.001) and the AMW smaller (P = 0.045) in patients with TED compared to controls. After adjusting for age and sex, the larger AIOS in TED remained significant (P < 0.001), but the smaller AMW in TED patients was no longer significant (P = 0.07). There was a negative correlation between AMW and the calculated average cross-sectional area of the medial rectus in TED (r = -0.23, P = 0.01). A difference in the structure of the bony orbit in TED compared to controls may be demonstrated by the AIOS and AMW radiological parameters. This likely represents the presence of bony remodeling in TED, which may be related to the expansion of the intraorbital soft tissue volume.

  12. Prevalent Practices of Thyroid Diseases During Pregnancy Among Endocrinologists, Internists and General Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Fereidoun; Mehran, Ladan; Amouzegar, Atieh; Alamdari, Shahram; Subetki, Imam; Saadat, Navid; Moini, Siamak; Sarvghadi, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Maternal thyroid disease in pregnancy is associated with adverse impact on both mother and fetus. Both the American thyroid association and the endocrine society have recently published guidelines for the management of thyroid disease in pregnancy. Objectives: The objective of this survey was to assess and compare the current practices of various East-Asian physicians in the screening and management of thyroid disease in pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Completed survey questionnaires were collected from 112 physicians of six East-Asian countries. The survey was based on clinical case scenarios, asking questions about the clinical practices related to diagnosis and management of thyroid disease during pregnancy. Reponses from 76 endocrinologists and 33 internists and general practitioners (generalists) were analyzed. Results: There were minor differences in treatment preferences for Graves’ disease in pregnancy and tests to monitor antithyroid drugs between endocrinologists and generalists; the major difference being targeted free thyroxin, and also thyroxin, depicted in the upper end of normal range, by the majority of endocrinologist and within the normal range, by generalists. Compared to generalists, endocrinologists perform more targeted screening and are more familiar with its risk factors. Predominantly, endocrinologists increase levothyroxine dose in hypothyroid women, upon confirmation of pregnancy and also indicate full dose in a pregnant woman, diagnosed with overt hypothyroidism, and treat thyroid peroxidase antibody positive or negative pregnant women with thyroid stimulating hormone (2.5 - 5 mU/L), as compared to generalists. Conclusions: There is wide variation in the clinical practices of screening and management of thyroid disorders during pregnancy in East-Asia, with many clinicians, in particular general practitioners, not adhering to clinical practice guidelines, unfortunately. PMID:27274337

  13. Response of newborn foals with thyroid musculoskeletal disease to adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH).

    PubMed

    Card, C E; Manning, S T

    2000-01-01

    Fetal maturation and equine parturition are not understood fully, although the adrenal and thyroid glands are thought to have regulatory roles. Thyroidectomized equine fetuses undergo prolonged gestation, and spontaneous diseases such as thyroid musculoskeletal disease and gestational fescue endophyte exposure are also associated with delayed parturition. Thyroid musculoskeletal disease is characterized by: histologically hyperplastic thyroid glands, chondro-osseous dysplasia and dysgenesis, angular limb deformity, low resting thyroxine and triiodothyronine concentrations, and lack of response to thyroid stimulating hormone. There are also similarities between foals born to mares grazing fescue grass infected with endophytes and foals with thyroid musculoskeletal disease (TH-MSD foals). It is thought that there may be an endocrine basis for the prolonged gestation observed in these disease states. The aim of the present study was to determine the endocrine competence of the adrenal gland in TH-MSD foals. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) response tests were used to compare the functional ability of the neonatal adrenal gland in healthy foals and TH-MSD foals. Basal thyroxine concentrations were significantly different between groups (P < 0.02): the thyroxine concentrations were lower in TH-MSD foals. After ACTH administration there was a significant effect of time (P < or = 0.001), but not treatment, on cortisol concentrations in foals. Thyroid hormone deficiency in TH-MSD foals did not significantly affect adrenal cortical secretion after ACTH administration. This finding indicates that thyroid function may play a major role in the timing of parturition either directly or indirectly via a mechanism other than by influencing adrenal responsiveness to ACTH.

  14. Modern concepts of preoperative preparation of patients with thyroid gland disease.

    PubMed

    Sabljak, Vera; Kalezić, Nevena; Ivanović, Branislava; Zivaljević, Vladan; Diklić, Aleksandar; Paunović, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Preoperative evaluation of patients with thyroid land disease, in any kind of surgery, should include the possibility of difficult intubation caused by thyromegaly, the hormonal status (its disbalance), as well as the screening, and therapy of consequences of thyroid imbalance on specific organ systems, especially cardiovascular. It is necessary to select the adequate anesthetics and other pharmacological agents, according to current hormonal status. It is also necessary to select the adequate medications and other therapeutic measures for prevention and treatment of possible complications in perioperative period, some of which are life-threatening (thyroid storm and mixedema coma).

  15. Thyroid disease in pregnancy. ACOG Technical Bulletin Number 181--June 1993.

    PubMed

    1993-10-01

    To accurately evaluate thyroid disorders in pregnancy, the physician must understand the physiologic changes that occur both in thyroid gland size and in thyroid function tests. The effect of thyrotoxicosis on pregnancy outcome largely depends on whether metabolic control is achieved. Women who become euthyroid on treatment usually can expect satisfactory outcomes. Propylthiouracil is considered to be the drug of choice for treating thyrotoxicosis during pregnancy. Because of the significant risk of hypothyroidism and obvious goiter in the infant, the use of iodide should be reserved for severe disease, such as thyroid storm or heart failure. Thyrotoxic infants may need antithyroid treatment until TSAbs are metabolized. Since overt hypothyroidism is often associated with infertility, it is uncommon in pregnancy. Hypothyroid women who do become pregnant, however, have an increased risk of low-birth-weight or stillborn infants. These women may require a greater dosage of thyroid hormone during pregnancy. The effects of subclinical hypothyroidism are not well defined. Accordingly, the need for treatment hinges on the woman's clinical history. Infants of hypothyroid mothers usually show no evidence of thyroid dysfunction, but those who are hypothyroid should receive prompt thyroid replacement therapy. To minimize the sequelae of congenital hypothyroidism, mass screening of infants and prompt treatment of those affected is recommended. During pregnancy, thyroid nodules should be evaluated by ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration or tissue biopsy. Radioiodine scanning should be avoided during pregnancy. If thyroid cancer is diagnosed, pregnancy should not delay treatment. Because postpartum thyroid dysfunction is fairly common yet difficult to detect, physicians and patients should be aware of the symptoms and risk factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in children with celiac disease compared to healthy 12-year olds.

    PubMed

    van der Pals, Maria; Ivarsson, Anneli; Norström, Fredrik; Högberg, Lotta; Svensson, Johan; Carlsson, Annelie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have suggested a correlation between untreated celiac disease and risk for other autoimmune diseases. We investigated the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in 12-year-old children (i) with symptomatic celiac disease diagnosed and treated with a gluten-free diet, (ii) with screening-detected untreated celiac disease, and (iii) without celiac disease. Methods. Blood samples from 12632 children were collected. All celiac disease cases, previously diagnosed and newly screening-detected, were identified. Per case, 4 referents were matched. Blood samples were analyzed for autoantibodies against thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb). The cut-off value for TPO positivity was set to 100 U/mL. Results. Altogether, 335 celiac disease cases were found. In the entire celiac disease group, 7.2% (24/335) had elevated titers of TPOAb compared to 2.8% (48/1695) of the referents. Among the previously diagnosed celiac disease cases, 7.5% (7/93, OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.2-6.4) was TPOAb positive and among screening-detected cases, 7.0% (17/242, OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.5-4.6) was TPOAb positive. Conclusion. Children with celiac disease showed a higher prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity. We could not confirm the hypothesis that untreated celiac disease is associated with increased risk of developing thyroid autoimmunity. Early initiation of celiac disease treatment might not lower the risk for other autoimmune diseases.

  17. Clinical significance of focal and diffuse thyroid diseases identified by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Salvatori, M; Melis, L; Castaldi, P; Maussier, M L; Rufini, V; Perotti, G; Rubello, D

    2007-09-01

    (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) thyroid incidentalomas are defined abnormal FDG uptake in the thyroid gland found at PET scan performed as part of a staging protocol and follow-up of patients with various kinds of malignancies. In the present study we report two cases of FDG PET thyroid incidentalomas, and review the literature with regard to the meaning of this new category of thyroid "disease". Since the advent of whole body FDG PET scan, a relatively high incidence of cases of thyroid FDG uptake has been reported as an incidental finding as in one of our patient. Focal uptake was found to be more likely associated to a malignant lesion, while a diffuse thyroid uptake to a benign thyroid disease. However, differential diagnosis is difficult, and reported data in literature are somewhat discordant. A focal thyroid uptake of FDG incidentally discovered at PET scan cannot be invariably considered a malignant thyroid nodule, however a prompt and complete work-up including laboratory examinations, ultrasonography and fine needle aspiration cytology, should be obtained to exclude a thyroid carcinoma. On the other hand, patients with a PET finding of diffuse FDG uptake can be considered at low risk of malignancy, being more likely associated to chronic thyroiditis or diffuse thyroid autonomy.

  18. The differences in T and B cell subsets in thyroid of children with Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Ben-Skowronek, Iwona; Szewczyk, Leszek; Kulik-Rechberger, Beata; Korobowicz, Elzbieta

    2013-08-01

    The differences between Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) suggest that changes in the subsets of T cells may have an influence on the course of these reactions. This study included 90 children: 30 with GD, 30 with HT, and 30 healthy children as controls. After thyroidectomy, standard histological examinations and immunohistochemical reactions were performed in paraffin specimens with monoclonal antibodies against T cell markers CD3, CD4, CD8 as well as against CD79 alpha B cells. Ultrathin sections were examined under a transmission electron microscope. Autoimmune reaction in GD consisted of an increased number of CD4+ T cells (3.17±4.27%) and plasma cells (22.89±8.61%) producing thyroidstimulating hormone-receptors and stimulating thyrocytes to activity. The number of CD8+ T cells was increased in children with HT (20.54±0.68%) as compared with the controls (0.65±0.30%). The autoimmune reaction in the HT children showed antibody dependent cytotoxicity with a low number of CD4+ T cells and an increased number of CD8+ T cells in the thyroid tissue in comparison with that in the GD children and the controls. Plasma cells (31.65±9.11%) in this situation produced the antibodies involved in cytotoxic reactions against thyrocytes. Graves' disease is characterized by the increased number of CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is characterized by the low number of CD4+ T cells and increased number of CD8+ T cells. CD8+ T cells have cytotoxic properties only in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  19. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor expression in normal and diseased human thyroid and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Waser, Beatrice; Blank, Annika; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Perren, Aurel; Reubi, Jean C

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP1) analogs may induce thyroid or pancreatic diseases in animals, raising questions about their use in diabetic patients. There is, however, controversy regarding expression of GLP1 receptors (GLP1R) in human normal and diseased thyroid and pancreas. Here, 221 human thyroid and pancreas samples were analyzed for GLP1R immunohistochemistry and compared with quantitative in vitro GLP1R autoradiography. Neither normal nor hyperplastic human thyroids containing parafollicular C cells express GLP1R with either method. Papillary thyroid cancer do not, and medullary thyroid carcinomas rarely express GLP1R. Insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells in the normal pancreas express a high density of GLP1R, whereas acinar cells express them in low amounts. Ductal epithelial cells do not express GLP1R. All benign insulinomas express high densities of GLP1R, whereas malignant insulinomas rarely express them. All ductal pancreatic carcinomas are GLP1R negative, whereas 6/20 PanIN 1/2 and 0/12 PanIN 3 express GLP1R. Therefore, normal thyroid, including normal and hyperplastic C cells, or papillary thyroid cancer are not targets for GLP1 analogs in humans. Conversely, all pancreatic insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells are physiological GLP1 targets, as well as most acini. As normal ductal epithelial cells or PanIN 3 or ductal pancreatic carcinomas do not express GLP1R, it seems unlikely that GLP1R is related to neoplastic transformation in pancreas. GLP1R-positive medullary thyroid carcinomas and all benign insulinomas are candidates for in vivo GLP1R targeting.

  20. Rheumatologic Manifestations in Iranian Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hezarkhani, Sharabeh; Aghaei, Mehrdad; Shamekhi, Maryam; Nomali, Mahin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are the most common endocrine diseases which result in rheumatologic manifestations. Some studies have shown association between rheumatologic disorders and ATDs. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the frequency of rheumatologic manifestations in patients with ATDs. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study during 2010 to 2011, 65 patients with ATDs referred to the Rheumatology clinic of 5 Azar Hospital in Gorgan (North of Iran) were studied via systematic random sampling and patients with positive antithyroid peroxides (anti-TPO) were included in the study. These patients were examined by a rheumatologist for diagnosis of rheumatologic manifestations and tested for serum levels of TSH, Free T3 and T4, Anti-Nuclear Antibodies (ANAs) and Rheumatoid Factor (RF). SPSS software (version 16) and descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: Nine males (14.8%) and 56 females (86.2%) with mean age of 38.81±1.44 years were studied. Overall, Rheumatologic manifestations were seen in 86.2 % (n=56). In this study, the most frequent rheumatologic manifestations were Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (36.1%) and Osteoarthritis (23%). Reynaud’s phenomenon (RP) (10.7%), Discopathy (8.9%), Fibromyalgia (5.3%), Myopathy (3.6%), Rheumatoid arthritis (3.6%) and trigger finger (3.6%) were other manifestations, respectively. Conclusion: In this region, there is a high frequency of rheumatologic manifestations in patients with ATDs. Thus, initial evaluation and regular checkings are recommended. PMID:25478383

  1. Cytogenetic study of a nodular hyperplasia of the thyroid after irradiation for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    van den Berg, E.; van Doormaal, J.J.; Oosterhuis, J.W.; de Jong, B.; Buist, J.; Vos, A.M.; Dam, A.; Vermeij, A. )

    1991-05-01

    We describe cytogenetics of a case of nodular hyperplasia of the thyroid with papillary microcarcinoma following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. The chromosomal pattern found was very heterogeneous with a clonal abnormality of chromosome 10, among others. Together with some recent data from the literature, this finding may point to an important role of chromosome 10 abnormalities in the pathogenesis of benign and malignant thyroid neoplasms.

  2. Ultrasonographic assessment of the thyroid gland structure in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Katarzyna; Woźniak-Stolarska, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), encompassing Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is still not fully elucidated and seems to be multifactorial. It has been suggested that genetic, immunological and environmental factors participate in IBD development. IBD extraintestinal manifestations include rheumatic, metabolic, dermatologic, ophthalmologic, hepatobiliary, pancreatic, urologic, pulmonary, neurological, hematological and thromboembolic complications. Thyroid gland diseases have not been confirmed as extraintestinal manifestations of IBD. However, it is known that some thyroid diseases share an immunological background with IBD, and that dysfunction of the thyroid gland may induce gastrointestinal symptoms. Ultrasound examination is the gold standard for evaluation of thyroid gland morphology. This study was designed to assess the prevalence of abnormalities in the structure of the thyroid gland in IBD patients and to compare it to the control group. The study group consisted of 199 consecutive IBD patients (80 CD patients and 119 UC patients) hospitalized at the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology of Wroclaw Medical University (Poland). The control group consisted of 42 healthy volunteers and patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders. The most common finding in the ultrasound examination in IBD patients were tumors. Tumors, which were smaller than or equal to 10 mm were present in 11.5% of IBD patients; and tumors larger than 10 mm were present in 13.1%. These results show that small tumors (less than 10 mm in diameter) of the thyroid gland are more frequent among patients with CD and UC compared to the control group (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.001, respectively). Additionally, enlargement of the thyroid gland occurs more often in UC patients compared to the control group (p = 0.003). There was no difference in the frequency of thyroid abnormalities between UC and CD patients. In patients with inflammatory

  3. The relationship between cytotoxin-associated gene A positive Helicobacter pylori infection and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Muyesser Sayki; Ekiz, Fuat; Deveci, Murat; Sahin, Mustafa; Topaloglu, Oya; Karbek, Basak; Tutal, Esra; Ginis, Zeynep; Cakal, Erman; Ozbek, Mustafa; Yuksel, Osman; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between cagA [cytotoxin-associated gene A] positivity and thyroid autoimmunity and thyroid volume. This prospective study included 78 Helicobacter pylori-positive (H. pylori) dyspeptic patients in the study group, and 50 age-, gender-, and body mass index-matched H. pylori-negative dyspeptic patients in the control group. All the controls were evaluated via upper gastrointestinal endoscopic biopsy or breath test, and were found as H. pylori negative. Gastric biopsy specimens were obtained via endoscopy and histological examination was performed for documentation of H. pylori. In all, 55.1% (n = 43) of the H. pylori-positive patients were cagA positive. There was no significant difference in metabolic syndrome parameters or thyroid function test results between the study and control groups. The frequency of anti-TPO and Hashimoto's thyroiditis positivity was significantly higher in the study group than in the control group. Thyroid volume was higher and severe parenchymal heterogeneity was more common in the H. pylori-positive patients. H. pylori infection might be a risk factor for autoimmune thyroid disease and high thyroid volume in patients diagnosed with histological evaluation. However, cagA positivity has no additional effect on these parameters.

  4. Radiation-related thyroid dysfunction: implications for the treatment of Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schimpff, S.C.; Diggs, C.H.; Wiswell, J.G.; Salvatore, P.C.; Wiernik, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T/sub 4/) were measured in sera from 214 patients with Hodgkin's disease. The literature was reviewed for patients with lymphoma or head and neck carcinoma who had received prior radiation therapy that encompassed the thyroid. Among 169 patients who had been treated with mantle radiation therapy at our center, 112 (66%) had evidence of thyroid dysfunction, including 43 with depressed T/sub 4/ levels. Among 45 who did not receive mantle irradiation, only three had evidence of dysfunction and none of these had T/sub 4/ depression. Thyroid dysfunction developed slowly, with less than 15% of patients tested during the first year showing dysfunction and the maximum of 66% reached at about 6 years. This entity is very common in lymphoma patients yet often is overlooked except in instances of specific thyroid function evaluation for research. A substantial proportion of patients with head and neck carcinoma develops thyroid dysfunction after irradiation, especially if therapy includes hemithyroidectomy. Serum TSH measurement every 6 months for at least 5 to 6 years after irradiation will detect early thyroid dysfunction. All patients with elevated serum TSH should be treated with sodium levothyroxine, regardless of whether they are clinically hypothyroid.

  5. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Graves' Disease in One Patient: The Extremes of Thyroid Dysfunction Associated with Interferon Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, R. C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease associated with interferon therapy can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, Graves' Hyperthyroidism, and autoimmune (often subclinical) hypothyroidism, the latter persisting in many patients. There are scare reports of a single patient developing extremes of autoimmune thyroid disease activated by the immunomodulatory effects of interferon. A 60-year-old man received 48 weeks of pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy for chronic HCV. Six months into treatment, he reported fatigue, weight gain, and slowed cognition. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was 58.8 mIU/L [0.27–4.2], fT4 11.1 pmol/L [12–25], and fT3 4.2 pmol/L [2.5–6.0] with elevated anti-TPO (983 IU/mL [<35]) and anti-TG (733 U/mL [<80]) antibodies. He commenced thyroxine with initial clinical and biochemical resolution but developed symptoms of hyperthyroidism with weight loss and tremor 14 months later. Serum TSH was <0.02 mIU/L, fT4 54.3 pmol/L, and fT3 20.2 pmol/L, with an elevated TSH receptor (TRAb, 4.0 U/L [<1.0]), anti-TPO (1,163 IU/mL) and anti-TG (114 U/mL) antibodies. Technetium scan confirmed Graves' Disease with bilateral diffuse increased tracer uptake (5.9% [0.5–3.5%]). The patient commenced carbimazole therapy for 6 months. Treatment was ceased following spontaneous clinical and biochemical remission (TSH 3.84 mIU/L, fT4 17pmol/L, fT3 4.5 pmol/L, and TRAb <1 U/L). This raises the need to monitor thyroid function closely in patients both during and following completion of interferon treatment. PMID:27042364

  6. Thyroid cancer in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst.

    PubMed

    Sturniolo, Giacomo; Vermiglio, Francesco; Moleti, Mariacarla

    2016-11-04

    Ectopy is the most common embryogenetic defect of the thyroid gland, representing between 48 and 61% of all thyroid dysgeneses. Persistence of thyroid tissue in the context of a thyroglossal duct remnant and lingual thyroid tissue are the most common defects. Although most cases of ectopic thyroid are asymptomatic, any disease affecting the thyroid may potentially involve the ectopic tissue, including malignancies. The prevalence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst is around 1% of patients affected with the above thyroid ectopies. We here review the current literature concerning primary thyroid carcinomas originating from thyroid tissue on thyroglossal duct cysts and lingual thyroid.

  7. Identification of chosen apoptotic (TIAR and TIA-1) markers expression in thyroid tissues from adolescents with immune and non-immune thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Bossowski, A; Czarnocka, B; Bardadin, K; Moniuszko, A; Łyczkowska, A; Czerwinska, J; Dadan, J; Bossowska, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) expression in thyrocytes from patients with GD and no-toxic multinodular goitre (NTMG) in relationship with apoptotic (TIAR and TIA-1) markers. The investigation was performed on thyroid cells isolated from postoperation thyroid tissues from 15 patients aged 12-21 years old with GD and 15 cases aged 13-21 years old with NTMG. Detection of NIS and TPO was performed by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of apoptotic markers in thyroid tissues was performed using antibodies to TIAR and TIA-1 by Western Blot and immunohistochemistry. Identification of proapoptotic TIAR and TIA-1 molecules in the thyroid tissues revealed a higher expression of both proteins in patients with Graves' disease (+++; +, respectively) in comparison to patients with NTNG (+; 0). In addition, TIAR expression was detected in three bands [p50, p42, p38 (kDa)] and TIA-1 in two bands [p22, p17 (kDa)]. using Western Blot test in patients with thyroid autoimmune diseases. In patients with NTNG expression of both apoptotic proteins was lower and identified in single bands: 42 (kDa) for TIAR and 17 (kDa) for TIA-1. The analysis of expression of NIS and TPO in thyroid follicular cells was higher in patients with Graves' disease in compared to their detection in patients with NTMG. In addition, degree of thyroid antigen expression positive correlated with amount of proapoptotic markers (TIAR, p<0.001; TIA-1, p<0.025 for NIS; TIAR, p<0.012 for TPO). We conclude that elevated expression of NIS and TPO in Graves' disease is associated with higher stimulation and activation of apoptosis in thyroid follicular cells during autoimmune process.

  8. Horner's syndrome in association with thyroid and parathyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Harding, Jane L; Sywak, Mark S; Sidhu, Stan; Delbridge, Leigh W

    2004-06-01

    Injury to the cervical sympathetic chain and its consequence, Horner's syndrome, as a result of thyroid pathology or surgical intervention is an uncommon complication. The purpose of the present study was to examine the experience of one endocrine surgical unit with pre and postoperative Horner's syndrome. This is a retrospective case series. The study group comprised all patients undergoing thyroid and parathyroid surgery at Royal North Shore Hospital from January 2000 to October 2003 who were identified as having either pre or postoperative Horner's syndrome. Patient demographics, operation performed, underlying pathology and outcomes were evaluated. There were nine cases of Horner's syndrome recorded from a total of 2208 thyroid and parathyroid operations undertaken: three with preoperative Horner's, an incidence of 0.14%, six with postoperative Horner's, an incidence of 0.27%. Patients ranged in age from 22 to 87 years. Two of the three preoperative cases were related to benign pathology, the remaining case having anaplastic carcinoma. Five of the six postoperative cases were related to thyroid malignancy with lymph node dissection; one case was associated with benign parathyroid pathology. Cervical sympathetic chain injury is a rare complication of surgery for thyroid and parathyroid conditions. The presence of preoperative Horner's does not necessarily indicate an underlying malignancy.

  9. Characteristics of benign and malignant thyroid disease in familial adenomatous polyposis patients and recommendations for disease surveillance.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoxi; Milas, Mira; O'Malley, Margaret; LaGuardia, Lisa; Berber, Eren; Jin, Judy; Metzger, Rosemarie; Mitchell, Jamie; Shin, Joyce; Burke, Carol A; Kalady, Matthew; Church, James; Siperstein, Allan

    2015-03-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a hereditary colon cancer syndrome that involves multiple extracolonic organs, including the thyroid. Several studies have estimated the rate of thyroid cancer in FAP to occur at five times the rate of the general population, but no current consensus defines screening for thyroid cancer in this cohort. This study seeks to define the features of benign and malignant thyroid disease in FAP patients, to compare thyroid cancer cases found through screening with those found incidentally, and to propose disease surveillance recommendations. Prospective screening for early thyroid cancer detection with thyroid ultrasound (US) was performed on FAP patients at the time of annual colonoscopy since November 2008. Clinical and US data were reviewed to characterize the observed thyroid nodules. Nonscreening-detected cases (NSD) were found through review of the colon cancer registry database. Eighteen NSD were found, compared with 15 screening-detected (SD) cases, out of 205 total patients screened (Mage=42 years; 55% female). The mean tumor size was larger in the NSD group than the SD group (p=0.04), and they tended to demonstrate more positive lymph nodes and more complications than the SD group. In the screened cohort, at least one thyroid nodule was detected in 106 (51.7%) patients, with 90% of these seen on initial exam. A total of 40/106 (37.7%) patients required fine-needle aspiration biopsy of a dominant nodule (Msize=14 mm), and 28/40 (70%) of these were performed at the first US visit. Suspicious US features were present in 16/40 (40%) patients, including five sub-centimeter nodules. Cytology and/or nodule US was abnormal in 15/205 screened patients, leading to surgery and revealing 14 papillary and one medullary thyroid cancer. Given the age and sex distribution of the screened cohort, this study reveals a higher-than-expected prevalence of both benign and malignant thyroid disease in the FAP population. Additionally, SD cases

  10. [Coexistence of Addison-Biermer's disease with autoimmune thyroiditis - case report].

    PubMed

    Lacka, Katarzyna; Maciejewski, Adam; Florczak-Wyspiańska, Jolanta

    2013-01-01

    Addison-Biermer's anaemia is an autoimmune disease and the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Hashimoto disease is the most common type of the thyroiditis and also has autoimmunological origin. Frequent coexistence of both mentioned entities has been observed. In the paper we report a case of a woman, who was diagnosed with pernicious anaemia (PA) with predominant neurological symptoms and concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis. Many efforts have been made in order to explain frequent coexistence of mentioned diseases. Both genetic (mainly HLA region genes) and environmental (mostly bacterial infections) factors are considered. The aim of the study (was to emphasize significance of diagnosing thyroid gland diseases among PA patients. It is also important to remember that neurological symptoms are frequent in the course of PA and may precede other complaints. However it should not prevent the right diagnosis.

  11. Hydatid cyst disease of the thyroid gland: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Sami; Demircan, Firat; Sogutcu, Nilgun

    2015-04-01

    Hydatid cyst disease may develop in any organ of the body, most frequently in the liver and lung, but occasionally can affect other organs such as the thyroid gland. Although the prevalence of thyroidal cyst disease varies by region, literature data suggest that it ranges between 0% and 3.4%. The aim of this report was to share 2 cases with thyroid hydatid cyst. Two female patients aged 26 and 57 years were admitted to our outpatient clinic with different complaints. While the first case presented with front of the neck swelling and pain, the second case presented with hoarseness, sore throat, and neck swelling. Both patients were living in a rural area in the southeastern region of Turkey and had had a long history of animal contact. Both patients had undergone previous surgeries for hydatid cyst disease. Both patients presented with a clinical picture consistent with typical multinodular goiter, and both underwent total thyroidectomy after detailed examinations and tests. The exact diagnosis was made after histopathologic examination in both patients. They both had a negative indirect hemagglutination test studied from blood samples. They both have had no recurrences during a 4-year follow-up. In conclusion, although thyroid gland is rarely affected, hydatid cyst disease should not be overlooked in differential diagnosis of cystic lesions of thyroid gland in patients who live in regions where hydatid cyst disease is endemic and who had hydatid cysts in other regions of their body.

  12. Total thyroidectomy is the preferred treatment for patients with Graves' disease and a thyroid nodule.

    PubMed

    Boostrom, Sarah; Richards, Melanie L

    2007-02-01

    To identify the indications and outcomes of total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease in a North American cohort. Prospective database of 297 patients undergoing total thyroidectomy in a tertiary care center identified 49 patients with Graves'. There were 37 women and 12 men (mean age, 37.9 years). Common indications for surgery were: refusal of radioactive iodine (20%), thyroid storm (18%), a thyroid nodule (16%), failure of I131(14%), and ophthalmopathy (14%). Complications included: symptomatic hypocalcemia (14%), permanent hypoparathyroidism (0%), and symptoms of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury (0%). Graves' patients had more bleeding (117 mL versus 48 mL, P<0.05). Clinical nodules were malignant in 38%. Papillary thyroid carcinoma occurred in 10% of patients, with 60% multifocal, and 60% lymph node metastases. Total thyroidectomy for Graves' has minimal morbidity. Patients with Graves' and a thyroid nodule are at an increased risk for malignancy and should be treated with a total thyroidectomy.

  13. Anti-CD38 autoimmunity in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis or Graves' disease

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, A; Fallahi, P; Nesti, C; Pupilli, C; Marchetti, P; Takasawa, S; Okamoto, H; Ferrannini, E

    2001-01-01

    Autoantibodies directed against human CD38 (an enzyme catalysing the interconversion of NAD+ and cyclic ADP-ribose) have been demonstrated recently in patients with type 2 diabetes. We tested 220 consecutive Caucasian patients with autoimmune chronic thyroiditis, 104 patients with Graves' disease, 220 subjects from the general population (control I) and 78 healthy control subjects not affected by thyroid autoimmune disorders (control II) for the presence of anti-CD38 autoimmunity. Using Western blot analysis and optical densitometry, a specific band corresponding to human recombinant CD38 was identified in the serum of several subjects. By defining anti-CD38 positivity as a standardized optical reading >3 s.d. higher than the mean value of control I, 10·4% of patients with thyroiditis and 7·7% of Graves' patients were anti-CD38 positive (P = 0·0009 versus 1·8% of control I). Similarly, 13·1% of patients with thyroiditis and 10·5% of Graves' patients had a standardized optical reading >3 s.d. higher than the mean value of the subjects not affected by thyroid autoimmune disorders (P = 0·002 versus 1·2% of control II). Anti-CD38 autoimmunity did not differ between euthyroid, hyperthyroid or hypothyroid patients or between patients with or without thyroid hypoechogenicity. Anti-CD38 autoantibodies were associated with higher levels of circulating antithyroid-peroxidase antibodies (P = 0·03) and they were more frequent in Graves' patients with ophthalmopathy (P < 0·05). Anti-CD38 autoantibodies are a new autoimmune marker in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and Graves' disease. The specific role of CD38 and its autoantibodies in the modulation of thyroid cell function or growth remains to be investigated. PMID:11737057

  14. High prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and nodular thyroid disease in patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Ana Beatriz B A; Pellizzari, Caio; Carvalho, Gisah A; Sant'Anna, Beatriz C; Montenegro, Rafaela L; Zammar Filho, Roberto G; Mesa Junior, Cleo O; Hauck Prante, Patrícia R; Olandoski, Marcia; Carvalho, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease has been known to affect thyroid hormone metabolism. Low serum levels of T3 and T4 are the most remarkable laboratorial findings. A high incidence of goiter and nodules on thyroid ultrasonography has been reported in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Our objective is to evaluate the prevalence of laboratorial and morphologic alterations in the thyroid gland in a cohort of patients with ESRD on hemodialysis (HD). Sixty-one patients with ESRD on HD were selected and compared with 43 healthy subjects matched by age, gender, and weight. Patients were submitted to thyroid ultrasonography. T3, free T4 (FT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone, antithyroglobulin, and antithyroperoxidase antibodies were measured. The mean age of patients with ESRD was 47.4 ± 12.3 and 61% were women. ESRD was mainly caused by hypertensive nephrosclerosis and diabetic nephropathy. Mean thyroid volume, as determined by ultrasonography, was similar in both groups. Patients with ESRD had more hypoechoic nodules when compared with the control group (24.1% vs. 7.9%, P = 0.056). Mean serum FT4 and T3 levels were significantly lower in patients with ESRD, and subclinical hypothyroidism was more prevalent in patients with ESRD (21.82% vs. 7.14% control group, P = 0.04). Titers of antithyroid antibodies were similar in both groups. ESRD was associated with a higher prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and lower levels of T3 and FT4. Almost a quarter of patients showed thyroid nodules >10 mm. Periodic ultrasound evaluation and assessment of thyroid function are recommended in patients with ESRD on HD.

  15. LOWER RATES OF RESIDUAL/RECURRENT DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH INCIDENTALLY DISCOVERED THYROID CARCINOMA.

    PubMed

    Shakil, Jawairia; Ansari, Mohammed Z; Brady, Jett; Xu, Jiaqiong; Robbins, Richard J

    2017-02-01

    Incidentally discovered thyroid cancers (IDTCs) have contributed to the rapid rise in thyroid cancer incidence over the past 20 years. Since death rates from thyroid cancer are not increasing, we hypothesized that IDTCs are less aggressive compared to clinically apparent thyroid cancer (CATC). A retrospective study of patients and tumor characteristics of IDTCs and their rates of residual/recurrent (R/R) disease were determined at a median follow-up of 27 months in the setting of a large academic medical center. Patient analysis groups (IDTC [n = 46] and CATC [n = 126]) were based upon how the cancer was initially discovered. Patients were followed clinically and by biochemical testing and ultrasonography. We also compared time to progression between these groups. Patients in the two groups had similar demographic and tumor characteristics. At the close of the study, R/R status in the IDTC group was 6.7%, compared to 20.8% in the CATC group (P = .04). Of the 28 individuals in our overall cohort who had R/R disease, 3 were from the IDTC group and 25 were from the CATC group (P = .04). All three of the IDTC recurrences occurred within the first 6 months of follow-up. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis, there was a nonsignificant trend for longer progression-free survival in the IDTC group (P = .08). Compared to CATC patients, IDTC patients have a significantly less aggressive course and a trend toward longer progression-free survival. If confirmed by further studies, it may be reasonable to subject them to less intense surveillance and more conservative therapeutic approaches. CATC = clinically apparent thyroid cancers CT = computed tomography HMH = Houston Methodist Hospital IDTC = incidentally discovered thyroid cancer MRI = magnetic resonance imaging PET = positron emission tomography PTMC = papillary thyroid microcarcinoma R/R = residual/recurrent RRA = radioiodine remnant ablation Tg = thyroglobulin TgAb = anti-thyroglobulin antibody TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone

  16. Thyroid hemiagenesis.

    PubMed

    Shaha, A R; Gujarati, R

    1997-06-01

    Thyroid hemiagenesis is a rare embryological condition, predominantly in females (3:1) with a left lobe being absent. The associated diseases in the remaining thyroid lobe include benign adenoma, multinodular goiter, hyperthyroidism, chronic thyroiditis, and rarely carcinoma. The most common pathology involved in thyroid hemiagenesis is hyperthyroidism. Presence of carcinoma in a patient with hemiagenesis is quite rare and very few cases are reported in the world literature. We report a 30-year-old female who presented with left thyroid mass gradually increasing in size over a period of 3 months. The patient's pre-operative workup included a thyroid scan, which revealed a cold nodule in the left lobe with absent right lobe. A fine-needle aspiration biopsy was suspicious for papillary thyroid carcinoma. The patient underwent thyroid exploration and left thyroid lobectomy. The operative findings confirmed hemiagenesis of the right lobe and papillary carcinoma in the left lobe. All four parathyroids were in normal position. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss and review the literature on thyroid hemiagenesis and present a rare case of absent right thyroid lobe with carcinoma in the remaining left thyroid lobe.

  17. The relationship between iodine nutrition and thyroid disease in lactating women with different iodine intakes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lixiang; Wang, Dandan; Liu, Peng; Meng, Fangang; Wen, Da; Jia, Qingzhen; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoye; Jiang, Peng; Shen, Hongmei

    2015-11-14

    Areas with low, adequate and excessive I content in water co-exist in China. Limited data are currently available on I nutrition and thyroid disease in lactating women and their breast-fed infants with different I intakes. This study aimed to evaluate I nutrition in both lactating women and their infants and the prevalence of thyroid disease in areas with different levels of I in water. From January to June 2014, a total of 343 healthy lactating women (excluding those taking anti-thyroid drugs or I supplements within a year of the study, consuming seafood at the time of the study or those diagnosed with congenital thyroid disease) from Beihai in Guangxi province and Jiajiazhuang, Yangcheng, Jicun and Pingyao townships in Shanxi province were selected. Compared with the I-sufficient group, median urinary I concentrations in both lactating women and infants as well as breast milk I levels were significantly lower in the I-deficient group (P<0·001). The prevalence of thyroid disease in lactating women, particularly subclinical hypothyroidism, was higher in the I-excess group than in the I-sufficient group (P<0·05). In areas with excessive water I content, high thyroid peroxidase antibody and high thyroglobulin levels were risk factors for abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. Our data collectively suggest that excessive I intake potentially causes subclinical hypothyroidism in lactating women. Moreover, enhanced monitoring of I status is important to avoid adverse effects of I deficiency or excess, particularly in susceptible populations such as pregnant or lactating women and infants.

  18. Immunoregulatory T cells, LFA-3 and HLA-DR in autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Nada, Aml Mohamed; Hammouda, Maha

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the changes in the expression of T-cell activation markers, namely CD4+ CD25+ and CD8+ in patients with AITD, namely Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis as well as colloid nodular goitre. HLA-DR, LFA-3, and peripheral total lymphocytic count are also measured. We compared the expression of CD4, CD25, and CD8 surface markers in peripheral blood lymphocyte in Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis as autoimmune thyroid diseases, as well as colloid goitre in comparison with healthy controls. Also, LFA-3 and HLA-DR were measured in the same groups using three-color flow cytometry. Total lymphocytic count in peripheral blood, thyroid function tests, antithyroid antibodies were also included in the laboratory investigations. The total number of participants was 65. All were recruited from endocrine clinics in a tertiary care hospital in the southern region of Saudi Arabia. All participants underwent history taking, clinical examination, laboratory workup, and radiological investigations. Neck ultrasound, technecium pertechnetate(ψψ) thyroid uptake, and fine-needle aspiration and cytology (FNAC) of the thyroid were done when indicated. The study was approved by the Hospital Research Isthics Committee and informed consents were obtained from all participants before enrollment in the study. In comparison with thecontrol group, activation markers CD4, CD25, and CD8 were lower in the autoimmune thyroid diseases. Lymphocyte function antigen-3 (CD58) and total lymphocytic count were higher in the AIT diseases whereas HLA-DR was lower than that in the control group. The CD4/CD8 ratio was lower in the AITD compared with the healthy euthyroid subjects. No difference was found between patients with colloid nodular goitre and the healthy control in any of the study variables except for LFA-3 which was significantly higher in the colloid goitre group. Our findings indicate downregulation of CD4+ CD25+ Treg as well as CD8+ T

  19. Immunoregulatory T cells, LFA-3 and HLA-DR in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nada, Aml Mohamed; Hammouda, Maha

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the changes in the expression of T-cell activation markers, namely CD4+ CD25+ and CD8+ in patients with AITD, namely Graves’ disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis as well as colloid nodular goitre. HLA-DR, LFA-3, and peripheral total lymphocytic count are also measured. Materials and Methods: We compared the expression of CD4, CD25, and CD8 surface markers in peripheral blood lymphocyte in Graves’ disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis as autoimmune thyroid diseases, as well as colloid goitre in comparison with healthy controls. Also, LFA-3 and HLA-DR were measured in the same groups using three-color flow cytometry. Total lymphocytic count in peripheral blood, thyroid function tests, antithyroid antibodies were also included in the laboratory investigations. The total number of participants was 65. All were recruited from endocrine clinics in a tertiary care hospital in the southern region of Saudi Arabia. All participants underwent history taking, clinical examination, laboratory workup, and radiological investigations. Neck ultrasound, technecium pertechnetateψψ thyroid uptake, and fine-needle aspiration and cytology (FNAC) of the thyroid were done when indicated. The study was approved by the Hospital Research Isthics Committee and informed consents were obtained from all participants before enrollment in the study. Results: In comparison with thecontrol group, activation markers CD4, CD25, and CD8 were lower in the autoimmune thyroid diseases. Lymphocyte function antigen-3 (CD58) and total lymphocytic count were higher in the AIT diseases whereas HLA-DR was lower than that in the control group. The CD4/CD8 ratio was lower in the AITD compared with the healthy euthyroid subjects. No difference was found between patients with colloid nodular goitre and the healthy control in any of the study variables except for LFA-3 which was significantly higher in the colloid goitre group. Conclusion: Our findings indicate

  20. German Association of Endocrine Surgeons practice guidelines for the surgical treatment of benign thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Musholt, Thomas J; Clerici, Thomas; Dralle, Henning; Frilling, Andreja; Goretzki, Peter E; Hermann, Michael M; Kussmann, Jochen; Lorenz, Kerstin; Nies, Christoph; Schabram, Jochen; Schabram, Peter; Scheuba, Christian; Simon, Dietmar; Steinmüller, Thomas; Trupka, Arnold W; Wahl, Robert A; Zielke, Andreas; Bockisch, Andreas; Karges, Wolfram; Luster, Markus; Schmid, Kurt W

    2011-06-01

    Benign thyroid disorders are among the most common diseases in Germany, affecting around 15 million people and leading to more than 100,000 thyroid surgeries per year. Since the first German guidelines for the surgical treatment of benign goiter were published in 1998, abundant new information has become available, significantly shifting surgical strategy towards more radical interventions. Additionally, minimally invasive techniques have been developed and gained wide usage. These circumstances demanded a revision of the guidelines. Based on a review of relevant recent guidelines from other groups and additional literature, unpublished data, and clinical experience, the German Association of Endocrine Surgeons formulated new recommendations on the surgical treatment of benign thyroid diseases. These guidelines were developed through a formal expert consensus process and in collaboration with the German societies of Nuclear Medicine, Endocrinology, Pathology, and Phoniatrics & Pedaudiology as well as two patient organizations. Consensus was achieved through several moderated conferences of surgical experts and representatives of the collaborating medical societies and patient organizations. The revised guidelines for the surgical treatment of benign thyroid diseases include recommendations regarding the preoperative assessment necessary to determine when surgery is indicated. Recommendations regarding the extent of resection, surgical techniques, and perioperative management are also given in order to optimize patient outcomes. Evidence-based recommendations for the surgical treatment of benign thyroid diseases have been created to aid the surgeon and to support optimal patient care, based on current knowledge. These recommendations comply with the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany requirements for S2k guidelines.

  1. [Subclinical and manifested hypothyroidism as a consequence of thyroid autoimmune disease].

    PubMed

    Milosević, Dragoslav P; Djurica, Snezana; Davidović, Mladen; Stević, Radmila; Rajić, Miodrag; Marković, Natasa

    2005-10-01

    Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) is a slowly developing persistent inflamation of the thyroid gland, which frequently leads to hypothyroidism. Some of the up-to-date knowledge about hypothyroidism, both subclinical and manifested, caused by autoimmune disease, was presented. Autoimmune thyroid gland disease can occur at any age, but predominantly affects women after periods of high emotional and physical stress or accidents, as well as during periods of hormonal changes. It can also develop in families, and having an autoimmune disease slightly increases the risk of developing another. This paper showed an increasing incidence of subclinical hypothyroidism (4.17%) in elderly, and, at the same time, the incidence of primary hypothyroidism accounting for 1%. It is very usefull to estimate the stimulated thyrotropin (TSH) response, as well as the value of fast, short time thyroid gland reserves, analyzed by T3 and T4 serum level at 60th minute after TRH stimulation. Treatment of choice for HT (hypothyroidism of any cause) is thyroid hormone replacement. Drug of choice is orally administered levothyroxine sodium, usually for life-time. The standard dose is 1.6-1.8 mcg/kg body weight per day, but is in most cases patient dependent. Elderly patients usually require smaller replacement dose of levothyroxine, sometimes less than 1 mcg/kg body weight per day with coronary dilatator at the same time.

  2. A case of metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma complicated with Graves' disease after total thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Mariko; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Tsuboi, Mitsuhiro; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Tangoku, Akira

    2017-09-05

    Thyroid cancer and Graves' disease may present simultaneously in one patient. The incidence of the development of hyperthyroidism from metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma is rare. We herein report a case of metastatic follicular carcinoma complicated with Graves' disease after total thyroidectomy. A 57-year-old woman underwent right hemithyroidectomy for follicular carcinoma. Metastatic lesions appeared in the lungs and skull two years after the first surgery, and remnant thyroidectomy was performed for radioactive iodine-131 (RAI) therapy, during which the TSH receptor antibody (TRAb) was found to be negative. The patient was treated with RAI therapy four times for four years and was receiving levothyroxine suppressive therapy. Although radioiodine uptake was observed in the lesions after the fourth course of RAI therapy, metastatic lesions had progressed. Four years after the second surgery, she had heart palpitations and tremors. Laboratory data revealed hyperthyroidism and positive TRAb. She was diagnosed with Graves' disease and received a fifth course of RAI therapy. 131I scintigraphy after RAI therapy showed strong radioiodine uptake in the metastatic lesions. As a result, the sizes and numbers of metastatic lesions decreased, and thyroid function improved. Metastatic lesions produced thyroid hormone and caused hyperthyroidism. RAI therapy was effective for Graves' disease and thyroid carcinoma.

  3. Cost-of-Illness Trends Associated with Thyroid Disease in Korea.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyung-Rae; Kang, Sungwook; Lee, Sunmi

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the scale of and trends associated with the cost-of-illness of thyroid disease in Korea at 2-year intervals during the last 10 years for which data are available. Cost-of-illness was estimated in terms of direct and indirect costs. Direct costs include direct medical costs due to hospitalization, outpatient and pharmacy sectors, transportation, and care-giver costs. Indirect costs include future income loss due to premature death and loss of productivity as a result of absence from work. The cost-of-illness of thyroid disease in Korea was estimated at 224.2 billion won in 2002, 303.4 billion won in 2004, 400.3 billion won in 2006, 570.4 billion won in 2008, and 762.2 billion won in 2010. For example, the cost-of-illness of thyroid disease in 2010 was 3.4 times greater compared to 2002. The direct cost of the total cost-of-illness was 69.7%, which accounted for the highest proportion of costs. Cost-of-illness for individuals between the ages of 30 and 50 accounted for the greatest share of costs. The cost-of-illness of thyroid disease was relatively large in economically active age groups, and demonstrated a very rapid growth rate compared to other major diseases in Korea. Therefore, we suggest nationwide recognition of the importance of prevention and management of thyroid disease and prioritization of the management of thyroid disease among current and future health promotion policies in Korea.

  4. Is vitamin D a player or not in the pathophysiology of autoimmune thyroid diseases?

    PubMed

    D'Aurizio, Federica; Villalta, Danilo; Metus, Paolo; Doretto, Paolo; Tozzoli, Renato

    2015-05-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D is a steroid hormone derived from vitamin D, playing an important role in maintaining an adequate serum level of calcium and phosphorus. It is now clear that vitamin D exerts an endocrine action on the cells of the immune system, generating anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effects. The mechanisms underlying the role of vitamin D in autoimmunity are not completely understood. Lower vitamin D levels have been found in several autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases, autoimmune thyroid diseases (i.e. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease) and autoimmune gastritis. Several genetic studies have demonstrated an association between thyroid autoimmunity susceptibility and gene polymorphisms of vitamin D receptor, vitamin D binding protein, 1-alpha-hydroxylase and 25-hydroxylase. Of note, some papers do not confirm this connection. With regard to the role of vitamin D in autoimmune thyroid diseases, available data remain controversial. Only few reports have analyzed the supposed association between autoimmune thyroid diseases and vitamin D concentration with inconclusive results. In our experience, low serum levels of vitamin D do not correlate either with Hashimoto's thyroiditis or with Graves' disease. The inability to achieve an unambiguous conclusion is in part due to the limitations in study design. In fact, most of the studies are cross-sectional surveys with a small number of subjects. In addition, the heterogeneity of the study population, seasonal variation of blood sampling, inter-method analytical variability of vitamin D assays and different definitions of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency contribute to contradicting results. Therefore, further randomized, controlled, prospective trials are needed in order to demonstrate the causality of vitD in AITD and consequently the role of vitamin D

  5. [Non-autoimmune thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Leonardo F L; Mana, Daniela L; Bruno, Oscar D

    2014-01-01

    The term thyroiditis comprises a group of thyroid diseases characterized by the presence of inflammation, including autoimmune and non-autoimmune entities. It may manifest as an acute illness with severe thyroid pain (subacute thyroiditis and infectious thyroiditis), and conditions in which the inflammation is not clinically evident evolving without pain and presenting primarily thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter (drug-induced thyroiditis and Riedel thyroiditis). The aim of this review is to provide an updated approach on non-autoimmune thyroiditis and its clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  6. Papillary thyroid microcarcinoma in Graves' disease presenting as a cystic neck mass.

    PubMed

    Patil, Milind; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar; Sahoo, JayaPrakash; Vivekanandan, Muthupillai; Kate, Vikram; Pandit, Nandini; Badhe, Bhawana

    2015-01-01

    The presentation of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) as a solitary cystic neck mass is uncommon. Additionally, its association with Graves' disease is very rare. We report a case of occult PTMC, who presented with a cystic neck mass in the background of Graves' disease without any goiter. Imaging like ultrasound of neck, single photon emission computed tomography-CT (SPECT-CT), and technetium scan failed to detect any lesion in the thyroid, which was picked up only by the contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) of neck. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy with right modified lymph node dissection. Our case highlights the presentation of metastatic PTMC as a differential diagnosis of a cystic neck mass even in a patient with Graves' disease without any thyroid enlargement.

  7. Adult onset Still's disease diagnosed concomitantly with occult papillary thyroid cancer: paraneoplastic manifestation or coincidence?

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joong Kyong; Oh, Ji-Min; Lee, Jaejoon; Kim, Sun Wook; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Koh, Eun-Mi

    2010-02-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, characterized by spiking fever, evanescent salmon pink maculopapular rash, arthritis, and leukocytosis with neutrophilia. Malignant lymphoma is one of the most important differential diagnoses of AOSD. AOSD has been reported as one of paraneoplastic syndromes associated with breast cancer. We report a rare case of occult papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) diagnosed coincidently with AOSD. A 32-year-old woman was diagnosed with AOSD according to the diagnostic criteria of Yamaguchi as follows: leukocytosis with neutrophilia, high fever with 39 degrees C and above, arthralgia/arthritis, sore throat, liver dysfunctions, and lymphadenopathy. Excisional biopsy of cervical lymph node showed metastatic papillary carcinoma, and immunohistochemical staining for thyroglobulin and thyroid transcription factor-1 was strongly positive. There was no evidence of focal lesion in the thyroid glands. To our knowledge, this is the first report of adult onset Still's disease diagnosed concomitantly with occult PTC.

  8. Computed Tomography Features of Incidentally Detected Diffuse Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rho, Myung Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to evaluate the CT features of incidentally detected DTD in the patients who underwent thyroidectomy and to assess the diagnostic accuracy of CT diagnosis. Methods. We enrolled 209 consecutive patients who received preoperative neck CT and subsequent thyroid surgery. Neck CT in each case was retrospectively investigated by a single radiologist. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of individual CT features and the cut-off CT criteria for detecting DTD by comparing the CT features with histopathological results. Results. Histopathological examination of the 209 cases revealed normal thyroid (n = 157), Hashimoto thyroiditis (n = 17), non-Hashimoto lymphocytic thyroiditis (n = 34), and diffuse hyperplasia (n = 1). The CT features suggestive of DTD included low attenuation, inhomogeneous attenuation, increased glandular size, lobulated margin, and inhomogeneous enhancement. ROC curve analysis revealed that CT diagnosis of DTD based on the CT classification of “3 or more” abnormal CT features was superior. When the “3 or more” CT classification was selected, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of CT diagnosis for DTD were 55.8%, 95.5%, 80.6%, 86.7%, and 85.6%, respectively. Conclusion. Neck CT may be helpful for the detection of incidental DTD. PMID:25548565

  9. Milk production and distribution in low-dose counties for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmel, J.G.; Beck, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    This report identifies sources of milk consumed by residents of Ferry, Okanogan, and Stevens Counties. This information will be used by the Hanford thyroid Disease Study to determine whether thyroid disease has been increased among people exposed to past iodine--131 emissions from Hanford Site Facilities.

  10. IgG4-related Hashimoto's thyroiditis--a new variant of a well known disease.

    PubMed

    Luiz, Henrique Vara; Gonçalves, Diogo; Silva, Tiago Nunes da; Nascimento, Isabel; Ribeiro, Ana; Mafra, Manuela; Manita, Isabel; Portugal, Jorge

    2014-11-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) has been characterized for many years as a well-defined clinicopathologic entity, but is now considered a heterogeneous disease. IgG4-related HT is a new subtype characterized by thyroid inflammation rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells and marked fibrosis. It may be part of the systemic IgG4-related disease. We report a case of a 56-year-old Portuguese man who presented with a one-month history of progressive neck swelling and dysphagia. Laboratory testing revealed increased inflammatory parameters, subclinical hypothyroidism and very high levels of thyroid autoantibodies. Cervical ultrasound (US) demonstrated an enlarged and heterogeneous thyroid gland and two hypoechoic nodules. US-guided fine needle aspiration cytology was consistent with lymphocytic thyroiditis. The patient was submitted to total thyroidectomy and microscopic examination identified typical findings of HT, marked fibrosis limited within the thyroid capsule and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, with >50 IgG4-positive plasma cells per high-power field and an IgG4/IgG ratio of >40%. After surgery, serum IgG4 concentration was high-normal. Symptoms relief and reduction in laboratory inflammatory parameters were noticed. Thyroid function is controlled with levothyroxine. To our knowledge we report the first case of IgG4-related HT in a non-Asian patient. We also perform a review of the literature regarding IgG4-related disease and IgG4-related HT. Our case highlights this new variant of the well known HT, and helps physicians in recognizing its main clinical features, allowing for proper diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Thyroid disease among the Rongelap and Utirik population--an update.

    PubMed

    Howard, J E; Vaswani, A; Heotis, P

    1997-07-01

    In 1954, 253 Marshallese were accidentally exposed to fallout radiation from the hydrogen bomb, BRAVO. The Marshall Islands Medical Program (MIMP) was established by the Department of Energy in 1955 to monitor and treat radiation-related disease pursuant to this accident. Medical teams from Brookhaven National Laboratory, a federal institution, regularly visit the Marshall Islands to give medical care to the exposed population. The most significant complication of the exposure has been found to be thyroid disease due to the ingestion of radioactive iodides from the fallout. In 1963 the first thyroid nodules were found in Rongelap subjects and in 1969 in Utirik. Non-neoplastic adenomatous nodules were associated with higher doses of radiation and neoplastic nodules developed in individuals receiving lower doses of radiation. Women were more susceptible to the development of palpable thyroid nodules than men. In 1994 the MIMP initiated examination of the thyroid by ultrasound to supplement the clinical examination. One hundred and sixty-four patients were evaluated. No significant differences were found in the incidence of thyroid nodules or the mean nodule count between the three groups of Rongelap and Utirik exposed and a comparison patient population. There was no significant difference in the incidence of thyroid nodules in males vs. females. Five exposed patients were referred for surgical excision of a nodule detected only by ultrasound. These ultrasound findings are unexpected in that females are known to have a higher incidence of thyroid disease than males and we expected that the incidence of ultrasound nodules would be higher in the exposed population.

  12. Medullary thyroid microcarcinoma: a clinicopathologic retrospective study of 38 patients with no prior familial disease.

    PubMed

    Guyétant, S; Dupre, F; Bigorgne, J C; Franc, B; Dutrieux-Berger, N; Lecomte-Houcke, M; Patey, M; Caillou, B; Viennet, G; Guerin, O; Saint-Andre, J P

    1999-08-01

    Thirty-eight patients (25 women, 13 men; mean age, 57.8 [32 to 91]) showing one or more medullary thyroid microcarcinomas (ie, < 1 cm), with no prior MEN II or medullary thyroid carcinoma history in their family, were reviewed. Follow-up was available for 29 patients (mean, 53.6 months [1 to 147]). 21 patients (72.4%) are alive and free of disease, four patients (13.8%) died during follow-up without disease, 2 patients are alive with disease (local recurrence and persistent hypercalcitoninemia) after 80 and 99 months, respectively, and 2 patients died of disease after 24 and 46 months. Most tumors were incidental pathological findings (19 of 38) or were discovered by systematic blood calcitonin measurement for a nodular thyroid disease (15 of 38). Only the four patients who had an unfavorable outcome were symptomatic cases (palpable micro-MTC, diarrhea, cervical lymph node metastasis and pulmonary metastatic disease). The two patients with metastatic disease at diagnosis died during follow-up. In univariate analysis, a symptomatic medullary thyroid carcinoma was a strong predictor of an unfavourable outcome (p < .00008), as were the preoperative calcitonin level (P = .007) and an elevated postoperative calcitonin level (P = .004). Among 30 histopathological criteria, only the presence of amyloid correlated with an unfavorable outcome (P = .018).

  13. Thyroid function, Alzheimer's disease and postoperative cognitive dysfunction: a tale of dangerous liaisons?

    PubMed

    Mafrica, Federica; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2008-05-01

    Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are commonly present conditions in adults, leading to neurological symptoms, affecting the central and peripheral nervous system, and to neurocognitive impairment. Several studies investigated a possible association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and thyroid dysfunctions. Increasing evidence supports an extensive interrelationship between thyroid hormones and the cholinergic system, which is selectively and early affected in AD. Moreover, thyroid hormones negatively regulate expression of the amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP), which plays a key role in the development of AD. A condition, the so called euthyroid sick syndrome (ESS), characterized by reduced serum T_{3} and T_{4} concentrations without increased serum thyroid stimulation hormone secretion, occurs within hours after major surgery. After surgery, elderly patients often exhibit a transient, reversible state of cognitive alterations. Delirium occurs in 10-26% of general medical patients over 65, and it is associated with a significant increase in morbidity and mortality. Modifications in thyroid hormone functioning may take place as a consequence of psycho-physical stress caused by surgery, and probably as a consequence of reduced conversion of T4 into T3 by the liver engaged in metabolizing anesthetic drugs. Therefore, modifications of thyroid hormones post-surgery, might play a role in the pathogenesis of postoperative cognitive dysfunction.

  14. Peripheral blood and intrathyroidal T cell clones from patients with thyroid autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Massart, C; Caroff, G; Maugendre, D; Genetet, N; Gibassier, J

    1999-01-01

    For a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune diseases, we have studied morphological and functional properties of T clones from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and from intrathyroidal lymphocytes (ITL) obtained from 3 patients with Graves' disease or 1 Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Investigations were carried out on clones cultured alone or cocultured with autologous thyrocytes. Clonage efficiency ranged from 30% to 33% for PBL and 10% to 36% for ITL. A predominance of CD4-positive clones was observed whatever the origin of the lymphocytes or the autoimmune pathology. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) was detected in the majority (17/19) of the clones tested. Intracytoplasmic interleukin (IL-4) was secreted in 7/19 clones and both cytokines were produced in 5/19 clones. In coculture a proliferative response and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) production were observed with 6 clones (4 from Graves thyrocytes and 2 from thyroiditis). No cytotoxic clone was derived from Graves or thyroiditis tissues. These data demonstrate that the large majority of T clones are principally CD4-T cells; all the clones secreted TNF-alpha and a large majority produced IFN-gamma. Only a few clones produced IL-4 alone or associated with IFN-gamma. Six T clones induced proliferative response and of TNF-alpha secretion in coculture. Further investigations must be performed on these antigen-reactive T clones to analyse their role in the pathogenesis of the human thyroid autoimmune diseases.

  15. Autoimmune thyroid disease in a cohort of Malaysian SLE patients: frequency, clinical and immunological associations.

    PubMed

    Ong, S G; Choy, C H

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) has been associated with other systemic autoimmune diseases. To date, there is limited data on thyroid disorders and autoimmune thyroid disease in Malaysia. The frequency of ATD among 189 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients was 6.3%, with 2.6% in the hyperthyroid group and 3.7% in the hypothyroid group. Hypothyroidism developed at a much younger mean age (24.3 years), suggesting that SLE might be a predisposing factor for the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. There was a higher rate of thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO) positivity compared with anti-thyroglobulin antibody (Tg) in the hyperthyroid subgroup. This study also demonstrated a greater proportion of ATD patients who demonstrated high titres (≥ 1:6400) of TPO compared with high titres of Tg. Although there was an association between ATD and the presence of anti-Ro/SSA and/or anti-La/SSB antibodies, the absence of sicca symptoms and negative Schirmer's tests suggest a lack of association with secondary Sjogren's syndrome. A novel association between ATD and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was detected in our cohort. Hence we propose that patients affected by APS be routinely screened for ATD. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis: relationship and the role of genetics.

    PubMed

    Lazúrová, Ivica; Jochmanová, Ivana; Benhatchi, Karim; Sotak, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), known as the most common organ-specific autoimmune disorder, is frequently accompanied by other organ and non-organ-specific autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although the exact pathogenic mechanisms of the coexistence of autoimmune disorders are still not completely defined, genetics, immune defects, hormones and environmental factors may play key roles in polyautoimmunity. In this review, the prevalence of AITD and antithyroid autoantibodies in RA patients and rheumatic manifestations in association with thyroid autoimmunity are discussed. Finally, we review the role of genetics in the association of both AITD and RA, especially CTLA-4 and PTPN22 polymorphisms.

  17. In vivo ocular biomechanical compliance in thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Vellara, Hans R; Hart, Richard; Gokul, Akilesh; McGhee, Charles N J; Patel, Dipika V

    2017-08-01

    To compare the ocular biomechanical properties in patients with thyroid eye disease (TED) and healthy participants using a non-contact Scheimpflug-based tonometer (CorVis ST). All eyes were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy, corneal tomography and the CorVis ST (CST). Patients with TED were examined by a fellowship trained oculoplastics specialist to determine status and assess severity. The outputs from CST and additionally derived parameters, including maximum orbital deformation (MOD), were compared between healthy participants and patients with TED using Student's t-test. Furthermore, a multiple linear regression analysis was used to control for various factors known to influence ocular biomechanical responses to an air pulse. This study included 20 patients with TED and compared them with a cohort of 152 healthy participants. The mean age of patients with TED was 46.7±19.0 years and the mean age of healthy participants was 35.9±13.8 years (p=0.03). There were no statistically significant differences in gender distributions between both groups (p>0.05). Several CST parameters were significantly different between groups (p<0.05). Of note, however, MOD was significantly lower in patients with TED (0.16±0.04 mm) compared with the healthy participants (0.25±0.05 mm, p<0.001). This dissimilarity remained even after controlling for the various cofactors. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.91±0.04 (95% CI 0.84 to 0.98, p<0.001) for MOD. The in vivo ocular biomechanics as measured by the CST reflects a reduced orbital compliance. This method of ocular biomechanical assessment may aid in the categorisation of TED severity and assist in monitoring and/or diagnosing TED. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Prevalence rate of thyroid diseases among autopsy cases of the atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima, 1951-1985

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko; Ezaki, Haruo; Etoh, Ryozo; Hiraoka, Toshio; Akiba, Suminori

    1995-03-01

    To examine the radiogenic risk of latent thyroid cancer, thyroid adenoma, colloid/adenomatous goiter and chronic thyroiditis, the date for 3821 subjects collected in the course of autopsies of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima from 1951 to 1985 by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) were analyzed using a logistic model. About 80% of the autopsies were performed at RERF and the remainder at local hospitals. The frequencies of the above diseases were not associated with whether the underlying cause of death was cancer. However, note that our results may be influenced by potentially biasing factors associated with autopsy selection. The relative frequency of latent thyroid cancer (greatest dimension {le}1.5 cm but detectable on a routine microscopic slide of the thyroid gland) increased as the radiation dose increased and was about 1.4-fold greater at 1 Gy than in the 0-Gy dose group. The relative occurrence of thyroid adenoma also increased as radiation dose increased, and was about 1.5-fold greater at 1 Gy than in the 0-Gy dose group. Sex, age at the time of the bombing or period of observation did not significantly modify the radiogenic risks for thyroid adenoma or latent thyroid cancer. No statistically significant association was found between radiation exposure and the rates of colloid/adenomatous goiter and chronic thyroiditis. The possible late effect of atomic bomb radiation on the frequency of benign thyroid diseases is discussed on the basis of these data. 38 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. The Effect of Ezetimibe/Statin Combination and High-Dose Statin Therapy on Thyroid Autoimmunity in Women with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Cardiovascular Disease: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, R; Szkróbka, W; Okopień, B

    2016-10-01

    Background: Intensive statin therapy was found to reduce thyroid autoimmunity in women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. No similar data are available for other hypolipidemic agents. Methods: The participants of the study were 16 women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and coronary artery disease. On the basis of statin tolerance, they were divided into 2 groups. 8 patients who did not tolerate high-dose statin therapy were treated with a statin, the dose of which was reduced by half, together with ezetimibe. The remaining 8 patients tolerating the treatment continued high-dose statin therapy. Plasma lipids, serum levels of thyrotropin, free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine, as well as titers of thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies were measured at the beginning of the study and 6 months later. Results: Replacing high-dose statin therapy with ezetimibe/statin combination therapy increased serum titers of thyroid peroxidase as well as led to an insignificant increase in serum titers of thyroglobulin antibodies. At the end of the study, thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibody titers were higher in patients receiving the combination therapy than in those treated only with high-dose statin. Conclusions: Our study shows that high-dose statin therapy produces a stronger effect on thyroid autoimmunity than ezetimibe/statin combination therapy.

  20. [Diagnosis of osteoporosis occurring in autoimmune thyroid gland disease].

    PubMed

    Radojković, Ivan; Radojković, Jana; Djurica, Snezana

    2005-10-01

    Osteoporosis or porotic bone is a general, systemic bone disease, which is manifested by fracture as its consequence. The main characteristic of this disease is the loss of bone microarchitecture, bone mass reduction, and its increased fragility. The result, thereof, is susceptibility to fracture. Etiology of osteoporosis is polymorph. Its socio-medical importance is enormous, since there is one osteoporotic fracture every 20 sec. worldwide. Million and six hundred thousand osteoporotic fractures occur annualy throughout the world. Thyroid gland is susceptible to autoimmune reactions that lead to autoimmune diseases, just like many other organs. The autoimmune disorder is a final consequence of a failure, in some instance, within the crucial mechanism of regulation of self tissue tolerance. The main goal is to prove the presence of osteoporosis, its inexpensive and quick diagnostics; to make a distinction among the causes that lead to it. In addition, to indicate the importance of osteoporosis that is caused by normal, metabolic processes which are an inevitable part of ageing. Diagnosis of osteoporosis can be done through laboratory, which is a tiresome, time consuming task. Measurements of BMD could be also performed by using new devices. Osteometers could be constructed on the basis of X-ray photon energy or US. Utilization most contemporary one uses laser beam, and it approximates the distance of additional tissue that also absorbs part of energy changing absorption of the reception unit and thus making the measurement results accurate. In diagnosing BMD by osteometer, one faces with certain difficulties. When axial quantitative CT is used, the value may be falsely lower, because of the loss of energy absorbed by aorta which is often calcified in elderly people. In devices with transversal scanning, of the same nature and technology, a part of the energy is being absorbed by transversal and spinal vertebrals. After the research, one may conclude that the most

  1. Hot and cold: coexistent Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in a patient with Schmidt's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Sowjanya; Naha, Kushal; Hande, Manjunath; Vivek, Ganapathiraman

    2014-05-21

    A 37-year-old housewife presented with generalised fatigue, palpitations and weight loss over the past 3 months. Physical examination revealed signs of hyperthyroidism. Thyroid function tests confirmed the presence of thyrotoxicosis. Pertechnetate radionuclide imaging of the thyroid showed diffusely increased radiotracer uptake consistent with Graves' disease and a cold nodule in the right lobe. Needle aspiration from the nodule yielded evidence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The patient also tested strongly positive for antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. Simultaneous laboratory evaluation revealed primary adrenal failure and probable pernicious anaemia, thus producing a diagnosis of Schmidt's syndrome. The patient was initiated on appropriate medical therapy for endocrinopathy. Graves' disease was treated with radioablation. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Association of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Noureldine, Salem I; Tufano, Ralph P

    2015-01-01

    The association of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer remains an active focus of research and controversy. Since it was first proposed in 1955, numerous studies have explored the epidemiology and etiology of these concurrent disease processes. The lymphocytic infiltration of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is frequently encountered in thyroid glands resected for a neoplasm. The most frequent association is noted with papillary thyroid cancer. Several recent studies performed on patients undergoing thyroidectomy with coexisting Hashimoto's thyroiditis report an increased prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer, with a favorable disease profile and an improved prognosis, particularly in women. Conversely, some population-based studies using fine-needle aspiration biopsy data report no linkage between serologic Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer, yet they are limited by the lack of definitive pathology. On the other hand, the significantly increased incidence of primary thyroid lymphomas in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis strongly suggests a pathogenetic link between this autoimmune disorder and malignant thyroid lymphoma. The lymphocytic infiltration of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is frequently associated with papillary thyroid cancer and may indeed be a risk factor for developing this type of cancer. Nonetheless, a pathogenesis linking these diseases remains unclear. The relationship between thyroid lymphoma and Hashimoto's thyroiditis appears to be well established.

  3. Reactive lymphoid hyperplasia of the thyroid followed by systemic autoimmune diseases: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Reactive lymphoid hyperplasia is a benign nodular lesion characterized by marked proliferation of non-neoplastic, polyclonal lymphocytes forming follicles. The lesion is found in various organs such as skin, orbit, lung, gastrointestinal tract, and liver. However, reactive lymphoid hyperplasia in the thyroid gland is extremely rare. Here, we present an interesting case of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia in the thyroid, which suggests the nature of the disease. Case presentation A 74-year-old Japanese man was referred to our institute because of a growing well-demarcated irregular-shaped mass in the right lobe of the thyroid. Malignant lymphoma was suspected by cytology, and right lobectomy was conducted. A final diagnosis of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia was made by the intimate investigation of the surgical specimen, with evidence of polyclonal and non-neoplastic lymphatic proliferations forming follicles with an active germinal center. After an initial uneventful postoperative course, our patient developed severe symptoms of systemic rheumatic arthritis, and alterations in autoimmune reaction, including clinically overt chronic thyroiditis, were identified. Conclusions Our case demonstrated important clinical information on reactive lymphoid hyperplasia of the thyroid, and suggested the importance of differential diagnosis, and possible close correlation between systemic autoimmune disorder and the disease. PMID:25005726

  4. Pediatric Thyroid Disease: When is Surgery Necessary, and Who Should be Operating on Our Children?

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Christopher; Tuggle, Charles; Solomon, Daniel; Sosa, Julie Ann

    2013-01-01

    Surgical diseases of the thyroid in the pediatric population represent a diverse set of both benign and malignant conditions. Overall, incidence is rare. Benign conditions include Graves’ disease, toxic adenomas, congenital hyperthyroidism, and goiter. Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), with its related familial cancer syndromes, are the most common malignancies. Near-total or total thyroidectomy is the appropriate surgery for thyroid cancer, with/out central lymph node dissection. Emerging practice guidelines from professional societies are helpful, although they generally have not addressed surgical management of the pediatric patient. Thyroidectomy in children is associated with a higher rate of complications, such as recurrent laryngeal nerve injury and hypoparathyroidism, as compared to the surgery in adults. Therefore, it is essential that pediatric thyroidectomy be performed by high-volume thyroid surgeons, regardless of specialty. Case volume to support surgical expertise usually must be borrowed from the adult experience, given the relative paucity of pediatric thyroidectomies at an institutional level. These surgeons should work as part of a multidisciplinary team that includes pediatric endocrinologists and anesthesiologists, pediatricians, nuclear medicine physicians, and pathologists to afford children the best clinical outcomes. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23149389

  5. Routine calcitonin measurement in nodular thyroid disease management: is it worthwhile?

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Yigit; Ozdemir, Murat; Ertunc, Gozde; Demir, Batuhan; Icoz, Gokhan; Akyildiz, Mahir; Yilmaz, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of routine calcitonin measurement in patients with nodular thyroid disease. Methods Consecutive patients with nodular thyroid disease (n = 640) were studied. Serum calcitonin levels were measured under basal conditions, and when basal values were between 10–100 pg/mL, testing was repeated after pentagastrin (PG) stimulation. Patients with previously diagnosed or familial medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) were excluded. Patients were operated on when basal or stimulated calcitonin >100 pg/mL or when other surgical indications were present. Results Four cases of MTC were identified. MTC was diagnosed in 75% of patients with basal calcitonin >100 pg/mL. One out of 11 patients with basal calcitonin between 10–100 pg/mL was diagnosed with MTC. PG stimulation resulted in elevation in 4 cases, where 1 case was diagnosed with MTC. Positive predictive value for basal calcitonin levels in the preoperative diagnosis of MTC was 5% for values between 10–100 pg/mL and 100% for values >100 pg/mL. Possible reasons for false positivity were papillary thyroid cancer in 17%, renal insufficiency in 8.3%, Hashimoto thyroiditis in 17% and β-blocker use in 33%. Positive predictive value for the PG test (>100 pg/mL) was 25% in the entire series. The cost of adding calcitonin measurement (±PG stimulation) to the preoperative work-up, resulted in €912.68 per MTC patient to detect the disease. Conclusion Basal calcitonin measurement together with PG stimulation in cases of basal calcitonin >10 pg/mL detects MTC in 0.62% of patients with nodular thyroid disease. PMID:28382288

  6. A 2016 Italian Survey about the Clinical Use of Selenium in Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Negro, Roberto; Attanasio, Roberto; Grimaldi, Franco; Marcocci, Claudio; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Papini, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Background Selenium (Se) is a trace element that plays key roles in thyroid physiology. Se deficiency is associated with increased risk of thyroid disease. Some evidence suggests that Se supplementation may be beneficial in autoimmune thyroid disease (either hypo- or hyperthyroidism). Objectives We sought to examine the use of Se in daily clinical practice among Italian endocrinologists. Methods Members of the Associazione Medici Endocrinologi (AME) were invited to participate in a web-based survey investigating the use of Se in different clinical conditions. Results A total of 815 individuals (43.2% of AME members) participated in the survey, 778 of whom completed all of the sections. Among these respondents, 85.2% considered using Se for thyroid disease (58.1% rarely/occasionally and 27.1% often/always), and 79.4% prescribed Se for chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) (39.1% sometimes and 40.3% often/always). About two thirds of the respondents considered Se use in cases of subclinical autoimmune hypothyroidism, and about 40% had suggested Se use for patients with AIT who were planning pregnancy or already pregnant. About one fourth of the respondents had used Se for mild Graves' orbitopathy. Regarding the suggested daily dosage of Se, 60% of the respondents answered 100-200 µg, 20-30% recommended <100 µg, and 10-20% recommended >200 µg. Conclusions Se use is widely considered in daily clinical practice. Moreover, Se supplementation is often used or suggested for purposes extending beyond those supported by evidence-based medicine. Ongoing studies will better clarify how Se treatment can be properly utilized in thyroid disease management. PMID:27843806

  7. Enhanced thyroid iodine metabolism in patients with triiodothyronine-predominant Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Takamatsu, J.; Hosoya, T.; Naito, N.; Yoshimura, H.; Kohno, Y.; Tarutani, O.; Kuma, K.; Sakane, S.; Takeda, K.; Mozai, T.

    1988-01-01

    Some patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease have increased serum T3 and normal or even low serum T4 levels during treatment with antithyroid drugs. These patients with elevated serum T3 to T4 ratios rarely have a remission of their hyperthyroidism. The aim of this study was to investigate thyroid iodine metabolism in such patients, whom we termed T3-predominant Graves' disease. Mean thyroid radioactive iodine uptake was 51.0 +/- 18.1% ( +/- SD) at 3 h, and it decreased to 38.9 +/- 20.1% at 24 h in 31 patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease during treatment. It was 20.0 +/- 11.4% at 3 h and increased to 31.9 +/- 16.0% at 24 h in 17 other patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease who had normal serum T3 and T4 levels and a normal serum T3 to T4 ratio during treatment (control Graves' disease). The activity of serum TSH receptor antibodies was significantly higher in the patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease than in control Graves' disease patients. From in vitro studies of thyroid tissue obtained at surgery, both thyroglobulin content and iodine content in thyroglobulin were significantly lower in patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease than in the control Graves' disease patients. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity determined by a guaiacol assay was 0.411 +/- 0.212 g.u./mg protein in the T3-predominant Graves' disease patients, significantly higher than that in the control Graves' disease patients. Serum TPO autoantibody levels determined by immunoprecipitation also were greater in T3-predominant Graves' disease patients than in control Graves' disease patients. Binding of this antibody to TPO slightly inhibited the enzyme activity of TPO, but this effect of the antibody was similar in the two groups of patients.

  8. May the Thyroid Gland and Thyroperoxidase Participate in Nitrosylation of Serum Proteins and Sporadic Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed Central

    García-Moreno, José-Manuel; Martín de Pablos, Angel; Chacón, José

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The research group has detected nitrosative stress and a singular version of nitrosylated serum α-synuclein in serum of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Dysfunction of the thyroid gland has been proposed to be linked to this disease. The aim of the study was to know if the thyroid gland is involved in idiopathic PD and nitrosative stress. We studied 50 patients (early and advanced disease patients), 35 controls, and 6 subjects with thyroidectomy. Clinical characteristics, serum thyroperoxidase levels, and 3-nitrotyrosine proteins were analyzed. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting methods were employed. The findings indicated that the prevalence of two thyroid dysfunctions (hyper- or hypothyroidism) was not found to be different in patients relative to controls. However, the levels of the enzyme thyroperoxidase were found to be elevated in early disease patients (p<0.006), not in advanced disease subjects, and these levels were negatively correlated with serum 3-nitrotyrosine proteins (p<0.05), the indicators of nitrosative stress. The thyroidectomized subjects showed very low levels of serum 3-nitrotyrosine proteins (78% reduction vs. controls) and, among these proteins, the nitrosylated serum α-synuclein was nearly absent. These observations lead to the hypothesis that the thyroid gland and thyroperoxidase participate in nitrosylation of serum proteins and they could influence Parkinsonian nitrosative stress as well as nitrosylation of serum α-synuclein, a potentially pathogenic factor. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2143–2148. PMID:25125346

  9. Histologic Findings and Cytological Alterations in Thyroid Nodules After Radioactive Iodine Treatment for Graves' Disease: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    El Hussein, Siba; Omarzai, Yumna

    2017-06-01

    Unlike the well-documented relation between radiation to the neck and development of papillary thyroid carcinoma, a causal association between radioactive iodine treatment for Graves' disease and development of thyroid malignancy is less defined. However, patients with a background of thyroid dysfunction presenting with clinically palpable thyroid nodules are followed more closely than the average population, and fine needle aspiration is recommended in such circumstances. Cytological examination of aspirates, and histologic examination of tissue provided from patients with a known history of Graves' disease, managed by radioactive iodine therapy can create a diagnostic dilemma, as the distinction between radiation effect and a malignant primary thyroid neoplasm can be very challenging. Thus, pathologists should be aware of the existence of these changes in the setting of radiation therapy for Graves' disease. Providing pathologists with appropriate clinical history of Graves' disease treated with radioactive iodine is of paramount importance in order to prevent an overdiagnosis of malignancy.

  10. Elevated interleukin-1β in peripheral blood mononuclear cells contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases, especially of Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Zhang, Xiaoxu; Dai, Fang; Shen, Jijia; Ren, Cuiping; Zuo, Chunlin; Zhang, Qiu

    2016-08-01

    To explore the relationship between IL-1β expression and two common autoimmune thyroid diseases: Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and Graves' disease (GD). qRT-PCR, Quantiglo ELISA, and flow cytometry were used to evaluate the expression levels of IL-1β in serum, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and thyroid tissue samples from patients with HT or GD. Local infiltration of monocytes was assessed by immunohistochemical study of patients' thyroid tissue samples. Although no significant differences in IL-1β levels were found between samples of serum from patients with HT or GD and normal controls, we found that IL-1β mRNA and protein levels in PBMCs of HT patients were significantly higher than those of patients with GD, which were in turn higher than the level in normal controls. In addition, IL-1β mRNA was also increased in thyroid gland tissue from patients with HT compared to those with GD, and this was accompanied by increased local infiltration of monocytes into thyroid tissues. Correlation analysis of the clinical samples validated the association of high IL-1β levels with the pathogenesis of HT. Our study suggests that IL-1β may be an active etiologic factor in the pathogenesis of HT and thus present a new target for novel diagnostics and treatment.

  11. TNFSF4 Gene Variations Are Related to Early-Onset Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases and Hypothyroidism of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Song, Rong-Hua; Wang, Qiong; Yao, Qiu-Ming; Shao, Xiao-Qing; Li, Ling; Wang, Wen; An, Xiao-Fei; Li, Qian; Zhang, Jin-An

    2016-08-20

    The aim of the current study was to examine whether the polymorphism loci of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4) gene increase the risk of susceptibility to autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) in the Han Chinese population, and a case-control study was performed in a set of 1,048 AITDs patients and 909 normal healthy controls in the study. A total of four tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the TNFSF4 region, including rs7514229, rs1234313, rs16845607 and rs3850641, were genotyped using the method of ligase detection reaction. An association between GG genotype of rs3850641 in TNFSF4 gene and AITDs was found (p = 0.046). Additionally, the clinical sub-phenotype analysis revealed a significant association between GG genotype in rs7514229 and AITDs patients who were ≤18 years of age. Furthermore, rs3850641 variant allele G was in strong association with hypothyroidism in Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) (p = 0.018). The polymorphisms of the TNFSF4 gene may contribute to the susceptibility to AITDs pathogenesis.

  12. Frequent somatic TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer: higher prevalence in advanced forms of the disease.

    PubMed

    Landa, Iñigo; Ganly, Ian; Chan, Timothy A; Mitsutake, Norisato; Matsuse, Michiko; Ibrahimpasic, Tihana; Ghossein, Ronald A; Fagin, James A

    2013-09-01

    TERT encodes the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase, which adds telomere repeats to chromosome ends, thus enabling cell replication. Telomerase activity is required for cell immortalization. Somatic TERT promoter mutations modifying key transcriptional response elements were recently reported in several cancers, such as melanomas and gliomas. The objectives of the study were: 1) to determine the prevalence of TERT promoter mutations C228T and C250T in different thyroid cancer histological types and cell lines; and 2) to establish the possible association of TERT mutations with mutations of BRAF, RAS, or RET/PTC. TERT promoter was PCR-amplified and sequenced in 42 thyroid cancer cell lines and 183 tumors: 80 papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs), 58 poorly differentiated thyroid cancers (PDTCs), 20 anaplastic thyroid cancers (ATCs), and 25 Hurthle cell cancers (HCCs). TERT promoter mutations were found in 98 of 225 (44%) specimens. TERT promoters C228T and C250T were mutually exclusive. Mutations were present in 18 of 80 PTCs (22.5%), in 40 of 78 (51%) advanced thyroid cancers (ATC + PDTC) (P = 3 × 10(-4) vs PTC), and in widely invasive HCCs (4 of 17), but not in minimally invasive HCCs (0 of 8). TERT promoter mutations were seen more frequently in advanced cancers with BRAF/RAS mutations compared to those that were BRAF/RAS wild-type (ATC + PDTC, 67.3 vs 24.1%; P < 10(-4)), whereas BRAF-mutant PTCs were less likely to have TERT promoter mutations than BRAF wild-type tumors (11.8 vs 50.0%; P = .04). TERT promoter mutations are highly prevalent in advanced thyroid cancers, particularly those harboring BRAF or RAS mutations, whereas PTCs with BRAF or RAS mutations are most often TERT promoter wild type. Acquisition of a TERT promoter mutation could extend survival of BRAF- or RAS-driven clones and enable accumulation of additional genetic defects leading to disease progression.

  13. Aggressive Disease Course of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma with Focal Undifferentiated Component: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Saima; Bashir, Humayun; Hassan, Aamna; Mushtaq, Sajid; Jamshed, Arif; Murtaza, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    We report an aggressive papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) with focal undifferentiated component in a 32-year-old female. She had limited disease confined within the thyroid gland at diagnosis. Within 12 months of thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation, thyroglobulin (Tg) levels were elevated. Second radioiodine ablative dose was given, however, stimulated Tg levels showed an upward trend with negative iodine scan within 12 months. An 18F fludeoxyglucose-avid solitary pulmonary nodule that was detected on positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan was resected followed by empiric radioiodine therapy. Within the next 10 months she developed multifocal bone metastases. The multifocal disease was rendered inoperable and treated with external beam radiation. The patient is on follow-up, and the Tg level continues to rise with local disease progression. In a small percentage of patients, PTC behaves as a very aggressive disease despite treatment. Focally undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma is an expression of the extreme end of the spectrum of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. PMID:27751976

  14. Aggressive Disease Course of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma with Focal Undifferentiated Component: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Saima; Bashir, Humayun; Hassan, Aamna; Mushtaq, Sajid; Jamshed, Arif; Murtaza, Ahmad

    2016-10-05

    We report an aggressive papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) with focal undifferentiated component in a 32-year-old female. She had limited disease confined within the thyroid gland at diagnosis. Within 12 months of thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation, thyroglobulin (Tg) levels were elevated. Second radioiodine ablative dose was given, however, stimulated Tg levels showed an upward trend with negative iodine scan within 12 months. An 18F fludeoxyglucose-avid solitary pulmonary nodule that was detected on positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan was resected followed by empiric radioiodine therapy. Within the next 10 months she developed multifocal bone metastases. The multifocal disease was rendered inoperable and treated with external beam radiation. The patient is on follow-up, and the Tg level continues to rise with local disease progression. In a small percentage of patients, PTC behaves as a very aggressive disease despite treatment. Focally undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma is an expression of the extreme end of the spectrum of differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

  15. Individualized Follow-up of Pregnant Women with Asymptomatic Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stoian, Dana; Pantea, Stelian; Margan, Madalin; Timar, Bogdan; Borcan, Florin; Craina, Marius; Craciunescu, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Maternal hormones are essential for the normal fetal development during pregnancy. Autoimmune thyroid disease is a frequent pathology in our iodine replete region. The aim of this study is to evaluate the occurrence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) in cases with known autoimmune thyroid disease, which were in a euthyroid state prior to pregnancy, and to assess the association between supplemental treatments administered and the outcome of the pregnancy. The study is a prospective interventional controlled study. The two cohorts comprise the interventional group, consisting of 109 pregnant women with known autoimmune asymptomatic thyroid disease, without any levothyroxine (LT4) treatment and an aged-matched control group, with an unknown thyroid disease. After the pregnancy, a monthly evaluation of TSH, FT3, and FT4 was performed. Offspring evaluation was made at birth time. 88.8% of the women developed SCH in the first four weeks of pregnancy. Average LT4 doses increased as the pregnancy progressed. The monthly adjustment was 12.5 or 25 μg. All SCH cases developed in the first trimester of pregnancy. There was no significant difference regarding the gestational week, weight, or length at birth between the interventional group and controls, when TSH values were in the optimal range, during the whole pregnancy. Premature birth was described in one case in the interventional group. PMID:26771604

  16. Tinea corporis overlying the thyroid gland after radioiodine (131I) treatment of Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Yedinak, M.A.; Crooks, L.A.; Fox, B.J.

    1986-04-01

    A case of tinea corporis involving the skin overlying the thyroid gland is described in a 36-year-old man who had received radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease. The dermatophytosis mimicked a delayed roentgen erythema. Radiation to the dermis may have locally altered the cell-mediated immunity and predisposed this patient to the dermatophytosis.

  17. Individualized Follow-up of Pregnant Women with Asymptomatic Autoimmune Thyroid Disease.

    PubMed

    Stoian, Dana; Pantea, Stelian; Margan, Madalin; Timar, Bogdan; Borcan, Florin; Craina, Marius; Craciunescu, Mihaela

    2016-01-12

    Maternal hormones are essential for the normal fetal development during pregnancy. Autoimmune thyroid disease is a frequent pathology in our iodine replete region. The aim of this study is to evaluate the occurrence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) in cases with known autoimmune thyroid disease, which were in a euthyroid state prior to pregnancy, and to assess the association between supplemental treatments administered and the outcome of the pregnancy. The study is a prospective interventional controlled study. The two cohorts comprise the interventional group, consisting of 109 pregnant women with known autoimmune asymptomatic thyroid disease, without any levothyroxine (LT4) treatment and an aged-matched control group, with an unknown thyroid disease. After the pregnancy, a monthly evaluation of TSH, FT3, and FT4 was performed. Offspring evaluation was made at birth time. 88.8% of the women developed SCH in the first four weeks of pregnancy. Average LT4 doses increased as the pregnancy progressed. The monthly adjustment was 12.5 or 25 μg. All SCH cases developed in the first trimester of pregnancy. There was no significant difference regarding the gestational week, weight, or length at birth between the interventional group and controls, when TSH values were in the optimal range, during the whole pregnancy. Premature birth was described in one case in the interventional group.

  18. [Thyroid dysfunctions and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Caron, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Advances in understanding the physiology of the thyroid function in normal pregnancy have highlighted the importance of the consequences of abnormal thyroid function on mother and fetal outcomes. Thyroid diseases are common in young women of childbearing age while management of thyroid diseases is relatively straightforward. For each thyroid dysfunction (hypothyroxinemia, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, postpartum thyroiditis), the issues with the obstetric complications of the mother and the fetus are considered. Indeed, early recognition of thyroid diseases during pregnancy and appropriate management has the potential to improve outcome for the mother and the fetus.

  19. Early severe fetal Graves disease in a mother after thyroid ablation and thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Meghan A; Wood, Colleen; Casey, Beret; Hobbins, John; Barbour, Lynn A

    2015-05-01

    Fetal Graves disease rarely presents before 26 weeks of gestation. We report a case of severe fetal Graves disease at 18 weeks of gestation in a mother who had very elevated Graves disease antibodies despite being several years post-thyroid ablative therapy and thyroidectomy. A 36-year-old woman, gravida 1 para 0, with severe Graves disease post-radioiodine ablation followed by thyroidectomy on levothyroxine presented at 18 weeks of gestation for ultrasound examination. Her fetus was found to be severely tachycardic with a goiter. Propylthiouracil was initiated for fetal therapy. Delivery at 34 weeks of gestation was undertaken as a result of preterm premature rupture of membranes. The neonate experienced heart failure and pulmonary hypertension at birth but recovered with appropriate medical therapy. It is possible for fetal Graves disease to develop as early as 18 weeks of gestation, and women who have had thyroid ablation and postsurgical hypothyroidism remain at risk for this serious pregnancy complication.

  20. Atypical Presentation of Hashimoto’s Disease in an Adolescent: Thyroid-Associated Ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kırmızıbekmez, Heves; Yeşiltepe Mutlu, Rahime Gül; Dursun, Fatma; Günay, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Hashitoxicosis is generally differentiated from Graves’ hyperthyroidism by its shorter course and absence of ophthalmopathy. In this case report, we describe an adolescent girl who presented with significant clinical findings of hyperthyroidism, a diffuse goiter with homogenously increased uptake in scintigraphy, and with ocular findings of ophthalmopathy. The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibody test was positive, and the family history revealed thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy. Clinical findings supported the diagnosis of Hashimoto’s disease (HD) in the follow-up period. Radioactive iodine uptake investigation was found to be a reliable method for differential diagnosis. Attention was drawn to the rarity of pediatric cases of HD who present with ophthalmopathy. PMID:25541900

  1. 3,3'-diindolylmethane modulates estrogen metabolism in patients with thyroid proliferative disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rajoria, Shilpi; Suriano, Robert; Parmar, Perminder Singh; Wilson, Yushan Lisa; Megwalu, Uchechukwu; Moscatello, Augustine; Bradlow, H Leon; Sepkovic, Daniel W; Geliebter, Jan; Schantz, Stimson P; Tiwari, Raj K

    2011-03-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer is four to five times higher in women than in men, suggesting a role for estrogen (E₂) in the pathogenesis of thyroid proliferative disease (TPD) that comprises cancer and goiter. The objective of this study was to investigate the antiestrogenic activity of 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), a bioactive compound derived from cruciferous vegetables, in patients with TPD. In this limited phase I clinical trial study, patients found to have TPD were administered 300 mg of DIM per day for 14 days. Patients subsequently underwent a total or partial thyroidectomy, and tissue, urine, and serum samples were collected. Pre- and post-DIM serum and urine samples were analyzed for DIM levels as well as estrogen metabolites. DIM levels were also determined in thyroid tissue samples. DIM was detectable in thyroid tissue, serum, and urine of patients after 14 days of supplementation. Urine analyses revealed that DIM modulated estrogen metabolism in patients with TPD. There was an increase in the ratio of 2-hydroxyestrones (C-2) to 16α-hydroxyestrone (C-16), consistent with antiestrogenic activity that results in more of C-2 product compared with C-16. Our data suggest that DIM enhances estrogen metabolism in TPD patients and can potentially serve as an antiestrogenic dietary supplement to help reduce the risk of developing TPD. The fact that DIM is detected in thyroid tissue implicates that it can manifest its antiestrogenic activity in situ to modulate TPD.

  2. A three-stage expert system based on support vector machines for thyroid disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Ling; Yang, Bo; Wang, Gang; Liu, Jie; Chen, Yi-Dong; Liu, Da-You

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present a three-stage expert system based on a hybrid support vector machines (SVM) approach to diagnose thyroid disease. Focusing on feature selection, the first stage aims at constructing diverse feature subsets with different discriminative capability. Switching from feature selection to model construction, in the second stage, the obtained feature subsets are fed into the designed SVM classifier for training an optimal predictor model whose parameters are optimized by particle swarm optimization (PSO). Finally, the obtained optimal SVM model proceeds to perform the thyroid disease diagnosis tasks using the most discriminative feature subset and the optimal parameters. The effectiveness of the proposed expert system (FS-PSO-SVM) has been rigorously evaluated against the thyroid disease dataset, which is commonly used among researchers who use machine learning methods for thyroid disease diagnosis. The proposed system has been compared with two other related methods including the SVM based on the Grid search technique (Grid-SVM) and the SVM based on Grid search and principle component analysis (PCA-Grid-SVM) in terms of their classification accuracy. Experimental results demonstrate that FS-PSO-SVM significantly outperforms the other ones. In addition, Compared to the existing methods in previous studies, the proposed system has achieved the highest classification accuracy reported so far by 10-fold cross-validation (CV) method, with the mean accuracy of 97.49% and with the maximum accuracy of 98.59%. Promisingly, the proposed FS-PSO-SVM expert system might serve as a new candidate of powerful tools for diagnosing thyroid disease with excellent performance.

  3. Expression of new human inorganic pyrophosphatase in thyroid diseases: Its intimate association with hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Eisuke . E-mail: koikeei@med.saga-u.ac.jp; Toda, Shuji; Yokoi, Fumiaki; Izuhara, Kenji; Koike, Norimasa; Itoh, Kouichi; Miyazaki, Kohji; Sugihara, Hajime

    2006-03-17

    Inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase) controls the level of inorganic pyrophosphate produced by biosynthesis of protein, RNA, and DNA. Thus, PPase is essential for life. PPase expression is unclear in the thyroid. We cloned a new human PPase, phospholysine phosphohistidine inorganic pyrophosphate phosphatase (LHPPase), and established a rabbit polyclonal anti-LHPPase antibody. This is First study to determine the PPase expression by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Intranuclear LHPPase expression of thyrocytes was enhanced most prominently in Graves' disease and autonomously functional thyroid nodule. To estimate a regulating factor of subcellular localization of LHPPase, we examined its expression of Graves' disease-derived thyrocytes in vitro with the disease-originated serum. Nuclear expression of LHPPase was lost in cultured thyrocytes even with the serum, while its cytoplasmic expression was retained. The data suggest that increased expression of LHPPase is associated with hyperthyroidism. Intranuclear expression of LHPPase may not be regulated by Graves' disease-derived serum factors.

  4. The influence of cyclosporin A on experimental autoimmune thyroid disease in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, A.M.; Rennie, D.P.; Weetman, A.P.; Hassman, R.A.; Foord, S.M.; Dieguez, C.; Hall, R.

    1983-01-01

    Female PVG/c rats, thymectomised on weaning and given 4 courses of whole body irradiation to a total dose of 1000 rads, developed experimental autoimmune thyroid disease (EAITD) as assessed by histological evidence of thyroiditis and circulating levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies. Hypothyroidism resulted. Induction of the disease was associated with a highly significant fall in T lymphocyte numbers. Eight weeks after their last dose of irradiation the animals commenced treatment with cyclosporin A (10 mg/kg rat/day, intragastrically) and were treated for varying time intervals thereafter. The reversal of the T lymphocyte helper: suppressor ratio on cyclosporin A therapy was associated with a significant improvement in the disease process. The alterations in the T cell subsets and in the disease lasted only as long as the drug was administered and thereafter reverted towards that seen in the control groups of animals receiving no treatment.

  5. Cutoff value of thyroid uptake of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate to discriminate between Graves' disease and painless thyroiditis: a single center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Suzuki, Ruriko; Kasai, Takatoshi; Onose, Hiroyuki; Komiya, Koji; Goto, Hiromasa; Takeno, Kageumi; Ishii, Shinya; Sato, Junko; Honda, Akira; Kawano, Yui; Himuro, Miwa; Yamada, Emiko; Yamada, Tetsu; Watada, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid uptake of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate is a useful way to determine the cause of thyrotoxicosis. In daily clinical practice, (99m)Tc-pertechnetate uptake is used to discriminate between Graves' disease and painless thyroiditis when clinical information is not enough to make the distinction. However, since the optimal cutoff value of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate uptake has not yet been elucidated, our aim was to determine this value. We recruited patients with thyrotoxicosis in whom (99m)Tc-pertechnetate uptake was measured in clinical settings between 2009 and 2013. Three experienced endocrinologists (who were blinded to the value of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate uptake and initial treatment) diagnosed the cause of thyrotoxicosis based on thyrotropin, free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, and thyrotropin receptor antibody levels, and by ultrasound findings and using images of thyroid uptake of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate without the actual values. Ninety-four patients diagnosed as having Graves' disease or painless thyroiditis were finally included. According to the diagnosis, the optimal cutoff value of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate uptake was determined by receiver operating characteristics analysis. A cutoff value of 1.0% provided optimal sensitivity and specificity of 96.6% and 97.1%, respectively. Then, its validity was confirmed in 78 patients with confirmed Graves' disease or painless thyroiditis diagnosed at another institute. Applying this cutoff value to the patients with thyrotoxicosis revealed positive and negative predictive values for Graves' disease of 100% and 88.9%, respectively. In conclusion, a cutoff value for (99m)Tc-pertechnetate uptake of 1.0% was useful to discriminate between Graves' disease and painless thyroiditis.

  6. Multicenter study on TGPO autoantibody prevalence in various thyroid and non-thyroid diseases; relationships with thyroglobulin and thyroperoxidase autoantibody parameters.

    PubMed

    Estienne, V; Duthoit, C; Costanzo, V D; Lejeune, P J; Rotondi, M; Kornfeld, S; Finke, R; Lazarus, J H; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Franke, W G; Smyth, P; D'Herbomez, M; Conte-Devolx, B; Persani, L; Carella, C; Jourdain, J R; Izembart, M; Toubert, M E; Pinchera, A; Weetman, A; Sapin, R; Carayon, P; Ruf, J

    1999-12-01

    TGPO autoantibodies (aAbs) that bind simultaneously to thyroglobulin (Tg) and thyroperoxidase (TPO) are present in the serum of patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) and have been found to differ from monospecific Tg and TPO aAbs. To obtain further insights on the prevalence defined as the rate of occurrence and significance of TGPO aAbs in a large population, we carried out a collaborative study involving 15 European teams. Serum samples from 3122 patients with various thyroid and non-thyroid diseases and normal subjects were assayed using a novel TGPO aAb detection kit. This test was designed so that TGPO aAbs are trapped between the Tg-coated solid phase and the soluble TPO labeled with a radioiodinated monoclonal antibody. Only three out of the 220 normal subjects (prevalence of 1.4%) were found to have positive TGPO aAb levels, which were mainly observed in the patients with AITD: the group of patients suffering from Hashimoto's thyroiditis had a TGPO aAb prevalence of 40.5% (n=437 patients), those with Graves' disease, a prevalence of 34.6% (n=645) and those with post-partum thyroiditis, 16.0% (n=243). Among the non-AITD patients with positive TGPO aAb levels, the TGPO aAb prevalence ranged from 20.7% among those with thyroid cancer (n=246) to 0% among those with toxic thyroid nodules (n=47). Among the patients with non-thyroid diseases, the TGPO aAb prevalence ranged from 9.8% in the case of Biermer's pernicious anemia (n=78) to 0% in that of premature ovarian failure (n=44). It is worth noting that the groups showing the highest TGPO aAb prevalence also contained the patients with the highest TGPO aAb titers. Statistical comparisons between the TGPO aAb prevalences in the various groups showed that TGPO aAb could be used as a parameter to distinguish between the groups of Hashimoto's and Graves' patients and between the women with post-partum thyroiditis and the post-partum women with only Tg and/or TPO aAb established during early pregnancy

  7. Changes in the thyroid function of Graves' disease patients treated by subtotal thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Kiminori; Ito, Koichi; Nagahama, Mitsuji; Kitagawa, Wataru; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Ohkuwa, Keiko; Yano, Yukiko; Uruno, Takashi; Akaishi, Junko; Suzuki, Akifumi; Masaki, Chie; Ito, Kunihiko

    2012-01-01

    The extent of thyroidectomy in Graves' disease is still a matter of controversy. Subtotal thyroidectomy has been used as the standard surgical procedure for Graves' disease in Japan, but high hyperthyroidism relapse rates have been reported. We retrospectively studied serial changes in the thyroid function Graves' disease patients after they had been treated by subtotal thyroidectomy and assessed whether subtotal thyroidectomy should be recommended as the standard surgical procedure for the treatment of Graves' disease. The subjects were 478 Graves' disease patients who underwent subtotal thyroidectomy at our institution between 1994 and 1997 and were followed up on a regular basis, and their thyroid function 2-3 years after surgery (the early period) and 8-10 years after surgery (the late period) was evaluated and compared. The evaluations in the late period showed that 57% of the euthyroid patients in the early period remained euthyroid, 30% had developed a relapse of hyperthyroidism, and 13 % had become hypothyroid. Approximately 80% of the patients who were overtly hyperthyroid or overtly hypothyroid in the early period remained so in the late period. During the entire periods 47 patients had subclinical hyperthyroidism and were followed up without any postoperative medication. Twenty (42.6%) of them developed overt hyperthyroidism, 11 (23.4%) experienced a spontaneous remission, and 16 (34%) continued to be subclinically hyperthyroid. Because thyroid function after subtotal thyroidectomy is unstable and reduces quality of life, subtotal thyroidectomy is concluded not to be suitable as a standard surgical procedure for the treatment of Graves' disease.

  8. Dual-Directional Immunomodulatory Effects of Corbrin Capsule on Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    He, Tianyi; Zhao, Ruxing; Lu, Yiran; Li, Wenjuan; Hou, Xinguo; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the effects of Corbrin Capsule (CS-C-Q80), a drug derived from Cordyceps sinensis (Berk.) Sacc., on autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). Methods. 44 Patients with Graves's disease (GD) and 56 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) were randomly assigned to treatment group (GD-Tx and HT-Tx) or control group (GD-Ct and HT-Ct). The control groups were given methimazole or levothyroxine only while the treatment groups were given Corbrin Capsule (2.0 g tid) besides the same conventional prescriptions as control groups. Thyroid hormones, thyroid antibodies, and T lymphocyte subsets were quantified at baseline and 24 weeks posttreatment. Results. Significant drop of serum anti-TPO-Ab levels was observed in both GD-Tx and HT-Tx groups. Before treatment, GD patients had higher helper T cells compared to cytotoxic T cells, while HT patients suffered from a nearly inverted proportion of helper T/cytotoxic T cells. There was a significant drop of the helper T/cytotoxic T cells ratio in GD-Tx to the median of the normal ranges after Corbrin treatment for 24 weeks, while that in HT-Tx was elevated. Conclusion. Corbrin Capsule could restore the balance between helper T and cytotoxic T cells in both GD and HT patients with dual-directional immunomodulatory effects. And it could significantly reduce the autoantibody levels in both GD and HT. PMID:27721890

  9. Assessment of significance of features acquired from thyroid ultrasonograms in Hashimoto's disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This paper concerns the analysis of the features obtained from thyroid ultrasound images in left and right transverse and longitudinal sections. In the image analysis, the thyroid lobe is treated as a texture for healthy subjects and patients with Hashimoto’s disease. The applied methods of analysis and image processing were profiled to obtain 10 features of the image. Then, their significance in the classification was shown. Material In this study, the examined group consisted of 29 healthy subjects aged 18 to 60 and 65 patients with Hashimoto's disease. For each subject, four ultrasound images were taken. They were all in transverse and longitudinal sections of the right and left lobe of the thyroid, which gave 376 images in total. Method 10 different features obtained from each ultrasound image were suggested. The analyzed thyroid lobe was marked automatically or manually with a rectangular element. Results The analysis of 10 features and the creation for each one of them their own decision tree configuration resulted in distinguishing 3 most significant features. The results of the quality of classification show accuracy above 94% for a non-trimmed decision tree. PMID:22898180

  10. Epidemiology of the rotator cuff tears: a new incidence related to thyroid disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Francesco; Osti, Leonardo; Padulo, Johnny; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: in the last years the incidence of rotator cuff tears increased and one main cause still waiting to be clarified. Receptors for thyroid hormones in rotator cuff tendons suggest possible effects on tendons metabolism and status. We undertook a retrospective, observational cohort study of 441 patients who underwent arthroscopic and mini-open repair for non traumatic degenerative rotator cuff tears. Methods: all the patients, predominantly females (63%), were interview to assess the relationship (frequency for class age “20 yrs” and factor analysis) between lesions of the rotator cuff with the following variables: gender, thyroid disease, smoker, taking medications for diabetes, hypertension or high cholesterol; presence of associated conditions (diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia). Results: thyroid disease is highly frequently (until 63% for 60<80 yrs) in females group independent to the age. Conversely, males showed a high frequency for smoker 37<62% until 80 yrs and 50% hypercholesterolemia over 80 yrs for the clinical variable studied. Conclusions: this is the first clinical report that shown a relationship between thyroid pathologies and non-traumatic rotator cuff tear as increased risk factors. PMID:25489548

  11. Thyroid Diseases and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes in a Contemporary US Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Männistö, Tuija; Grewal, Jagteshwar; Xie, Yunlong; Chen, Zhen; Laughon, S. Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Context: Thyroid diseases are inconsistently reported to increase risk for pregnancy complications. Objective: The objective of this study was to study pregnancy complications associated with common and uncommon thyroid diseases. Design, Setting, and Participants: We analyzed singleton pregnancies (N = 223 512) from a retrospective US cohort, the Consortium on Safe Labor (2002–2008). Thyroid diseases and outcomes were derived from electronic medical records. Multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations estimated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 99% confidence intervals (99% CI). Main Outcome Measures: Hypertensive diseases, diabetes, preterm birth, cesarean sections, inductions, and intensive care unit (ICU) admissions were analyzed. Results: Primary hypothyroidism was associated with increased odds of preeclampsia (OR = 1.47, 99% CI = 1.20–1.81), superimposed preeclampsia (OR = 2.25, 99% CI = 1.53–3.29), gestational diabetes (OR = 1.57, 99% CI = 1.33–1.86), preterm birth (OR = 1.34, 99% CI = 1.17–1.53), induction (OR = 1.15, 99% CI = 1.04–1.28), cesarean section (prelabor, OR = 1.31, 99% CI = 1.11–1.54; after spontaneous labor OR = 1.38, 99% CI = 1.14–1.66), and ICU admission (OR = 2.08, 99% CI = 1.04–4.15). Iatrogenic hypothyroidism was associated with increased odds of placental abruption (OR = 2.89, 99% CI = 1.14–7.36), breech presentation (OR = 2.09, 99% CI = 1.07–4.07), and cesarean section after spontaneous labor (OR = 2.05, 99% CI = 1.01–4.16). Hyperthyroidism was associated with increased odds of preeclampsia (OR = 1.78, 99% CI = 1.08–2.94), superimposed preeclampsia (OR = 3.64, 99% CI = 1.82–7.29), preterm birth (OR = 1.81, 99% CI = 1.32–2.49), induction (OR = 1.40, 99% CI = 1.06–1.86), and ICU admission (OR = 3.70, 99% CI = 1.16–11.80). Conclusions: Thyroid diseases were associated with obstetrical, labor, and delivery complications. Although we lacked information on treatment during pregnancy

  12. Differences in heart rate profile during exercise among subjects with subclinical thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Maor, Elad; Kivity, Shaye; Kopel, Eran; Segev, Shlomo; Sidi, Yechezkel; Goldenberg, Ilan; Olchovsky, David

    2013-10-01

    Clinical thyroid disease is associated with changes in the cardiovascular system, including changes in heart rate during exercise. However, data on the relation between subclinical thyroid disease (SCTD) and heart rate during exercise are limited. We investigated 3799 apparently healthy subjects who were evaluated in the Institute for Preventive Medicine at the Sheba Medical Center. All subjects answered standard health questionnaires; were examined by a physician; completed routine blood tests including thyrotropin, free triiodothyronine, and free thyroxine levels; and underwent a treadmill exercise according to the Bruce protocol. Subjects with known thyroid disease or those who were taking thyroid-related drugs were excluded from the analysis. Heart rate profile was compared between patients with subclinical hypothyroidism (SCHypoT), patients with normal thyroid function, and patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism (SCHyperT) using propensity score matching. Seventy patients had SCHyperT and 273 had SCHypoT. Compared with age- and sex-matched normal subjects, SCHyperT subjects had a higher resting heart rate (83±17 vs. 76±12 beats per minute [bpm], p=0.006), a significantly higher recovery heart rate (94±12 vs. 90±12 bpm, p=0.045), and a significantly lower heart rate reserve (80±20 vs. 87±18 bpm, p=0.006). Subjects with SCHypoT showed a trend toward a lower resting heart rate (75±13 vs. 77±15 bpm, p=0.09) and had a significantly lower recovery heart rate (88±12 vs. 90±13 bpm, p=0.035). There was no significant difference in exercise duration or blood pressure between subjects with SCTD and their matched normal controls. Subjects with SCTD have a significantly different heart rate profile during rest, exercise, and recovery.

  13. Defining Optimal Health Range for Thyroid Function Based on the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Chaker, Layal; Korevaar, Tim I M; Rizopoulos, Dimitris; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Völzke, Henry; Hofman, Albert; Rodondi, Nicolas; Cappola, Anne R; Peeters, Robin P; Franco, Oscar H

    2017-08-01

    Reference ranges of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) are defined by their distribution in apparently healthy populations (2.5th and 97.5th percentiles), irrespective of disease risk, and are used as cutoffs for defining and clinically managing thyroid dysfunction. To provide proof of concept in defining optimal health ranges of thyroid function based on cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality risk. In all, 9233 participants from the Rotterdam Study (mean age, 65.0 years) were followed up (median, 8.8 years) from baseline to date of death or end of follow-up period (2012), whichever came first (689 cases of CVD mortality). We calculated 10-year absolute risks of CVD mortality (defined according to the SCORE project) using a Fine and Gray competing risk model per percentiles of TSH and FT4, modeled nonlinearly and with sex and age adjustments. Overall, FT4 level >90th percentile was associated with a predicted 10-year CVD mortality risk >7.5% (P = 0.005). In men, FT4 level >97th percentile was associated with a risk of 10.8% (P < 0.001). In participants aged ≥65 years, absolute risk estimates were <10.0% below the 30th percentile (∼14.5 pmol/L or 1.10 ng/dL) and ≥15.0% above the 97th percentile of FT4 (∼22 pmol/L or 1.70 ng/dL). We describe absolute 10-year CVD mortality risks according to thyroid function (TSH and FT4) and suggest that optimal health ranges for thyroid function can be defined according to disease risk and are possibly sex and age dependent. These results need to be replicated with sufficient samples and representative populations.

  14. Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis due to Both Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis in the Same Three Patients.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Ashley; Puthenpura, Vidya; Marshall, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and Graves' disease (GD) are the 2 most common autoimmune disease processes affecting the thyroid gland. The relationship between the two is complex and not clearly understood. It has been theorized that HT and GD are 2 separate disease processes due to unique genetic differences demonstrated by genome studies. On the other hand, based on occurrence of both HT and GD in monozygotic twins and within the same family, they have been regarded to represent 2 ends of the same spectrum. This case report describes 3 patients who presented with thyrotoxicosis due to both GD and HT. The initial presentation was thyrotoxicosis due to GD treated with antithyroid medication followed by temporary resolution. They all subsequently experienced recurrence of thyrotoxicosis in the form of Hashitoxicosis due to HT, and then eventually all developed thyrotoxicosis due to GD, requiring radioablation therapy.

  15. Usefulness of preoperative serum calcitonin in patients with nodular thyroid disease without suspicious history or cytology for medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rosário, Pedro Weslley; Penna, Gustavo Cancela; Brandão, Kamilla; Souza, Bárbara Érika

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of preoperative serum calcitonin (sCT) in patients with nodular disease without suspicion of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in history or cytology. sCT was measured before thyroidectomy in 494 patients with nodular disease who had no family history of MTC or multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, and no cytological suspicion of MTC. Basal sCT was < 10 ng/mL in 482 patients and none of them had MTC. One patient with basal sCT > 100 pg/mL had MTC. Among the 11 patients with basal sCT between 10 and 100 pg/mL, MTC was diagnosed in only one. The two patients with MTC were submitted to total thyroidectomy, combined with elective lymph node dissection indicated exclusively based on hypercalcitoninemia, and sCT was undetectable after six months. Preoperative sCT is useful for the detection of sporadic MTC in patients with nodular disease, even in the absence of suspicious history or cytology.

  16. Clinical and laboratory assessment of thyroid abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.M.

    1985-09-01

    Clinical assessment of the patient with suspected thyroid disease remains an important part of the workup. Available laboratory tests of thyroid function include measurements of serum thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone, titers of autoantibodies involved with Graves' disease and thyroiditis, and thyroid imaging and uptake techniques. The usefulness and limitations of each of these tests are reviewed.

  17. Proof of concept of the WOMED model of benign thyroid disease: Restitution of thyroid morphology after correction of physical and psychological stressors and magnesium supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo, Roy; Moncayo, Helga

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of a combined supplementation with magnesium, selenium and coenzyme Q10 on the morphology of the thyroid in patients with benign diseases. The clinical examination and treatment approach aims additionally at treating musculoskeletal and psychological stress. Methods A group of 8 patients (5 with hyperthyroidism, 3 with hypothyroidism) who initially attended a public institution received additional treatment at our private institution. The basic pharmacological treatment, i.e. substitution or thyreostatic, was kept unchanged. The inclusion of patients required good quality ultrasound images to be available. Results Initially the changes of the musculoskeletal system were corrected. Following this, stress components were also treated. After a period of 2–4 years of supplementation we observed a normalization of thyroid morphology as evidenced on ultrasound while at the same time there was a reduction of perfusion intensity. Thyroid antibody titers decreased in the majority of cases. Failure of the treatment was seen in 2 cases of chronic thyroiditis that was present for more than 10 years. The ultrasound images of these patients suggest a possible fibrosis. Conclusions In spite of the limitation due to the small number of cases, our observational study has delivered proof of concept for our examination and treatment model for benign thyroid disease. General significance Our results challenge validity of the prevailing dogma of a destructive unstoppable “autoimmune” destructive process of the gland. At the same time it shows new therapeutic options for patients with thyroid disease. PMID:26672672

  18. The coexistence of primary hyperparathyroidism and thyroid nodules: should the preoperative work-up of the parathyroid and the thyroid diseases be specifically adjusted?

    PubMed Central

    SCERRINO, G.; ATTARD, M.; LO PICCOLO, C.; ATTARD, A.; MELFA, G.I.; RASPANTI, C.; ZARCONE, M.; BONVENTRE, S.; MAZZOLA, S.; GULOTTA, G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and objectives Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) can be found in concomitance with thyroid disease (TD) in a high frequency of cases. In this context the diagnostic exams for localizing the enlarged parathyroid(s) gland(s) could be less reliable or non-conclusive. Moreover, the thyroid carcinoma seems to be more frequent compared to that isolated thyroid desease and, therefore, carefully investigated. The main goal of the present study is to evaluate which diagnostic tool (US, MIBI) is more reliable for localizing the site of the PTH hypersecretion and to confirm if it is always advantageous a combination of both exams. Besides, we evaluated the incidence of thyroid carcinoma in our series of patients. Patients and methods A review of available data of 73 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy + parathyroidectomy from 2003 and 2014 was performed. The preoperative workup included systematically US and MIBI whose results were considered true positive when at least the side (left/right) of the parathyroid affected were concordant with the surgical report, settled as the gold standard, according to the Cox non-nested model. The connection between the diagnostic results of US versus MIBI was calculated with the Cohen K index for evaluating their overlap. The average of the thyroid carcinoma were also calculated. Results The difference between respectively US versus surgical report (p value=0.73) and MIBI versus surgical report (p value=0.81) were not significant. The low Cohen K index showed that both US and MIBI are complementary. In 23 patients (32,9%) a thyroid carcinoma was found. Conclusions The association of MIBI and neck US is mandatory in the first evaluation of patients undergoing thyroidectomy and parathyroid excision simultaneously. The high prevalence of thyroid carcinoma in this specific context suggests a more aggressive diagnostic and surgical behaviour. PMID:27734796

  19. Analysis of risk factors of rapid thyroidal radioiodine-131 turnover in Graves' disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruiguo; Tan, Jian; Wang, Renfei; Zhang, Guizhi; Jia, Qiang; Meng, Zhaowei; Zhang, Yueqian

    2017-08-15

    Rapid iodine-131((131)I) turnover in the thyroid gland is an important feature of Graves' disease (GD) and also a strong predictor of radioiodine therapy failure. The aim of this study was to explore the predictors of rapid (131)I turnover. The clinical data on 2543 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into 2 groups depending on present or absent with rapid (131)I turnover defined as a 4-hour to 24-hour (131)I uptake ratio of ≥1. Overall, 590 cases (23.2%) had a rapid (131)I turnover. In the univariate analysis, gender, age, FT3/FT4 concentration, disease duration, with or without antithyroid drugs (ATD), time of ATD, thyroid weight and thyroid textures displayed significant differences. Cutoff values of age, FT3 and thyroid weight to predict rapid (131)I turnover were 38 years, 35 pmol/l and 56 g by receiver operating characteristic curves. Binary logistic regression analysis further revealed higher probability of rapid (131)I turnover in patients with thyroid weight ≥56 g (odds ratio [OR]:3.7, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.032-4.559), age <38 years (OR:2.3, 95%CI: 1.906-2.856), FT3 concentration ≥35 pmol/l (OR:7.6, 95%CI: 5.857-8.563) and females (OR:2.2, 95%CI: 1.757-2.791). In conclusion, larger goiters, younger age, higher FT3 concentration and females are independently associated with rapid (131)I turnover in GD patients.

  20. Radioiodine therapy in benign thyroid diseases: effects, side effects, and factors affecting therapeutic outcome.

    PubMed

    Bonnema, Steen Joop; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2012-12-01

    Radioiodine ((131)I) therapy of benign thyroid diseases was introduced 70 yr ago, and the patients treated since then are probably numbered in the millions. Fifty to 90% of hyperthyroid patients are cured within 1 yr after (131)I therapy. With longer follow-up, permanent hypothyroidism seems inevitable in Graves' disease, whereas this risk is much lower when treating toxic nodular goiter. The side effect causing most concern is the potential induction of ophthalmopathy in predisposed individuals. The response to (131)I therapy is to some extent related to the radiation dose. However, calculation of an exact thyroid dose is error-prone due to imprecise measurement of the (131)I biokinetics, and the importance of internal dosimetric factors, such as the thyroid follicle size, is probably underestimated. Besides these obstacles, several potential confounders interfere with the efficacy of (131)I therapy, and they may even interact mutually and counteract each other. Numerous studies have evaluated the effect of (131)I therapy, but results have been conflicting due to differences in design, sample size, patient selection, and dose calculation. It seems clear that no single factor reliably predicts the outcome from (131)I therapy. The individual radiosensitivity, still poorly defined and impossible to quantify, may be a major determinant of the outcome from (131)I therapy. Above all, the impact of (131)I therapy relies on the iodine-concentrating ability of the thyroid gland. The thyroid (131)I uptake (or retention) can be stimulated in several ways, including dietary iodine restriction and use of lithium. In particular, recombinant human thyrotropin has gained interest because this compound significantly amplifies the effect of (131)I therapy in patients with nontoxic nodular goiter.

  1. Thyroid malignancy markers on sonography are common in patients with benign thyroid disease and previous iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krejbjerg, Anne; Brilli, Lucia; Pikelis, Arunas; Pedersen, Henrik Baymler; Laurberg, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of benign thyroid nodules on sonography and ultrasound elastography in a population exposed to iodine deficiency. We conducted a prospective systematic evaluation of preoperative thyroid sonography and elastography in patients assigned for surgical excision of benign thyroid nodules. Two experienced sonographers performed all sonographic and elastographic examinations. Thyroid nodules were evaluated by 7 generally accepted sonographic malignancy risk markers and assigned an elasticity score on elastography. The final diagnosis of a benign thyroid nodule was based on histopathologic analysis of resected thyroid gland tissue. We evaluated 232 thyroid nodules in 105 patients (86 women and 19 men). In total, 57% of the examined nodules had 1 or 2 malignancy risk markers present, and 24% did not have any markers present. A solid nodule larger than 15 mm was the most common malignancy risk marker observed (63%), followed by low elasticity (33%), microcalcifications (26%), and hypoechogenicity (15%). In an analysis stratified according to the number of nodules (solitary versus multiple), low elasticity was described more frequently in solitary nodules (61.9% versus 30.4%; P= .004). A large nodular volume was a predictor (P < .05) of microcalcifications and intranodular vascularization, whereas an absent halo sign and a solid nodule were found less frequently in nodules with larger volumes. Our results show that routine preoperative malignancy risk evaluation of presumably benign thyroid nodules is of little value when performed on patients exposed to iodine deficiency. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  2. Shear Wave Velocity: A New Quantitative Index to Estimate the Status of Thyroid in Diffuse Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lin-Yao; Ji, Qiao; Hou, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Zhou, Xian-Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of the study was to assess the application value of VTQ in DTD. Research Design and Methods. Thirty healthy subjects and 74 DTD patients were involved. The thyroid stiffness, which was expressed by SWV, was measured by VTQ and compared between the patients and healthy people. The relationship between SWV and thyroid serological indexes was also analyzed. Results. The thyroid SWVs of DTD patients were higher than those of the healthy (2.56 ± 1.33 m/s versus 1.74 ± 0.16 m/s, P = 0.011). There was no significant difference between the thyroid SWVs in GD and HT patients (P = 0.168). The SWVs in patients with GD and HT were both higher than those of the healthy (P < 0.05). The area under the ROC curve was 0.938 for SWV to distinguish between DTD and healthy thyroid. With a cutoff value of 2.02 m/s, the sensitivity and specificity were 81.12% and 100.00%, respectively. Additionally, we found a positive liner correlation between thyroid SWV and TSH in DTD patients (P < 0.001). Conclusion. SWV is a good indicator of the thyroid tissue stiffness, which might be considered helpful in screening DTD. What is more, SWV might have a potential in assessing the thyroid function. PMID:26146499

  3. The association of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) with psoriatic disease: a prospective cohort study, systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Samer R; Bano, Arjola; Wakkee, Marlies; Korevaar, Tim I M; Franco, Oscar H; Nijsten, Tamar E C; Peeters, Robin P; Chaker, Layal

    2017-10-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and psoriatic disease share auto-immunological components. Few studies have investigated the link between both, yielding inconclusive results. We assessed the association of AITD with psoriatic disease in a prospective cohort study and performed a systematic review and meta-analysis. 8214 participants of the Rotterdam Study (RS) with thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-Abs), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and/or free thyroxine (FT4) measurements and information on psoriatic disease were included. We performed logistic and Cox regression analyses and a systematic literature search in several electronic databases on AITD and psoriatic disease. We pooled odds ratios (ORs) of included studies using the Mantel-Haenszel method, while adding RS data on prevalent psoriatic disease. Within the RS, we found no association between TPO-Ab positivity and psoriatic disease. There was a positive trend between TSH and prevalent psoriatic disease, and between FT4 and incident psoriatic disease, although not significant. Out of 1850 articles identified, seven were included in the systematic review and four in the meta-analysis. The risk of psoriatic disease (pooled OR) was 1.71 (confidence interval (CI): 1.27-2.31) for TPO-Ab positivity, 1.25 (CI: 1.14-1.37) for AITD and 1.34 (CI: 1.16-1.54) respectively, and 1.17 (CI: 1.03-1.32) for hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. Our meta-analysis suggests that TPO-Ab positivity, hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism might be associated with prevalent psoriatic disease. However, there are only few studies with large heterogeneity regarding psoriatic disease definition and indication of publication bias. Additional prospective data are needed to assess the association of AITD with incident psoriatic disease. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  4. Combined segregation and linkage analysis of Graves disease with a thyroid autoantibody diathesis.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, D. C.; Ratanachaiyavong, S.; McGregor, A. M.; Collins, A.; Morton, N. E.

    1994-01-01

    Combined segregation and linkage analysis is a powerful technique for modeling linkage to diseases whose etiology is more complex than the effect of a well-described single genetic locus and for investigating the influence of single genes on various aspects of the disease phenotype. Graves disease is familial and is associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele DR3. Probands with Graves disease, as well as close relatives, have raised levels of thyroid autoantibodies. This phenotypic information additional to affection status may be considered by the computer program COMDS for combined segregation and linkage analysis, when normals are classified into diathesis classes of increasing thyroid autoantibody titer. The ordinal model considers the cumulative odds of lying in successive classes, and a single additional parameter is introduced for each gene modeled. Distributional assumptions are avoided by providing estimates of the population frequencies of each class. Evidence for linkage was increased by considering the thyroid autoantibody diathesis and by testing two-locus models. The analysis revealed evidence for linkage to HLA-DR when the strong coupling of the linked locus to allele DR3 was considered (lod score of 6.6). Linkage analysis of the residual variation revealed no evidence of linkage to Gm, but a suggestion of linkage to Km. PMID:8079993

  5. Expression and function of thyroid hormone receptor variants in normal and chronically diseased human liver.

    PubMed

    Chamba, A; Neuberger, J; Strain, A; Hopkins, J; Sheppard, M C; Franklyn, J A

    1996-01-01

    As the liver represents a major target organ for thyroid hormone action, we compared the expression of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) alpha and beta variants in normal human liver and liver affected by primary biliary cirrhosis, sclerosing cholangitis, cryptogenic cirrhosis, and alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 6 in each group). Western blot analysis using specific polyclonal antibodies to alpha 1 or beta 1 TRs or to the related non-T3-binding c-erbA alpha 2 variant revealed abundant expression of TRs in normal and diseased liver, with no difference in size or abundance of TR proteins. Immunocytochemistry likewise revealed abundant nuclear expression of TR proteins in normal and diseased liver, with similar patterns and intensity of staining. Despite abundant TR protein expression, Northern blot hybridization of polyadenylated ribonucleic acid (RNA; 10 micrograms) to TR complementary DNAs revealed only a weak signal for c-erbA alpha 2 messenger RNA (mRNA). Comparison of the level of expression of the thyroid hormone-regulated mRNAs encoding T4-binding globulin, sex hormone-binding globulin, cortisol-binding globulin, and transthyretin in normal and diseased tissue revealed no significant difference, suggesting that hepatocellular expression of these mRNAs is maintained in chronic liver disease despite a marked reduction in circulating T3 concentrations.

  6. Combined segregation and linkage analysis of Graves disease with a thyroid autoantibody diathesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, D.C.; Ratanachaiyavong, S.; McGregor, A.M.; Collins, A.; Morton, N.E.

    1994-09-01

    Combined segregation and linkage analysis is a powerful technique for modeling linkage to diseases whose etiology is more complex than the effect of a well-described single genetic locus and for investigating the influence of single genes on various aspects of the disease phenotype. Graves disease is familial and is associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele DR3. Probands with Graves disease, as well as close relatives, have raised levels of thyroid autoantibodies. This phenotypic information additional to affection status may be considered by the computer program COMDS for combined segregation and linkage analysis, when normals are classified into diathesis classes of increasing thyroid autoantibody titer. The ordinal model considers the cumulative odds of lying in successive classes, and a single additional parameter is introduced for each gene modeled. Distributional assumptions are avoided by providing estimates of the population frequencies of each class. Evidence for linkage was increased by considering the thyroid autoantibody diathesis and by testing two-locus models. The analysis revealed evidence for linkage to HLA-DR when the strong coupling of the linked locus to allele DR3 was considered (lod score of 6.6). Linkage analysis of the residual variation revealed no evidence of linkage to Gm, but a suggestion of linkage to Km. 32 refs., 10 tabs.

  7. Effects of levothyroxine treatment on pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Nazarpour, Sima; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Tohidi, Maryam; Alavi Majd, Hamid; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2017-02-01

    Despite some studies indicating that thyroid antibody positivity during pregnancy has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, evidence regarding the effects of levothyroxine (LT4) treatment of euthyroid/subclinical hypothyroid pregnant women with autoimmune thyroid disease on pregnancy outcome is limited. We aimed to assess whether pregnant women with autoimmune thyroid disease, but without overt thyroid dysfunction are affected by higher rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, we aimed to explore whether LT4 treatment improves the pregnancy outcome of affected women. A prospective study was carried out on pregnant women from the first trimester to delivery. The study was conducted among pregnant women receiving prenatal care in centers under coverage of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. Of a total of 1746 pregnant women, screened for thyroid dysfunction, 1028 euthyroid TPOAb-negative (TPOAb(-)) and 131 thyroid peroxidase antibody-positive (TPOAb(+)) women without overt thyroid dysfunction entered the second phase of the study. TPOAb(+) women were randomly divided into two groups: group A (n = 65), treated with LT4 and group B (n = 66), received no treatment. The 1028 TPOAb(-) women (group C) served as a normal population control group. Primary outcomes were preterm delivery and miscarriage and secondary outcomes included placenta abruption, still birth, neonatal admission and neonatal TSH levels. Groups B and C displayed a lower rate of preterm deliveries compared with group A (RR = 0.30, 95% CI: 0.1-0.85, P = 0.0229) and (RR = 0.23, shows the percentages of women with TSH values 95% CI: 0.14-0.40, P < 0.001) respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the rates of preterm labor between groups A and C (RR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.30-2.09, P = 0.64). The number needed to treat (NNT) for preterm birth was 1.7 (95% CI: 0.039-0.30). Treatment with LT4 decreases the risk of preterm

  8. [Riedel thyroiditis: two cases report].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rongjin; Wang, Junguo

    2014-10-01

    Riedel thyroiditis is a benign disease, which is often self-limited. Examinations, such as CT and histologic diagnosis can distinguish it from malignant neoplasms and hashimoto's thyroiditis. Riedel thyroiditis is an uncommon form of chronic thyroiditis in which the thyroid gland is replaced by fibrous tissue. It can be cured by surgery and medicine.

  9. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Kikuchi's Disease: Presentation of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saratziotis, Athanasios; Karakousis, Konstantinos; Tzika, Kelly; Oikonomou, Katerina G.; Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old woman with a history of Hashimoto's thyroiditis who presented with tender right anterior cervical lymphadenopathy and fever. Workup for infectious, autoimmune, and malignant causes was unremarkable. Surgical removal of cervical lymph nodes after detailed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging disclosed necrotizing lymphadenitis, also known as Kikuchi's disease (KD). The patient was treated with a short-term course of steroids, due to the onset of pancytopenia and borderline antiphospholipid antibodies combined with increased anti-thyroglobulin (anti-TG) titers. Despite being a diagnosis of exclusion, KD should be included in the differential of such patients, particularly in cases of previous or concurrent autoimmune diseases such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis, which necessitate a long-term follow-up. PMID:23227401

  10. [A database for thyroid diseases: evaluation with special reference to potential consequences of a nuclear power plant accident].

    PubMed

    Rabenhorst, G; Tsokos, M; Freitag, F; Wienegge, C

    1998-09-01

    The concept of a thyroid disease register based on a relational database system with a structured query language (SQL) is reported. More than 5000 examination findings of benign and malignant thyroid disorders have been recorded so far, covering the period from 1986 to 1996. For epidemiological studies these population-based thyroid diseases data can be allocated to a digital data map by means of the five-digit German postal code. When evaluating the data with regard to the function of the thyroid gland as an indicator of preceding nuclear power plant disasters and fallout, we found neither indicators of an increased incidence of thyroid carcinoma as an aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster nor the occurrence of clusters. The data were supplemented by the results of a survey among all Schleswig-Holstein pathologists involved in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. Data on childhood carcinoma of the thyroid were also provided by the Childhood Tumor Register of the Institute of Pathology, University of Kiel, and by the Childhood Cancer Register of the University of Mainz.

  11. [Radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 5). German Guideline].

    PubMed

    Dietlein, Markus; Grünwald, Frank; Schmidt, Matthias; Schneider, Peter; Verburg, Frederik A; Luster, Markus

    2016-12-06

    The version 5 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disorders is an update of the version 4, which was published by the German Society of Nuclear Medicine (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Nuklearmedizin, DGN) in co-ordination with the German Society of Endocrinology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Endokrinologie, DGE, Sektion Schilddrüse) and the German Society of General- and Visceral-Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgie, DGAV) in 2007. This guideline was harmonized with the recommendations of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). According to the German "Directive on Radiation Protection in Medicine" the physician specialised in nuclear medicine ("Fachkunde in der Therapie mit offenen radioaktiven Stoffen") is responsible for the justfication to treat with radioiodine. Therefore, relevant medical indications for radioiodine therapy and alternative therapeutic options are discussed within the guideline. This procedure guideline is developed in the consensus of a representative expert group. This fulfils the level S1 (first step) within the German classification of Clinical Practice Guidelines.

  12. Estimation of thyroid radiation doses for the hanford thyroid disease study: results and implications for statistical power of the epidemiological analyses.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, Kenneth J; Davis, Scott; Hamilton, Thomas E; Saporito, Mark S; Onstad, Lynn E

    2004-07-01

    Residents of eastern Washington, northeastern Oregon, and western Idaho were exposed to I released into the atmosphere from operations at the Hanford Nuclear Site from 1944 through 1972, especially in the late 1940's and early 1950's. This paper describes the estimated doses to the thyroid glands of the 3,440 evaluable participants in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study, which investigated whether thyroid morbidity was increased in people exposed to radioactive iodine from Hanford during 1944-1957. The participants were born during 1940-1946 to mothers living in Benton, Franklin, Walla Walla, Adams, Okanogan, Ferry, or Stevens Counties in Washington State. Whenever possible someone with direct knowledge of the participant's early life (preferably the participant's mother) was interviewed about the participant's individual dose-determining characteristics (residence history, sources and quantities of food, milk, and milk products consumed, production and processing techniques for home-grown food and milk products). Default information was used if no interview respondent was available. Thyroid doses were estimated using the computer program Calculation of Individual Doses from Environmental Radionuclides (CIDER) developed by the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. CIDER provided 100 sets of doses to represent uncertainty of the estimates. These sets were not generated independently for each participant, but reflected the effects of uncertainties in characteristics shared by participants. Estimated doses (medians of each participant's 100 realizations) ranged from 0.0029 mGy to 2823 mGy, with mean and median of 174 and 97 mGy, respectively. The distribution of estimated doses provided the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study with sufficient statistical power to test for dose-response relationships between thyroid outcomes and exposure to Hanford's I.

  13. A patient with Graves’ disease showing only psychiatric symptoms and negativity for both TSH receptor autoantibody and thyroid stimulating antibody

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Both thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) negative Graves’s disease (GD) is extremely rare. Here we present such a patient. Case presentation The patient was a 76-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having schizophrenia forty years ago. She did not show characteristic symptoms for hyperthyroidism, such as swelling of thyroid, exophthalmos, tachycardia and tremor, however, she showed only psychomotor agitation. Serum free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine levels were elevated and TSH level was suppressed, suggesting the existence of hyperthyroidism. However, both the first generation TSH receptor autoantibody (TRAb1) and the thyroid stimulating autoantibody (TSAb) were negative. Slightly increased blood flow and swelling was detected by thyroid echography. Thyroid scintigraphy demonstrated diffuse and remarkably elevated uptake of 123I uptake. Finally, we diagnosed her as having GD. She was treated by using methimazole, and hyperthyroidism and her psychiatric symptoms were promptly ameliorated. Discussion We experienced a patient with GD who did not show characteristic symptoms except for psychiatric symptoms, and also showed negativity for both TRAb1 and TSAb. Thyroid autoantibody-negative GD is extremely rare. Thyroid scintigraphy was useful to diagnose such a patient. PMID:23206540

  14. A predictive mathematical model for the calculation of the final mass of Graves' disease thyroids treated with 131I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traino, Antonio C.; Di Martino, Fabio; Grosso, Mariano; Monzani, Fabio; Dardano, Angela; Caraccio, Nadia; Mariani, Giuliano; Lazzeri, Mauro

    2005-05-01

    Substantial reductions in thyroid volume (up to 70-80%) after radioiodine therapy of Graves' hyperthyroidism are common and have been reported in the literature. A relationship between thyroid volume reduction and outcome of 131I therapy of Graves' disease has been reported by some authors. This important result could be used to decide individually the optimal radioiodine activity A0 (MBq) to administer to the patient, but a predictive model relating the change in gland volume to A0 is required. Recently, a mathematical model of thyroid mass reduction during the clearance phase (30-35 days) after 131I administration to patients with Graves' disease has been published and used as the basis for prescribing the therapeutic thyroid absorbed dose. It is well known that the thyroid volume reduction goes on until 1 year after therapy. In this paper, a mathematical model to predict the final mass of Graves' diseased thyroids submitted to 131I therapy is presented. This model represents a tentative explanation of what occurs macroscopically after the end of the clearance phase of radioiodine in the gland (the so-called second-order effects). It is shown that the final thyroid mass depends on its basal mass, on the radiation dose absorbed by the gland and on a constant value α typical of thyroid tissue. α has been evaluated based on a set of measurements made in 15 reference patients affected by Graves' disease and submitted to 131I therapy. A predictive equation for the calculation of the final mass of thyroid is presented. It is based on macroscopic parameters measurable after a diagnostic 131I capsule administration (0.37-1.85 MBq), before giving the therapy. The final mass calculated using this equation is compared to the final mass of thyroid measured 1 year after therapy administration in 22 Graves' diseased patients. The final masses calculated and measured 1 year after therapy are in fairly good agreement (R = 0.81). The possibility, for the physician, to decide a

  15. A computer aided diagnosis system for thyroid disease using extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Na; Ouyang, Ji-Hong; Chen, Hui-Ling; Liu, Da-You

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we present an effective and efficient computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system based on principle component analysis (PCA) and extreme learning machine (ELM) to assist the task of thyroid disease diagnosis. The CAD system is comprised of three stages. Focusing on dimension reduction, the first stage applies PCA to construct the most discriminative new feature set. After then, the system switches to the second stage whose target is model construction. ELM classifier is explored to train an optimal predictive model whose parameters are optimized. As we known, the number of hidden neurons has an important role in the performance of ELM, so we propose an experimental method to hunt for the optimal value. Finally, the obtained optimal ELM model proceeds to perform the thyroid disease diagnosis tasks using the most discriminative new feature set and the optimal parameters. The effectiveness of the resultant CAD system (PCA-ELM) has been rigorously estimated on a thyroid disease dataset which is taken from UCI machine learning repository. We compare it with other related methods in terms of their classification accuracy. Experimental results demonstrate that PCA-ELM outperforms other ones reported so far by 10-fold cross-validation method, with the mean accuracy of 97.73% and with the maximum accuracy of 98.1%. Besides, PCA-ELM performs much faster than support vector machines (SVM) based CAD system. Consequently, the proposed method PCA-ELM can be considered as a new powerful tools for diagnosing thyroid disease with excellent performance and less time.

  16. [ANALYSIS OF THE SURGICAL TREATMENT RESULTS IN THE THYROID GLAND DISEASES].

    PubMed

    Tarashchenko, Yu N; Bolgov, M Yu

    2015-08-01

    The results of surgical treatment of the thyroid gland diseases were analyzed, including the specific morbidity rate, cosmetic effect of the operation, stationary treatment of patients duration, the operation radicalism. Improvement of the operation methods and introduction of modern electric surgical instruments have permitted to reduce the operation duration, the surgical access length, the rate of postoperative hypocalcaemia occurrence, duration of the patients stationary treatment.

  17. Subconjunctival injection of triamcinolone for the treatment of upper lid retraction associated with thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Mi; Lee, Hwa; Park, Minsoo; Baek, Sehyun

    2012-11-01

    Management of retraction of the upper lid during the congestive phase of thyroid eye disease is usually limited to conservative treatment. We evaluated the efficacy of subconjunctival injection of triamcinolone for the treatment of the upper lid retraction associated with thyroid eye disease.Thirty patients (43 eyes, 11 men and 19 women) with the upper lid retraction associated with thyroid eye disease were evaluated between May 2009 and September 2010. A dose of 0.5 mL of triamcinolone acetonide (40 mg/mL) was injected into the subconjunctival space at the upper margin of the tarsus. If the upper lid retraction had not improved or was still severe 2 weeks after the initial injection, then triamcinolone was injected repeatedly at 2-week intervals. Photographs were taken before the injection and at the follow-up visit, and lid parameters including marginal reflex distance 1, interpalpebral fissure height, total palpebral fissure area, the upper nasal palpebral fissure area, and the upper temporal palpebral fissure area were measured. Changes in the lid parameters after the injection were evaluated.The mean number of injections per patient was 2.67, and the mean (SD) follow-up period was 260.97 (91.10) days. All lid parameters improved significantly after the triamcinolone injection (all P's < 0.05). Nineteen of 22 patients in the congestive phase responded to the triamcinolone injection; however, 6 of 8 patients in the fibrotic phase did not respond to the triamcinolone injection. Complications associated with the triamcinolone injection included an increased intraocular pressure (2 patients) and a mild ptosis (1 patient).The subconjunctival triamcinolone injection is a simple and effective treatment option for the upper lid retraction associated with thyroid eye disease, and this treatment is more effective for the patients in the congestive phase.

  18. Elephantiasis Nostras Verrucosa: a rare thyroid dermopathy in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Kakati, S; Doley, B; Pal, S; Deka, U J

    2005-06-01

    Elephantiasis Nostras Verrucosa (ENV) is a rare form of pretibial myxedema, which is nearly always associated with Graves' disease. A case is presented here of Graves' disease who had elephantiasis variety of pre-tibial myxedema (PTM).

  19. Graves' Disease Patients with Persistent Hyperthyroidism and Diffuse Lymphoplasmacytic Infiltration in the Thyroid Show No Histopathological Compatibility with IgG4-Related Disease.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Eijun; Hirokawa, Mitsuyoshi; Ito, Mitsuru; Fukata, Shuji; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Amino, Nobuyuki; Miyauchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a novel disease entity characterized by diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells and fibrosis into multiple organs. There is still controversy over whether some thyroid diseases are actually IgG4-related disease. The objective of this study was to elucidate the clinicopathological features of Graves' disease with diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the thyroid. Among 1,484 Graves' disease patients who underwent thyroidectomy, we examined their histopathological findings including the degree of lymphoplasmacytic and fibrotic infiltration and levels of IgG4-positive plasma cells in the thyroid. Their clinical pictures were defined by laboratory and ultrasonographic evaluation. A total of 11 patients (0.74%) showed diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the stroma of the thyroid gland. Meanwhile, other patients showed variable lymphoid infiltration ranging from absent to focally dense but no aggregation of plasma cells in the thyroid gland. Based on the diagnostic criteria of IgG4-related disease, 5 of the 11 subjects had specifically increased levels of IgG4-positive plasma cells in the thyroid. Fibrotic infiltration was present in only 1 patient developing hypothyroidism after anti-thyroid drug treatment for 4 years, but not in the other 10 patients with persistent hyperthyroidism. Obliterative phlebitis was not identified in any of the 11 subjects. Thyroid ultrasound examination showed 1 patient developing hypothyroidism who had diffuse hypoechogenicity, but the other hyperthyroid patients had a coarse echo texture. In our study, Graves' disease patients with persistent hyperthyroidism who had diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells in the thyroid showed no concomitant fibrosis or obliterative phlebitis.

  20. Graves’ Disease Patients with Persistent Hyperthyroidism and Diffuse Lymphoplasmacytic Infiltration in the Thyroid Show No Histopathological Compatibility with IgG4-Related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Eijun; Hirokawa, Mitsuyoshi; Ito, Mitsuru; Fukata, Shuji; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Amino, Nobuyuki; Miyauchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Background IgG4-related disease is a novel disease entity characterized by diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells and fibrosis into multiple organs. There is still controversy over whether some thyroid diseases are actually IgG4-related disease. The objective of this study was to elucidate the clinicopathological features of Graves’ disease with diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the thyroid. Patients and Methods Among 1,484 Graves’ disease patients who underwent thyroidectomy, we examined their histopathological findings including the degree of lymphoplasmacytic and fibrotic infiltration and levels of IgG4-positive plasma cells in the thyroid. Their clinical pictures were defined by laboratory and ultrasonographic evaluation. Results A total of 11 patients (0.74%) showed diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the stroma of the thyroid gland. Meanwhile, other patients showed variable lymphoid infiltration ranging from absent to focally dense but no aggregation of plasma cells in the thyroid gland. Based on the diagnostic criteria of IgG4-related disease, 5 of the 11 subjects had specifically increased levels of IgG4-positive plasma cells in the thyroid. Fibrotic infiltration was present in only 1 patient developing hypothyroidism after anti-thyroid drug treatment for 4 years, but not in the other 10 patients with persistent hyperthyroidism. Obliterative phlebitis was not identified in any of the 11 subjects. Thyroid ultrasound examination showed 1 patient developing hypothyroidism who had diffuse hypoechogenicity, but the other hyperthyroid patients had a coarse echo texture. Conclusions In our study, Graves’ disease patients with persistent hyperthyroidism who had diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells in the thyroid showed no concomitant fibrosis or obliterative phlebitis. PMID:26218874

  1. Humic substances in drinking water and the epidemiology of thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Laurberg, Peter; Andersen, Stig; Pedersen, Inge Bülow; Ovesen, Lars; Knudsen, Nils

    2003-01-01

    Thyroid diseases are common in all populations but the type and frequency depends on environmental factors. In Denmark geographical differences in iodine intake are caused by different iodine contents of drinking water, which varies from < 1 to 139 microg iodine per litre. Comparative epidemiologic studies have demonstrated considerable differences in type and occurrence of thyroid disease with more goitre and hyperthyroidism in Aalborg with water iodine content around 5 microg/L, and more hypothyroidism in Copenhagen with water iodine around 20 microg/L. In Denmark, iodine in ground water is bound in humic substances, which have probably leached from marine sediments in the aquifers. Interestingly, humic substances in water from other parts of the world have goitrogenic properties, especially humic substances from coal and shale. Humic substances are heterogeneous mixtures of naturally occurring molecules, produced by decomposition of plant and animal tissues. The effect of humic substances in drinking water on the epidemiology of thyroid disease probably depends on the source of aquifer sediments.

  2. Thyroid Hormones and Antioxidant Systems: Focus on Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Antonio; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Di Segni, Chantal; Persano, Mariasara; Gadotti, Giovanni; Silvestrini, Andrea; Festa, Roberto; Tiano, Luca; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Meucci, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    In previous works we demonstrated an inverse correlation between plasma Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and thyroid hormones; in fact, CoQ10 levels in hyperthyroid patients were found among the lowest detected in human diseases. On the contrary, CoQ10 is elevated in hypothyroid subjects, also in subclinical conditions, suggesting the usefulness of this index in assessing metabolic status in thyroid disorders. A Low-T3 syndrome is a condition observed in several chronic diseases: it is considered an adaptation mechanism, where there is a reduction in pro-hormone T4 conversion. Low T3-Syndrome is not usually considered to be corrected with replacement therapy. We review the role of thyroid hormones in regulation of antioxidant systems, also presenting data on total antioxidant capacity and Coenzyme Q10. Published studies suggest that oxidative stress could be involved in the clinical course of different heart diseases; our data could support the rationale of replacement therapy in low-T3 conditions. PMID:24351864

  3. Clinicopathological features of Riedel's thyroiditis associated with IgG4-related disease in Japan.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Ken; Inaba, Hidefumi; Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Yasushi; Doi, Asako; Nishi, Masahiro; Hirokawa, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshida, Akira; Imai, Ryoukichi; Akamizu, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Riedel's thyroiditis (RT) is a rare chronic fibrosing disorder characterized by a hard, infiltrative lesion in the thyroid gland, which is often associated with multifocal fibrosclerosis. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is typified by infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells into multiple organs, resulting in tissue fibrosis and organ dysfunction. In order to evaluate the clinicopathological features of RT and its relationship with IgG4-RD, we performed a Japanese literature search using the keywords "Riedel" and "Riedel's thyroiditis." We used the electronic databases Medline and Igaku Chuo Zasshi, the latter of which is the largest medical literature database in Japan. The diagnosis of RT was based on the presence of a fibroinflammatory process with extension into surrounding tissues. Only 10 patients in Japan fulfilled RT diagnostic criteria during the 25-year period between 1988 and 2012. Two patients with confirmed IgG4/IgG immunohistochemical findings demonstrated 43 and 13 IgG4-positive plasma cells per high-power field, respectively, and the IgG4-positive/IgG-positive plasma cell ratios of 20% and less than 5%. Of the 10 patients with RT, two received glucocorticoids, one of whom experienced marked shrinkage of the thyroid lesion. One patient had extra-thyroid involvement in the form of retroperitoneal fibrosis. Although the clinicopathological features of RT suggest that IgG4-RD may be the underlying condition in some cases, further investigation is needed to clarify the etiology of RT in relation to IgG4-RD.

  4. Thyroid diseases in patients treated during pre-puberty for medulloblastoma with different radiotherapic protocols.

    PubMed

    Corrias, A; Einaudi, S; Ricardi, U; Sandri, A; Besenzon, L; Altare, F; Artesani, L; Genitori, L; Andreo, M; De Sanctis, C

    2001-06-01

    We evaluated thyroid disease in 32 patients treated, during pre-puberty, for medulloblastoma, followed for at least 4 years and without relapse during observation. After surgery the patients underwent chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT). The protocols were as follows: 20 patients (group A) SNC 76 and SNC 85 protocols which included conventional fractionated RT (36-40 Gy to the craniospinal axis and a 14-18 Gy boost to the posterior fossa, administered as 1.5-1.8 Gy per fraction per day) and a junction between the cranial and the spinal fields at C2-C3 level; 12 patients (group B) SNC 91 protocol which included hyperfractionated RT (36 Gy to the craniospinal axis and a 30 Gy boost to the posterior fossa; this was administred as 1 Gy per fraction twice per day) and a junction at levels C5-C6 or C6-C7 level. The mean age at diagnosis was 7.4+/-3.2 years for group A and 8.4+/-2.6 years for group B. Thyroid function was evaluated yearly and ultrasonographic characteristics every 2 years. The patients were followed for a mean of 10.8+/-3.8 for group A and 6+/-1.4 years for group B. Primary hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 16 group A patients and 4 group B patients, and central hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 2 group A patients (difference in risk of developing hypothyroidism evaluated with a Wilcoxon-test: p=0.048). Ultrasonography showed reduced thyroid volume in 7 group A cases, and structural changes in 21 patients (17 group A, 4 group B); 9 L-thyroxine-treated patients were confirmed hypothyroid after having stopped therapy. A thyroid nodule was detected in two cases (one from each group). In conclusion, our data indicate that thyroid injury may be diminished by the use of hyperfractionation and low-junction radiotherapy in the treatment of medulloblastoma.

  5. Investigation of autoimmune diseases accompanying Hashimoto's thyroiditis in children and adolescents and evaluation of cardiac signs.

    PubMed

    Baş, Veysel Nijat; Yılmaz Agladioglu, Sebahat; Özgür, Senem; Karademir, Selmin; Aycan, Zehra

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, it was aimed to investigate the concomitance of additional cardiac problems, mainly mitral valve prolapse, in adolescents and pediatric patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, by screening autoimmune markers. Fifty-seven euthyroid patients, who applied to the Pediatric Endocrinology clinic at our institution with marked symptoms of hypothyroidism at the time of diagnosis, and were diagnosed and treated for Hashimoto's thyroiditis, were included in the present study. All patients were evaluated by performing non-organ specific autoantibodies which could be tested at our institution, thyroid ultrasonography, two-dimensional echocardiography, and 24-h holter monitorization. Of the 57 cases with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 48 (84.2%) were female, and nine (15.8%) were male. In the echocardiographic evaluation, mitral valve problems were detected in 10 (17.5%) of all cases; mitral valve prolapse was diagnosed in eight (seven females and one male) cases, and mitral insufficiency was diagnosed in two female cases. First-degree atrioventricular block was observed in only two patients during 24-h holter monitorization. Different non-organ specific autoantibody positivity was distributed as antinuclear antibody in 15 (26.3%) cases, anticardiolipin IgG in two cases, anticardiolipin IgM in three cases, tissue transglutaminase IgA in one, glutamic acid decarboxylase in one, anti-insulin antibody in four cases, antiphospholipid IgG in one, and antiphospholipid IgM in one case. It should be underlined that patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis should to be followed up closely for mitral valve prolapse and accompanying autoimmune diseases.

  6. Spectrum and prevalence of nodular thyroid diseases detected by ultrasonography in the Western Black Sea region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Yusuf; Besir, Fahri Halit; Erkan, Melih Engin; Yazgan, Omer; Gungor, Adem; Onder, Elif; Coşkun, Hulya; Aydin, Leyla

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate thyroid diseases and the prevalence of goiter by ultrasonography (US) in a moderately iodine deficient area. The MELEN Study is a prospective cohort study on the prevalence of thyroid diseases in Turkish adults. A total of 2233 subjects with a mean age of 50 (age range 18 to 92) were submitted to study. Thyroid US was performed and interpreted by the same experienced physician. Goiter prevalence was defined according to Gutekunst's criteria. The most common thyroid disease was multinodular goiter (MNG) (42%), followed by nodular goiter (NG) (14.6%). The crude prevalence of nodular disease in the region was 56.6%. In the study cohort, thyrotoxicosis (TSH <0.35 μIU/ml) prevalence was 12 % and subclinical and overt hypothyroidism (TSH > 4.5 μIU/ml) prevalence was 6.5 %. We found that thyrotoxicosis and nodular thyroidal diseases are more important public health issues in moderate iodine deficient geographical areas. We recommend the increased rates of US screening especially in the endemic regions in order to detect thyroidal nodules earlier.

  7. The Danish investigation on iodine intake and thyroid disease, DanThyr: status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Laurberg, Peter; Jørgensen, Torben; Perrild, Hans; Ovesen, Lars; Knudsen, Nils; Pedersen, Inge Bülow; Rasmussen, Lone B; Carlé, Allan; Vejbjerg, Pernille

    2006-08-01

    Denmark was an area of iodine deficiency, and mandatory iodine fortification of table salt and salt in bread (13 p.p.m. iodine) was initiated in 2000/2001. The Danish investigation on iodine intake and thyroid disease (DanThyr) is the monitoring of the iodine fortification program. DanThyr consists of three main parts: a study of population cohorts initialized before (n=4649) and after (n=3570) iodization of salt, a prospective identification of incident cases of overt hyper- and hypothyroidism in a population of around 550,000 people since 1997, and compilation of data from the national registers on the use of thyroid medication, thyroid surgery, and radioiodine therapy. Studies were carried-out in parallel in subcohorts living in areas with differences in iodine content of ground water. The study showed profound effects of even small differences in iodine intake level on the prevalence of goiter, nodules, and thyroid dysfunction. Mild and moderate iodine deficiency was associated with a decrease in serum TSH with age. Other environmental factors were also important for goiter development (increase in risk, smoking and pregnancy; decrease in risk, oral contraception and alcohol consumption), and the individual risk depended on the genetic background. Environmental factors had only a minor influence on the prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies in the population. There were more cases of overt hypothyroidism in mild than in moderate iodine deficiency caused by a 53% higher incidence of spontaneous (presumably autoimmune) hypothyroidism. On the other hand, there were 49% more cases of overt hyperthyroidism in the area with moderate iodine deficiency. The cautious iodine fortification program, aiming at an average increase in iodine intake of 50 mug/day has been associated with a 50% increase in incidence of hyperthyroidism in the area with the most severe iodine deficiency. The incidence is expected to decrease in the future, but there may be more cases of Graves

  8. Fibrosing variant of Hashimoto thyroiditis is an IgG4 related disease.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Vikram; Huck, Amelia; Ooi, Esther; Stone, John H; Faquin, William C; Nielsen, G Petur

    2012-08-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and the fibrosing variant of Hashimoto thyroiditis (FVHT) are immune-mediated tumefactive lesions of the thyroid. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is now a widely recognised multi-organ system disease characterised by elevated serum and tissue concentrations of IgG4. In this study, the authors address several unresolved questions pertaining to the relationship between HT and FVHT, and the association of each of these diseases with IgG4-RD. The authors evaluated 28 consecutive cases of HT and nine cases of FVHT. The clinical, demographic and serological data were recorded. The slides were stained immunohistochemically using antibodies to IgG4 and IgG and the quantitative analysis was recorded. Data on thyroid function tests were available on seven cases of FVHT and 14 cases of HT. Based on the availability of data, hypothyroidism was noted in 62% (9/14) of HT and 86% of FVHT (6/7). FVHT demonstrated an exaggerated lobular pattern with lobules separated by cellular storiform-type fibrosis, resembling fibrosis seen in other forms of IgG-RD. The median IgG4 counts per high power field (×40) in HT and FVHT were 2.3 and 22, respectively. The median IgG4:IgG ratios in HT and FVHT were 0.11 and 0.58, respectively. The authors propose that FVHT belongs to the spectrum of IgG4-RD. Although a proportion of cases of HT show elevated numbers of IgG4 positive plasma cells, these cases lack the histological features typically associated with IgG4-RD, and thus the relationship between HT and IgG4-RD remains unproven.

  9. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D serum level in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, but not Graves' disease is relatively deficient.

    PubMed

    Ke, Wencai; Sun, Tiange; Zhang, Yanan; He, Leqi; Wu, Qiang; Liu, Jun; Zha, Bingbing

    2017-06-29

    Vitamin D is a modulator of both the innate and adaptive immune system. As vitamin D deficiency was a risk factor for some autoimmune diseases, we aimed to evaluate the serum vitamin D levels in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and investigated the association between serum vitamin D levels and AITD. 175 AITD patients including 51 GD, 61 euthyroid HT (mild HT), 63 euthyroid HT patients with hypothyroidism receiving hormone therapy (treated HT) were recruited from the outpatient department. 51 controls were from the physical checkup center of the hospital. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels, thyroid function, antithyroid antibodies, IL-4, IL-17, and TNF-α were determined. Compared with the controls, treated and mild HT patients had significantly lower 25(OH)D levels (45.77±3.48 vs. 83.49±6.24 nmol/L, p<0.001) and (55.25±3.88 vs. 83.49±6.24 nmol/L, p<0.001), respectively. However, GD patients had similar 25(OH)D levels (81.77±5.60 vs. 83.49±6.24 nmol/L, p=0.808). Compared to 24.1% controls with prevalent vitamin D deficiency, mild HT and treated HT patients were significantly different (55.4%, p<0.001) and (70.3%, p<0.001), respectively; no difference was seen in the GD patients (22.9%, p=0.797). Serum 25(OH)D levels were not associated with thyroid function, antithyroid antibodies, and serum cytokines IL-4, IL-17, and TNF-α in patients with AITD. We observed relatively low vitamin D level in mild and treated HT patients, while GD patients had similar 25(OH)D levels to those of healthy individuals. Further studies are imperative to explore the complex etiology of vitamin D deficiency in AITD.

  10. Thyroid hormone levels and incident chronic kidney disease in euthyroid individuals: the Kangbuk Samsung Health Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiyi; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Cho, Juhee; Lee, Won-Young; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Kwon, Min-Jung; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Rampal, Sanjay; Han, Won Kon; Shin, Hocheol; Guallar, Eliseo

    2014-10-01

    Overt and subclinical hypothyroidism are associated with higher levels of serum creatinine and with increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prospective association between thyroid hormones and kidney function in euthyroid individuals,however, is largely unexplored. We conducted a prospective cohort study in 104 633 South Korean men and women who were free of CKD and proteinuria at baseline and had normal thyroid hormone levels and no history of thyroid disease or cancer. At each annual or biennial follow-up visit, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxin (FT4) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. The study outcome was incident CKD, defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)<60 ml/min/1.73 m2 based on the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration creatinine equation. After a median follow-up of 3.5 years, 1032 participants developed incident CKD.There was a positive association between high-normal levels of TSH and increased risk of incident CKD. In fully-adjusted models including baseline eGFR, the hazard ratio comparing the highest vs the lowest quintiles of TSH was 1.26 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02 to 1.55; P for linear trend=0.03]. In spline models, FT3 levels below 3 pg/ml were also associated with increased risk of incident CKD. There was no association between FT4 levels and CKD. In a large cohort of euthyroid men and women, high levels of TSH and low levels of FT3, even within the normal range, were modestly associated with an increased risk of incident CKD.

  11. Mechanisms in endocrinology: the crosstalk between thyroid gland and adipose tissue: signal integration in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Santini, Ferruccio; Marzullo, Paolo; Rotondi, Mario; Ceccarini, Giovanni; Pagano, Loredana; Ippolito, Serena; Chiovato, Luca; Biondi, Bernadette

    2014-10-01

    Obesity and thyroid diseases are common disorders in the general population and they frequently occur in single individuals. Alongside a chance association, a direct relationship between 'thyroid and obesity' has been hypothesized. Thyroid hormone is an important determinant of energy expenditure and contributes to appetite regulation, while hormones and cytokines from the adipose tissue act on the CNS to inform on the quantity of energy stores. A continuous interaction between the thyroid hormone and regulatory mechanisms localized in adipose tissue and brain is important for human body weight control and maintenance of optimal energy balance. Whether obesity has a pathogenic role in thyroid disease remains largely a matter of investigation. This review highlights the complexity in the identification of thyroid hormone deficiency in obese patients. Regardless of the importance of treating subclinical and overt hypothyroidism, at present there is no evidence to recommend pharmacological correction of the isolated hyperthyrotropinemia often encountered in obese patients. While thyroid hormones are not indicated as anti-obesity drugs, preclinical studies suggest that thyromimetic drugs, by targeting selected receptors, might be useful in the treatment of obesity and dyslipidemia.

  12. [The role of color doppler ultrasonography, thyroid function and auto antibody for the screening of Graves' disease in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Xue, M; Shi, Q L; Tan, K N; Wu, Y; Zhou, R

    2016-06-01

    To determine whether color doppler ultrasonography (CDU), thyroid function or thyroid autoimmune antibodies could identify Graves' disease in pregnancy(GDP) in pregnant patients with newly diagnosed thyrotoxicosis. It is an observational study. Sixty-eight pregnant patients with newly diagnosed thyrotoxicosis including gestational hyperthyroidism(GHT) subjects (GHT group, n=33) and GDP subjects (GDP group, n=35), and 62 age-and sex-matched healthy subjects (C1 group: pregnant, n=32, C2 group: non-pregnant, n=30) were recruited. Thyroid function, human chorionic gonadotropin(HCG), thyroid autoimmune antibodies were detected. Peak systolic velocity of the superior thyroid artery (STA-PSV) and diastole inner diameter(STA-D) of the superior thyroid artery were measured by CDU. A ROC curve was used to evaluate STA-PSV, STA-D, thyroid function and thyroid autoimmune antibodies for identification of GDP. The area under the ROC curve of STA-PSV, STA-D and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free T4 (FT4) for GDP were 0.905, 0.887, 0.803 and 0.786, respectively. The optimal cut-off points of STA-PSV, STA-D, TSH and FT4 for GDP were 40 cm/s, 2.0mm, 0.03 mIU/L and 30 pmol/L with the sensitivity of 82.9%, 72.1%, 81.8%, 76.2% and specificity of 81.8%, 87.9%, 75.2%, 80.3%, respectively. Detection of STA-PSV and STA-D by CDU, as well as thyroid function, is useful in screening GDP in pregnant patients with thyrotoxicosis.

  13. Fetal and neonatal thyroid function in relation to maternal Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Polak, Michel; Le Gac, Isabelle; Vuillard, Edith; Guibourdenche, J; Leger, J; Toubert, M-E; Madec, A-M; Oury, J-F; Czernichow, P; Luton, Dominique

    2004-06-01

    The abundance of published data on the neonatal effects of maternal Graves' disease (GD) contrasts with the paucity of information on fetal effects. In our yet unpublished study, we prospectively studied 72 pregnant women with a history of Graves' disease. Fetal ultrasonography was done at 22 and 32 weeks of gestational age. Fetal goiter was found at 32 weeks in 11 of the fetuses of the 41 mothers with positive TSH-receptor antibodies and/or antithyroid treatment and in none of the fetuses of the 31 other mothers. In the 11 fetuses with goiter, ultrasound findings (thyroid Doppler and bone maturation), fetal heart rate, and maternal antibody and antithyroid drug status effectively discriminated between hypothyroidism (n=7) and hyperthyroidism (n=4). One fetus with hyperthyroidism died in utero at 35 weeks from heart failure. Treatment was successful in the ten other fetuses. One fetus without goiter had moderate hypothyroidism at birth. This study showed that it is of the utmost importance to have the fetal thyroid scrutinized by an expert ultrasonographist and to have team work with obstetricians and paediatric endocrinologists in pregnant mothers with GD. This allowed us to accurately determine fetal thyroid status and to adapt the treatment in mothers successfully. Fetal hyperthyroidism does exist and needs an appropriate aggressive treatment.

  14. Nodular thyroid disease in children and adolescents: a high incidence of carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, C.; Smith, M.; Lawrence, A.M.; Jarosz, H.; Paloyan, E.

    1988-07-01

    Over a period of 32 years from 1954 to 1986, 65 patients under the age of 21 years, 52 girls and 13 boys, were operated for nodular thyroids: the overall incidence of carcinoma was 37 per cent. It was 46 per cent in those patients presenting with a solitary nodule. Among the 24 patients with a malignancy, the carcinoma was of the papillary variety in 63 per cent, follicular in 25 per cent and medullary in 12 per cent. Two thirds of the patients had metastatic disease at the time of presentation. All patients with thyroid carcinoma were treated with total thyroidectomy. Other measures included neck dissection and radioactive iodine. When the eight patients with a history of head and neck irradiation and the three patients with medullary carcinoma were excluded, the incidence of carcinoma was 28 per cent. In summary, in spite of the decline in radiation associated cases, the incidence of carcinoma in nodular thyroid disease in the population under 21 years, remains at the relatively high figure of 28 per cent.

  15. No definitive evidence for a connection between autoimmune thyroid diseases and stress in women.

    PubMed

    Damian, Lisandra; Ghiciuc, Cristina Mihaela; Dima-Cozma, Lucia Corina; Ungureanu, Maria Christina; Cozma, Sebastian; Patacchioli, Francesca Romana; Lupusoru, Catalina Elena

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to examine the available clinical studies performed during the last 15 years to identify if there is a causal relationship between the onset and course of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis/sympathetic-adrenomedullary system (SAM) (dys)function in women. Using the PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus databases, a comprehensive search was performed, and 14 articles were finally identified. The majority of selected studies suggested a causal connection between Graves' Disease (GD) and stress, as well as between Hashimoto Thyroiditis (HT), with its variant postpartum thyroiditis, and stress. However, due to heterogeneity in the protocols, mainly based on the theoretical side effects of stress on the immune-neuroendocrine system, and the different modalities used to establish the impact of stress on individuals, no definitive conclusions could be reached to explain the mechanisms by which stress contributes to the onset of AITDs in women and to determine whether stress management could help in modifying the course of AITDs.

  16. Central Retinal Vein Occlusion Resolving After Orbital Decompression in Thyroid Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Grob, Seanna R; Yoon, Michael K

    A 49-year-old male presented with proptosis and was found to have optic nerve edema with peripapillary hemorrhages. Diagnostic testing showed a suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone. CT orbits showed homogenous tendon-sparing enlargement of the medial and inferior rectus muscles, characteristic of thyroid eye disease. Intravenous methylprednisolone was administered given the concern for compressive optic neuropathy. He initially had improvement of his symptoms, so orbital decompression was deferred. Subsequently he presented with worsening diplopia and right proptosis, a new afferent pupillary defect, and a cecocentral visual field defect. Dilated examination revealed significant optic nerve head edema and diffuse retinal hemorrhages in all 4 quadrants consistent with a central retinal vein occlusion. The patient underwent an urgent 3-wall orbital decompression on the right. Close follow up postoperatively showed resolution of the central retinal vein occlusion and the associated optic disc edema, peripapillary hemorrhages, and macular edema. Orbital decompression is known to improve many manifestations of thyroid eye disease, but this is the first report of orbital decompression resulting in resolution of a central retinal vein occlusion.

  17. Alemtuzumab Induced Thyroid Disease in Multiple Sclerosis: A Review and Approach to Management.

    PubMed

    Mahzari, Moeber; Arnaout, Amel; Freedman, Mark S

    2015-09-01

    Alemtuzumab, an anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody, was recently approved for treatment of MS in Canada, having shown to significantly reduce relapses and disability in patients, particularly those who relapsed despite first line treatment. Offsetting its benefit however, is the development of novel secondary autoimmune disease, particularly affecting the thyroid gland in up to 36% of patients. The incidence of Alemtuzumab induced thyroid dysfunction (AITD) will likely rise as alemtuzumab becomes more widely used for treating MS. We review the clinical and investigational cues that help delineate the aetiology and management of thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism in ATID. AITD can be easily managed and we present a simple approach for its evaluation and management by neurologists that should be implemented prior to considering a referral to an internist or endocrinologist for further opinion or treatment.

  18. Incidence of thyroid cancer in women in relation to previous exposure to radiation therapy and history of thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    McTiernan, A.M.; Weiss, N.S.; Daling, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    Female residents of 13 counties of Western Washington, in whom papillary, follicular, or mixed papillary-follicular thyroid carcinomas had been diagnosed between 1974 and 1979 were interviewed regarding their medical and reproductive histories and past exposure to radiation treatments. For comparison, a random sample of women from the same population was interviewed. Women who had received radiation treatments to the head or neck prior to 5 years before interview were 16.5 times (95% confidence interval . 8.1-33.5) more likely than unexposed women to develop cancer. The relative risk (RR) was highest for papillary cancer (19.4) but also was elevated substantially for follicular and mixed papillary-follicular tumors. Women first irradiated at age 19 years or younger had a much higher RR than did women irradiated at age 20 or older. Regardless of prior radiation exposure, women who ever had had a goiter were at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer. Women who had ever developed a goiter had 17 times the risk of developing follicular cancer and almost 7 times the risk of developing papillary cancer as compared with women who never had had a goiter. Risk of thyroid cancer was elevated even among women who had had a history of goiter many years prior to diagnosis. A history of thyroid nodules was also a risk factor for papillary and mixed thyroid cancer. Neither a history of hypothyroidism nor hyperthyroidism was found to increase the risk of thyroid cancer.

  19. Thyroid disorders in women.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Li, J

    2015-04-01

    Thyroid disorders include autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), thyroid goiter, nodule and cancer. AITD mainly consist of autoimmune thyroiditis and Graves disease. The common characteristic of thyroid disorders is female preponderance in their prevalence. The female-to-male rate ratio is reported at 4~6:1 for AITD and about 3~4:1 for thyroid nodule. For PTC, it is greatest during reproductive age and drops from five and more in patients aged 20-24, to 3.4 in patients aged 35-44 to one in patients over 80. The effects of female gonadal hormones and X chromosome inactivation on thyroid gland and immune system greatly contribute to the female predilection of AITD. The former mainly include prolactin and estrogen. The direct actions of estrogen on the thyroid tissue contribute to the development of thyroid goiter, nodule and cancer in women.

  20. Thyroid Eye Disease: Towards an Evidence Base for Treatment in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Erin F.; Smith, Terry J.; Douglas, Raymond S.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is the most common extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves’ disease. Incomplete understanding of its pathogenesis has hindered development of targeted therapies that might alter the natural course of disease. Smoking cessation and maintenance of euthyroidism appear to reduce the rate of onset and severity of TED. Recent evidence suggests that selenium may lessen the inflammatory symptoms in mild disease. Corticosteroids remain the primary treatment for patients with moderate to severe active TED. Surgical decompression is commonly undertaken in the chronic stable phase, and only rarely in the active phase when vision is threatened by compressive optic neuropathy. Orbital radiotherapy remains an adjunctive strategy during active disease. Targeted immunotherapies have the potential to alter disease progression, but further evidence is needed to establish safety and efficacy. In this article, we review evidence from prospective therapeutic trials of several treatment modalities. We focus on moderate to severe active TED. PMID:22354545

  1. Thyroid eye disease: towards an evidence base for treatment in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Erin F; Smith, Terry J; Douglas, Raymond S

    2012-06-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is the most common extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease. Incomplete understanding of its pathogenesis has hindered development of targeted therapies that might alter the natural course of disease. Smoking cessation and maintenance of euthyroidism appear to reduce the rate of onset and severity of TED. Recent evidence suggests that selenium may lessen the inflammatory symptoms in mild disease. Corticosteroids remain the primary treatment for patients with moderate to severe active TED. Surgical decompression is commonly undertaken in the chronic stable phase, and only rarely in the active phase when vision is threatened by compressive optic neuropathy. Orbital radiotherapy remains an adjunctive strategy during active disease. Targeted immunotherapies have the potential to alter disease progression, but further evidence is needed to establish safety and efficacy. In this article, we review evidence from prospective therapeutic trials of several treatment modalities. We focus on moderate to severe active TED.

  2. An investigation into the prevalence of thyroid disease on Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, T.; Fujimori, K.; Kimura, N.

    1997-07-01

    The objective of the study was to obtain thyroid disease rate statistics on as much of the population as possible that was alive during the years of nuclear testing and to test the hypothesis that described a linearly decreasing prevalence of palpable nodules with increasing distance from the Bikini test site. 1,322 Marshallese born before 1965 were given a thyroid examination using neck palpation, fine needle aspiration biopsy, and high resolution ultrasound imaging. Approximately 40% of the total population living on this island who are at risk from exposure to radioactive fallout during the years 1946-1958 were screened. Of that group, 815 were alive at the time of the BRAVO test on 1 March 1954. Two hundred sixty-six people with thyroid nodules were found (32.6%): 132 were palpable nodules (16.2%), and 134 were nodules that could be diagnosed with ultrasound only (15.7%). Prevalence of palpable nodules was particularly high in men and women older than 60 y, in men who were 6 to 15 y of age at the time of the BRAVO test, and in women 1 to 10 y of age at the time of the BRAVO test. In 22 people, the clinical diagnosis was most likely cancer though histopathological evidence was only available from 11 operated cases. Of the 11 operated cases, 10 were cancer. Cancer prevalence was particularly high in those women born between 1944 and 1953 (7/220 = 3.2%), i.e., who were children during the early years of nuclear testing. The Ebeye data showed a marginally significant correlation between palpable nodule prevalence among women and distance to Bikini (r = -0.44, p = 0.06). This report summarizes the clinical findings of the thyroid examinations, the age distributions for nodular disease and cancer, and examines the relationship between prevalence of nodules and present day levels of {sup 137}Cs in the environment of each atoll. 22 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Possible association between thyroid autoimmunity and Menière's disease

    PubMed Central

    Fattori, B; Nacci, A; Dardano, A; Dallan, I; Grosso, M; Traino, C; Mancini, V; Ursino, F; Monzani, F

    2008-01-01

    Various aetiopathological mechanisms have been postulated to be at the root of Menière's disease (MD), and some data suggest that there may be also an underlying autoimmune factor. In fact, Menière patients manifest certain characteristics that are typical of autoimmune involvement association of particular human leucocyte antigen haplotypes, the presence of antibodies against internal ear antigens. In this study, we evaluated the association between thyroid autoimmunity and MD in a non-selected group of patients. We recruited 50 consecutive MD patients and two groups as controls: group A, 82 healthy volunteers; and group B, 50 subjects suffering from acute unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy. All subjects were submitted to instrumental assessment of cochlear–vestibular function and analysis of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, anti-TSH receptor antibody (TR-Ab), anti-thyroperoxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) and anti-thyroglobulin antibody (Tg-Ab) in the blood. The prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in group B [6/50 (12%); 66·7% TPO-Ab and 33·3% Tg-Ab] was superimposable with the healthy controls [6/82 (7%); 66·7% TPO-Ab and 33·3% Tg-Ab]. In contrast, 38% of the MD patients (P = 0·0001 versus group A and group B) had significant autoantibody levels (68·4% TPO-Ab; 15·8% TPO-Ab + TR-Ab; 10·5% Tg-Ab; 5·2% TPO-Ab + Tg-Ab). Furthermore, 14% of the MD patients were hyperthyroid under l-thyroxine therapy, while no dysfunction was seen in the control groups. Overall, our data demonstrate a significant association between MD and thyroid autoimmunity, which suggests that an autoimmune factor is involved in the aetiopathogenesis of this disease. These findings suggest that it should be useful to submit MD patients to multi-disciplinary clinical investigation. PMID:18241228

  4. Thyroid Disorders (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of thyroid disorder or thyroid disease. Hyperthyroidism (say: hi-per-THYE-roy-diz-em) happens when the ... Kids with the opposite problem have hypothyroidism (say: hi-po-THYE-roy-diz-em). In this case, ...

  5. Common genetic variants associated with thyroid function may be risk alleles for Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Purdey; Brix, Thomas H; Wilson, Scott G; Ward, Lynley C; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John P; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Walsh, John P

    2015-02-14

    Recent studies have identified common genetic variants associated with TSH, free T4 and thyroid peroxidase antibodies, but it is unclear whether these differ between patients with Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease. To examine whether 11 common genetic variants differ between Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease. We genotyped 11 common variants in a discovery cohort of 203 Australian patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Two variants with significant or suggestive associations were analysed in a replication cohort of 384 Danish patients. For rs753760 (PDE10A), the minor allele frequency in Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease was 0·38 vs. 0·23, respectively, (P = 6·42 × 10(-4) ) in the discovery cohort, 0·29 vs. 0·24 (P = 0·147) in the replication cohort and 0·32 vs. 0·24 in combined analysis (P = 0·0021; all analyses adjusted for sex). In healthy controls from Busselton, the frequency was 0·29, significantly different from Hashimoto's disease but not Graves' disease. For rs4889009 (MAF gene region), the frequency of the minor G-allele in Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease was 0·48 vs. 0·36 (P = 0·0156) in the discovery cohort, 0·48 vs. 0·34 (P = 1·83 × 10(-4) ) in the replication cohort and 0·48 vs. 0·35 in the combined analysis (P = 7·53 × 10(-6) ); in controls, the frequency was 0·38, significantly different from Graves' disease but not Hashimoto's disease. After further adjustment for smoking, associations with rs4889009 remained significant, whereas those with rs753760 were not. Common variants in PDE10A and MAF gene regions may influence whether patients with AITD develop Graves' disease or Hashimoto's disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [Clinical studies on autoimmune mechanisms of the thyroid Part II. Leucocyte migration inhibiton studies in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and in Graves' disease (author's transol)].

    PubMed

    Ikekubo, K

    1975-10-20

    The Leucocyte migration inhibiton test (LMT) using the agaraose plate technique according Clausen was performed in 19 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 23 patients with Graves' disease, and in 17 normal subjects. A series of leucocyte suspensions was preincubated at 37 degrees C for 30 min. with crude thyroid extract (Crude), purified thyroglobulin (Tg) and thyroid microsomes (Micr) in concentrations of 500, 300 and 100 muml, respectively together with phosphate buffer saline (PBS) as the control. Then, each of the aliquots of 7 mul of leucocyte suspension 1.5 million leucocytes, preincubated with various antigens of PBS, was placed into 4 wells, 2 in each of 2 agarose plates, followed by a 2nd incubation for 24 hours at 37 degrees C, in 2 per cent CO2 with 98 per cent atomospheric air, resulting in a pH of between 7.2 and 7.4. After the incubation, the migration areas were studied and measured by planimetry. The degree of migration inhibition was expressed as a migration index (MI); that is, the ratio of the average extent of migration of the leucocytes cultured with antigens to that of control. The MI values for normal subjects against Crude, Tg and Micr were 97.6 +/- 6.8 (mean +/- S.D)%, 97.8 +/- 4.2%, and 95.5 +/- 5.3%, respectively. Low MI values, below 2 S.D. of the normal, were regarded as positive results. The rate of positive LMT in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis were 32%, 46% and 31% against Crude, Tg and Micr, respectively. In Graves' disease, they were 35%, 50% and 41% for the same antigens, respectively. In 68--68% of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease, positive LMT was at least shown with one of the three antigens. In Graves' disease, there was no correlation between MI values and the presence of long acting thyroid stimulator (LATS). In untreated patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease with a short clinical course, the migration inhibiton factor against Tg or Micr was found to be positive in a

  7. Editorial: The genetic basis of autoimmune thyroid disease: Time to focus on chromosomal loci other than the major histocompatibility complex (HLA in man)

    SciTech Connect

    McLachlan, S.M. )

    1993-09-01

    Extensive investigations have demonstrated associations between autoimmune thyroid diseases and HLA but the relative risks are low. Family studies provide a powerful method of investigating genetic factors involved in disease. However, recent data suggest that HLA-region genes are unlikely to determine inheritance of autoimmune thyroid disease. 10 refs.

  8. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases. PMID:28117293

  9. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Murat

    2016-01-05

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases.

  10. Acute thyroid eye disease (TED): principles of medical and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Verity, D H; Rose, G E

    2013-03-01

    The active inflammatory phase of thyroid eye disease (TED) is mediated by the innate immune system, and management is aimed at aborting this self-limited period of autoimmune activity. In most patients with TED, ocular and adnexal changes are mild and management involves controlling thyroid dysfunction, cessation of smoking, and addressing ocular surface inflammation and exposure. In patients with acute moderate disease, this being sufficient to impair orbital functions, immunosuppression reduces the long-term sequelae of acute inflammation, and adjunctive fractionated low-dose orbital radiotherapy is used as a steroid-sparing measure. Elective surgery is often required following moderate TED, be it for proptosis, diplopia, lid retraction, or to debulk the eyelid, and this should be delayed until the disease is quiescent, with the patient stable and weaned off all immunosuppression. Thus, surgical intervention during the active phase of moderate disease is rarely indicated, although clinical experience suggests that, where there is significant orbital congestion, early orbital decompression can limit progression to more severe disease. Acute severe TED poses a major risk of irreversible loss of vision due to marked exposure keratopathy, 'hydraulic' orbital congestion, or compressive optic neuropathy. If performed promptly, retractor recession with or without a suture tarsorrhaphy protects the ocular surface from severe exposure and, in patients not responding to high-dose corticosteroid treatment, decompression of the deep medial orbital wall and floor can rapidly relieve compressive optic neuropathy, as well as alleviate the inflammatory and congestive features of raised orbital pressure.

  11. Acute thyroid eye disease (TED): Principles of medical and surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Verity, D H; Rose, G E

    2013-01-01

    The active inflammatory phase of thyroid eye disease (TED) is mediated by the innate immune system, and management is aimed at aborting this self-limited period of autoimmune activity. In most patients with TED, ocular and adnexal changes are mild and management involves controlling thyroid dysfunction, cessation of smoking, and addressing ocular surface inflammation and exposure. In patients with acute moderate disease, this being sufficient to impair orbital functions, immunosuppression reduces the long-term sequelae of acute inflammation, and adjunctive fractionated low-dose orbital radiotherapy is used as a steroid-sparing measure. Elective surgery is often required following moderate TED, be it for proptosis, diplopia, lid retraction, or to debulk the eyelid, and this should be delayed until the disease is quiescent, with the patient stable and weaned off all immunosuppression. Thus, surgical intervention during the active phase of moderate disease is rarely indicated, although clinical experience suggests that, where there is significant orbital congestion, early orbital decompression can limit progression to more severe disease. Acute severe TED poses a major risk of irreversible loss of vision due to marked exposure keratopathy, ‘hydraulic' orbital congestion, or compressive optic neuropathy. If performed promptly, retractor recession with or without a suture tarsorrhaphy protects the ocular surface from severe exposure and, in patients not responding to high-dose corticosteroid treatment, decompression of the deep medial orbital wall and floor can rapidly relieve compressive optic neuropathy, as well as alleviate the inflammatory and congestive features of raised orbital pressure. PMID:23412559

  12. The Role of the Immune Response in the Pathogenesis of Thyroid Eye Disease: A Reassessment

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, James T.; Choi, Dongseok; Wong, Amanda; Wilson, David J.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Harrington, Christina A.; Dailey, Roger A.; Ng, John D.; Steele, Eric A.; Czyz, Craig N.; Foster, Jill A.; Tse, David; Alabiad, Chris; Dubovy, Sander; Parekh, Prashant K.; Harris, Gerald J.; Kazim, Michael; Patel, Payal J.; White, Valerie A.; Dolman, Peter J.; Edward, Deepak P.; Alkatan, Hind M.; al Hussain, Hailah; Selva, Dinesh; Yeatts, R. Patrick; Korn, Bobby S.; Kikkawa, Don O.; Stauffer, Patrick; Planck, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although thyroid eye disease is a common complication of Graves’ disease, the pathogenesis of the orbital disease is poorly understood. Most authorities implicate the immune response as an important causal factor. We sought to clarify pathogenesis by using gene expression microarray. Methods An international consortium of ocular pathologists and orbital surgeons contributed formalin fixed orbital biopsies. RNA was extracted from orbital tissue from 20 healthy controls, 25 patients with thyroid eye disease (TED), 25 patients with nonspecific orbital inflammation (NSOI), 7 patients with sarcoidosis and 6 patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Tissue was divided into a discovery set and a validation set. Gene expression was quantified using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays which include 54,000 probe sets. Results Principal component analysis showed that gene expression from tissue from patients with TED more closely resembled gene expression from healthy control tissue in comparison to gene expression characteristic of sarcoidosis, NSOI, or granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Unsupervised cluster dendrograms further indicated the similarity between TED and healthy controls. Heat maps based on gene expression for cytokines, chemokines, or their receptors showed that these inflammatory markers were associated with NSOI, sarcoidosis, or GPA much more frequently than with TED. Conclusion This is the first study to compare gene expression in TED to gene expression associated with other causes of exophthalmos. The juxtaposition shows that inflammatory markers are far less characteristic of TED relative to other orbital inflammatory diseases. PMID:26371757

  13. An unusual association of three autoimmune disorders: celiac disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Boccuti, Viera; Perrone, Antonio; D'Introno, Alessia; Campobasso, Anna; Sangineto, Moris; Sabbà, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    Autoimmune disorders are known to be more frequent in women and often associated each others, but it is rare to see multiple autoimmune diseases in a single patient. Recently, the concept of multiple autoimmune syndrome has been introduced to describe patients with at least three autoimmune diseases. We describe a case of a young man with a clinical history of psychiatric symptoms and celiac disease (CD) who was diagnosed to have other two autoimmune disorders: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This case is unusual upon different patterns: the rare combination of the three autoimmune diseases, their appearance in a man and the atypical onset of the diseases with psychiatric symptoms likely to be related either to CD or to SLE.

  14. Twin studies as a model for exploring the aetiology of autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Brix, Thomas Heiberg; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2012-04-01

    Twins are an important resource for evaluating the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors in determining a phenotype. During the last decades, a number of twin studies have investigated the aetiology of several phenotypes related to thyroid autoimmunity. Taken together, these studies have provided valid and unbiased information regarding the influence of genetic and environmental factors in the aetiology of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). The comparison of concordance rates between monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic twins provides irrefutable evidence of a genetic component, and biometric